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Sample records for acid concentration particle

  1. Particle concentration measurement of virus samples using electrospray differential mobility analysis and quantitative amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Cole, Kenneth D; Pease, Leonard F; Tsai, De-Hao; Singh, Tania; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt A; Wang, Lili

    2009-07-24

    Virus reference materials are needed to develop and calibrate detection devices and instruments. We used electrospray differential mobility analysis (ES-DMA) and quantitative amino acid analysis (AAA) to determine the particle concentration of three small model viruses (bacteriophages MS2, PP7, and phiX174). The biological activity, purity, and aggregation of the virus samples were measured using plaque assays, denaturing gel electrophoresis, and size-exclusion chromatography. ES-DMA was developed to count the virus particles using gold nanoparticles as internal standards. ES-DMA additionally provides quantitative measurement of the size and extent of aggregation in the virus samples. Quantitative AAA was also used to determine the mass of the viral proteins in the pure virus samples. The samples were hydrolyzed and the masses of the well-recovered amino acids were used to calculate the equivalent concentration of viral particles in the samples. The concentration of the virus samples determined by ES-DMA was in good agreement with the concentration predicted by AAA for these purified samples. The advantages and limitations of ES-DMA and AAA to characterize virus reference materials are discussed.

  2. Sample preparation for measurement of plasma mycophenolic acid concentrations using chromatographically functionalized magnetic micro-particles.

    PubMed

    König, Katrin; Vogeser, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing chromatographically modified magnetic micro-particles is an innovative principle of sample preparation for quantitative analysis of small molecules in complex biomedical samples by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Since no vacuum or pressure has to be applied-in contrast to cartridge based solid phase extraction protocols-the principle's main characteristics are potentially straightforward automation and a high extraction performance (in terms of µg of extraction material per µL of sample). Following first descriptions of the approach, this article reports, the validation of a magnetic particle-based, analytical method for the quantification of the immunosuppressant mycophenolic acid in plasma. This sample preparation technology has shown a good performance for this clinically relevant analyte. As a result, we conclude that further work towards the implementation of this technology in a multi- analyte approach on robotic systems, aiming towards a fully automated process, is justified. PMID:23221116

  3. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P.; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEONLA-BSA, which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEONLA-BSA particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEONLA-BSA changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment. PMID:26287178

  4. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-08-14

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEON(LA-BSA), which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEON(LA-BSA) particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEON(LA-BSA) changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment.

  5. Tangential Flow Ultrafiltration Allows Purification and Concentration of Lauric Acid-/Albumin-Coated Particles for Improved Magnetic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Stapf, Marcus; Nowak, Johannes; Pöttler, Marina; Friedrich, Ralf P; Tietze, Rainer; Lyer, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey; Odenbach, Stefan; Hilger, Ingrid; Alexiou, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are frequently used for drug targeting, hyperthermia and other biomedical purposes. Recently, we have reported the synthesis of lauric acid-/albumin-coated iron oxide nanoparticles SEON(LA-BSA), which were synthesized using excess albumin. For optimization of magnetic treatment applications, SPION suspensions need to be purified of excess surfactant and concentrated. Conventional methods for the purification and concentration of such ferrofluids often involve high shear stress and low purification rates for macromolecules, like albumin. In this work, removal of albumin by low shear stress tangential ultrafiltration and its influence on SEON(LA-BSA) particles was studied. Hydrodynamic size, surface properties and, consequently, colloidal stability of the nanoparticles remained unchanged by filtration or concentration up to four-fold (v/v). Thereby, the saturation magnetization of the suspension can be increased from 446.5 A/m up to 1667.9 A/m. In vitro analysis revealed that cellular uptake of SEON(LA-BSA) changed only marginally. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was not greatly affected by concentration. In contrast, the maximum temperature Tmax in magnetic hyperthermia is greatly enhanced from 44.4 °C up to 64.9 °C by the concentration of the particles up to 16.9 mg/mL total iron. Taken together, tangential ultrafiltration is feasible for purifying and concentrating complex hybrid coated SPION suspensions without negatively influencing specific particle characteristics. This enhances their potential for magnetic treatment. PMID:26287178

  6. Particle concentration in exhaled breath

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, C.I.; Stampfer, J.F.

    1987-11-01

    Measurements were made of the number of concentration of particles in exhaled breath under various conditions of exercise. A laser light scattering particle spectrometer was used to count particles exhaled by test subjects wearing respirators in a challenge environment of clean, dry air. Precautions were taken to ensure that particles were not generated by the respirators and that no extraneous water or other particles were produced in the humid exhaled air. The number of particles detected in exhales air varied over a range from <0.10 to approx. 4 particles/cm/sup 3/ depending upon the test subject and his activity. Subjects at rest exhaled the lowest concentration of particles, whereas exercises producing a faster respiration rate caused increased exhalation of particles. Exhaled particle concentration can limit the usefulness of nondiscriminating, ambient challenge aerosols for the fit testing of highly protective respirators.

  7. Continuous flow dielectrophoretic particle concentrator

    DOEpatents

    Cummings, Eric B.

    2007-04-17

    A continuous-flow filter/concentrator for separating and/or concentrating particles in a fluid is disclosed. The filter is a three-port device an inlet port, an filter port and a concentrate port. The filter separates particles into two streams by the ratio of their dielectrophoretic mobility to their electrokinetic, advective, or diffusive mobility if the dominant transport mechanism is electrokinesis, advection, or diffusion, respectively.Also disclosed is a device for separating and/or concentrating particles by dielectrophoretic trapping of the particles.

  8. Fiber Optic Particle Concentration Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarski, Anthony A.

    1986-01-01

    A particle concentration sensor would be useful in many industrial process monitoring applications where in situ measurements are required. These applications include determination of butterfat content of milk, percent insolubles in engine oil, and cell concentration in a bioreactor. A fiber optic probe was designed to measure particle concentration by monitoring the scattered light from the particle-light interaction at the end of a fiber-optic-based probe tip. Linear output was obtained from the sensor over a large range of particle loading for a suspension of 1.7 μm polystyrene microspheres in water and E. coli bacteria in a fermenter.

  9. Effect of concentration and cumulative exposure of inhaled sulfuric acid on tracheobronchial particle clearance in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Spektor, D M; Yen, B M; Lippmann, M

    1989-02-01

    We have previously shown that 1-hr exposures to 0.5 microns sulfuric acid (H2SO4) mist at 100 and 1000 micrograms/m3 produced transient alterations of bronchial mucociliary clearance of monodispersed 7.6 and 4.2 microns mass median aerodynamic diameter gamma-tagged ferric oxide (Fe2O3) in healthy nonsmoking humans in a dose-dependent manner. To determine the role, if any, of the length of exposure, 10 healthy volunteers were exposed to 100 micrograms/m3 H2SO4 for 1 hr and 2 hr on separate occasions, 1 week apart, with measurements of their mucociliary clearance of 5.2 microns Fe2O3 particles inhaled both before and after the inhalation of the H2SO4. Their rate of bronchial mucociliary clearance was markedly reduced for both Fe2O3 aerosols, with slower clearance of the aerosol inhaled after the H2SO4 exposure. For the tagged Fe2O3 aerosol inhaled after exposure for 2 hr at 100 micrograms/m3 H2SO4, the tracheobronchial clearance halftime, (T50), tripled from control, and the reduced rate of clearance was still evident 3 hr after the end of exposure. The 1-hr 100 micrograms/m3 H2SO4 exposure doubled T50 from control, and the reduced rate of clearance lasted for about 2 hr after the end of exposure. These results indicate that the effect of doubling the length of exposure was as great or greater than an order of magnitude increase in the concentration of H2SO4.

  10. Alpha-Lipoic Acid Reduces LDL-Particle Number and PCSK9 Concentrations in High-Fat Fed Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Bradley; Wen, Shin; Zigouras, Sophia; Browne, Richard W.; Li, Zhuyun; Patel, Mulchand S.; Williamson, David L.; Rideout, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    We characterized the hypolipidemic effects of alpha-lipoic acid (LA, R-form) and examined the associated molecular mechanisms in a high fat fed Zucker rat model. Rats (n = 8) were assigned to a high fat (HF) diet or the HF diet with 0.25% LA (HF-LA) for 30 days and pair fed to remove confounding effects associated with the anorectic properties of LA. Compared with the HF controls, the HF-LA group was protected against diet-induced obesity (102.5±3.1 vs. 121.5±3.6,% change BW) and hypercholesterolemia with a reduction in total-C (−21%), non-HDL-C (−25%), LDL-C (−16%), and total LDL particle number (−46%) and an increase in total HDL particles (∼22%). This cholesterol-lowering response was associated with a reduction in plasma PCSK9 concentration (−70%) and an increase in hepatic LDLr receptor protein abundance (2 fold of HF). Compared with the HF-fed animals, livers of LA-supplemented animals were protected against TG accumulation (−46%), likely through multiple mechanisms including: a suppressed lipogenic response (down-regulation of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase expression); enhanced hepatic fat oxidation (increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase Iα expression); and enhanced VLDL export (increased hepatic diacylglycerol acyltransferase and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein expression and elevated plasma VLDL particle number). Study results also support an enhanced fatty acid uptake (2.8 fold increase in total lipase activity) and oxidation (increased CPT1β protein abundance) in muscle tissue in LA-supplemented animals compared with the HF group. In summary, in the absence of a change in caloric intake, LA was effective in protecting against hypercholesterolemia and hepatic fat accumulation under conditions of strong genetic and dietary predisposition toward obesity and dyslipidemia. PMID:24595397

  11. Observations of Sub-3 nm Particles and Sulfuric acid Concentrations during Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period 2011 in Long Island, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Kanawade, V. P.; You, Y.; Hallar, A. G.; Mccubbin, I. B.; Chirokova, G.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Springston, S. R.; Wang, J.; Kuang, C.; Lee, Y.; McGraw, R. L.; Mikkila, J.; Lee, S.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is an important source of aerosol particles. But the NPF processes are not well understood, in part because of our limited understanding of the formation of atmospheric sub-3 nm size aerosols and the limited number of simultaneous observations of particle size distributions and the aerosol nucleation precursors. During Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Observation Period (July-August 2011) in Long Island, New York, we deployed a particle size magnifier (Airmodus A09) running at different working fluid saturation ratios and a TSI CPC3776 to extract the information of sub-3 nm particles formation. A scanning mobility particle spectrometer (SMPS), a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS), and a number of atmospheric trace gas analyzers were used to simultaneously measure aerosol size distributions, sulfuric acid, and other possible aerosol precursors, respectively. Our observation results show that sub-3 nm particles existed during both NPF and non-NPF events, indicating the formation of sub-3nm particle didn't always lead to NPF characterized by typical banana shaped aerosol size distributions measured by SMPS. However, sub-3 nm particles were much higher during NPF events. Sub-3 nm particles were well-correlated with sulfuric acid showing the same diurnal variations and noontime peaks, especially for NPF days. These results are consistent with laboratory studies showing that formation of sub-3 nm particles is very sensitive to sulfuric acid (than amines and ammonia) [Yu et al. GRL 2012]. HYSPLIT back trajectory analysis indicates that air masses from Great Lakes, containing more SO2, VOCs and secondary organics, may contribute to growth of sub-3 nm particles and NPF.

  12. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3− aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    DOE PAGES

    Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Ayres, B. R.; Ault, A.; Bondy, A.; Takahama, S.; Modini, R. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Knote, C.; et al

    2015-09-25

    Inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA) revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3−) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of supermicron crustal and sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 μm) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3more » and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of crustal dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. In addition, calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3− is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral cation-containing aerosol surface area. Modeling of NO3− and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas–aerosol phase partitioning.« less

  13. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3- aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Hannah M.; Draper, Danielle C.; Ayres, Benjamin R.; Ault, Andrew P.; Bondy, Amy L.; Takahama, S.; Modini, Robert; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Knote, Christoph; Laskin, Alexander; Wang, Bingbing; Fry, Juliane L.

    2015-09-25

    The inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 1 June to 15 July 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA), an ion chromatograph coupled with a wet rotating denuder and a steam-jet aerosol collector for monitoring of ambient inorganic gas and aerosol species, revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3 ) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of coarse mode mineral or sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 um) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3 and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of mineral dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. Calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3 is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral dust surface area. Modeling of NO3 and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas/aerosol phase partitioning.

  14. Focusing particle concentrator with application to ultrafine particles

    DOEpatents

    Hering, Susanne; Lewis, Gregory; Spielman, Steven R.

    2013-06-11

    Technology is presented for the high efficiency concentration of fine and ultrafine airborne particles into a small fraction of the sampled airflow by condensational enlargement, aerodynamic focusing and flow separation. A nozzle concentrator structure including an acceleration nozzle with a flow extraction structure may be coupled to a containment vessel. The containment vessel may include a water condensation growth tube to facilitate the concentration of ultrafine particles. The containment vessel may further include a separate carrier flow introduced at the center of the sampled flow, upstream of the acceleration nozzle of the nozzle concentrator to facilitate the separation of particle and vapor constituents.

  15. EXPOSURE TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICLES (CAPS): REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies support a participation of fine particulate matter (PM) with a diameter of 0.1 to 2.5 microm in the effects of air pollution particles on human health. The ambient fine particle concentrator is a recently developed technology that can enrich the mass of ambi...

  16. Dielectrophoretic concentration of particles under electrokinetic flow

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Bettencourt, Kerry A.; Fuller, Christopher K.

    2004-09-07

    The use of dielectrophoresis to collect particles under the conditions of electrokinetically-driven flow. Dielectrophortic concentration of particles under electrokinetic flow is accomplished by interdigitated electrodes patterned on an inner surface of a microfluid channel, a DC voltage is applied across the ends to the channel, and an AC voltage is applied across the electrodes, and particles swept down the channel electrokinetically are trapped within the field established by the electrodes. The particles can be released when the voltage to the electrodes is released.

  17. Effects of particle size, helium gas pressure and microparticle dose on the plasma concentration of indomethacin after bombardment of indomethacin-loaded poly-L-lactic acid microspheres using a Helios gun system.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masaki; Natsume, Hideshi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Sugibayashi, Kenji; Morimoto, Yasunori

    2002-05-01

    We investigated the effects of the particle size of indomethacin-loaded poly-L-lactic acid microspheres (IDM-loaded PLA MS), the helium pressure used to accelerate the particles, and the bombardment dose of PLA MS on the plasma concentration of IDM after bombarding with IDM-loaded PLA MS of different particle size ranges, 20-38, 44-53 and 75-100 microm, the abdomen of hairless rats using the Helios gene gun system (Helios gun system). Using larger particles and a higher helium pressure, produced an increase in the plasma IDM concentration and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and resultant F (relative bioavailability with respect to intracutaneous injection) of IDM increased by an amount depending on the particle size and helium pressure. Although a reduction in the bombardment dose led to a decrease in C(max) and AUC, F increased on decreasing the bombardment dose. In addition, a more efficient F was obtained after bombarding with IDM-loaded PLA MS of 75-100 microm in diameter at each low dose in different sites of the abdomen compared with that after bolus bombardment with a high dose (dose equivalent). These results suggest that the bombardment injection of drug-loaded microspheres by the Helios gun system is a very useful tool for delivering a variety of drugs in powder form into the skin and systemic circulation.

  18. Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Ward, Michael D.; Kaduchak, Gregory

    2010-11-23

    An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

  19. Pretreating lignocellulosic biomass by the concentrated phosphoric acid plus hydrogen peroxide (PHP) for enzymatic hydrolysis: evaluating the pretreatment flexibility on feedstocks and particle sizes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Fei; Hu, Jinguang; Sun, Fubao; Lin, Lili; Yang, Gang; Zhang, Yanzong; Deng, Shihuai

    2014-08-01

    In order to seek a high-efficient pretreatment path for converting lignocellulosic feedstocks to fermentable sugars by enzymatic hydrolysis, the concentrated H₃PO₄ plus H₂O₂ (PHP) was attempted to pretreat different lignocellulosic biomass for evaluating the pretreatment flexibility on feedstocks. Meanwhile, the responses of pretreatment to particle sizes were also evaluated. When the PHP-pretreatment was employed (final H₂O₂ and H₃PO₄ concentration of 1.77% and 80.0%), 71-96% lignin and more than 95% hemicellulose in various feedstocks (agricultural residues, hardwood, softwood, bamboo, and their mixture, and garden wastes mixture) can be removed. Consequently, more than 90% glucose conversion was uniformly achieved indicating PHP greatly improved the pretreatment flexibility to different feedstocks. Moreover, when wheat straw and oak chips were PHP-pretreated with different sizes, the average glucose conversion reached 94.9% and 100% with lower coefficient of variation (7.9% and 0.0%), which implied PHP-pretreatment can significantly weaken the negative effects of feedstock sizes on subsequent conversion.

  20. Fe and S K-edge XAS determination of iron-sulfur species present in a range of acid sulfate soils: Effects of particle size and concentration on quantitative XANES determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Kate E.; Burton, Edward D.; Cook, Perran; Raven, Mark D.; Fitzpatrick, Robert W.; Bush, Richard; Sullivan, Leigh A.; Hocking, Rosalie K.

    2009-11-01

    Acid sulfate soils (ASS) are soils and soft sediments in which sulfuric acid may be produced from iron sulfides or have been produced leaving iron oxyhydroxysulfates in amounts that have a long lasting effect on soil characteristics. If soil material is exposed to rotting vegetation or other reducing material, the Fe-oxyhydroxysulfates can be bacterially reduced to sulfides including disulfides (pyrite and marcasite), and Monosulfidic Black Ooze (MBO) a poorly characterised material known to be a mixture of iron sulfides (especially mackinawite) and organic matter. The chemistry of these environments is strongly affected by Fe and S cycling processes and herein we have sought to identify key differences in environments that occur as a function of Fe and S concentration. In addition to our chemical results, we have found that the effects of particle size on self absorption in natural sediments play an important role in the spectroscopic identification of the relative proportions of different species present.

  1. Mass concentration and ion composition of coarse and fine particles in an urban area in Beirut: effect of calcium carbonate on the absorption of nitric and sulfuric acids and the depletion of chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouyoumdjian, H.; Saliba, N. A.

    2006-05-01

    Levels of coarse (PM10-2.5) and fine (PM2.5) particles were determined between February 2004 and January 2005 in the city of Beirut, Lebanon. While low PM mass concentrations were measured in the rainy season, elevated levels were detected during sand storms originating from Arabian desert and/or Africa. Using ATR-FTIR and IC, it was shown that nitrate, sulfate, carbonate and chloride were the main anionic constituents of the coarse particles, whereas sulfate was mostly predominant in the fine particles in the form of (NH4)2SO4. Ammonium nitrate was not expected to be important because the medium was defined as ammonium poor. In parallel, the cations Ca2+ and Na+ dominated in the coarse, and NH4+, Ca2+ and Na+ in the fine particles. Coarse nitrate and sulfate ions resulted from the respective reactions of nitric and sulfuric acid with a relatively high amount of calcium carbonate. Both CaCO3 and Ca(NO3)2 crystals identified by ATR-FTIR in the coarse particles were found to be resistant to soaking in water for 24 h but became water soluble when they were formed in the fine particles suggesting, thereby, different growth and adsorption phenomena. The seasonal variational study showed that nitrate and sulfate ion concentrations increased in the summer due to the enhancement of photochemical reactions which facilitated the conversion of NO2 and SO2 gases into NO3- and SO42-, respectively. While nitrate was mainly due to local heavy traffic, sulfates were due to local and long-range transport phenomena. Using the air mass trajectory HYSPLIT model, it was found that the increase in the sulfate concentration correlated with wind vectors coming from Eastern and Central Europe. Chloride levels, on the other hand, were high when wind originated from the sea and low during sand storms. In addition to sea salt, elevated levels of chloride were also attributed to waste mass burning in proximity to the site. In comparison to other neighboring Mediterranean countries, relatively

  2. 1- and 2-particle Microrheology of Hyaluronic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Austin; Kearns, Sarah; Ross, David; Das, Moumita; Thurston, George; Franklin, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (also called HA or Hyaluronan) is a high molecular weight polysaccaride ubiquitous in the extracellular matrix of soft tissue such as cartilage, skin, the eye's vitreous gel and synovial fluid. It has been shown to play an important role in mechanotransduction, cell migration and proliferation, and in tissue morphodynamics. We present a confocal microrheology study of hyaluronic acid of varying concentrations. The mean squared displacement (MSD) of sub-micron colloidal tracer particles is tracked in two dimensions and shows a transition from diffusive motion at low concentrations to small-time trapping by the protein network as the concentration increases. Correlations between particle motion can be used to determine an effective mean-squared displacement which deviates from the single-particle MSD as the fluid becomes less homogeneous. The real and effective mean-squared displacements are used to probe the local and space-averaged frequency dependent rheological properties of the fluid as the concentration changes.

  3. Plasma polymerized allylamine coated quartz particles for humic acid removal.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Karyn L; Majewski, Peter

    2012-08-15

    Allylamine plasma polymerization has been used to modify the surface of quartz particles for humic acid removal via an inductively coupled rotating barrel plasma reactor. Plasma polymerized allylamine (ppAA) films were deposited at a power of 25 W, allylamine flow rate of 4.4 sccm and polymerization times of 5-60 min. The influence of polymerization time on surface chemistry was investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and electrokinetic analysis. Acid orange 7 adsorption/desorption quantified the number of surface amine groups. Humic acid removal via ppAA quartz particles was examined by varying pH, removal time, humic acid concentration, and particle mass. Increasing the polymerization time increased the concentration of amine groups on the ppAA quartz surface, thus also increasing the isoelectric point. ToF-SIMS demonstrated uniform distribution of amine groups across the particle surface. Greatest humic acid removal was observed at pH 5 due to electrostatic attraction. At higher pH values, for longer polymerization times, humic acid removal was also observed due to hydrogen bonding. Increasing the initial humic acid concentration increased the mass of humic acid removed, with longer polymerization times exhibiting the greatest increases. Plasma polymerization using a rotating plasma reactor has shown to be a successful method for modifying quartz particles for the removal of humic acid. Further development of the plasma polymerization process and investigation of additional contaminants will aid in the development of a low cost water treatment system.

  4. Amino acid concentrations in human embryological fluids.

    PubMed

    Jauniaux, E; Sherwood, R A; Jurkovic, D; Boa, F G; Campbell, S

    1994-06-01

    The concentrations of amino acids in samples of coelomic fluid (n = 15), amniotic fluid (n = 9) and maternal serum (n = 15) obtained from normal pregnancies between 7 and 12 weeks of gestation were measured using reversed-phase chromatography with pre-column derivatization. The total molar concentration of the 18 amino acids measured was 2.3 times higher in coelomic fluid than in maternal serum. All amino acids except serine and tryptophan were present in significantly higher concentrations in coelomic fluid than in maternal serum. Significant correlations between maternal serum and coelomic fluid were only found for proline, tyrosine, and tryptophan, suggesting that levels of the other amino acids are mainly influenced by placental synthesis and do not directly depend on maternal amino acid metabolism. Levels of all amino acids were significantly higher in coelomic fluid compared to amniotic fluid. Compared to maternal serum, the amniotic fluid contained significantly higher levels of arginine, lysine, alanine and tyrosine and lower levels of serine, glutamine and tryptophan. The total molar amino acid concentration decreased significantly with gestational age in both coelomic fluid and maternal serum. These results suggest that amino acids accumulate in coelomic fluid to support the metabolism of the secondary yolk sac, and that the exocoelomic cavity is the reservoir for most nutrients needed by the embryo and early fetus in the first trimester of human pregnancy.

  5. System for particle concentration and detection

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Whaley, Josh A.; Zimmerman, Mark D.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Tran, Huu M.; Maurer, Scott M.; Munslow, William D.

    2013-03-19

    A new microfluidic system comprising an automated prototype insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) triggering microfluidic device for pathogen monitoring that can eventually be run outside the laboratory in a real world environment has been used to demonstrate the feasibility of automated trapping and detection of particles. The system broadly comprised an aerosol collector for collecting air-borne particles, an iDEP chip within which to temporarily trap the collected particles and a laser and fluorescence detector with which to induce a fluorescence signal and detect a change in that signal as particles are trapped within the iDEP chip.

  6. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  7. Workplace aerosol mass concentration measurement using optical particle counters.

    PubMed

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Bémer, Denis; Lidén, Göran

    2012-02-01

    Direct-reading aerosol measurement usually uses the optical properties of airborne particles to detect and measure particle concentration. In the case of occupational hygiene, mass concentration measurement is often required. Two aerosol monitoring methods are based on the principle of light scattering: optical particle counting (OPC) and photometry. The former analyses the light scattered by a single particle, the latter by a cloud of particles. Both methods need calibration to transform the quantity of scattered light detected into particle concentration. Photometers are simpler to use and can be directly calibrated to measure mass concentration. However, their response varies not only with aerosol concentration but also with particle size distribution, which frequently contributes to biased measurement. Optical particle counters directly measure the particle number concentration and particle size that allows assessment of the particle mass provided the particles are spherical and of known density. An integrating algorithm is used to calculate the mass concentration of any conventional health-related aerosol fraction. The concentrations calculated thus have been compared with simultaneous measurements by conventional gravimetric sampling to check the possibility of field OPC calibration with real workplace aerosols with a view to further monitoring particle mass concentration. Aerosol concentrations were measured in the food industry using the OPC GRIMM® 1.108 and the CIP 10-Inhalable and CIP 10-Respirable (ARELCO®) aerosol samplers while meat sausages were being brushed and coated with calcium carbonate. Previously, the original OPC inlet had been adapted to sample inhalable aerosol. A mixed aerosol of calcium carbonate and fungi spores was present in the workplace. The OPC particle-size distribution and an estimated average particle density of both aerosol components were used to calculate the mass concentration. The inhalable and respirable aerosol fractions

  8. Fatty Acids as Surfactants on Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervahattu, H.; Juhanoja, J.; Niemi, J.

    2003-12-01

    Fatty acids (n-alcanoic acids) are common compounds in numerous anthropogenic and natural emissions. According to Rogge et al. (1993), catalyst-equipped automobiles emitted more than 600 μg km-1 of fatty acids which was over 50% of all identified organics in fine aerosol emissions. Coal burning produces fatty acids ranging from about 1700 mg kg-1 for bituminous coal to over 10000 mg kg-1 for lignite (Oros and Simoneit, 2000). Similarly, biomass burning is an important source for aerosol fatty acids. They are the major identified compound group in deciduous tree smoke, their total emission factor being measured as 1589 mg kg-1 which was 56% of all identified organic compounds (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a). Large amounts of fatty acid are also emitted from burning of conifer trees and grass (Oros and Simoneit, 2001a; Simoneit, 2002). Fatty acids have been reported to be major constituents of marine aerosols in many investigations (Barger and Garrett, 1976; Gagosian et. al, 1981; Sicre et al., 1990; Stephanou, 1992). It has been suggested that as the marine aerosol particles form, they acquire a coating of organic surfactants (Blanchard, 1964; Gill et al., 1983; Middlebrook et al., 1998; Ellison et al., 1999). Amphiphilic molecules, including lipids, can be assembled as monomolecular layers at air/water interfaces as well as transported to a solid support. Recently, we could show by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry that fatty acids are important ingredients of the outermost surface layer of the sea-salt aerosol particles (Tervahattu et al., 2002). In their TOF-SIMS studies on the surface composition of atmospheric aerosols, Peterson and Tyler (2002) found fatty acids on the surface of Montana forest fire particles. In this work we have studied by TOF-SIMS the surface chemical composition of aerosol particles emitted from field fires in the Baltic and other East European countries and transported to Finland as well as aerosol particles transported from

  9. Measurement of particle concentrations in a dental office.

    PubMed

    Sotiriou, Maria; Ferguson, Stephen F; Davey, Mark; Wolfson, Jack M; Demokritou, Philip; Lawrence, Joy; Sax, Sonja N; Koutrakis, Petros

    2008-02-01

    Particles in a dental office can be generated by a number of instruments, such as air-turbine handpieces, low-speed handpieces, ultrasonic scalers, bicarbonate polishers, polishing cups, as well as drilling and air sprays inside the oral cavity. This study examined the generation of particles during dental drilling and measured particle size, mass, and trace elements. The air sampling techniques included both continuous and integrated methods. The following particle continuous measurements were taken every minute: (1) size-selective particle number concentration (Climet); (2) total particle number concentration (PTRAK), and; (3) particle mass concentration (DustTrak). Integrated particle samples were collected for about 5 h on each of five sampling days, using a PM(2.5) sampler (ChemComb) for elemental/organic carbon analysis, and a PM(10) sampler (Harvard Impactor) for mass and elemental analyses. There was strong evidence that these procedures result in particle concentrations above background. The dental procedures produced number concentrations of relatively small particles (<0.5 microm) that were much higher than concentrations produced for the relatively larger particles (>0.5 microm). Also, these dental procedures caused significant elevation above background of certain trace elements (measured by X-ray fluorescence) but did not cause any elevation of elemental carbon (measured by thermal optical reflectance). Dental drilling procedures aerosolize saliva and products of drilling, producing particles small enough to penetrate deep into the lungs. The potential health impacts of the exposure of dental personnel to such particles need to be evaluated. Increased ventilation and personal breathing protection could be used to minimize harmful effects.

  10. Analysis of particle-borne odorants emitted from concentrated animal feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xufei; Lorjaroenphon, Yaowapa; Cadwallader, Keith R; Wang, Xinlei; Zhang, Yuanhui; Lee, Jongmin

    2014-08-15

    Airborne particles are known to serve as a carrier of odors emanating from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs). However, limited quantitative data about particle-borne odorants preclude an accurate assessment of the role of particles in odor transport. This study collected total suspended particulates (TSP) and PM10 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm) at the air exhaust of eight types of CAFOs (swine: farrowing, gestation, weaning, and finishing; poultry: manure-belt layer hen, tom turkey, chicken broiler, and cage-free layer hen; in total 20 animal buildings) in multiple seasons, and examined the variability in particle odorant composition with animal operation type, season, and particle size. Fifty-seven non-sulfur-containing odorants were identified and quantitated, including carbonyls, alcohols, acids, phenols, and nitrogen-containing compounds. They in total accounted for 2.19±1.52% TSP and 4.97±3.25% PM10 mass. Acetic acid and ethanol were most abundant but less odor-contributing than phenylacetic acid, indole, dodecanoic acid, and (E,E)-2,4-decadienal, as determined by odor activity value. Particle odorant composition varied significantly with animal operation type, season, and particle size. The TSP and PM10 samples from swine gestation buildings, for example, showed distinctly different odorant compositions than those from tom turkey buildings. The summer TSP and PM10 samples contained in general lower concentrations of short-chain fatty acids but higher concentrations of long-chain fatty acids, aldehydes, and short-chain alcohols than the winter samples. Compared to TSP, PM10 samples from different types of CAFOs shared a more similar odorant composition, contained higher odorant concentrations per mass of particles, and accounted for on average 53.2% of the odor strength of their corresponding TSP samples. PMID:24863138

  11. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3 aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, H. M.; Draper, D. C.; Ayres, B. R.; Ault, A.; Bondy, A.; Takahama, S.; Modini, R. L.; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, E.; Knote, C.; Laskin, A.; Wang, B.; Fry, J. L.

    2015-09-25

    Inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA) revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of supermicron crustal and sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 μm) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3 and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of crustal dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. In addition, calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3 is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral cation-containing aerosol surface area. Modeling of NO3 and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas–aerosol phase partitioning.

  12. Vertical particle concentration profiles around urban office buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, T. N.; He, C.; Morawska, L.; Knibbs, L. D.; Falk, M.

    2012-06-01

    Despite its role in determining both indoor and outdoor human exposure to anthropogenic particles, there is limited information describing vertical profiles of particle concentrations in urban environments, especially for ultrafine particles. Furthermore, the results of the few studies performed have been inconsistent. As such, this study aimed to assess the influence of vehicle emissions and nucleation formation on particle characteristics (particle number size distribution - PNSD and PM2.5 concentration) at different heights around three urban office buildings located next to busy roads in Brisbane, Australia, and place these results in the broader context of the existing literature. Two sets of instruments were used to simultaneously measure PNSD, particle number (PN) and PM2.5 concentrations, respectively, for up to three weeks at each building. The results showed that both PNSD and PM2.5 concentration around building envelopes were influenced by vehicle emissions and new particle formation, and that they exhibited variability across the three different office buildings. During nucleation events, PN concentration in size range of <30 nm and total PN concentration increased (7-65% and 5-46%, respectively), while PM2.5 concentration decreased (36-52%) with height. This study has shown an under acknowledged role for nucleation in producing particles that can affect large numbers of people, due to the high density and occupancy of urban office buildings and the fact that the vast majority of people's time is spent indoors. These findings highlight important new information related to the previously overlooked role of particle formation in the urban atmosphere and its potential effects on selection of air intake locations and appropriate filter types when designing or upgrading mechanical ventilation systems in urban office buildings. The results also serve to better define particle behaviour and variability around building envelopes, which has implications for

  13. Sulfuric Acid and Soot Particle Formation in Aircraft Exhaust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Verma, S.; Ferry, G. V.; Howard, S. D.; Vay, S.; Kinne, S. A.; Baumgardner, D.; Dermott, P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Goodman, J.; Gore, Waren J. Y. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A combination of CN counts, Ames wire impactor size analyses and optical particle counter data in aircraft exhaust results in a continuous particle size distribution between 0.01 micrometer and 1 micrometer particle radius sampled in the exhaust of a Boeing 757 research aircraft. The two orders of magnitude size range covered by the measurements correspond to 6-7 orders of magnitude particle concentration. CN counts and small particle wire impactor data determine a nucleation mode, composed of aircraft-emitted sulfuric acid aerosol, that contributes between 62% and 85% to the total aerosol surface area and between 31% and 34% to its volume. Soot aerosol comprises 0.5% of the surface area of the sulfuric acid aerosol. Emission indices are: EIH2SO4 = 0.05 g/kgFUEL and (0.2-0.5) g/kgFUEL (for 75 ppmm and 675 ppmm fuel-S, respectively), 2.5E4particles/kgFUEL (for 75 and 675 ppmm fuel-S). The sulfur (gas) to H2SO4 (particle) conversion efficiency is between 10% and 25%.

  14. Effect of Nitric Acid Concentrations on Synthesis and Stability of Maghemite Nanoparticles Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Yaacob, Iskandar Idris

    2014-01-01

    Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been synthesized using a chemical coprecipitation method at different nitric acid concentrations as an oxidizing agent. Characterization of all samples performed by several techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), alternating gradient magnetometry (AGM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential. The XRD patterns confirmed that the particles were maghemite. The crystallite size of all samples decreases with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. TEM observation showed that the particles have spherical morphology with narrow particle size distribution. The particles showed superparamagnetic behavior with decreased magnetization values at the increasing concentration of nitric acid. TGA measurement showed that the stability temperature decreases with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. DLS measurement showed that the hydrodynamic particle sizes decrease with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. Zeta potential values show a decrease with the increasing concentration of nitric acid. The increasing concentration of nitric acid in synthesis of maghemite nanoparticles produced smaller size particles, lower magnetization, better thermal stability, and more stable maghemite nanoparticles suspension. PMID:24963510

  15. Energetic particle-induced enhancements of stratospheric nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, Arthur C.

    1994-01-01

    Inclusion of complete ion chemistry in the calculation of minor species production during energetic particle deposition events leads to significant enhancement in the calculated nitric acid concentration during precipitation. An ionization rate of 1.2 x 10(exp 3)/cu cm/s imposed for 1 day increases HNO3 from 3 x 10(exp 5) to 6 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm at 50 km. With an ionization rate of 600 cu cm/s, the maximum HNO3 is 3 x 10(exp 7)/cu cm. Calculations which neglect negative ions predict the nitric acid will fall during precipitation events. The decay time for converting HNO3 into odd nitrogen and hydrogen is more than 1 day for equinoctial periods at 70 deg latitude. Examination of nitric acid data should yield important information on the magnitude and frequency of charged particle events.

  16. High aerosol acidity despite declining atmospheric sulfate concentrations over the past 15 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Rodney J.; Guo, Hongyu; Russell, Armistead G.; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-04-01

    Particle acidity affects aerosol concentrations, chemical composition and toxicity. Sulfate is often the main acid component of aerosols, and largely determines the acidity of fine particles under 2.5 μm in diameter, PM2.5. Over the past 15 years, atmospheric sulfate concentrations in the southeastern United States have decreased by 70%, whereas ammonia concentrations have been steady. Similar trends are occurring in many regions globally. Aerosol ammonium nitrate concentrations were assumed to increase to compensate for decreasing sulfate, which would result from increasing neutrality. Here we use observed gas and aerosol composition, humidity, and temperature data collected at a rural southeastern US site in June and July 2013 (ref. ), and a thermodynamic model that predicts pH and the gas-particle equilibrium concentrations of inorganic species from the observations to show that PM2.5 at the site is acidic. pH buffering by partitioning of ammonia between the gas and particle phases produced a relatively constant particle pH of 0-2 throughout the 15 years of decreasing atmospheric sulfate concentrations, and little change in particle ammonium nitrate concentrations. We conclude that the reductions in aerosol acidity widely anticipated from sulfur reductions, and expected acidity-related health and climate benefits, are unlikely to occur until atmospheric sulfate concentrations reach near pre-anthropogenic levels.

  17. Concentration distributions of arbitrary shaped particles in microfluidic channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saibaba, Arvind; Shaqfeh, Eric; Darve, Eric

    2009-11-01

    We are interested in the study of the transient and steady state concentration distribution of orientable Brownian particles across channels at low Reynolds numbers. This is important in understanding margination of blood ``particles'' including platelets as well as new drug delivery and cancer nanotechnology particles which are involved in hemostasis as well as delivering drugs to the vascular endothelial cells. Although our formulation is general, the particles we consider are rigid Brownian ``surfboards'' which have been found to be effective in drug delivery since they are resistant to leukocyte attack [1]. The Stokes flow in the channel around the particles, driven by a mean pressure gradient, is computed using the Boundary Element method within the single layer formulation. The particle motion is calculated using rigid body dynamics with a contribution due to Brownian motion that satisfies the Fluctuation-Dissipation theorem. Finite concentrations are considered, and all hydrodynamic interactions are included. The concentration distribution is computed and interpreted as a balance between the concentration dependent variation in the non-equilibrium particle osmotic pressure and the cross stream particle normal stresses. [4pt] [1] J. A. Champion, S. Mitragotri, ``Role of target geometry in phagocytosis'', PNAS 103, 4930-4934, (2006)

  18. PACO: PArticle COunting Method To Enforce Concentrations in Dynamic Simulations.

    PubMed

    Berti, Claudio; Furini, Simone; Gillespie, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    We present PACO, a computationally efficient method for concentration boundary conditions in nonequilibrium particle simulations. Because it requires only particle counting, its computational effort is significantly smaller than other methods. PACO enables Brownian dynamics simulations of micromolar electrolytes (3 orders of magnitude lower than previously simulated). PACO for Brownian dynamics is integrated in the BROWNIES package (www.phys.rush.edu/BROWNIES). We also introduce a molecular dynamics PACO implementation that allows for very accurate control of concentration gradients.

  19. Airborne particle concentrations at schools measured at different spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Fuoco, F. C.; Morawska, L.; Stabile, L.

    2013-03-01

    Potential adverse effects on children health may result from school exposure to airborne particles. To address this issue, measurements in terms of particle number concentration, particle size distribution and black carbon (BC) concentrations were performed in three school buildings in Cassino (Italy) and its suburbs, outside and inside of the classrooms during normal occupancy and use. Additional time resolved information was gathered on ventilation condition, classroom activity, and traffic count data around the schools were obtained using a video camera. Across the three investigated school buildings, the outdoor and indoor particle number concentration monitored down to 4 nm and up to 3 μm ranged from 2.8 × 104 part cm-3 to 4.7 × 104 part cm-3 and from 2.0 × 104 part cm-3 to 3.5 × 104 part cm-3, respectively. The total particle concentrations were usually higher outdoors than indoors, because no indoor sources were detected. I/O measured was less than 1 (varying in a relatively narrow range from 0.63 to 0.74), however one school exhibited indoor concentrations higher than outdoor during the morning rush hours. Particle size distribution at the outdoor site showed high particle concentrations in different size ranges, varying during the day; in relation to the starting and finishing of school time two modes were found. BC concentrations were 5 times higher at the urban school compared with the suburban and suburban-to-urban differences were larger than the relative differences of ultrafine particle concentrations.

  20. Saharan Dust Particle Size And Concentration Distribution In Central Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunnu, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    A.K. Sunnu*, G. M. Afeti* and F. Resch+ *Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) Kumasi, Ghana. E-mail: albertsunnu@yahoo.com +Laboratoire Lepi, ISITV-Université du Sud Toulon-Var, 83162 La Valette cedex, France E-mail: resch@univ-tln.fr Keywords: Atmospheric aerosol; Saharan dust; Particle size distributions; Particle concentrations. Abstract The Saharan dust that is transported and deposited over many countries in the West African atmospheric environment (5°N), every year, during the months of November to March, known locally as the Harmattan season, have been studied over a 13-year period, between 1996 and 2009, using a location at Kumasi in central Ghana (6° 40'N, 1° 34'W) as the reference geographical point. The suspended Saharan dust particles were sampled by an optical particle counter, and the particle size distributions and concentrations were analysed. The counter gives the total dust loads as number of particles per unit volume of air. The optical particle counter used did not discriminate the smoke fractions (due to spontaneous bush fires during the dry season) from the Saharan dust. Within the particle size range measured (0.5 μm-25 μm.), the average inter-annual mean particle diameter, number and mass concentrations during the northern winter months of January and February were determined. The average daily number concentrations ranged from 15 particles/cm3 to 63 particles/cm3 with an average of 31 particles/cm3. The average daily mass concentrations ranged from 122 μg/m3 to 1344 μg/m3 with an average of 532 μg/m3. The measured particle concentrations outside the winter period were consistently less than 10 cm-3. The overall dust mean particle diameter, analyzed from the peak representative Harmattan periods over the 13-year period, ranged from 0.89 μm to 2.43 μm with an average of 1.5 μm ± 0.5. The particle size distributions exhibited the typical distribution pattern for

  1. Analysis of cell concentration, volume concentration, and colony size of Microcystis via laser particle analyzer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Gao, Li

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of the cell concentration, volume concentration, and colony size of Microcystis is widely used to provide early warnings of the occurrence of blooms and to facilitate the development of predictive tools to mitigate their impact. This study developed a new approach for the analysis of the cell concentration, volume concentration, and colony size of Microcystis by applying a laser particle analyzer. Four types of Microcystis samples (55 samples in total) were analyzed by a laser particle analyzer and a microscope. By the application of the laser particle analyzer (1) when n = 1.40 and k = 0.1 (n is the intrinsic refractive index, whereas k is absorption of light by the particle), the results of the laser particle analyzer showed good agreement with the microscopic results for the obscuration indicator, volume concentration, and size distribution of Microcystis; (2) the Microcystis cell concentration can be calculated based on its linear relationship with obscuration; and (3) the volume concentration and size distribution of Microcystis particles (including single cells and colonies) can be obtained. The analytical processes involved in this new approach are simpler and faster compared to that by microscopic counting method. From the results, it was identified that the relationship between cell concentration and volume concentration depended on the colony size of Microcystis because the intercellular space was high when the colony size was high. Calculation of cell concentration and volume concentration may occur when the colony size information is sufficient.

  2. Intercomparison of number concentration measurements by various aerosol particle counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankilov, A.; Baklanov, A.; Colhoun, M.; Enderle, K.-H.; Gras, J.; Julanov, Yu.; Kaller, D.; Lindner, A.; Lushnikov, A. A.; Mavliev, R.; McGovern, F.; Mirme, A.; O'Connor, T. C.; Podzimek, J.; Preining, O.; Reischl, G. P.; Rudolf, R.; Sem, G. J.; Szymanski, W. W.; Tamm, E.; Vrtala, A. E.; Wagner, P. E.; Winklmayr, W.; Zagaynov, V.

    Total aerosol particle number concentrations, as measured by means of 16 different measurement systems, have been quantitatively compared during an international workshop at the Institute for Experimental Physics of the University of Vienna, Austria, which was coordinated within the Committee on Nucleation and Atmospheric Aerosols (ICCP-IUGG). The range of measuring instruments includes Pollak counters (PCO) in use already for several decades, presently available commercial particle counters, as well as laboratory prototypes. The operation of the instruments considered was based on different measurement principles: (1) adiabatic expansion condensation particle counter, (2) flow diffusion condensation particle counter, (3) turbulent mixing condensation particle counter, (4) laser optical particle counter, and (5) electrostatic particle measurement system. Well-defined test aerosols with various chemical compositions were considered: DEHS, sodium chloride, silver, hydrocarbons, and tungsten oxide. The test aerosols were nearly monodispersed with mean particle diameters between 4 and 520 nm, the particle number concentrations were varied over a range from about 4×10 1 to 7×10 6 cm -3. A few measurements were performed with two-component aerosol mixtures. For simultaneous concentration measurements, the various instruments considered were operated under steady state conditions in a linear flow system. A series of at least 10 single concentration measurements was performed by each individual instrument at each set of test aerosol parameters. The average of the concentration data measured by the various instruments was defined as a common reference. The number concentrations obtained from the various instruments typically agreed within a factor of about two over the entire concentration range considered. The agreement of the measured concentrations is notable considering the various different measurement principles applied in this study, and particularly in view of the

  3. The Effect of Particle Concentration on the Heating Rate of Ferrofluids for Magnetic Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malaescu, I.; Marin, C. N.; Bunoiu, M.; Fannin, P. C.; Stefu, N.; Iordaconiu, L.

    2015-12-01

    The complex magnetic susceptibility χ(f) = χ'(f) - i χ″(f), of a ferrofluid sample with magnetite particles dispersed in kerosene and stabilized with oleic acid, over the range 0.1 GHz to 6 GHz, was determined. The initial sample has been successively diluted with kerosene (with a dilution rate of 2/3), thus obtaining further three samples. Using the complex magnetic susceptibility measurements of each sample, the frequency field and particle concentration dependencies of the heating rate of the ferrofluid samples, were analyzed. The results show the possibility of using the heating rate of ferrofluid samples with different particle concentrations, in hyperthermia applications.

  4. Simplified confocal microscope for counting particles at low concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Joseph P.; Swift, Kerry M.; Ruan, Qiaoqiao; Perfetto, Sergio; Gratton, Enrico; Tetin, Sergey Y.

    2013-07-01

    We describe a compact scanning confocal fluorescence microscope capable of detecting particles concentrations less than 100 particles/ml in ˜15 min. The system mechanically moves a cuvette containing ˜3 ml of sample. A relatively large confocal volume is observed within the cuvette using a 1 mm pinhole in front of a detection PMT. Due to the motion of the sample, particles traverse the confocal volume quickly, and analysis by pattern recognition qualifies spikes in the emission intensity data and counts them as events. We show linearity of detection as a function of concentration and also characterize statistical behavior of the instrument. We calculate a detection sensitivity of the system using 3 μm fluorescent microspheres to be 5 particles/ml. Furthermore, to demonstrate biological application, we performed a dilution series to quantify stained E. coli and yeast cells. We counted E. coli cells at a concentration as low as 30 cells/ml in 10 min/sample.

  5. Source contributions to atmospheric fine carbon particle concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrew Gray, H.; Cass, Glen R.

    A Lagrangian particle-in-cell air quality model has been developed that facilitates the study of source contributions to atmospheric fine elemental carbon and fine primary total carbon particle concentrations. Model performance was tested using spatially and temporally resolved emissions and air quality data gathered for this purpose in the Los Angeles area for the year 1982. It was shown that black elemental carbon (EC) particle concentrations in that city were dominated by emissions from diesel engines including both on-highway and off-highway applications. Fine primary total carbon particle concentrations (TC=EC+organic carbon) resulted from the accumulation of small increments from a great variety of emission source types including both gasoline and diesel powered highway vehicles, stationary source fuel oil and gas combustion, industrial processes, paved road dust, fireplaces, cigarettes and food cooking (e.g. charbroilers). Strategies for black elemental carbon particle concentration control will of necessity need to focus on diesel engines, while controls directed at total carbon particle concentrations will have to be diversified over a great many source types.

  6. [Ultrafine particle number concentration and size distribution of vehicle exhaust ultrafine particles].

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye-qiang; Chen, Qiu-fang; Sun, Zai; Cai, Zhi-liang; Yang, Wen-jun

    2014-09-01

    Ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations obtained from three different vehicles were measured using fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) and automobile exhaust gas analyzer. UFP number concentration and size distribution were studied at different idle driving speeds. The results showed that at a low idle speed of 800 rmin-1 , the emission particle number concentration was the lowest and showed a increasing trend with the increase of idle speed. The majority of exhaust particles were in Nuclear mode and Aitken mode. The peak sizes were dominated by 10 nm and 50 nm. Particle number concentration showed a significantly sharp increase during the vehicle acceleration process, and was then kept stable when the speed was stable. In the range of 0. 4 m axial distance from the end of the exhaust pipe, the particle number concentration decayed rapidly after dilution, but it was not obvious in the range of 0. 4-1 m. The number concentration was larger than the background concentration. Concentration of exhaust emissions such as CO, HC and NO showed a reducing trend with the increase of idle speed,which was in contrast to the emission trend of particle number concentration. PMID:25518646

  7. Continuum modeling of hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions in microfluidic high-concentration suspensions.

    PubMed

    Ley, Mikkel W H; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    A continuum model is established for numerical studies of hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions in microfluidic high-concentration suspensions. A suspension of microparticles placed in a microfluidic channel and influenced by an external force, is described by a continuous particle-concentration field coupled to the continuity and Navier-Stokes equation for the solution. The hydrodynamic interactions are accounted for through the concentration dependence of the suspension viscosity, of the single-particle mobility, and of the momentum transfer from the particles to the suspension. The model is applied on a magnetophoretic and an acoustophoretic system, respectively, and based on the results, we illustrate three main points: (1) for relative particle-to-fluid volume fractions greater than 0.01, the hydrodynamic interaction effects become important through a decreased particle mobility and an increased suspension viscosity. (2) At these high particle concentrations, particle-induced flow rolls occur, which can lead to significant deviations of the advective particle transport relative to that of dilute suspensions. (3) Which interaction mechanism that dominates, depends on the specific flow geometry and the specific external force acting on the particles. PMID:26948344

  8. Continuum modeling of hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions in microfluidic high-concentration suspensions.

    PubMed

    Ley, Mikkel W H; Bruus, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    A continuum model is established for numerical studies of hydrodynamic particle-particle interactions in microfluidic high-concentration suspensions. A suspension of microparticles placed in a microfluidic channel and influenced by an external force, is described by a continuous particle-concentration field coupled to the continuity and Navier-Stokes equation for the solution. The hydrodynamic interactions are accounted for through the concentration dependence of the suspension viscosity, of the single-particle mobility, and of the momentum transfer from the particles to the suspension. The model is applied on a magnetophoretic and an acoustophoretic system, respectively, and based on the results, we illustrate three main points: (1) for relative particle-to-fluid volume fractions greater than 0.01, the hydrodynamic interaction effects become important through a decreased particle mobility and an increased suspension viscosity. (2) At these high particle concentrations, particle-induced flow rolls occur, which can lead to significant deviations of the advective particle transport relative to that of dilute suspensions. (3) Which interaction mechanism that dominates, depends on the specific flow geometry and the specific external force acting on the particles.

  9. Preferential concentration of heavy particles in compressible isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Liu, Han; Ma, Zongqiang; Xiao, Zuoli

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of particle-laden compressible isotropic turbulence with Taylor Reynolds number Reλ ˜ 100 are conducted by using a high-order turbulence solver, which is based on high-order compact finite difference method in the whole flow domain and localized artificial diffusivities for discontinuities. For simplicity, only one-way coupling (i.e., the influence of fluid on particles) between the carrier flow and particles is considered. The focus is on the study of the preferential concentration of heavy particles in dissipative scale of turbulence and the underlying mechanisms. Firstly, the effect of Stokes number (St) on the particle distribution in flow of Mach 1.01 (referred to as high-Mach-number case in this study) is investigated as a necessary supplementation for the previous studies in incompressible and weakly compressible flows. It turns out that heavy particles with Stokes number close to unity exhibit the strongest preferential concentration, which is in agreement with the observation in incompressible flow. All types of heavy particles have a tendency to accumulate in high-density regions of the background flow. While all kinds of particles dominantly collect in low-vorticity regions, intermediate and large particles (St = 1 and St = 5) are also found to collect in high-vorticity regions behind the randomly formed shocklets. Secondly, the impact of turbulent Mach number (Mt) (or the compressibility) of the carrier flow on the spatial distribution of the particles with St = 1 is discussed using the simulated compressible flows with Mt being 0.22, 0.68, and 1.01, respectively. In low-Mach-number flow, particles tend to concentrate in regions of low vorticity due to the centrifuge effect of vortices and particle concentration decreases monotonically with the increasing vorticity magnitude. As Mach number increases, the degree of particle clustering is slightly weakened in low-vorticity regions but is enhanced in high-vorticity regions, which

  10. Preferrential Concentration of Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Preferential concentration in turbulence is a process that causes inertial particles to cluster in regions of high strain (in-between high vorticity regions), with specifics depending on their stopping time or Stokes number. This process is thought to be of importance in various problems including cloud droplet formation and aerosol transport in the atmosphere, sprays, and also in the formation of asteroids and comets in protoplanetary nebulae. In protoplanetary nebulae, the initial accretion of primitive bodies from freely-floating particles remains a problematic subject. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] in turbulent nebulae. One scenario that can lead directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects, avoiding the problematic m-km size range, involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in protoplanetary turbulence. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles generally known as "chondrules" [2]. Thus, while it is arcane, turbulent preferential concentration acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. Here, we present the statistical determination of particle multiplier distributions from numerical simulations of particle-laden isotopic turbulence, and a cascade model for modeling turbulent concentration at lengthscales and Reynolds numbers not accessible by numerical simulations. We find that the multiplier distributions are scale dependent at the very largest scales but have scale-invariant properties under a particular variable normalization at smaller scales.

  11. Opposed-flow virtual cyclone for particle concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Rader, Daniel J.; Torczynski, John R.

    2000-12-05

    An opposed-flow virtual cyclone for aerosol collation which can accurately collect, classify, and concentrate (enrich) particles in a specific size range. The opposed-flow virtual cyclone is a variation on the virtual cyclone and has its inherent advantages (no-impact particle separation in a simple geometry), while providing a more robust design for concentrating particles in a flow-through type system. The opposed-flow virtual cyclone consists of two geometrically similar virtual cyclones arranged such that their inlet jets are inwardly directed and symmetrically opposed relative to a plane of symmetry located between the two inlet slits. A top plate bounds both jets on the "top" side of the inlets, while the other or lower wall curves "down" and away from each inlet jet. Each inlet jet will follow the adjacent lower wall as it turns away, and that particles will be transferred away from the wall and towards the symmetry plane by centrifugal action. After turning, the two jets merge smoothly along the symmetry line and flow parallel to it through the throat. Particles are transferred from the main flows, across a dividing streamline, and into a central recirculating region, where particle concentrations become greatly increased relative to the main stream.

  12. Highly integrated optical microsystem for particle concentration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Meike; Ma, Xuan; Schneider, Jan; Sinzinger, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    We present our research on integrated optical Talbot interferometers for particle mass concentration measurements. For optimum integration of highly sensitive optical measurement systems we apply a planar emitter-receiver-unit with a vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) at 850 nm as light source. The optical system is integrated into a planar transparent PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) substrate. We suggest a planar integrated free-space optical system for monitoring the particle mass concentration of polydisperse suspensions. Thorough simulations of the optical sensor show that for the required regime of particle concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) turbidity measurements where the attenuation of a light beam is evaluated for example at different wavelengths do not provide the required measurement precision. We therefore propose a system where the probe beam even though sent through the system is blocked before reaching the detector by an interferometric setup. The stray light originating from the particles is exploited for the measurement. For our application we focus on particles with sizes in the range 1 - 120 μm and particle mass concentrations in the range of 1-10 mg/L. In this case significant strength of the scattering signal only appears in small angles relative to the incident probe beam (forward scattering). The probe beam and the stray light thus overlap to a large extent. Our sensor concept is based on a monolithically integrated Talbot interferometer. Two properly aligned diffraction gratings are used to remove the primary beam. We use a stripe detector as second grating. The stray light causes perturbations within the formation of the self image of the grating. These perturbations are visualized as speckles on a detector and exploited for particle concentration measurements. The potential of the sensor concept is presented on the example of a modular Talbot interferometer using a HeNe laser at 633 nm to measure particle mass

  13. Ozonolysis of Mixed Oleic-Acid/Stearic-Acid Particles: Reaction Kinetics and Chemical Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. T.; Katrib, Y.; Biskos, G.; Buseck, P. R.; Davidovits, P.; Jayne, J. T.; Mochida, M.; Wise, M. E.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Atmospheric particles directly and indirectly affect global climate and have a primary role in regional issues of air pollution, visibility, and human health. Atmospheric particles have a variety of shapes, dimensions, and chemical compositions, and these physicochemical properties evolve (i.e., "age") during transport of the particles through the atmosphere, in part because of the chemical reactions of particle-phase organic molecules with gas-phase atmospheric oxidants. As a global average, hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozone (O3) are responsible quantitatively for most oxidant aging of atmospheric particles. The reactions of the hydroxyl radical occur in the surface region of a particle because of the nearly diffusion-limited bimolecular rate constant of OH with a variety of organic molecules. Ozone, on the other hand, is a selective agent for the unsaturated bonds of organic molecules and may diffuse a considerable distance into particles prior to reaction. The reaction of oleic acid with ozone has recently emerged as a model system to better understand the atmospheric chemical oxidation processes affecting organic particles. The ozonolysis of mixed oleic-acid/stearic-acid (OL/SA) aerosol particles from 0/100 to 100/0 weight percent composition is studied. The magnitude of the divergence of the particle beam inside an aerosol mass spectrometer shows that, in the concentration range 100/0 to 60/40, the mixed OL/SA particles are liquid prior to reaction. Upon ozonolysis, particles with SA composition greater than 25% change shape, indicating that they have solidified. Transmission electron micrographs show that SA(s) forms needles. For SA compositions greater than 10%, the reaction kinetics exhibit an initial fast decay of OL for low O3 exposure with no further loss of OL at higher O3 exposures. For compositions from 50/50 to 10/90, the residual OL concentration remains at 28+/-2% of its initial value. The initial reactive uptake coefficient for O3, as determined by

  14. Electrophoretic mobility of silica particles in a mixture of toluene and ethanol at different particle concentrations.

    PubMed

    Medrano, M; Pérez, A T; Lobry, L; Peters, F

    2009-10-20

    In this paper we present measurements of the electrophoretic mobility of colloidal particles by using heterodyne detection of light scattering. The measurements have been made up to concentrations of 5.4% silica nanoparticles, with a diameter on the order of 80 nm, in a mixture of 70% toluene and 30% ethanol. To make possible the measurements at these concentrations, the liquid mixture is chosen so as to match the index of refraction of the particles, thus resulting in a transparent suspension.

  15. Ultrasonic spectrum for particle concentration measurement in multicomponent suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Xiaobin; Jiang, Shulan; Yang, Yili; Liang, Jian; Shi, Tielin; Li, Xiwen

    2016-02-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of applying the ultrasonic spectrum technique to the measurement of particle concentrations in multicomponent suspensions. A combination of the kernel partial least squares (KPLS) model and the interval selection methods is implemented to build the relationship between the ultrasonic spectra of the first reflected pulses and the particle concentrations. First of all, the interval selection methods are used to select optimal spectral interval(s) from full spectra. Then, the KPLS models with optimal spectral interval(s) are tuned, built and evaluated to obtain the optimal model. Finally, the optimal KPLS model is employed to measure the particle concentrations in the mixing process and its online prediction ability is evaluated. In comparison with the linear partial least squares (PLS) models, the optimal KPLS model shows the best performance. The results demonstrate that particle concentrations in multicomponent suspensions can be measured online by the ultrasonic spectrum technique, and the KPLS model with optimal spectral interval(s) shows the superiority in model calibration.

  16. PARTICLE ASSOCIATION EFFECTS ON MICROBIAL INDICATOR CONCENTRATIONS FOR CSO DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of blending on indicator microorganism concentrations in combined sewer overflow (CSO) was investigated due to concerns that standard techniques fail to measure particle-associated organisms found in sewage. It was shown that blending CSO samples diluted in a mixture ...

  17. System for concentrating and analyzing particles suspended in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Cummings, Eric B.; Singh, Anup K.

    2011-04-26

    Disclosed is a device for separating and concentrating particles suspended in a fluid stream by using dielectrophoresis (DEP) to trap and/or deflect those particles as they migrate through a fluid channel. The method uses fluid channels designed to constrain a liquid flowing through it to uniform electrokinetic flow velocities. This behavior is achieved by connecting deep and shallow sections of channels, with the channel depth varying abruptly along an interface. By careful design of abrupt changes in specific permeability at the interface, an abrupt and spatially uniform change in electrokinetic force can be selected. Because these abrupt interfaces also cause a sharp gradient in applied electric fields, a DEP force also can be established along the interface. Depending on the complex conductivity of the suspended particles and the immersion liquid, the DEP force can controllably complement or oppose the local electrokinetic force transporting the fluid through the channel allowing for manipulation of particles suspended in the transporting liquid.

  18. Determination of Solid Particle Concentration at coal Transshipment site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siliņš, K.; Žandeckis, A.; Valtere, S.

    2009-01-01

    Coal handling and grinding processes are associated with significant particulate matter emissions into the atmosphere. This problem is particularly urgent when a coal-processing company is located in or nearby a densely populated city. To quantitatively evaluate concentrations generated into the atmosphere according to the standardized methodology, it is necessary to make extensive measurements using an automatic real-time, infrared dust and aerosol monitor. Before the experiments, the impact of particulate matter on human health and the environment was explored, six solid particle concentration detection methods and best available techniques for particulate matter emission prevention was described. During this study field measurements were carried out at on the territory of a coal transshipment company. Using the solid particle concentration detection system Dust Detective kit, concentration monitoring of total particulate matter (TSP), PM10 and PM2.5 was carried out. The equipment was located 6 m above ground and 120 m away from the emission source - coal crushing and handling site. TSP monitoring was carried out during four diurnal, PM10 - during 17 diunral and PM2.5 - during 12 days. After comparison of results with concentration values set in normative documents of Latvia and EU, it was found out that average 17 diurnal day concentration values of PM10 exceeded normative values for nine times. PM2.5 daily average concentrations of 12 days exceeded for four times exceeded the value of 25 μg/m3, which is mentioned in Directive 2008/50/EC of EU. After analysis of wind behaviour impact on the concentration values it is now understood that if wind comes from the dust emission source to the measurement system, the increase in wind speed increases particle concentration as all particles in the air and those raised from coal piles are driven towards the equipment. If wind comes from the opposite direction, the decrease of wind velocity results in an increase of

  19. Simultaneous In-Situ Measurement of Local Particle Size, Particle Concentration, and Velocity of Aerosols.

    PubMed

    Weber; Schweiger

    1999-02-01

    Photon correlation spectroscopy has been applied to the characterization of (quasi-)monodisperse aerosols. The experiments were carried out with an experimental standard pin hole setup on laminar flowing aerosols of the submicrometer particle size range. It is shown that beside local mean particle size and local aerosol velocity simultaneously the local particle number concentration may be obtained from a single measured autocorrelation function. The proposed procedure does not require calibration. It is pointed out that measurement conditions can be adapted to the properties of the aerosol to be characterized, thus allowing characterization of aerosols over a wide parameter range, e.g., it is not restricted to the case of low particle concentration. The experimental results are compared to data from literature, data from reference measurements and data from a theoretical model, respectively. The method can also be usefull for characterization of other fluid-particle systems as hydrosols. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  20. The influence of particle clustering on the rheological properties of highly concentrated magnetic nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Susan-Resiga, Daniela; Socoliuc, V; Boros, T; Borbáth, Tunde; Marinica, Oana; Han, Adelina; Vékás, L

    2012-05-01

    In this paper the particle volume fraction and temperature dependence of the dynamic viscosity of highly concentrated transformer oil based magnetic nanofluids was investigated in the absence of an external magnetic field. The solid particle volume fraction dependence of the relative viscosity was found to be very well fitted by the Krieger-Dougherty formula, whence the mean ellipticity of the colloidal particles and the effective surfactant layer thickness were obtained. Using the information on the particles' size and shape statistics obtained from TEM, DLS and magnetogranulometry investigations, it was concluded that the magnetite nanoparticles agglomerate in small clusters of about 1.3 particles/cluster, due to the van der Waals interactions. The effective thickness of the oleic acid surfactant layer was estimated as about 1.4 nm, in very good agreement with the value resulted from previous SANS investigations. PMID:22134213

  1. Environmentally relevant concentrations of microplastic particles influence larval fish ecology.

    PubMed

    Lönnstedt, Oona M; Eklöv, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The widespread occurrence and accumulation of plastic waste in the environment have become a growing global concern over the past decade. Although some marine organisms have been shown to ingest plastic, few studies have investigated the ecological effects of plastic waste on animals. Here we show that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of microplastic polystyrene particles (90 micrometers) inhibits hatching, decreases growth rates, and alters feeding preferences and innate behaviors of European perch (Perca fluviatilis) larvae. Furthermore, individuals exposed to microplastics do not respond to olfactory threat cues, which greatly increases predator-induced mortality rates. Our results demonstrate that microplastic particles operate both chemically and physically on larval fish performance and development.

