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Sample records for acid concentration particle

  1. How biogenic terpenes govern the correlation between sulfuric acid concentrations and new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonn, B.; Kulmala, M.; Riipinen, I.; Sihto, S.-L.; Ruuskanen, T. M.

    2008-06-01

    New particle formation has been observed to take place all around the world. However, because of the inability to determine the chemical composition of the smallest clusters or particles, indirect tools such as the correlation between nucleation rate and measured sulfuric acid concentrations have been used to infer the nucleation mechanism. In this study we describe the observed correlation with gaseous sulfuric acid concentrations by interactions of sesquiterpene oxidation products with sulfuric acid. Two formation pathways of nucleation initiating molecules are considered. The interaction of sulfuric acid with organic sulfates, which are formed from stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs, formed from sesquiterpenes), can be used to explain the observed squared relationship between particle formation rate and ambient sulfuric acid concentrations. The corresponding linear dependence is explained with the participation of secondary ozonides, which are formed from sCIs and aldehydes. Both pathways are negatively affected by increasing water vapor concentration as observed in recent studies. In order to check the assumptions made we apply the derived nucleation coefficients to measurements of the BACCI/QUEST IV campaign made during spring 2005 in Hyytiälä, Finland. A reasonable agreement between the measurement data and the predicted nucleation rates is found, giving support for the presented nucleation description.

  2. Observations of Sub-3 nm Particles and Sulfuric acid Concentrations during the Summer in Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Y.; Yu, H.; Weech, D.; Haller, G.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Chirokova, G.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.; McGraw, R. L.; Kanawade, V. P.; Lee, S.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles. But the NPF processes are not well understood, in part because of our limited understanding of the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm size aerosols and because of the limited number of simultaneous observations of particle size distributions and the aerosol nucleation precursors. During the 2011 (July - August) Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period in Long Island, New York, we have measured aerosol number concentrations down to 1 nm with a particle size magnifier (a new technique developed by Airmodus to detect sub-3nm particles), aerosol size distributions larger than 3 nm with a scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), and concentrations of sulfuric acid (a key aerosol precursor) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), along with a number of atmospheric trace gases and micron and sub-micron size particles. There were several different types of airmasses in our observation site during the summer, including long-range transported polluted or less polluted continental airmasses and relatively clean marine airmasses, mixed with local biogenic emissions. Our observation results show a very similar diurnal trend of sulfuric acid and total aerosol concentrations down to 1 nm during the daytime, consistent with our recent laboratory studies of sulfuric acid-ammonia-amine-water multicomponent nucleation that the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm particles is largely due to sulfuric acid. However, the rise of sub-3 nm particle concentrations didn't always lead to NPF events characterized by typical banana shaped aerosol size distributions measured by SMPS. Additionally, there were also unexpected rises of sub-3 nm particles during the nighttime, with no sulfuric acid and when there were no NPF events. These results provide unique observation data needed to understand the atmospheric NPF processes in this observation site.

  3. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P.; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEONLA-BSA, which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEONLA-BSA particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEONLA-BSA changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment. PMID:26287178

  4. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEON(LA-BSA), which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEON(LA-BSA) particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEON(LA-BSA) changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment. PMID:26287178

  5. Continuous flow dielectrophoretic particle concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Cummings, Eric B.

    2007-04-17

    A continuous-flow filter/concentrator for separating and/or concentrating particles in a fluid is disclosed. The filter is a three-port device an inlet port, an filter port and a concentrate port. The filter separates particles into two streams by the ratio of their dielectrophoretic mobility to their electrokinetic, advective, or diffusive mobility if the dominant transport mechanism is electrokinesis, advection, or diffusion, respectively.Also disclosed is a device for separating and/or concentrating particles by dielectrophoretic trapping of the particles.

  6. Speciated fine-particle (<2.5 {micro}m aerodynamic diameter) and vapor-phase acid concentrations in southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.A. Jr.; Stover, C.A.; Westerdahl, F.D.

    1998-12-31

    A fine-particle (<2.5 {micro}m aerodynamic diameter) and vapor-phase acid sampling network has been in operation among 12 communities in southern California since late 1993. The data from this network consists of concentrations of particulate matter <10 {micro}m in aerodynamic diameter (PM10), nitrogen dioxide, ozone, vapor-phase hydrochloric, nitric, acetic, and formic acids, particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5), and the chloride, nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium components of PM2.5. These measurements are the basis of the exposure assessment estimates of the Children`s Health Study, a multi-year study, mainly of lung function development and respiratory illness, taking place in southern California. One of the goals of the Children`s Health Study is to utilize a cost-effective means of obtaining continuous fine-particle and vapor-phase acid data for a multi-year study with enough time resolution to allow seasonal estimates of exposure. A two-week sampler was developed to meet these needs. Four continuous years of vapor-phase acid and PM2.5 mass, chloride, nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium data have been collected. During this time, the sampler has proven to be reliable. A decline in PM2.5 mass, nitrate, and ammonium ions in most of the communities from 1994 to 1997 was observed. In contrast, very little change in vapor-phase acids was observed. There has been increased interest at the national level in fine particles and their characteristics. The network provides a rich database that can be used to characterize southern California communities on the basis of their level of fine particles (and their components) and vapor-phase acids and should prove valuable with respect to both prospective and retrospective health studies. The database also provides a general characterization of the levels of PM2.5 affecting 25 million people in southern California.

  7. Alpha-Lipoic Acid Reduces LDL-Particle Number and PCSK9 Concentrations in High-Fat Fed Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Bradley; Wen, Shin; Zigouras, Sophia; Browne, Richard W.; Li, Zhuyun; Patel, Mulchand S.; Williamson, David L.; Rideout, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    We characterized the hypolipidemic effects of alpha-lipoic acid (LA, R-form) and examined the associated molecular mechanisms in a high fat fed Zucker rat model. Rats (n = 8) were assigned to a high fat (HF) diet or the HF diet with 0.25% LA (HF-LA) for 30 days and pair fed to remove confounding effects associated with the anorectic properties of LA. Compared with the HF controls, the HF-LA group was protected against diet-induced obesity (102.5±3.1 vs. 121.5±3.6,% change BW) and hypercholesterolemia with a reduction in total-C (−21%), non-HDL-C (−25%), LDL-C (−16%), and total LDL particle number (−46%) and an increase in total HDL particles (∼22%). This cholesterol-lowering response was associated with a reduction in plasma PCSK9 concentration (−70%) and an increase in hepatic LDLr receptor protein abundance (2 fold of HF). Compared with the HF-fed animals, livers of LA-supplemented animals were protected against TG accumulation (−46%), likely through multiple mechanisms including: a suppressed lipogenic response (down-regulation of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase expression); enhanced hepatic fat oxidation (increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase Iα expression); and enhanced VLDL export (increased hepatic diacylglycerol acyltransferase and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein expression and elevated plasma VLDL particle number). Study results also support an enhanced fatty acid uptake (2.8 fold increase in total lipase activity) and oxidation (increased CPT1β protein abundance) in muscle tissue in LA-supplemented animals compared with the HF group. In summary, in the absence of a change in caloric intake, LA was effective in protecting against hypercholesterolemia and hepatic fat accumulation under conditions of strong genetic and dietary predisposition toward obesity and dyslipidemia. PMID:24595397

  8. Observations of Sub-3 nm Particles and Sulfuric acid Concentrations during Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period 2011 in Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Kanawade, V. P.; You, Y.; Hallar, A. G.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Chirokova, G.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.; Lee, Y.; McGraw, R. L.; Mikkila, J.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles. But the NPF processes are not well understood, in part because of our limited understanding of the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm size aerosols and the limited number of simultaneous observations of particle size distributions and the aerosol nucleation precursors. During Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period (July-August 2011) in Long Island, New York, we deployed a particle size magnifier (Airmodus A09) running at different working fluid saturation ratios and a TSI CPC3776 to extract the information of sub-3 nm particles formation. A scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), and a number of atmospheric trace gas analyzers were used to simultaneously measure aerosol size distributions, sulfuric acid, and other possible aerosol precursors, respectively. Our observation results show that sub-3 nm particles existed during both NPF and non-NPF events, indicating the formation of sub-3nm particle didn't always lead to NPF characterized by typical banana shaped aerosol size distributions measured by SMPS. However, sub-3 nm particles were much higher during NPF events. Sub-3 nm particles were well-correlated with sulfuric acid showing the same diurnal variations and noontime peaks, especially for NPF days. These results are consistent with laboratory studies showing that formation of sub-3 nm particles is very sensitive to sulfuric acid (than amines and ammonia) [Yu et al. GRL 2012]. HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis indicates that air masses from Great Lakes, containing more SO2, VOCs and secondary organics, may contribute to growth of sub-3 nm particles and NPF.

  9. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3- aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Hannah M.; Draper, Danielle C.; Ayres, Benjamin R.; Ault, Andrew P.; Bondy, Amy L.; Takahama, S.; Modini, Robert; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Knote, Christoph; Laskin, Alexander; Wang, Bingbing; Fry, Juliane L.

    2015-09-25

    The inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 1 June to 15 July 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA), an ion chromatograph coupled with a wet rotating denuder and a steam-jet aerosol collector for monitoring of ambient inorganic gas and aerosol species, revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3 ) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of coarse mode mineral or sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 um) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3 and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of mineral dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. Calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3 is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral dust surface area. Modeling of NO3 and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas/aerosol phase partitioning.

  10. Oxodicarboxylic acids in atmospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römpp, Andreas; Winterhalter, Richard; Moortgat, Geert K.

    Fine mode aerosol was collected on quartz fiber filters at several sites across Europe. These samples were analyzed for carboxylic acids by liquid chromatography coupled to a hybrid (quadrupole and time-of-flight) mass spectrometer (LC/MS/MS-TOF). A series of oxodicarboxylic acids (C 7-C 11) was detected. Oxodicarboxylic acids are linear dicarboxylic acids with an additional carbonyl group. Previous measurements of these acids are scarce and their sources are largely unknown. Several structural isomers (different positions of the carbonyl group within the molecule) could be identified and differentiated by the combination of laboratory experiments and high mass accuracy measurements. The homologs with 9-11 carbon atoms were identified for the first time in atmospheric aerosol particles. The concentrations of oxodicarboxylic acids in ambient aerosol samples frequently exceeded those of the corresponding unsubstituted dicarboxylic acids. Oxodicarboxylic acids have been shown to be products of the reaction of dicarboxylic acids with OH radicals in chamber experiments and a reaction mechanism is proposed. Good correlation of oxodicarboxylic acid and hydroxyl radical concentrations was found at two measurement sites (Finland and Crete) of different geographic location and meteorological conditions. The ratios of individual isomers from the field samples are comparable to those of the laboratory experiments. The results of this study imply that the reaction of OH radicals and dicarboxylic acids is an important pathway for the production of oxodicarboxylic acids in the atmosphere. Oxodicarboxylic acids seem to be important intermediates in atmospheric oxidation processes of organic compounds.

  11. Focusing particle concentrator with application to ultrafine particles

    DOEpatents

    Hering, Susanne; Lewis, Gregory; Spielman, Steven R.

    2013-06-11

    Technology is presented for the high efficiency concentration of fine and ultrafine airborne particles into a small fraction of the sampled airflow by condensational enlargement, aerodynamic focusing and flow separation. A nozzle concentrator structure including an acceleration nozzle with a flow extraction structure may be coupled to a containment vessel. The containment vessel may include a water condensation growth tube to facilitate the concentration of ultrafine particles. The containment vessel may further include a separate carrier flow introduced at the center of the sampled flow, upstream of the acceleration nozzle of the nozzle concentrator to facilitate the separation of particle and vapor constituents.

  12. EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES (CAPS): REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies support a participation of fine particulate matter (PM) with a diameter of 0.1 to 2.5 microm in the effects of air pollution particles on human health. The ambient fine particle concentrator is a recently developed technology that can enrich the mass of ambi...

  13. g Dependent particle concentration due to sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haranas, Ioannis; Gkigkitzis, Ioannis; Zouganelis, George D.

    2012-11-01

    Sedimentation of particles in a fluid has long been used to characterize particle size distribution. Stokes' law is used to determine an unknown distribution of spherical particle sizes by measuring the time required for the particles to settle a known distance in a fluid of known viscosity and density. In this paper, we study the effects of gravity on sedimentation by examining the resulting particle concentration distributed in an equilibrium profile of concentration C m, n above the bottom of a container. This is for an experiment on the surface of the Earth and therefore the acceleration of gravity had been corrected for the oblateness of the Earth and its rotation. Next, at the orbital altitude of the spacecraft in orbit around Earth the acceleration due to the central field is corrected for the oblateness of the Earth. Our results show that for experiments taking place in circular or elliptical orbits of various inclinations around the Earth the concentration ratio C m, n / C m, ave , the inclination seems to be the most ineffective in affecting the concentration among all the orbital elements. For orbital experiment that use particles of diameter d p =0.001 μm the concentration ratios for circular and slightly elliptical orbits in the range e=0-0.1 exhibit a 0.009 % difference. The concentration ratio increases with the increase of eccentricity, which increases more for particles of larger diameters. Finally, for particles of the same diameter concentration ratios between Earth and Mars surface experiments are related in the following way C_{(m,n)_{mathit{Earth}}} = 0.99962 C_{(m,n)_{mathit{Mars}}}.

  14. Dielectrophoretic concentration of particles under electrokinetic flow

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Bettencourt, Kerry A.; Fuller, Christopher K.

    2004-09-07

    The use of dielectrophoresis to collect particles under the conditions of electrokinetically-driven flow. Dielectrophortic concentration of particles under electrokinetic flow is accomplished by interdigitated electrodes patterned on an inner surface of a microfluid channel, a DC voltage is applied across the ends to the channel, and an AC voltage is applied across the electrodes, and particles swept down the channel electrokinetically are trapped within the field established by the electrodes. The particles can be released when the voltage to the electrodes is released.

  15. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael D.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  16. Fe and S K-edge XAS determination of iron-sulfur species present in a range of acid sulfate soils: Effects of particle size and concentration on quantitative XANES determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Kate E.; Burton, Edward D.; Cook, Perran; Raven, Mark D.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.; Bush, Richard; Sullivan, Leigh A.; Hocking, Rosalie K.

    2009-11-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) are soils and soft sediments in which sulfuric acid may be produced from iron sulfides or have been produced leaving iron oxyhydroxysulfates in amounts that have a long lasting effect on soil characteristics. If soil material is exposed to rotting vegetation or other reducing material, the Fe-oxyhydroxysulfates can be bacterially reduced to sulfides including disulfides (pyrite and marcasite), and Monosulfidic Black Ooze (MBO) a poorly characterised material known to be a mixture of iron sulfides (especially mackinawite) and organic matter. The chemistry of these environments is strongly affected by Fe and S cycling processes and herein we have sought to identify key differences in environments that occur as a function of Fe and S concentration. In addition to our chemical results, we have found that the effects of particle size on self absorption in natural sediments play an important role in the spectroscopic identification of the relative proportions of different species present.

  17. Mass concentration and ion composition of coarse and fine particles in an urban area in Beirut: effect of calcium carbonate on the absorption of nitric and sulfuric acids and the depletion of chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouyoumdjian, H.; Saliba, N. A.

    2006-05-01

    Levels of coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particles were determined between February 2004 and January 2005 in the city of Beirut, Lebanon. While low PM mass concentrations were measured in the rainy season, elevated levels were detected during sand storms originating from Arabian desert and/or Africa. Using ATR-FTIR and IC, it was shown that nitrate, sulfate, carbonate and chloride were the main anionic constituents of the coarse particles, whereas sulfate was mostly predominant in the fine particles in the form of (NH4)2SO4. Ammonium nitrate was not expected to be important because the medium was defined as ammonium poor. In parallel, the cations Ca2+ and Na+ dominated in the coarse, and NH4+, Ca2+ and Na+ in the fine particles. Coarse nitrate and sulfate ions resulted from the respective reactions of nitric and sulfuric acid with a relatively high amount of calcium carbonate. Both CaCO3 and Ca(NO3)2 crystals identified by ATR-FTIR in the coarse particles were found to be resistant to soaking in water for 24 h but became water soluble when they were formed in the fine particles suggesting, thereby, different growth and adsorption phenomena. The seasonal variational study showed that nitrate and sulfate ion concentrations increased in the summer due to the enhancement of photochemical reactions which facilitated the conversion of NO2 and SO2 gases into NO3- and SO42-, respectively. While nitrate was mainly due to local heavy traffic, sulfates were due to local and long-range transport phenomena. Using the air mass trajectory HYSPLIT model, it was found that the increase in the sulfate concentration correlated with wind vectors coming from Eastern and Central Europe. Chloride levels, on the other hand, were high when wind originated from the sea and low during sand storms. In addition to sea salt, elevated levels of chloride were also attributed to waste mass burning in proximity to the site. In comparison to other neighboring Mediterranean countries, relatively

  18. Diffusion of sulfuric acid in concentrated solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Umino, S.; Newman, J. )

    1993-08-01

    Aqueous sulfuric acid is an economically important chemical reagent. It is one of the largest volume chemical commodities, finding uses in fertilizer production, petroleum refining, extraction of metals from their ores, production of inorganic pigments, pickling of iron and steel, synthesis of surface-active agents, and as a reactant in the lead-acid storage battery. The restricted diffusion method was used to measure the differential diffusion coefficient of sulfuric acid in water at 25 C for the concentration range from 0.3 to 7.5 molar. The concentration gradients of diffusing species were observed by Rayleigh interferometry. Experimental transport data are analyzed with concentrated solution theory of electrolytes in order to elucidate macroscopic transport characteristics of sulfuric acid in terms of specific binary interactions in solution. Results indicate that the transport properties of sulfuric acid are determined by the hydrogen ion-water molecule.

  19. DICARBOXYLIC ACID CONCENTRATION TRENDS AND SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This abstract describes a slide presentation on results of dicarboxylic acid concentration trends and sampling artifacts to be presented at the 2006 International Aerosol Conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research in St. Paul, Minnesota on September 10-...

  20. INDOOR CONCENTRATION MODELING OF AEROSOL STRONG ACIDITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for estimating indoor concentrations of acid aerosol was applied to data collected during the summer of 1989, in a densely populated location in New Jersey. he model, from a study of a semi-rural community in Pennsylvania, was used to estimate indoor concentrations of aer...

  1. 1- and 2-particle Microrheology of Hyaluronic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Austin; Kearns, Sarah; Ross, David; Das, Moumita; Thurston, George; Franklin, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (also called HA or Hyaluronan) is a high molecular weight polysaccaride ubiquitous in the extracellular matrix of soft tissue such as cartilage, skin, the eye's vitreous gel and synovial fluid. It has been shown to play an important role in mechanotransduction, cell migration and proliferation, and in tissue morphodynamics. We present a confocal microrheology study of hyaluronic acid of varying concentrations. The mean squared displacement (MSD) of sub-micron colloidal tracer particles is tracked in two dimensions and shows a transition from diffusive motion at low concentrations to small-time trapping by the protein network as the concentration increases. Correlations between particle motion can be used to determine an effective mean-squared displacement which deviates from the single-particle MSD as the fluid becomes less homogeneous. The real and effective mean-squared displacements are used to probe the local and space-averaged frequency dependent rheological properties of the fluid as the concentration changes.

  2. System for particle concentration and detection

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Whaley, Josh A.; Zimmerman, Mark D.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Tran, Huu M.; Maurer, Scott M.; Munslow, William D.

    2013-03-19

    A new microfluidic system comprising an automated prototype insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) triggering microfluidic device for pathogen monitoring that can eventually be run outside the laboratory in a real world environment has been used to demonstrate the feasibility of automated trapping and detection of particles. The system broadly comprised an aerosol collector for collecting air-borne particles, an iDEP chip within which to temporarily trap the collected particles and a laser and fluorescence detector with which to induce a fluorescence signal and detect a change in that signal as particles are trapped within the iDEP chip.

  3. Indoor concentration modeling of aerosol strong acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenka, M.; Waldman, J.; Suh, H.; Koutrakis, P.

    1993-01-01

    A model for estimating indoor concentrations of acid aerosol was applied to data collected during the summer of 1989, in a densely populated location in New Jersey. The model, from a study of a semi-rural community in Pennsylvania, was used to estimate indoor concentrations of aerosol strong acidity (H+) at an elderly care residence in suburban New Jersey. The purpose of the present work is to assess the applicability of the model for predicting H+ exposures in a suburban environment and to evaluate the models performance for daytime and nighttime periods. Indoor and outdoor samples were taken at an elderly care home between June 20 and July 30, 1989. The indoor and outdoor monitoring schedule collected two 12-h samples per day. Samples were taken with the Indoor Denuder Sampler (IDS). Samples were analyzed for indoor and outdoor concentrations of aerosol strong acidity (H+), ammonia (NH3), and anion determination. The model generally underestimated the indoor H+ concentration. Slight improvement was seen in the model estimate of H+ for the nighttime period (7:00 pm to 7:00 am, local time). The model applied to the site in New Jersey did not predict the indoor H+ concentrations as well as it did for the experiment from which it was developed.

  4. [Plasma amino acid concentrations in aggressive dogs].

    PubMed

    Juhr, Norbert-Christian; Brand, Ulrike; Riedel, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    Following the hypothesis that metabolic screens may be useful tools in the diagnosis of canine aggression we have investigated the blood plasma amino acid levels of dogs which have been found aggressive (N = 10) against dogs or men in comparison to non-aggressive dogs (N = 10). In summary, the aggressive dogs showed elevated plasma concentrations of the neurophysiological active aromatic amino acids tryptophan (46/171 micromol/l, p < 0,001), tyrosine (38/67 micromol/l, p < 0.01) and histidine (74/91 micromol/l, p < 0.01) and lower lysine concentrations (175/151 micromol/l, p < 0.05), which seems to point to a stress situation of these dogs. The nitrogen metabolism is impaired in the urea-cycle in the conversion of ornithine (17/34 micromol/l, p < 0.01) to citrulline (64/47 micromol/l). Higher levels of branched chain amino acids, especially leucine (122/150 micromol/l, p < 0.01), mainly metabolized in muscles, and isoleucin (60/71 micromol/l, p < 0.05) show a high energy potential. The acidose-stimulator methionine (48/78 micromol/l, p < 0.01) proved elevated. The results show that the changed behavior in the aggressive dogs is also reflected in their free amino acid plasma concentrations, independent of the question whether these data are the cause or the result of the aggressivity. PMID:15803756

  5. Sedimentation of multisized particles in concentrated suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Selim, M.S.; Kothari, A.C.; Turian, R.M.

    1983-11-01

    A model is developed for predicting the sedimentation velocity in suspensions of multisized nonflocculating solids, in which the retarding effect of the smaller particles on the setting velocities of the larger ones is taken into account. Tests of the model, and comparisons with other models, demonstrate that it provides improved prediction of data on suspensions comprising both discrete particle size mixtures and continuous size distributions, and that it is applicable to continuous countercurrent solid-liquid operations.

  6. Fatty Acids as Surfactants on Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervahattu, H.; Juhanoja, J.; Niemi, J.

    2003-12-01

    Fatty acids (n-alcanoic acids) are common compounds in numerous anthropogenic and natural emissions. According to Rogge et al. (1993), catalyst-equipped automobiles emitted more than 600 μg km-1 of fatty acids which was over 50% of all identified organics in fine aerosol emissions. Coal burning produces fatty acids ranging from about 1700 mg kg-1 for bituminous coal to over 10000 mg kg-1 for lignite (Oros and Simoneit, 2000). Similarly, biomass burning is an important source for aerosol fatty acids. They are the major identified compound group in deciduous tree smoke, their total emission factor being measured as 1589 mg kg-1 which was 56% of all identified organic compounds (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a). Large amounts of fatty acid are also emitted from burning of conifer trees and grass (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a; Simoneit, 2002). Fatty acids have been reported to be major constituents of marine aerosols in many investigations (Barger and Garrett, 1976; Gagosian et. al, 1981; Sicre et al., 1990; Stephanou, 1992). It has been suggested that as the marine aerosol particles form, they acquire a coating of organic surfactants (Blanchard, 1964; Gill et al., 1983; Middlebrook et al., 1998; Ellison et al., 1999). Amphiphilic molecules, including lipids, can be assembled as monomolecular layers at air/water interfaces as well as transported to a solid support. Recently, we could show by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry that fatty acids are important ingredients of the outermost surface layer of the sea-salt aerosol particles (Tervahattu et al., 2002). In their TOF-SIMS studies on the surface composition of atmospheric aerosols, Peterson and Tyler (2002) found fatty acids on the surface of Montana forest fire particles. In this work we have studied by TOF-SIMS the surface chemical composition of aerosol particles emitted from field fires in the Baltic and other East European countries and transported to Finland as well as aerosol particles transported from

  7. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  8. Effect of nitric acid concentrations on synthesis and stability of maghemite nanoparticles suspension.

    PubMed

    Nurdin, Irwan; Johan, Mohd Rafie; Yaacob, Iskandar Idris; Ang, Bee Chin

    2014-01-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been synthesized using a chemical coprecipitation method at different nitric acid concentrations as an oxidizing agent. Characterization of all samples performed by several techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), alternating gradient magnetometry (AGM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential. The XRD patterns confirmed that the particles were maghemite. The crystallite size of all samples decreases with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. TEM observation showed that the particles have spherical morphology with narrow particle size distribution. The particles showed superparamagnetic behavior with decreased magnetization values at the increasing concentration of nitric acid. TGA measurement showed that the stability temperature decreases with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. DLS measurement showed that the hydrodynamic particle sizes decrease with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. Zeta potential values show a decrease with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. The increasing concentration of nitric acid in synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles produced smaller size particles, lower magnetization, better thermal stability, and more stable maghemite nanoparticles suspension. PMID:24963510

  9. Effect of Nitric Acid Concentrations on Synthesis and Stability of Maghemite Nanoparticles Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Iskandar Idris

    2014-01-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been synthesized using a chemical coprecipitation method at different nitric acid concentrations as an oxidizing agent. Characterization of all samples performed by several techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), alternating gradient magnetometry (AGM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential. The XRD patterns confirmed that the particles were maghemite. The crystallite size of all samples decreases with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. TEM observation showed that the particles have spherical morphology with narrow particle size distribution. The particles showed superparamagnetic behavior with decreased magnetization values at the increasing concentration of nitric acid. TGA measurement showed that the stability temperature decreases with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. DLS measurement showed that the hydrodynamic particle sizes decrease with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. Zeta potential values show a decrease with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. The increasing concentration of nitric acid in synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles produced smaller size particles, lower magnetization, better thermal stability, and more stable maghemite nanoparticles suspension. PMID:24963510

  10. High aerosol acidity despite declining atmospheric sulfate concentrations over the past 15 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Rodney J.; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead G.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Particle acidity affects aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity. Sulfate is often the main acid component of aerosols, and largely determines the acidity of fine particles under 2.5 μm in diameter, PM2.5. Over the past 15 years, atmospheric sulfate concentrations in the southeastern United States have decreased by 70%, whereas ammonia concentrations have been steady. Similar trends are occurring in many regions globally. Aerosol ammonium nitrate concentrations were assumed to increase to compensate for decreasing sulfate, which would result from increasing neutrality. Here we use observed gas and aerosol composition, humidity, and temperature data collected at a rural southeastern US site in June and July 2013 (ref. ), and a thermodynamic model that predicts pH and the gas-particle equilibrium concentrations of inorganic species from the observations to show that PM2.5 at the site is acidic. pH buffering by partitioning of ammonia between the gas and particle phases produced a relatively constant particle pH of 0-2 throughout the 15 years of decreasing atmospheric sulfate concentrations, and little change in particle ammonium nitrate concentrations. We conclude that the reductions in aerosol acidity widely anticipated from sulfur reductions, and expected acidity-related health and climate benefits, are unlikely to occur until atmospheric sulfate concentrations reach near pre-anthropogenic levels.

  11. Electrophoretic mobility of particles in concentrated solutions of electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Deinega, Yu.F.; Polyakova, V.M.; Aleksandrova, L.N.

    1986-11-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of particles of phenol-formaldehyde and aniline-formaldehyde resins in zinc sulfate solutions has been investigated. It is shown that as the electrolyte concentration rises, the electrophoretic mobility falls, reaches a minimum, and then increases. A possible mechanism for the formation of an electric double layer on the surface of particles in concentrated solutions of electrolytes is proposed.

  12. Analysis of particle-borne odorants emitted from concentrated animal feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xufei; Lorjaroenphon, Yaowapa; Cadwallader, Keith R; Wang, Xinlei; Zhang, Yuanhui; Lee, Jongmin

    2014-08-15

    Airborne particles are known to serve as a carrier of odors emanating from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, limited quantitative data about particle-borne odorants preclude an accurate assessment of the role of particles in odor transport. This study collected total suspended particulates (TSP) and PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm) at the air exhaust of eight types of CAFOs (swine: farrowing, gestation, weaning, and finishing; poultry: manure-belt layer hen, tom turkey, chicken broiler, and cage-free layer hen; in total 20 animal buildings) in multiple seasons, and examined the variability in particle odorant composition with animal operation type, season, and particle size. Fifty-seven non-sulfur-containing odorants were identified and quantitated, including carbonyls, alcohols, acids, phenols, and nitrogen-containing compounds. They in total accounted for 2.19±1.52% TSP and 4.97±3.25% PM10 mass. Acetic acid and ethanol were most abundant but less odor-contributing than phenylacetic acid, indole, dodecanoic acid, and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, as determined by odor activity value. Particle odorant composition varied significantly with animal operation type, season, and particle size. The TSP and PM10 samples from swine gestation buildings, for example, showed distinctly different odorant compositions than those from tom turkey buildings. The summer TSP and PM10 samples contained in general lower concentrations of short-chain fatty acids but higher concentrations of long-chain fatty acids, aldehydes, and short-chain alcohols than the winter samples. Compared to TSP, PM10 samples from different types of CAFOs shared a more similar odorant composition, contained higher odorant concentrations per mass of particles, and accounted for on average 53.2% of the odor strength of their corresponding TSP samples. PMID:24863138

  13. Recovery of boric acid from evaporator concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Chrubasik, A.; Hennecke, A.; Chechelnitzky, G.M.; Kremnev, V.A.; Sinjawski, P.N.; Tevestchenko, L.J.

    1995-12-31

    The process is based on such characteristic properties of boric acid and borates as: solubility depending on pH-value; and high ion-exchange resin capacity for borates and its regeneration by means of ammonia solution. On the basis of laboratory investigations a pilot plant BOR 100 was built 1993. The operation of the pilot plant started at the beginning of 1994. After the functional test and start up in the first half year 1994 the treatment of few batches of original evaporator concentrates was performed.

  14. Sulfuric Acid and Soot Particle Formation in Aircraft Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Verma, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Howard, S. D.; Vay, S.; Kinne, S. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Dermott, P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Goodman, J.; Gore, Waren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A combination of CN counts, Ames wire impactor size analyses and optical particle counter data in aircraft exhaust results in a continuous particle size distribution between 0.01 micrometer and 1 micrometer particle radius sampled in the exhaust of a Boeing 757 research aircraft. The two orders of magnitude size range covered by the measurements correspond to 6-7 orders of magnitude particle concentration. CN counts and small particle wire impactor data determine a nucleation mode, composed of aircraft-emitted sulfuric acid aerosol, that contributes between 62% and 85% to the total aerosol surface area and between 31% and 34% to its volume. Soot aerosol comprises 0.5% of the surface area of the sulfuric acid aerosol. Emission indices are: EIH2SO4 = 0.05 g/kgFUEL and (0.2-0.5) g/kgFUEL (for 75 ppmm and 675 ppmm fuel-S, respectively), 2.5E4particles/kgFUEL (for 75 and 675 ppmm fuel-S). The sulfur (gas) to H2SO4 (particle) conversion efficiency is between 10% and 25%.

  15. Energetic particle-induced enhancements of stratospheric nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1994-01-01

    Inclusion of complete ion chemistry in the calculation of minor species production during energetic particle deposition events leads to significant enhancement in the calculated nitric acid concentration during precipitation. An ionization rate of 1.2 x 10(exp 3)/cu cm/s imposed for 1 day increases HNO3 from 3 x 10(exp 5) to 6 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm at 50 km. With an ionization rate of 600 cu cm/s, the maximum HNO3 is 3 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. Calculations which neglect negative ions predict the nitric acid will fall during precipitation events. The decay time for converting HNO3 into odd nitrogen and hydrogen is more than 1 day for equinoctial periods at 70 deg latitude. Examination of nitric acid data should yield important information on the magnitude and frequency of charged particle events.

  16. Vertical particle concentration profiles around urban office buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, T. N.; He, C.; Morawska, L.; Knibbs, L. D.; Falk, M.

    2012-06-01

    Despite its role in determining both indoor and outdoor human exposure to anthropogenic particles, there is limited information describing vertical profiles of particle concentrations in urban environments, especially for ultrafine particles. Furthermore, the results of the few studies performed have been inconsistent. As such, this study aimed to assess the influence of vehicle emissions and nucleation formation on particle characteristics (particle number size distribution - PNSD and PM2.5 concentration) at different heights around three urban office buildings located next to busy roads in Brisbane, Australia, and place these results in the broader context of the existing literature. Two sets of instruments were used to simultaneously measure PNSD, particle number (PN) and PM2.5 concentrations, respectively, for up to three weeks at each building. The results showed that both PNSD and PM2.5 concentration around building envelopes were influenced by vehicle emissions and new particle formation, and that they exhibited variability across the three different office buildings. During nucleation events, PN concentration in size range of <30 nm and total PN concentration increased (7-65% and 5-46%, respectively), while PM2.5 concentration decreased (36-52%) with height. This study has shown an under acknowledged role for nucleation in producing particles that can affect large numbers of people, due to the high density and occupancy of urban office buildings and the fact that the vast majority of people's time is spent indoors. These findings highlight important new information related to the previously overlooked role of particle formation in the urban atmosphere and its potential effects on selection of air intake locations and appropriate filter types when designing or upgrading mechanical ventilation systems in urban office buildings. The results also serve to better define particle behaviour and variability around building envelopes, which has implications for

  17. Airborne particle concentrations at schools measured at different spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Fuoco, F. C.; Morawska, L.; Stabile, L.

    2013-03-01

    Potential adverse effects on children health may result from school exposure to airborne particles. To address this issue, measurements in terms of particle number concentration, particle size distribution and black carbon (BC) concentrations were performed in three school buildings in Cassino (Italy) and its suburbs, outside and inside of the classrooms during normal occupancy and use. Additional time resolved information was gathered on ventilation condition, classroom activity, and traffic count data around the schools were obtained using a video camera. Across the three investigated school buildings, the outdoor and indoor particle number concentration monitored down to 4 nm and up to 3 μm ranged from 2.8 × 104 part cm-3 to 4.7 × 104 part cm-3 and from 2.0 × 104 part cm-3 to 3.5 × 104 part cm-3, respectively. The total particle concentrations were usually higher outdoors than indoors, because no indoor sources were detected. I/O measured was less than 1 (varying in a relatively narrow range from 0.63 to 0.74), however one school exhibited indoor concentrations higher than outdoor during the morning rush hours. Particle size distribution at the outdoor site showed high particle concentrations in different size ranges, varying during the day; in relation to the starting and finishing of school time two modes were found. BC concentrations were 5 times higher at the urban school compared with the suburban and suburban-to-urban differences were larger than the relative differences of ultrafine particle concentrations.

  18. Micelles Protect and Concentrate Activated Acetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Zoe; House, C.

    2014-01-01

    As more and more exoplanets are discovered and the habitability of such planets is considered, one can turn to searching for the origin of life on Earth in order to better understand what makes a habitable planet. Activated acetic acid, or methyl thioacetate, has been proposed to be central to the origin of life on Earth, and also as an important energy currency molecule in early cellular evolution. We have investigated the hydrolysis of methyl thioacetate under various conditions. Its uncatalyzed rate of hydrolysis is about three orders of magnitude faster (K = 0.00663 s^-1; 100°C, pH 7.5, concentration = 0.33mM) than published rates for its catalyzed production making it unlikely to accumulate under prebiotic conditions. However, we also observed that methyl thioacetate was protected from hydrolysis when inside its own hydrophobic droplets. We found that methyl thioacetate protection from hydrolysis was also possible in droplets of hexane and in the membranes of nonanoic acid micelles. Thus, the hydrophobic regions of prebiotic micelles and early cell membranes could have offered a refuge for this energetic molecule increasing its lifetime in close proximity to the reactions for which it would be needed. Methyl thioacetate could thus be important for the origin of life on Earth and perhaps for better understanding the potential habitability of other planets.

  19. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  20. The Effect of Particle Concentration on the Heating Rate of Ferrofluids for Magnetic Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaescu, I.; Marin, C. N.; Bunoiu, M.; Fannin, P. C.; Stefu, N.; Iordaconiu, L.

    2015-12-01

    The complex magnetic susceptibility χ(f) = χ'(f) - i χ″(f), of a ferrofluid sample with magnetite particles dispersed in kerosene and stabilized with oleic acid, over the range 0.1 GHz to 6 GHz, was determined. The initial sample has been successively diluted with kerosene (with a dilution rate of 2/3), thus obtaining further three samples. Using the complex magnetic susceptibility measurements of each sample, the frequency field and particle concentration dependencies of the heating rate of the ferrofluid samples, were analyzed. The results show the possibility of using the heating rate of ferrofluid samples with different particle concentrations, in hyperthermia applications.

  1. Number concentrations of fine and ultrafine particles containing metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolocka, Michael P.; Lake, Derek A.; Johnston, Murray V.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    Typical classification schemes for large data sets of single-particle mass spectra involve statistical or neural network analysis. In this work, a new approach is evaluated in which particle spectra are pre-selected on the basis of an above threshold signal intensity at a specified m/ z (mass to charge ratio). This provides a simple way to identify candidate particles that may contain the specific chemical component associated with that m/ z. Once selected, the candidate particle spectra are then classified by the fast adaptive resonance algorithm, ART 2-a, to confirm the presence of the targeted component in the particle and to study the intra-particle associations with other chemical components. This approach is used to characterize metals in a 75,000 particle data set obtained in Baltimore, Maryland. Particles containing a specific metal are identified and then used to determine the size distribution, number concentration, time/wind dependencies and intra-particle correlations with other metals. Four representative elements are considered in this study: vanadium, iron, arsenic and lead. Number concentrations of ambient particles containing these elements can exceed 10,000 particles cm -3 at the measurement site. Vanadium, a primary marker for fuel oil combustion, is observed from all wind directions during this time period. Iron and lead are observed from the east-northeast. Most particles from this direction that contain iron also contain lead and most particles that contain lead also contain iron, suggesting a common emission source for the two. Arsenic and lead are observed from the south-southeast. Particles from this direction contain either arsenic or lead but rarely both, suggesting different sources for each element.

  2. Source contributions to atmospheric fine carbon particle concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew Gray, H.; Cass, Glen R.

    A Lagrangian particle-in-cell air quality model has been developed that facilitates the study of source contributions to atmospheric fine elemental carbon and fine primary total carbon particle concentrations. Model performance was tested using spatially and temporally resolved emissions and air quality data gathered for this purpose in the Los Angeles area for the year 1982. It was shown that black elemental carbon (EC) particle concentrations in that city were dominated by emissions from diesel engines including both on-highway and off-highway applications. Fine primary total carbon particle concentrations (TC=EC+organic carbon) resulted from the accumulation of small increments from a great variety of emission source types including both gasoline and diesel powered highway vehicles, stationary source fuel oil and gas combustion, industrial processes, paved road dust, fireplaces, cigarettes and food cooking (e.g. charbroilers). Strategies for black elemental carbon particle concentration control will of necessity need to focus on diesel engines, while controls directed at total carbon particle concentrations will have to be diversified over a great many source types.

  3. Application of Medical Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Particle Concentration Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borup, Daniel; Elkins, Christopher; Eaton, John

    2014-11-01

    Particle transport and deposition in internal flows is important in a range of applications such as dust aggregation in turbine engines and aerosolized medicine deposition in human airways. Unlike optical techniques, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is well suited for complex applications in which optical access is not possible. Here we present efforts to measure 3D particle concentration distribution using MRI. Glass particles dispersed in water flow reduce MRI signal from a spin-echo or gradient-echo scanning sequence by decreasing spin density and dephasing the spins present in the fluid. A preliminary experiment was conducted with a particle streak injected at the centerline of a turbulent round pipe flow with a U bend. Measurements confirmed that signal strength was related to particle concentration and showed the effects of gravitational settling and turbulent dispersion. Next, measurements of samples in a mixing chamber were taken. Particle volume fraction was varied and sensitivity to particle/fluid velocity was investigated. These results give a relationship between MRI signal, particle volume fraction, MRI sequence echo time, and spin relaxation parameters that can be used to measure local particle volume fraction in other turbulent flows of interest.

  4. [Ultrafine particle number concentration and size distribution of vehicle exhaust ultrafine particles].

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye-qiang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Sun, Zai; Cai, Zhi-liang; Yang, Wen-jun

    2014-09-01

    Ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations obtained from three different vehicles were measured using fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) and automobile exhaust gas analyzer. UFP number concentration and size distribution were studied at different idle driving speeds. The results showed that at a low idle speed of 800 rmin-1 , the emission particle number concentration was the lowest and showed a increasing trend with the increase of idle speed. The majority of exhaust particles were in Nuclear mode and Aitken mode. The peak sizes were dominated by 10 nm and 50 nm. Particle number concentration showed a significantly sharp increase during the vehicle acceleration process, and was then kept stable when the speed was stable. In the range of 0. 4 m axial distance from the end of the exhaust pipe, the particle number concentration decayed rapidly after dilution, but it was not obvious in the range of 0. 4-1 m. The number concentration was larger than the background concentration. Concentration of exhaust emissions such as CO, HC and NO showed a reducing trend with the increase of idle speed,which was in contrast to the emission trend of particle number concentration. PMID:25518646

  5. Continuum modeling of hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions in microfluidic high-concentration suspensions.

    PubMed

    Ley, Mikkel W H; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-03-23

    A continuum model is established for numerical studies of hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions in microfluidic high-concentration suspensions. A suspension of microparticles placed in a microfluidic channel and influenced by an external force, is described by a continuous particle-concentration field coupled to the continuity and Navier-Stokes equation for the solution. The hydrodynamic interactions are accounted for through the concentration dependence of the suspension viscosity, of the single-particle mobility, and of the momentum transfer from the particles to the suspension. The model is applied on a magnetophoretic and an acoustophoretic system, respectively, and based on the results, we illustrate three main points: (1) for relative particle-to-fluid volume fractions greater than 0.01, the hydrodynamic interaction effects become important through a decreased particle mobility and an increased suspension viscosity. (2) At these high particle concentrations, particle-induced flow rolls occur, which can lead to significant deviations of the advective particle transport relative to that of dilute suspensions. (3) Which interaction mechanism that dominates, depends on the specific flow geometry and the specific external force acting on the particles. PMID:26948344

  6. Preferrential Concentration of Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Preferential concentration in turbulence is a process that causes inertial particles to cluster in regions of high strain (in-between high vorticity regions), with specifics depending on their stopping time or Stokes number. This process is thought to be of importance in various problems including cloud droplet formation and aerosol transport in the atmosphere, sprays, and also in the formation of asteroids and comets in protoplanetary nebulae. In protoplanetary nebulae, the initial accretion of primitive bodies from freely-floating particles remains a problematic subject. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] in turbulent nebulae. One scenario that can lead directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects, avoiding the problematic m-km size range, involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in protoplanetary turbulence. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles generally known as "chondrules" [2]. Thus, while it is arcane, turbulent preferential concentration acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. Here, we present the statistical determination of particle multiplier distributions from numerical simulations of particle-laden isotopic turbulence, and a cascade model for modeling turbulent concentration at lengthscales and Reynolds numbers not accessible by numerical simulations. We find that the multiplier distributions are scale dependent at the very largest scales but have scale-invariant properties under a particular variable normalization at smaller scales.

  7. Preferential concentration of heavy particles in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Liu, Han; Ma, Zongqiang; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of particle-laden compressible isotropic turbulence with Taylor Reynolds number Reλ ˜ 100 are conducted by using a high-order turbulence solver, which is based on high-order compact finite difference method in the whole flow domain and localized artificial diffusivities for discontinuities. For simplicity, only one-way coupling (i.e., the influence of fluid on particles) between the carrier flow and particles is considered. The focus is on the study of the preferential concentration of heavy particles in dissipative scale of turbulence and the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, the effect of Stokes number (St) on the particle distribution in flow of Mach 1.01 (referred to as high-Mach-number case in this study) is investigated as a necessary supplementation for the previous studies in incompressible and weakly compressible flows. It turns out that heavy particles with Stokes number close to unity exhibit the strongest preferential concentration, which is in agreement with the observation in incompressible flow. All types of heavy particles have a tendency to accumulate in high-density regions of the background flow. While all kinds of particles dominantly collect in low-vorticity regions, intermediate and large particles (St = 1 and St = 5) are also found to collect in high-vorticity regions behind the randomly formed shocklets. Secondly, the impact of turbulent Mach number (Mt) (or the compressibility) of the carrier flow on the spatial distribution of the particles with St = 1 is discussed using the simulated compressible flows with Mt being 0.22, 0.68, and 1.01, respectively. In low-Mach-number flow, particles tend to concentrate in regions of low vorticity due to the centrifuge effect of vortices and particle concentration decreases monotonically with the increasing vorticity magnitude. As Mach number increases, the degree of particle clustering is slightly weakened in low-vorticity regions but is enhanced in high-vorticity regions, which

  8. Opposed-flow virtual cyclone for particle concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, Daniel J.; Torczynski, John R.

    2000-12-05

    An opposed-flow virtual cyclone for aerosol collation which can accurately collect, classify, and concentrate (enrich) particles in a specific size range. The opposed-flow virtual cyclone is a variation on the virtual cyclone and has its inherent advantages (no-impact particle separation in a simple geometry), while providing a more robust design for concentrating particles in a flow-through type system. The opposed-flow virtual cyclone consists of two geometrically similar virtual cyclones arranged such that their inlet jets are inwardly directed and symmetrically opposed relative to a plane of symmetry located between the two inlet slits. A top plate bounds both jets on the "top" side of the inlets, while the other or lower wall curves "down" and away from each inlet jet. Each inlet jet will follow the adjacent lower wall as it turns away, and that particles will be transferred away from the wall and towards the symmetry plane by centrifugal action. After turning, the two jets merge smoothly along the symmetry line and flow parallel to it through the throat. Particles are transferred from the main flows, across a dividing streamline, and into a central recirculating region, where particle concentrations become greatly increased relative to the main stream.

  9. Quantum states of two particles on concentric spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezra, Gregory S.; Berry, R. Stephen

    1983-10-01

    The model of two particles on a sphere is extended to two particles on concentric spheres (POCS). The quantum states are found for two electrons, one on a sphere of radius 10 a.u. (simulating the shell n=3 in He) and the other, on spheres of 10, 15, 25, 50, and 100 a.u. The eigenvalues and densities ρ(θ12) exhibit a transition from collective, moleculelike behavior to independent-particle-like behavior with Russell-Saunders coupling. The parallel problem of two particles with electron masses interacting via a repulsive Gaussian potential is also treated and a similar transition from collective to independent-particle behavior found. The principal difference between the two cases is only the region of radius of the larger sphere where the transition occurs.

  10. Hyperammonemia Associated with Valproic Acid Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Alvariza, Silvana; Magallanes, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid, a branched short-chain fatty acid, has numerous action mechanisms which turn it into a broad spectrum anticonvulsant drug and make its use possible in some other pathologies such as bipolar disorder. It is extensively metabolized in liver, representing β-oxidation in the mitochondria one of its main metabolic route (40%). Carnitine is responsible for its entry into the mitochondria as any other fatty acid. Long-term high-dose VPA therapy or acute VPA overdose induces carnitine depletion, resulting in high levels of ammonia in blood. As a high correlation between salivary valproic acid levels and plasma ultrafiltrate levels was found in humans, saliva becomes a promising monitoring fluid in order to study valproic acid pharmacokinetics and its toxic effect. Extended-release (twice daily) formulations of valproic acid or carnitine supplementation are the proposed two therapeutic strategies in order to reverse hyperammonemia. PMID:24868521

  11. Temporal variations of airborne particles concentration in the Brussels environment.

    PubMed

    Vanderstraeten, P; Lénelle, Y; Meurrens, A; Carati, D; Brenig, L; Offer, Z Y

    2007-09-01

    We report and analyze data on the PM10 fraction of airborne particles measured at five recording stations in the Brussels region from October 2002 till September 2003. These stations are representative of the various activity sectors of the Brussels urban area. The objective was the determination of the origin of the PM10 particles (particles up to 10 mum) that are recorded in that region in order to follow the EU directives concerning tolerance level of airborne particles concentration. In order to evaluate the impacts of local and external factors that inject solid particles in the atmosphere of Brussels we compared concentration data from working and not working (holidays) periods. Moreover, we also compared concentrations from periods of agricultural activity and rest in the Brabant provinces surrounding the Brussels region for various crop types. The results lead to the conclusion that the impact or urban traffic is rather limited while that of the agricultural activities is important. Moreover, there appears a clear-cut distinction between different types of crops. PMID:17180416

  12. PARTICLE ASSOCIATION EFFECTS ON MICROBIAL INDICATOR CONCENTRATIONS FOR CSO DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of blending on indicator microorganism concentrations in combined sewer overflow (CSO) was investigated due to concerns that standard techniques fail to measure particle-associated organisms found in sewage. It was shown that blending CSO samples diluted in a mixture ...

  13. Acoustic Measurement of Suspended Fine Particle Concentrations by Attenuation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of sediment concentration is important in the study of streams and rivers. The work presented explores the appropriate frequency and transducer spacing for acoustic measurement of suspended particles in the range of 0.1 – 64 microns. High frequency (20 MHz) acoustic signal attenuation wa...

  14. Modeling the effect of outdoor particle concentrations on indoor concentrations in a heated environment

    SciTech Connect

    Pandian, M.D. )

    1988-01-01

    Exposure to suspended particulate mater in the home or workplace can produce adverse human health effects. Sources of suspended particulate matter include cigarette smoke, consumer spray products, and dust from cement manufacture, metal processing, and coal-fired power generation. The particle concentrations in these indoor environments can be determined from experimental studies or modeling techniques. Many experimental studies have been conducted to determine the mass concentration of total suspended particulate matter, usually expressed in {mu}g/m{sup 3}, and the elemental composition of particulate matter in these environments. However, there is not much reported data on particle size distributions in indoor environments. One of the early indoor modeling efforts was undertaken by Shair and Heitner, who conducted a theoretical analysis for relating indoor pollutant concentrations to those outdoors. The author describes the theoretical analysis and compared it to results obtained from experiments on conditioned cigarette smoke particle concentrations in a room at 20{degrees}C and 60 {percent}.

  15. System for concentrating and analyzing particles suspended in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Cummings, Eric B.; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-04-26

    Disclosed is a device for separating and concentrating particles suspended in a fluid stream by using dielectrophoresis (DEP) to trap and/or deflect those particles as they migrate through a fluid channel. The method uses fluid channels designed to constrain a liquid flowing through it to uniform electrokinetic flow velocities. This behavior is achieved by connecting deep and shallow sections of channels, with the channel depth varying abruptly along an interface. By careful design of abrupt changes in specific permeability at the interface, an abrupt and spatially uniform change in electrokinetic force can be selected. Because these abrupt interfaces also cause a sharp gradient in applied electric fields, a DEP force also can be established along the interface. Depending on the complex conductivity of the suspended particles and the immersion liquid, the DEP force can controllably complement or oppose the local electrokinetic force transporting the fluid through the channel allowing for manipulation of particles suspended in the transporting liquid.

  16. Determination of Solid Particle Concentration at coal Transshipment site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siliņš, K.; Žandeckis, A.; Valtere, S.

    2009-01-01

    Coal handling and grinding processes are associated with significant particulate matter emissions into the atmosphere. This problem is particularly urgent when a coal-processing company is located in or nearby a densely populated city. To quantitatively evaluate concentrations generated into the atmosphere according to the standardized methodology, it is necessary to make extensive measurements using an automatic real-time, infrared dust and aerosol monitor. Before the experiments, the impact of particulate matter on human health and the environment was explored, six solid particle concentration detection methods and best available techniques for particulate matter emission prevention was described. During this study field measurements were carried out at on the territory of a coal transshipment company. Using the solid particle concentration detection system Dust Detective kit, concentration monitoring of total particulate matter (TSP), PM10 and PM2.5 was carried out. The equipment was located 6 m above ground and 120 m away from the emission source - coal crushing and handling site. TSP monitoring was carried out during four diurnal, PM10 - during 17 diunral and PM2.5 - during 12 days. After comparison of results with concentration values set in normative documents of Latvia and EU, it was found out that average 17 diurnal day concentration values of PM10 exceeded normative values for nine times. PM2.5 daily average concentrations of 12 days exceeded for four times exceeded the value of 25 μg/m3, which is mentioned in Directive 2008/50/EC of EU. After analysis of wind behaviour impact on the concentration values it is now understood that if wind comes from the dust emission source to the measurement system, the increase in wind speed increases particle concentration as all particles in the air and those raised from coal piles are driven towards the equipment. If wind comes from the opposite direction, the decrease of wind velocity results in an increase of

  17. Water and acid soluble trace metals in atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, S. E.; Harriss, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Continental aerosols are collected above a deciduous forest in eastern Tennessee and subjected to selective extractions to determine the water-soluble and acid-leachable concentrations of Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn. The combined contributions of these metals to the total aerosol mass is 0.5 percent, with approximately 70 percent of this attributable to Pb alone. A substantial fraction (approximately 50 percent or more) of the acid-leachable metals is soluble in distilled water. In general, this water-soluble fraction increases with decreasing particle size and with increasing frequency of atmospheric water vapor saturation during the sampling period. The pattern of relative solubilities (Zn being greater than Mn, which is approximately equal to Cd, which is greater than Pb) is found to be similar to the general order of the thermodynamic solubilities of the most probable salts of these elements in continental aerosols with mixed fossil fuel and soil sources.

  18. The influence of particle clustering on the rheological properties of highly concentrated magnetic nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Susan-Resiga, Daniela; Socoliuc, V; Boros, T; Borbáth, Tunde; Marinica, Oana; Han, Adelina; Vékás, L

    2012-05-01

    In this paper the particle volume fraction and temperature dependence of the dynamic viscosity of highly concentrated transformer oil based magnetic nanofluids was investigated in the absence of an external magnetic field. The solid particle volume fraction dependence of the relative viscosity was found to be very well fitted by the Krieger-Dougherty formula, whence the mean ellipticity of the colloidal particles and the effective surfactant layer thickness were obtained. Using the information on the particles' size and shape statistics obtained from TEM, DLS and magnetogranulometry investigations, it was concluded that the magnetite nanoparticles agglomerate in small clusters of about 1.3 particles/cluster, due to the van der Waals interactions. The effective thickness of the oleic acid surfactant layer was estimated as about 1.4 nm, in very good agreement with the value resulted from previous SANS investigations. PMID:22134213

  19. Coulombic wall slip of concentrated soft-particle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Michael; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhibing; Fryer, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The coefficients of friction of concentrated soft-particle suspensions (tomato paste and a microgel suspension) were measured as a function of the slip velocity for a number of substrates. The data are interpreted using a micro-elastohydrodynamic model that is consistent with significant bulk frictional dissipation and an increase in the number of particle-wall contacts with increasing normal stress. The origin of the Coulombic slip, which has not been observed previously for pastes, is ascribed to the sensitivity of the lubricating film thickness.

  20. Genesis Concentrator Target Particle Contamination Mapping and Material Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of surface particles were found to be < 5 microns in diameter with increasing numbers close to the optical resolution limit of 0.3 microns. Acceleration grid EDS results show that the majority of materials appear to be from the SRC shell and SLA materials which include carbon-carbon fibers and Si-rich microspheres in a possible silicone binder. Other major debris material from the SRC included white paint, kapton, collector array fragments, and Al. Image analysis also revealed that SRC materials were also found mixed with the Utah mud and salt deposits. The EDS analysis of the acceleration grid showed that particles < 1 m where generally carbon based particles. Chemical cleaning techniques with Xylene and HF in an ultrasonic bath are currently being investigated for removal of small particles by the Genesis science team as well as ultra-pure water megasonic cleaning by the JSC team [4]. Removal of organic contamination from target materials is also being investigated by the science team with the use of UV-ozone cleaning devices at JSC and Open University [5]. In preparation for solar wind oxygen analyses at UCLA and Open University [1, 2], surface particle contamination on three Genesis concentrator targets was closely examined to evaluate cleaning strategies. Two silicon carbide (Genesis sample # 60001 and 60003) and one chemical vapor deposited (CVD) 13C concentrator target (60002) were imaged and mosaic mapped with optical microscopes. The resulting full target mosaic images and particle feature maps were subsequently compared with non-flight, but flight-like, concentrator targets and sample return capsule (SRC) materials. Contamination found on the flown concentrator acceleration grid was further examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for particle identification was subsequently compared with the optical images from the flown targets. Figure 1 show that all three targets imaged in this report

  1. DICARBOXYLIC ACID CONCENTRATION TRENDS AND SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dicarboxylic acids associated with airborne particulate matter were measured during a summer period in Philadelphia that included multiple air pollution episodes. Samples were collected for two ten hour periods each day using a high volume sampler with two quartz fiber filters in...

  2. Evaluation of the performance of a particle concentrator for online instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saarikoski, S.; Carbone, S.; Cubison, M. J.; Hillamo, R.; Keronen, P.; Sioutas, C.; Worsnop, D. R.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-07-01

    The performance of the miniature Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (m-VACES; Geller et al., 2005) was investigated in laboratory and field studies using online instruments. Laboratory tests focused on the behavior of monodisperse ammonium sulfate (AS) or dioctyl sebacate (DOS) particles in the m-VACES measured with the aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). The ambient measurements were conducted at an urban site in Helsinki, Finland, where the operation of the m-VACES was explored in conjunction with a Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) in addition to the SMPS. In laboratory tests, the growth of particles in water vapor produced a stable droplet size distribution independent of the original particle size. However, when the droplets were dried with the goal of measuring the original size distribution, a shift to larger particles was observed for small particle sizes (up to ~ 200 nm in mobility diameter). That growth was probably caused by water-soluble organic compounds absorbed on the water droplets from the gas phase, but not evaporated in the drying phase. In ambient measurements, a similar enrichment was observed for nitrate and sulfate in the m-VACES whereas the presence of acidic ambient particles affected the enrichment of ammonium. Gaseous ammonia was likely to be absorbed on acidic particles in the m-VACES, neutralizing the aerosol. For organics, the enrichment efficiency was comparable with sulfate and nitrate but a small positive artifact for hydrocarbons and nitrogen-containing organic compounds was noticed. Ambient and concentrated organic aerosol (OA) was analyzed further with positive matrix factorization (PMF). A three-factor solution was chosen for both of the data sets but the factors were slightly different for the ambient and concentrated OA, however, the data set used for the PMF analysis was limited in size (3 days) and therefore had substantial uncertainty. Overall, the

  3. Solubility series of methanofullerenes in concentrated sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biglova, Yu. N.; Kolesov, S. V.; Biglova, R. Z.; Kraikin, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    A spectroscopic study of the dissolution of C60 and its monosubstituted derivatives methanofullerenes in 98% sulfuric acid revealed that methanofullerenes dissolved in sulfuric acid much better than the starting C60. A solubility series of functionalized fullerenes was obtained, which did not change during the extraction of methanofullerenes with sulfuric acid from benzene solutions. An effective methods was developed for separating methanofullerenes, which is based on the difference between the solubilities of the starting and functionalized fullerenes in concentrated sulfuric acid.

  4. Field evaluation of nanofilm detectors for measuring acidic particles in indoor and outdoor air.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beverly S; Heikkinen, Maire S A; Hazi, Yair; Gao, Hai; Peters, Paul; Lippmann, Morton

    2004-09-01

    This field evaluation study was conducted to assess new technology designed to measure number concentrations of strongly acidic ultrafine particles. Interest in these particles derives from their potential to cause adverse health effects. Current methods for counting and sizing airborne ultrafine particles cannot isolate those particles that are acidic. We hypothesized that the size-resolved number concentration of such particles to which people are exposed could be measured by newly developed iron nanofilm detectors on which sulfuric acid (H2SO4*) droplets produce distinctive ringed reaction sites visible by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We carried out field measurements using an array of samplers, with and without the iron nanofilm detectors, that allowed indirect comparison of particle number concentrations and size-resolved measures of acidity. The iron nanofilm detectors are silicon chips (5 mm x 5 mm x 0.6 mm) that are coated with iron by vapor deposition. The iron layer was 21.5 or 26 nm thick for the two batches used in these experiments. After exposure the detector surface was scanned topographically by AFM to view and enumerate the ringed acid reaction sites and deposited nonacidic particles. The number of reaction sites and particles per scan can be counted directly on the image displayed by AFM. Sizes can also be measured, but for this research we did not size particles collected in the field. The integrity of the surface of iron nanofilm detectors was monitored by laboratory analysis and by deploying blank detectors and detectors that had previously been exposed to H2SO4 calibration aerosols. The work established that the detectors could be used with confidence in temperate climates. Under extreme high humidity and high temperature, the surface film was liable to detach from the support, but remaining portions of the film still produced reliable data. Exposure to ambient gases in a filtered air canister during the field tests did not affect the film

  5. Computation of Concentric Shell Particle Scattering Effects in Jovian Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Patrick M.; Sromovsky, Lawrence A.

