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Sample records for acid consensus crac

  1. Molecular mechanisms of protein-cholesterol interactions in plasma membranes: Functional distinction between topological (tilted) and consensus (CARC/CRAC) domains.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Di Scala, Coralie; Baier, Carlos J; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2016-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms that control the multiple possible modes of protein association with membrane cholesterol are remarkably convergent. These mechanisms, which include hydrogen bonding, CH-π stacking and dispersion forces, are used by a wide variety of extracellular proteins (e.g. microbial or amyloid) and membrane receptors. Virus fusion peptides penetrate the membrane of host cells with a tilted orientation that is compatible with a transient interaction with cholesterol; this tilted orientation is also characteristic of the process of insertion of amyloid proteins that subsequently form oligomeric pores in the plasma membrane of brain cells. Membrane receptors that are associated with cholesterol generally display linear consensus binding motifs (CARC and CRAC) characterized by a triad of basic (Lys/Arg), aromatic (Tyr/phe) and aliphatic (Leu/Val) amino acid residues. In some cases, the presence of both CARC and CRAC within the same membrane-spanning domain allows the simultaneous binding of two cholesterol molecules, one in each membrane leaflet. In this review the molecular basis and the functional significance of the different modes of protein-cholesterol interactions in plasma membranes are discussed.

  2. CRAC channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is an important Ca2+ influx pathway in many non-excitable and some excitable cells. It is regulated by the filling state of intracellular Ca2+ stores, notably the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Reduction in [Ca2+]ER results in activation of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels that mediate sustained Ca2+ influx which is required for many cell functions as well as refilling of Ca2+ stores. The Ca2+ release activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel is the best characterized SOC channel with well-defined electrophysiological properties. In recent years, the molecular components of the CRAC channel, long mysterious, have been defined. ORAI1 (or CRACM1) acts as the pore-forming subunit of the CRAC channel in the plasma membrane. Stromal interaction molecule (STIM) 1 is localized in the ER, senses [Ca2+]ER, and activates the CRAC channel upon store depletion by binding to ORAI1. Both proteins are widely expressed in many tissues in both human and mouse consistent with the widespread prevalence of SOCE and CRAC channel currents in many cells types. CRAC channelopathies in human patients with mutations in STIM1 and ORAI1 are characterized by abolished CRAC channel currents, lack of SOCE and—clinically—immunodeficiency, congenital myopathy, and anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia. This article reviews the role of ORAI and STIM proteins for SOCE and CRAC channel function in a variety of cell types and tissues and compares the phenotypes of ORAI1 and STIM1-deficient human patients and mice with targeted deletion of Orai and Stim genes. PMID:20111871

  3. Characterization of Putative Cholesterol Recognition/Interaction Amino Acid Consensus-Like Motif of Campylobacter jejuni Cytolethal Distending Toxin C

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chih-Ho; Lai, Cheng-Kuo; Lin, Ying-Ju; Hung, Chiu-Lien; Chu, Chia-Han; Feng, Chun-Lung; Chang, Chia-Shuo; Su, Hong-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) produced by Campylobacter jejuni comprises a heterotrimeric complex formed by CdtA, CdtB, and CdtC. Among these toxin subunits, CdtA and CdtC function as essential proteins that mediate toxin binding to cytoplasmic membranes followed by delivery of CdtB into the nucleus. The binding of CdtA/CdtC to the cell surface is mediated by cholesterol, a major component in lipid rafts. Although the putative cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain of CDT has been reported from several bacterial pathogens, the protein regions contributing to CDT binding to cholesterol in C. jejuni remain unclear. Here, we selected a potential CRAC-like region present in the CdtC from C. jejuni for analysis. Molecular modeling showed that the predicted functional domain had the shape of a hydrophobic groove, facilitating cholesterol localization to this domain. Mutation of a tyrosine residue in the CRAC-like region decreased direct binding of CdtC to cholesterol rather than toxin intermolecular interactions and led to impaired CDT intoxication. These results provide a molecular link between C. jejuni CdtC and membrane-lipid rafts through the CRAC-like region, which contributes to toxin recognition and interaction with cholesterol. PMID:23762481

  4. Effect of the CRAC Peptide, VLNYYVW, on mPTP Opening in Rat Brain and Liver Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Azarashvili, Tamara; Krestinina, Olga; Baburina, Yulia; Odinokova, Irina; Akatov, Vladimir; Beletsky, Igor; Lemasters, John; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2016-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO; 18 kDa) is a high-affinity cholesterol-binding protein located in the outer membrane of mitochondria. A domain in the C-terminus of TSPO was characterized as the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC). The ability of the CRAC domain to bind to cholesterol led us to hypothesize that this peptide may participate in the regulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Herein, we report the effect of the synthetic CRAC peptide, VLNYYVW, on mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. It was found that the CRAC peptide alone prevents the mPTP from opening, as well as the release of apoptotic factors (cytochrome c, AIF, and EndoG) in rat brain mitochondria (RBM). Co-incubation of CRAC, together with the TSPO drug ligand, PK 11195, resulted in the acceleration of mPTP opening and in the increase of apoptotic factor release. VLNYYVW did not induce swelling in rat liver mitochondria (RLM). 3,17,19-androsten-5-triol (19-Atriol; an inhibitor of the cholesterol-binding activity of the CRAC peptide) alone and in combination with the peptide was able to stimulate RLM swelling, which was Ca2+- and CsA-sensitive. Additionally, a combination of 19-Atriol with 100 nM PK 11195 or with 100 µM PK 11195 displayed the opposite effect: namely, the addition of 19-Atriol with 100 µM PK 11195 in a suspension of RLM suppressed the Ca2+-induced swelling of RLM by 40%, while the presence of 100 nM PK 11195 with 19-Atriol enhanced the swelling of RLM by 60%. Taken together, these data suggest the participation of the TSPO’s CRAC domain in the regulation of permeability transition. PMID:27983605

  5. A Cholesterol Recognition Amino Acid Consensus Domain in GP64 Fusion Protein Facilitates Anchoring of Baculovirus to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Asanov, Alexander; Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R.; Sampieri, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Baculoviridae is a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses that selectively infect insects. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is the best-studied baculovirus from the family. Many studies over the last several years have shown that AcMNPV can enter a wide variety of mammalian cells and deliver genetic material for foreign gene expression. While most animal viruses studied so far have developed sophisticated mechanisms to selectively infect specific cells and tissues in an organism, AcMNPV can penetrate and deliver foreign genes into most cells studied to this date. The details about the mechanisms of internalization have been partially described. In the present study, we have identified a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain present in the AcMNPV envelope fusion protein GP64. We demonstrated the association of a CRAC domain with cholesterol, which is important to facilitate the anchoring of the virus at the mammalian cell membrane. Furthermore, this initial anchoring favors AcMNPV endocytosis via a dynamin- and clathrin-dependent mechanism. Under these conditions, efficient baculovirus-driven gene expression is obtained. In contrast, when cholesterol is reduced from the plasma membrane, AcMNPV enters the cell via a dynamin- and clathrin-independent mechanism. The result of using this alternative internalization pathway is a reduced level of baculovirus-driven gene expression. This study is the first to document the importance of a novel CRAC domain in GP64 and its role in modulating gene delivery in AcMNPV. PMID:23986592

  6. A cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus domain in GP64 fusion protein facilitates anchoring of baculovirus to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Luz-Madrigal, Agustin; Asanov, Alexander; Camacho-Zarco, Aldo R; Sampieri, Alicia; Vaca, Luis

    2013-11-01

    Baculoviridae is a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses that selectively infect insects. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) is the best-studied baculovirus from the family. Many studies over the last several years have shown that AcMNPV can enter a wide variety of mammalian cells and deliver genetic material for foreign gene expression. While most animal viruses studied so far have developed sophisticated mechanisms to selectively infect specific cells and tissues in an organism, AcMNPV can penetrate and deliver foreign genes into most cells studied to this date. The details about the mechanisms of internalization have been partially described. In the present study, we have identified a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain present in the AcMNPV envelope fusion protein GP64. We demonstrated the association of a CRAC domain with cholesterol, which is important to facilitate the anchoring of the virus at the mammalian cell membrane. Furthermore, this initial anchoring favors AcMNPV endocytosis via a dynamin- and clathrin-dependent mechanism. Under these conditions, efficient baculovirus-driven gene expression is obtained. In contrast, when cholesterol is reduced from the plasma membrane, AcMNPV enters the cell via a dynamin- and clathrin-independent mechanism. The result of using this alternative internalization pathway is a reduced level of baculovirus-driven gene expression. This study is the first to document the importance of a novel CRAC domain in GP64 and its role in modulating gene delivery in AcMNPV.

  7. Interaction of mammalian seminal plasma protein PDC-109 with cholesterol: implications for a putative CRAC domain.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Silvia; Müller, Karin; Bittman, Robert; Herrmann, Andreas; Müller, Peter

    2010-10-26

    Seminal plasma proteins of the fibronectin type II (Fn2) family modulate mammalian spermatogenesis by triggering the release of the lipids phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol from sperm cells. Whereas the specific interaction of these proteins with phosphatidylcholine is well-understood, their selectivity for cholesterol is unknown. To characterize the interaction between the bovine Fn2 protein PDC-109 and cholesterol, we have investigated the effect of PDC-109 on the dynamics of fluorescent cholesterol analogues in lipid vesicles by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. The data show that PDC-109 decreases the rotational mobility of cholesterol within the membrane and that the extent of this impact depends on the cholesterol structure, indicating a specific influence of PDC-109 on cholesterol. We propose that the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) regions of PDC-109 are involved in the interaction with cholesterol.

  8. STIM1 activates CRAC channels through rotation of the pore helix to open a hydrophobic gate

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Megumi; Yeung, Priscilla S.-W.; Ing, Christopher E.; McNally, Beth A.; Pomès, Régis; Prakriya, Murali

    2017-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels constitute a major pathway for Ca2+ influx and mediate many essential signalling functions in animal cells, yet how they open remains elusive. Here, we investigate the gating mechanism of the human CRAC channel Orai1 by its activator, stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1). We find that two rings of pore-lining residues, V102 and F99, work together to form a hydrophobic gate. Mutations of these residues to polar amino acids produce channels with leaky gates that conduct ions in the resting state. STIM1-mediated channel activation occurs through rotation of the pore helix, which displaces the F99 residues away from the pore axis to increase pore hydration, allowing ions to flow through the V102-F99 hydrophobic band. Pore helix rotation by STIM1 also explains the dynamic coupling between CRAC channel gating and ion selectivity. This hydrophobic gating mechanism has implications for CRAC channel function, pharmacology and disease-causing mutations. PMID:28220789

  9. STIM1 activates CRAC channels through rotation of the pore helix to open a hydrophobic gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Megumi; Yeung, Priscilla S.-W.; Ing, Christopher E.; McNally, Beth A.; Pomès, Régis; Prakriya, Murali

    2017-02-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels constitute a major pathway for Ca2+ influx and mediate many essential signalling functions in animal cells, yet how they open remains elusive. Here, we investigate the gating mechanism of the human CRAC channel Orai1 by its activator, stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1). We find that two rings of pore-lining residues, V102 and F99, work together to form a hydrophobic gate. Mutations of these residues to polar amino acids produce channels with leaky gates that conduct ions in the resting state. STIM1-mediated channel activation occurs through rotation of the pore helix, which displaces the F99 residues away from the pore axis to increase pore hydration, allowing ions to flow through the V102-F99 hydrophobic band. Pore helix rotation by STIM1 also explains the dynamic coupling between CRAC channel gating and ion selectivity. This hydrophobic gating mechanism has implications for CRAC channel function, pharmacology and disease-causing mutations.

  10. How cholesterol interacts with membrane proteins: an exploration of cholesterol-binding sites including CRAC, CARC, and tilted domains.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells contains several types of lipids displaying high biochemical variability in both their apolar moiety (e.g., the acyl chain of glycerolipids) and their polar head (e.g., the sugar structure of glycosphingolipids). Among these lipids, cholesterol is unique because its biochemical variability is almost exclusively restricted to the oxidation of its polar -OH group. Although generally considered the most rigid membrane lipid, cholesterol can adopt a broad range of conformations due to the flexibility of its isooctyl chain linked to the polycyclic sterane backbone. Moreover, cholesterol is an asymmetric molecule displaying a planar α face and a rough β face. Overall, these structural features open up a number of possible interactions between cholesterol and membrane lipids and proteins, consistent with the prominent regulatory functions that this unique lipid exerts on membrane components. The aim of this review is to describe how cholesterol interacts with membrane lipids and proteins at the molecular/atomic scale, with special emphasis on transmembrane domains of proteins containing either the consensus cholesterol-binding motifs CRAC and CARC or a tilted peptide. Despite their broad structural diversity, all these domains bind cholesterol through common molecular mechanisms, leading to the identification of a subset of amino acid residues that are overrepresented in both linear and three-dimensional membrane cholesterol-binding sites.

  11. Balloon test project: Cosmic Ray Antimatter Calorimeter (CRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, J. C.; Dhenain, G.; Goret, P.; Jorand, J.; Masse, P.; Mestreau, P.; Petrou, N.; Robin, A.

    1984-01-01

    Cosmic ray observations from balloon flights are discussed. The cosmic ray antimatter calorimeter (CRAC) experiment attempts to measure the flux of antimatter in the 200-600 Mev/m energy range and the isotopes of light elements between 600 and 1,000 Mev/m.

  12. Multiple developmental roles for CRAC, a cytosolic regulator of adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Shaulsky, G; Kuspa, A

    1999-04-01

    Receptor-mediated activation of adenylyl cyclase (ACA) in Dictyostelium requires CRAC protein. Upon translocation to the membrane, this pleckstrin homology (PH) domain protein stimulates ACA and thereby mediates developmental aggregation. CRAC may also have roles later in development since CRAC-null cells can respond to chemotactic signals and participate in developmental aggregation when admixed with wild-type cells, but they do not complete development within such chimeras. To test whether the role of CRAC in postaggregative development is related to the activation of ACA, chemotactic aggregation was bypassed in CRAC-null cells by activating the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). While such strains formed mounds, they did not complete fruiting body morphogenesis or form spores. Expression of CRAC in the prespore cells of these strains rescued sporulation and fruiting body formation. This later function of CRAC does not appear to require its PH domain since the C-terminal portion of the protein (CRAC-DeltaPH) can substitute for full-length CRAC in promoting spore cell formation and morphogenesis. No detectable ACA activation was observed in any of the CRAC-null strains rescued by PKA activation and expression of CRAC-DeltaPH. Finally, we found that the development of CRAC-null ACA-null double mutants could be rescued by the activation of PKA together with the expression of CRAC-DeltaPH. Thus, there appears to be a required function for CRAC in postaggregative development that is independent of its previously described function in the ACA activation pathway.

  13. Is There Scientific Consensus on Acid Rain? -- Excerpts from Six Governmental Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Education Report and Newsletter, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Compiles a series of direct quotations from six governmental reports that reflect a scientific consensus on major aspects of acid deposition. Presents the statements in a question and answer format. Also reviews the sources, extent, and effects of acid rain. (ML)

  14. CRAC: an integrated approach to the analysis of RNA-seq reads

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A large number of RNA-sequencing studies set out to predict mutations, splice junctions or fusion RNAs. We propose a method, CRAC, that integrates genomic locations and local coverage to enable such predictions to be made directly from RNA-seq read analysis. A k-mer profiling approach detects candidate mutations, indels and splice or chimeric junctions in each single read. CRAC increases precision compared with existing tools, reaching 99:5% for splice junctions, without losing sensitivity. Importantly, CRAC predictions improve with read length. In cancer libraries, CRAC recovered 74% of validated fusion RNAs and predicted novel recurrent chimeric junctions. CRAC is available at http://crac.gforge.inria.fr. PMID:23537109

  15. Calculations of reactor-accident consequences, Version 2. CRAC2: computer code user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, L.T.; Johnson, J.D.; Blond, R.M.