  2. Genesis Concentrator Target Particle Contamination Mapping and Material Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of surface particles were found to be < 5 microns in diameter with increasing numbers close to the optical resolution limit of 0.3 microns. Acceleration grid EDS results show that the majority of materials appear to be from the SRC shell and SLA materials which include carbon-carbon fibers and Si-rich microspheres in a possible silicone binder. Other major debris material from the SRC included white paint, kapton, collector array fragments, and Al. Image analysis also revealed that SRC materials were also found mixed with the Utah mud and salt deposits. The EDS analysis of the acceleration grid showed that particles < 1 m where generally carbon based particles. Chemical cleaning techniques with Xylene and HF in an ultrasonic bath are currently being investigated for removal of small particles by the Genesis science team as well as ultra-pure water megasonic cleaning by the JSC team [4]. Removal of organic contamination from target materials is also being investigated by the science team with the use of UV-ozone cleaning devices at JSC and Open University [5]. In preparation for solar wind oxygen analyses at UCLA and Open University [1, 2], surface particle contamination on three Genesis concentrator targets was closely examined to evaluate cleaning strategies. Two silicon carbide (Genesis sample # 60001 and 60003) and one chemical vapor deposited (CVD) 13C concentrator target (60002) were imaged and mosaic mapped with optical microscopes. The resulting full target mosaic images and particle feature maps were subsequently compared with non-flight, but flight-like, concentrator targets and sample return capsule (SRC) materials. Contamination found on the flown concentrator acceleration grid was further examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for particle identification was subsequently compared with the optical images from the flown targets. Figure 1 show that all three targets imaged in this report

  3. Concentration characteristics of VOCs and acids/bases in the gas phase and water-soluble ions in the particle phase at an electrical industry park during construction and mass production.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jiun H; Huang, Yao S; Shieh, Zhu X; Chiang, Hung L

    2011-01-01

    The electronics industry is a major business in the Central Taiwan Science Park (CTSP). Particulate samples and 11 water-soluble ionic species in the particulate phase were measured by ionic chromatography (IC). Additionally, acid and base gases were sampled by denuder absorption and analyzed by IC. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected in stainless-steel canisters four times daily and analyzed via gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Ozone formation potential (OFP) was measured using maximum increment reactivity. In addition, airborne pollutants during (1) construction and (2) mass production were measured. Particulate matter concentration did not increase significantly near the optoelectronic plant during construction, but it was higher than during mass production. SO(2), HNO(2) and NH(3) were the dominant gases in the denuder absorption system. Nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium ions predominated both in PM(2.5) and PM(10-2.5); but calcium ion concentration was significantly higher in PM(10-2.5) samples during construction. Toluene, propane, isopentane, and n-butane may have come from vehicle exhaust. Construction equipment emitted high concentrations of ethylbenzene, m-xylene, p-xylene, o-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, and toluene. During mass production, methyl ethyl ketone), acetone and ethyl acetate were significantly higher than during construction, although there was continuous rain. The aromatic group constituted >50% of the VOC concentration totals and contributed >70% of OFP.

  4. Water and acid soluble trace metals in atmospheric particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, S. E.; Harriss, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Continental aerosols are collected above a deciduous forest in eastern Tennessee and subjected to selective extractions to determine the water-soluble and acid-leachable concentrations of Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn. The combined contributions of these metals to the total aerosol mass is 0.5 percent, with approximately 70 percent of this attributable to Pb alone. A substantial fraction (approximately 50 percent or more) of the acid-leachable metals is soluble in distilled water. In general, this water-soluble fraction increases with decreasing particle size and with increasing frequency of atmospheric water vapor saturation during the sampling period. The pattern of relative solubilities (Zn being greater than Mn, which is approximately equal to Cd, which is greater than Pb) is found to be similar to the general order of the thermodynamic solubilities of the most probable salts of these elements in continental aerosols with mixed fossil fuel and soil sources.

  5. Boron concentration measurement in biological tissues by charged particle spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of boron concentration in biological tissues is a fundamental aspect of boron neutron capture therapy, because the outcome of the therapy depends on the distribution of boron at a cellular level, besides on its overall concentration. This work describes a measurement technique based on the spectroscopy of the charged particles emitted in the reaction (10)B(n,α)(7)Li induced by thermal neutrons, allowing for a quantitative determination of the boron concentration in the different components that may be simultaneously present in a tissue sample, such as healthy cells, tumor cells and necrotic cells. Thin sections of tissue containing (10)B are cut at low temperatures and irradiated under vacuum in a thermal neutron field. The charged particles arising from the sample during the irradiation are collected by a thin silicon detector, and their spectrum is used to determine boron concentration through relatively easy calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of this technique are here described, and validation of the method using tissue standards with known boron concentrations is presented.

  6. Determination of dicarboxylic acids in tropospherical particles and cloudwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v. Pinxteren, D.; Brüggemann, E.; Herrmann, H.

    2003-04-01

    During two FEBUKO (field investigations of budgets and conversions of particle phase organics in troposheric cloud processes) field campaigns aerosol particle and cloudwater samples were taken in a forestal region in Germany (Thüringer Wald). Particle collection took place in fall 2001 and 2002 at two valley sites (luff and lee) of the mountain Schmücke. On top of this mountain cloudwater was sampled. The aim was to collect and physically and chemically characterize air masses before, while and after passing an orographic cloud in order to provide information about possible multiphase interactions and chemical processing of the aerosol. In this campaign capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been used to determine the dicarboxylic acids. CE has some important advantages for the analysis of ions in aerosol particles compared to the commonly used ion chromatography or gas chromatography. The absolute detection limits are very low (below 1 pmole) and it has a large range of signal-to-concentration linearity. Thus it suits to difficult matrices with strongly changing concentrations and compositions such as aerosol samples. The separation efficiency is usually much higher than in liquid chromatography and the required sample amount is low (down to <1 µL). For sampling of the particles a five-stage low-pressure cascade impactor was used. A humidity-controlled tube bundle served as the inlet device. Tedlar foil was used as an impaction substrate then used for ion analysis. For cloudwater sampling four cloudwater collectors from the California Institute of Technology (CASCC2) were used, which collect droplets with a 50% cut off diameter of 3,5 µm by inertial impaction on several rows of teflon strands. Upcoming results of the measurements are presented.

  7. Hyperammonemia Associated with Valproic Acid Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Alvariza, Silvana; Magallanes, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid, a branched short-chain fatty acid, has numerous action mechanisms which turn it into a broad spectrum anticonvulsant drug and make its use possible in some other pathologies such as bipolar disorder. It is extensively metabolized in liver, representing β-oxidation in the mitochondria one of its main metabolic route (40%). Carnitine is responsible for its entry into the mitochondria as any other fatty acid. Long-term high-dose VPA therapy or acute VPA overdose induces carnitine depletion, resulting in high levels of ammonia in blood. As a high correlation between salivary valproic acid levels and plasma ultrafiltrate levels was found in humans, saliva becomes a promising monitoring fluid in order to study valproic acid pharmacokinetics and its toxic effect. Extended-release (twice daily) formulations of valproic acid or carnitine supplementation are the proposed two therapeutic strategies in order to reverse hyperammonemia. PMID:24868521

  8. Arterial Stiffness, Lipoprotein Particle Size, and Lipoprotein Particle Concentration in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Lisa M; Silverstein, Janet H.; Shuster, Jonathan J; Haller, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine if lipoprotein particle abnormalities correlate with arterial stiffness in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D). STUDY DESIGN In this case-control study, we evaluated 70 children, 35 with T1D and 35 controls, ages 10–18 years, matched for age, sex, race, and BMI. Arterial stiffness was assessed by radial tonometry (AI75) and blood was collected for lipoprotein subclass analysis. RESULTS T1D subjects had increased AI75, decreased small LDL particle concentration (P=0.0067), increased large LDL particle concentration (P=0.007), increased large HDL particle concentration (P=0.0012), increased mean LDL particle size (P=0.0028), and increased mean HDL particle size (P<0.0001) compared to controls. No significant correlations were found between lipoprotein subclasses and arterial stiffness in T1D subjects. CONCLUSIONS T1D subjects have increased arterial stiffness when compared to controls, despite a less pro-atherogenic lipoprotein profile, indicating the need to identify other risk factors that correlate with arterial stiffness in T1D youth. PMID:20857838

  9. Effect of particle hardness on the penetration behavior of fabrics intercalated with dry particles and concentrated particle-fluid suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kalman, Dennis P; Merrill, Richard L; Wagner, Norman J; Wetzel, Eric D

    2009-11-01

    The penetration behavior of Kevlar fabric intercalated with dry particles and shear thickening fluids (STF), highly concentrated fluid-particle suspensions, is presented. In particular, the role of particle hardness is explored by comparing fabric treatments containing SiO(2) particles, which are significantly harder than Kevlar, to treatments containing softer poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) particles. The fabric testing includes yarn pull-out, quasi-static spike puncture, and ballistic penetration resistance, performed on single fabric layers. It was found that both dry particle and STF treatments resulted in improvements in fabric properties relative to neat or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) treated fabrics. On comparison of treatments with different particle hardness, the SiO(2) materials performed better in all tests than comparable PMMA materials, although the SiO(2) treatments caused yarn failure in pull-out testing, reducing the total pull-out energy. In addition, resistance to yarn pull-out was found to be substantially higher for STF-treated fabrics than for dry particle treated fabrics. However, both dry particle addition and STF treatments exhibited comparable enhancements in puncture and ballistic resistance. These observations suggest that viscous stress transfer, friction, and physical entrainment of hard particles into filaments contribute to the demonstrated improvements in the properties of protective fabrics treated with shear thickening fluids.

  10. Characterization of ultrafine particle number concentration and new particle formation in urban environment of Taipei, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Huang, W.-R.; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2013-04-01

    An intensive aerosol characterization experiment was performed at the Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory (TARO, 25.02° N, 121.53° E) in the urban area of Taipei, Taiwan during July 2012. Number concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles were measured continuously, which were accompanied by concurrent measurements of mass concentration of submicron particles, PM (d ≤ 1 μm), and photolysis rate of ozone, J(O1D). The averaged number concentrations of total (Ntotal), accumulation mode (Nacu), Aitken mode (Ntotal), and nucleation mode (Nnuc) particles were 7.6 × 103 cm-3, 1.2 × 103 cm-3, 4.4 × 103 cm-3, and 1.9 × 103 cm-3, respectively. Accordingly, the ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100 nm) accounted for 83% of the total number concentration of particles measured in this study (10 ≤ d ≤ 429 nm), indicating the importance of UFPs to the air quality and radiation budget in Taipei and its surrounding areas. An averaged Nnuc/NOx ratio of ~60 cm-3 ppbv-1 was derived from nighttime measurements, which was suggested to be the characteristic of vehicle emissions that contributed to the "urban background" of nucleation mode particles throughout a day. On the contrary, it was found that the number concentration of nucleation mode particles was independent of NOx and could be elevated up to 10 times the "urban background" levels during daytime, suggesting a substantial amount of nucleation mode particles produced from photochemical processes. Consistency in the time series of the nucleation mode particle concentration and the proxy of H2SO4 production, UVB·SO2, for new particle formation (NPF) events showed that photo-oxidation of SO2 was responsible for the formation of new particles in our study area. Moreover, analysis upon the diameter growth rate, GR, and formation rate of nucleation mode particles, J10-25, found that the values of GR (8.5 ± 6.8 nm h-1) in Taipei were comparable to other urban areas, whereas the values of J10-25 (2.2 ± 1

  11. Outdoor ultrafine particle concentrations in front of fast food restaurants.

    PubMed

    Vert, Cristina; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been associated with negative effects on human health. Emissions from motor vehicles are the principal source of UFPs in urban air. A study in Vancouver suggested that UFP concentrations were related to density of fast food restaurants near the monitoring sites. A previous monitoring campaign could not separate the contribution of restaurants from road traffic. The main goal of this study has been the quantification of fast food restaurants' contribution to outdoor UFP concentrations. A portable particle number counter (DiscMini) has been used to carry out mobile monitoring in a largely pedestrianized area in the city center of Utrecht. A fixed route passing 17 fast food restaurants was followed on 8 days. UFP concentrations in front of the restaurants were 1.61 times higher than in a nearby square without any local sources used as control area and 1.22 times higher compared with all measurements conducted in between the restaurants. Adjustment for other sources such as passing mopeds, smokers or candles did not explain the increase. In conclusion, fast food restaurants result in significant increases in outdoor UFP concentrations in front of the restaurant.

  12. Outdoor ultrafine particle concentrations in front of fast food restaurants.

    PubMed

    Vert, Cristina; Meliefste, Kees; Hoek, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have been associated with negative effects on human health. Emissions from motor vehicles are the principal source of UFPs in urban air. A study in Vancouver suggested that UFP concentrations were related to density of fast food restaurants near the monitoring sites. A previous monitoring campaign could not separate the contribution of restaurants from road traffic. The main goal of this study has been the quantification of fast food restaurants' contribution to outdoor UFP concentrations. A portable particle number counter (DiscMini) has been used to carry out mobile monitoring in a largely pedestrianized area in the city center of Utrecht. A fixed route passing 17 fast food restaurants was followed on 8 days. UFP concentrations in front of the restaurants were 1.61 times higher than in a nearby square without any local sources used as control area and 1.22 times higher compared with all measurements conducted in between the restaurants. Adjustment for other sources such as passing mopeds, smokers or candles did not explain the increase. In conclusion, fast food restaurants result in significant increases in outdoor UFP concentrations in front of the restaurant. PMID:26531805

  13. Effect of precursor concentration and spray pyrolysis temperature upon hydroxyapatite particle size and density.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jeong-Cheol; Rhee, Sang-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    In the synthesis of hydroxyapatite powders by spray pyrolysis, control of the particle size was investigated by varying the initial concentration of the precursor solution and the pyrolysis temperature. Calcium phosphate solutions (Ca/P ratio of 1.67) with a range of concentrations from 0.1 to 2.0 mol/L were prepared by dissolving calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and diammonium hydrogen phosphate in deionized water and subsequently adding nitric acid. Hydroxyapatite powders were then synthesized by spray pyrolysis at 900°C and at 1500°C, using these calcium phosphate precursor solutions, under the fixed carrier gas flow rate of 10 L/min. The particle size decreased as the precursor concentration decreased and the spray pyrolysis temperature increased. Sinterability tests conducted at 1100°C for 1 h showed that the smaller and denser the particles were, the higher the relative densities were of sintered hydroxyapatite disks formed from these particles. The practical implication of these results is that highly sinterable small and dense hydroxyapatite particles can be synthesized by means of spray pyrolysis using a low-concentration precursor solution and a high pyrolysis temperature under a fixed carrier gas flow rate.

  14. Field evaluation of nanofilm detectors for measuring acidic particles in indoor and outdoor air.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beverly S; Heikkinen, Maire S A; Hazi, Yair; Gao, Hai; Peters, Paul; Lippmann, Morton

    2004-09-01

    This field evaluation study was conducted to assess new technology designed to measure number concentrations of strongly acidic ultrafine particles. Interest in these particles derives from their potential to cause adverse health effects. Current methods for counting and sizing airborne ultrafine particles cannot isolate those particles that are acidic. We hypothesized that the size-resolved number concentration of such particles to which people are exposed could be measured by newly developed iron nanofilm detectors on which sulfuric acid (H2SO4*) droplets produce distinctive ringed reaction sites visible by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We carried out field measurements using an array of samplers, with and without the iron nanofilm detectors, that allowed indirect comparison of particle number concentrations and size-resolved measures of acidity. The iron nanofilm detectors are silicon chips (5 mm x 5 mm x 0.6 mm) that are coated with iron by vapor deposition. The iron layer was 21.5 or 26 nm thick for the two batches used in these experiments. After exposure the detector surface was scanned topographically by AFM to view and enumerate the ringed acid reaction sites and deposited nonacidic particles. The number of reaction sites and particles per scan can be counted directly on the image displayed by AFM. Sizes can also be measured, but for this research we did not size particles collected in the field. The integrity of the surface of iron nanofilm detectors was monitored by laboratory analysis and by deploying blank detectors and detectors that had previously been exposed to H2SO4 calibration aerosols. The work established that the detectors could be used with confidence in temperate climates. Under extreme high humidity and high temperature, the surface film was liable to detach from the support, but remaining portions of the film still produced reliable data. Exposure to ambient gases in a filtered air canister during the field tests did not affect the film

  15. Field evaluation of nanofilm detectors for measuring acidic particles in indoor and outdoor air.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Beverly S; Heikkinen, Maire S A; Hazi, Yair; Gao, Hai; Peters, Paul; Lippmann, Morton

    2004-09-01

    This field evaluation study was conducted to assess new technology designed to measure number concentrations of strongly acidic ultrafine particles. Interest in these particles derives from their potential to cause adverse health effects. Current methods for counting and sizing airborne ultrafine particles cannot isolate those particles that are acidic. We hypothesized that the size-resolved number concentration of such particles to which people are exposed could be measured by newly developed iron nanofilm detectors on which sulfuric acid (H2SO4*) droplets produce distinctive ringed reaction sites visible by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We carried out field measurements using an array of samplers, with and without the iron nanofilm detectors, that allowed indirect comparison of particle number concentrations and size-resolved measures of acidity. The iron nanofilm detectors are silicon chips (5 mm x 5 mm x 0.6 mm) that are coated with iron by vapor deposition. The iron layer was 21.5 or 26 nm thick for the two batches used in these experiments. After exposure the detector surface was scanned topographically by AFM to view and enumerate the ringed acid reaction sites and deposited nonacidic particles. The number of reaction sites and particles per scan can be counted directly on the image displayed by AFM. Sizes can also be measured, but for this research we did not size particles collected in the field. The integrity of the surface of iron nanofilm detectors was monitored by laboratory analysis and by deploying blank detectors and detectors that had previously been exposed to H2SO4 calibration aerosols. The work established that the detectors could be used with confidence in temperate climates. Under extreme high humidity and high temperature, the surface film was liable to detach from the support, but remaining portions of the film still produced reliable data. Exposure to ambient gases in a filtered air canister during the field tests did not affect the film

  16. Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamai, Hisashi; Hamamoto, Shiro; Nishiyama, Fumitaka; Yasuda, Hajime

    1995-04-01

    Ultrafine metal particles immobilized on styrene/acrylic acid copolymer fine particles were produced by reducing the copolymer particles-metal ion complexes or refluxing an ethanol solution of metal ions in the presence of copolymer particles. The size of metal particles formed by reduction of the complex is smaller than that by reflux of the metal ion solution and depends on the amount of metal ions immobilized.

  17. Particle size concentration distribution and influences on exhaled breath particles in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Wu, Chieh-Liang; Chen, Yi-Fang; Huang, Sheng-Hsiu; Wang, Yu-Ling; Chen, Chun-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Humans produce exhaled breath particles (EBPs) during various breath activities, such as normal breathing, coughing, talking, and sneezing. Airborne transmission risk exists when EBPs have attached pathogens. Until recently, few investigations had evaluated the size and concentration distributions of EBPs from mechanically ventilated patients with different ventilation mode settings. This study thus broke new ground by not only evaluating the size concentration distributions of EBPs in mechanically ventilated patients, but also investigating the relationship between EBP level and positive expiratory end airway pressure (PEEP), tidal volume, and pneumonia. This investigation recruited mechanically ventilated patients, with and without pneumonia, aged 20 years old and above, from the respiratory intensive care unit of a medical center. Concentration distributions of EBPs from mechanically ventilated patients were analyzed with an optical particle analyzer. This study finds that EBP concentrations from mechanically ventilated patients during normal breathing were in the range 0.47-2,554.04 particles/breath (0.001-4.644 particles/mL). EBP concentrations did not differ significantly between the volume control and pressure control modes of the ventilation settings in the mechanically ventilated patients. The patient EBPs were sized below 5 µm, and 80% of them ranged from 0.3 to 1.0 µm. The EBPs concentrations in patients with high PEEP (> 5 cmH₂O) clearly exceeded those in patients with low PEEP (≤ 5 cmH₂O). Additionally, a significant negative association existed between pneumonia duration and EBPs concentration. However, tidal volume was not related to EBPs concentration.

  18. High concentrations of coarse particles emitted from a cattle feeding operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Gramann, J.; Auvermann, B. W.

    2011-08-01

    Housing roughly 10 million head of cattle in the United States alone, open air cattle feedlots represent a significant but poorly constrained source of atmospheric particles. Here we present a comprehensive characterization of physical and chemical properties of particles emitted from a large representative cattle feedlot in the Southwest United States. In the summer of 2008, measurements and samplings were conducted at the upwind and downwind edges of the facility. A series of far-field measurements and samplings was also conducted 3.5 km north of the facility. Two instruments, a GRIMM Sequential Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a GRIMM Portable Aerosol Spectrometer (PAS), were used to measure particle size distributions over the range of 0.01 to 25 μm diameter. Raman microspectroscopy was used to determine the chemical composition of particles on a single particle basis. Volume size distributions of dust were dominated by coarse mode particles. Twenty-four hour averaged concentrations of PM10 (particulate matter with a diameter of 10 μm or less) were as high as 1200 μg m-3 during the campaign. The primary constituents of the particulate matter were carbonaceous materials, such as humic acid, water soluble organics, and less soluble fatty acids, including stearic acid and tristearin. A significant fraction of the organic particles was present in internal mixtures with salts. Basic characteristics such as size distribution and composition of agricultural aerosols were found to be different than the properties of those found in urban and semi-urban aerosols. Failing to account for such differences may lead to errors in estimates of aerosol effects on local air quality, visibility, and public health.

  19. Particle size and metals concentrations of dust from a paint manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Huang, Siew Lai; Yin, Chun-Yang; Yap, Siaw Yang

    2010-02-15

    In this study, the particle size distribution and concentration of metallic elements of solvent- and water-based paint dust from bulk dust collected from dust-collecting hoppers were determined. The mean particle size diameter over a 12-week sampling period was determined using a particle size analyzer. The metals composition and concentration of the dust were determined via acid digestion technique followed by concentration analysis using inductively coupled plasma. The volume weighted mean particle diameters were found to be 0.941+/-0.016 and 8.185+/-0.201 microm for solvent- and water-based paint dust, respectively. The mean concentrations of metals in solvent-based paint dust were found to be 100+/-20.00 microg/g (arsenic), 1550+/-550.00 microg/g (copper), 15,680+/-11,780.00 microg/g (lead) and 30,460+/-10,580.00 microg/g (zinc) while the mean concentrations of metals in water-based paint dust were found to be 20.65+/-6.11 microg/g (arsenic), 9.14+/-14.65 microg/g (copper), 57.46+/-22.42 microg/g (lead) and 1660+/-1260 microg/g (zinc). Both paint dust types could be considered as hazardous since almost all of the dust particles were smaller than 10 microm. Particular emphasis on containment of solvent-based paint dust particles should be given since it was shown that they were very fine in size (<1 microm) and had high lead and zinc concentrations.

  20. Environmentally relevant concentrations of microplastic particles influence larval fish ecology.

    PubMed

    Lönnstedt, Oona M; Eklöv, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The widespread occurrence and accumulation of plastic waste in the environment have become a growing global concern over the past decade. Although some marine organisms have been shown to ingest plastic, few studies have investigated the ecological effects of plastic waste on animals. Here we show that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of microplastic polystyrene particles (90 micrometers) inhibits hatching, decreases growth rates, and alters feeding preferences and innate behaviors of European perch (Perca fluviatilis) larvae. Furthermore, individuals exposed to microplastics do not respond to olfactory threat cues, which greatly increases predator-induced mortality rates. Our results demonstrate that microplastic particles operate both chemically and physically on larval fish performance and development. PMID:27257256

  1. Statistics of particle concentration in free-surface turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bandi, Mahesh M; Larkin, J; Goldburg, W

    2009-01-01

    Particles on the surface of an incompressible fluid maintained in a turbulent steady-state cluster into spatio-temporally complex flow structures. We experimentally study the statistics of particle concentration n(r, t) over various coarse-grained scales r' in the inertial range. Another control parameter is the Taylor Microscale Reynolds number Re{sub {lambda}}. The focus is on the steady state probability density function {Pi}(n{sub r}). Attention is also given to the variance {sigma}{sup 2}(r, t) of this PDF, since it yields information about the topology of the coagulated structures. Where possible, the results are compared and contrasted with those obtained in a recent analytical and numerical study of two-dimensional synthetic turbulence by Ducasse and Pumir. There, but not here, the dimensionless compressibility C is an important control parameter.

  2. Characterization of the interactions within fine particle mixtures in highly concentrated suspensions for advanced particle processing.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Akira; Bryant, Gary

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to summarize recent investigations into the dispersion of fine particles, and the characterization of their interactions, in concentrated suspensions. This summary will provide a better understanding of the current status of this research, and will provide useful feedback for advanced particle processing. Such processes include the fabrication of functional nanostructures and the sustainable beneficiation of complex ores. For example, there has been increasing demand for complex ore utilization due to the noticeable decrease in the accessibility of high grade and easily extractable ores. In order to maintain the sustainable use of mineral resources, the effective beneficiation of complex ores is urgently required. It can be successfully achieved only with selective particle/mineral dispersion/liberation and the assistance of mineralogical and particle characterization. PMID:26298173

  3. Characterization of the interactions within fine particle mixtures in highly concentrated suspensions for advanced particle processing.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Akira; Bryant, Gary

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to summarize recent investigations into the dispersion of fine particles, and the characterization of their interactions, in concentrated suspensions. This summary will provide a better understanding of the current status of this research, and will provide useful feedback for advanced particle processing. Such processes include the fabrication of functional nanostructures and the sustainable beneficiation of complex ores. For example, there has been increasing demand for complex ore utilization due to the noticeable decrease in the accessibility of high grade and easily extractable ores. In order to maintain the sustainable use of mineral resources, the effective beneficiation of complex ores is urgently required. It can be successfully achieved only with selective particle/mineral dispersion/liberation and the assistance of mineralogical and particle characterization.

  4. Extinction of polarized light in ferrofluids with different magnetic particle concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Socoliuc, V.; Popescu, L. B.

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic field intensity and nanoparticle concentration dependence of the polarized light extinction in a ferrofluid made of magnetite particles stabilized with technical grade oleic acid dispersed in transformer oil was experimentally investigated. The magnetically induced optical anisotropy, i.e. the dichroism divided by concentration, was found to decrease with increasing sample concentration from 2% to 8%. The magnetically induced change in the optical extinction of light polarized at 54.74° with respect to the magnetic field direction was found to be positive for the less concentrated sample (2%) and negative for the samples with 4% and 8% magnetic nanoparticle concentrations, the more negative the higher the concentration and field intensity. Based on the theoretically proven fact [11] that the particle orientation mechanism has no effect on the extinction of light polarized at 54.74° with respect to the field direction, we analyzed the experimental findings in the frames of the agglomeration and long-range pair correlations theories for the magnetically induced optical anisotropy in ferrofluids. We developed a theoretical model in the approximation of single scattering for the optical extinction coefficient of a ferrofluid with magnetically induced particle agglomeration. The model predicts the existence of a polarization independent component of the optical extinction coefficient that is experimentally measurable at 54.74° polarization angle. The change in the optical extinction of light polarized at 54.74° is positive if only the formation of straight n-particle chains is considered and may become negative in the hypothesis that the longer chains degenerate to more isotropic structures (polymer-like coils, globules or bundles of chains). The model for the influence on the light absorption of the long-range pair correlations, published elsewhere, predicts that the change in the optical extinction of light polarized at 54.74° is always negative, the

  5. DICARBOXYLIC ACID CONCENTRATION TRENDS AND SAMPLING ARTIFACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dicarboxylic acids associated with airborne particulate matter were measured during a summer period in Philadelphia that included multiple air pollution episodes. Samples were collected for two ten hour periods each day using a high volume sampler with two quartz fiber filters in...

  6. Optical detection of glucose concentration in samples with scattering particles.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Han; Lo, Yu-Lung; Liao, Chia-Chi; Lin, Jian-Xiang

    2015-12-10

    An optical-based method is proposed for measuring the glucose concentration of samples containing scattering particles. In the proposed approach, a Stokes-Mueller reflection-based polarimetry technique is used to solve the Mueller matrices of a turbid glucose sample with circular birefringence and depolarization properties given six incident lights with different polarization states. Using an error function defined as the difference between the simulated output Stokes vectors and the experimental ones, a genetic algorithm is used to inversely derive the optical rotation and depolarization parameters of the experimental sample corresponding to the glucose concentration and scattering depolarization effect, respectively. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using glucose samples containing 0.02 ml and 0.04 ml lipofundin, respectively. PMID:26836866

  7. Particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in transportation microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houston, Douglas; Wu, Jun; Yang, Dongwoo; Jaimes, Guillermo

    2013-06-01

    This study is one of the first case studies to characterize the exposure of urban residents to traffic-related air pollution across locations and transportation microenvironments during everyday activities. Twenty-four adult residents of Boyle Heights, a neighborhood near downtown Los Angeles, carried a portable air pollution monitor and a Global Positioning Systems (GPS) tracking device for a total of 96 days. We found significant spatial and temporal variation in the particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pPAH) concentrations in transportation microenvironments. Average pPAH concentrations were higher while walking outdoors (190 ng m-3) compared to traveling in private passenger vehicles (138-155 ng m-3) or traveling in public transportation (61-124 ng m-3). Although travel comprised 5% of participant days, it was associated with 27% of overall daily pPAH exposure. Regression models explained 40-55% of the variation in daily average pPAH concentrations, and 40-44% of the variation in 1-min interval concentrations. Important factors included time spent traveling, travel speed, meteorological and nearby land use factors, time of day, and proximity to roadways. Although future research is needed to develop stronger predictive models, our study demonstrates portable tracking devices can provide a more complete, diurnal characterization of air pollution exposures for urban populations.

  8. Fatty acids on continental sulfate aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervahattu, H.; Juhanoja, J.; Vaida, V.; Tuck, A. F.; Niemi, J. V.; Kupiainen, K.; Kulmala, M.; VehkamäKi, H.

    2005-03-01

    Surface analyses of atmospheric aerosols from different continental sources, such as forest fires and coal and straw burning, show that organic surfactants are found on such aerosols. The predominant organic species detected by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry on the sulfate aerosols are fatty acids of different carbon chain length up to the C32 acid. These observations are consistent with literature accounts of functional group analysis of bulk samples, but this is the first direct evidence of fatty acid films on the surface of sulfate aerosols. Surface analysis leads to the conclusion that fatty acid films on continental aerosols may be more common than has been previously suggested.

  9. A case study of urban particle acidity and its influence on secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Jimenez, Jose L; Worsnop, Douglas R; Canagaratna, Manjula

    2007-05-01

    Size-resolved indicators of aerosol acidity, including H+ ion concentrations (H+Aer) and the ratio of stoichiometric neutralization are evaluated in submicrometer aerosols using highly time-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) data from Pittsburgh. The pH and ionic strength within the aqueous particle phase are also estimated using the Aerosol Inorganics Model (AIM). Different mechanisms that contribute to the presence of acidic particles in Pittsburgh are discussed. The largest H+Aer loadings and lowest levels of stoichiometric neutralization were detected when PM1 loadings were high and dominated by SO4(2-). The average size distribution of H+Aer loading shows an accumulation mode at Dva approximately 600 nm and an enhanced smaller mode that centers at Dva approximately 200 nm and tails into smaller sizes. The acidity in the accumulation mode particles suggests that there is generally not enough gas-phase NH3 available on a regional scale to completely neutralize sulfate in Pittsburgh. The lack of stoichiometric neutralization in the 200 nm mode particles is likely caused by the relatively slow mixing of gas-phase NH3 into SO2-rich plumes containing younger particles. We examined the influence of particle acidity on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation by comparing the mass concentrations and size distributions of oxygenated organic aerosol (00A--surrogate for SOA in Pittsburgh) during periods when particles are, on average, acidic to those when particles are bulk neutralized. The average mass concentration of ODA during the acidic periods (3.1 +/- 1.7 microg m(-3)) is higher than that during the neutralized periods (2.5 +/- 1.3 microg m(-3)). Possible reasons for this enhancement include increased condensation of SOA species, acid-catalyzed SOA formation, and/or differences in air mass transport and history. However, even if the entire enhancement (approximately 0.6 microg m(-3)) can be attributed to acid catalysis, the upperbound increase of SOA mass

  10. Spatial variability of fine particle concentrations in three European areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoek, Gerard; Meliefste, Kees; Cyrys, Josef; Lewné, Marie; Bellander, Tom; Brauer, Mike; Fischer, Paul; Gehring, Ulrike; Heinrich, Joachim; van Vliet, Patricia; Brunekreef, Bert

    Epidemiological studies of long-term air pollution effects have been hampered by difficulties in characterizing the spatial variation in air pollution. We conducted a study to assess the risk of long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution for the development of inhalant allergy and asthma in children in Stockholm county, Munich and the Netherlands. Exposure to traffic-related air pollution was assessed through a 1-year monitoring program and regression modeling using exposure indicators. This paper documents the performance of the exposure monitoring strategy and the spatial variation of ambient particle concentrations. We measured the ambient concentration of PM2.5 and the reflectance of PM2.5 filters ('soot') at 40-42 sites representative of different exposure conditions of the three study populations. Each site was measured during four 14-day average sampling periods spread over one year (spring 1999 to summer 2000). In each study area, a continuous measurement site was operated to remove potential bias due to temporal variation. The selected approach was an efficient method to characterize spatial differences in annual average concentration between a large number of sites in each study area. Adjustment with data from the continuous measurement site improved the precision of the calculated annual averages, especially for PM2.5. Annual average PM2.5 concentrations ranged from 11 to 20 μg/m 3 in Munich, from 8 to 16 μg/m 3 in Stockholm and from 14 to 26 μg/m 3 in the Netherlands. Larger spatial contrasts were found for the absorption coefficient of PM2.5. PM2.5 concentrations were on average 17-18% higher at traffic sites than at urban background sites, but PM2.5 absorption coefficients at traffic sites were between 31% and 55% increased above background. This suggests that spatial variation of traffic-related air pollution may be underestimated if PM2.5 only is measured.

  11. Model for a surface film of fatty acids on rain water and aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, Winfried

    Organic compounds with polar groups can form films on the water surface which lower the surface tension and may hinder the transport of water vapor and trace gases through the interface. A model is presented which describes in detail surface films formed by fatty acids. The model has been applied to measured concentrations of fatty acids on rain water and atmospheric aerosol particles. In most cases only a diluted film has been calculated which does not affect their physical and chemical properties. The exception was a clean region in the western USA, where the fatty acid concentrations are sufficiently high to form a dense film on atmospheric aerosol particles. An algorithm for the identification of the sources of fatty acids was developed. It showed leaf abrasion or biomass burning as a major source of fatty acids in the western USA.

  12. The Volumetric Particle Approach for Concentration Fluctuations and Chemical Reactions in Lagrangian Particle and Particle-grid Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, Massimo

    2013-02-01

    A new approach is proposed to predict concentration fluctuations in the framework of one-particle Lagrangian stochastic models. The approach is innovative since it allows the computation of concentration fluctuations in dispersing plumes using a Lagrangian one-particle model with micromixing but with no need for the simulating of background particles. The extension of the model for the treatment of chemically reactive plumes is also accomplished and allows the computation of plume-related chemical reactions in a Lagrangian one-particle framework separately from the background chemical reactions, accounting for the effect of concentration fluctuations on chemical reactions in a general, albeit approximate, manner. These characteristics should make the proposed approach an ideal tool for plume-in-grid calculations in chemistry transport models. The results are compared to the wind-tunnel experiments of Fackrell and Robins (J Fluid Mech, 117:1-26, 1982) for plume dispersion in a neutral boundary layer and to the measurements of Legg et al. (Boundary-Layer Meteorol, 35:277-302, 1986) for line source dispersion in and above a model canopy. Preliminary reacting plume simulations are also shown comparing the model with the experimental results of Brown and Bilger (J Fluid Mech, 312:373-407, 1996; Atmos Environ, 32:611-628, 1998) to demonstrate the feasibility of computing chemical reactions in the proposed framework.

  13. Indoor concentrations of fine particles and particle-bound PAHs in Gothenburg, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannesson, S.; Bergemalm-Rynell, K.; Strandberg, B.; Sällsten, G.

    2009-02-01

    Fine particles are formed in a variety of processes, both natural and anthropogenic. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between exposure to particulate matter and adverse health effects. Airborne particles contain a variety of compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and several of the PAHs are known or suspected carcinogens. In this study, stationary measurements of PM2.5 were performed in the residences of 20 study participants along with simultaneous monitoring at an urban background site. The collected particle mass was then analyzed for its content of some particle-bound PAHs using GC-MS. The median level of PM2.5 indoors was 7.3 μg/m3 and in urban background 5.3 μg/m3. For benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) the corresponding results were 10 pg/m3 and 35 pg/m3, respectively. There were significant correlations between indoor and ambient levels for both PM2.5 (rs=0.58, p=0.02) and B(a)P (rs=0.67, p=0.007). No significant correlation was, however, found between the concentration of PM2.5 and the associated levels of the investigated PAH compounds. This finding implies that exposure to B(a)P or other particle-bound PAH components needs to be separately assessed.

  14. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Rizzo, L. V.; Pauliqueivis, T.; Kuwata, Mikinori; Karl, Thomas G.; Guenther, Alex B.; Allan, James D.; Coe, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Poeschl, U.; Jiminez, J. L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Martin, Scot T.

    2015-01-01

    Real-time mass spectra of non-refractory component of submicron aerosol particles were recorded in a tropical rainforest in the central Amazon basin during the wet season of 2008, as a part of the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08). Organic components accounted on average for more than 80% of the non-refractory submicron particle mass concentrations during the period of measurements. Ammonium was present in sufficient quantities to halfway neutralize sulfate. In this acidic, isoprene-dominated, low-NOx environment the high-resolution mass spectra as well as mass closures with ion chromatography measurements did not provide evidence for significant contributions of organosulfate species, at least at concentrations above uncertainty levels. Positive-matrix factorization of the time series of particle mass spectra identified four statistical factors to account for the variance of the signal intensities of the organic constituents: a factor HOA having a hydrocarbon-like signature and identified as regional emissions of primary organic material, a factor OOA-1 associated with fresh production of secondary organic material by a mechanism of BVOC oxidation followed by gas-to-particle conversion, a factor OOA-2 consistent with reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products, especially epoxydiols by acidic particles, and a factor OOA-3 associated with long range transport and atmospheric aging. The OOA-1, -2, and -3 factors had progressively more oxidized signatures. Diameter-resolved mass spectral markers also suggested enhanced reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products to the accumulation mode for the OOA-2 factor, and such size partitioning can be indicative of in-cloud process. The campaign-average factor loadings were in a ratio of 1.1:1.0 for the OOA-1 compared to the OOA-2 pathway, suggesting the comparable importance of gas-phase compared to particle-phase (including cloud waters) production pathways of secondary organic material during

  15. Acidic reaction products of mono- and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-01-01

    Biogenic acids were measured from PM2.5 aerosols at SMEAR II station (Station For Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations) in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The measured organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene. Due to lack of authentic standards caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesized at the Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, University of Helsinki. The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during summer concomitant with the precursor mono- and sesquiterpenes. Of the acids β-caryophyllinic acid had highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected on the basis of emission calculations of precursor compounds and yields in oxidation experiments in smog chambers implicating that β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields are underestimated. Concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursor were clearly lower in summer than in winter indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were correlated with the accumulation mode particle number concentrations.

  16. Convection in colloidal suspensions with particle-concentration-dependent viscosity.

    PubMed

    Glässl, M; Hilt, M; Zimmermann, W

    2010-07-01

    The onset of thermal convection in a horizontal layer of a colloidal suspension is investigated in terms of a continuum model for binary-fluid mixtures where the viscosity depends on the local concentration of colloidal particles. With an increasing difference between the viscosity at the warmer and the colder boundary the threshold of convection is reduced in the range of positive values of the separation ratio psi with the onset of stationary convection as well as in the range of negative values of psi with an oscillatory Hopf bifurcation. Additionally the convection rolls are shifted downwards with respect to the center of the horizontal layer for stationary convection psi>0 and upwards for the Hopf bifurcation (psi<0.

  17. Acidic reaction products of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes in atmospheric fine particles in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vestenius, M.; Hellén, H.; Levula, J.; Kuronen, P.; Helminen, K. J.; Nieminen, T.; Kulmala, M.; Hakola, H.

    2014-08-01

    Biogenic acids were measured in aerosols at the SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station in Finland from June 2010 until October 2011. The analysed organic acids were pinic, pinonic, caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids from oxidation of α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene and β-caryophyllene, respectively. Due to a lack of authentic standards, the caric, limonic and caryophyllinic acids were synthesised for this study. The mean, median, maximum and minimum concentrations (ng m-3) were as follows: limonic acid (1.26, 0.80, 16.5, below detection limit (< LOD)), pinic acid (5.53, 3.25, 31.4, 0.15), pinonic acid (9.87, 5.07, 80.1, < LOD), caric acid (5.52, 3.58, 49.8, < LOD), and caryophyllinic acid (7.87, 6.07, 86.1, < LOD). The highest terpenoic acid concentrations were measured during the summer. Of the acids, β-caryophyllinic acid showed the highest concentrations in summer, but during other times of the year pinonic acid was the most abundant. The β-caryophyllinic acid contribution was higher than expected, based on the emission calculations of the precursor compounds and yields from oxidation experiments in smog chambers, implying that the β-caryophyllene emissions or β-caryophyllinic acid yields were underestimated. The concentration ratios between terpenoic acids and their precursors were clearly lower in summer than in winter, indicating stronger partitioning to the aerosol phase during the cold winter season. The β-caryophyllinic and caric acids were weakly correlated with the accumulation-mode particle number concentrations.

  18. FINE AND COARSE PARTICLES: CONCENTRATION RELATIONSHIPS RELEVANT TO EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine particles and coarse particles are defined in terms of the modal structure of particle size distributions typically observed in the atmosphere. Differences among the various modes are discussed. The fractions of fine and coarse particles collected in specific size ranges, ...

  19. Nucleic acid separations using superficially porous silica particles

    PubMed Central

    Close, Elizabeth D.; Nwokeoji, Alison O.; Milton, Dafydd; Cook, Ken; Hindocha, Darsha M.; Hook, Elliot C.; Wood, Helen; Dickman, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Ion pair reverse-phase liquid chromatography has been widely employed for nucleic acid separations. A wide range of alternative stationary phases have been utilised in conjunction with ion pair reverse-phase chromatography, including totally porous particles, non-porous particles, macroporous particles and monolithic stationary phases. In this study we have utilised superficially porous silica particles in conjunction with ion pair reverse-phase liquid chromatography for the analysis of nucleic acids. We have investigated a range of different pore-sizes and phases for the analysis of a diverse range of nucleic acids including oligonucleotides, oligoribonucleotides, phosphorothioate oligonucleotides and high molecular weight dsDNA and RNA. The pore size of the superficially porous silica particles was shown to significantly affect the resolution of the nucleic acids. Optimum separations of small oligonucleotides such as those generated in RNase mapping experiments were obtained with 80 Å pore sizes and can readily be interfaced with mass spectrometry analysis. Improved resolution of larger oligonucleotides (>19 mers) was observed with pore sizes of 150 Å. The optimum resolution for larger dsDNA/RNA molecules was achieved using superficially porous silica particles with pore sizes of 400 Å. Furthermore, we have utilised 150 Å pore size solid-core particles to separate typical impurities of a fully phosphorothioated oligonucleotide, which are often generated in the synthesis of this important class of therapeutic oligonucleotide. PMID:26948761

  20. Highly accurate boronimeter assay of concentrated boric acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, R.M. )

    1992-01-01

    The Random-Walk Boronimeter has successfully been used as an on-line indicator of boric acid concentration in an operating commercial pressurized water reactor. The principle has been adapted for measurement of discrete samples to high accuracy and to concentrations up to 6000 ppm natural boron in light water. Boric acid concentration in an aqueous solution is a necessary measurement in many nuclear power plants, particularly those that use boric acid dissolved in the reactor coolant as a reactivity control system. Other nuclear plants use a high-concentration boric acid solution as a backup shutdown system. Such a shutdown system depends on rapid injection of the solution and frequent surveillance of the fluid to ensure the presence of the neutron absorber. The two methods typically used to measure boric acid are the chemical and the physical methods. The chemical method uses titration to determine the ionic concentration of the BO[sub 3] ions and infers the boron concentration. The physical method uses the attenuation of neutrons by the solution and infers the boron concentration from the neutron absorption properties. This paper describes the Random-Walk Boronimeter configured to measure discrete samples to high accuracy and high concentration.

  1. Heart Rate Response and Lactic Acid Concentration in Squash Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudin, Paula; And Others

    1978-01-01

    It was concluded that playing squash is an activity that results in heart rate responses of sufficient intensity to elicit aerobic training effects without producing high lactic acid concentration in the blood. (MM)

  2. Serum concentration of sialic acids in naturally occurring ovine babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilnejad, Bijan; Tavassoli, Mousa; Asri-Rezaei, Siamak; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Abtahi Froushani, Seyyed Meysam; Arjmand, Jafar; Golabi, Mostafa

    2014-10-01

    This study is designated to assess the effect of the severity of Babesia ovis infection on sialic acid concentration in blood sera in naturally infected sheep. Infected animals (diseased group) comprised 38 Iranian fat-tailed sheep, about 1-3 years old, naturally infected with B. ovis, divided into four subgroups with respect to parasitemia rates (low 0.1-0.3 %, moderate 0.4-0.9 %, high 1-2.5 %, and very high >2.5 %). The parasitological diagnosis was confirmed using PCR analysis. As a control group, ten clinically healthy sheep reared under the same management and environmental conditions were also sampled. Hematological parameters and the concentrations of total sialic acid (TSA), lipid-bound sialic acid (LBSA), and protein-bound sialic acid (PBSA) were measured in both groups. Compared to controls, sialic acid concentrations showed significant increase (p < 0.05) in infected sheep. Parasitemia rate was positively correlated with sialic acid concentrations. This study demonstrated that B. ovis infection induced marked and persistent elevations of serum sialic acid concentrations. It seems that increase of serum sialic acid concentrations during parasitemia alter receptor-ligand interactions, which are known to play important role in immune response. Furthermore, sialic acid would indirectly inhibit the action of leukocytes and consequently promote the evasion of the immune response and persistence of the parasite in the host. This factor could influence the parasite-host cell adhesion, but further detailed biochemical investigations are needed to precisely explain the exact role of sialic acid in invasion process of the parasite to the host cells.

  3. Pictorial Analogies XI: Concentrations and Acidity of Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortman, John J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents pictorial analogies of several concepts relating to solutions for chemistry students. These include concentration of solution, strength of solution, supersaturated solution, and conjugate acid-base pairs. Among the examples are comparison of acid strength to percentage of strong soldiers or making supersaturated solution analogous to a…

  4. Seasonal variations of number size distributions and mass concentrations of atmospheric particles in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianhua; Guinot, Benjamin; Yu, Tong; Wang, Xin; Liu, Wenqing

    2005-06-01

    Particle number and mass concentrations were measured in Beijing during the winter and summer periods in 2003, together with some other parameters including black carbon (BC) and meteorological conditions. Particle mass concentrations exhibited low seasonality, and the ratio of PM2.5/PM10 in winter was higher than that in summer. Particle number size distribution (PSD) was characterized by four modes and exhibited low seasonality. BC was well correlated with the number and mass concentrations of accumulation and coarse particles, indicating these size particles are related to anthropogenic activities. Particle mass and number concentrations (except ultra-fine and nucleation particles) followed well the trends of BC concentration for the majority of the day, indicating that most particles were associated with primary emissions. The diurnal number distributions of accumulation and coarse mode particles were characterized by two peaks.

  5. Effects of humic acid on physical and hydrodynamic properties of kaolin flocs by particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Runsheng; Zhang, Xihui; Xiao, Feng; Li, Xiaoyan; Cai, Zhonghua

    2011-07-01

    The physical and hydrodynamic properties of kaolin flocs including floc size, strength, regrowth, fractal structure and settling velocity were investigated by in situ particle image velocimetry technique at different humic acid concentration. Jar-test experimental results showed that the adsorbed humic acid had a significant influence on the coagulation process for alum and ferric chloride. Kaolin flocs formed with the ferric chloride were larger and stronger than those for alum at same humic acid concentration. Floc strength and regrowth were estimated by strength factor and recovery factor at different humic acid concentration. It was found that the increased humic acid concentration had a slight influence on the strength of kaolin flocs and resulted in much worse floc regrowth. In addition, the floc regrowth after breakage depended on the shear history and coagulants under investigation. The changes in fractal structure recorded continuously by in situ particle image velocimetry technique during the growth-breakage-regrowth processes provided a supporting information that the kaolin flocs exhibited a multilevel structure. It was proved that the increased humic acid concentration resulted in decrease in mass fractal dimension of kaolin flocs and consequently worse sedimentation performance through free-settling and microbalance techniques.

  6. Concentrations of acidic antiinflammatory drugs in gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Frey, H H; El-Sayed, M A

    1977-12-01

    In rats, the concentrations of the acidic antiinflammatory drugs salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid, phenylbutazone, flufenamic acid and indomethacin in the glandular portion of the gastric mucosa were determined 30 and 60 min after oral or subcutaneous administration. In another series of experiments, solutions of the drugs were introduced into the ligated stomach and the concentrations in the mucosa and in the contents of the stomach were determined after 60 min. The ratio between the concentrations in the musoca and those in serum or gastric contents were much lower than expected according to the distribution by passive non-ionic diffusion. This apparent discrepancy may be explained as a result of a drug-induced damage to the mucosal cell allowing free diffusion of ionized drug across the cell membrane. PMID:603322

  7. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, M.Y.

    1996-08-13

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

  8. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, Michel Y.

    1996-01-01

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall.

  9. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, M.Y.

    1995-10-17

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall. 14 figs.

  10. Guarded capacitance probes for measuring particle concentration and flow

    DOEpatents

    Louge, Michel Y.

    1995-01-01

    Guarded capacitance probe structures are constructed with guard electrodes surrounding one or more sensor electrodes and ground electrodes or grounded surfaces surrounding the guard electrodes. In a one sensor embodiment, the probe utilizes an apertured sensor electrode and the guard electrode both surrounds the sensor electrode and fills the aperture. This embodiment is particularly useful for measuring particle concentration in a fluid suspension contained within a vessel or pipe. The portion of the guard electrode within the aperture of the sensor electrode prevents electric field lines from emanating from the sensor electrode into the fluid suspension and toward infinity. A two sensor embodiment of the probe is useful for measuring flow velocities of fluid suspensions through cross correlation of the outputs generated by each sensor. The relative dimensions of the guard and sensor electrodes are selected to provide the most accurate measurements by confining the electric lines emanating from the sensor electrode or electrodes and terminating on the surrounding grounded surfaces to a small measurement volume of the fluid suspension near the vessel or pipe wall.

  11. Simultaneous acetic acid separation and monosaccharide concentration by reverse osmosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fanglei; Wang, Cunwen; Wei, Jiang

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility and efficiency of simultaneous acetic acid separation and sugar concentration in model lignocellulosic hydrolyzates by reverse osmosis. The effects of operation parameters such as pH, temperature, pressure and feed concentration on the solute retentions were examined with a synthetic xylose–glucose–acetic acid model solution. Results showed that the monosaccharides were almost completely rejected at above 20 bar, while the acetic acid retention increased with the increase in pH and pressure, and decreased with the temperature increase. The maximum separation factors of acetic acid over xylose and glucose reached as high as 211.5 and 228.4 at pH 2.93 (the initial pH of model lignocellulosic hydrolyzates), 40 °C and 20 bar. Furthermore, the concentration and diafiltration process were employed at optimal operation conditions. Consequently, a high sugar concentration and a beneficially lower acetic acid concentration were simultaneously achieved by reverse osmosis.

  12. New Particle Formation and Growth from Methanesulfonic Acid, Amines, Water, and Organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Particles in the atmosphere can influence visibility, negatively impact human health, and affect climate. The largest uncertainty in determining global radiative forcing is attributed to atmospheric aerosols. While new particle formation in many locations is correlated with sulfuric acid in air, neither the gas-phase binary nucleation of H2SO4-H2O nor the gas-phase ternary nucleation of H2SO4-NH3-H2O alone can fully explain observations. An additional potential particle source, based on previous studies in this laboratory, is methanesulfonic acid (MSA) with amines and water vapor. However, organics are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) being a major component of particles. Organics could be involved in the initial stages of particle formation by enhancing or inhibiting nucleation from sulfuric acid or MSA, in addition to contributing to their growth to form SOA. Experiments to measure the effects of a series of organics of varying structure on particle formation and growth from MSA, amines, and water were performed in a custom-built small volume aerosol flow tube reactor. Analytical instruments and techniques include a scanning mobility particle sizer to measure particle size distributions, sampling onto a weak cation exchange resin with analysis by ion chromatography to measure amine concentrations, and filter collection and analysis by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to measure MSA concentrations. Organics were measured by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The impact of these organics on the initial particle formation as well as growth will be reported. The outcome is an improved understanding of fundamental chemistry of nucleation and growth to ultimately be incorporated into climate models to better predict how particles affect the global climate budget.

  13. Submicron particle mass concentrations and sources in the Amazonian wet season (AMAZE-08)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Farmer, D. K.; Rizzo, L. V.; Pauliquevis, T.; Kuwata, M.; Karl, T. G.; Guenther, A.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.; Jimenez, J. L.; Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    Real-time mass spectra of the non-refractory species in submicron aerosol particles were recorded in a tropical rainforest in the central Amazon Basin during the wet season from February to March 2008, as a part of the Amazonian Aerosol Characterization Experiment (AMAZE-08). Organic material accounted on average for more than 80% of the non-refractory submicron particle mass concentrations during the period of measurements. There was insufficient ammonium to neutralize sulfate. In this acidic, isoprene-rich, HO2-dominant environment, positive-matrix factorization of the time series of particle mass spectra identified four statistical factors to account for the 99% of the variance in the signal intensities of the organic constituents. The first factor was identified as associated with regional and local pollution and labeled "HOA" for its hydrocarbon-like characteristics. A second factor was associated with long-range transport and labeled "OOA-1" for its oxygenated characteristics. A third factor, labeled "OOA-2," was implicated as associated with the reactive uptake of isoprene oxidation products, especially of epoxydiols to acidic haze, fog, or cloud droplets. A fourth factor, labeled "OOA-3," was consistent with an association with the fresh production of secondary organic material (SOM) by the mechanism of gas-phase oxidation of biogenic volatile organic precursors followed by gas-to-particle conversion of the oxidation products. The suffixes 1, 2, and 3 on the OOA labels signify ordinal ranking with respect to the extent of oxidation represented by the factor. The process of aqueous-phase oxidation of water-soluble products of gas-phase photochemistry might also have been associated to some extent with the OOA-2 factor. The campaign-average factor loadings had a ratio of 1.4:1 for OOA-2 : OOA-3, suggesting the comparable importance of particle-phase compared to gas-phase pathways for the production of SOM during the study period.

  14. Concentration and characterization of airborne particles in Tehran's subway system.

    PubMed

    Kamani, Hosein; Hoseini, Mohammad; Seyedsalehi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Yousef; Jaafari, Jalil; Safari, Gholam Hosein

    2014-06-01

    Particulate matter is an important air pollutant, especially in closed environments like underground subway stations. In this study, a total of 13 elements were determined from PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected at two subway stations (Imam Khomeini and Sadeghiye) in Tehran's subway system. Sampling was conducted in April to August 2011 to measure PM concentrations in platform and adjacent outdoor air of the stations. In the Imam Khomeini station, the average concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 94.4 ± 26.3 and 52.3 ± 16.5 μg m(-3) in the platform and 81.8 ± 22.2 and 35 ± 17.6 μg m(-3) in the outdoor air, respectively. In the Sadeghiye station, mean concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 87.6 ± 23 and 41.3 ± 20.4 μg m(-3) in the platform and 73.9 ± 17.3 and 30 ± 15 μg m(-3), in the outdoor air, respectively. The relative contribution of elemental components in each particle fraction were accounted for 43% (PM10) and 47.7% (PM2.5) in platform of Imam Khomeini station and 15.9% (PM10) and 18.5% (PM2.5) in the outdoor air of this station. Also, at the Sadeghiye station, each fraction accounted for 31.6% (PM10) and 39.8% (PM2.5) in platform and was 11.7% (PM10) and 14.3% (PM2.5) in the outdoor. At the Imam Khomeini station, Fe was the predominant element to represent 32.4 and 36 % of the total mass of PM10 and PM2.5 in the platform and 11.5 and 13.3% in the outdoor, respectively. At the Sadeghiye station, this element represented 22.7 and 29.8% of total mass of PM10 and PM2.5 in the platform and 8.7 and 10.5% in the outdoor air, respectively. Other major crustal elements were 5.8% (PM10) and 5.3% (PM2.5) in the Imam Khomeini station platform and 2.3 and 2.4% in the outdoor air, respectively. The proportion of other minor elements was significantly lower, actually less than 7% in total samples, and V was the minor concentration in total mass of PM10 and PM2.5 in both platform stations. PMID:24573466

  15. Oleic acid coated magnetic nano-particles: Synthesis and characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Biswajit Goyal, P. S.

    2015-06-24

    Magnetic nano particles of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} coated with oleic acid were synthesized using wet chemical route, which involved co-precipitation of Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. The nano particles were characterized using XRD, TEM, FTIR, TGA and VSM. X-ray diffraction studies showed that nano particles consist of single phase Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} having inverse spinel structure. The particle size obtained from width of Bragg peak is about 12.6 nm. TEM analysis showed that sizes of nano particles are in range of 6 to 17 nm with a dominant population at 12 - 14 nm. FTIR and TGA analysis showed that -COOH group of oleic acid is bound to the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles and one has to heat the sample to 278° C to remove the attached molecule from the surface. Further it was seen that Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles exhibit super paramagnetism with a magnetization of about 53 emu/ gm.

  16. Aerosol pH buffering in the southeastern US: Fine particles remain highly acidic despite large reductions in sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, R. J.; Guo, H.; Russell, A. G.; Nenes, A.

    2015-12-01

    pH is a critical aerosol property that impacts many atmospheric processes, including biogenic secondary organic aerosol formation, gas-particle phase partitioning, and mineral dust or redox metal mobilization. Particle pH has also been linked to adverse health effects. Using a comprehensive data set from the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) as the basis for thermodynamic modeling, we have shown that particles are currently highly acidic in the southeastern US, with pH between 0 and 2. Sulfate and ammonium are the main acid-base components that determine particle pH in this region, however they have different sources and their concentrations are changing. Over 15 years of network data show that sulfur dioxide emission reductions have resulted in a roughly 70 percent decrease in sulfate, whereas ammonia emissions, mainly link to agricultural activities, have been largely steady, as have gas phase ammonia concentrations. This has led to the view that particles are becoming more neutralized. However, sensitivity analysis, based on thermodynamic modeling, to changing sulfate concentrations indicates that particles have remained highly acidic over the past decade, despite the large reductions in sulfate. Furthermore, anticipated continued reductions of sulfate and relatively constant ammonia emissions into the future will not significantly change particle pH until sulfate drops to clean continental background levels. The result reshapes our expectation of future particle pH and implies that atmospheric processes and adverse health effects linked to particle acidity will remain unchanged for some time into the future.

  17. Core-Shell Hydrogel Particles Harvest, Concentrate and Preserve Labile Low Abundance Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Caterina; Patanarut, Alexis; George, Tony; Bishop, Barney; Zhou, Weidong; Fredolini, Claudia; Ross, Mark M.; Espina, Virginia; Pellacani, Giovanni; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Liotta, Lance A.; Luchini, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Background The blood proteome is thought to represent a rich source of biomarkers for early stage disease detection. Nevertheless, three major challenges have hindered biomarker discovery: a) candidate biomarkers exist at extremely low concentrations in blood; b) high abundance resident proteins such as albumin mask the rare biomarkers; c) biomarkers are rapidly degraded by endogenous and exogenous proteinases. Methodology and Principal Findings Hydrogel nanoparticles created with a N-isopropylacrylamide based core (365 nm)-shell (167 nm) and functionalized with a charged based bait (acrylic acid) were studied as a technology for addressing all these biomarker discovery problems, in one step, in solution. These harvesting core-shell nanoparticles are designed to simultaneously conduct size exclusion and affinity chromatography in solution. Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), a clinically relevant, highly labile, and very low abundance biomarker, was chosen as a model. PDGF, spiked in human serum, was completely sequestered from its carrier protein albumin, concentrated, and fully preserved, within minutes by the particles. Particle sequestered PDGF was fully protected from exogenously added tryptic degradation. When the nanoparticles were added to a 1 mL dilute solution of PDGF at non detectable levels (less than 20 picograms per mL) the concentration of the PDGF released from the polymeric matrix of the particles increased within the detection range of ELISA and mass spectrometry. Beyond PDGF, the sequestration and protection from degradation for a series of additional very low abundance and very labile cytokines were verified. Conclusions and Significance We envision the application of harvesting core-shell nanoparticles to whole blood for concentration and immediate preservation of low abundance and labile analytes at the time of venipuncture. PMID:19274087

  18. Acid-degradable polyurethane particles for protein-based vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bachelder, Eric M.; Beaudette, Tristan T.; Broaders, Kyle E.; Paramonov, Sergey E.; Dashe, Jesse; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2009-01-01

    Acid-degradable particles containing a model protein antigen, ovalbumin, were prepared from a polyurethane with acetal moieties embedded throughout the polymer, and characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The small molecule degradation by-product of the particles was synthesized and tested in vitro for toxicity indicating an LC50 of 12,500 μg/ml. A new liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry technique was developed to monitor the in vitro degradation of these particles. The degradation by-product inside RAW macrophages was at its highest level after 24 hours of culture and was efficiently exocytosed until it was no longer detectable after four days. When tested in vitro, these particles induced a substantial increase in the presentation of the immunodominant ovalbumin-derived peptide SIINFEKL in both macrophages and dendritic cells. In addition, vaccination with these particles generated a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response that was superior to both free ovalbumin and particles made from an analogous but slower-degrading acid-labile polyurethane polymer. Overall, we present a fully degradable polymer system with non-toxic by-products, which may find use in various biomedical applications including protein-based vaccines. PMID:18710254

  19. Comparison of sulfur measurements from a regional fine particle network with concurrent acid modes network results

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.L.; Stockburger, L.; Barnes, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 micrometers) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Enviromental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during the two year period in 1988-90. The 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the most predominant chemical element concentrations determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis. Statistical summaries of the fine mass and sulfur concentrations by site and season were prepared. The availability of simultaneous particulate sulfate measurements from independent collection and analytical procedures provided an opportunity to examine their agreement and provide a more reliable data base for evaluation of regional particulate models and estimation of contribution to urban aerosol concentration.

  20. Monitoring of trifluoroacetic acid concentration in environmental waters in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianbo; Zhang, Ying; Li, Jinlong; Hu, Jianxin; Ye, Peng; Zeng, Zheng

    2005-04-01

    It is critically important and extremely meaningful to determine the concentration of TFA in the environmental water in China. This will create background reference for the effects of analyzing the extensive employment of the substitutes to CFCs in China. In this paper a set of analytical methods was described for use in monitoring of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) concentration of environmental waters including collecting, pre-treatment measures, preserving, concentrating and derivatization of samples from different kinds of environmental waters. The GC with electrical capture detector (ECD) and headspace auto sampler were used in the analysis. The lowest detection limit of the instrument is 0.0004 ng methyl trifluoroacetic acid (MTFA), and the lowest detected concentration with the method is 3.0 ng/ml TFA. TFA collected in various environmental water samples (including rainfall, inland surface water, ground water, and waste water) from nine provinces and autonomous regions in China have been determined by applying the analytical methods created and defined in this work. The results indicate that the concentrations of TFA in nine rainfalls and three snowfalls through the period from 2000 to 2001 ranged from 25 to 220 ng/l, the TFA concentration in the inland surface water samples ranged from 4.7 to 221 ng/l, the concentration of TFA in groundwater samples collected in Beijing was 10 ng/l, and the TFA concentration in coastal water samples ranged from 4.2 to 190.1 ng/l.