    2014-11-01

    From analysis of NIMS and ISO spectra of Jupiter Sromovsky and Fry (2010, Icarus 210, 211-229; 2010, Icarus 210, 230-257) concluded that both NH3 and NH4SH were present near the visible cloud tops, probably in the form of composite particles. Composite particles were also suggested from analysis of VIMS spectra of Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011 by Sromovsky et al. (2013, Icarus 226, 402-418), in this case concentric shells of H2O, NH4SH, and NH3. These results and suggestions that coatings of various materials might be capable of hiding NH3 spectral features on Jupiter, such as by Atreya et al. (2005, Planet. Space Sci. 53, 498-507), have raised interest in and a need for modeling of scattering properties of complex composite particles. Since many of the particle sizes inferred for composite particles are below or close to the range near 1 μm where particle shape has less impact on near IR spectral features (Clapp and Miller, 1993, Icarus 105, 529-536), concentric shell codes have considerable relevance to modeling of composite particles. Here we report on two codes: one fast code (Toon and Ackerman, 1981, Applied Optics 20, No. 20, 3657-3660) that is capable of handling a core and shell of different materials, and a slower code (Pena and Pal, 2009, Computer Physics Comm., 180, 2348-2354) that can handle an arbitrary number of layers. Typical times to calculate a phase function for a wide size distribution (gamma distribution with normalized variance of 0.1) for the faster core/shell code are about 0.75 seconds per wavelength. The newer slower, but more versatile, code runs about 10X slower, and will typically double or triple the execution time of our multiple scattering code when it is incorporated. Optimizing integration over particle size distributions to achieve suitable accuracy can minimize computational costs; we have therefore determined a rule for the number of intervals in the size distribution. Sample calculations will be presented to show effects

  6. Effect of precursor concentration and spray pyrolysis temperature upon hydroxyapatite particle size and density.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jeong-Cheol; Rhee, Sang-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    In the synthesis of hydroxyapatite powders by spray pyrolysis, control of the particle size was investigated by varying the initial concentration of the precursor solution and the pyrolysis temperature. Calcium phosphate solutions (Ca/P ratio of 1.67) with a range of concentrations from 0.1 to 2.0 mol/L were prepared by dissolving calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and diammonium hydrogen phosphate in deionized water and subsequently adding nitric acid. Hydroxyapatite powders were then synthesized by spray pyrolysis at 900°C and at 1500°C, using these calcium phosphate precursor solutions, under the fixed carrier gas flow rate of 10 L/min. The particle size decreased as the precursor concentration decreased and the spray pyrolysis temperature increased. Sinterability tests conducted at 1100°C for 1 h showed that the smaller and denser the particles were, the higher the relative densities were of sintered hydroxyapatite disks formed from these particles. The practical implication of these results is that highly sinterable small and dense hydroxyapatite particles can be synthesized by means of spray pyrolysis using a low-concentration precursor solution and a high pyrolysis temperature under a fixed carrier gas flow rate. PMID:25891158

  7. Outdoor ultrafine particle concentrations in front of fast food restaurants.

    PubMed

    Vert, Cristina; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been associated with negative effects on human health. Emissions from motor vehicles are the principal source of UFPs in urban air. A study in Vancouver suggested that UFP concentrations were related to density of fast food restaurants near the monitoring sites. A previous monitoring campaign could not separate the contribution of restaurants from road traffic. The main goal of this study has been the quantification of fast food restaurants' contribution to outdoor UFP concentrations. A portable particle number counter (DiscMini) has been used to carry out mobile monitoring in a largely pedestrianized area in the city center of Utrecht. A fixed route passing 17 fast food restaurants was followed on 8 days. UFP concentrations in front of the restaurants were 1.61 times higher than in a nearby square without any local sources used as control area and 1.22 times higher compared with all measurements conducted in between the restaurants. Adjustment for other sources such as passing mopeds, smokers or candles did not explain the increase. In conclusion, fast food restaurants result in significant increases in outdoor UFP concentrations in front of the restaurant. PMID:26531805

  8. PROTOTYPE CONCENTRATION MONITOR FOR ESTIMATING ACIDIC DRY DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dry deposition contributes significantly to the acidification of the ecosystem. However, difficulties in measuring dry deposition of reactive gases and fine particles make routine direct monitoring impractical. An alternate approach is to use the 'concentration monitoring' method...

  9. Electrophoretic mobility of silica particles in a mixture of toluene and ethanol at different particle concentrations.

    PubMed

    Medrano, M; Pérez, A T; Lobry, L; Peters, F

    2009-10-20

    In this paper we present measurements of the electrophoretic mobility of colloidal particles by using heterodyne detection of light scattering. The measurements have been made up to concentrations of 5.4% silica nanoparticles, with a diameter on the order of 80 nm, in a mixture of 70% toluene and 30% ethanol. To make possible the measurements at these concentrations, the liquid mixture is chosen so as to match the index of refraction of the particles, thus resulting in a transparent suspension. PMID:19754057

  10. Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hisashi; Hamamoto, Shiro; Nishiyama, Fumitaka; Yasuda, Hajime

    1995-04-01

    Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer fine particles were produced by reducing the copolymer particles-metal ion complexes or refluxing an ethanol solution of metal ions in the presence of copolymer particles. The size of metal particles formed by reduction of the complex is smaller than that by reflux of the metal ion solution and depends on the amount of metal ions immobilized.

  11. Effect of particle hardness on the penetration behavior of fabrics intercalated with dry particles and concentrated particle-fluid suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kalman, Dennis P; Merrill, Richard L; Wagner, Norman J; Wetzel, Eric D

    2009-11-01

    The penetration behavior of Kevlar fabric intercalated with dry particles and shear thickening fluids (STF), highly concentrated fluid-particle suspensions, is presented. In particular, the role of particle hardness is explored by comparing fabric treatments containing SiO(2) particles, which are significantly harder than Kevlar, to treatments containing softer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles. The fabric testing includes yarn pull-out, quasi-static spike puncture, and ballistic penetration resistance, performed on single fabric layers. It was found that both dry particle and STF treatments resulted in improvements in fabric properties relative to neat or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) treated fabrics. On comparison of treatments with different particle hardness, the SiO(2) materials performed better in all tests than comparable PMMA materials, although the SiO(2) treatments caused yarn failure in pull-out testing, reducing the total pull-out energy. In addition, resistance to yarn pull-out was found to be substantially higher for STF-treated fabrics than for dry particle treated fabrics. However, both dry particle addition and STF treatments exhibited comparable enhancements in puncture and ballistic resistance. These observations suggest that viscous stress transfer, friction, and physical entrainment of hard particles into filaments contribute to the demonstrated improvements in the properties of protective fabrics treated with shear thickening fluids. PMID:20356133

  12. Characterization of ultrafine particle number concentration and new particle formation in urban environment of Taipei, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Huang, W.-R.; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2013-04-01

    An intensive aerosol characterization experiment was performed at the Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory (TARO, 25.02° N, 121.53° E) in the urban area of Taipei, Taiwan during July 2012. Number concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles were measured continuously, which were accompanied by concurrent measurements of mass concentration of submicron particles, PM (d ≤ 1 μm), and photolysis rate of ozone, J(O1D). The averaged number concentrations of total (Ntotal), accumulation mode (Nacu), Aitken mode (Ntotal), and nucleation mode (Nnuc) particles were 7.6 × 103 cm-3, 1.2 × 103 cm-3, 4.4 × 103 cm-3, and 1.9 × 103 cm-3, respectively. Accordingly, the ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100 nm) accounted for 83% of the total number concentration of particles measured in this study (10 ≤ d ≤ 429 nm), indicating the importance of UFPs to the air quality and radiation budget in Taipei and its surrounding areas. An averaged Nnuc/NOx ratio of ~60 cm-3 ppbv-1 was derived from nighttime measurements, which was suggested to be the characteristic of vehicle emissions that contributed to the "urban background" of nucleation mode particles throughout a day. On the contrary, it was found that the number concentration of nucleation mode particles was independent of NOx and could be elevated up to 10 times the "urban background" levels during daytime, suggesting a substantial amount of nucleation mode particles produced from photochemical processes. Consistency in the time series of the nucleation mode particle concentration and the proxy of H2SO4 production, UVB·SO2, for new particle formation (NPF) events showed that photo-oxidation of SO2 was responsible for the formation of new particles in our study area. Moreover, analysis upon the diameter growth rate, GR, and formation rate of nucleation mode particles, J10-25, found that the values of GR (8.5 ± 6.8 nm h-1) in Taipei were comparable to other urban areas, whereas the values of J10-25 (2.2 ± 1

  13. Measurement of Particle Concentrations above a Forest and Surrounding Farmland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyou, D.; Butler, J.; Zito, E.; Hull, W.; Hoffman, J.; Mazocca, P.; Dhaniyala, S.; Hopke, P. K.; Barthelmie, R.; Scott, S.; Pryor, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    Very little information is currently available regarding the spatial scales on which nucleation occurs in the near surface layer. As part of the May 2008 Nucleation In ForesTs (NIFTY) campaign, an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system was flown across the study area of the Morgan-Monroe State Forest (MMSF). The Clarkson Vector-P UAV carried a TSI Model 3007 Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) and a Grimm Model 1.109 Universal Aerosol Spectrometer (UAS). The CPC provides the count of ultrafine particles while the UAS gives counts of large particles (0.25 to 20 "Ým). These measurements were designed to supplement the extensive measurements being made on the 46 m instrumented tower. Because of the FAA restrictions of line-of-sight observation of the UAV by ground observers, we were limited in the spatial extent and were limited to studying altitudes below 1200 feet. However, these restrictions still permitted us to make a series of measurements of the spatial and vertical extent of particle concentrations to support the ground level composition measurements to better understand nucleation and growth in this rural area of southwestern Indiana.

  14. Particle Size Concentration Distribution and Influences on Exhaled Breath Particles in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Fang; Huang, Sheng-Hsiu; Wang, Yu-Ling; Chen, Chun-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Humans produce exhaled breath particles (EBPs) during various breath activities, such as normal breathing, coughing, talking, and sneezing. Airborne transmission risk exists when EBPs have attached pathogens. Until recently, few investigations had evaluated the size and concentration distributions of EBPs from mechanically ventilated patients with different ventilation mode settings. This study thus broke new ground by not only evaluating the size concentration distributions of EBPs in mechanically ventilated patients, but also investigating the relationship between EBP level and positive expiratory end airway pressure (PEEP), tidal volume, and pneumonia. This investigation recruited mechanically ventilated patients, with and without pneumonia, aged 20 years old and above, from the respiratory intensive care unit of a medical center. Concentration distributions of EBPs from mechanically ventilated patients were analyzed with an optical particle analyzer. This study finds that EBP concentrations from mechanically ventilated patients during normal breathing were in the range 0.47–2,554.04 particles/breath (0.001–4.644 particles/mL). EBP concentrations did not differ significantly between the volume control and pressure control modes of the ventilation settings in the mechanically ventilated patients. The patient EBPs were sized below 5 µm, and 80% of them ranged from 0.3 to 1.0 µm. The EBPs concentrations in patients with high PEEP (> 5 cmH2O) clearly exceeded those in patients with low PEEP (≤ 5 cmH2O). Additionally, a significant negative association existed between pneumonia duration and EBPs concentration. However, tidal volume was not related to EBPs concentration. PMID:24475230

  15. High concentrations of coarse particles emitted from a cattle feeding operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Gramann, J.; Auvermann, B. W.

    2011-08-01

    Housing roughly 10 million head of cattle in the United States alone, open air cattle feedlots represent a significant but poorly constrained source of atmospheric particles. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of physical and chemical properties of particles emitted from a large representative cattle feedlot in the Southwest United States. In the summer of 2008, measurements and samplings were conducted at the upwind and downwind edges of the facility. A series of far-field measurements and samplings was also conducted 3.5 km north of the facility. Two instruments, a GRIMM Sequential Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a GRIMM Portable Aerosol Spectrometer (PAS), were used to measure particle size distributions over the range of 0.01 to 25 μm diameter. Raman microspectroscopy was used to determine the chemical composition of particles on a single particle basis. Volume size distributions of dust were dominated by coarse mode particles. Twenty-four hour averaged concentrations of PM10 (particulate matter with a diameter of 10 μm or less) were as high as 1200 μg m-3 during the campaign. The primary constituents of the particulate matter were carbonaceous materials, such as humic acid, water soluble organics, and less soluble fatty acids, including stearic acid and tristearin. A significant fraction of the organic particles was present in internal mixtures with salts. Basic characteristics such as size distribution and composition of agricultural aerosols were found to be different than the properties of those found in urban and semi-urban aerosols. Failing to account for such differences may lead to errors in estimates of aerosol effects on local air quality, visibility, and public health.

  16. Ocular acid burn due to 20% concentrated salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Shazly, Tarek A

    2011-03-01

    This is a case report of severe conjunctival and corneal epithelial defects resulting from accidental exposure to salicylic acid that was mistakenly used instead of artificial tears (eye drops). The patient was treated with tobramycin 0.3%-dexamethasone 1% 3 times a day, cyclopentolate 1% twice a day, and artificial tears 6 times a day and underwent daily examinations until the corneal and conjunctival epithelial defects resolved. The corneal and conjunctival epithelial defects slowly resolved over 14 days. Visual acuity improved to its preinjury level of 20/40 in the affected eye. No residual corneal scarring was evident. Slowly resolving corneal and conjunctival epithelial defects can occur from direct contact with salicylic acid; therefore, this medication should be packaged and labeled differently from eye drops. PMID:20954793

  17. Statistics of particle concentration in free-surface turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bandi, Mahesh M; Larkin, J; Goldburg, W

    2009-01-01

    Particles on the surface of an incompressible fluid maintained in a turbulent steady-state cluster into spatio-temporally complex flow structures. We experimentally study the statistics of particle concentration n(r, t) over various coarse-grained scales r' in the inertial range. Another control parameter is the Taylor Microscale Reynolds number Re{sub {lambda}}. The focus is on the steady state probability density function {Pi}(n{sub r}). Attention is also given to the variance {sigma}{sup 2}(r, t) of this PDF, since it yields information about the topology of the coagulated structures. Where possible, the results are compared and contrasted with those obtained in a recent analytical and numerical study of two-dimensional synthetic turbulence by Ducasse and Pumir. There, but not here, the dimensionless compressibility C is an important control parameter.

  18. Environmentally relevant concentrations of microplastic particles influence larval fish ecology.

    PubMed

    Lönnstedt, Oona M; Eklöv, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The widespread occurrence and accumulation of plastic waste in the environment have become a growing global concern over the past decade. Although some marine organisms have been shown to ingest plastic, few studies have investigated the ecological effects of plastic waste on animals. Here we show that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of microplastic polystyrene particles (90 micrometers) inhibits hatching, decreases growth rates, and alters feeding preferences and innate behaviors of European perch (Perca fluviatilis) larvae. Furthermore, individuals exposed to microplastics do not respond to olfactory threat cues, which greatly increases predator-induced mortality rates. Our results demonstrate that microplastic particles operate both chemically and physically on larval fish performance and development. PMID:27257256

  19. Fine particle concentrations in buses and taxis in Florence, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fondelli, M. Cristina; Chellini, Elisabetta; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Cenni, Isabella; Gasparrini, Antonio; Nava, Silvia; Garcia-Orellana, Isabel; Lupi, Andrea; Grechi, Daniele; Mallone, Sandra; Jantunen, Matti

    On October 2004, a sampling survey was carried out in Florence to estimate urban fine particle exposure concentrations inside commuting vehicles during workdays characterized by heavy traffic. Portable samplers were positioned inside four regularly scheduled diesel-powered buses and four taxis during eight weekdays. Each sampler consisted of a 2.5 μm size pre-separator cyclone, a direct-reading data logging photometer (pDR-1200), and a 4 L min -1 filter sampler for the determination of PM 2.5 mass concentration. Based on reflectance analysis measurements, a PM 2.5 Black Smoke Index was determined for each filter, and the elemental composition of the PM 2.5 was analyzed by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). PM 2.5 mass concentrations inside the vehicles correlated well with the urban ambient air PM 2.5 concentrations measured at the fixed-site monitoring stations. The PM 2.5 excess above the urban ambient level was on average 32 μg m -3 (range: 22-52 μg m -3) and 20 μg m -3 (range: 11-29 μg m -3) in buses and taxis, respectively. The PM 2.5-bound sulfur concentration was also higher in the buses than in the taxis. Based on daily Time-Microenvironment-Activity-Diary (TMAD) data, the Florentines spend on average 9.7% of their day in traffic, and the corresponding average exposure is approximately 12% of their daily PM 2.5 personal exposure. The obtained data could be used to plan interventions to minimize the PM 2.5 citizen exposures in commuting.

  20. Extinction of polarized light in ferrofluids with different magnetic particle concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socoliuc, V.; Popescu, L. B.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic field intensity and nanoparticle concentration dependence of the polarized light extinction in a ferrofluid made of magnetite particles stabilized with technical grade oleic acid dispersed in transformer oil was experimentally investigated. The magnetically induced optical anisotropy, i.e. the dichroism divided by concentration, was found to decrease with increasing sample concentration from 2% to 8%. The magnetically induced change in the optical extinction of light polarized at 54.74° with respect to the magnetic field direction was found to be positive for the less concentrated sample (2%) and negative for the samples with 4% and 8% magnetic nanoparticle concentrations, the more negative the higher the concentration and field intensity. Based on the theoretically proven fact [11] that the particle orientation mechanism has no effect on the extinction of light polarized at 54.74° with respect to the field direction, we analyzed the experimental findings in the frames of the agglomeration and long-range pair correlations theories for the magnetically induced optical anisotropy in ferrofluids. We developed a theoretical model in the approximation of single scattering for the optical extinction coefficient of a ferrofluid with magnetically induced particle agglomeration. The model predicts the existence of a polarization independent component of the optical extinction coefficient that is experimentally measurable at 54.74° polarization angle. The change in the optical extinction of light polarized at 54.74° is positive if only the formation of straight n-particle chains is considered and may become negative in the hypothesis that the longer chains degenerate to more isotropic structures (polymer-like coils, globules or bundles of chains). The model for the influence on the light absorption of the long-range pair correlations, published elsewhere, predicts that the change in the optical extinction of light polarized at 54.74° is always negative, the

  1. Highly accurate boronimeter assay of concentrated boric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, R.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The Random-Walk Boronimeter has successfully been used as an on-line indicator of boric acid concentration in an operating commercial pressurized water reactor. The principle has been adapted for measurement of discrete samples to high accuracy and to concentrations up to 6000 ppm natural boron in light water. Boric acid concentration in an aqueous solution is a necessary measurement in many nuclear power plants, particularly those that use boric acid dissolved in the reactor coolant as a reactivity control system. Other nuclear plants use a high-concentration boric acid solution as a backup shutdown system. Such a shutdown system depends on rapid injection of the solution and frequent surveillance of the fluid to ensure the presence of the neutron absorber. The two methods typically used to measure boric acid are the chemical and the physical methods. The chemical method uses titration to determine the ionic concentration of the BO[sub 3] ions and infers the boron concentration. The physical method uses the attenuation of neutrons by the solution and infers the boron concentration from the neutron absorption properties. This paper describes the Random-Walk Boronimeter configured to measure discrete samples to high accuracy and high concentration.

  2. Heart Rate Response and Lactic Acid Concentration in Squash Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudin, Paula; And Others

    1978-01-01

    It was concluded that playing squash is an activity that results in heart rate responses of sufficient intensity to elicit aerobic training effects without producing high lactic acid concentration in the blood. (MM)

  3. Characterization of the interactions within fine particle mixtures in highly concentrated suspensions for advanced particle processing.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Akira; Bryant, Gary

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to summarize recent investigations into the dispersion of fine particles, and the characterization of their interactions, in concentrated suspensions. This summary will provide a better understanding of the current status of this research, and will provide useful feedback for advanced particle processing. Such processes include the fabrication of functional nanostructures and the sustainable beneficiation of complex ores. For example, there has been increasing demand for complex ore utilization due to the noticeable decrease in the accessibility of high grade and easily extractable ores. In order to maintain the sustainable use of mineral resources, the effective beneficiation of complex ores is urgently required. It can be successfully achieved only with selective particle/mineral dispersion/liberation and the assistance of mineralogical and particle characterization. PMID:26298173

  4. Pictorial Analogies XI: Concentrations and Acidity of Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortman, John J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents pictorial analogies of several concepts relating to solutions for chemistry students. These include concentration of solution, strength of solution, supersaturated solution, and conjugate acid-base pairs. Among the examples are comparison of acid strength to percentage of strong soldiers or making supersaturated solution analogous to a…

  5. Optical detection of glucose concentration in samples with scattering particles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Han; Lo, Yu-Lung; Liao, Chia-Chi; Lin, Jian-Xiang

    2015-12-10

    An optical-based method is proposed for measuring the glucose concentration of samples containing scattering particles. In the proposed approach, a Stokes-Mueller reflection-based polarimetry technique is used to solve the Mueller matrices of a turbid glucose sample with circular birefringence and depolarization properties given six incident lights with different polarization states. Using an error function defined as the difference between the simulated output Stokes vectors and the experimental ones, a genetic algorithm is used to inversely derive the optical rotation and depolarization parameters of the experimental sample corresponding to the glucose concentration and scattering depolarization effect, respectively. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using glucose samples containing 0.02 ml and 0.04 ml lipofundin, respectively. PMID:26836866

  6. Acidic reaction products of mono- and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic acids were measured from PM2.5 aerosols at SMEAR II station (Station For Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The measured organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene. Due to lack of authentic standards caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesized at the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, University of Helsinki. The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during summer concomitant with the precursor mono- and sesquiterpenes. Of the acids β-caryophyllinic acid had highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected on the basis of emission calculations of precursor compounds and yields in oxidation experiments in smog chambers implicating that β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields are underestimated. Concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursor were clearly lower in summer than in winter indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were correlated with the accumulation mode particle number concentrations.

  7. Model for a surface film of fatty acids on rain water and aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Winfried

    Organic compounds with polar groups can form films on the water surface which lower the surface tension and may hinder the transport of water vapor and trace gases through the interface. A model is presented which describes in detail surface films formed by fatty acids. The model has been applied to measured concentrations of fatty acids on rain water and atmospheric aerosol particles. In most cases only a diluted film has been calculated which does not affect their physical and chemical properties. The exception was a clean region in the western USA, where the fatty acid concentrations are sufficiently high to form a dense film on atmospheric aerosol particles. An algorithm for the identification of the sources of fatty acids was developed. It showed leaf abrasion or biomass burning as a major source of fatty acids in the western USA.

  8. Stability of lipid encapsulated phenolic acid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds such as ferulic acid and p-coumaric acids are potential bioactive additives for use in animal feeds to replace current antioxidants and antimicrobial compounds. These compounds are ubiquitous in plants and may be obtained from commodity grain crops and waste biomass. Encapsulation...

  9. Acidic reaction products of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-08-01

    Biogenic acids were measured in aerosols at the SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The analysed organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene, respectively. Due to a lack of authentic standards, the caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesised for this study. The mean, median, maximum and minimum concentrations (ng m-3) were as follows: limonic acid (1.26, 0.80, 16.5, below detection limit (< LOD)), pinic acid (5.53, 3.25, 31.4, 0.15), pinonic acid (9.87, 5.07, 80.1, < LOD), caric acid (5.52, 3.58, 49.8, < LOD), and caryophyllinic acid (7.87, 6.07, 86.1, < LOD). The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during the summer. Of the acids, β-caryophyllinic acid showed the highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected, based on the emission calculations of the precursor compounds and yields from oxidation experiments in smog chambers, implying that the β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields were underestimated. The concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursors were clearly lower in summer than in winter, indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during the cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were weakly correlated with the accumulation-mode particle number concentrations.

  10. Particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in transportation microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Douglas; Wu, Jun; Yang, Dongwoo; Jaimes, Guillermo

    2013-06-01

    This study is one of the first case studies to characterize the exposure of urban residents to traffic-related air pollution across locations and transportation microenvironments during everyday activities. Twenty-four adult residents of Boyle Heights, a neighborhood near downtown Los Angeles, carried a portable air pollution monitor and a Global Positioning Systems (GPS) tracking device for a total of 96 days. We found significant spatial and temporal variation in the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pPAH) concentrations in transportation microenvironments. Average pPAH concentrations were higher while walking outdoors (190 ng m-3) compared to traveling in private passenger vehicles (138-155 ng m-3) or traveling in public transportation (61-124 ng m-3). Although travel comprised 5% of participant days, it was associated with 27% of overall daily pPAH exposure. Regression models explained 40-55% of the variation in daily average pPAH concentrations, and 40-44% of the variation in 1-min interval concentrations. Important factors included time spent traveling, travel speed, meteorological and nearby land use factors, time of day, and proximity to roadways. Although future research is needed to develop stronger predictive models, our study demonstrates portable tracking devices can provide a more complete, diurnal characterization of air pollution exposures for urban populations.

  11. Inside versus Outside: Ion Redistribution in Nitric Acid Reacted Sea Spray Aerosol Particles as Determined by Single Particle Analysis (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Guasco, T.; Ryder, O. S.; Baltrusaitis, J.; Cuadra-Rodriguez, L. A.; Collins, D. B.; Ruppel, M. J.; Bertram, T. H.; Prather, K. A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles were generated under real-world conditions using natural seawater and a unique ocean-atmosphere facility equipped with actual breaking waves or a marine aerosol reference tank (MART) that replicates those conditions. The SSA particles were exposed to nitric acid in situ in a flow tube and the well-known chloride displacement and nitrate formation reaction was observed. However, as discussed here, little is known about how this anion displacement reaction affects the distribution of cations and other chemical constituents within and phase state of individual SSA particles. Single particle analysis of individual SSA particles shows that cations (Na+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+) within individual particles undergo a spatial redistribution after heterogeneous reaction with nitric acid, along with a more concentrated layer of organic matter at the surface of the particle. These data suggest that specific ion and aerosol pH effects play an important role in aerosol particle structure in ways that have not been previously recognized. The ordering of organic coatings can impact trace gas uptake, and subsequently impact trace gas budgets of O3 and NOx.

  12. Concentrations of acidic antiinflammatory drugs in gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Frey, H H; El-Sayed, M A

    1977-12-01

    In rats, the concentrations of the acidic antiinflammatory drugs salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, phenylbutazone, flufenamic acid and indomethacin in the glandular portion of the gastric mucosa were determined 30 and 60 min after oral or subcutaneous administration. In another series of experiments, solutions of the drugs were introduced into the ligated stomach and the concentrations in the mucosa and in the contents of the stomach were determined after 60 min. The ratio between the concentrations in the musoca and those in serum or gastric contents were much lower than expected according to the distribution by passive non-ionic diffusion. This apparent discrepancy may be explained as a result of a drug-induced damage to the mucosal cell allowing free diffusion of ionized drug across the cell membrane. PMID:603322

  13. Acoustofluidic particle manipulation inside a sessile droplet: four distinct regimes of particle concentration.

    PubMed

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Cho, Hyunjun; Ha, Byung Hang; Jung, Jin Ho; Park, Jinsoo; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-02-21

    In this study, we have investigated the motion of polystyrene microparticles inside a sessile droplet of water actuated by surface acoustic waves (SAWs), which produce an acoustic streaming flow (ASF) and impart an acoustic radiation force (ARF) on the particles. We have categorized four distinct regimes (R1-R4) of particle aggregation that depend on the particle diameter, the SAW frequency, the acoustic wave field (travelling or standing), the acoustic waves' attenuation length, and the droplet volume. The particles are concentrated at the centre of the droplet in the form of a bead (R1), around the periphery of the droplet in the form of a ring (R2), at the side of the droplet in the form of an isolated island (R3), and close to the centre of the droplet in the form of a smaller ring (R4). The ASF-based drag force, the travelling or standing SAW-based ARF, and the centrifugal force are utilized in various combinations to produce these distinct regimes. For simplicity, we fixed the fluid volume at 5 μL, varied the SAW actuation frequency (10, 20, 80, and 133 MHz), and tested several particle diameters in the range 1-30 μm to explicitly demonstrate the regimes R1-R4. We have further demonstrated the separation of particles (1 and 10 μm, 3 and 5 μm) using mixed regime configurations (R1 and R2, R2 and R4, respectively). PMID:26755271

  14. Spatial variability of fine particle concentrations in three European areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, Gerard; Meliefste, Kees; Cyrys, Josef; Lewné, Marie; Bellander, Tom; Brauer, Mike; Fischer, Paul; Gehring, Ulrike; Heinrich, Joachim; van Vliet, Patricia; Brunekreef, Bert

    Epidemiological studies of long-term air pollution effects have been hampered by difficulties in characterizing the spatial variation in air pollution. We conducted a study to assess the risk of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution for the development of inhalant allergy and asthma in children in Stockholm county, Munich and the Netherlands. Exposure to traffic-related air pollution was assessed through a 1-year monitoring program and regression modeling using exposure indicators. This paper documents the performance of the exposure monitoring strategy and the spatial variation of ambient particle concentrations. We measured the ambient concentration of PM2.5 and the reflectance of PM2.5 filters ('soot') at 40-42 sites representative of different exposure conditions of the three study populations. Each site was measured during four 14-day average sampling periods spread over one year (spring 1999 to summer 2000). In each study area, a continuous measurement site was operated to remove potential bias due to temporal variation. The selected approach was an efficient method to characterize spatial differences in annual average concentration between a large number of sites in each study area. Adjustment with data from the continuous measurement site improved the precision of the calculated annual averages, especially for PM2.5. Annual average PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 11 to 20 μg/m 3 in Munich, from 8 to 16 μg/m 3 in Stockholm and from 14 to 26 μg/m 3 in the Netherlands. Larger spatial contrasts were found for the absorption coefficient of PM2.5. PM2.5 concentrations were on average 17-18% higher at traffic sites than at urban background sites, but PM2.5 absorption coefficients at traffic sites were between 31% and 55% increased above background. This suggests that spatial variation of traffic-related air pollution may be underestimated if PM2.5 only is measured.

  15. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Rizzo, L. V.; Pauliqueivis, T.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Karl, Thomas G.; Guenther, Alex B.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Poeschl, U.; Jiminez, J. L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Martin, Scot T.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time mass spectra of non-refractory component of submicron aerosol particles were recorded in a tropical rainforest in the central Amazon basin during the wet season of 2008, as a part of the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08). Organic components accounted on average for more than 80% of the non-refractory submicron particle mass concentrations during the period of measurements. Ammonium was present in sufficient quantities to halfway neutralize sulfate. In this acidic, isoprene-dominated, low-NOx environment the high-resolution mass spectra as well as mass closures with ion chromatography measurements did not provide evidence for significant contributions of organosulfate species, at least at concentrations above uncertainty levels. Positive-matrix factorization of the time series of particle mass spectra identified four statistical factors to account for the variance of the signal intensities of the organic constituents: a factor HOA having a hydrocarbon-like signature and identified as regional emissions of primary organic material, a factor OOA-1 associated with fresh production of secondary organic material by a mechanism of BVOC oxidation followed by gas-to-particle conversion, a factor OOA-2 consistent with reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products, especially epoxydiols by acidic particles, and a factor OOA-3 associated with long range transport and atmospheric aging. The OOA-1, -2, and -3 factors had progressively more oxidized signatures. Diameter-resolved mass spectral markers also suggested enhanced reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products to the accumulation mode for the OOA-2 factor, and such size partitioning can be indicative of in-cloud process. The campaign-average factor loadings were in a ratio of 1.1:1.0 for the OOA-1 compared to the OOA-2 pathway, suggesting the comparable importance of gas-phase compared to particle-phase (including cloud waters) production pathways of secondary organic material during

  16. Life at high salt concentrations, intracellular KCl concentrations, and acidic proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Oren, Aharon

    2013-01-01

    Extremely halophilic microorganisms that accumulate KCl for osmotic balance (the Halobacteriaceae, Salinibacter) have a large excess of acidic amino acids in their proteins. This minireview explores the occurrence of acidic proteomes in halophiles of different physiology and phylogenetic affiliation. For fermentative bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales, known to accumulate KCl, an acidic proteome was predicted. However, this is not confirmed by genome analysis. The reported excess of acidic amino acids is due to a high content of Gln and Asn, which yield Glu and Asp upon acid hydrolysis. The closely related Halorhodospira halophila and Halorhodospira halochloris use different strategies to cope with high salt. The first has an acidic proteome and accumulates high KCl concentrations at high salt concentrations; the second does not accumulate KCl and lacks an acidic proteome. Acidic proteomes can be predicted from the genomes of some moderately halophilic aerobes that accumulate organic osmotic solutes (Halomonas elongata, Chromohalobacter salexigens) and some marine bacteria. Based on the information on cultured species it is possible to understand the pI profiles predicted from metagenomic data from hypersaline environments. PMID:24204364

  17. Investigation of surfactant mediated acid-base charging of mineral oxide particles dispersed in apolar systems.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Matthew M; Berg, John C

    2012-12-21

    The current work examines the role of acid-base properties on particle charging in apolar media. Manipulating the polarity and magnitude of charge in such systems is of growing interest to a number of applications. A major hurdle to the implementation of this technology is that the mechanism(s) of particle charging remain a subject of debate. The authors previously conducted a study of the charging of a series of mineral oxide particles dispersed in apolar systems that contained the surfactant AOT. It was observed that there was a correlation between the particle electrophoretic mobility and the acid-base nature of the particle, as characterized by aqueous point of zero charge (PZC) or the isoelectric point (IEP). The current study investigates whether or not a similar correlation is observed with other surfactants, namely, the acidic Span 80 and the basic OLOA 11000. This is accomplished by measuring the electrophoretic mobility of a series of mineral oxides that are dispersed in Isopar-L containing various concentrations of either Span 80 or OLOA 11000. The mineral oxides used have PZC values that cover a wide range of pH, providing a systematic study of how particle and surfactant acid-base properties impact particle charge. It was found that the magnitude and polarity of particle surface charge varied linearly with the particle PZC for both surfactants used. In addition, the point at which the polarity of charge reversed for the basic surfactant OLOA 11000 was shifted to a pH of approximately 8.5, compared to the previous result of about 5 for AOT. This proves that both surfactant and particle acid-base properties are important, and provides support for the theory of acid-base charging in apolar media. PMID:23157688

  18. Nucleic acid separations using superficially porous silica particles

    PubMed Central

    Close, Elizabeth D.; Nwokeoji, Alison O.; Milton, Dafydd; Cook, Ken; Hindocha, Darsha M.; Hook, Elliot C.; Wood, Helen; Dickman, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Ion pair reverse-phase liquid chromatography has been widely employed for nucleic acid separations. A wide range of alternative stationary phases have been utilised in conjunction with ion pair reverse-phase chromatography, including totally porous particles, non-porous particles, macroporous particles and monolithic stationary phases. In this study we have utilised superficially porous silica particles in conjunction with ion pair reverse-phase liquid chromatography for the analysis of nucleic acids. We have investigated a range of different pore-sizes and phases for the analysis of a diverse range of nucleic acids including oligonucleotides, oligoribonucleotides, phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and high molecular weight dsDNA and RNA. The pore size of the superficially porous silica particles was shown to significantly affect the resolution of the nucleic acids. Optimum separations of small oligonucleotides such as those generated in RNase mapping experiments were obtained with 80 Å pore sizes and can readily be interfaced with mass spectrometry analysis. Improved resolution of larger oligonucleotides (>19 mers) was observed with pore sizes of 150 Å. The optimum resolution for larger dsDNA/RNA molecules was achieved using superficially porous silica particles with pore sizes of 400 Å. Furthermore, we have utilised 150 Å pore size solid-core particles to separate typical impurities of a fully phosphorothioated oligonucleotide, which are often generated in the synthesis of this important class of therapeutic oligonucleotide. PMID:26948761

  19. Kinetics and Products of Heterogeneous Oxidation of Oleic acid, Linoleic acid and Linolenic acid in Aerosol Particles by Hydroxyl radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nah, T.; Leone, S. R.; Wilson, K. R.

    2010-12-01

    A significant mass fraction of atmospheric aerosols is composed of a variety of oxidized organic compounds with varying functional groups that may affect the rate at which they chemically age. Here we study the heterogeneous reaction of OH radicals with different sub-micron, alkenoic acid particles: Oleic acid (OA), Linoleic acid (LA), and Linolenic acid (LNA), in the presence of H2O2 and O2. This research explores how OH addition reactions initiate chain reactions that rapidly transform the chemical composition of an organic particle. Particles are chemically aged in a photochemical flow tube reactor where they are exposed to OH radicals (~ 1011 molecule cm-3 s) that are produced by the photolysis of H2O2 at 254 nm. The aerosols are then sized and their composition analyzed via Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization (APCI). Detailed kinetic measurements show that the reactive uptake coefficient is larger than 1, indicating the presence of secondary chemistry occurring in the condensed phase. Reactive uptake coefficient is found to scale linearly with the number of double bonds present in the molecule. In addition, the reactive uptake coefficient is found to depend sensitively upon the concentrations of O2 in the photochemical flow tube reactor, indicating that O2 plays a role in secondary chemistry. In the absence of O2 the reactive uptake coefficient increases to ~ 8, 5 and 3 for LNA, LA, and OA, respectively. The reactive uptake coefficient approaches values of 6, 4 and 2 for LNA, LA, and OA respectively when 18% of the total nitrogen flow is replaced with O2. Mechanistic pathways and products will also be presented herein.

  20. Stability of lipid encapsulated ferulic acid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Encapsulation of bioactive compounds by a solid lipid matrix provides stability and a mechanism for controlled release in formulated products. Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and have applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a common pheno...

  1. Reactivity of the cadmium ion in concentrated phosphoric acid solutions.

    PubMed

    De Gyves, J; Gonzales, J; Louis, C; Bessiere, J

    1989-07-01

    The solvation transfer coefficients which characterize the changes of ion reactivity with phosphoric acid concentration have been calculated for cadmium from the constants of the successive chloride complexes, and for silver and diethyldithiophosphate from potentiometric measurements. They evidence the strong desolvation of the cadmium species in concentrated phosphoric acid media, causing a remarkable increase of its reactivity. They allow the results of liquid-liquid extraction, precipitation and flotation reactions to be correctly interpreted and their changes to be foreseen when the reagents are modified. PMID:18964794

  2. Effect of polymer species and concentration on the production of mefenamic acid nanoparticles by media milling.

    PubMed

    Ito, Atsutoshi; Konnerth, Christoph; Schmidt, Jochen; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The effect of four structurally different polymer species (hydroxypropylcellulose, polyvinylpyrrolidone, vinylpyrrolidone-vinyl acetate copolymer and polyvinyl alcohol) on the production of mefenamic acid nanoparticles during media milling has been studied. It was found that product particle sizes are strongly determined by the type of polymeric stabiliser as well as by its concentration at constant process conditions. With respect to small product particle sizes an optimum excipient concentration was identified and adjusted for colloidal stability of the drug nanosuspensions. Furthermore, it was found that overdosing of excipients must be omitted to suppress ripening due to enhanced solubilisation phenomena. Hence, the smallest product particle sizes were obtained using a polymeric stabiliser which exhibits a high affinity to the model drug compound and a low solubilisation capacity. Affinities of each polymer species to mefenamic acid and corresponding surface concentrations were determined using straightforward and simple viscosity measurements of the supernatant. A relationship between polymer affinity, solubilisation capacity and limiting product particle size has been observed, which supports the hypothesis that final product particle sizes are rather determined by the solid-liquid equilibrium than by pure mechanical fracture. PMID:26592155

  3. On the dissolution kinetics of humic acid particles. Effect of monocarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Brigante, Maximiliano; Zanini, Graciela; Avena, Marcelo

    2008-05-01

    The dissolution kinetics of humic acid particles has been studied in batch experiments, and the effects of monocarboxylic (formic, acetic, and propionic) acids are reported. The dissolution rate of the particles is significantly affected by the presence of monocarboxylic acids in the pH range 4-10. At pH 7, for example, propionic acid increases 30 times this dissolution rate. The capacity of increasing the dissolution rate is in the order formic acidacidacid, and this dissolving capacity of carboxylics seems to be directly related to their affinity for HA molecules located at the surface of the solid particles. The results indicate that carboxylics and related compounds may affect markedly the mobility and transport of humic substances in the environment. PMID:18328533

  4. Concentration-Purification of Uranium from an Acid Leaching Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guettaf, H.; Becis, A.; Ferhat, K.; Hanou, K.; Bouchiha, D.; Yakoubi, K.; Ferrad, F.

    2009-11-01

    Chemical processes for the elaboration of uranium concentrate from uranium ore have been studied. This process is composed of successive units operations: crushing, milling, acid conventional leaching, filtration-washing, purification-concentration by ion exchange resins and uranium precipitation. The acid leaching operating conditions allow us to obtain a recovery uranium rate of 93%. The uranium concentration of the pregnant solution is approximately of 1.2 g/l. This value justifies the use of ion exchange resins to the concentration-purification of our pregnant solution. We have noticed that the pregnant solution contains a relatively high phosphate concentration which causes a premature uranium precipitation at pH=1.8. This pH value is in general, considered optimal to obtain the highest amount of fixed uranium by the anionic resin. To avoid the precipitation of uranium, the pH=1.5 has been fixed. We have obtained at this condition a good adsorption capacity. A 75% uranium concentrate have been elaborated, but the filtration of this concentrate has been very difficult. We have also noticed an excessive sulphate concentration. In order to improve this process, we have tested nitrates as eluant at different operating conditions.

  5. Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation: 1. Theory for kinetic- and nucleation-type particle formation and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merikanto, Joonas; Duplissy, Jonathan; Määttänen, Anni; Henschel, Henning; Donahue, Neil M.; Brus, David; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kulmala, Markku; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2016-02-01

    We derive a version of Classical Nucleation Theory normalized by quantum chemical results on sulfuric acid-water hydration to describe neutral and ion-induced particle formation in the binary sulfuric acid-water system. The theory is extended to treat the kinetic regime where the nucleation free energy barrier vanishes at high sulfuric acid concentrations or low temperatures. In the kinetic regime particle formation rates become proportional to sulfuric acid concentration to second power in the neutral system or first power in the ion-induced system. We derive simple general expressions for the prefactors in kinetic-type and activation-type particle formation calculations applicable also to more complex systems stabilized by other species. The theory predicts that the binary water-sulfuric acid system can produce strong new particle formation in the free troposphere both through barrier crossing and through kinetic pathways. At cold stratospheric and upper free tropospheric temperatures neutral formation dominates the binary particle formation rates. At midtropospheric temperatures the ion-induced pathway becomes the dominant mechanism. However, even the ion-induced binary mechanism does not produce significant particle formation in warm boundary layer conditions, as it requires temperatures below 0°C to take place at atmospheric concentrations. The theory successfully reproduces the characteristics of measured charged and neutral binary particle formation in CERN CLOUD3 and CLOUD5 experiments, as discussed in a companion paper.

  6. ELEVATED METHYLMALOIC ACID CONCENTRATIONS ARE COMMON AMONG ELDERLY AMERICANS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To describe serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) concentrations of elderly Americans and examine relations between serum MMA and other factors, we used surplus sera collected from elderly (n=1,145) and young-adult (n=1,026) participants in Phase 2 of the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Sur...

  7. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, M.Y.

    1995-10-17

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

  8. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, M.Y.

    1996-08-13

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

  9. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, Michel Y.

    1995-01-01

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall.

  10. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, Michel Y.

    1996-01-01

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall.

  11. New Particle Formation and Growth from Methanesulfonic Acid, Amines, Water, and Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere can influence visibility, negatively impact human health, and affect climate. The largest uncertainty in determining global radiative forcing is attributed to atmospheric aerosols. While new particle formation in many locations is correlated with sulfuric acid in air, neither the gas-phase binary nucleation of H2SO4-H2O nor the gas-phase ternary nucleation of H2SO4-NH3-H2O alone can fully explain observations. An additional potential particle source, based on previous studies in this laboratory, is methanesulfonic acid (MSA) with amines and water vapor. However, organics are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) being a major component of particles. Organics could be involved in the initial stages of particle formation by enhancing or inhibiting nucleation from sulfuric acid or MSA, in addition to contributing to their growth to form SOA. Experiments to measure the effects of a series of organics of varying structure on particle formation and growth from MSA, amines, and water were performed in a custom-built small volume aerosol flow tube reactor. Analytical instruments and techniques include a scanning mobility particle sizer to measure particle size distributions, sampling onto a weak cation exchange resin with analysis by ion chromatography to measure amine concentrations, and filter collection and analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure MSA concentrations. Organics were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The impact of these organics on the initial particle formation as well as growth will be reported. The outcome is an improved understanding of fundamental chemistry of nucleation and growth to ultimately be incorporated into climate models to better predict how particles affect the global climate budget.

  12. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 2. Gas and particle phase formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Zhang, Xiaolu; Parker, Eric T.; Veres, Patrick R.; Roberts, James M.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Ellis, Raluca A.; Huey, L. Greg; Weber, Rodney J.

    2012-10-01

    Gas and fine particle (PM2.5) phase formic acid concentrations were measured with online instrumentation during separate one-month studies in the summer of 2010 in Los Angeles (LA), CA, and Atlanta, GA. In both urban environments, median gas phase concentrations were on the order of a few ppbv (LA 1.6 ppbv, Atlanta 2.3 ppbv) and median particle phase concentrations were approximately tens of ng/m3 (LA 49 ng/m3, Atlanta 39 ng/m3). LA formic acid gas and particle concentrations had consistent temporal patterns; both peaked in the early afternoon and generally followed the trends in photochemical secondary gases. Atlanta diurnal trends were more irregular, but the mean diurnal profile had similar afternoon peaks in both gas and particle concentrations, suggesting a photochemical source in both cities. LA formic acid particle/gas (p/g) ratios ranged between 0.01 and 12%, with a median of 1.3%. No clear evidence that LA formic acid preferentially partitioned to particle water was observed, except on three overcast periods of suppressed photochemical activity. Application of Henry's Law to predict partitioning during these periods greatly under-predicted particle phase formate concentrations based on bulk aerosol liquid water content (LWC) and pH estimated from thermodynamic models. In contrast to LA, formic acid partitioning in Atlanta appeared to be more consistently associated with elevated relative humidity (i.e., aerosol LWC), although p/g ratios were somewhat lower, ranging from 0.20 to 5.8%, with a median of 0.8%. Differences in formic acid gas absorbing phase preferences between these two cities are consistent with that of bulk water-soluble organic carbon reported in a companion paper.

  13. On the gas-particle partitioning of soluble organic aerosol in two urban atmospheres with contrasting emissions: 2. Gas and particle phase formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiumeng; Zhang, Xiaolu; Parker, Eric T.; Veres, Patrick R.; Roberts, James M.; Gouw, Joost A.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Ellis, Raluca A.; Huey, L. Greg; Weber, Rodney J.

    2011-11-01

    Gas and fine particle (PM2.5) phase formic acid concentrations were measured with online instrumentation during separate one-month studies in the summer of 2010 in Los Angeles (LA), CA, and Atlanta, GA. In both urban environments, median gas phase concentrations were on the order of a few ppbv (LA 1.6 ppbv, Atlanta 2.3 ppbv) and median particle phase concentrations were approximately tens of ng/m3 (LA 49 ng/m3, Atlanta 39 ng/m3). LA formic acid gas and particle concentrations had consistent temporal patterns; both peaked in the early afternoon and generally followed the trends in photochemical secondary gases. Atlanta diurnal trends were more irregular, but the mean diurnal profile had similar afternoon peaks in both gas and particle concentrations, suggesting a photochemical source in both cities. LA formic acid particle/gas (p/g) ratios ranged between 0.01 and 12%, with a median of 1.3%. No clear evidence that LA formic acid preferentially partitioned to particle water was observed, except on three overcast periods of suppressed photochemical activity. Application of Henry's Law to predict partitioning during these periods greatly under-predicted particle phase formate concentrations based on bulk aerosol liquid water content (LWC) and pH estimated from thermodynamic models. In contrast to LA, formic acid partitioning in Atlanta appeared to be more consistently associated with elevated relative humidity (i.e., aerosol LWC), although p/g ratios were somewhat lower, ranging from 0.20 to 5.8%, with a median of 0.8%. Differences in formic acid gas absorbing phase preferences between these two cities are consistent with that of bulk water-soluble organic carbon reported in a companion paper.

  14. Reactions of Methanesulfonic Acid with Amines and Ammonia as a Source of New Particles in Air.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haihan; Varner, Mychel E; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2016-03-01

    New particle formation (NPF) from gaseous precursors as a significant source of aerosol needs to be better understood to accurately predict the impacts on visibility, climate change, and human health. While ternary nucleation of sulfuric acid, amines/NH3, and water is recognized as a significant driver for NPF, increasing evidence suggests a contribution from methanesulfonic acid (MSA) and amines under certain conditions. Here we report the formation of particles 2.5-10 nm in diameter from the reactions of MSA with methylamine (MA), dimethylamine (DMA), and NH3 at reaction times of 2.3-7.8 s in a flow reactor and compare these particles with those previously reported to be formed from reaction with trimethylamine (TMA). The effects of water vapor and concentrations of gaseous precursors on the particle number concentration and particle size were studied. The presence of water significantly enhances particle formation and growth. Under similar experimental conditions, particle number concentrations decrease in the order MA ≫ TMA ≈ DMA ≫ NH3, where NH3 is 2-3 orders of magnitude less efficient than DMA. Quantum chemical calculations of likely intermediate clusters were carried out to provide insights into the role of water and the different capacities of amines/NH3 in particle formation. Both gas-phase basicity and hydrogen-bonding capacity of amines/NH3 contribute to the potential for particles to form and grow. Our results indicate that, although amines typically have concentrations 1-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of NH3 in the atmosphere, they still play an important role in driving NPF. PMID:26379061

  15. Oleic acid coated magnetic nano-particles: Synthesis and characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Biswajit Goyal, P. S.

    2015-06-24

    Magnetic nano particles of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} coated with oleic acid were synthesized using wet chemical route, which involved co-precipitation of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. The nano particles were characterized using XRD, TEM, FTIR, TGA and VSM. X-ray diffraction studies showed that nano particles consist of single phase Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} having inverse spinel structure. The particle size obtained from width of Bragg peak is about 12.6 nm. TEM analysis showed that sizes of nano particles are in range of 6 to 17 nm with a dominant population at 12 - 14 nm. FTIR and TGA analysis showed that -COOH group of oleic acid is bound to the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles and one has to heat the sample to 278° C to remove the attached molecule from the surface. Further it was seen that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles exhibit super paramagnetism with a magnetization of about 53 emu/ gm.

  16. Relationships among particle number, surface area, and respirable mass concentrations in automotive engine manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, William A; Evans, Douglas E; Ku, Bon Ki; Maynard, Andrew D; Slavin, Thomas J; Peters, Thomas M

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between particle number, surface area, and respirable mass concentration measured simultaneously in a foundry and an automotive engine machining and assembly center. Aerosol concentrations were measured throughout each plant with a condensation particle counter for number concentration, a diffusion charger for active surface area concentration, and an optical particle counter for respirable mass concentration. At selected locations, particle size distributions were characterized with the optical particle counter and an electrical low pressure impactor. Statistical analyses showed that active surface area concentration was correlated with ultrafine particle number concentration and weakly correlated with respirable mass concentration. Correlation between number and active surface area concentration was stronger during winter (R2 = 0.6 for both plants) than in the summer (R2 = 0.38 and 0.36 for the foundry and engine plant respectively). The stronger correlation in winter was attributed to use of direct-fire gas fired heaters that produced substantial numbers of ultrafine particles with a modal diameter between 0.007 and 0.023 mu m. These correlations support findings obtained through theoretical analysis. Such analysis predicts that active surface area increasingly underestimates geometric surface area with increasing particle size, particularly for particles larger than 100 nm. Thus, a stronger correlation between particle number concentration and active surface area concentration is expected in the presence of high concentrations of ultrafine particles. In general, active surface area concentration may be a concentration metric that is distinct from particle number concentration and respirable mass concentration. For future health effects or toxicological studies involving nano-materials or ultrafine aerosols, this finding needs to be considered, as exposure metrics may influence data interpretation. PMID:18982535

  17. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Rizzo, L. V.; Pauliquevis, T.; Kuwata, M.; Karl, T. G.; Guenther, A.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.; Jimenez, J. L.; Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    Real-time mass spectra of the non-refractory species in submicron aerosol particles were recorded in a tropical rainforest in the central Amazon Basin during the wet season from February to March 2008, as a part of the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08). Organic material accounted on average for more than 80% of the non-refractory submicron particle mass concentrations during the period of measurements. There was insufficient ammonium to neutralize sulfate. In this acidic, isoprene-rich, HO2-dominant environment, positive-matrix factorization of the time series of particle mass spectra identified four statistical factors to account for the 99% of the variance in the signal intensities of the organic constituents. The first factor was identified as associated with regional and local pollution and labeled "HOA" for its hydrocarbon-like characteristics. A second factor was associated with long-range transport and labeled "OOA-1" for its oxygenated characteristics. A third factor, labeled "OOA-2," was implicated as associated with the reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products, especially of epoxydiols to acidic haze, fog, or cloud droplets. A fourth factor, labeled "OOA-3," was consistent with an association with the fresh production of secondary organic material (SOM) by the mechanism of gas-phase oxidation of biogenic volatile organic precursors followed by gas-to-particle conversion of the oxidation products. The suffixes 1, 2, and 3 on the OOA labels signify ordinal ranking with respect to the extent of oxidation represented by the factor. The process of aqueous-phase oxidation of water-soluble products of gas-phase photochemistry might also have been associated to some extent with the OOA-2 factor. The campaign-average factor loadings had a ratio of 1.4:1 for OOA-2 : OOA-3, suggesting the comparable importance of particle-phase compared to gas-phase pathways for the production of SOM during the study period.

  18. Concentration and characterization of airborne particles in Tehran's subway system.

    PubMed

    Kamani, Hosein; Hoseini, Mohammad; Seyedsalehi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Yousef; Jaafari, Jalil; Safari, Gholam Hosein

    2014-06-01

    Particulate matter is an important air pollutant, especially in closed environments like underground subway stations. In this study, a total of 13 elements were determined from PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected at two subway stations (Imam Khomeini and Sadeghiye) in Tehran's subway system. Sampling was conducted in April to August 2011 to measure PM concentrations in platform and adjacent outdoor air of the stations. In the Imam Khomeini station, the average concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 94.4 ± 26.3 and 52.3 ± 16.5 μg m(-3) in the platform and 81.8 ± 22.2 and 35 ± 17.6 μg m(-3) in the outdoor air, respectively. In the Sadeghiye station, mean concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 87.6 ± 23 and 41.3 ± 20.4 μg m(-3) in the platform and 73.9 ± 17.3 and 30 ± 15 μg m(-3), in the outdoor air, respectively. The relative contribution of elemental components in each particle fraction were accounted for 43% (PM10) and 47.7% (PM2.5) in platform of Imam Khomeini station and 15.9% (PM10) and 18.5% (PM2.5) in the outdoor air of this station. Also, at the Sadeghiye station, each fraction accounted for 31.6% (PM10) and 39.8% (PM2.5) in platform and was 11.7% (PM10) and 14.3% (PM2.5) in the outdoor. At the Imam Khomeini station, Fe was the predominant element to represent 32.4 and 36 % of the total mass of PM10 and PM2.5 in the platform and 11.5 and 13.3% in the outdoor, respectively. At the Sadeghiye station, this element represented 22.7 and 29.8% of total mass of PM10 and PM2.5 in the platform and 8.7 and 10.5% in the outdoor air, respectively. Other major crustal elements were 5.8% (PM10) and 5.3% (PM2.5) in the Imam Khomeini station platform and 2.3 and 2.4% in the outdoor air, respectively. The proportion of other minor elements was significantly lower, actually less than 7% in total samples, and V was the minor concentration in total mass of PM10 and PM2.5 in both platform stations. PMID:24573466

  19. Functionalised carboxylic acids in atmospheric particles: An annual cycle revealing seasonal trends and possible sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Monique; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Carboxylic acids represent a major fraction of the water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in atmospheric particles. Among the particle phase carboxylic acids, straight-chain monocarboxylic acids (MCA) and dicarboxylic acids (DCA) with 2-10 carbon atoms have extensively been studied in the past. However, only a few studies exist dealing with functionalised carboxylic acids, i.e. having additional hydroxyl-, oxo- or nitro-groups. Regarding atmospheric chemistry, these functionalised carboxylic acids are of particular interest as they are supposed to be formed during atmospheric oxidation processes, e.g. through radical reactions. Therefore they can provide insights into the tropospheric multiphase chemistry. During this work 28 carboxylic acids (4 functionalised aliphatic MCAs, 5 aromatic MCAs, 3 nitroaromatic MCAs, 6 aliphatic DCAs, 6 functionalised aliphatic DCAs, 4 aromatic DCAs) were quantitatively determined in 256 filter samples taken at the rural research station Melpitz (Saxony, Germany) with a PM10 Digitel DHA-80 filter sampler. All samples were taken in 2010 covering a whole annual cycle. The resulting dataset was examined for a possible seasonal dependency of the acid concentrations. Furthermore the influence of the air mass origin on the acid concentrations was studied based on a simple two-sector classification (western or eastern sector) using a back trajectory analysis. Regarding the annual average, adipic acid was found to be the most abundant compound with a mean concentration of 7.8 ng m-3 followed by 4-oxopimelic acid with 6.1 ng m-3. The sum of all acid concentrations showed two maxima during the seasonal cycle; one in summer and one in winter, whereas the highest overall acid concentrations were found in summer. In general the target acids could be divided into two different groups, where one group has its maximum concentration in summer and the other group during winter. The first group contains all investigated aliphatic mono- and dicarboxylic

  20. Comparison of sulfur measurements from a regional fine particle network with concurrent acid modes network results

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.L.; Stockburger, L.; Barnes, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 micrometers) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Enviromental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during the two year period in 1988-90. The 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the most predominant chemical element concentrations determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis. Statistical summaries of the fine mass and sulfur concentrations by site and season were prepared. The availability of simultaneous particulate sulfate measurements from independent collection and analytical procedures provided an opportunity to examine their agreement and provide a more reliable data base for evaluation of regional particulate models and estimation of contribution to urban aerosol concentration.

  1. Electrodialysis synthesis of concentrated solutions of perrhenic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palant, A. A.; Bryukvin, V. A.; Levin, A. M.; Reshetova, O. V.

    2011-03-01

    The presented results demonstrate the possibility of electrodialysis production of concentrated solutions of perrhenic acid (HReO4 concentration >400 g/l). KReO4 is used as a precursor. The investigations are performed in a three-chamber electrodialysis cell in a continuous mode. The optimal processing parameters are as follows: the current is 3-5 A, the voltage is 30-40 V, and the anode chamber temperature is 20-25°C. Grade AR-0 ammonium perrhenate is precipitated from the obtained HReO4 solution.

  2. Optical properties of internally mixed aerosol particles composed of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Miriam A; Hasenkopf, Christa A; Beaver, Melinda R; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2009-12-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of internally mixed aerosol particles composed of dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulfate using cavity ring-down aerosol extinction spectroscopy at a wavelength of 532 nm. The real refractive indices of these nonabsorbing species were retrieved from the extinction and concentration of the particles using Mie scattering theory. We obtain refractive indices for pure ammonium sulfate and pure dicarboxylic acids that are consistent with literature values, where they exist, to within experimental error. For mixed particles, however, our data deviates significantly from a volume-weighted average of the pure components. Surprisingly, the real refractive indices of internal mixtures of succinic acid and ammonium sulfate are higher than either of the pure components at the highest organic weight fractions. For binary internal mixtures of oxalic or adipic acid with ammonium sulfate, the real refractive indices of the mixtures are approximately the same as ammonium sulfate for all organic weight fractions. Various optical mixing rules for homogeneous and slightly heterogeneous systems fail to explain the experimental real refractive indices. It is likely that complex particle morphologies are responsible for the observed behavior of the mixed particles. Implications of our results for atmospheric modeling and aerosol structure are discussed. PMID:19877658

  3. HUMAN CLINICAL STUDIES OF CONCENTRATED AMBIENT ULTRAFINE AND FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Confirmation of our hypothesis that exposure to ambient ultrafine and fine particles promotes coagulation and alters cardiac function will have important implications for air pollution regulatory efforts, and will provide new approaches for the prevention of cardiovascular hea...

  4. Effect of Wheat Dietary Fiber Particle Size during Digestion In Vitro on Bile Acid, Faecal Bacteria and Short-Chain Fatty Acid Content.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Szwengiel, Artur; Górecka, Danuta; Gujska, Elżbieta; Kaczkowska, Joanna; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2016-06-01

    The influence of bile acid concentration on the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. bacteria was demonstrated. Exposing these bacteria to the environment containing bile acid salts, and very poor in nutrients, leads to the disappearance of these microorganisms due to the toxic effect of bile acids. A multidimensional analysis of data in the form of principal component analysis indicated that lactic acid bacteria bind bile acids and show antagonistic effect on E. coli spp. bacteria. The growth in E. coli spp. population was accompanied by a decline in the population of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. with a simultaneous reduction in the concentration of bile acids. This is direct proof of acid binding ability of the tested lactic acid bacteria with respect to cholic acid, lithocholic acid and deoxycholic acid. This research demonstrated that the degree of fineness of wheat dietary fibre does not affect the sorption of bile acids and growth of some bacteria species; however, it has an impact on the profile of synthesized short-chained fatty acids. During the digestion of a very fine wheat fibre fraction (WF 90), an increase in the concentration of propionic and butyric acids, as compared with the wheat fiber fraction of larger particles - WF 500, was observed. Our study suggested that wheat fibre did not affect faecal bacteria growth, however, we observed binding of bile acids by Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. PMID:26924312

  5. pH-Sensitive ionomeric particles obtained via chemical conjugation of silk with poly(amino acid)s.