    1983-02-01

    The CRAC2 computer code is a revision of the Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences computer code, CRAC, developed for the Reactor Safety Study. The CRAC2 computer code incorporates significant modeling improvements in the areas of weather sequence sampling and emergency response, and refinements to the plume rise, atmospheric dispersion, and wet deposition models. New output capabilities have also been added. This guide is to facilitate the informed and intelligent use of CRAC2. It includes descriptions of the input data, the output results, the file structures, control information, and five sample problems.

  16. Analysis of uncertainties in CRAC2 calculations: the inhalation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Killough, G.G.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    CRAC2 is a computer code for estimating the health effects and economic costs that might result from a release of radioactivity from a nuclear reactor to the environment. This paper describes tests of sensitivity of the predicted health effects to uncertainties in parameters associated with inhalation of the released radionuclides. These parameters are the particle size of the carrier aerosol and, for each element in the release, the clearance parameters for the lung model on which the code's dose conversion factors for inhalation are based. CRAC2 uses hourly meteorological data and a straight-line Gaussian plume model to predict the transport of airborne radioactivity; it includes models for plume depletion and population evacuation, and data for the distributions of population and land use. The code can compute results for single weather sequences, or it can perform random sampling of weather sequences from the meteorological data file and compute results for each weather sequence in the sample. For the work described in this paper, we concentrated on three fixed weather sequences that represent a range of conditions. For each fixed weather sequence, we applied random sampling to joint distributions of the inhalation parameters in order to estimate the sensitivity of the predicted health effects. All sampling runs produced coefficients of variation that were less than 50%, but some differences of means between weather sequences were substantial, as were some differences between means and the corresponding CRAC2 results without random sampling. Early injuries showed differences of as much as 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, while the differences in early fatalities were less than a factor of 2. Latent cancer fatalities varied by less than 10%. 19 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  17. The PI3K-mediated activation of CRAC independently regulates adenylyl cyclase activation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Comer, Frank I; Lippincott, Christopher K; Masbad, Joseph J; Parent, Carole A

    2005-01-26

    The ability of a cell to detect an external chemical signal and initiate a program of directed migration along a gradient comprises the fundamental process called chemotaxis. Investigations in Dictyostelium discoideum and neutrophils have established that pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-containing proteins that bind to the PI3K products PI(3,4)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3, such as CRAC (cytosolic regulator of adenylyl cyclase) and Akt/PKB, translocate specifically to the leading edge of chemotaxing cells. CRAC is essential for the chemoattractant-mediated activation of the adenylyl cyclase ACA, which converts ATP into cAMP, the primary chemoattractant for D. discoideum. The mechanisms by which CRAC activates ACA remain to be determined. We now show that in addition to its essential role in the activation of ACA, CRAC is involved in regulating chemotaxis. Through mutagenesis, we show that these two functions are independently regulated downstream of PI3K. A CRAC mutant that has lost the capacity to bind PI3K products does not support chemotaxis and shows minimal ACA activation. Finally, overexpression of CRAC and various CRAC mutants show strong effects on ACA activation with little effect on chemotaxis. These findings establish that chemoattractant-mediated activation of PI3K is important for the CRAC-dependent regulation of both chemotaxis and adenylyl cyclase activation.

  18. Global Aesthetics Consensus: Avoidance and Management of Complications from Hyaluronic Acid Fillers—Evidence- and Opinion-Based Review and Consensus Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Steven; Sundaram, Hema; De Boulle, Koenraad L.; Goodman, Greg J.; Monheit, Gary; Wu, Yan; Trindade de Almeida, Ada R.; Swift, Arthur; Vieira Braz, André

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although the safety profile of hyaluronic acid fillers is favorable, adverse reactions can occur. Clinicians and patients can benefit from ongoing guidance on adverse reactions to hyaluronic acid fillers and their management. Methods: A multinational, multidisciplinary group of experts in cosmetic medicine convened the Global Aesthetics Consensus Group to review the properties and clinical uses of Hylacross and Vycross hyaluronic acid products and develop updated consensus recommendations for early and late complications associated with hyaluronic acid fillers. Results: The consensus panel provided specific recommendations focusing on early and late complications of hyaluronic acid fillers and their management. The impact of patient-, product-, and technique-related factors on such reactions was described. Most of these were noted to be mild and transient. Serious adverse events are rare. Early adverse reactions to hyaluronic acid fillers include vascular infarction and compromise; inflammatory reactions; injection-related events; and inappropriate placement of filler material. Among late reactions are nodules, granulomas, and skin discoloration. Most adverse events can be avoided with proper planning and technique. Detailed understanding of facial anatomy, proper patient and product selection, and appropriate technique can further reduce the risks. Should adverse reactions occur, the clinician must be prepared and have tools available for effective treatment. Conclusions: Adverse reactions with hyaluronic acid fillers are uncommon. Clinicians should take steps to further reduce the risk and be prepared to treat any complications that arise. PMID:27219265

  19. Guide for licensing evaluations using CRAC2: A computer program for calculating reactor accident consequences

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.E.; Roussin, R.W.; Gilpin, H.

    1988-12-01

    A version of the CRAC2 computer code applicable for use in analyses of consequences and risks of reactor accidents in case work for environmental statements has been implemented for use on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Data General MV/8000 computer system. Input preparation is facilitated through the use of an interactive computer program which operates on an IBM personal computer. The resulting CRAC2 input deck is transmitted to the MV/8000 by using an error-free file transfer mechanism. To facilitate the use of CRAC2 at NRC, relevant background material on input requirements and model descriptions has been extracted from four reports - ''Calculations of Reactor Accident Consequences,'' Version 2, NUREG/CR-2326 (SAND81-1994) and ''CRAC2 Model Descriptions,'' NUREG/CR-2552 (SAND82-0342), ''CRAC Calculations for Accident Sections of Environmental Statements, '' NUREG/CR-2901 (SAND82-1693), and ''Sensitivity and Uncertainty Studies of the CRAC2 Computer Code,'' NUREG/CR-4038 (ORNL-6114). When this background information is combined with instructions on the input processor, this report provides a self-contained guide for preparing CRAC2 input data with a specific orientation toward applications on the MV/8000. 8 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. Functional Analysis of Orai1 Concatemers Supports a Hexameric Stoichiometry for the CRAC Channel.

    PubMed

    Yen, Michelle; Lokteva, Ludmila A; Lewis, Richard S

    2016-11-01

    Store-operated Ca(2+) entry occurs through the binding of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) sensor STIM1 to Orai1, the pore-forming subunit of the Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel. Although the essential steps leading to channel opening have been described, fundamental questions remain, including the functional stoichiometry of the CRAC channel. The crystal structure of Drosophila Orai indicates a hexameric stoichiometry, while studies of linked Orai1 concatemers and single-molecule photobleaching suggest that channels assemble as tetramers. We assessed CRAC channel stoichiometry by expressing hexameric concatemers of human Orai1 and comparing in detail their ionic currents to those of native CRAC channels and channels generated from monomeric Orai1 constructs. Cell surface biotinylation results indicated that Orai1 channels in the plasma membrane were assembled from intact hexameric polypeptides and not from truncated protein products. In addition, the L273D mutation depressed channel activity equally regardless of which Orai1 subunit in the concatemer carried the mutation. Thus, functional channels were generated from intact Orai1 hexamers in which all subunits contributed equally. These hexameric Orai1 channels displayed the biophysical fingerprint of native CRAC channels, including the distinguishing characteristics of gating (store-dependent activation, Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation, open probability), permeation (ion selectivity, affinity for Ca(2+) block, La(3+) sensitivity, unitary current magnitude), and pharmacology (enhancement and inhibition by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate). Because permeation characteristics depend strongly on pore geometry, it is unlikely that hexameric and tetrameric pores would display identical Ca(2+) affinity, ion selectivity, and unitary current magnitude. Thus, based on the highly similar pore properties of the hexameric Orai1 concatemer and native CRAC channels, we conclude that the CRAC channel functions as a

  1. STIM1 carboxyl-terminus activates native SOC, I(crac) and TRPC1 channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo N; Zeng, Weizhong; Kim, Joo Young; Yuan, Joseph P; Han, Linhuang; Muallem, Shmuel; Worley, Paul F

    2006-09-01

    Receptor-evoked Ca2+ signalling involves Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum, followed by Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. Ca2+ influx is essential for many cellular functions, from secretion to transcription, and is mediated by Ca2+-release activated Ca2+ (I(crac)) channels and store-operated calcium entry (SOC) channels. Although the molecular identity and regulation of I(crac) and SOC channels have not been precisely determined, notable recent findings are the identification of STIM1, which has been indicated to regulate SOC and I(crac) channels by functioning as an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ sensor, and ORAI1 (ref. 7) or CRACM1 (ref. 8)--both of which may function as I(crac) channels or as an I(crac) subunit. How STIM1 activates the Ca2+ influx channels and whether STIM1 contributes to the channel pore remains unknown. Here, we identify the structural features that are essential for STIM1-dependent activation of SOC and I(crac) channels, and demonstrate that they are identical to those involved in the binding and activation of TRPC1. Notably, the cytosolic carboxyl terminus of STIM1 is sufficient to activate SOC, I(crac) and TRPC1 channels even when native STIM1 is depleted by small interfering RNA. Activity of STIM1 requires an ERM domain, which mediates the selective binding of STIM1 to TRPC1, 2 and 4, but not to TRPC3, 6 or 7, and a cationic lysine-rich region, which is essential for gating of TRPC1. Deletion of either region in the constitutively active STIM1(D76A) yields dominant-negative mutants that block native SOC channels, expressed TRPC1 in HEK293 cells and I(crac) in Jurkat cells. These observations implicate STIM1 as a key regulator of activity rather than a channel component, and reveal similar regulation of SOC, I(crac) and TRPC channel activation by STIM1.

  2. Store-Operated CRAC Channels Regulate Gene Expression and Proliferation in Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Agila; Shum, Andrew K.; McBride, Helen J.; Kessler, John A.; Feske, Stefan; Miller, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium signals regulate many critical processes during vertebrate brain development including neurogenesis, neurotransmitter specification, and axonal outgrowth. However, the identity of the ion channels mediating Ca2+ signaling in the developing nervous system is not well defined. Here, we report that embryonic and adult mouse neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs/NPCs) exhibit store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) mediated by Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels. SOCE in NPCs was blocked by the CRAC channel inhibitors La3+, BTP2, and 2-APB and Western blots revealed the presence of the canonical CRAC channel proteins STIM1 and Orai1. Knock down of STIM1 or Orai1 significantly diminished SOCE in NPCs, and SOCE was lost in NPCs from transgenic mice lacking Orai1 or STIM1 and in knock-in mice expressing the loss-of-function Orai1 mutant, R93W. Therefore, STIM1 and Orai1 make essential contributions to SOCE in NPCs. SOCE in NPCs was activated by epidermal growth factor and acetylcholine, the latter occurring through muscarinic receptors. Activation of SOCE stimulated gene transcription through calcineurin/NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells) signaling through a mechanism consistent with local Ca2+ signaling by Ca2+ microdomains near CRAC channels. Importantly, suppression or deletion of STIM1 and Orai1 expression significantly attenuated proliferation of embryonic and adult NPCs cultured as neurospheres and, in vivo, in the subventricular zone of adult mice. These findings show that CRAC channels serve as a major route of Ca2+ entry in NPCs and regulate key effector functions including gene expression and proliferation, indicating that CRAC channels are important regulators of mammalian neurogenesis. PMID:24990931

  3. Consensus statement on viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid for the management of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Henrotin, Yves; Raman, Raghu; Richette, Pascal; Bard, Hervé; Jerosch, Jörg; Conrozier, Thierry; Chevalier, Xavier; Migliore, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    Viscosupplementation (VS) with hyaluronic acid is currently used by physicians to treat osteoarthritis. However, many aspects of this treatment remain questionable and subject of controversy. A group of 8 experts in this field, from European countries, met to debate on 24 statements previously listed by the group members. Based on an extensive research of the literature and expert opinion, a consensus position has been proposed for each statement. Agreement was achieved on some recommendations. In particular, the expert achieved unanimous agreement in favor of the following statements: VS is an effective treatment for mild to moderate knee OA; VS is not an alternative to surgery in advanced hip OA; VS is a well-tolerated treatment of knee and other joints OA; VS should not be used only in patients who have failed to respond adequately to analgesics and NSAIDs; VS is a "positive" indication but not a "lack of anything better" indication; the dosing regimen must be supported by evidence-based medicine; cross-linking is a proven means for prolonging IA residence time of HA; the best approach to inject accurately knee joint is the lateral mid-patellar one; when VS is performed under fluoroscopy, the amount of radiopaque contrast agent must be as low as possible to avoid viscosupplement dilution. These clear recommendations have been established to help practitioners in the use of viscosupplementation.

  4. Graded activation of CRAC channel by binding of different numbers of STIM1 to Orai1 subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhengzheng; Liu, Lin; Deng, Yongqiang; Ji, Wei; Du, Wen; Xu, Pingyong; Chen, Liangyi; Xu, Tao

    2011-01-01

    The Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel pore is formed by Orai1 and gated by STIM1 after intracellular Ca2+ store depletion. To resolve how many STIM1 molecules are required to open a CRAC channel, we fused different numbers of Orai1 subunits with functional two-tandem cytoplasmic domains of STIM1 (residues 336-485, designated as S domain). Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of these chimeric molecules revealed that CRAC current reached maximum at a stoichiometry of four Orai1 and eight S domains. Further experiments indicate that two-tandem S domains specifically interact with the C-terminus of one Orai1 subunit, and CRAC current can be gradually increased as more Orai1 subunits can interact with S domains or STIM1 proteins. Our data suggest that maximal opening of one CRAC channel requires eight STIM1 molecules, and support a model that the CRAC channel activation is not in an “all-or-none” fashion but undergoes a graded process via binding of different numbers of STIM1. PMID:20838418

  5. Suppression of arthritis-induced bone erosion by a CRAC channel antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Harry C; Soboloff, Jonathan; Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina L; Larrouture, Quitterie C; Witt, Michelle R; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Elliott, Meenal; Hirsch, Raphael; Barnett, John B

    2016-01-01

    Objective We have shown in vitro and in vivo that osteoclast maturation requires calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channels. In inflammatory arthritis, osteoclasts mediate severe and debilitating bone erosion. In the current study, we assess the value of CRAC channels as a therapeutic target to suppress bone erosion in acute inflammatory arthritis. Methods Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was induced in mice. The CRAC channel inhibitor 3,4-dichloropropionaniline (DCPA) and a placebo was administered 1 day prior to collagen II booster to induce arthritis. Effects on swelling, inflammatory cell invasion in joints, serum cytokines and bone erosion were measured. Results Assays, by blinded observers, of arthritis severity showed that DCPA, 21 mg/kg/day, suppressed arthritis development over 3 weeks. Bone and cartilage damage in sections of animal feet was reduced approximately 50%; overall swelling of joints was reduced by a similar amount. Effects on bone density by µCT showed clear separation in DCPA-treated CIA animals from CIA without treatment, while differences between controls without CIA and CIA treated with DCPA differed by small amounts and in most cases were not statistically different. Response was not related to anticollagen titres. There were no adverse effects in the treated group on animal weight or activity, consistent with low toxicity. The effect was maximal 12–17 days after collagen booster, during the rapid appearance of arthritis in untreated CIA. At 20 days after treatment (day 40), differences in arthritis score were reduced and tumour necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1, or IL-6 in the serum of the animals were similar in treated and untreated animals. Conclusions DCPA, a novel inhibitor of CRAC channels, suppresses bone erosion associated with acute arthritis in mice and might represent a new treatment modality for acute arthrits. PMID:26819750

  6. Consensus protein design

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2016-01-01

    A popular and successful strategy in semi-rational design of protein stability is the use of evolutionary information encapsulated in homologous protein sequences. Consensus design is based on the hypothesis that at a given position, the respective consensus amino acid contributes more than average to the stability of the protein than non-conserved amino acids. Here, we review the consensus design approach, its theoretical underpinnings, successes, limitations and challenges, as well as providing a detailed guide to its application in protein engineering. PMID:27274091

  7. Treatment of Hyaluronic Acid Filler-Induced Impending Necrosis With Hyaluronidase: Consensus Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel L; Biesman, Brian S; Dayan, Steven H; DeLorenzi, Claudio; Lambros, Val S; Nestor, Mark S; Sadick, Neil; Sykes, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Injection-induced necrosis is a rare but dreaded consequence of soft tissue augmentation with filler agents. It usually occurs as a result of injection of filler directly into an artery, but can also result from compression or injury. We provide recommendations on the use of hyaluronidase when vascular compromise is suspected. Consensus recommendations were developed by thorough discussion and debate amongst the authors at a roundtable meeting on Wednesday June 18, 2014 in Las Vegas, NV as well as significant ongoing written and verbal communications amongst the authors in the months prior to journal submission. All authors are experienced tertiary care providers. A prompt diagnosis and immediate treatment with high doses of hyaluronidase (at least 200 U) are critically important. It is not felt necessary to do a skin test in cases of impending necrosis. Some experts recommend dilution with saline to increase dispersion or lidocaine to aid vasodilation. Additional hyaluronidase should be injected if improvement is not seen within 60 minutes. A warm compress also aids vasodilation, and massage has been shown to help. Some experts advocate the use of nitroglycerin paste, although this area is controversial. Introducing an oral aspirin regimen should help prevent further clot formation due to vascular compromise. In our experience, patients who are diagnosed promptly and treated within 24 hours will usually have the best outcomes.