  1. [Ultrafine particle number concentration and size distribution measurements in a street canyon].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Ling; Huang, Zhen; Wang, Jia-Song; Tu, Xiao-Dong; Ye, Chun

    2007-04-01

    A field experiment was conducted to measure concentrations and size distributions of particle (10 nm < D(p) < 487 nm) at four heights in an asymmetric street canyon on Beijing East Road in Shanghai, China. It shows that particle number size distributions are bimodal or trimodal lognormal in form. At a certain height in the range from 1.5 to 20 m, particle number concentrations and size distributions significantly vary with the height. Particle number concentrations in nuclei mode drop significantly and the mode diameters shift to the larger diameter. The variations of particle number concentration and size distribution in accumulation mode are less significant than that in nuclei mode. Particle number concentrations and size distributions slightly change with increasing the height in the range from 20 to 38 m. Concentrations of CO and PM(2.5) were also measured. Power laws are found to be well fitted for the concentration decay of total particle number, total particle volume, CO and PM(2.5). Due to the effect of the wind speed and direction, the total particle volume, PM(2.5) and CO concentrations are lower for Test I (high wind speed and step-up street canyon) than for test II (low wind speed and wind channeling along the canyon), at the meantime, the decay rates of the total particle number, the total particle volume, CO and PM(2.5) concentrations for test I are lower than for test II . No matter how the wind direction changes, the decay rates of the total particle number concentrations are larger than those of CO and PM(2.5), which clearly shows that coagulation and deposition besides dilution processes affect the total particle number concentration.

  2. Organic Nitrogen in Atmospheric Drops and Particles: Concentrations, (Limited) Speciation, and Chemical Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasio, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2003-12-01

    While quite a bit is known of the concentrations, speciation, and chemistry of inorganic forms of nitrogen in the atmosphere, the same cannot be said for organic forms. Despite this, there is growing evidence that organic N (ON) is ubiquitous in the atmosphere, especially in atmospheric condensed phases such as fog/cloud drops and aerosol particles. Although the major compounds that make up organic N are generally unknown, as are the sources of these compounds, it is clear that there are significant fluxes of ON between the atmosphere and ecosystems. It also appears that organic N can have significant effects in both spheres. The goal of our recent work in this area has been to better describe the atmospheric component of the biogeochemistry of organic nitrogen. Based on particle, gas, and fogwater samples from Northern California we have made three major findings: 1) Organic N represents a significant component, approximately 20%, of the total atmospheric N loading in these samples. This is broadly consistent with studies from other locations. 2) Amino compounds, primarily as combined amino acids, account for approximately 20% of the measured ON in our condensed phase samples. Given the properties of amino acids, these compounds could significantly affect the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric particles. 3) Organic nitrogen in atmospheric particles and drops is transformed to inorganic forms - primarily ammonium, nitrate, and nitrogen oxides (NOx) - during exposure to sunlight and/or ozone. These chemical reactions likely increase the bioavailability of the condensed phase nitrogen pool and enhance its biological effects after deposition to ecosystems.

  3. Method of particle trajectory recognition in particle flows of high particle concentration using a candidate trajectory tree process with variable search areas

    DOEpatents

    Shaffer, Franklin D.

    2013-03-12

    The application relates to particle trajectory recognition from a Centroid Population comprised of Centroids having an (x, y, t) or (x, y, f) coordinate. The method is applicable to visualization and measurement of particle flow fields of high particle. In one embodiment, the centroids are generated from particle images recorded on camera frames. The application encompasses digital computer systems and distribution mediums implementing the method disclosed and is particularly applicable to recognizing trajectories of particles in particle flows of high particle concentration. The method accomplishes trajectory recognition by forming Candidate Trajectory Trees and repeated searches at varying Search Velocities, such that initial search areas are set to a minimum size in order to recognize only the slowest, least accelerating particles which produce higher local concentrations. When a trajectory is recognized, the centroids in that trajectory are removed from consideration in future searches.

  4. A constitutive equation for concentrated suspensions that accounts for shear-induced particle migration

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, R.J.; Armstrong, R.C.; Brown, R.A. ); Graham, A.L.; Abbott, J.R. )

    1992-01-01

    A constitutive equation for computing particle concentration and velocity fields in concentrated monomodal suspensions is proposed that consists of two parts: a Newtonian constitutive equation in which the viscosity depends on the local particle volume fraction and a diffusion equation that accounts for shear-induced particle migration. Particle flux expressions used to obtain the diffusion equation are derived by simple scaling arguments. Predictions are made for the particle volume fraction and velocity fields for steady Couette and Poiseuille flow, and for transient start-up of steady shear flow in a Couette apparatus. Particle concentrations for a monomodal suspension of polymethyl methacrylate spheres in a Newtonian solvent are measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging in the Couette geometry for two particle sizes and volume fractions. The predictions agree remarkably well with the measurements for both transient and steady-state experiments as well as for different particle sizes.

  5. A method based on light scattering to estimate the concentration of virus particles without the need for virus particle standards☆

    PubMed Central

    Makra, István; Terejánszky, Péter; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E.

    2015-01-01

    Most often the determination of the concentration of virus particles is rendered difficult by the availability of proper standards. We have adapted a static light scattering based method for the quantification of virus particles (shown for poliovirus) without the need of virus particle standards. Instead, as standards, well-characterized polymeric nanoparticle solutions are used. The method is applicable for virus particles acting as Rayleigh scatterers, i.e., virus particles with equivalent diameters up to ca. 1/10th of the wavelength of the scattered monochromatic light (∼70 nm diameter). Further limitations may arise if the refractive index of the virus is unavailable or cannot be calculated based on its composition, such as in case of enveloped viruses. The method is especially relevant for preparation of virus particle concentration standards and to vaccine formulations based on attenuated or inactivated virus particles where the classical plaque forming assays cannot be applied. The method consists of: • Measuring the intensity of the light scattered by viruses suspended in an aqueous solution. • Measuring the intensity of the light scattered by polymeric nanoparticles of known concentration and comparable size with the investigated virus particle. • The concentration of virus nanoparticles can be calculated based on the two measured scattered light intensities by knowing the refractive index of the dispersing solution, of the polymer and virus nanoparticles as well as their relative sphere equivalent diameters. PMID:26150976

  6. Ozone, Electrostatic Precipitators, and Particle Number Concentrations: Correlations Observed in a Real Office during Working Hours.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jianbang; Weschler, Charles J; Mo, Jinhan; Day, Drew; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-09-20

    This study investigates the impacts of outdoor and indoor ozone concentrations, ESP operation and occupancy on particle number concentrations within a modern office in Changsha, China. The office's one-pass air handling system contains a mini-bag filter (MERV 12) followed by an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. Over a five-week period the system was operated either without the ESP (Stage 1, first-third week) or with the ESP (Stage 2, fourth and fifth week). Ozone and particle number concentrations were measured on working days. During both stages, indoor ozone and particle number concentrations tracked the outdoor ozone concentration. When operating, the ESP produced approximately 29 mg h(-1) of ozone, increasing supply air ozone by 15 ppb and steady-state indoor ozone by about 3 ppb. Occupancy tended to decrease indoor ozone and increase particle levels. During occupancy, indoor particle levels were low (∼2600 particle/cm(3)) when the supply air ozone level was less than 18 ppb. Above this threshold, the supply air ozone concentration and indoor particle number concentration were linearly related, and ESP operation increased the average indoor particle level by about 22 000 particles/cm(3). The implications for worker exposure to both ozone and particles are discussed. PMID:27571436

  7. Ozone, Electrostatic Precipitators, and Particle Number Concentrations: Correlations Observed in a Real Office during Working Hours.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jianbang; Weschler, Charles J; Mo, Jinhan; Day, Drew; Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-09-20

    This study investigates the impacts of outdoor and indoor ozone concentrations, ESP operation and occupancy on particle number concentrations within a modern office in Changsha, China. The office's one-pass air handling system contains a mini-bag filter (MERV 12) followed by an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter. Over a five-week period the system was operated either without the ESP (Stage 1, first-third week) or with the ESP (Stage 2, fourth and fifth week). Ozone and particle number concentrations were measured on working days. During both stages, indoor ozone and particle number concentrations tracked the outdoor ozone concentration. When operating, the ESP produced approximately 29 mg h(-1) of ozone, increasing supply air ozone by 15 ppb and steady-state indoor ozone by about 3 ppb. Occupancy tended to decrease indoor ozone and increase particle levels. During occupancy, indoor particle levels were low (∼2600 particle/cm(3)) when the supply air ozone level was less than 18 ppb. Above this threshold, the supply air ozone concentration and indoor particle number concentration were linearly related, and ESP operation increased the average indoor particle level by about 22 000 particles/cm(3). The implications for worker exposure to both ozone and particles are discussed.

  8. Factors affecting the concentration of outdoor particles indoors (COPI): Identification of data needs and existing data

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, Tracy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Fisk, William J.; Sohn, Michael D.; Delp, Woody W.; Riley, William J.; Sextro, Richard G.

    2001-12-01

    The process of characterizing human exposure to particulate matter requires information on both particle concentrations in microenvironments and the time-specific activity budgets of individuals among these microenvironments. Because the average amount of time spent indoors by individuals in the US is estimated to be greater than 75%, accurate characterization of particle concentrations indoors is critical to exposure assessments for the US population. In addition, it is estimated that indoor particle concentrations depend strongly on outdoor concentrations. The spatial and temporal variations of indoor particle concentrations as well as the factors that affect these variations are important to health scientists. For them, knowledge of the factors that control the relationship of indoor particle concentrations to outdoor levels is particularly important. In this report, we identify and evaluate sources of data for those factors that affect the transport to and concentration of outdoor particles in the indoor environment. Concentrations of particles indoors depend upon the fraction of outdoor particles that penetrate through the building shell or are transported via the air handling (HVAC) system, the generation of particles by indoor sources, and the loss mechanisms that occur indoors, such as deposition. To address these issues, we (i) identify and assemble relevant information including the behavior of particles during air leakage, HVAC operations, and particle filtration; (ii) review and evaluate the assembled information to distinguish data that are directly relevant to specific estimates of particle transport from those that are only indirectly useful and (iii) provide a synthesis of the currently available information on building air-leakage parameters and their effect on indoor particle matter concentrations.

  9. Measurement of airborne particle concentrations near the Sunset Crater volcano, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Benke, Roland R; Hooper, Donald M; Durham, James S; Bannon, Donald R; Compton, Keith L; Necsoiu, Marius; McGinnis, Ronald N

    2009-02-01

    Direct measurements of airborne particle mass concentrations or mass loads are often used to estimate health effects from the inhalation of resuspended contaminated soil. Airborne particle mass concentrations were measured using a personal sampler under a variety of surface-disturbing activities within different depositional environments at both volcanic and nonvolcanic sites near the Sunset Crater volcano in northern Arizona. Focused field investigations were performed at this analog site to improve the understanding of natural and human-induced processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The level of surface-disturbing activity was found to be the most influential factor affecting the measured airborne particle concentrations, which increased over three orders of magnitude relative to ambient conditions. As the surface-disturbing activity level increased, the particle size distribution and the majority of airborne particle mass shifted from particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 mum (0.00039 in) to particles with aerodynamic diameters greater than 10 mum (0.00039 in). Under ambient conditions, above average wind speeds tended to increase airborne particle concentrations. In contrast, stronger winds tended to decrease airborne particle concentrations in the breathing zone during light and heavy surface-disturbing conditions. A slight increase in the average airborne particle concentration during ambient conditions was found above older nonvolcanic deposits, which tended to be finer grained than the Sunset Crater tephra deposits. An increased airborne particle concentration was realized when walking on an extremely fine-grained deposit, but the sensitivity of airborne particle concentrations to the resuspendible fraction of near-surface grain mass was not conclusive in the field setting when human activities disturbed the bulk of near-surface material. Although the limited sample size precluded detailed statistical analysis, the differences in airborne particle

  10. [Variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations in Qingdao and its impact on visibility].

    PubMed

    Ke, Xin-Shu; Sheng, Li-Fang; Kong, Jun; Hao, Ze-Tong; Qu, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric particle number concentrations were measured from September 2010 to August 2011 with potable light house laser particle counter to study the variation of atmospheric particle concentrations and its impact on visibility in Qingdao. Backward trajectory was calculated by Hysplit model. Statistical analysis was done to discuss the influence of meteorological factors on the atmospheric particle number concentrations and visibility. It was shown that the atmospheric particle number concentrations were the highest in winter and spring, followed by autumn, and the lowest in summer. Air mass from Xinjiang and Gansu regions resulted in higher particle concentrations, while the atmospheric particles from the northeast and the ocean had lower concentrations. The variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations presented a good negative correlation with the variation of wind speed, relative humidity and mixed-layer height. When the air mass came from west or northwest, the surface wind direction was south or southeast and the mixed-layer height was low, the number concentration of fine particles was likely to be higher, which tended to cause low visibility phenomenon.

  11. COOKING-RELATED PARTICLE CONCENTRATIONS MEASURED IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOME IN RESTON, VA

    EPA Science Inventory

    In non-smoking households, cooking is one of the most significant sources of indoor particles. To date, there are limited data available regarding indoor particle concentrations generated by different types of cooking. To increase the knowledge base associated with particles ...

  12. A concentration rebound method for measuring particle penetrationand deposition in the indoor environment

    SciTech Connect

    tlthatcher@lbl.gov

    2002-09-01

    Continuous, size resolved particle measurements were performed in two houses in order to determine size-dependent particle penetration and deposition in the indoor environment. The experiments consisted of three parts: (1) measurement of the particle loss rate following artificial elevation of indoor particle concentrations, (2) rapid reduction in particle concentration through induced ventilation by pressurization of the houses with HEPA-filtered air, and (3) measurement of the particle concentration rebound after house pressurization stopped. During the particle concentration decay period, when indoor concentrations are very high, losses due to deposition are large compared to gains due to particle infiltration. During the concentration rebound period, the opposite is true. The large variation in indoor concentration allows the effects of penetration and deposition losses to be separated by the transient, two-parameter model we employed to analyze the data. We found penetration factors between 0.3 and 1 and deposition loss rates between 0.1 and 5 h{sup -1}, for particles between 0.1 and 10 {micro}m.

  13. Amine bearing polymeric particles as acid neutralizers for engine oils

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, A.N.; Chattha, M.S.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a lubricating oil composition consisting of a major proportion of a lubricating base oil and about 0.1 to 15 weight percent of an acid neutralizing additive which consists of polymer particles (a) bearing pendant amine groups, and (b) having a diameter of about 500 A and 10,000 A. The amine functional particles are formed by reacting polymer particles bearing pendant epoxide groups with a secondary amine in an amount so as to react essentially all of the epoxide groups on the epoxide bearing polymer particles with the secondary amine. The polymer particles bearing pendant epoxide groups are formed by the free radical addition polymerization of: (a) between about 50 and about 100 weight percent of an ethylenically unsaturated monomers bearing an epoxide group, and (b) 0 up to about 50 weight percent of other monoethylenically unsaturated monomers; in the presence of: (I) a non-polar organic liquid which is a solvent for the polymerizable monomers, but a non-solvent for the resultant polymer, and (II) polymeric dispersion stabilizer containing at least two segments, with one segment being solvated by the non-polar organic liquid and the second segment being of different polarity than the first segment and relatively insoluble in the non-polar organic liquid. The second segment of the stabilizer is chemically attached to the polymerized particle.

  14. Hygroscopic properties of ultrafine aerosol particles in the boreal forest: diurnal variation, solubility and the influence of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, M.; Petäjä, T.; Aufmhoff, H.; Aalto, P.; Hämeri, K.; Arnold, F.; Laaksonen, A.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-10-01

    Freshly formed atmospheric aerosol particles are neither large enough to efficiently scatter incoming solar radiation nor able to act as cloud condensation nuclei. As the particles grow larger, their hygroscopicity determines the limiting size after which they are important in both of the aforementioned processes. The condensing species resulting in growth alter the hygroscopicity of the particles. We have measured hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles present in a boreal forest, along with the very hygroscopic atmospheric trace gas sulfuric acid. The focus was on days with new particle formation by nucleation. The measured hygroscopic growth factors (GF) correlated positively with gaseous phase sulfuric acid concentrations. This correlation had a strong size dependency; the smaller the particle, the more condensing sulfuric acid is bound to alter the GF due to initially smaller mass. In addition, water uptake of nucleation mode particles was monitored during new particle formation events and followed during their growth to Aitken mode sizes. As the modal diameter increased, the solubility of the particles decreased. This indicated that initially more hygroscopic particles transformed into less hygroscopic or even hydrophobic particles. A similar behavior was seen also during days with no particle formation, with GF decreasing during the evenings and increasing during early morning. This can be tentatively explained by day- and nighttime differences in the hygroscopicity of condensable vapors.

  15. Solubility of methanol in low-temperature aqueous sulfuric acid and implications for atmospheric particle composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Using traditional Knudsen cell techniques, we find well-behaved Henry's law uptake of methanol in aqueous 45 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions at temperatures between 197 and 231 K. Solubility of methanol increases with decreasing temperature and increasing acidity, with an effective Henry's law coefficient ranging from 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 8) M/atm. Equilibrium uptake of methanol into sulfuric acid aerosol particles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere will not appreciably alter gas-phase concentrations of methanol. The observed room temperature reaction between methanol and sulfuric acid is too slow to provide a sink for gaseous methanol at the temperatures of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. It is also too slow to produce sufficient quantities of soluble reaction products to explain the large amount of unidentified organic material seen in particles of the upper troposphere.

  16. Apparatus and method for collection and concentration of respirable particles into a small fluid volume

    DOEpatents

    Simon, Jonathan N.; Brown, Steve B.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the collection of respirable particles and concentration of such particles into a small fluid volume. The apparatus captures and concentrates small (1-10 .mu.m) respirable particles into a sub-millileter volume of fluid. The method involves a two step operation, collection and concentration: wherein collection of particles is by a wetted surface having small vertical slits that act as capillary channels; and concentration is carried out by transfer of the collected particles to a small volume (sub-milliliter) container by centrifugal force whereby the particles are forced through the vertical slits and contact a non-wetted wall surface, and are deflected to the bottom where they are contained for analysis, such as a portable flow cytometer or a portable PCR DNA analysis system.

  17. Reduced Burst Release and Enhanced Oral Bioavailability in Shikimic Acid-Loaded Polylactic Acid Submicron Particles by Coaxial Electrospray.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miaomiao; Wang, Yuanwen; Omari-Siaw, Emmanuel; Wang, Shengli; Zhu, Yuan; Xu, Ximing

    2016-08-01

    In this study, using the coaxial electrospray method, we prepared submicron particles of the water-soluble drug shikimic acid (SA) with polylactic acid (PLA) as a polymer, to reduce the burst release and enhance the oral bioavailability. In vitro release study performed in HCl solution (pH 1.2) showed that the coaxial electrospray submicron particles could reduce burst release effect and presented a sustained release profile, compared with free SA and the particles prepared by electrospray method. The absorption of SA in the intestinal tract, studied using an in situ perfusion method in rats, also revealed jejunum as the main absorptive segment followed by duodenum and ileum. Moreover, the SA-loaded particles greatly enhanced the absorption of SA in the tested intestinal segments. The intestinal absorption rate was not enhanced with increasing drug concentration (5-15 μg/mL) which suggested that active transport or facilitated diffusion could play vital role in SA absorption. In addition, the SA-loaded PLA coaxial electrospray particle exhibited a prolonged plasma circulation with enhanced bioavailability after oral administration. In all, the coaxial electrospray technique could provide notable advantages for the oral delivery of SA, thereby enhancing its clinical application.

  18. Characterization of ultrafine particle number concentration and new particle formation in an urban environment of Taipei, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Huang, W.-R.; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2013-09-01

    An intensive aerosol characterization experiment was performed at the Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory (TARO, 25.02° N, 121.53° E) in the urban area of Taipei, Taiwan, during July 2012. Number concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles were measured continuously, which were accompanied by concurrent measurements of mass concentration of submicron particles, PM1 (d ≤ 1 μm), and photolysis rate of ozone, J(O1D). The averaged number concentrations of total (Ntotal), accumulation mode (Nacu), Aitken mode (NAitken), and nucleation mode (Nnuc) particles were 13.9 × 103 cm-3, 1.2 × 103 cm-3, 6.1 × 103 cm-3, and 6.6 × 103 cm-3, respectively. Accordingly, the ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100 nm) accounted for 91% of the total number concentration of particles measured in this study (10 ≤ d ≤ 429 nm), indicating the importance of UFPs to the air quality and radiation budget in Taipei and its surrounding areas. An averaged Nnuc / NOx ratio of 192.4 cm-3 ppbv-1 was derived from nighttime measurements, which was suggested to be the characteristic of vehicle emissions that contributed to the "urban background" of nucleation mode particles throughout a day. On the contrary, it was found that the number concentration of nucleation mode particles was independent of NOx and could be elevated up to 10 times of the "urban background" levels during daytime, suggesting a substantial amount of nucleation mode particles produced from photochemical processes. Averages (± 1σ) of the diameter growth rate (GR) and formation rate of nucleation mode particles, J10, were 11.9 ± 10.6 nm h-1 and 6.9 ± 3.0 cm-3 s-1, respectively. Consistency in the time series of the nucleation mode particle concentration and the proxy of H2SO4 production, UVB · SO2/CS, for new particle formation (NPF) events suggested that photooxidation of SO2 was likely one of the major mechanisms for the formation of new particles in our study area. Moreover, it was revealed that the

  19. Effect of Wheat Dietary Fiber Particle Size during Digestion In Vitro on Bile Acid, Faecal Bacteria and Short-Chain Fatty Acid Content.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Szwengiel, Artur; Górecka, Danuta; Gujska, Elżbieta; Kaczkowska, Joanna; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2016-06-01

    The influence of bile acid concentration on the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. bacteria was demonstrated. Exposing these bacteria to the environment containing bile acid salts, and very poor in nutrients, leads to the disappearance of these microorganisms due to the toxic effect of bile acids. A multidimensional analysis of data in the form of principal component analysis indicated that lactic acid bacteria bind bile acids and show antagonistic effect on E. coli spp. bacteria. The growth in E. coli spp. population was accompanied by a decline in the population of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. with a simultaneous reduction in the concentration of bile acids. This is direct proof of acid binding ability of the tested lactic acid bacteria with respect to cholic acid, lithocholic acid and deoxycholic acid. This research demonstrated that the degree of fineness of wheat dietary fibre does not affect the sorption of bile acids and growth of some bacteria species; however, it has an impact on the profile of synthesized short-chained fatty acids. During the digestion of a very fine wheat fibre fraction (WF 90), an increase in the concentration of propionic and butyric acids, as compared with the wheat fiber fraction of larger particles - WF 500, was observed. Our study suggested that wheat fibre did not affect faecal bacteria growth, however, we observed binding of bile acids by Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp.

  20. Effect of Wheat Dietary Fiber Particle Size during Digestion In Vitro on Bile Acid, Faecal Bacteria and Short-Chain Fatty Acid Content.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Szwengiel, Artur; Górecka, Danuta; Gujska, Elżbieta; Kaczkowska, Joanna; Drożdżyńska, Agnieszka; Walkowiak, Jarosław

    2016-06-01

    The influence of bile acid concentration on the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. bacteria was demonstrated. Exposing these bacteria to the environment containing bile acid salts, and very poor in nutrients, leads to the disappearance of these microorganisms due to the toxic effect of bile acids. A multidimensional analysis of data in the form of principal component analysis indicated that lactic acid bacteria bind bile acids and show antagonistic effect on E. coli spp. bacteria. The growth in E. coli spp. population was accompanied by a decline in the population of Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. with a simultaneous reduction in the concentration of bile acids. This is direct proof of acid binding ability of the tested lactic acid bacteria with respect to cholic acid, lithocholic acid and deoxycholic acid. This research demonstrated that the degree of fineness of wheat dietary fibre does not affect the sorption of bile acids and growth of some bacteria species; however, it has an impact on the profile of synthesized short-chained fatty acids. During the digestion of a very fine wheat fibre fraction (WF 90), an increase in the concentration of propionic and butyric acids, as compared with the wheat fiber fraction of larger particles - WF 500, was observed. Our study suggested that wheat fibre did not affect faecal bacteria growth, however, we observed binding of bile acids by Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus spp. PMID:26924312

  1. PARTICLE ASSOCIATION EFFECTS ON MICROBIAL INDICATOR CONCENTRATIONS AND CSO DISINFECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combined sewer overflow (CSO) and wastewater disinfection effectiveness are evaluated by measuring microbial indicator concentrations before and after disinfection. The standard techniques for quantifying indicators are membrane filtration and multiple-tube fermentation/most pro...

  2. Seasonal and spatial changes of free and bound organic acids in total suspended particles in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shexia; Peng, Ping'an; Song, Jianzhong; Bi, Xinhui; Zhao, Jinping; He, Lulu; Sheng, Guoying; Fu, Jiamo

    2010-12-01

    The concentrations and compositions of free and bound organic acids in total suspended particles from typical urban, suburban and forest park sites of Guangzhou were determined in this study. The free form of organic acids (solvent extractable) in aerosols in Guangzhou varied with site and season. The suburban samples contained the highest contents of alkanoic, alkenoic and dicarboxylic acids. These findings were consistent with a higher supply of hydrocarbons and NOx in the suburban area. However, concentrations of aromatic acids were similar in the urban, suburban and forest park sites. Generally, winter season samples of the acids from anthropogenic sources contained more organic acids than summer season samples due to stronger removal by wet deposition in the summer. For the acids from botanic sources, the summer season samples were higher. In addition to the free acids, bound acids (solvent non-extractable) mainly formed by esterification of free acids were also found in the samples. In general, bound acids were higher than free acids. Esterification is mainly controlled by the pKa of organic acids and the atmospheric pH value. This explains why aromatic and dicarboxylic acids occur mainly as bound forms and why the samples from urban sites contained high levels of bound acids as the pH of rain water can reach 4.53. Concentrations of alkanoic and alkenoic acids in the aerosols of Guangzhou were much higher than those in the other areas studied.

  3. Laser Particle Diffraction: A Novel Approach to Quantify In-Situ Suspended Sediment Particle Size Class Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, G. W.; Hubbart, J. A.; Chinnasamy, P.; Bulliner, E. A.; Schulz, J.

    2010-12-01

    Hydrologic modification exacted by development can variably increase or decreases diffuse pollution loads, and sediment particle class concentrations. For example, larger particle classes may originate primarily from agricultural and localized riparian development or in-stream hydrogeomorphological processes, while smaller particle size class concentrations may increase in urban environments. These distinctions are critical since fine sediments can transport greater quantities of adsorbed chemicals, nutrients and pollutants, fill interstitial spaces of gravel in spawning beds, and detrimentally affect aquatic biota (e.g. invertebrates and fish). Laser Diffraction (LD) instruments measure optical scattering with specially constructed detectors to detect light diffraction effects of particles of individual size classes. The Streamside Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry (LISST, Sequoia Scientific, Inc) LD instrument was designed for monitoring suspended sediment in shallow rivers, streams, and ponds sensing particle sizes ranging from 1.9 to 387 um (accuracy ± 10 to 20%). Multiple on-going studies in central Missouri, USA are utilizing LD instruments to better understand anthropogenic diffuse sediment pollution. Three LD units were deployed in a central Missouri stream during spring 2010. In an Urban environment, after a single precipitation event the largest particle class bin (356.79 um) comprised almost 50% of the total concentration of suspended sediments in pre-event flow conditions, whereas in the post-precipitation flow event conditions it comprised nearly 44%, a 12.5% difference. The smallest particle class (2.06 um) concentrations in pre and post-precipitation event conditions was 0.8 and 3.4% respectively reflecting more than 450% increased concentration in post flow conditions after a 13.2 mm (0.52 in) precipitation event. During the month of March 2010 average total concentration of sediment (μl/l) in forested, agricultural, and urban

  4. Ice formation on nitric acid coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-08-16

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles due to nitric acid coating are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coating on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated ice nucleation ability of Arizona test dust, illite, K-feldspar and quartz as a function of temperature (-25 to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75 to 110%). Particles were size selected at 250 nm and transported (bare or coated) to the ice nucleation chamber to determine the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and water saturation conditions. All dust nucleated ice at water-subsaturated conditions, but the coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability compared to bare particles. However, at water-supersaturated conditions, we observed that bare and coated particles had nearly similar ice nucleation characteristics. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that structural properties of bare dust particles modified after acid treatment. We found that lattice parameters were slightly different, but crystallite sizes of the coated particles were reduced compared to bare particles. Next, single-column model results show that simulated ice crystal number concentrations mostly depends upon fraction of particles that are coated, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and the competition between ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, we observed that coating modify the ice-cloud properties and the picture of ice and mixed-phase cloud evolution is complex when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms are competing for fixed water vapor mass.

  5. Vehicle and driving characteristics that influence in-cabin particle number concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Kostenidou, Evangelia; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J; Fruin, Scott A

    2011-10-15

    In-transit microenvironments experience elevated levels of vehicle-related pollutants such as ultrafine particles. However, in-vehicle particle number concentrations are frequently lower than on-road concentrations due to particle losses inside vehicles. Particle concentration reduction occurs due to a complicated interplay between a vehicle's air-exchange rate (AER), which determines particle influx rate, and particle losses due to surfaces and the in-cabin air filter. Accurate determination of inside-to-outside particle concentration ratios is best made under realistic aerodynamic and AER conditions because these ratios and AER are determined by vehicle speed and ventilation preference, in addition to vehicle characteristics such as age. In this study, 6 vehicles were tested at 76 combinations of driving speeds, ventilation conditions (i.e., outside air or recirculation), and fan settings. Under recirculation conditions, particle number attenuation (number reduction for 10-1000 nm particles) averaged 0.83 ± 0.13 and was strongly negatively correlated with increasing AER, which in turn depended on speed and the age of the vehicle. Under outside air conditions, attenuation averaged 0.33 ± 0.10 and primarily decreased at higher fan settings that increased AER. In general, in-cabin particle number reductions did not vary strongly with particle size, and cabin filters exhibited low removal efficiencies. PMID:21928803

  6. Effects of humic and fulvic acids on poliovirus concentration from water by microporous filtration.

    PubMed Central

    Sobsey, M D; Hickey, A R

    1985-01-01

    Because naturally occurring organic matter is thought to interfere with virus adsorption to microporous filters, humic and fulvic acids isolated from a highly colored, soft surface water were used as model organics in studies on poliovirus adsorption to and recovery from electropositive Virosorb 1MDS and electronegative Filterite filters. Solutions of activated carbon-treated tap water containing 3, 10, and 30-mg/liter concentrations of humic or fulvic acid were seeded with known amounts of poliovirus and processed with Virosorb 1MDS filters at pH 7.5 or Filterite filters at pH 3.5 (with and without 5 mM MgCl2). Organic acids caused appreciable reductions in virus adsorption and recovery efficiencies with both types of filter. Fulvic acid caused greater reductions in poliovirus recovery with Virosorb 1MDS filters than with Filterite filters. Fulvic acid interference with poliovirus recovery by Filterite filters was overcome by the presence of 5 mM MgCl2. Although humic acid reduced poliovirus recoveries by both types of filter, its greatest effect was on virus elution and recovery from Filterite filters. Single-particle analyses demonstrated MgCl2 enhancement of poliovirus association with both organic acids at pH 3.5. The mechanisms by which each organic acid reduced virus adsorption and recovery appeared to be different for each type of filter. PMID:2984989

  7. Apparatus to collect, classify, concentrate, and characterize gas-borne particles

    DOEpatents

    Rader, Daniel J.; Torczynski, John R.; Wally, Karl; Brockmann, John E.

    2003-12-16

    An aerosol lab-on-a-chip (ALOC) integrates one or more of a variety of particle collection, classification, concentration (enrichment), an characterization processes onto a single substrate or layered stack of such substrates. By mounting a UV laser diode laser light source on the substrate, or substrates tack, so that it is located down-stream of the sample inlet port and at right angle the sample particle stream, the UV light source can illuminate individual particles in the stream to induce a fluorescence response in those particles having a fluorescent signature such as biological particles, some of said particles. An illuminated particle having a fluorescent signal above a threshold signal would trigger a sorter module that would separate that particle from the particle stream.

  8. Characterization and reconstruction of historical London, England, acidic aerosol concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, K.; Thurston, G.D.

    1989-02-01

    Several past studies of the historical London air pollution record have reported an association between daily mortality and British Smoke levels. However, this pollution index does not give direct information on particulate mass or its chemical composition. A more specific particulate matter index, aerosol acidity, was measured at a site in central London, and daily data are available for the period 1963-1972. British smoke and SO/sub 2/ were also measured at the same site. Also, meteorological parameters were routinely measured at a nearby British Meteorological Office. Thus, daily fluctuation of the acidic aerosols was characterized in terms of other environmental parameters. Each of the other parameters analyzed seems necessary, but not sufficient to explain a high level of acidic aerosol. Overall, about half of the variance of log-transformed daily fluctuations of acidic aerosols can be explained by a combination of parameters including SO/sub 2/ and British smoke concentrations, temperature, ventilation by wind, and humidity. The rest of the variance cannot be explained by the parameters included in this analysis. Potential factors responsible for this unique variance would be variations in the availability of basic gases to cause neutralization and variation in the availability of catalytic metal salts. Because the acidic aerosol has a unique component of variation, it may be possible to distinguish health effects due to this specific pollutant from other available pollution indices or environmental factors.

  9. Characterization and reconstruction of historical London, England, acidic aerosol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Thurston, G D

    1989-02-01

    Several past studies of the historical London air pollution record have reported an association between daily mortality and British Smoke levels. However, this pollution index does not give direct information on particulate mass or its chemical composition. A more specific particulate matter index, aerosol acidity, was measured at a site in central London, and daily data are available for the period 1963-1972. British Smoke and SO2 were also measured at the same site. Also, meteorological parameters were routinely measured at a nearby British Meteorological Office. Thus, daily fluctuation of the acidic aerosols was characterized in terms of other environmental parameters. Each of the other parameters analyzed seems necessary, but not sufficient to explain a high level of acidic aerosol. Overall, about half of the variance of log-transformed daily fluctuations of acidic aerosols can be explained by a combination of parameters including SO2 and British Smoke concentrations, temperature, ventilation by wind, and humidity. The rest of the variance cannot be explained by the parameters included in this analysis. Potential factors responsible for this unique variance would be variations in the availability of basic gases to cause neutralization and variation in the availability of catalytic metal salts. Because the acidic aerosol has a unique component of variation, it may be possible to distinguish health effects due to this specific pollutant from other available pollution indices or environmental factors.

  10. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J.; Dunne, Eimear M.; Flagan, Richard C.; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J.; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K.; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P.; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D.; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N.; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E.; Wagner, Paul E.; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  11. Contribution from indoor sources to particle number and mass concentrations in residential houses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia; Hitchins, Jane; Gilbert, Dale

    As part of a large study investigating indoor air in residential houses in Brisbane, Australia, the purpose of this work was to quantify emission characteristics of indoor particle sources in 15 houses. Submicrometer particle number and approximation of PM 2.5 concentrations were measured simultaneously for more than 48 h in the kitchen of all the houses by using a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a photometer (DustTrak), respectively. In addition, characterizations of particles resulting from cooking conducted in an identical way in all the houses were measured by using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an aerodynamic particle sizer (APS) and a DustTrak. All the events of elevated particle concentrations were linked to indoor activities using house occupants diary entries, and catalogued into 21 different types of indoor activities. This enabled quantification of the effect of indoor sources on indoor particle concentrations as well as quantification of emission rates from the sources. For example, the study found that frying, grilling, stove use, toasting, cooking pizza, cooking, candle vaporizing eucalyptus oil and fan heater use, could elevate the indoor submicrometer particle number concentration levels by more than five times, while PM 2.5 concentrations could be up to 3, 30 and 90 times higher than the background levels during smoking, frying and grilling, respectively.

  12. On the factors governing the abundance of oxalic acid in tropospheric aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, D.; Neusuess, C.; Brüggemann, E.; Gnauk, T.; Müller, K.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Oxalic acid is frequently observed as one of the most abundant single organic compounds in tropospheric particles. Its sources are commonly believed to be of secondary nature. In state-of-the-art multiphase chemistry models, different pathways exist, which can lead to oxalic acid as final product. Anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions can be photochemically degraded to glyoxal and methyglyoxal, which - after partitioning into deliquescent particles or cloud droplets - are further oxidized via glyoxylic acid to oxalic acid [Herrmann et al., 2005]. A biogenic oxidation pathway starts with isoprene or monoterpene emissions and leads to glycolaldehyde and methylglyoxal via methacrolein and methylvinylketone, followed by aqueous phase oxalic acid formation [Lim et al., 2005]. As suggested by Warneck, 2003, a marine pathway might exist, starting from marine ethene emissions and leading via glycolaldehyde to oxalic acid. The aim of this study was to elucidate from field measurements the importance of each of these pathways. To this aim, oxalic acid concentrations from 144 size-resolved particle samples (5-stage Berner impactor) from different continental and coastal European sampling sites were statistically analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). Hourly back trajectories were calculated for each sampling interval using the HYSPLIT model [Draxler and Rolph, 2003] and combined in a novel way with global land cover data to yield “residence times” of the sampled air masses above urban, agricultural, forested, and oceanic areas. These residence times served as quantitative proxies for different emission regimes (anthropogenic, biogenic, marine) in the statistical analysis. Additionally, meteorological parameters such as sunflux along the trajectories or mixing layer depth at the sampling site were retrieved from the HYSPLIT output. PCA of the continental dataset retrieved two factors that were connected to the oxalic acid concentrations. A first one showed high

  13. Particle size tailoring of ursolic acid nanosuspensions for improved anticancer activity by controlled antisolvent precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yancai; Song, Ju; Chow, Shing Fung; Chow, Albert H L; Zheng, Ying

    2015-10-15

    The present study was aimed at tailoring the particle size of ursolic acid (UA) nanosuspension for improved anticancer activity. UA nanosuspensions were prepared by antisolvent precipitation using a four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM) under defined conditions of varying solvent composition, drug feeding concentration or stream flow rate. The resulting products were characterized for particle size and polydispersity. Two of the UA nanosuspensions with mean particle sizes of 100 and 300 nm were further assessed for their in-vitro activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells using fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, as well as flow cytometry with propidium (PI) staining and with double staining by fluorescein isothiocyanate. It was revealed that the solvent composition, drug feeding concentration and stream flow rate were critical parameters for particle size control of the UA nanosuspensions generated with the MIVM. Specifically, decreasing the UA feeding concentration or increasing the stream flow rate or ethanol content resulted in a reduction of particle size. Excellent reproducibility for nanosuspension production was demonstrated for the 100 and 300 nm UA preparations with a deviation of not more than 5% in particle size from the mean value of three independent batches. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that these two different sized UA nanosuspensions, particularly the 300 nm sample, exhibited a higher anti-proliferation activity against the MCF-7 cells and afforded a larger population of these cells in both early and late apoptotic phases. In conclusion, MIVM is a robust and pragmatic tool for tailoring the particle size of the UA nanosuspension. Particle size appears to be a critical determinant of the anticancer activity of the UA nanoparticles.

  14. Particle size tailoring of ursolic acid nanosuspensions for improved anticancer activity by controlled antisolvent precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yancai; Song, Ju; Chow, Shing Fung; Chow, Albert H L; Zheng, Ying

    2015-10-15

    The present study was aimed at tailoring the particle size of ursolic acid (UA) nanosuspension for improved anticancer activity. UA nanosuspensions were prepared by antisolvent precipitation using a four-stream multi-inlet vortex mixer (MIVM) under defined conditions of varying solvent composition, drug feeding concentration or stream flow rate. The resulting products were characterized for particle size and polydispersity. Two of the UA nanosuspensions with mean particle sizes of 100 and 300 nm were further assessed for their in-vitro activity against MCF-7 breast cancer cells using fluorescence microscopy with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, as well as flow cytometry with propidium (PI) staining and with double staining by fluorescein isothiocyanate. It was revealed that the solvent composition, drug feeding concentration and stream flow rate were critical parameters for particle size control of the UA nanosuspensions generated with the MIVM. Specifically, decreasing the UA feeding concentration or increasing the stream flow rate or ethanol content resulted in a reduction of particle size. Excellent reproducibility for nanosuspension production was demonstrated for the 100 and 300 nm UA preparations with a deviation of not more than 5% in particle size from the mean value of three independent batches. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that these two different sized UA nanosuspensions, particularly the 300 nm sample, exhibited a higher anti-proliferation activity against the MCF-7 cells and afforded a larger population of these cells in both early and late apoptotic phases. In conclusion, MIVM is a robust and pragmatic tool for tailoring the particle size of the UA nanosuspension. Particle size appears to be a critical determinant of the anticancer activity of the UA nanoparticles. PMID:26302857

  15. Use of extractive distillation to produce concentrated nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, P.C.; Griffin, T.P.; Irwin, C.F.

    1981-04-01

    Concentrated nitric acid (> 95 wt %) is needed for the treatment of off-gases from a fuels-reprocessing plant. The production of concentrated nitric acid by means of extractive distillation in the two-pot apparatus was studied to determine the steady-state behavior of the system. Four parameters, EDP volume (V/sub EDP/) and temperature (T/sub EDP/), acid feed rate, and solvent recycle, were independently varied. The major response factors were percent recovery (CPRR) and product purity (CCP). Stage efficiencies also provided information about the system response. Correlations developed for the response parameters are: CPRR = 0.02(V/sub EDP/ - 800 cc) + 53.5; CCP = -0.87 (T/sub EDP/ - 140/sup 0/C) + 81; eta/sub V,EDP/ = 9.1(F/sub feed/ - 11.5 cc/min) - 0.047(V/sub EDP/ - 800 cc) - 2.8(F/sub Mg(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2// - 50 cc/min) + 390; and eta/sub L,EDP/ = 1.9(T/sub EDP/ - 140/sup 0/C) + 79. A computer simulation of the process capable of predicting steady-state conditions was developed, but it requires further work.

  16. Electrophoretic Mobility of Poly(acrylic acid)-Coated Alumina Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bhosale, Prasad S.; Chun, Jaehun; Berg, John C.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) adsorption on the electrokinetic behavior of alumina dispersions under high pH conditions was investigated as a function of polymer concentration and molecular weight as well as the presence, concentration and ion type of background electrolyte. Systems of this type are relevant to nuclear waste treatment, in which PAA is known to be an effective rheology modifier. The presence of all but the lowest molecular weight PAA studied (1800) led to decreases in dynamic electrophoretic mobility at low polymer concentrations, attributable to bridging flocculation, as verified by measurements of particle size distribution. Bridging effects increased with polymer molecular weight, and decreased with polymer concentration. Increases in background electrolyte concentration enhanced dynamic electrophoretic mobility as the polymer layers were compressed and bridging was reduced. Such enhancements were reduced as the cation was changed from Na+ to K+ to Cs+.

  17. Concentrations of PAHs in atmospheric particles (PM-10) and roadside soil particles collected in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Nasr Yousef M. J.; Abas, M. Radzi Bin; Ketuly, Kamal Aziz; Tahir, Norhayati Mohd

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in atmospheric particles and roadside soil particles were measured at eight locations in the city center and the suburb of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Atmospheric particles were collected using high-volume PM-10 sampler on glass fiber filters over 24 h average sampling period. Both types of samples were extracted with dichloromethane by ultrasonic agitation. The extracts were then fractionated on an alumina-silica column and the aromatic fraction was subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis. Total PAH concentrations in the atmospheric particles and roadside soil particles were found to be 6.28±4.35 ng m -3 and 0.22±0.11 μg g -1, respectively. Benzo[ g, h, i]perylene and coronene were found to be the most abundant PAHs in airborne particles at all locations. The most abundant PAHs in the roadside soil particles were fluoranthene, pyrene and phenanthrene.

  18. Characterisation of particle emissions from the driving car fleet and the contribution to ambient and indoor particle concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmgren, Finn; Wåhlin, Peter; Kildesø, Jan; Afshari, Alireza; Fogh, Christian L.

    The population is mainly exposed to high air pollution concentrations in the urban environment, where motor vehicle emissions constitute the main source of fine and ultrafine particles. These particles can penetrate deep into the respiratory system, and studies indicate that the smaller the particle, the larger the health impacts. The chemical composition, surface reactivity and physical properties are also important. However, the knowledge about chemical and physical properties of particles and the temporal and spatial variability of the smallest particles is still very limited. The present study summarises the first results of a larger project with the aims to improve the knowledge. The concentration and the emissions of ultrafine particles from petrol and diesel vehicles, respectively, have been quantified using Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer of ultrafine particles in the size range 6-700 nm and routine monitoring data from urban streets and urban background in Denmark. The quantification was carried out using receptor modelling. The number size distributions of petrol and diesel emissions showed a maximum at 20-30 nm and non-traffic at ≈100 nm. The contribution of ultrafine particles from diesel vehicles is dominating in streets. The same technique has been applied on PM 10, and ≈50% contribution from non-traffic. The technique has also been introduced in relation to elemental and organic carbon, and the first data showed strong correlation between traffic pollution and elemental carbon. The outdoor air quality has a significant effect on indoor pollution levels, and we spend most of the time indoors. Knowledge about the influence of ambient air pollution on the concentrations in the indoor environment is therefore crucial for assessment of human health effects of traffic pollution. The results of our studies will be included in air quality models for calculation of human exposure. Preliminary results from our first campaign showed, that the deposition

  19. Vertical variations of particle number concentration and size distribution in a street canyon in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Li, X L; Wang, J S; Tu, X D; Liu, W; Huang, Z

    2007-06-01

    Measurements of particle number size distribution in the range of 10-487 nm were made at four heights on one side of an asymmetric street canyon on Beijing East Road in Shanghai, China. The result showed that the number size distributions were bimodal or trimodal and lognormal in form. Within a certain height from 1.5 to 20 m, the particle size distributions significantly changed with increasing height. The particle number concentrations in the nucleation mode and in the Aitken mode significantly dropped, and the peaking diameter in the Aitken mode shifted to larger sizes. The variations of the particle number size distributions in the accumulation mode were less significant than those in the nucleation and Aitken modes. The particle number size distributions slightly changed with increasing height ranging from 20 to 38 m. The particle number concentrations in the street canyon showed a stronger association with the pre-existing particle concentrations and the intensity of the solar radiation when the traffic flow was stable. The particle number concentrations were observed higher in Test I than in Test II, probably because the small pre-existing particle concentrations and the intense solar radiation promoted the formation of new particles. The pollutant concentrations in the street canyon showed a stronger association with wind speed and direction. For example, the concentrations of total particle surface area, total particle volume, PM2.5 and CO were lower in Test I (high wind speed and step-up canyon) than in Test II (low wind speed and wind blowing parallel to the canyon). The equations for the normalized concentration curves of the total particle number, CO and PM2.5 in Test I and Test II were derived. A power functions was found to be a good estimator for predicting the concentrations of total particle number, CO and PM2.5 at different heights. The decay rates of PM2.5 and CO concentrations were lower in Test I than in Test II. However, the decay rate of the

  20. Particle number concentration, size distribution and chemical composition during haze and photochemical smog episodes in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Chen, Jianmin; Cheng, Tiantao; Zhang, Renyi; Wang, Xinming

    2014-09-01

    The aerosol number concentration and size distribution as well as size-resolved particle chemical composition were measured during haze and photochemical smog episodes in Shanghai in 2009. The number of haze days accounted for 43%, of which 30% was severe (visibility<2km) and moderate (2km≤visibility<3km) haze, mainly distributed in winter and spring. The mean particle number concentration was about 17,000/cm(3) in haze, more than 2 times that in clean days. The greatest increase of particle number concentration was in 0.5-1μm and 1-10μm size fractions during haze events, about 17.78 times and 8.78 times those of clean days. The largest increase of particle number concentration was within 50-100nm and 100-200nm fractions during photochemical smog episodes, about 5.89 times and 4.29 times those of clean days. The particle volume concentration and surface concentration in haze, photochemical smog and clean days were 102, 49, 15μm(3)/cm(3) and 949, 649, 206μm(2)/cm(3), respectively. As haze events got more severe, the number concentration of particles smaller than 50nm decreased, but the particles of 50-200nm and 0.5-1μm increased. The diurnal variation of particle number concentration showed a bimodal pattern in haze days. All soluble ions were increased during haze events, of which NH4(+), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) increased greatly, followed by Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Cl(-). These ions were very different in size-resolved particles during haze and photochemical smog episodes.

  1. Immersion freezing in concentrated solution droplets for a variety of ice nucleating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Kohn, Monika; Grawe, Sarah; Hartmann, Susan; Hellner, Lisa; Herenz, Paul; Welti, Andre; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-04-01

    The measurement campaign LINC (Leipzig Ice Nucleation counter Comparison) was conducted in September 2015, during which ice nucleation measurements as obtained with the following instruments were compared: - LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, see e.g. Wex et al., 2014) - PIMCA-PINC (Portable Immersion Mode Cooling Chamber together with PINC) - PINC (Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber, Chou et al., 2011) - SPIN (SPectrometer for Ice Nuclei, Droplet Measurement Technologies) While LACIS and PIMCA-PINC measured immersion freezing, PINC and SPIN varied the super-saturation during the measurements and collected data also for relative humidities below 100% RHw. A suite of different types of ice nucleating particles were examined, where particles were generated from suspensions, subsequently dried and size selected. For the following samples, data for all four instruments are available: K-feldspar, K-feldspar treated with nitric acid, Fluka-kaolinite and birch pollen. Immersion freezing measurements by LACIS and PIMCA-PINC were in excellent agreement. Respective parameterizations from these measurement were used to model the ice nucleation behavior below water vapor saturation, assuming that the process can be described as immersion freezing in concentrated solutions. This is equivalent to simply including a concentration dependent freezing point depression in the immersion freezing parameterization, as introduced for coated kaolinite particles in Wex et al. (2014). Overall, measurements performed below water vapor saturation were reproduced by the model, and it will be discussed in detail, why deviations were observed in some cases. Acknowledgement: Part of this work was funded by the DFG Research Unit FOR 1525 INUIT, grant WE 4722/1-2. Literature: Chou, C., O. Stetzer, E. Weingartner, Z. Juranyi, Z. A. Kanji, and U. Lohmann (2011), Ice nuclei properties within a Saharan dust event at the Jungfraujoch in the Swiss Alps, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11(10), 4725

  2. Concentration and particle size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons formed by thermal cooking.

    PubMed

    Saito, E; Tanaka, N; Miyazaki, A; Tsuzaki, M

    2014-06-15

    The concentration and particle size distribution of 19 major polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted by thermal cooking were investigated. Corn, trout, beef, prawns, and pork were selected for grilling. The PAHs in the oil mist emitted when the food was grilled were collected according to particle size range and analysed by GC/MS. Much higher concentrations of PAHs were detected in the oil mist emitted by grilled pork, trout, and beef samples, which were rich in fat. The main components of the cooking exhaust were 3- and 4-ring PAHs, regardless of food type. The particle size distribution showed that almost all the PAHs were concentrated in particles with diameters of <0.43 μm. For pork, the toxic equivalent of benzo[a]pyrene accounted for 50% of the PAHs in particles with diameters of <0.43 μm. From these results, we estimated that >90% of the PAHs would reach the alveolar region of the lungs.

  3. Adsorption of acids and bases from aqueous solutions onto silicon dioxide particles.

    PubMed

    Zengin, Huseyin; Erkan, Belgin

    2009-12-30

    The adsorption of acids and bases onto the surface of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) particles was systematically studied as a function of several variables, including activation conditions, contact time, specific surface area, particle size, concentration and temperature. The physical properties of SiO(2) particles were investigated, where characterizations were carried out by FT-IR spectroscopy, and morphology was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM of samples showed good dispersion and uniform SiO(2) particles with an average diameter of about 1-1.5 microm. The adsorption results revealed that SiO(2) surfaces possessed effective interactions with acids and bases, and greatest adsorption capacity was achieved with NaOH, where the best fit isotherm model was the Freundlich adsorption model. The adsorption properties of raw SiO(2) particles were further improved by ultrasonication. Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity of NaOH adsorbate at 25 degrees C on sonicated SiO(2) (182.6 mg/g) was found to be greater than that of the unsonicated SiO(2) (154.3mg/g). The spontaneity of the adsorption process was established by decreases in DeltaG(ads)(0), which varied from -10.5 to -13.6 kJ mol(-1), in the temperature range 283-338K. PMID:19683387

  4. Radon in indoor concentrations and indoor concentrations of metal dust particles in museums and other public buildings.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, G L; Braz, D; de Jesus, E F; Santos, S M; Cardoso, K; Hecht, A A; Dias da Cunha, Moore K

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the public and occupational exposure to radon and metal-bearing particles in museums and public buildings located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For this study, four buildings were selected: two historic buildings, which currently house an art gallery and an art museum; and two modern buildings, a chapel and a club. Integrated radon concentration measurements were performed using passive radon detectors with solid state nuclear track detector-type Lexan used as nuclear track detector. Air samplers with a cyclone were used to collect the airborne particle samples that were analyzed by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. The average unattached-radon concentrations in indoor air in the buildings were above 40 Bq/m(3), with the exception of Building D as measured in 2009. The average radon concentrations in indoor air in the four buildings in 2009 were below the recommended reference level by World Health Organization (100 Bq/m(3)); however, in 2011, the average concentrations of radon in Buildings A and C were above this level, though lower than 300 Bq/m(3). The average concentrations of unattached radon were lower than 148 Bq/m(3) (4pCi/L), the USEPA level recommended to take action to reduce the concentrations of radon in indoor air. The unattached-radon average concentrations were also lower than the value recommended by the European Union for new houses. As the unattached-radon concentrations were below the international level recommended to take action to reduce the radon concentration in air, it was concluded that during the period of sampling, there was low risk to human health due to the inhalation of unattached radon in these four buildings.

  5. On-Road measurement of particulate matter emissions from vehicles: particle concentration, size distribution and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, N.; China, S.; Cook, J.; Kuhns, H. D.; Moosmuller, H.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-12-01

    During summer 2010, we conducted a field experiment in Southern Michigan to measure on-road vehicle emissions. During the campaign, particulate matter (PM) concentrations were monitored with a Light Detection and Ranging (Lidar) and transmissometer system. The Lidar and transmissometer system measures PM mass concentration of vehicle exhaust using backscatter and extinction of an ultraviolet laser beam directed across the road. Collocated with the Lidar system we deployed an extractive system inclusive of a LiCor 840 to monitor CO2 concentrations, a laser aerosol spectrometer to measure particle size distributions for PM with diameter larger than 0.1 µm, and a portable condensation particle counter to estimate the total particle number concentration for particles with diameters between~30nm and 1 µm. In addition, road-side vehicle exhaust particles were collected on nuclepore filters for scanning electron microscopy analysis during selected periods of time. In this study we analyze fuel-based mass and number PM emission factors from passing vehicles. The emission factors are estimated normalizing the PM data by the CO2 concentration. The morphology of the particulates is also investigated with electron microscopy analysis. Type of vehicles and traffic counts were recorded by one of the researchers during the sampling period to evaluate the influence on particle morphology due to traffic volume and fuel type. Image processing and fractal geometry are used to estimate various morphological parameters and fractal dimension. Diurnal variation of particle morphology descriptors and fractal dimension of soot particles are investigated and compared with CO2 emissions, particle size distribution and particle number concentration for selected subsets of the data. Variations of PM emission factors and PM morphology are also investigated for different traffic conditions and days of the week. The analysis of the PM data is of particular importance in monitoring vehicle

  6. Shear-induced particle diffusion and its effects on the flow of concentrated suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Acrivos, A.

    1996-12-31

    The mechanism underlying shear-induced particle diffusion in concentrated suspensions is clarified. Examples are then presented where this diffusion process plays a crucial role in determining the manner by which such suspensions flow under laminar conditions.

  7. Modeling particle number concentrations along Interstate 10 in El Paso, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olvera, Hector A.; Jimenez, Omar; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2014-12-01

    Annual average daily particle number concentrations around a highway were estimated with an atmospheric dispersion model and a land use regression model. The dispersion model was used to estimate particle concentrations along Interstate 10 at 98 locations within El Paso, Texas. This model employed annual averaged wind speed and annual average daily traffic counts as inputs. A land use regression model with vehicle kilometers traveled as the predictor variable was used to estimate local background concentrations away from the highway to adjust the near-highway concentration estimates. Estimated particle number concentrations ranged between 9.8 × 103 particles/cc and 1.3 × 105 particles/cc, and averaged 2.5 × 104 particles/cc (SE 421.0). Estimates were compared against values measured at seven sites located along I10 throughout the region. The average fractional error was 6% and ranged between -1% and -13% across sites. The largest bias of -13% was observed at a semi-rural site where traffic was lowest. The average bias amongst urban sites was 5%. The accuracy of the estimates depended primarily on the emission factor and the adjustment to local background conditions. An emission factor of 1.63 × 1014 particles/veh-km was based on a value proposed in the literature and adjusted with local measurements. The integration of the two modeling techniques ensured that the particle number concentrations estimates captured the impact of traffic along both the highway and arterial roadways. The performance and economical aspects of the two modeling techniques used in this study shows that producing particle concentration surfaces along major roadways would be feasible in urban regions where traffic and meteorological data are readily available.

  8. Modeling particle number concentrations along Interstate 10 in El Paso, Texas

    PubMed Central

    Olvera, Hector A.; Jimenez, Omar; Provencio-Vasquez, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Annual average daily particle number concentrations around a highway were estimated with an atmospheric dispersion model and a land use regression model. The dispersion model was used to estimate particle concentrations along Interstate 10 at 98 locations within El Paso, Texas. This model employed annual averaged wind speed and annual average daily traffic counts as inputs. A land use regression model with vehicle kilometers traveled as the predictor variable was used to estimate local background concentrations away from the highway to adjust the near-highway concentration estimates. Estimated particle number concentrations ranged between 9.8 × 103 particles/cc and 1.3 × 105 particles/cc, and averaged 2.5 × 104 particles/cc (SE 421.0). Estimates were compared against values measured at seven sites located along I10 throughout the region. The average fractional error was 6% and ranged between -1% and -13% across sites. The largest bias of -13% was observed at a semi-rural site where traffic was lowest. The average bias amongst urban sites was 5%. The accuracy of the estimates depended primarily on the emission factor and the adjustment to local background conditions. An emission factor of 1.63 × 1014 particles/veh-km was based on a value proposed in the literature and adjusted with local measurements. The integration of the two modeling techniques ensured that the particle number concentrations estimates captured the impact of traffic along both the highway and arterial roadways. The performance and economical aspects of the two modeling techniques used in this study shows that producing particle concentration surfaces along major roadways would be feasible in urban regions where traffic and meteorological data are readily available. PMID:25313294

  9. Particle oxidation model of synthetic FeS and sediment acid-volatile sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Toro, D.M. di |; Mahony, J.D.; Gonzalez, A.M.

    1996-12-01

    A model is proposed for the kinetics of the oxidation of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS). It is based on a surface oxidation reaction that erodes the particle surface until the particle disappears. A monodisperse particle size distribution is assumed with a reaction rate that is proportional to the surface area remaining and a dimensional exponent that related the surface area to the particle volume. The model is fit to time course data from a number of experiments conducted using synthetic FeS at various pHs, oxygen concentrations, and ionic strengths. The reaction rate constants are modeled using a surface complexation model. It is based upon the formation of two activated surface complexes with molecular oxygen, one of which is charged. The complexation model provides a good fit to the variation of the reaction rate constant with respect to O{sub 2}, pH, temperature, and ionic strength. The dimensional exponent {nu} increases with pH from values characteristic of plates and needles to values reflecting more spherical particles, presumably due to coagulation. However the increase in {nu} with respect to O{sub 2} at high concentrations is unexplained.

  10. Influence of dust-particle concentration on gas-discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Sukhinin, G I; Fedoseev, A V

    2010-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic model of a low-pressure dc glow discharge with dust particles based on Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function is presented. The ions and electrons production in ionizing processes as well as their recombination on the dust-particle surface and on the discharge tube wall were taken into account. The influence of dust-particle concentration N(d) on gas discharge and dust particles parameters was investigated. It is shown that the increase of N(d) leads to the increase of an averaged electric field and ion density, and to the decrease of a dust-particle charge and electron density in the dusty cloud. The results were obtained in a wide region of different discharge and dusty plasma parameters: dust particles density 10(2)-10(8) cm(-3), discharge current density 10(-1)-10(1) mA/cm(2), and dust particles radius 1, 2, and 5 microm. The scaling laws for dust-particle surface potential and electric filed dependencies on dust-particle density, particle radius and discharge currents were revealed. It is shown that the absorption of electrons and ions on the dust particles surface does not lead to the electron energy distribution function depletion due to a self-consistent adjustment of dust particles and discharge parameters.

  11. Acidic species and chloride depletion in coarse aerosol particles in the US east coast.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunliang; Gao, Yuan

    2008-12-15

    To investigate the interactions of water-soluble acidic species associated with coarse mode aerosol particles (1.8-10 microm) and chlorine depletion, ten sets of size-segregated aerosol samples were collected by a 10-stage Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) in Newark, New Jersey on the U.S. east coast. The samples were grouped into two categories according to the air-mass back trajectories and mass ratios of sodium to magnesium and calcium: Group I was primarily impacted by marine air mass and Group II was dominated by the continental air mass. In Group I, the concentrations of coarse mode nitrate and chloride depletion showed a strong correlation (R2=0.88). Without considering other cations, nitrate was found to account for all of the chloride depletion in coarse particles for most samples. The association of coarse mode nitrate with sea-salt particles is favored when the mass ratio of sodium to calcium is approximately equal to or greater than unity. Excess sulfate accounts for a maximum of 33% of chloride depletion in the coarse particles. Regarding chloride depletion in the different particle sizes, excess nitrate and sulfate account for 89% of the chloride depletion in the particle size range of 1.8-3.2 microm in the sample from July 13-14; all of the determined dicarboxylic acids and mono-carboxylic acids cannot compensate for the rest of the chloride depletion. In Group II, high percentages of chloride depletion were not observed. With nitrate being dominant in chlorine depletion observed at this location, N-containing species from pollution emissions may have profound impact on atmospheric composition through altering chlorine chemistry in this region. PMID:18973925

  12. Size-Selective Concentration of Chondrules and Other Small Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Hogan, Robert C.; Paque, Julie M.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Size-selective concentration of particles in a weakly turbulent protoplanetary nebula may be responsible for the initial collection of chondrules and other constituents into primitive bodY precursors. This paper presents the main elements of this process of turbulent concentration. In the terrestrial planet region. both the characteristic size and size distribution of chondrules are explained. "Fluffier" particles would be concentrated in nebula regions which were at a lower density and/or more intensely turbulent. The spatial distribution of concentrated particle density obeys multifractal scaling, suggesting a close tie to the turbulent cascade process. This scaling behavior allows predictions of the probability distributions for concentration in the protoplanetary nebula to be made. Large concentration factors (less than 10(exp 5)) are readily obtained, implying that numerous zones of particle density significantly exceeding the gas density could exist. If most of the available solids were actually in chondrule sized particles, the ensuing particle mass density would become so large that the feedback effects on gas turbulence due to mass loading could no longer be neglected. This paper describes the process, presenting its basic elements and some implications, without including the effects of mass loading.