    PubMed

    Serban, Monica A; Kaplan, David L

    2010-12-13

    Silk-fibroin-based biomaterials have been widely utilized for a range of biomaterial-related systems. For all these previously reported systems, the β-sheet forming feature of the silk was the key stabilizing element of the final material structure. Herein, we describe a different strategy, based on the engineering of silk-based ionomers that can yield stable colloidal composites or particle suspensions through electrostatic interactions. These silk-based ionomers were obtained by carbodiimide-mediated coupling of silk fibroin with polylysine hydrobromide and polyglutamic acid sodium salts, respectively. Colloidal composites could be obtained by mixing the ionomeric pair at high concentration (i.e., 25% w/v), while combining them at lower concentrations (i.e., 5% w/v) yielded particle suspensions. The assembly of the ionomers was driven by electrostatic interactions, pH-dependent, and reversible. The network assembly appeared to be polarized, with the interacting poly(amino acid) chains clustered to the core of the particles and the silk backbone oriented outward. In agreement with this assembly mode, doxorubicin, a hydrophilic antitumor drug, could be released at a slow rate, in a pH-dependent manner, indicating that the inside of the ionomeric particles was mainly hydrophilic in nature. PMID:21028849

  6. Seasonal and spatial changes of free and bound organic acids in total suspended particles in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Bi, Xinhui; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-12-01

    The concentrations and compositions of free and bound organic acids in total suspended particles from typical urban, suburban and forest park sites of Guangzhou were determined in this study. The free form of organic acids (solvent extractable) in aerosols in Guangzhou varied with site and season. The suburban samples contained the highest contents of alkanoic, alkenoic and dicarboxylic acids. These findings were consistent with a higher supply of hydrocarbons and NOx in the suburban area. However, concentrations of aromatic acids were similar in the urban, suburban and forest park sites. Generally, winter season samples of the acids from anthropogenic sources contained more organic acids than summer season samples due to stronger removal by wet deposition in the summer. For the acids from botanic sources, the summer season samples were higher. In addition to the free acids, bound acids (solvent non-extractable) mainly formed by esterification of free acids were also found in the samples. In general, bound acids were higher than free acids. Esterification is mainly controlled by the pKa of organic acids and the atmospheric pH value. This explains why aromatic and dicarboxylic acids occur mainly as bound forms and why the samples from urban sites contained high levels of bound acids as the pH of rain water can reach 4.53. Concentrations of alkanoic and alkenoic acids in the aerosols of Guangzhou were much higher than those in the other areas studied.

  7. Effect of antacid and ascorbic acid on serum salicylate concentration.

    PubMed

    Hansten, P D; Hayton, W L

    1980-01-01

    To determine the effect of antacid or ascorbic acid administration on plateau serum salicylate concentrations, nine healthy subjects were given each of the following treatments by balanced block design: choline salicylate (equivalent to 3.76 or 5.62 Gm/day of aspirin); choline salicylate plus magnesium-aluminum hydroxide (120 ml/day); or choline salicylate plus ascorbic acid (3 Gm/day). In subjects developing a control serum salicylate level above 10 mg/dl, antacid administration produced a decrease in serum salicylate level (mean 19.8 mg/dl vs. 15.8 mg/dl) (P less than 0.01). Ascorbic acid administration was not associated with a significant change in serum salicylate. The reduction in serum salicylate following antacid appears to be due to antacid-induced alkalinization of the urine with resultant increase in renal salicylate clearance. Antacid administration should be considered a potential cause of altered serum salicylate concentration in patients receiving large doses of salicylate. PMID:7400368

  8. Use of extractive distillation to produce concentrated nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, P.C.; Griffin, T.P.; Irwin, C.F.

    1981-04-01

    Concentrated nitric acid (> 95 wt %) is needed for the treatment of off-gases from a fuels-reprocessing plant. The production of concentrated nitric acid by means of extractive distillation in the two-pot apparatus was studied to determine the steady-state behavior of the system. Four parameters, EDP volume (V/sub EDP/) and temperature (T/sub EDP/), acid feed rate, and solvent recycle, were independently varied. The major response factors were percent recovery (CPRR) and product purity (CCP). Stage efficiencies also provided information about the system response. Correlations developed for the response parameters are: CPRR = 0.02(V/sub EDP/ - 800 cc) + 53.5; CCP = -0.87 (T/sub EDP/ - 140/sup 0/C) + 81; eta/sub V,EDP/ = 9.1(F/sub feed/ - 11.5 cc/min) - 0.047(V/sub EDP/ - 800 cc) - 2.8(F/sub Mg(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2// - 50 cc/min) + 390; and eta/sub L,EDP/ = 1.9(T/sub EDP/ - 140/sup 0/C) + 79. A computer simulation of the process capable of predicting steady-state conditions was developed, but it requires further work.

  9. Ice formation on nitric acid-coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome; Berg, Larry

    2015-08-01

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles caused by a coating of nitric acid are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coatings on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated the ice nucleation ability of Arizona Test Dust, illite, K-feldspar, and quartz as a function of temperature (-25°C to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75% to 110%). The particles (bare or nitric acid coated) were size selected at 250 nm, and the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and saturation conditions was determined. All of the dust species nucleated ice at subsaturated conditions, although the coated particles (except quartz) showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability relative to bare particles. However, at supersaturated conditions, bare and coated particles had nearly equivalent ice nucleation characteristics. The results of a single-column model showed that simulated ice crystal number concentrations are mostly dependent upon the coated particle fraction, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and competition among ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, coatings were observed to modify ice-cloud properties, and the complexity of ice-cloud and mixed-phase-cloud evolution when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms compete for fixed water vapor budgets was supported.

  10. Solubility of methanol in low-temperature aqueous sulfuric acid and implications for atmospheric particle composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using traditional Knudsen cell techniques, we find well-behaved Henry's law uptake of methanol in aqueous 45 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions at temperatures between 197 and 231 K. Solubility of methanol increases with decreasing temperature and increasing acidity, with an effective Henry's law coefficient ranging from 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 8) M/atm. Equilibrium uptake of methanol into sulfuric acid aerosol particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere will not appreciably alter gas-phase concentrations of methanol. The observed room temperature reaction between methanol and sulfuric acid is too slow to provide a sink for gaseous methanol at the temperatures of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. It is also too slow to produce sufficient quantities of soluble reaction products to explain the large amount of unidentified organic material seen in particles of the upper troposphere.

  11. Measurement of airborne particle concentrations near the Sunset Crater volcano, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Benke, Roland R; Hooper, Donald M; Durham, James S; Bannon, Donald R; Compton, Keith L; Necsoiu, Marius; McGinnis, Ronald N

    2009-02-01

    Direct measurements of airborne particle mass concentrations or mass loads are often used to estimate health effects from the inhalation of resuspended contaminated soil. Airborne particle mass concentrations were measured using a personal sampler under a variety of surface-disturbing activities within different depositional environments at both volcanic and nonvolcanic sites near the Sunset Crater volcano in northern Arizona. Focused field investigations were performed at this analog site to improve the understanding of natural and human-induced processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The level of surface-disturbing activity was found to be the most influential factor affecting the measured airborne particle concentrations, which increased over three orders of magnitude relative to ambient conditions. As the surface-disturbing activity level increased, the particle size distribution and the majority of airborne particle mass shifted from particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 mum (0.00039 in) to particles with aerodynamic diameters greater than 10 mum (0.00039 in). Under ambient conditions, above average wind speeds tended to increase airborne particle concentrations. In contrast, stronger winds tended to decrease airborne particle concentrations in the breathing zone during light and heavy surface-disturbing conditions. A slight increase in the average airborne particle concentration during ambient conditions was found above older nonvolcanic deposits, which tended to be finer grained than the Sunset Crater tephra deposits. An increased airborne particle concentration was realized when walking on an extremely fine-grained deposit, but the sensitivity of airborne particle concentrations to the resuspendible fraction of near-surface grain mass was not conclusive in the field setting when human activities disturbed the bulk of near-surface material. Although the limited sample size precluded detailed statistical analysis, the differences in airborne particle

  12. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  13. A method based on light scattering to estimate the concentration of virus particles without the need for virus particle standards☆

    PubMed Central

    Makra, István; Terejánszky, Péter; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E.

    2015-01-01

    Most often the determination of the concentration of virus particles is rendered difficult by the availability of proper standards. We have adapted a static light scattering based method for the quantification of virus particles (shown for poliovirus) without the need of virus particle standards. Instead, as standards, well-characterized polymeric nanoparticle solutions are used. The method is applicable for virus particles acting as Rayleigh scatterers, i.e., virus particles with equivalent diameters up to ca. 1/10th of the wavelength of the scattered monochromatic light (∼70 nm diameter). Further limitations may arise if the refractive index of the virus is unavailable or cannot be calculated based on its composition, such as in case of enveloped viruses. The method is especially relevant for preparation of virus particle concentration standards and to vaccine formulations based on attenuated or inactivated virus particles where the classical plaque forming assays cannot be applied. The method consists of: • Measuring the intensity of the light scattered by viruses suspended in an aqueous solution. • Measuring the intensity of the light scattered by polymeric nanoparticles of known concentration and comparable size with the investigated virus particle. • The concentration of virus nanoparticles can be calculated based on the two measured scattered light intensities by knowing the refractive index of the dispersing solution, of the polymer and virus nanoparticles as well as their relative sphere equivalent diameters. PMID:26150976

  14. A method based on light scattering to estimate the concentration of virus particles without the need for virus particle standards.

    PubMed

    Makra, István; Terejánszky, Péter; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E

    2015-01-01

    Most often the determination of the concentration of virus particles is rendered difficult by the availability of proper standards. We have adapted a static light scattering based method for the quantification of virus particles (shown for poliovirus) without the need of virus particle standards. Instead, as standards, well-characterized polymeric nanoparticle solutions are used. The method is applicable for virus particles acting as Rayleigh scatterers, i.e., virus particles with equivalent diameters up to ca. 1/10th of the wavelength of the scattered monochromatic light (∼70 nm diameter). Further limitations may arise if the refractive index of the virus is unavailable or cannot be calculated based on its composition, such as in case of enveloped viruses. The method is especially relevant for preparation of virus particle concentration standards and to vaccine formulations based on attenuated or inactivated virus particles where the classical plaque forming assays cannot be applied. The method consists of: •Measuring the intensity of the light scattered by viruses suspended in an aqueous solution.•Measuring the intensity of the light scattered by polymeric nanoparticles of known concentration and comparable size with the investigated virus particle.•The concentration of virus nanoparticles can be calculated based on the two measured scattered light intensities by knowing the refractive index of the dispersing solution, of the polymer and virus nanoparticles as well as their relative sphere equivalent diameters. PMID:26150976

  15. [Variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations in Qingdao and its impact on visibility].

    PubMed

    Ke, Xin-Shu; Sheng, Li-Fang; Kong, Jun; Hao, Ze-Tong; Qu, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric particle number concentrations were measured from September 2010 to August 2011 with potable light house laser particle counter to study the variation of atmospheric particle concentrations and its impact on visibility in Qingdao. Backward trajectory was calculated by Hysplit model. Statistical analysis was done to discuss the influence of meteorological factors on the atmospheric particle number concentrations and visibility. It was shown that the atmospheric particle number concentrations were the highest in winter and spring, followed by autumn, and the lowest in summer. Air mass from Xinjiang and Gansu regions resulted in higher particle concentrations, while the atmospheric particles from the northeast and the ocean had lower concentrations. The variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations presented a good negative correlation with the variation of wind speed, relative humidity and mixed-layer height. When the air mass came from west or northwest, the surface wind direction was south or southeast and the mixed-layer height was low, the number concentration of fine particles was likely to be higher, which tended to cause low visibility phenomenon. PMID:24720179

  16. Method of particle trajectory recognition in particle flows of high particle concentration using a candidate trajectory tree process with variable search areas

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    2013-03-12

    The application relates to particle trajectory recognition from a Centroid Population comprised of Centroids having an (x, y, t) or (x, y, f) coordinate. The method is applicable to visualization and measurement of particle flow fields of high particle. In one embodiment, the centroids are generated from particle images recorded on camera frames. The application encompasses digital computer systems and distribution mediums implementing the method disclosed and is particularly applicable to recognizing trajectories of particles in particle flows of high particle concentration. The method accomplishes trajectory recognition by forming Candidate Trajectory Trees and repeated searches at varying Search Velocities, such that initial search areas are set to a minimum size in order to recognize only the slowest, least accelerating particles which produce higher local concentrations. When a trajectory is recognized, the centroids in that trajectory are removed from consideration in future searches.

  17. Amine bearing polymeric particles as acid neutralizers for engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, A.N.; Chattha, M.S.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a lubricating oil composition consisting of a major proportion of a lubricating base oil and about 0.1 to 15 weight percent of an acid neutralizing additive which consists of polymer particles (a) bearing pendant amine groups, and (b) having a diameter of about 500 A and 10,000 A. The amine functional particles are formed by reacting polymer particles bearing pendant epoxide groups with a secondary amine in an amount so as to react essentially all of the epoxide groups on the epoxide bearing polymer particles with the secondary amine. The polymer particles bearing pendant epoxide groups are formed by the free radical addition polymerization of: (a) between about 50 and about 100 weight percent of an ethylenically unsaturated monomers bearing an epoxide group, and (b) 0 up to about 50 weight percent of other monoethylenically unsaturated monomers; in the presence of: (I) a non-polar organic liquid which is a solvent for the polymerizable monomers, but a non-solvent for the resultant polymer, and (II) polymeric dispersion stabilizer containing at least two segments, with one segment being solvated by the non-polar organic liquid and the second segment being of different polarity than the first segment and relatively insoluble in the non-polar organic liquid. The second segment of the stabilizer is chemically attached to the polymerized particle.

  18. Hygroscopic properties of ultrafine aerosol particles in the boreal forest: diurnal variation, solubility and the influence of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Aufmhoff, H.; Aalto, P.; Hämeri, K.; Arnold, F.; Laaksonen, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-10-01

    Freshly formed atmospheric aerosol particles are neither large enough to efficiently scatter incoming solar radiation nor able to act as cloud condensation nuclei. As the particles grow larger, their hygroscopicity determines the limiting size after which they are important in both of the aforementioned processes. The condensing species resulting in growth alter the hygroscopicity of the particles. We have measured hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles present in a boreal forest, along with the very hygroscopic atmospheric trace gas sulfuric acid. The focus was on days with new particle formation by nucleation. The measured hygroscopic growth factors (GF) correlated positively with gaseous phase sulfuric acid concentrations. This correlation had a strong size dependency; the smaller the particle, the more condensing sulfuric acid is bound to alter the GF due to initially smaller mass. In addition, water uptake of nucleation mode particles was monitored during new particle formation events and followed during their growth to Aitken mode sizes. As the modal diameter increased, the solubility of the particles decreased. This indicated that initially more hygroscopic particles transformed into less hygroscopic or even hydrophobic particles. A similar behavior was seen also during days with no particle formation, with GF decreasing during the evenings and increasing during early morning. This can be tentatively explained by day- and nighttime differences in the hygroscopicity of condensable vapors.

  19. LC/ESI-MS/MS method for determination of salivary eicosapentaenoic acid concentration to arachidonic acid concentration ratio.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Shoujiro; Tomaru, Koki; Matsumoto, Nagisa; Watanabe, Shui; Higashi, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    A simple liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) method for determination of the eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) concentration to arachidonic acid (AA) concentration ratio in human saliva has been developed. The EPA/AA ratio in serum or plasma is widely recognized as a useful indicator in identifying the risk of cardiovascular disease, especially atherosclerosis. The salivary EPA/AA ratio is expected to be a convenient alternative to the serum or plasma EPA/AA ratio, because saliva offers the advantages of easy and noninvasive sampling. The saliva was deproteinized with acetonitrile, purified using an Oasis HLB cartridge, and derivatized with 1-[(4-dimethylaminophenyl)carbonyl]piperazine (DAPPZ). The derivatized EPA and AA were subjected to LC/ESI-MS/MS, and the EPA/AA ratio was determined using the selected reaction monitoring mode. The DAPPZ-derivatization increased the ESI sensitivity by 100- and 300-fold for EPA and AA, respectively, and enabled the detection of trace fatty acids in saliva using a 200 μL sample. The assay reproducibility was satisfactory (relative standard deviation, <5.0%). The method was successfully applied to the measurement of the salivary EPA/AA ratios of healthy Japanese subjects and their changes owing to the supplementation of EPA. PMID:25620210

  20. COOKING-RELATED PARTICLE CONCENTRATIONS MEASURED IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOME IN RESTON, VA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In non-smoking households, cooking is one of the most significant sources of indoor particles. To date, there are limited data available regarding indoor particle concentrations generated by different types of cooking. To increase the knowledge base associated with particles ...

  1. Ice formation on nitric acid coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-08-16

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles due to nitric acid coating are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coating on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated ice nucleation ability of Arizona test dust, illite, K-feldspar and quartz as a function of temperature (-25 to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75 to 110%). Particles were size selected at 250 nm and transported (bare or coated) to the ice nucleation chamber to determine the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and water saturation conditions. All dust nucleated ice at water-subsaturated conditions, but the coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability compared to bare particles. However, at water-supersaturated conditions, we observed that bare and coated particles had nearly similar ice nucleation characteristics. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that structural properties of bare dust particles modified after acid treatment. We found that lattice parameters were slightly different, but crystallite sizes of the coated particles were reduced compared to bare particles. Next, single-column model results show that simulated ice crystal number concentrations mostly depends upon fraction of particles that are coated, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and the competition between ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, we observed that coating modify the ice-cloud properties and the picture of ice and mixed-phase cloud evolution is complex when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms are competing for fixed water vapor mass.

  2. PARTICLE ASSOCIATION EFFECTS ON MICROBIAL INDICATOR CONCENTRATIONS AND CSO DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combined sewer overflow (CSO) and wastewater disinfection effectiveness are evaluated by measuring microbial indicator concentrations before and after disinfection. The standard techniques for quantifying indicators are membrane filtration and multiple-tube fermentation/most pro...

  3. CONTROLLED EXPOSURES OF HEALTHY AND ASTHMATIC VOLUNTEERS TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES IN METROPOLITAN LOS ANGELES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigators expect to use a Harvard ambient particle concentrator to assess the effects of exposure to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) on healthy and asthmatic people.  12 healthy individuals and 12 individuals with mild asthma will be exposed to either filtere...

  4. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR PARTICLES INDUCE PULMONARY INFLAMMATION IN HEALTHY HUMAN VOLUNTEERS

    EPA Science Inventory


    We tested the hypothesis that exposure of healthy volunteers to concentrated ambient particles (CAPS) is associated with an influx of inflammatory cells into the lower respiratory tract. Thirty-eight volunteers were exposed to either filtered air or particles concentrated fro...

  5. Apparatus and method for collection and concentration of respirable particles into a small fluid volume

    DOEpatents

    Simon, Jonathan N.; Brown, Steve B.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the collection of respirable particles and concentration of such particles into a small fluid volume. The apparatus captures and concentrates small (1-10 .mu.m) respirable particles into a sub-millileter volume of fluid. The method involves a two step operation, collection and concentration: wherein collection of particles is by a wetted surface having small vertical slits that act as capillary channels; and concentration is carried out by transfer of the collected particles to a small volume (sub-milliliter) container by centrifugal force whereby the particles are forced through the vertical slits and contact a non-wetted wall surface, and are deflected to the bottom where they are contained for analysis, such as a portable flow cytometer or a portable PCR DNA analysis system.

  6. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J.; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K.; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N.; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E.; Wagner, Paul E.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  7. Acid-catalyzed reactions of hexanal on sulfuric acid particles: Identification of reaction products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Rebecca M.; Elrod, Matthew J.; Kincaid, Kristi; Beaver, Melinda R.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    While it is well established that organics compose a large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol mass, the mechanisms through which organics are incorporated into atmospheric aerosols are not well understood. Acid-catalyzed reactions of compounds with carbonyl groups have recently been suggested as important pathways for transfer of volatile organics into acidic aerosols. In the present study, we use the aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to probe the uptake of gas-phase hexanal into ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols. While both deliquesced and dry non-acidic ammonium sulfate aerosols showed no organic uptake, the acidic aerosols took up substantial amounts of organic material when exposed to hexanal vapor. Further, we used 1H-NMR, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and GC-MS to identify the products of the acid-catalyzed reaction of hexanal in acidic aerosols. Both aldol condensation and hemiacetal products were identified, with the dominant reaction products dependent upon the initial acid concentration of the aerosol. The aldol condensation product was formed only at initial concentrations of 75-96 wt% sulfuric acid in water. The hemiacetal was produced at all sulfuric acid concentrations studied, 30-96 wt% sulfuric acid in water. Aerosols up to 88.4 wt% organic/11.1 wt% H 2SO 4/0.5 wt% water were produced via these two dimerization reaction pathways. The UV-VIS spectrum of the isolated aldol condensation product, 2-butyl 2-octenal, extends into the visible region, suggesting these reactions may impact aerosol optical properties as well as aerosol composition. In contrast to previous suggestions, no polymerization of hexanal or its products was observed at any sulfuric acid concentration studied, from 30 to 96 wt% in water.

  8. Characterization of ultrafine particle number concentration and new particle formation in an urban environment of Taipei, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Huang, W.-R.; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2013-09-01

    An intensive aerosol characterization experiment was performed at the Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory (TARO, 25.02° N, 121.53° E) in the urban area of Taipei, Taiwan, during July 2012. Number concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles were measured continuously, which were accompanied by concurrent measurements of mass concentration of submicron particles, PM1 (d ≤ 1 μm), and photolysis rate of ozone, J(O1D). The averaged number concentrations of total (Ntotal), accumulation mode (Nacu), Aitken mode (NAitken), and nucleation mode (Nnuc) particles were 13.9 × 103 cm-3, 1.2 × 103 cm-3, 6.1 × 103 cm-3, and 6.6 × 103 cm-3, respectively. Accordingly, the ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100 nm) accounted for 91% of the total number concentration of particles measured in this study (10 ≤ d ≤ 429 nm), indicating the importance of UFPs to the air quality and radiation budget in Taipei and its surrounding areas. An averaged Nnuc / NOx ratio of 192.4 cm-3 ppbv-1 was derived from nighttime measurements, which was suggested to be the characteristic of vehicle emissions that contributed to the "urban background" of nucleation mode particles throughout a day. On the contrary, it was found that the number concentration of nucleation mode particles was independent of NOx and could be elevated up to 10 times of the "urban background" levels during daytime, suggesting a substantial amount of nucleation mode particles produced from photochemical processes. Averages (± 1σ) of the diameter growth rate (GR) and formation rate of nucleation mode particles, J10, were 11.9 ± 10.6 nm h-1 and 6.9 ± 3.0 cm-3 s-1, respectively. Consistency in the time series of the nucleation mode particle concentration and the proxy of H2SO4 production, UVB · SO2/CS, for new particle formation (NPF) events suggested that photooxidation of SO2 was likely one of the major mechanisms for the formation of new particles in our study area. Moreover, it was revealed that the

  9. Concentrations of ultrafine particles at a highway toll collection booth and exposure implications for toll collectors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Cheng-Hsiung; Huang, Hsiao-Lin; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2010-12-15

    Research regarding the magnitude of ultrafine particle levels at highway toll stations is limited. This study measured ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles at a highway toll station from October 30 to November 1 and November 5 to November 6, 2008. A scanning mobility particle sizer was used to measure ultrafine particle concentrations at a ticket/cash tollbooth. Levels of hourly average ultrafine particles at the tollbooth were about 3-6 times higher than those in urban backgrounds, indicating that a considerable amount of ultrafine particles are exhausted from passing vehicles. A bi-modal size distribution pattern with a dominant mode at about <6 nm and a minor mode at about 40 nm was observed at the tollbooth. The high amounts of nanoparticles in this study can be attributed to gas-to-particle reactions in fresh fumes emitted directly from vehicles. The influences of traffic volume, wind speed, and relative humidity on ultrafine particle concentrations were also determined. High ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles existed under low wind speed, low relative humidity, and high traffic volume. Although different factors account for high ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles at the tollbooth, measurements indicate that toll collectors who work close to traffic emission sources have a high exposure risk. PMID:21071066

  10. Vehicle and driving characteristics that influence in-cabin particle number concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Kostenidou, Evangelia; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J; Fruin, Scott A

    2011-10-15

    In-transit microenvironments experience elevated levels of vehicle-related pollutants such as ultrafine particles. However, in-vehicle particle number concentrations are frequently lower than on-road concentrations due to particle losses inside vehicles. Particle concentration reduction occurs due to a complicated interplay between a vehicle's air-exchange rate (AER), which determines particle influx rate, and particle losses due to surfaces and the in-cabin air filter. Accurate determination of inside-to-outside particle concentration ratios is best made under realistic aerodynamic and AER conditions because these ratios and AER are determined by vehicle speed and ventilation preference, in addition to vehicle characteristics such as age. In this study, 6 vehicles were tested at 76 combinations of driving speeds, ventilation conditions (i.e., outside air or recirculation), and fan settings. Under recirculation conditions, particle number attenuation (number reduction for 10-1000 nm particles) averaged 0.83 ± 0.13 and was strongly negatively correlated with increasing AER, which in turn depended on speed and the age of the vehicle. Under outside air conditions, attenuation averaged 0.33 ± 0.10 and primarily decreased at higher fan settings that increased AER. In general, in-cabin particle number reductions did not vary strongly with particle size, and cabin filters exhibited low removal efficiencies. PMID:21928803

  11. Electrophoretic Mobility of Poly(acrylic acid)-Coated Alumina Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bhosale, Prasad S.; Chun, Jaehun; Berg, John C.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) adsorption on the electrokinetic behavior of alumina dispersions under high pH conditions was investigated as a function of polymer concentration and molecular weight as well as the presence, concentration and ion type of background electrolyte. Systems of this type are relevant to nuclear waste treatment, in which PAA is known to be an effective rheology modifier. The presence of all but the lowest molecular weight PAA studied (1800) led to decreases in dynamic electrophoretic mobility at low polymer concentrations, attributable to bridging flocculation, as verified by measurements of particle size distribution. Bridging effects increased with polymer molecular weight, and decreased with polymer concentration. Increases in background electrolyte concentration enhanced dynamic electrophoretic mobility as the polymer layers were compressed and bridging was reduced. Such enhancements were reduced as the cation was changed from Na+ to K+ to Cs+.

  12. Dietary arachidonic acid dose-dependently increases the arachidonic acid concentration in human milk.

    PubMed

    Weseler, Antje R; Dirix, Chantal E H; Bruins, Maaike J; Hornstra, Gerard

    2008-11-01

    Lactation hampers normalization of the maternal arachidonic acid (AA) status, which is reduced after pregnancy and can further decline by the presently recommended increased consumption of (n-3) long-chain PUFA [(n-3) LCPUFA]. This may be unfavorable for breast-fed infants, because they also require an optimum supply of (n-6) LCPUFA. We therefore investigated the LCPUFA responses in nursing mothers upon increased consumption of AA and (n-3) LCPUFA. In a parallel, double-blind, controlled trial, lactating women received for 8 wk no extra LCPUFA (control group, n = 8), 200 (low AA group, n = 9), or 400 (high AA group, n = 8) mg/d AA in combination with (n-3) LCPUFA [320 mg/d docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), 80 mg/d eicosapentaenoic acid, and 80 mg/d other (n-3) fatty acids], or this dose of (n-3) LCPUFA alone [DHA + eicosapentaenoic acid group, n = 8]. Relative concentrations of AA, DHA, and sums of (n-6) and (n-3) LCPUFA were measured in milk total lipids (TL) and erythrocyte phospholipids (PL) after 2 and 8 wk and changes were compared by ANCOVA. The combined consumption of AA and (n-3) LCPUFA caused dose-dependent elevations of AA and total (n-6) LCPUFA concentrations in milk TL and did not significantly affect the DHA and total (n-3) LCPUFA increases caused by (n-3) LCPUFA supplementation only. This latter treatment did not significantly affect breast milk AA and total (n-6) LCPUFA concentrations. AA and DHA concentrations in milk TL and their changes were strongly and positively correlated with their corresponding values in erythrocyte PL (r(2) = 0.27-0.50; P concentration of their milk TL. PMID:18936218

  13. Effects of precursor concentration and acidic sulfate in aqueous glyoxal-OH radical oxidation and implications for secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Perri, Mark J; Seitzinger, Sybil P; Turpin, Barbara J

    2009-11-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated that aqueous OH radical oxidation of glyoxal yields low-volatility compounds. When this chemistry takes place in clouds and fogs, followed by droplet evaporation (or if it occurs in aerosol water), the products are expected to remain partially in the particle phase, forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Acidic sulfate exists ubiquitously in atmospheric water and has been shown to enhance SOA formation through aerosol phase reactions. In this work, we investigate how starting concentrations of glyoxal (30-3000 microM) and the presence of acidic sulfate (0-840 microM) affect product formation in the aqueous reaction between glyoxal and OH radical. The oxalic acid yield decreased with increasing precursor concentrations, and the presence of sulfuric acid did not alter oxalic acid concentrations significantly. A dilute aqueous chemistry model successfully reproduced oxalic acid concentrations, when the experiment was performed at cloud-relevant concentrations (glyoxal <300 microM), but predictions deviated from measurements at increasing concentrations. Results elucidate similarities and differences in aqueous glyoxal chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. They validate for the first time the accuracy of model predictions at cloud-relevant concentrations. These results suggest that cloud processing of glyoxal could be an important source of SOA. PMID:19924930

  14. Apparatus to collect, classify, concentrate, and characterize gas-borne particles

    DOEpatents

    Rader, Daniel J.; Torczynski, John R.; Wally, Karl; Brockmann, John E.

    2003-12-16

    An aerosol lab-on-a-chip (ALOC) integrates one or more of a variety of particle collection, classification, concentration (enrichment), an characterization processes onto a single substrate or layered stack of such substrates. By mounting a UV laser diode laser light source on the substrate, or substrates tack, so that it is located down-stream of the sample inlet port and at right angle the sample particle stream, the UV light source can illuminate individual particles in the stream to induce a fluorescence response in those particles having a fluorescent signature such as biological particles, some of said particles. An illuminated particle having a fluorescent signal above a threshold signal would trigger a sorter module that would separate that particle from the particle stream.

  15. Variation of particle number concentration and size distributions at the urban environment in Vilnius (Lithuania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulevicius, Vidmantas; Byčenkienë, Steigvilë; Plauškaitë, Kristina; Dudoitis, Vadimas

    2013-05-01

    This study presents results of research on urban aerosol particles with a focus on the particle size distribution and the aerosol particle number concentration (PNC). The real time measurements of the aerosol PNC in the size range of 9-840 nm were performed at the urban background site using a Condensed Particle Counter and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Strong diurnal patterns in aerosol PNC were evident as a direct effect of three sources of the aerosol particles (nucleation, traffic, and residential heating appliances). The traffic exhaust emissions were a major contributor of the pollution observed at the roadside site that was dominated by the nucleation mode particles, while particles formed due to the residential heating appliances and secondary formation processes contributed to the accumulation mode particles and could impact the variation of PNC and its size distribution during the same day.

  16. Contribution from indoor sources to particle number and mass concentrations in residential houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia; Hitchins, Jane; Gilbert, Dale

    As part of a large study investigating indoor air in residential houses in Brisbane, Australia, the purpose of this work was to quantify emission characteristics of indoor particle sources in 15 houses. Submicrometer particle number and approximation of PM 2.5 concentrations were measured simultaneously for more than 48 h in the kitchen of all the houses by using a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a photometer (DustTrak), respectively. In addition, characterizations of particles resulting from cooking conducted in an identical way in all the houses were measured by using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and a DustTrak. All the events of elevated particle concentrations were linked to indoor activities using house occupants diary entries, and catalogued into 21 different types of indoor activities. This enabled quantification of the effect of indoor sources on indoor particle concentrations as well as quantification of emission rates from the sources. For example, the study found that frying, grilling, stove use, toasting, cooking pizza, cooking, candle vaporizing eucalyptus oil and fan heater use, could elevate the indoor submicrometer particle number concentration levels by more than five times, while PM 2.5 concentrations could be up to 3, 30 and 90 times higher than the background levels during smoking, frying and grilling, respectively.

  17. Influence of compressive strength and applied force in concrete on particles exposure concentrations during cutting processes.

    PubMed

    Soo, Jhy-Charm; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Chen, Ching-Hwa; Chen, Mei-Ru; Hsu, Hsin-I; Wu, Trong-Neng

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this research was to identify the influence of applied force (AF) and the compressive strength (CS) of concrete on particle exposure concentrations during concrete cutting processes. Five cutting conditions were selected with AF varied between 9.8 and 49 N and CS varied between 2500 and 6000 psi. For each selected cutting condition, the measured total dust concentrations (C(tot)) were used to further determine the corresponding three health-related exposure concentrations of the inhalable (C(inh)), thoracic (C(thor)), and respirable fraction (C(res)). Results show that particle size distribution was consistently in a bimodal form under all selected cutting conditions. An increase in CS resulted in an increase in coarse particle generations leading to an increase in the four measured particle exposure levels. An increase in AF resulted in an increase in exposure concentrations with a higher fraction of fine particles (i.e., C(tho) and C(res)) However, for particle exposure concentrations with a higher fraction of coarse particles (i.e., C(tot) and C(inh)), an increase in AF resulted in an initial increase, followed by a decrease in concentration. Finally, the above inferences were further confirmed through the use of fixed-effect models to determine the influence of both CS and AF on the four exposure concentrations. These results provide a reference for industries to initiate appropriate control strategies to reduce the exposure levels encountered by workers. PMID:21621248

  18. Mechanochemical leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate by sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadabad, Farhad Khorramshahi; Hejazi, Sina; khaki, Jalil Vahdati; Babakhani, Abolfazl

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to introduce a new cost-effective methodology for increasing the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite concentrates at ambient temperature and pressure. Mechanical activation was employed during the leaching (mechanochemical leaching) of chalcopyrite concentrates in a sulfuric acid medium at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. High energy ball milling process was used during the leaching to provide the mechanochemical leaching condition, and atomic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to determine the leaching behavior of chalcopyrite. Moreover, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the chalcopyrite powder before and after leaching. The results demonstrated that mechanochemical leaching was effective; the extraction of copper increased significantly and continuously. Although the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite was very low at ambient temperature, the percentages of copper dissolved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3) after 20 h of mechanochemical leaching reached 28% and 33%, respectively. Given the efficiency of the developed method and the facts that it does not require the use of an autoclave and can be conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, it represents an economical and easy-to-use method for the leaching industry.

  19. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.148 Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice is the food that complies with the requirements for...

  20. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.148 Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice is the food that complies with the requirements for...

  1. A simple hydrothermal preparation of TiO 2 nanomaterials using concentrated hydrochloric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Phan, Thuy-Duong; Pham, Hai-Dinh; Viet Cuong, Tran; Jung Kim, Eui; Kim, Sunwook; Woo Shin, Eun

    2009-12-01

    A TiO 2 nanostructure was synthesized via a simple method using only concentrated hydrochloric acid as the morphological/crystallographic controlling agent. Microscopy images showed that the texture of the TiO 2 powder could be easily engineered and tuned by tailoring the HCl volume, creating cuboid, flower, cauliflower, and ball-shaped particles. Three-dimensional TiO 2 microparticles resulted from the self-assembly of nanostructured sub-units including nanocubes, nanoprisms, and nanorods. The crystalline anatase and rutile phases were also identified depending on the acidic medium. HCl played a key role in orchestrating the structures and morphologies of the TiO 2 nanoscale materials. The phase transformation and morphological changes were strongly related to the crystal growth mechanism of the TiO 2 nanostructure.

  2. A single-particle characterization of a mobile Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System for exposure studies

    PubMed Central

    Freney, Evelyn J; Heal, Mathew R; Donovan, Robert J; Mills, Nicholas L; Donaldson, Kenneth; Newby, David E; Fokkens, Paul HB; Cassee, Flemming R

    2006-01-01

    Background An Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS) was used to investigate the size and chemical composition of fine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) in the size range 0.2–2.6 μm produced by a Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enrichment System (VACES) contained within the Mobile Ambient Particle Concentrator Exposure Laboratory (MAPCEL). The data were collected during a study of human exposure to CAPs, in Edinburgh (UK), in February-March 2004. The air flow prior to, and post, concentration in the VACES was sampled in turn into the ATOFMS, which provides simultaneous size and positive and negative mass spectral data on individual fine particles. Results The particle size distribution was unaltered by the concentrator over the size range 0.2–2.6 μm, with an average enrichment factor during this study of ~5 (after dilution of the final air stream). The mass spectra from single particles were objectively grouped into 20 clusters using the multivariate K-means algorithm and then further grouped manually, according to similarity in composition and time sequence, into 8 main clusters. The particle ensemble was dominated by pure and reacted sea salt and other coarse inorganic dusts (as a consequence of the prevailing maritime-source climatology during the study), with relatively minor contributions from carbonaceous and secondary material. Very minor variations in particle composition were noted pre- and post-particle concentration, but overall there was no evidence of any significant change in particle composition. Conclusion These results confirm, via single particle analysis, the preservation of the size distribution and chemical composition of fine ambient PM in the size range 0.2–2.6 μm after passage through the VACES concentration instrumentation. PMID:16723024

  3. Radon in indoor concentrations and indoor concentrations of metal dust particles in museums and other public buildings.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, G L; Braz, D; de Jesus, E F; Santos, S M; Cardoso, K; Hecht, A A; Dias da Cunha, Moore K

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the public and occupational exposure to radon and metal-bearing particles in museums and public buildings located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For this study, four buildings were selected: two historic buildings, which currently house an art gallery and an art museum; and two modern buildings, a chapel and a club. Integrated radon concentration measurements were performed using passive radon detectors with solid state nuclear track detector-type Lexan used as nuclear track detector. Air samplers with a cyclone were used to collect the airborne particle samples that were analyzed by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. The average unattached-radon concentrations in indoor air in the buildings were above 40 Bq/m(3), with the exception of Building D as measured in 2009. The average radon concentrations in indoor air in the four buildings in 2009 were below the recommended reference level by World Health Organization (100 Bq/m(3)); however, in 2011, the average concentrations of radon in Buildings A and C were above this level, though lower than 300 Bq/m(3). The average concentrations of unattached radon were lower than 148 Bq/m(3) (4pCi/L), the USEPA level recommended to take action to reduce the concentrations of radon in indoor air. The unattached-radon average concentrations were also lower than the value recommended by the European Union for new houses. As the unattached-radon concentrations were below the international level recommended to take action to reduce the radon concentration in air, it was concluded that during the period of sampling, there was low risk to human health due to the inhalation of unattached radon in these four buildings. PMID:23124728

  4. Unexpectedly high indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations associated with nitrous acid.

    PubMed

    Gómez Alvarez, Elena; Amedro, Damien; Afif, Charbel; Gligorovski, Sasho; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Schoemacker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Wortham, Henri

    2013-08-13

    The hydroxyl (OH) radical is the most important oxidant in the atmosphere since it controls its self-oxidizing capacity. The main sources of OH radicals are the photolysis of ozone and the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO). Due to the attenuation of solar radiation in the indoor environment, the possibility of OH formation through photolytic pathways indoors has been ignored up to now. In the indoor air, the ozonolysis of alkenes has been suggested as an alternative route of OH formation. Models and indirect measurements performed up to now according to this hypothesis suggest concentrations of OH radicals on the order of 10(4)-10(5) molecules per cubic centimeter. Here, we present direct measurements of significant amounts of OH radicals of up to 1.8⋅10(6) molecules per cubic centimeter during an experimental campaign carried out in a school classroom in Marseille. This concentration is on the same order of magnitude of outdoor OH levels in the urban scenario. We also show that photolysis of HONO is an important source of OH radicals indoors under certain conditions (i.e., direct solar irradiation inside the room). Additionally, the OH concentrations were found to follow a linear dependence with the product J(HONO)⋅[HONO]. This was also supported by using a simple quasiphotostationary state model on the OH radical budget. These findings force a change in our understanding of indoor air quality because the reactivity linked to OH would involve formation of secondary species through chemical reactions that are potentially more hazardous than the primary pollutants in the indoor air. PMID:23898188

  5. Unexpectedly high indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations associated with nitrous acid

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Alvarez, Elena; Amedro, Damien; Afif, Charbel; Gligorovski, Sasho; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Doussin, Jean-Francois; Wortham, Henri

    2013-01-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) radical is the most important oxidant in the atmosphere since it controls its self-oxidizing capacity. The main sources of OH radicals are the photolysis of ozone and the photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO). Due to the attenuation of solar radiation in the indoor environment, the possibility of OH formation through photolytic pathways indoors has been ignored up to now. In the indoor air, the ozonolysis of alkenes has been suggested as an alternative route of OH formation. Models and indirect measurements performed up to now according to this hypothesis suggest concentrations of OH radicals on the order of 104–105 molecules per cubic centimeter. Here, we present direct measurements of significant amounts of OH radicals of up to 1.8⋅106 molecules per cubic centimeter during an experimental campaign carried out in a school classroom in Marseille. This concentration is on the same order of magnitude of outdoor OH levels in the urban scenario. We also show that photolysis of HONO is an important source of OH radicals indoors under certain conditions (i.e., direct solar irradiation inside the room). Additionally, the OH concentrations were found to follow a linear dependence with the product J(HONO)⋅[HONO]. This was also supported by using a simple quasiphotostationary state model on the OH radical budget. These findings force a change in our understanding of indoor air quality because the reactivity linked to OH would involve formation of secondary species through chemical reactions that are potentially more hazardous than the primary pollutants in the indoor air. PMID:23898188

  6. Nicotinic acid modulates intracellular calcium concentration and disassembles the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIEJING; LI, YANXI; ZHANG, PENGHUI; NIU, HUA; SHI, YU

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA), a member of the vitamin B family, is well known for its functions in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis due to decreasing plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In recent years, the major side effect of NA, cutaneous flushing, has also attracted extensive attention. However, the effects of NA in other aspects of physiology or cell biology have remained elusive. The present study provided evidence that high concentrations of NA were able to first reduce and later elevate intracellular [Ca2+] in the NIH3T3 cell line. The reduction of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration was achieved within the initial 10 sec, and was preceded by a gradual elevation of intracellular [Ca2+]. Notably, marked accumulation of opaque materials in the perinuclear region was observed in NIH3T3 cells treated with 70 mM NA. Further analysis revealed that treatment with 70 mM NA for 1 h disassembled the microtubule and F-actin cytoskeleton systems and resulted in β-tubulin degradation in an ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent manner. These data indicated that high concentrations of NA disrupted cytoskeleton structures, which may have contributed to minus end (nucleus region) to plus end (cell membrane region)-directed transport processes and resulted in the deposition of material in the perinuclear region. Artificially increasing [Ca2+] adding CaCl2 to the culture media effected the disassembly of F-actin, while it had no apparent effect on microtubules. These results suggested that the disruption of the cytoskeleton systems was not entirely due to the NA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]. Finally, microinjection of NA into xenopus embryos blocked the transport of melanosomes to the peripheral cellular area. In conclusion, the present study indicated that NA disassembles F-actin and microtubule systems, thereby blocking cytoskeleton-dependent intracellular transport. PMID:25241762

  7. Nicotinic acid modulates intracellular calcium concentration and disassembles the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiejing; Li, Yanxi; Zhang, Penghui; Niu, Hua; Shi, Yu

    2014-12-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA), a member of the vitamin B family, is well known for its functions in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis due to decreasing plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. In recent years, the major side effect of NA, cutaneous flushing, has also attracted extensive attention. However, the effects of NA in other aspects of physiology or cell biology have remained elusive. The present study provided evidence that high concentrations of NA were able to first reduce and later elevate intracellular [Ca2+] in the NIH3T3 cell line. The reduction of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration was achieved within the initial 10 sec, and was preceded by a gradual elevation of intracellular [Ca2+]. Notably, marked accumulation of opaque materials in the perinuclear region was observed in NIH3T3 cells treated with 70 mM NA. Further analysis revealed that treatment with 70 mM NA for 1 h disassembled the microtubule and F‑actin cytoskeleton systems and resulted in β‑tubulin degradation in an ubiquitin‑proteasome-dependent manner. These data indicated that high concentrations of NA disrupted cytoskeleton structures, which may have contributed to minus end (nucleus region) to plus end (cell membrane region)-directed transport processes and resulted in the deposition of material in the perinuclear region. Artificially increasing [Ca2+] adding CaCl2 to the culture media effected the disassembly of F‑actin, while it had no apparent effect on microtubules. These results suggested that the disruption of the cytoskeleton systems was not entirely due to the NA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]. Finally, microinjection of NA into xenopus embryos blocked the transport of melanosomes to the peripheral cellular area. In conclusion, the present study indicated that NA disassembles F‑actin and microtubule systems, thereby blocking cytoskeleton-dependent intracellular transport. PMID:25241762

  8. Characterisation of particle emissions from the driving car fleet and the contribution to ambient and indoor particle concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmgren, Finn; Wåhlin, Peter; Kildesø, Jan; Afshari, Alireza; Fogh, Christian L.

    The population is mainly exposed to high air pollution concentrations in the urban environment, where motor vehicle emissions constitute the main source of fine and ultrafine particles. These particles can penetrate deep into the respiratory system, and studies indicate that the smaller the particle, the larger the health impacts. The chemical composition, surface reactivity and physical properties are also important. However, the knowledge about chemical and physical properties of particles and the temporal and spatial variability of the smallest particles is still very limited. The present study summarises the first results of a larger project with the aims to improve the knowledge. The concentration and the emissions of ultrafine particles from petrol and diesel vehicles, respectively, have been quantified using Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer of ultrafine particles in the size range 6-700 nm and routine monitoring data from urban streets and urban background in Denmark. The quantification was carried out using receptor modelling. The number size distributions of petrol and diesel emissions showed a maximum at 20-30 nm and non-traffic at ≈100 nm. The contribution of ultrafine particles from diesel vehicles is dominating in streets. The same technique has been applied on PM 10, and ≈50% contribution from non-traffic. The technique has also been introduced in relation to elemental and organic carbon, and the first data showed strong correlation between traffic pollution and elemental carbon. The outdoor air quality has a significant effect on indoor pollution levels, and we spend most of the time indoors. Knowledge about the influence of ambient air pollution on the concentrations in the indoor environment is therefore crucial for assessment of human health effects of traffic pollution. The results of our studies will be included in air quality models for calculation of human exposure. Preliminary results from our first campaign showed, that the deposition

  9. Particle number concentration, size distribution and chemical composition during haze and photochemical smog episodes in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Chen, Jianmin; Cheng, Tiantao; Zhang, Renyi; Wang, Xinming

    2014-09-01

    The aerosol number concentration and size distribution as well as size-resolved particle chemical composition were measured during haze and photochemical smog episodes in Shanghai in 2009. The number of haze days accounted for 43%, of which 30% was severe (visibility<2km) and moderate (2km≤visibility<3km) haze, mainly distributed in winter and spring. The mean particle number concentration was about 17,000/cm(3) in haze, more than 2 times that in clean days. The greatest increase of particle number concentration was in 0.5-1μm and 1-10μm size fractions during haze events, about 17.78 times and 8.78 times those of clean days. The largest increase of particle number concentration was within 50-100nm and 100-200nm fractions during photochemical smog episodes, about 5.89 times and 4.29 times those of clean days. The particle volume concentration and surface concentration in haze, photochemical smog and clean days were 102, 49, 15μm(3)/cm(3) and 949, 649, 206μm(2)/cm(3), respectively. As haze events got more severe, the number concentration of particles smaller than 50nm decreased, but the particles of 50-200nm and 0.5-1μm increased. The diurnal variation of particle number concentration showed a bimodal pattern in haze days. All soluble ions were increased during haze events, of which NH4(+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) increased greatly, followed by Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-). These ions were very different in size-resolved particles during haze and photochemical smog episodes. PMID:25193840

  10. Immersion freezing in concentrated solution droplets for a variety of ice nucleating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Kohn, Monika; Grawe, Sarah; Hartmann, Susan; Hellner, Lisa; Herenz, Paul; Welti, Andre; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The measurement campaign LINC (Leipzig Ice Nucleation counter Comparison) was conducted in September 2015, during which ice nucleation measurements as obtained with the following instruments were compared: - LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, see e.g. Wex et al., 2014) - PIMCA-PINC (Portable Immersion Mode Cooling Chamber together with PINC) - PINC (Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber, Chou et al., 2011) - SPIN (SPectrometer for Ice Nuclei, Droplet Measurement Technologies) While LACIS and PIMCA-PINC measured immersion freezing, PINC and SPIN varied the super-saturation during the measurements and collected data also for relative humidities below 100% RHw. A suite of different types of ice nucleating particles were examined, where particles were generated from suspensions, subsequently dried and size selected. For the following samples, data for all four instruments are available: K-feldspar, K-feldspar treated with nitric acid, Fluka-kaolinite and birch pollen. Immersion freezing measurements by LACIS and PIMCA-PINC were in excellent agreement. Respective parameterizations from these measurement were used to model the ice nucleation behavior below water vapor saturation, assuming that the process can be described as immersion freezing in concentrated solutions. This is equivalent to simply including a concentration dependent freezing point depression in the immersion freezing parameterization, as introduced for coated kaolinite particles in Wex et al. (2014). Overall, measurements performed below water vapor saturation were reproduced by the model, and it will be discussed in detail, why deviations were observed in some cases. Acknowledgement: Part of this work was funded by the DFG Research Unit FOR 1525 INUIT, grant WE 4722/1-2. Literature: Chou, C., O. Stetzer, E. Weingartner, Z. Juranyi, Z. A. Kanji, and U. Lohmann (2011), Ice nuclei properties within a Saharan dust event at the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11(10), 4725

  11. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on iron efficiency: Removal of three chloroacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shun; Wang, Xiao-mao; Mao, Yu-qin; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Hong-wei; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2015-04-15

    The monochloroacetic, dichloroacetic and trichloroacetic acid (MCAA, DCAA and TCAA) removed by metallic iron under controlled dissolved oxygen conditions (0, 0.75, 1.52, 2.59, 3.47 or 7.09 mg/L DO) was investigated in well-mixed batch systems. The removal of CAAs increased first and then decreased with increasing DO concentration. Compared with anoxic condition, the reduction of MCAA and DCAA was substantially enhanced in the presence of O2, while TCAA reduction was significantly inhibited above 2.59 mg/L. The 1.52 mg/L DO was optimum for the formation of final product, acetic acid. Chlorine mass balances were 69-102%, and carbon mass balances were 92-105%. With sufficient mass transfer from bulk to the particle surface, the degradation of CAAs was limited by their reduction or migration rate within iron particles, which were dependent on the change of reducing agents and corrosion coatings. Under anoxic conditions, the reduction of CAAs was mainly inhibited by the available reducing agents in the conductive layer. Under low oxic conditions, the increasing reducing agents and thin lepidocrocite layer were favorable for CAA dechlorination. Under high oxic conditions, the redundant oxygen competing for reducing agents and significant lepidocrocite growth became the major restricting factors. Various CAA removal mechanisms could be potentially applied to explaining the effect of DO concentration on iron efficiency for contaminant reduction in water and wastewater treatment. PMID:25697696

  12. Particle Concentration and Yield Stress of Biomass Slurries During Enzymatic Hydrolysis at High-Solids Loadings

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, C. M.; Dibble, C. J.; Knutsen, J. S.; Stickel, J. J.; Liberatore, M. W.

    2009-01-01

    Effective and efficient breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass remains a primary barrier for its use as a feedstock for renewable transportation fuels. A more detailed understanding of the material properties of biomass slurries during conversion is needed to design cost-effective conversion processes. A series of enzymatic saccharification experiments were performed with dilute acid pretreated corn stover at initial insoluble solids loadings of 20% by mass, during which the concentration of particulate solids and the rheological property yield stress ({tau}{sub y}) of the slurries were measured. The saccharified stover liquefies to the point of being pourable ({tau}{sub y} {le} 10 Pa) at a total biomass conversion of about 40%, after roughly 2 days of saccharification for a moderate loading of enzyme. Mass balance and semi-empirical relationships are developed to connect the progress of enzymatic hydrolysis with particle concentration and yield stress. The experimental data show good agreement with the proposed relationships. The predictive models developed here are based on established physical principles and should be applicable to the saccharification of other biomass systems. The concepts presented, especially the ability to predict yield stress from extent of conversion, will be helpful in the design and optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis processes that operate at high-solids loadings.

  13. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit. PMID:27610289

  14. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  15. Hydrogen Reduction Kinetics of Magnetite Concentrate Particles Relevant to a Novel Flash Ironmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Sohn, H. Y.

    2013-02-01

    A novel ironmaking technology is under development at the University of Utah. The purpose of this research was to determine comprehensive kinetics of the flash reduction reaction of magnetite concentrate particles by hydrogen. Experiments were carried out in the temperature range of 1423 K to 1673 K (1150 °C to 1400 °C) with the other experimental variables being hydrogen partial pressure and particle size. The nucleation and growth kinetics expression was found to describe the reduction rate of fine concentrate particles and the reduction kinetics had a 1/2-order dependence on hydrogen partial pressure and an activation energy of 463 kJ/mol. Unexpectedly, large concentrate particles reacted faster at 1423 K and 1473 K (1150 °C and 1200 °C), but the effect of particle size was negligible when the reduction temperature was above 1573 K (1300 °C). A complete reaction rate expression incorporating all these factors was formulated.

  16. Acidic species and chloride depletion in coarse aerosol particles in the US east coast.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunliang; Gao, Yuan

    2008-12-15

    To investigate the interactions of water-soluble acidic species associated with coarse mode aerosol particles (1.8-10 microm) and chlorine depletion, ten sets of size-segregated aerosol samples were collected by a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) in Newark, New Jersey on the U.S. east coast. The samples were grouped into two categories according to the air-mass back trajectories and mass ratios of sodium to magnesium and calcium: Group I was primarily impacted by marine air mass and Group II was dominated by the continental air mass. In Group I, the concentrations of coarse mode nitrate and chloride depletion showed a strong correlation (R2=0.88). Without considering other cations, nitrate was found to account for all of the chloride depletion in coarse particles for most samples. The association of coarse mode nitrate with sea-salt particles is favored when the mass ratio of sodium to calcium is approximately equal to or greater than unity. Excess sulfate accounts for a maximum of 33% of chloride depletion in the coarse particles. Regarding chloride depletion in the different particle sizes, excess nitrate and sulfate account for 89% of the chloride depletion in the particle size range of 1.8-3.2 microm in the sample from July 13-14; all of the determined dicarboxylic acids and mono-carboxylic acids cannot compensate for the rest of the chloride depletion. In Group II, high percentages of chloride depletion were not observed. With nitrate being dominant in chlorine depletion observed at this location, N-containing species from pollution emissions may have profound impact on atmospheric composition through altering chlorine chemistry in this region. PMID:18973925

  17. On-Road measurement of particulate matter emissions from vehicles: particle concentration, size distribution and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, N.; China, S.; Cook, J.; Kuhns, H. D.; Moosmuller, H.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-12-01

    During summer 2010, we conducted a field experiment in Southern Michigan to measure on-road vehicle emissions. During the campaign, particulate matter (PM) concentrations were monitored with a Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) and transmissometer system. The Lidar and transmissometer system measures PM mass concentration of vehicle exhaust using backscatter and extinction of an ultraviolet laser beam directed across the road. Collocated with the Lidar system we deployed an extractive system inclusive of a LiCor 840 to monitor CO2 concentrations, a laser aerosol spectrometer to measure particle size distributions for PM with diameter larger than 0.1 µm, and a portable condensation particle counter to estimate the total particle number concentration for particles with diameters between~30nm and 1 µm. In addition, road-side vehicle exhaust particles were collected on nuclepore filters for scanning electron microscopy analysis during selected periods of time. In this study we analyze fuel-based mass and number PM emission factors from passing vehicles. The emission factors are estimated normalizing the PM data by the CO2 concentration. The morphology of the particulates is also investigated with electron microscopy analysis. Type of vehicles and traffic counts were recorded by one of the researchers during the sampling period to evaluate the influence on particle morphology due to traffic volume and fuel type. Image processing and fractal geometry are used to estimate various morphological parameters and fractal dimension. Diurnal variation of particle morphology descriptors and fractal dimension of soot particles are investigated and compared with CO2 emissions, particle size distribution and particle number concentration for selected subsets of the data. Variations of PM emission factors and PM morphology are also investigated for different traffic conditions and days of the week. The analysis of the PM data is of particular importance in monitoring vehicle

  18. Shear-induced particle diffusion and its effects on the flow of concentrated suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Acrivos, A.

    1996-12-31

    The mechanism underlying shear-induced particle diffusion in concentrated suspensions is clarified. Examples are then presented where this diffusion process plays a crucial role in determining the manner by which such suspensions flow under laminar conditions.

  19. Modeling particle number concentrations along Interstate 10 in El Paso, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Olvera, Hector A.; Jimenez, Omar; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Annual average daily particle number concentrations around a highway were estimated with an atmospheric dispersion model and a land use regression model. The dispersion model was used to estimate particle concentrations along Interstate 10 at 98 locations within El Paso, Texas. This model employed annual averaged wind speed and annual average daily traffic counts as inputs. A land use regression model with vehicle kilometers traveled as the predictor variable was used to estimate local background concentrations away from the highway to adjust the near-highway concentration estimates. Estimated particle number concentrations ranged between 9.8 × 103 particles/cc and 1.3 × 105 particles/cc, and averaged 2.5 × 104 particles/cc (SE 421.0). Estimates were compared against values measured at seven sites located along I10 throughout the region. The average fractional error was 6% and ranged between -1% and -13% across sites. The largest bias of -13% was observed at a semi-rural site where traffic was lowest. The average bias amongst urban sites was 5%. The accuracy of the estimates depended primarily on the emission factor and the adjustment to local background conditions. An emission factor of 1.63 × 1014 particles/veh-km was based on a value proposed in the literature and adjusted with local measurements. The integration of the two modeling techniques ensured that the particle number concentrations estimates captured the impact of traffic along both the highway and arterial roadways. The performance and economical aspects of the two modeling techniques used in this study shows that producing particle concentration surfaces along major roadways would be feasible in urban regions where traffic and meteorological data are readily available. PMID:25313294

  20. Modeling particle number concentrations along Interstate 10 in El Paso, Texas.

    PubMed

    Olvera, Hector A; Jimenez, Omar; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2014-12-01

    Annual average daily particle number concentrations around a highway were estimated with an atmospheric dispersion model and a land use regression model. The dispersion model was used to estimate particle concentrations along Interstate 10 at 98 locations within El Paso, Texas. This model employed annual averaged wind speed and annual average daily traffic counts as inputs. A land use regression model with vehicle kilometers traveled as the predictor variable was used to estimate local background concentrations away from the highway to adjust the near-highway concentration estimates. Estimated particle number concentrations ranged between 9.8 × 10(3) particles/cc and 1.3 × 10(5) particles/cc, and averaged 2.5 × 10(4) particles/cc (SE 421.0). Estimates were compared against values measured at seven sites located along I10 throughout the region. The average fractional error was 6% and ranged between -1% and -13% across sites. The largest bias of -13% was observed at a semi-rural site where traffic was lowest. The average bias amongst urban sites was 5%. The accuracy of the estimates depended primarily on the emission factor and the adjustment to local background conditions. An emission factor of 1.63 × 10(14) particles/veh-km was based on a value proposed in the literature and adjusted with local measurements. The integration of the two modeling techniques ensured that the particle number concentrations estimates captured the impact of traffic along both the highway and arterial roadways. The performance and economical aspects of the two modeling techniques used in this study shows that producing particle concentration surfaces along major roadways would be feasible in urban regions where traffic and meteorological data are readily available. PMID:25313294

  1. Modeling particle number concentrations along Interstate 10 in El Paso, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvera, Hector A.; Jimenez, Omar; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2014-12-01

    Annual average daily particle number concentrations around a highway were estimated with an atmospheric dispersion model and a land use regression model. The dispersion model was used to estimate particle concentrations along Interstate 10 at 98 locations within El Paso, Texas. This model employed annual averaged wind speed and annual average daily traffic counts as inputs. A land use regression model with vehicle kilometers traveled as the predictor variable was used to estimate local background concentrations away from the highway to adjust the near-highway concentration estimates. Estimated particle number concentrations ranged between 9.8 × 103 particles/cc and 1.3 × 105 particles/cc, and averaged 2.5 × 104 particles/cc (SE 421.0). Estimates were compared against values measured at seven sites located along I10 throughout the region. The average fractional error was 6% and ranged between -1% and -13% across sites. The largest bias of -13% was observed at a semi-rural site where traffic was lowest. The average bias amongst urban sites was 5%. The accuracy of the estimates depended primarily on the emission factor and the adjustment to local background conditions. An emission factor of 1.63 × 1014 particles/veh-km was based on a value proposed in the literature and adjusted with local measurements. The integration of the two modeling techniques ensured that the particle number concentrations estimates captured the impact of traffic along both the highway and arterial roadways. The performance and economical aspects of the two modeling techniques used in this study shows that producing particle concentration surfaces along major roadways would be feasible in urban regions where traffic and meteorological data are readily available.