  8. Dispelling the North American acid rain clouds: Developing a framework for political consensus through the identification of elite viewpoints

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, N.

    1988-01-01

    Acidic deposition has simultaneously been referred to as an environmental curiosity and as an ecological holocaust. This polarization of opinion on this pollutant has resulted in the policy stalemate in Congress over this issue and is responsible for the major part of the friction which currently besets Canada-United States relations. This study identified the distinctive viewpoints which characterize opposing attitudes. In addition, the specific areas of consensus and disagreement among these elite groups were determined. All of these objectives were carried out using the results of the Q-sort technique and interviews with members of the acid rain elite in both Canada and the United States (i.e. politicians, scientists, regulators, environmental/advocacy groups, and industry/utility personnel). Furthermore, a comprehensive, in-depth review of the scientific, legal, economic, social and political aspects of this tissue was conducted. Results show that implementation of the Acid Rain Experimental Control Program (ARECP) and the Clean Coal Technology project has the potential to break the existing stalemates over this issue and, at the same, could avert damage to many ecosystems, man-made structures and human health.

  9. Customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS): climate satisfaction evaluation based on subjective perception.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Yang, Shing-Ru; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Climate not only influences the behavior of people in urban environments but also affects people's schedules and travel plans. Therefore, providing people with appropriate long-term climate evaluation information is crucial. Therefore, we developed an innovative climate assessment system based on field investigations conducted in three cities located in Northern, Central, and Southern Taiwan. The field investigations included the questionnaire surveys and climate data collection. We first analyzed the relationship between the participants and climate parameters comprising physiologically equivalent temperature, air temperature, humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, cloud cover, and precipitation. Second, we established the neutral value, comfort range, and dissatisfied range of each parameter. Third, after verifying that the subjects' perception toward the climate parameters vary based on individual preferences, we developed the customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS) approach, which featured functions such as personalized and default climate suitability information to be used by users exhibiting varying demands. Finally, we performed calculations using the climate conditions of two cities during the past 10 years to demonstrate the performance of the CRACS approach. The results can be used as a reference when planning activities in the city or when organizing future travel plans. The flexibility of the assessment system enables it to be adjusted for varying regions and usage characteristics.

  10. Customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS): climate satisfaction evaluation based on subjective perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Yang, Shing-Ru; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Climate not only influences the behavior of people in urban environments but also affects people's schedules and travel plans. Therefore, providing people with appropriate long-term climate evaluation information is crucial. Therefore, we developed an innovative climate assessment system based on field investigations conducted in three cities located in Northern, Central, and Southern Taiwan. The field investigations included the questionnaire surveys and climate data collection. We first analyzed the relationship between the participants and climate parameters comprising physiologically equivalent temperature, air temperature, humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, cloud cover, and precipitation. Second, we established the neutral value, comfort range, and dissatisfied range of each parameter. Third, after verifying that the subjects' perception toward the climate parameters vary based on individual preferences, we developed the customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS) approach, which featured functions such as personalized and default climate suitability information to be used by users exhibiting varying demands. Finally, we performed calculations using the climate conditions of two cities during the past 10 years to demonstrate the performance of the CRACS approach. The results can be used as a reference when planning activities in the city or when organizing future travel plans. The flexibility of the assessment system enables it to be adjusted for varying regions and usage characteristics.

  11. Atmospheric ionization induced by precipitating electrons: Comparison of CRAC:EPII model with a parametrization model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, A. A.; Mishev, A. L.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2016-11-01

    Results of a comparison of a new model CRAC:EPII (Cosmic Ray Atmospheric Cascade: Electron Precipitation Induced Ionization) with a commonly used parametric model of atmospheric ionization is presented. The CRAC:EPII is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of precipitating electrons propagation and interaction with matter in the Earth's atmosphere. It explicitly considers energy deposit: ionization, pair production, Compton scattering, generation of Bremsstrahlung high energy photons, photo-ionization and annihilation of positrons, multiple scattering as physical processes accordingly. Propagation of precipitating electrons and their interactions with air is simulated with the GEANT4 simulation tool PLANETOCOSMICS code using NRLMSISE-00 atmospheric model. Ionization yields are computed and compared with a parametrization model for different energies of incident precipitating energetic electrons, using simulated fluxes of mono-energetic particles. A good agreement between the two models is achieved in the mesosphere but the contribution of Bremsstrahlung in the stratosphere, which is not accounted for in the parametric models, is found significant. As an example, we calculated profiles of the ion production rates in the middle and upper atmosphere (below 100 km) on the basis of balloon-born measured spectra of precipitating electrons for 30-October-2002 and 07-January-2004.

  12. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Barton F [Durham, NC; Gao, Feng [Durham, NC; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos, NM; Hahn, Beatrice H [Birmingham, AL; Shaw, George M [Birmingham, AL; Kothe, Denise [Birmingham, AL; Li, Ying Ying [Hoover, AL; Decker, Julie [Alabaster, AL; Liao, Hua-Xin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  13. Store-operated CRAC channels regulate PAR2-activated Ca2+ signaling and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jairaman, Amit; Yamashita, Megumi; Schleimer, Robert P.; Prakriya, Murali

    2015-01-01

    The G-protein coupled protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory and auto-immune disorders. In airway epithelial cells (AECs), stimulation of PAR2 by allergens and proteases triggers the release of a host of inflammatory mediators to regulate bronchomotor tone and immune cell recruitment. Activation of PAR2 turns on several cell signaling pathways of which the mobilization of cytosolic Ca2+ is likely a critical but poorly understood event. Here, we show that Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels encoded by STIM1 and Orai1 are a major route of Ca2+ entry in primary human AECs and drive the Ca2+ elevations seen in response to PAR2 activation. Activation of CRAC channels induces the production of several key inflammatory mediators from AECs including TSLP, IL-6 and PGE2, in part through stimulation of gene expression via NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells). Furthermore, PAR2 stimulation induces the production of many key inflammatory mediators including PGE2, IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF in a CRAC-channel dependent manner. These findings indicate that CRAC channels are the primary mechanism for Ca2+ influx in AECs and a vital checkpoint for the induction of PAR2-induced proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:26238490

  14. Alignment editing and identification of consensus secondary structures for nucleic acid sequences: interactive use of dot matrix representations.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, J P; Janjić, N; Pribnow, D; Zichi, D A

    1995-01-01

    We present a computer-aided approach for identifying and aligning consensus secondary structure within a set of functionally related oligonucleotide sequences aligned by sequence. The method relies on visualization of secondary structure using a generalization of the dot matrix representation appropriate for consensus sequence data sets. An interactive computer program implementing such a visualization of consensus structure has been developed. The program allows for alignment editing, data and display filtering and various modes of base pair representation, including co-variation. The utility of this approach is demonstrated with four sample data sets derived from in vitro selection experiments and one data set comprising tRNA sequences. Images PMID:7501472

  15. Characterization of T cell mutants with defects in capacitative calcium entry: genetic evidence for the physiological roles of CRAC channels

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Prolonged Ca2+ influx is an essential signal for the activation of T lymphocytes by antigen. This influx is thought to occur through highly selective Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels that are activated by the depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores. We have isolated mutants of the Jurkat human T cell line NZdipA to explore the molecular mechanisms that underlie capacitative Ca2+ entry and to allow a genetic test of the functions of CRAC channels in T cells. Five mutant cell lines (CJ-1 through CJ-5) were selected based on their failure to express a lethal diphtheria toxin A chain gene and a lacZ reporter gene driven by NF-AT, a Ca(2+)- and protein kinase C-dependent transcription factor. The rate of Ca2+ influx evoked by thapsigargin was reduced to varying degrees in the mutant cells whereas the dependence of NF-AT/lacZ gene transcription on [Ca2+]i was unaltered, suggesting that the transcriptional defect in these cells is caused by a reduced level of capacitative Ca2+ entry. We examined several factors that determine the rate of Ca2+ entry, including CRAC channel activity, K(+)-channel activity, and Ca2+ clearance mechanisms. The only parameter found to be dramatically altered in most of the mutant lines was the amplitude of the Ca2+ current (ICRAC), which ranged from 1 to 41% of that seen in parental control cells. In each case, the severity of the ICRAC defect was closely correlated with deficits in Ca2+ influx rate and Ca(2-)-dependent gene transcription. Behavior of the mutant cells provides genetic evidence for several roles of ICRAC in T cells. First, mitogenic doses of ionomycin appear to elevate [Ca2+]i primarily by activating CRAC channels. Second, ICRAC promotes the refilling of empty Ca2+ stores. Finally, CRAC channels are solely responsible for the Ca2+ influx that underlies antigen-mediated T cell activation. These mutant cell lines may provide a useful system for isolating, expressing, and exploring the functions of genes involved in

  16. CRAC channels, calcium, and cancer in light of the driver and passenger concept.

    PubMed

    Hoth, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Advances in next-generation sequencing allow very comprehensive analyses of large numbers of cancer genomes leading to an increasingly better characterization and classification of cancers. Comparing genomic data predicts candidate genes driving development, growth, or metastasis of cancer. Cancer driver genes are defined as genes whose mutations are causally implicated in oncogenesis whereas passenger mutations are defined as not being oncogenic. Currently, a list of several hundred cancer driver mutations is discussed including prominent members like TP53, BRAF, NRAS, or NF1. According to the vast literature on Ca(2+) and cancer, Ca(2+) signals and the underlying Ca(2+) channels and transporters certainly influence the development, growth, and metastasis of many cancers. In this review, I focus on the calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channel genes STIM and Orai and their role for cancer development, growth, and metastasis. STIM and Orai genes are being discussed in the context of current cancer concepts with a focus on the driver-passenger hypothesis. One result of this discussion is the hypothesis that a driver analysis of Ca(2+) homeostasis-related genes should not be carried out by looking at isolated genes. Rather a pool of “Ca(2+) genes” might be considered to act as one potential cancer driver. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen.

  17. A Possible Mechanism of Zika Virus Associated Microcephaly: Imperative Role of Retinoic Acid Response Element (RARE) Consensus Sequence Repeats in the Viral Genome

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Singh, Himanshu N.; Pareek, Vikas; Raza, Khursheed; Dantham, Subrahamanyam; Kumar, Pavan; Mochan, Sankat; Faiq, Muneeb A.

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the reports of microcephaly as a consistent outcome in the fetuses of pregnant women infected with ZIKV in Brazil, Zika virus (ZIKV)—microcephaly etiomechanistic relationship has recently been implicated. Researchers, however, are still struggling to establish an embryological basis for this interesting causal handcuff. The present study reveals robust evidence in favor of a plausible ZIKV-microcephaly cause-effect liaison. The rationale is based on: (1) sequence homology between ZIKV genome and the response element of an early neural tube developmental marker “retinoic acid” in human DNA and (2) comprehensive similarities between the details of brain defects in ZIKV-microcephaly and retinoic acid embryopathy. Retinoic acid is considered as the earliest factor for regulating anteroposterior axis of neural tube and positioning of structures in developing brain through retinoic acid response elements (RARE) consensus sequence (5′–AGGTCA–3′) in promoter regions of retinoic acid-dependent genes. We screened genomic sequences of already reported virulent ZIKV strains (including those linked to microcephaly) and other viruses available in National Institute of Health genetic sequence database (GenBank) for the RARE consensus repeats and obtained results strongly bolstering our hypothesis that ZIKV strains associated with microcephaly may act through precipitation of dysregulation in retinoic acid-dependent genes by introducing extra stretches of RARE consensus sequence repeats in the genome of developing brain cells. Additional support to our hypothesis comes from our findings that screening of other viruses for RARE consensus sequence repeats is positive only for those known to display neurotropism and cause fetal brain defects (for which maternal-fetal transmission during developing stage may be required). The numbers of RARE sequence repeats appeared to match with the virulence of screened positive viruses. Although, bioinformatic evidence and

  18. "Speeding up the road to recovery": The Complex Recovery Assessment and Consultation (CRAC) service.

    PubMed

    Davis Le Brun, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The number of bed closures in mental health is on the rise, creating additional pressure on services, including acute mental health services. An efficient way of working is required in order to streamline the acute care pathway and decrease unnecessary delays to length of stay, ensuring all individuals can be offered an inpatient bed when in crisis. The Complex Recovery Assessment and Consultation (CRAC) service was created in order to support acute mental health inpatient clinicians in streamlining hospital stays for service users who present with complex presentations that require lengthier admissions (over 40 days) by offering assessment, advice, and intervention from a rehabilitation perspective. The team was also created to understand why individuals may require a lengthy hospital stay. Preliminary data showed that requiring a placement on discharge proved to be the most significant factor in increased length of stay and so the team took on a new role of discharge coordinator after around a year of operating. This involved assisting in decreasing any delays out of hospital through improved communication and dedicated time to complete tasks, such as completing paperwork for placement referrals and funding panels. Since taking on this role it was found that the time taken for individuals to be discharged to a rehabilitation or specialist placement decreased; a rehabilitation placement by 13.12 days and a specialist placement by 9.22 days. Discharge to a family address also decreased by 2.9 days and a home address by 2.47 days. Those patients with complex presentations benefit from having one dedicated team to coordinate the discharge process. Their lengthier acute inpatient stay is improved through streamlining care pathways, ultimately decreasing delays in discharge.

  19. Inhibition of KCa3.1 by depolarisation and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) during Ca²⁺ release activated Ca²⁺ (CRAC) entry in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells: Implications for the interpretation of 2-APB inhibition of CRAC entry.