  13. Wood dust particle and mass concentrations and filtration efficiency in sanding of wood materials.

    PubMed

    Welling, Irma; Lehtimäki, Matti; Rautio, Sari; Lähde, Tero; Enbom, Seppo; Hynynen, Pasi; Hämeri, Kaarle

    2009-02-01

    The importance of fine particles has become apparent as the knowledge of their effects on health has increased. Fine particle concentrations have been published for outside air, plasma arc cutting, welding, and grinding, but little data exists for the woodworking industry. Sanding was evaluated as the producer of the woodworking industry's finest particles, and was selected as the target study. The number of dust particles in different particle size classes and the mass concentrations were measured in the following environments: workplace air during sanding in plywood production and in the inlet and return air; in the dust emission chamber; and in filter testing. The numbers of fine particles were low, less than 10(4) particles/cm(3) (10(7) particles/L). They were much lower than typical number concentrations near 10(6) particles/cm(3) measured in plasma arc cutting, grinding, and welding. Ultrafine particles in the size class less than 100 nm were found during sanding of MDF (medium density fiberboard) sheets. When the cleaned air is returned to the working areas, the dust content in extraction systems must be monitored continuously. One way to monitor the dust content in the return air is to use an after-filter and measure pressure drop across the filter to indicate leaks in the air-cleaning system. The best after-filtration materials provided a clear increase in pressure drop across the filter in the loading of the filter. The best after-filtration materials proved to be quite effective also for fine particles. The best mass removal efficiencies for fine particles around 0.3 mum were over 80% for some filter materials loaded with sanding wood dust.

  14. Free fatty acid particles in protein formulations, part 2: contribution of polysorbate raw material.

    PubMed

    Siska, Christine C; Pierini, Christopher J; Lau, Hollis R; Latypov, Ramil F; Fesinmeyer, R Matthew; Litowski, Jennifer R

    2015-02-01

    Polysorbate 20 (PS20) is a nonionic surfactant frequently used to stabilize protein biopharmaceuticals. During the development of mAb formulations containing PS20, small clouds of particles were observed in solutions stored in vials. The degree of particle formation was dependent on PS20 concentration. The particles were characterized by reversed-phase HPLC after dissolution and labeling with the fluorescent dye 1-pyrenyldiazomethane. The analysis showed that the particles consisted of free fatty acids (FFAs), with the distribution of types consistent with those found in the PS20 raw material. Protein solutions formulated with polysorbate 80, a chemically similar nonionic surfactant, showed a substantial delay in particle formation over time compared with PS20. Multiple lots of polysorbates were evaluated for FFA levels, each exhibiting differences based on polysorbate type and lot. Polysorbates purchased in more recent years show a greater distribution and quantity of FFA and also a greater propensity to form particles. This work shows that the quality control of polysorbate raw materials could play an important role in biopharmaceutical product quality.

  15. Effects of precursor concentration and acidic sulfate in aqueous glyoxal-OH radical oxidation and implications for secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Perri, Mark J; Seitzinger, Sybil P; Turpin, Barbara J

    2009-11-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated that aqueous OH radical oxidation of glyoxal yields low-volatility compounds. When this chemistry takes place in clouds and fogs, followed by droplet evaporation (or if it occurs in aerosol water), the products are expected to remain partially in the particle phase, forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Acidic sulfate exists ubiquitously in atmospheric water and has been shown to enhance SOA formation through aerosol phase reactions. In this work, we investigate how starting concentrations of glyoxal (30-3000 microM) and the presence of acidic sulfate (0-840 microM) affect product formation in the aqueous reaction between glyoxal and OH radical. The oxalic acid yield decreased with increasing precursor concentrations, and the presence of sulfuric acid did not alter oxalic acid concentrations significantly. A dilute aqueous chemistry model successfully reproduced oxalic acid concentrations, when the experiment was performed at cloud-relevant concentrations (glyoxal <300 microM), but predictions deviated from measurements at increasing concentrations. Results elucidate similarities and differences in aqueous glyoxal chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. They validate for the first time the accuracy of model predictions at cloud-relevant concentrations. These results suggest that cloud processing of glyoxal could be an important source of SOA. PMID:19924930

  16. Effects of precursor concentration and acidic sulfate in aqueous glyoxal-OH radical oxidation and implications for secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi; Perri, Mark J; Seitzinger, Sybil P; Turpin, Barbara J

    2009-11-01

    Previous experiments demonstrated that aqueous OH radical oxidation of glyoxal yields low-volatility compounds. When this chemistry takes place in clouds and fogs, followed by droplet evaporation (or if it occurs in aerosol water), the products are expected to remain partially in the particle phase, forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Acidic sulfate exists ubiquitously in atmospheric water and has been shown to enhance SOA formation through aerosol phase reactions. In this work, we investigate how starting concentrations of glyoxal (30-3000 microM) and the presence of acidic sulfate (0-840 microM) affect product formation in the aqueous reaction between glyoxal and OH radical. The oxalic acid yield decreased with increasing precursor concentrations, and the presence of sulfuric acid did not alter oxalic acid concentrations significantly. A dilute aqueous chemistry model successfully reproduced oxalic acid concentrations, when the experiment was performed at cloud-relevant concentrations (glyoxal <300 microM), but predictions deviated from measurements at increasing concentrations. Results elucidate similarities and differences in aqueous glyoxal chemistry in clouds and in wet aerosols. They validate for the first time the accuracy of model predictions at cloud-relevant concentrations. These results suggest that cloud processing of glyoxal could be an important source of SOA.

  17. Exposure to particle number, surface area and PM concentrations in pizzerias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Morawska, L.; Stabile, L.; Viola, A.

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this work was to quantify exposure to particles emitted by wood-fired ovens in pizzerias. Overall, 15 microenvironments were chosen and analyzed in a 14-month experimental campaign. Particle number concentration and distribution were measured simultaneously using a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), an Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS). The surface area and mass distributions and concentrations, as well as the estimation of lung deposition surface area and PM 1 were evaluated using the SMPS-APS system with dosimetric models, by taking into account the presence of aggregates on the basis of the Idealized Aggregate (IA) theory. The fraction of inhaled particles deposited in the respiratory system and different fractions of particulate matter were also measured by means of a Nanoparticle Surface Area Monitor (NSAM) and a photometer (DustTrak DRX), respectively. In this way, supplementary data were obtained during the monitoring of trends inside the pizzerias. We found that surface area and PM 1 particle concentrations in pizzerias can be very high, especially when compared to other critical microenvironments, such as the transport hubs. During pizza cooking under normal ventilation conditions, concentrations were found up to 74, 70 and 23 times higher than background levels for number, surface area and PM 1, respectively. A key parameter is the oven shape factor, defined as the ratio between the size of the face opening in respect to the diameter of the semicircular oven door, and particular attention must also be paid to hood efficiency.

  18. Transport and Retention of Engineered Nanoporous Particles in Porous Media: Effects of Concentration and Flow Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianying; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming

    2013-01-20

    Engineered nanoporous particles are an important class of nano-structured materials that can be functionalized in their internal surfaces for various applications including groundwater contaminant sequestration. This paper reported a study of transport and retention of engineered nanoporous silicate particles (ENSPs) that are designed for treatment and remediation of contaminants such as uranium in groundwater and sediments. The transport and retention of ENSPs were investigated under variable particle concentrations and dynamic flow conditions in a synthetic groundwater that mimics field groundwater chemical composition. The dynamic flow condition was achieved using a flow-interruption (stop-flow) approach with variable stop-flow durations to explore particle retention and release kinetics. The results showed that the ENSPs transport was strongly affected by the particle concentrations and dynamic flow conditions. A lower injected ENSPs concentration and longer stop-flow duration led to a more particle retention. The experimental data were used to evaluate the applicability of various kinetic models that were developed for colloidal particle retention and release in describing ENSPs transport. Model fits suggested that the transport and retention of ENSPs were subjected to a complex coupling of reversible attachment/detachment and straining/liberation processes. Both experimental and modeling results indicated that dynamic groundwater flow condition is an important parameter to be considered in exploring and modeling engineered particle transport in subsurface porous media.

  19. Diamine-sulfuric acid reactions are a potent source of new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Coty N.; Bachman, Ryan; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H.; Hanson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric nucleation from sulfuric acid depends on the concentrations and the stabilizing effect of other trace gases, such as ammonia and amines. Diamines are an understudied class of atmospherically relevant compounds, and we examine how they affect sulfuric acid nucleation in both flow reactor experiments and the atmosphere. The number of particles produced from sulfuric acid and diamines in the flow reactor was equal to or greater than the number formed from monoamines, implying that diamines are more effective nucleating agents. Upper limits of diamine abundance were also monitored during three field campaigns: Lamont, OK (2013); Lewes, DE (2012); and Atlanta, GA (2009). Mixing ratios were measured as high as tens of parts per trillion by volume (GA and OK). Laboratory results suggest that diamines at these levels are important for atmospheric nucleation. Diamines likely participate in atmospheric nucleation and should be considered in nucleation measurements and models.

  20. Particle concentrations and number size distributions in the planetary boundary layer derived from airship based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Ralf; Zhao, Defeng; Ehn, Mikael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Rohrer, Franz; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric particles play a key role for regional and global climate due to their direct and indirect radiative forcing effects. The concentration and size of the particles are important variables to these effects. Within the continental planetary boundary layer (PBL) the particle number size distribution is influenced by meteorological parameters, local sinks and sources resulting in variable spatial distributions. However, measurements of particle number size distributions over a broad vertical range of the PBL are rare. The airship ZEPPELIN NT is an ideal platform to measure atmospheric aerosols on a regional scale within an altitude range up to 1000 m. For campaigns in the Netherlands, Northern Italy and South Finland in 2012 and 2013 the airship was deployed with a wide range of instruments, including measurements of different trace gases, short lived radicals, solar radiation, aerosols and meteorological parameters. Flights were carried out at different times of the day to investigate the influence of the diurnal evolution of the PBL on atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. During night and early morning hours the concentration and size distribution of atmospheric particles were found to be strongly influenced by the layered structure of the PBL, i.e. the nocturnal boundary layer and the residual layer. Within the residual layer particle concentrations stay relatively constant as this layer is decoupled from ground sources. The particles persist in the accumulation mode as expected for an aged aerosol. In the nocturnal boundary layer particle concentrations and size are more dynamic with higher concentrations than in the residual layer. A few hours after sunrise, the layered structure of the PBL intermixes. During daytime the PBL is well mixed and a negative concentration gradient with increasing height is observed. Several height profiles at different times of the day and at different locations in Europe were measured. The aerosol measurements will be

  1. Measurement of particle number and related pollutant concentrations in an urban area in South Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo-Castañeda, D. M.; Teixeira, E. C.; Rolim, S. B. A.; Pereira, F. N.; Wiegand, F.

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to analyze atmospheric particle number concentration at Sapucaia do Sul, in the Metropolitan Area of Porto Alegre, and associate it with the pollutants NO, NO2, and O3. Measurements were performed in two periods: August to October, in 2010 and 2011. We used the following equipment: the continuous particulate monitor (CPM), the chemiluminescent nitrogen oxide analyzer (AC32M), and the UV photometric ozone analyzer (O342M). Daily and hourly particle number concentrations in fractions PR1.0 (0.3-1.0 μm), PR2.5 (1.0-2.5 μm), and PR10 (2.5-10 μm), and concentrations of pollutants NO, NO2, NOx, and O3 were measured. These data were correlated with meteorological parameters such as wind speed, temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation. The daily variation of OX (NO2 + O3) and its relation with NO2 were also established. The results obtained for daily particle number concentration (particles L-1) showed that the area of study had higher particle number of PR2.5 and PR1.0 size ranges, with values of 19.5 and 28.51 particles L-1, respectively. Differences in particle number concentrations in PR1 and PR2.5 size ranges were found between weekdays and weekends. The daily variation per hour of concentrations of particle number, NO, and NOx showed peaks during increased traffic flow in the morning and in the evening. NO2 showed peaks at different times, with the first peak (morning) 2 h after the peak of NO, and a second peak in the evening (19:00). This is due to the oxidation of NO and to the photolysis of NO3 formed overnight. Correlation analysis suggests that there may be a relationship between the fine and ultrafine particles and NO, probably indicating that they have similar sources, such as vehicular emissions. In addition, a possible relationship of solar radiation with fine particle number concentrations, as well as with O3 was also observed. The results, too, show an inverse relationship between particle number

  2. Water Condensation Growth Cells for Ultrafine Particle Collection Onto Concentrated Spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, G. S.; Hering, S. V.; Kreisberg, N.

    2007-12-01

    A laminar flow, condensation method, analogous to that employed in the water-based condensation particle counters, is utilized to provide concentrated, low-pressure drop collection of fine and ultrafine particles. With the laminar flow water condensation approach, the aerosol flow is first chilled by a cold walled conditioner, and then introduced into a hot wet-walled condenser. Because water vapor diffuses more rapidly then heat, the air vapor is supersaturated resulting in particles large enough to be collected by impaction. Several types of collectors have been designed and tested. A compact system utilizing a single TED as a heat pump to provide a ~ 25 ° C temperature difference provides collection at 0.4 L/min with a lower cutpoint of 10 nm, a pressure drop of 1 kPa, and a power consumption of 1 Watt. A larger, parallel plate system samples at 10 L/min, and yields a cutpoint of 20 nm. The design of these systems was guided by numeric modeling of the saturation ratios, particle activation and growth. The model includes the heat release from condensation, and the associated warming of the flow that reduces the supersaturation and particle growth at high particle number concentrations. By controlling the system geometry (either plate separation or tube diameter), we are able to activate at small particle sizes while minimizing concentration effects. Our method of particle collection provides a number of other advantages. Particle bounce off the impaction surface can be eliminated by controlling the temperature of the impaction surface so as to maintain a thin film of water on the surface. Particles can also be collected into a small liquid vial containing less then 1 ml of fluid, which eliminates the need for particle extraction from filters or resuspension from surface, it minimizes the total volume of the sample, and it allows for continuous automated collection and analysis.

  3. A Miniature System for Separating Aerosol Particles and Measuring Mass Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dao; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chen, Chuin-Shan; Dai, Chi-An

    2010-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a new sensing system which consists of two virtual impactors and two quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) sensors for measuring particle mass concentration and size distribution. The virtual impactors utilized different inertial forces of particles in air flow to classify different particle sizes. They were designed to classify particle diameter, d, into three different ranges: d < 2.28 μm, 2.28 μm ≤ d ≤ 3.20 μm, d > 3.20 μm. The QCM sensors were coated with a hydrogel, which was found to be a reliable adhesive for capturing aerosol particles. The QCM sensor coated with hydrogel was used to measure the mass loading of particles by utilizing its characteristic of resonant frequency shift. An integrated system has been demonstrated. PMID:22319317

  4. A simple hydrothermal preparation of TiO 2 nanomaterials using concentrated hydrochloric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Phan, Thuy-Duong; Pham, Hai-Dinh; Viet Cuong, Tran; Jung Kim, Eui; Kim, Sunwook; Woo Shin, Eun

    2009-12-01

    A TiO 2 nanostructure was synthesized via a simple method using only concentrated hydrochloric acid as the morphological/crystallographic controlling agent. Microscopy images showed that the texture of the TiO 2 powder could be easily engineered and tuned by tailoring the HCl volume, creating cuboid, flower, cauliflower, and ball-shaped particles. Three-dimensional TiO 2 microparticles resulted from the self-assembly of nanostructured sub-units including nanocubes, nanoprisms, and nanorods. The crystalline anatase and rutile phases were also identified depending on the acidic medium. HCl played a key role in orchestrating the structures and morphologies of the TiO 2 nanoscale materials. The phase transformation and morphological changes were strongly related to the crystal growth mechanism of the TiO 2 nanostructure.

  5. Mechanochemical leaching of chalcopyrite concentrate by sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadabad, Farhad Khorramshahi; Hejazi, Sina; khaki, Jalil Vahdati; Babakhani, Abolfazl

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to introduce a new cost-effective methodology for increasing the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite concentrates at ambient temperature and pressure. Mechanical activation was employed during the leaching (mechanochemical leaching) of chalcopyrite concentrates in a sulfuric acid medium at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. High energy ball milling process was used during the leaching to provide the mechanochemical leaching condition, and atomic absorption spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry were used to determine the leaching behavior of chalcopyrite. Moreover, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the chalcopyrite powder before and after leaching. The results demonstrated that mechanochemical leaching was effective; the extraction of copper increased significantly and continuously. Although the leaching efficiency of chalcopyrite was very low at ambient temperature, the percentages of copper dissolved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3) after 20 h of mechanochemical leaching reached 28% and 33%, respectively. Given the efficiency of the developed method and the facts that it does not require the use of an autoclave and can be conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, it represents an economical and easy-to-use method for the leaching industry.

  6. Sex Steroid Modulation of Fatty Acid Utilization and Fatty Acid Binding Protein Concentration in Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Ockner, Robert K.; Lysenko, Nina; Manning, Joan A.; Monroe, Scott E.; Burnett, David A.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism by which sex steroids influence very low density hepatic lipoprotein triglyceride production has not been fully elucidated. In previous studies we showed that [14C]oleate utilization and incorporation into triglycerides were greater in hepatocyte suspensions from adult female rats than from males. The sex differences were not related to activities of the enzymes of triglyceride biosynthesis, whereas fatty acid binding protein (FABP) concentration in liver cytosol was greater in females. These findings suggested that sex differences in lipoprotein could reflect a sex steroid influence on the availability of fatty acids for hepatocellular triglyceride biosynthesis. In the present studies, sex steroid effects on hepatocyte [14C]oleate utilization and FABP concentration were investigated directly. Hepatocytes from immature (30-d-old) rats exhibited no sex differences in [14C]oleate utilization. With maturation, total [14C]oleate utilization and triglyceride biosynthesis increased moderately in female cells and decreased markedly in male cells; the profound sex differences in adults were maximal by age 60 d. Fatty acid oxidation was little affected. Rats were castrated at age 30 d, and received estradiol, testosterone, or no hormone until age 60 d, when hepatocyte [14C]oleate utilization was studied. Castration virtually eliminated maturational changes and blunted the sex differences in adults. Estradiol or testosterone largely reproduced the appropriate adult pattern of [14C]oleate utilization regardless of the genotypic sex of the treated animal. In immature females and males, total cytosolic FABP concentrations were similar. In 60-d-old animals, there was a striking correlation among all groups (females, males, castrates, and hormone-treated) between mean cytosolic FABP concentration on the one hand, and mean total [14C]oleate utilization (r = 0.91) and incorporation into triglycerides (r = 0.94) on the other. In 30-d-old animals rates of [14C

  7. Optical determination of incipient soot particle concentrations in ethene laminar diffusion flames.

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S. B.; Santoro, R. J.

    1999-07-06

    Recent studies in premixed flames have shown the existence of ''transparent particles.'' These particles, 2 nm in size and in high number densities are considered to be a phase transitional between the gas phase PAH species and particulate soot. In the present study, various optical diagnostics were evaluated for measuring the concentration of these particles in situ, Through such evaluations, a technique using extinction at two wavelengths was found to be ideal. While employing such a technique, the volume fractions of these particles in an ethene laminar diffusion flame were measured. Low in the flame, these particles were found to be concentrated in the fuel rich core, while at higher locations, they could be found with appreciable volume fractions even in the soot laden regions. Having given due consideration for the errors due to uncertainties in the optical constants, we report the existence of these particles in an ethene flame with volume fractions comparable to those of soot. Also, similar measurements performed in a low sooting ethene/methanol flame show the concentration of these particles to be of the same order of magnitude as in a pure ethene flame.

  8. Applicability Limits of Beer's Law for Dispersion Media with a High Concentration of Particles.

    PubMed

    Dick, V P

    1998-07-20

    This study analyzes the values of volume concentrations of scatterers at which radiation extinction in dispersion media obeys Beer's law. The dependence of the maximum particle concentration at which Beer's law holds on the properties of the dispersion medium is investigated. It is shown that the maximum concentration is strongly dependent on the scatterers' parameters and varies over a wide range, from tenths to tens of percent.

  9. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... that the ratio of the Brix reading to the grams of acid, expressed as anhydrous citric acid, per 100... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.148 Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. (a)...

  10. Distribution of the concentration of heavy metals associated with the sediment particles accumulated on road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zafra, C A; Temprano, J; Tejero, I

    2011-07-01

    The heavy metal pollution caused by road run-off water constitutes a problem in urban areas. The metallic load associated with road sediment must be determined in order to study its impact in drainage systems and receiving waters, and to perfect the design of prevention systems. This paper presents data regarding the sediment collected on road surfaces in the city of Torrelavega (northern Spain) during a period of 65 days (132 samples). Two sample types were collected: vacuum-dried samples and those swept up following vacuuming. The sediment loading (g m(-2)), particle size distribution (63-2800 microm) and heavy metal concentrations were determined. The data showed that the concentration of heavy metals tends to increase with the reduction in the particle diameter (exponential tendency). The concentrations ofPb, Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni, Cd, Fe, Mn and Co in the size fraction <63 microm were 350, 630, 124, 57, 56, 38, 3231, 374 and 51 mg kg(-1), respectively (average traffic density: 3800 vehicles day(-1)). By increasing the residence time of the sediment, the concentration increases, whereas the ratio of the concentration between the different size fractions decreases. The concentration across the road diminishes when the distance between the roadway and the sampling siteincreases; when the distance increases, the ratio between size fractions for heavy metal concentrations increases. Finally, the main sources of heavy metals are the particles detached by braking (brake pads) and tyre wear (rubber), and are associated with particle sizes <125 microm.

  11. Genetic strain and reproductive status affect endometrial fatty acid concentrations.

    PubMed

    Meier, S; Peterson, A J; Mitchell, M D; Littlejohn, M; Walker, C G; Roche, J R

    2009-08-01

    Poor reproductive performance limits cow longevity in seasonal, pasture-based dairy systems. Few differences in ovarian dynamics have been reported in different strains of Holstein-Friesian cows, implying that the uterine environment may be a key component determining reproductive success. To test the hypothesis that the uterine environment differs among genetic strains of the Holstein-Friesian cow, endometrial fatty acids (FA) were analyzed from New Zealand (NZ), and North American (NA) Holstein-Friesian cows. The effect of reproductive status was also investigated, with cows from both Holstein-Friesian strains slaughtered on either d 17 of the estrous cycle (termed cyclic) or d 17 of pregnancy (after embryo transfer; termed pregnant). Endometrial tissues were collected from 22 cows (NZ pregnant, n = 6; NZ cyclic, n = 4; NA pregnant, n = 6; NA cyclic, n = 6), and FA composition was analyzed. Daily plasma progesterone concentrations, milk production, milk FA composition, body weight, and body condition score were determined. Milk yield (4% fat-corrected milk) was similar for the NZ (28.5 kg/d) and NA (29.3 kg/d; SE 2.07 kg/d) cows, but NZ cows had a greater mean milk fat percentage. Mean plasma progesterone concentrations were significantly greater in NZ cows. Plasma progesterone concentrations were similar in the pregnant and cyclic groups. Mean length of the trophoblast recovered from the pregnant cows (NZ: 20.8 +/- 2.84 cm; NA: 27.9 +/- 10.23 cm) was not affected by genetic strain. Endometrial tissues from NZ cows contained greater concentrations of C17:0, C20:3n-3, and total polyunsaturated FA. The endometria from pregnant cows contained greater concentrations of C17:0, C20:2, and C20:3n-6, and less C20:1, C20:2, C20:5n-3. The observed changes in endometrial FA between Holstein-Friesian cows of different genetic origins or reproductive states may reflect differences in endometrial function and may affect reproductive function.

  12. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.148 Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice is the food that complies with the requirements for...

  13. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.148 Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice is the food that complies with the requirements for...

  14. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.148 Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice is the food that complies with the requirements for...

  15. 21 CFR 146.148 - Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. 146... Canned Fruit Juices and Beverages § 146.148 Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice. (a) Reduced acid frozen concentrated orange juice is the food that complies with the requirements for...

  16. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondo, L.; Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-03-01

    Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI-APi-TOF (Chemical Ionization-Atmospheric Pressure interface-Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI-APi-TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4-H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self-contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  17. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit.

  18. Effect of dimethylamine on the gas phase sulfuric acid concentration measured by Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ehrhart, S.; Kürten, A.; Adamov, A.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Duplissy, J.; Franchin, A.; Dommen, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Dunne, E. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Hakala, J.; Hansel, A.; Keskinen, H.; Kim, J.; Jokinen, T.; Lehtipalo, K.; Leiminger, M.; Praplan, A.; Riccobono, F.; Rissanen, M. P.; Sarnela, N.; Schobesberger, S.; Simon, M.; Sipilä, M.; Smith, J. N.; Tomé, A.; Tröstl, J.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Vaattovaara, P.; Winkler, P. M.; Williamson, C.; Wimmer, D.; Baltensperger, U.; Kirkby, J.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sulfuric acid is widely recognized as a very important substance driving atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Based on quantum chemical calculations it has been suggested that the quantitative detection of gas phase sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by use of Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) could be biased in the presence of gas phase amines such as dimethylamine (DMA). An experiment (CLOUD7 campaign) was set up at the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) chamber to investigate the quantitative detection of H2SO4 in the presence of dimethylamine by CIMS at atmospherically relevant concentrations. For the first time in the CLOUD experiment, the monomer sulfuric acid concentration was measured by a CIMS and by two CI‐APi‐TOF (Chemical Ionization‐Atmospheric Pressure interface‐Time Of Flight) mass spectrometers. In addition, neutral sulfuric acid clusters were measured with the CI‐APi‐TOFs. The CLOUD7 measurements show that in the presence of dimethylamine (<5 to 70 pptv) the sulfuric acid monomer measured by the CIMS represents only a fraction of the total H2SO4, contained in the monomer and the clusters that is available for particle growth. Although it was found that the addition of dimethylamine dramatically changes the H2SO4 cluster distribution compared to binary (H2SO4‐H2O) conditions, the CIMS detection efficiency does not seem to depend substantially on whether an individual H2SO4 monomer is clustered with a DMA molecule. The experimental observations are supported by numerical simulations based on A Self‐contained Atmospheric chemistry coDe coupled with a molecular process model (Sulfuric Acid Water NUCleation) operated in the kinetic limit. PMID:27610289

  19. In situ formation and spatial variability of particle number concentration in a European megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikridas, M.; Sciare, J.; Freutel, F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; von der Weiden-Reinmüller, S.-L.; Borbon, A.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Merkel, M.; Crippa, M.; Kostenidou, E.; Psichoudaki, M.; Hildebrandt, L.; Engelhart, G. J.; Petäjä, T.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Drewnick, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kulmala, M.; Beekmann, M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-09-01

    Ambient particle number size distributions were measured in Paris, France, during summer (1-31 July 2009) and winter (15 January to 15 February 2010) at three fixed ground sites and using two mobile laboratories and one airplane. The campaigns were part of the Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation (MEGAPOLI) project. New particle formation (NPF) was observed only during summer on approximately 50 % of the campaign days, assisted by the low condensation sink (about 10.7 ± 5.9 × 10-3 s-1). NPF events inside the Paris plume were also observed at 600 m altitude onboard an aircraft simultaneously with regional events identified on the ground. Increased particle number concentrations were measured aloft also outside of the Paris plume at the same altitude, and were attributed to NPF. The Paris plume was identified, based on increased particle number and black carbon concentration, up to 200 km away from the Paris center during summer. The number concentration of particles with diameters exceeding 2.5 nm measured on the surface at the Paris center was on average 6.9 ± 8.7 × 104 and 12.1 ± 8.6 × 104 cm-3 during summer and winter, respectively, and was found to decrease exponentially with distance from Paris. However, further than 30 km from the city center, the particle number concentration at the surface was similar during both campaigns. During summer, one suburban site in the NE was not significantly affected by Paris emissions due to higher background number concentrations, while the particle number concentration at the second suburban site in the SW increased by a factor of 3 when it was downwind of Paris.

  20. Infrared spectrum of nitric acid dihydrate: Influence of particle shape.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Robert; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Stetzer, Olaf; Schurath, Ulrich

    2005-03-24

    In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extinction spectra of airborne alpha-NAD microparticles generated by two different methods were recorded in the large coolable aerosol chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The extinction spectrum of alpha-NAD crystals obtained by shock freezing of a HNO3/H2O gas mixture could be accurately reproduced using Mie theory with published refractive indices of alpha-NAD as input. In contrast, Mie theory proved to be inadequate to properly reproduce the infrared extinction spectrum of alpha-NAD crystals which were formed via homogeneous nucleation of supercooled HNO3/H2O solution droplets, evaporating slowly on a time scale of several hours at about 195 K. Much better agreement between measured and calculated extinction spectra was obtained by T-matrix calculations assuming oblate particles with aspect ratios greater than five. This indicates that strongly aspherical alpha-NAD crystals are obtained when supercooled nitric acid solution droplets freeze and grow slowly, a process which has been discussed as a potential pathway to the formation of crystalline polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. PMID:16833561

  1. Ultrafine particles near a roadway intersection: origin and apportionment of fast changes in concentration.

    PubMed

    Klems, Joseph P; Pennington, M Ross; Zordan, Christopher A; Johnston, Murray V

    2010-10-15

    A wavelet-based algorithm was implemented to separate the high frequency portion of ambient nanoparticle measurements taken during the summer and winter of 2009 in Wilmington, Delaware. These measurements included both number concentration and size distributions recorded once every second by a condensation particle counter (CPC) and a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). The high frequency portion of the signal, consisting of a series of abrupt spikes in number concentration that varied in length from a few seconds to tens of seconds, accounted for 6-35% of the daily ambient number concentration with hourly contributions sometimes greater than 50%. When the data were weighted by particle volume, this portion of the signal contributed an average of 20% to the daily PM(0.1) concentration. Particle concentration spikes were preferentially observed from locations surrounding the measurement site where motor vehicles accelerate after a red traffic light turns green. As the distance or transit time from emission to sampling increased, the size distribution shifted to larger particle diameters. PMID:20843065

  2. [Concentration and Particle Size Distribution of Microbiological Aerosol During Haze Days in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ling-fei; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Hong-bao; Li, Na; Wang, Jie; Yang, Wen-hui; Yin, Zhe; Jiao, Zhou-guang; Wen, Zhan-bo; Li, Jin-song

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we evaluated the bacterial, fungal aerosol concentration, and particle size distribution using microbiological aerosol sampler, and analyzed the particles count concentration of PM1.0, PM2.5, PM5.0 and PM10.0 using aerodynamic particle sizer during clear and haze days in Beijing during Jan 8th, 2013 to Feb 4th, 2013. The concentration of bacterial, fungal aerosol, air particulate matter and aerosol distribution were compared between haze days and clear days. Our results indicated that the proportion of fungal particles smaller than 5 micron, which could deposit in lungs or deeper regions, was much higher than bacterial particles. The biological concentration of bacteria and fungi were higher in clear days than in haze days, and there was no statistic difference of the microbiological aerosol distribution. The concentration of air particulate matter were higher in haze days than in clear days, PM10 was the main particulate matters both in clear days and haze days.

  3. Determination of concentration of charged particles in various regions of thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, A. G.; Mo, Q.

    2015-12-01

    During the Severe Thunderstorm Precipitation and Electrification Study in 2000, data on hydrometeor sizes and charges were obtained in thunderstorms using an optical array probe modified by the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology and mounted on the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology armored T-28 research aircraft. Analysis yielded quantitative observations of hydrometeor size and charge data in selected regions of storms with relatively low concentrations of charged particles. In most regions hydrometeor concentrations were so high that there were multiple charged particles in the probe sample volume at the same time and quantitative charge analysis was not possible. While it is impossible to reliably determine individual particle charges in these high concentration regions, we can use Poisson statistics to estimate the total number concentration of charged particles based on the fraction of records with just one particle in them. We compare these number concentrations for different thunderstorm regions, including updrafts, flanking cells, core precipitation regions, and trailing stratiform regions, at approximately the -10 C level, in several thunderstorms. We will discuss the implications of these results for understanding charge-separation processes in thunderstorms.

  4. Gas/particle partitioning behavior of perfluorocarboxylic acids with terrestrial aerosols.

    PubMed

    Arp, Hans Peter H; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2009-11-15

    Experimentally determined gas/particle partitioning constants, K(ip), using inverse gas chromatography (IGC) are presented for perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), covering a diverse set of terrestrial aerosols over an ambient range of relative humidity (RH) and temperature. The results are compared to estimated K(ip) values using a recently developed model that has been validated for diverse neutral and ionizable organic compounds. The modeling results consistently underestimate the experimental results. This is likely due to additional partition mechanisms unique for surfactants not being accounted for in the model, namely aggregate formation and water surface adsorption. These processes likely also biased the IGC K(ip) measurements compared to ambient PFCA concentrations. Nevertheless, both the experimental and modeling results indicate that partitioning to terrestrial particles in ambient atmospheres is negligible, though sorption to condensed water can be substantial. This favors rain sequestration as a more important atmospheric removal mechanism than dry particle sequestration. PFCAs found on particle filters during ambient sampling are thus accountable to vapor-phase PFCAs or aqueous-phase PFCAs sorbing directly to the filters, or the trapping of perfluorocarboxylate-salt particles. Further work on understanding the partitioning and speciation of PFCAs in atmospheric water droplets is needed to further quantify and understand their atmospheric behavior. To aid in this, a general RH dependent K(ip) model for surfactants is presented.

  5. Influence of ventilation and filtration on indoor particle concentrations in urban office buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, Tran Ngoc; He, Congrong; Morawska, Lidia; Knibbs, Luke D.

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to quantify the efficiency of deep bag and electrostatic filters, and assess the influence of ventilation systems using these filters on indoor fine (<2.5 μm) and ultrafine particle concentrations in commercial office buildings. Measurements and modelling were conducted for different indoor and outdoor particle source scenarios at three office buildings in Brisbane, Australia. Overall, the in-situ efficiency, measured for particles in size ranges 6-3000 nm, of the deep bag filters ranged from 26.3 to 46.9% for the three buildings, while the in-situ efficiency of the electrostatic filter in one building was 60.2%. The highest PN and PM2.5 concentrations in one of the office buildings (up to 131% and 31% higher than the other two buildings, respectively) were due to the proximity of the building's HVAC air intakes to a nearby bus-only roadway, as well as its higher outdoor ventilation rate. The lowest PN and PM2.5 concentrations (up to 57% and 24% lower than the other two buildings, respectively) were measured in a building that utilised both outdoor and mixing air filters in its HVAC system. Indoor PN concentrations were strongly influenced by outdoor levels and were significantly higher during rush-hours (up to 41%) and nucleation events (up to 57%), compared to working-hours, for all three buildings. This is the first time that the influence of new particle formation on indoor particle concentrations has been identified and quantified. A dynamic model for indoor PN concentration, which performed adequately in this study also revealed that using mixing/outdoor air filters can significantly reduce indoor particle concentration in buildings where indoor air was strongly influenced by outdoor particle levels. This work provides a scientific basis for the selection and location of appropriate filters and outdoor air intakes, during the design of new, or upgrade of existing, building HVAC systems. The results also serve to provide a better

  6. Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Monache, L D; Stull, R B

    2006-04-19

    An atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. Reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate. Urban air quality, and particularly airborne particles, is a major concern in terms of human health impacts. Sea-spray is known to be a major component of the particle ensemble at coastal sites yet relatively few air quality models include the interaction of gases with sea-spray and the fate of the particles produced. Sea-spray is not an inert addition to the particle ensemble because heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray droplets changes the droplets composition and the particle size distribution, which impacts deposition and the ion balance in different particle size fractions. It is shown that the ISOPART model is capable of simulating gas and particle concentrations in the coastal metropolis of Vancouver and the surrounding valley. It is also demonstrated that to accurately simulate ambient concentrations of particles and reactive/soluble gases in a coastal valley it is absolutely critical to include heterogeneous chemistry in/on sea-spray. Partitioning of total particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} between sea-spray and NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} is highly sensitive to the amount of sea-spray present, and hence the initial vertical profile, sea-spray source functions [48] and the wind speed. When a fixed wind speed is used to initialize the sea-spray vertical profiles, as expected, the sea-spray concentration decays with distance inland, but the particle-NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentration decays more slowly because it is also a function of the uptake rate for HNO{sub 3}. The simulation results imply model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield highly misleading results in terms of emission sensitivities of the PM

  7. Inverse dependency of particle residence times in ponds to the concentration of phosphate, the limiting nutrient.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kimberly A; Santschi, Peter H

    2004-01-01

    234Th, a commonly used short-lived particle-reactive tracer in marine systems, was measured in three different holding pond series at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Colorado, along with its parent nuclide 238U, to determine steady-state residence times of particle-reactive actinides such as Pu, and of particles. Series B ponds, which received industrial effluent that includes ortho-phosphate (PO4) and actinides, differed from series A and C ponds, which did not. This difference was also evident in the calculated particle residence times, which were <1 day for the ponds B4 and B5, where PO4 concentrations were higher (1.4 and 1.8 mg/l), and 3 and 3.4 days for ponds A3 and C2, respectively, where ortho-phosphate concentrations were lower (<0.1 mg/l). Particle residence times thus showed an inverse relationship with the concentration of ortho-phosphate, the limiting nutrient in fresh water systems. The same relationship to the concentration of ortho-phosphate or any of the other nutrient elements was not evident for the residence times of dissolved 234Th, which ranged between 0.1 and 2 days. This can be attributed to higher concentrations of dissolved and particulate ligands with greater binding potential for actinides such as four-valent Th and Pu in ponds with higher ortho-phosphate concentrations. Regardless of actual ortho-phosphate concentration, however, at water residence (holding) times of 1 month in these ponds, particles and associated actinides would be expected to be completely removed from the pond water to sediments. PMID:15261419

  8. Inverse dependency of particle residence times in ponds to the concentration of phosphate, the limiting nutrient.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kimberly A; Santschi, Peter H

    2004-01-01

    234Th, a commonly used short-lived particle-reactive tracer in marine systems, was measured in three different holding pond series at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Colorado, along with its parent nuclide 238U, to determine steady-state residence times of particle-reactive actinides such as Pu, and of particles. Series B ponds, which received industrial effluent that includes ortho-phosphate (PO4) and actinides, differed from series A and C ponds, which did not. This difference was also evident in the calculated particle residence times, which were <1 day for the ponds B4 and B5, where PO4 concentrations were higher (1.4 and 1.8 mg/l), and 3 and 3.4 days for ponds A3 and C2, respectively, where ortho-phosphate concentrations were lower (<0.1 mg/l). Particle residence times thus showed an inverse relationship with the concentration of ortho-phosphate, the limiting nutrient in fresh water systems. The same relationship to the concentration of ortho-phosphate or any of the other nutrient elements was not evident for the residence times of dissolved 234Th, which ranged between 0.1 and 2 days. This can be attributed to higher concentrations of dissolved and particulate ligands with greater binding potential for actinides such as four-valent Th and Pu in ponds with higher ortho-phosphate concentrations. Regardless of actual ortho-phosphate concentration, however, at water residence (holding) times of 1 month in these ponds, particles and associated actinides would be expected to be completely removed from the pond water to sediments.

  9. Foamy Virus Protein—Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Martin V.; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  10. Foamy Virus Protein-Nucleic Acid Interactions during Particle Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Martin V; Lindemann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Compared with orthoretroviruses, our understanding of the molecular and cellular replication mechanism of foamy viruses (FVs), a subfamily of retroviruses, is less advanced. The FV replication cycle differs in several key aspects from orthoretroviruses, which leaves established retroviral models debatable for FVs. Here, we review the general aspect of the FV protein-nucleic acid interactions during virus morphogenesis. We provide a summary of the current knowledge of the FV genome structure and essential sequence motifs required for RNA encapsidation as well as Gag and Pol binding in combination with details about the Gag and Pol biosynthesis. This leads us to address open questions in FV RNA engagement, binding and packaging. Based on recent findings, we propose to shift the point of view from individual glycine-arginine-rich motifs having functions in RNA interactions towards envisioning the FV Gag C-terminus as a general RNA binding protein module. We encourage further investigating a potential new retroviral RNA packaging mechanism, which seems more complex in terms of the components that need to be gathered to form an infectious particle. Additional molecular insights into retroviral protein-nucleic acid interactions help us to develop safer, more specific and more efficient vectors in an era of booming genome engineering and gene therapy approaches. PMID:27589786

  11. Magnetofluidic concentration and separation of non-magnetic particles using two magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-07-01

    The present paper reports the use of diluted ferrofluid and two arrays of permanent magnets for the size-selective concentration of non-magnetic particles. The micro magnetofluidic device consists of a straight channels sandwiched between two arrays of permanent magnets. The permanent magnets create multiple capture zones with minimum magnetic field strength along the channel. The complex interaction between magnetic forces and hydrodynamic force allows the device to operate in different regimes suitable for concentration of non-magnetic particles with small difference in size. Our experimental results show that non-magnetic particles with diameters of 3.1 μm and 4.8 μm can be discriminated and separated with this method. The results from this study could be used as a guide for the design of size-sensitive separation devices for particle and cell based on negative magnetophoresis. PMID:27478527

  12. Role of Polymer Segment-Particle Surface Interactions in Controlling Nanoparticle Dispersions in Concentrated Polymer Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, So Youn; Zukoski, Charles F.

    2014-09-24

    The microstructure of particles suspended in concentrated polymer solutions is examined with small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. Of interest are changes to long wavelength particle density fluctuations in ternary mixtures of silica nanoparticles suspended in concentrated solutions of poly(ethylene glycol). The results are understood in terms of application of the pseudo-two-component polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) theory modified to account for solvent addition via effective contact strength of interfacial attraction, εpc, in an implicit manner. The combined experimental-theoretical study emphasizes the complex interactions between solvent, polymer, and particle surface that control particle miscibility but also demonstrate that these factors can all be understood in terms of variations of εpc.

  13. Hydrodynamic particle migration in a concentrated suspension undergoing flow between rotating eccentric cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Phan-Thien, Nhan; Graham, A.L.; Abbott, J.R.; Altobelli, S.A.; Mondy, L.A.

    1995-07-01

    We report on experimental measurements and numerical predictions of shear-induced migration of particles in concentrated suspensions subjected to flow in the wide gap between a rotating inner cylinder placed eccentrically within a fixed outer cylinder (a cylindrical bearing). The suspensions consists of large, noncolloidal spherical particles suspended in a viscous Newtonian liquid. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging is used to measure the time evolution of concentration and velocity profiles as the flow induced particle migration from the initial, well-mixed state. A model originally proposed by Phillips et al. (1992) is generalized to two dimensions. The coupled equations of motion and particle migration are solved numerically using an explicit pseudo-transient finite volume formulation. While not all of the qualitative features observed in the experiments are reproduced by this general numerical implementation, the velocity predictions show moderately good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Magnetofluidic concentration and separation of non-magnetic particles using two magnet arrays.

    PubMed

    Hejazian, Majid; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-07-01

    The present paper reports the use of diluted ferrofluid and two arrays of permanent magnets for the size-selective concentration of non-magnetic particles. The micro magnetofluidic device consists of a straight channels sandwiched between two arrays of permanent magnets. The permanent magnets create multiple capture zones with minimum magnetic field strength along the channel. The complex interaction between magnetic forces and hydrodynamic force allows the device to operate in different regimes suitable for concentration of non-magnetic particles with small difference in size. Our experimental results show that non-magnetic particles with diameters of 3.1 μm and 4.8 μm can be discriminated and separated with this method. The results from this study could be used as a guide for the design of size-sensitive separation devices for particle and cell based on negative magnetophoresis.

  15. Spatial & temporal variations of PM10 and particle number concentrations in urban air.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Christer; Norman, Michael; Gidhagen, Lars

    2007-04-01

    The size of particles in urban air varies over four orders of magnitude (from 0.001 microm to 10 microm in diameter). In many cities only particle mass concentrations (PM10, i.e. particles <10 microm diameter) is measured. In this paper we analyze how differences in emissions, background concentrations and meteorology affect the temporal and spatial distribution of PM10 and total particle number concentrations (PNC) based on measurements and dispersion modeling in Stockholm, Sweden. PNC at densely trafficked kerbside locations are dominated by ultrafine particles (<0.1 microm diameter) due to vehicle exhaust emissions as verified by high correlation with NOx. But PNC contribute only marginally to PM10, due to the small size of exhaust particles. Instead wear of the road surface is an important factor for the highest PM10 concentrations observed. In Stockholm, road wear increases drastically due to the use of studded tires and traction sand on streets during winter; up to 90% of the locally emitted PM10 may be due to road abrasion. PM10 emissions and concentrations, but not PNC, at kerbside are controlled by road moisture. Annual mean urban background PM10 levels are relatively uniformly distributed over the city, due to the importance of long range transport. For PNC local sources often dominate the concentrations resulting in large temporal and spatial gradients in the concentrations. Despite these differences in the origin of PM10 and PNC, the spatial gradients of annual mean concentrations due to local sources are of equal magnitude due to the common source, namely traffic. Thus, people in different areas experiencing a factor of 2 different annual PM10 exposure due to local sources will also experience a factor of 2 different exposure in terms of PNC. This implies that health impact studies based solely on spatial differences in annual exposure to PM10 may not separate differences in health effects due to ultrafine and coarse particles. On the other hand

  16. Spatial & temporal variations of PM10 and particle number concentrations in urban air.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Christer; Norman, Michael; Gidhagen, Lars

    2007-04-01

    The size of particles in urban air varies over four orders of magnitude (from 0.001 microm to 10 microm in diameter). In many cities only particle mass concentrations (PM10, i.e. particles <10 microm diameter) is measured. In this paper we analyze how differences in emissions, background concentrations and meteorology affect the temporal and spatial distribution of PM10 and total particle number concentrations (PNC) based on measurements and dispersion modeling in Stockholm, Sweden. PNC at densely trafficked kerbside locations are dominated by ultrafine particles (<0.1 microm diameter) due to vehicle exhaust emissions as verified by high correlation with NOx. But PNC contribute only marginally to PM10, due to the small size of exhaust particles. Instead wear of the road surface is an important factor for the highest PM10 concentrations observed. In Stockholm, road wear increases drastically due to the use of studded tires and traction sand on streets during winter; up to 90% of the locally emitted PM10 may be due to road abrasion. PM10 emissions and concentrations, but not PNC, at kerbside are controlled by road moisture. Annual mean urban background PM10 levels are relatively uniformly distributed over the city, due to the importance of long range transport. For PNC local sources often dominate the concentrations resulting in large temporal and spatial gradients in the concentrations. Despite these differences in the origin of PM10 and PNC, the spatial gradients of annual mean concentrations due to local sources are of equal magnitude due to the common source, namely traffic. Thus, people in different areas experiencing a factor of 2 different annual PM10 exposure due to local sources will also experience a factor of 2 different exposure in terms of PNC. This implies that health impact studies based solely on spatial differences in annual exposure to PM10 may not separate differences in health effects due to ultrafine and coarse particles. On the other hand

  17. Magnetic field and particle concentration competitive effects on ferrofluid based silicone elastomer microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Balasoiu, M.; Lebedev, V. T.; Orlova, D. N.; Bica, I.

    2011-12-15

    Structural peculiarities of ferroelastomers composed of polydimetylsiloxane with embedded magnetite particles during polymerization have been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. The effects of ferroparticles' concentration in the range of C = 0-6 wt %, and external magnetic fields of induction B = 0-1 kG applied during the polymerization on the structure of polymeric matrix and particles distribution in polymer were analyzed.

  18. Particle Deformation and Concentration Polarization in Electroosmotic Transport of Hydrogels through Pores

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report detection of deformable, hydrogel particles by the resistive-pulse technique using single pores in a polymer film. The hydrogels pass through the pores by electroosmosis and cause formation of a characteristic shape of resistive pulses indicating the particles underwent dehydration and deformation. These effects were explained via a non-homogeneous pressure distribution along the pore axis modeled by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Navier Stokes equations. The local pressure drops are induced by the electroosmotic fluid flow. Our experiments also revealed the importance of concentration polarization in the detection of hydrogels. Due to the negative charges as well as branched, low density structure of the hydrogel particles, concentration of ions in the particles is significantly higher than in the bulk. As a result, when electric field is applied across the membrane, a depletion zone can be created in the vicinity of the particle observed as a transient drop of the current. Our experiments using pores with openings between 200 and 1600 nm indicated the concentration polarization dominated the hydrogels detection for pores wider than 450 nm. The results are of importance for all studies that involve transport of molecules, particles and cells through pores with charged walls. The developed inhomogeneous pressure distribution can potentially influence the shape of the transported species. The concentration polarization changes the interpretation of the resistive pulses; the observed current change does not necessarily reflect only the particle size but also the size of the depletion zone that is formed in the particle vicinity.

  19. Simple Model for Gold Nano Particles Concentration Dependence of Resonance Energy Transfer Intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, N. M.; Ha, C. V.; Nga, D. T.; Lan, N. T.; Nhung, T. H.; Viet, N. A.

    2016-06-01

    Gold nano particles (GNPs) concentration dependence of the energy transfer occurs between the fluorophores and GNPs is investigated. In the case of theses pairs, GNPs can enhance or quench the fluorescence of fluorophores depending upon the relative magnitudes of two energy transfer mechanisms: i) the plasmonic field enhancement at the fluorophores emission frequencies (plasmon coupled fluorescence enhancement) and ii) the localized plasmon coupled Forster energy transfer from fluorescent particles to gold particles, which quenches the fluorescence. The competition of these mechanisms is depending on the spectral overlap of fluorophores and GNPs, their relative concentration, excitation wavelength. Simple two branches surface plasmon polariton model for GNPs concentration dependence of the energy transfer is proposed. The experimental data and theoretical results confirm our findings.

  20. Forces acting on a particle in a concentration gradient under an externally applied oscillating electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuan; Yobas, Levent

    2014-09-01

    We report a force field on a particle in a concentration (conductivity) gradient under an externally applied oscillating electric field. The conductivity gradient was established through integrated microcapillaries bridging high- and low-conductivity streams in dedicated microchannels. Particles in low-conductivity electrolyte were observed to experience a strong force with the application of an oscillating field and pulled to the microcapillary openings where they were held against the flow. Particle trapping was accompanied by a concurrent electrolyte injection from high- to low-conductivity channel, triggered with the externally applied field and further contributed to the conductivity gradient near the trapping sites. We experimentally evaluated the force dependence on the magnitude and frequency of the excitation field for 10 μm polystyrene particles immersed at various conductivity levels. The experiments suggest that the observed force cannot be simply explained by dielectrophoresis or diffusiophoresis alone and further requires the consideration of a so-called concentration polarization force. This force has been rather recently postulated based on a theoretical treatment and yet to be experimentally validated. Using the theoretical treatment of this force, together with fluidic drag and diffusiophoresis, we correctly predicted trapping trajectories of particles based on a simultaneous solution of Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations. The predicted and measured trapping velocities were found in reasonable agreement (within a factor of <1.6), suggesting that the consideration of the concentration polarization force is necessary for describing the observed particle behavior.

  1. Synthesis of monodispersed hematite particles from highly concentrated metal hydroxide gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingyuan

    The synthesis of uniform hematite particles with various morphologies from highly concentrated metal hydroxide gels was investigated. The investigations were focused on the effects of cation (trivalent and divalent), anions (arsenate and selenate), and organic additives (alkyl sufates) on particle formation. Monodispersed aluminum-substituted hematite particles were synthesized from concentrated mixed solutions of FeCl3 and AlCl3. With increasing aluminum contents, the product particles exhibited ellipsoidal, rod- and peanut-like shapes. Lattice parameter a decreased with increasing Al incorporation. The particles grew anisotropically along c crystal axis according to TEM and XRD analysis. Chromium substitution had a similar influence on particle shape modification. With increasing chromium content, hematite particles exhibited ellipsoidal and peanut-like morphologies. The incorporation of Cr in hematite increases with increasing Cr addition in the starting solution. The particles grew anisotropically along c crystal axis according to XRD analysis. The size of hematite particles decreased when divalent Cu or Mn contents increased in initial solutions. The cubic shape was well maintained with Cu addition. Hematite particles produced with the existence of Mn2+ were irregular in shape and porous in structure. Copper substitution in hematite was verified by both chemical analysis and lattice parameter calculation. However, the incorporation of Mn is negligible. Ellipsoidal and peanut-shaped hematite particles were synthesized with the addition of arsenate and selenate ions. Product particles were more elongated upon the addition of more anions. The shape modification effects of these anions were interpreted in terms of bond matching due to similar Fe-Fe and O-O distances of hematite and anions, respectively. The addition of alkyl sulfates produced peanut-shaped hematite particles. Uniform particles with the same morphology were always formed despite the differences in

  2. [Particle mass concentrations and size distribution during and after the Beijing Olympic Games].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Rui; Sun, Yang; Li, Liang; Wang, Yue-Si

    2011-04-01

    To study the variance characteristics of particle mass and number concentration during and after the Beijing Olympic Games, on-line measurements of particle mass and number concentration were conducted on the rooftop of a two-story building near the 325 m meteorological observation tower in the courtyard of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics during 2008-08-08 - 2008- 10-07 by using TEOM and APS. Sources and transportation of atmospheric particles during the experiment were discussed with surface meteorology data and backward trajectories calculated using HYSPLIT model. It had been found that the average mass concentration of PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 were (23.1 +/- 1.6) microg x m(-3) and (55.5 +/- 7.3) microg x m(-3) during the Olympic time, which were 18.2% and 16.0% lower than non-Olympic time, and 22.3% and 18.0% lower than non-Source control time. In Olympic time, average number concentration of PN2.5-10 and PN0.5-2.5 were (15 +/- 1) cm(-3) and (3138 +/- 567) cm(-3), which were 23.4% and 27.5% lower than non-Olympic time, and 29.5% and 34.3% lower than non-Source control time. According to the correlation analysis result of particle matter and meteorological factors, there were significant linear relationships between wind speed, relative humidity and precipitation of prior day and particle mass and number concentrations, stepwise regression analysis showed that 42% and 53% of the variance in mass and number concentration of fine particle were both accounted for wind speed and relative humility, while 21% and 39% of the variance in mass and number concentration of coarse particle were both accounted for wind speed and precipitation of prior day. For the entire period, 46% of total air masses came from regions south of Beijing like Baoding and Shijiazhuang and were favor to increase both the mass and number concentration of fine particles, whereas air masses transported from the north and near north regions had a great effect on scavenging both fine and coarse

  3. [Particle mass concentrations and size distribution during and after the Beijing Olympic Games].

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Rui; Sun, Yang; Li, Liang; Wang, Yue-Si

    2011-04-01

    To study the variance characteristics of particle mass and number concentration during and after the Beijing Olympic Games, on-line measurements of particle mass and number concentration were conducted on the rooftop of a two-story building near the 325 m meteorological observation tower in the courtyard of the Institute of Atmospheric Physics during 2008-08-08 - 2008- 10-07 by using TEOM and APS. Sources and transportation of atmospheric particles during the experiment were discussed with surface meteorology data and backward trajectories calculated using HYSPLIT model. It had been found that the average mass concentration of PM2.5-10 and PM2.5 were (23.1 +/- 1.6) microg x m(-3) and (55.5 +/- 7.3) microg x m(-3) during the Olympic time, which were 18.2% and 16.0% lower than non-Olympic time, and 22.3% and 18.0% lower than non-Source control time. In Olympic time, average number concentration of PN2.5-10 and PN0.5-2.5 were (15 +/- 1) cm(-3) and (3138 +/- 567) cm(-3), which were 23.4% and 27.5% lower than non-Olympic time, and 29.5% and 34.3% lower than non-Source control time. According to the correlation analysis result of particle matter and meteorological factors, there were significant linear relationships between wind speed, relative humidity and precipitation of prior day and particle mass and number concentrations, stepwise regression analysis showed that 42% and 53% of the variance in mass and number concentration of fine particle were both accounted for wind speed and relative humility, while 21% and 39% of the variance in mass and number concentration of coarse particle were both accounted for wind speed and precipitation of prior day. For the entire period, 46% of total air masses came from regions south of Beijing like Baoding and Shijiazhuang and were favor to increase both the mass and number concentration of fine particles, whereas air masses transported from the north and near north regions had a great effect on scavenging both fine and coarse

  4. Variation of particle concentrations and environmental noise on the urban neighbourhood scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Stephan; Litschke, Tom

    Particulate air pollution and environmental noise received increased attention within the environmental health community during recent years due to their potential impacts on human health. In this study the spatio-temporal variation of noise and particles was estimated by a short set of mobile measurements within an urban neighbourhood in Essen, Germany. Particle concentrations (PM 1 and PM coarse = PM 10 - PM 1) were measured by an optical particle counter continuously along the measurement route while environmental noise was measured at fixed points on the same route. Additionally, wind and turbulence parameters were gathered above rooftop height and within an urban street canyon. The spatial distribution of noise was very homogeneous while the distribution of particle concentrations turned out to be rather inhomogeneous. The spatial correlation between noise and particles was found to be poor for PM coarse during all measurements. However, for PM 1 and noise a moderate positive correlation ( r ˜ 0.5) emerged under conditions of weak turbulent atmospheric mixing. The spatio-temporal covariation between particles and noise is believed to be more evident for ultrafine (<100 nm) particles.

  5. Variability of particle number concentration and particle size dynamics in an urban street canyon under different meteorological conditions.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephan; Kordowski, Klaus; Kuttler, Wilhelm

    2013-04-01

    During a six-month study period, aerosol number size distributions, mean meteorological conditions and turbulent exchange were measured within an urban street canyon in Essen, Germany. The findings were compared to simultaneous measurements conducted at suburban sites within the study area. The effects of turbulent exchange and different canyon flow situations on aerosol number concentration variability within the street canyon were studied. In comparison to a suburban background site, the busy urban street canyon aerosol number concentration was significantly elevated in the size range below 70 nm throughout the daytime hours. During the morning rush hour, total number concentrations were a factor of 2.2 higher. On average, the total number concentration at the street canyon site roughly doubled the suburban background concentrations (by a factor of 1.9). The intensity of turbulent mixing within the street canyon was sensitive to the prevailing flow regime. The highest turbulent mixing during cross-canyon flow from directions downwind of the measurement spot was accompanied by the lowest number concentration of all flow regimes observed within the canyon. This behaviour was consistent for the different aerosol size classes considered in this study. The effects of meteorology and traffic intensity on total aerosol number concentrations were parameterised using a multiple linear regression analysis and indicated that turbulent mixing within the canyon, traffic intensity and NOx concentrations were the most significant parameters. The model is characterised by an average relative uncertainty of 29%. During situations with a total number concentration>7500 cm(-3), a relative uncertainty of the modelled data of ±25% emerges but displays a larger deviation for low particle concentrations.

  6. Atmospheric concentrations and deposition of trichloroacetic acid in Scotland: results from a 2-year sampling campaign.

    PubMed

    Heal, M R; Reeves, N M; Cape, J N

    2003-06-15

    The first long-term concurrent measurements of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in rainwater, in cloudwater, and in air (both gas and particle phase) are reported. Measurements were made weekly between June 1998 and April 2000 at a rural forested upland site in SE Scotland. Rainwater TCA concentration did not differ significantly between two elevations (602 and 275 m asl), with precipitation-weighted mean values of 0.77 and 0.70 microg L(-1), respectively (n > 75). The precipitation-weighted mean concentration of TCA in cloudwater at the highest elevation was 0.92 microg L(-1), yielding an average cloudwater enrichment factor of 1.2, considerably lower than for other inorganic ions measured. Rainwater and cloudwater TCA concentrations did not vary systematically with season. Since wet precipitation depth also did not vary systematically with season, the wet deposition fluxes of TCA were likewise invariant (annual fluxes at the highest elevation of 880 and 130 microg m(-2), respectively, for rain and cloud interception to spruce forest). Weekly integrated concentrations of TCA in air (gas and particle) were very low (median 25 pg m(-3), range < LOD-110 pg m(-3)). The estimated upper limit for annual dry deposition of TCA at this site was approximately 20 microg m(-2), assuming a deposition velocity of 2 cm s(-1). Concentrations of TCA in air correlated reasonably strongly with concentrations in rainwater, with a partition ratio approximately equal to the Henry's law coefficient. On average, only about 23% of TCA measured in Edinburgh air was associated with the particle phase. These measurements are consistent with the observed high scavenging ratio of TCA (ratio of concentration in air to concentration in rainwater). Overall, these data confirm that the atmosphere is an important source of TCA to the environment and that precipitation is the dominant transfer mechanism. In line with previous work, the atmospheric deposition flux is greater than expected from the current

  7. Clinical overview of Omacor: a concentrated formulation of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold

    2006-08-21

    Omacor (omega-3-acid ethyl esters; Reliant Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Liberty Corner, NJ) is a highly purified, prescription omega-3 fatty acid formulation with high concentrations of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (465 mg) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (375 mg) in each 1-g capsule, along with 4 mg (6 IU) of vitamin E. At a typical dose of 4 capsules/day, Omacor significantly lowers plasma triglyceride levels either as monotherapy or in combination with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) or fibrates. Omacor also modestly increases plasma levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, increases high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and has favorable effects on lipoprotein particle size and subclass distribution. Omacor is well tolerated, with few side effects other than mild gastrointestinal symptoms. Hyperglycemia, abnormal bleeding, elevations in muscle or liver enzymes, and/or abnormalities in kidney or nerve function have not been reported. Through its intensive purification process, Omacor has minimal "fishy" smell and taste, and it has not been reported to cause hypervitaminosis or illness due to exposure to environmental toxins. Omacor provides a safe, effective, well-tolerated approach to management of hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:16919519

  8. Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in auto-rickshaws in New Delhi, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, Joshua, S.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Reich, Alexander, H.; Deshpande, Shyam J.; Kaushik, Geetanjali; Chel, Arvind; Marshall, Julian D.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2011-08-01

    Concentrations of air pollutants from vehicles are elevated along roadways, indicating that human exposure in transportation microenvironments may not be adequately characterized by centrally located monitors. We report results from ˜180 h of real-time measurements of fine particle and black carbon mass concentration (PM 2.5, BC) and ultrafine particle number concentration (PN) inside a common vehicle, the auto-rickshaw, in New Delhi, India. Measured exposure concentrations are much higher in this study (geometric mean for ˜60 trip-averaged concentrations: 190 μg m -3 PM 2.5, 42 μg m -3 BC, 280 × 10 3 particles cm -3; GSD ˜1.3 for all three pollutants) than reported for transportation microenvironments in other megacities. In-vehicle concentrations exceeded simultaneously measured ambient levels by 1.5× for PM 2.5, 3.6× for BC, and 8.4× for PN. Short-duration peak concentrations (averaging time: 10 s), attributable to exhaust plumes of nearby vehicles, were greater than 300 μg m -3 for PM 2.5, 85 μg m -3 for BC, and 650 × 10 3 particles cm -3 for PN. The incremental increase of within-vehicle concentration above ambient levels—which we attribute to in- and near-roadway emission sources—accounted for 30%, 68% and 86% of time-averaged in-vehicle PM 2.5, BC and PN concentrations, respectively. Based on these results, we estimate that one's exposure during a daily commute by auto-rickshaw in Delhi is as least as large as full-day exposures experienced by urban residents of many high-income countries. This study illuminates an environmental health concern that may be common in many populous, low-income cities.

  9. [Method for recovering and concentrating lactic acid during interval training].

    PubMed

    Faye, J; Arabi, F; Faye, B; Seck, D; Cisse, F; Martineaud, J P; Thiam, A

    1996-01-01

    Sixteen athletes were divided into 2 equal groups, A and B. Then, they were put through a series of repetitive trial exercises consisting in a sequence of 400 m races run to a sub-maximum speed (75% of maximum speed) and with pauses of a length of time equal to race time, and repeated to exhaustion, i.e., inability to keep up required speed. Recuperation in between races varied: Group A was completely passive, motionless; Group B was still going, albeit rather slowly. The parameters measured included blood concentration of lactic acid at rest and on completion of exercise and overall distance covered. At rest, there was a significant difference of lactatemia between the two groups. During the exercise, the distance run by Group B was longer (by 187.5 m) that that covered by Group A, though the difference was not significant (0.05 < P < 0.10), but his lactatemia was significantly much lower (P < 0.05). On average, the race speed and the time for recuperation which were alternatively measured were just the same for the two groups. PMID:9827091

  10. Concentration polarization of interacting solute particles in cross-flow membrane filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Kim, A.S.; Elimelech, M.

    1999-04-01

    A theoretical approach for predicting the influence of interparticle interactions on concentration polarization and the ensuing permeate flux decline during cross-flow membrane filtration of charged solute particles is presented. The Ornstein-Zernike integral equation is solved using appropriate closures corresponding to hard-spherical and long-range solute-solute interactions to predict the radial distribution function of the solute particles in a concentrated solution (dispersion). Two properties of the solution, namely the osmotic pressure and the diffusion coefficient, are determined on the basis of the radial distribution function at different solute concentrations. Incorporation of the concentration dependence of these two properties in the concentration polarization model comprising the convective-diffusion equation and the osmotic-pressure governed permeate flux equation leads to the coupled prediction of the solute concentration profile and the local permeate flux. The approach leads to a direct quantitative incorporation of solute-solute interactions in the framework of a standard theory of concentration polarization. The developed model is used to study the effects of ionic strength and electrostatic potential on the variations of solute diffusivity and osmotic pressure. Finally, the combined influence of these two properties on the permeate flux decline behavior during cross-flow membrane filtration of charged solute particles is predicted.