  2. Diamine-sulfuric acid reactions are a potent source of new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Coty N.; Bachman, Ryan; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nucleation from sulfuric acid depends on the concentrations and the stabilizing effect of other trace gases, such as ammonia and amines. Diamines are an understudied class of atmospherically relevant compounds, and we examine how they affect sulfuric acid nucleation in both flow reactor experiments and the atmosphere. The number of particles produced from sulfuric acid and diamines in the flow reactor was equal to or greater than the number formed from monoamines, implying that diamines are more effective nucleating agents. Upper limits of diamine abundance were also monitored during three field campaigns: Lamont, OK (2013); Lewes, DE (2012); and Atlanta, GA (2009). Mixing ratios were measured as high as tens of parts per trillion by volume (GA and OK). Laboratory results suggest that diamines at these levels are important for atmospheric nucleation. Diamines likely participate in atmospheric nucleation and should be considered in nucleation measurements and models.

  3. POTENTIAL CONTRIBUTION OF SULFATE PRODUCTION IN CUMULUS CLOUD DROPLETS TO GROUND LEVEL PARTICLE SULFUR CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Relationships have been examined between the presence or absence of cumulus clouds and 3rd quarter fine particle sulfur concentrations in St. Louis. An association between the presence of cumulus clouds with SO2 conversions in droplets and incrementally higher fine particle sulfu...

  4. Emission of submicron aerosol particles in cement kilns: Total concentration and size distribution.

    PubMed

    Rotatori, Mauro; Mosca, Silvia; Guerriero, Ettore; Febo, Antonio; Giusto, Marco; Montagnoli, Mauro; Bianchini, Massimo; Ferrero, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Cement plants are responsible for particle and gaseous emissions into the atmosphere. With respect to particle emission, the greater part of is in the range from 0.05 to 5.0 µm in diameter. In the last years attention was paid to submicron particles, but there is a lack of available data on the emission from stationary sources. In this paper, concentration and size distribution of particles emitted from four cement kilns, in relationship to operational conditions (especially the use of alternative fuel to coal) of the clinker process are reported. Experimental campaigns were carried out by measuring particles concentration and size distribution at the stack of four cement plants through condensation particle counter (CPC) and scanning mobility particle sizer spectrometer (SMPS). Average total particle number concentrations were between 2000 and 4000 particles/cm³, about 8-10 times lower that those found in the corresponding surrounding areas. As for size distribution, for all the investigated plants it is stable with a unimodal distribution (120-150 nm), independent from the fuel used. PMID:25946956

  5. Composition and hygroscopicity of aerosol particles at Mt. Lu in South China: Implications for acid precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijun; Chi, Jianwei; Shi, Zongbo; Wang, Xinfeng; Chen, Bin; Wang, Yan; Li, Tao; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Daizhou; Wang, Zifa; Shi, Chune; Liu, Liangke; Wang, Wenxing

    2014-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of aerosol particles were studied at Mt. Lu, an elevated site (115°59‧E, 29°35‧N, 1165 m) within the acid precipitation area. Northeast winds transport copious amounts of air pollutants and water vapor from the Yangtze River Delta into this acid precipitation area. NH4+ and SO42- are the dominant ions in PM2.5 and determine aerosol acidity. Individual particle analysis shows abundant S-rich and metals (i.e. Fe-, Zn-, Mn-, and Pb-rich) particles. Unlike aerosol particles in North China and urban areas, there are little soot and mineral particles at Mt. Lu. Lack of mineral particles contributed to the higher acidity in precipitation in the research area. Nano-sized spherical metal particles were observed to be embedded in 37% of S-rich particles. These metal particles were likely originated from heavy industries and fired-power plants. Hygroscopic experiments show that most particles start to deliquesce at 73-76% but organic coating lowers the particle deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) to 63-73%. The DRHs of these aerosol particles are clearly smaller than that of pure ammonium sulfate particles which is 80%. Since RH in ambient air was relatively high, ranging from 65% to 85% during our study period, most particles at our sampling site were in liquid phase. Our results suggest that liquid phase reactions in aerosol particles may contribute to SO2 to sulfuric acid conversion in the acid precipitation area.

  6. Influence of dust-particle concentration on gas-discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhinin, G. I.; Fedoseev, A. V.

    2010-01-15

    A self-consistent kinetic model of a low-pressure dc glow discharge with dust particles based on Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function is presented. The ions and electrons production in ionizing processes as well as their recombination on the dust-particle surface and on the discharge tube wall were taken into account. The influence of dust-particle concentration N{sub d} on gas discharge and dust particles parameters was investigated. It is shown that the increase of N{sub d} leads to the increase of an averaged electric field and ion density, and to the decrease of a dust-particle charge and electron density in the dusty cloud. The results were obtained in a wide region of different discharge and dusty plasma parameters: dust particles density 10{sup 2}-10{sup 8} cm{sup -3}, discharge current density 10{sup -1}-10{sup 1} mA/cm{sup 2}, and dust particles radius 1, 2, and 5 mum. The scaling laws for dust-particle surface potential and electric filed dependencies on dust-particle density, particle radius and discharge currents were revealed. It is shown that the absorption of electrons and ions on the dust particles surface does not lead to the electron energy distribution function depletion due to a self-consistent adjustment of dust particles and discharge parameters.

  7. Effects of concentrated ambient particles on heart rate and blood pressure in pulmonary hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tsun-Jen; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Wang, Peng-Yau; Tsai, Chia-Fang; Chen, Chun-Yen; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that increased concentrations of ambient particles are associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Recent studies have revealed that particulate air pollution exposure is associated with indicators of autonomic function including heart rate, blood pressure, and heart rate variability. However, this association has not been clearly demonstrated in animal studies. To overcome the problems of wide variations in diseased animals and circadian cycles, we adopted a novel approach using a mixed-effects model to investigate whether ambient particle exposure was associated with changes in heart rate and blood pressure in pulmonary hypertensive rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with radiotelemetry devices and exposed to concentrated ambient particles generated by an air particle concentrator. The rats were held in nose-only exposure chambers for 6 hr per day for 3 consecutive days and then rested for 4 days in each week during the experimental period of 5 weeks. These animals were exposed to concentrated particles during weeks 2, 3, and 4 and exposed to filtered air during weeks 1 and 5. The particle concentrations for tested animals ranged between 108 and 338 micro g/m(3). Statistical analysis using mixed-effects models revealed that entry and exit of exposure chamber and particle exposure were associated with changes in heart rate and mean blood pressure. Immediately after particle exposure, the hourly averaged heart rate decreased and reached the lowest at the first and second hour of exposure for a decrease of 14.9 (p < 0.01) and 11.7 (p = 0.01) beats per minute, respectively. The hourly mean blood pressure also decreased after the particle exposure, with a maximal decrease of 3.3 (p < 0.01) and 4.1 (p < 0.01) mm Hg at the first and second hour of exposure. Our results indicate that ambient particles might influence blood pressure and heart rate. PMID:12573896

  8. Measurement, analysis, and modeling of gas-to-particle conversion between ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Bok-Haeng

    Since 1990, the population of hogs in eastern North Carolina has increased sharply resulting in increased emissions of ammonia. An Annular Denuder System (ADS) was used, which consisted of a cyclone separator, two diffusion denuders coated with sodium carbonate and citric acid, respectively, and a filter pack consisting of Teflon and nylon filters in series. The ADS measured ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles in ambient atmosphere at a commercial hog farm in Eastern North Carolina from April 1998 to March 1999. The sodium carbonate coated denuders yielded average acid gas concentrations of 0.23 mug/m 3 HCl (+/-0.20 mug/m3); 1.10 mug/m 3 HONO (+/-1.17 mug/m3); 1.14 mug/m 3 HNO3 (+/-0.81 mug/m3), and 1.61 mug/m 3 SO2 (+/-1.58 mug/m3). The citric acid coated denuders yielded an average concentration of 17.89 mug/m 3 NH3 (+/-15.03 mug/m3). The filters yielded average fine aerosol (i.e., fine particular matter, Dp ≤ 2.5 mum) concentrations of 1.64 mug/m3 NH4+ (+/-1.26 mug/m3); 0.26 mug/m3 Cl - (+/-0.69 mug/m3); 1.92 mug/m 3 NO3- (+/-1.09 mug/m 3), and 3.18 mug/m3 SO42- (+/-3.12 mug/m3). Using the data collected from the study sites, we evaluated the seasonal variations and the effects of relative humidity on fine particle species. Based on the measurements of ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles, the mean pseudo-first-order rate constant, kS, between NH3 and H2SO4 aerosol is estimated to be 3.70 (+/-2.99) x 10-3 sec-1. The rate constant was found to increase as temperature increases, and decrease with increasing relative humidity. The equilibrium time constant was determined based on the estimated kinetic rate constants and the observed inorganic components of atmospheric aerosols. The average value of equilibrium time constant was determined to be 17.01 (+/-12.19) minutes for ambient equilibrium time between ammonia, nitric acid gas and ammonium nitrate aerosol; and 10.83 (+/-8.97) minutes for ammonia, hydrochloric acid, and ammonium chloride. The aerosol

  9. Wood dust particle and mass concentrations and filtration efficiency in sanding of wood materials.

    PubMed

    Welling, Irma; Lehtimäki, Matti; Rautio, Sari; Lähde, Tero; Enbom, Seppo; Hynynen, Pasi; Hämeri, Kaarle

    2009-02-01

    The importance of fine particles has become apparent as the knowledge of their effects on health has increased. Fine particle concentrations have been published for outside air, plasma arc cutting, welding, and grinding, but little data exists for the woodworking industry. Sanding was evaluated as the producer of the woodworking industry's finest particles, and was selected as the target study. The number of dust particles in different particle size classes and the mass concentrations were measured in the following environments: workplace air during sanding in plywood production and in the inlet and return air; in the dust emission chamber; and in filter testing. The numbers of fine particles were low, less than 10(4) particles/cm(3) (10(7) particles/L). They were much lower than typical number concentrations near 10(6) particles/cm(3) measured in plasma arc cutting, grinding, and welding. Ultrafine particles in the size class less than 100 nm were found during sanding of MDF (medium density fiberboard) sheets. When the cleaned air is returned to the working areas, the dust content in extraction systems must be monitored continuously. One way to monitor the dust content in the return air is to use an after-filter and measure pressure drop across the filter to indicate leaks in the air-cleaning system. The best after-filtration materials provided a clear increase in pressure drop across the filter in the loading of the filter. The best after-filtration materials proved to be quite effective also for fine particles. The best mass removal efficiencies for fine particles around 0.3 mum were over 80% for some filter materials loaded with sanding wood dust. PMID:19065389

  10. Direct Measurement of pH in Individual Particles via Raman Microspectroscopy and Variation in Acidity with Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Rindelaub, Joel D; Craig, Rebecca L; Nandy, Lucy; Bondy, Amy L; Dutcher, Cari S; Shepson, Paul B; Ault, Andrew P

    2016-02-18

    Atmospheric aerosol acidity is an important characteristic of aqueous particles, which has been linked to the formation of secondary organic aerosol by catalyzing reactions of oxidized organic compounds that have partitioned to the particle phase. However, aerosol acidity is difficult to measure and traditionally estimated using indirect methods or assumptions based on composition. Ongoing disagreements between experiments and thermodynamic models of particle acidity necessitate improved fundamental understanding of pH and ion behavior in high ionic strength atmospheric particles. Herein, Raman microspectroscopy was used to determine the pH of individual particles (H2SO4+MgSO4) based on sulfate and bisulfate concentrations determined from νs(SO4(2-)) and νs(HSO4(-)), the acid dissociation constant, and activity coefficients from extended Debye-Hückel calculations. Shifts in pH and peak positions of νs(SO4(2-)) and νs(HSO4(-)) were observed as a function of relative humidity. These results indicate the potential for direct spectroscopic determination of pH in individual particles and the need to improve fundamental understanding of ion behavior in atmospheric particles. PMID:26745214

  11. Exposure to particle number, surface area and PM concentrations in pizzerias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Morawska, L.; Stabile, L.; Viola, A.

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify exposure to particles emitted by wood-fired ovens in pizzerias. Overall, 15 microenvironments were chosen and analyzed in a 14-month experimental campaign. Particle number concentration and distribution were measured simultaneously using a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The surface area and mass distributions and concentrations, as well as the estimation of lung deposition surface area and PM 1 were evaluated using the SMPS-APS system with dosimetric models, by taking into account the presence of aggregates on the basis of the Idealized Aggregate (IA) theory. The fraction of inhaled particles deposited in the respiratory system and different fractions of particulate matter were also measured by means of a Nanoparticle Surface Area Monitor (NSAM) and a photometer (DustTrak DRX), respectively. In this way, supplementary data were obtained during the monitoring of trends inside the pizzerias. We found that surface area and PM 1 particle concentrations in pizzerias can be very high, especially when compared to other critical microenvironments, such as the transport hubs. During pizza cooking under normal ventilation conditions, concentrations were found up to 74, 70 and 23 times higher than background levels for number, surface area and PM 1, respectively. A key parameter is the oven shape factor, defined as the ratio between the size of the face opening in respect to the diameter of the semicircular oven door, and particular attention must also be paid to hood efficiency.

  12. Pelargonic acid weed control: Concentrations, adjuvants, and application timing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pelargonic acid is a fatty acid naturally occurring in many plants, animals, and foods. Pelargonic acid has potential as a broad-spectrum post-emergence or burn-down herbicide for organic crop production. Field research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Lane, OK, Atoka County) to determine the ...

  13. Transport and Retention of Engineered Nanoporous Particles in Porous Media: Effects of Concentration and Flow Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming

    2013-01-20

    Engineered nanoporous particles are an important class of nano-structured materials that can be functionalized in their internal surfaces for various applications including groundwater contaminant sequestration. This paper reported a study of transport and retention of engineered nanoporous silicate particles (ENSPs) that are designed for treatment and remediation of contaminants such as uranium in groundwater and sediments. The transport and retention of ENSPs were investigated under variable particle concentrations and dynamic flow conditions in a synthetic groundwater that mimics field groundwater chemical composition. The dynamic flow condition was achieved using a flow-interruption (stop-flow) approach with variable stop-flow durations to explore particle retention and release kinetics. The results showed that the ENSPs transport was strongly affected by the particle concentrations and dynamic flow conditions. A lower injected ENSPs concentration and longer stop-flow duration led to a more particle retention. The experimental data were used to evaluate the applicability of various kinetic models that were developed for colloidal particle retention and release in describing ENSPs transport. Model fits suggested that the transport and retention of ENSPs were subjected to a complex coupling of reversible attachment/detachment and straining/liberation processes. Both experimental and modeling results indicated that dynamic groundwater flow condition is an important parameter to be considered in exploring and modeling engineered particle transport in subsurface porous media.

  14. Size distribution and number concentration of particles at the stack of a municipal waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, G; Ficco, G; Stabile, L

    2009-02-01

    A large number of particles and gaseous products are generated by waste combustion processes. Of particular importance are the ultrafine particles (less than 0.1 microm in aerodynamic diameter) that are emitted in large quantities from all the combustion sources. Recent findings of toxicological and epidemiological studies indicate that fine and ultrafine particles could represent health and environmental risks. Quantifying particulate emissions from combustion sources is important: (i) to examine the source status in compliance with regulations; (ii) to create inventories of such emissions at local, regional and national levels, for developing appropriate management and control strategies in relation to air quality; (iii) to predict ambient air quality in the areas involved at the source and (iv) to perform source apportionment and exposure assessment for the human populations and/or ecological systems involved. In order to control and mitigate the particles in the view of health and environmental risk reduction, a good understanding of the relative and absolute contribution from the emission sources to the airborne concentrations is necessary. For these purposes, the concentration and size distribution of particles in terms of mass and number in a waste gas of a municipal waste incineration plant were measured in the stack gas. The mass concentrations obtained are well below the imposed daily threshold value for both incineration lines and the mass size distribution is on average very stable. The total number concentrations are between 1 x 10(5) and 2 x 10(5)particles/cm(3) and are on average relatively stable from one test to another. The measured values and the comparison with other point sources show a very low total number concentration of particles at the stack gas, revealing the importance of the flue gas treatment also for ultrafine particles. Also in respect to linear sources (high and light duty vehicles), the comparison shows a negligible emission in

  15. Determining the sulfuric acid fog concentration in coke oven gas

    SciTech Connect

    Zin'kovskaya, S.I.; Okhrimenko, E.L.; Sobko, L.V.

    1982-11-06

    A volumetric method for the analysis of sulfuric acid aerosols at levels of acid greater (25-40 g/m/sup 3/) than those (1 g/m/sup 3/) analyzable by current methods is described. Coke oven gas after acid scrubbing and electrofiltration is passed through a Schott filter (pressure drop 100 mm Hg), the sulfuric acid aerosol being condensed on the filter which is washed with water and the washings filtered with NaOH (0.01 N after electrofilter, 1.0 N after the acid towers) to methyl orange end point. The error is +/- 2%.

  16. Particle concentrations and number size distributions in the planetary boundary layer derived from airship based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Ralf; Zhao, Defeng; Ehn, Mikael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Rohrer, Franz; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric particles play a key role for regional and global climate due to their direct and indirect radiative forcing effects. The concentration and size of the particles are important variables to these effects. Within the continental planetary boundary layer (PBL) the particle number size distribution is influenced by meteorological parameters, local sinks and sources resulting in variable spatial distributions. However, measurements of particle number size distributions over a broad vertical range of the PBL are rare. The airship ZEPPELIN NT is an ideal platform to measure atmospheric aerosols on a regional scale within an altitude range up to 1000 m. For campaigns in the Netherlands, Northern Italy and South Finland in 2012 and 2013 the airship was deployed with a wide range of instruments, including measurements of different trace gases, short lived radicals, solar radiation, aerosols and meteorological parameters. Flights were carried out at different times of the day to investigate the influence of the diurnal evolution of the PBL on atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. During night and early morning hours the concentration and size distribution of atmospheric particles were found to be strongly influenced by the layered structure of the PBL, i.e. the nocturnal boundary layer and the residual layer. Within the residual layer particle concentrations stay relatively constant as this layer is decoupled from ground sources. The particles persist in the accumulation mode as expected for an aged aerosol. In the nocturnal boundary layer particle concentrations and size are more dynamic with higher concentrations than in the residual layer. A few hours after sunrise, the layered structure of the PBL intermixes. During daytime the PBL is well mixed and a negative concentration gradient with increasing height is observed. Several height profiles at different times of the day and at different locations in Europe were measured. The aerosol measurements will be

  17. Measurement of particle number and related pollutant concentrations in an urban area in South Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo-Castañeda, D. M.; Teixeira, E. C.; Rolim, S. B. A.; Pereira, F. N.; Wiegand, F.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze atmospheric particle number concentration at Sapucaia do Sul, in the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre, and associate it with the pollutants NO, NO2, and O3. Measurements were performed in two periods: August to October, in 2010 and 2011. We used the following equipment: the continuous particulate monitor (CPM), the chemiluminescent nitrogen oxide analyzer (AC32M), and the UV photometric ozone analyzer (O342M). Daily and hourly particle number concentrations in fractions PR1.0 (0.3-1.0 μm), PR2.5 (1.0-2.5 μm), and PR10 (2.5-10 μm), and concentrations of pollutants NO, NO2, NOx, and O3 were measured. These data were correlated with meteorological parameters such as wind speed, temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation. The daily variation of OX (NO2 + O3) and its relation with NO2 were also established. The results obtained for daily particle number concentration (particles L-1) showed that the area of study had higher particle number of PR2.5 and PR1.0 size ranges, with values of 19.5 and 28.51 particles L-1, respectively. Differences in particle number concentrations in PR1 and PR2.5 size ranges were found between weekdays and weekends. The daily variation per hour of concentrations of particle number, NO, and NOx showed peaks during increased traffic flow in the morning and in the evening. NO2 showed peaks at different times, with the first peak (morning) 2 h after the peak of NO, and a second peak in the evening (19:00). This is due to the oxidation of NO and to the photolysis of NO3 formed overnight. Correlation analysis suggests that there may be a relationship between the fine and ultrafine particles and NO, probably indicating that they have similar sources, such as vehicular emissions. In addition, a possible relationship of solar radiation with fine particle number concentrations, as well as with O3 was also observed. The results, too, show an inverse relationship between particle number

  18. Various concentrations of erucic acid in mustard oil and mustard.

    PubMed

    Wendlinger, Christine; Hammann, Simon; Vetter, Walter

    2014-06-15

    Erucic acid is a typical constituent of mustard or rape. Foodstuff with a high content of erucic acid is considered undesirable for human consumption because it has been linked to myocardial lipidosis and heart lesions in laboratory rats. As a result, several countries have restricted its presence in oils and fats. In this study, the erucic acid content in several mustard oils and prepared mustard samples from Germany and Australia was determined. Seven of nine mustard oil samples exceeded the permitted maximum levels established for erucic acid (range: 0.3-50.8%, limit: 5%). The erucic acid content in mustard samples (n=15) varied from 14% to 33% in the lipids. Two servings (i.e. 20 g) of the mustards with the highest erucic acid content already surpassed the tolerable daily intake established by Food Standards Australia New Zealand. However, a careful selection of mustard cultivars could lower the nutritional intake of erucic acid. PMID:24491745

  19. Variations in retention efficiency of bivalves to different concentrations and organic content of suspended particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jihong; Fang, Jianguang; Liang, Xingming

    2010-01-01

    Retention efficiencies (RE) of scallop ( Chlamys farreri), oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and mussel ( Mytilus edulis) in a flow-through system were measured to understand the short-term response to various particle and organic matter concentrations. By comparing the RE of C. farreri with that of C. gigas and M. edulis, we gained further knowledge on the feeding physiological characteristics of C. farreri and ascertained the possible cause of high summer mortalities of this species. The experimental feeding conditions included natural differences in the abundance and composition of suspended seston, as well as conditions in which seston abundance and composition were manipulated by adding natural silt or cultured microalgae. The results show that in natural sea water, the minimum particle size for maximal retention in M. edulis, C. gigas and C. farreri was approximately 4, 6, and 8 μm, respectively; the RE of 2-μm (equivalent spherical diameter) particles was 17%, 19%, and 8%, respectively; and the relative standardized RE was 58%, 49%, and 18%, respectively. In C. gigas and M. edulis, the minimal particle size for maximal retention did not change with food quality (organic content). C. farreri was more sensitive to fluctuations in particle concentration and organic content. With particle concentration increase, the minimal particle size for maximal retention in scallop shifted to large particles and the RE for 2-μm particle decreased from 8% in natural seawater to 1.6%-6% in silt-enriched groups. With organic content increase, the minimal particle size for maximal retention shifted from 8 to 5 μm in natural seawater.Variation in RE of C. farreri with food conditions and the relationship between lower RE and smaller particle size may hamper C. farreri from food taking due to the decrease in the size distribution of phytoplankton in Sungo Bay.

  20. Online Particle Size And Concentration Measurement In A Pressurized Coal Combustion Process

    SciTech Connect

    Schiel, A.; Umhauer, H.; Kasper, G.; Christmann, W.

    2002-09-19

    The energy industry has to face the demand for highly efficient coal combustion power plants in order to minimize the CO{sub 2} emissions. Efforts are made in new combustion processes, where coal powder is burned at a temperature of 1400 C and a pressure of 16 bars. The hot flue gas is used for a combined gas and steam turbine process. For that reason the flue gas has to be cleaned at the operating temperature and pressure. Limiting values for a secure operation of the turbine, with acceptable abrasion of the blades by impacting particles, are a mass concentration of c{sub M} {le}3 m g/m{sub N}{sup 3} at particle sizes smaller than 3 {micro}m . A granular bed filter is used to remove the gross of fine ash particles. But until now the separation of the submicron aerosol particles at high temperatures does not meet the mentioned specifications, and is still one of the most important open tasks. Regardless what kind of separation process will be implemented to remove fine ash particles, for investigations and control it is necessary to determine the particle concentration and size after the separation. The fact that the particle concentration after the purification is quite small and the size of the particles is less than 10 {micro}m means that gravimetric measurements are not suitable to record spontaneous changes due to the combustion process because of extended sampling times. Additionally a gravimetric measurement technique at operating conditions (T = 1400 C, p = 16 bars) is questionable, because particles can be lost by thermophoretic transport to the walls, also condensation of alkali species on the particle surfaces cannot be avoided (representativity). The single-particle-light-scattering size analysis is especially suited for measurements at low particle concentrations (< 10{sup 5} particles/m{sup 3}). With the counting technique used here, single particles are detected in situ while passing an optically defined measuring volume, which is placed in an iso

  1. Infrared spectrum of nitric acid dihydrate: Influence of particle shape.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Stetzer, Olaf; Schurath, Ulrich

    2005-03-24

    In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extinction spectra of airborne alpha-NAD microparticles generated by two different methods were recorded in the large coolable aerosol chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The extinction spectrum of alpha-NAD crystals obtained by shock freezing of a HNO3/H2O gas mixture could be accurately reproduced using Mie theory with published refractive indices of alpha-NAD as input. In contrast, Mie theory proved to be inadequate to properly reproduce the infrared extinction spectrum of alpha-NAD crystals which were formed via homogeneous nucleation of supercooled HNO3/H2O solution droplets, evaporating slowly on a time scale of several hours at about 195 K. Much better agreement between measured and calculated extinction spectra was obtained by T-matrix calculations assuming oblate particles with aspect ratios greater than five. This indicates that strongly aspherical alpha-NAD crystals are obtained when supercooled nitric acid solution droplets freeze and grow slowly, a process which has been discussed as a potential pathway to the formation of crystalline polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. PMID:16833561

  2. A Miniature System for Separating Aerosol Particles and Measuring Mass Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dao; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chen, Chuin-Shan; Dai, Chi-An

    2010-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a new sensing system which consists of two virtual impactors and two quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) sensors for measuring particle mass concentration and size distribution. The virtual impactors utilized different inertial forces of particles in air flow to classify different particle sizes. They were designed to classify particle diameter, d, into three different ranges: d < 2.28 μm, 2.28 μm ≤ d ≤ 3.20 μm, d > 3.20 μm. The QCM sensors were coated with a hydrogel, which was found to be a reliable adhesive for capturing aerosol particles. The QCM sensor coated with hydrogel was used to measure the mass loading of particles by utilizing its characteristic of resonant frequency shift. An integrated system has been demonstrated. PMID:22319317

  3. Effects of running the Bostom Marathon on plasma concentrations of large neutral amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.; Lopez G-Coviella, I.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Vacanti, C. A.; Logue, M.; During, M.; Caballero, B.; Maher, T. J.; Evoniuk, G.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma large neutral amino acid concentrations were measured in thirty-seven subjects before and after completing the Boston Marathon. Concentrations of tyrosine, phenylalanine, and methionine increased, as did their 'plasma ratios' (i.e., the ratio of each amino acid's concentration to the summed plasma concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids which compete with it for brain uptake). No changes were noted in the plasma concentrations of tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, nor valine; however, the 'plasma ratios' of valine, leucine, and isoleucine all decreased. These changes in plasma amino acid patterns may influence neurotransmitter synthesis.

  4. Effect of L (+) ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Mohamed El-shahte Ismaiel

    2015-11-01

    In this study, monosodium glutamate and ascorbic acid were used as crystal and growth modifiers to control the crystallization of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate prepared by reacting a mixed solution of Na2CO3 with CaCl2 at ambient temperature, (25 °C), constant Ca++/ CO3- - molar ratio and pH with stirring. The polymorph and morphology of the crystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that rhombohedral calcite was only formed in water without organic additives, and both calcite and spherical vaterite with various morphologies were produced in the presence of monosodium glutamate. The content of vaterite increased as the monosodium glutamate increased. In addition, spherical vaterite was obtained in the presence of different concentrations of ascorbic acid. The spherical vaterite posses an aggregate shape composed of nano-particles, ranging from 30 to 50 nm as demonstrated by the SEM and TEM analyses. Therefore, the ascorbic stabilizes vaterite and result in nano-particles compared to monosodium glutamate.

  5. Foamy Virus Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Martin V; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  6. Cardiac oxidative stress and dysfunction by fine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) are mediated by angiotensin-II.

    PubMed

    Ghelfi, Elisa; Wellenius, Gregory A; Lawrence, Joy; Millet, Emil; Gonzalez-Flecha, Beatriz

    2010-09-01

    Inhalation exposure to fine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) increases cardiac oxidants by mechanisms involving modulation of the sympathovagal tone on the heart. Angiotensin-II is a potent vasoconstrictor and a sympatho-excitatory peptide involved in the regulation of blood pressure. We hypothesized that increases in angiotensin-II after fine particulate matter (PM) exposure could be involved in the development of cardiac oxidative stress. Adult rats were treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor (benazepril), or an angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB; valsartan) before exposure to fine PM aerosols or filtered air. Exposures were carried out for 5 hours in the chamber of the Harvard fine particle concentrator (fine PM mass concentration: 440 +/- 80 microg/m(3)). At the end of the exposure the animals were tested for in situ chemiluminescence (CL) of the heart, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and for plasma levels of angiotensin-II. Also, continuous electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements were collected on a subgroup of exposed animals. PM exposure was associated with statistically significant increases in plasma angiotensin concentrations. Pre-treatment with the ACE inhibitor effectively lowered angiotensin concentration, whereas ARB treatment led to increases in angiotensin above the PM-only level. PM exposure also led to significant increases in heart oxidative stress (CL, TBARS), and a shortening of the T-end to T-peak interval on the ECG that were prevented by treatment with both the ACE inhibitor and ARB. These results show that ambient fine particles can increase plasma levels of angiotensin-II and suggest a role of the renin-angiotensin system in the development of particle-related acute cardiac events. PMID:20718632

  7. Optical tweezing electrophoresis of single biotinylated colloidal particles for avidin concentration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brans, Toon; Strubbe, Filip; Schreuer, Caspar; Neyts, Kristiaan; Beunis, Filip

    2015-06-01

    We present a novel approach for label-free concentration measurement of a specific protein in a solution. The technique combines optical tweezers and microelectrophoresis to establish the electrophoretic mobility of a single microparticle suspended in the solution. From this mobility measurement, the amount of adsorbed protein on the particle is derived. Using this method, we determine the concentration of avidin in a buffer solution. After calibration of the setup, which accounts for electro-osmotic flow in the measurement device, the mobilities of both bare and biotinylated microspheres are measured as a function of the avidin concentration in the mixture. Two types of surface adsorption are identified: the biotinylated particles show specific adsorption, resulting from the binding of avidin molecules with biotin, at low avidin concentrations (below 0.04 μg/ml) while at concentrations of several μg/ml non-specific on both types of particles is observed. These two adsorption mechanisms are incorporated in a theoretical model describing the relation between the measured mobility and the avidin concentration in the mixture. This model describes the electrophoretic mobility of these particles accurately over four orders of magnitude of the avidin concentration.

  8. Distribution of the concentration of heavy metals associated with the sediment particles accumulated on road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zafra, C A; Temprano, J; Tejero, I

    2011-07-01

    The heavy metal pollution caused by road run-off water constitutes a problem in urban areas. The metallic load associated with road sediment must be determined in order to study its impact in drainage systems and receiving waters, and to perfect the design of prevention systems. This paper presents data regarding the sediment collected on road surfaces in the city of Torrelavega (northern Spain) during a period of 65 days (132 samples). Two sample types were collected: vacuum-dried samples and those swept up following vacuuming. The sediment loading (g m(-2)), particle size distribution (63-2800 microm) and heavy metal concentrations were determined. The data showed that the concentration of heavy metals tends to increase with the reduction in the particle diameter (exponential tendency). The concentrations ofPb, Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni, Cd, Fe, Mn and Co in the size fraction <63 microm were 350, 630, 124, 57, 56, 38, 3231, 374 and 51 mg kg(-1), respectively (average traffic density: 3800 vehicles day(-1)). By increasing the residence time of the sediment, the concentration increases, whereas the ratio of the concentration between the different size fractions decreases. The concentration across the road diminishes when the distance between the roadway and the sampling siteincreases; when the distance increases, the ratio between size fractions for heavy metal concentrations increases. Finally, the main sources of heavy metals are the particles detached by braking (brake pads) and tyre wear (rubber), and are associated with particle sizes <125 microm. PMID:21882553

  9. Optical determination of incipient soot particle concentrations in ethene laminar diffusion flames.

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S. B.; Santoro, R. J.

    1999-07-06

    Recent studies in premixed flames have shown the existence of ''transparent particles.'' These particles, 2 nm in size and in high number densities are considered to be a phase transitional between the gas phase PAH species and particulate soot. In the present study, various optical diagnostics were evaluated for measuring the concentration of these particles in situ, Through such evaluations, a technique using extinction at two wavelengths was found to be ideal. While employing such a technique, the volume fractions of these particles in an ethene laminar diffusion flame were measured. Low in the flame, these particles were found to be concentrated in the fuel rich core, while at higher locations, they could be found with appreciable volume fractions even in the soot laden regions. Having given due consideration for the errors due to uncertainties in the optical constants, we report the existence of these particles in an ethene flame with volume fractions comparable to those of soot. Also, similar measurements performed in a low sooting ethene/methanol flame show the concentration of these particles to be of the same order of magnitude as in a pure ethene flame.

  10. Spatio-temporal covariation of urban particle number concentration and ambient noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Stephan

    Mobile measurements of ambient noise and particle number concentrations were carried out within an urban residential area in Essen, Germany, during summer 2008. A busy major road with a traffic intensity of about 44,000 vehicles per day was situated within the study area. The spatio-temporal distribution of noise and particles was closely coupled to road traffic on the major road. Total particle number concentrations in proximity to the main road were on average between 25,000 cm -3 and 35,000 cm -3 while sound levels reached 70-78 dB(A). These estimates were more than double-fold (factor 2.4) in comparison to the urban residential background. At a 50 m distance off the road particle number concentrations were decaying to about 50% of the initial value. The measurements were characterised by close spatial correlation between total particle number concentration and ambient noise with correlation coefficients of up to r = 0.74. However, during one measurement day coupling between both quantities was weak due to higher turbulent mixing within the canopy layer and a change in ambient wind directions. Enhanced dilution of particle emission from road traffic by turbulent mixing and 'decoupling' from the influence of road traffic are believed to be responsible.

  11. Investigation of particle inertial migration in high particle concentration suspension flow by multi-electrodes sensing and Eulerian-Lagrangian simulation in a square microchannel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tong; Yao, Jiafeng; Liu, Kai; Takei, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    The inertial migration of neutrally buoyant spherical particles in high particle concentration (αpi  > 3%) suspension flow in a square microchannel was investigated by means of the multi-electrodes sensing method which broke through the limitation of conventional optical measurement techniques in the high particle concentration suspensions due to interference from the large particle numbers. Based on the measured particle concentrations near the wall and at the corner of the square microchannel, particle cross-sectional migration ratios are calculated to quantitatively estimate the migration degree. As a result, particle migration to four stable equilibrium positions near the centre of each face of the square microchannel is found only in the cases of low initial particle concentration up to 5.0 v/v%, while the migration phenomenon becomes partial as the initial particle concentration achieves 10.0 v/v% and disappears in the cases of the initial particle concentration αpi  ≥ 15%. In order to clarify the influential mechanism of particle-particle interaction on particle migration, an Eulerian-Lagrangian numerical model was proposed by employing the Lennard-Jones potential as the inter-particle potential, while the inertial lift coefficient is calculated by a pre-processed semi-analytical simulation. Moreover, based on the experimental and simulation results, a dimensionless number named migration index was proposed to evaluate the influence of the initial particle concentration on the particle migration phenomenon. The migration index less than 0.1 is found to denote obvious particle inertial migration, while a larger migration index denotes the absence of it. This index is helpful for estimation of the maximum initial particle concentration for the design of inertial microfluidic devices. PMID:27158288

  12. In situ formation and spatial variability of particle number concentration in a European megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikridas, M.; Sciare, J.; Freutel, F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Borbon, A.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Merkel, M.; Crippa, M.; Kostenidou, E.; Psichoudaki, M.; Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Petäjä, T.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Drewnick, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kulmala, M.; Beekmann, M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-09-01

    Ambient particle number size distributions were measured in Paris, France, during summer (1-31 July 2009) and winter (15 January to 15 February 2010) at three fixed ground sites and using two mobile laboratories and one airplane. The campaigns were part of the Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation (MEGAPOLI) project. New particle formation (NPF) was observed only during summer on approximately 50 % of the campaign days, assisted by the low condensation sink (about 10.7 ± 5.9 × 10-3 s-1). NPF events inside the Paris plume were also observed at 600 m altitude onboard an aircraft simultaneously with regional events identified on the ground. Increased particle number concentrations were measured aloft also outside of the Paris plume at the same altitude, and were attributed to NPF. The Paris plume was identified, based on increased particle number and black carbon concentration, up to 200 km away from the Paris center during summer. The number concentration of particles with diameters exceeding 2.5 nm measured on the surface at the Paris center was on average 6.9 ± 8.7 × 104 and 12.1 ± 8.6 × 104 cm-3 during summer and winter, respectively, and was found to decrease exponentially with distance from Paris. However, further than 30 km from the city center, the particle number concentration at the surface was similar during both campaigns. During summer, one suburban site in the NE was not significantly affected by Paris emissions due to higher background number concentrations, while the particle number concentration at the second suburban site in the SW increased by a factor of 3 when it was downwind of Paris.

  13. Determination of concentration of charged particles in various regions of thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, A. G.; Mo, Q.

    2015-12-01

    During the Severe Thunderstorm Precipitation and Electrification Study in 2000, data on hydrometeor sizes and charges were obtained in thunderstorms using an optical array probe modified by the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and mounted on the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology armored T-28 research aircraft. Analysis yielded quantitative observations of hydrometeor size and charge data in selected regions of storms with relatively low concentrations of charged particles. In most regions hydrometeor concentrations were so high that there were multiple charged particles in the probe sample volume at the same time and quantitative charge analysis was not possible. While it is impossible to reliably determine individual particle charges in these high concentration regions, we can use Poisson statistics to estimate the total number concentration of charged particles based on the fraction of records with just one particle in them. We compare these number concentrations for different thunderstorm regions, including updrafts, flanking cells, core precipitation regions, and trailing stratiform regions, at approximately the -10 C level, in several thunderstorms. We will discuss the implications of these results for understanding charge-separation processes in thunderstorms.

  14. Ultrafine particles near a roadway intersection: origin and apportionment of fast changes in concentration.

    PubMed

    Klems, Joseph P; Pennington, M Ross; Zordan, Christopher A; Johnston, Murray V

    2010-10-15

    A wavelet-based algorithm was implemented to separate the high frequency portion of ambient nanoparticle measurements taken during the summer and winter of 2009 in Wilmington, Delaware. These measurements included both number concentration and size distributions recorded once every second by a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). The high frequency portion of the signal, consisting of a series of abrupt spikes in number concentration that varied in length from a few seconds to tens of seconds, accounted for 6-35% of the daily ambient number concentration with hourly contributions sometimes greater than 50%. When the data were weighted by particle volume, this portion of the signal contributed an average of 20% to the daily PM(0.1) concentration. Particle concentration spikes were preferentially observed from locations surrounding the measurement site where motor vehicles accelerate after a red traffic light turns green. As the distance or transit time from emission to sampling increased, the size distribution shifted to larger particle diameters. PMID:20843065

  15. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  16. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  17. Inverse dependency of particle residence times in ponds to the concentration of phosphate, the limiting nutrient.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kimberly A; Santschi, Peter H

    2004-01-01

    234Th, a commonly used short-lived particle-reactive tracer in marine systems, was measured in three different holding pond series at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Colorado, along with its parent nuclide 238U, to determine steady-state residence times of particle-reactive actinides such as Pu, and of particles. Series B ponds, which received industrial effluent that includes ortho-phosphate (PO4) and actinides, differed from series A and C ponds, which did not. This difference was also evident in the calculated particle residence times, which were <1 day for the ponds B4 and B5, where PO4 concentrations were higher (1.4 and 1.8 mg/l), and 3 and 3.4 days for ponds A3 and C2, respectively, where ortho-phosphate concentrations were lower (<0.1 mg/l). Particle residence times thus showed an inverse relationship with the concentration of ortho-phosphate, the limiting nutrient in fresh water systems. The same relationship to the concentration of ortho-phosphate or any of the other nutrient elements was not evident for the residence times of dissolved 234Th, which ranged between 0.1 and 2 days. This can be attributed to higher concentrations of dissolved and particulate ligands with greater binding potential for actinides such as four-valent Th and Pu in ponds with higher ortho-phosphate concentrations. Regardless of actual ortho-phosphate concentration, however, at water residence (holding) times of 1 month in these ponds, particles and associated actinides would be expected to be completely removed from the pond water to sediments. PMID:15261419

  18. Enhanced concentrations of citric acid in spring aerosols collected at the Gosan background site in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jinsang; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in the aerosol samples under the Asian continent outflow, total suspended particle (TSP) samples ( n = 32) were collected at the Gosan site in Jeju Island over 2-5 days integration during 23 March-1 June 2007 and 16-24 April 2008. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls using a capillary gas chromatography technique. We found elevated concentrations of atmospheric citric acid (range: 20-320 ng m -3) in the TSP samples during mid- to late April of 2007 and 2008. To specify the sources of citric acid, dicarboxylic acids and related compounds were measured in the pollen sample collected at the Gosan site (Pollen_Gosan), authentic pollen samples from Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria) (Pollen_cedar) and Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa) (Pollen_cypress), and tangerine fruit produced from Jeju Island. Citric acid (2790 ng in unit mg of pollen mass) was found as most abundant species in the Pollen_Gosan, followed by oxalic acid (2390 ng mg -1). Although citric acid was not detected in the Pollen_cedar and Pollen_cypress as major species, it was found as a dominant species in the tangerine juice while malic acid was detected as major species in the tangerine peel, followed by oxalic and citric acids. Since Japanese cedar trees are planted around tangerine farms to prevent strong winds from the Pacific Ocean, citric acid that may be directly emitted from tangerine is likely adsorbed on pollens emitted from Japanese cedar and then transported to the Gosan site. Much lower malic/citric acid ratios obtained under cloudy condition than clear condition suggest that malic acid may rapidly decompose to lower molecular weight compounds such as oxalic and malonic acids (

  19. Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Monache, L D; Stull, R B

    2006-04-19

    An atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. Reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate. Urban air quality, and particularly airborne particles, is a major concern in terms of human health impacts. Sea-spray is known to be a major component of the particle ensemble at coastal sites yet relatively few air quality models include the interaction of gases with sea-spray and the fate of the particles produced. Sea-spray is not an inert addition to the particle ensemble because heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray droplets changes the droplets composition and the particle size distribution, which impacts deposition and the ion balance in different particle size fractions. It is shown that the ISOPART model is capable of simulating gas and particle concentrations in the coastal metropolis of Vancouver and the surrounding valley. It is also demonstrated that to accurately simulate ambient concentrations of particles and reactive/soluble gases in a coastal valley it is absolutely critical to include heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray. Partitioning of total particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} between sea-spray and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is highly sensitive to the amount of sea-spray present, and hence the initial vertical profile, sea-spray source functions [48] and the wind speed. When a fixed wind speed is used to initialize the sea-spray vertical profiles, as expected, the sea-spray concentration decays with distance inland, but the particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration decays more slowly because it is also a function of the uptake rate for HNO{sub 3}. The simulation results imply model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield highly misleading results in terms of emission sensitivities of the PM

  20. Magnetofluidic concentration and separation of non-magnetic particles using two magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-07-01

    The present paper reports the use of diluted ferrofluid and two arrays of permanent magnets for the size-selective concentration of non-magnetic particles. The micro magnetofluidic device consists of a straight channels sandwiched between two arrays of permanent magnets. The permanent magnets create multiple capture zones with minimum magnetic field strength along the channel. The complex interaction between magnetic forces and hydrodynamic force allows the device to operate in different regimes suitable for concentration of non-magnetic particles with small difference in size. Our experimental results show that non-magnetic particles with diameters of 3.1 μm and 4.8 μm can be discriminated and separated with this method. The results from this study could be used as a guide for the design of size-sensitive separation devices for particle and cell based on negative magnetophoresis. PMID:27478527

  1. Role of Polymer Segment-Particle Surface Interactions in Controlling Nanoparticle Dispersions in Concentrated Polymer Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2014-09-24

    The microstructure of particles suspended in concentrated polymer solutions is examined with small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. Of interest are changes to long wavelength particle density fluctuations in ternary mixtures of silica nanoparticles suspended in concentrated solutions of poly(ethylene glycol). The results are understood in terms of application of the pseudo-two-component polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) theory modified to account for solvent addition via effective contact strength of interfacial attraction, εpc, in an implicit manner. The combined experimental-theoretical study emphasizes the complex interactions between solvent, polymer, and particle surface that control particle miscibility but also demonstrate that these factors can all be understood in terms of variations of εpc.

  2. Non-homogeneous concentration of suspensions in micro-capillary networks: particles in a bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Doyeux, Vincent; Peponas, Sarah; Ismail, Mourad; Coupier, Gwennou

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the distribution of particles in flows of dilute suspensions in bifurcating channels. In studies relevant to blood flow in the microcirculation, an increase of the volume fraction of particles (hematocrit) in the high flow rate branch is usually observed, leading to non-uniform concentrations in a network of channels, with possible consequences on oxygen transport and pressure distribution. In the literature, this phenomenon is often wrongly interpreted as the result of some attraction of the particles towards this high flow rate branch. We show thanks to experiments and numerical simulations that the concentration phenomenon, often referred to as Zweifach-Fung effect, is mainly due to the non-homogeneous spatial distribution of particles in the mother branch, while a weak attraction towards the low flow rate branch occurs in the bifurcation.

  3. Magnetic field and particle concentration competitive effects on ferrofluid based silicone elastomer microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Balasoiu, M.; Lebedev, V. T.; Orlova, D. N.; Bica, I.

    2011-12-15

    Structural peculiarities of ferroelastomers composed of polydimetylsiloxane with embedded magnetite particles during polymerization have been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. The effects of ferroparticles' concentration in the range of C = 0-6 wt %, and external magnetic fields of induction B = 0-1 kG applied during the polymerization on the structure of polymeric matrix and particles distribution in polymer were analyzed.

  4. Particle Deformation and Concentration Polarization in Electroosmotic Transport of Hydrogels through Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report detection of deformable, hydrogel particles by the resistive-pulse technique using single pores in a polymer film. The hydrogels pass through the pores by electroosmosis and cause formation of a characteristic shape of resistive pulses indicating the particles underwent dehydration and deformation. These effects were explained via a non-homogeneous pressure distribution along the pore axis modeled by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. The local pressure drops are induced by the electroosmotic fluid flow. Our experiments also revealed the importance of concentration polarization in the detection of hydrogels. Due to the negative charges as well as branched, low density structure of the hydrogel particles, concentration of ions in the particles is significantly higher than in the bulk. As a result, when electric field is applied across the membrane, a depletion zone can be created in the vicinity of the particle observed as a transient drop of the current. Our experiments using pores with openings between 200 and 1600 nm indicated the concentration polarization dominated the hydrogels detection for pores wider than 450 nm. The results are of importance for all studies that involve transport of molecules, particles and cells through pores with charged walls. The developed inhomogeneous pressure distribution can potentially influence the shape of the transported species. The concentration polarization changes the interpretation of the resistive pulses; the observed current change does not necessarily reflect only the particle size but also the size of the depletion zone that is formed in the particle vicinity.

  5. Notably improved inversion of Differential Mobility Particle Sizer data obtained under conditions of fluctuating particle number concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølgaard, B.; Vanhatalo, J.; Aalto, P. P.; Prisle, N. L.; Hämeri, K.

    2015-10-01

    The Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS) is designed for measurements of particle number size distributions. It performs a number of measurements while scanning over different particle sizes. A standard assumption in the data processing (inversion) algorithm is that the size distribution remains the same throughout each scan. For a DMPS deployed in an urban area this assumption is likely to be violated most of the time, and the resulting size distribution data are unreliable. To improve the reliability, we developed a new algorithm using a statistical model in which the problematic assumption was replaced with more realistic smoothness assumptions, which were expressed through Gaussian Process prior probabilities. We tested the model with data from a twin-DMPS located in Helsinki and found that it provides size distribution data which are much more realistic. Furthermore, particle number concentrations extracted from the DMPS data were compared with data from a condensation particle counter at 30 s resolution, and the overall agreement was good. Thus, the quality of the inverted data was clearly improved.

  6. Notably improved inversion of differential mobility particle sizer data obtained under conditions of fluctuating particle number concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mølgaard, Bjarke; Vanhatalo, Jarno; Aalto, Pasi P.; Prisle, Nønne L.; Hämeri, Kaarle

    2016-02-01

    The differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS) is designed for measurements of particle number size distributions. It performs a number of measurements while scanning over different particle sizes. A standard assumption in the data-processing (inversion) algorithm is that the size distribution remains the same throughout each scan. For a DMPS deployed in an urban area this assumption is likely to be violated most of the time, and the resulting size distribution data are unreliable. To improve the reliability, we developed a new algorithm using a statistical model in which the problematic assumption was replaced with more realistic smoothness assumptions, which were expressed through Gaussian process prior probabilities. We tested the model with data from a twin DMPS located at an urban background site in Helsinki and found that it provides size distribution data which are much more realistic. Furthermore, particle number concentrations extracted from the DMPS data were compared with data from a condensation particle counter. At 10 min resolution, the correlation for a period of 10 days was 0.984 with the new algorithm and 0.967 with the old one. Moreover, the time resolution was improved, and at 30 s resolution we obtained positive correlations for 89 % of the scans. Thus, the quality of the inverted data was clearly improved.

  7. Simple Model for Gold Nano Particles Concentration Dependence of Resonance Energy Transfer Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, N. M.; Ha, C. V.; Nga, D. T.; Lan, N. T.; Nhung, T. H.; Viet, N. A.

    2016-06-01

    Gold nano particles (GNPs) concentration dependence of the energy transfer occurs between the fluorophores and GNPs is investigated. In the case of theses pairs, GNPs can enhance or quench the fluorescence of fluorophores depending upon the relative magnitudes of two energy transfer mechanisms: i) the plasmonic field enhancement at the fluorophores emission frequencies (plasmon coupled fluorescence enhancement) and ii) the localized plasmon coupled Forster energy transfer from fluorescent particles to gold particles, which quenches the fluorescence. The competition of these mechanisms is depending on the spectral overlap of fluorophores and GNPs, their relative concentration, excitation wavelength. Simple two branches surface plasmon polariton model for GNPs concentration dependence of the energy transfer is proposed. The experimental data and theoretical results confirm our findings.

  8. Shape evolution of SrCO{sub 3} particles in the presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jiaguo . E-mail: jiaguoyu@yahoo.com; Guo Hua; Cheng Bei

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, strontium carbonate particles with different morphologies were prepared by a simple precipitation reaction of sodium carbonate with strontium nitrate in the absence and presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid) (PSMA). The as-prepared products were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the concentration of PSMA on the morphologies and phase structures of strontium carbonate particles were investigated and discussed. The results showed that SrCO{sub 3} particles with various shapes, such as bundles, dumbbells, irregular aggregates and spheres could be obtained by varying the concentration of PSMA. A schematic illustration was proposed to account for the shape evolution of the as-prepared SrCO{sub 3} particles.

  9. Size distributions and formation of dicarboxylic acids in atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xiaohong; Fang, Ming; Chan, Chak K.

    The PM2.5 concentrations and the size distributions of dicarboxylic acids in Hong Kong were studied. Eleven sets of daily PM2.5 samples were obtained at a downtown sampling site during the period of 5-16 December 2000 using an R&P speciation PM2.5 sampler. About 6-12% of the total oxalic acid was found in the gas phase in some samples. A good correlation between succinate and sulfate ( R2=0.88) and a moderate correlation between oxalate and sulfate ( R2=0.74) were found. Sampling artifacts of oxalate, malonate and succinate were found to be negligible. A total of 18 sets of 48-96 h size distribution data on dicarboxylic acids, sulfate, nitrate and sodium at an urban site and a rural site from June 2000 to May 2001 were obtained using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor. Data from both sites show similar size distribution characteristics of the dicarboxylic acids. The condensation mode of oxalate was usually observed at 0.177-0.32 μm. The location of the peak of the droplet mode of oxalate was associated with that of sulfate. When the peak of sulfate in the droplet mode appeared at 0.32-0.54 μm, the peak of oxalate sometimes appeared at 0.32-0.54 μm and sometimes shifted to 0.54-1.0 μm. When the peak of sulfate in the droplet mode appeared at 0.54-1.0 μm, the peak of oxalate sometimes appeared at 0.54-1.0 μm and sometimes shifted to 1.0-1.8 μm. Oxalate, succinate and sulfate found in the droplet mode were attributed to in-cloud formation. The slight shift of the oxalate peak from 0.32-0.54 to 0.54-1.0 μm or from 0.54-1.0 to 1.0-1.8 μm was ascribed to minor oxalate evaporation after in-cloud formation. The maximum peak of malonate sometimes appeared in the droplet mode and sometimes appeared at 3.1-6.2 μm. The formation of malonate is associated to the reactions between sea salt and malonic acid.

  10. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Qingxu; Zhong, Chu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  11. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3−-N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  12. Forces acting on a particle in a concentration gradient under an externally applied oscillating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuan; Yobas, Levent

    2014-09-01

    We report a force field on a particle in a concentration (conductivity) gradient under an externally applied oscillating electric field. The conductivity gradient was established through integrated microcapillaries bridging high- and low-conductivity streams in dedicated microchannels. Particles in low-conductivity electrolyte were observed to experience a strong force with the application of an oscillating field and pulled to the microcapillary openings where they were held against the flow. Particle trapping was accompanied by a concurrent electrolyte injection from high- to low-conductivity channel, triggered with the externally applied field and further contributed to the conductivity gradient near the trapping sites. We experimentally evaluated the force dependence on the magnitude and frequency of the excitation field for 10 μm polystyrene particles immersed at various conductivity levels. The experiments suggest that the observed force cannot be simply explained by dielectrophoresis or diffusiophoresis alone and further requires the consideration of a so-called concentration polarization force. This force has been rather recently postulated based on a theoretical treatment and yet to be experimentally validated. Using the theoretical treatment of this force, together with fluidic drag and diffusiophoresis, we correctly predicted trapping trajectories of particles based on a simultaneous solution of Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations. The predicted and measured trapping velocities were found in reasonable agreement (within a factor of <1.6), suggesting that the consideration of the concentration polarization force is necessary for describing the observed particle behavior.

  13. [Particle mass concentrations and size distribution during and after the Beijing Olympic Games].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Rui; Sun, Yang; Li, Liang; Wang, Yue-Si

    2011-04-01

    To study the variance characteristics of particle mass and number concentration during and after the Beijing Olympic Games, on-line measurements of particle mass and number concentration were conducted on the rooftop of a two-story building near the 325 m meteorological observation tower in the courtyard of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics during 2008-08-08 - 2008- 10-07 by using TEOM and APS. Sources and transportation of atmospheric particles during the experiment were discussed with surface meteorology data and backward trajectories calculated using HYSPLIT model. It had been found that the average mass concentration of PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 were (23.1 +/- 1.6) microg x m(-3) and (55.5 +/- 7.3) microg x m(-3) during the Olympic time, which were 18.2% and 16.0% lower than non-Olympic time, and 22.3% and 18.0% lower than non-Source control time. In Olympic time, average number concentration of PN2.5-10 and PN0.5-2.5 were (15 +/- 1) cm(-3) and (3138 +/- 567) cm(-3), which were 23.4% and 27.5% lower than non-Olympic time, and 29.5% and 34.3% lower than non-Source control time. According to the correlation analysis result of particle matter and meteorological factors, there were significant linear relationships between wind speed, relative humidity and precipitation of prior day and particle mass and number concentrations, stepwise regression analysis showed that 42% and 53% of the variance in mass and number concentration of fine particle were both accounted for wind speed and relative humility, while 21% and 39% of the variance in mass and number concentration of coarse particle were both accounted for wind speed and precipitation of prior day. For the entire period, 46% of total air masses came from regions south of Beijing like Baoding and Shijiazhuang and were favor to increase both the mass and number concentration of fine particles, whereas air masses transported from the north and near north regions had a great effect on scavenging both fine and coarse

  14. Urban background levels of particle number concentration and sources in Vilnius, Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byčenkienė, Steigvilė; Plauškaitė, Kristina; Dudoitis, Vadimas; Ulevicius, Vidmantas

    2014-06-01

    This study presents results of research on urban aerosol particles with a focus on the aerosol particle number concentration (PNC) and the particle size distribution. The real time measurements of aerosol PNC (> 4.5 nm) and number size distributions (9-840 nm) were performed. The seasonal variations essentially comprised the minimum monthly mean in October 2010 (3400 ± 3000 cm- 3) and the maximum in April 2011 (19,000 ± 15,000 cm- 3). The mean annual PNC was 10,000 ± 8000 cm- 3 with an average mode size of 30-50 nm. The presence of strong diurnal patterns in aerosol PNC was evident as a direct effect of three sources of aerosol particles (nucleation, traffic, and residential heating). Hybrid receptor modeling potential source contribution function (PSCF) and concentration weighted trajectory (CWT) were used by incorporating 72-h backward trajectories and measurements of PNC in Vilnius. The results of trajectory clustering and the PSCF method demonstrated that possible additional source areas contributing to the elevated particle number concentration in Vilnius could be industrial areas in central Europe. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed highest loadings for PNC, PM10, NOx, NO, NO2 and SO2 concentrations, indicating combustion processes occurring in vehicle engines and use of sulfur-containing fossil fuels for residential heating.

  15. Synthesis of monodispersed hematite particles from highly concentrated metal hydroxide gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingyuan

    The synthesis of uniform hematite particles with various morphologies from highly concentrated metal hydroxide gels was investigated. The investigations were focused on the effects of cation (trivalent and divalent), anions (arsenate and selenate), and organic additives (alkyl sufates) on particle formation. Monodispersed aluminum-substituted hematite particles were synthesized from concentrated mixed solutions of FeCl3 and AlCl3. With increasing aluminum contents, the product particles exhibited ellipsoidal, rod- and peanut-like shapes. Lattice parameter a decreased with increasing Al incorporation. The particles grew anisotropically along c crystal axis according to TEM and XRD analysis. Chromium substitution had a similar influence on particle shape modification. With increasing chromium content, hematite particles exhibited ellipsoidal and peanut-like morphologies. The incorporation of Cr in hematite increases with increasing Cr addition in the starting solution. The particles grew anisotropically along c crystal axis according to XRD analysis. The size of hematite particles decreased when divalent Cu or Mn contents increased in initial solutions. The cubic shape was well maintained with Cu addition. Hematite particles produced with the existence of Mn2+ were irregular in shape and porous in structure. Copper substitution in hematite was verified by both chemical analysis and lattice parameter calculation. However, the incorporation of Mn is negligible. Ellipsoidal and peanut-shaped hematite particles were synthesized with the addition of arsenate and selenate ions. Product particles were more elongated upon the addition of more anions. The shape modification effects of these anions were interpreted in terms of bond matching due to similar Fe-Fe and O-O distances of hematite and anions, respectively. The addition of alkyl sulfates produced peanut-shaped hematite particles. Uniform particles with the same morphology were always formed despite the differences in

  16. Total and size-resolved particle number and black carbon concentrations near an industrial area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keuken, M. P.; Moerman, M.; Zandveld, P.; Henzing, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Total and size-resolved particle number and black carbon concentrations were investigated in urban areas of the city of Rotterdam (the Netherlands) situated near an industrial area. Several monitoring campaigns were conducted in the period 2011-2014 at three local locations and at a regional background site. Black carbon levels showed minor elevation due to industrial emissions. In contrast, particle number concentrations (PNC) increased during periods with wind directions from the industrial area, by 1000 to 23,000 particles per cm3 depending on the distance to the area from 1 to 40 km. The size distribution of elevated PNC was characterized by two modes: 10-20 nm (nucleation particles) and 20-100 nm (Aitken particles). Five dominant industrial sources were identified and used as input for dispersion modelling of PN in 2012. The results showed that in Rotterdam about 70,000 addresses were exposed to an additional annual PNC of 5000-10,000 particles per cm3 and about 55,000 addresses to additional PNC of 10,000-20,000 particles per cm3 for 39% of the time. More measurements of PNC up- and downwind of the industrial area are recommended to identify more accurately the PN emission sources and to validate the dispersion modelling.

  17. Pulsed laser measurements of particle and vapour concentrations in a turbulent jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, I. M.

    1989-10-01

    A turbulent jet of air has been seeded with both particles and a vapor. An excimer pumped dye laser excited visible fluorescence from the biacetyl vapor and Mie scattering from the micron-size particles. It was possible to measure the simultaneous scatteirng from both phases by using interference filters to separate the signals. It has been found that the biacetyl vapor provides an adequate tracer for measurements of the concentration field in a turbulent flow. Furthermore, the feasibility of making simultaneous concentration measurements of two phases in a turbulent flow has been demonstrated.