    PubMed

    Littlechild, Robert; Zaidman, Nathalie; Khodaverdi, Darren; Mason, Michael James

    2015-02-01

    In the present experiments in HEL cells, we have investigated the requirement for a hyperpolarised resting membrane potential for the initial activation of the Ca(2+) activated K(+) channel, KCa3.1, following activation of the Ca(2+) release activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) entry pathway. In intact cells, fluorimetric measurements of [Ca(2+)]i following thapsigargin-mediated activation of CRAC entry revealed a sustained increase in [Ca(2+)]i. Block of KCa3.1 by application of charybdotoxin resulted in a 50% reduction in the steady-state [Ca(2+)]i, consistent with the well established role for KCa3.1-mediated hyperpolarisation in augmenting CRAC entry. Interestingly, subsequent depolarisation to 0mV by application of gramicidin resulted in a fall in steady-state Ca(2+) levels to values theoretically below that required for activation of KCa3.1. Whole cell patch clamp experiments confirmed the lack of KCa3.1 activation at 0mV following activation of the CRAC entry pathway, indicating an absolute requirement for a hyperpolarised resting membrane potential for the initial activation of KCa3.1 leading to hyperpolarisation and augmented Ca(2+) entry. Current clamp experiments confirmed the requirement for a hyperpolarised resting membrane potential in KCa3.1 activation by CRAC entry. Given the critical role played by KCa3.1 and membrane potential in general in the control of CRAC-mediated [Ca(2+)]i changes, we investigated the hypothesis that inhibition of the CRAC-mediated changes in [Ca(2+)]i observed following 2-APB addition may in part arise from direct inhibition of KCa3.1 by 2-APB. Under whole cell patch clamp, 2-APB, at concentrations typically used to block the CRAC channel, potently inhibited KCa3.1 in a reversible manner (half maximal inhibition 14.2 μM). This block was accompanied by a marked shift in the reversal potential to depolarised values approaching that set by endogenous membrane conductances. At the single channel level, 2-APB applied to the cytosolic face

  20. Global Aesthetics Consensus: Hyaluronic Acid Fillers and Botulinum Toxin Type A—Recommendations for Combined Treatment and Optimizing Outcomes in Diverse Patient Populations

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Steven; Signorini, Massimo; Vieira Braz, André; Fagien, Steven; Swift, Arthur; De Boulle, Koenraad L.; Raspaldo, Hervé; Trindade de Almeida, Ada R.; Monheit, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Background: Combination of fillers and botulinum toxin for aesthetic applications is increasingly popular. Patient demographics continue to diversify, and include an expanding population receiving maintenance treatments over decades. Methods: A multinational panel of plastic surgeons and dermatologists convened the Global Aesthetics Consensus Group to develop updated guidelines with a worldwide perspective for hyaluronic acid fillers and botulinum toxin. This publication considers strategies for combined treatments, and how patient diversity influences treatment planning and outcomes. Results: Global Aesthetics Consensus Group recommendations reflect increased use of combined treatments in the lower and upper face, and some midface regions. A fully patient-tailored approach considers physiologic and chronologic age, ethnically associated facial morphotypes, and aesthetic ideals based on sex and culture. Lower toxin dosing, to modulate rather than paralyze muscles, is indicated where volume deficits influence muscular activity. Combination of toxin with fillers is appropriate for several indications addressed previously with toxin alone. New scientific data regarding hyaluronic acid fillers foster an evidence-based approach to selection of products and injection techniques. Focus on aesthetic units, rather than isolated rhytides, optimizes results from toxin and fillers. It also informs longitudinal treatment planning, and analysis of toxin nonresponders. Conclusions: The emerging objective of injectable treatment is facial harmonization rather than rejuvenation. Combined treatment is now a standard of care. Its use will increase further as we refine the concept that aspects of aging are intimately related, and that successful treatment entails identifying and addressing the primary causes of each. CLINICAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, V. PMID:27119917

  1. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes act as a chemokine and recruit macrophages by activating the PLC/IP3/CRAC channel signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Tan, Xiao-Qiu; Yan, Li; Zeng, Bo; Meng, Jie; Xu, Hai-Yan; Cao, Ji-Min

    2017-03-22

    The impact of nanomaterials on immune cells is gaining attention but is not well documented. Here, we report a novel stimulating effect of carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (c-MWCNTs) on the migration of macrophages and uncover the underlying mechanisms, especially the upstream signaling, using a series of techniques including transwell migration assay, patch clamp, ELISA and confocal microscopy. c-MWCNTs dramatically stimulated the migration of RAW264.7 macrophages when endocytosed, and this effect was abolished by inhibiting phospholipase C (PLC) with U-73122, antagonizing the IP3 receptor with 2-APB, and blocking calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channels with SK&F96365. c-MWCNTs directly activated PLC and increased the IP3 level and [Ca(2+)]i level in RAW264.7 cells, promoted the translocation of the ER-resident stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) towards the membranous calcium release-activated calcium channel modulator 1 (Orai1), and increased CRAC current densities in both RAW264.7 cells and HEK293 cells stably expressing the CRAC channel subunits Orai1 and STIM1. c-MWCNTs also induced dramatic spatial polarization of KCa3.1 channels in the RAW264.7 cells. We conclude that c-MWCNT is an activator of PLC and strongly recruits macrophages via the PLC/IP3/CRAC channel signaling cascade. These novel findings may provide a fundamental basis for the impact of MWCNTs on the immune system.

  2. Bidirectional coupling between ryanodine receptors and Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channel machinery sustains store-operated Ca2+ entry in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Pratima; Dadsetan, Sepehr; Fomina, Alla F

    2012-10-26

    The expression and functional significance of ryanodine receptors (RyR) were investigated in resting and activated primary human T cells. RyR1, RyR2, and RyR3 transcripts were detected in human T cells. RyR1/2 transcript levels increased, whereas those of RyR3 decreased after T cell activation. RyR1/2 protein immunoreactivity was detected in activated but not in resting T cells. The RyR agonist caffeine evoked Ca(2+) release from the intracellular store in activated T cells but not in resting T cells, indicating that RyR are functionally up-regulated in activated T cells compared with resting T cells. In the presence of store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) via plasmalemmal Ca(2+) release-activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channels, RyR blockers reduced the Ca(2+) leak from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the magnitude of SOCE, suggesting that a positive feedback relationship exists between RyR and CRAC channels. Overexpression of fluorescently tagged RyR2 and stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), an ER Ca(2+) sensor gating CRAC channels, in HEK293 cells revealed that RyR are co-localized with STIM1 in the puncta formed after store depletion. These data indicate that in primary human T cells, the RyR are coupled to CRAC channel machinery such that SOCE activates RyR via a Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release mechanism, which in turn reduces the Ca(2+) concentration within the ER lumen in the vicinity of STIM1, thus facilitating SOCE by reducing store-dependent CRAC channel inactivation. Treatment with RyR blockers suppressed activated T cell expansion, demonstrating the functional importance of RyR in T cells.

  3. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen.

  4. Stim1 and Orai1 Mediate CRAC Currents and Store-Operated Calcium Entry Important for Endothelial Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Abdullaev, Iskandar F.; Bisaillon, Jonathan M.; Potier, Marie; Gonzalez, Jose C.; Motiani, Rajender K.; Trebak, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in the store-operated Calcium (Ca2+) entry (SOCE) pathway have identified Stim1 as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensor and Orai1 as the pore forming subunit of the highly Ca2+ selective CRAC channel expressed in hematopoietic cells. Previous studies however, have suggested that endothelial cell (EC) SOCE is mediated by the non-selective Canonical Transient Receptor Potential (TRPC) channel family, TRPC1 or TRPC4. Here we show that passive store depletion by thapsigargin or receptor activation by either thrombin or the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) activates the same pathway in primary EC with classical SOCE pharmacological features. EC possess the archetypical Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ current (ICRAC), albeit of a very small amplitude. Using a maneuver that amplifies currents in divalent free bath solutions, we show that EC CRAC has similar characteristics to that recorded from RBL cells, namely a similar time course of activation, sensitivity to 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and low concentrations of lanthanides, and large Na+ currents displaying the typical depotentiation. RNA silencing of either Stim1 or Orai1 essentially abolished SOCE and ICRAC in EC which were rescued by ectopic expression of either Stim1 or Orai1, respectively. Surprisingly, knockdown of either TRPC1 or TRPC4 proteins had no effect on SOCE and ICRAC. Ectopic expression of Stim1 in EC increased their ICRAC to a size comparable to that in RBL cells. Knockdown of Stim1, Stim2 or Orai1 inhibited EC proliferation and caused cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phase, although Orai1 knockdown was more efficient than that of Stim proteins. These results are first to establish the requirement of Stim1/Orai1 in the endothelial SOCE pathway. PMID:18845811

  5. Use of recycled chunk rubber asphalt concrete (CRAC) on low volume roads and use of recycled crumb rubber modifier in asphalt pavements. Final report, June 1993-June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, M.; Funk, L.P.; Sadeq, M.A.; Marucci, G.

    1995-06-01

    The major objective of this project was to formulate a Chunk Rubber Asphalt Concrete (CRAC) mix for use on low volume roads. CRAC is a rubber modified asphalt concrete product produced by the `dry process` where rubber chunks of 1/2 inch size are used as aggregate in a cold mix with a type C fly ash. The second objective of this project was to develop guidelines concerning the use of rubber modified asphalt concrete hot mix to include: (1) Design methods for use of asphalt-rubber mix for new construction and overlay, (2) Mix design method for asphalt-rubber, and (3) Test method for determining the amount of rubber in an asphalt-rubber concrete for quality control purposes.

  6. The C- and N-terminal STIM1 binding sites on Orai1 are required for both trapping and gating CRAC channels

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Beth A; Somasundaram, Agila; Jairaman, Amit; Yamashita, Megumi; Prakriya, Murali

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ (CRAC) channels are activated through a mechanism wherein depletion of intracellular calcium stores results in the aggregation of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ sensor, and Orai1, the CRAC channel protein, at overlapping sites in the ER and plasma membranes (PMs). The redistribution of CRAC channels is driven through direct STIM1–Orai1 binding, an important event that not only controls gating, but also regulates Orai1 ion selectivity. Orai1 harbours two STIM1 binding sites, one each on the intracellular C- and N-termini. Previous studies have proposed modular functions for these sites, with the C-terminal site thought to regulate STIM1–Orai1 binding and trapping of Orai1 at the ER–PM junctions, and the N-terminal site mediating gating. However, here we find that a variety of mutations in the N-terminal site impair the binding of Orai1 to STIM1 and to the soluble CRAC activation domain (CAD). Gating could be restored in several N- and C-terminal point mutants by directly tethering the minimal STIM1 activation domain (S) to Orai1 (Orai1–SS channels), indicating that loss of gating in these mutants by full-length STIM1 results from insufficient ligand binding. By contrast, gating could not be restored in mutant Orai1–SS channels carrying more drastic deletions that removed the STIM1 binding sites (Δ1–85, Δ73–85, or Δ272–279 Orai1), suggesting that STIM1 binding to both sites is essential for channel activation. Moreover, analysis of ion selectivity indicated that the molecular requirements for gating and modulation of ion selectivity are similar, yet substantively different from those for Orai1 puncta formation, suggesting that ion selectivity and gating are mechanistically coupled in CRAC channels. Our results indicate that the C- and N-terminal STIM1 binding sites are both essential for multiple aspects of Orai1 function including STIM1–Orai1 association, Orai1 trapping

  7. Aljoya Consensus Statement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A consensus statement of 100 experts meeting at the Aljoya Conference Center in Seattle, Washington in July 2000 for the First International Conference on Trans-Pacific Transport of Atmospheric Contaminants.

  8. Critique, Contextualism and Consensus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Jane

    2004-01-01

    In an epistemology of contextualism, how robust does consensus need to be for critique to be practically effective? In 'Relativism and the Critical Potential of Philosophy of Education,' Frieda Heyting proposes a form of contextualism, but her argument raises a number of problems. The kinds of criteria that her version of contextualism will…

  9. Consensus Statement Immunonutrition and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Bermon, Stephane; Castell, Lindy M; Calder, Philip C; Bishop, Nicolette C; Blomstrand, Eva; Mooren, Frank C; Krüger, Karsten; Kavazis, Andreas N; Quindry, John C; Senchina, David S; Nieman, David C; Gleeson, Michael; Pyne, David B; Kitic, Cecilia M; Close, Graeme L; Larson-Meyer, D Enette; Marcos, Ascension; Meydani, Simin N; Walsh, Neil P; Nagatomi, Ryochi

    2017-01-01

    In this consensus statement on immunonutrition and exercise, a panel of knowledgeable contributors from across the globe provides a consensus of updated science, including the background, the aspects for which a consensus actually exists, the controversies and, when possible, suggested directions for future research.

  10. Towards Consensus Gene Ages

    PubMed Central

    Liebeskind, Benjamin J.; McWhite, Claire D.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Correctly estimating the age of a gene or gene family is important for a variety of fields, including molecular evolution, comparative genomics, and phylogenetics, and increasingly for systems biology and disease genetics. However, most studies use only a point estimate of a gene’s age, neglecting the substantial uncertainty involved in this estimation. Here, we characterize this uncertainty by investigating the effect of algorithm choice on gene-age inference and calculate consensus gene ages with attendant error distributions for a variety of model eukaryotes. We use 13 orthology inference algorithms to create gene-age datasets and then characterize the error around each age-call on a per-gene and per-algorithm basis. Systematic error was found to be a large factor in estimating gene age, suggesting that simple consensus algorithms are not enough to give a reliable point estimate. We also found that different sources of error can affect downstream analyses, such as gene ontology enrichment. Our consensus gene-age datasets, with associated error terms, are made fully available at so that researchers can propagate this uncertainty through their analyses (geneages.org). PMID:27259914

  11. Spanish Consensus Statement

    PubMed Central

    Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2015-01-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms—without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period—all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain. PMID:27213161

  12. Achieving consensus in environmental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kurstedt, Jr., H. A.; Jones, R. M.; Walker, J. A.; Middleman, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new research effort on consensus tied to the Environmental Restoration Program (ERP) within the US Department of Energy's Office of Defense Waste and Transportation Management (DWTM). We define consensus and explain why consensus decisions are not merely desirable but necessary in furthering ERP activities. As examples of our planned applied research, we first discuss Nominal Group Technique as a representative consensus-generating tool, and we conclude by describing the consensus-related mission of the Waste Management Review Group, established at Virginia Tech to conduct independent, third-party review of DWTM/ERP plans and activities. 10 refs.

  13. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-07

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  14. Decreased Degradation of Internalized Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Caused by Mutation of Aspartic Acid 6.30550 in a Protein Kinase-CK2 Consensus Sequence in the Third Intracellular Loop of Human Follicle-Stimulating Hormone Receptor1

    PubMed Central

    Kluetzman, Kerri S.; Thomas, Richard M.; Nechamen, Cheryl A.; Dias, James A.