  11. Shape evolution of SrCO{sub 3} particles in the presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid)

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Jiaguo . E-mail: jiaguoyu@yahoo.com; Guo Hua; Cheng Bei

    2006-03-15

    In this paper, strontium carbonate particles with different morphologies were prepared by a simple precipitation reaction of sodium carbonate with strontium nitrate in the absence and presence of poly-(styrene-alt-maleic acid) (PSMA). The as-prepared products were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the concentration of PSMA on the morphologies and phase structures of strontium carbonate particles were investigated and discussed. The results showed that SrCO{sub 3} particles with various shapes, such as bundles, dumbbells, irregular aggregates and spheres could be obtained by varying the concentration of PSMA. A schematic illustration was proposed to account for the shape evolution of the as-prepared SrCO{sub 3} particles.

  12. How comparable are size-resolved particle number concentrations from different instruments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornsby, K. E.; Pryor, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    The need for comparability of particle size resolved measurements originates from multiple drivers including: (i) Recent suggestions that air quality standards for particulate matter should migrate from being mass-based to incorporating number concentrations. This move would necessarily be predicated on measurement comparability which is absolutely critical to compliance determination. (ii) The need to quantify and diagnose causes of variability in nucleation and growth rates in nano-particle experiments conducted in different locations. (iii) Epidemiological research designed to identify key parameters in human health responses to fine particle exposure. Here we present results from a detailed controlled laboratory instrument inter-comparison experiment designed to investigate data comparability in the size range of 2.01-523.3 nm across a range of particle composition, modal diameter and absolute concentration. Particle size distributions were generated using a TSI model 3940 Aerosol Generation System (AGS) diluted using zero air, and sampled using four TSI Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) configurations and a TSI model 3091 Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). The SMPS configurations used two Electrostatic Classifiers (EC) (model 3080) attached to either a Long DMA (LDMA) (model 3081) or a Nano DMA (NDMA) (model 3085) plumbed to either a TSI model 3025A Butanol Condensed Particle Counting (CPC) or a TSI model 3788 Water CPC. All four systems were run using both high and low flow conditions, and were operated with both the internal diffusion loss and multiple charge corrections turned on. The particle compositions tested were sodium chloride, ammonium nitrate and olive oil diluted in ethanol. Particles of all three were generated at three peak concentration levels (spanning the range observed at our experimental site), and three modal particle diameters. Experimental conditions were maintained for a period of 20 minutes to ensure experimental

  13. Concentrated ambient air particles induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Joao R F; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Clarke, Robert W; Coull, Brent A; Stearns, Rebecca C; Lawrence, Joy; Murthy, G G Krishna; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether short-term exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) alter the morphology of small pulmonary arteries in normal rats and rats with chronic bronchitis (CB). Sprague-Dawley male rats were exposed to CAPs, using the Harvard Ambient Particle Concentrator, or to particle-free air (sham) under identical conditions during 3 consecutive days (5 hr/day) in six experimental sets. CB was induced by exposure to 276 +/- 9 ppm of sulfur dioxide (5 hr/day, 5 days/week, 6 weeks). Physicochemical characterization of CAPs included measurements of particle mass, size distribution, and composition. Rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last CAPs exposure. Histologic slides were prepared from random sections of lung lobes and coded for blinded analysis. The lumen/wall area (L/W) ratio was determined morphometrically on transverse sections of small pulmonary arteries. When all animal data (normal and CB) were analyzed together, the L/W ratios decreased as concentrations of fine particle mass, silicon, lead, sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon increased. In separate univariate analyses of animal data, the association for sulfate was significant only in normal rats, whereas silicon was significantly associated in both CB and normal rats. In multivariate analyses including all particle factors, the association with silicon remained significant. Our results indicate that short-term CAPs exposures (median, 182.75 micro g/m3; range, 73.50-733.00 micro g/m3) can induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in normal and CB rats. This effect was correlated with specific particle components and suggests that the pulmonary vasculature might be an important target for ambient air particle toxicity. PMID:12460797

  14. A concentrated solar cavity absorber with direct heat transfer through recirculating metallic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarker, M. R. I.; Saha, Manabendra; Beg, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    A recirculating flow solar particle cavity absorber (receiver) is modeled to investigate the flow behavior and heat transfer characteristics of a novel developing concept. It features a continuous recirculating flow of non-reacting metallic particles (black silicon carbide) with air which are used as a thermal enhancement medium. The aim of the present study is to numerically investigate the thermal behavior and flow characteristics of the proposed concept. The proposed solar particle receiver is modeled using two phase discrete particle model (DPM), RNG k-flow model and discrete ordinate (DO) radiation model. Numerical analysis is carried out considering a solar receiver with only air and the mixture of non-reacting particles and air as a heat transfer as well as heat carrying medium. The parametric investigation is conducted considering the incident solar flux on the receiver aperture and changing air flow rate and recirculation rate inside the receiver. A stand-alone feature of the recirculating flow solar particle receiver concept is that the particles are directly exposed to concentrated solar radiation monotonously through recirculating flow inside the receiver and results in efficient irradiation absorption and convective heat transfer to air that help to achieve high temperature air and consequently increase in thermal efficiency. This paper presents, results from the developed concept and highlights its flow behavior and potential to enhance the heat transfer from metallic particles to air by maximizing heat carrying capacity of the heat transfer medium. The imposed milestones for the present system will be helpful to understand the radiation absorption mechanism of the particles in a recirculating flow based receiver, the thermal transport between the particles, the air and the cavity, and the fluid dynamics of the air and particle in the cavity.

  15. Linking particle number concentration (PNC), meteorology and traffic variables in a UK street canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Heather D.; Arthur, Robert; BéruBé, Kelly A.; Jones, Tim P.

    2014-10-01

    Ambient particle number concentration (PNC) has been linked with adverse health outcomes such as asthma, reduced lung function and cardiovascular disease. To investigate the relationship between PNC, meteorology and traffic we measured size segregated respirable particles in a busy commuter street in Swansea, UK for ten months using a Dekati Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI). The ELPI segregates particles into 12 size fractions between 7 nm and 10 μm. The median PNC for the sampling period was 31,545 cm- 3. For the ultrafine particles (7-93 nm), the highest PNC was found in winter (46,615 cm- 3; 15 minute average) and the lowest for that size fraction in summer (29,696 cm- 3). For the particles below 93 nm there was a trimodal distribution to weekdays (particularly Monday to Wednesday), with PNC peaks at 09:00, 16:00 and 23:00. Wind direction had a significant influence on PNC and differed between particles in the fine range (below 2.5 μm) and more coarse particles (up to 10 μm). For fine particles, winds parallel to the canyon were associated with higher PNCs which were attributed to the replenishment of traffic particles. For coarse particles, PNCs were higher from winds perpendicular to the canyon and this was linked to source distribution around the sampling site and the recirculation of pollutants within the canyon. During times when vehicle volumes were high and vehicles were exhibiting stop-start behaviour, if this was combined with low wind speeds, ultrafine PNC was highest. This effect was generally observed during the morning rush hour. Current mass-based legislation does not take into account exposure to the number of particles or the change in population exposure diurnally.

  16. Interactions of meteoric smoke particles with sulphuric acid in the Earth's stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, R. W.; Dhomse, S.; Tian, W. S.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2012-01-01

    Nano-sized meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) with iron-magnesium silicate compositions, formed in the upper mesosphere as a result of meteoric ablation, may remove sulphuric acid from the gas-phase above 40 km and may also affect the composition and behaviour of supercooled H2SO4-H2O droplets in the global stratospheric aerosol (Junge) layer. This study describes a time-resolved spectroscopic analysis of the evolution of the ferric (Fe3+) ion originating from amorphous ferrous (Fe2+)-based silicate powders dissolved in varying Wt % sulphuric acid (30-75%) solutions over a temperature range of 223-295 K. Complete dissolution of the particles was observed under all conditions. The first-order rate coefficient for dissolution decreases at higher Wt % and lower temperature, which is consistent with the increased solution viscosity limiting diffusion of H2SO4 to the particle surfaces. Dissolution under stratospheric conditions should take less than a week, and is much faster than the dissolution of crystalline Fe2+ compounds. The chemistry climate model UMSLIMCAT (based on the UKMO Unified Model) was then used to study the transport of MSPs through the middle atmosphere. A series of model experiments were performed with different uptake coefficients. Setting the concentration of 1.5 nm radius MSPs at 80 km to 3000 cm-3 (based on rocket-borne charged particle measurements), the model matches the reported Wt % Fe values of 0.5-1.0 in Junge layer sulphate particles, and the MSP optical extinction between 40 and 75 km measured by a satellite-borne spectrometer, if the global meteoric input rate is about 20 t d-1. The model indicates that an uptake coefficient ≥0.01 is required to account for the observed two orders of magnitude depletion of H2SO4 vapour above 40 km.

  17. Interactions of meteoric smoke particles with sulphuric acid in the Earth's stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, R. W.; Dhomse, S.; Tian, W. S.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2012-05-01

    Nano-sized meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) with iron-magnesium silicate compositions, formed in the upper mesosphere as a result of meteoric ablation, may remove sulphuric acid from the gas-phase above 40 km and may also affect the composition and behaviour of supercooled H2SO4-H2O droplets in the global stratospheric aerosol (Junge) layer. This study describes a time-resolved spectroscopic analysis of the evolution of the ferric (Fe3+) ion originating from amorphous ferrous (Fe2+)-based silicate powders dissolved in varying Wt % sulphuric acid (30-75 %) solutions over a temperature range of 223-295 K. Complete dissolution of the particles was observed under all conditions. The first-order rate coefficient for dissolution decreases at higher Wt % and lower temperature, which is consistent with the increased solution viscosity limiting diffusion of H2SO4 to the particle surfaces. Dissolution under stratospheric conditions should take less than a week, and is much faster than the dissolution of crystalline Fe2+ compounds. The chemistry climate model UMSLIMCAT (based on the UKMO Unified Model) was then used to study the transport of MSPs through the middle atmosphere. A series of model experiments were performed with different uptake coefficients. Setting the concentration of 1.5 nm radius MSPs at 80 km to 3000 cm-3 (based on rocket-borne charged particle measurements), the model matches the reported Wt % Fe values of 0.5-1.0 in Junge layer sulphate particles, and the MSP optical extinction between 40 and 75 km measured by a satellite-borne spectrometer, if the global meteoric input rate is about 20 tonnes per day. The model indicates that an uptake coefficient ≥0.01 is required to account for the observed two orders of magnitude depletion of H2SO4 vapour above 40 km.

  18. [Study on number concentration distribution of atmospheric ultrafine particles in Hangzhou].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Fang; Sun, Zai; Fu, Zhi-Min; Yang, Wen-Jun; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2013-02-01

    Atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFPs) were measured with fast mobility particle sizer(FMPS) in Hangzhou, during March 2011 to February 2012. The number concentration and size distribution of UFPs associated with meteorology were studied. The results showed that the number concentration of UFPs was logarithmic bi-modal distribution, and the seasonal levels presented winter > summer > spring> autumn. The highest monthly average concentration was 3.56 x 10(4) cm-3 in December and the lowest was 2.51 x 10(4) cm-3 in October. The seasonal values of count medium diameter(CMD) were spring > winter > autumn > summer. The highest monthly average CMD was 53. 51 nm in April and the lowest was 16.68 nm in June. Meteorological factors had effects on concentration of UFPs. PMID:23668106

  19. Monitor of the concentration of particles of dense radioactive materials in a stream of air

    DOEpatents

    Yule, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    A monitor of the concentration of particles of radioactive materials such as plutonium oxide in diameters as small as 1/2 micron includes in combination a first stage comprising a plurality of virtual impactors, a second stage comprising a further plurality of virtual impactors, a collector for concentrating particulate material, a radiation detector disposed near the collector to respond to radiation from collected material and means for moving a stream of air, possibly containing particulate contaminants, through the apparatus.

  20. Effect of L (+) ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraya, Mohamed El-shahte Ismaiel

    2015-11-01

    In this study, monosodium glutamate and ascorbic acid were used as crystal and growth modifiers to control the crystallization of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate prepared by reacting a mixed solution of Na2CO3 with CaCl2 at ambient temperature, (25 °C), constant Ca++/ CO3- - molar ratio and pH with stirring. The polymorph and morphology of the crystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that rhombohedral calcite was only formed in water without organic additives, and both calcite and spherical vaterite with various morphologies were produced in the presence of monosodium glutamate. The content of vaterite increased as the monosodium glutamate increased. In addition, spherical vaterite was obtained in the presence of different concentrations of ascorbic acid. The spherical vaterite posses an aggregate shape composed of nano-particles, ranging from 30 to 50 nm as demonstrated by the SEM and TEM analyses. Therefore, the ascorbic stabilizes vaterite and result in nano-particles compared to monosodium glutamate.

  1. Effect of the bile-acid sequestrant colestipol on postprandial serum bile-acid concentration: evaluation by bioluminescent enzymic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, S S; Wayne, M L; Smith, R B; Wright, C E; Andreadis, N A; Hofmann, A F

    1989-02-01

    Chronic ingestion of bile-acid sequestrants has been shown to decrease the serum cholesterol concentration and coronary events in hypercholesterolaemic patients. To develop improved sequestrants, a rapid, convenient method for testing the bile-acid binding efficacy of sequestrants is needed. Serum bile-acid concentrations could be used to detect bile-acid binding by an administered sequestrant, since the serum bile-acid concentration is determined largely by the rate of intestinal absorption in healthy individuals. To test this, serum bile-acid concentrations were measured at frequent intervals over 24 h in five otherwise healthy hypercholesterolaemic subjects during the ingestion of three standard meals, with or without the addition of 5 g colestipol granules administered 30 min before each meal. Total serum bile-acid concentration was measured with a previously reported bioluminescent enzymic assay, that uses a 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, an oxido-reductase, and a bacterial luciferase co-immobilized on to Sepharose beads. Bile acids in 1 ml of serum were isolated by solid-phase extraction chromatography with reversed-phase C18 cartridges. Colestipol lowered the postprandial elevation of serum bile acids by one half, with a subsequent decrease in the cumulative area under the curve. The data suggest that measurement of serum bile-acid concentrations by bioluminescence is a rapid, simple way to document the efficacy of bile-acid sequestrants.

  2. Ratios of total suspended solids to suspended sediment concentrations by particle size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selbig, W.R.; Bannerman, R.T.

    2011-01-01

    Wet-sieving sand-sized particles from a whole storm-water sample before splitting the sample into laboratory-prepared containers can reduce bias and improve the precision of suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC). Wet-sieving, however, may alter concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS) because the analytical method used to determine TSS may not have included the sediment retained on the sieves. Measuring TSS is still commonly used by environmental managers as a regulatory metric for solids in storm water. For this reason, a new method of correlating concentrations of TSS and SSC by particle size was used to develop a series of correction factors for SSC as a means to estimate TSS. In general, differences between TSS and SSC increased with greater particle size and higher sand content. Median correction factors to SSC ranged from 0.29 for particles larger than 500m to 0.85 for particles measuring from 32 to 63m. Great variability was observed in each fraction-a result of varying amounts of organic matter in the samples. Wide variability in organic content could reduce the transferability of the correction factors. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  3. A splitting integration scheme for the SPH simulation of concentrated particle suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Xin; Ellero, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Simulating nearly contacting solid particles in suspension is a challenging task due to the diverging behavior of short-range lubrication forces, which pose a serious time-step limitation for explicit integration schemes. This general difficulty limits severely the total duration of simulations of concentrated suspensions. Inspired by the ideas developed in [S. Litvinov, M. Ellero, X.Y. Hu, N.A. Adams, J. Comput. Phys. 229 (2010) 5457-5464] for the simulation of highly dissipative fluids, we propose in this work a splitting integration scheme for the direct simulation of solid particles suspended in a Newtonian liquid. The scheme separates the contributions of different forces acting on the solid particles. In particular, intermediate- and long-range multi-body hydrodynamic forces, which are computed from the discretization of the Navier-Stokes equations using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method, are taken into account using an explicit integration; for short-range lubrication forces, velocities of pairwise interacting solid particles are updated implicitly by sweeping over all the neighboring pairs iteratively, until convergence in the solution is obtained. By using the splitting integration, simulations can be run stably and efficiently up to very large solid particle concentrations. Moreover, the proposed scheme is not limited to the SPH method presented here, but can be easily applied to other simulation techniques employed for particulate suspensions.

  4. Characterization study of cesium concentrated particles in the soils near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satou, Yukihiko; Sueki, Keisuke; Sasa, Kimikazu; Adachi, Kouji; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2015-04-01

    Radionuclides from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident contaminated a vast area. Two types of contamination, spread and spot types, were observed in soils with autoradiography using an imaging plate. Other samples such as dust filters, vegetation, X-ray films, and so on, also indicate the spot type contamination in the early stage of the FDNPP accident. The source of spot type contamination is well known as hot particles at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) accident in 1986. Hot particles were divided into two groups, fuel hot particles and fission product particles, and they were emitted directly from reactor core with phreatic explosion and fire. In contrast, the official reports of the FDNPP accident did not conforme core explosion. In addition, the emitted total amount of Uranium was very few (Yamamoto et al., 2014). Thus, the spot type contaminations were not identified as the same of hot particles yet. Therefore, the present study aimed to pick up and identify the spot contaminations in soils. Surface soil samples were collected at 20 km northwest from the FDNPP in June 2013. Soils were spread in plastic bags for autoradiography with imaging plate analysis. Then, the soil particles were collected on a sticky carbon tape and analyzed by SEM-EDS to detect radioactive particles. Finally, particles were confirmed to contain photo peaks in the γ-spectrum by a germanium semiconductor detector. Four radioactive particles were isolated from the soil samples in the present study. Detected γ-ray emission radionuclides were only Cs-134 and Cs-137. The X-ray spectra on the SEM-EDS of all particles showed a Cs peak as well as O, Fe, Zn, and Rb peaks, and these elements were distributed uniformly within the particles. In addition, uniform distribution of Si was also shown. Moreover, U was detected from one of the particles, but U concentration was very low and existed locally in the particle. These characters are very similar to previous

  5. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Licina, Dusan; Bhangar, Seema; Brooks, Brandon; Baker, Robyn; Firek, Brian; Tang, Xiaochen; Morowitz, Michael J; Banfield, Jillian F; Nazaroff, William W

    2016-01-01

    Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupancy. The experiments were conducted over one year in a private-style NICU. The NICU was served by a central heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system equipped with an economizer and a high-efficiency particle filtration system. The following parameters were measured continuously during weekdays with 1-min resolution: particles larger than 0.3 μm resolved into 6 size groups, CO2 level, dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity, and presence or absence of occupants. Altogether, over sixteen periods of a few weeks each, measurements were conducted in rooms occupied with premature infants. In parallel, a second monitoring station was operated in a nearby hallway or at the local nurses' station. The monitoring data suggest a strong link between indoor particle concentrations and human occupancy. Detected particle peaks from occupancy were clearly discernible among larger particles and imperceptible for submicron (0.3-1 μm) particles. The mean indoor particle mass concentrations averaged across the size range 0.3-10 μm during occupied periods was 1.9 μg/m3, approximately 2.5 times the concentration during unoccupied periods (0.8 μg/m3). Contributions of within-room emissions to total PM10 mass in the baby rooms averaged 37-81%. Near-room indoor emissions and outdoor sources contributed 18-59% and 1-5%, respectively. Airborne particle levels in the size range 1-10 μm showed strong dependence on human activities, indicating the importance of indoor

  6. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Licina, Dusan; Bhangar, Seema; Brooks, Brandon; Baker, Robyn; Firek, Brian; Tang, Xiaochen; Morowitz, Michael J.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupancy. The experiments were conducted over one year in a private-style NICU. The NICU was served by a central heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system equipped with an economizer and a high-efficiency particle filtration system. The following parameters were measured continuously during weekdays with 1-min resolution: particles larger than 0.3 μm resolved into 6 size groups, CO2 level, dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity, and presence or absence of occupants. Altogether, over sixteen periods of a few weeks each, measurements were conducted in rooms occupied with premature infants. In parallel, a second monitoring station was operated in a nearby hallway or at the local nurses’ station. The monitoring data suggest a strong link between indoor particle concentrations and human occupancy. Detected particle peaks from occupancy were clearly discernible among larger particles and imperceptible for submicron (0.3–1 μm) particles. The mean indoor particle mass concentrations averaged across the size range 0.3–10 μm during occupied periods was 1.9 μg/m3, approximately 2.5 times the concentration during unoccupied periods (0.8 μg/m3). Contributions of within-room emissions to total PM10 mass in the baby rooms averaged 37–81%. Near-room indoor emissions and outdoor sources contributed 18–59% and 1–5%, respectively. Airborne particle levels in the size range 1–10 μm showed strong dependence on human activities, indicating the importance of indoor

  7. Effect of acid concentration and treatment time on acid-alcohol modified jackfruit seed starch properties.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Himjyoti; Paul, Sanjib Kumar; Kalita, Dipankar; Mahanta, Charu Lata

    2011-09-15

    The properties of starch extracted from jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) seeds, collected from west Assam after acid-alcohol modification by short term treatment (ST) for 15-30min with concentrated hydrochloric acid and long term treatment (LT) for 1-15days with 1M hydrochloric acid, were investigated. Granule density, freeze thaw stability, solubility and light transmittance of the treated starches increased. A maximum decrease in the degree of polymerisation occurred in ST of 30min (2607.6). Jackfruit starch had 27.1±0.04% amylose content (db), which in ST initially decreased and then increased with the severity of treatment; in LT the effect was irregular. The pasting profile and granule morphology of the treated samples were severely modified. Native starch had the A-type crystalline pattern and crystalline structure increased on treatment. FTIR spectra revealed slight changes in bond stretching and bending. Colour measurement indicated that whiteness increased on treatment. Acid modified jackfruit seed starch can have applications in the food industry.

  8. Effect of acid concentration and treatment time on acid-alcohol modified jackfruit seed starch properties.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Himjyoti; Paul, Sanjib Kumar; Kalita, Dipankar; Mahanta, Charu Lata

    2011-09-15

    The properties of starch extracted from jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.) seeds, collected from west Assam after acid-alcohol modification by short term treatment (ST) for 15-30min with concentrated hydrochloric acid and long term treatment (LT) for 1-15days with 1M hydrochloric acid, were investigated. Granule density, freeze thaw stability, solubility and light transmittance of the treated starches increased. A maximum decrease in the degree of polymerisation occurred in ST of 30min (2607.6). Jackfruit starch had 27.1±0.04% amylose content (db), which in ST initially decreased and then increased with the severity of treatment; in LT the effect was irregular. The pasting profile and granule morphology of the treated samples were severely modified. Native starch had the A-type crystalline pattern and crystalline structure increased on treatment. FTIR spectra revealed slight changes in bond stretching and bending. Colour measurement indicated that whiteness increased on treatment. Acid modified jackfruit seed starch can have applications in the food industry. PMID:25212133

  9. Elevated Concentrations of Lead in Particulate Matter on the Neighborhood-Scale in Delhi, India As Determined by Single Particle Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongru; Peters, Thomas M; Casuccio, Gary S; Lersch, Traci L; West, Roger R; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Naresh; Ault, Andrew P

    2016-05-17

    High mass concentrations of atmospheric lead particles are frequently observed in the Delhi, India metropolitan area, although the sources of lead particles are poorly understood. In this study, particles sampled across Delhi (August - December 2008) were analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX) to improve our understanding of the spatial and physicochemical variability of lead-rich particles (>90% lead). The mean mass concentration of lead-rich particles smaller than 10 μm (PM10) was 0.7 μg/m(3) (1.5 μg/m(3) std. dev.) with high variability (range: 0-6.2 μg/m(3)). Four samples (16% of 25 samples) with PM10 lead-rich particle concentrations >1.4 μg/m(3) were defined as lead events and studied further. The temporal characteristics, heterogeneous spatial distribution, and wind patterns of events, excluded regional monsoon conditions or common anthropogenic sources from being the major causes of the lead events. Individual particle composition, size, and morphology analysis indicate informal recycling operations of used lead-acid batteries as the likely source of the lead events. This source is not typically included in emission inventories, and the observed isolated hotspots with high lead concentrations could represent an elevated exposure risk in certain neighborhoods of Delhi.

  10. Elevated Concentrations of Lead in Particulate Matter on the Neighborhood-Scale in Delhi, India As Determined by Single Particle Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongru; Peters, Thomas M; Casuccio, Gary S; Lersch, Traci L; West, Roger R; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Naresh; Ault, Andrew P

    2016-05-17

    High mass concentrations of atmospheric lead particles are frequently observed in the Delhi, India metropolitan area, although the sources of lead particles are poorly understood. In this study, particles sampled across Delhi (August - December 2008) were analyzed by computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (CCSEM-EDX) to improve our understanding of the spatial and physicochemical variability of lead-rich particles (>90% lead). The mean mass concentration of lead-rich particles smaller than 10 μm (PM10) was 0.7 μg/m(3) (1.5 μg/m(3) std. dev.) with high variability (range: 0-6.2 μg/m(3)). Four samples (16% of 25 samples) with PM10 lead-rich particle concentrations >1.4 μg/m(3) were defined as lead events and studied further. The temporal characteristics, heterogeneous spatial distribution, and wind patterns of events, excluded regional monsoon conditions or common anthropogenic sources from being the major causes of the lead events. Individual particle composition, size, and morphology analysis indicate informal recycling operations of used lead-acid batteries as the likely source of the lead events. This source is not typically included in emission inventories, and the observed isolated hotspots with high lead concentrations could represent an elevated exposure risk in certain neighborhoods of Delhi. PMID:27077697

  11. Heating Characteristics of Transformer Oil-Based Magnetic Fluids of Different Magnetic Particle Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skumiel, A.; Hornowski, T.; Józefczak, A.

    2011-04-01

    The heating ability of mineral oil-based magnetic fluids with different magnetic particle concentrations is studied. The calorimetric measurements were carried out in an alternating magnetic field of 500 A · m-1 to 2500 A · m-1 amplitude and of 1500 kHz frequency. The revealed H n law-type dependence of the temperature increase rate, (d T/d t) t=0, on the amplitude of the magnetic field indicates the presence of superparamagnetic and partially ferromagnetic particles in the tested samples since n > 2. The specific absorption rate (SAR) defined as the rate of energy absorption per unit mass increases with a decrease of the volume fraction of the dispersed phase. This can be explained by the formation of aggregates in the samples with a higher concentration of magnetic particles.

  12. Airborne particle concentration and meteorologic conditions associated with pneumonia incidence in feedlot cattle

    SciTech Connect

    MacVean, D.W.; Franzen, D.K.; Keefe, T.J.; Bennett, B.W.

    1986-12-01

    To elucidate the role of air quality on the occurrence of pneumonia in feedlot cattle, the following environmental values were measured at a feedlot: suspended particulates in 5 particle-size fractions, relative humidity, air temperature, and barometric pressure. Pneumonia incidence data were classified by the number of days the cattle had been at the feedlot (days on feed). The concentration of airborne particles, range of temperature, days on feed, and season of the year were associated with incidence of pneumonia in cattle. Pneumonia incidence rates were greatest both within 15 days of arrival at the feedlot and during the fall sampling periods. The incidence of pneumonia in the 16 to 30 days-on-feed group was closely associated with the concentration of particles 2.0 to 3.3 microns in diameter and the range of daily temperature when exposure occurred 15 days before the onset of disease in the fall and 10 days before in the spring.

  13. TISSUE REMODELING IN THE HUMAN LUNG IN RELATION TO PARTICLE CONCENTRATION AND METAL CONTENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    TISSUE REMODELING IN THE HUMAN LUNG IN RELATION TO PARTICLE CONCENTRATION AND METAL CONTENT. J Gallagher1, J Inmon1, S Schlaegle2, A Levine2, T Rogers3, J Scott1, F Green4, M Schenker5, K Pinkerton5 1NHEERL, US-EPA, RTP, NC, USA; 2RJ Lee Group Inc, Monroeville, Pa, USA; ...

  14. The Effects of Vegetation Barriers on Near-road Ultrafine Particle Number and Carbon Monoxide Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous studies have shown that people living in near-roadway communities (within 100 m of the road) are exposed to high ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations, which may be associated with adverse health effects. Vegetation barriers have been shown to affect pollutant t...

  15. Concentration of Methylamine and Ethylamine Salts measured by a particle into liquid sampler and Ion Chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Particle-Into-Liquid Sampler (PILS) and ion chromatographs (ICs) were used to detect the concentration of methylamine salts associated with atmospheric particulate matter reactions in a smog chamber. The smog chamber is located at U.C. Riverside’s College of Engineering Center for Environmental Re...

  16. EFFECTS OF METAL COMPONENTS IN CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR PARTICLES ON PULMONARY INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF METAL COMPONENTS IN CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR PARTICLES ON PULMONARY INJURY. Yuh-Chin Huang, Jackie Stonehuerner, Jackie Carter, Andrew J. Ghio, Robert B. Devlin. NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, NC.
    The mechanisms for cardiopulmonary morbidity associated with exposure to air po...

  17. DEVELOPMENT AND LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION OF A PROTOTYPE COARSE PARTICLE CONCENTRATOR FOR INHALATION TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES. (R825270)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the development and laboratory characterization of a prototype slit nozzle virtual impactor that can be used to concentrate coarse particles. A variety of physical design and flow parameters were evaluated including different acceleration and collection sli...

  18. Apparatus and method for concentrating and filtering particles suspended in a fluid

    DOEpatents

    Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Cummings, Eric B.; Singh, Anup K.

    2009-05-19

    Disclosed is a device for separating and concentrating particles suspended in a fluid stream by using dielectrophoresis (DEP) to trap and/or deflect those particles as they migrate through a fluid channel. The method uses fluid channels designed to constrain a liquid flowing through it to uniform electrokinetic flow velocities. This behavior is achieved by connecting deep and shallow sections of channels, with the channel depth varying abruptly along an interface. By careful design of abrupt changes in specific permeability at the interface, an abrupt and spatially uniform change in electrokinetic force can be selected. Because these abrupt interfaces also cause a sharp gradient in applied electric fields, a DEP force also can be established along the interface. Depending on the complex conductivity of the suspended particles and the immersion liquid, the DEP force can controllably complement or oppose the local electrokinetic force transporting the fluid through the channel allowing for manipulation of particles suspended in the transporting liquid.

  19. Cascade model for particle concentration and enstrophy in fully developed turbulence with mass-loading feedback.

    PubMed

    Hogan, R C; Cuzzi, J N

    2007-05-01

    A cascade model is described based on multiplier distributions determined from three-dimensional (3D) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent particle laden flows, which include two-way coupling between the phases at global mass loadings equal to unity. The governing Eulerian equations are solved using psuedospectral methods on up to 512(3) computional grid points. DNS results for particle concentration and enstrophy at Taylor microscale Reynolds numbers in the range 34-170 were used to directly determine multiplier distributions on spatial scales three times the Kolmogorov length scale. The multiplier probability distribution functions (PDFs) are well characterized by the beta distribution function. The width of the PDFs, which is a measure of intermittency, decreases with increasing mass loading within the local region where the multipliers are measured. The functional form of this dependence is not sensitive to Reynolds numbers in the range considered. A partition correlation probability is included in the cascade model to account for the observed spatial anticorrelation between particle concentration and enstrophy. Joint probability distribution functions of concentration and enstrophy generated using the cascade model are shown to be in excellent agreement with those derived directly from our 3D simulations. Probabilities predicted by the cascade model are presented at Reynolds numbers well beyond what is achievable by direct simulation. These results clearly indicate that particle mass loading significantly reduces the probabilities of high particle concentration and enstrophy relative to those resulting from unloaded runs. Particle mass density appears to reach a limit at around 100 times the gas density. This approach has promise for significant computational savings in certain applications.

  20. Effects of running the Bostom Marathon on plasma concentrations of large neutral amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conlay, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.; Lopez G-Coviella, I.; Blusztajn, J. K.; Vacanti, C. A.; Logue, M.; During, M.; Caballero, B.; Maher, T. J.; Evoniuk, G.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma large neutral amino acid concentrations were measured in thirty-seven subjects before and after completing the Boston Marathon. Concentrations of tyrosine, phenylalanine, and methionine increased, as did their 'plasma ratios' (i.e., the ratio of each amino acid's concentration to the summed plasma concentrations of the other large neutral amino acids which compete with it for brain uptake). No changes were noted in the plasma concentrations of tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, nor valine; however, the 'plasma ratios' of valine, leucine, and isoleucine all decreased. These changes in plasma amino acid patterns may influence neurotransmitter synthesis.

  1. Preparation of monodisperse aqueous microspheres containing high concentration of l-ascorbic acid by microchannel emulsification.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Nauman; Kobayashi, Isao; Neves, Marcos A; Uemura, Kunihiko; Nakajima, Mitsutoshi; Nabetani, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monodisperse aqueous microspheres containing high concentrations of l-ascorbic acid with different concentrations of sodium alginate (Na-ALG) and magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) were prepared by using microchannel emulsification (MCE). The continuous phase was water-saturated decane containing a 5% (w/w) hydrophobic emulsifier. The flow rate of the continuous phase was maintained at 10 mL h(-1), whereas the pressure applied to the disperse phase was varied between 3 and 25 kPa. The disperse phase optimized for successfully generating aqueous microspheres included 2% (w/w) Na-ALG and 1% (w/w) MgSO4. At a higher MgSO4 concentration, the generated microspheres resulted in coalescence and subsequent bursting. At a lower MgSO4 concentration, unstable and polydisperse microspheres were obtained. The aqueous microspheres generated from the MCs under optimized conditions had a mean particle diameter (dav) of 14-16 µm and a coefficient of variation (CV) of less than 8% at the disperse phase pressures of 5-15 kPa.

  2. Concentration, Size Distribution, and Infectivity of Airborne Particles Carrying Swine Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Carmen; Raynor, Peter C.; Davies, Peter R.; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    When pathogens become airborne, they travel associated with particles of different size and composition. Particle size determines the distance across which pathogens can be transported, as well as the site of deposition and the survivability of the pathogen. Despite the importance of this information, the size distribution of particles bearing viruses emitted by infectious animals remains unknown. In this study we characterized the concentration and size distribution of inhalable particles that transport influenza A virus (IAV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) generated by acutely infected pigs and assessed virus viability for each particle size range. Aerosols from experimentally infected pigs were sampled for 24 days using an Andersen cascade impactor able to separate particles by size (ranging from 0.4 to 10 micrometer (μm) in diameter). Air samples collected for the first 9, 20 and the last 3 days of the study were analyzed for IAV, PRRSV and PEDV, respectively, using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantified as geometric mean copies/m3 within each size range. IAV was detected in all particle size ranges in quantities ranging from 5.5x102 (in particles ranging from 1.1 to 2.1μm) to 4.3x105 RNA copies/m3 in the largest particles (9.0–10.0μm). PRRSV was detected in all size ranges except particles between 0.7 and 2.1μm in quantities ranging from 6x102 (0.4–0.7μm) to 5.1x104 RNA copies/m3 (9.0–10.0μm). PEDV, an enteric virus, was detected in all particle sizes and in higher quantities than IAV and PRRSV (p < 0.0001) ranging from 1.3x106 (0.4–0.7μm) to 3.5x108 RNA copies/m3 (9.0–10.0μm). Infectious status was demonstrated for the 3 viruses, and in the case of IAV and PRRSV, viruses were isolated from particles larger than 2.1μm. In summary, our results indicated that airborne PEDV, IAV and PRRSV can be found in a wide range of

  3. Atmospheric concentrations and gas-particle partitions of pesticides: Comparisons between measured and gas-particle partitioning models from source and receptor sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiki, Mustapha; Poissant, Laurier

    Atmospheric concentrations and gas-particles partition were measured for 83 pesticides including organochlorines (OCs), acid herbicides (AHs), neutral herbicides (NHs) and organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). Samples have been collected in June 2005 at two sites, located in Québec, named St. Anicet (agricultural area) and Bay St. François wetland (receptor site). The highest vapor concentration was measured for metolachlor which was 23,600 pg m -3 and 12,200 pg m -3 at St. Anicet and Bay St. François (BSF), respectively. In the particulate phase, MCPA exhibited the highest level (323 pg m -3) at St. Anicet. Gas-particle partitions (GPPs) were also investigated and it was expressed as a function of the fraction of chemical in the particulate phase ( ϕ). The highest average of ϕ was observed for the AHs which were MCPB (75%) and MCPA (50%) at BSF and St. Anicet, respectively. Likewise, the GPPs were estimated by several models, namely Junge-Pankow model, KOA model, and polyparameter linear free energy relationships (ppLFERs). The estimated GPPs were compared to the observed ones and data showed a better correlation at BSF (receptor site) than that at St. Anicet. This suggests a kinetic effect on the GPPs of chemicals.

  4. Giant in-particle field concentration and Fano resonances at light scattering by high-refractive-index particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribelsky, Michael I.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a detailed analytical study of light scattering by a particle with high refractive index m +i κ and low losses (m ≫1 ,0 <κ ≪1 ) based on the exact Mie solution. We show that there is a dramatic difference in the behavior of the electromagnetic field within the particle (inner problem) and outside it (outer problem). With an increase in m at fixed values of the other parameters, the field within the particle asymptotically converges to a periodic function of m . The electric and magnetic type Mie resonances of different orders overlap substantially. It may lead to a giant concentration of the electromagnetic energy within the particle. At the same time, we demonstrate that the solution for the outer problem makes it possible to present each partial scattered wave as a sum of two partitions. One of them corresponds to the m -independent wave, scattered by a perfectly reflecting particle and plays the role of a background, while the other is associated with the excitation of a sharply m -dependent resonant Mie mode. The interference of the partitions brings about a typical asymmetric Fano profile. The profile is obtained from the exact Mie solution by means of identical transformations without any additional assumptions and/or fitting. It makes it possible to generalize rigorously the Fano theory to the case of finite dissipation. At an increase in m the Fano resonances in the outer problem die out and the scattered field converges to the universal, m -independent profile. The behavior of the resonances at a fixed m and varying particle size parameter (x ) is also discussed in detail. The similarities and differences of the two cases (fixed x , varying m and fixed m , varying x ) are disclosed. We also show that under certain very general conditions the scattering cross section of a large lossy sphere cannot be smaller than half its geometric cross section, while its absorption cross section cannot exceed three halves of the geometric

  5. The effects of vegetation barriers on near-road ultrafine particle number and carbon monoxide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Yeng; Hagler, Gayle; Baldauf, Richard; Isakov, Vlad; Lin, Hong-Yiou; Khlystov, Andrey

    2016-05-15

    Numerous studies have shown that people living in near-roadway communities (within 100 m of the road) are exposed to high ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations, which may be associated with adverse health effects. Vegetation barriers have been shown to affect pollutant transport via particle deposition to leaves and altering the dispersion of emission plumes, which in turn would modify the exposure of near-roadway communities to traffic-related UFPs. In this study, both stationary (equipped with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer, SMPS) and mobile (equipped with Fast Mobility Particle Sizer, FMPS) measurements were conducted to investigate the effects of vegetation barriers on downwind UFP (particle diameters ranging from 14 to 102 nm) concentrations at two sites in North Carolina, USA. One site had mainly deciduous vegetation while the other was primarily coniferous; both sites have a nearby open field without the vegetation barriers along the same stretch of limited access road, which served as a reference. During downwind conditions (traffic emissions transported towards the vegetation barrier) and when the wind speed was above or equal to 0.5m/s, field measurements indicated that vegetation barriers with full foliage reduced UFP and CO concentrations by 37.7-63.6% and 23.6-56.1%, respectively. When the test was repeated at the same sites during winter periods when deciduous foliage was reduced, the deciduous barrier during winter showed no significant change in UFP concentration before and after the barrier. Results from the stationary (using SMPS) and mobile (using FMPS) measurements for UFP total number concentrations generally agreed to within 20%. PMID:26930311

  6. The effects of vegetation barriers on near-road ultrafine particle number and carbon monoxide concentrations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Yeng; Hagler, Gayle; Baldauf, Richard; Isakov, Vlad; Lin, Hong-Yiou; Khlystov, Andrey

    2016-05-15

    Numerous studies have shown that people living in near-roadway communities (within 100 m of the road) are exposed to high ultrafine particle (UFP) number concentrations, which may be associated with adverse health effects. Vegetation barriers have been shown to affect pollutant transport via particle deposition to leaves and altering the dispersion of emission plumes, which in turn would modify the exposure of near-roadway communities to traffic-related UFPs. In this study, both stationary (equipped with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer, SMPS) and mobile (equipped with Fast Mobility Particle Sizer, FMPS) measurements were conducted to investigate the effects of vegetation barriers on downwind UFP (particle diameters ranging from 14 to 102 nm) concentrations at two sites in North Carolina, USA. One site had mainly deciduous vegetation while the other was primarily coniferous; both sites have a nearby open field without the vegetation barriers along the same stretch of limited access road, which served as a reference. During downwind conditions (traffic emissions transported towards the vegetation barrier) and when the wind speed was above or equal to 0.5m/s, field measurements indicated that vegetation barriers with full foliage reduced UFP and CO concentrations by 37.7-63.6% and 23.6-56.1%, respectively. When the test was repeated at the same sites during winter periods when deciduous foliage was reduced, the deciduous barrier during winter showed no significant change in UFP concentration before and after the barrier. Results from the stationary (using SMPS) and mobile (using FMPS) measurements for UFP total number concentrations generally agreed to within 20%.

  7. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  8. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  9. Investigation of Aerosol Surface Area Estimation from Number and Mass Concentration Measurements: Particle Density Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Bon Ki; Evans, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    For nanoparticles with nonspherical morphologies, e.g., open agglomerates or fibrous particles, it is expected that the actual density of agglomerates may be significantly different from the bulk material density. It is further expected that using the material density may upset the relationship between surface area and mass when a method for estimating aerosol surface area from number and mass concentrations (referred to as “Maynard’s estimation method”) is used. Therefore, it is necessary to quantitatively investigate how much the Maynard’s estimation method depends on particle morphology and density. In this study, aerosol surface area estimated from number and mass concentration measurements was evaluated and compared with values from two reference methods: a method proposed by Lall and Friedlander for agglomerates and a mobility based method for compact nonspherical particles using well-defined polydisperse aerosols with known particle densities. Polydisperse silver aerosol particles were generated by an aerosol generation facility. Generated aerosols had a range of morphologies, count median diameters (CMD) between 25 and 50 nm, and geometric standard deviations (GSD) between 1.5 and 1.8. The surface area estimates from number and mass concentration measurements correlated well with the two reference values when gravimetric mass was used. The aerosol surface area estimates from the Maynard’s estimation method were comparable to the reference method for all particle morphologies within the surface area ratios of 3.31 and 0.19 for assumed GSDs 1.5 and 1.8, respectively, when the bulk material density of silver was used. The difference between the Maynard’s estimation method and surface area measured by the reference method for fractal-like agglomerates decreased from 79% to 23% when the measured effective particle density was used, while the difference for nearly spherical particles decreased from 30% to 24%. The results indicate that the use of

  10. Power law relation between particle concentrations and their sizes in the blood plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichenko, M. N.; Chaikov, L. L.; Zaritskii, A. R.

    2016-08-01

    This work is devoted to the investigation of sizes and concentrations of particles in blood plasma by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Blood plasma contains many different proteins and their aggregates, microparticles and vesicles. Their sizes, concentrations and shapes can give information about donor's health. Our DLS study of blood plasma reveals unexpected dependence: with increasing of the particle sizes r (from 1 nm up to 1 μm), their concentrations decrease as r-4 (almost by 12 orders). We found also that such dependence was repeated for model solution of fibrinogen and thrombin with power coefficient is -3,6. We believe that this relation is a fundamental law of nature that shows interaction of proteins (and other substances) in biological liquids.

  11. European Marine Background Ice Nucleating Particle concentrations Measured at the Mace Head Station, Ireland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, James; Kanji, Zamin A.; Ovadnevaite, Jurgita; Ceburnis, Darius; O'Dowd, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Ice formation is an important process which controls cloud microphysical properties and can be critical in the creation of precipitation, therefore influencing the hydrological cycle and energy budget of the Earth. Ice Nucleating Particles (INP) can greatly increase the temperature and rate of ice formation, but the sources and geographical distributions of these particles is not well understood. Mace Head in Ireland is a coastal site on the north eastern edge of Europe with prevailing winds generally from the Atlantic Ocean with little continental influence. Observations of INP concentration from August 2015 using the Horizontal Ice Nucleation Chamber (HINC) at temperature of -30 C are presented. Correlations between the INP and meteorological conditions and aerosol compositions are made, as well as comparisons with commonly used INP concentration parameterisations. Observed INP concentrations are generally low, suggesting that oceanic sources in this region do not contribute significant numbers of INP to the global distribution.

  12. Jamming, Self-Filtration and Cake Growth in Concentrated Particle Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Youjing; Li, Shoubo; Yang, Donglei; Mi, Yongli; Wang, Xiaorong

    2015-03-01

    We study the flows of concentrated particle suspensions driven through a circular orifice. Above a critical concentration, a jammed structure (i.e., quasi-solid sphere) often forms in the flow and at the entrance of the geometrical constriction. Once occurred this jammed structure grows fast as time t passes and produces a reduction in the solid concentration downstream. Our analysis shows that a combination of the particle jamming, the self-filtration, and the cake-formation with the flow passing through the pores of the jammed solid is responsible for the occurrence of such phenomena. Based on this mechanism, we establish a mathematical model to show how the jammed structure is propagated. Our results suggest that the size D of the jammed structure in this case is proportional to a 1/3 power of the time t. Experiments also support this conclusion.

  13. Emissions from an international airport increase particle number concentrations 4-fold at 10 km downwind.

    PubMed

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Gould, Tim; Hartin, Kris; Larson, Timothy V; Fruin, Scott A

    2014-06-17

    We measured the spatial pattern of particle number (PN) concentrations downwind from the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) with an instrumented vehicle that enabled us to cover larger areas than allowed by traditional stationary measurements. LAX emissions adversely impacted air quality much farther than reported in previous airport studies. We measured at least a 2-fold increase in PN concentrations over unimpacted baseline PN concentrations during most hours of the day in an area of about 60 km(2) that extended to 16 km (10 miles) downwind and a 4- to 5-fold increase to 8-10 km (5-6 miles) downwind. Locations of maximum PN concentrations were aligned to eastern, downwind jet trajectories during prevailing westerly winds and to 8 km downwind concentrations exceeded 75 000 particles/cm(3), more than the average freeway PN concentration in Los Angeles. During infrequent northerly winds, the impact area remained large but shifted to south of the airport. The freeway length that would cause an impact equivalent to that measured in this study (i.e., PN concentration increases weighted by the area impacted) was estimated to be 280-790 km. The total freeway length in Los Angeles is 1500 km. These results suggest that airport emissions are a major source of PN in Los Angeles that are of the same general magnitude as the entire urban freeway network. They also indicate that the air quality impact areas of major airports may have been seriously underestimated. PMID:24871496

  14. Emissions from an international airport increase particle number concentrations 4-fold at 10 km downwind.

    PubMed

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Gould, Tim; Hartin, Kris; Larson, Timothy V; Fruin, Scott A

    2014-06-17

    We measured the spatial pattern of particle number (PN) concentrations downwind from the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) with an instrumented vehicle that enabled us to cover larger areas than allowed by traditional stationary measurements. LAX emissions adversely impacted air quality much farther than reported in previous airport studies. We measured at least a 2-fold increase in PN concentrations over unimpacted baseline PN concentrations during most hours of the day in an area of about 60 km(2) that extended to 16 km (10 miles) downwind and a 4- to 5-fold increase to 8-10 km (5-6 miles) downwind. Locations of maximum PN concentrations were aligned to eastern, downwind jet trajectories during prevailing westerly winds and to 8 km downwind concentrations exceeded 75 000 particles/cm(3), more than the average freeway PN concentration in Los Angeles. During infrequent northerly winds, the impact area remained large but shifted to south of the airport. The freeway length that would cause an impact equivalent to that measured in this study (i.e., PN concentration increases weighted by the area impacted) was estimated to be 280-790 km. The total freeway length in Los Angeles is 1500 km. These results suggest that airport emissions are a major source of PN in Los Angeles that are of the same general magnitude as the entire urban freeway network. They also indicate that the air quality impact areas of major airports may have been seriously underestimated.

  15. On the growth of nitric and sulfuric acid aerosol particles under stratospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, Patrick; Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.

    1988-01-01

    A theory for the formation of frozen aerosol particles in the Antarctic stratosphere was developed and applied to the formation of polar stratospheric clouds. The theory suggests that the condensed ice particles are composed primarily of nitric acid and water, with small admixtures of sulfuric and hydrochloric acids in solid solution. The proposed particle formation mechanism is in agreement with the magnitude and seasonal behavior of the optical extinction observed in the winter polar stratosphere.

  16. Influence of particles shape on the vertical profile of blowing snow concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vionnet, Vincent; Trouvilliez, Alexandre; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Guyomarc'h, Gilbert

    2013-04-01

    In alpine regions, blowing snow events strongly influence the temporal and spatial evolution of the snow cover throughout the winter season. In Antarctica, blowing snow is an essential surface mass balance process and plays a non-negligible role in the annual accumulation. The vertical profile of blowing snow concentration determines the quantity of snow transported in turbulent suspension. A power law is often used to represent this vertical profile. It serves as an analytical solution representing an equilibrium between vertical turbulent diffusion and gravitational settling. In this work, we study how the exponent of the power law depends on the type of transported particles. Vertical profiles of blowing snow concentration have been collected at the experimental site of Col du Lac Blanc (French Alps) in 2011 and 2012 and near the research station of Cap Prud'homme (Antarctica) in 2010 and 2011. We used mechanical gauges (butterfly nets) and optical devices (Snow Particles Counters). Profiles collected during blowing snow events with precipitation have been corrected to account for the contribution of snowfall. Results show that profiles collected during blowing snow without snowfall differ from the corrected profiles collected during snowfall. At a given wind speed, particles transported during snowfall have a lower settling velocity than particles transported without snowfall. This difference confirms earlier observations (Takahashi, 1985) and can be explained by the change of drag coefficient between dendritic and rounded particles. This difference pertains several hours after the end of the snowfall illustrating the fragmentation of snow grains during blowing snow events.

  17. Three-dimensional simulations of dilute and concentrated suspensions using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Quesada, Adolfo; Bian, Xin; Ellero, Marco

    2016-04-01

    A three-dimensional model for a suspension of rigid spherical particles in a Newtonian fluid is presented. The solvent is modeled with smoothed particle hydrodynamics method, which takes into account exactly the long-range multi-body hydrodynamic interactions between suspended spheres. Short-range lubrication forces which are necessary to simulate concentrated suspensions, are introduced pair-wisely based on the analytical solution of Stokes equations for approaching/departing objects. Given that lubrication is singular at vanishing solid particle separations, an implicit splitting integration scheme is used to obtain accurate results and at the same time to avoid prohibitively small simulation time steps. Hydrodynamic interactions between solid particles, at both long-range and short-range limits, are verified against theory in the case of two approaching spheres in a quiescent medium and under bulk shear flow, where good agreements are obtained. Finally, numerical results for the suspension viscosity of a many-particle system are shown and compared with analytical solutions available in the dilute and semi-dilute case as well as with previous numerical results obtained in the concentrated limit.

  18. Ice nucleation of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles and implication for cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar; Sanders, Cassandra; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-01

    Ice nucleation properties of atmospherically relevant dust minerals coated with soluble materials are not yet well understood. We determined ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw; 75 to 110%) for five different mineral dust types: (1) Arizona test dust, (2) illite, (3) montmorillonite, (4) K-feldspar, and (5) quartz. The particles were dry dispersed and size selected at 200 nm, and we determined the fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw. Under water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability. Under water-supersaturated conditions, however, we did not observe a significant coating effect (i.e., the bare and coated dust particles had nearly similar nucleating properties). X-ray diffraction patterns of the coated particles indicated that acid treatment altered the crystalline nature of the surface and caused structural disorder; thus, we concluded that the lack of such structured order reduced the ice nucleation efficiency of the coated particles in deposition ice nucleation mode. In addition, our single column model results show that coated particles significantly modify cloud properties such as ice crystal number concentration and ice water content compared to bare particles in water-subsaturated conditions. However, in water-supersaturated conditions, cloud properties differ only at warmer temperatures. These modeling results imply that future aged dust particle simulations should implement coating parameterizations to accurately predict cloud properties.

  19. An exemple of particle concentration reduction in Parisian subway stations by electrostatic precipitation.

    PubMed

    Tokarek, S; Bernis, A

    2006-11-01

    The air quality in Parisian subway stations is a great concern to users and the public authorities. Particle concentration is one of the major problems; indeed concentrations observed in stations are generally superior to those collected in the street. The subway generates its own particles from wheels / rail contact, braking, the ground... One of the ways explored to lower this level of particles is a removal treatment: the principle is to treat the ambient air using a suitable system placed in stations. Following literature, the process chosen by Paris Transport Authority is the electrostatic precipitator. An electrostatic precipitator prototype from the Recycl'Air company is installed in May 2001 in a closed station on the 5th line (Italy Place -Bobigny). Results show that, by the end of approximately one year, the efficiency has fallen by 15% and it is therefore necessary to clean the precipitation cartridges. A consideration has also been made on the possibility to equip an entire subway station. According to the results obtained, about twenty filters placed in the top of a non mechanically ventilated station would permit to half an initial concentration in particles of 230 microg m(-3).

  20. Characterization of a Quadrotor Unmanned Aircraft System for Aerosol-Particle-Concentration Measurements.

    PubMed

    Brady, James M; Stokes, M Dale; Bonnardel, Jim; Bertram, Timothy H

    2016-02-01

    High-spatial-resolution, near-surface vertical profiling of atmospheric chemical composition is currently limited by the availability of experimental platforms that can sample in constrained environments. As a result, measurements of near-surface gradients in trace gas and aerosol particle concentrations have been limited to studies conducted from fixed location towers or tethered balloons. Here, we explore the utility of a quadrotor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) as a sampling platform to measure vertical and horizontal concentration gradients of trace gases and aerosol particles at high spatial resolution (1 m) within the mixed layer (0-100 m). A 3D Robotics Iris+ autonomous quadrotor UAS was outfitted with a sensor package consisting of a two-channel aerosol optical particle counter and a CO2 sensor. The UAS demonstrated high precision in both vertical (±0.5 m) and horizontal positions (±1 m), highlighting the potential utility of quadrotor UAS drones for aerosol- and trace-gas measurements within complex terrain, such as the urban environment, forest canopies, and above difficult-to-access areas such as breaking surf. Vertical profiles of aerosol particle number concentrations, acquired from flights conducted along the California coastline, were used to constrain sea-spray aerosol-emission rates from coastal wave breaking. PMID:26730457

  1. Characterization of a Quadrotor Unmanned Aircraft System for Aerosol-Particle-Concentration Measurements.

    PubMed

    Brady, James M; Stokes, M Dale; Bonnardel, Jim; Bertram, Timothy H

    2016-02-01

    High-spatial-resolution, near-surface vertical profiling of atmospheric chemical composition is currently limited by the availability of experimental platforms that can sample in constrained environments. As a result, measurements of near-surface gradients in trace gas and aerosol particle concentrations have been limited to studies conducted from fixed location towers or tethered balloons. Here, we explore the utility of a quadrotor unmanned aircraft system (UAS) as a sampling platform to measure vertical and horizontal concentration gradients of trace gases and aerosol particles at high spatial resolution (1 m) within the mixed layer (0-100 m). A 3D Robotics Iris+ autonomous quadrotor UAS was outfitted with a sensor package consisting of a two-channel aerosol optical particle counter and a CO2 sensor. The UAS demonstrated high precision in both vertical (±0.5 m) and horizontal positions (±1 m), highlighting the potential utility of quadrotor UAS drones for aerosol- and trace-gas measurements within complex terrain, such as the urban environment, forest canopies, and above difficult-to-access areas such as breaking surf. Vertical profiles of aerosol particle number concentrations, acquired from flights conducted along the California coastline, were used to constrain sea-spray aerosol-emission rates from coastal wave breaking.

  2. Concentration variations of amino acids in mammalian fossils: effects of diagenesis and the implications for amino acid racemization analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, B.; Rutter, N.W.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed amino acid analysis of bones, teeth, and antler from several mammal species have shown that concentrations of several amino acids can be related to three factors: type of material analyzed, diagenetic alteration of the material, and relative age of the fossil. Concentrations of several amino acids are significantly different in enamel compared to those of dentine or cement. This can be used to check that no contamination of one material by another has occurred, which is critical for using the data for amino acid dating, since all three materials have different racemization rates for some acids. With increased in growth of secondary minerals, generally reduced amino acid concentrations are observed. Interacid ratios and concentrations vary significantly the norms expected for the type of material with increasing degrees of alteration. These effects can be linked to abnormal racemization ratios observed in the same samples. Therefore, abnormal concentrations and/or interacid ratios can be used to detect samples in which the D/L amino acid ratios otherwise appear normal, thereby insuring better accuracy of amino acid racemization analysis. For unaltered fossils, with increasing sample age regardless the type of material, some amino acids steadily degrade, while others actually increase in concentration initially due to their generation as by-products of decay. Preliminary studies indicate that this progressive alteration can used to complement racemization data for determining relative stratigraphic sequences.

  3. Optimal reconstruction of concentrations, gradients and reaction rates from particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernàndez-Garcia, D.; Sanchez-Vila, X.

    2011-03-01

    Random walk particle tracking methodologies to simulate solute transport of conservative species constitute an attractive alternative for their computational efficiency and absence of numerical dispersion. Yet, problems stemming from the reconstruction of concentrations from particle distributions have typically prevented its use in reactive transport problems. The numerical problem mainly arises from the need to first reconstruct the concentrations of species/components from a discrete number of particles, which is an error prone process, and then computing a spatial functional of the concentrations and/or its derivatives (either spatial or temporal). Errors are then propagated, so that common strategies to reconstruct this functional require an unfeasible amount of particles when dealing with nonlinear reactive transport problems. In this context, this article presents a methodology to directly reconstruct this functional based on kernel density estimators. The methodology mitigates the error propagation in the evaluation of the functional by avoiding the prior estimation of the actual concentrations of species. The multivariate kernel associated with the corresponding functional depends on the size of the support volume, which defines the area over which a given particle can influence the functional. The shape of the kernel functions and the size of the support volume determines the degree of smoothing, which is optimized to obtain the best unbiased predictor of the functional using an iterative plug-in support volume selector. We applied the methodology to directly reconstruct the reaction rates of a precipitation/dissolution problem involving the mixing of two different waters carrying two aqueous species in chemical equilibrium and moving through a randomly heterogeneous porous medium.

  4. Quality control of semi-continuous mobility size-fractionated particle number concentration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Rong Chun; Teh, Hee Wen; Jaques, Peter A.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Froines, John R.

    Fine and ultrafine particles have been postulated to play an important role in the association between ambient particulate matters and adverse health effects. As part of the EPA Supersite Program, the Southern California Particle Center & Supersite has conducted a series of monitoring campaigns that contribute to a better understanding of the sources, chemical composition and physical state of ambient aerosols. The Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) was deployed to semi-continuously measure mobility size-fractioned particle number concentrations. As part of the quality control efforts, we developed a two-stage graphic and statistical procedure to label and identify potentially discordant observations. The first stage considered the entire size-fractionated data by date-time as a whole to plot total concentration (TC) vs. coefficient of variation (CV), both in log scale. TC represents the magnitude of overall concentration for a size distribution; while CV represents the relative variability. This plot was used to partition all size distributions into four to five distinct regions. In each region, a generalized extreme studentized deviate (ESD) and a modified Z-score procedure were applied to identify potential discordant outliers. We have found that the majority of particle size distributions are concentrated within a 'normal' region, with TC ranging from 10 2 to 10 5 cm -3 and CV varying between 20% and 200%. Size distributions that are contaminated with discordant outliers are displayed distinctly from the 'normal' region and form four to five clusters in the Log TC-Log CV plot. The pattern of clusters in the plot is consistent among the four sampling sites in this study, suggesting the robustness of this technique. The generalized ESD and modified Z-score effectively identify discordant outliers and reveal that the pattern of clustering outliers are consistent within each distinct region. It has, thus, been concluded that the new approach is a useful

  5. Contribution of ants in modifying of soil acidity and particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgun, Alexandra; Golichenkov, Maxim

    2015-04-01

    Being a natural body, formed by the influence of biota on the upper layers of the Earth's crust, the soil is the most striking example of biogenic-abiogenic interactions in the biosphere. Invertebrates (especially ants that build soil nests) are important agents that change soil properties in well developed terrestrial ecosystems. Impact of soil microorganisms on soil properties is particularly described in numerous literature and concerns mainly chemical properties and general indicators of soil biological activity. Influence of ants (as representatives of the soil mesofauna) mostly appears as mechanical movement of soil particles and aggregates, and chemical effects caused by concentration of organic matter within the ant's nest. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of ants on physical and chemical soil attributes such as particle size distribution and soil acidity. The samples were taken from aerial parts of Lasius niger nests, selected on different elements of the relief (summit position, slope, terrace and floodplain) in the Arkhangelsk region (north of the European part of Russia) and compared with the specimens of the upper horizons of the reference soils. Particle size distribution was determined by laser diffraction method using laser diffraction particle size analyzer «Analysette 22 comfort» (FRITSCH, Germany). The acidity (pH) was determined by potentiometry in water suspension. Particle size distribution of the samples from the nests is more variable as compared to the control samples. For example, the content of 5-10 μm fraction ranges from 9% to 12% in reference soils, while in the anthill samples the variation is from 8% to 15%. Similarly, for 50-250 μm fraction - it ranges from 15% to 18% in reference soils, whereas in anthills - from 6% to 29%. The results of particle size analysis showed that the reference sample on the terrace has silty loam texture and nests soil L. niger are medium loam. The reference soil on the slope is

  6. Thermodynamic correction of particle concentrations measured by underwing probes on fast flying aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, R.; Spichtinger, P.; Mahnke, C.; Klingebiel, M.; Afchine, A.; Petzold, A.; Krämer, M.; Costa, A.; Molleker, S.; Jurkat, T.; Minikin, A.; Borrmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Particle concentration measurements with underwing probes on aircraft are impacted by air compression upstream of the instrument body as a function of flight velocity. In particular for fast-flying aircraft the necessity arises to account for compression of the air sample volume. Hence, a correction procedure is needed to invert measured particle number concentrations to ambient conditions that is commonly applicable for different instruments to gain comparable results. In the compression region where the detection of particles occurs (i.e. under factual measurement conditions), pressure and temperature of the air sample are increased compared to ambient (undisturbed) conditions in certain distance away from the aircraft. Conventional procedures for scaling the measured number densities to ambient conditions presume that the particle penetration speed through the instruments' detection area equals the aircraft speed (True Air Speed, TAS). However, particle imaging instruments equipped with pitot-tubes measuring the Probe Air Speed (PAS) of each underwing probe reveal PAS values systematically below those of the TAS. We conclude that the deviation between PAS and TAS is mainly caused by the compression of the probed air sample. From measurements during two missions in 2014 with the German Gulfstream G-550 (HALO - High Altitude LOng range) research aircraft we develop a procedure to correct the measured particle concentration to ambient conditions using a thermodynamic approach. With the provided equation the corresponding concentration correction factor ξ is applicable to the high frequency measurements of each underwing probe which is equipped with its own air speed sensor (e.g. a pitot-tube). ξ-values of 1 to 0.85 are calculated for air speeds (i.e. TAS) between 60 and 260 m s-1. From HALO data it is found that ξ does not significantly vary between the different deployed instruments. Thus, for the current HALO underwing probe configuration a parameterisation of

  7. Particle concentration dynamics in the ventilation duct after an artificial release: for countering potential bioterrorist attack.

    PubMed

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2014-02-28

    Ventilation duct serves as a potential target for bioterrorist attack. Understanding the dynamics of aerosolized harmful agents in the ventilation ducts provides the fundamentals for effective control and management, e.g., risk assessment. In this work, new models for predicting the concentration dynamics in the ventilation duct after a particle resuspension (representing the case that harmful agents are dosed when the ventilation is off and subsequently being turned on) or puff injection (representing the case that harmful agents are dosed when the ventilation is running) event were derived based on the mass balance model. The models were validated by a series of wind tunnel experiments. Indoor airborne particle concentration models were derived by incorporating the proposed ventilation duct models for resuspension and injection cases. The effects of resuspension and injection in the duct on indoor airborne particle concentration were examined by two hypothetical cases of Bacillus anthracis dosage using the derived models. For the same amount of BW agent dosage in the ventilation duct, the resuspension type release prolongs the exposure of harmful agents whereas the injection type release produces a higher peak concentration.