  18. Accurate Quantification of High Density Lipoprotein Particle Concentration by Calibrated Ion Mobility Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Patrick M.; Ronsein, Graziella E.; Monette, Jeffrey S.; Pamir, Nathalie; Wimberger, Jake; He, Yi; Anantharamaiah, G.M.; Kim, Daniel Seung; Ranchalis, Jane E.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Vaisar, Tomas; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2015-01-01

    Background It is critical to develop new metrics to determine whether high density lipoprotein (HDL) is cardioprotective in humans. One promising approach is HDL particle concentration (HDL-P) – the size and concentration of HDL in plasma or serum. However, the two methods currently used to determine HDL-P yield concentrations that differ more than 5-fold. We therefore developed and validated an improved approach to quantify HDL-P, termed calibrated ion mobility analysis (calibrated IMA). Methods HDL was isolated from plasma by ultracentrifugation, introduced into the gas phase with electrospray ionization, separated by size, and quantified by particle counting. A calibration curve constructed with purified proteins was used to correct for the ionization efficiency of HDL particles. Results The concentrations of gold nanoparticles and reconstituted HDLs measured by calibrated IMA were indistinguishable from concentrations determined by orthogonal methods. In plasma of control (n=40) and cerebrovascular disease (n=40) subjects, three subspecies of HDL were reproducibility measured, with an estimated total HDL-P of 13.4±2.4 µM (mean±SD). HDL-C accounted for 48% of the variance in HDL-P. HDL-P was significantly lower in subjects with cerebrovascular disease, and this difference remained significant after adjustment for HDL cholesterol levels. Conclusions Calibrated IMA accurately and reproducibly determined the concentration of gold nanoparticles and synthetic HDL, strongly suggesting the method could accurately quantify HDL particle concentration. Importantly, the estimated stoichiometry of apoA-I determined by calibrated IMA was 3–4 per HDL particle, in excellent agreement with current structural models. Furthermore, HDL-P associated with cardiovascular disease status in a clinical population independently of HDL cholesterol. PMID:25225166

  19. CHARACTERISTICS OF ACIDITY AND MAJOR ION CONCENTRATION OF SNOWFALL, SNOWPACK AND SNOWMELT WATER IN THE TEMPERATE SNOW AREA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaoka, Yoshihiro; Takeuchi, Yukari

    This paper describes the acidity and main ion concentration of snowfall, snowpack and snowmelt water in the temperate snow area. In order to understand the variation of snow water quality and its relationship among snow, snowpack and snowmelt, snow monitoring and chemical measurement were conducted from December 2008 to March 2009 at Tohkamachi experiment site. As a result, the both of snowfall and snowmelt were high acidity and their average were around 4.6 and 5.0, individually. However, high frequencies of rainfall and snowmelt occurrence during winter decrease the high acidity of snowpack and snowmelt water since they prevent the chemical matter from depositing in the snowpack layer. Moreover, it is suspected that the soil component from Eurasia continent contained in the snow particle also decrease the high acidity of snowfall and snowpack.

  20. Enumerating virus-like particles in an optically concentrated suspension by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi; Cheng, Xuanhong; Daniel Ou-Yang, H.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is one of the most sensitive methods for enumerating low concentration nanoparticles in a suspension. However, biological nanoparticles such as viruses often exist at a concentration much lower than the FCS detection limit. While optically generated trapping potentials are shown to effectively enhance the concentration of nanoparticles, feasibility of FCS for enumerating field-enriched nanoparticles requires understanding of the nanoparticle behavior in the external field. This paper reports an experimental study that combines optical trapping and FCS to examine existing theoretical predictions of particle concentration. Colloidal suspensions of polystyrene (PS) nanospheres and HIV-1 virus-like particles are used as model systems. Optical trapping energies and statistical analysis are used to discuss the applicability of FCS for enumerating nanoparticles in a potential well produced by a force field. PMID:24049685

  1. [Study on number concentration distribution of atmospheric ultrafine particles in Hangzhou].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Fang; Sun, Zai; Fu, Zhi-Min; Yang, Wen-Jun; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2013-02-01

    Atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFPs) were measured with fast mobility particle sizer(FMPS) in Hangzhou, during March 2011 to February 2012. The number concentration and size distribution of UFPs associated with meteorology were studied. The results showed that the number concentration of UFPs was logarithmic bi-modal distribution, and the seasonal levels presented winter > summer > spring> autumn. The highest monthly average concentration was 3.56 x 10(4) cm-3 in December and the lowest was 2.51 x 10(4) cm-3 in October. The seasonal values of count medium diameter(CMD) were spring > winter > autumn > summer. The highest monthly average CMD was 53. 51 nm in April and the lowest was 16.68 nm in June. Meteorological factors had effects on concentration of UFPs. PMID:23668106

  2. How comparable are size-resolved particle number concentrations from different instruments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornsby, K. E.; Pryor, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The need for comparability of particle size resolved measurements originates from multiple drivers including: (i) Recent suggestions that air quality standards for particulate matter should migrate from being mass-based to incorporating number concentrations. This move would necessarily be predicated on measurement comparability which is absolutely critical to compliance determination. (ii) The need to quantify and diagnose causes of variability in nucleation and growth rates in nano-particle experiments conducted in different locations. (iii) Epidemiological research designed to identify key parameters in human health responses to fine particle exposure. Here we present results from a detailed controlled laboratory instrument inter-comparison experiment designed to investigate data comparability in the size range of 2.01-523.3 nm across a range of particle composition, modal diameter and absolute concentration. Particle size distributions were generated using a TSI model 3940 Aerosol Generation System (AGS) diluted using zero air, and sampled using four TSI Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) configurations and a TSI model 3091 Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). The SMPS configurations used two Electrostatic Classifiers (EC) (model 3080) attached to either a Long DMA (LDMA) (model 3081) or a Nano DMA (NDMA) (model 3085) plumbed to either a TSI model 3025A Butanol Condensed Particle Counting (CPC) or a TSI model 3788 Water CPC. All four systems were run using both high and low flow conditions, and were operated with both the internal diffusion loss and multiple charge corrections turned on. The particle compositions tested were sodium chloride, ammonium nitrate and olive oil diluted in ethanol. Particles of all three were generated at three peak concentration levels (spanning the range observed at our experimental site), and three modal particle diameters. Experimental conditions were maintained for a period of 20 minutes to ensure experimental

  3. Concentrated ambient air particles induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Joao R F; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Clarke, Robert W; Coull, Brent A; Stearns, Rebecca C; Lawrence, Joy; Murthy, G G Krishna; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether short-term exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) alter the morphology of small pulmonary arteries in normal rats and rats with chronic bronchitis (CB). Sprague-Dawley male rats were exposed to CAPs, using the Harvard Ambient Particle Concentrator, or to particle-free air (sham) under identical conditions during 3 consecutive days (5 hr/day) in six experimental sets. CB was induced by exposure to 276 +/- 9 ppm of sulfur dioxide (5 hr/day, 5 days/week, 6 weeks). Physicochemical characterization of CAPs included measurements of particle mass, size distribution, and composition. Rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last CAPs exposure. Histologic slides were prepared from random sections of lung lobes and coded for blinded analysis. The lumen/wall area (L/W) ratio was determined morphometrically on transverse sections of small pulmonary arteries. When all animal data (normal and CB) were analyzed together, the L/W ratios decreased as concentrations of fine particle mass, silicon, lead, sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon increased. In separate univariate analyses of animal data, the association for sulfate was significant only in normal rats, whereas silicon was significantly associated in both CB and normal rats. In multivariate analyses including all particle factors, the association with silicon remained significant. Our results indicate that short-term CAPs exposures (median, 182.75 micro g/m3; range, 73.50-733.00 micro g/m3) can induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in normal and CB rats. This effect was correlated with specific particle components and suggests that the pulmonary vasculature might be an important target for ambient air particle toxicity. PMID:12460797

  4. Monitor of the concentration of particles of dense radioactive materials in a stream of air

    DOEpatents

    Yule, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    A monitor of the concentration of particles of radioactive materials such as plutonium oxide in diameters as small as 1/2 micron includes in combination a first stage comprising a plurality of virtual impactors, a second stage comprising a further plurality of virtual impactors, a collector for concentrating particulate material, a radiation detector disposed near the collector to respond to radiation from collected material and means for moving a stream of air, possibly containing particulate contaminants, through the apparatus.

  5. Linking particle number concentration (PNC), meteorology and traffic variables in a UK street canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Heather D.; Arthur, Robert; BéruBé, Kelly A.; Jones, Tim P.

    2014-10-01

    Ambient particle number concentration (PNC) has been linked with adverse health outcomes such as asthma, reduced lung function and cardiovascular disease. To investigate the relationship between PNC, meteorology and traffic we measured size segregated respirable particles in a busy commuter street in Swansea, UK for ten months using a Dekati Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI). The ELPI segregates particles into 12 size fractions between 7 nm and 10 μm. The median PNC for the sampling period was 31,545 cm- 3. For the ultrafine particles (7-93 nm), the highest PNC was found in winter (46,615 cm- 3; 15 minute average) and the lowest for that size fraction in summer (29,696 cm- 3). For the particles below 93 nm there was a trimodal distribution to weekdays (particularly Monday to Wednesday), with PNC peaks at 09:00, 16:00 and 23:00. Wind direction had a significant influence on PNC and differed between particles in the fine range (below 2.5 μm) and more coarse particles (up to 10 μm). For fine particles, winds parallel to the canyon were associated with higher PNCs which were attributed to the replenishment of traffic particles. For coarse particles, PNCs were higher from winds perpendicular to the canyon and this was linked to source distribution around the sampling site and the recirculation of pollutants within the canyon. During times when vehicle volumes were high and vehicles were exhibiting stop-start behaviour, if this was combined with low wind speeds, ultrafine PNC was highest. This effect was generally observed during the morning rush hour. Current mass-based legislation does not take into account exposure to the number of particles or the change in population exposure diurnally.

  6. A concentrated solar cavity absorber with direct heat transfer through recirculating metallic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarker, M. R. I.; Saha, Manabendra; Beg, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    A recirculating flow solar particle cavity absorber (receiver) is modeled to investigate the flow behavior and heat transfer characteristics of a novel developing concept. It features a continuous recirculating flow of non-reacting metallic particles (black silicon carbide) with air which are used as a thermal enhancement medium. The aim of the present study is to numerically investigate the thermal behavior and flow characteristics of the proposed concept. The proposed solar particle receiver is modeled using two phase discrete particle model (DPM), RNG k-flow model and discrete ordinate (DO) radiation model. Numerical analysis is carried out considering a solar receiver with only air and the mixture of non-reacting particles and air as a heat transfer as well as heat carrying medium. The parametric investigation is conducted considering the incident solar flux on the receiver aperture and changing air flow rate and recirculation rate inside the receiver. A stand-alone feature of the recirculating flow solar particle receiver concept is that the particles are directly exposed to concentrated solar radiation monotonously through recirculating flow inside the receiver and results in efficient irradiation absorption and convective heat transfer to air that help to achieve high temperature air and consequently increase in thermal efficiency. This paper presents, results from the developed concept and highlights its flow behavior and potential to enhance the heat transfer from metallic particles to air by maximizing heat carrying capacity of the heat transfer medium. The imposed milestones for the present system will be helpful to understand the radiation absorption mechanism of the particles in a recirculating flow based receiver, the thermal transport between the particles, the air and the cavity, and the fluid dynamics of the air and particle in the cavity.

  7. Air pollutant concentrations near three Texas roadways, Part I: Ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yifang; Pudota, Jayanth; Collins, Donald; Allen, David; Clements, Andrea; DenBleyker, Allison; Fraser, Matt; Jia, Yuling; McDonald-Buller, Elena; Michel, Edward

    Vehicular emitted air pollutant concentrations were studied near three types of roadways in Austin, Texas: (1) State Highway 71 (SH-71), a heavily traveled arterial highway dominated by passenger vehicles; (2) Interstate 35 (I-35), a limited access highway north of Austin in Georgetown; and (3) Farm to Market Road 973 (FM-973), a heavily traveled surface roadway dominated by truck traffic. Air pollutants examined include carbon monoxide (CO), oxides of nitrogen (NO x), and carbonyl species in the gas-phase. In the particle phase, ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations (diameter < 100 nm), fine particulate matter (PM 2.5, diameter < 2.5 μm) mass and carbon content and several particle-bound organics were examined. All roadways had an upwind stationary sampling location, one or two fixed downwind sample locations and a mobile monitoring platform that characterized pollutant concentrations fall-off with increased distance from the roadways. Data reported in this paper focus on UFP while other pollutants and near-roadway chemical processes are examined in a companion paper. Traffic volume, especially heavy-duty traffic, wind speed, and proximity to the road were found to be the most important factors determining UFP concentrations near the roadways. Since wind directions were not consistent during the sampling periods, distances along wind trajectories from the roadway to the sampling points were used to study the decay characteristics of UFPs. Under perpendicular wind conditions, for all studied roadway types, particle number concentrations increased dramatically moving from the upwind side to the downwind side. The elevated particle number concentrations decay exponentially with increasing distances from the roadway with sharp concentration gradients observed within 100-150 m, similar to previously reported studies. A single exponential decay curve was found to fit the data collected from all three roadways very well under perpendicular wind conditions. No

  8. Elevated Concentrations of Lead in Particulate Matter on the Neighborhood-Scale in Delhi, India As Determined by Single Particle Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongru; Peters, Thomas M; Casuccio, Gary S; Lersch, Traci L; West, Roger R; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Naresh; Ault, Andrew P

    2016-05-17

    High mass concentrations of atmospheric lead particles are frequently observed in the Delhi, India metropolitan area, although the sources of lead particles are poorly understood. In this study, particles sampled across Delhi (August - December 2008) were analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX) to improve our understanding of the spatial and physicochemical variability of lead-rich particles (>90% lead). The mean mass concentration of lead-rich particles smaller than 10 μm (PM10) was 0.7 μg/m(3) (1.5 μg/m(3) std. dev.) with high variability (range: 0-6.2 μg/m(3)). Four samples (16% of 25 samples) with PM10 lead-rich particle concentrations >1.4 μg/m(3) were defined as lead events and studied further. The temporal characteristics, heterogeneous spatial distribution, and wind patterns of events, excluded regional monsoon conditions or common anthropogenic sources from being the major causes of the lead events. Individual particle composition, size, and morphology analysis indicate informal recycling operations of used lead-acid batteries as the likely source of the lead events. This source is not typically included in emission inventories, and the observed isolated hotspots with high lead concentrations could represent an elevated exposure risk in certain neighborhoods of Delhi. PMID:27077697

  9. Ratios of total suspended solids to suspended sediment concentrations by particle size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, W.R.; Bannerman, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    Wet-sieving sand-sized particles from a whole storm-water sample before splitting the sample into laboratory-prepared containers can reduce bias and improve the precision of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC). Wet-sieving, however, may alter concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) because the analytical method used to determine TSS may not have included the sediment retained on the sieves. Measuring TSS is still commonly used by environmental managers as a regulatory metric for solids in storm water. For this reason, a new method of correlating concentrations of TSS and SSC by particle size was used to develop a series of correction factors for SSC as a means to estimate TSS. In general, differences between TSS and SSC increased with greater particle size and higher sand content. Median correction factors to SSC ranged from 0.29 for particles larger than 500m to 0.85 for particles measuring from 32 to 63m. Great variability was observed in each fraction-a result of varying amounts of organic matter in the samples. Wide variability in organic content could reduce the transferability of the correction factors. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  10. Concentration and particle size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formed by thermal cooking.

    PubMed

    Saito, E; Tanaka, N; Miyazaki, A; Tsuzaki, M

    2014-06-15

    The concentration and particle size distribution of 19 major polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted by thermal cooking were investigated. Corn, trout, beef, prawns, and pork were selected for grilling. The PAHs in the oil mist emitted when the food was grilled were collected according to particle size range and analysed by GC/MS. Much higher concentrations of PAHs were detected in the oil mist emitted by grilled pork, trout, and beef samples, which were rich in fat. The main components of the cooking exhaust were 3- and 4-ring PAHs, regardless of food type. The particle size distribution showed that almost all the PAHs were concentrated in particles with diameters of <0.43 μm. For pork, the toxic equivalent of benzo[a]pyrene accounted for 50% of the PAHs in particles with diameters of <0.43 μm. From these results, we estimated that >90% of the PAHs would reach the alveolar region of the lungs. PMID:24491732

  11. Biomass, lipid productivities and fatty acids composition of marine Nannochloropsis gaditana cultured in desalination concentrate.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ângelo Paggi; Feller, Rafael; Moecke, Elisa Helena Siegel; Sant'Anna, Ernani Sebastião

    2015-12-01

    In this study the feasibility of growing marine Nannochloropsis gaditana in desalination concentrate (DC) was explored and the influence of the DC concentration on the biomass growth, lipid productivities and fatty acids composition was assessed. The reuse of the medium with the optimum DC concentration in successive algal cultivation cycles and the additional of a carbon source to the optimized medium were also evaluated. On varying the DC concentration, the maximum biomass concentration (0.96gL(-1)) and lipid content (12.6%) were obtained for N. gaditana in the medium with the optimum DC concentration (75%). Over the course of the reuse of the optimum DC medium, three cultivation cycles were performed, observing that the biomass productivity is directly correlated to lipid productivity. Palmitic acid was the major fatty acid found in N. gaditana cells. The saturated fatty acids content of the algae enhanced significantly on increasing the DC concentration. PMID:26318921

  12. The role of acid-base effects on particle charging in apolar media.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Matthew Michael; Berg, John C

    2015-06-01

    The creation and stabilization of electric charge in apolar environments (dielectric constant≈2) have been an area of interest dating back to when an explanation was sought for the occurrence of what are now known as electrokinetic explosions during the pumping of fuels. More recently attention has focused on the charging of suspended particles in such media, underlying such applications as electrophoretic displays (e.g., the Amazon Kindle® reader) and new printing devices (e.g., the HP Indigo® Digital Press). The endeavor has been challenging owing to the complexity of the systems involved and the large number of factors that appear to be important. A number of different, and sometimes conflicting, theories for particle surface charging have been advanced, but most observations obtained in the authors' laboratory, as well as others, appear to be explainable in terms of an acid-base mechanism. Adducts formed between chemical functional groups on the particle surface and monomers of reverse micelle-forming surfactants dissociate, leaving charged groups on the surface, while the counter-charges formed are sequestered in the reverse micelles. For a series of mineral oxides in a given medium with a given surfactant, surface charging (as quantified by the maximum electrophoretic mobility or zeta potential obtained as surfactant concentration is varied) was found to scale linearly with the aqueous PZC (or IEP) values of the oxides. Different surfactants, with the same oxide series, yielded similar behavior, but with different PZC crossover points between negative and positive particle charging, and different slopes of charge vs. PZC. Thus the oxide series could be used as a yardstick to characterize the acid-base properties of the surfactants. This has led directly to the study of other materials, including surface-modified oxides, carbon blacks, pigments (charge transfer complexes), and polymer latices. This review focuses on the acid-base mechanism of particle

  13. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Licina, Dusan; Bhangar, Seema; Brooks, Brandon; Baker, Robyn; Firek, Brian; Tang, Xiaochen; Morowitz, Michael J; Banfield, Jillian F; Nazaroff, William W

    2016-01-01

    Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupancy. The experiments were conducted over one year in a private-style NICU. The NICU was served by a central heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system equipped with an economizer and a high-efficiency particle filtration system. The following parameters were measured continuously during weekdays with 1-min resolution: particles larger than 0.3 μm resolved into 6 size groups, CO2 level, dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity, and presence or absence of occupants. Altogether, over sixteen periods of a few weeks each, measurements were conducted in rooms occupied with premature infants. In parallel, a second monitoring station was operated in a nearby hallway or at the local nurses' station. The monitoring data suggest a strong link between indoor particle concentrations and human occupancy. Detected particle peaks from occupancy were clearly discernible among larger particles and imperceptible for submicron (0.3-1 μm) particles. The mean indoor particle mass concentrations averaged across the size range 0.3-10 μm during occupied periods was 1.9 μg/m3, approximately 2.5 times the concentration during unoccupied periods (0.8 μg/m3). Contributions of within-room emissions to total PM10 mass in the baby rooms averaged 37-81%. Near-room indoor emissions and outdoor sources contributed 18-59% and 1-5%, respectively. Airborne particle levels in the size range 1-10 μm showed strong dependence on human activities, indicating the importance of indoor

  14. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Licina, Dusan; Bhangar, Seema; Brooks, Brandon; Baker, Robyn; Firek, Brian; Tang, Xiaochen; Morowitz, Michael J.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupancy. The experiments were conducted over one year in a private-style NICU. The NICU was served by a central heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system equipped with an economizer and a high-efficiency particle filtration system. The following parameters were measured continuously during weekdays with 1-min resolution: particles larger than 0.3 μm resolved into 6 size groups, CO2 level, dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity, and presence or absence of occupants. Altogether, over sixteen periods of a few weeks each, measurements were conducted in rooms occupied with premature infants. In parallel, a second monitoring station was operated in a nearby hallway or at the local nurses’ station. The monitoring data suggest a strong link between indoor particle concentrations and human occupancy. Detected particle peaks from occupancy were clearly discernible among larger particles and imperceptible for submicron (0.3–1 μm) particles. The mean indoor particle mass concentrations averaged across the size range 0.3–10 μm during occupied periods was 1.9 μg/m3, approximately 2.5 times the concentration during unoccupied periods (0.8 μg/m3). Contributions of within-room emissions to total PM10 mass in the baby rooms averaged 37–81%. Near-room indoor emissions and outdoor sources contributed 18–59% and 1–5%, respectively. Airborne particle levels in the size range 1–10 μm showed strong dependence on human activities, indicating the importance of indoor

  15. Summary and implications of reported amino acid concentrations in the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Shock, E.L.; Schulte, M.D. )

    1990-11-01

    A study of literature reports of the concentrations of amino acids in extracts from the Murchison meteorite shows that many of the concentration ratios are constant. There are two possible interpretations of these ratios. One is that they are controlled by the pathways through which the amino acids formed, from which it follows that the amino acids are distributed in the same proportions throughout the meteorite. The other interpretation is that the ratios result from the analytical procedures used to extract the amino acids from the meteorite. These methods rely heavily on high-temperature (100{degree}C) aqueous extraction and subsequent high-temperature acid hydrolysis. A correlation was observed in the present study between the relative concentrations of several amino acids in the meteorite extracts and their relative aqueous solubilities at 100{degree}C. The extract solutions are dilute, and far from the saturation limits, but these correlations suggest that the sampling procedure affects directly the reported concentrations for these amino acids. If the extraction process does not bias the results, and all extractable amino acids are removed from meteorite samples, then the properties of amino acids which control both their solubilities and their concentrations in the meteorite need to be established. The possibility of sampling bias needs to be tested experimentally before concluding that extraction is complete, and that the constant relative abundances indicate that the relative concentrations of amino acids are homogeneous in the meteorite.

  16. Concentration of Methylamine and Ethylamine Salts measured by a particle into liquid sampler and Ion Chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler (PILS) and ion chromatographs (ICs) were used to detect the concentration of methylamine salts associated with atmospheric particulate matter reactions in a smog chamber. The smog chamber is located at U.C. Riverside’s College of Engineering Center for Environmental Re...

  17. TISSUE REMODELING IN THE HUMAN LUNG IN RELATION TO PARTICLE CONCENTRATION AND METAL CONTENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    TISSUE REMODELING IN THE HUMAN LUNG IN RELATION TO PARTICLE CONCENTRATION AND METAL CONTENT. J Gallagher1, J Inmon1, S Schlaegle2, A Levine2, T Rogers3, J Scott1, F Green4, M Schenker5, K Pinkerton5 1NHEERL, US-EPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2RJ Lee Group Inc, Monroeville, Pa, USA; ...

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF A PROTOTYPE COARSE PARTICLE CONCENTRATOR FOR INHALATION TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES. (R825270)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the development and laboratory characterization of a prototype slit nozzle virtual impactor that can be used to concentrate coarse particles. A variety of physical design and flow parameters were evaluated including different acceleration and collection sli...

  19. The Effects of Vegetation Barriers on Near-road Ultrafine Particle Number and Carbon Monoxide Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have shown that people living in near-roadway communities (within 100 m of the road) are exposed to high ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations, which may be associated with adverse health effects. Vegetation barriers have been shown to affect pollutant t...

  20. TRACE ELEMENT CONCENTRATIONS ON FINE PARTICLES IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric particles were collected from May, 1980 to Dec., 1981 at 3 sampling sites in the Ohio River Valley (ORV). The collected samples were analyzed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) for elemental concentrations and their masses determined by beta gauging. The XRF data and associa...

  1. Characterization study of cesium concentrated particles in the soils near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Yukihiko; Sueki, Keisuke; Sasa, Kimikazu; Adachi, Kouji; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2015-04-01

    Radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident contaminated a vast area. Two types of contamination, spread and spot types, were observed in soils with autoradiography using an imaging plate. Other samples such as dust filters, vegetation, X-ray films, and so on, also indicate the spot type contamination in the early stage of the FDNPP accident. The source of spot type contamination is well known as hot particles at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) accident in 1986. Hot particles were divided into two groups, fuel hot particles and fission product particles, and they were emitted directly from reactor core with phreatic explosion and fire. In contrast, the official reports of the FDNPP accident did not conforme core explosion. In addition, the emitted total amount of Uranium was very few (Yamamoto et al., 2014). Thus, the spot type contaminations were not identified as the same of hot particles yet. Therefore, the present study aimed to pick up and identify the spot contaminations in soils. Surface soil samples were collected at 20 km northwest from the FDNPP in June 2013. Soils were spread in plastic bags for autoradiography with imaging plate analysis. Then, the soil particles were collected on a sticky carbon tape and analyzed by SEM-EDS to detect radioactive particles. Finally, particles were confirmed to contain photo peaks in the γ-spectrum by a germanium semiconductor detector. Four radioactive particles were isolated from the soil samples in the present study. Detected γ-ray emission radionuclides were only Cs-134 and Cs-137. The X-ray spectra on the SEM-EDS of all particles showed a Cs peak as well as O, Fe, Zn, and Rb peaks, and these elements were distributed uniformly within the particles. In addition, uniform distribution of Si was also shown. Moreover, U was detected from one of the particles, but U concentration was very low and existed locally in the particle. These characters are very similar to previous

  2. Airborne particle concentration and meteorologic conditions associated with pneumonia incidence in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    MacVean, D W; Franzen, D K; Keefe, T J; Bennett, B W

    1986-12-01

    To elucidate the role of air quality on the occurrence of pneumonia in feedlot cattle, the following environmental values were measured at a feedlot: suspended particulates in 5 particle-size fractions, relative humidity, air temperature, and barometric pressure. Pneumonia incidence data were classified by the number of days the cattle had been at the feedlot (days on feed). The concentration of airborne particles, range of temperature, days on feed, and season of the year were associated with incidence of pneumonia in cattle. Pneumonia incidence rates were greatest both within 15 days of arrival at the feedlot and during the fall sampling periods. The incidence of pneumonia in the 16 to 30 days-on-feed group was closely associated with the concentration of particles 2.0 to 3.3 microns in diameter and the range of daily temperature when exposure occurred 15 days before the onset of disease in the fall and 10 days before in the spring. PMID:3800131

  3. Heating Characteristics of Transformer Oil-Based Magnetic Fluids of Different Magnetic Particle Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skumiel, A.; Hornowski, T.; Józefczak, A.

    2011-04-01

    The heating ability of mineral oil-based magnetic fluids with different magnetic particle concentrations is studied. The calorimetric measurements were carried out in an alternating magnetic field of 500 A · m-1 to 2500 A · m-1 amplitude and of 1500 kHz frequency. The revealed H n law-type dependence of the temperature increase rate, (d T/d t) t=0, on the amplitude of the magnetic field indicates the presence of superparamagnetic and partially ferromagnetic particles in the tested samples since n > 2. The specific absorption rate (SAR) defined as the rate of energy absorption per unit mass increases with a decrease of the volume fraction of the dispersed phase. This can be explained by the formation of aggregates in the samples with a higher concentration of magnetic particles.

  4. Airborne particle concentration and meteorologic conditions associated with pneumonia incidence in feedlot cattle

    SciTech Connect

    MacVean, D.W.; Franzen, D.K.; Keefe, T.J.; Bennett, B.W.

    1986-12-01

    To elucidate the role of air quality on the occurrence of pneumonia in feedlot cattle, the following environmental values were measured at a feedlot: suspended particulates in 5 particle-size fractions, relative humidity, air temperature, and barometric pressure. Pneumonia incidence data were classified by the number of days the cattle had been at the feedlot (days on feed). The concentration of airborne particles, range of temperature, days on feed, and season of the year were associated with incidence of pneumonia in cattle. Pneumonia incidence rates were greatest both within 15 days of arrival at the feedlot and during the fall sampling periods. The incidence of pneumonia in the 16 to 30 days-on-feed group was closely associated with the concentration of particles 2.0 to 3.3 microns in diameter and the range of daily temperature when exposure occurred 15 days before the onset of disease in the fall and 10 days before in the spring.

  5. Determining concentration and fall velocity of estuarine particle populations using ADV, OBS and LISST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fugate, David C.; Friedrichs, Carl T.

    2002-07-01

    In describing suspended sediment conditions in the lower Chesapeake Bay, VA, USA, this paper reports and develops methods for distinguishing multiple particle populations in the bottom boundary layer of estuaries in general. In addition, a novel application of the acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) is shown to estimate in situ particle fall velocity at a single point without affecting the ambient turbulence. In situ estimates of suspended sediment concentration from ADV, optical backscatter, and laser in situ scattering and transmissometry (LISST) instruments are compared with gravimetrically determined mass concentrations from pumped water samples. In this environment, acoustic backscatter from the ADV proved to be the best estimator of mass concentrations due to its apparent insensitivity to the size or density of muddy aggregates. The concentration estimates and the relative sensitivities of the instruments to particle size and density combined with size distribution information from the LISST reveal the characteristics of multiple particle populations in the bottom boundary layer. Two rapidly settling sediment populations are suggested with similar fall velocities but distinct critical erosion stresses. A slowly settling background population is also identified whose concentration varies over meteorological time scales. Fall velocities are estimated analytically from a balance of settling and diffusive flux gradients using two methods, one employing Reynolds concentration flux, and the other estimating eddy diffusivity using the von-Karman Prandtl equation. Comparison of the local change and advective terms in the solute transport equation to the magnitude of the settling term suggests that a balance between the settling and resuspension term is a good first order approximation at this site, validating the indirect method for estimating settling velocity. Single elevation estimates of fall velocity using the ADV to estimate Reynolds concentration flux produced

  6. Cascade model for particle concentration and enstrophy in fully developed turbulence with mass-loading feedback.

    PubMed

    Hogan, R C; Cuzzi, J N

    2007-05-01

    A cascade model is described based on multiplier distributions determined from three-dimensional (3D) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent particle laden flows, which include two-way coupling between the phases at global mass loadings equal to unity. The governing Eulerian equations are solved using psuedospectral methods on up to 512(3) computional grid points. DNS results for particle concentration and enstrophy at Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers in the range 34-170 were used to directly determine multiplier distributions on spatial scales three times the Kolmogorov length scale. The multiplier probability distribution functions (PDFs) are well characterized by the beta distribution function. The width of the PDFs, which is a measure of intermittency, decreases with increasing mass loading within the local region where the multipliers are measured. The functional form of this dependence is not sensitive to Reynolds numbers in the range considered. A partition correlation probability is included in the cascade model to account for the observed spatial anticorrelation between particle concentration and enstrophy. Joint probability distribution functions of concentration and enstrophy generated using the cascade model are shown to be in excellent agreement with those derived directly from our 3D simulations. Probabilities predicted by the cascade model are presented at Reynolds numbers well beyond what is achievable by direct simulation. These results clearly indicate that particle mass loading significantly reduces the probabilities of high particle concentration and enstrophy relative to those resulting from unloaded runs. Particle mass density appears to reach a limit at around 100 times the gas density. This approach has promise for significant computational savings in certain applications. PMID:17677162

  7. Apparatus and method for concentrating and filtering particles suspended in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Cummings, Eric B.; Singh, Anup K.

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed is a device for separating and concentrating particles suspended in a fluid stream by using dielectrophoresis (DEP) to trap and/or deflect those particles as they migrate through a fluid channel. The method uses fluid channels designed to constrain a liquid flowing through it to uniform electrokinetic flow velocities. This behavior is achieved by connecting deep and shallow sections of channels, with the channel depth varying abruptly along an interface. By careful design of abrupt changes in specific permeability at the interface, an abrupt and spatially uniform change in electrokinetic force can be selected. Because these abrupt interfaces also cause a sharp gradient in applied electric fields, a DEP force also can be established along the interface. Depending on the complex conductivity of the suspended particles and the immersion liquid, the DEP force can controllably complement or oppose the local electrokinetic force transporting the fluid through the channel allowing for manipulation of particles suspended in the transporting liquid.

  8. COMPARISON OF SULFUR MEASUREMENTS FROM A REGIONAL FINE PARTICLE NETWORK WITH CONCURRENT ACID MODES NETWORK RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 um) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Environmental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during a two year period in 1988-90. he 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the...

  9. On the growth of nitric and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1988-01-01

    A theory for the formation of frozen aerosol particles in the Antarctic stratosphere was developed and applied to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The theory suggests that the condensed ice particles are composed primarily of nitric acid and water, with small admixtures of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in solid solution. The proposed particle formation mechanism is in agreement with the magnitude and seasonal behavior of the optical extinction observed in the winter polar stratosphere.

  10. Using Conductivity Measurements to Determine the Identities and Concentrations of Unknown Acids: An Inquiry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, K. Christopher; Garza, Ariana

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a student designed experiment using titrations involving conductivity measurements to identify unknown acids as being either HCl or H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4], and to determine the concentrations of the acids, thereby improving the utility of standard acid-base titrations. Using an inquiry context, students gain experience…

  11. Aerosol-chamber study of the α-pinene/O 3 reaction: influence of particle acidity on aerosol yields and products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Yoshiteru; Böge, Olaf; Gnauk, Thomas; Herrmann, Hartmut

    α-Pinene ozonolysis was carried out in the presence of ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid seed particles in a 9 m 3 Teflon chamber at the mixing ratios of 100 ppbv for α-pinene and about 70 ppbv for ozone. The evolution of size distribution was measured by means of a differential mobility particle sizer (DMPS). The resulting secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was sampled by a denuder/quartz fiber filter combination for the determination of the total organic carbon concentration (TOC) in the particle phase, using a thermographic method and by a denuder/PTFE filter combination for the analysis of individual chemical species in the particle phase using capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (CE-ESI-MS). cis-Pinic acid ( m/ z 185) and another species tentatively identified at m/ z 171 and 199 were the major particle phase species for both seed particles although the product yields were different, indicating the influence of seed particle acidity. A thermographic method for the determination of TOC showed an increase of particle phase organics by 40% for the experiments with higher acidity. CE-ESI-MS analysis showed a large increase in the concentration of compounds with Mw>300 from the experiments with sulfuric acid seed particles. These results suggest that the seed particle acidity enhances the yield of SOA and plays an important role in the formation of larger molecules in the particle phase. Our results from direct particle phase chemical analysis suggest for the first time that condensation of smaller organics takes place by polymerization or aldol condensation following the formation of aldehydes, such as pinonaldehyde from the terpene ozonolysis.

  12. Atmospheric concentrations and gas-particle partitions of pesticides: Comparisons between measured and gas-particle partitioning models from source and receptor sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiki, Mustapha; Poissant, Laurier

    Atmospheric concentrations and gas-particles partition were measured for 83 pesticides including organochlorines (OCs), acid herbicides (AHs), neutral herbicides (NHs) and organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). Samples have been collected in June 2005 at two sites, located in Québec, named St. Anicet (agricultural area) and Bay St. François wetland (receptor site). The highest vapor concentration was measured for metolachlor which was 23,600 pg m -3 and 12,200 pg m -3 at St. Anicet and Bay St. François (BSF), respectively. In the particulate phase, MCPA exhibited the highest level (323 pg m -3) at St. Anicet. Gas-particle partitions (GPPs) were also investigated and it was expressed as a function of the fraction of chemical in the particulate phase ( ϕ). The highest average of ϕ was observed for the AHs which were MCPB (75%) and MCPA (50%) at BSF and St. Anicet, respectively. Likewise, the GPPs were estimated by several models, namely Junge-Pankow model, KOA model, and polyparameter linear free energy relationships (ppLFERs). The estimated GPPs were compared to the observed ones and data showed a better correlation at BSF (receptor site) than that at St. Anicet. This suggests a kinetic effect on the GPPs of chemicals.

  13. Development of xylose-fermenting yeasts for ethanol production at high acetic acid concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandas, D.V.; Whelan, D.R.; Panchal, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Mutants resistant to comparatively high levels of acetic acid were isolated from the xylose-fermenting yeasts Candida shehatae and Pichia Stipitis by adapting these cultures to increasing concentrations of acetic acid grown in shake-flask cultures. These mutants were tested for their ability to ferment xylose in presence of high acetic acid concentrations, in acid hydrolysates of wood, and in hardwood spent sulfite liquor, and compared with their wild-type counterparts and between themselves. The P. stipitis mutant exhibited faster fermentation times, better tolerance to acid hydrolysates, and tolerance to lower pH.

  14. The effects of vegetation barriers on near-road ultrafine particle number and carbon monoxide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Yeng; Hagler, Gayle; Baldauf, Richard; Isakov, Vlad; Lin, Hong-Yiou; Khlystov, Andrey

    2016-05-15

    Numerous studies have shown that people living in near-roadway communities (within 100 m of the road) are exposed to high ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations, which may be associated with adverse health effects. Vegetation barriers have been shown to affect pollutant transport via particle deposition to leaves and altering the dispersion of emission plumes, which in turn would modify the exposure of near-roadway communities to traffic-related UFPs. In this study, both stationary (equipped with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer, SMPS) and mobile (equipped with Fast Mobility Particle Sizer, FMPS) measurements were conducted to investigate the effects of vegetation barriers on downwind UFP (particle diameters ranging from 14 to 102 nm) concentrations at two sites in North Carolina, USA. One site had mainly deciduous vegetation while the other was primarily coniferous; both sites have a nearby open field without the vegetation barriers along the same stretch of limited access road, which served as a reference. During downwind conditions (traffic emissions transported towards the vegetation barrier) and when the wind speed was above or equal to 0.5m/s, field measurements indicated that vegetation barriers with full foliage reduced UFP and CO concentrations by 37.7-63.6% and 23.6-56.1%, respectively. When the test was repeated at the same sites during winter periods when deciduous foliage was reduced, the deciduous barrier during winter showed no significant change in UFP concentration before and after the barrier. Results from the stationary (using SMPS) and mobile (using FMPS) measurements for UFP total number concentrations generally agreed to within 20%. PMID:26930311

  15. Dissolved, particulate and acid-leachable trace metal concentrations in North Atlantic precipitation collected on the Global Change Expedition

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, B.; Jickells, T.D. )

    1990-12-01

    Atmospheric inputs of trace metals into surface waters are an important pathway for the oceanic biogeochemical cycling of many trace constituents. Rainwater samples from six precipitation events were collected on board ship during legs 3 and 4 of the Global Change Expedition over the North Atlantic Ocean and analyzed for dissolved, particulate (Al and Pb), and acid-leachable trace metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn). Acid-leachable concentrations of the elements were similar to reported values from the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans which were measured using comparable acidification procedures. Concentrations of dissolved and particulate Al and Pb were determined in rain events acid-leachable and total trace metal concentrations suggest that the acid-leachable fraction of metals can significantly underestimate total concentrations of crustal elements in rain. The solubilities of Al and Pb in precipitation were variable and mean solubilities of the elements were 13% and 45%, respectively. Recycled sea salt components were less than 14% for Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn, indicating that the net trace metal flux is from the atmosphere to the oceans. Deep sea particle fluxes for these metals through the western tropical North Atlantic exceed atmospheric deposition fluxes by a factor of 18 to 41. 57 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Concentration, Size Distribution, and Infectivity of Airborne Particles Carrying Swine Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Carmen; Raynor, Peter C.; Davies, Peter R.; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    When pathogens become airborne, they travel associated with particles of different size and composition. Particle size determines the distance across which pathogens can be transported, as well as the site of deposition and the survivability of the pathogen. Despite the importance of this information, the size distribution of particles bearing viruses emitted by infectious animals remains unknown. In this study we characterized the concentration and size distribution of inhalable particles that transport influenza A virus (IAV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) generated by acutely infected pigs and assessed virus viability for each particle size range. Aerosols from experimentally infected pigs were sampled for 24 days using an Andersen cascade impactor able to separate particles by size (ranging from 0.4 to 10 micrometer (μm) in diameter). Air samples collected for the first 9, 20 and the last 3 days of the study were analyzed for IAV, PRRSV and PEDV, respectively, using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantified as geometric mean copies/m3 within each size range. IAV was detected in all particle size ranges in quantities ranging from 5.5x102 (in particles ranging from 1.1 to 2.1μm) to 4.3x105 RNA copies/m3 in the largest particles (9.0–10.0μm). PRRSV was detected in all size ranges except particles between 0.7 and 2.1μm in quantities ranging from 6x102 (0.4–0.7μm) to 5.1x104 RNA copies/m3 (9.0–10.0μm). PEDV, an enteric virus, was detected in all particle sizes and in higher quantities than IAV and PRRSV (p < 0.0001) ranging from 1.3x106 (0.4–0.7μm) to 3.5x108 RNA copies/m3 (9.0–10.0μm). Infectious status was demonstrated for the 3 viruses, and in the case of IAV and PRRSV, viruses were isolated from particles larger than 2.1μm. In summary, our results indicated that airborne PEDV, IAV and PRRSV can be found in a wide range of

  17. European Marine Background Ice Nucleating Particle concentrations Measured at the Mace Head Station, Ireland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, James; Kanji, Zamin A.; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Ceburnis, Darius; O'Dowd, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Ice formation is an important process which controls cloud microphysical properties and can be critical in the creation of precipitation, therefore influencing the hydrological cycle and energy budget of the Earth. Ice Nucleating Particles (INP) can greatly increase the temperature and rate of ice formation, but the sources and geographical distributions of these particles is not well understood. Mace Head in Ireland is a coastal site on the north eastern edge of Europe with prevailing winds generally from the Atlantic Ocean with little continental influence. Observations of INP concentration from August 2015 using the Horizontal Ice Nucleation Chamber (HINC) at temperature of -30 C are presented. Correlations between the INP and meteorological conditions and aerosol compositions are made, as well as comparisons with commonly used INP concentration parameterisations. Observed INP concentrations are generally low, suggesting that oceanic sources in this region do not contribute significant numbers of INP to the global distribution.

  18. Jamming, Self-Filtration and Cake Growth in Concentrated Particle Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Li, Shoubo; Yang, Donglei; Mi, Yongli; Wang, Xiaorong

    2015-03-01

    We study the flows of concentrated particle suspensions driven through a circular orifice. Above a critical concentration, a jammed structure (i.e., quasi-solid sphere) often forms in the flow and at the entrance of the geometrical constriction. Once occurred this jammed structure grows fast as time t passes and produces a reduction in the solid concentration downstream. Our analysis shows that a combination of the particle jamming, the self-filtration, and the cake-formation with the flow passing through the pores of the jammed solid is responsible for the occurrence of such phenomena. Based on this mechanism, we establish a mathematical model to show how the jammed structure is propagated. Our results suggest that the size D of the jammed structure in this case is proportional to a 1/3 power of the time t. Experiments also support this conclusion.

  19. Aerosol particle and organic vapor concentrations at industrial work sites in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, R W; Rood, M J; Sani, S; Mohamed, M; Rashid, M; Jab, A T; Landsberger, S

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish baseline data about air pollutants potentially related to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) in the Federal Territory and Selangor, Malaysia. During 1991-1993, ambient air quality was monitored at 42 work sites representing ten industrial sectors: adhesive manufacturing, foundries, latex processing, metalworking, plywood/veneer milling, ricemilling, rubber tire manufacturing, sawmilling, shoemaking, and textile related industries. At each work site, aerosol particle size distributions and concentrations of formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, isopropyl alcohol, and furfural were measured. Mean aerosol particle concentrations ranged from 61 micrograms/m3 in foundries to 5,578 micrograms/m3 in ricemills, with five industries (adhesives, metalworking, ricemilling, sawmilling, and shoemaking) exceeding the US EPA 24-hr ambient air standard for PM-10. Formaldehyde concentrations exceeded the threshold limit value (TLV) in adhesives factories. Other vapours and elements measured were well below TLVs. PMID:12109256

  20. Rheophysics of highly concentrated coarse-particle suspensions in a wide-gap Couette rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiederseiner, S.; Ancey, C.; Rentschler, M.; Andreini, N.

    2009-06-01

    An optical visualization apparatus has been designed to measure the particle-velocity and solid-concentration profiles of highly concentrated coarse-particle suspensions in a wide-gap Couette rheometer. The main objective is to investigate the frictional-viscous transition, a phenomenon that has been already reported in recent papers [1, 2, 3, 4], but still remains partially understood. For wide-gap viscometers and complex fluids, a related issue is the Couette problem, which underpins the rheometrical treatment for viscometric flows in coaxial-cylinder rheometers; we compare shear-rate computations obtained by solving the Couette problem (bulk estimate) and by differentiating the velocity and concentration profiles (local measurement).

  1. Emissions from an International Airport Increase Particle Number Concentrations 4-fold at 10 km Downwind

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We measured the spatial pattern of particle number (PN) concentrations downwind from the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) with an instrumented vehicle that enabled us to cover larger areas than allowed by traditional stationary measurements. LAX emissions adversely impacted air quality much farther than reported in previous airport studies. We measured at least a 2-fold increase in PN concentrations over unimpacted baseline PN concentrations during most hours of the day in an area of about 60 km2 that extended to 16 km (10 miles) downwind and a 4- to 5-fold increase to 8–10 km (5–6 miles) downwind. Locations of maximum PN concentrations were aligned to eastern, downwind jet trajectories during prevailing westerly winds and to 8 km downwind concentrations exceeded 75 000 particles/cm3, more than the average freeway PN concentration in Los Angeles. During infrequent northerly winds, the impact area remained large but shifted to south of the airport. The freeway length that would cause an impact equivalent to that measured in this study (i.e., PN concentration increases weighted by the area impacted) was estimated to be 280–790 km. The total freeway length in Los Angeles is 1500 km. These results suggest that airport emissions are a major source of PN in Los Angeles that are of the same general magnitude as the entire urban freeway network. They also indicate that the air quality impact areas of major airports may have been seriously underestimated. PMID:24871496

  2. Emissions from an international airport increase particle number concentrations 4-fold at 10 km downwind.

    PubMed

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Gould, Tim; Hartin, Kris; Larson, Timothy V; Fruin, Scott A

    2014-06-17

    We measured the spatial pattern of particle number (PN) concentrations downwind from the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) with an instrumented vehicle that enabled us to cover larger areas than allowed by traditional stationary measurements. LAX emissions adversely impacted air quality much farther than reported in previous airport studies. We measured at least a 2-fold increase in PN concentrations over unimpacted baseline PN concentrations during most hours of the day in an area of about 60 km(2) that extended to 16 km (10 miles) downwind and a 4- to 5-fold increase to 8-10 km (5-6 miles) downwind. Locations of maximum PN concentrations were aligned to eastern, downwind jet trajectories during prevailing westerly winds and to 8 km downwind concentrations exceeded 75 000 particles/cm(3), more than the average freeway PN concentration in Los Angeles. During infrequent northerly winds, the impact area remained large but shifted to south of the airport. The freeway length that would cause an impact equivalent to that measured in this study (i.e., PN concentration increases weighted by the area impacted) was estimated to be 280-790 km. The total freeway length in Los Angeles is 1500 km. These results suggest that airport emissions are a major source of PN in Los Angeles that are of the same general magnitude as the entire urban freeway network. They also indicate that the air quality impact areas of major airports may have been seriously underestimated. PMID:24871496

  3. Water administration of medium-chain fatty acid caprylic acid produced variable efficacy against cecal Campylobacter jejuni concentrations in broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter is one of the most common causes of foodborne illness, and poultry is considered a primary source of Campylobacter infections. Caprylic acid, an eight-carbon fatty acid, has been shown in previous studies to reduce enteric cecal Campylobacter concentrations in poultry when administere...

  4. Contribution of ants in modifying of soil acidity and particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgun, Alexandra; Golichenkov, Maxim

    2015-04-01

    Being a natural body, formed by the influence of biota on the upper layers of the Earth's crust, the soil is the most striking example of biogenic-abiogenic interactions in the biosphere. Invertebrates (especially ants that build soil nests) are important agents that change soil properties in well developed terrestrial ecosystems. Impact of soil microorganisms on soil properties is particularly described in numerous literature and concerns mainly chemical properties and general indicators of soil biological activity. Influence of ants (as representatives of the soil mesofauna) mostly appears as mechanical movement of soil particles and aggregates, and chemical effects caused by concentration of organic matter within the ant's nest. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of ants on physical and chemical soil attributes such as particle size distribution and soil acidity. The samples were taken from aerial parts of Lasius niger nests, selected on different elements of the relief (summit position, slope, terrace and floodplain) in the Arkhangelsk region (north of the European part of Russia) and compared with the specimens of the upper horizons of the reference soils. Particle size distribution was determined by laser diffraction method using laser diffraction particle size analyzer «Analysette 22 comfort» (FRITSCH, Germany). The acidity (pH) was determined by potentiometry in water suspension. Particle size distribution of the samples from the nests is more variable as compared to the control samples. For example, the content of 5-10 μm fraction ranges from 9% to 12% in reference soils, while in the anthill samples the variation is from 8% to 15%. Similarly, for 50-250 μm fraction - it ranges from 15% to 18% in reference soils, whereas in anthills - from 6% to 29%. The results of particle size analysis showed that the reference sample on the terrace has silty loam texture and nests soil L. niger are medium loam. The reference soil on the slope is

  5. Investigation of Aerosol Surface Area Estimation from Number and Mass Concentration Measurements: Particle Density Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Evans, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    For nanoparticles with nonspherical morphologies, e.g., open agglomerates or fibrous particles, it is expected that the actual density of agglomerates may be significantly different from the bulk material density. It is further expected that using the material density may upset the relationship between surface area and mass when a method for estimating aerosol surface area from number and mass concentrations (referred to as “Maynard’s estimation method”) is used. Therefore, it is necessary to quantitatively investigate how much the Maynard’s estimation method depends on particle morphology and density. In this study, aerosol surface area estimated from number and mass concentration measurements was evaluated and compared with values from two reference methods: a method proposed by Lall and Friedlander for agglomerates and a mobility based method for compact nonspherical particles using well-defined polydisperse aerosols with known particle densities. Polydisperse silver aerosol particles were generated by an aerosol generation facility. Generated aerosols had a range of morphologies, count median diameters (CMD) between 25 and 50 nm, and geometric standard deviations (GSD) between 1.5 and 1.8. The surface area estimates from number and mass concentration measurements correlated well with the two reference values when gravimetric mass was used. The aerosol surface area estimates from the Maynard’s estimation method were comparable to the reference method for all particle morphologies within the surface area ratios of 3.31 and 0.19 for assumed GSDs 1.5 and 1.8, respectively, when the bulk material density of silver was used. The difference between the Maynard’s estimation method and surface area measured by the reference method for fractal-like agglomerates decreased from 79% to 23% when the measured effective particle density was used, while the difference for nearly spherical particles decreased from 30% to 24%. The results indicate that the use of

  6. Temperature and magnetic field responsive hyaluronic acid particles with tunable physical and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekici, Sema; Ilgin, Pinar; Yilmaz, Selahattin; Aktas, Nahit; Sahiner, Nurettin

    2011-01-01

    We report the preparation and characterization of thiolated-temperature-responsive hyaluronic acid-cysteamine-N-isopropyl acrylamide (HA-CYs-NIPAm) particles and thiolated-magnetic-responsive hyaluronic acid (HA-Fe-CYs) particles. Linear hyaluronic acid (HA) crosslinked with divinyl sulfone as HA particles was prepared using a water-in-oil micro emulsion system which were then oxidized HA-O with NaIO4 to develop aldehyde groups on the particle surface. HA-O hydrogel particles were then reacted with cysteamine (CYs) which interacted with aldehydes on the HA surface to form HA particles with cysteamine (HA-CYs) functionality on the surface. HA-CYs particles were further exposed to radical polymerization with NIPAm to obtain temperature responsive HA-CYs-NIPAm hydrogel particles. To acquire magnetic field responsive HA composites, magnetic iron particles were included in HA to form HA-Fe during HA particle preparation. HA-Fe hydrogel particles were also chemically modified. The prepared HA-CYs-NIPAm demonstrated temperature dependent size variations and phase transition temperature. HA-CYs-NIPAm and HA-Fe-CYs particles can be used as drug delivery vehicles. Sulfamethoxazole (SMZ), an antibacterial drug, was used as a model drug for temperature-induced release studies from these particles.

  7. Hydrogen Reduction Kinetics of Hematite Concentrate Particles Relevant to a Novel Flash Ironmaking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Mohassab, Yousef; Jiang, Tao; Sohn, Hong Yong

    2015-04-01

    As an integral part of developing a novel ironmaking process, the hydrogen reduction kinetics of hematite concentrate particles (average particle size 21 µm) were measured in the temperature range from 1423 K to 1623 K (1150 °C to 1350 °C). The novel ironmaking process aims at producing iron from iron oxide concentrates in a flash reactor using gaseous fuels and reductants, which will help reduce energy consumption and minimize greenhouse gas emissions. More than 90 pct reduction of hematite concentrate particles could be obtained by hydrogen at a temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C) and 3 seconds of residence time, indicating that hematite concentrate is suitable for the flash reduction process under development largely aimed at the use of magnetite concentrates. The nucleation and growth rate equation with the Avrami parameter, n, of 1.0 well described the kinetics of hematite reduction. The reduction rate has a 1st-order dependence on the partial pressure of hydrogen. The activation energy of the reaction was 214 kJ/mol, indicating strong temperature dependence. The following complete rate equation was developed that can satisfactorily predict the kinetics of hematite concentrate particles and is suitable for the design of a flash reactor: {{{d}}X}/{{{d}t}} = 4.41 × 107 × {{e}}^{{ - 214{,}000/RT}} × ( {p{{H}}2 - {p{{H}}2 {{O}}}/K} ) × (1 - X), where X is fractional reduction degree, R is 8.314 J/mol K, T is in K, p is in atm, and t is in seconds.

  8. Giant in-particle field concentration and Fano resonances at light scattering by high-refractive-index particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribelsky, Michael I.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a detailed analytical study of light scattering by a particle with high refractive index m +i κ and low losses (m ≫1 ,0 <κ ≪1 ) based on the exact Mie solution. We show that there is a dramatic difference in the behavior of the electromagnetic field within the particle (inner problem) and outside it (outer problem). With an increase in m at fixed values of the other parameters, the field within the particle asymptotically converges to a periodic function of m . The electric and magnetic type Mie resonances of different orders overlap substantially. It may lead to a giant concentration of the electromagnetic energy within the particle. At the same time, we demonstrate that the solution for the outer problem makes it possible to present each partial scattered wave as a sum of two partitions. One of them corresponds to the m -independent wave, scattered by a perfectly reflecting particle and plays the role of a background, while the other is associated with the excitation of a sharply m -dependent resonant Mie mode. The interference of the partitions brings about a typical asymmetric Fano profile. The profile is obtained from the exact Mie solution by means of identical transformations without any additional assumptions and/or fitting. It makes it possible to generalize rigorously the Fano theory to the case of finite dissipation. At an increase in m the Fano resonances in the outer problem die out and the scattered field converges to the universal, m -independent profile. The behavior of the resonances at a fixed m and varying particle size parameter (x ) is also discussed in detail. The similarities and differences of the two cases (fixed x , varying m and fixed m , varying x ) are disclosed. We also show that under certain very general conditions the scattering cross section of a large lossy sphere cannot be smaller than half its geometric cross section, while its absorption cross section cannot exceed three halves of the geometric

  9. Practical considerations in the concentration and recovery of spent nitration acids

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C.M.

    1995-12-01

    Most organic nitrations employ sulphuric acid or oleum in the nitration acid. Even in rare nitric acid only nitrations, sulphuric acid is used as the dehydrating agent to produce 99% nitric acid. The used sulphuric acid is discharged in a diluted form contaminated with organic components and nitric/nitrous species. Pressures are emloyed to reconcentrate and reprocess such spent acids. Acid recovery and concentration is expensive. This paper discusses some of the aspects which must be considered when contemplating acid recovery. In the current industrial climate, acid recovery and recycle should be regarded as an integral part of a nitration process development rather than an afterthought. Case histories will be given in which such considerations influenced the course of the development of the nitration process itself. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of well planned bench and pilot scale test programmes.

  10. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  11. Influence of particles shape on the vertical profile of blowing snow concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vionnet, Vincent; Trouvilliez, Alexandre; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Guyomarc'h, Gilbert

    2013-04-01

    In alpine regions, blowing snow events strongly influence the temporal and spatial evolution of the snow cover throughout the winter season. In Antarctica, blowing snow is an essential surface mass balance process and plays a non-negligible role in the annual accumulation. The vertical profile of blowing snow concentration determines the quantity of snow transported in turbulent suspension. A power law is often used to represent this vertical profile. It serves as an analytical solution representing an equilibrium between vertical turbulent diffusion and gravitational settling. In this work, we study how the exponent of the power law depends on the type of transported particles. Vertical profiles of blowing snow concentration have been collected at the experimental site of Col du Lac Blanc (French Alps) in 2011 and 2012 and near the research station of Cap Prud'homme (Antarctica) in 2010 and 2011. We used mechanical gauges (butterfly nets) and optical devices (Snow Particles Counters). Profiles collected during blowing snow events with precipitation have been corrected to account for the contribution of snowfall. Results show that profiles collected during blowing snow without snowfall differ from the corrected profiles collected during snowfall. At a given wind speed, particles transported during snowfall have a lower settling velocity than particles transported without snowfall. This difference confirms earlier observations (Takahashi, 1985) and can be explained by the change of drag coefficient between dendritic and rounded particles. This difference pertains several hours after the end of the snowfall illustrating the fragmentation of snow grains during blowing snow events.

  12. Three-dimensional simulations of dilute and concentrated suspensions using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Bian, Xin; Ellero, Marco

    2016-04-01

    A three-dimensional model for a suspension of rigid spherical particles in a Newtonian fluid is presented. The solvent is modeled with smoothed particle hydrodynamics method, which takes into account exactly the long-range multi-body hydrodynamic interactions between suspended spheres. Short-range lubrication forces which are necessary to simulate concentrated suspensions, are introduced pair-wisely based on the analytical solution of Stokes equations for approaching/departing objects. Given that lubrication is singular at vanishing solid particle separations, an implicit splitting integration scheme is used to obtain accurate results and at the same time to avoid prohibitively small simulation time steps. Hydrodynamic interactions between solid particles, at both long-range and short-range limits, are verified against theory in the case of two approaching spheres in a quiescent medium and under bulk shear flow, where good agreements are obtained. Finally, numerical results for the suspension viscosity of a many-particle system are shown and compared with analytical solutions available in the dilute and semi-dilute case as well as with previous numerical results obtained in the concentrated limit.

  13. INTERCOMPARISON OF ATMOSPHERIC NITRIC ACID MEASUREMENTS AT ELEVATED AMBIENT CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several methods for measurement of ambient HNO3 were compared over a 9-day period during the Carbonaceous Species Methods Comparison Study at Glendora, CA, in August 1986. ourly averaged HNO3 concentrations were in the range 0.5-25 ppbv, with hourly maxima each day in excess of 1...

  14. Characterization of a Quadrotor Unmanned Aircraft System for Aerosol-Particle-Concentration Measurements.

    PubMed

    Brady, James M; Stokes, M Dale; Bonnardel, Jim; Bertram, Timothy H

    2016-02-01

    High-spatial-resolution, near-surface vertical profiling of atmospheric chemical composition is currently limited by the availability of experimental platforms that can sample in constrained environments. As a result, measurements of near-surface gradients in trace gas and aerosol particle concentrations have been limited to studies conducted from fixed location towers or tethered balloons. Here, we explore the utility of a quadrotor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) as a sampling platform to measure vertical and horizontal concentration gradients of trace gases and aerosol particles at high spatial resolution (1 m) within the mixed layer (0-100 m). A 3D Robotics Iris+ autonomous quadrotor UAS was outfitted with a sensor package consisting of a two-channel aerosol optical particle counter and a CO2 sensor. The UAS demonstrated high precision in both vertical (±0.5 m) and horizontal positions (±1 m), highlighting the potential utility of quadrotor UAS drones for aerosol- and trace-gas measurements within complex terrain, such as the urban environment, forest canopies, and above difficult-to-access areas such as breaking surf. Vertical profiles of aerosol particle number concentrations, acquired from flights conducted along the California coastline, were used to constrain sea-spray aerosol-emission rates from coastal wave breaking. PMID:26730457

  15. Encapsulation of ployunsaturated fatty acid esters with solid lipid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as a-linolenic acid (ALA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are known to improve cardiovascular and nervous system health. These compounds are increasingly used in food and animal feed formulations. However, the high degree of unsaturation in these structures can...