    2011-01-01

    A naturally occurring mutation in follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene has been reported: an amino acid change to glycine occurs at a conserved aspartic acid 550 (D550, D567, D6.30567). This residue is contained in a protein kinase-CK2 consensus site present in human FSHR (hFSHR) intracellular loop 3 (iL3). Because CK2 has been reported to play a role in trafficking of some receptors, the potential roles for CK2 and D550 in FSHR function were evaluated by generating a D550A mutation in the hFSHR. The hFSHR-D550A binds hormone similarly to WT-hFSHR when expressed in HEK293T cells. Western blot analyses showed lower levels of mature hFSHR-D550A. Maximal cAMP production of both hFSHR-D550A as well as the naturally occurring mutation hFSHR-D550G was diminished, but constitutive activity was not observed. Unexpectedly, when 125I-hFSH bound to hFSHR-D550A or hFSHR-D550G, intracellular accumulation of radiolabeled FSH was observed. Both sucrose and dominant-negative dynamin blocked internalization of radiolabeled FSH and its commensurate intracellular accumulation. Accumulation of radiolabeled FSH in cells transfected with hFSHR-D550A is due to a defect in degradation of hFSH as measured in pulse chase studies, and confocal microscopy imaging revealed that FSH accumulated in large intracellular structures. CK2 kinase activity is not required for proper degradation of internalized FSH because inhibition of CK2 kinase activity in cells expressing hFSHR did not uncouple degradation of internalized radiolabeled FSH. Additionally, the CK2 consensus site in FSHR iL3 is not required for binding because CK2alpha coimmunoprecipitated with hFSHR-D550A. Thus, mutation of D550 uncouples the link between internalization and degradation of hFSH. PMID:21270425

  15. Consensus Protein Design Without Phylogenetic Bias

    PubMed Central

    Jäckel, Christian; Bloom, Jesse D; Kast, Peter; Arnold, Frances H; Hilvert, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Consensus design is an appealing strategy for the stabilization of proteins. It exploits amino acid conservation in sets of homologous proteins to identify likely beneficial mutations. Nevertheless, its success depends on the phylogenetic diversity of the sequence set available. Here we show that randomization of a single protein represents a reliable alternative source of sequence diversity essentially free of phylogenetic bias. A small number of functional protein sequences selected from binary-patterned libraries suffices as input for consensus design of active enzymes that are easier to produce and substantially more stable than individual members of the starting data set. Although catalytic activity correlates less consistently with sequence conservation in these extensively randomized proteins, less extreme mutagenesis strategies might be adopted in practice to augment stability while maintaining function. PMID:20433850

  16. Consensus on consensus: a synthesis of consensus estimates on human-caused global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, John; Oreskes, Naomi; Doran, Peter T.; Anderegg, William R. L.; Verheggen, Bart; Maibach, Ed W.; Carlton, J. Stuart; Lewandowsky, Stephan; Skuce, Andrew G.; Green, Sarah A.; Nuccitelli, Dana; Jacobs, Peter; Richardson, Mark; Winkler, Bärbel; Painting, Rob; Rice, Ken

    2016-04-01

    The consensus that humans are causing recent global warming is shared by 90%-100% of publishing climate scientists according to six independent studies by co-authors of this paper. Those results are consistent with the 97% consensus reported by Cook et al (Environ. Res. Lett. 8 024024) based on 11 944 abstracts of research papers, of which 4014 took a position on the cause of recent global warming. A survey of authors of those papers (N = 2412 papers) also supported a 97% consensus. Tol (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 048001) comes to a different conclusion using results from surveys of non-experts such as economic geologists and a self-selected group of those who reject the consensus. We demonstrate that this outcome is not unexpected because the level of consensus correlates with expertise in climate science. At one point, Tol also reduces the apparent consensus by assuming that abstracts that do not explicitly state the cause of global warming (‘no position’) represent non-endorsement, an approach that if applied elsewhere would reject consensus on well-established theories such as plate tectonics. We examine the available studies and conclude that the finding of 97% consensus in published climate research is robust and consistent with other surveys of climate scientists and peer-reviewed studies.

  17. Brazilian consensus on photoprotection.

    PubMed

    Schalka, Sérgio; Steiner, Denise; Ravelli, Flávia Naranjo; Steiner, Tatiana; Terena, Aripuanã Cobério; Marçon, Carolina Reato; Ayres, Eloisa Leis; Addor, Flávia Alvim Sant'anna; Miot, Helio Amante; Ponzio, Humberto; Duarte, Ida; Neffá, Jane; Cunha, José Antônio Jabur da; Boza, Juliana Catucci; Samorano, Luciana de Paula; Corrêa, Marcelo de Paula; Maia, Marcus; Nasser, Nilton; Leite, Olga Maria Rodrigues Ribeiro; Lopes, Otávio Sergio; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; Meyer, Renata Leal Bregunci; Cestari, Tânia; Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva dos; Rego, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with a large heterogeneity of climates and massive mixing of the population. Almost the entire national territory is located between the Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn, and the Earth axial tilt to the south certainly makes Brazil one of the countries of the world with greater extent of land in proximity to the sun. The Brazilian coastline, where most of its population lives, is more than 8,500 km long. Due to geographic characteristics and cultural trends, Brazilians are among the peoples with the highest annual exposure to the sun. Epidemiological data show a continuing increase in the incidence of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Photoprotection can be understood as a set of measures aimed at reducing sun exposure and at preventing the development of acute and chronic actinic damage. Due to the peculiarities of Brazilian territory and culture, it would not be advisable to replicate the concepts of photoprotection from other developed countries, places with completely different climates and populations. Thus the Brazilian Society of Dermatology has developed the Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection, the first official document on photoprotection developed in Brazil for Brazilians, with recommendations on matters involving photoprotection.

  18. Between consensus and contestation.

    PubMed

    Weale, Albert

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - Noting that discussions of public participation and priority setting typically presuppose certain political theories of democracy, the purpose of this paper is to discuss two theories: the consensual and the agonistic. The distinction is illuminating when considering the difference between institutionalized public participation and contestatory participation. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is a theoretical reconstruction of two ways of thinking about public participation in relation to priority setting in health care, drawing on the work of Habermas, a deliberative theorist, and Mouffe, a theorist of agonism. Findings - The different theoretical approaches can be associated with different ways of understanding priority setting. In particular, agonistic democratic theory would understand priority setting as system of inclusions and exclusions rather than the determination of a consensus of social values, which is the typical deliberative way of thinking about the issues. Originality/value - The paper shows the value of drawing out explicitly the tacit assumptions of practices of political participation in order to reveal their scope and limitations. It suggests that making such theoretical presuppositions explicit has value for health services management in recognizing these implicit choices.

  19. Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection

    PubMed Central

    Schalka, Sérgio; Steiner, Denise; Ravelli, Flávia Naranjo; Steiner, Tatiana; Terena, Aripuanã Cobério; Marçon, Carolina Reato; Ayres, Eloisa Leis; Addor, Flávia Alvim Sant'anna; Miot, Helio Amante; Ponzio, Humberto; Duarte, Ida; Neffá, Jane; da Cunha, José Antônio Jabur; Boza, Juliana Catucci; Samorano, Luciana de Paula; Corrêa, Marcelo de Paula; Maia, Marcus; Nasser, Nilton; Leite, Olga Maria Rodrigues Ribeiro; Lopes, Otávio Sergio; Oliveira, Pedro Dantas; Meyer, Renata Leal Bregunci; Cestari, Tânia; dos Reis, Vitor Manoel Silva; Rego, Vitória Regina Pedreira de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Brazil is a country of continental dimensions with a large heterogeneity of climates and massive mixing of the population. Almost the entire national territory is located between the Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn, and the Earth axial tilt to the south certainly makes Brazil one of the countries of the world with greater extent of land in proximity to the sun. The Brazilian coastline, where most of its population lives, is more than 8,500 km long. Due to geographic characteristics and cultural trends, Brazilians are among the peoples with the highest annual exposure to the sun. Epidemiological data show a continuing increase in the incidence of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Photoprotection can be understood as a set of measures aimed at reducing sun exposure and at preventing the development of acute and chronic actinic damage. Due to the peculiarities of Brazilian territory and culture, it would not be advisable to replicate the concepts of photoprotection from other developed countries, places with completely different climates and populations. Thus the Brazilian Society of Dermatology has developed the Brazilian Consensus on Photoprotection, the first official document on photoprotection developed in Brazil for Brazilians, with recommendations on matters involving photoprotection. PMID:25761256

  20. Is There a Consensus on Consensus Methodology? Descriptions and Recommendations for Future Consensus Research.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, Jane; Carline, Jan D; Durning, Steven J

    2016-05-01

    The authors of this article reviewed the methodology of three common consensus methods: nominal group process, consensus development panels, and the Delphi technique. The authors set out to determine how a majority of researchers are conducting these studies, how they are analyzing results, and subsequently the manner in which they are reporting their findings. The authors conclude with a set of guidelines and suggestions designed to aid researchers who choose to use the consensus methodology in their work.Overall, researchers need to describe their inclusion criteria. In addition to this, on the basis of the current literature the authors found that a panel size of 5 to 11 members was most beneficial across all consensus methods described. Lastly, the authors agreed that the statistical analyses done in consensus method studies should be as rigorous as possible and that the predetermined definition of consensus must be included in the ultimate manuscript. More specific recommendations are given for each of the three consensus methods described in the article.

  1. Consensus development for healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Kea, Bory; Sun, Benjamin Chih-An

    2015-04-01

    Consensus development sprang from a desire to synthesize clinician and expert opinions on clinical practice and research agendas in the 1950s. And since the American Institute of Medicine formally defined "guidelines" in 1990, there has been a proliferation of clinical practice guidelines (CPG) both formally and informally. This modern decision-making tool used by both physicians and patients, requires extensive planning to overcome the challenges of consensus development while reaping its rewards. Consensus allows for a group approach of multiple experts sharing ideas to form consensus on topics ranging from appropriateness of procedures to research agenda development. Disagreements can shed light on areas of controversy and launch further discussions. It has five main components: three inputs (defining the task, participant identification and recruitment, and information synthesis), the approach (consensus development by explicit or implicit means), and the output (dissemination of results). Each aspect requires extensive planning a priori as they influence the entire process, from how information will be interpreted, the interaction of participants, the resulting judgment, to whether there will be uptake of results. Implicit approaches utilize qualitative methods and/or a simple voting structure of majority wins, and are used in informal consensus development methods and consensus development conferences. Explicit approaches aggregate results or judgments using explicit rules set a priori with definitions of "agreement" or consensus. Because the implicit process can be more opaque, unforeseen challenges can emerge such as the undue influence of a minority. And yet, the logistics of explicit approaches may be more time consuming and not appropriate when speed is a priority. In determining which method to use, it is important to understand the pros and cons of different approaches and how it will affect the overall input, approach, and outcome.

  2. Consensus Algorithms Over Fading Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    studying the effect of fading and collisions on the performance of wireless consensus gossiping and in comparing its cost (measured in terms of number of...not assumed to be symmetric under A2. III. RELATED WORK There has been a resurgence of interest in characterizing consen- sus and gossip algorithms...tree, and then distribute the consensus value, with a finite number of exchanges. The price paid is clearly that of finding the appropriate routing

  3. Consensus development for healthcare professionals

    PubMed Central

    Kea, Bory; Sun, Benjamin C.

    2015-01-01

    Consensus development sprang from a desire to synthesize clinician and expert opinions on clinical practice and research agendas in the 1950s. And since the American Institute of Medicine formally defined “guidelines” in 1990, there has been a proliferation of clinical practice guidelines (CPG) both formally and informally. This modern decision making tool used by both physicians and patients, requires extensive planning to meet the challenges of consensus development while reaping its rewards. Consensus allows for a group approach with multiple experts sharing ideas to form consensus on topics ranging from appropriateness of procedures to research agenda development. Disagreements can shed light on areas of controversy and launch further discussions. It has five main components: three inputs (defining the task, participant identification and recruitment, and information synthesis), the approach (consensus development by explicit or implicit means), and the output (dissemination of results). Each aspect requires extensive planning a priori as they influence the entire process, from how information will be interpreted, the interaction of participants, the resulting judgment, to whether there will be uptake of results. Implicit approaches utilize qualitative methods and/or a simple voting structure of majority wins, and are used in informal consensus development methods and consensus development conferences. Explicit approaches aggregate results or judgments using explicit rules set a priori with definitions of “agreement” or consensus. Because the implicit process can be more opaque, unforeseen challenges can emerge such as the undue influence of a minority. And yet, the logistics of explicit approaches may be more time consuming and not appropriate when speed is a priority. In determining which method to use, it is important to understand the pros and cons of the different approaches and how it will affect the overall input, approach, and outcome. PMID

  4. C3 glomerulopathy: consensus report.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Matthew C; D'Agati, Vivette D; Nester, Carla M; Smith, Richard J; Haas, Mark; Appel, Gerald B; Alpers, Charles E; Bajema, Ingeborg M; Bedrosian, Camille; Braun, Michael; Doyle, Mittie; Fakhouri, Fadi; Fervenza, Fernando C; Fogo, Agnes B; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Gale, Daniel P; Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Griffin, Gene; Harris, Claire L; Holers, V Michael; Johnson, Sally; Lavin, Peter J; Medjeral-Thomas, Nicholas; Paul Morgan, B; Nast, Cynthia C; Noel, Laure-Hélène; Peters, D Keith; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Servais, Aude; Sethi, Sanjeev; Song, Wen-Chao; Tamburini, Paul; Thurman, Joshua M; Zavros, Michael; Cook, H Terence

    2013-12-01

    C3 glomerulopathy is a recently introduced pathological entity whose original definition was glomerular pathology characterized by C3 accumulation with absent or scanty immunoglobulin deposition. In August 2012, an invited group of experts (comprising the authors of this document) in renal pathology, nephrology, complement biology, and complement therapeutics met to discuss C3 glomerulopathy in the first C3 Glomerulopathy Meeting. The objectives were to reach a consensus on: the definition of C3 glomerulopathy, appropriate complement investigations that should be performed in these patients, and how complement therapeutics should be explored in the condition. This meeting report represents the current consensus view of the group.

  5. Standardised neonatal parenteral nutrition formulations - an Australasian group consensus 2012.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Srinivas; Osborn, David; Sinn, John; Lui, Kei

    2014-02-18

    Standardised parenteral nutrition formulations are routinely used in the neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. In 2010, a multidisciplinary group was formed to achieve a consensus on the formulations acceptable to majority of the neonatal intensive care units. Literature review was undertaken for each nutrient and recommendations were developed in a series of meetings held between November 2010 and April 2011. Three standard and 2 optional amino acid/dextrose formulations and one lipid emulsion were agreed by majority participants in the consensus. This has a potential to standardise neonatal parenteral nutrition guidelines, reduce costs and prescription errors.

  6. International consensus on allergy immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Agache, Ioana; Bonini, Sergio; Burks, A Wesley; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, Walter; Cox, Linda; Demoly, Pascal; Frew, Antony J; O'Hehir, Robin; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Muraro, Antonella; Lack, Gideon; Larenas, Désirée; Levin, Michael; Nelson, Harald; Pawankar, Ruby; Pfaar, Oliver; van Ree, Ronald; Sampson, Hugh; Santos, Alexandra F; Du Toit, George; Werfel, Thomas; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Zhang, Luo; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2015-09-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been used to treat allergic disease since the early 1900s. Despite numerous clinical trials and meta-analyses proving AIT efficacious, it remains underused and is estimated to be used in less than 10% of patients with allergic rhinitis or asthma worldwide. In addition, there are large differences between regions, which are not only due to socioeconomic status. There is practically no controversy about the use of AIT in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, but for atopic dermatitis or food allergy, the indications for AIT are not well defined. The elaboration of a wider consensus is of utmost importance because AIT is the only treatment that can change the course of allergic disease by preventing the development of asthma and new allergen sensitizations and by inducing allergen-specific immune tolerance. Safer and more effective AIT strategies are being continuously developed both through elaboration of new allergen preparations and adjuvants and alternate routes of administration. A number of guidelines, consensus documents, or both are available on both the international and national levels. The international community of allergy specialists recognizes the need to develop a comprehensive consensus report to harmonize, disseminate, and implement the best AIT practice. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology, formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; and the World Allergy Organization, has decided to issue an international consensus on AIT.

  7. Consensus standard requirements and guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Putman, V.L.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents information from the ANS Criticality Alarm System Workshop relating to the consensus standard requirements and guidance. Topics presented include: definition; nomenclature; requirements and recommendations; purpose of criticality alarms; design criteria; signal characteristics; reliability, dependability and durability; tests; and emergency preparedness and planning.