  8. Particle concentration dynamics in the ventilation duct after an artificial release: for countering potential bioterrorist attack.

    PubMed

    You, Siming; Wan, Man Pun

    2014-02-28

    Ventilation duct serves as a potential target for bioterrorist attack. Understanding the dynamics of aerosolized harmful agents in the ventilation ducts provides the fundamentals for effective control and management, e.g., risk assessment. In this work, new models for predicting the concentration dynamics in the ventilation duct after a particle resuspension (representing the case that harmful agents are dosed when the ventilation is off and subsequently being turned on) or puff injection (representing the case that harmful agents are dosed when the ventilation is running) event were derived based on the mass balance model. The models were validated by a series of wind tunnel experiments. Indoor airborne particle concentration models were derived by incorporating the proposed ventilation duct models for resuspension and injection cases. The effects of resuspension and injection in the duct on indoor airborne particle concentration were examined by two hypothetical cases of Bacillus anthracis dosage using the derived models. For the same amount of BW agent dosage in the ventilation duct, the resuspension type release prolongs the exposure of harmful agents whereas the injection type release produces a higher peak concentration. PMID:24447859

  9. Time evolution of atmospheric particle number concentration during high-intensity pyrotechnic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F.; Caballero, Sandra; Galindo, Nuria

    2014-10-01

    The Mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events, typical of eastern Spanish festivals, in which thousands of firecrackers are burnt at ground level in an intense, short-time (<8 min) deafening spectacle that generates short-lived, thick aerosol clouds. In this study, the impact of such events on air quality has been evaluated by means of particle number concentration measurements performed close to the venue during the June festival in Alicante (southeastern Spain). Peak concentrations and dilution times observed throughout the Mascletàs have been compared to those measured when conventional aerial fireworks were launched 2 km away from the monitoring site. The impact of the Mascletàs on the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.3 μm was higher (maximum ˜2·104 cm-3) than that of fireworks (maximum ˜2·103 cm-3). The effect of fireworks depended on whether the dominant meteorological conditions favoured the transport of the plume to the measurement location. However, the time required for particle concentrations to return to background levels is longer and more variable for firework displays (minutes to hours) than for the Mascletàs (<25 min).

  10. Indoor and outdoor concentrations of fine particles, particle-bound PAHs and volatile organic compounds in Kaunas, Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Kliucininkas, Linas; Martuzevicius, Dainius; Krugly, Edvinas; Prasauskas, Tadas; Kauneliene, Violeta; Molnar, Peter; Strandberg, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This complex study presents indoor and outdoor levels of air-borne fine particles, particle-bound PAHs and VOCs at two urban locations in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania, and considers possible sources of pollution. Two sampling campaigns were performed in January-February and March-April 2009. The mean outdoor PM(2.5) concentration at Location 1 in winter was 34.5 ± 15.2 µg m(-3) while in spring it was 24.7 ± 12.2 µg m(-3); at Location 2 the corresponding values were 36.7 ± 21.7 and 22.4 ± 19.4 µg m(-3), respectively. In general there was little difference between the PM concentrations at Locations 1 and 2. PM(2.5) concentrations were lower during the spring sampling campaign. These PM concentrations were similar to those in many other European cities; however, the levels of most PAHs analysed were notably higher. The mean sum PAH concentrations at Locations 1 and 2 in the winter campaign were 75.1 ± 32.7 and 32.7 ± 11.8 ng m(-3), respectively. These differences are greater than expected from the difference in traffic intensity at the two sites, suggesting that there is another significant source of PAH emissions at Location 1 in addition to the traffic. The low observed indoor/outdoor (I/O) ratios indicate that PAH emissions at the locations studied arise primarily from outdoor sources. The buildings at both locations have old windows with wooden frames that are fairly permissive in terms of air circulation. VOC concentrations were mostly low and comparable to those reported from Sweden. The mean outdoor concentrations of VOC's were: 0.7 ± 0.2, 3.0 ± 0.8, 0.5 ± 0.2, 3.5 ± 0.3, and 0.2 ± 0.1 µg m(-3), for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, sum of m-, p-, o-xylenes, and naphthalene, respectively. Higher concentrations of VOCs were observed during the winter campaign, possibly due to slower dispersion, slower chemical transformations and/or the lengthy "cold start" period required by vehicles in the wintertime. A trajectory analysis showed that air masses

  11. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Qingxu; Zhong, Chu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  12. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3−-N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  13. Elevational Variation in Soil Amino Acid and Inorganic Nitrogen Concentrations in Taibai Mountain, China.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaochuang; Ma, Qingxu; Zhong, Chu; Yang, Xin; Zhu, Lianfeng; Zhang, Junhua; Jin, Qianyu; Wu, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are important sources of soil organic nitrogen (N), which is essential for plant nutrition, but detailed information about which amino acids predominant and whether amino acid composition varies with elevation is lacking. In this study, we hypothesized that the concentrations of amino acids in soil would increase and their composition would vary along the elevational gradient of Taibai Mountain, as plant-derived organic matter accumulated and N mineralization and microbial immobilization of amino acids slowed with reduced soil temperature. Results showed that the concentrations of soil extractable total N, extractable organic N and amino acids significantly increased with elevation due to the accumulation of soil organic matter and the greater N content. Soil extractable organic N concentration was significantly greater than that of the extractable inorganic N (NO3--N + NH4+-N). On average, soil adsorbed amino acid concentration was approximately 5-fold greater than that of the free amino acids, which indicates that adsorbed amino acids extracted with the strong salt solution likely represent a potential source for the replenishment of free amino acids. We found no appreciable evidence to suggest that amino acids with simple molecular structure were dominant at low elevations, whereas amino acids with high molecular weight and complex aromatic structure dominated the high elevations. Across the elevational gradient, the amino acid pool was dominated by alanine, aspartic acid, glycine, glutamic acid, histidine, serine and threonine. These seven amino acids accounted for approximately 68.9% of the total hydrolyzable amino acid pool. The proportions of isoleucine, tyrosine and methionine varied with elevation, while soil major amino acid composition (including alanine, arginine, aspartic acid, glycine, histidine, leucine, phenylalanine, serine, threonine and valine) did not vary appreciably with elevation (p>0.10). The compositional similarity of many

  14. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  15. Particle size conditions water repellency in sand samples hydrophobized with stearic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Peñaloza, F. A.; Jordán, A.; Bellinfante, N.; Bárcenas-Moreno, G.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Granged, A. J. P.; Gil, J.; Zavala, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    The main objective of this research is to study the effects of particle size and soil moisture on water repellency (WR) from hydrophobized sand samples. Quartz sand samples were collected from the top 15 cm of sandy soils, homogenised and divided in different sieve fractions: 0.5 - 2 mm (coarse sand), 0.25 - 0.5 mm (medium sand), and 0.05 - 0.25 mm (fine sand). WR was artificially induced in sand samples using different concentrations of stearic acid (SA; 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 20 and 30 g kg-1). Sand samples were placed in Petri plates and moistened with distilled water until 10% water content in weight. After a period of 30 min, soil WR was determined using the water drop penetration time (WDPT) test. A set of sub-samples was placed in an oven (50 oC) during the experimental period, and the rest was left air-drying at standard laboratory conditions. Water repellent soil samples were used as control, and the same treatments were applied. WR was determined every 24 h. No changes in WR were observed after 6 days of treatment. As expected, air-dried fine sand samples showed WR increasing with SA concentration and decreasing with soil moisture. In contrast, oven-dried samples remained wettable at SA concentrations below 5 g kg-1. Fine sand oven-dried samples showed extreme WR after just one day of treatment, but air-dried samples did not show extreme repellency until three days after treatment. SA concentrations above 5 g kg-1 always induced extreme WR. Medium sand air-dried samples showed hydrophilic properties when moist and low SA concentration (£1 g kg-1), but strong to extreme WR was induced by higher SA concentrations. In the case of oven-dried samples, medium sand showed severe to extreme WR regardless of soil moisture. Coarse sand showed the longest WDPTs, independently of soil moisture content or SA concentration. This behaviour may be caused by super-hydrophobicity. Also, it is suggested that movements of sand particles during wetting, contribute to expose new

  16. An experimental study of thermal diffusivity of Au nanoparticles: effects of concentration particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari, Esmaeil; Moradi, Mohammad; Raeisi, Morteza

    2016-06-01

    In this article, Au nanoparticles in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solution were prepared by gamma radiation at different concentrations. The solutions were irradiated at doses of 50 kGy for making different sizes. The average sizes of particle in the prepared samples were measured using the nanophox machine. A dual-beam mode-mismatched thermal lens (TL) method was used to investigate the effect of thermal diffusivity of samples. The TL measurement was carried out using a green diode laser (wavelength 532 nm, 60 mW) and a He-Ne laser (wavelength 632.8 nm, 0.5 mW) for excitation source and probe beam, respectively. The results showed that the thermal diffusivity of samples enhances with the growth of particle size and density of solutions. This increment can be attributed to phonon scattering at interface of particles-liquid and contact between the nanoparticles and surrounded liquid.

  17. Size-fractionated major particle composition and concentrations from the US GEOTRACES North Atlantic Zonal Transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Ohnemus, Daniel C.; Auro, Maureen E.

    2015-06-01

    The concentration and the major phase composition (particulate organic matter, CaCO3, opal, lithogenic matter, and iron and manganese oxyhydroxides) of marine particles is thought to determine the scavenging removal of particle-reactive TEIs. Particles are also the vector for transferring carbon from the atmosphere to the deep ocean via the biological carbon pump, and their composition may determine the efficiency and strength of this transfer. Here, we present the first full ocean depth section of size-fractionated (1-51 μm, >51 μm) suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration and major phase composition from the US GEOTRACES North Atlantic Zonal Transect between Woods Hole, MA and Lisbon, Portugal conducted in 2010 and 2011. Several major particle features are notable in the section: intense benthic nepheloid layers were observed in the western North American margin with concentrations of SPM of up to 1648 μg/L, two to three orders of magnitude higher than surrounding waters, that were dominated by lithogenic material. A more moderate benthic nepheloid layer was also observed in the eastern Mauritanian margin (44 μg/L) that had a lower lithogenic content and, notably, significant concentrations of iron and manganese oxyhydroxides (2.5% each). An intermediate nepheloid layer reaching 102 μg/L, an order of magnitude above surrounding waters, was observed associated with the Mediterranean Outflow. Finally, there was a factor of two enhancement in SPM at the TAG hydrothermal plume due almost entirely to the addition of iron oxyhydroxides from the hydrothermal vent. We observe correlations between POC and CaCO3 in large (>51 μm) particles in the upper 2000 m, but not deeper than 2000 m, and no correlations between POC and CaCO3 at any depth in small (<51 μm) particles. There were also no correlations between POC and lithogenic material in large particles. Overall, there were very large uncertainties associated with all regression coefficients for mineral

  18. Variability of aerosol particle number concentrations observed over the western Pacific in the spring of 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegawa, N.; Moteki, N.; Oshima, N.; Koike, M.; Kita, K.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, N.; Kondo, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne measurements of aerosols were conducted over the western Pacific in the spring of 2009 during the Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia (A-FORCE) aircraft campaign. The A-FORCE flights intensively covered an important vertical-latitudinal range in the outflow region of East Asia (0-9 km altitude; 27°N-38°N). This paper presents the variability of aerosol particle number concentrations obtained by condensation particle counters and a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), with the focus on those in the free troposphere. The number concentration data include total condensation nuclei with particle diameters (dp) larger than 10 nm (total CN10), PM0.17-CN10 (dp ~10-130 nm), and SP2 black carbon (NBC; dp ~75-850 nm). Large increases in total CN10 that were not associated with NBC were observed in the free troposphere, suggesting influences from new particle formation (NPF). Statistical characteristics of total CN10, PM0.17-CN10, and NBC in the lower troposphere (LT; 0-3 km), middle troposphere (MT; 3-6 km), and upper troposphere (UT; 6-9 km) are investigated. The correlation between total CN10 and NBC, along with the ratio of PM0.17 to total CN10 and carbon monoxide mixing ratio (CO), is used to interpret the observed variability. The median concentrations of total CN10 and PM0.17-CN10 in the UT were higher than those in the MT by a factor of ~1.4 and ~1.6, respectively. We attribute the enhancements of CN10 in the UT to NPF. Possible mechanisms affecting NPF in the free troposphere are discussed.

  19. Pickering Emulsion Gels Prepared by Hydrogen-Bonded Zein/Tannic Acid Complex Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuan; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shou-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-08-26

    Food-grade colloidal particles and complexes, which are formed via modulation of the noncovalent interactions between macromolecules and natural small molecules, can be developed as novel functional ingredients in a safe and sustainable way. For this study was prepared a novel zein/tannic acid (TA) complex colloidal particle (ZTP) based on the hydrogen-bonding interaction between zein and TA in aqueous ethanol solution by using a simple antisolvent approach. Pickering emulsion gels with high oil volume fraction (φ(oil) > 50%) were successfully fabricated via one-step homogenization. Circular dichroism (CD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, which were used to characterize the structure of zein/TA complexes in ethanol solution, clearly showed that TA binding generated a conformational change of zein without altering their supramolecular structure at pH 5.0 and intermediate TA concentrations. Consequently, the resultant ZTP had tuned near neutral wettability (θ(ow) ∼ 86°) and enhanced interfacial reactivity, but without significantly decreased surface charge. These allowed the ZTP to stabilize the oil droplets and further triggered cross-linking to form a continuous network among and around the oil droplets and protein particles, leading to the formation of stable Pickering emulsion gels. Layer-by-layer (LbL) interfacial architecture on the oil-water surface of the droplets was observed, which implied a possibility to fabricate hierarchical interface microstructure via modulation of the noncovalent interaction between hydrophobic protein and natural polyphenol. PMID:26226053

  20. Pickering Emulsion Gels Prepared by Hydrogen-Bonded Zein/Tannic Acid Complex Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuan; Guo, Jian; Yin, Shou-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-08-26

    Food-grade colloidal particles and complexes, which are formed via modulation of the noncovalent interactions between macromolecules and natural small molecules, can be developed as novel functional ingredients in a safe and sustainable way. For this study was prepared a novel zein/tannic acid (TA) complex colloidal particle (ZTP) based on the hydrogen-bonding interaction between zein and TA in aqueous ethanol solution by using a simple antisolvent approach. Pickering emulsion gels with high oil volume fraction (φ(oil) > 50%) were successfully fabricated via one-step homogenization. Circular dichroism (CD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements, which were used to characterize the structure of zein/TA complexes in ethanol solution, clearly showed that TA binding generated a conformational change of zein without altering their supramolecular structure at pH 5.0 and intermediate TA concentrations. Consequently, the resultant ZTP had tuned near neutral wettability (θ(ow) ∼ 86°) and enhanced interfacial reactivity, but without significantly decreased surface charge. These allowed the ZTP to stabilize the oil droplets and further triggered cross-linking to form a continuous network among and around the oil droplets and protein particles, leading to the formation of stable Pickering emulsion gels. Layer-by-layer (LbL) interfacial architecture on the oil-water surface of the droplets was observed, which implied a possibility to fabricate hierarchical interface microstructure via modulation of the noncovalent interaction between hydrophobic protein and natural polyphenol.

  1. Encapsulation of ployunsaturated fatty acid esters with solid lipid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as a-linolenic acid (ALA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are known to improve cardiovascular and nervous system health. These compounds are increasingly used in food and animal feed formulations. However, the high degree of unsaturation in these structures can...

  2. Cloud-encounter and particle-concentration variabilities from GASP data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nastrom, G. D.; Holdeman, J. D.; Davis, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Summary statistics, tabulations, and variability studies are presented for cloud encounter and particle concentration data taken as part of the NASA global atmospheric sampling program. Cloud encounter was experienced in about 15 percent of the data samples; however, the percentage varies with season, latitude, and altitude (particularly distance from the tropopause). In agreement with classical storm models, the data show more clouds in the upper troposphere in anticyclones than in cyclones. The concentration of particles with a diameter greater than 3 micron also varies with time and location, depending primarily on the horizontal extent of cloudiness. Some examples of the application of the statistical data to the estimation of the frequency of cloud encounter and laminar flow loss to be expected on long range airline routes are also presented.

  3. Particle size distribution and PAH concentrations of incense smoke in a combustion chamber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi-Ru; Lin, Ta-Chang; Chang, Feng-Hsiang

    2007-01-01

    The particle size distribution and the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in incense smoke were studied using a custom-designed combustion chamber. Among the nine types of incense investigated, the particle and the total PAH emission factors varied significantly. The average mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of the smoke aerosol was 262+/-49nm, which positively correlated to particle emission factor (mg/stick, p<0.05). Coagulation was a major mechanism that dictates the MMAD of the smoke. The total toxic equivalency (the sum of the benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentration) of the solid-phase PAHs (S-PAHs) was over 40 times higher than that of the corresponding gas-phase PAHs, indicating that the S-PAHs in incense smoke may pose potential health risk. Experiments show that each lowered percentage of total carbon content in the raw incense helped decrease the particle emission factor by 2.6mg/g-incense, and the reduction of S-PAH emission factor ranged from 8.7 to 26% when the carbon content was lowered from 45 to 40%.

  4. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-05-20

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere.

  5. The effect of acid-base clustering and ions on the growth of atmospheric nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Rondo, Linda; Kontkanen, Jenni; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Jokinen, Tuija; Sarnela, Nina; Kürten, Andreas; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Franchin, Alessandro; Nieminen, Tuomo; Riccobono, Francesco; Sipilä, Mikko; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Duplissy, Jonathan; Adamov, Alexey; Ahlm, Lars; Almeida, João; Amorim, Antonio; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Dommen, Josef; Downard, Andrew J; Dunne, Eimear M; Flagan, Richard C; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Jud, Werner; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Keskinen, Helmi; Kim, Jaeseok; Kirkby, Jasper; Kupc, Agnieszka; Kupiainen-Määttä, Oona; Laaksonen, Ari; Lawler, Michael J; Leiminger, Markus; Mathot, Serge; Olenius, Tinja; Ortega, Ismael K; Onnela, Antti; Petäjä, Tuukka; Praplan, Arnaud; Rissanen, Matti P; Ruuskanen, Taina; Santos, Filipe D; Schallhart, Simon; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Simon, Mario; Smith, James N; Tröstl, Jasmin; Tsagkogeorgas, Georgios; Tomé, António; Vaattovaara, Petri; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Vrtala, Aron E; Wagner, Paul E; Williamson, Christina; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Virtanen, Annele; Donahue, Neil M; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Baltensperger, Urs; Riipinen, Ilona; Curtius, Joachim; Worsnop, Douglas R; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-01-01

    The growth of freshly formed aerosol particles can be the bottleneck in their survival to cloud condensation nuclei. It is therefore crucial to understand how particles grow in the atmosphere. Insufficient experimental data has impeded a profound understanding of nano-particle growth under atmospheric conditions. Here we study nano-particle growth in the CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoors Droplets) chamber, starting from the formation of molecular clusters. We present measured growth rates at sub-3 nm sizes with different atmospherically relevant concentrations of sulphuric acid, water, ammonia and dimethylamine. We find that atmospheric ions and small acid-base clusters, which are not generally accounted for in the measurement of sulphuric acid vapour, can participate in the growth process, leading to enhanced growth rates. The availability of compounds capable of stabilizing sulphuric acid clusters governs the magnitude of these effects and thus the exact growth mechanism. We bring these observations into a coherent framework and discuss their significance in the atmosphere. PMID:27197574

  6. Gas/particle partitioning of low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids at a suburban site in Saitama, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Linfa; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kubota, Tsutomu; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiko; Wang, Qingyue; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-01

    Low-molecular-weight dicarboxylic acids (diacids) exhibit semivolatile behavior in the atmosphere, but their partitioning between the gaseous and particulate phases is still unclear. An annular denuder-filter pack system with a cyclone PM 2.5 was employed to investigate the gaseous and particulate phase concentrations of diacids, with high collection efficiency of most target compounds. Saturated diacids, unsaturated diacids, ketocarboxylic acids, and dicarbonyls were determined in gaseous and particulate samples collected from a suburban site in Japan, during 2007 summer, 2008 late-winter and early-winter. The concentrations of gaseous and particulate diacids in early-winter were lower than those in summer, but higher than those in late-winter. Individual diacid in gaseous phase showed a relatively good correlation with ambient oxidants, but a low correlation with NO gas (a primary pollutant). Particulate fraction to the total amount ( FP) of individual acid was larger in winter than in summer, and also was larger at night than in the daytime. In the same sample, individual diacid and ketocarboxylic acid had higher particulate phase occurrence ( FP > 56% in summer), whereas unsaturated diacid had higher gaseous phase occurrence ( FP < 18% in summer). In summer, gas/particle partitioning of diacids varied diurnally; FP values of oxalic and glyoxylic acids increased from their lowest values in the morning to their highest values at night, exhibiting the similar diurnal variation of relative humidity in the atmosphere. The higher humidity at night may lead to the formation of droplets in which water-soluble gaseous phases can dissolve, thus promoting gas-to-particle conversion. These results suggest that gas/particle partitioning of diacids depends not only on the concentrations in the gaseous phase by photochemical oxidation, but also on the characteristics of the atmosphere (e.g., temperature, sunlight, and relative humidity) and the aerosols (e.g., acidity

  7. Why sulfuric acid forms particles so extremely well, and how organics might still compete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurten, T.; Ehn, M.; Kupiainen, O.; Olenius, T.; Rissanen, M.; Thornton, J. A.; Nielsen, L.; Jørgensen, S.; Ortega Colomer, I. K.; Kjaergaard, H. G.; Vehkamäki, H.

    2013-12-01

    It is a well-known result in aerosol science that the single most important molecule for the first steps of new-particle formation in our atmosphere is sulfuric acid, H2SO4. From a chemical perspective, this seems somewhat counterintuitive: the atmosphere contains thousands of different organic compounds, many of which can potentially form oxidation products with even lower volatility than H2SO4. The unique role of sulfuric acid is due to its formation kinetics. The conversion of sulfur dioxide, SO2 to H2SO4 requires only a single oxidant molecule (e.g. OH), as subsequent steps are extremely rapid. Still, the saturation vapor pressure of H2SO4 is over 108 times lower than that of SO2. In contrast, the oxidation reactions of organic molecules typically lower their saturation vapor pressure by only a factor of 10-1000 per oxidation step. Therefore, organic compounds are usually lost to pre-existing aerosol surfaces before they have undergone sufficiently many oxidation reactions to nucleate on their own. The presence of strong nitrogen-containing base molecules such as amines enhances the particle-forming advantages of sulfuric acid even further. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that the evaporation rate of sulfuric acid from key clusters containing two acid molecules may decrease by a factor of 108 in the presence of ppt-level concentrations of amines, implying a total decrease of up to 1016 in the effective vapor pressure going from SO2 to H2SO4. In some circumstances, this decrease causes the energy barrier for new-particle formation to disappear: the process is no longer nucleation, and some common applications of e.g. the nucleation theorem cease to apply. Cluster kinetic models combined with first-principles evaporation rates appear to describe this sulfuric acid - base clustering reasonably well, and result in cluster formation rates close to those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN. There may nevertheless exist exceptions to the general rule that

  8. Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city.

    PubMed

    Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Delle Monache, L; Stull, R

    2008-02-25

    With the worlds population becoming increasingly focused on coastal locations there is a need to better understand the interactions between anthropogenic emissions and marine atmospheres. Herein an atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. It is shown that the model can reasonably represent the average features of the gas phase and particle climate relative to in situ measurements. It is further demonstrated that reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate, but that the importance of these heterogeneous reactions is critically dependent on both the initial vertical profile of sea spray and the sea-spray source functions. The results emphasize the need for improved understanding of sea spray production and dispersion and further that model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield mis-leading results in terms of emission sensitivities of particle composition and concentrations.

  9. Modeling the impact of sea-spray on particle concentrations in a coastal city.

    PubMed

    Pryor, S C; Barthelmie, R J; Schoof, J T; Binkowski, F S; Delle Monache, L; Stull, R

    2008-02-25

    With the worlds population becoming increasingly focused on coastal locations there is a need to better understand the interactions between anthropogenic emissions and marine atmospheres. Herein an atmospheric chemistry-transport model is used to assess the impacts of sea-spray chemistry on the particle composition in and downwind of a coastal city--Vancouver, British Columbia. It is shown that the model can reasonably represent the average features of the gas phase and particle climate relative to in situ measurements. It is further demonstrated that reactions in/on sea-spray affect the entire particle ensemble and particularly the size distribution of particle nitrate, but that the importance of these heterogeneous reactions is critically dependent on both the initial vertical profile of sea spray and the sea-spray source functions. The results emphasize the need for improved understanding of sea spray production and dispersion and further that model analyses of air quality in coastal cities conducted without inclusion of sea-spray interactions may yield mis-leading results in terms of emission sensitivities of particle composition and concentrations. PMID:18061242

  10. Extending the Capabilities of Single Particle Mass Spectrometry: I. Measurements of Aerosol Number Concentration, Size Distribution, and Asphericity

    SciTech Connect

    Vaden, Timothy D.; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2011-01-04

    Single particle mass spectrometers have traditionally been deployed to measure the size and composition of individual particles at relatively slow sampling rates that are determined by the rate at which the ionization lasers can fire and/or mass spectra can be recorded. To take advantage of the fact that under most conditions SPLAT can detect and size particles at much higher rates we developed a dual data acquisition mode, in which particle number concentrations, size distributions, and asphericity parameters are measured at a particle concentration determined rate, all the while the instrument generates and records mass-spectra at an operator set rate. We show that with this approach particle number concentration and asphericity parameters are measured with 1 sec resolution and particle vacuum aerodynamic size distributions are measured with 10 sec to 60 sec resolution. SPLAT measured particle number concentrations are in perfect agreement with the PCASP. Particle asphericity parameters are based on measured particle beam divergence. We illustrate the effect that high particle concentrations can have on the measured size distributions and develop a method to remove these effects and correct the size distributions.

  11. Biomass, lipid productivities and fatty acids composition of marine Nannochloropsis gaditana cultured in desalination concentrate.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ângelo Paggi; Feller, Rafael; Moecke, Elisa Helena Siegel; Sant'Anna, Ernani Sebastião

    2015-12-01

    In this study the feasibility of growing marine Nannochloropsis gaditana in desalination concentrate (DC) was explored and the influence of the DC concentration on the biomass growth, lipid productivities and fatty acids composition was assessed. The reuse of the medium with the optimum DC concentration in successive algal cultivation cycles and the additional of a carbon source to the optimized medium were also evaluated. On varying the DC concentration, the maximum biomass concentration (0.96gL(-1)) and lipid content (12.6%) were obtained for N. gaditana in the medium with the optimum DC concentration (75%). Over the course of the reuse of the optimum DC medium, three cultivation cycles were performed, observing that the biomass productivity is directly correlated to lipid productivity. Palmitic acid was the major fatty acid found in N. gaditana cells. The saturated fatty acids content of the algae enhanced significantly on increasing the DC concentration. PMID:26318921

  12. Biomass, lipid productivities and fatty acids composition of marine Nannochloropsis gaditana cultured in desalination concentrate.

    PubMed

    Matos, Ângelo Paggi; Feller, Rafael; Moecke, Elisa Helena Siegel; Sant'Anna, Ernani Sebastião

    2015-12-01

    In this study the feasibility of growing marine Nannochloropsis gaditana in desalination concentrate (DC) was explored and the influence of the DC concentration on the biomass growth, lipid productivities and fatty acids composition was assessed. The reuse of the medium with the optimum DC concentration in successive algal cultivation cycles and the additional of a carbon source to the optimized medium were also evaluated. On varying the DC concentration, the maximum biomass concentration (0.96gL(-1)) and lipid content (12.6%) were obtained for N. gaditana in the medium with the optimum DC concentration (75%). Over the course of the reuse of the optimum DC medium, three cultivation cycles were performed, observing that the biomass productivity is directly correlated to lipid productivity. Palmitic acid was the major fatty acid found in N. gaditana cells. The saturated fatty acids content of the algae enhanced significantly on increasing the DC concentration.

  13. Concentrations, size distributions and temporal variations of fluorescent biological aerosol particles in southern tropical India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Krishna R, Ravi; CV, Biju; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. The Indian tropical region, where large fraction of the world's total population is residing, experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to be very diverse over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the seasons. Here we characterize the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) at a high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) in South India during the South-West monsoon, which constitute around 80 percent of the annual rainfall in Munnar. Continuous three months measurements (from 01 June 2014 to 21 Aug 2104) FBAPs were carried out at Munnar using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) during IMS. The mean number and mass concentration of coarse FBAP averaged over the entire campaign was 1.7 x 10-2 cm-3 and 0.24 µg m-3 respectively, which corresponds to 2 percent and 6 percent of total aerosol particle number and mass concentration. In agreement to other previous measurements the number size distribution of FBAP also peaks at 3.2 micron indicating the strong presence of fungal spores. This was also supported by the Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis of bioaerosols on filter paper. They also displayed a strong diurnal cycle with maximum concentration occurring at early morning hours. During periods of heavy and continuous rain where the wind is consistently blowing from South-West direction it was

  14. Dietary source of stearidonic acid promotes higher muscle DHA concentrations than linolenic acid in hybrid striped bass.

    PubMed

    Bharadwaj, Anant S; Hart, Steven D; Brown, Billie J; Li, Yong; Watkins, Bruce A; Brown, Paul B

    2010-01-01

    Rapid expansion of aquacultural production is placing increasing demand on fish oil supplies and intensified the search for alternative lipid sources. Many of the potential alternative sources contain low concentrations of long chain n-3 fatty acids and the conversion of dietary linolenic acid to longer chain highly unsaturated fatty acids is a relatively inefficient process in some species. A 6-week study was conducted to compare tissue fatty acid (FA) concentrations in hybrid striped bass fed either 18:3n-3 (alpha-linolenic acid; ALA) or 18:4n-3 (stearidonic acid; SDA). Hybrid striped bass were fed either a control diet containing fish oil, or diets containing ALA or SDA at three different levels (0.5, 1 and 2% of the diet). There were no significant differences in whole animal responses between fish fed ALA or SDA. Liver and muscle concentrations of ALA and SDA were responsive to dosages fed. However, only 22:6n-3 concentrations in muscle were significantly affected by dietary source of 18 carbon precursors. Muscle 22:6n-3 concentrations were significantly higher in fish fed SDA compared to fish fed ALA. Based on these data, it appears that feeding SDA can increase long chain n-3 fatty acid concentrations in fish muscle.

  15. The effect of aerosol vertical profiles on satellite-estimated surface particle sulfate concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Zifeng; Wang, Jun; Ferrare, Richard A.; Newsom, Rob K.; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2011-02-15

    The aerosol vertical distribution is an important factor in determining the relationship between satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth (AOD) and ground-level fine particle pollution concentrations. We evaluate how aerosol profiles measured by ground-based lidar and simulated by models can help improve the association between AOD retrieved by the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) and fine particle sulfate (SO4) concentrations using matched data at two lidar sites. At the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) site, both lidar and model aerosol profiles marginally improve the association between SO4 concentrations and MISR fractional AODs, as the correlation coefficient between cross-validation (CV) and observed SO4 concentrations changes from 0.87 for the no-scaling model to 0.88 for models scaled with aerosol vertical profiles. At the GSFC site, a large amount of urban aerosols resides in the well-mixed boundary layer so the column fractional AODs are already excellent indicators of ground-level particle pollution. In contrast, at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) site with relatively low aerosol loadings, scaling substantially improves model performance. The correlation coefficient between CV and observed SO4 concentrations is increased from 0.58 for the no-scaling model to 0.76 in the GEOS-Chem scaling model, and the model bias is reduced from 17% to 9%. In summary, despite the inaccuracy due to the coarse horizontal resolution and the challenges of simulating turbulent mixing in the boundary layer, GEOS-Chem simulated aerosol profiles can still improve methods for estimating surface aerosol (SO4) mass from satellite-based AODs, particularly in rural areas where aerosols in the free troposphere and any long-range transport of aerosols can significantly contribute to the column AOD.

  16. Summary and implications of reported amino acid concentrations in the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect

    Shock, E.L.; Schulte, M.D. )

    1990-11-01

    A study of literature reports of the concentrations of amino acids in extracts from the Murchison meteorite shows that many of the concentration ratios are constant. There are two possible interpretations of these ratios. One is that they are controlled by the pathways through which the amino acids formed, from which it follows that the amino acids are distributed in the same proportions throughout the meteorite. The other interpretation is that the ratios result from the analytical procedures used to extract the amino acids from the meteorite. These methods rely heavily on high-temperature (100{degree}C) aqueous extraction and subsequent high-temperature acid hydrolysis. A correlation was observed in the present study between the relative concentrations of several amino acids in the meteorite extracts and their relative aqueous solubilities at 100{degree}C. The extract solutions are dilute, and far from the saturation limits, but these correlations suggest that the sampling procedure affects directly the reported concentrations for these amino acids. If the extraction process does not bias the results, and all extractable amino acids are removed from meteorite samples, then the properties of amino acids which control both their solubilities and their concentrations in the meteorite need to be established. The possibility of sampling bias needs to be tested experimentally before concluding that extraction is complete, and that the constant relative abundances indicate that the relative concentrations of amino acids are homogeneous in the meteorite.

  17. Dissolved, particulate and acid-leachable trace metal concentrations in North Atlantic precipitation collected on the Global Change Expedition

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, B.; Jickells, T.D. )

    1990-12-01

    Atmospheric inputs of trace metals into surface waters are an important pathway for the oceanic biogeochemical cycling of many trace constituents. Rainwater samples from six precipitation events were collected on board ship during legs 3 and 4 of the Global Change Expedition over the North Atlantic Ocean and analyzed for dissolved, particulate (Al and Pb), and acid-leachable trace metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn). Acid-leachable concentrations of the elements were similar to reported values from the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans which were measured using comparable acidification procedures. Concentrations of dissolved and particulate Al and Pb were determined in rain events acid-leachable and total trace metal concentrations suggest that the acid-leachable fraction of metals can significantly underestimate total concentrations of crustal elements in rain. The solubilities of Al and Pb in precipitation were variable and mean solubilities of the elements were 13% and 45%, respectively. Recycled sea salt components were less than 14% for Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn, indicating that the net trace metal flux is from the atmosphere to the oceans. Deep sea particle fluxes for these metals through the western tropical North Atlantic exceed atmospheric deposition fluxes by a factor of 18 to 41. 57 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Effective static and high-frequency viscosities of concentrated suspensions of soft particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Carlos I.

    2011-08-01

    We obtain an analytic expression that allows to determine the static η and high-frequency η∞ viscosities as function of the volume fraction ϕ of a concentrated suspension of soft spherical particles in a liquid of viscosity η0. The particles consist of a hard core of radius a covered by a porous layer of thickness d. Suspensions of hard spheres and homogeneous porous particles are limiting cases of the model. The proposed expression incorporates the results for the intrinsic viscosity obtained on the basis of a cell model [H. Ohshima, Langmuir 26, 6287 (2010)], 10.1021/la904121p into a recently obtained relation for the effective viscosity of concentrated colloidal suspensions [C. I. Mendoza and I. Santamaría-Holek, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 044904 (2009), 10.1063/1.3063120; J. Colloid. Interface Sci. 346, 118 (2010)], 10.1016/j.jcis.2010.02.033. In this model, the correlations between the particles due to crowding effects are introduced through an effective volume fraction ϕeff which is then used as integration variable in a differential effective medium procedure. The final expression is simple, accurate, and allows to collapse all the data in a universal master curve that is independent of the parameters characterizing the system. The only difference between the static and high-frequency cases is that in the later case ϕeff also incorporates hydrodynamic interactions arising from the so-called relaxation term. We have tested the accuracy of our model comparing with experimental results for spherical polymeric brushes and simulations for the high-frequency viscosity of homogeneous porous particles. In all cases the agreement with the data is extremely good.

  19. Using Conductivity Measurements to Determine the Identities and Concentrations of Unknown Acids: An Inquiry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, K. Christopher; Garza, Ariana

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a student designed experiment using titrations involving conductivity measurements to identify unknown acids as being either HCl or H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4], and to determine the concentrations of the acids, thereby improving the utility of standard acid-base titrations. Using an inquiry context, students gain experience…

  20. Development of xylose-fermenting yeasts for ethanol production at high acetic acid concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandas, D.V.; Whelan, D.R.; Panchal, C.J.

    1995-12-31

    Mutants resistant to comparatively high levels of acetic acid were isolated from the xylose-fermenting yeasts Candida shehatae and Pichia Stipitis by adapting these cultures to increasing concentrations of acetic acid grown in shake-flask cultures. These mutants were tested for their ability to ferment xylose in presence of high acetic acid concentrations, in acid hydrolysates of wood, and in hardwood spent sulfite liquor, and compared with their wild-type counterparts and between themselves. The P. stipitis mutant exhibited faster fermentation times, better tolerance to acid hydrolysates, and tolerance to lower pH.

  1. The influence of particle size on radionuclide activity concentrations in Tejo River sediments.

    PubMed

    Madruga, M J; Silva, L; Gomes, A R; Libânio, A; Reis, M

    2014-06-01

    Sediment samples from Tejo River were analyzed for (228)Ra, (226)Ra, (137)Cs and (40)K by HPGe gamma spectrometry. The activity concentration data were statistically analyzed. The activity concentrations values were in the range of about two orders of magnitude for each radionuclide. The influence of the particle size on the radionuclide concentrations was observed. The different environmental origins of the radionuclides (228)Ra, (226)Ra, (137)Cs and (40)K, in the sediments were demonstrated through correlation analysis. Cluster analysis showed a close relationship between (228)Ra and (226)Ra and a different behavior for (40)K. The data obtained in this study provides useful information on the background radioactivity of the studied area and can be further used for radiological mapping of the Tejo River. PMID:24561724

  2. The influence of particle size on radionuclide activity concentrations in Tejo River sediments.

    PubMed

    Madruga, M J; Silva, L; Gomes, A R; Libânio, A; Reis, M

    2014-06-01

    Sediment samples from Tejo River were analyzed for (228)Ra, (226)Ra, (137)Cs and (40)K by HPGe gamma spectrometry. The activity concentration data were statistically analyzed. The activity concentrations values were in the range of about two orders of magnitude for each radionuclide. The influence of the particle size on the radionuclide concentrations was observed. The different environmental origins of the radionuclides (228)Ra, (226)Ra, (137)Cs and (40)K, in the sediments were demonstrated through correlation analysis. Cluster analysis showed a close relationship between (228)Ra and (226)Ra and a different behavior for (40)K. The data obtained in this study provides useful information on the background radioactivity of the studied area and can be further used for radiological mapping of the Tejo River.

  3. Particle size and concentration adjustments of tomato products for Howard mold count.

    PubMed

    Bandler, R; Cichowicz, S M; Cichowicz, S; Floyd, D; Kaminski, J; Russell, G; Senff, W; Trauba, R

    1981-05-01

    The present AOAC method for mold counts of tomato products (44.096) provides no inter-product standardization of concentration among juice, sauce, paste, puree, and catsup; no intra-product standardization of concentration for juice, sauce, and catsup; and no adjustment for degree of comminution. Use of the official method, therefore, could result in an artificially increased mold count for products which have undergone extreme comminution. A new method was developed to adjust all products to the same concentration and grind them to a uniform particle size, thereby ensuring comparable mold counts on products produced by different processes. Collaborative study results showed equal repeatability for both the official and the proposed methods and a lower coefficient of variation for the proposed method.

  4. Liquid-like ordered colloidal suspensions of lipid A: The influence of lipid A particle concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thies, M.; Quitschau, P.; Zimmermann, K.; Rusch, V.; Faunce, C. A.; Paradies, H. H.

    2002-02-01

    Electrostatically stabilized aqueous dispersions of nm-sized free lipid A particles at low volume fractions (1.0×10-4⩽∅⩽3.5×10-4) in the presence of 1.0-10.0 mM NaCl (25 °C) have been characterized by static and quasielastic light scattering (QELS) techniques, electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), conductivity measurements, and acid-base titrations. QELS and electron microscopy (ρ¯TEM=8.0±0.6%) yield similar values for the particle size and particle size distribution (ρ¯QELS=10.9±0.75 %), whereas conductivity and acid-base titrations estimate surface chemical parameters (dissociation constant, ionizable sites, and Stern capacitance). Effective particle charges were determined by fits of the integral equation calculations of the polydisperse static structure factor, S¯(Q), to the light scattering data. Using the particle properties as determined from these experiments, the polydisperse structure factor, S¯(Q), was calculated as a function of volume fraction, ∅, which was found to be consistent with a S¯(Q) dependence on the number particle density. It can be concluded that, at low volume fractions and low ionic strength, the light scattering data are well represented by a Poisson-Boltzmann model (PBC) of fluid-like ordering of free lipid A in aqueous solution. We find that the light scattering data of this dispersion are best described by a model where only a small fraction of the ionizable phosphate groups is dissociated at neutral pH. Finally, light scattering studies of lipid A dispersions of volume fractions of 3.9×10-4⩽∅⩽4.9×10-4 indicate the presence of long-range order, resulting in distinct peaks which can be assigned either to a face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice (a=51.7 nm) or a body-centered cubic (bcc) lattice (a=41.5 nm), respectively.

  5. A chamber study of the influence of boreal BVOC emissions and sulfuric acid on nanoparticle formation rates at ambient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Maso, M.; Liao, L.; Wildt, J.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Kleist, E.; Tillmann, R.; Sipilä, M.; Hakala, J.; Lehtipalo, K.; Ehn, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D.; Mentel, T.

    2016-02-01

    Aerosol formation from biogenic and anthropogenic precursor trace gases in continental background areas affects climate via altering the amount of available cloud condensation nuclei. Significant uncertainty still exists regarding the agents controlling the formation of aerosol nanoparticles. We have performed experiments in the Jülich plant-atmosphere simulation chamber with instrumentation for the detection of sulfuric acid and nanoparticles, and present the first simultaneous chamber observations of nanoparticles, sulfuric acid, and realistic levels and mixtures of biogenic volatile compounds (BVOCs). We present direct laboratory observations of nanoparticle formation from sulfuric acid and realistic BVOC precursor vapour mixtures performed at atmospherically relevant concentration levels. We directly measured particle formation rates separately from particle growth rates. From this, we established that in our experiments, the formation rate was proportional to the product of sulfuric acid and biogenic VOC emission strength. The formation rates were consistent with a mechanism in which nucleating BVOC oxidation products are rapidly formed and activate with sulfuric acid. The growth rate of nanoparticles immediately after birth was best correlated with estimated products resulting from BVOC ozonolysis.

  6. Influential parameters on ultrafine particle concentration downwind at waste-to-energy plants.

    PubMed

    Scungio, Mauro; Buonanno, Giorgio; Arpino, Fausto; Ficco, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    A numerical investigation on the parameters influencing the ultrafine particle concentrations downwind an incinerator plant has been carried out on a three-dimensional full scale model. The simulation was based on a modified version of the k-ε turbulence model in order to take into account the thermal buoyancy effect of the plume, and reproducing a stable and neutral atmospheric boundary layer by setting appropriate values of velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent dissipation rate. The ability of the model to reproduce and maintain a stable atmospheric boundary layer was evaluated by analyzing the turbulent characteristics of the flow along the domain. A parametric analysis made on the basis of different plant operational, environmental, and flue gas treatment parameters was carried out in order to evaluate the impact of incinerator plants on the background concentration of ultrafine particles. The evaluation was made at 5 km downwind the chimney in a breathable area, showing that the most significant impact is due to the flue gas treatment section, with a variation on the background concentration up to 370% for a plant hypothetically working without controls on ultrafine particles emission. Operational and environmental parameters determine variations of the concentrations ranging from 1.62% to 4.48% for the lowest and highest chimney, from 1.41% to 4.52% for the lowest and highest wind speed and from 2.48% to 4.5% for the lowest and highest flue gas velocity, respectively. In addition, plume rise evaluation was carried out as a function of wind speed and flue gas velocity from the chimney. PMID:25670165

  7. Multi-step process for concentrating magnetic particles in waste sludges

    DOEpatents

    Watson, J.L.

    1990-07-10

    This invention involves a multi-step, multi-force process for dewatering sludges which have high concentrations of magnetic particles, such as waste sludges generated during steelmaking. This series of processing steps involves (1) mixing a chemical flocculating agent with the sludge; (2) allowing the particles to aggregate under non-turbulent conditions; (3) subjecting the mixture to a magnetic field which will pull the magnetic aggregates in a selected direction, causing them to form a compacted sludge; (4) preferably, decanting the clarified liquid from the compacted sludge; and (5) using filtration to convert the compacted sludge into a cake having a very high solids content. Steps 2 and 3 should be performed simultaneously. This reduces the treatment time and increases the extent of flocculation and the effectiveness of the process. As partially formed aggregates with active flocculating groups are pulled through the mixture by the magnetic field, they will contact other particles and form larger aggregates. This process can increase the solids concentration of steelmaking sludges in an efficient and economic manner, thereby accomplishing either of two goals: (a) it can convert hazardous wastes into economic resources for recycling as furnace feed material, or (b) it can dramatically reduce the volume of waste material which must be disposed. 7 figs.

  8. Multi-step process for concentrating magnetic particles in waste sludges

    DOEpatents

    Watson, John L.

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a multi-step, multi-force process for dewatering sludges which have high concentrations of magnetic particles, such as waste sludges generated during steelmaking. This series of processing steps involves (1) mixing a chemical flocculating agent with the sludge; (2) allowing the particles to aggregate under non-turbulent conditions; (3) subjecting the mixture to a magnetic field which will pull the magnetic aggregates in a selected direction, causing them to form a compacted sludge; (4) preferably, decanting the clarified liquid from the compacted sludge; and (5) using filtration to convert the compacted sludge into a cake having a very high solids content. Steps 2 and 3 should be performed simultaneously. This reduces the treatment time and increases the extent of flocculation and the effectiveness of the process. As partially formed aggregates with active flocculating groups are pulled through the mixture by the magnetic field, they will contact other particles and form larger aggregates. This process can increase the solids concentration of steelmaking sludges in an efficient and economic manner, thereby accomplishing either of two goals: (a) it can convert hazardous wastes into economic resources for recycling as furnace feed material, or (b) it can dramatically reduce the volume of waste material which must be disposed.

  9. [Concentration of glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid (Vit. C), and thiobarbiturate acid reacting components (MDA) in brain neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Dudek, H; Farbiszewski, R; Łebkowski, W J; Michno, T; Kozłowski, A

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentration of glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid (Vit C), and thiobarbiturate acid reacting components (MDA) in brain neoplasms in specimens from normal brain tissue. The group of 72 individuals treated surgically for brain neoplasm in Department of Neurosurgery Medical Academy of Białystok (Poland) in the period from 1996 to 1999 was included into the study. The GSH concentration was estimated with GSH-400 method, ascorbic acid by the use of Kyaw method, and MDA by Salaris and Babs method. The statistical analysis revealed diminished concentration of GSH and Vit. C (p < 0.001), and analogous increase of MDA concentration (p < 0.001) in the investigated specimens compared to the mentioned above substances concentration in the specimens obtained from normal brain tissue.

  10. Effects of Wind on Background Particle Concentrations at Truck Freight Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Ronald; Hart, Jaime E; Davis, Mary E; Reaser, Paul; Natkin, Jonathan; Laden, Francine; Garshick, Eric; Smith, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Truck freight terminals are predominantly located near highways and industrial facilities. This proximity to pollution sources, coupled with meteorological conditions and wind patterns, may affect occupational exposures to particles at these work locations. In order to understand this process, data from an environmental sampling study of particles at US trucking terminals, along with weather and geographic maps, were analyzed to determine the extent to which the transportation of particles from local pollutant sources elevated observed occupational exposures at these locations. To help identify potential upwind sources, wind direction weighted averages and speed measurements were used to construct wind roses, which were superimposed on overhead photos of the terminal and examined for upwind source activity. Statistical tests were performed on these “source” and “non-source” directions to determine whether there were significant differences in observed particle levels between the two groups. Our results provide evidence that nearby upwind pollution sources significantly elevated background concentrations at only a few of the locations sampled, while the majority provided little to no evidence of a significant upwind source effect. PMID:17162479

  11. Origin of high particle number concentrations reaching the St. Louis, Midwest Supersite.

    PubMed

    de Foy, Benjamin; Schauer, James J

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafine particles are associated with adverse health effects. Total Particle Number Concentration (TNC) of fine particles were measured during 2002 at the St. Louis - Midwest supersite. The time series showed overall low level with frequent large peaks. The time series was analyzed alongside criteria pollutant measurements and meteorological observations. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify further contributing factors and to determine the association of different pollutants with TNC levels. This showed the strong contribution of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) to high TNC levels. The analysis also suggested that increased dispersion resulting from faster winds and higher mixing heights led to higher TNC levels. Overall, the results show that there were intense particle nucleation events in a SO2 rich plume reaching the site which contributed around 29% of TNC. A further 40% was associated with primary emissions from mobile sources. By separating the remaining TNC by time of day and clear sky conditions, we suggest that most likely 8% of TNC are due to regional nucleation events and 23% are associated with the general urban background.

  12. Modeling source contributions to submicron particle number concentrations measured in Rochester, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Ogulei, D.; Hopke, P.K.; Chalupa, D.C.; Utell, M.J.

    2007-02-15

    An advanced receptor model was used to elicit source information based on ambient submicron (0.01-0.47 {mu}m) particle number concentrations, gaseous species, and meteorological variables measured at the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation central monitoring site in Rochester, NY. Four seasonal data sets (winter, spring, summer, and fall) were independently investigated. A total of ten different sources were identified, including two traffic factors, two nucleation factors, industrial emissions, residential/commercial heating, secondary nitrate, secondary sulfate, ozone-rich secondary aerosol, and regionally transported aerosol. The resolved sources were generally characterized by similar number modes for either winter, spring, summer or fall. The size distributions for nucleation were dominated by the smallest particles ({lt}10-30 nm) that gradually grew to larger sizes as could be seen by observing the volume profiles. In addition, the nucleation factors were closely linked to traffic rush hours suggesting that cooling of tail-pipe emissions may have induced nucleation activity in the vicinity of the highways. Industrial emissions were dominated by emissions from coal-fired power plants that were located to the northwest of the sampling site. These facilities represent the largest point emission sources of SO{sub 2}, and probably ultrafine ({lt}0.1 {mu}m) or submicron particles, in Rochester. Regionally transported material was characterized by accumulation mode particles. Air parcel back-trajectories showed transport of air masses from the industrial midwest.

  13. Effects of wind on background particle concentrations at truck freight terminals.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ronald; Hart, Jaime E; Davis, Mary E; Reaser, Paul; Natkin, Jonathan; Laden, Francine; Garshick, Eric; Smith, Thomas J

    2007-01-01

    Truck freight terminals are predominantly located near highways and industrial facilities. This proximity to pollution sources, coupled with meteorological conditions and wind patterns, may affect occupational exposures to particles at these work locations. To understand this process, data from an environmental sampling study of particles at U.S. trucking terminals, along with weather and geographic maps, were analyzed to determine the extent to which the transportation of particles from local pollutant sources elevated observed occupational exposures at these locations. To help identify potential upwind sources, wind direction weighted averages and speed measurements were used to construct wind roses that were superimposed on overhead photos of the terminal and examined for upwind source activity. Statistical tests were performed on these "source" and "nonsource" directions to determine whether there were significant differences in observed particle levels between the two groups. Our results provide evidence that nearby upwind pollution sources significantly elevated background concentrations at only a few of the locations sampled, whereas the majority provided little to no evidence of a significant upwind source effect.

  14. Origin of high particle number concentrations reaching the St. Louis, Midwest Supersite.

    PubMed

    de Foy, Benjamin; Schauer, James J

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafine particles are associated with adverse health effects. Total Particle Number Concentration (TNC) of fine particles were measured during 2002 at the St. Louis - Midwest supersite. The time series showed overall low level with frequent large peaks. The time series was analyzed alongside criteria pollutant measurements and meteorological observations. Multiple regression analysis was used to identify further contributing factors and to determine the association of different pollutants with TNC levels. This showed the strong contribution of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) to high TNC levels. The analysis also suggested that increased dispersion resulting from faster winds and higher mixing heights led to higher TNC levels. Overall, the results show that there were intense particle nucleation events in a SO2 rich plume reaching the site which contributed around 29% of TNC. A further 40% was associated with primary emissions from mobile sources. By separating the remaining TNC by time of day and clear sky conditions, we suggest that most likely 8% of TNC are due to regional nucleation events and 23% are associated with the general urban background. PMID:26257365

  15. Particle phase distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in stormwater--Using humic acid and iron nano-sized colloids as test particles.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Katrine; Kalmykova, Yuliya; Strömvall, Ann-Margret; Baun, Anders; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-11-01

    The distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in different particulate fractions in stormwater: Total, Particulate, Filtrated, Colloidal and Dissolved fractions, were examined and compared to synthetic suspensions of humic acid colloids and iron nano-sized particles. The distribution of low-molecular weight PAHs (LMW PAHs), middle-molecular weight PAHs (MMW PAHs) and high-molecular weight PAHs (HMW PAHs) among the fractions was also evaluated. The results from the synthetic suspensions showed that the highest concentrations of the PAHs were found in the Filtrated fractions and, surprisingly, high loads were found in the Dissolved fractions. The PAHs identified in stormwater in the Particulate fractions and Dissolved fractions follow their hydrophobic properties. In most samples >50% of the HMW PAHs were found in the Particulate fractions, while the LMW and MMW PAHs were found to a higher extent in the Filtrated fractions. The highest concentrations of PAHs were present in the stormwater with the highest total suspended solids (TSS); the relative amount of the HMW PAHs was highest in the Particulate fractions (particles>0.7 μm). The highest concentration of PAHs in the Colloidal fraction was found in the sample with occurrence of small nano-sized particles (<10nm). The results show the importance of developing technologies that both can manage particulate matter and effectively remove PAHs present in the Colloidal and Dissolved fractions in stormwater.

  16. Construction of nanoscale protein particle using temperature-sensitive elastin-like peptide and polyaspartic acid chain.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshihiko; Mie, Masayasu; Kobatake, Eiry

    2009-07-01

    Temperature-responsive monodisperse spheres are useful for various in vivo and in vitro applications. Size, response temperature and biocompatibility are particularly important consideration with in vivo applications. In this work, we constructed fusion proteins of low antigenic elastin-like peptide (ELP) and a polyaspartic acid chain, and studied the particles that had a favorable size and temperature of formation of particle. From DLS analysis, we confirmed that some of them formed particles with less than 100nm in diameter around 37 degrees C, while the diameter of ELPs alone is larger than 1microm in diameter. The (PGVGV)(160)D(22), which is composed of a short aspartic acid chain and a long ELP region, had a tendency to form large particles. The temperature of formation and collapse of the protein particle were dependent on the length of the ELP and the polyaspartic acid chain, and the concentration of proteins. The direct observation with TEM indicated that the morphologies of the particles were spherical except when (PGVGV)(160)D(22) was used. The intensities of the environment-sensitive hydrophobic fluorescence increased at 37 degrees C more than 1.5 times as much as at 25 degrees C both in free form and modified at the ELP region. These results indicated that the polarity of the environment surround the fluorescence decreased or the movement of fluorescence was limited, and thus, implied that the ELP formed a more hydrophobic or rigid region and could hold hydrophobic drugs. These results suggest that a temperature-responsive protein particle with favorable size and temperature of formation can be constructed that is suitable for any in vitro or in vivo application.

  17. Analysis of the Hydrogen Reduction Rate of Magnetite Concentrate Particles in a Drop Tube Reactor Through CFD Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Deqiu; Mohassab, Yousef; Elzohiery, Mohamed; Sohn, H. Y.

    2016-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach, coupled with experimental results, was developed to accurately evaluate the kinetic parameters of iron oxide particle reduction. Hydrogen reduction of magnetite concentrate particles was used as a sample case. A detailed evaluation of the particle residence time and temperature profile inside the reactor is presented. This approach eliminates the errors associated with assumptions like constant particle temperature and velocity while the particles travel down a drop tube reactor. The gas phase was treated as a continuum in the Eulerian frame of reference, and the particles are tracked using a Lagrangian approach in which the trajectory and velocity are determined by integrating the equation of particle motion. In addition, a heat balance on the particle that relates the particle temperature to convection and radiation was also applied. An iterative algorithm that numerically solves the governing coupled ordinary differential equations was developed to determine the pre-exponential factor and activation energy that best fit the experimental data.

  18. Effects of pH and fulvic acids concentration on the stability of fulvic acids--cerium (IV) oxide nanoparticle complexes.

    PubMed

    Oriekhova, Olena; Stoll, Serge

    2016-02-01

    The behavior of cerium (IV) oxide nanoparticles has been first investigated at different pH conditions. The point of zero charge was determined as well as the stability domains using dynamic light scattering, nanoparticle tracking analysis and scanning electron microscopy. A baseline hydrodynamic diameter of 180 nm was obtained indicating that individual CeO2 nanoparticles are forming small aggregates. Then we analyzed the particle behavior at variable concentrations of fulvic acids for three different pH-electrostatic scenarios corresponding to positive, neutral and negative CeO2 surface charges. The presence of fulvic acids was found to play a key role on the CeO2 stability via the formation of electrostatic complexes. It was shown that a small amount of fulvic acids (2 mg L(-1)), representative of environmental fresh water concentrations, is sufficient to stabilize CeO2 nanoparticles (50 mg L(-1)). When electrostatic complexes are formed between negatively charged FAs and positively charged CeO2 NPs the stability of such complexes is obtained with time (up to 7 weeks) as well as in pH changing conditions. Based on zeta potential variations we also found that the fulvic acids are changing the CeO2 acid-base surface properties. Obtained results presented here constitute an important outcome in the domain of risk assessment, transformation and removal of engineered nanomaterials released into the environment. PMID:26347935

  19. Particle size distribution of hydrocyanic acid in gari, a cassava-based product.

    PubMed

    Maduagwu, E N; Fafunso, M

    1980-12-01

    A reciprocal relationship was observed between the cyanide content of gari and particle size. Hydrocyanic acid (HCN) content was positively correlated (r = 0.62) with sugar content but the correlation with starch content was poor (r = 0.33). From both the nutritional and toxicological standpoints, it would appear that larger particles size in gari is beneficial.

  20. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    PubMed

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be <8 × 10(-4), at least a factor of 10(4) less than that for HNO3 in water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed. PMID:27043733

  1. Kinetics of Acid-Catalyzed Dehydration of Cyclic Hemiacetals in Organic Aerosol Particles in Equilibrium with Nitric Acid Vapor.

    PubMed

    Ranney, April P; Ziemann, Paul J

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have shown that 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, which are often major products of the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons, can undergo acid-catalyzed cyclization and dehydration in aerosol particles to form highly reactive unsaturated dihydrofurans. In this study the kinetics of dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals, the rate-limiting step in this process, was investigated in a series of environmental chamber experiments in which secondary organic aerosol (SOA) containing cyclic hemiacetals was formed from the reaction of n-pentadecane with OH radicals in dry air in the presence of HNO3. A particle beam mass spectrometer was used to monitor the formation and dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals in real time, and SOA and HNO3 were quantified in filter samples by gravimetric analysis and ion chromatography. Measured dehydration rate constants increased linearly with increasing concentration of HNO3 in the gas phase and in SOA, corresponding to catalytic rate constants of 0.27 h(-1) ppmv(-1) and 7.0 h(-1) M(-1), respectively. The measured Henry's law constant for partitioning of HNO3 into SOA was 3.7 × 10(4) M atm(-1), ∼25% of the value for dissolution into water, and the acid dissociation constant was estimated to be <8 × 10(-4), at least a factor of 10(4) less than that for HNO3 in water. The results indicate that HNO3 was only weakly dissociated in the SOA and that dehydration of cyclic hemiacetals was catalyzed by molecular HNO3 rather than by H(+). The Henry's law constant and kinetics relationships measured here can be used to improve mechanisms and models of SOA formation from the oxidation of hydrocarbons in dry air in the presence of NOx, which are conditions commonly used in laboratory studies. The fate of cyclic hemiacetals in the atmosphere, where the effects of higher relative humidity, organic/aqueous phase separation, and acid catalysis by molecular H2SO4 and/or H(+) are likely to be important, is discussed.

  2. Concentration-dependent surface-enhanced Raman scattering of 2-benzoylpyridine adsorbed on colloidal silver particles.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Joydeep; Ghosh, Manash

    2004-09-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of 2-benzoylpyridine (2-BP) adsorbed on silver hydrosols has been investigated. It has been observed that with a small change in the adsorbate concentration, the SER spectra of 2-BP show significant change in their features, indicating different orientational changes of the different part of the flexible molecule on the colloidal silver surface with adsorbate concentration. The time dependence of the SER spectra of the molecule has been explained in terms of aggregation of colloidal silver particles and co-adsorption and replacement kinetics of the adsorbed solute and solvent molecules on the silver surface. The broad long-wavelength band in the absorption spectra of the silver sol due to solute-induced coagulation of colloidal silver particles is found to be red-shifted with the increase in adsorbate concentration. The surface-enhanced Raman excitation profiles indicate that the resonance of the Raman excitation radiation with the new aggregation band contributes more to the SERS intensity than that with the original sol band.

  3. Linking in-vehicle ultrafine particle exposures to on-road concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Eckel, Sandrah P.; Knibbs, Luke D.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J.; Fruin, Scott A.

    2012-11-01

    For traffic-related pollutants like ultrafine particles (UFP), a significant fraction of overall exposure occurs within or close to the transit microenvironment. Therefore, understanding exposure to these pollutants in such microenvironments is crucial to accurately assessing overall UFP exposure. The aim of this study was to develop models for predicting in-cabin UFP concentrations if roadway concentrations are known, quantifying the effect of vehicle characteristics, ventilation settings, driving conditions and air exchange rates (AER). Particle concentrations and AER were measured in 43 and 73 vehicles, respectively, under various ventilation settings and driving speeds. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression models were used to identify and quantify the factors that determine inside-to-outside (I/O) UFP ratios and AERs across a full range of vehicle types and ages. AER was the most significant determinant of UFP I/O ratios, and was most strongly influenced by ventilation setting (recirculation or outside air intake). Further inclusion of ventilation fan speed, vehicle age or mileage, and driving speed explained greater than 79% of the variability in measured UFP I/O ratios.