  16. Optimal reconstruction of concentrations, gradients and reaction rates from particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernàndez-Garcia, D.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2011-03-01

    Random walk particle tracking methodologies to simulate solute transport of conservative species constitute an attractive alternative for their computational efficiency and absence of numerical dispersion. Yet, problems stemming from the reconstruction of concentrations from particle distributions have typically prevented its use in reactive transport problems. The numerical problem mainly arises from the need to first reconstruct the concentrations of species/components from a discrete number of particles, which is an error prone process, and then computing a spatial functional of the concentrations and/or its derivatives (either spatial or temporal). Errors are then propagated, so that common strategies to reconstruct this functional require an unfeasible amount of particles when dealing with nonlinear reactive transport problems. In this context, this article presents a methodology to directly reconstruct this functional based on kernel density estimators. The methodology mitigates the error propagation in the evaluation of the functional by avoiding the prior estimation of the actual concentrations of species. The multivariate kernel associated with the corresponding functional depends on the size of the support volume, which defines the area over which a given particle can influence the functional. The shape of the kernel functions and the size of the support volume determines the degree of smoothing, which is optimized to obtain the best unbiased predictor of the functional using an iterative plug-in support volume selector. We applied the methodology to directly reconstruct the reaction rates of a precipitation/dissolution problem involving the mixing of two different waters carrying two aqueous species in chemical equilibrium and moving through a randomly heterogeneous porous medium.

  17. Atmospheric fate of nuclei-mode particles estimated from the number concentrations and chemical composition of particles measured at roadside and background sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fushimi, Akihiro; Hasegawa, Shuichi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Fujitani, Yuji; Tanabe, Kiyoshi; Kobayashi, Shinji

    Number concentrations and size-resolved chemical compositions of atmospheric particles at a roadside site in Kawasaki City, Japan, and a background site 200 m away were measured in winter to estimate the atmospheric fate of nuclei-mode particles emitted from vehicles. Measurements with a scanning mobility particle sizer showed a sharp peak in nuclei-mode particles with a modal diameter of around 0.020 μm at the roadside site; in contrast, no peak for nuclei-mode particles was observed at the background site. For chemical analysis, size-resolved particles were sampled by low-pressure impactors. Carbon analysis suggested that diesel exhaust particles contributed to both the roadside and background Stage 1 (S1; 0.030-0.060 μm) particles. The ratios of organic carbon (OC) to total carbon (TC) increased for smaller particles, and were 28% and 51% for the roadside and the background S1 particles, respectively. It is likely that the OC/TC ratio for nuclei-mode particles was larger than for the S1 particles, and that OC was one of the major constituents of the nuclei-mode particles at the roadside site. From this result and the greater Kelvin effect for smaller particles, it is likely that nuclei-mode particles in the roadside atmosphere are more volatile than the S1 particles. Organic analysis of the size-resolved particles suggested that lubricating oil from vehicles affected the organic composition of both the roadside and background S1 particles, and that C 33n-alkane and more volatile organic compounds in the S1 particles partially evaporated in the atmosphere following the emission of the particles from diesel vehicles. It is likely that evaporation of the constituents (or possibly coagulation with pre-existing particles after shrinking by partial evaporation) of the nuclei-mode particles in the atmosphere was responsible for the absence of nuclei-mode particles in the background atmosphere.

  18. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulphuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Ehn, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich Plant-Atmosphere Simulation Chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulphuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulphuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOC). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulphuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapor mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulphuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulphuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

  19. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulfuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Ehn, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich plant-atmosphere simulation chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulfuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulfuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulfuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapour mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulfuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulfuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

  20. Thermodynamic correction of particle concentrations measured by underwing probes on fast flying aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, R.; Spichtinger, P.; Mahnke, C.; Klingebiel, M.; Afchine, A.; Petzold, A.; Krämer, M.; Costa, A.; Molleker, S.; Jurkat, T.; Minikin, A.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Particle concentration measurements with underwing probes on aircraft are impacted by air compression upstream of the instrument body as a function of flight velocity. In particular for fast-flying aircraft the necessity arises to account for compression of the air sample volume. Hence, a correction procedure is needed to invert measured particle number concentrations to ambient conditions that is commonly applicable for different instruments to gain comparable results. In the compression region where the detection of particles occurs (i.e. under factual measurement conditions), pressure and temperature of the air sample are increased compared to ambient (undisturbed) conditions in certain distance away from the aircraft. Conventional procedures for scaling the measured number densities to ambient conditions presume that the particle penetration speed through the instruments' detection area equals the aircraft speed (True Air Speed, TAS). However, particle imaging instruments equipped with pitot-tubes measuring the Probe Air Speed (PAS) of each underwing probe reveal PAS values systematically below those of the TAS. We conclude that the deviation between PAS and TAS is mainly caused by the compression of the probed air sample. From measurements during two missions in 2014 with the German Gulfstream G-550 (HALO - High Altitude LOng range) research aircraft we develop a procedure to correct the measured particle concentration to ambient conditions using a thermodynamic approach. With the provided equation the corresponding concentration correction factor ξ is applicable to the high frequency measurements of each underwing probe which is equipped with its own air speed sensor (e.g. a pitot-tube). ξ-values of 1 to 0.85 are calculated for air speeds (i.e. TAS) between 60 and 260 m s-1. From HALO data it is found that ξ does not significantly vary between the different deployed instruments. Thus, for the current HALO underwing probe configuration a parameterisation of

  1. Effects of pH and fulvic acids concentration on the stability of fulvic acids--cerium (IV) oxide nanoparticle complexes.

    PubMed

    Oriekhova, Olena; Stoll, Serge

    2016-02-01

    The behavior of cerium (IV) oxide nanoparticles has been first investigated at different pH conditions. The point of zero charge was determined as well as the stability domains using dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking analysis and scanning electron microscopy. A baseline hydrodynamic diameter of 180 nm was obtained indicating that individual CeO2 nanoparticles are forming small aggregates. Then we analyzed the particle behavior at variable concentrations of fulvic acids for three different pH-electrostatic scenarios corresponding to positive, neutral and negative CeO2 surface charges. The presence of fulvic acids was found to play a key role on the CeO2 stability via the formation of electrostatic complexes. It was shown that a small amount of fulvic acids (2 mg L(-1)), representative of environmental fresh water concentrations, is sufficient to stabilize CeO2 nanoparticles (50 mg L(-1)). When electrostatic complexes are formed between negatively charged FAs and positively charged CeO2 NPs the stability of such complexes is obtained with time (up to 7 weeks) as well as in pH changing conditions. Based on zeta potential variations we also found that the fulvic acids are changing the CeO2 acid-base surface properties. Obtained results presented here constitute an important outcome in the domain of risk assessment, transformation and removal of engineered nanomaterials released into the environment. PMID:26347935

  2. Gas/particle partitioning of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids at a suburban site in Saitama, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Linfa; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kubota, Tsutomu; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiko; Wang, Qingyue; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids (diacids) exhibit semivolatile behavior in the atmosphere, but their partitioning between the gaseous and particulate phases is still unclear. An annular denuder-filter pack system with a cyclone PM 2.5 was employed to investigate the gaseous and particulate phase concentrations of diacids, with high collection efficiency of most target compounds. Saturated diacids, unsaturated diacids, ketocarboxylic acids, and dicarbonyls were determined in gaseous and particulate samples collected from a suburban site in Japan, during 2007 summer, 2008 late-winter and early-winter. The concentrations of gaseous and particulate diacids in early-winter were lower than those in summer, but higher than those in late-winter. Individual diacid in gaseous phase showed a relatively good correlation with ambient oxidants, but a low correlation with NO gas (a primary pollutant). Particulate fraction to the total amount ( FP) of individual acid was larger in winter than in summer, and also was larger at night than in the daytime. In the same sample, individual diacid and ketocarboxylic acid had higher particulate phase occurrence ( FP > 56% in summer), whereas unsaturated diacid had higher gaseous phase occurrence ( FP < 18% in summer). In summer, gas/particle partitioning of diacids varied diurnally; FP values of oxalic and glyoxylic acids increased from their lowest values in the morning to their highest values at night, exhibiting the similar diurnal variation of relative humidity in the atmosphere. The higher humidity at night may lead to the formation of droplets in which water-soluble gaseous phases can dissolve, thus promoting gas-to-particle conversion. These results suggest that gas/particle partitioning of diacids depends not only on the concentrations in the gaseous phase by photochemical oxidation, but also on the characteristics of the atmosphere (e.g., temperature, sunlight, and relative humidity) and the aerosols (e.g., acidity

  3. Altered heart-rate variability in asthmatic and healthy volunteers exposed to concentrated ambient coarse particles.

    PubMed

    Gong, Henry; Linn, William S; Terrell, Sheryl L; Clark, Kenneth W; Geller, Michael D; Anderson, Karen R; Cascio, Wayne E; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2004-06-01

    Twelve mildly asthmatic and four healthy adults were exposed to filtered air (FA) and concentrated ambient coarse particles (CCP) supplied to a whole-body exposure chamber via a coarse particle concentrator with 15 parallel virtual impactors. Exposures were conducted in a Los Angeles suburb with high levels of motor-vehicle pollution and lasted 2 h with intermittent exercise. Mean CCP concentration was 157 microg/m(3) (range: 56-218 microg/m(3)) measured by continuous monitoring with a tapered-element oscillating microbalance (TEOM). On average, 80% of mass was coarse (2.5-10 microm aerodynamic diameter) and the rest <2.5 microm. Relative to FA, CCP exposure did not significantly alter respiratory symptoms, spirometry, arterial oxygen saturation, or airway inflammation according to exhaled nitric oxide and total and differential cell counts of induced sputum. After CCP exposure, Holter electrocardiograms showed small (p <.05) increases in heart rate and decreases in heart-rate variability, which were larger in healthy than in asthmatic subjects. Cardiac ectopy did not increase. In conclusion, acute exposure to elevated concentrations of ambient coarse particles elicited no obvious pulmonary effects but appeared to alter the autonomic nervous system of the heart in adult volunteers. PMID:15204749

  4. Modelling particle number concentrations in a typical street canyon in Germany and analysis of future trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toenges-Schuller, N.; Schneider, Chr.; Niederau, A.; Vogt, R.; Birmili, W.

    2015-06-01

    An aerosol box model and a gas-phase chemistry box model were coupled to simulate particle number (PN) concentrations, both solid and volatile, in a typical street canyon with a high traffic volume in Germany. The simulation accounts for emission, nucleation and aerosol aging processes while dilution is parameterised by a simple two-stage process. Calculations were performed for the years 2010, 2015, 2020 and 2025, and for a vehicle fleet consisting of electric vehicles only ("electric mobility"). Projections including a high fraction of Euro-6 vehicles in the fleet suggest that PN emissions will reduce by 90% in 2025 compared to 2010. Ambient PN concentrations are, however, expected to reduce by merely 29% over the same period. Apart from contributions of urban background air, reductions in primary particles are partially offset by secondary particle formation by nucleating exhaust gases. In the "electric mobility" scenario omitting tailpipe emissions, PN concentrations are expected to reduce by 60% from 2010 to 2025. For an aerosol assumed to be mixed externally only, PN of elemental carbon (EC) was calculated to reduce by 76% from 2010 to 2025, in the "electric mobility" scenario by 87%. Overall, the contribution of solid PN emissions from gasoline vehicles to PN concentration in the street canyon is expected to be approximately 4% in 2025.

  5. Time evolution of atmospheric particle number concentration during high-intensity pyrotechnic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F.; Caballero, Sandra; Galindo, Nuria

    2014-10-01

    The Mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events, typical of eastern Spanish festivals, in which thousands of firecrackers are burnt at ground level in an intense, short-time (<8 min) deafening spectacle that generates short-lived, thick aerosol clouds. In this study, the impact of such events on air quality has been evaluated by means of particle number concentration measurements performed close to the venue during the June festival in Alicante (southeastern Spain). Peak concentrations and dilution times observed throughout the Mascletàs have been compared to those measured when conventional aerial fireworks were launched 2 km away from the monitoring site. The impact of the Mascletàs on the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.3 μm was higher (maximum ˜2·104 cm-3) than that of fireworks (maximum ˜2·103 cm-3). The effect of fireworks depended on whether the dominant meteorological conditions favoured the transport of the plume to the measurement location. However, the time required for particle concentrations to return to background levels is longer and more variable for firework displays (minutes to hours) than for the Mascletàs (<25 min).

  6. Impact of Dry Solids and Bile Acid Concentrations on Bile Acid Binding Capacity of Extruded Oat Cereals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extruded breakfast cereals (EBC), processed from two oat lines, N979-5-2-4 (N979) and ‘Jim’, with beta-glucan concentrations of 8.7 and 4.9%, respectively, were used to determine the impact of dry solids (DS) and bile acid (BA) concentrations on in vitro BA binding efficiency. A full fractional fact...

  7. Pickering Emulsion Gels Prepared by Hydrogen-Bonded Zein/Tannic Acid Complex Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuan; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shou-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-08-26

    Food-grade colloidal particles and complexes, which are formed via modulation of the noncovalent interactions between macromolecules and natural small molecules, can be developed as novel functional ingredients in a safe and sustainable way. For this study was prepared a novel zein/tannic acid (TA) complex colloidal particle (ZTP) based on the hydrogen-bonding interaction between zein and TA in aqueous ethanol solution by using a simple antisolvent approach. Pickering emulsion gels with high oil volume fraction (φ(oil) > 50%) were successfully fabricated via one-step homogenization. Circular dichroism (CD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, which were used to characterize the structure of zein/TA complexes in ethanol solution, clearly showed that TA binding generated a conformational change of zein without altering their supramolecular structure at pH 5.0 and intermediate TA concentrations. Consequently, the resultant ZTP had tuned near neutral wettability (θ(ow) ∼ 86°) and enhanced interfacial reactivity, but without significantly decreased surface charge. These allowed the ZTP to stabilize the oil droplets and further triggered cross-linking to form a continuous network among and around the oil droplets and protein particles, leading to the formation of stable Pickering emulsion gels. Layer-by-layer (LbL) interfacial architecture on the oil-water surface of the droplets was observed, which implied a possibility to fabricate hierarchical interface microstructure via modulation of the noncovalent interaction between hydrophobic protein and natural polyphenol. PMID:26226053

  8. Spatial-temporal variations of particle number concentrations between a busy street and the urban background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos-Juusela, Vanessa; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kousa, Anu; Hämeri, Kaarle

    2013-11-01

    To estimate spatial-temporal variations of ultrafine particles (UFP) in Helsinki, we measured particle total number concentrations (PNC) continuously in a busy street and an urban background site for six months, using condensation particle counters (CPC). We also evaluated the effects of temperature, wind speed and wind direction on PNC, as well as the correlation between PNC and PM2.5, PM10 and black carbon (BC) at the street. We found that on weekdays, hourly median PNC were highly correlated with BC (r = 0.88), moderately correlated with PM2.5 (r = 0.59) and weakly correlated with PM10 (r = 0.22). Number concentrations at the street were inversely proportional to temperature and wind speed, and highly dependent on wind direction. The highest PNC occurred during northeastern winds while the lowest occurred during southwestern winds. As these wind directions are nearly perpendicular to the street axis, the formation of wind vortices may have influenced the dispersion of UFP in the site. Although the temporal correlation for PNC was moderately high between the sites (r = 0.71), the median concentration at the street was 3 times higher than the urban background levels. The results indicate that people living or passing by the busy street are exposed to UFP concentrations well above the urban background levels. Thus, the study suggests that urban microenvironments should be considered in epidemiological studies. In addition the results emphasize that regulations based solely on PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations may be insufficient for preventing the adverse health effects of airborne particles.

  9. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere. PMID:27197574

  10. Optical detection of concentrations for mixed acid: HF and HNO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Gumin; Kim, Kyoungsik

    2009-02-01

    Mixed acid, which consist of HF and HNO3, is used as a good etchant for silicon dioxide in the wet etching and pickling process of stainless steel. The optical detection of concentration for such mixed acids is crucial to optimize and cut costs in the manufacturing process. Optical detection in the IR regime has been utilized to measure the concentration of the mixed acid for HF and HNO3, because that has several strong absorption peaks, which is contributed by vibrational mode of each acid molecular in this spectrum. In this research, we observed the concentrations of mixed acid to consist of HF and HNO3, as we measured the absorption intensity of OH- stretch and NO3 - stretch band by optical spectroscopy. The concentration range of HF over 1.5-3 wt% and that of HNO3 over 2-10 wt% were studied in room temperature.

  11. Why sulfuric acid forms particles so extremely well, and how organics might still compete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurten, T.; Ehn, M.; Kupiainen, O.; Olenius, T.; Rissanen, M.; Thornton, J. A.; Nielsen, L.; Jørgensen, S.; Ortega Colomer, I. K.; Kjaergaard, H. G.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2013-12-01

    It is a well-known result in aerosol science that the single most important molecule for the first steps of new-particle formation in our atmosphere is sulfuric acid, H2SO4. From a chemical perspective, this seems somewhat counterintuitive: the atmosphere contains thousands of different organic compounds, many of which can potentially form oxidation products with even lower volatility than H2SO4. The unique role of sulfuric acid is due to its formation kinetics. The conversion of sulfur dioxide, SO2 to H2SO4 requires only a single oxidant molecule (e.g. OH), as subsequent steps are extremely rapid. Still, the saturation vapor pressure of H2SO4 is over 108 times lower than that of SO2. In contrast, the oxidation reactions of organic molecules typically lower their saturation vapor pressure by only a factor of 10-1000 per oxidation step. Therefore, organic compounds are usually lost to pre-existing aerosol surfaces before they have undergone sufficiently many oxidation reactions to nucleate on their own. The presence of strong nitrogen-containing base molecules such as amines enhances the particle-forming advantages of sulfuric acid even further. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that the evaporation rate of sulfuric acid from key clusters containing two acid molecules may decrease by a factor of 108 in the presence of ppt-level concentrations of amines, implying a total decrease of up to 1016 in the effective vapor pressure going from SO2 to H2SO4. In some circumstances, this decrease causes the energy barrier for new-particle formation to disappear: the process is no longer nucleation, and some common applications of e.g. the nucleation theorem cease to apply. Cluster kinetic models combined with first-principles evaporation rates appear to describe this sulfuric acid - base clustering reasonably well, and result in cluster formation rates close to those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN. There may nevertheless exist exceptions to the general rule that

  12. Short communication: Association of milk fatty acids with early lactation hyperketonemia and elevated concentration of nonesterified fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Mann, S; Nydam, D V; Lock, A L; Overton, T R; McArt, J A A

    2016-07-01

    The objective of our study was to extend the limited research available on the association between concentrations of milk fatty acids and elevated nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) concentrations in early lactation dairy cattle. Measurement of milk fatty acids for detection of cows in excessive negative energy balance has the potential to be incorporated in routine in-line monitoring systems. Blood samples were taken from 84 cows in second or greater lactation 3 times per week between 3 to 14 d in milk. Cows were characterized as hyperketonemic (HYK) if blood BHB concentration was ≥1.2mmol/L at least once and characterized as having elevated concentrations of NEFA (NEFAH) if serum NEFA concentration was ≥1mmol/L at least once. Composition of colostrum and milk fatty acids at wk 2 postpartum was used to investigate the potential diagnostic value of individual fatty acids and fatty acid ratios for the correct classification of cows with NEFA and BHB concentrations above these thresholds, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to identify thresholds of fatty acid concentration and fatty acid ratios when ROC area under the curve was ≥0.70. Correct classification rate (CCR, %) was calculated as {[(number of true positives + number of true negatives)/total number tested] × 100}. None of the colostrum fatty acids yielded a sufficiently high area under the curve in ROC analysis for the association with HYK and NEFAH. The following fatty acids and fatty acid ratios were identified for an association with NEFAH (threshold, CCR): C15:0 (≤0.65g/100g, 68.3%); cis-9 C16:1 (≥1.85g/100g, 70.7%); cis-9 C18:1 (≥26g/100g, 69.5%), cis-9 C18:1 to C15:0 ratio (≥45, 69.5%); cis-9 C16:1 to C15:0 (≥2.50, 73.2%). Several fatty acids were associated with HYK (threshold, CCR): C6:0 (≤1.68g/100g, 80.5%), C8:0 (≤0.80g/100g, 80.5%), C10:0 (≤1.6g/100g, 79.3%); C12:0 (≤1.42g/100g, 82.9%); C14:0 (≤6.10g/100g, 84

  13. Measurement and analysis of the relationship between ammonia, acid gases, and fine particles in eastern North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Baek, Bok Haeng; Aneja, Viney P

    2004-05-01

    An annular denuder system, which consisted of a cyclone separator; two diffusion denuders coated with sodium carbonate and citric acid, respectively; and a filter pack consisting of Teflon and nylon filters in series, was used to measure acid gases, ammonia (NH3), and fine particles in the atmosphere from April 1998 to March 1999 in eastern North Carolina (i.e., an NH3-rich environment). The sodium carbonate denuders yielded average acid gas concentrations of 0.23 microg/m3 hydrochloric acid (standard deviation [SD] +/- 0.2 microg/m3); 1.14 microg/m3 nitric acid (SD +/- 0.81 microg/m3), and 1.61 microg/m3 sulfuric acid (SD +/- 1.58 microg/m3). The citric acid denuders yielded an average concentration of 17.89 microg/m3 NH3 (SD +/- 15.03 microg/m3). The filters yielded average fine aerosol concentrations of 1.64 microg/m3 ammonium (NH4+; SD +/- 1.26 microg/m3); 0.26 microg/m3 chloride (SD +/- 0.69 microg/m3), 1.92 microg/m3 nitrate (SD +/- 1.09 microg/m3), and 3.18 microg/m3 sulfate (SO4(2-); SD +/- 3.12 microg/m3). From seasonal variation, the measured particulates (NH4+, SO4(2-), and nitrate) showed larger peak concentrations during summer, suggesting that the gas-to-particle conversion was efficient during summer. The aerosol fraction in this study area indicated the domination of ammonium sulfate particles because of the local abundance of NH3, and the long-range transport of SO4(2-) based on back trajectory analysis. Relative humidity effects on gas-to-particle conversion processes were analyzed by particulate NH4+ concentration originally formed from the neutralization processes with the secondary pollutants in the atmosphere. PMID:15149049

  14. Cationic RAFT polymerization using ppm concentrations of organic acid.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Mineto; Satoh, Kotaro; Kamigaito, Masami

    2015-02-01

    A metal-free, cationic, reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization was proposed and realized. A series of thiocarbonylthio compounds were used in the presence of a small amount of triflic acid for isobutyl vinyl ether to give polymers with controlled molecular weight of up to 1×10(5) and narrow molecular-weight distributions (Mw /Mn <1.1). This "living" or controlled cationic polymerization is applicable to various electron-rich monomers including vinyl ethers, p-methoxystyrene, and even p-hydroxystyrene that possesses an unprotected phenol group. A transformation from cationic to radical RAFT polymerization enables the synthesis of block copolymers between cationically and radically polymerizable monomers, such as vinyl ether and vinyl acetate or methyl acrylate. PMID:25511364

  15. Effect of temperature and concentration on benzoyl peroxide bleaching efficacy and benzoic acid levels in whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2015-11-01

    Much of the fluid whey produced in the United States is a by-product of Cheddar cheese manufacture and must be bleached. Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is currently 1 of only 2 legal chemical bleaching agents for fluid whey in the United States, but benzoic acid is an unavoidable by-product of BP bleaching. Benzoyl peroxide is typically a powder, but new liquid BP dispersions are available. A greater understanding of the bleaching characteristics of BP is necessary. The objective of the study was to compare norbixin destruction, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences between liquid whey and 80% whey protein concentrates (WPC80) bleached at different temperatures with 2 different benzoyl peroxides (soluble and insoluble). Two experiments were conducted in this study. For experiment 1, 3 factors (temperature, bleach type, bleach concentration) were evaluated for norbixin destruction using a response surface model-central composite design in liquid whey. For experiment 2, norbixin concentration, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences were explored in WPC80 from whey bleached by the 2 commercially available BP (soluble and insoluble) at 5 mg/kg. In liquid whey, soluble BP bleached more norbixin than insoluble BP, especially at lower concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) at both cold (4°C) and hot (50°C) temperatures. The WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 50°C had lower norbixin concentration, benzoic acid levels, cardboard flavor, and aldehyde levels than WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 4°C. Regardless of temperature, soluble BP destroyed more norbixin at lower concentrations than insoluble BP. The WPC80 from soluble-BP-bleached wheys had lower cardboard flavor and lower aldehyde levels than WPC80 from insoluble-BP-bleached whey. This study suggests that new, soluble (liquid) BP can be used at lower concentrations than insoluble BP to achieve equivalent bleaching and that less residual benzoic acid remains in WPC80 powder from liquid whey

  16. Interactions of valproic acid with carbamazepine and its metabolites' concentrations, concentrations ratios, and level/dose ratios in epileptic children.

    PubMed

    Liu, H; Delgado, M R; Browne, R H

    1995-02-01

    In two groups of epileptic children receiving carbamazepine (CBZ) therapy with or without valproic acid (VPA) comedication, we investigate the drug interactions of VPA on serum CBZ and its metabolites' concentrations, concentration ratios, and level/dose ratios. Serum total and free CBZ-10, 11-epoxide (CBZ-E) concentrations are significantly increased in patients taking CBZ plus VPA, together with higher CBZ-E/CBZ concentration ratios and CBZ-E level/dose ratios. These results reflect the accumulation of CBZ-E. The decreased concentration ratios of trans-10, 11-dihydroxy-10, 11-dihydro-CBZ (CBZ-H)/CBZ-E observed in patients taking CBZ plus VPA suggest an inhibition in the biotransformation from CBZ-E to CBZ-H. Significant negative correlations are found between serum VPA level and CBZ-H/CBZ-E concentration ratios, indicating that the inhibition of CBZ-E hydrolysis by VPA may depend on the concentration of VPA (total or free CBZ-H/CBZ-E concentration ratio = [formula: see text], respectively). VPA concentration also shows significant positive correlations with CBZ-E and CBZ level/dose ratios. Patients taking CBZ plus VPA have significant higher free fractions of CBZ and CBZ-E than do patients on CBZ alone, suggesting a protein-binding displacement by VPA. PMID:8665529

  17. Size-fractionated major particle composition and concentrations from the US GEOTRACES North Atlantic Zonal Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Auro, Maureen E.

    2015-06-01

    The concentration and the major phase composition (particulate organic matter, CaCO3, opal, lithogenic matter, and iron and manganese oxyhydroxides) of marine particles is thought to determine the scavenging removal of particle-reactive TEIs. Particles are also the vector for transferring carbon from the atmosphere to the deep ocean via the biological carbon pump, and their composition may determine the efficiency and strength of this transfer. Here, we present the first full ocean depth section of size-fractionated (1-51 μm, >51 μm) suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration and major phase composition from the US GEOTRACES North Atlantic Zonal Transect between Woods Hole, MA and Lisbon, Portugal conducted in 2010 and 2011. Several major particle features are notable in the section: intense benthic nepheloid layers were observed in the western North American margin with concentrations of SPM of up to 1648 μg/L, two to three orders of magnitude higher than surrounding waters, that were dominated by lithogenic material. A more moderate benthic nepheloid layer was also observed in the eastern Mauritanian margin (44 μg/L) that had a lower lithogenic content and, notably, significant concentrations of iron and manganese oxyhydroxides (2.5% each). An intermediate nepheloid layer reaching 102 μg/L, an order of magnitude above surrounding waters, was observed associated with the Mediterranean Outflow. Finally, there was a factor of two enhancement in SPM at the TAG hydrothermal plume due almost entirely to the addition of iron oxyhydroxides from the hydrothermal vent. We observe correlations between POC and CaCO3 in large (>51 μm) particles in the upper 2000 m, but not deeper than 2000 m, and no correlations between POC and CaCO3 at any depth in small (<51 μm) particles. There were also no correlations between POC and lithogenic material in large particles. Overall, there were very large uncertainties associated with all regression coefficients for mineral

  18. An experimental study of thermal diffusivity of Au nanoparticles: effects of concentration particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari, Esmaeil; Moradi, Mohammad; Raeisi, Morteza

    2016-06-01

    In this article, Au nanoparticles in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solution were prepared by gamma radiation at different concentrations. The solutions were irradiated at doses of 50 kGy for making different sizes. The average sizes of particle in the prepared samples were measured using the nanophox machine. A dual-beam mode-mismatched thermal lens (TL) method was used to investigate the effect of thermal diffusivity of samples. The TL measurement was carried out using a green diode laser (wavelength 532 nm, 60 mW) and a He-Ne laser (wavelength 632.8 nm, 0.5 mW) for excitation source and probe beam, respectively. The results showed that the thermal diffusivity of samples enhances with the growth of particle size and density of solutions. This increment can be attributed to phonon scattering at interface of particles-liquid and contact between the nanoparticles and surrounded liquid.

  19. Impact of roadside noise barriers on particle size distributions and pollutants concentrations near freeways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhi; Hudda, Neelakshi; Daher, Nancy; Kam, Winnie; Herner, Jorn; Kozawa, Kathleen; Mara, Steven; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2010-08-01

    Increasing epidemiological evidence has established an association between a host of adverse health effects and exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) and co-pollutants, especially those emitted from motor vehicles. Although PM and their co-pollutants dispersion profiles near the open freeway have been extensively characterized by means of both experimental measurements and numerical simulations in recent years, such investigations near freeways with roadside barriers have not been well documented in the literature. A few previous studies suggested that the presence of roadside structures, such as noise barriers and vegetation, may impact the decay of pollutant concentrations downwind of the freeway by limiting the initial dispersion of traffic emissions and increasing their vertical mixing due to the upward deflection of airflow. Since the noise barriers are now common roadside features of the freeways, particularly those running through populated urban areas, it is pertinent to investigate the impact of their presence on the particles and co-pollutants concentrations in areas adjacent to busy roadways. This study investigated two highly trafficked freeways (I-710 and I-5) in Southern California, with two sampling sites for each freeway, one with and the other without the roadside noise barriers. Particle size distributions and co-pollutants concentrations were measured in the immediate proximity of freeways and at different distances downwind of the freeways. The results showed the formation of a "concentration deficit" zone in the immediate vicinity of the freeway with the presence of roadside noise barrier, followed by a surge of pollutant concentrations further downwind at 80-100 m away from freeway. The particle and co-pollutants concentrations reach background levels at farther distances of 250-400 m compared to 150-200 m at the sites without roadside noise barriers.

  20. Variability of aerosol particle number concentrations observed over the western Pacific in the spring of 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegawa, N.; Moteki, N.; Oshima, N.; Koike, M.; Kita, K.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Kondo, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne measurements of aerosols were conducted over the western Pacific in the spring of 2009 during the Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia (A-FORCE) aircraft campaign. The A-FORCE flights intensively covered an important vertical-latitudinal range in the outflow region of East Asia (0-9 km altitude; 27°N-38°N). This paper presents the variability of aerosol particle number concentrations obtained by condensation particle counters and a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), with the focus on those in the free troposphere. The number concentration data include total condensation nuclei with particle diameters (dp) larger than 10 nm (total CN10), PM0.17-CN10 (dp ~10-130 nm), and SP2 black carbon (NBC; dp ~75-850 nm). Large increases in total CN10 that were not associated with NBC were observed in the free troposphere, suggesting influences from new particle formation (NPF). Statistical characteristics of total CN10, PM0.17-CN10, and NBC in the lower troposphere (LT; 0-3 km), middle troposphere (MT; 3-6 km), and upper troposphere (UT; 6-9 km) are investigated. The correlation between total CN10 and NBC, along with the ratio of PM0.17 to total CN10 and carbon monoxide mixing ratio (CO), is used to interpret the observed variability. The median concentrations of total CN10 and PM0.17-CN10 in the UT were higher than those in the MT by a factor of ~1.4 and ~1.6, respectively. We attribute the enhancements of CN10 in the UT to NPF. Possible mechanisms affecting NPF in the free troposphere are discussed.

  1. Cloud-encounter and particle-concentration variabilities from GASP data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nastrom, G. D.; Holdeman, J. D.; Davis, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Summary statistics, tabulations, and variability studies are presented for cloud encounter and particle concentration data taken as part of the NASA global atmospheric sampling program. Cloud encounter was experienced in about 15 percent of the data samples; however, the percentage varies with season, latitude, and altitude (particularly distance from the tropopause). In agreement with classical storm models, the data show more clouds in the upper troposphere in anticyclones than in cyclones. The concentration of particles with a diameter greater than 3 micron also varies with time and location, depending primarily on the horizontal extent of cloudiness. Some examples of the application of the statistical data to the estimation of the frequency of cloud encounter and laminar flow loss to be expected on long range airline routes are also presented.

  2. Dose-response of five bile acids on serum and liver bile Acid concentrations and hepatotoxicty in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Peizhen; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2011-10-01

    Feeding bile acids (BAs) to rodents has been used to study BA signaling and toxicity in vivo. However, little is known about the effect of feeding BAs on the concentrations of BAs in serum and liver as well as the dose of the fed BAs that causes liver toxicity. The present study was designed to investigate the relative hepatotoxicity of individual BAs by feeding mice cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) at concentrations of 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, or 3% in their diet for 7 days. The data demonstrate that (1) the ability of the fed BAs to produce hepatotoxicity is UDCAconcentration of each BA in the feed that causes hepatotoxicity in mice is CA and CDCA at 0.3%, DCA at 0.1%, and LCA at 0.03%; (3) BA feeding results in a dose-dependent increase in the total serum BA concentrations but had little effect on liver total BA concentrations; (4) hepatotoxicity of the fed BAs does not simply depend on the concentration or hydrophobicity of total BAs in the liver; and (5) liver BA-conjugation enzymes are saturated by feeding UDCA at concentrations higher than 0.3%. In conclusion, the findings of the present study provide guidance for choosing the feeding concentrations of BAs in mice and will aid in interpreting BA hepatotoxicity as well as BA-mediated gene regulation. PMID:21747115

  3. The Influence of Base Concentration on the Surface Particle of Lithium Aluminosilicate System

    SciTech Connect

    Nazri, I. M.; Asliza, M. A. Sri; Othman, R.

    2008-03-17

    The study of base concentration effect toward surface particles of lithium aluminosilicate glass ceramic system has been done by using NaOH solution. The parent glass with composition of 60% SiO{sub 2}, 31% Li{sub 2}O, 6% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 3% TiO{sub 2} in wt% was prepared by melting process at 1250 deg. C prior to quenching rapidly to room temperature. Sintering and crystallization process on this parent glass were carefully examined by Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Based on these analyses, the selected crystal has been chosen as a precursor material. There are two controlling parameter involved in this study i.e. NaOH concentration and leaching period. The morphology of the glass ceramic particle was observed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM). The result shows that by increasing the basic concentration as well as increasing the soaking leaching period, the tendency of glass ceramic particle to leach out is relatively highs.

  4. Productivity of concentrated hyaluronic acid using a Maxblend fermentor.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, S; Nagatsuru, M; Shibutani, M; Yamamoto, S; Hasebe, S

    1999-01-01

    Application of the Maxblend impeller to the fermentative production of hyaluronic acid (HA) was investigated. A 2-m3-scale fermentor fitted with this impeller (MBF) was used and the main fermentation was started with 85% of the nominal volume containing the pre-culture broth and medium. The kinetic characteristics of the MBF were compared with those of a conventional-type fermentor fitted with a turbine blade (TBN). The HA production yield in the MBF was over 20% higher than that in the TBN under the operating conditions of a high aeration rate and low vessel pressure since the broth viscosity increased. The apparent viscosity of the broth at the end of the cultivation rose to about 70 Pa.s. The molecular weight of the HA produced was independent of the agitation speed within the investigated range, and no significant difference was observed between the viscosity-average molecular weights of the HA obtained in the two types of fermentor, each having an estimated value of 4.3 x 10(6) under the same agitation power. PMID:16232576

  5. Relationship between adipic acid concentration and the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Puig-Alcaraz, Carmen; Fuentes-Albero, Milagros; Cauli, Omar

    2016-08-30

    Dicarboxylic acids are an important source of information about metabolism and potential physiopathological alterations in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We measured the concentration between dicarboxylic adipic and suberic acids in children with an ASD and typically-developing (TD) children and analyzed any relationships between the severity of the core symptoms of ASDs and other clinical features (drugs, supplements, drugs, or diet). The core symptoms of autism were evaluated using the DSM-IV criteria, and adipic acid and suberic acid were measured in urine samples. Overall, no increase in the concentration of adipic acid in children with ASDs compared to TD children, however when considering vitamin B supplementation in ASD there were significantly increased level of urinary adipic acid in children with an ASD not taking vitamin B supplementation compared to supplemented children or to TD children. No significant difference were observed in suberic acid. Interestingly, the increase in adipic acid concentration was significantly and indirectly correlated with the severity of the deficit in socialization and communication skills in children with an ASD. Therefore, therapeutic treatments aimed at decreasing adipic acid concentration might not be beneficial for treating the core symptoms of ASDs. PMID:27259135

  6. Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city.

    PubMed

    Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Delle Monache, L; Stull, R

    2008-02-25

    With the worlds population becoming increasingly focused on coastal locations there is a need to better understand the interactions between anthropogenic emissions and marine atmospheres. Herein an atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. It is shown that the model can reasonably represent the average features of the gas phase and particle climate relative to in situ measurements. It is further demonstrated that reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate, but that the importance of these heterogeneous reactions is critically dependent on both the initial vertical profile of sea spray and the sea-spray source functions. The results emphasize the need for improved understanding of sea spray production and dispersion and further that model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield mis-leading results in terms of emission sensitivities of particle composition and concentrations. PMID:18061242

  7. Concentrations, size distributions and temporal variations of fluorescent biological aerosol particles in southern tropical India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Krishna R, Ravi; CV, Biju; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. The Indian tropical region, where large fraction of the world's total population is residing, experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to be very diverse over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the seasons. Here we characterize the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) at a high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) in South India during the South-West monsoon, which constitute around 80 percent of the annual rainfall in Munnar. Continuous three months measurements (from 01 June 2014 to 21 Aug 2104) FBAPs were carried out at Munnar using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) during IMS. The mean number and mass concentration of coarse FBAP averaged over the entire campaign was 1.7 x 10-2 cm-3 and 0.24 µg m-3 respectively, which corresponds to 2 percent and 6 percent of total aerosol particle number and mass concentration. In agreement to other previous measurements the number size distribution of FBAP also peaks at 3.2 micron indicating the strong presence of fungal spores. This was also supported by the Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis of bioaerosols on filter paper. They also displayed a strong diurnal cycle with maximum concentration occurring at early morning hours. During periods of heavy and continuous rain where the wind is consistently blowing from South-West direction it was

  8. The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-02-15

    The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

  9. Concentration and fractionation of hydrophobic organic acid constituents from natural waters by liquid chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    A scheme is presented which used adsorption chromatography with pH gradient elution and size-exclusion chromatography to concentrate and separate hydrophobic organic acids from water. A review of chromatographic processes involved in the flow scheme is also presented. Organic analytes which appear in each aqueous fraction are quantified by dissolved organic carbon analysis. Hydrophobic organic acids in a water sample are concentrated on a porous acrylic resin. These acids usually constitute approximately 30-50 percent of the dissolved organic carbon in an unpolluted water sample and are eluted with an aqueous eluent (dilute base). The concentrate is then passed through a column of polyacryloylmorpholine gel, which separates the acids into high- and low-molecular-weight fractions. The high- and low-molecular-weight eluates are reconcentrated by adsorption chromatography, then are eluted with a pH gradient into strong acids (predominately carboxylic acids) and weak acids (predominately phenolic compounds). For standard compounds and samples of unpolluted waters, the scheme fractionates humic substances into strong and weak acid fractions that are separated from the low molecular weight acids. A new method utilizing conductivity is also presented to estimate the acidic components in the methanol fraction.

  10. Forced swimming and imipramine modify plasma and brain amino acid concentrations in mice.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuro; Yamane, Haruka; Tomonaga, Shozo; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between monoamine metabolism and forced swimming or antidepressants have been well studied, however information is lacking regarding amino acid metabolism under these conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of forced swimming and imipramine on amino acid concentrations in plasma, the cerebral cortex and the hypothalamus in mice. Forced swimming caused cerebral cortex concentrations of L-glutamine, L-alanine, and taurine to be increased, while imipramine treatment caused decreased concentrations of L-glutamate, L-alanine, L-tyrosine, L-methionine, and L-ornithine. In the hypothalamus, forced swimming decreased the concentration of L-serine while imipramine treatment caused increased concentration of beta-alanine. Forced swimming caused increased plasma concentration of taurine, while concentrations of L-serine, L-asparagine, L-glutamine and beta-alanine were decreased. Imipramine treatment caused increased plasma concentration of all amino acid, except for L-aspartate and taurine. In conclusion, forced swimming and imipramine treatment modify central and peripheral amino acid metabolism. These results may aid in the identification of amino acids that have antidepressant-like effects, or may help to refine the dosages of antidepressant drugs. PMID:19010319

  11. Reactive uptake of N2O5 by aerosol particles containing mixtures of humic acid and ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Badger, Claire L; Griffiths, Paul T; George, Ingrid; Abbatt, Jonathan P D; Cox, R Anthony

    2006-06-01

    The kinetics of reactive uptake of N2O5 on submicron aerosol particles containing humic acid and ammonium sulfate has been investigated as a function of relative humidity (RH) and aerosol composition using a laminar flow reactor coupled with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) to characterize the aerosol. For single-component humic acid aerosol the uptake coefficient, gamma, was found to increase from 2 to 9 x 10(-4) over the range 25-75% RH. These values are 1-2 orders of magnitude below those typically observed for single-component sulfate aerosols (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2003, 5, 3453-3463;(1) Atmos. Environ. 2000, 34, 2131-2159(2)). For the mixed aerosols, gamma was found to decrease with increasing humic acid mass fraction and increase with increasing RH. For aerosols containing only 6% humic acid by dry mass, a decrease in reactivity of more than a factor of 2 was observed compared with the case for single-component ammonium sulfate. The concentration of liquid water in the aerosol droplets was calculated using the aerosol inorganic model (for the ammonium sulfate component) and a new combined FTIR-DMA system (for the humic acid component). Analysis of the uptake coefficients using the water concentration data shows that the change in reactivity cannot be explained by the change in water content alone. We suggest that, due to its surfactant properties, the main effect of the humic acid is to reduce the mass accommodation coefficient for N2O5 at the aerosol particle surface. This has implications for the use of particle hygroscopicity data for predictions of the rate of N2O5 hydrolysis. PMID:16722713

  12. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Koehorst, Martijn; Groen, Albert K.; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis. Aim To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions. Methods HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h) with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1–50 μM) of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h), menadione (50 μM, 6 h) or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h). Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11) and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed. Results Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauro)ursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  13. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    PubMed

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be <8 × 10(-4), at least a factor of 10(4) less than that for HNO3 in water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed. PMID:27043733

  14. Association between Circulating Vitamin D Metabolites and Fecal Bile Acid Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Haussler, Mark R; Alberts, David S; Kohler, Lindsay N; Lance, Peter; Martínez, María Elena; Roe, Denise J; Jurutka, Peter W

    2016-07-01

    Although hydrophobic bile acids have been demonstrated to exhibit cytotoxic and carcinogenic effects in the colorectum, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) has been investigated as a potential chemopreventive agent. Vitamin D has been shown to play a role in both bile acid metabolism and in the development of colorectal neoplasia. Using a cross-sectional design, we sought to determine whether baseline circulating concentrations of the vitamin D metabolites 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were associated with baseline fecal bile acid concentrations in a trial of UDCA for the prevention of colorectal adenoma recurrence. We also prospectively evaluated whether vitamin D metabolite concentrations modified the effect of UDCA on adenoma recurrence. After adjustment for age, sex, BMI, physical activity, and calcium intake, adequate concentrations of 25(OH)D (≥30 ng/mL) were statistically significantly associated with reduced odds for high levels of total [OR, 0.61; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.38-0.97], and primary (OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38-0.96) bile acids, as well as individually with chenodeoxycholic acid (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.24-0.63) and cholic acid (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.36-0.90). No significant associations were observed for 1,25(OH)2D and high versus low fecal bile acid concentrations. In addition, neither 25(OH)D nor 1,25(OH)2D modified the effect of UDCA on colorectal adenoma recurrence. In conclusion, this is the first study to demonstrate an inverse relationship between circulating levels of 25(OH)D and primary fecal bile acid concentrations. These results support prior data demonstrating that vitamin D plays a key role in bile acid metabolism, and suggest a potential mechanism of action for 25(OH)D in colorectal cancer prevention. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 589-97. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27138789

  15. Relating urban airborne particle concentrations to shipping using carbon based elemental emission ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Graham R.; Juwono, Alamsyah M.; Friend, Adrian J.; Cheung, Hing-Cho; Stelcer, Eduard; Cohen, David; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-10-01

    This study demonstrates a novel method for testing the hypothesis that variations in primary and secondary particle number concentration (PNC) in urban air are related to residual fuel oil combustion at a coastal port lying 30 km upwind, by examining the correlation between PNC and airborne particle composition signatures chosen for their sensitivity to the elemental contaminants present in residual fuel oil. Residual fuel oil combustion indicators were chosen by comparing the sensitivity of a range of concentration ratios to airborne emissions originating from the port. The most responsive were combinations of vanadium and sulphur concentration ([S], [V]) expressed as ratios with respect to black carbon concentration ([BC]). These correlated significantly with ship activity at the port and with the fraction of time during which the wind blew from the port. The average [V] when the wind was predominantly from the port was 0.52 ng m-3 (87%) higher than the average for all wind directions and 0.83 ng m-3 (280%) higher than that for the lowest vanadium yielding wind direction considered to approximate the natural background. Shipping was found to be the main source of V impacting urban air quality in Brisbane. However, contrary to the stated hypothesis, increases in PNC related measures did not correlate with ship emission indicators or ship traffic. Hence at this site ship emissions were not found to be a major contributor to PNC compared to other fossil fuel combustion sources such as road traffic, airport and refinery emissions.

  16. Vertical profiles of black carbon concentration and particle number size distribution in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L.; Deng, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The vertical distribution of aerosols is of great importance to our understanding in the impacts of aerosols on radiation balance and climate, as well as air quality and public health. To better understand and estimate the effects of atmospheric components including trace gases and aerosols on atmospheric environment and climate, an intensive field campaign, Vertical Observations of trace Gases and Aerosols in the North China Plain (VOGA-NCP), was carried out from late July to early August 2013 over a rural site in the polluted NCP. During the campaign, vertical profiles of black carbon (BC) concentration and particle number size distribution were measured respectively by a micro-Aethalometer and an optical particle counter attached to a tethered balloon within 1000 m height. Meteorological parameters, including temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction, were measured simultaneously by a radiosonde also attached to the tethered balloon. Preliminary results showed distinct diurnal variations of the vertical distribution of aerosol total number concentration and BC concentration, following the development of the mixing layer. Generally, there was a well mixing of aerosols within the mixing layer and a sharp decrease above the mixing layer. Particularly, a small peak of BC concentrations was observed around 400-500 m height for several profiles. Further analysis would be needed to explain such phenomenon. It was also found that measured vertical profiles of BC using the filter-based method might be affected by the vertical distribution of relative humidity.

  17. Broiler skin color as affected by organic acids: influence of concentration and method of application.

    PubMed

    Bilgili, S F; Conner, D E; Pinion, J L; Tamblyn, K C

    1998-05-01

    Color of broiler skin was evaluated after exposure to organic acids under various concentrations and simulated potential plant application conditions. Breast skin from chilled broiler carcasses was treated with acetic (AA), citric (CA), lactic (LA), malic (ML), mandelic (MN), propionic (PA), or tartaric (TA) acids at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 6% concentrations. Each acid and concentration was applied in simulated dip (23 C for 15 s), scalder (50 C for 2 min), and immersion chiller (1 C for 60 min) conditions. A tap water control was included with each application method. Objective color values of L* (lightness), a* (redness), and b* (yellowness) were measured before and after the treatments to calculate color differentials under a factorial arrangement of organic acids and concentrations. Skin lightness increased (P < 0.01) in simulated chiller as compared to dip and scalder applications. Skin redness was reduced significantly in scalder, and yellowness in dip and scalder applications, respectively. In simulated dip application, with the exception of PA, all acids decreased lightness and increased redness and yellowness values. Propionic acid had little affect on lightness and redness values, but decreased yellowness values. In simulated scalder application, with the exception of PA, all acids decreased lightness with increasing concentration. The redness values changed little in scalder application. However, yellowness values were increased with all acids, except for PA, which decreased yellowness values. In simulated chiller conditions, all acids, except for PA, decreased lightness and redness and increased yellowness values. Propionic acid increased lightness and decreased yellowness values significantly in chiller conditions. Alterations in skin color should be taken into account in the selection and application of organic acids as carcass disinfectants. PMID:9603365

  18. Organosulfates and organic acids in Arctic aerosols: speciation, annual variation and concentration levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A. M. K.; Kristensen, K.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Zare, A.; Cozzi, F.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Skov, H.; Brandt, J.; Christensen, J. H.; Ström, J.; Tunved, P.; Krejci, R.; Glasius, M.

    2014-02-01

    Sources, composition and occurrence of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the Arctic were investigated at Zeppelin Mountain, Svalbard, and Station Nord, northeast Greenland, during the full annual cycle of 2008 and 2010 respectively. We focused on the speciation of three types of SOA tracers: organic acids, organosulfates and nitrooxy organosulfates from both anthropogenic and biogenic precursors, here presenting organosulfate concentrations and compositions during a full annual cycle and chemical speciation of organosulfates in Arctic aerosols for the first time. Aerosol samples were analysed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled to a quadrupole Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer (HPLC-q-TOF-MS). A total of 11 organic acids (terpenylic acid, benzoic acid, phthalic acid, pinic acid, suberic acid, azelaic acid, adipic acid, pimelic acid, pinonic acid, diaterpenylic acid acetate (DTAA) and 3-methyl-1,2,3-butanetricarboxylic acid (MBTCA)), 12 organosulfates and one nitrooxy organosulfate were identified at the two sites. Six out of the 12 organosulfates are reported for the first time. Concentrations of organosulfates follow a distinct annual pattern at Station Nord, where high concentration were observed in late winter and early spring, with a mean total concentration of 47 (±14) ng m-3, accounting for 7 (±2)% of total organic matter, contrary to a considerably lower organosulfate mean concentration of 2 (±3) ng m-3 (accounting for 1 (±1)% of total organic matter) observed during the rest of the year. The organic acids followed the same temporal trend as the organosulfates at Station Nord; however the variations in organic acid concentrations were less pronounced, with a total mean organic acid concentration of 11.5 (±4) ng m-3 (accounting for 1.7 (±0.6)% of total organic matter) in late winter and early spring, and 2.2 (±1) ng m-3 (accounting for 0.9 (±0.4)% of total organic matter) during the rest of the year. At Zeppelin Mountain

  19. The influence of particle size on radionuclide activity concentrations in Tejo River sediments.

    PubMed

    Madruga, M J; Silva, L; Gomes, A R; Libânio, A; Reis, M

    2014-06-01

    Sediment samples from Tejo River were analyzed for (228)Ra, (226)Ra, (137)Cs and (40)K by HPGe gamma spectrometry. The activity concentration data were statistically analyzed. The activity concentrations values were in the range of about two orders of magnitude for each radionuclide. The influence of the particle size on the radionuclide concentrations was observed. The different environmental origins of the radionuclides (228)Ra, (226)Ra, (137)Cs and (40)K, in the sediments were demonstrated through correlation analysis. Cluster analysis showed a close relationship between (228)Ra and (226)Ra and a different behavior for (40)K. The data obtained in this study provides useful information on the background radioactivity of the studied area and can be further used for radiological mapping of the Tejo River. PMID:24561724

  20. Particle phase distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in stormwater--Using humic acid and iron nano-sized colloids as test particles.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Katrine; Kalmykova, Yuliya; Strömvall, Ann-Margret; Baun, Anders; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-11-01

    The distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different particulate fractions in stormwater: Total, Particulate, Filtrated, Colloidal and Dissolved fractions, were examined and compared to synthetic suspensions of humic acid colloids and iron nano-sized particles. The distribution of low-molecular weight PAHs (LMW PAHs), middle-molecular weight PAHs (MMW PAHs) and high-molecular weight PAHs (HMW PAHs) among the fractions was also evaluated. The results from the synthetic suspensions showed that the highest concentrations of the PAHs were found in the Filtrated fractions and, surprisingly, high loads were found in the Dissolved fractions. The PAHs identified in stormwater in the Particulate fractions and Dissolved fractions follow their hydrophobic properties. In most samples >50% of the HMW PAHs were found in the Particulate fractions, while the LMW and MMW PAHs were found to a higher extent in the Filtrated fractions. The highest concentrations of PAHs were present in the stormwater with the highest total suspended solids (TSS); the relative amount of the HMW PAHs was highest in the Particulate fractions (particles>0.7 μm). The highest concentration of PAHs in the Colloidal fraction was found in the sample with occurrence of small nano-sized particles (<10nm). The results show the importance of developing technologies that both can manage particulate matter and effectively remove PAHs present in the Colloidal and Dissolved fractions in stormwater. PMID:26057998

  1. Size-resolved sulfuric acid mist concentrations at phosphate fertilizer manufacturing facilities in Florida.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Mei; Wu, Chang-Yu; Lundgren, Dale A; Birky, Brian K

    2007-01-01

    Strong inorganic acid mists containing sulfuric acid were identified as a 'known human carcinogen' in a National Toxicology Program (NTP) report where phosphate fertilizer manufacture was listed as one of many occupational exposures to strong acids. To properly assess the occupational exposure to sulfuric acid mists in modern facilities, approved National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 7903 and a cascade impactor were used for measuring the total sulfuric acid mist concentration and size-resolved sulfuric acid mist concentration, respectively. Sampling was conducted at eight phosphate fertilizer plants and two background sites in Florida and there were 24 sampling sites in these plants. Samples were analyzed by ion chromatography (IC) to quantify the water-soluble ion species. The highest sulfuric acid concentrations by the cascade impactor were obtained at the sulfuric acid pump tank area. When high aerosol mass concentrations (100 micro g m(-3)) were observed at this area, the sulfuric acid mists were in the coarse mode. The geometric mean sulfuric acid concentrations (+/-geometric standard deviation) of PM(23) (aerodynamic cut size smaller than 23 micro m), PM(10) and PM(2.5) from the cascade impactor were 41.7 (+/-5.5), 37.9 (+/-5.8) and 22.1 (+/-4.5) micro g m(-3), respectively. The geometric mean (+/-geometric standard deviation) for total sulfuric acid concentration from the NIOSH method samples was 143 (+/-5.08) micro g m(-3). Sulfuric acid mist concentrations varied significantly among the plants and even at the same location. The measurements by the NIOSH method were 1.5-229 times higher than those by the cascade impactor. Moreover, using the NIOSH method, the sulfuric acid concentrations measured at the lower flow rate (0.30 Lpm) were higher than those at the higher flow rate (0.45 Lpm). One possible reason for the significant differences between the results from the cascade impactor and the NIOSH method is the potential

  2. Effect of citric acid concentration and hydrolysis time on physicochemical properties of sweet potato starches.

    PubMed

    Surendra Babu, Ayenampudi; Parimalavalli, Ramanathan; Rudra, Shalini Gaur

    2015-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of citric acid treated sweet potato starches were investigated in the present study. Sweet potato starch was hydrolyzed using citric acid with different concentrations (1 and 5%) and time periods (1 and 11 h) at 45 °C and was denoted as citric acid treated starch (CTS1 to CTS4) based on their experimental conditions. The recovery yield of acid treated starches was above 85%. The CTS4 sample displayed the highest amylose (around 31%) and water holding capacity its melting temperature was 47.66 °C. The digestibility rate was slightly increased for 78.58% for the CTS3 and CTS4. The gel strength of acid modified starches ranged from 0.27 kg to 1.11 kg. RVA results of acid thinned starches confirmed a low viscosity profile. CTS3 starch illustrated lower enthalpy compared to all other modified starches. All starch samples exhibited a shear-thinning behavior. SEM analysis revealed that the extent of visible degradation was increased at higher hydrolysis time and acid concentration. The CTS3 satisfied the criteria required for starch to act as a fat mimetic. Overall results conveyed that the citric acid treatment of sweet potato starch with 5% acid concentration and 11h period was an ideal condition for the preparation of a fat replacer. PMID:26188303

  3. Influential parameters on ultrafine particle concentration downwind at waste-to-energy plants.

    PubMed

    Scungio, Mauro; Buonanno, Giorgio; Arpino, Fausto; Ficco, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    A numerical investigation on the parameters influencing the ultrafine particle concentrations downwind an incinerator plant has been carried out on a three-dimensional full scale model. The simulation was based on a modified version of the k-ε turbulence model in order to take into account the thermal buoyancy effect of the plume, and reproducing a stable and neutral atmospheric boundary layer by setting appropriate values of velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent dissipation rate. The ability of the model to reproduce and maintain a stable atmospheric boundary layer was evaluated by analyzing the turbulent characteristics of the flow along the domain. A parametric analysis made on the basis of different plant operational, environmental, and flue gas treatment parameters was carried out in order to evaluate the impact of incinerator plants on the background concentration of ultrafine particles. The evaluation was made at 5 km downwind the chimney in a breathable area, showing that the most significant impact is due to the flue gas treatment section, with a variation on the background concentration up to 370% for a plant hypothetically working without controls on ultrafine particles emission. Operational and environmental parameters determine variations of the concentrations ranging from 1.62% to 4.48% for the lowest and highest chimney, from 1.41% to 4.52% for the lowest and highest wind speed and from 2.48% to 4.5% for the lowest and highest flue gas velocity, respectively. In addition, plume rise evaluation was carried out as a function of wind speed and flue gas velocity from the chimney. PMID:25670165

  4. Multi-step process for concentrating magnetic particles in waste sludges

    DOEpatents

    Watson, J.L.

    1990-07-10

    This invention involves a multi-step, multi-force process for dewatering sludges which have high concentrations of magnetic particles, such as waste sludges generated during steelmaking. This series of processing steps involves (1) mixing a chemical flocculating agent with the sludge; (2) allowing the particles to aggregate under non-turbulent conditions; (3) subjecting the mixture to a magnetic field which will pull the magnetic aggregates in a selected direction, causing them to form a compacted sludge; (4) preferably, decanting the clarified liquid from the compacted sludge; and (5) using filtration to convert the compacted sludge into a cake having a very high solids content. Steps 2 and 3 should be performed simultaneously. This reduces the treatment time and increases the extent of flocculation and the effectiveness of the process. As partially formed aggregates with active flocculating groups are pulled through the mixture by the magnetic field, they will contact other particles and form larger aggregates. This process can increase the solids concentration of steelmaking sludges in an efficient and economic manner, thereby accomplishing either of two goals: (a) it can convert hazardous wastes into economic resources for recycling as furnace feed material, or (b) it can dramatically reduce the volume of waste material which must be disposed. 7 figs.

  5. Multi-step process for concentrating magnetic particles in waste sludges

    DOEpatents

    Watson, John L.

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a multi-step, multi-force process for dewatering sludges which have high concentrations of magnetic particles, such as waste sludges generated during steelmaking. This series of processing steps involves (1) mixing a chemical flocculating agent with the sludge; (2) allowing the particles to aggregate under non-turbulent conditions; (3) subjecting the mixture to a magnetic field which will pull the magnetic aggregates in a selected direction, causing them to form a compacted sludge; (4) preferably, decanting the clarified liquid from the compacted sludge; and (5) using filtration to convert the compacted sludge into a cake having a very high solids content. Steps 2 and 3 should be performed simultaneously. This reduces the treatment time and increases the extent of flocculation and the effectiveness of the process. As partially formed aggregates with active flocculating groups are pulled through the mixture by the magnetic field, they will contact other particles and form larger aggregates. This process can increase the solids concentration of steelmaking sludges in an efficient and economic manner, thereby accomplishing either of two goals: (a) it can convert hazardous wastes into economic resources for recycling as furnace feed material, or (b) it can dramatically reduce the volume of waste material which must be disposed.