  8. Confrontation--Catalyst for Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Vincent M., Jr.

    The main question discussed in this paper is whether the confrontations which have been taking place on college campuses these past few years provide the basis for a new consensus which will enable all to move forward with confidence and a renewed sense of achievement. In discussing these confrontations, however, several fallacies need to be…

  9. Using Consensus Groups in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Regina O.; Dirkx, John M.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes online consensus group work, a form of collaborative learning. It discusses collaborative learning, small group work, and consensus learning, with recommendations for their use in online contexts.

  10. Cost Sensitive Moving Target Consensus

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Sisi; Li, Yun; Levitt, Karl N.

    2016-01-01

    Consensus is a fundamental approach to implementing fault-tolerant services through replication where there exists a tradeoff between the cost and the resilience. For instance, Crash Fault Tolerant (CFT) protocols have a low cost but can only handle crash failures while Byzantine Fault Tolerant (BFT) protocols handle arbitrary failures but have a higher cost. Hybrid protocols enjoy the benefits of both high performance without failures and high resiliency under failures by switching among different subprotocols. However, it is challenging to determine which subprotocols should be used. We propose a moving target approach to switch among protocols according to the existing system and network vulnerability. At the core of our approach is a formalized cost model that evaluates the vulnerability and performance of consensus protocols based on real-time Intrusion Detection System (IDS) signals. Based on the evaluation results, we demonstrate that a safe, cheap, and unpredictable protocol is always used and a high IDS error rate can be tolerated.

  11. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a ``decide-announce-defend`` approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other`s positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a ``safe`` context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  12. Energy strategy: Roadmap to consensus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    The United States lacks a comprehensive approach to policy-making in the energy realm. Today, as in the past, individual constituency groups tend to focus on their particular aspect of the energy challenge. Many employ a decide-announce-defend'' approach to policy-making, setting out to secure a unilateral advantage for themselves. By so doing, they inevitably pit interest against interest. The result is a polarization of constituencies, and shortsighted policies designed to address the issue of the moment. The American Energy Assurance Council (AEAC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1987 for the sole purpose of facilitating progress toward a fair efficient wise, stable, and consensus-based national energy strategy. AEAC does not have a substantive policy agencies. Rather, we are committed to supporting a process whereby the many stakeholders and policy makers concerned with energy-related issues can come together in productive discourse, thereby overcoming ignorance of each other's positions. The Council seeks to act as a facilitative body, providing a safe'' context for inventive and creative thinking. We attempt to build a store of common knowledge, and to build on that store according to mutually agreed-upon groundrules, and employing sophisticated approaches to facilitation and mediation. This report, the National Energy Consensus Experiment (NECE), was an ambitious experiment in consensus-building. We learned a great deal from it, both in terms of substance and process, and we are convinced that it holds important lessons for others who may seek to build consensus in the public policy realm.

  13. American Burn Association Consensus Statements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    finally allow us to follow the ACS program in bariatric surgery and link quality-based purchasing with verification. For this col- laborative...University of Washington Medicine Department of Surgery , Seattle, Washington. See under consensus statements for author affiliations. The 2012 ABA burn...correspondence to Nicole S. Gibran MD, FACS, UW Medicine Regional Burn Center, UW Medicine Department of Surgery , Seattle, Washington 98104. Copyright

  14. Consensus formation on adaptive networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozma, Balazs; Barrat, Alain

    2008-01-01

    The structure of a network can significantly influence the properties of the dynamical processes that take place on them. While many studies have been paid to this influence, much less attention has been devoted to the interplay and feedback mechanisms between dynamical processes and network topology on adaptive networks. Adaptive rewiring of links can happen in real life systems such as acquaintance networks, where people are more likely to maintain a social connection if their views and values are similar. In our study, we consider different variants of a model for consensus formation. Our investigations reveal that the adaptation of the network topology fosters cluster formation by enhancing communication between agents of similar opinion, although it also promotes the division of these clusters. The temporal behavior is also strongly affected by adaptivity: while, on static networks, it is influenced by percolation properties, on adaptive networks, both the early and late time evolutions of the system are determined by the rewiring process. The investigation of a variant of the model reveals that the scenarios of transitions between consensus and polarized states are more robust on adaptive networks.

  15. Consensus of Hybrid Multi-Agent Systems.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanshi; Ma, Jingying; Wang, Long

    2017-01-27

    In this brief, we consider the consensus problem of hybrid multiagent systems. First, the hybrid multiagent system is proposed, which is composed of continuous-time and discrete-time dynamic agents. Then, three kinds of consensus protocols are presented for the hybrid multiagent system. The analysis tool developed in this brief is based on the matrix theory and graph theory. With different restrictions of the sampling period, some necessary and sufficient conditions are established for solving the consensus of the hybrid multiagent system. The consensus states are also obtained under different protocols. Finally, simulation examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of our theoretical results.

  16. Canadian asthma consensus report, 1999

    PubMed Central

    Boulet, L P; Becker, A; Bérubé, D; Beveridge, R; Ernst, P

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To provide physicians with current guidelines for the diagnosis and optimal management of asthma in children and adults, including pregnant women and the elderly, in office, emergency department, hospital and clinic settings. OPTIONS: The consensus group considered the roles of education, avoidance of provocative environmental and other factors, diverse pharmacotherapies, delivery devices and emergency and in-hospital management of asthma. OUTCOMES: Provision of the best control of asthma by confirmation of the diagnosis using objective measures, rapid achievement and maintenance of control and regular follow-up. EVIDENCE: The key diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations are based on the 1995 Canadian guidelines and a critical review of the literature by small groups before a full meeting of the consensus group. Recommendations are graded according to 5 levels of evidence. Differences of opinion were resolved by consensus following discussion. VALUES: Respirologists, immunoallergists, pediatricians and emergency and family physicians gave prime consideration to the achievement and maintenance of optimal control of asthma through avoidance of environmental inciters, education of patients and the lowest effective regime of pharmacotherapy to reduce morbidity and mortality. BENEFITS, HARMS AND COSTS: Adherence to the guidelines should be accompanied by significant reduction in patients' symptoms, reduced morbidity and mortality, fewer emergency and hospital admissions, fewer adverse side-effects from medications, better quality of life for patients and reduced costs. RECOMMENDATIONS: Recommendations are included in each section of the report. In summary, after a diagnosis of asthma is made based on clinical evaluation, including demonstration of variable airflow obstruction, and contributing factors are identified, a treatment plan is established to obtain and maintain optimal asthma control. The main components of treatment are patient education

  17. Learning consensus in adversarial environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamvoudakis, Kyriakos G.; García Carrillo, Luis R.; Hespanha, João. P.

    2013-05-01

    This work presents a game theory-based consensus problem for leaderless multi-agent systems in the presence of adversarial inputs that are introducing disturbance to the dynamics. Given the presence of enemy components and the possibility of malicious cyber attacks compromising the security of networked teams, a position agreement must be reached by the networked mobile team based on environmental changes. The problem is addressed under a distributed decision making framework that is robust to possible cyber attacks, which has an advantage over centralized decision making in the sense that a decision maker is not required to access information from all the other decision makers. The proposed framework derives three tuning laws for every agent; one associated with the cost, one associated with the controller, and one with the adversarial input.

  18. International Consensus on drug allergy.

    PubMed

    Demoly, P; Adkinson, N F; Brockow, K; Castells, M; Chiriac, A M; Greenberger, P A; Khan, D A; Lang, D M; Park, H-S; Pichler, W; Sanchez-Borges, M; Shiohara, T; Thong, B Y- H

    2014-04-01

    When drug reactions resembling allergy occur, they are called drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHRs) before showing the evidence of either drug-specific antibodies or T cells. DHRs may be allergic or nonallergic in nature, with drug allergies being immunologically mediated DHRs. These reactions are typically unpredictable. They can be life-threatening, may require or prolong hospitalization, and may necessitate changes in subsequent therapy. Both underdiagnosis (due to under-reporting) and overdiagnosis (due to an overuse of the term ‘allergy’) are common. A definitive diagnosis of such reactions is required in order to institute adequate treatment options and proper preventive measures. Misclassification based solely on the DHR history without further testing may affect treatment options, result in adverse consequences, and lead to the use of more-expensive or less-effective drugs, in contrast to patients who had undergone a complete drug allergy workup. Several guidelines and/or consensus documents on general or specific drug class-induced DHRs are available to support the medical decision process. The use of standardized systematic approaches for the diagnosis and management of DHRs carries the potential to improve outcomes and should thus be disseminated and implemented. Consequently, the International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology (iCAALL), formed by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI), the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI), the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), and the World Allergy Organization (WAO), has decided to issue an International CONsensus (ICON) on drug allergy. The purpose of this document is to highlight the key messages that are common to many of the existing guidelines, while critically reviewing and commenting on any differences and deficiencies of evidence, thus providing a comprehensive reference document for the diagnosis and management of

  19. Data publication consensus and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, John; Strasser, Carly

    2014-01-01

    The movement to bring datasets into the scholarly record as first class research products (validated, preserved, cited, and credited) has been inching forward for some time, but now the pace is quickening. As data publication venues proliferate, significant debate continues over formats, processes, and terminology. Here, we present an overview of data publication initiatives underway and the current conversation, highlighting points of consensus and issues still in contention. Data publication implementations differ in a variety of factors, including the kind of documentation, the location of the documentation relative to the data, and how the data is validated. Publishers may present data as supplemental material to a journal article, with a descriptive “data paper,” or independently. Complicating the situation, different initiatives and communities use the same terms to refer to distinct but overlapping concepts. For instance, the term published means that the data is publicly available and citable to virtually everyone, but it may or may not imply that the data has been peer-reviewed. In turn, what is meant by data peer review is far from defined; standards and processes encompass the full range employed in reviewing the literature, plus some novel variations. Basic data citation is a point of consensus, but the general agreement on the core elements of a dataset citation frays if the data is dynamic or part of a larger set. Even as data publication is being defined, some are looking past publication to other metaphors, notably “data as software,” for solutions to the more stubborn problems. PMID:25075301

  20. Questioning the Consensus Definition of Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    This focus article provided the author with an opportunity to unpack the consensus definition of validity and to explore its implications in the light of recent debates. He proposed an elaboration of the consensus definition, which was intended to express the spirit of the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing" with increased…

  1. Posterior Probabilities for a Consensus Ordering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fligner, Michael A.; Verducci, Joseph S.

    1990-01-01

    The concept of consensus ordering is defined, and formulas for exact and approximate posterior probabilities for consensus ordering are developed under the assumption of a generalized Mallows' model with a diffuse conjugate prior. These methods are applied to a data set concerning 98 college students. (SLD)

  2. Eastern Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference 2014

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetkova, E.; Sud, S.; Aucoin, N.; Biagi, J.; Burkes, R.; Samson, B.; Brule, S.; Cripps, C.; Colwell, B.; Falkson, C.; Dorreen, M.; Goel, R.; Halwani, F.; Maroun, J.; Michaud, N.; Tehfe, M.; Thirlwell, M.; Vickers, M.; Asmis, T.

    2015-01-01

    The annual Eastern Canadian Colorectal Cancer Consensus Conference was held in Montreal, Quebec, 23–25 October 2014. Expert radiation, medical, and surgical oncologists and pathologists involved in the management of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies participated in presentations and discussions resulting in consensus statements on such hot topics as management of neuroendocrine tumours, advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer, and metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:26300681

  3. [GEITDAH consensus on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].

    PubMed

    Montañés-Rada, F; Gastaminza-Pérez, X; Catalá, M A; Ruiz-Sanz, F; Ruiz-Lázaro, P M; Herreros-Rodríguez, O; García-Giral, M; Ortiz-Guerra, J; Alda-Díez, J A; Mojarro-Práxedes, D; Cantó-Díez, T; Mardomingo-Sanz, M J; Sasot-Llevadot, J; Pàmias, M; Rey-Sánchez, F

    2010-11-16

    In this article, the GEITDAH -the Spanish abbreviation of the Special Interest Group on Attention Deficit Hyper-activity Disorder (ADHD)- presents a consensus reached by experts in the management of ADHD from all over Spain. The consensus concerns fundamental aspects that should be the starting point for future local or regional consensus guides. Another aim of this consensus is also to reduce the amount of variability that occurs in the health care offered to patients with ADHD in our country, as well as to act as a stimulus in educational matters. That fact that it is not very long will make it more popular among greater numbers of people and this will allow these goals to be reached more effectively. The conclusions in the consensus guide have been constructed around an introduction dealing with basic aspects and recommendations for diagnosis, treatment (both pharmacological and psychotherapeutic), patient flow and organisational aspects.

  4. Myalgic encephalomyelitis: International Consensus Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, B M; van de Sande, M I; De Meirleir, K L; Klimas, N G; Broderick, G; Mitchell, T; Staines, D; Powles, A C P; Speight, N; Vallings, R; Bateman, L; Baumgarten-Austrheim, B; Bell, D S; Carlo-Stella, N; Chia, J; Darragh, A; Jo, D; Lewis, D; Light, A R; Marshall-Gradisbik, S; Mena, I; Mikovits, J A; Miwa, K; Murovska, M; Pall, M L; Stevens, S

    2011-01-01

    , Japan; A. Kirchenstein Institute of Microbiology and Virology, Riga Stradins University, Riga, Latvia; Department of Biochemistry & Basic Medical Sciences, Washington State University, Portland, OR; Department of Sports Sciences, University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA USA). Myalgic encephalomyelitis: International Consensus Criteria (Review). J Intern Med 2011; 270: 327–338. The label ‘chronic fatigue syndrome’ (CFS) has persisted for many years because of the lack of knowledge of the aetiological agents and the disease process. In view of more recent research and clinical experience that strongly point to widespread inflammation and multisystemic neuropathology, it is more appropriate and correct to use the term ‘myalgic encephalomyelitis’ (ME) because it indicates an underlying pathophysiology. It is also consistent with the neurological classification of ME in the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Diseases (ICD G93.3). Consequently, an International Consensus Panel consisting of clinicians, researchers, teaching faculty and an independent patient advocate was formed with the purpose of developing criteria based on current knowledge. Thirteen countries and a wide range of specialties were represented. Collectively, members have approximately 400 years of both clinical and teaching experience, authored hundreds of peer-reviewed publications, diagnosed or treated approximately 50 000 patients with ME, and several members coauthored previous criteria. The expertise and experience of the panel members as well as PubMed and other medical sources were utilized in a progression of suggestions/drafts/reviews/revisions. The authors, free of any sponsoring organization, achieved 100% consensus through a Delphi-type process. The scope of this paper is limited to criteria of ME and their application. Accordingly, the criteria reflect the complex symptomatology. Operational notes enhance clarity and specificity by providing guidance in the

  5. [Argentine Consensus of Respiratory Rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Sívori, Martín; Benzo, Roberto; Rhodius, Edgardo; Jolly, Enrique; Boim, Clarisa; Saadia, Marcela; Conti, Ernesto; Guevara, Ivan; Carles, Daniel; Victorio, Carlos; Santini, Fabian; Ratto, Patricia; Capparelli, Ignacio; Prieto, Ernesto; Azvalinsky, Marcos; Alais, Maria

    2004-01-01

    A group of pulmonologists and physical therapists from the Asociacion Argentina de Medicina Respiratoria revised the scientific literature on Respiratory Rehabilitation (RR) to elaborate evidence-based national recommendations to promote its use. RR is a multidisciplinary program of care for patients with chronic respiratory impairment, individually tailored, designed to optimize physical and social performance and autonomy of patients. It is particularly indicated in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) with exercise intolerance. Inclusion and exclusion criteria, guidelines for initial evaluation and follow up have been defined. The resources needed were defined. It was recommended a hospital ambulatory program with domiciliary complement. A pulmonologist and physical therapist were required for the program as minimum. Aerobic training was recommended for lower limb (LL) (Evidence A) and upper limb (UL) (Evidence B), strength training for LL and UL (Evidence C), as well as respiratory muscles training by resistive inspiratory threshold load (Evidence D) and other physiotherapy techniques were recommended for specific patients. In addition recommendations have been made for educational objectives of the program, nutritional and psychological support. The positive impact of RR on health care was analyzed through the reduction in exacerbation of COPD, length of hospital stay and cost. RR is a key component in the treatment of COPD patients. This evidenced-based consensus statement was prepared to provide recommendations to be implemented nationally.