  4. Linking In-Vehicle Ultrafine Particle Exposures to On-Road Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hudda, Neelakshi; Eckel, Sandrah P; Knibbs, Luke D; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J; Fruin, Scott A

    2012-11-01

    For traffic-related pollutants like ultrafine particles (UFP, Dp < 100 nm), a significant fraction of overall exposure occurs within or close to the transit microenvironment. Therefore, understanding exposure to these pollutants in such microenvironments is crucial to accurately assessing overall UFP exposure. The aim of this study was to develop models for predicting in-cabin UFP concentrations if roadway concentrations are known, taking into account vehicle characteristics, ventilation settings, driving conditions and air exchange rates (AER). Particle concentrations and AER were measured in 43 and 73 vehicles, respectively, under various ventilation settings and driving speeds. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and generalized estimating equation (GEE) regression models were used to identify and quantify the factors that determine inside-to-outside (I/O) UFP ratios and AERs across a full range of vehicle types and ages. AER was the most significant determinant of UFP I/O ratios, and was strongly influenced by ventilation setting (recirculation or outside air intake). Inclusion of ventilation fan speed, vehicle age or mileage, and driving speed explained greater than 79% of the variability in measured UFP I/O ratios. PMID:23888122

  5. Ventilation dependence of concentration metrics of Ultra-fine Particles in a coagulating household smoke.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Sreekanth, B; Mayya, Y S

    2016-01-01

    Role of Ultra-fine Particles (UFPs) in causing adverse health effects among large population across the world, attributable to household smoke, is being increasingly recognized. However, there is very little theoretical perspective available on the complex behavior of the UFP metrics with respect to controlling factors, such as ventilation rate and particle emission rate from the combustion sources. This numerical study examines through coagulation dynamics, the dependence of UFP metrics, viz., number (PN), mass (PM(0.1)) and surface area (PA(0.1)) concentrations below 0.1 μm diameter, on ventilation and the number emission rate from household smoke. For strong sources, the steady-state concentrations of these metrics are found to increase initially with increasing Air Exchange Rate (AER), reach a peak value and then decrease. Counter correlations are seen between UFP metric and PM(2.5) concentrations. The concepts of Critical Air Exchange Rate (CAER) and Half-Value Air Exchange Rate (HaVAER) have been introduced which indicate a feasibility of mitigation of PM(0.1) and PA(0.1), unlike PN, by ventilation techniques. The study clearly brings forth complex differential behavior of the three UFP metrics. The results are further discussed. PMID:26795205

  6. Nitric Acid Uptake on Subtropical Cirrus Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Marcy, T. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Hudson, P. K.; Thompson, T. L.; Kaercher, B.; Ridley, B. A.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Baumgardner, D.; Garrett, T. J.; Weinstock, E. M.; Smith, J. B.; Sayres, D. S.; Pittman, J. V.; Dhaniyala, S.; Bui, T. P.; Mahoney, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The redistribution of HNO3 via uptake and sedimentation by cirrus cloud particles is considered an important term in the upper tropospheric budget of reactive nitrogen. Numerous cirrus cloud encounters by the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft during the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers-Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) were accompanied by the observation of condensed-phase HNO3 with the NOAA chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The instrument measures HNO3 with two independent channels of detection connected to separate forward and downward facing inlets that allow a determination of the amount of HNO3 condensed on ice particles. Subtropical cirrus clouds, as indicated by the presence of ice particles, were observed coincident with condensed-phase HNO3 at temperatures of 197-224 K and pressures of 122-224 hPa. Maximum levels of condensed-phase HNO3 approached the gas-phase equivalent of 0.8 ppbv. Ice particle surface coverages as high as 1.4 # 10(exp 14) molecules/ square cm were observed. A dissociative Langmuir adsorption model, when using an empirically derived HNO3 adsorption enthalpy of -11.0 kcal/mol, effectively describes the observed molecular coverages to within a factor of 5. The percentage of total HNO3 in the condensed phase ranged from near zero to 100% in the observed cirrus clouds. With volume-weighted mean particle diameters up to 700 ?m and particle fall velocities up to 10 m/s, some observed clouds have significant potential to redistribute HNO3 in the upper troposphere.

  7. Nitric Acid Uptake on Subtropical Cirrus Cloud Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The redistribution of HNO3 via uptake and sedimentation by cirrus cloud particles is considered an important term in the upper tropospheric budget of reactive nitrogen. Numerous cirrus cloud encounters by the NASA WB-57F high-altitude research aircraft during CRYSTAL-FACE were accompanied by the observation of condensed-phase HNO3 with the NOAA chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The instrument measures HNO3 with two independent channels of detection connected to separate forward- and downward-facing inlets that allow a determination of the amount of HNO3 condensed on ice particles. Subtropical cirrus clouds, as indicated by the presence of ice particles, were observed coincident with condensed-phase HNO3 at temperatures of 197 K - 224 K and pressures of 122 hPa - 224 hPa. Maximum levels of condensed-phase HNO3 approached the gas-phase equivalent of 0.8 ppbv. Ice particle surface coverages as high as 1.4- 10(exp 14) molecules/sq cm were observed. A dissociative Langmuir adsorption model, when using an empirically derived HNO3 adsorption enthalpy of -11.0 kcal/mol, effectively describes the observed molecular coverages to within a factor of 5. The percentage of total HNO3 in the condensed phase ranged from near zero to 100% in the observed cirrus clouds. With volume-weighted mean particle diameters up to 700 pm and particle fall velocities up to 10 m/s, some observed clouds have significant potential to redistribute HNO3 in the upper troposphere.

  8. The effect of dust emissions from open storage piles to particle ambient concentration and human exposure.

    PubMed

    Chalvatzaki, E; Aleksandropoulou, V; Glytsos, T; Lazaridis, M

    2012-12-01

    The current study focus on the determination of dust emissions from piles in open storage yards of a municipal solid waste (MSW) composting site and the subsequent atmospheric dust dispersion. The ISC3-ST (Industrial Source Complex Version 3 - Short Term) model was used for the evaluation of the PM(10) ambient concentrations associated with the dispersion of MSW compost dust emissions in air. Dust emission rates were calculated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency proposed dust resuspension formulation from open storage piles using local meteorological data. The dispersion modelling results on the spatial distribution of PM(10) source depletion showed that the maximum concentrations were observed at a distance 25-75 m downwind of the piles in the prevailing wind direction. Sensitivity calculations were performed also to reveal the effect of the compost pile height, the friction velocity and the receptor height on the ambient PM(10) concentration. It was observed that PM(10) concentrations (downwind in the prevailing wind direction) increased with increasing the friction velocity, increasing the pile height (for distances greater than 125 m from the source) and decreasing the receptor height (for distances greater than 125 m from the source). Furthermore, the results of ISC3-ST were analysed with the ExDoM (Exposure Dose Model) human exposure model. The ExDoM is a model for calculating the human exposure and the deposition dose, clearance, and finally retention of aerosol particles in the human respiratory tract (RT). PM(10) concentration at the composting site was calculated as the sum of the concentration from compost pile dust resuspension and the background concentration. It was found that the exposure to PM(10) and deposited lung dose for an adult Caucasian male who is not working at the composting site is less by 20-74% and 29-84%, respectively, compared to those for a worker exposed to PM concentrations at the composting site.

  9. Optical detection of concentrations for mixed acid: HF and HNO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Gumin; Kim, Kyoungsik

    2009-02-01

    Mixed acid, which consist of HF and HNO3, is used as a good etchant for silicon dioxide in the wet etching and pickling process of stainless steel. The optical detection of concentration for such mixed acids is crucial to optimize and cut costs in the manufacturing process. Optical detection in the IR regime has been utilized to measure the concentration of the mixed acid for HF and HNO3, because that has several strong absorption peaks, which is contributed by vibrational mode of each acid molecular in this spectrum. In this research, we observed the concentrations of mixed acid to consist of HF and HNO3, as we measured the absorption intensity of OH- stretch and NO3 - stretch band by optical spectroscopy. The concentration range of HF over 1.5-3 wt% and that of HNO3 over 2-10 wt% were studied in room temperature.

  10. Chronic Social Stress and Susceptibility to Concentrated Ambient Fine Particles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Clougherty, Jane E.; Rossi, Christina A.; Lawrence, Joy; Long, Mark S.; Diaz, Edgar A.; Lim, Robert H.; McEwen, Bruce; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic evidence suggests that chronic stress may alter susceptibility to air pollution. However, persistent spatial confounding between these exposures may limit the utility of epidemiologic methods to disentangle these effects and cannot identify physiologic mechanisms for potential differential susceptibilities. Objectives Using a rat model of social stress, we compared respiratory responses to fine concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) and examined biological markers of inflammation. Methods Twenty-four 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups [stress/CAPs, stress/filtered air (FA), nonstress/CAPs, nonstress/FA]. Stress-group animals were individually introduced into the home cage of a dominant male twice weekly. Blood drawn at sacrifice was analyzed for immune and inflammatory markers. CAPs were generated using the Harvard ambient particle concentrator, which draws real-time urban ambient fine particles, enriching concentrations approximately 30 times. CAPs/FA exposures were delivered in single-animal plethysmographs, 5 hr/day for 10 days, and respiratory function was continuously monitored using a Buxco system. Results Stressed animals displayed higher average C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor-α, and white blood cell counts than did nonstressed animals. Only among stressed animals were CAPs exposures associated with increased respiratory frequency, lower flows, and lower volumes, suggesting a rapid, shallow breathing pattern. Conversely, in animals with elevated CAPs exposures alone, we observed increased inspiratory flows and greater minute volumes (volume of air inhaled or exhaled per minute). Conclusions CAPs effects on respiratory measures differed significantly, and substantively, by stress group. Higher CAPs exposures were associated with a rapid, shallow breathing pattern only under chronic stress. Blood measures provided evidence of inflammatory responses. Results support epidemiologic

  11. Inhaled concentrated ambient particles are associated with hematologic and bronchoalveolar lavage changes in canines.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, R W; Coull, B; Reinisch, U; Catalano, P; Killingsworth, C R; Koutrakis, P; Kavouras, I; Murthy, G G; Lawrence, J; Lovett, E; Wolfson, J M; Verrier, R L; Godleski, J J

    2000-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammatory and hematologic responses of canines were studied after exposure to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) using the Harvard ambient particle concentrator (HAPC). For pulmonary inflammatory studies, normal dogs were exposed in pairs to either CAPs or filtered air (paired studies) for 6 hr/day on 3 consecutive days. For hematologic studies, dogs were exposed for 6 hr/day for 3 consecutive days with one receiving CAPs while the other was simultaneously exposed to filtered air; crossover of exposure took place the following week (crossover studies). Physicochemical characterization of CAPs exposure samples included measurements of particle mass, size distribution, and composition. No statistical differences in biologic responses were found when all CAPs and all sham exposures were compared. However, the variability in biologic response was considerably higher with CAPs exposure. Subsequent exploratory graphical analyses and mixed linear regression analyses suggested associations between CAPs constituents and biologic responses. Factor analysis was applied to the compositional data from paired and crossover experiments to determine elements consistently associated with each other in CAPs samples. In paired experiments, four factors were identified; in crossover studies, a total of six factors were observed. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and hematologic data were regressed on the factor scores. Increased BAL neutrophil percentage, total peripheral white blood cell (WBC) counts, circulating neutrophils, and circulating lymphocytes were associated with increases in the aluminum/silicon factor. Increased circulating neutrophils and increased BAL macrophages were associated with the vanadium/nickel factor. Increased BAL neutrophils were associated with the bromine/lead factor when only the compositional data from the third day of CAPs exposure were used. Significant decreases in red blood cell counts and hemoglobin levels were correlated with the sulfur

  12. Effect of temperature and concentration on benzoyl peroxide bleaching efficacy and benzoic acid levels in whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2015-11-01

    Much of the fluid whey produced in the United States is a by-product of Cheddar cheese manufacture and must be bleached. Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is currently 1 of only 2 legal chemical bleaching agents for fluid whey in the United States, but benzoic acid is an unavoidable by-product of BP bleaching. Benzoyl peroxide is typically a powder, but new liquid BP dispersions are available. A greater understanding of the bleaching characteristics of BP is necessary. The objective of the study was to compare norbixin destruction, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences between liquid whey and 80% whey protein concentrates (WPC80) bleached at different temperatures with 2 different benzoyl peroxides (soluble and insoluble). Two experiments were conducted in this study. For experiment 1, 3 factors (temperature, bleach type, bleach concentration) were evaluated for norbixin destruction using a response surface model-central composite design in liquid whey. For experiment 2, norbixin concentration, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences were explored in WPC80 from whey bleached by the 2 commercially available BP (soluble and insoluble) at 5 mg/kg. In liquid whey, soluble BP bleached more norbixin than insoluble BP, especially at lower concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) at both cold (4°C) and hot (50°C) temperatures. The WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 50°C had lower norbixin concentration, benzoic acid levels, cardboard flavor, and aldehyde levels than WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 4°C. Regardless of temperature, soluble BP destroyed more norbixin at lower concentrations than insoluble BP. The WPC80 from soluble-BP-bleached wheys had lower cardboard flavor and lower aldehyde levels than WPC80 from insoluble-BP-bleached whey. This study suggests that new, soluble (liquid) BP can be used at lower concentrations than insoluble BP to achieve equivalent bleaching and that less residual benzoic acid remains in WPC80 powder from liquid whey

  13. Effect of temperature and concentration on benzoyl peroxide bleaching efficacy and benzoic acid levels in whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Gerard, P D; Drake, M A

    2015-11-01

    Much of the fluid whey produced in the United States is a by-product of Cheddar cheese manufacture and must be bleached. Benzoyl peroxide (BP) is currently 1 of only 2 legal chemical bleaching agents for fluid whey in the United States, but benzoic acid is an unavoidable by-product of BP bleaching. Benzoyl peroxide is typically a powder, but new liquid BP dispersions are available. A greater understanding of the bleaching characteristics of BP is necessary. The objective of the study was to compare norbixin destruction, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences between liquid whey and 80% whey protein concentrates (WPC80) bleached at different temperatures with 2 different benzoyl peroxides (soluble and insoluble). Two experiments were conducted in this study. For experiment 1, 3 factors (temperature, bleach type, bleach concentration) were evaluated for norbixin destruction using a response surface model-central composite design in liquid whey. For experiment 2, norbixin concentration, residual benzoic acid, and flavor differences were explored in WPC80 from whey bleached by the 2 commercially available BP (soluble and insoluble) at 5 mg/kg. In liquid whey, soluble BP bleached more norbixin than insoluble BP, especially at lower concentrations (5 and 10 mg/kg) at both cold (4°C) and hot (50°C) temperatures. The WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 50°C had lower norbixin concentration, benzoic acid levels, cardboard flavor, and aldehyde levels than WPC80 from liquid whey bleached with BP at 4°C. Regardless of temperature, soluble BP destroyed more norbixin at lower concentrations than insoluble BP. The WPC80 from soluble-BP-bleached wheys had lower cardboard flavor and lower aldehyde levels than WPC80 from insoluble-BP-bleached whey. This study suggests that new, soluble (liquid) BP can be used at lower concentrations than insoluble BP to achieve equivalent bleaching and that less residual benzoic acid remains in WPC80 powder from liquid whey

  14. Brain and Liver Headspace Aldehyde Concentration Following Dietary Supplementation with n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Ross, Brian M; Babay, Slim; Malik, Imran

    2015-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species react with unsaturated fatty acids to form a variety of metabolites including aldehydes. Many aldehydes are volatile enough to be detected in headspace gases of blood or cultured cells and in exhaled breath, in particular propanal and hexanal which are derived from omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, respectively. Aldehydes are therefore potential non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress and of various diseases in which oxidative stress is thought to play a role including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. It is unclear, however, how changes in the abundance of the fatty acid precursors, for example by altered dietary intake, affect aldehyde concentrations. We therefore fed male Wistar rats diets supplemented with either palm oil or a combination of palm oil plus an n-3 fatty acid (alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, or docosahexaenoic acids) for 4 weeks. Fatty acid analysis revealed large changes in the abundance of both n-3 and n-6 fatty acids in the liver with smaller changes observed in the brain. Despite the altered fatty acid abundance, headspace concentrations of C1-C8 aldehydes, and tissue concentrations of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, did not differ between the 4 dietary groups. Our data suggest that tissue aldehyde concentrations are independent of fatty acid abundance, and further support their use as volatile biomarkers of oxidative stress.

  15. Wide-range particle characterization and elemental concentration in Beijing aerosol during the 2013 Spring Festival.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hui; Li, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Jiating; Li, Bai; Sun, Jialong; Chen, Rui; Gao, Yuxi; Chen, Chunying

    2014-09-01

    The number and mass concentration, size distribution, and the concentration of 16 elements were studied in aerosol samples during the Spring Festival celebrations in 2013 in Beijing, China. Both the number and mass concentration increased sharply in a wide range from 10 nm to 10 μm during the firecrackers and fireworks activities. The prominent increase of the number concentration was in 50 nm-500 nm with a peak of 1.7 × 10(5)/cm(3) at 150 nm, which is 8 times higher than that after 1.5 h. The highest mass concentration was in 320-560 nm, which is 4 times higher than the control. K, Mg, Sr, Ba and Pb increased sharply during the firework activities in PM10. Although the aerosol emission from firework activities is a short-term air quality degradation event, there may be a substantial hazard arising from the chemical composition of the emitted particles. PMID:24975025

  16. Determinants of spikes in ultrafine particle concentration whilst commuting by bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Shanon; Dirks, Kim N.; Salmond, Jennifer A.; Xie, Shanju

    2015-07-01

    This paper examines concentration of ultrafine particles (UFPs) based on data collected using high-resolution UFP monitors whilst travelling by bus during rush hour along three different urban routes in Auckland, New Zealand. The factors influencing in-bus UFP concentration were assessed using a combination of spatial, statistical and GIS analysis techniques to determine both spatial and temporal variability. Results from 68 bus trips showed that concentrations varied more within a route than between on a given day, despite differences in urban morphology, land use and traffic densities between routes. A number of trips were characterised by periods of very rapid increases in UFPs (concentration 'spikes'), followed by slow declines. Trips which recorded at least one spike (an increase of greater than 10,000 pt/cm3) resulted in significantly higher mean concentrations. Spikes in UFPs were significantly more likely to occur when travelling at low speeds and when passengers were alighting and boarding at bus stops close to traffic light intersections.

  17. Wide-range particle characterization and elemental concentration in Beijing aerosol during the 2013 Spring Festival.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hui; Li, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Jiating; Li, Bai; Sun, Jialong; Chen, Rui; Gao, Yuxi; Chen, Chunying

    2014-09-01

    The number and mass concentration, size distribution, and the concentration of 16 elements were studied in aerosol samples during the Spring Festival celebrations in 2013 in Beijing, China. Both the number and mass concentration increased sharply in a wide range from 10 nm to 10 μm during the firecrackers and fireworks activities. The prominent increase of the number concentration was in 50 nm-500 nm with a peak of 1.7 × 10(5)/cm(3) at 150 nm, which is 8 times higher than that after 1.5 h. The highest mass concentration was in 320-560 nm, which is 4 times higher than the control. K, Mg, Sr, Ba and Pb increased sharply during the firework activities in PM10. Although the aerosol emission from firework activities is a short-term air quality degradation event, there may be a substantial hazard arising from the chemical composition of the emitted particles.

  18. Ultrasonic device for real-time sewage velocity and suspended particles concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Abda, F; Azbaid, A; Ensminger, D; Fischer, S; François, P; Schmitt, P; Pallarès, A

    2009-01-01

    In the frame of a technological research and innovation network in water and environment technologies (RITEAU, Réseau de Recherche et d'Innovation Technologique Eau et Environnement), our research group, in collaboration with industrial partners and other research institutions, has been in charge of the development of a suitable flowmeter: an ultrasonic device measuring simultaneously the water flow and the concentration of size classes of suspended particles. Working on the pulsed ultrasound principle, our multi-frequency device (1 to 14 MHz) allows flow velocity and water height measurement and estimation of suspended solids concentration. Velocity measurements rely on the coherent Doppler principle. A self developed frequency estimator, so called Spectral Identification method, was used and compared to the classical Pulse-Pair method. Several measurements campaigns on one wastewater collector of the French city of Strasbourg gave very satisfactory results and showed smaller standard deviation values for the Doppler frequency extracted by the Spectral Identification method. A specific algorithm was also developed for the water height measurements. It relies on the water surface acoustic impedance rupture and its peak localisation and behaviour in the collected backscattering data. This algorithm was positively tested on long time measurements on the same wastewater collector. A large part of the article is devoted to the measurements of the suspended solids concentrations. Our data analysis consists in the adaptation of the well described acoustic behaviour of sand to the behaviour of wastewater particles. Both acoustic attenuation and acoustic backscattering data over multiple frequencies are analyzed for the extrapolation of size classes and respective concentrations. Under dry weather conditions, the massic backscattering coefficient and the overall size distribution showed similar evolution whatever the measurement site was and were suggesting a global

  19. On the peculiarities of LDA method in two-phase flows with high concentrations of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poplavski, S. V.; Boiko, V. M.; Nesterov, A. U.

    2016-10-01

    Popular applications of laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) in gas dynamics are reviewed. It is shown that the most popular method cannot be used in supersonic flows and two-phase flows with high concentrations of particles. A new approach to implementation of the known LDA method based on direct spectral analysis, which offers better prospects for such problems, is presented. It is demonstrated that the method is suitable for gas-liquid jets. Owing to the progress in laser engineering, digital recording of spectra, and computer processing of data, the method is implemented at a higher technical level and provides new prospects of diagnostics of high-velocity dense two-phase flows.

  20. Ultrasonic device for real-time sewage velocity and suspended particles concentration measurements.

    PubMed

    Abda, F; Azbaid, A; Ensminger, D; Fischer, S; François, P; Schmitt, P; Pallarès, A

    2009-01-01

    In the frame of a technological research and innovation network in water and environment technologies (RITEAU, Réseau de Recherche et d'Innovation Technologique Eau et Environnement), our research group, in collaboration with industrial partners and other research institutions, has been in charge of the development of a suitable flowmeter: an ultrasonic device measuring simultaneously the water flow and the concentration of size classes of suspended particles. Working on the pulsed ultrasound principle, our multi-frequency device (1 to 14 MHz) allows flow velocity and water height measurement and estimation of suspended solids concentration. Velocity measurements rely on the coherent Doppler principle. A self developed frequency estimator, so called Spectral Identification method, was used and compared to the classical Pulse-Pair method. Several measurements campaigns on one wastewater collector of the French city of Strasbourg gave very satisfactory results and showed smaller standard deviation values for the Doppler frequency extracted by the Spectral Identification method. A specific algorithm was also developed for the water height measurements. It relies on the water surface acoustic impedance rupture and its peak localisation and behaviour in the collected backscattering data. This algorithm was positively tested on long time measurements on the same wastewater collector. A large part of the article is devoted to the measurements of the suspended solids concentrations. Our data analysis consists in the adaptation of the well described acoustic behaviour of sand to the behaviour of wastewater particles. Both acoustic attenuation and acoustic backscattering data over multiple frequencies are analyzed for the extrapolation of size classes and respective concentrations. Under dry weather conditions, the massic backscattering coefficient and the overall size distribution showed similar evolution whatever the measurement site was and were suggesting a global

  1. DNA/polyethyleneimine/hyaluronic acid small complex particles and tumor suppression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomoko; Yoshihara, Chieko; Hamada, Katsuyuki; Koyama, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    The highest barriers for non-viral vectors to an efficient in vivo gene transfection would be (1) non-specific interaction with biological molecules, and (2) large size of the DNA complex particles. Protective coating of the DNA/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes by hyaluronic acid (HA) effectively diminished the adverse interactions with biological molecules. Here we found HA also protected the DNA/PEI complexes against aggregation and inactivation through lyophilization-and-rehydration procedures. It allows us to prepare the concentrated very small DNA complex particles (<70 nm) suspension by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by lyophilized-and-rehydrated to a small volume. In vivo gene expression efficiency of the small complex was examined with mice subcutaneously inoculated with B16 melanoma cells. These formulations showed high reporter-gene expression level in tumor after intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice. Small complex was then made of the plasmid encoding GM-CSF gene, and injected into the mice bearing subcutaneous solid B16 tumor. After intravenous injection, it induced apparent tumor growth suppression in 50% of the mice. Notably, significant therapeutic effect was detected in the mice that received intratumoral injection, and 75% of the mice were completely cured with disappearance of tumor. PMID:20047759

  2. Artificial primary marine aerosol production: a laboratory study with varying water temperature, salinity, and succinic acid concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zábori, J.; Matisāns, M.; Krejci, R.; Nilsson, E. D.; Ström, J.

    2012-11-01

    Primary marine aerosols are an important component of the climate system, especially in the remote marine environment. With diminishing sea-ice cover, better understanding of the role of sea spray aerosol on climate in the polar regions is required. As for Arctic Ocean water, laboratory experiments with NaCl water confirm that a few degrees change in the water temperature (Tw) gives a large change in the number of primary particles. Small particles with a dry diameter between 0.01 μm and 0.25 μm dominate the aerosol number density, but their relative dominance decreases with increasing water temperature from 0 °C where they represent 85-90% of the total aerosol number to 10 °C, where they represent 60-70% of the total aerosol number. This effect is most likely related to a change in physical properties and not to modification of sea water chemistry. A change of salinity between 15 g kg-1 and 35 g kg-1 did not influence the shape of a particle number size distribution. Although the magnitude of the size distribution for a water temperature change between 0 °C and 16 °C changed, the shape did not. An experiment where succinic acid was added to a NaCl water solution showed, that the number concentration of particles with 0.010 μm < Dp < 4.5 μm decreased on average by 10% when the succinic acid concentration in NaCl water at a water temperature of 0 °C was increased from 0 μmol L-1 to 94 μmol L-1. A shift to larger sizes in the particle number size distribution is observed from pure NaCl water to Arctic Ocean water. This is likely a consequence of organics and different inorganic salts present in Arctic Ocean water in addition to the NaCl.

  3. Factors affecting the response of lung clearance systems to acid aerosols: role of exposure concentration, exposure time, and relative acidity.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, R B

    1989-02-01

    The ability of the lungs to clear deposited material is essential for maintenance of lung homeostasis. Acid aerosols have been shown to alter the efficiency of this process. This paper assesses the role of acid aerosol exposure concentration (C), exposure time (T), and relative acidity in producing changes in clearance from both the tracheobronchial tree and respiratory region of the lungs of rabbits. The response was found to be due to total exposure, i.e., some combination form of C x T, and was also related to relative acidity.

  4. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 μg m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 μg m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 μg m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area. PMID:22358115

  5. Acidic gases and nitrate and sulfate particles in the atmosphere in the city of Guadalajara, México.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga-Noreña, Hugo; Waliszewski, Stefan; Murillo-Tovar, Mario; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; de la Garza-Rodríguez, Iliana; Colunga-Urbina, Edith; Cuevas-Ordaz, Rosalva

    2012-05-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid, nitric acid, nitrate and sulfate particles were obtained in this study from April to June 2008 in the center of the city of Guadalajara, while concentrations of ozone, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and meteorological parameters (temperature and relative humidity), were acquired by the Secretaría del Medio Ambiente para el Desarrollo Sustentable del Estado de Jalisco (SEMADES). The results showed that nitric acid (2.7 μg m(-3)) was 2.7 times higher than nitrous acid (1.0 μg m(-3)). The sulfur dioxide (SO(2)) concentration indicated an opposite trend to sulfate (SO(4) (2-)), with the average concentration of SO(2) (6.9 μg m(-3)) higher in almost the entire period of study. The sulfur conversion ratio (Fs, 24.9%) and nitrogen conversion ratio (Fn, 6.2%), were revealed to be similar to that reported in other urban areas during warm seasons. It is also noted that ozone is not the main oxidizer of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide. This determination was made by taking into account the slightly positively correlation determined for Fn (r(2) = 0.084) and Fs (r(2) = 0.092) with ozone that perhaps suggests there are other oxidizing species such as the radical OH, which are playing an important role in the processes of atmospheric oxidation in this area.

  6. Modeling of yeast Brettanomyces bruxellensis growth at different acetic acid concentrations under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Yahara, Garcia Alvarado; Javier, Mendez Ancona; Tulio, Mata Jimenez Marco; Javier, Gómez Rodriguez; Guadalupe, Aguilar Uscanga Maria

    2007-11-01

    Glucose utilization by Brettanomyces bruxellensis at different acetic acid concentrations under aerobic and anaerobic conditions was investigated. The presence of the organic acid disturbs the growth and fermentative activity of the yeast when its concentration exceeds 2 g l(-1). A mathematical model is proposed for the kinetic behavior analysis of yeast growing in batch culture. A Matlab algorithm was used for estimation of model parameters, whose confidence intervals were also calculated at a 0.95 probability level using a t-Student distribution for f degrees of freedom. The model successfully simulated the batch kinetics observed at different concentrations of acetic acid under both oxygen conditions.

  7. Dose-Response of Five Bile Acids on Serum and Liver Bile Acid Concentrations and Hepatotoxicty in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Peizhen; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2011-01-01

    Feeding bile acids (BAs) to rodents has been used to study BA signaling and toxicity in vivo. However, little is known about the effect of feeding BAs on the concentrations of BAs in serum and liver as well as the dose of the fed BAs that causes liver toxicity. The present study was designed to investigate the relative hepatotoxicity of individual BAs by feeding mice cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) at concentrations of 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, or 3% in their diet for 7 days. The data demonstrate that (1) the ability of the fed BAs to produce hepatotoxicity is UDCAconcentration of each BA in the feed that causes hepatotoxicity in mice is CA and CDCA at 0.3%, DCA at 0.1%, and LCA at 0.03%; (3) BA feeding results in a dose-dependent increase in the total serum BA concentrations but had little effect on liver total BA concentrations; (4) hepatotoxicity of the fed BAs does not simply depend on the concentration or hydrophobicity of total BAs in the liver; and (5) liver BA-conjugation enzymes are saturated by feeding UDCA at concentrations higher than 0.3%. In conclusion, the findings of the present study provide guidance for choosing the feeding concentrations of BAs in mice and will aid in interpreting BA hepatotoxicity as well as BA-mediated gene regulation. PMID:21747115

  8. Spatial and monthly trends in speciated fine particle concentration in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, William C.; Schichtel, Bret A.; Pitchford, Marc L.; Ashbaugh, Lowell L.; Eldred, Robert A.

    2004-02-01

    In the spring of 1985 an interagency consortium of federal land management agencies and the Environmental Protection Agency established the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network to assess visibility and aerosol monitoring for the purpose of tracking spatial and temporal trends of visibility and visibility-impairing particles in rural areas. The program was initiated with 20 monitoring sites and was expanded to 165 sites between 2000 and 2003. This paper reports on fine aerosol data collected in the year 2001 at 143 sites. The major fine (dp < 2.5 μm) particle aerosol species, sulfates, nitrates, organics, light-absorbing carbon, and wind-blown dust, and coarse gravimetric mass are monitored, and at some sites, light scattering and/or extinction are measured. Sulfates, carbon, and crustal material are responsible for most of the fine mass at the majority of locations throughout the United States, while at sites in southern California and the midwestern United States, nitrates can contribute significantly. In the eastern United States, sulfates contribute between 50 and 60% of the fine mass. Sulfate concentrations tend to be highest in the summer months while organic concentrations can be high in the spring, summer, or fall seasons, depending upon fire-related emissions. However, at the two urban sites, Phoenix, Arizona, and Puget Sound, Washington, organics peak during the winter months. Nitrate concentrations also tend to be highest during the winter months. During the spring months in many areas of the western United States, fine soil can contribute as much as 40% of fine mass. The temporal changes in soil concentration that occur simultaneously over much of the western United States including the Rocky Mountain region suggest a large source region, possibly long-range transport of Asian dust.

  9. Effect of acid concentration on closed-vessel microwave-assisted digestion of plant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Geórgia C. L.; Gonzalez, Mário H.; Ferreira, Antônio G.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2002-12-01

    The efficiency of microwave-assisted acid digestion of plants using different concentrations of nitric acid (2.0, 3.0, 5.0, 7.0 and 14 mol l -1) with hydrogen peroxide (30% v/v) was evaluated by measuring the residual carbon content (RCC) using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) with axial viewing. Certified reference materials were used for evaluating the accuracy attained when 2 mol l -1 HNO 3 was employed for digestion. Under all experimental conditions RCC values were always lower than 13% w/v, and even the highest concentration did not cause any interference with element recovery. It seems that the high pressure reached for closed-vessel operation improved the oxidative action of nitric acid due to consequent temperature increase, even when this reagent was not used at high concentrations. According to acid-base titration data, residual acid in the digestates varied from 1.2 to 4.0 mol l -1, depending on the acid concentration initially added. It can be concluded that for plant materials, microwave-assisted acid digestion can be carried out under mild conditions, which implies that digestates do not need extensive dilution before introduction by pneumatic nebulization to ICP-OES. An additional advantage is the lower amount of residue generated when working with less concentrated acid solutions.

  10. Influence of acid functionalization on the cardiopulmonary toxicity of carbon nanotubes and carbon black particles in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Haiyan McGee, John K.; Saxena, Rajiv K.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.; Devlin, Robert B.; Gilmour, M. Ian

    2009-09-15

    Engineered carbon nanotubes are being developed for a wide range of industrial and medical applications. Because of their unique properties, nanotubes can impose potentially toxic effects, particularly if they have been modified to express functionally reactive chemical groups on their surface. The present study was designed to evaluate whether acid functionalization (AF) enhanced the cardiopulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as control carbon black particles. Mice were exposed by oropharyngeal aspiration to 10 or 40 {mu}g of saline-suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), acid-functionalized SWCNTs (AF-SWCNTs), ultrafine carbon black (UFCB), AF-UFCB, or 2 {mu}g LPS. 24 hours later, pulmonary inflammatory responses and cardiac effects were assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage and isolated cardiac perfusion respectively, and compared to saline or LPS-instilled animals. Additional mice were assessed for histological changes in lung and heart. Instillation of 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs, UFCB and AF-UFCB increased percentage of pulmonary neutrophils. No significant effects were observed at the lower particle concentration. Sporadic clumps of particles from each treatment group were observed in the small airways and interstitial areas of the lungs according to particle dose. Patches of cellular infiltration and edema in both the small airways and in the interstitium were also observed in the high dose group. Isolated perfused hearts from mice exposed to 40 {mu}g of AF-SWCNTs had significantly lower cardiac functional recovery, greater infarct size, and higher coronary flow rate than other particle-exposed animals and controls, and also exhibited signs of focal cardiac myofiber degeneration. No particles were detected in heart tissue under light microscopy. This study indicates that while acid functionalization increases the pulmonary toxicity of both UFCB and SWCNTs, this treatment caused cardiac effects only with the AF

  11. The influence of size distribution on the particle concentration effect and trace metal partitioning in rivers

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, G.; Rozan, T.F.

    1999-01-01

    The particle concentration effect (p.c.e.) is an unexpected decline in partition coefficients (K{sub d}) as suspended particulate matter (SPM) increases. This anomaly has been attributed to a variety of causes, but most often to the existence of colloidal forms of the adsorbate, which are included, in error, in the dissolved fraction when calculating K{sub d}. To test this hypothesis the authors have directly measured colloidal, macroparticulate, and truly dissolved metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, fe, Al, Mn, Ag) monthly for one year (6/96--7/97) in four Connecticut rivers having a range of ancillary biogeochemical characteristics. These include factors that re all likely to influence partitioning between dissolved and solid phases, such as DOC, pH, and competing cations. The p.c.e. is clearly evident in these rivers, and explicit consideration of colloidal metals eliminates or reduces this anomaly in nearly all cases. Furthermore, a substantial portion of metals occurs in the colloidal fraction, and the amount of colloidal metals increases with SPM. Both of these conditions are necessary for the colloidal model to explain the p.c.e.. Important differences are observed among river and metals, and in some cases systematic decreases in K{sub d} continue even when colloidal metals are taken in to account. This additional decrease can be eliminated by excluding large particles having negligible surface complexation sites. When corrections are applied for both colloids and large particles, K{sub d} values become truly constant.

  12. The role of dust storms in total atmospheric particle concentrations at two sites in the western U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, J. C.; Reynolds, R. L.; Munson, S. M.; Fernandez, D.; Belnap, J.

    2013-10-01

    Mineral aerosols are produced during the erosion of soils by wind and are a common source of particles (dust) in arid and semiarid regions. The size of these particles varies widely from less than 2 µm to larger particles that can exceed 50 µm in diameter. In this study, we present two continuous records of total suspended particle (TSP) concentrations at sites in Mesa Verde and Canyonlands National Parks in Colorado and Utah, USA, respectively, and compare those values to measurements of fine and coarse particle concentrations made from nearby samplers. Average annual concentrations of TSP at Mesa Verde were 90 µg m-3 in 2011 and at Canyonlands were 171 µg m-3 in 2009, 113 µg m-3 in 2010, and 134 µg m-3 in 2011. In comparison, annual concentrations of fine (diameter of 2.5 µm and below) and coarse (2.5-10 µm diameter) particles at these sites were below 10 µg m-3 in all years. The high concentrations of TSP appear to be the result of regional dust storms with elevated concentrations of particles greater than 10 µm in diameter. These conditions regularly occur from spring through fall with 2 week mean TSP periodically in excess of 200 µg m-3. Measurement of particles on filters indicates that the median particle size varies between approximately 10 µm in winter and 40 µm during the spring. These persistently elevated concentrations of large particles indicate that regional dust emission as dust storms and events are important determinants of air quality in this region.

  13. The role of dust storms in total atmospheric particle concentrations at two sites in the western U.S.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neff, Jason C.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Munson, Seth M.; Fernandez, Daniel; Belnap, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    Mineral aerosols are produced during the erosion of soils by wind and are a common source of particles (dust) in arid and semiarid regions. The size of these particles varies widely from less than 2 µm to larger particles that can exceed 50 µm in diameter. In this study, we present two continuous records of total suspended particle (TSP) concentrations at sites in Mesa Verde and Canyonlands National Parks in Colorado and Utah, USA, respectively, and compare those values to measurements of fine and coarse particle concentrations made from nearby samplers. Average annual concentrations of TSP at Mesa Verde were 90 µg m−3 in 2011 and at Canyonlands were 171 µg m−3 in 2009, 113 µg m−3 in 2010, and 134 µg m−3 in 2011. In comparison, annual concentrations of fine (diameter of 2.5 µm and below) and coarse (2.5–10 µm diameter) particles at these sites were below 10 µg m−3 in all years. The high concentrations of TSP appear to be the result of regional dust storms with elevated concentrations of particles greater than 10 µm in diameter. These conditions regularly occur from spring through fall with 2 week mean TSP periodically in excess of 200 µg m−3. Measurement of particles on filters indicates that the median particle size varies between approximately 10 µm in winter and 40 µm during the spring. These persistently elevated concentrations of large particles indicate that regional dust emission as dust storms and events are important determinants of air quality in this region.

  14. Relationship between adipic acid concentration and the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Puig-Alcaraz, Carmen; Fuentes-Albero, Milagros; Cauli, Omar

    2016-08-30

    Dicarboxylic acids are an important source of information about metabolism and potential physiopathological alterations in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). We measured the concentration between dicarboxylic adipic and suberic acids in children with an ASD and typically-developing (TD) children and analyzed any relationships between the severity of the core symptoms of ASDs and other clinical features (drugs, supplements, drugs, or diet). The core symptoms of autism were evaluated using the DSM-IV criteria, and adipic acid and suberic acid were measured in urine samples. Overall, no increase in the concentration of adipic acid in children with ASDs compared to TD children, however when considering vitamin B supplementation in ASD there were significantly increased level of urinary adipic acid in children with an ASD not taking vitamin B supplementation compared to supplemented children or to TD children. No significant difference were observed in suberic acid. Interestingly, the increase in adipic acid concentration was significantly and indirectly correlated with the severity of the deficit in socialization and communication skills in children with an ASD. Therefore, therapeutic treatments aimed at decreasing adipic acid concentration might not be beneficial for treating the core symptoms of ASDs.

  15. Aviation Emissions Impact Ambient Ultrafine Particle Concentrations in the Greater Boston Area.

    PubMed

    Hudda, N; Simon, M C; Zamore, W; Brugge, D; Durant, J L

    2016-08-16

    Ultrafine particles are emitted at high rates by jet aircraft. To determine the possible impacts of aviation activities on ambient ultrafine particle number concentrations (PNCs), we analyzed PNCs measured from 3 months to 3.67 years at three sites within 7.3 km of Logan International Airport (Boston, MA). At sites 4.0 and 7.3 km from the airport, average PNCs were 2- and 1.33-fold higher, respectively, when winds were from the direction of the airport compared to other directions, indicating that aviation impacts on PNC extend many kilometers downwind of Logan airport. Furthermore, PNCs were positively correlated with flight activity after taking meteorology, time of day and week, and traffic volume into account. Also, when winds were from the direction of the airport, PNCs increased with increasing wind speed, suggesting that buoyant aircraft exhaust plumes were the likely source. Concentrations of other pollutants [CO, black carbon (BC), NO, NO2, NOx, SO2, and fine particulate matter (PM2.5)] decreased with increasing wind speed when winds were from the direction of the airport, indicating a different dominant source (likely roadway traffic emissions). Except for oxides of nitrogen, other pollutants were not correlated with flight activity. Our findings point to the need for PNC exposure assessment studies to take aircraft emissions into consideration, particularly in populated areas near airports. PMID:27490267

  16. Platelet Activation by Low Concentrations of Intact Oxidized LDL Particles Involves the PAF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Chen, Xi; Salomon, Robert G.; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Mitochondrial depolarization aids platelet activation. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) contains the medium length oxidatively truncated phospholipid hexadecyl azelaoyl-lysoPAF (HAz-LPAF) that disrupts mitochondrial function in nucleated cells, so oxLDL may augment platelet activation. Methods and Results Flow cytometry showed intact oxLDL particles synergized with sub-threshold amounts of soluble agonists to increase intracellular Ca++, and initiate platelet aggregation and surface expression of activated gpIIb/IIIa and P-selectin. oxLDL also induced aggregation and increased intracellular Ca++ in FURA2-labeled cells by itself at low, although not higher, concentrations. HAz-LPAF, alone and in combination with sub-stimulatory amounts of thrombin, rapidly increased cytoplasmic Ca++ and initiated aggregation. HAz-LPAF depolarized mitochondria in intact platelets, but this required concentrations beyond those that directly activated platelets. An unexpectedly large series of chemically pure truncated phospholipids generated by oxidative fragmentation of arachidonoyl-, docosahexaneoyl-, or linoleoyl alkyl phospholipids were platelet agonists. The PAF receptor, thought to effectively recognize only phospholipids with very short sn-2 residues, was essential for platelet activation because PAF receptor agonists blocked signaling by all these medium length phospholipids and oxLDL. Conclusions Intact oxLDL particles activate platelets through the PAF receptor, and the PAF receptor responds to a far wider range of oxidized phospholipids in oxLDL than anticipated. PMID:19112165

  17. Determination of kinetic effects on particle size and concentration: instruction for scale up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Lee, Changi; Uehara, Masato; Maeda, Hideaki

    2011-10-01

    Increasing the synthesis scale is one of the most important issues in nanocrystal synthesis. The main difference between small and large reactor is their thermal transfer rate which is reported to have great effects on particle nucleation and growth. In this paper, CdSe Quantum dots synthesis as was used as a model to investigate the heating rate effects in a microreactor system capable of precisely controlling the temperature and heating rate. Results showed that heating rate effects highly depended on the synthesis parameters. For example, in 5% Dodecanamine (DDA) case, there was no heating rate effect; while in the case of 20% DDA case, heating rate could affect both particle size distribution and morphology. Test experiments to demonstrate the up-scalability have been conducted and the results showed that products synthesized by batch reactor were comparable with microreactor products: Batch reactor gave same product when the DDA concentration was 5% but quite different product when the DDA concentration was 20%, compared with microreactor products. The data on the effects of heating rate obtained by this set up have high reliability and enable us to choose the proper method to increase the synthesis scale.

  18. Middle East measurements of concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles for coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendersky, Sergey; Kopeika, Norman S.; Blaunstein, Natan S.

    2005-10-01

    Recently, an extension of the Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) was proposed based on analysis of an extensive series of measurements at the Irish Atlantic Coast and at the French Mediterranean Coast. We confirm the relevance of that work for the distant eastern Meditteranean and extend several coefficients of that coastal model, proposed by Piazzola et al. for the Meditteranean Coast (a form of the Navy Aerosol Model), to midland Middle East coastal environments. This analysis is based on data collected at three different Middle East coastal areas: the Negev Desert (Eilat) Red Sea Coast, the Sea of Galilee (Tiberias) Coast, and the Mediterranean (Haifa) Coast. Aerosol size distributions are compared with those obtained through measurements carried out over the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean Coasts, and Mediterranean, and Baltic Seas Coasts. An analysis of these different results allows better understanding of the similarities and differences between different coastal lake, sea, and open ocean zones. It is shown that in the coastal regions in Israel, compared to open ocean and other sea zones, larger differences in aerosol particle concentration are observed. The aerosol particle concentrations and their dependences on wind speed for these coastal zones are analyzed and discussed. We propose to classify the aerosol distribution models to either: 1. a coastal model with marine aerosol domination; 2. a coastal model with continental aerosol domination (referred to as midland coast in this work); or 3. a coastal model with balanced marine and continental conditions.

  19. Aviation Emissions Impact Ambient Ultrafine Particle Concentrations in the Greater Boston Area.

    PubMed

    Hudda, N; Simon, M C; Zamore, W; Brugge, D; Durant, J L

    2016-08-16

    Ultrafine particles are emitted at high rates by jet aircraft. To determine the possible impacts of aviation activities on ambient ultrafine particle number concentrations (PNCs), we analyzed PNCs measured from 3 months to 3.67 years at three sites within 7.3 km of Logan International Airport (Boston, MA). At sites 4.0 and 7.3 km from the airport, average PNCs were 2- and 1.33-fold higher, respectively, when winds were from the direction of the airport compared to other directions, indicating that aviation impacts on PNC extend many kilometers downwind of Logan airport. Furthermore, PNCs were positively correlated with flight activity after taking meteorology, time of day and week, and traffic volume into account. Also, when winds were from the direction of the airport, PNCs increased with increasing wind speed, suggesting that buoyant aircraft exhaust plumes were the likely source. Concentrations of other pollutants [CO, black carbon (BC), NO, NO2, NOx, SO2, and fine particulate matter (PM2.5)] decreased with increasing wind speed when winds were from the direction of the airport, indicating a different dominant source (likely roadway traffic emissions). Except for oxides of nitrogen, other pollutants were not correlated with flight activity. Our findings point to the need for PNC exposure assessment studies to take aircraft emissions into consideration, particularly in populated areas near airports.

  20. Enhancing effect of marine oligotrophy on environmental concentrations of particle-reactive trace elements

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffree, R.A.; Szymczak, R.

    2000-05-15

    A biogeochemical model has been previously developed that explains the inverse and nonlinear relationship between Po-210 concentration in zooplankton and their biomass, under oligotrophic conditions in French Polynesia. In this study the model structure was reviewed to determine a set of biogeochemical behaviors of Po-210, proposed to be critical to its environmental enhancement under oligotrophy: this set was then used to identify 25 other elements with comparable behaviors to Po-210. Field investigation in the Timor Sea showed that four of these a priori identified elements, viz. Cd, Co, Pb, and Mn as well as Cr and Ni, showed elevated water concentrations with reduced particle removal rates in the euphotic zone, results that are consistent with those previously obtained for Po-210 and the proposed explanatory model. These findings point to the enhanced susceptibility to contamination with particle-reactive elements of oligotrophic marine systems, whose degree and geographic extent may be enhanced by projected increases in sea surface temperatures from global warming.

  1. Dry deposition, concentration and gas/particle partitioning of atmospheric carbazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esen, Fatma; Tasdemir, Yücel; Cindoruk, S. Sıddık

    2010-03-01

    The atmospheric concentrations and dry deposition of carbazole were measured to present the temporal changes, gas/particle partitioning and magnitude of fluxes. Atmospheric samples were collected from July 2004 to May 2005 at four different sites in Bursa, Turkey. The average total (gas and particulate) carbazole concentrations were 7.6 ± 9.9 ng m - 3 in Gulbahce (Residential), 1.1 ± 1.2 ng m - 3 in BUTAL (Traffic), 3.3 ± 5.0 ng m - 3 in BOID (Industrial), and 1.2 ± 0.7 ng m - 3 in the Uludag University Campus (UU) (Suburban). Experimental gas/particle partition coefficient ( Kp) was determined using the study results and compared with Kp values calculated from octanol-air and soot-air + octanol partitioning models. Total dry deposition fluxes of carbazole were 290 ± 484 ng m - 2 d - 1 in BUTAL and 72 ± 67 ng m - 2 d - 1 in the UU Campus. Particulate phase dry deposition velocities were 0.81 ± 0.78 cm s - 1 and 0.90 ± 1.53 cm s - 1 for BUTAL and the UU Campus, respectively. On the other hand, gas-phase mass transfer coefficients were calculated to be 0.34 ± 0.29 cm s - 1 and 0.26 ± 0.17 cm s - 1 for BUTAL and the UU Campus, respectively.

  2. Mass concentration and mineralogical characteristics of aerosol particles collected at Dunhuang during ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z. X.; Cao, J. J.; Li, X. X.; Okuda, T.; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, X. Y.

    2006-03-01

    Measurements were performed in spring 2001 and 2002 to determine the characteristics of soil dust in the Chinese desert region of Dunhuang, one of the ground sites of the Asia-Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia). The mean mass concentrations of total suspended particle matter during the spring of 2001 and 2002 were 317 mu g m(-3) and 307 mu g m(-3) respectively. Eleven dust storm events were observed with a mean aerosol concentration of 1095 mu g m(-3), while the non-dusty days with calm or weak wind speed had a background aerosol loading of 196 mu g m(-3) on average in the springtime. The main minerals detected in the aerosol samples by X-ray diffraction were illite, kaolinite, chlorite, quartz, feldspar, calcite and dolomite. Gypsum, halite and amphibole were also detected in a few samples. The mineralogical data also show that Asian dust is characterized by a kaolinite to chlorite (K/C) ratio lower than 1 whereas Saharan dust exhibits a K/C ratio larger than 2. Air mass back- trajectory analysis show that three families of pathways are associated with the aerosol particle transport to Dunhuang, but these have similar K/C ratios, which further demonstrates that the mineralogical characteristics of Asian dust are different from African dust.

  3. Submicrometer-Sized Thermometer Particles Exploiting Selective Nucleic Acid Stability.

    PubMed

    Puddu, Michela; Mikutis, Gediminas; Stark, Wendelin J; Grass, Robert N

    2016-01-27

    Encapsulated nucleic acid selective damage quantification by real-time polymerase chain reaction is used as sensing mechanism to build a novel class of submicrometer size thermometer. Thanks to the high thermal and chemical stability, and the capability of storing the read accumulated thermal history, the sensor overcomes some of current limitations in small scale thermometry.

  4. Concentration and fractionation of hydrophobic organic acid constituents from natural waters by liquid chromatography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    A scheme is presented which used adsorption chromatography with pH gradient elution and size-exclusion chromatography to concentrate and separate hydrophobic organic acids from water. A review of chromatographic processes involved in the flow scheme is also presented. Organic analytes which appear in each aqueous fraction are quantified by dissolved organic carbon analysis. Hydrophobic organic acids in a water sample are concentrated on a porous acrylic resin. These acids usually constitute approximately 30-50 percent of the dissolved organic carbon in an unpolluted water sample and are eluted with an aqueous eluent (dilute base). The concentrate is then passed through a column of polyacryloylmorpholine gel, which separates the acids into high- and low-molecular-weight fractions. The high- and low-molecular-weight eluates are reconcentrated by adsorption chromatography, then are eluted with a pH gradient into strong acids (predominately carboxylic acids) and weak acids (predominately phenolic compounds). For standard compounds and samples of unpolluted waters, the scheme fractionates humic substances into strong and weak acid fractions that are separated from the low molecular weight acids. A new method utilizing conductivity is also presented to estimate the acidic components in the methanol fraction.

  5. Circadian changes in endogenous concentrations of indole-3-acetic acid, melatonin, serotonin, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid in Characeae (Chara australis Brown).

    PubMed

    Beilby, Mary J; Turi, Christina E; Baker, Teesha C; Tymm, Fiona Jm; Murch, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Giant-celled Characeae (Chara australis Brown), grown for 4 months on 12/12 hr day/night cycle and summer/autumn temperatures, exhibited distinct concentration maxima in auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA), melatonin and serotonin about 4 hr after subjective daybreak. These concentration peaks persisted after 3 day pretreatment in continuous darkness: confirming a circadian rhythm, rather than a response to "light on." The plants pretreated for 3 d in continuous light exhibited several large IAA concentration maxima throughout the 24 hr. The melatonin and serotonin concentrations decreased and were less synchronized with IAA. Chara plants grown on 9/15 hr day/night cycle for 4 months and winter/spring temperatures contained much smaller concentrations of IAA, melatonin and serotonin. The IAA concentration maxima were observed in subjective dark phase. Serotonin concentration peaks were weakly correlated with those of IAA. Melatonin concentration was low and mostly independent of circadian cycle. The "dark" IAA concentration peaks persisted in plants treated for 3 d in the dark. The plants pretreated for 3 d in the light again developed more IAA concentration peaks. In this case the concentration maxima in melatonin and serotonin became more synchronous with those in IAA. The abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) concentrations were also measured in plants on winter regime. The ABA concentration did not exhibit circadian pattern, while JA concentration peaks were out of phase with those of IAA. The data are discussed in terms of crosstalk between metabolic pathways. PMID:26382914

  6. Circadian changes in endogenous concentrations of indole-3-acetic acid, melatonin, serotonin, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid in Characeae (Chara australis Brown).

    PubMed

    Beilby, Mary J; Turi, Christina E; Baker, Teesha C; Tymm, Fiona Jm; Murch, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    Giant-celled Characeae (Chara australis Brown), grown for 4 months on 12/12 hr day/night cycle and summer/autumn temperatures, exhibited distinct concentration maxima in auxin (indole-3-acetic acid; IAA), melatonin and serotonin about 4 hr after subjective daybreak. These concentration peaks persisted after 3 day pretreatment in continuous darkness: confirming a circadian rhythm, rather than a response to "light on." The plants pretreated for 3 d in continuous light exhibited several large IAA concentration maxima throughout the 24 hr. The melatonin and serotonin concentrations decreased and were less synchronized with IAA. Chara plants grown on 9/15 hr day/night cycle for 4 months and winter/spring temperatures contained much smaller concentrations of IAA, melatonin and serotonin. The IAA concentration maxima were observed in subjective dark phase. Serotonin concentration peaks were weakly correlated with those of IAA. Melatonin concentration was low and mostly independent of circadian cycle. The "dark" IAA concentration peaks persisted in plants treated for 3 d in the dark. The plants pretreated for 3 d in the light again developed more IAA concentration peaks. In this case the concentration maxima in melatonin and serotonin became more synchronous with those in IAA. The abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) concentrations were also measured in plants on winter regime. The ABA concentration did not exhibit circadian pattern, while JA concentration peaks were out of phase with those of IAA. The data are discussed in terms of crosstalk between metabolic pathways.

  7. Isoprene in poplar emissions: effects on new particle formation and OH concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Andres, S.; Bachner, M.; Behnke, K.; Broch, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Kleist, E.; Mentel, T. F.; Rubach, F.; Springer, M.; Steitz, B.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Schnitzler, J.-P.; Wildt, J.

    2011-08-01

    Stress-induced volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from transgenic Grey poplar, modified in isoprene emission potential were used for the investigation of photochemical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Nucleation rates of up to 3600 cm-3 s-1 were observed in our experiments. In poplar, acute ozone stress induces the emission of a wide array of VOCs dominated by sesquiterpenes and aromatic VOCs. Constitutive light-dependent emission of isoprene ranged between 66 nmol m-2 s-1 in non-transgenic controls (wild type WT) and nearly zero (<0.5 nmol m-2 s-1) in isoprene emission-repressed lines (line RA22), respectively. In the presence of isoprene new particle formation was suppressed compared to non-isoprene containing VOC mixtures. Compared to isoprene/monoterpene systems emitted from other plants the suppression of nucleation by isoprene was less effective for the VOC mixture emitted from stressed poplar. This is explained by the observed high efficiency of new particle formation for emissions from stressed poplar. Direct measurements of OH in the reaction chamber revealed that the steady state concentration of OH is lower in the presence of isoprene than in the absence of isoprene, supporting the hypothesis that isoprenes' suppressing effect on nucleation is related to radical chemistry. In order to test whether isoprene contributes to SOA mass formation, fully deuterated isoprene (C5D8) was added to the stress-induced emission profile of an isoprene free poplar mutant. Mass spectral analysis showed that, despite the isoprene-induced suppression of particle formation, fractions of deuterated isoprene were incorporated into the SOA. A fractional mass yield of 2.3 % of isoprene was observed. Future emission changes due to land use and climate change may therefore affect both gas phase oxidation capacity and new particle number formation.

  8. Isoprene in poplar emissions: effects on new particle formation and OH concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Andres, S.; Bachner, M.; Behnke, K.; Broch, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Kleist, E.; Mentel, T. F.; Rubach, F.; Springer, M.; Steitz, B.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Schnitzler, J.-P.; Wildt, J.

    2012-01-01

    Stress-induced volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from transgenic Grey poplar modified in isoprene emission potential were used for the investigation of photochemical secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. In poplar, acute ozone stress induces the emission of a wide array of VOCs dominated by sesquiterpenes and aromatic VOCs. Constitutive light-dependent emission of isoprene ranged between 66 nmol m-2 s-1 in non-transgenic controls (wild type WT) and nearly zero (<0.5 nmol m-2 s-1) in isoprene emission-repressed plants (line RA22), respectively. Nucleation rates of up to 3600 cm-3 s-1 were observed in our experiments. In the presence of isoprene new particle formation was suppressed compared to non-isoprene containing VOC mixtures. Compared to isoprene/monoterpene systems emitted from other plants the suppression of nucleation by isoprene was less effective for the VOC mixture emitted from stressed poplar. This is explained by the observed high efficiency of new particle formation for emissions from stressed poplar. Direct measurements of OH in the reaction chamber revealed that the steady state concentration of OH is lower in the presence of isoprene than in the absence of isoprene, supporting the hypothesis that isoprenes' suppressing effect on nucleation is related to radical chemistry. In order to test whether isoprene contributes to SOA mass formation, fully deuterated isoprene (C5D8) was added to the stress-induced emission profile of an isoprene free poplar mutant. Mass spectral analysis showed that, despite the isoprene-induced suppression of particle formation, fractions of deuterated isoprene were incorporated into the SOA. A fractional mass yield of 2.3% of isoprene was observed. Future emission changes due to land use and climate change may therefore affect both gas phase oxidation capacity and new particle number formation.

  9. Humic Acid Effects on the Transport of Colloidal Particles in Unsaturated Porous Media: Humic Acid Dosage, pH, and Ionic Strength Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, V. L.; Gao, B.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    Soil colloids and biocolloids can facilitate contaminant transport within the soil profile through the complexation of pollutants previously thought to have limited mobility. Dissolved organic substances are qualitatively known to alter the behavior of colloids and surface chemistry of soil particles in aquatic environments when adsorbed to their surfaces. Specifically, it has been observed that even small amounts of adsorbed humic acids result in a pronounced increase in colloid mobility in saturated porous systems, presumably by a combination of electrostatic and steric stabilization. However, the degree to which adsorbed humic acids stabilize colloidal suspension is highly sensitive to the system's solution chemistry; mainly in terms of pH, ionic strength, and metal ions present. The objective of this study is to expound quantitatively on the role that combined stabilizing and destabilizing solution chemistry components have on humic acid-colloid transport in unsaturated media by isolating experimentally some underlying mechanisms that regulate colloid transport in realistic aquatic systems. We hypothesize that in chemically heterogeneous porous media, with ionic strength values above 0 and pH ranges from 4 to 9, the effect of humic acid on colloid suspensions cannot be simply characterized by increased stability and mobility. That a critical salt concentration must exists for a given humic acid concentration and pH, above which the network of humic acid collapses by forming coordination complexes with other suspended or adsorbed humic acids, thus increasing greatly the retention of colloids in the porous medium by sweep flocculation. In addition, capillary forces in unsaturated media may contribute further to overcome repulsive forces that prevent flocculation of humic acid-colloid complexes. The experimental work in this study will include: jar tests to determine critical solution concentration combinations for desired coagulation/flocculation rates, column

  10. Forced swimming and imipramine modify plasma and brain amino acid concentrations in mice.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuro; Yamane, Haruka; Tomonaga, Shozo; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2009-01-01

    The relationships between monoamine metabolism and forced swimming or antidepressants have been well studied, however information is lacking regarding amino acid metabolism under these conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of forced swimming and imipramine on amino acid concentrations in plasma, the cerebral cortex and the hypothalamus in mice. Forced swimming caused cerebral cortex concentrations of L-glutamine, L-alanine, and taurine to be increased, while imipramine treatment caused decreased concentrations of L-glutamate, L-alanine, L-tyrosine, L-methionine, and L-ornithine. In the hypothalamus, forced swimming decreased the concentration of L-serine while imipramine treatment caused increased concentration of beta-alanine. Forced swimming caused increased plasma concentration of taurine, while concentrations of L-serine, L-asparagine, L-glutamine and beta-alanine were decreased. Imipramine treatment caused increased plasma concentration of all amino acid, except for L-aspartate and taurine. In conclusion, forced swimming and imipramine treatment modify central and peripheral amino acid metabolism. These results may aid in the identification of amino acids that have antidepressant-like effects, or may help to refine the dosages of antidepressant drugs. PMID:19010319

  11. Using Simple Quadratic Equations to Estimate Equilibrium Concentrations of an Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brilleslyper, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Application of quadratic equations to standard problem in chemistry like finding equilibrium concentrations of ions in an acid solution is explained. This clearly shows that pure mathematical analysis has meaningful applications in other areas as well.

  12. Capillary-loaded particle fluid dynamics: effect on estimation of sperm concentration.

    PubMed

    Douglas-Hamilton, Diarmaid H; Smith, Nancy G; Kuster, Christopher E; Vermeiden, Jan P W; Althouse, Gary C

    2005-01-01

    Capillary loaded chambers are frequently used for semen analysis. Poiseuille flow of specimen into these chambers causes migration of suspended particles or cells in a direction transverse to the flow, which results in their preferential accumulation in the Segre-Silberberg (SS) planes. This SS effect depends on the transverse velocity gradient in the laminar flow. For semen analysis in thin capillary-loaded slides, the SS effect can lead to erroneous estimation of sample sperm-cell concentration. To better understand chamber flow dynamics and SS effect significance, we assessed flow uniformity, inflow cell velocity, and results of concentration measurements under different flow conditions for latex bead and porcine and human sperm suspensions. Overall, a concentration peak was present at the meniscus, which continued through chamber loading. High-velocity SS preferred planes, which channeled particles toward the meniscus, were located at the fractional positions of beta = .27 and beta = .73, where beta is the distance from wall to plane normalized to the chamber depth. In computer-automated semen analysis, a standard 20-microm x 18-mm x 6-mm chamber is commonly used, and these studies supported our previously published fluid-flow theory for this type of chamber. Conversely, the SS effect does not appear to have time to develop in the 100-microm-depth hemacytometer, which is deeper than the standard slide, has lower transverse velocity gradient, and consequently does not exhibit concentration variation due to the SS effect. These findings provide further support that hemacytometry, when performed properly, remains the gold standard. Applicability of our findings to routine semen analyses was then tested in 2 studies performed with independent boar studs. These studies compared diluted boar semen concentrations estimated by standard hemacytometry and in capillary-loaded 20-microm slides, using a computer-automated semen-analysis system designed to compensate for the

  13. In situ air-water and particle-water partitioning of perfluorocarboxylic acids, perfluorosulfonic acids and perfluorooctyl sulfonamide at a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Vierke, Lena; Ahrens, Lutz; Shoeib, Mahiba; Palm, Wolf-Ulrich; Webster, Eva M; Ellis, David A; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Harner, Tom

    2013-08-01

    In situ measurements of air and water phases at a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) were used to investigate the partitioning behavior of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs), perfluorosulfonic acids (PFSAs) and perfluorooctyl sulfonamide (HFOSA) and their conjugate bases (PFC(-)s, PFS(-)s, and FOSA(-), respectively). Particle-dissolved (Rd) and air-water (QAW) concentration ratios were determined at different tanks of a WWTP. Sum of concentrations of C4-12,14 PFC(A)s, C4,6,8,10 PFS(A)s and (H)FOSA were as high as 50 pg m(-3) (atmospheric gas phase), 2300 ng L(-1) (aqueous dissolved phase) and 2500 ng L(-1) (aqueous particle phase). Particle-dissolved concentration ratios of total species, log Rd, ranged from -2.9 to 1.3 for PFS(A)s, from -1.9 to 1.1 for PFC(A)s and was 0.71 for (H)FOSA. These field-based values agree well with equilibrium partitioning data reported in the literature, suggesting that any in situ generation from precursors, if they are present in this system, occurs at a slower rate than the rate of approach to equilibrium. Acid QAW were also estimated. Good agreement between the QAW and the air-water equilibrium partition coefficient for C8PFCA suggests that the air above the WWTP tanks is at or near equilibrium with the water. Uncertainties in these QAW values are attributed mainly to variability in pKa values reported in the literature. The WWTP provides a unique environment for investigating environmental fate processes of the PFCAs and PFSAs under 'real' conditions in order to better understand and predict their fate in the environment.