  6. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 μg m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 μg m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 μg m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area. PMID:22358115

  7. Physiological concentrations of bile acids down-regulate agonist induced secretion in colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Keating, Niamh; Mroz, Magdalena S; Scharl, Michael M; Marsh, Christine; Ferguson, Gail; Hofmann, Alan F; Keely, Stephen J

    2009-08-01

    In patients with bile acid malabsorption, high concentrations of bile acids enter the colon and stimulate Cl(-) and fluid secretion, thereby causing diarrhoea. However, deoxycholic acid (DCA), the predominant colonic bile acid, is normally present at lower concentrations where its role in regulating transport is unclear. Thus, the current study set out to investigate the effects of physiologically relevant DCA concentrations on colonic epithelial secretory function. Cl(-) secretion was measured as changes in short-circuit current across voltage-clamped T(84) cell monolayers. At high concentrations (0.5-1 mM), DCA acutely stimulated Cl(-) secretion but this effect was associated with cell injury, as evidenced by decreased transepithelial resistance (TER) and increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. In contrast, chronic (24 hrs) exposure to lower DCA concentrations (10-200 microM) inhibited responses to Ca(2+) and cAMP-dependent secretagogues without altering TER, LDH release, or secretagogue-induced increases in intracellular second messengers. Other bile acids - taurodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid - had similar antisecretory effects. DCA (50 microM) rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) and both ERK and p38 MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases). The EGFr inhibitor, AG1478, and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, reversed the antisecretory effects of DCA, while the MAPK inhibitors, PD98059 and SB203580, did not. In summary, our studies suggest that, in contrast to its acute prosecretory effects at pathophysiological concentrations, lower, physiologically relevant, levels of DCA chronically down-regulate colonic epithelial secretory function. On the basis of these data, we propose a novel role for bile acids as physiological regulators of colonic secretory capacity. PMID:19583809

  8. Physiological concentrations of bile acids down‐regulate agonist induced secretion in colonic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Niamh; Mroz, Magdalena S.; Scharl, Michael M.; Marsh, Christine; Ferguson, Gail; Hofmann, Alan F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In patients with bile acid malabsorption, high concentrations of bile acids enter the colon and stimulate Cl− and fluid secretion, thereby causing diarrhoea. However, deoxycholic acid (DCA), the predominant colonic bile acid, is normally present at lower concentrations where its role in regulating transport is unclear. Thus, the current study set out to investigate the effects of physiologically relevant DCA concentrations on colonic epithelial secretory function. Cl− secretion was measured as changes in short‐circuit current across voltage‐clamped T84 cell monolayers. At high concentrations (0.5–1 mM), DCA acutely stimulated Cl− secretion but this effect was associated with cell injury, as evidenced by decreased transepithelial resistance (TER) and increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. In contrast, chronic (24 hrs) exposure to lower DCA concentrations (10–200 μM) inhibited responses to Ca2+ and cAMP‐dependent secretagogues without altering TER, LDH release, or secretagogue‐induced increases in intracellular second messengers. Other bile acids – taurodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid – had similar antisecretory effects. DCA (50 μM) rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) and both ERK and p38 MAPKs (mitogen‐activated protein kinases). The EGFr inhibitor, AG1478, and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, reversed the antisecretory effects of DCA, while the MAPK inhibitors, PD98059 and SB203580, did not. In summary, our studies suggest that, in contrast to its acute prosecretory effects at pathophysiological concentrations, lower, physiologically relevant, levels of DCA chronically down‐regulate colonic epithelial secretory function. On the basis of these data, we propose a novel role for bile acids as physiological regulators of colonic secretory capacity. PMID:19583809

  9. Nitric Acid Uptake on Subtropical Cirrus Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The redistribution of HNO3 via uptake and sedimentation by cirrus cloud particles is considered an important term in the upper tropospheric budget of reactive nitrogen. Numerous cirrus cloud encounters by the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft during CRYSTAL-FACE were accompanied by the observation of condensed-phase HNO3 with the NOAA chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The instrument measures HNO3 with two independent channels of detection connected to separate forward- and downward-facing inlets that allow a determination of the amount of HNO3 condensed on ice particles. Subtropical cirrus clouds, as indicated by the presence of ice particles, were observed coincident with condensed-phase HNO3 at temperatures of 197 K - 224 K and pressures of 122 hPa - 224 hPa. Maximum levels of condensed-phase HNO3 approached the gas-phase equivalent of 0.8 ppbv. Ice particle surface coverages as high as 1.4- 10(exp 14) molecules/sq cm were observed. A dissociative Langmuir adsorption model, when using an empirically derived HNO3 adsorption enthalpy of -11.0 kcal/mol, effectively describes the observed molecular coverages to within a factor of 5. The percentage of total HNO3 in the condensed phase ranged from near zero to 100% in the observed cirrus clouds. With volume-weighted mean particle diameters up to 700 pm and particle fall velocities up to 10 m/s, some observed clouds have significant potential to redistribute HNO3 in the upper troposphere.

  10. Nitric Acid Uptake on Subtropical Cirrus Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Marcy, T. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Hudson, P. K.; Thompson, T. L.; Kaercher, B.; Ridley, B. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Baumgardner, D.; Garrett, T. J.; Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. B.; Sayres, D. S.; Pittman, J. V.; Dhaniyala, S.; Bui, T. P.; Mahoney, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The redistribution of HNO3 via uptake and sedimentation by cirrus cloud particles is considered an important term in the upper tropospheric budget of reactive nitrogen. Numerous cirrus cloud encounters by the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) were accompanied by the observation of condensed-phase HNO3 with the NOAA chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The instrument measures HNO3 with two independent channels of detection connected to separate forward and downward facing inlets that allow a determination of the amount of HNO3 condensed on ice particles. Subtropical cirrus clouds, as indicated by the presence of ice particles, were observed coincident with condensed-phase HNO3 at temperatures of 197-224 K and pressures of 122-224 hPa. Maximum levels of condensed-phase HNO3 approached the gas-phase equivalent of 0.8 ppbv. Ice particle surface coverages as high as 1.4 # 10(exp 14) molecules/ square cm were observed. A dissociative Langmuir adsorption model, when using an empirically derived HNO3 adsorption enthalpy of -11.0 kcal/mol, effectively describes the observed molecular coverages to within a factor of 5. The percentage of total HNO3 in the condensed phase ranged from near zero to 100% in the observed cirrus clouds. With volume-weighted mean particle diameters up to 700 ?m and particle fall velocities up to 10 m/s, some observed clouds have significant potential to redistribute HNO3 in the upper troposphere.

  11. Effects of Wind on Background Particle Concentrations at Truck Freight Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Ronald; Hart, Jaime E; Davis, Mary E; Reaser, Paul; Natkin, Jonathan; Laden, Francine; Garshick, Eric; Smith, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Truck freight terminals are predominantly located near highways and industrial facilities. This proximity to pollution sources, coupled with meteorological conditions and wind patterns, may affect occupational exposures to particles at these work locations. In order to understand this process, data from an environmental sampling study of particles at US trucking terminals, along with weather and geographic maps, were analyzed to determine the extent to which the transportation of particles from local pollutant sources elevated observed occupational exposures at these locations. To help identify potential upwind sources, wind direction weighted averages and speed measurements were used to construct wind roses, which were superimposed on overhead photos of the terminal and examined for upwind source activity. Statistical tests were performed on these “source” and “non-source” directions to determine whether there were significant differences in observed particle levels between the two groups. Our results provide evidence that nearby upwind pollution sources significantly elevated background concentrations at only a few of the locations sampled, while the majority provided little to no evidence of a significant upwind source effect. PMID:17162479

  12. Origin of high particle number concentrations reaching the St. Louis, Midwest Supersite.

    PubMed

    de Foy, Benjamin; Schauer, James J

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafine particles are associated with adverse health effects. Total Particle Number Concentration (TNC) of fine particles were measured during 2002 at the St. Louis - Midwest supersite. The time series showed overall low level with frequent large peaks. The time series was analyzed alongside criteria pollutant measurements and meteorological observations. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify further contributing factors and to determine the association of different pollutants with TNC levels. This showed the strong contribution of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) to high TNC levels. The analysis also suggested that increased dispersion resulting from faster winds and higher mixing heights led to higher TNC levels. Overall, the results show that there were intense particle nucleation events in a SO2 rich plume reaching the site which contributed around 29% of TNC. A further 40% was associated with primary emissions from mobile sources. By separating the remaining TNC by time of day and clear sky conditions, we suggest that most likely 8% of TNC are due to regional nucleation events and 23% are associated with the general urban background. PMID:26257365

  13. Reactive uptake of N2O5 by aerosols containing dicarboxylic acids. Effect of particle phase, composition, and nitrate content.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul T; Badger, Claire L; Cox, R Anthony; Folkers, Mareike; Henk, Hartmut H; Mentel, Thomas F

    2009-04-30

    Reactive uptake coefficients for loss of N(2)O(5) to micron-size aerosols containing oxalic malonic, succinic, and glutaric acids, and mixtures with ammonium hydrogen sulfate and ammonium sulfate, are presented. The uptake measurements were made using two different systems: atmospheric pressure laminar flow tube reactor (Cambridge) and the Large Indoor Aerosol Chamber at Forschungszentrum Juelich. Generally good agreement is observed for the data recorded using the two techniques. Measured uptake coefficients lie in the range 5 x 10(-4)-3 x 10(-2), dependent on relative humidity, on particle phase, and on particle composition. Uptake to solid particles is generally slow, with observed uptake coefficients less than 1 x 10(-3), while uptake to liquid particles is around an order of magnitude more efficient. These results are rationalized using a numerical model employing explicit treatment of both transport and chemistry. Our results indicate a modest effect of the dicarboxylic acids on uptake and confirm the strong effect of particle phase, liquid water content, and particulate nitrate concentrations. PMID:19385680

  14. Effect of acid leaching on upgrading the graphite concentrate from West Kalimantan (Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syarifuddin, Fahmi; Florena, Fenfen Fenda; Hanam, Eko Sulistio; Trisko, Nici; Kustiyanto, Eko; Enilisiana, Rianto, Anton; Arinton, Ghenadi

    2016-02-01

    In this research an attempt has been done for upgrading the carbon content on processed graphite concentrate obtained from Sanggau Regency, West Kalimantan, Indonesia by acid leaching. The purpose of this research was to find optimal conditions for increasing graphite purity by eliminating the impurities, in particular, sillica - which is easy to remove by hydrofluoric acid. The concentrate contained 69.74% FC ranging from 149 µm to 841 µm. The optimal leaching parameters were time reaction 120 minutes, temperature 180° C, solid-liquid ratio 1:5 and purity of acid 48%. The determination of the carbon content showed that the carbon grade was 98% FC.

  15. DNA/polyethyleneimine/hyaluronic acid small complex particles and tumor suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoko; Yoshihara, Chieko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Koyama, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    The highest barriers for non-viral vectors to an efficient in vivo gene transfection would be (1) non-specific interaction with biological molecules, and (2) large size of the DNA complex particles. Protective coating of the DNA/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes by hyaluronic acid (HA) effectively diminished the adverse interactions with biological molecules. Here we found HA also protected the DNA/PEI complexes against aggregation and inactivation through lyophilization-and-rehydration procedures. It allows us to prepare the concentrated very small DNA complex particles (<70 nm) suspension by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by lyophilized-and-rehydrated to a small volume. In vivo gene expression efficiency of the small complex was examined with mice subcutaneously inoculated with B16 melanoma cells. These formulations showed high reporter-gene expression level in tumor after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice. Small complex was then made of the plasmid encoding GM-CSF gene, and injected into the mice bearing subcutaneous solid B16 tumor. After intravenous injection, it induced apparent tumor growth suppression in 50% of the mice. Notably, significant therapeutic effect was detected in the mice that received intratumoral injection, and 75% of the mice were completely cured with disappearance of tumor. PMID:20047759

  16. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF PARTICLE BEAM LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ACID HERBICIDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle beam liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was evaluated for the measurement of acid herbicides. n acetic acid/ammonium acetate/methano1 solvent system with a C-8 reversed Phase column gave baseline resolution of all target analytes. etection limits in the full...

  17. Linking in-vehicle ultrafine particle exposures to on-road concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Eckel, Sandrah P.; Knibbs, Luke D.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J.; Fruin, Scott A.

    2012-11-01

    For traffic-related pollutants like ultrafine particles (UFP), a significant fraction of overall exposure occurs within or close to the transit microenvironment. Therefore, understanding exposure to these pollutants in such microenvironments is crucial to accurately assessing overall UFP exposure. The aim of this study was to develop models for predicting in-cabin UFP concentrations if roadway concentrations are known, quantifying the effect of vehicle characteristics, ventilation settings, driving conditions and air exchange rates (AER). Particle concentrations and AER were measured in 43 and 73 vehicles, respectively, under various ventilation settings and driving speeds. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression models were used to identify and quantify the factors that determine inside-to-outside (I/O) UFP ratios and AERs across a full range of vehicle types and ages. AER was the most significant determinant of UFP I/O ratios, and was most strongly influenced by ventilation setting (recirculation or outside air intake). Further inclusion of ventilation fan speed, vehicle age or mileage, and driving speed explained greater than 79% of the variability in measured UFP I/O ratios.

  18. Linking In-Vehicle Ultrafine Particle Exposures to On-Road Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Eckel, Sandrah P; Knibbs, Luke D; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J; Fruin, Scott A

    2012-11-01

    For traffic-related pollutants like ultrafine particles (UFP, Dp < 100 nm), a significant fraction of overall exposure occurs within or close to the transit microenvironment. Therefore, understanding exposure to these pollutants in such microenvironments is crucial to accurately assessing overall UFP exposure. The aim of this study was to develop models for predicting in-cabin UFP concentrations if roadway concentrations are known, taking into account vehicle characteristics, ventilation settings, driving conditions and air exchange rates (AER). Particle concentrations and AER were measured in 43 and 73 vehicles, respectively, under various ventilation settings and driving speeds. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression models were used to identify and quantify the factors that determine inside-to-outside (I/O) UFP ratios and AERs across a full range of vehicle types and ages. AER was the most significant determinant of UFP I/O ratios, and was strongly influenced by ventilation setting (recirculation or outside air intake). Inclusion of ventilation fan speed, vehicle age or mileage, and driving speed explained greater than 79% of the variability in measured UFP I/O ratios. PMID:23888122

  19. Ventilation dependence of concentration metrics of Ultra-fine Particles in a coagulating household smoke.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Sreekanth, B; Mayya, Y S

    2016-01-01

    Role of Ultra-fine Particles (UFPs) in causing adverse health effects among large population across the world, attributable to household smoke, is being increasingly recognized. However, there is very little theoretical perspective available on the complex behavior of the UFP metrics with respect to controlling factors, such as ventilation rate and particle emission rate from the combustion sources. This numerical study examines through coagulation dynamics, the dependence of UFP metrics, viz., number (PN), mass (PM(0.1)) and surface area (PA(0.1)) concentrations below 0.1 μm diameter, on ventilation and the number emission rate from household smoke. For strong sources, the steady-state concentrations of these metrics are found to increase initially with increasing Air Exchange Rate (AER), reach a peak value and then decrease. Counter correlations are seen between UFP metric and PM(2.5) concentrations. The concepts of Critical Air Exchange Rate (CAER) and Half-Value Air Exchange Rate (HaVAER) have been introduced which indicate a feasibility of mitigation of PM(0.1) and PA(0.1), unlike PN, by ventilation techniques. The study clearly brings forth complex differential behavior of the three UFP metrics. The results are further discussed. PMID:26795205

  20. Plasma amino acid concentrations in 36 dogs with histologically confirmed superficial necrolytic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Outerbridge, Catherine A; Marks, Stanley L; Rogers, Quinton R

    2002-08-01

    Plasma amino acid concentrations were measured in 36 dogs diagnosed with superficial necrolytic dermatitis (SND) via skin biopsy. The median age of the dogs was 10 years, and 27 out of 36 (75%) were male. Twenty-two out of 36 (61%) of the dogs were accounted for by six breeds; West Highland white terriers (six), Shetland sheepdogs (five), cocker spaniels (four), Scottish terriers (three), Lhasa apsos (two) and Border collies (two). The mean concentration (+/- standard deviation) was calculated for each measured plasma amino acid and compared to previously documented concentrations of plasma amino acids measured in dogs with acute and chronic hepatitis. The ratio of branched chain amino acids to aromatic amino acids in the dogs with SND was 2.6, slightly lower than that in normal dogs. The mean plasma amino acid concentrations for dogs with SND were significantly lower than for dogs with acute and chronic hepatitis. A metabolic hepatopathy in which there is increased hepatic catabolism of amino acids is hypothesized to explain the hypoaminoacidaemia seen in SND. PMID:12174180

  1. Analysis of the Hydrogen Reduction Rate of Magnetite Concentrate Particles in a Drop Tube Reactor Through CFD Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Deqiu; Mohassab, Yousef; Elzohiery, Mohamed; Sohn, H. Y.

    2016-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach, coupled with experimental results, was developed to accurately evaluate the kinetic parameters of iron oxide particle reduction. Hydrogen reduction of magnetite concentrate particles was used as a sample case. A detailed evaluation of the particle residence time and temperature profile inside the reactor is presented. This approach eliminates the errors associated with assumptions like constant particle temperature and velocity while the particles travel down a drop tube reactor. The gas phase was treated as a continuum in the Eulerian frame of reference, and the particles are tracked using a Lagrangian approach in which the trajectory and velocity are determined by integrating the equation of particle motion. In addition, a heat balance on the particle that relates the particle temperature to convection and radiation was also applied. An iterative algorithm that numerically solves the governing coupled ordinary differential equations was developed to determine the pre-exponential factor and activation energy that best fit the experimental data.

  2. Analysis of the Hydrogen Reduction Rate of Magnetite Concentrate Particles in a Drop Tube Reactor Through CFD Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Deqiu; Mohassab, Yousef; Elzohiery, Mohamed; Sohn, H. Y.

    2016-02-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach, coupled with experimental results, was developed to accurately evaluate the kinetic parameters of iron oxide particle reduction. Hydrogen reduction of magnetite concentrate particles was used as a sample case. A detailed evaluation of the particle residence time and temperature profile inside the reactor is presented. This approach eliminates the errors associated with assumptions like constant particle temperature and velocity while the particles travel down a drop tube reactor. The gas phase was treated as a continuum in the Eulerian frame of reference, and the particles are tracked using a Lagrangian approach in which the trajectory and velocity are determined by integrating the equation of particle motion. In addition, a heat balance on the particle that relates the particle temperature to convection and radiation was also applied. An iterative algorithm that numerically solves the governing coupled ordinary differential equations was developed to determine the pre-exponential factor and activation energy that best fit the experimental data.

  3. Determination of effect factor for effective parameter on saccharification of lignocellulosic material by concentrated acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghili, Sina; Nodeh, Ali Arasteh

    2015-12-01

    Tamarisk usage as a new group of lignocelluloses material to produce fermentable sugars in bio ethanol process was studied. The overall aim of this work was to establish the optimum condition for acid hydrolysis of this new material and a mathematical model predicting glucose release as a function of operation variable. Sulfuric acid concentration in the range of 20 to 60%(w/w), process temperature between 60 to 95oC, hydrolysis time from 120 to 240 min and solid content 5,10,15%(w/w) were used as hydrolysis conditions. HPLC was used to analysis of the product. This analysis indicated that glucose was the main fermentable sugar and was increase with time, temperature and solid content and acid concentration was a parabola influence in glucose production. The process was modeled by a quadratic equation. Curve study and model were found that 42% acid concentration, 15 % solid content and 90oC were optimum condition.

  4. Spatial and temporal variation of particle number concentration in Augsburg, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Cyrys, Josef; Pitz, Mike; Heinrich, Joachim; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Peters, Annette

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies on health effects of outdoor air pollution are largely based on single monitoring site for estimating the exposure of people living in urban areas. For such an approach two aspects are important: the temporal correlation and the spatial variation of the absolute levels of concentrations measured at different sites in an urban area. Whereas many studies have shown small spatial variability of fine particles in urban areas, little is known on how well a single monitoring station could represent the temporal and spatial variation of ultrafine particles across urban areas. In our study we investigated the temporal and spatial variation of particle number concentration (PNC) at four background sites in Augsburg, Germany. Two of them were influenced by traffic, one was placed in the outskirts of the city. The average PNC levels at two urban background sites with traffic impact were 16,943 cm−3 and 20,702 cm−3, respectively, compared to 11,656 cm−3 at the urban background site without traffic impact (ratio 1.2 to 1.8). The Spearman correlation coefficients between the monitoring sites were high (r>0.80). The pronounced differences in absolute PNC levels suggest that the use of a single monitoring station in long-term epidemiological studies must be insufficient to attribute accurate exposure levels of PNC to all study subjects. On the other hand, the high temporal correlations of PNC across the city area of Augsburg implicate that in epidemiological time-series studies the use of one single ambient monitoring site is an adequate approach for characterizing exposure to ultrafine particles. PMID:18511107

  5. Preparation and properties of films cast from mixtures of poly(vinyl alcohol) and submicron particles prepared from amylose-palmitic acid inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Fanta, George F; Selling, Gordon W; Felker, Frederick C; Kenar, James A

    2015-05-01

    The use of starch in polymer composites for film production has been studied for increasing biodegradability, improving film properties and reducing cost. In this study, submicron particles were prepared from amylose-sodium palmitate complexes both by rapidly cooling jet-cooked starch-palmitic acid mixtures and by acidifying solutions of starch-sodium palmitate complexes. Films were cast containing poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH) with up to 50% starch particles. Tensile strength decreased and Young's modulus increased with starch concentration, but percent elongations remained similar to controls regardless of preparation method or starch content. Microscopy showed particulate starch distribution in films made with rapidly cooled starch-palmitic acid particles but smooth, diffuse starch staining with acidified sodium palmitate complexes. The mild effects on tensile properties suggest that submicron starch particles prepared from amylose-palmitic acid complexes provide a useful, commercially viable approach for PVOH film modification. PMID:25659717

  6. Determinants of spikes in ultrafine particle concentration whilst commuting by bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Shanon; Dirks, Kim N.; Salmond, Jennifer A.; Xie, Shanju

    2015-07-01

    This paper examines concentration of ultrafine particles (UFPs) based on data collected using high-resolution UFP monitors whilst travelling by bus during rush hour along three different urban routes in Auckland, New Zealand. The factors influencing in-bus UFP concentration were assessed using a combination of spatial, statistical and GIS analysis techniques to determine both spatial and temporal variability. Results from 68 bus trips showed that concentrations varied more within a route than between on a given day, despite differences in urban morphology, land use and traffic densities between routes. A number of trips were characterised by periods of very rapid increases in UFPs (concentration 'spikes'), followed by slow declines. Trips which recorded at least one spike (an increase of greater than 10,000 pt/cm3) resulted in significantly higher mean concentrations. Spikes in UFPs were significantly more likely to occur when travelling at low speeds and when passengers were alighting and boarding at bus stops close to traffic light intersections.

  7. Wide-range particle characterization and elemental concentration in Beijing aerosol during the 2013 Spring Festival.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hui; Li, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Jiating; Li, Bai; Sun, Jialong; Chen, Rui; Gao, Yuxi; Chen, Chunying

    2014-09-01

    The number and mass concentration, size distribution, and the concentration of 16 elements were studied in aerosol samples during the Spring Festival celebrations in 2013 in Beijing, China. Both the number and mass concentration increased sharply in a wide range from 10 nm to 10 μm during the firecrackers and fireworks activities. The prominent increase of the number concentration was in 50 nm-500 nm with a peak of 1.7 × 10(5)/cm(3) at 150 nm, which is 8 times higher than that after 1.5 h. The highest mass concentration was in 320-560 nm, which is 4 times higher than the control. K, Mg, Sr, Ba and Pb increased sharply during the firework activities in PM10. Although the aerosol emission from firework activities is a short-term air quality degradation event, there may be a substantial hazard arising from the chemical composition of the emitted particles. PMID:24975025

  8. Comparison of XAD macroporous resins for the concentration of fulvic acid from aqueous solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Five macroreticular, nonlonlc AmberlHe XAD resins were evaluated for concentration and Isolation of fulvlc acid from aqueous solution. The capacity of each resin for fulvlc acid was measured by both batch and column techniques. Elution efficiencies were determined by desorptlon with 0.1 N NaOH. Highest recoveries were obtained with the acrylic ester resins which proved to be most efficient for both adsorption and elution of fulvlc acid. Compared to the acrylic ester resins, usefulness of the styrene dvlnybenzene resins to remove fulvlc acid is limited because of slow diffusion-controlled adsorption and formation of charge-transfer complexes, which hinders elution. ?? 1979 American Chemical Society.

  9. Chronic Social Stress and Susceptibility to Concentrated Ambient Fine Particles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Clougherty, Jane E.; Rossi, Christina A.; Lawrence, Joy; Long, Mark S.; Diaz, Edgar A.; Lim, Robert H.; McEwen, Bruce; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic evidence suggests that chronic stress may alter susceptibility to air pollution. However, persistent spatial confounding between these exposures may limit the utility of epidemiologic methods to disentangle these effects and cannot identify physiologic mechanisms for potential differential susceptibilities. Objectives Using a rat model of social stress, we compared respiratory responses to fine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) and examined biological markers of inflammation. Methods Twenty-four 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups [stress/CAPs, stress/filtered air (FA), nonstress/CAPs, nonstress/FA]. Stress-group animals were individually introduced into the home cage of a dominant male twice weekly. Blood drawn at sacrifice was analyzed for immune and inflammatory markers. CAPs were generated using the Harvard ambient particle concentrator, which draws real-time urban ambient fine particles, enriching concentrations approximately 30 times. CAPs/FA exposures were delivered in single-animal plethysmographs, 5 hr/day for 10 days, and respiratory function was continuously monitored using a Buxco system. Results Stressed animals displayed higher average C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α, and white blood cell counts than did nonstressed animals. Only among stressed animals were CAPs exposures associated with increased respiratory frequency, lower flows, and lower volumes, suggesting a rapid, shallow breathing pattern. Conversely, in animals with elevated CAPs exposures alone, we observed increased inspiratory flows and greater minute volumes (volume of air inhaled or exhaled per minute). Conclusions CAPs effects on respiratory measures differed significantly, and substantively, by stress group. Higher CAPs exposures were associated with a rapid, shallow breathing pattern only under chronic stress. Blood measures provided evidence of inflammatory responses. Results support epidemiologic

  10. Inhaled concentrated ambient particles are associated with hematologic and bronchoalveolar lavage changes in canines.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R W; Coull, B; Reinisch, U; Catalano, P; Killingsworth, C R; Koutrakis, P; Kavouras, I; Murthy, G G; Lawrence, J; Lovett, E; Wolfson, J M; Verrier, R L; Godleski, J J

    2000-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammatory and hematologic responses of canines were studied after exposure to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) using the Harvard ambient particle concentrator (HAPC). For pulmonary inflammatory studies, normal dogs were exposed in pairs to either CAPs or filtered air (paired studies) for 6 hr/day on 3 consecutive days. For hematologic studies, dogs were exposed for 6 hr/day for 3 consecutive days with one receiving CAPs while the other was simultaneously exposed to filtered air; crossover of exposure took place the following week (crossover studies). Physicochemical characterization of CAPs exposure samples included measurements of particle mass, size distribution, and composition. No statistical differences in biologic responses were found when all CAPs and all sham exposures were compared. However, the variability in biologic response was considerably higher with CAPs exposure. Subsequent exploratory graphical analyses and mixed linear regression analyses suggested associations between CAPs constituents and biologic responses. Factor analysis was applied to the compositional data from paired and crossover experiments to determine elements consistently associated with each other in CAPs samples. In paired experiments, four factors were identified; in crossover studies, a total of six factors were observed. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and hematologic data were regressed on the factor scores. Increased BAL neutrophil percentage, total peripheral white blood cell (WBC) counts, circulating neutrophils, and circulating lymphocytes were associated with increases in the aluminum/silicon factor. Increased circulating neutrophils and increased BAL macrophages were associated with the vanadium/nickel factor. Increased BAL neutrophils were associated with the bromine/lead factor when only the compositional data from the third day of CAPs exposure were used. Significant decreases in red blood cell counts and hemoglobin levels were correlated with the sulfur

  11. Endogenous flow of amino acids in the avian ileum as influenced by increasing dietary peptide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Velmurugu; Morel, Patrick C H; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Thomas, Donald V

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish whether feeding broiler chickens with diets containing increasing dietary peptide concentrations would cause increases in ileal endogenous amino acid flow. The flow of N and most amino acids increased quadratically (P < 0.05 to 0.001) with increasing dietary concentrations of peptides. The exceptions were the flow of threonine, serine, glycine, tyrosine and cystine, which increased linearly (P < 0.001) with dietary peptide levels. Another notable exception to the general trend was the flow of proline, which was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in birds fed the protein-free diet. The amino acid profile of endogenous protein, expressed as proportion of crude protein, indicated that the ratios of threonine, glutamic acid, proline, glycine, leucine, histidine, arginine and cystine were influenced (P < 0.05) with increasing dietary peptide concentrations. In general, compared with the protein-free diet, the ratios of threonine and arginine in endogenous protein were lower (P < 0.05) and those of glutamic acid, glycine and histidine were greater (P < 0.05) in diets with high concentrations of peptides. The ratio of proline was found to decrease (P < 0.05) with increasing dietary peptide concentrations. These changes in the amino acid profile of endogenous protein are probably reflective of changes in the output of one or more of the components of endogenous protein. Overall, the present results demonstrated that increasing dietary peptide concentrations increased the flow of endogenous amino acid flow at the terminal ileum of broiler chickens in a dose-dependent manner and also caused changes in the composition of endogenous protein. The observed changes in endogenous amino flow will influence the maintenance requirements for amino acids and also have implications for the calculation of true digestibility coefficient of feedstuffs. PMID:18662428

  12. Effects of squat exercise and branched-chain amino acid supplementation on plasma free amino acid concentrations in young women.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Kobayashi, Hisamine; Mawatari, Kazunori; Akita, Keiichi; Inaguma, Asami; Watanabe, Satoko; Bajotto, Gustavo; Sato, Juichi

    2009-06-01

    The present study was conducted to examine alterations in plasma free amino acid concentrations induced by squat exercise and branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation in young, untrained female subjects. In the morning on the exercise session day, participants ingested drinks containing either BCAA (isoleucine:leucine:valine=1:2.3:1.2) or dextrin (placebo) at 0.1 g/kg body weight 15 min before a squat exercise session, which consisted of 7 sets of 20 squats, with 3 min intervals between sets. In the placebo trial, plasma BCAA concentrations were decreased subsequent to exercise, whereas they were significantly increased in the BCAA trial until 2 h after exercise. Marked changes in other free amino acids in response to squat exercise and BCAA supplementation were observed. In particular, plasma concentrations of methionine and aromatic amino acids were temporarily decreased in the BCAA trial, being significantly lower than those in the placebo trial. These results suggest that BCAA intake before exercise affects methionine and aromatic amino acid metabolism. PMID:19602839

  13. Ultrasonic device for real-time sewage velocity and suspended particles concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Abda, F; Azbaid, A; Ensminger, D; Fischer, S; François, P; Schmitt, P; Pallarès, A

    2009-01-01

    In the frame of a technological research and innovation network in water and environment technologies (RITEAU, Réseau de Recherche et d'Innovation Technologique Eau et Environnement), our research group, in collaboration with industrial partners and other research institutions, has been in charge of the development of a suitable flowmeter: an ultrasonic device measuring simultaneously the water flow and the concentration of size classes of suspended particles. Working on the pulsed ultrasound principle, our multi-frequency device (1 to 14 MHz) allows flow velocity and water height measurement and estimation of suspended solids concentration. Velocity measurements rely on the coherent Doppler principle. A self developed frequency estimator, so called Spectral Identification method, was used and compared to the classical Pulse-Pair method. Several measurements campaigns on one wastewater collector of the French city of Strasbourg gave very satisfactory results and showed smaller standard deviation values for the Doppler frequency extracted by the Spectral Identification method. A specific algorithm was also developed for the water height measurements. It relies on the water surface acoustic impedance rupture and its peak localisation and behaviour in the collected backscattering data. This algorithm was positively tested on long time measurements on the same wastewater collector. A large part of the article is devoted to the measurements of the suspended solids concentrations. Our data analysis consists in the adaptation of the well described acoustic behaviour of sand to the behaviour of wastewater particles. Both acoustic attenuation and acoustic backscattering data over multiple frequencies are analyzed for the extrapolation of size classes and respective concentrations. Under dry weather conditions, the massic backscattering coefficient and the overall size distribution showed similar evolution whatever the measurement site was and were suggesting a global

  14. Influence of acid functionalization on the cardiopulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and carbon black particles in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Haiyan McGee, John K.; Saxena, Rajiv K.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Devlin, Robert B.; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2009-09-15

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being developed for a wide range of industrial and medical applications. Because of their unique properties, nanotubes can impose potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups on their surface. The present study was designed to evaluate whether acid functionalization (AF) enhanced the cardiopulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as control carbon black particles. Mice were exposed by oropharyngeal aspiration to 10 or 40 {mu}g of saline-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), acid-functionalized SWCNTs (AF-SWCNTs), ultrafine carbon black (UFCB), AF-UFCB, or 2 {mu}g LPS. 24 hours later, pulmonary inflammatory responses and cardiac effects were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage and isolated cardiac perfusion respectively, and compared to saline or LPS-instilled animals. Additional mice were assessed for histological changes in lung and heart. Instillation of 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs, UFCB and AF-UFCB increased percentage of pulmonary neutrophils. No significant effects were observed at the lower particle concentration. Sporadic clumps of particles from each treatment group were observed in the small airways and interstitial areas of the lungs according to particle dose. Patches of cellular infiltration and edema in both the small airways and in the interstitium were also observed in the high dose group. Isolated perfused hearts from mice exposed to 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs had significantly lower cardiac functional recovery, greater infarct size, and higher coronary flow rate than other particle-exposed animals and controls, and also exhibited signs of focal cardiac myofiber degeneration. No particles were detected in heart tissue under light microscopy. This study indicates that while acid functionalization increases the pulmonary toxicity of both UFCB and SWCNTs, this treatment caused cardiac effects only with the AF

  15. Retinoic acid stimulation of human dermal fibroblast proliferation is dependent on suboptimal extracellular Ca2+ concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Varani, J.; Shayevitz, J.; Perry, D.; Mitra, R.S.; Nickoloff, B.J.; Voorhees, J.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Human dermal fibroblasts failed to proliferate when cultured in medium containing 0.15 mmol/l (millimolar) Ca2+ (keratinocyte growth medium (KGM)) but did when the external Ca2+ concentration was raised to 1.4 mmol/l. All-trans retinoic acid (retinoic acid) stimulated proliferation in KGM but did not further stimulate growth in Ca2(+)-supplemented KGM. The ability of retinoic acid to stimulate proliferation was inhibited in KGM prepared without Ca2+ or prepared with 0.03 mmol/l Ca2+ and in KGM treated with 1 mmol/l ethylene-glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetra acetic acid. Using 45Ca2+ to measure Ca2+ influx and efflux, it was found that retinoic acid minimally increased Ca2+ uptake into fibroblasts. In contrast, retinoic acid treatment of fibroblasts that had been pre-equilibrated for 1 day with 45Ca2+ inhibited release of intracellular Ca2+ into the extracellular fluid. Retinoic acid also stimulated 35S-methionine incorporation into trichloroacetic acid-precipitable material but in contrast to its effect on proliferation, stimulation of 35S-methionine incorporation occurred in both high-Ca2+ and low-Ca2+ medium. These data indicate that retinoic acid stimulation of proliferation, but not protein synthesis, is dependent on the concentration of Ca2+ in the extracellular environment.

  16. Annular denuders for use in global climate and stratospheric measurements of acidic gases and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Robert K.

    1991-02-01

    Measurements of acidic and basic gases that coexist with fine particle (less than 2.5 micron) may be useful for determining the impact of these species on global climate changes and determining species that influence stratospheric ozone levels. Annular denuders are well suited for this purpose. A new concentric annular denuder system, consisting of a three channel denuder, a Teflon coated cyclone preseparator, and a multistage filter pack was developed, evaluated, and shown to provide reliable atmospheric measurements of SO2, HNO2, HNO3, NH3, SO4(=), NH4(+), NO3(-), and H(+). For example, the precision of the annular denuder for the ambient measurements of HNO3 and nitrates at concentrations between 0.1 to 3 microgram/cu m was + or - 12 and 16 pct., respectively. The 120 x 25 mm three channel denuder is encased in a stainless steel sheath and has annular spaces that are 1 mm wide. This design was shown to have nearly identical capacity for removal of SO2 as conventional 210 x 25 mm single channel denuder configurations. The cyclone preseparator was designed and tested to have a D sub 50 cutoff diameter of 2.5 micron and minimal retention of HNO3.

  17. Preparation of poly(acrylic acid) particles by dispersion polymerization in an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Minami, Hideto; Kimura, Akira; Kinoshita, Keigo; Okubo, Masayoshi

    2010-05-01

    Poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) particles were successfully prepared by dispersion polymerization of acrylic acid in ionic liquid, N,N-diethyl-N-methyl-N-(2-methoxyethyl)ammonium bis(trifluoro-methanesulfonyl)amide ([DEME][TFSA]) at 70 degrees C with low hydrolysis grade (35.4%) poly(vinyl alcohol) as stabilizer. Interestingly, the PAA particles were easily extracted as particle state with water. Thus, the PAA particles had a cross-linked structure during the polymerization without cross-linker. Moreover, it was also noted that the cross-linking density of the PAA particles could be controlled by thermal treatment at various temperatures in [DEME][TFSA] utilizing the advantages of nonvolatility and high thermal stability of the ionic liquid. PMID:20043688

  18. Uptake of nitric acid by sub-micron-sized ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, O. P.; Cziczo, D. J.; Morgan, A. M.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Niedziela, R. F.

    The uptake of gas phase nitric acid by half-micron-diameter ice crystals has been studied at 230 K by measuring the nitrate content of ice particles which have been exposed to 5 × 10-6 torr of nitric acid in a low temperature flow tube. A cold NaOH-coated denuder is used to distinguish gas-phase nitric acid from adsorbed nitric acid. Ice particle diameters were determined by fitting measured aerosol infrared extinction spectra to spectra calculated via Mie theory, and their number density is measured directly with a CN counter. Under conditions in which the surface is saturated and not all the gas-phase nitric acid adsorbs, the measured uptakes are 1.2 × 1014 molecules/cm² where the surface area is the geometric area of the particles. Within experimental uncertainties, this surface coverage is the same as that measured on thin films of ice formed by freezing liquid water. These results are the first quantitative study of the nitric acid uptake capacity of ice particles, and they provide additional support to the suggestion that ice and snow provide a route for the efficient scavenging of nitric acid from the atmosphere.

  19. Continuous Ethanol Production with a Membrane Bioreactor at High Acetic Acid Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Ylitervo, Päivi; Franzén, Carl Johan; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J.

    2014-01-01

    The release of inhibitory concentrations of acetic acid from lignocellulosic raw materials during hydrolysis is one of the main concerns for 2nd generation ethanol production. The undissociated form of acetic acid can enter the cell by diffusion through the plasma membrane and trigger several toxic effects, such as uncoupling and lowered intracellular pH. The effect of acetic acid on the ethanol production was investigated in continuous cultivations by adding medium containing 2.5 to 20.0 g·L−1 acetic acid at pH 5.0, at a dilution rate of 0.5 h−1. The cultivations were performed at both high (~25 g·L−1) and very high (100–200 g·L−1) yeast concentration by retaining the yeast cells inside the reactor by a cross-flow membrane in a membrane bioreactor. The yeast was able to steadily produce ethanol from 25 g·L−1 sucrose, at volumetric rates of 5–6 g·L−1·h−1 at acetic acid concentrations up to 15.0 g·L−1. However, the yeast continued to produce ethanol also at a concentration of 20 g·L−1 acetic acid but at a declining rate. The study thereby demonstrates the great potential of the membrane bioreactor for improving the robustness of the ethanol production based on lignocellulosic raw materials. PMID:25028956

  20. Dynamics of statistically confident particle sizes and concentrations in blood plasma obtained by the dynamic light scattering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikov, Leonid L.; Kirichenko, Marina N.; Krivokhizha, Svetlana V.; Zaritskiy, Alexander R.

    2015-05-01

    The work is devoted to the study of sizes and concentrations of proteins, and their aggregates in blood plasma samples, using static and dynamic light scattering methods. A new approach is proposed based on multiple repetition of measurements of intensity size distribution and on counting the number of registrations of different sizes, which made it possible to obtain statistically confident particle sizes and concentrations in the blood plasma. It was revealed that statistically confident particle sizes in the blood plasma were stable during 30 h of observations, whereas the concentrations of particles of different sizes varied as a result of redistribution of material between them owing to the protein degradation processes.

  1. [Concentrations and acidity contributions of acetate and formate in precipitation at 14 stations of China].

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-huan; Xu, Xiao-bin; Yu, Xiao-lan; Tang, Jie

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the concentrations of organic acids in precipitation in China and their contributions to the total acidity of precipitation, samples were taken at 14 stations of regional representativeness in 2007 and analyzed for acetate and formate using ion chromatography. In this paper, data of acetate and formate in precipitation at 14 stations are presented, wet depositions of these organic acids are calculated, and contributions of them to the total free acidity (TFA) of precipitation are estimated. Based on the measurements, the mean concentrations of formate at different stations were in the range of 0.96-3.43 micromol/L, and those of acetate in the range of 0-5.13 micromol/L, close to the levels at remote sites in other countries and at the lower ends of concentration ranges from previous measurements in China. Comparisons indicate that the concentrations of the organic acids at remote sites are lower than those at sites in the vicinity of urban areas. The annual wet depositions of formate and acetate were estimated to be in the ranges of 0.38-4.18 mmol/(m2 x a) and 0.06-5.87 mmol/(m2 x a), respectively, with larger depositions in southern China and smaller depositions in northern China. The relative contributions of the two organic acids to the TFA of precipitation were estimated to be in the range of 0.02%-51.6%, with an overall average of 2.95%. This suggests that although acid rain in China is mainly caused by emissions of sulfur and nitrogen oxides, organic acids can significantly contribute to the acidification of precipitation in some regions and during some periods, hence need to be included in observational studies of acid rain. PMID:20527162

  2. Shear Rheology of Suspensions of Porous Zeolite Particles in Concentrated Polymer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Kayode O.; Breedveld, Victor

    2008-07-01

    We present experimental data on the shear rheology of Ultem (polyetherimide)/NMP(l-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone) solutions with and without suspended surface-modified porous/nonporous zeolite (ZSM-5) particles. We found that the porous zeolite suspensions have relative viscosities that significantly exceed the Krieger-Dougherty predictions for hard sphere suspensions. The major origin of this discrepancy is the selective absorption of NMP solvent into the zeolite pores, which raises both the polymer concentration and the particle volume fraction, thus enhancing both the viscosity of the continuous phase Ultem/NMP polymer solution and the particle contribution to the suspension viscosity. Other factors, such as zeolite non-sphericity and specific interactions with Ultem polymer, contribute to the suspension viscosity to a lesser extent. We propose a predictive model for the viscosity of porous zeolite suspensions by incorporating an absorption parameter, α, into the Krieger-Dougherty model. We also propose independent approaches to determine α. The first one is indirect and based on zeolite density/porosity data, assuming that all pores will be filled with solvent. The other method is based on our experimental data, by comparing the viscosity data of porous versus non-porous zeolite suspensions. The different approaches are compared.

  3. The role of dust storms in total atmospheric particle concentrations at two sites in the western U.S.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neff, Jason C.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Munson, Seth M.; Fernandez, Daniel; Belnap, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    Mineral aerosols are produced during the erosion of soils by wind and are a common source of particles (dust) in arid and semiarid regions. The size of these particles varies widely from less than 2 µm to larger particles that can exceed 50 µm in diameter. In this study, we present two continuous records of total suspended particle (TSP) concentrations at sites in Mesa Verde and Canyonlands National Parks in Colorado and Utah, USA, respectively, and compare those values to measurements of fine and coarse particle concentrations made from nearby samplers. Average annual concentrations of TSP at Mesa Verde were 90 µg m−3 in 2011 and at Canyonlands were 171 µg m−3 in 2009, 113 µg m−3 in 2010, and 134 µg m−3 in 2011. In comparison, annual concentrations of fine (diameter of 2.5 µm and below) and coarse (2.5–10 µm diameter) particles at these sites were below 10 µg m−3 in all years. The high concentrations of TSP appear to be the result of regional dust storms with elevated concentrations of particles greater than 10 µm in diameter. These conditions regularly occur from spring through fall with 2 week mean TSP periodically in excess of 200 µg m−3. Measurement of particles on filters indicates that the median particle size varies between approximately 10 µm in winter and 40 µm during the spring. These persistently elevated concentrations of large particles indicate that regional dust emission as dust storms and events are important determinants of air quality in this region.

  4. The role of dust storms in total atmospheric particle concentrations at two sites in the western U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, J. C.; Reynolds, R. L.; Munson, S. M.; Fernandez, D.; Belnap, J.

    2013-10-01

    Mineral aerosols are produced during the erosion of soils by wind and are a common source of particles (dust) in arid and semiarid regions. The size of these particles varies widely from less than 2 µm to larger particles that can exceed 50 µm in diameter. In this study, we present two continuous records of total suspended particle (TSP) concentrations at sites in Mesa Verde and Canyonlands National Parks in Colorado and Utah, USA, respectively, and compare those values to measurements of fine and coarse particle concentrations made from nearby samplers. Average annual concentrations of TSP at Mesa Verde were 90 µg m-3 in 2011 and at Canyonlands were 171 µg m-3 in 2009, 113 µg m-3 in 2010, and 134 µg m-3 in 2011. In comparison, annual concentrations of fine (diameter of 2.5 µm and below) and coarse (2.5-10 µm diameter) particles at these sites were below 10 µg m-3 in all years. The high concentrations of TSP appear to be the result of regional dust storms with elevated concentrations of particles greater than 10 µm in diameter. These conditions regularly occur from spring through fall with 2 week mean TSP periodically in excess of 200 µg m-3. Measurement of particles on filters indicates that the median particle size varies between approximately 10 µm in winter and 40 µm during the spring. These persistently elevated concentrations of large particles indicate that regional dust emission as dust storms and events are important determinants of air quality in this region.

  5. Comprehensive Profiling of Plasma Fatty Acid Concentrations in Young Healthy Canadian Adults

    PubMed Central

    Abdelmagid, Salma A.; Clarke, Shannon E.; Nielsen, Daiva E.; Badawi, Alaa; El-Sohemy, Ahmed; Mutch, David M.; Ma, David W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating fatty acids (FA) are associated with a multitude of chronic diseases. However, a major gap in establishing such relationships is the lack of accepted fatty acid reference ranges representing healthy individuals. Data on validated FA reference ranges would provide a better understanding of study baseline measures and aid in the evaluation and interpretation of pharmaceutical or dietary interventions. Reference ranges for plasma FA levels have been reported in a few small studies and on a limited number of FA. Therefore, we determined the average and percentiles of a broad set of 61 FA (C14 - C24:1) from plasma total lipids from an ethnically diverse population of healthy young Canadian males and females (Total n = 826). Plasma concentrations of some of the major FA ranged from 0.3 to 4.1 mmol/L for palmitic acid, 0.1 to 1.0 mmol/L for stearic acid, 0.03 to 3.2 mmol/L for oleic acid, 0.2 to 5.0 mmol/L for linoleic acid (LA), 12.0 to 186.9 μmol/L for α-linolenic acid, and 7.2 to 237.5 μmol/L for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Males had significantly higher plasma concentrations of γ-linolenic acid (GLA) and n-3 docosapentaenoic acid and lower concentrations of palmitoleic acid, LA and DHA than females. Comparison of FA concentrations between Caucasians, East Asians and South Asians revealed that South Asians had significantly lower levels of palmitoleic acid (p < 0.01) and oleic acid (p = 0.01) while East Asians had lower levels of GLA (p = 0.02) and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (p = 0.03). Overall, these data provide a comprehensive set of quantitative values that profiles a small cohort of Canadians which highlights the utility of establishing validated FA reference ranges that may be used to understand how deficient, suboptimal, or excess amounts of a given FA may be associated with chronic disease. PMID:25675440

  6. Aviation Emissions Impact Ambient Ultrafine Particle Concentrations in the Greater Boston Area.

    PubMed

    Hudda, N; Simon, M C; Zamore, W; Brugge, D; Durant, J L

    2016-08-16

    Ultrafine particles are emitted at high rates by jet aircraft. To determine the possible impacts of aviation activities on ambient ultrafine particle number concentrations (PNCs), we analyzed PNCs measured from 3 months to 3.67 years at three sites within 7.3 km of Logan International Airport (Boston, MA). At sites 4.0 and 7.3 km from the airport, average PNCs were 2- and 1.33-fold higher, respectively, when winds were from the direction of the airport compared to other directions, indicating that aviation impacts on PNC extend many kilometers downwind of Logan airport. Furthermore, PNCs were positively correlated with flight activity after taking meteorology, time of day and week, and traffic volume into account. Also, when winds were from the direction of the airport, PNCs increased with increasing wind speed, suggesting that buoyant aircraft exhaust plumes were the likely source. Concentrations of other pollutants [CO, black carbon (BC), NO, NO2, NOx, SO2, and fine particulate matter (PM2.5)] decreased with increasing wind speed when winds were from the direction of the airport, indicating a different dominant source (likely roadway traffic emissions). Except for oxides of nitrogen, other pollutants were not correlated with flight activity. Our findings point to the need for PNC exposure assessment studies to take aircraft emissions into consideration, particularly in populated areas near airports. PMID:27490267

  7. Mass concentration and mineralogical characteristics of aerosol particles collected at Dunhuang during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z. X.; Cao, J. J.; Li, X. X.; Okuda, T.; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2006-03-01

    Measurements were performed in spring 2001 and 2002 to determine the characteristics of soil dust in the Chinese desert region of Dunhuang, one of the ground sites of the Asia-Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). The mean mass concentrations of total suspended particle matter during the spring of 2001 and 2002 were 317 mu g m(-3) and 307 mu g m(-3) respectively. Eleven dust storm events were observed with a mean aerosol concentration of 1095 mu g m(-3), while the non-dusty days with calm or weak wind speed had a background aerosol loading of 196 mu g m(-3) on average in the springtime. The main minerals detected in the aerosol samples by X-ray diffraction were illite, kaolinite, chlorite, quartz, feldspar, calcite and dolomite. Gypsum, halite and amphibole were also detected in a few samples. The mineralogical data also show that Asian dust is characterized by a kaolinite to chlorite (K/C) ratio lower than 1 whereas Saharan dust exhibits a K/C ratio larger than 2. Air mass back- trajectory analysis show that three families of pathways are associated with the aerosol particle transport to Dunhuang, but these have similar K/C ratios, which further demonstrates that the mineralogical characteristics of Asian dust are different from African dust.

  8. Control of aerosol contaminants in indoor air: combining the particle concentration reduction with microbial inactivation.

    PubMed

    Grinshpun, Sergey A; Adhikari, Atin; Honda, Takeshi; Kim, Ki Youn; Toivola, Mika; Rao, K S Ramchander; Reponen, Tiina

    2007-01-15

    An indoor air purification technique, which combines unipolar ion emission and photocatalytic oxidation (promoted by a specially designed RCI cell), was investigated in two test chambers, 2.75 m3 and 24.3 m3, using nonbiological and biological challenge aerosols. The reduction in particle concentration was measured size selectively in real-time, and the Air Cleaning Factor and the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) were determined. While testing with virions and bacteria, bioaerosol samples were collected and analyzed, and the microorganism survival rate was determined as a function of exposure time. We observed that the aerosol concentration decreased approximately 10 to approximately 100 times more rapidly when the purifier operated as compared to the natural decay. The data suggest that the tested portable unit operating in approximately 25 m3 non-ventilated room is capable to provide CADR-values more than twice as great than the conventional closed-loop HVAC system with a rating 8 filter. The particle removal occurred due to unipolar ion emission, while the inactivation of viable airborne microorganisms was associated with photocatalytic oxidation. Approximately 90% of initially viable MS2 viruses were inactivated resulting from 10 to 60 min exposure to the photocatalytic oxidation. Approximately 75% of viable B. subtilis spores were inactivated in 10 min, and about 90% or greater after 30 min. The biological and chemical mechanisms that led to the inactivation of stress-resistant airborne viruses and bacterial spores were reviewed. PMID:17310729

  9. Middle East measurements of concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles for coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendersky, Sergey; Kopeika, Norman S.; Blaunstein, Natan S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, an extension of the Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) was proposed based on analysis of an extensive series of measurements at the Irish Atlantic Coast and at the French Mediterranean Coast. We confirm the relevance of that work for the distant eastern Meditteranean and extend several coefficients of that coastal model, proposed by Piazzola et al. for the Meditteranean Coast (a form of the Navy Aerosol Model), to midland Middle East coastal environments. This analysis is based on data collected at three different Middle East coastal areas: the Negev Desert (Eilat) Red Sea Coast, the Sea of Galilee (Tiberias) Coast, and the Mediterranean (Haifa) Coast. Aerosol size distributions are compared with those obtained through measurements carried out over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean Coasts, and Mediterranean, and Baltic Seas Coasts. An analysis of these different results allows better understanding of the similarities and differences between different coastal lake, sea, and open ocean zones. It is shown that in the coastal regions in Israel, compared to open ocean and other sea zones, larger differences in aerosol particle concentration are observed. The aerosol particle concentrations and their dependences on wind speed for these coastal zones are analyzed and discussed. We propose to classify the aerosol distribution models to either: 1. a coastal model with marine aerosol domination; 2. a coastal model with continental aerosol domination (referred to as midland coast in this work); or 3. a coastal model with balanced marine and continental conditions.

  10. Determination of kinetic effects on particle size and concentration: instruction for scale up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Lee, Changi; Uehara, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2011-10-01

    Increasing the synthesis scale is one of the most important issues in nanocrystal synthesis. The main difference between small and large reactor is their thermal transfer rate which is reported to have great effects on particle nucleation and growth. In this paper, CdSe Quantum dots synthesis as was used as a model to investigate the heating rate effects in a microreactor system capable of precisely controlling the temperature and heating rate. Results showed that heating rate effects highly depended on the synthesis parameters. For example, in 5% Dodecanamine (DDA) case, there was no heating rate effect; while in the case of 20% DDA case, heating rate could affect both particle size distribution and morphology. Test experiments to demonstrate the up-scalability have been conducted and the results showed that products synthesized by batch reactor were comparable with microreactor products: Batch reactor gave same product when the DDA concentration was 5% but quite different product when the DDA concentration was 20%, compared with microreactor products. The data on the effects of heating rate obtained by this set up have high reliability and enable us to choose the proper method to increase the synthesis scale.

  11. Ultrasonic Method for Concentration and Particle Size Analysis in Dense Coal-water Slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Minghua; Su, Mingxu; Dong, Lili; Shang, Zhitao; Cai, Xiaoshu

    2007-06-01

    The concentration and particle size distribution in particulate two-phase flow are the important parameters in a wide variety of industrial areas. For the purpose of on-line characterizing dense coal-water slurry, ultrasonic methods have many advantages, such as no-dilution, real-time and no-invasion, while light-based techniques are not capable of providing information because optical methods normally require the sample to be diluted. In this paper, the modified Urick equation including temperature modification, which can be used to determine concentration from the measurement of velocity in the coal-water slurry, is evaluated on the basis of model analysis and experiments. Combined with the optimum regulation technique inverse algorithm, the particle size distribution of the coal-water slurry is obtained according to the attenuation prediction of Coupled-phase model plus Bouguer-Lambert-Beer-Law scattering model and experimental attenuation at frequencies ranges from 3MHz to 12MHz. This technique brings the possibility of using ultrasound for on-line measurement of dense slurry.

  12. Enhancing effect of marine oligotrophy on environmental concentrations of particle-reactive trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffree, R.A.; Szymczak, R.

    2000-05-15

    A biogeochemical model has been previously developed that explains the inverse and nonlinear relationship between Po-210 concentration in zooplankton and their biomass, under oligotrophic conditions in French Polynesia. In this study the model structure was reviewed to determine a set of biogeochemical behaviors of Po-210, proposed to be critical to its environmental enhancement under oligotrophy: this set was then used to identify 25 other elements with comparable behaviors to Po-210. Field investigation in the Timor Sea showed that four of these a priori identified elements, viz. Cd, Co, Pb, and Mn as well as Cr and Ni, showed elevated water concentrations with reduced particle removal rates in the euphotic zone, results that are consistent with those previously obtained for Po-210 and the proposed explanatory model. These findings point to the enhanced susceptibility to contamination with particle-reactive elements of oligotrophic marine systems, whose degree and geographic extent may be enhanced by projected increases in sea surface temperatures from global warming.

  13. Body mass index, gestational weight gain and fatty acid concentrations during pregnancy: the Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Vidakovic, Aleksandra Jelena; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Gishti, Olta; Felix, Janine F; Williams, Michelle A; Hofman, Albert; Demmelmair, Hans; Koletzko, Berthold; Tiemeier, Henning; Gaillard, Romy

    2015-11-01

    Obesity during pregnancy may be correlated with an adverse nutritional status affecting pregnancy and offspring outcomes. We examined the associations of prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain with plasma fatty acid concentrations in mid-pregnancy. This study was embedded in a population-based prospective cohort study among 5636 women. We obtained prepregnancy body mass index and maximum weight gain during pregnancy by questionnaires. We measured concentrations of saturated fatty acid (SFA), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA) at a median gestational age of 20.5 (95% range 17.1-24.9) weeks. We used multivariate linear regression models. As compared to normal weight women, obese women had higher total SFA concentrations [difference: 0.10 standard deviation (SD) (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0, 0.19)] and lower total n-3 PUFA concentrations [difference: - 0.11 SD (95% CI - 0.20, - 0.02)]. As compared to women with sufficient gestational weight gain, those with excessive gestational weight gain had higher SFA concentrations [difference: 0.16 SD (95% CI 0.08, 0.25)], MUFA concentrations [difference: 0.16 SD (95% CI 0.08, 0.24)] and n-6 PUFA concentrations [difference: 0.12 SD (95% CI 0.04, 0.21)]. These results were not materially affected by adjustment for maternal characteristics. Our results suggest that obesity and excessive weight gain during pregnancy are associated with an adverse fatty acids profile. Further studies are needed to assess causality and direction of the observed associations. PMID:26666541

  14. Circadian changes in endogenous concentrations of indole-3-acetic acid, melatonin, serotonin, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid in Characeae (Chara australis Brown)

    PubMed Central

    Beilby, Mary J; Turi, Christina E; Baker, Teesha C; Tymm, Fiona JM; Murch, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Giant-celled Characeae (Chara australis Brown), grown for 4 months on 12/12 hr day/night cycle and summer/autumn temperatures, exhibited distinct concentration maxima in auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA), melatonin and serotonin about 4 hr after subjective daybreak. These concentration peaks persisted after 3 day pretreatment in continuous darkness: confirming a circadian rhythm, rather than a response to “light on.” The plants pretreated for 3 d in continuous light exhibited several large IAA concentration maxima throughout the 24 hr. The melatonin and serotonin concentrations decreased and were less synchronized with IAA. Chara plants grown on 9/15 hr day/night cycle for 4 months and winter/spring temperatures contained much smaller concentrations of IAA, melatonin and serotonin. The IAA concentration maxima were observed in subjective dark phase. Serotonin concentration peaks were weakly correlated with those of IAA. Melatonin concentration was low and mostly independent of circadian cycle. The “dark” IAA concentration peaks persisted in plants treated for 3 d in the dark. The plants pretreated for 3 d in the light again developed more IAA concentration peaks. In this case the concentration maxima in melatonin and serotonin became more synchronous with those in IAA. The abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) concentrations were also measured in plants on winter regime. The ABA concentration did not exhibit circadian pattern, while JA concentration peaks were out of phase with those of IAA. The data are discussed in terms of crosstalk between metabolic pathways. PMID:26382914

  15. Characterization and source apportionment of particle number concentration at a semi-urban tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Firoz; Latif, Mohd Talib; Amil, Norhaniza; Juneng, Liew; Mohamad, Noorlin; Nadzir, Mohd Shahrul Mohd; Hoque, Hossain Mohammed Syedul

    2015-09-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) and correlation have been used to study the variability of particle mass and particle number concentrations (PNC) in a tropical semi-urban environment. PNC and mass concentration (diameter in the range of 0.25->32.0 μm) have been measured from 1 February to 26 February 2013 using an in situ Grimm aerosol sampler. We found that the 24-h average total suspended particulates (TSP), particulate matter ≤10 μm (PM10), particulate matter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5) and particulate matter ≤1 μm (PM1) were 14.37 ± 4.43, 14.11 ± 4.39, 12.53 ± 4.13 and 10.53 ± 3.98 μg m(-3), respectively. PNC in the accumulation mode (<500 nm) was the most abundant (at about 99 %). Five principal components (PCs) resulted from the PCA analysis where PC1 (43.8 % variance) predominates with PNC in the fine and sub-microme tre range. PC2, PC3, PC4 and PC5 explain 16.5, 12.4, 6.0 and 5.6 % of the variance to address the coarse, coarser, accumulation and giant fraction of PNC, respectively. Our particle distribution results show good agreement with the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) distribution. PMID:25925145

  16. Effects of varying media, temperature, and growth rates on the intracellular concentrations of yeast amino acids.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Force, E; Benítez, T

    1995-01-01

    Variations of the yeast free amino acid pool under different culture conditions were studied in two Saccharomyces strains, the laboratory haploid strain S288C and the industrial fermentative yeast IFI256. The internal amino acid pool of both strains was measured when grown in laboratory (minimal and complete) versus semiindustrial (molasses with or without added biotin and/or diammonium phosphate) media, in fermentable (glucose, fructose, sucrose) versus respirable (glycerol) carbon sources, in different temperatures (22, 30, and 37 degrees C), pHs (2.0-4.75), and growth rates (0.018-0.24 h-1) in continuous culture, and at different phases of the growth curve in batch culture (lag, exponential, early and late stationary). Results indicated that environmental conditions, particularly the presence of amino acids in the media, enormously influenced the intracellular amino acid concentration. Higher values were detected in molasses than in laboratory media and in fermentable carbon sources (glucose, fructose, sucrose) than in glycerol. Variations in the amino acid pool along the growth curve were greater at 37 degrees C than at other temperatures; in all cases, the highest values were measured at the beginning of the exponential phase. In continuous culture and at different growth rates, intracellular free amino acid concentrations increased by 3-10-fold when the growth rate was lower than 0.05 h-1, representing 20-35% of the total (free plus protein) amino acid content and indicating that amino acid yield was a partly growth-linked parameter. PMID:7654310

  17. Capillary-loaded particle fluid dynamics: effect on estimation of sperm concentration.

    PubMed

    Douglas-Hamilton, Diarmaid H; Smith, Nancy G; Kuster, Christopher E; Vermeiden, Jan P W; Althouse, Gary C

    2005-01-01

    Capillary loaded chambers are frequently used for semen analysis. Poiseuille flow of specimen into these chambers causes migration of suspended particles or cells in a direction transverse to the flow, which results in their preferential accumulation in the Segre-Silberberg (SS) planes. This SS effect depends on the transverse velocity gradient in the laminar flow. For semen analysis in thin capillary-loaded slides, the SS effect can lead to erroneous estimation of sample sperm-cell concentration. To better understand chamber flow dynamics and SS effect significance, we assessed flow uniformity, inflow cell velocity, and results of concentration measurements under different flow conditions for latex bead and porcine and human sperm suspensions. Overall, a concentration peak was present at the meniscus, which continued through chamber loading. High-velocity SS preferred planes, which channeled particles toward the meniscus, were located at the fractional positions of beta = .27 and beta = .73, where beta is the distance from wall to plane normalized to the chamber depth. In computer-automated semen analysis, a standard 20-microm x 18-mm x 6-mm chamber is commonly used, and these studies supported our previously published fluid-flow theory for this type of chamber. Conversely, the SS effect does not appear to have time to develop in the 100-microm-depth hemacytometer, which is deeper than the standard slide, has lower transverse velocity gradient, and consequently does not exhibit concentration variation due to the SS effect. These findings provide further support that hemacytometry, when performed properly, remains the gold standard. Applicability of our findings to routine semen analyses was then tested in 2 studies performed with independent boar studs. These studies compared diluted boar semen concentrations estimated by standard hemacytometry and in capillary-loaded 20-microm slides, using a computer-automated semen-analysis system designed to compensate for the

  18. Water uptake of internally mixed ammonium sulfate and dicarboxylic acid particles probed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, Lorena; Méndez, Estíbaliz; Sánchez, María N.; Castaño, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.