  6. Consensus Paper: Cerebellum and Emotion.

    PubMed

    Adamaszek, M; D'Agata, F; Ferrucci, R; Habas, C; Keulen, S; Kirkby, K C; Leggio, M; Mariën, P; Molinari, M; Moulton, E; Orsi, L; Van Overwalle, F; Papadelis, C; Priori, A; Sacchetti, B; Schutter, D J; Styliadis, C; Verhoeven, J

    2017-04-01

    Over the past three decades, insights into the role of the cerebellum in emotional processing have substantially increased. Indeed, methodological refinements in cerebellar lesion studies and major technological advancements in the field of neuroscience are in particular responsible to an exponential growth of knowledge on the topic. It is timely to review the available data and to critically evaluate the current status of the role of the cerebellum in emotion and related domains. The main aim of this article is to present an overview of current facts and ongoing debates relating to clinical, neuroimaging, and neurophysiological findings on the role of the cerebellum in key aspects of emotion. Experts in the field of cerebellar research discuss the range of cerebellar contributions to emotion in nine topics. Topics include the role of the cerebellum in perception and recognition, forwarding and encoding of emotional information, and the experience and regulation of emotional states in relation to motor, cognitive, and social behaviors. In addition, perspectives including cerebellar involvement in emotional learning, pain, emotional aspects of speech, and neuropsychiatric aspects of the cerebellum in mood disorders are briefly discussed. Results of this consensus paper illustrate how theory and empirical research have converged to produce a composite picture of brain topography, physiology, and function that establishes the role of the cerebellum in many aspects of emotional processing.

  7. [Mexican consensus on portal hypertension].

    PubMed

    Narváez-Rivera, R M; Cortez-Hernández, C A; González-González, J A; Tamayo-de la Cuesta, J L; Zamarripa-Dorsey, F; Torre-Delgadillo, A; Rivera-Ramos, J F J; Vinageras-Barroso, J I; Muneta-Kishigami, J E; Blancas-Valencia, J M; Antonio-Manrique, M; Valdovinos-Andraca, F; Brito-Lugo, P; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Bernal-Reyes, R; Sobrino-Cossío, S; Aceves-Tavares, G R; Huerta-Guerrero, H M; Moreno-Gómez, N; Bosques-Padilla, F J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the Mexican Consensus on Portal Hypertension was to develop documented guidelines to facilitate clinical practice when dealing with key events of the patient presenting with portal hypertension and variceal bleeding. The panel of experts was made up of Mexican gastroenterologists, hepatologists, and endoscopists, all distinguished professionals. The document analyzes themes of interest in the following modules: preprimary and primary prophylaxis, acute variceal hemorrhage, and secondary prophylaxis. The management of variceal bleeding has improved considerably in recent years. Current information indicates that the general management of the cirrhotic patient presenting with variceal bleeding should be carried out by a multidisciplinary team, with such an approach playing a major role in the final outcome. The combination of drug and endoscopic therapies is recommended for initial management; vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as variceal bleeding is suspected and maintained for 5 days. After the patient is stabilized, urgent diagnostic endoscopy should be carried out by a qualified endoscopist, who then performs the corresponding endoscopic variceal treatment. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be regarded as an integral part of treatment, started upon hospital admittance and continued for 5 days. If there is treatment failure, rescue therapies should be carried out immediately, taking into account that interventional radiology therapies are very effective in controlling refractory variceal bleeding. These guidelines have been developed for the purpose of achieving greater clinical efficacy and are based on the best evidence of portal hypertension that is presently available.

  8. Replacement of amino acid sequence features of a- and c-subunits of ATP synthases of Alkaliphilic Bacillus with the Bacillus consensus sequence results in defective oxidative phosphorylation and non-fermentative growth at pH 10.5.

    PubMed

    Wang, ZhenXiong; Hicks, David B; Guffanti, Arthur A; Baldwin, Katisha; Krulwich, Terry Ann

    2004-06-18

    Mitchell's (Mitchell, P. (1961) Nature 191, 144-148) chemiosmotic model of energy coupling posits a bulk electrochemical proton gradient (Deltap) as the sole driving force for proton-coupled ATP synthesis via oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and for other bioenergetic work. Two properties of proton-coupled OXPHOS by alkaliphilic Bacillus species pose a challenge to this tenet: robust ATP synthesis at pH 10.5 that does not correlate with the magnitude of the Deltap and the failure of artificially imposed potentials to substitute for respiration-generated potentials in energizing ATP synthesis at high pH (Krulwich, T. (1995) Mol. Microbiol. 15, 403-410). Here we show that these properties, in alkaliphilic Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4, depend upon alkaliphile-specific features in the proton pathway through the a- and c-subunits of ATP synthase. Site-directed changes were made in six such features to the corresponding sequence in Bacillus megaterium, which reflects the consensus sequence for non-alkaliphilic Bacillus. Five of the six single mutants assembled an active ATPase/ATP synthase, and four of these mutants exhibited a specific defect in non-fermentative growth at high pH. Most of these mutants lost the ability to generate the high phosphorylation potentials at low bulk Deltap that are characteristic of alkaliphiles. The aLys(180) and aGly(212) residues that are predicted to be in the proton uptake pathway of the a-subunit were specifically implicated in pH-dependent restriction of proton flux through the ATP synthase to and from the bulk phase. The evidence included greatly enhanced ATP synthesis in response to an artificially imposed potential at high pH. The findings demonstrate that the ATP synthase of extreme alkaliphiles has special features that are required for non-fermentative growth and OXPHOS at high pH.

  9. Phenotypic comparisons of consensus variants versus laboratory resurrections of Precambrian proteins.

    PubMed

    Risso, Valeria A; Gavira, Jose A; Gaucher, Eric A; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2014-06-01

    Consensus-sequence engineering has generated protein variants with enhanced stability, and sometimes, with modulated biological function. Consensus mutations are often interpreted as the introduction of ancestral amino acid residues. However, the precise relationship between consensus engineering and ancestral protein resurrection is not fully understood. Here, we report the properties of proteins encoded by consensus sequences derived from a multiple sequence alignment of extant, class A β-lactamases, as compared with the properties of ancient Precambrian β-lactamases resurrected in the laboratory. These comparisons considered primary sequence, secondary, and tertiary structure, as well as stability and catalysis against different antibiotics. Out of the three consensus variants generated, one could not be expressed and purified (likely due to misfolding and/or low stability) and only one displayed substantial stability having substrate promiscuity, although to a lower extent than ancient β-lactamases. These results: (i) highlight the phenotypic differences between consensus variants and laboratory resurrections of ancestral proteins; (ii) question interpretations of consensus proteins as phenotypic proxies of ancestral proteins; and (iii) support the notion that ancient proteins provide a robust approach toward the preparation of protein variants having large numbers of mutational changes while possessing unique biomolecular properties.

  10. Consensus of population systems with community structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Wu, Bin; Wang, Long; Fu, Feng

    2008-11-01

    Multicommunity population systems may reach a consensus state where the fractions of each species in different communities agree on a common value. In this paper, by analyzing the evolutionary dynamics based on an extended replicator equation incorporating community effects, the consensus problem of population systems with n communities is studied. In particular, the simple case of two communities is investigated in detail. In general, for n communities, a sufficient and necessary condition for population systems to reach a consensus of coexistent state is provided. Regarding the population dynamics for the four different types of games, whether the population systems can achieve consensus is determined. The dynamics of community-structured populations shows richer features than nonstructured populations, and some nontrivial phenomena arising from different community-structured population systems are illustrated with concrete numerical examples.

  11. Leader selection for fast consensus in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Wen; Wang, Lin; Wang, Xiaofan

    2015-12-01

    This paper considers a leader-follower system with the aim to select an optimal leader so as to drive the remaining nodes to reach the desired consensus with the fastest convergence speed. An index called consensus centrality (CC) is proposed to quantify how fast a leader could guide the network to achieve the desired consensus. The experiment results explored the big similarities between the distributions of CC and degree in the network, which suggest that the suboptimal leader selected by the maximum degree can approximately approach the optimal leader in heterogeneous networks. Combining the degree-based k-shell decomposition with consensus centrality, a leader selection algorithm is proposed to reduce the computational complexity in large-scale networks. Finally, the convergence time of an equivalent discrete-time model is given to illustrate the properties of the suboptimal solutions.

  12. Polyphasic taxonomy, a consensus approach to bacterial systematics.

    PubMed Central

    Vandamme, P; Pot, B; Gillis, M; de Vos, P; Kersters, K; Swings, J

    1996-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, a much broader range of taxonomic studies of bacteria has gradually replaced the former reliance upon morphological, physiological, and biochemical characterization. This polyphasic taxonomy takes into account all available phenotypic and genotypic data and integrates them in a consensus type of classification, framed in a general phylogeny derived from 16S rRNA sequence analysis. In some cases, the consensus classification is a compromise containing a minimum of contradictions. It is thought that the more parameters that will become available in the future, the more polyphasic classification will gain stability. In this review, the practice of polyphasic taxonomy is discussed for four groups of bacteria chosen for their relevance, complexity, or both: the genera Xanthomonas and Campylobacter, the lactic acid bacteria, and the family Comamonadaceae. An evaluation of our present insights, the conclusions derived from it, and the perspectives of polyphasic taxonomy are discussed, emphasizing the keystone role of the species. Taxonomists did not succeed in standardizing species delimitation by using percent DNA hybridization values. Together with the absence of another "gold standard" for species definition, this has an enormous repercussion on bacterial taxonomy. This problem is faced in polyphasic taxonomy, which does not depend on a theory, a hypothesis, or a set of rules, presenting a pragmatic approach to a consensus type of taxonomy, integrating all available data maximally. In the future, polyphasic taxonomy will have to cope with (i) enormous amounts of data, (ii) large numbers of strains, and (iii) data fusion (data aggregation), which will demand efficient and centralized data storage. In the future, taxonomic studies will require collaborative efforts by specialized laboratories even more than now is the case. Whether these future developments will guarantee a more stable consensus classification remains an open question. PMID

  13. Diagnostic and therapeutic consensus on acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Doga, M; Bonadonna, S; Gola, M; Nuzzo, M; Giustina, A

    2005-01-01

    In February 1999 and May 2000, two workshops were held in Cortina, Italy and Montecarlo, respectively, to develop a consensus defining the diagnosis and treatment of acromegaly. The workshops were sponsored by the Italian Society of Endocrinology, the Pituitary Society and European Neuroendocrine Association. Partecipants from all over the world included endocrinologists, neurosurgeons and radiotherapists skilled in the management of acromegaly. This review paper summarizes the main points of the two consensus statements published following these two workshops.

  14. Population conference: consensus and conflict.

    PubMed

    Willson, P D

    1984-01-01

    The United Nations-sponsored International Conference on Population held in Mexico City was both a rejection and an affirmation of a new policy of the Reagan administration. The policy denies international family planning funds to nongovernmental organizations that perform or actively promote abortion as a family planning method in other nations. A compromise statement was accepted urging governments to take appropriate measures to discourage abortion as a family planning method and when possible to provide for the humane treatment and counseling of women ho resorted to abortion. The statement on abortion was 1 of 88 reccomendations approved by the conference. The commitment expressed in the 10-year-old World Population Plan of Action to the rights and responsiblity to all people as reaffirmed. The conference also endorsed family life education and sex education as well as suitable family planning, information and services for adolescents, with due consideration given to the role, rights and obligations of parents. Increased support for international population and family planning programs was urged and World Bank President, Clausen, urged a 4-fold increase in international funding by the year 2000. Most of the conference's recommendations re devoted to the broad range of population policy issues, including morbidity and mortality, international and internal migration, the relationship between population and economic development and the status of women. The purpose of the recommendations is to increase the momentum of international support. The Mexico City conference was characterized by a remarkable degree of consensus about population policies with respect to integration with economic development, the need to respect individual rights and the recognition that all nations have sovereign rights to develop and implement their own population policies. Conflict and controversy arose in the areas of the arms race and the Middle East. The US position on abortion funding

  15. Asian Consensus Report on Functional Dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Hiroto; Ghoshal, Uday C; Gonlachanvit, Sutep; Gwee, Kok-Ann; Ang, Tiing-Leong; Chang, Full-Young; Fock, Kwong Ming; Hongo, Michio; Hou, Xiaohua; Kachintorn, Udom; Ke, Meiyun; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Lee, Kwang Jae; Lu, Ching-Liang; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Miura, Soichiro; Park, Hyojin; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Sugano, Kentaro; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Wong, Benjamin CY

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Environmental factors such as food, lifestyle and prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection are widely different in Asian countries compared to the West, and physiological functions and genetic factors of Asians may also be different from those of Westerners. Establishing an Asian consensus for functional dyspepsia is crucial in order to attract attention to such data from Asian countries, to articulate the experience and views of Asian experts, and to provide a relevant guide on management of functional dyspepsia for primary care physicians working in Asia. Methods Consensus team members were selected from Asian experts and consensus development was carried out using a modified Delphi method. Consensus teams collected published papers on functional dyspepsia especially from Asia and developed candidate consensus statements based on the generated clinical questions. At the first face-to-face meeting, each statement was reviewed and e-mail voting was done twice. At the second face-to-face meeting, final voting on each statement was done using keypad voting system. A grade of evidence and a strength of recommendation were applied to each statement according to the method of the GRADE Working Group. Results Twenty-nine consensus statements were finalized, including 7 for definition and diagnosis, 5 for epidemiology, 9 for pathophysiology and 8 for management. Algorithms for diagnosis and management of functional dyspepsia were added. Conclusions This consensus developed by Asian experts shows distinctive features of functional dyspepsia in Asia and will provide a guide to the diagnosis and management of functional dyspepsia for Asian primary care physicians. PMID:22523724

  16. A Research and Discussion Note: The Macrostructure of Consensus Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungra, Philippa

    2007-01-01

    This research note presents a preliminary study of the structure of consensus statements (CSs). The consensus statement is released by a medical association after calling a consensus development conference on a pertinent medical issue. Using a very small corpus, this note attempts to characterize consensus statements by identifying the sequence of…

  17. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique.

  18. Reaching Consensus by Allowing Moments of Indecision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenkeson, A.; Swami, A.

    2015-10-01

    Group decision-making processes often turn into a drawn out and costly battle between two opposing subgroups. Using analytical arguments based on a master equation description of the opinion dynamics occurring in a three-state model of cooperatively interacting units, we show how the capability of a social group to reach consensus can be enhanced when there is an intermediate state for indecisive individuals to pass through. The time spent in the intermediate state must be relatively short compared to that of the two polar states in order to create the beneficial effect. Furthermore, the cooperation between individuals must not be too low, as the benefit to consensus is possible only when the cooperation level exceeds a specific threshold. We also discuss how zealots, agents that remain in one state forever, can affect the consensus among the rest of the population by counteracting the benefit of the intermediate state or making it virtually impossible for an opposition to form.