  14. The concentration of Ca2+ that solubilizes outer capsid proteins from rotavirus particles is dependent on the strain.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, M C; Charpilienne, A; Liprandi, F; Gajardo, R; Michelangeli, F; Cohen, J

    1996-08-01

    It has been previously shown that rotavirus maturation and stability of the outer capsid are calcium-dependent processes. More recently, it has been hypothesized that penetration of the cell membrane is also affected by conformational changes of the capsid induced by Ca2+. In this study, we determined quantitatively the critical concentration of calcium ion that leads to solubilization of the outer capsid proteins VP4 and VP7. Since this critical concentration is below or close to trace levels of Ca2+, we have used buffered solutions based on ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and Ca-EGTA. This method allowed us to show a very high variability of the free [Ca2+] needed to stabilize, at room temperature, the outer capsid of several rotavirus strains. This concentration is about 600 nM for the two bovine strains tested (RF and UK), 100 nM for the porcine strain OSU, and only 10 to 20 nM for the simian strain SA11. Titration of viral infectivity after incubation in buffer of defined [Ca2+] confirmed that the loss of infectivity occurs at different [Ca2+] for these three strains. For the bovine strain, the cleavage of VP4 by trypsin has no significant effect on the [Ca2+] that solubilizes outer shell proteins. The outer layer (VP7) of virus-like particles (VLP) made of recombinant proteins VP2, VP6, and VP7 (VLP2/6/7) was also solubilized by lowering the [Ca2+]. The critical concentration of Ca2+ needed to solubilize VP7 from VLP2/6/7 made of protein from the bovine strain is close to the concentration needed for the corresponding virus. Genetic analysis of this phenotype in a set of reassortant viruses from two parental strains having the phenotypes of strains OSU (porcine) and UK (bovine) confirmed that this property of viral particles is probably associated with the gene coding for VP7. The analysis of VLP by reverse genetics might allow the identification of the region(s) essential for calcium binding.

  15. The concentration of Ca2+ that solubilizes outer capsid proteins from rotavirus particles is dependent on the strain.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, M C; Charpilienne, A; Liprandi, F; Gajardo, R; Michelangeli, F; Cohen, J

    1996-01-01

    It has been previously shown that rotavirus maturation and stability of the outer capsid are calcium-dependent processes. More recently, it has been hypothesized that penetration of the cell membrane is also affected by conformational changes of the capsid induced by Ca2+. In this study, we determined quantitatively the critical concentration of calcium ion that leads to solubilization of the outer capsid proteins VP4 and VP7. Since this critical concentration is below or close to trace levels of Ca2+, we have used buffered solutions based on ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) and Ca-EGTA. This method allowed us to show a very high variability of the free [Ca2+] needed to stabilize, at room temperature, the outer capsid of several rotavirus strains. This concentration is about 600 nM for the two bovine strains tested (RF and UK), 100 nM for the porcine strain OSU, and only 10 to 20 nM for the simian strain SA11. Titration of viral infectivity after incubation in buffer of defined [Ca2+] confirmed that the loss of infectivity occurs at different [Ca2+] for these three strains. For the bovine strain, the cleavage of VP4 by trypsin has no significant effect on the [Ca2+] that solubilizes outer shell proteins. The outer layer (VP7) of virus-like particles (VLP) made of recombinant proteins VP2, VP6, and VP7 (VLP2/6/7) was also solubilized by lowering the [Ca2+]. The critical concentration of Ca2+ needed to solubilize VP7 from VLP2/6/7 made of protein from the bovine strain is close to the concentration needed for the corresponding virus. Genetic analysis of this phenotype in a set of reassortant viruses from two parental strains having the phenotypes of strains OSU (porcine) and UK (bovine) confirmed that this property of viral particles is probably associated with the gene coding for VP7. The analysis of VLP by reverse genetics might allow the identification of the region(s) essential for calcium binding. PMID:8763990

  16. Electrokinetic behavior of melamine-formaldehyde latex particles at moderate electrolyte concentration.

    PubMed

    Dahlsten, Per; Próchniak, Piotr; Kosmulski, Marek; Rosenholm, Jarl B

    2009-11-15

    The electrokinetic behavior of micrometer-sized melamine-formaldehyde latex particles in 10(-3)-10(-1)M monovalent electrolyte dispersions was investigated by electrophoresis and electroacoustics. Specific adsorption of the electrolytes was identified as a shift of the isoelectric point (pH(iep)) with an increased ionic strength. All salts had an equal dependence on the ionic strength. The pH(iep) was correlated with the anion sequence predicted by the hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) principle, Hofmeister series, and Born charging. The Born and the Hofmeister anion scale were successful in producing a systematic dependency of the isoelectric point (pH(iep)), particularly in high (10(-1)M) and low (10(-3)M) MF electrolyte dispersions. No clear trend could be found for the pH(iep) dependence on the anion HSAB scale.

  17. Plasma osmotic and electrolyte concentrations of largemouth bass from some acidic Florida lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Canfield, D.E. Jr.; Maceina, M.J.; Nordlie, F.G.; Shireman, J.V.

    1985-05-01

    Five acidic clear (pH 3.7-4.9), three acidic colored (pH 4.1-4.6), and three neutral (pH 6.9-7.3) north-central Florida lakes were surveyed in 1983 to determine plasma osmotic and electrolyte concentrations, growth, and coefficients of condition for largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides floridanus. Plasma osmotic concentrations averaged greater than 273 milliosmoles/kg in fish from acidic colored and circumneutral lakes, but averaged less than 269 milliosmoles/kg in four of the acidic clear lakes. Growth and coefficients of condition of largemouth bass > 305 mm total length in the acidic lakes were significantly lower than in the neutral lakes. Reductions in fish growth and condition, however, could be related to either acidic conditions or lake trophic status. 29 references, 3 tables.

  18. Source apportionment of ambient particle number concentrations in central Los Angeles using positive matrix factorization (PMF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowlat, Mohammad Hossein; Hasheminassab, Sina; Sioutas, Constantinos

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model (version 5.0) was used to identify and quantify major sources contributing to particulate matter (PM) number concentrations, using PM number size distributions in the range of 13 nm to 10 µm combined with several auxiliary variables, including black carbon (BC), elemental and organic carbon (EC/OC), PM mass concentrations, gaseous pollutants, meteorological, and traffic counts data, collected for about 9 months between August 2014 and 2015 in central Los Angeles, CA. Several parameters, including particle number and volume size distribution profiles, profiles of auxiliary variables, contributions of different factors in different seasons to the total number concentrations, diurnal variations of each of the resolved factors in the cold and warm phases, weekday/weekend analysis for each of the resolved factors, and correlation between auxiliary variables and the relative contribution of each of the resolved factors, were used to identify PM sources. A six-factor solution was identified as the optimum for the aforementioned input data. The resolved factors comprised nucleation, traffic 1, traffic 2 (with a larger mode diameter than traffic 1 factor), urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust. Traffic sources (1 and 2) were the major contributor to PM number concentrations, collectively making up to above 60 % (60.8-68.4 %) of the total number concentrations during the study period. Their contribution was also significantly higher in the cold phase compared to the warm phase. Nucleation was another major factor significantly contributing to the total number concentrations (an overall contribution of 17 %, ranging from 11.7 to 24 %), with a larger contribution during the warm phase than in the cold phase. The other identified factors were urban background aerosol, secondary aerosol, and soil/road dust, with relative contributions of approximately 12 % (7.4-17.1), 2.1 % (1

  19. Hormone-fuel concentrations in anephric subjects. Effect of hemodialysis (with special reference to amino acids).

    PubMed Central

    Ganda, O P; Aoki, T T; Soeldner, J S; Morrison, R S; Cahill, G F

    1976-01-01

    Arterial blood concentrations of insulin, glucagon, and various substrates were determined in six anephric subjects in the postabsorptive state and immediately after hemodialysis. Plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations were normal, and declined during dialysis. Plasma glucagon was elevated and remained unchanged. There was moderate hypertriglyceridemia before dialysis, but this decreased significantly after administration of heparin just before the start of dialysis, and at the end of dialysis was lowered further into the normal range. Comparison of postabsorptive whole blood concentrations of amino acids with those in normal, healthy adults revealed striking differences. Glutamine, proline, citrulline, glycine and both 1- and 3-methyl-histidines were increased, while serine, glutamate, tyrosine, lysine, and branched-chain amino acids were decreased. The glycine/serine ratio was elevated to 300% and tyrosine/phenylalanine ratio was lowered to 60% of normal. To investigate the potential role of blood cells in amino acid transport, the distribution of individual amino acids in plasma and blood cell compartments was studied. Despite a markedly diminished blood cell mass (mean hematocrit, 20.6 +/- 1.4%), there was no significant decrease in the fraction of most amino acids present in the cell compartment, and this was explained by increases of several amino acids in cellular water. None were decreased. Furthermore, during dialysis, whole blood and plasma amino acids declined by approximately 30% and 40%, respectively, whereas no significant change was observed in the cell compartment. Alanine was the only amino acid whose concentration declined in the cells as well as in plasma. The results indicate (a) significant alterations in the concentrations of hormones and substrates in patients on chronic, intermittent hemodialysis; (b) removal of amino acids during hemodialysis, predominantly from the plasma compartment, with no significant change in cell content

  20. Hormesis in Cholestatic Liver Disease; Preconditioning with Low Bile Acid Concentrations Protects against Bile Acid-Induced Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verhaag, Esther M.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Koehorst, Martijn; Groen, Albert K.; Moshage, Han; Faber, Klaas Nico

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cholestasis is characterized by accumulation of bile acids and inflammation, causing hepatocellular damage. Still, liver damage markers are highest in acute cholestasis and drop when this condition becomes chronic, indicating that hepatocytes adapt towards the hostile environment. This may be explained by a hormetic response in hepatocytes that limits cell death during cholestasis. Aim To investigate the mechanisms that underlie the hormetic response that protect hepatocytes against experimental cholestatic conditions. Methods HepG2.rNtcp cells were preconditioned (24 h) with sub-apoptotic concentrations (0.1–50 μM) of various bile acids, the superoxide donor menadione, TNF-α or the Farsenoid X Receptor agonist GW4064, followed by a challenge with the apoptosis-inducing bile acid glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA; 200 μM for 4 h), menadione (50 μM, 6 h) or cytokine mixture (CM; 6 h). Levels of apoptotic and necrotic cell death, mRNA expression of the bile salt export pump (ABCB11) and bile acid sensors, as well as intracellular GCDCA levels were analyzed. Results Preconditioning with the pro-apoptotic bile acids GCDCA, taurocholic acid, or the protective bile acids (tauro)ursodeoxycholic acid reduced GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity in HepG2.rNtcp cells. Bile acid preconditioning did not induce significant levels of necrosis in GCDCA-challenged HepG2.rNtcp cells. In contrast, preconditioning with cholic acid, menadione or TNF-α potentiated GCDCA-induced apoptosis. GCDCA preconditioning specifically reduced GCDCA-induced cell death and not CM- or menadione-induced apoptosis. The hormetic effect of GCDCA preconditioning was concentration- and time-dependent. GCDCA-, CDCA- and GW4064- preconditioning enhanced ABCB11 mRNA levels, but in contrast to the bile acids, GW4064 did not significantly reduce GCDCA-induced caspase-3/7 activity. The GCDCA challenge strongly increased intracellular levels of this bile acid, which was not lowered by GCDCA

  1. African Anthropogenic Combustion Emissions: Estimate of Regional Mortality Attributable to Fine Particle Concentrations in 2030

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liousse, C.; Roblou, L.; Assamoi, E.; Criqui, P.; Galy-Lacaux, C.; Rosset, R.

    2014-12-01

    Fossil fuel (traffic, industries) and biofuel (domestic fires) emissions of gases and particles in Africa are expected to significantly increase in the near future, particularly due to rapid growth of African cities and megacities. In this study, we will present the most recent developments of African combustion emission inventories, including African specificities. Indeed, a regional fossil fuel and biofuel inventory for gases and particulates described in Liousse et al. (2014) has been developed for Africa at a resolution of 0.25° x 0.25° for the years 2005 and 2030. For 2005, the original database of Junker and Liousse (2008) was used after modification for updated regional fuel consumption and emission factors. Two prospective inventories for 2030 are derived based on Prospective Outlook on Long-term Energy Systems (POLES) model (Criqui, 2001). The first is a reference scenario (2030ref) with no emission controls and the second is for a "clean" scenario (2030ccc*) including Kyoto policy and African specific emission control. This inventory predicts very large increases of pollutant emissions in 2030 (e.g. contributing to 50% of global anthropogenic organic particles), if no emission regulations are implemented. These inventories have been introduced in RegCM4 model. In this paper we will focus on aerosol modelled concentrations in 2005, 2030ref and 2030ccc*. Spatial distribution of aerosol concentrations will be presented with a zoom at a few urban and rural sites. Finally mortality rates (respiratory, cardiovascular) caused by anthropogenic PM2.5 increase from 2005 to 2030, calculated following Lelieveld et al. (2013), will be shown for each scenarios. To conclude, this paper will discuss the effectiveness of scenarios to reduce emissions, aerosol concentrations and mortality rates, underlining the need for further measurements scheduled in the frame of the new DACCIWA (Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions) program.

  2. Inhalation of concentrated ambient air particles exacerbates myocardial ischemia in conscious dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Wellenius, Gregory A; Coull, Brent A; Godleski, John J; Koutrakis, Petros; Okabe, Kazunori; Savage, Sara T; Lawrence, Joy E; Murthy, G G Krishna; Verrier, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    Short-term increases in ambient air pollution have been associated with an increased incidence of acute cardiac events. We assessed the effect of inhalation exposure to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) on myocardial ischemia in a canine model of coronary artery occlusion. Six mongrel dogs underwent thoracotomy for implantation of a vascular occluder around the left anterior descending coronary artery and tracheostomy to facilitate particulate exposure. After recovery (5-13 weeks), pairs of subjects were exposed for 6 hr/day on 3 or 4 consecutive days. Within each pair, one subject was randomly assigned to breathe CAPs on the second exposure day and filtered air at other times. The second subject breathed CAPs on the third exposure day and filtered air at other times. Immediately after each exposure, subjects underwent 5-min coronary artery occlusion. We determined ST-segment elevation, a measure of myocardial ischemia heart rate, and arrhythmia incidence during occlusion from continuous electrocardiograms. Exposure to CAPs (median, 285.7; range, 161.3-957.3 microg/m3) significantly (p = 0.007) enhanced occlusion-induced peak ST-segment elevation in precordial leads V4 (9.4 +/- 1.7 vs. 6.2 +/- 0.9 mm, CAPs vs. filtered air, respectively) and V5 (9.2 +/- 1.3 vs. 7.5 +/- 0.9 mm). ST-segment elevation was significantly correlated with the silicon concentration of the particles and other crustal elements possibly associated with urban street dust (p = 0.003 for Si). No associations were found with CAPs mass or number concentrations. Heart rate was not affected by CAPs exposure. These results suggest that exacerbation of myocardial ischemia during coronary artery occlusion may be an important mechanism of environmentally related acute cardiac events. PMID:12676590

  3. PARTICLE CONCENTRATIONS IN INNER-CITY HOMES OF CHILDREN WITH ASTHMA: THE EFFECTS OF SMOKING, COOKING, AND OUTDOOR POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inner-city children have high rates of asthma. Exposures to particles, including allergens, may cause or exacerbate asthma symptoms. As part of an epidemiologic study of inner-city children with asthma, continuous (10-min average) measurements of particle concentrations were made...

  4. Water uptake of internally mixed ammonium sulfate and dicarboxylic acid particles probed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, Lorena; Méndez, Estíbaliz; Sánchez, María N.; Castaño, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.

    2013-05-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually mixtures of inorganic and organic compounds in variable proportions, and the relative amount of organic fraction can influence the hygroscopic properties of the particles. Infrared spectra of submicrometer internally mixed dry particles of ammonium sulfate (AS) with various dicarboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic, maleic, glutaric and pimelic) have been measured in an aerosol flow tube at several solute mass ratios. The spectra show a notable broadening in the bandwidth of sulfate ion ν3 vibrational band near 1115 cm-1 with respect to pure AS. We attribute these perturbations, that are biggest at AS/organic acid mass ratio near unity, to intermolecular interactions between inorganic ions and organic acid molecules in the internally mixed solids. The water uptake behavior of internally mixed particles has been measured by recording the infrared integrated absorbance of liquid water as a function of relative humidity (RH). The amount of water present in the particles prior to deliquescence correlates partially with the water solubilities of the dicarboxylic acids, and also with the relative magnitudes of intermolecular interactions in the internally mixed dry solids. Phase change of ammonium sulfate in the internally mixed particles with RH has been spectrally monitored, and it is shown that water uptaken before full deliquescence produces structural changes in the particles that are revealed by their vibrational spectra.

  5. Water uptake properties of internally mixed sodium halide and succinic acid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, Lorena; Méndez, Estíbaliz; Sánchez, María N.; Castaño, Fernando; Basterretxea, Francisco J.

    2011-10-01

    Sea salt aerosols include appreciable fractions of organic material, that can affect properties such as hygroscopicity, phase transition or chemical reactivity. Although sodium chloride is the major component of marine salt, bromide and iodide ions tend to accumulate onto particle surfaces and influence their behaviour. The hygroscopic properties of internally mixed submicrometric particles composed of succinic acid (SA) and NaX (where X = F, Cl, Br or I) have been studied by infrared absorption spectroscopy in an aerosol flow cell at ambient temperature for different relative succinic acid/NaX compositions. The results show that deliquescence relative humidities of SA/NaF and SA/NaCl are equal to those of the pure sodium halides. SA/NaBr particles, on the other hand, deliquesce at lower relative humidities than pure NaBr particles, the effect being more marked as the SA/NaBr mass ratio approaches unity. The SA/NaI system behaves as a non-deliquescent system, absorbing liquid water at all relative humidities, as in pure NaI. Succinic acid phase in the particles has been spectroscopically monitored at given values of both RH and SA/NaX solute mass ratio. The different hygroscopic properties as the halogen ion is changed can be rationalized in terms of simple thermodynamic arguments and can be attributed to the relative contributions of ion-molecule interactions in the solid particles. The observed behaviour is of interest for tropospheric sea salt aerosols mixed with organic acids.

  6. Primary Accretion and Turbulent Cascades: Scale-Dependence of Particle Concentration Multiplier Probability Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Weston, B.; Shariff, K.

    2013-10-01

    Primitive bodies with 10s-100s of km diameter (or even larger) may form directly from small nebula constituents, bypassing the step-by-step “incremental growth” that faces a variety of barriers at cm, m, and even 1-10km sizes. In the scenario of Cuzzi et al (Icarus 2010 and LPSC 2012; see also Chambers Icarus 2010) the immediate precursors of 10-100km diameter asteroid formation are dense clumps of chondrule-(mm-) size objects. These predictions utilize a so-called cascade model, which is popular in turbulence studies. One of its usual assumptions is that certain statistical properties of the process (the so-called multiplier pdfs p(m)) are scale-independent within a cascade of energy from large eddy scales to smaller scales. In similar analyses, Pan et al (2011 ApJ) found discrepancies with results of Cuzzi and coworkers; one possibility was that p(m) for particle concentration is not scale-independent. To assess the situation we have analyzed recent 3D direct numerical simulations of particles in turbulence covering a much wider range of scales than analyzed by either Cuzzi and coworkers or by Pan and coworkers (see Bec et al 2010, J. Flu. Mech 646, 527). We calculated p(m) at scales ranging from 45-1024η where η is the Kolmogorov scale, for both particles with a range of stopping times spanning the optimum value, and for energy dissipation in the fluid. For comparison, the p(m) for dissipation have been observed to be scale-independent in atmospheric flows (at much larger Reynolds number) for scales of at least 30-3000η. We found that, in the numerical simulations, the multiplier distributions for both particle concentration and fluid dissipation are as expected at scales of tens of η, but both become narrower and less intermittent at larger scales. This is consistent with observations of atmospheric flows showing scale independence to >3000η if scale-free behavior is established only after some number 10 of large-scale bifurcations (at scales perhaps

  7. Concentration levels and source apportionment of ultrafine particles in road microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyropoulos, G.; Samara, C.; Voutsa, D.; Kouras, A.; Manoli, E.; Voliotis, A.; Tsakis, A.; Chasapidis, L.; Konstandopoulos, A.; Eleftheriadis, K.

    2016-03-01

    A mobile laboratory unit (MOBILAB) with on-board instrumentation (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer, SMPS; Ambient NOx analyzer) was used to measure size-resolved particle number concentrations (PNCs) of quasi-ultrafine particles (UFPs, 9-372 nm), along with NOx, in road microenvironments. On-road measurements were carried out in and around a large Greek urban agglomeration, the Thessaloniki Metropolitan Area (TMA). Two 2-week measurement campaigns were conducted during the warm period of 2011 and the cold period of 2012. During each sampling campaign, MOBILAB was driven through a 5-day inner-city route and a second 5-day external route covering in total a wide range of districts (urban, urban background, industrial and residential), and road types (major and minor urban roads, freeways, arterial and interurban roads). All routes were conducted during working days, in morning and in afternoon hours under real-world traffic conditions. Spatial classification of MOBILAB measurements involved the assignment of measurement points to location bins defined by the aspect ratio of adjacent urban street canyons (USCs). Source apportionment was further carried out, by applying Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to particle size distribution data. Apportioned PMF factors were interpreted, by employing a two-step methodology, which involved (a) statistical association of PMF factor contributions with 12 h air-mass back-trajectories ending at the TMA during MOBILAB measurements, and (b) Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) using PMF factor contributions as the dependent variables, while relative humidity, solar radiation flux, and vehicle speed were used as the independent variables. The applied data analysis showed that low-speed cruise and high-load engine operation modes are the two dominant sources of UFPs in most of the road microenvironments in the TMA, with significant contributions from background photochemical processes during the warm period, explaining the reversed

  8. Effect of citric acid concentration and hydrolysis time on physicochemical properties of sweet potato starches.

    PubMed

    Surendra Babu, Ayenampudi; Parimalavalli, Ramanathan; Rudra, Shalini Gaur

    2015-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of citric acid treated sweet potato starches were investigated in the present study. Sweet potato starch was hydrolyzed using citric acid with different concentrations (1 and 5%) and time periods (1 and 11 h) at 45 °C and was denoted as citric acid treated starch (CTS1 to CTS4) based on their experimental conditions. The recovery yield of acid treated starches was above 85%. The CTS4 sample displayed the highest amylose (around 31%) and water holding capacity its melting temperature was 47.66 °C. The digestibility rate was slightly increased for 78.58% for the CTS3 and CTS4. The gel strength of acid modified starches ranged from 0.27 kg to 1.11 kg. RVA results of acid thinned starches confirmed a low viscosity profile. CTS3 starch illustrated lower enthalpy compared to all other modified starches. All starch samples exhibited a shear-thinning behavior. SEM analysis revealed that the extent of visible degradation was increased at higher hydrolysis time and acid concentration. The CTS3 satisfied the criteria required for starch to act as a fat mimetic. Overall results conveyed that the citric acid treatment of sweet potato starch with 5% acid concentration and 11h period was an ideal condition for the preparation of a fat replacer.

  9. Transporters in Arabidopsis roots mediating uptake of amino acids at naturally occurring concentrations.

    PubMed

    Svennerstam, Henrik; Jämtgård, Sandra; Ahmad, Iftikhar; Huss-Danell, Kerstin; Näsholm, Torgny; Ganeteg, Ulrika

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies of Arabidopsis have identified several transporters as being important for amino acid uptake. We used Arabidopsis plants with altered expression of lysine histidine transporter 1 (LHT1), amino acid permease 1 (AAP1) and amino acid permease 5 (AAP5) with the aim of disentangling the roles of each transporter in the uptake of different amino acids at naturally occurring concentrations (2-50 μM). LHT1 mutants displayed reduced uptake rates of L-Gln, L-Ala, L-Glu and L-Asp but not of L-Arg or L-Lys, while AAP5 mutants were affected in the uptake of L-Arg and L-Lys only. Double mutants (lht1aap5) exhibited reduced uptake of all tested amino acids. In the concentration range tested, AAP1 mutants did not display altered uptake rates for any of the studied amino acids. Expression analysis of amino acid transporter genes with important root functions revealed no major differences in the individual mutants other than for genes targeted for mutation. We conclude that LHT1 and AAP5, but not AAP1, are crucial for amino acid uptake at concentrations typically found in soils. LHT1 and AAP5 displayed complementary affinity spectra, and no redundancy with respect to gene expression was found between the two transporters, suggesting these two transporters have separate roles in amino acid uptake.

  10. Occurrence and Concentrations of Halogenated Flame Retardants in the Atmospheric Fine Particles in Chinese Cities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Lin, Tian; Shen, Kaijun; Li, Jun; Yu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Gan

    2016-09-20

    The concentrations of halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) in PM2.5 were monitored for one year at 10 urban sites in China during 2013-2014. This study investigated four classes of HFRs: nine polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), six nonbromodiphenyl ether (BDE) brominated flame retardants, two dechlorane plus (DP) flame retardants, and three chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs). Extremely high concentrations of BDE-209 and DBDPE were observed in only one city (Guangzhou), which was a consequence of the intensive e-waste recycling and disposal operations in the Pearl River Delta. This result differed from the tris(monochloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) distributions, which showed high concentrations in most cities, suggesting wide usage and large emissions in China in recent years. The highest TCPP and TCEP concentrations were observed in the summer, indicating that emission from local sources was an important factor controlling the levels in the air. This was not the case for BDE-209 and DBDPE, for which higher concentrations were found in winter. When bound to particulate matter due to low vapor pressure, these compounds may be more persistent in air, and temperature-dependent gas-particle partitioning was a key factor. Moreover, regional pollution and long-range transport had a significant influence on the seasonal distributions of BDE-209 and DBDPE, especially in cities (Guangzhou and Shanghai) close to electrical/electronic waste recycling sites. Residents in urban areas were exposed to higher levels of chlorinated OPFRs. This raises considerable concern, and an appropriate risk assessment is required.

  11. Occurrence and Concentrations of Halogenated Flame Retardants in the Atmospheric Fine Particles in Chinese Cities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Di; Lin, Tian; Shen, Kaijun; Li, Jun; Yu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Gan

    2016-09-20

    The concentrations of halogenated flame retardants (HFRs) in PM2.5 were monitored for one year at 10 urban sites in China during 2013-2014. This study investigated four classes of HFRs: nine polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), six nonbromodiphenyl ether (BDE) brominated flame retardants, two dechlorane plus (DP) flame retardants, and three chlorinated organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs). Extremely high concentrations of BDE-209 and DBDPE were observed in only one city (Guangzhou), which was a consequence of the intensive e-waste recycling and disposal operations in the Pearl River Delta. This result differed from the tris(monochloropropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) distributions, which showed high concentrations in most cities, suggesting wide usage and large emissions in China in recent years. The highest TCPP and TCEP concentrations were observed in the summer, indicating that emission from local sources was an important factor controlling the levels in the air. This was not the case for BDE-209 and DBDPE, for which higher concentrations were found in winter. When bound to particulate matter due to low vapor pressure, these compounds may be more persistent in air, and temperature-dependent gas-particle partitioning was a key factor. Moreover, regional pollution and long-range transport had a significant influence on the seasonal distributions of BDE-209 and DBDPE, especially in cities (Guangzhou and Shanghai) close to electrical/electronic waste recycling sites. Residents in urban areas were exposed to higher levels of chlorinated OPFRs. This raises considerable concern, and an appropriate risk assessment is required. PMID:27539248

  12. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric-acid ion clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new-particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from < 2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3 (0.1 to 56 pptv), and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4] < 0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm/Δ n), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δ m/Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4] > 10. Positively

  13. On the composition of ammonia-sulfuric acid clusters during aerosol particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, S.; Franchin, A.; Bianchi, F.; Rondo, L.; Duplissy, J.; Kürten, A.; Ortega, I. K.; Metzger, A.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Dommen, J.; Dunne, E. M.; Ehn, M.; Gagné, S.; Ickes, L.; Junninen, H.; Hansel, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Kirkby, J.; Kupc, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtipalo, K.; Mathot, S.; Onnela, A.; Petäjä, T.; Riccobono, F.; Santos, F. D.; Sipilä, M.; Tomé, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Viisanen, Y.; Wagner, P. E.; Wimmer, D.; Curtius, J.; Donahue, N. M.; Baltensperger, U.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-05-01

    The formation of particles from precursor vapors is an important source of atmospheric aerosol. Research at the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) facility at CERN tries to elucidate which vapors are responsible for this new particle formation, and how in detail it proceeds. Initial measurement campaigns at the CLOUD stainless-steel aerosol chamber focused on investigating particle formation from ammonia (NH3) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4). Experiments were conducted in the presence of water, ozone and sulfur dioxide. Contaminant trace gases were suppressed at the technological limit. For this study, we mapped out the compositions of small NH3-H2SO4 clusters over a wide range of atmospherically relevant environmental conditions. We covered [NH3] in the range from <2 to 1400 pptv, [H2SO4] from 3.3 × 106 to 1.4 × 109 cm-3, and a temperature range from -25 to +20 °C. Negatively and positively charged clusters were directly measured by an atmospheric pressure interface time-of-flight (APi-TOF) mass spectrometer, as they initially formed from gas-phase NH3 and H2SO4, and then grew to larger clusters containing more than 50 molecules of NH3 and H2SO4, corresponding to mobility-equivalent diameters greater than 2 nm. Water molecules evaporate from these clusters during sampling and are not observed. We found that the composition of the NH3-H2SO4 clusters is primarily determined by the ratio of gas-phase concentrations [NH3] / [H2SO4], as well as by temperature. Pure binary H2O-H2SO4 clusters (observed as clusters of only H2SO4) only form at [NH3] / [H2SO4]<0.1 to 1. For larger values of [NH3] / [H2SO4], the composition of NH3-H2SO4 clusters was characterized by the number of NH3 molecules m added for each added H2SO4 molecule n (Δm / Δn), where n is in the range 4-18 (negatively charged clusters) or 1-17 (positively charged clusters). For negatively charged clusters, Δm / Δn saturated between 1 and 1.4 for [NH3] / [H2SO4]>10. Positively charged clusters grew on

  14. Turbulent Concentration of mm-Size Particles in the Protoplanetary Nebula: Scale-Dependent Cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Hartlep, T.

    2015-01-01

    The initial accretion of primitive bodies (here, asteroids in particular) from freely-floating nebula particles remains problematic. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" (or even a mm-to-cm-size barrier) in turbulent nebulae, making the preconditions for so-called "streaming instabilities" difficult to achieve even for so-called "lucky" particles. Even if growth by sticking could somehow breach the meter size barrier, turbulent nebulae present further obstacles through the 1-10km size range. On the other hand, nonturbulent nebulae form large asteroids too quickly to explain long spreads in formation times, or the dearth of melted asteroids. Theoretical understanding of nebula turbulence is itself in flux; recent models of MRI (magnetically-driven) turbulence favor low-or- no-turbulence environments, but purely hydrodynamic turbulence is making a comeback, with two recently discovered mechanisms generating robust turbulence which do not rely on magnetic fields at all. An important clue regarding planetesimal formation is an apparent 100km diameter peak in the pre-depletion, pre-erosion mass distribution of asteroids; scenarios leading directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects of this size, which avoid the problematic m-km size range, could be called "leapfrog" scenarios. The leapfrog scenario we have studied in detail involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in turbulence, which can under certain conditions shrink inexorably on 100-1000 orbit timescales and form 10-100km diameter sandpile planetesimals. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles. Thus, while they are arcane, turbulent concentration models acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. The typical sizes of planetesimals and the rate of their formation can be

  15. Ion beam shaping of Au nanoparticles in silica: Particle size and concentration dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Dawi, E. A.; Mink, M. P.; Vredenberg, A. M.; Habraken, F. H. P. M.; Rizza, G.

    2009-04-01

    Irradiation with swift heavy ions of spherical Au nanoparticles confined within a silica matrix shapes them into prolate nanorods and nanowires whose principal axes are aligned along the beam direction. In the present paper, we investigate the role that is played by the initial nanoparticle size and concentration in this so-called ion-shaping mechanism. We have produced silica films wherein Au nanoparticles with average diameters of 15, 30, and 45 nm were embedded within a single plane and have irradiated these films at 300 K at normal incidence with 18, 25, and 54 MeV Ag ions. We demonstrate the existence of both threshold and saturation fluences for the elongation effects mentioned. The values of these critical fluences depend both on the ion energy and the initial nanoparticle size. Moreover, we show that 45 nm Au particles are not deformed when irradiated with 18 MeV Ag ions, such that this value corresponds to an energy threshold for the deformation process. As far as the influence of the nanoparticle concentration on the shaping characteristics is concerned, we have found that above the critical irradiation fluence, the deformation effect becomes very sensitive to the initial concentration of the nanoparticles.

  16. Twice weekly intake of farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) positively influences lipoprotein concentration and particle size in overweight men and women.

    PubMed

    Raatz, Susan K; Johnson, LuAnn K; Rosenberger, Thad A; Picklo, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    The US Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend twice weekly fish intake. Farmed Atlantic salmon is a good source of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids which have positive lipid modifying effects; however, it is unknown whether these responses are dose-dependent. Our primary research objective was to determine the effect of dose-dependent intake of farmed Atlantic salmon on lipoprotein particle (P) size and concentration. We hypothesized that low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-P and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-P size and concentration would increase with salmon intake in a dose-dependent manner. Overweight, adult participants (n = 19) were enrolled in a cross-over designed clinical trial evaluating intake of farmed Atlantic salmon. In random order, participants were assigned to 90, 180, or 270 g of salmon twice weekly for 4-week dietary treatments. Following a 4- to 8-week washout, participants crossed over to another dose of fish intake until all treatments were completed. Plasma lipid concentrations were determined and serum lipoprotein concentrations and particle size were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. Intake of salmon reduced plasma and serum triglyceride (TG) concentrations and increased plasma HDL-C concentrations. The concentrations of large very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-P and chylomicron (CM)-P were reduced. Large LDL-P concentrations were increased in a dose-dependent manner. The mean size of VLDL-P was reduced and that of LDL was increased. Total TG was reduced as was the TG content of VLDL-P and CM-P. Twice weekly intake of farmed Atlantic salmon portions influences lipoprotein particle size and concentration in a manner associated with cardiovascular disease risk reduction. PMID:27632909

  17. A Stochastic Framework For Sediment Concentration Estimation By Accounting Random Arrival Processes Of Incoming Particles Into Receiving Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C.; Hung, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    This study attempts to apply queueing theory to develop a stochastic framework that could account for the random-sized batch arrivals of incoming sediment particles into receiving waters. Sediment particles, control volume, mechanics of sediment transport (such as mechanics of suspension, deposition and resuspension) are treated as the customers, service facility and the server respectively in queueing theory. In the framework, the stochastic diffusion particle tracking model (SD-PTM) and resuspension of particles are included to simulate the random transport trajectories of suspended particles. The most distinguished characteristic of queueing theory is that customers come to the service facility in a random manner. In analogy to sediment transport, this characteristic is adopted to model the random-sized batch arrival process of sediment particles including the random occurrences and random magnitude of incoming sediment particles. The random occurrences of arrivals are simulated by Poisson process while the number of sediment particles in each arrival can be simulated by a binominal distribution. Simulations of random arrivals and random magnitude are proposed individually to compare with the random-sized batch arrival simulations. Simulation results are a probabilistic description for discrete sediment transport through ensemble statistics (i.e. ensemble means and ensemble variances) of sediment concentrations and transport rates. Results reveal the different mechanisms of incoming particles will result in differences in the ensemble variances of concentrations and transport rates under the same mean incoming rate of sediment particles.

  18. Effect of ions on sulfuric acid-water binary particle formation: 2. Experimental data and comparison with QC-normalized classical nucleation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duplissy, J.; Merikanto, J.; Franchin, A.; Tsagkogeorgas, G.; Kangasluoma, J.; Wimmer, D.; Vuollekoski, H.; Schobesberger, S.; Lehtipalo, K.; Flagan, R. C.; Brus, D.; Donahue, N. M.; Vehkamäki, H.; Almeida, J.; Amorim, A.; Barmet, P.; Bianchi, F.; Breitenlechner, M.; Dunne, E. M.; Guida, R.; Henschel, H.; Junninen, H.; Kirkby, J.; Kürten, A.; Kupc, A.; Määttänen, A.; Makhmutov, V.; Mathot, S.; Nieminen, T.; Onnela, A.; Praplan, A. P.; Riccobono, F.; Rondo, L.; Steiner, G.; Tome, A.; Walther, H.; Baltensperger, U.; Carslaw, K. S.; Dommen, J.; Hansel, A.; Petäjä, T.; Sipilä, M.; Stratmann, F.; Vrtala, A.; Wagner, P. E.; Worsnop, D. R.; Curtius, J.; Kulmala, M.

    2016-02-01

    We report comprehensive, demonstrably contaminant-free measurements of binary particle formation rates by sulfuric acid and water for neutral and ion-induced pathways conducted in the European Organization for Nuclear Research Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets chamber. The recently developed Atmospheric Pressure interface-time of flight-mass spectrometer was used to detect contaminants in charged clusters and to identify runs free of any contaminants. Four parameters were varied to cover ambient conditions: sulfuric acid concentration (105 to 109 mol cm-3), relative humidity (11% to 58%), temperature (207 K to 299 K), and total ion concentration (0 to 6800 ions cm-3). Formation rates were directly measured with novel instruments at sizes close to the critical cluster size (mobility size of 1.3 nm to 3.2 nm). We compare our results with predictions from Classical Nucleation Theory normalized by Quantum Chemical calculation (QC-normalized CNT), which is described in a companion paper. The formation rates predicted by the QC-normalized CNT were extended from critical cluster sizes to measured sizes using the UHMA2 sectional particle microphysics model. Our results show, for the first time, good agreement between predicted and measured particle formation rates for the binary (neutral and ion-induced) sulfuric acid-water system. Formation rates increase with RH, sulfuric acid, and ion concentrations and decrease with temperature at fixed RH and sulfuric acid concentration. Under atmospheric conditions, neutral particle formation dominates at low temperatures, while ion-induced particle formation dominates at higher temperatures. The good agreement between the theory and our comprehensive data set gives confidence in using the QC-normalized CNT as a powerful tool to study neutral and ion-induced binary particle formation in atmospheric modeling.

  19. Concentrated ambient ultrafine particle exposure induces cardiac change in young healthy volunteers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to ambient ultrafine particles has been associated with cardiopulmonary toxicity and mortality. Adverse effects specifically linked to ultrafine particles include loss of sympathovagal balance and altered hemostasis. To characterize the effects of ultrafine particles in ...

  20. Raman scattering investigations of the interaction of a COV with pure and acid doped ice particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facq, S.; Oancea, A.; Focsa, C.; Chazallon, B.

    2009-04-01

    Ice present in polar stratosphere is as well a common component of the troposphere, particularly in cirrus clouds widespread in tropopause and upper troposphere region. With water droplets, ice constitutes the condensed matter that can interact with atmospheric trace gases via many different trapping processes (co-deposition i.e; incorporation during growing ice conditions, adsorption, freezing etc). The incorporation of trace gases in ice surface/volume can both affect the atmospheric chemistry and the ice structure and reactivity. This can therefore modify the nature and composition of the incorporated species in ice, or in the gas phase. Recently, field measurements have demonstrated the presence of nitric acid in ice particles from cirrus clouds(1,2) (concentration between 0.63 wt% and 2.5 wt %). Moreover, laboratory experiments have shown that the uptake of atmospheric trace gases can be enhanced up to 1 or 2 orders of magnitude in these doped ice particles. Among trace gases capable to interact with atmospheric condensed matter figure volatile organic compounds such as aldehydes, ketones and alcohols (ex: ethanol and methanol). They play an important role in the upper troposphere (3,4) and snowpack chemistry (5) as they can be easily photolysed, producing free radicals and so influence the oxidizing capacity and the ozone-budget of the atmosphere (3,4). The temperature range at which these physico-chemical processes occur extents between ~ 190 K and 273K. Interaction between ice and trace gases are therefore largely dependent on the ice surface properties as well as on the phase formation dynamic (crystalline or not). This study aims to examine and characterize the incorporation of a COV (ex: ethanol), at the surface or in the volume of ice formed by different growth mechanisms (vapour deposition or droplets freezing). Vibrational spectra of water OH and ethanol CH-spectral regions are analysed using confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy at different temperatures

  1. The effects of vehicle emissions and nucleation events on vertical particle concentration profiles around urban office buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang, T. N.; He, C.; Morawska, L.; Knibbs, L. D.; Falk, M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite its role in determining both indoor and outdoor human exposure to anthropogenic particles, there is limited information describing vertical profiles of particle concentrations in urban environments, especially for ultrafine particles. Furthermore, the results of the few studies performed have been inconsistent. As such this study aimed to assess the influence of vehicle emissions and nucleation formation on particle concentrations (PN and PM2.5) at different heights around three urban office buildings located next to busy roads in Brisbane, Australia, and place these results in the broader context of the existing literature. Two sets of instruments were used to simultaneously measure PN size distribution, PN and PM2.5 concentrations, respectively, for up to three weeks each at three office buildings. The results showed that both PN and PM2.5 concentrations around building envelope were influenced by vehicle emissions and new particle formation, and that they exhibited variability across the three different office buildings. During the nucleation event, PN concentrations increased (21-46%), while PM2.5 concentrations decreased (36-52%) with height at all three buildings. This study has shown an underappreciated role of nucleation in producing particles that can affect large numbers of people, due to the high density and occupancy of urban office buildings and the fact that the vast majority of people's time is spent indoors. These findings highlight important new information related to the previously overlooked role of particle formation in the urban atmosphere and its potential effects on selection of air intake locations and appropriate filter types when designing or upgrading mechanical ventilation systems in urban office buildings. The results also serve to better define particle behaviour and variability around building envelopes, which has implications for studies of both human exposure and particle dynamics.

  2. Seasonal variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations, new particle formation and atmospheric oxidation capacity at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quynh T.; Glasius, Marianne; Sørensen, Lise L.; Jensen, Bjarne; Skov, Henrik; Birmili, Wolfram; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Kristensson, Adam; Nøjgaard, Jacob K.; Massling, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    This work presents an analysis of the physical properties of sub-micrometer aerosol particles measured at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord (VRS), northeast Greenland, between July 2010 and February 2013. The study focuses on particle number concentrations, particle number size distributions and the occurrence of new particle formation (NPF) events and their seasonality in the high Arctic, where observations and characterization of such aerosol particle properties and corresponding events are rare and understanding of related processes is lacking.A clear accumulation mode was observed during the darker months from October until mid-May, which became considerably more pronounced during the prominent Arctic haze months from March to mid-May. In contrast, nucleation- and Aitken-mode particles were predominantly observed during the summer months. Analysis of wind direction and wind speed indicated possible contributions of marine sources from the easterly side of the station to the observed summertime particle number concentrations, while southwesterly to westerly winds dominated during the darker months. NPF events lasting from hours to days were mostly observed from June until August, with fewer events observed during the months with less sunlight, i.e., March, April, September and October. The results tend to indicate that ozone (O3) might be weakly anti-correlated with particle number concentrations of the nucleation-mode range (10-30 nm) in almost half of the NPF events, while no positive correlation was observed. Calculations of air mass back trajectories using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model for the NPF event days suggested that the onset or interruption of events could possibly be explained by changes in air mass origin. A map of event occurrence probability was computed, indicating that southerly air masses from over the Greenland Sea were more likely linked to those events.

  3. High concentrations of biological aerosol particles and ice nuclei during and after rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. Alex; Pöhlker, Christopher; Prenni, Anthony; DeMott, Paul; Mason, Ryan; Robinson, Niall; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Tobo, Yutaka; Després, Viviane; Garcia, Elvin; Gochis, David; Sinha, Bärbel; Day, Douglas; Andreae, Meinrat; Jimenez, Jose; Gallagher, Martin; Kreidenweis, Sonia; Bertram, Allan; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    Bioaerosols are relevant for public health and may play an important role in the climate system, but their atmospheric abundance, properties and sources are not well understood. Here we show that the concentration of airborne biological particles in a forest ecosystem increases dramatically during rain and that bioparticles are closely correlated with atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). The greatest increase of bioparticles and IN occurred in the size range of 2-6 µm, which is characteristic for bacterial aggregates and fungal spores. By DNA analysis we found high diversities of airborne bacteria and fungi, including human and plant pathogens (mildew, smut and rust fungi, molds, Enterobacteraceae, Pseudomonadaceae). In addition to known bacterial and fungal IN (Pseudomonas sp., Fusarium sporotrichioides), we discovered two species of IN-active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators (Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum). Our findings suggest that atmospheric bioaerosols, IN and rainfall are more tightly coupled than previously assumed.

  4. High concentrations of biological aerosol particles and ice nuclei during and after rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Pöhlker, C.; Prenni, A. J.; DeMott, P. J.; Mason, R. H.; Robinson, N. H.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Tobo, Y.; Després, V. R.; Garcia, E.; Gochis, D. J.; Harris, E.; Müller-Germann, I.; Ruzene, C.; Schmer, B.; Sinha, B.; Day, D. A.; Andreae, M. O.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gallagher, M.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Bertram, A. K.; Pöschl, U.

    2013-01-01

    Bioaerosols are relevant for public health and may play an important role in the climate system, but their atmospheric abundance, properties and sources are not well understood. Here we show that the concentration of airborne biological particles in a forest ecosystem increases dramatically during rain and that bioparticles are closely correlated with atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). The greatest increase of bioparticles and IN occurred in the size range of 2-6 μm, which is characteristic for bacterial aggregates and fungal spores. By DNA analysis we found high diversities of airborne bacteria and fungi, including human and plant pathogens (mildew, smut and rust fungi, molds, Enterobacteraceae, Pseudomonadaceae). In addition to known bacterial and fungal IN (Pseudomonas sp., Fusarium sporotrichioides), we discovered two species of IN-active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators (Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum). Our findings suggest that atmospheric bioaerosols, IN and rainfall are more tightly coupled than previously assumed.

  5. Feasibility of the Simultaneous Determination of Monomer Concentrations and Particle Size in Emulsion Polymerization Using in Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An immersion Raman probe was used in emulsion copolymerization reactions to measure monomer concentrations and particle sizes. Quantitative determination of monomer concentrations is feasible in two-monomer copolymerizations, but only the overall conversion could be measured by Raman spectroscopy in a four-monomer copolymerization. The feasibility of measuring monomer conversion and particle size was established using partial least-squares (PLS) calibration models. A simplified theoretical framework for the measurement of particle sizes based on photon scattering is presented, based on the elastic-sphere-vibration and surface-tension models. PMID:26900256

  6. Concentration and Particle Size of Airborne Toxic Algae (Brevetoxin) Derived from Ocean Red Tide Events

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Mcdonald, Jacob D.; Kracko, Dean; Irvin, C. Mitch; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H.; Henry, Michael S.; Bourdelaisa, Andrea; Naar, Jerome; Baden, Daniel G.

    2009-01-01

    Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico are formed by blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces brevetoxins (PbTx). Brevetoxins can be transferred from water to air in the wind-powered whitecapped waves during red tide episodes. Inhalation exposure to marine aerosol containing PbTx causes respiratory problems. A liquid chromatograph/ tandem mass spectrometric method was developed for the detection and quantitation of several PbTxs in ambient samples collected during red tide events. This method was complemented by a previously developed antibody assay that analyzes the entire class of PbTx compounds. The method showed good linearity, accuracy, and reproducibility, allowing quantitation of PbTx compounds in the 10 pg/m3 range. Air concentrations of PbTxs and brevenal for individual samples ranged from 0.01 to 80 ng/m3. The particle size showed a single mode with a mass median diameter between 6 and 10 μm, which was consistent for all of the PbTx species that were measured. Our results imply that individual PbTxs were from the same marine aerosol or from marine aerosol that was produced from the same process. The particle size indicated the likelihood of high deposition efficiency in the respiratory tract with the majority of aerosol deposited in the upper airways and small but not insignificant deposition in the lower airways. PMID:15954221

  7. Impurity identifications, concentrations and particle fluxes from spectral measurements of the EXTRAP T2R plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menmuir, S.; Kuldkepp, M.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-10-01

    An absolute intensity calibrated 0.5 m spectrometer with optical multi-channel analyser detector was used to observe the visible-UV radiation from the plasma in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch experiment. Spectral lines were identified indicating the presence of oxygen, chromium, iron and molybdenum impurities in the hydrogen plasma. Certain regions of interest were examined in more detail and at different times in the plasma discharge. Impurity concentration calculations were made using the absolute intensities of lines of OIV and OV measured at 1-2 ms into the discharge generating estimates of the order of 0.2% of ne in the central region rising to 0.7% of ne at greater radii for OIV and 0.3% rising to 0.6% for OV. Edge electron temperatures of 0.5-5 eV at electron densities of 5-10×1011 cm-3 were calculated from the measured relative intensities of hydrogen Balmer lines. The absolute intensities of hydrogen lines and of multiplets of neutral chromium and molybdenum were used to determine particle fluxes (at 4-5 ms into the plasma) of the order 1×1016, 7×1013 and 3×1013 particles cm-2 s-1, respectively.

  8. Comparison of Satellite Observations of Aerosol Optical Depth to Surface Monitor Fine Particle Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Mary M.; AlSaadi, Jassim A.; Neil, Doreen O.; Pierce, Robert B.; Pippin, Margartet R.; Roell, Marilee M.; Kittaka, Chieko; Szykman, James J.

    2004-01-01

    Under NASA's Earth Science Applications Program, the Infusing satellite Data into Environmental Applications (IDEA) project examined the relationship between satellite observations and surface monitors of air pollutants to facilitate a more capable and integrated observing network. This report provides a comparison of satellite aerosol optical depth to surface monitor fine particle concentration observations for the month of September 2003 at more than 300 individual locations in the continental US. During September 2003, IDEA provided prototype, near real-time data-fusion products to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) directed toward improving the accuracy of EPA s next-day Air Quality Index (AQI) forecasts. Researchers from NASA Langley Research Center and EPA used data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument combined with EPA ground network data to create a NASA-data-enhanced Forecast Tool. Air quality forecasters used this tool to prepare their forecasts of particle pollution, or particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), for the next-day AQI. The archived data provide a rich resource for further studies and analysis. The IDEA project uses data sets and models developed for tropospheric chemistry research to assist federal, state, and local agencies in making decisions concerning air quality management to protect public health.

  9. Concentration and particle size of airborne toxic algae (brevetoxin) derived from ocean red tide events.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; McDonald, Jacob D; Kracko, Dean; Irvin, C Mitch; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H; Henry, Michael S; Bourdelaisa, Andrea; Naar, Jerome; Baden, Daniel G

    2005-05-15

    Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico are formed by blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces brevetoxins (PbTx). Brevetoxins can be transferred from water to air in the wind-powered whitecapped waves during red tide episodes. Inhalation exposure to marine aerosol containing PbTx causes respiratory problems. A liquid chromatograph/ tandem mass spectrometric method was developed for the detection and quantitation of several PbTxs in ambient samples collected during red tide events. This method was complemented by a previously developed antibody assay that analyzes the entire class of PbTx compounds. The method showed good linearity, accuracy, and reproducibility, allowing quantitation of PbTx compounds in the 10 pg/m3 range. Air concentrations of PbTxs and brevenal for individual samples ranged from 0.01 to 80 ng/m3. The particle size showed a single mode with a mass median diameter between 6 and 10 microm, which was consistent for all of the PbTx species that were measured. Our results imply that individual PbTxs were from the same marine aerosol or from marine aerosol that was produced from the same process. The particle size indicated the likelihood of high deposition efficiency in the respiratory tract with the majority of aerosol deposited in the upper airways and small but not insignificant deposition in the lower airways. PMID:15954221

  10. Determination of effect factor for effective parameter on saccharification of lignocellulosic material by concentrated acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghili, Sina; Nodeh, Ali Arasteh

    2015-12-01

    Tamarisk usage as a new group of lignocelluloses material to produce fermentable sugars in bio ethanol process was studied. The overall aim of this work was to establish the optimum condition for acid hydrolysis of this new material and a mathematical model predicting glucose release as a function of operation variable. Sulfuric acid concentration in the range of 20 to 60%(w/w), process temperature between 60 to 95oC, hydrolysis time from 120 to 240 min and solid content 5,10,15%(w/w) were used as hydrolysis conditions. HPLC was used to analysis of the product. This analysis indicated that glucose was the main fermentable sugar and was increase with time, temperature and solid content and acid concentration was a parabola influence in glucose production. The process was modeled by a quadratic equation. Curve study and model were found that 42% acid concentration, 15 % solid content and 90oC were optimum condition.

  11. Triggering of Myocardial Infarction by Increased Ambient Fine Particle Concentration: Effect Modification by Source Direction

    PubMed Central

    Hopke, Philip K.; Kane, Cathleen; Utell, Mark J.; Chalupa, David C.; Kumar, Pramod; Ling, Frederick; Gardner, Blake; Rich, David Q.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previously, we reported a 18% increased odds of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) associated with each 7.1 µg/m3 increase in PM2.5 concentration in the hour prior to MI onset. We found no association with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). We examined if this association was modified by PM2.5 source direction. Methods We used the NOAA HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to calculate each hourly air mass location for the 24 hours before each case or control time period in our previous PM2.5/STEMI case-crossover analysis. Using these data on patients with STEMI (n=338), hourly PM2.5 concentrations, and case-crossover methods, we evaluated whether our PM2.5/STEMI association was modified by whether the air mass passed through each of the 8 cardinal wind direction sectors in the previous 24 hours. Results When the air mass passed through the West-Southwest direction (WSW) any time in the past 24 hours, the odds of STEMI associated with each 7.1 µg/m3 increase in PM2.5 concentration in the previous hour (OR=1.27; 95% CI=1.08, 1.22) was statistically significantly (p=0.01) greater than the relative odds of STEMI associated with increased PM2.5 concentration when the wind arrived from any other direction (OR=0.99; 95% CI=0.80, 1.22). We found no other effect modification by any other source direction. Further, relative odds estimates were largest when the time spent in the WSW was 8-16 hours, compared to ≤7 hours or 17-24 hours, suggesting that particles arising from sources in this direction were more potent in triggering STEMIs. Conclusions Since relative odds estimates were higher when the air mass passed through the WSW octant in the past 24 hours, there may be specific components of the ambient aerosol that are more potent in triggering STEMIs. This direction is associated with substantial emissions from coal-fired power plants and other industrial sources of the Ohio River Valley, many of which are

  12. Characterization and surface properties of amino-acid-modified carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite particles.

    PubMed

    Jack, Kevin S; Vizcarra, Timothy G; Trau, Matt

    2007-11-20

    The surface properties (nature, strength, and stability of interaction of functional groups) and bulk morphologies of a series of amino-acid-functionalized carbonate-containing hydroxyapatite (CHA) particles were investigated. It was found that the amino acids were both occluded in and presented on the surface of the CHA particles. Furthermore, their presence enhanced particle colloidal stability by retardation of Ostwald ripening and in some cases increasing the magnitude of the zeta-potential. Measurements of adsorption isotherms and zeta-potential titrations have shown that the amino-acid-surface interactions are weak and reversible at pH 9 and consistent with a model in which the carboxyl terminus interacts with calcium ions in the CHA lattice. Complexities in adsorption behavior are discussed in terms of different adsorption mechanisms that may be prevalent at different pHs.

  13. Trends in elemental concentrations of fine particles at remote sites in the United States of America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldred, Robert A.; Cahill, Thomas A.

    The University of California at Davis has been monitoring particulate concentrations in remote sites throughout the United States of America since 1979 in networks operated for the National Park Service and the Environmental Protection Agency. Twelve sites in remote class I visibility areas have almost complete records from June 1982 to August 1992, seven in the southwest, three in the northwest, and two in the east. During this period, two samples of fine particles (0-2.5 μm) on Teflon filters were collected every week and analysed for elemental concentration by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). This paper will examine the historical trends for sulfur, zinc, lead, and the soil elements. Measurements during the past four years have verified that the sulfur is present as sulfate. In the southwest, 80% of the sulfur trends in spring, summer and fall decreased, while most of the winter trends increased. The annual trends decreased at six of the seven sites. The trends in the northwest increased slightly. The two eastern sites had the most important trends, with significant increases of almost 4% per year in summer, 1-3% increases in spring and fall, and 2% decreases in winter. The annual increases were between 2 and 3%. Generally there were no significant trends for zinc and the soil elements. Lead at all sites decreased sharply through 1986, corresponding to the shift to unleaded gasoline, but has since leveled off at around 18% of the 1982 means. The most important conclusion of this study is that through the use of stable sampling and analytical protocols, we have been able to determine statistically significant historical trends of as small as 1-2% per year for sites with 10-year records.

  14. Elevated plasma bile acid concentrations in two sisters with tyrosinaemia type I.

    PubMed

    Sass, J O; Skladal, D

    2000-02-01

    A 21-month-old girl suffering from tyrosinaemia type I and undergoing treatment with 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoro-methylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC) presented with pruritus which rapidly ceased with administration of high doses of ursodeoxycholic acid. Determination of plasma bile acids revealed clearly elevated levels both in samples taken before and after the onset of NTBC therapy, thus indicating, that the increase was not related to the administration of this drug. This result is corroborated by data from the first patient's newborn sister, diagnosed with the same disease, who showed elevated plasma bile acid concentrations in all samples examined, except for the cord plasma. This is the first report on altered bile acid concentrations in tyrosinaemia type I, and underlines the need for thorough investigation of bile acid metabolism in this disease.

  15. Comparison of XAD macroporous resins for the concentration of fulvic acid from aqueous solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    Five macroreticular, nonlonlc AmberlHe XAD resins were evaluated for concentration and Isolation of fulvlc acid from aqueous solution. The capacity of each resin for fulvlc acid was measured by both batch and column techniques. Elution efficiencies were determined by desorptlon with 0.1 N NaOH. Highest recoveries were obtained with the acrylic ester resins which proved to be most efficient for both adsorption and elution of fulvlc acid. Compared to the acrylic ester resins, usefulness of the styrene dvlnybenzene resins to remove fulvlc acid is limited because of slow diffusion-controlled adsorption and formation of charge-transfer complexes, which hinders elution. ?? 1979 American Chemical Society.

  16. Size Distribution Studies on Sulfuric Acid-Water Particles in a Photolytic Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullahi, H. U.; Kunz, J. C.; Hanson, D. R.; Thao, S.; Vences, J.

    2015-12-01

    The size distribution of particles composed of sulfuric acid and water were measured in a Photolytic cylindrical Flow Reactor (PhoFR, inner diameter 5 cm, length ~ 100 cm). In the reactor, nitrous acid, water and sulfur dioxide gases along with ultraviolet light produced sulfuric acid. The particles formed from these vapors were detected with a scanning mobility particle spectrometer equipped with a diethylene glycol condensation particle counter (Jiang et al. 2011). For a set of standard conditions, particles attained a log-normal distribution with a peak diameter of 6 nm, and a total number of about 3x105 cm-3. The distributions show that ~70 % of the particles are between 4 and 8 nm diameter (lnσ ~ 0.37). These standard conditions are: 296 K, 25% relative humidity, total flow = 3 sLpm, ~10 ppbv HONO, SO2 in excess. With variations of relative humidity, the total particle number varied strongly, with a power relationship of ~3.5, and the size distributions showed a slight increase in peak diameter with relative humidity, increasing about 1 nm from 8 to 33 % relative humidity. Variations of HONO at a constant light intensity (wavelength of ~ 360 nm) were performed and particle size and total number changed dramatically. Size distributions also changed drastically with variations of light intensity, accomplished by turning on/off some of the black light flourescent bulbs that illuminated the flow reactor. Comparisons of these size distributions to recently published nucleation experiments (e.g. Zollner et al., Glasoe et al.) as well as to simulations of PhoFR reveal important details about the levels of sulfuric acid present in PhoFR as well as possible base contaminants.

  17. Products of the radical initiated oxidation of model solid and liquid organic acid particles in simulated "clean" and "polluted" environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum, L. H.; Smith, G. D.

    2009-05-01

    Using a flow tube reactor coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer, the Cl-initiated oxidation of solid and supercooled liquid organic acid particles were investigated at 293 K. In creating aerosols of species which are able to be supercooled or solid at room temperature, it is possible to distinguish the effect of phase on particle reactivity and product formation. In a clean atmosphere, where there are negligible concentrations of NOx, the primary fate of peroxy radicals (formed from H-abstraction by Cl and OH radicals in the presence of O2) are their reactions to form ketone and alcohol products. These products are then able to undergo further oxidation to form multiply oxidized products. The formation of low-molecular weight volatile species may also be important in the oxidative aging of organic aerosols, however neither the mechanism of their formation nor their formation yields are well understood. We have shown that, for equivalent Cl exposures, more multiply-oxidized species as well as more low-molecular-weight species were created from the oxidation of solid particles than from liquid particles. The findings from these studies suggest that slower diffusion of the oxidation products in solid particles confines them to the surface where they continue to react with Cl radicals producing more-highly- functionalized products which may decompose more readily. By introducing nitric oxide to the flow tube reaction system, we show that in a polluted atmosphere, where NOx is present in significant concentrations, organic nitrate formation may become important on the surface of solid particles but not liquid particles as the RO2 are confined to the surface of solid particles (causing a enhanced localized concentration of RO2) where they may then react with ambient nitric oxide through the reaction RO2 + NO → RO2NO* → RONO2. These experiments of these model systems indicate that particle phase could be important in determining how organic aerosols

  18. Facile preparation of core@shell and concentration-gradient spinel particles for Li-ion battery cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Naito, Makio

    2015-02-01

    Core@shell and concentration-gradient particles have attracted much attention as improved cathodes for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, most of their preparation routes have employed a precisely-controlled co-precipitation method. Here, we report a facile preparation route of core@shell and concentration-gradient spinel particles by dry powder processing. The core@shell particles composed of the MnO2 core and the Li(Ni,Mn)2O4 spinel shell are prepared by mechanical treatment using an attrition-type mill, whereas the concentration-gradient spinel particles with an average composition of LiNi0.32Mn1.68O4 are produced by calcination of their core@shell particles as a precursor. The concentration-gradient LiNi0.32Mn1.68O4 spinel cathode exhibits the high discharge capacity of 135.3 mA h g-1, the wide-range plateau at a high voltage of 4.7 V and the cyclability with a capacity retention of 99.4% after 20 cycles. Thus, the facile preparation route of the core@shell and concentration-gradient particles may provide a new opportunity for the discovery and investigation of functional materials as well as for the cathode materials for LIBs.

  19. Corona ions from overhead transmission voltage powerlines: effect on direct current electric field and ambient particle concentration levels.

    PubMed

    J-Fatokun, Folasade; Jayaratne, Rohan; Morawska, Lidia; Birtwhistle, David; Rachman, Rihandanu; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2010-01-01

    Along with their essential role in electricity transmission and distribution, some powerlines also generate large concentrations of corona ions. This study aimed at the comprehensive investigation of corona ions, vertical direct current electric field (dc e-field), ambient aerosol particle charge, and particle number concentration levels in the proximity of some high/subtransmission voltage powerlines. The influence of meteorology on the instantaneous value of these parameters and the possible existence of links or associations between the parameters measured were also statistically investigated. The presence of positive and negative polarities of corona ions was associated with variation in the mean vertical dc e-field, ambient ion, and particle charge concentration level. Though these variations increased with wind speed, their values also decreased with distance from the powerlines. Predominately positive polarities of ions were recorded up to a distance of 150 m (with the maximum values recorded 50 m downwind of the powerlines). At 200 m from the source, negative ions predominated. Particle number concentration levels, however, remained relatively constant (10(3) particle cm(-3)), irrespective of the sampling site and distance from the powerlines. Meteorological factors of temperature, humidity, and wind direction showed no influence on the electrical parameters measured. The study also discovered that e-field measurements were not necessarily a true representation of the ground-level ambient ion/particle charge concentrations.

  20. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    PubMed

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  1. Optimal Viscosity and Particle Shape of Hyaluronic Acid Filler as a Scaffold for Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Yeol; Namgoong, Sik; Han, Seung-Kyu; Won, Chang-Hoon; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2015-07-01

    The authors previously reported that cultured human fibroblasts suspended in a hyaluronic acid filler can produce human dermal matrices with extended in vivo stability in animal and clinical studies. The present study was undertaken to determine the optimal viscosity and particle shape of hyaluronic acid filler as a scaffold for cultured human dermal fibroblasts to enhance the maximal viability of injected cells. The fibroblasts were suspended in either 1 of 3 hyaluronic acid viscosities at 2 different particle shapes. The viscosities used in this study were low (600,000-800,000 centipoises), moderate (2,000,000-4,000,000 centipoises), and high (8,000,000-12,000,000 centipoises). The particle shape was evaluated by testing round and irregular shapes. The fibroblast mixed bioimplants were injected into the back of individual athymic nude mice. The levels of type I collagen were measured using fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) and immunohistochemical staining at 16 weeks after the injections. Results of FACS demonstrated that the mean cell ratio with human collagens in the moderate viscosity group was greater than those of control, low, and high viscosity groups. An immunohistochemical study showed similar results. The moderate viscosity group demonstrated the highest positive staining of human collagens. However, there were no significa