    2013-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds in variable proportions, and the relative amount of organic fraction can influence the hygroscopic properties of the particles. Infrared spectra of submicrometer internally mixed dry particles of ammonium sulfate (AS) with various dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic, maleic, glutaric and pimelic) have been measured in an aerosol flow tube at several solute mass ratios. The spectra show a notable broadening in the bandwidth of sulfate ion ν3 vibrational band near 1115 cm-1 with respect to pure AS. We attribute these perturbations, that are biggest at AS/organic acid mass ratio near unity, to intermolecular interactions between inorganic ions and organic acid molecules in the internally mixed solids. The water uptake behavior of internally mixed particles has been measured by recording the infrared integrated absorbance of liquid water as a function of relative humidity (RH). The amount of water present in the particles prior to deliquescence correlates partially with the water solubilities of the dicarboxylic acids, and also with the relative magnitudes of intermolecular interactions in the internally mixed dry solids. Phase change of ammonium sulfate in the internally mixed particles with RH has been spectrally monitored, and it is shown that water uptaken before full deliquescence produces structural changes in the particles that are revealed by their vibrational spectra.

  19. Isoprene in poplar emissions: effects on new particle formation and OH concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Andres, S.; Bachner, M.; Behnke, K.; Broch, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Kleist, E.; Mentel, T. F.; Rubach, F.; Springer, M.; Steitz, B.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Schnitzler, J.-P.; Wildt, J.

    2011-08-01

    Stress-induced volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from transgenic Grey poplar, modified in isoprene emission potential were used for the investigation of photochemical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Nucleation rates of up to 3600 cm-3 s-1 were observed in our experiments. In poplar, acute ozone stress induces the emission of a wide array of VOCs dominated by sesquiterpenes and aromatic VOCs. Constitutive light-dependent emission of isoprene ranged between 66 nmol m-2 s-1 in non-transgenic controls (wild type WT) and nearly zero (<0.5 nmol m-2 s-1) in isoprene emission-repressed lines (line RA22), respectively. In the presence of isoprene new particle formation was suppressed compared to non-isoprene containing VOC mixtures. Compared to isoprene/monoterpene systems emitted from other plants the suppression of nucleation by isoprene was less effective for the VOC mixture emitted from stressed poplar. This is explained by the observed high efficiency of new particle formation for emissions from stressed poplar. Direct measurements of OH in the reaction chamber revealed that the steady state concentration of OH is lower in the presence of isoprene than in the absence of isoprene, supporting the hypothesis that isoprenes' suppressing effect on nucleation is related to radical chemistry. In order to test whether isoprene contributes to SOA mass formation, fully deuterated isoprene (C5D8) was added to the stress-induced emission profile of an isoprene free poplar mutant. Mass spectral analysis showed that, despite the isoprene-induced suppression of particle formation, fractions of deuterated isoprene were incorporated into the SOA. A fractional mass yield of 2.3 % of isoprene was observed. Future emission changes due to land use and climate change may therefore affect both gas phase oxidation capacity and new particle number formation.

  20. Isoprene in poplar emissions: effects on new particle formation and OH concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Andres, S.; Bachner, M.; Behnke, K.; Broch, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Kleist, E.; Mentel, T. F.; Rubach, F.; Springer, M.; Steitz, B.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Schnitzler, J.-P.; Wildt, J.

    2012-01-01

    Stress-induced volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from transgenic Grey poplar modified in isoprene emission potential were used for the investigation of photochemical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. In poplar, acute ozone stress induces the emission of a wide array of VOCs dominated by sesquiterpenes and aromatic VOCs. Constitutive light-dependent emission of isoprene ranged between 66 nmol m-2 s-1 in non-transgenic controls (wild type WT) and nearly zero (<0.5 nmol m-2 s-1) in isoprene emission-repressed plants (line RA22), respectively. Nucleation rates of up to 3600 cm-3 s-1 were observed in our experiments. In the presence of isoprene new particle formation was suppressed compared to non-isoprene containing VOC mixtures. Compared to isoprene/monoterpene systems emitted from other plants the suppression of nucleation by isoprene was less effective for the VOC mixture emitted from stressed poplar. This is explained by the observed high efficiency of new particle formation for emissions from stressed poplar. Direct measurements of OH in the reaction chamber revealed that the steady state concentration of OH is lower in the presence of isoprene than in the absence of isoprene, supporting the hypothesis that isoprenes' suppressing effect on nucleation is related to radical chemistry. In order to test whether isoprene contributes to SOA mass formation, fully deuterated isoprene (C5D8) was added to the stress-induced emission profile of an isoprene free poplar mutant. Mass spectral analysis showed that, despite the isoprene-induced suppression of particle formation, fractions of deuterated isoprene were incorporated into the SOA. A fractional mass yield of 2.3% of isoprene was observed. Future emission changes due to land use and climate change may therefore affect both gas phase oxidation capacity and new particle number formation.

  1. Source apportionment of ambient particle number concentrations in central Los Angeles using positive matrix factorization (PMF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowlat, Mohammad Hossein; Hasheminassab, Sina; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model (version 5.0) was used to identify and quantify major sources contributing to particulate matter (PM) number concentrations, using PM number size distributions in the range of 13 nm to 10 µm combined with several auxiliary variables, including black carbon (BC), elemental and organic carbon (EC/OC), PM mass concentrations, gaseous pollutants, meteorological, and traffic counts data, collected for about 9 months between August 2014 and 2015 in central Los Angeles, CA. Several parameters, including particle number and volume size distribution profiles, profiles of auxiliary variables, contributions of different factors in different seasons to the total number concentrations, diurnal variations of each of the resolved factors in the cold and warm phases, weekday/weekend analysis for each of the resolved factors, and correlation between auxiliary variables and the relative contribution of each of the resolved factors, were used to identify PM sources. A six-factor solution was identified as the optimum for the aforementioned input data. The resolved factors comprised nucleation, traffic 1, traffic 2 (with a larger mode diameter than traffic 1 factor), urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust. Traffic sources (1 and 2) were the major contributor to PM number concentrations, collectively making up to above 60 % (60.8-68.4 %) of the total number concentrations during the study period. Their contribution was also significantly higher in the cold phase compared to the warm phase. Nucleation was another major factor significantly contributing to the total number concentrations (an overall contribution of 17 %, ranging from 11.7 to 24 %), with a larger contribution during the warm phase than in the cold phase. The other identified factors were urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust, with relative contributions of approximately 12 % (7.4-17.1), 2.1 % (1

  2. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric-acid ion clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new-particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from < 2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3 (0.1 to 56 pptv), and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4] < 0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm/Δ n), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δ m/Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4] > 10. Positively

  3. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-05-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from <2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3, and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4]<0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm / Δn), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δm / Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4]>10. Positively charged clusters grew on

  4. Sex Differences in Long Chain Fatty Acid Utilization and Fatty Acid Binding Protein Concentration in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ockner, Robert K.; Burnett, David A.; Lysenko, Nina; Manning, Joan A.

    1979-01-01

    Female sex and estrogen administration are associated with increased hepatic production of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins; the basis for this has not been fully elucidated. Inasmuch as hepatic lipoprotein production is also influenced by FFA availability and triglyceride biosynthesis, we investigated sex differences in FFA utilization in rat hepatocyte suspensions and in the components of the triglyceride biosynthetic pathway. Isolated adult rat hepatocyte suspensions were incubated with albumin-bound [14C]oleate for up to 15 min. At physiological and low oleate concentrations, cells from females incorporated significantly more 14C into glycerolipids, especially triglycerides, and into oxidation products than did male cells, per milligram cell protein. At 0.44 mM oleate, incorporation into triglycerides in female cells was approximately twice that in male cells. Comparable sex differences were observed in cells from fasted animals and when [14C]-glycerol incorporation was measured. At higher oleate concentrations, i.e., fatty acid:albumin mole ratios in excess of 2:1, these sex differences were no longer demonstrable, suggesting that maximal rates of fatty acid esterification and oxidation were similar in female and male cells. In female and male hepatic microsomes, specific activities of long chain acyl coenzyme A synthetase, phosphatidate phosphohydrolase, and diglyceride acyltransferase were similar, but glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase activity was slightly greater in females at certain substrate concentrations. Microsomal incorporation of [14C]oleate into total glycerolipids was not significantly greater in females. In further contrast to intact cells, microsomal incorporation of [14C]oleate into triglycerides, although significantly greater in female microsomes, accounted for only a small fraction of the fatty acid esterified. The binding affinity and stoichiometry of partially purified female hepatic fatty acid binding protein (FABP) were similar to

  5. Force acting on a dielectric particle in a concentration gradient by ionic concentration polarization under an externally applied DC electric field.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kwan Hyoung; Li, Dongqing

    2005-06-15

    There is a concentration-polarization (CP) force acting on a particle submerged in an electrolyte solution with a concentration (conductivity) gradient under an externally applied DC electric field. This force originates from the two mechanisms: (i) gradient of electrohydrodynamic pressure around the particle developed by the Coulombic force acting on induced free charges by the concentration polarization, and (ii) dielectric force due to nonuniform electric field induced by the conductivity gradient. A perturbation analysis is performed for the electric field, the concentration field, and the hydrodynamic field, under the assumptions of creeping flow and small concentration gradient. The leading order component of this force acting on a dielectric spherical particle is obtained by integrating the Maxwell and the hydrodynamic stress tensors. The analytical results are validated by comparing the surface pressure and the skin friction to those of a numerical analysis. The CP force is proportional to square of the applied electric field, effective for electrically neutral particles, and always directs towards the region of higher ionic concentration. The magnitude of the CP force is compared to that of the electrophoretic and the conventional dielectrophoretic forces. PMID:15897097

  6. Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation: 2. Experimental data and comparison with QC-normalized classical nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duplissy, J.; Merikanto, J.; Franchin, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Kangasluoma, J.; Wimmer, D.; Vuollekoski, H.; Schobesberger, S.; Lehtipalo, K.; Flagan, R. C.; Brus, D.; Donahue, N. M.; Vehkamäki, H.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Barmet, P.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Dunne, E. M.; Guida, R.; Henschel, H.; Junninen, H.; Kirkby, J.; Kürten, A.; Kupc, A.; Määttänen, A.; Makhmutov, V.; Mathot, S.; Nieminen, T.; Onnela, A.; Praplan, A. P.; Riccobono, F.; Rondo, L.; Steiner, G.; Tome, A.; Walther, H.; Baltensperger, U.; Carslaw, K. S.; Dommen, J.; Hansel, A.; Petäjä, T.; Sipilä, M.; Stratmann, F.; Vrtala, A.; Wagner, P. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.; Kulmala, M.

    2016-02-01

    We report comprehensive, demonstrably contaminant-free measurements of binary particle formation rates by sulfuric acid and water for neutral and ion-induced pathways conducted in the European Organization for Nuclear Research Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber. The recently developed Atmospheric Pressure interface-time of flight-mass spectrometer was used to detect contaminants in charged clusters and to identify runs free of any contaminants. Four parameters were varied to cover ambient conditions: sulfuric acid concentration (105 to 109 mol cm-3), relative humidity (11% to 58%), temperature (207 K to 299 K), and total ion concentration (0 to 6800 ions cm-3). Formation rates were directly measured with novel instruments at sizes close to the critical cluster size (mobility size of 1.3 nm to 3.2 nm). We compare our results with predictions from Classical Nucleation Theory normalized by Quantum Chemical calculation (QC-normalized CNT), which is described in a companion paper. The formation rates predicted by the QC-normalized CNT were extended from critical cluster sizes to measured sizes using the UHMA2 sectional particle microphysics model. Our results show, for the first time, good agreement between predicted and measured particle formation rates for the binary (neutral and ion-induced) sulfuric acid-water system. Formation rates increase with RH, sulfuric acid, and ion concentrations and decrease with temperature at fixed RH and sulfuric acid concentration. Under atmospheric conditions, neutral particle formation dominates at low temperatures, while ion-induced particle formation dominates at higher temperatures. The good agreement between the theory and our comprehensive data set gives confidence in using the QC-normalized CNT as a powerful tool to study neutral and ion-induced binary particle formation in atmospheric modeling.

  7. Critical supersaturations for aerosol particles of succinic acid and its salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenningsson, B.; Bilde, M.; Rosenørn, T.; Mønster, J.

    2003-04-01

    Dicarboxylic acids, like succinic acid, have been identified as important water soluble organic compounds in the atmosphere. Salts of carboxylic acids can be formed in the atmosphere in reactions between the acid and an inorganic salt. In this work we have studied the cloud droplet nucleating ability for succinic acid and some of its salts: disodium succinate, diammonium succinate and calcium succinate. A monodisperse aerosol was generated by atomizing a water solution of the compound of interest, drying the particles in diffusion driers and selecting a narrow size range using a differential mobility analyzer. The aerosol was then analyzed using a static thermal gradient cloud condensation nucleus spectrometer (CCNC-100B from the University of Wyoming). A CPC was used to count the number of particles as a reference. For a fixed particle diameter, the supersaturation was scanned to find a steep increase in the fraction of particles that were activated to cloud droplets. This critical supersaturation is compared with theoretical calculations using Köhler theory. Experimental critical supersaturations for succinic acid agree with Köhler theory with a van't Hoff factor of 1, i.e. it activates as if it does not dissociate. For the sodium salt, a van't Hoff factor of 2 fits laboratory data and theoretical calculations.

  8. African Anthropogenic Combustion Emissions: Estimate of Regional Mortality Attributable to Fine Particle Concentrations in 2030

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liousse, C.; Roblou, L.; Assamoi, E.; Criqui, P.; Galy-Lacaux, C.; Rosset, R.

    2014-12-01

    Fossil fuel (traffic, industries) and biofuel (domestic fires) emissions of gases and particles in Africa are expected to significantly increase in the near future, particularly due to rapid growth of African cities and megacities. In this study, we will present the most recent developments of African combustion emission inventories, including African specificities. Indeed, a regional fossil fuel and biofuel inventory for gases and particulates described in Liousse et al. (2014) has been developed for Africa at a resolution of 0.25° x 0.25° for the years 2005 and 2030. For 2005, the original database of Junker and Liousse (2008) was used after modification for updated regional fuel consumption and emission factors. Two prospective inventories for 2030 are derived based on Prospective Outlook on Long-term Energy Systems (POLES) model (Criqui, 2001). The first is a reference scenario (2030ref) with no emission controls and the second is for a "clean" scenario (2030ccc*) including Kyoto policy and African specific emission control. This inventory predicts very large increases of pollutant emissions in 2030 (e.g. contributing to 50% of global anthropogenic organic particles), if no emission regulations are implemented. These inventories have been introduced in RegCM4 model. In this paper we will focus on aerosol modelled concentrations in 2005, 2030ref and 2030ccc*. Spatial distribution of aerosol concentrations will be presented with a zoom at a few urban and rural sites. Finally mortality rates (respiratory, cardiovascular) caused by anthropogenic PM2.5 increase from 2005 to 2030, calculated following Lelieveld et al. (2013), will be shown for each scenarios. To conclude, this paper will discuss the effectiveness of scenarios to reduce emissions, aerosol concentrations and mortality rates, underlining the need for further measurements scheduled in the frame of the new DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions) program.

  9. Inhalation of concentrated ambient air particles exacerbates myocardial ischemia in conscious dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Wellenius, Gregory A; Coull, Brent A; Godleski, John J; Koutrakis, Petros; Okabe, Kazunori; Savage, Sara T; Lawrence, Joy E; Murthy, G G Krishna; Verrier, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    Short-term increases in ambient air pollution have been associated with an increased incidence of acute cardiac events. We assessed the effect of inhalation exposure to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) on myocardial ischemia in a canine model of coronary artery occlusion. Six mongrel dogs underwent thoracotomy for implantation of a vascular occluder around the left anterior descending coronary artery and tracheostomy to facilitate particulate exposure. After recovery (5-13 weeks), pairs of subjects were exposed for 6 hr/day on 3 or 4 consecutive days. Within each pair, one subject was randomly assigned to breathe CAPs on the second exposure day and filtered air at other times. The second subject breathed CAPs on the third exposure day and filtered air at other times. Immediately after each exposure, subjects underwent 5-min coronary artery occlusion. We determined ST-segment elevation, a measure of myocardial ischemia heart rate, and arrhythmia incidence during occlusion from continuous electrocardiograms. Exposure to CAPs (median, 285.7; range, 161.3-957.3 microg/m3) significantly (p = 0.007) enhanced occlusion-induced peak ST-segment elevation in precordial leads V4 (9.4 +/- 1.7 vs. 6.2 +/- 0.9 mm, CAPs vs. filtered air, respectively) and V5 (9.2 +/- 1.3 vs. 7.5 +/- 0.9 mm). ST-segment elevation was significantly correlated with the silicon concentration of the particles and other crustal elements possibly associated with urban street dust (p = 0.003 for Si). No associations were found with CAPs mass or number concentrations. Heart rate was not affected by CAPs exposure. These results suggest that exacerbation of myocardial ischemia during coronary artery occlusion may be an important mechanism of environmentally related acute cardiac events. PMID:12676590

  10. Raman scattering investigations of the interaction of a COV with pure and acid doped ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facq, S.; Oancea, A.; Focsa, C.; Chazallon, B.

    2009-04-01

    Ice present in polar stratosphere is as well a common component of the troposphere, particularly in cirrus clouds widespread in tropopause and upper troposphere region. With water droplets, ice constitutes the condensed matter that can interact with atmospheric trace gases via many different trapping processes (co-deposition i.e; incorporation during growing ice conditions, adsorption, freezing etc). The incorporation of trace gases in ice surface/volume can both affect the atmospheric chemistry and the ice structure and reactivity. This can therefore modify the nature and composition of the incorporated species in ice, or in the gas phase. Recently, field measurements have demonstrated the presence of nitric acid in ice particles from cirrus clouds(1,2) (concentration between 0.63 wt% and 2.5 wt %). Moreover, laboratory experiments have shown that the uptake of atmospheric trace gases can be enhanced up to 1 or 2 orders of magnitude in these doped ice particles. Among trace gases capable to interact with atmospheric condensed matter figure volatile organic compounds such as aldehydes, ketones and alcohols (ex: ethanol and methanol). They play an important role in the upper troposphere (3,4) and snowpack chemistry (5) as they can be easily photolysed, producing free radicals and so influence the oxidizing capacity and the ozone-budget of the atmosphere (3,4). The temperature range at which these physico-chemical processes occur extents between ~ 190 K and 273K. Interaction between ice and trace gases are therefore largely dependent on the ice surface properties as well as on the phase formation dynamic (crystalline or not). This study aims to examine and characterize the incorporation of a COV (ex: ethanol), at the surface or in the volume of ice formed by different growth mechanisms (vapour deposition or droplets freezing). Vibrational spectra of water OH and ethanol CH-spectral regions are analysed using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy at different temperatures

  11. Concentration methods for high-resolution THz spectroscopy of nucleic-acid biomolecules and crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. R.; Zhang, W.; Mendoza, E. A.; Kuznetsova, Y.; Brueck, S. R. J.; Rahman, M.; Norton, M. L.

    2012-03-01

    Biomolecules can exhibit low-lying vibrational modes in the THz region which are detectable in transmission given a strong molecular dipole moment and optical depth, and a spectrometer of adequate sensitivity. The nucleic acids are particularly interesting because of applications such as label-free gene assay, bio-agent detection, etc. However for nucleic acids, sample preparation and THz coupling are of paramount importance because of the strong absorption by liquid water and the small concentration of molecules present in physiological solutions. Concentration methods become necessary to make the THz vibrational modes detectable, either by concentrating the nucleic-acid sample itself in a small volume but large area, or by concentrating the THz radiation down to the volume of the sample. This paper summarizes one type of the first method: nanofluidic channel arrays for biological nucleic acids; and two types of the second method: (1) a circular-waveguide pinhole, and (2) a circular-waveguide, conical-horn coupling structure, both for DNA crystals. The first method has been demonstrated on a very short artificial nucleic acid [small-interfering (si) RNA (17-to-25 bp)] and a much longer, biological molecule [Lambda-phage DNA (48.5 kbp)]. The second method has been demonstrated on small (~100 micron) single crystals of DNA grown by the sitting-drop method.

  12. Perfluoroalkyl Acid Concentrations in Blood Samples Subjected to Transportation and Processing Delay

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Cathrine Carlsen; Henriksen, Tine Brink; Bossi, Rossana; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Fuglsang, Jens; Olsen, Jørn; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    Background In studies of perfluoroalkyl acids, the validity and comparability of measured concentrations may be affected by differences in the handling of biospecimens. We aimed to investigate whether measured plasma levels of perfluoroalkyl acids differed between blood samples subjected to delay and transportation prior to processing and samples with immediate processing and freezing. Methods Pregnant women recruited at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark, (n = 88) provided paired blood samples. For each pair of samples, one was immediately processed and plasma was frozen, and the other was delayed and transported as whole blood before processing and freezing of plasma (similar to the Danish National Birth Cohort). We measured 12 perfluoroalkyl acids and present results for compounds with more than 50% of samples above the lower limit of quantification. Results For samples taken in the winter, relative differences between the paired samples ranged between -77 and +38% for individual perfluoroalkyl acids. In most cases concentrations were lower in the delayed and transported samples, e.g. the relative difference was -29% (95% confidence interval -30; -27) for perfluorooctane sulfonate. For perfluorooctanoate there was no difference between the two setups [corresponding estimate 1% (0, 3)]. Differences were negligible in the summer for all compounds. Conclusions Transport of blood samples and processing delay, similar to conditions applied in some large, population-based studies, may affect measured perfluoroalkyl acid concentrations, mainly when outdoor temperatures are low. Attention to processing conditions is needed in studies of perfluoroalkyl acid exposure in humans. PMID:26356420

  13. PARTICLE CONCENTRATIONS IN INNER-CITY HOMES OF CHILDREN WITH ASTHMA: THE EFFECTS OF SMOKING, COOKING, AND OUTDOOR POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inner-city children have high rates of asthma. Exposures to particles, including allergens, may cause or exacerbate asthma symptoms. As part of an epidemiologic study of inner-city children with asthma, continuous (10-min average) measurements of particle concentrations were made...

  14. Primary Accretion and Turbulent Cascades: Scale-Dependence of Particle Concentration Multiplier Probability Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Weston, B.; Shariff, K.

    2013-10-01

    Primitive bodies with 10s-100s of km diameter (or even larger) may form directly from small nebula constituents, bypassing the step-by-step “incremental growth” that faces a variety of barriers at cm, m, and even 1-10km sizes. In the scenario of Cuzzi et al (Icarus 2010 and LPSC 2012; see also Chambers Icarus 2010) the immediate precursors of 10-100km diameter asteroid formation are dense clumps of chondrule-(mm-) size objects. These predictions utilize a so-called cascade model, which is popular in turbulence studies. One of its usual assumptions is that certain statistical properties of the process (the so-called multiplier pdfs p(m)) are scale-independent within a cascade of energy from large eddy scales to smaller scales. In similar analyses, Pan et al (2011 ApJ) found discrepancies with results of Cuzzi and coworkers; one possibility was that p(m) for particle concentration is not scale-independent. To assess the situation we have analyzed recent 3D direct numerical simulations of particles in turbulence covering a much wider range of scales than analyzed by either Cuzzi and coworkers or by Pan and coworkers (see Bec et al 2010, J. Flu. Mech 646, 527). We calculated p(m) at scales ranging from 45-1024η where η is the Kolmogorov scale, for both particles with a range of stopping times spanning the optimum value, and for energy dissipation in the fluid. For comparison, the p(m) for dissipation have been observed to be scale-independent in atmospheric flows (at much larger Reynolds number) for scales of at least 30-3000η. We found that, in the numerical simulations, the multiplier distributions for both particle concentration and fluid dissipation are as expected at scales of tens of η, but both become narrower and less intermittent at larger scales. This is consistent with observations of atmospheric flows showing scale independence to >3000η if scale-free behavior is established only after some number 10 of large-scale bifurcations (at scales perhaps

  15. Concentration levels and source apportionment of ultrafine particles in road microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyropoulos, G.; Samara, C.; Voutsa, D.; Kouras, A.; Manoli, E.; Voliotis, A.; Tsakis, A.; Chasapidis, L.; Konstandopoulos, A.; Eleftheriadis, K.

    2016-03-01

    A mobile laboratory unit (MOBILAB) with on-board instrumentation (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer, SMPS; Ambient NOx analyzer) was used to measure size-resolved particle number concentrations (PNCs) of quasi-ultrafine particles (UFPs, 9-372 nm), along with NOx, in road microenvironments. On-road measurements were carried out in and around a large Greek urban agglomeration, the Thessaloniki Metropolitan Area (TMA). Two 2-week measurement campaigns were conducted during the warm period of 2011 and the cold period of 2012. During each sampling campaign, MOBILAB was driven through a 5-day inner-city route and a second 5-day external route covering in total a wide range of districts (urban, urban background, industrial and residential), and road types (major and minor urban roads, freeways, arterial and interurban roads). All routes were conducted during working days, in morning and in afternoon hours under real-world traffic conditions. Spatial classification of MOBILAB measurements involved the assignment of measurement points to location bins defined by the aspect ratio of adjacent urban street canyons (USCs). Source apportionment was further carried out, by applying Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to particle size distribution data. Apportioned PMF factors were interpreted, by employing a two-step methodology, which involved (a) statistical association of PMF factor contributions with 12 h air-mass back-trajectories ending at the TMA during MOBILAB measurements, and (b) Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) using PMF factor contributions as the dependent variables, while relative humidity, solar radiation flux, and vehicle speed were used as the independent variables. The applied data analysis showed that low-speed cruise and high-load engine operation modes are the two dominant sources of UFPs in most of the road microenvironments in the TMA, with significant contributions from background photochemical processes during the warm period, explaining the reversed

  16. Preparation of complex nano-particles based on alginic acid/poly[(2-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate] and a drug vehicle for doxorubicin release controlled by ionic strength.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hong; Ni, Caihua; Zhang, Liping

    2012-01-23

    Monodispersed complex nano-particles were synthesized simply by mixing alginic acid (ALG-H) with poly[(2-dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate] (PDEMA) in pure water without any surfactants or additives. The structure and properties of the nano-particles were extensively studied. The surface charges and average sizes of the nano-particles were varied with the composition of ALG-H and PDEMA. The nano-particles were formed through electrostatic attraction force, and they were very stable in pure water, but dissociated in salt solutions. An anticancer drug (doxorubicin) was loaded in the nano-particles and released in different saline solutions. The release profiles revealed that the drug release could be controlled by adjusting the pH and salt concentrations. The nano-particles displayed apparent advantages such as simple preparation process, low cost, free of organic solvents, size controllable, biodegradable and biocompatible. PMID:22079138

  17. Uncoupling effect of fatty acids on heart muscle mitochondria and submitochondrial particles.

    PubMed

    Dedukhova, V I; Mokhova, E N; Skulachev, V P; Starkov, A A; Arrigoni-Martelli, E; Bobyleva, V A

    1991-12-16

    The effect of ATP/ADP-antiporter inhibitors on palmitate-induced uncoupling was studied in heart muscle mitochondria and inside-out submitochondrial particles. In both systems palmitate is found to decrease the respiration-generated membrane potential. In mitochondria, this effect is specifically abolished by carboxyatractylate (CAtr) a non-penetrating inhibitor of antiporter. In submitochondrial particles, CAtr does not abolish the palmitate-induced potential decrease. At the same time, bongkrekic acid, a penetrating inhibitor of the antiporter, suppresses the palmitate effect on the potential both in mitochondria and particles. Palmitoyl-CoA which is known to inhibit the antiporter in mitochondria as well as in particles decreases the palmitate uncoupling efficiency in both these systems. These data are in agreement with the hypothesis that the ATP/ADP-antiporter is involved in the action of free fatty acids as natural uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:1765167

  18. Turbulent Concentration of mm-Size Particles in the Protoplanetary Nebula: Scale-Dependent Cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Hartlep, T.

    2015-01-01

    The initial accretion of primitive bodies (here, asteroids in particular) from freely-floating nebula particles remains problematic. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" (or even a mm-to-cm-size barrier) in turbulent nebulae, making the preconditions for so-called "streaming instabilities" difficult to achieve even for so-called "lucky" particles. Even if growth by sticking could somehow breach the meter size barrier, turbulent nebulae present further obstacles through the 1-10km size range. On the other hand, nonturbulent nebulae form large asteroids too quickly to explain long spreads in formation times, or the dearth of melted asteroids. Theoretical understanding of nebula turbulence is itself in flux; recent models of MRI (magnetically-driven) turbulence favor low-or- no-turbulence environments, but purely hydrodynamic turbulence is making a comeback, with two recently discovered mechanisms generating robust turbulence which do not rely on magnetic fields at all. An important clue regarding planetesimal formation is an apparent 100km diameter peak in the pre-depletion, pre-erosion mass distribution of asteroids; scenarios leading directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects of this size, which avoid the problematic m-km size range, could be called "leapfrog" scenarios. The leapfrog scenario we have studied in detail involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in turbulence, which can under certain conditions shrink inexorably on 100-1000 orbit timescales and form 10-100km diameter sandpile planetesimals. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles. Thus, while they are arcane, turbulent concentration models acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. The typical sizes of planetesimals and the rate of their formation can be

  19. A Stochastic Framework For Sediment Concentration Estimation By Accounting Random Arrival Processes Of Incoming Particles Into Receiving Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.; Hung, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    This study attempts to apply queueing theory to develop a stochastic framework that could account for the random-sized batch arrivals of incoming sediment particles into receiving waters. Sediment particles, control volume, mechanics of sediment transport (such as mechanics of suspension, deposition and resuspension) are treated as the customers, service facility and the server respectively in queueing theory. In the framework, the stochastic diffusion particle tracking model (SD-PTM) and resuspension of particles are included to simulate the random transport trajectories of suspended particles. The most distinguished characteristic of queueing theory is that customers come to the service facility in a random manner. In analogy to sediment transport, this characteristic is adopted to model the random-sized batch arrival process of sediment particles including the random occurrences and random magnitude of incoming sediment particles. The random occurrences of arrivals are simulated by Poisson process while the number of sediment particles in each arrival can be simulated by a binominal distribution. Simulations of random arrivals and random magnitude are proposed individually to compare with the random-sized batch arrival simulations. Simulation results are a probabilistic description for discrete sediment transport through ensemble statistics (i.e. ensemble means and ensemble variances) of sediment concentrations and transport rates. Results reveal the different mechanisms of incoming particles will result in differences in the ensemble variances of concentrations and transport rates under the same mean incoming rate of sediment particles.

  20. Acid dissolution experiments - Carbonates and the 6.8-micrometer bands in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandford, S. A.

    1986-03-01

    A chemical dissolution experiment on an interplanetary dust particle (IDP) showed that carbonates, not acid-insoluble organic compounds, were responsible for virtually all the absorption at 6.8 micrometers seen in the infrared spectra of this particle. The IDP examined had an infrared spectrum characteristic of layer-lattice silicates and belongs to a class of IDP's whose spectra resemble those of protostellar objects like W33 A, which also exhibit a band at 6.8 micrometers.

  1. Size Distribution Studies on Sulfuric Acid-Water Particles in a Photolytic Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, H. U.; Kunz, J. C.; Hanson, D. R.; Thao, S.; Vences, J.

    2015-12-01

    The size distribution of particles composed of sulfuric acid and water were measured in a Photolytic cylindrical Flow Reactor (PhoFR, inner diameter 5 cm, length ~ 100 cm). In the reactor, nitrous acid, water and sulfur dioxide gases along with ultraviolet light produced sulfuric acid. The particles formed from these vapors were detected with a scanning mobility particle spectrometer equipped with a diethylene glycol condensation particle counter (Jiang et al. 2011). For a set of standard conditions, particles attained a log-normal distribution with a peak diameter of 6 nm, and a total number of about 3x105 cm-3. The distributions show that ~70 % of the particles are between 4 and 8 nm diameter (lnσ ~ 0.37). These standard conditions are: 296 K, 25% relative humidity, total flow = 3 sLpm, ~10 ppbv HONO, SO2 in excess. With variations of relative humidity, the total particle number varied strongly, with a power relationship of ~3.5, and the size distributions showed a slight increase in peak diameter with relative humidity, increasing about 1 nm from 8 to 33 % relative humidity. Variations of HONO at a constant light intensity (wavelength of ~ 360 nm) were performed and particle size and total number changed dramatically. Size distributions also changed drastically with variations of light intensity, accomplished by turning on/off some of the black light flourescent bulbs that illuminated the flow reactor. Comparisons of these size distributions to recently published nucleation experiments (e.g. Zollner et al., Glasoe et al.) as well as to simulations of PhoFR reveal important details about the levels of sulfuric acid present in PhoFR as well as possible base contaminants.

  2. The effects of vehicle emissions and nucleation events on vertical particle concentration profiles around urban office buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, T. N.; He, C.; Morawska, L.; Knibbs, L. D.; Falk, M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite its role in determining both indoor and outdoor human exposure to anthropogenic particles, there is limited information describing vertical profiles of particle concentrations in urban environments, especially for ultrafine particles. Furthermore, the results of the few studies performed have been inconsistent. As such this study aimed to assess the influence of vehicle emissions and nucleation formation on particle concentrations (PN and PM2.5) at different heights around three urban office buildings located next to busy roads in Brisbane, Australia, and place these results in the broader context of the existing literature. Two sets of instruments were used to simultaneously measure PN size distribution, PN and PM2.5 concentrations, respectively, for up to three weeks each at three office buildings. The results showed that both PN and PM2.5 concentrations around building envelope were influenced by vehicle emissions and new particle formation, and that they exhibited variability across the three different office buildings. During the nucleation event, PN concentrations increased (21-46%), while PM2.5 concentrations decreased (36-52%) with height at all three buildings. This study has shown an underappreciated role of nucleation in producing particles that can affect large numbers of people, due to the high density and occupancy of urban office buildings and the fact that the vast majority of people's time is spent indoors. These findings highlight important new information related to the previously overlooked role of particle formation in the urban atmosphere and its potential effects on selection of air intake locations and appropriate filter types when designing or upgrading mechanical ventilation systems in urban office buildings. The results also serve to better define particle behaviour and variability around building envelopes, which has implications for studies of both human exposure and particle dynamics.

  3. Products of the radical initiated oxidation of model solid and liquid organic acid particles in simulated "clean" and "polluted" environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum, L. H.; Smith, G. D.

    2009-05-01

    Using a flow tube reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer, the Cl-initiated oxidation of solid and supercooled liquid organic acid particles were investigated at 293 K. In creating aerosols of species which are able to be supercooled or solid at room temperature, it is possible to distinguish the effect of phase on particle reactivity and product formation. In a clean atmosphere, where there are negligible concentrations of NOx, the primary fate of peroxy radicals (formed from H-abstraction by Cl and OH radicals in the presence of O2) are their reactions to form ketone and alcohol products. These products are then able to undergo further oxidation to form multiply oxidized products. The formation of low-molecular weight volatile species may also be important in the oxidative aging of organic aerosols, however neither the mechanism of their formation nor their formation yields are well understood. We have shown that, for equivalent Cl exposures, more multiply-oxidized species as well as more low-molecular-weight species were created from the oxidation of solid particles than from liquid particles. The findings from these studies suggest that slower diffusion of the oxidation products in solid particles confines them to the surface where they continue to react with Cl radicals producing more-highly- functionalized products which may decompose more readily. By introducing nitric oxide to the flow tube reaction system, we show that in a polluted atmosphere, where NOx is present in significant concentrations, organic nitrate formation may become important on the surface of solid particles but not liquid particles as the RO2 are confined to the surface of solid particles (causing a enhanced localized concentration of RO2) where they may then react with ambient nitric oxide through the reaction RO2 + NO → RO2NO* → RONO2. These experiments of these model systems indicate that particle phase could be important in determining how organic aerosols

  4. Concentrated ambient ultrafine particle exposure induces cardiac change in young healthy volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to ambient ultrafine particles has been associated with cardiopulmonary toxicity and mortality. Adverse effects specifically linked to ultrafine particles include loss of sympathovagal balance and altered hemostasis. To characterize the effects of ultrafine particles in ...

  5. Osmotic-pressure-controlled concentration of colloidal particles in thin-shelled capsules.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Park, Jin-Gyu; Choi, Tae Min; Manoharan, Vinothan N; Weitz, David A

    2014-01-01

    Colloidal crystals are promising structures for photonic applications requiring dynamic control over optical properties. However, for ease of processing and reconfigurability, the crystals should be encapsulated to form 'ink' capsules rather than confined in a thin film. Here we demonstrate a class of encapsulated colloidal photonic structures whose optical properties can be controlled through osmotic pressure. The ordering and separation of the particles within the microfluidically created capsules can be tuned by changing the colloidal concentration through osmotic pressure-induced control of the size of the individual capsules, modulating photonic stop band. The rubber capsules exhibit a reversible change in the diffracted colour, depending on osmotic pressure, a property we call osmochromaticity. The high encapsulation efficiency and capsule uniformity of this microfluidic approach, combined with the highly reconfigurable shapes and the broad control over photonic properties, make this class of structures particularly suitable for photonic applications such as electronic inks and reflective displays. PMID:24394965

  6. Osmotic-pressure-controlled concentration of colloidal particles in thin-shelled capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Shin-Hyun; Park, Jin-Gyu; Choi, Tae Min; Manoharan, Vinothan N.; Weitz, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Colloidal crystals are promising structures for photonic applications requiring dynamic control over optical properties. However, for ease of processing and reconfigurability, the crystals should be encapsulated to form ‘ink’ capsules rather than confined in a thin film. Here we demonstrate a class of encapsulated colloidal photonic structures whose optical properties can be controlled through osmotic pressure. The ordering and separation of the particles within the microfluidically created capsules can be tuned by changing the colloidal concentration through osmotic pressure-induced control of the size of the individual capsules, modulating photonic stop band. The rubber capsules exhibit a reversible change in the diffracted colour, depending on osmotic pressure, a property we call osmochromaticity. The high encapsulation efficiency and capsule uniformity of this microfluidic approach, combined with the highly reconfigurable shapes and the broad control over photonic properties, make this class of structures particularly suitable for photonic applications such as electronic inks and reflective displays.

  7. High concentrations of biological aerosol particles and ice nuclei during and after rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. Alex; Pöhlker, Christopher; Prenni, Anthony; DeMott, Paul; Mason, Ryan; Robinson, Niall; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Tobo, Yutaka; Després, Viviane; Garcia, Elvin; Gochis, David; Sinha, Bärbel; Day, Douglas; Andreae, Meinrat; Jimenez, Jose; Gallagher, Martin; Kreidenweis, Sonia; Bertram, Allan; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Bioaerosols are relevant for public health and may play an important role in the climate system, but their atmospheric abundance, properties and sources are not well understood. Here we show that the concentration of airborne biological particles in a forest ecosystem increases dramatically during rain and that bioparticles are closely correlated with atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). The greatest increase of bioparticles and IN occurred in the size range of 2-6 µm, which is characteristic for bacterial aggregates and fungal spores. By DNA analysis we found high diversities of airborne bacteria and fungi, including human and plant pathogens (mildew, smut and rust fungi, molds, Enterobacteraceae, Pseudomonadaceae). In addition to known bacterial and fungal IN (Pseudomonas sp., Fusarium sporotrichioides), we discovered two species of IN-active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators (Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum). Our findings suggest that atmospheric bioaerosols, IN and rainfall are more tightly coupled than previously assumed.

  8. High concentrations of biological aerosol particles and ice nuclei during and after rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Pöhlker, C.; Prenni, A. J.; DeMott, P. J.; Mason, R. H.; Robinson, N. H.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Tobo, Y.; Després, V. R.; Garcia, E.; Gochis, D. J.; Harris, E.; Müller-Germann, I.; Ruzene, C.; Schmer, B.; Sinha, B.; Day, D. A.; Andreae, M. O.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gallagher, M.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Bertram, A. K.; Pöschl, U.

    2013-01-01

    Bioaerosols are relevant for public health and may play an important role in the climate system, but their atmospheric abundance, properties and sources are not well understood. Here we show that the concentration of airborne biological particles in a forest ecosystem increases dramatically during rain and that bioparticles are closely correlated with atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). The greatest increase of bioparticles and IN occurred in the size range of 2-6 μm, which is characteristic for bacterial aggregates and fungal spores. By DNA analysis we found high diversities of airborne bacteria and fungi, including human and plant pathogens (mildew, smut and rust fungi, molds, Enterobacteraceae, Pseudomonadaceae). In addition to known bacterial and fungal IN (Pseudomonas sp., Fusarium sporotrichioides), we discovered two species of IN-active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators (Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum). Our findings suggest that atmospheric bioaerosols, IN and rainfall are more tightly coupled than previously assumed.

  9. Salicylic acid induces apoptosis in colon carcinoma cells grown in-vitro: Influence of oxygen and salicylic acid concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Zitta, Karina; Meybohm, Patrick; Bein, Berthold; Huang, Ying; Heinrich, Christin; Scholz, Jens; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2012-04-15

    In solid tumors the hypoxic environment can promote tumor progression and resistance to therapy. Recently, acetylsalicylic acid a major component of analgesic drugs and its metabolite salicylic acid (SA) have been shown to reduce the risk of colon cancer, but the mechanisms of action remain still unclear. Here we elucidate the effects of physiologically relevant concentrations of SA on colon carcinoma cells (CaCo-2) grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Western blotting, caspase-3/7 apoptosis assays, MTS cell-proliferation assays, LDH cytotoxicity assays and hydrogen peroxide measurements were performed to investigate the effects of 1 and 10 {mu}M SA on CaCo-2 cells grown under normoxic conditions and cells exposed to hypoxia. Under normoxic conditions, SA did not influence cell proliferation or LDH release of CaCo-2 cells. However, caspase-3/7 activity was significantly increased. Under hypoxia, cell proliferation was reduced and LDH release and caspase-3/7 activities were increased. None of these parameters was altered by the addition of SA under hypoxic conditions. Hypoxia increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations 300-fold and SA significantly augmented the release of hydrogen peroxide under normoxic, but not under hypoxic conditions. Phosphorylation of the pro-survival kinases akt and erk1/2 was not changed by SA under hypoxic conditions, whereas under normoxia SA reduced phosphorylation of erk1/2 after 2 hours. We conclude that in colon carcinoma cells effects of SA on apoptosis and cellular signaling are dependent on the availability of oxygen. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of salicylic acid on colon carcinoma cells grown under normoxic and hypoxic conditions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid increases caspase-3/7 activity and hydrogen peroxide release under normoxia Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid decreases pro-survival erk-1/2 phosphorylation under normoxia Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Salicylic acid does

  10. Strategies for testing the irritation-signaling model for chronic lung effects of fine acid particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hattis, D.; Abdollahzadeh, S.; Franklin, C.A. )

    1990-03-01

    The irritation signaling model proposed that a long term contribution to chronic bronchitis might result from the repeated delivery of signals resulting from temporary localized acidification of the bronchial epithelium by the action of individual particles. This led to a prediction that the effectiveness of particles in inducing changes in mucus secreting cell numbers/types should depend on the number of particles deposited that contained a particular amount of acid--implying that particles below a certain size cutoff (and therefore lacking a minimum amount of acid) should be ineffective; and that particle potency per unit weight should be greatest at the cutoff and decline strongly above the cutoff. Since the development of this hypothesis both epidemiological observations and some experimental studies have tended to reinforce the notion that acid particles can make a contribution to relatively long lasting bronchitic-like changes, and enhance the desirability of more direct testing of the model. In this paper we develop a general theoretical framework for the contributions of environmental agents to chronic obstructive lung disease, and a series of alternative hypotheses against which the predictions of the irritant signaling model can be compared. Based on this, we suggest a research program that could be used to further develop and test the model and reasonable alternatives. 82 references.

  11. Post-Bariatric Surgery Changes in Quinolinic and Xanthurenic Acid Concentrations Are Associated with Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Pigeyre, Marie; Caiazzo, Robert; Raverdy, Violeta; Verkindt, Hélène; Leloire, Audrey; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Yengo, Loïc; Allorge, Delphine; Froguel, Philippe; Pattou, François

    2016-01-01

    Background An increase of plasma kynurenine concentrations, potentially bioactive metabolites of tryptophan, was found in subjects with obesity, resulting from low-grade inflammation of the white adipose tissue. Bariatric surgery decreases low-grade inflammation associated with obesity and improves glucose control. Objective Our goal was to determine the concentrations of all kynurenine metabolites after bariatric surgery and whether they were correlated with glucose control improvement. Design Kynurenine metabolite concentrations, analysed by liquid or gas chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, circulating inflammatory markers, metabolic traits, and BMI were measured before and one year after bariatric surgery in 44 normoglycemic and 47 diabetic women with obesity. Associations between changes in kynurenine metabolites concentrations and in glucose control and metabolic traits were analysed between baseline and twelve months after surgery. Results Tryptophan and kynurenine metabolite concentrations were significantly decreased one year after bariatric surgery and were correlated with the decrease of the usCRP in both groups. Among all the kynurenine metabolites evaluated, only quinolinic acid and xanthurenic acid were significantly associated with glucose control improvement. The one year delta of quinolinic acid concentrations was negatively associated with the delta of fasting glucose (p = 0.019) and HbA1c (p = 0.014), whereas the delta of xanthurenic acid was positively associated with the delta of insulin sensitivity index (p = 0.0018). Conclusion Bariatric surgery has induced a global down-regulation of kynurenine metabolites, associated with weight loss. Our results suggest that, since kynurenine monoxygenase diverts the kynurenine pathway toward the synthesis of xanthurenic acid, its inhibition may also contribute to glucose homeostasis. PMID:27327770

  12. Concentration and particle size of airborne toxic algae (brevetoxin) derived from ocean red tide events.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; McDonald, Jacob D; Kracko, Dean; Irvin, C Mitch; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H; Henry, Michael S; Bourdelaisa, Andrea; Naar, Jerome; Baden, Daniel G

    2005-05-15

    Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico are formed by blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces brevetoxins (PbTx). Brevetoxins can be transferred from water to air in the wind-powered whitecapped waves during red tide episodes. Inhalation exposure to marine aerosol containing PbTx causes respiratory problems. A liquid chromatograph/ tandem mass spectrometric method was developed for the detection and quantitation of several PbTxs in ambient samples collected during red tide events. This method was complemented by a previously developed antibody assay that analyzes the entire class of PbTx compounds. The method showed good linearity, accuracy, and reproducibility, allowing quantitation of PbTx compounds in the 10 pg/m3 range. Air concentrations of PbTxs and brevenal for individual samples ranged from 0.01 to 80 ng/m3. The particle size showed a single mode with a mass median diameter between 6 and 10 microm, which was consistent for all of the PbTx species that were measured. Our results imply that individual PbTxs were from the same marine aerosol or from marine aerosol that was produced from the same process. The particle size indicated the likelihood of high deposition efficiency in the respiratory tract with the majority of aerosol deposited in the upper airways and small but not insignificant deposition in the lower airways. PMID:15954221

  13. Comparison of Satellite Observations of Aerosol Optical Depth to Surface Monitor Fine Particle Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Mary M.; AlSaadi, Jassim A.; Neil, Doreen O.; Pierce, Robert B.; Pippin, Margartet R.; Roell, Marilee M.; Kittaka, Chieko; Szykman, James J.

    2004-01-01

    Under NASA's Earth Science Applications Program, the Infusing satellite Data into Environmental Applications (IDEA) project examined the relationship between satellite observations and surface monitors of air pollutants to facilitate a more capable and integrated observing network. This report provides a comparison of satellite aerosol optical depth to surface monitor fine particle concentration observations for the month of September 2003 at more than 300 individual locations in the continental US. During September 2003, IDEA provided prototype, near real-time data-fusion products to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) directed toward improving the accuracy of EPA s next-day Air Quality Index (AQI) forecasts. Researchers from NASA Langley Research Center and EPA used data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument combined with EPA ground network data to create a NASA-data-enhanced Forecast Tool. Air quality forecasters used this tool to prepare their forecasts of particle pollution, or particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), for the next-day AQI. The archived data provide a rich resource for further studies and analysis. The IDEA project uses data sets and models developed for tropospheric chemistry research to assist federal, state, and local agencies in making decisions concerning air quality management to protect public health.

  14. Feasibility of the Simultaneous Determination of Monomer Concentrations and Particle Size in Emulsion Polymerization Using in Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An immersion Raman probe was used in emulsion copolymerization reactions to measure monomer concentrations and particle sizes. Quantitative determination of monomer concentrations is feasible in two-monomer copolymerizations, but only the overall conversion could be measured by Raman spectroscopy in a four-monomer copolymerization. The feasibility of measuring monomer conversion and particle size was established using partial least-squares (PLS) calibration models. A simplified theoretical framework for the measurement of particle sizes based on photon scattering is presented, based on the elastic-sphere-vibration and surface-tension models. PMID:26900256

  15. Effects of concentrated ambient particles on normal and hypersecretory airways in rats.

    PubMed

    Harkema, Jack R; Keeler, Gerald; Wagner, James; Morishita, Masako; Timm, Edward; Hotchkiss, Jon; Marsik, Frank; Dvonch, Timothy; Kaminski, Norbert; Barr, Edward

    2004-08-01

    in southwestern Detroit during the summer months when particulate air pollution is usually high (July and September 2000). We monitored the outdoor air pollution in this community daily, and exposed normal and compromised rats to concentrated PM2.5 from this local urban atmosphere. Rats in the inhalation studies were exposed for 1 day or for 4 or 5 consecutive days (10 hours/day) to either filtered air (controls) or concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) delivered by a Harvard ambient fine particle concentrator. Rats were killed 24 hours after the end of the exposure. Biochemical, morphometric, and molecular techniques were used to identify airway epithelial and inflammatory responses to CAPs. Lung lobes were also either intratracheally lavaged with saline to determine cellular composition and protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) or removed for analysis by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS) to detect retention of ambient PM2.5--derived trace elements. The Harvard concentrator effectively concentrated the fine ambient particles from this urban atmosphere (10-30 times) without significantly changing the major physicochemical features of the atmospheric particles. Daily CAPs mass concentrations during the 10-hour exposure period (0800-1800) in July ranged from 16 to 895 microg/m3 and in September ranged from 81 to 755 microg/m3. In general, chemical characteristics of ambient particles were conserved through the concentrator into the exposure chamber. Single or repeated exposures to CAPs did not cause adverse effects in the nasal or pulmonary airways of healthy F344 or BN rats. In addition, CAPs-related toxicity was not observed in F344 rats pretreated with bacterial endotoxin. Variable airway responses to CAPs exposure were observed in BN rats with preexisting allergic airway disease induced by OVA sensitization and challenge. Only OVA-challenged BN rats exposed to CAPs for 5 consecutive days in September 2000 had significant increases in

  16. NHI-Acid Concentration Membranes -- Membrane Recommendations for the S-I Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F Stewart

    2007-03-01

    Scope: The purpose of this draft report is to make recommendations concerning the applicability of specific membrane materials for acid concentration processes to the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle integrated laboratory scale (ILS) demonstration. Introduction Acid concentration membrane processes have been studied for possible inclusion in the Sulfur-Iodine integrated laboratory scale (S-I ILS) demonstration. The need for this technology is driven by the chemical processes required for economical water splitting using the S-I cycle. Of the chemical processes inherent to the S-I cycle that have been identified as targets for deployment of membrane technology, three have been studied during the past three fiscal years as a part of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. First, the ability to concentrate hydriodic acid (HI) and iodine mixtures was sought as a method for aiding in the isolation of HI away from water and iodine. Isolated HI would then be delivered to the HI decomposition process for liberation of product hydrogen. Second, an extension of this technology to sulfuric acid was proposed to benefit sulfuric acid decomposition recycle. Third, decomposition of HI to form hydrogen is equilibrium limited. Removal of hydrogen, utilizing Le Chatelier’s principle, will increase to overall conversion and thus increasing the efficiency of the S-I cycle.

  17. Biofilter for generation of concentrated sulphuric acid from H2S.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, K A; Charles, W; Kayaalp, A; Cord-Ruwisch, R; Ho, G

    2016-08-01

    Biofilters are used for the conversion of odorous hydrogen sulphide to odourless sulphate in wastewater treatment plants under the right conditions of moisture and pH. One of the consequences of maintaining the suitable pH and moisture content is the production of large volumes of weakly acidic leachate. This paper presents a biofilter with a maximum H2S elimination capacity of 16.3 g m(-3) h(-1) and removal efficiency greater than 95 % which produces small volumes (1 mL of solution L(-1) of reactor day(-1)) of sulphuric acid with a concentration greater than 5.5 M after 150 days of continuous operation. The concentrated sulphuric acid was produced by intermittently trickling a minimum amount of nutrient solution down the upflow biofilter which created a moisture and pH gradient within the biofilter resulting in an environment at the top for the bacterial conversion of H2S, while sulphuric acid was accumulated at the base. Genetic diversity profiling of samples taken from different sections of the biofilter confirms that the upper sections of the biofilter had the best environment for the bacteria to convert H2S to sulphate. The formation of concentrated sulphuric acid presents an opportunity for the recovery of sulphur from the waste stream as a usable product. PMID:27189453

  18. Effect of sulfuric acid concentration of bentonite and calcination time of pillared bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mara, Ady; Wijaya, Karna; Trisunaryati, Wega; Mudasir

    2016-04-01

    An activation of natural clay has been developed. Activation was applied by refluxing the natural bentonite in variation of the sulfuric acid concentration and calcination time of pillared bentonite (PLC). Calcination was applied using oven in microwave 2,45 GHz. Determination of acidity was applied by measuring the amount of adsorbed ammonia and pyridine. Morphological, functional groups and chrystanility characterizations were analyzed using SEM, TEM, FTIR and XRD. Porosity was analyzed using SSA. The results showed that the greater of the concentration of sulfuric acid and calcination time was, the greater the acidity of bentonite as well as the pore diameter were. FTIR spectra showed no fundamental changes in the structure of the natural bentonite, SEM, and TEM images were showing an increase in space or field due to pillarization while the XRD patterns showed a shift to a lower peak. Optimization was obtained at a concentration of 2 M of sulfuric acid and calcination time of 20 minutes, keggin ion of 2.2 and suspension of 10 mmol, respectively each amounted to 11.7490 mmol/gram of ammonia and 2.4437 mmol/gram of pyridine with 154.6391 m2/gram for surface area, 0.130470 m3/gram of pore volume and 3.37484 nm of pore diameter.

  19. Plasma Amino Acid Concentrations Predict Mortality in Patients with End-Stage Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kinny-Köster, Benedict; Bartels, Michael; Becker, Susen; Scholz, Markus; Thiery, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Background The liver plays a key role in amino acid metabolism. In former studies, a ratio between branched-chain and aromatic amino acids (Fischer’s ratio) revealed associations with hepatic encephalopathy. Furthermore, low concentrations of branched-chain amino acids were linked to sarcopenia in literature. Encephalopathy and sarcopenia are known to dramatically worsen the prognosis. Aim of this study was to investigate a complex panel of plasma amino acids in the context of mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease. Methods 166 patients evaluated for orthotopic liver transplantation were included. 19 amino acids were measured from citrated plasma samples using mass spectrometry. We performed survival analysis for plasma amino acid constellations and examined the relationship to established mortality predictors. Results 33/166 (19.9%) patients died during follow-up. Lower values of valine (p<0.001), Fischer’s ratio (p<0.001) and valine to phenylalanine ratio (p<0.001) and higher values of phenylalanine (p<0.05) and tyrosine (p<0.05) were significantly associated with mortality. When divided in three groups, the tertiles discriminated cumulative survival for valine (p = 0.016), phenylalanine (p = 0.024) and in particular for valine to phenylalanine ratio (p = 0.003) and Fischer’s ratio (p = 0.005). Parameters were also significantly correlated with MELD and MELD-Na score. Conclusions Amino acids in plasma are valuable biomarkers to determine increased risk of mortality in patients with end-stage liver disease. In particular, valine concentrations and constellations composed of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids were strongly associated with prognosis. Due to their pathophysiological importance, the identified amino acids could be used to examine individual dietary recommendations to serve as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27410482

  20. Total volatile fatty acid concentrations are unreliable estimators of treatment effects on ruminal fermentation in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile fatty acid concentrations ([VFA], mM) have long been used to assess impact of dietary treatments on ruminal fermentation in vivo. However, discrepancies in statistical results between VFA and VFA pool size (VFAmol), possibly related to ruminal digesta liquid amount (LIQ, kg), suggest issues...

  1. Abscisic acid form, concentration, and application timing influence phenology and bud cold hardiness in Merlot grapevines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of abscisic acid (ABA) form, concentration and application timing on bud cold hardiness, phenology and fruiting performance on ‘Merlot’ grapevines (Vitis vinifera) were evaluated in a three year field trial with site locations in British Columbia Canada, Ontario Canada, Washington U.S. ...

  2. GASEOUS AND PARTICULATE AMMONIA AND NITRIC ACID CONCENTRATIONS, COLUMBUS, OHIO AREA--SUMMER 1980

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data is presented for gaseous ammonia and nitric acid and particulate ammonium ion and nitrate ion concentrations in air samples collected in support of the PEPE-NEROS study during the summer of 1980. Ground-level samples were collected near Croton, Ohio; aerial samples were also...

  3. EFFECTS OF THREE CONCENTRATIONS OF MIXED FATTY ACIDS ON DECHLORINATION OF TETRACHLOROETHENE IN AQUIFER MICROCOSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chloroethenes are among the most common organic contaminants of ground water. he biotransformation of these compounds by reductive dechlorination is a promising technology for in situ treatment. he effects of three concentrations of a fatty acids mixture on the reductive dehaloge...

  4. CONCENTRATION OF GLIAL FIBRILLARY ACIDIC PROTEIN INCREASES WITH AGE IN THE MOUSE AND RAT BRAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of aging in the expression of the astrocyte protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), was examined. n both mice and rats the concentration of GFAP increased throughout the brain as a function of aging. he largest increase (2-fold) was observed in striatum for both...

  5. EFFECTS OF THREE CONCENTRATIONS OF MIXED FATTY ACIDS ON DECHLORINATION OF TETRACHLOROETHENE IN AQUIFER MICRO- COSMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chloroethenes are among the most common organic contaminants of ground water. The biotransformation of these compounds by reductive dechlorination is a promising technology for in situ treatment. The effects of three concentrations of a fatty acids mixture on the reductive dehalo...

  6. Mineral, flavonoid, and fatty acid concentrations in ten diverse Lablab purpureus (L.) sweet accessions.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seeds of Hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus [L.]) Sweet containing high concentrations of minerals, flavonoids and fatty acids may provide government agencies with a nutrient-dense and health-beneficial food for use in hunger stricken and nutrient deprived people. Seeds from ten hyacinth bean accession...

  7. Role of lauric acid-potassium hydroxide concentration on bacterial contamination of spray washed broiler carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine reductions in bacterial contamination of broiler carcasses washed in a spray cabinet with various concentrations of lauric acid (LA)-potassium hydroxide (KOH) solutions. Fifty eviscerated carcasses and 5 ceca were obtained from the processing line of...

  8. Dry Matter Production and Leaf Elemental Concentrations of Rambutan Grown on an Acid Ultisol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the adaptability of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum) to highly acidic soils rich in aluminum (Al). A 2-yr field study was conducted to determine the effects of various levels of soil Al on dry matter production, plant growth, and nutrient concentration in the leaves of four cult...

  9. Breath concentration of acetic acid vapour is elevated in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, David; Sovová, Kristýna; Dryahina, Kseniya; Doušová, Tereza; Dřevínek, Pavel; Španěl, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    A study has been carried out of the volatile organic compounds present in the exhaled breath of 58 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. An important o