  19. Thailand Consensus on Helicobacter pylori Treatment 2015.

    PubMed

    Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Pittayanon, Rapat; Rojborwonwitaya, Jarin; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Mairiang, Pisaln; Praisontarangkul, Ong-Ard; Ovartlarnporn, Buncha; Sottisuporn, Jaksin; Pisespongsa, Pises; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Sony, Ravin; Sirinthornpunya, Siam; Chaiyamahapurk, Orawan; Wiwattanachang, Olarn; Sansak, Inchaya; Harnsomboon, Piyathida; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chuenrattanakul, Surapon

    2016-01-01

    Management of Helicobacter pylori infection is an important aspect of many upper gastrointestinal tract diseases, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The Thailand Consensus on H. pylori treatment 2015 consisted of 22 national experts who took active roles, discussed all important clinical information and investigated clinical aspects in four workshops, focuising on: (1) Diagnosis (2) Treatment (3) Follow-up after eradication and (4) H. pylori infection and special conditions. Experts were invited to participate on the basis of their expertise and contribution to H. pylori works and/or consensus methodology. The results of each workshop were taken to a final consensus vote by all experts. Recommendations were developed from the best evidence and availability to guide clinicians in management of this specific infection associated with variety of clinical outcomes.

  20. Reaching Consensus by Allowing Moments of Indecision

    PubMed Central

    Svenkeson, A.; Swami, A.

    2015-01-01

    Group decision-making processes often turn into a drawn out and costly battle between two opposing subgroups. Using analytical arguments based on a master equation description of the opinion dynamics occurring in a three-state model of cooperatively interacting units, we show how the capability of a social group to reach consensus can be enhanced when there is an intermediate state for indecisive individuals to pass through. The time spent in the intermediate state must be relatively short compared to that of the two polar states in order to create the beneficial effect. Furthermore, the cooperation between individuals must not be too low, as the benefit to consensus is possible only when the cooperation level exceeds a specific threshold. We also discuss how zealots, agents that remain in one state forever, can affect the consensus among the rest of the population by counteracting the benefit of the intermediate state or making it virtually impossible for an opposition to form. PMID:26439503

  1. Eastern Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference 2016

    PubMed Central

    Bossé, D.; Ng, T.; Ahmad, C.; Alfakeeh, A.; Alruzug, I.; Biagi, J.; Brierley, J.; Chaudhury, P.; Cleary, S.; Colwell, B.; Cripps, C.; Dawson, L.A.; Dorreen, M.; Ferland, E.; Galiatsatos, P.; Girard, S.; Gray, S.; Halwani, F.; Kopek, N.; Mahmud, A.; Martel, G.; Robillard, L.; Samson, B.; Seal, M.; Siddiqui, J.; Sideris, L.; Snow, S.; Thirwell, M.; Vickers, M.; Goodwin, R.; Goel, R.; Hsu, T.; Tsvetkova, E.; Ward, B.; Asmis, T.

    2016-01-01

    The annual Eastern Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference 2016 was held in Montreal, Quebec, 5–7 February. Experts in radiation oncology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, and infectious diseases involved in the management of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies participated in presentations and discussion sessions for the purpose of developing the recommendations presented here. This consensus statement addresses multiple topics: ■ Follow-up and survivorship of patients with resected colorectal cancer■ Indications for liver metastasectomy■ Treatment of oligometastases by stereotactic body radiation therapy■ Treatment of borderline resectable and unresectable pancreatic cancer■ Transarterial chemoembolization in hepatocellular carcinoma■ Infectious complications of antineoplastic agents PMID:28050151

  2. Photopatch testing: a consensus methodology for Europe.

    PubMed

    Bruynzeel, D P; Ferguson, J; Andersen, K; Gonçalo, M; English, John; Goossens, A; Holzle, E; Ibbotson, S H; Lecha, M; Lehmann, P; Leonard, F; Moseley, Harry; Pigatto, P; Tanew, A

    2004-11-01

    A group of interested European Contact Dermatologists/Photobiologists met to produce a consensus statement on methodology, test materials and interpretation of photopatch testing. While it is recognized that a range of local variables operate throughout Europe, the underlying purpose of the work is to act as an essential preamble to a Pan European Photopatch Test Study focusing particularly on sunscreen chemicals.

  3. Epistemic Iterations and Consensus Definitions of Validity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhard, George, Jr.; Behizadeh, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    In his article, Paul E. Newton has conducted a review of selected perspectives on validity theory with the goal of disambiguating the definition of validity and describing a consensus definition of validity. Newton provides a nuanced discussion of the evolution of the concept of validity over the years. His Focus article has two major goals: (1)…

  4. 3rd Brazilian Consensus on Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga; Maguinilk, Ismael; Zaterka, Schlioma; Parente, José Miguel; do Carmo Friche Passos, Maria; Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado P

    2013-04-01

    Signicant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  5. Consensus among Economists--An Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Dan; Geide-Stevenson, Doris

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore consensus among economists on specific propositions based on a fall 2011 survey of American Economic Association members. Results are based on 568 responses and provide evidence of changes in opinion over time by including propositions from earlier studies in 2000 (Fuller and Geide-Stevenson 2003) and 1992…

  6. Health Promoting Schools: Consensus, Strategies, and Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macnab, Andrew J.; Gagnon, Faith A.; Stewart, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to summarize a consensus statement generated on the current challenges, strategies, and potential of health promoting schools (HPS) at a 2011 colloquium at the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study where 40 people from five continents came together to share their global and regional experience surrounding…

  7. Adaptive bipartite consensus on coopetition networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiangping; Zhu, Hong

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a bipartite consensus tracking problem is considered for a group of autonomous agents on a coopetition network, on which the agents interact cooperatively and competitively simultaneously. The coopetition network involves positive and negative edges and is conveniently modeled by a signed graph. Additionally, the dynamics of all the agents are subjected to unknown disturbances, which are represented by linearly parameterized models. An adaptive estimation scheme is designed for each agent by virtue of the relative position measurements and the relative velocity measurements from its neighbors. Then a consensus tracking law is proposed for a new distributed system, which uses the relative measurements as the new state variables. The convergence of the consensus tracking error and the parameter estimation are analyzed even when the coopetition network is time-varying and no more global information about the bounds of the unknown disturbances is available to all the agents. Finally, some simulation results are provided to demonstrate the formation of the bipartite consensus on the coopetition network.

  8. Consensus among Economics Teachers from Transition Economies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leet, Don R.; Lang, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    The authors analyze the economic opinions of teachers and economists from the former Soviet Union who participated in economic education programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education under the auspices of the National Council on Economic Education from 1995-2001. They sought to determine the level of consensus on economic topics among the…

  9. Statistical Inference for Cultural Consensus Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-24

    Facts on Aging Quiz ”. Covariates were also incorporated into the model, and it was shown that a consensus answer key that corresponded to the...Structural balance: a generalization of Heider’s theory. Psychological Review, 63, 277-293. Palmore, E. (1998). Facts on aging quiz , second edition

  10. The Overreliance of Accreditors on Consensus Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Frank B.

    2001-01-01

    Argues that the legitimacy of accreditation in teacher education is rooted in political consensus, power, and scholarship. Because these roots are fragile, there is no accepted concept of educational malpractice. The legitimacy of accreditation should be rooted in scholarly evidence that the program has fulfilled the claim that its graduates are…

  11. Multi-Attribute Consensus Building Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shyyan, Vitaliy; Christensen, Laurene; Thurlow, Martha; Lazarus, Sheryl

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Attribute Consensus Building (MACB) method is a quantitative approach for determining a group's opinion about the importance of each item (strategy, decision, recommendation, policy, priority, etc.) on a list (Vanderwood, & Erickson, 1994). This process enables a small or large group of participants to generate and discuss a set…

  12. Report of the Consensus Planning Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington, DC.

    This third report of the National Assessment Planning Project concentrates on the consensus planning process used in the project. The project is an outgrowth of National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) program expansion, whose original task was to produce state-by-state comparisons of student achievement. The report is organized in four…

  13. Quorum responses and consensus decision making

    PubMed Central

    Sumpter, David J.T.; Pratt, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Animal groups are said to make consensus decisions when group members come to agree on the same option. Consensus decisions are taxonomically widespread and potentially offer three key benefits: maintenance of group cohesion, enhancement of decision accuracy compared with lone individuals and improvement in decision speed. In the absence of centralized control, arriving at a consensus depends on local interactions in which each individual's likelihood of choosing an option increases with the number of others already committed to that option. The resulting positive feedback can effectively direct most or all group members to the best available choice. In this paper, we examine the functional form of the individual response to others' behaviour that lies at the heart of this process. We review recent theoretical and empirical work on consensus decisions, and we develop a simple mathematical model to show the central importance to speedy and accurate decisions of quorum responses, in which an animal's probability of exhibiting a behaviour is a sharply nonlinear function of the number of other individuals already performing this behaviour. We argue that systems relying on such quorum rules can achieve cohesive choice of the best option while also permitting adaptive tuning of the trade-off between decision speed and accuracy. PMID:19073480

  14. Report on the consensus workshop on formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, M.; Hart, R.; Karrh, B.W.; Koestner, A.; Neal, R.; Parkinson, D.; Perera, F.; Powell, K.E.; Rosenkranz, S.

    1984-01-01

    The Consensus Workshop on Formaldehyde consisted of bringing together scientists from academia, government, industry and public interest groups to address some important toxicological questions concerning the health effects of formaldehyde. The participants in the workshop, the Executive Panel which coordinated the meeting, and the questions posed, all were chosen through a broadly based nomination process in order to achieve as comprehensive a consensus as possible. The subcommittees considered the toxicological problems associated with formaldehyde in the areas of exposure, epidemiology, carcinogenicity/histology/genotoxicity, immunology/sensitization/irritation, structure activity/biochemistry metabolism, reproduction/teratology, behavior/neurotoxicity/psychology and risk estimation. Some questions considered included the possible human carcinogenicity of formaldehyde, as well as other human health effects, and the interpretation of pathology induced by formaldehyde. These reports, plus introductory material on the procedures used in setting up the Consensus Workshop are presented here. Additionally, there is included a listing of the data base that was made available to the panel chairmen prior to the meeting and was readily accessible to the participants during their deliberations in the meeting. This data base, since it was computerized, was also capable of being searched for important terms. These materials were supplemented by information brought by the panelists. The workshop has defined the consensus concerning a number of major points in formaldehyde toxicology and has identified a number of major deficits in understanding which are important guides to future research. 264 references.

  15. Report on the Consensus Workshop on Formaldehyde.

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The Consensus Workshop on Formaldehyde consisted of bringing together scientists from academia, government, industry and public interest groups to address some important toxicological questions concerning the health effects of formaldehyde. The participants in the workshop, the Executive Panel which coordinated the meeting, and the questions posed, all were chosen through a broadly based nomination process in order to achieve as comprehensive a consensus as possible. The subcommittees considered the toxicological problems associated with formaldehyde in the areas of exposure, epidemiology, carcinogenicity/histology/genotoxicity, immunology/sensitization/irritation, structure activity/biochemistry/metabolism, reproduction/teratology, behavior/neurotoxicity/psychology and risk estimation. Some questions considered included the possible human carcinogenicity of formaldehyde, as well as other human health effects, and the interpretation of pathology induced by formaldehyde. These reports, plus introductory material on the procedures used in setting up the Consensus Workshop are presented here. Additionally, there is included a listing of the data base that was made available to the panel chairmen prior to the meeting and was readily accessible to the participants during their deliberations in the meeting. This data base, since it was computerized, was also capable of being searched for important terms. These materials were supplemented by information brought by the panelists. The workshop has defined the consensus concerning a number of major points in formaldehyde toxicology and has identified a number of major deficits in understanding which are important guides to future research. PMID:6525992

  16. Definition of the bacterial N-glycosylation site consensus sequence.

    PubMed

    Kowarik, Michael; Young, N Martin; Numao, Shin; Schulz, Benjamin L; Hug, Isabelle; Callewaert, Nico; Mills, Dominic C; Watson, David C; Hernandez, Marcela; Kelly, John F; Wacker, Michael; Aebi, Markus

    2006-05-03

    The Campylobacter jejuni pgl locus encodes an N-linked protein glycosylation machinery that can be functionally transferred into Escherichia coli. In this system, we analyzed the elements in the C. jejuni N-glycoprotein AcrA required for accepting an N-glycan. We found that the eukaryotic primary consensus sequence for N-glycosylation is N terminally extended to D/E-Y-N-X-S/T (Y, X not equalP) for recognition by the bacterial oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) PglB. However, not all consensus sequences were N-glycosylated when they were either artificially introduced or when they were present in non-C. jejuni proteins. We were able to produce recombinant glycoproteins with engineered N-glycosylation sites and confirmed the requirement for a negatively charged side chain at position -2 in C. jejuni N-glycoproteins. N-glycosylation of AcrA by the eukaryotic OST in Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurred independent of the acidic residue at the -2 position. Thus, bacterial N-glycosylation site selection is more specific than the eukaryotic equivalent with respect to the polypeptide acceptor sequence.

  17. Global Aesthetics Consensus: Botulinum Toxin Type A—Evidence-Based Review, Emerging Concepts, and Consensus Recommendations for Aesthetic Use, Including Updates on Complications

    PubMed Central

    Signorini, Massimo; Liew, Steven; Trindade de Almeida, Ada R.; Wu, Yan; Vieira Braz, André; Fagien, Steven; Goodman, Greg J.; Monheit, Gary; Raspaldo, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    Background: Botulinum toxin type A injection remains the leading nonsurgical cosmetic procedure worldwide, with a high rate of efficacy and patient satisfaction. Methods: A multinational, multidisciplinary group of plastic surgeons and dermatologists convened the Global Aesthetics Consensus Group to develop updated consensus recommendations with a worldwide perspective for botulinum toxin and hyaluronic acid fillers. This publication on botulinum toxin type A considers advances in facial analysis, injection techniques, and avoidance and management of complications. Results: Use of botulinum toxin has evolved from the upper face to also encompass the lower face, neck, and midface. The Global Aesthetics Consensus Group emphasizes an integrative, diagnostic approach. Injection dosage and placement are based on analysis of target muscles in the context of adjacent ones and associated soft and hard tissues. The indication for selection of botulinum toxin as a primary intervention is that excessive muscular contraction is the primary etiology of the facial disharmony to be addressed. Global Aesthetics Consensus Group recommendations demonstrate a paradigm shift toward neuromodulation rather than paralysis, including lower dosing of the upper face, more frequent combination treatment with hyaluronic acid fillers, and intracutaneous injection where indicated to limit depth and degree of action. Conclusions: The accumulation of clinical evidence and experience with botulinum toxin has led to refinements in treatment planning and implementation. The Global Aesthetics Consensus Group advocates an etiology-driven, patient-tailored approach, to enable achievement of optimal efficacy and safety in patient populations that are rapidly diversifying with respect to ethnicity, gender, and age. CLINCAL QUESTION/LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic, V. PMID:26910696

  18. Expert consensus document: A consensus on the medical treatment of acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Giustina, Andrea; Chanson, Philippe; Kleinberg, David; Bronstein, Marcello D; Clemmons, David R; Klibanski, Anne; van der Lely, Aart J; Strasburger, Christian J; Lamberts, Steven W; Ho, Ken K Y; Casanueva, Felipe F; Melmed, Shlomo

    2014-04-01

    In March 2013, the Acromegaly Consensus Group met to revise and update guidelines for the medical treatment of acromegaly. The meeting comprised experts skilled in the medical management of acromegaly. The group considered treatment goals covering biochemical, clinical and tumour volume outcomes, and the place in guidelines of somatostatin receptor ligands, growth hormone receptor antagonists and dopamine agonists, and alternative modalities for treatment including combination therapy and novel treatments. This document represents the conclusions of the workshop consensus.

  19. CONSENSUS TREATMENT RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LATE-ONSET POMPE DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Cupler, Edward J.; Berger, Kenneth I.; Leshner, Robert T.; Wolfe, Gil I.; Han, Jay J.; Barohn, Richard J.; Kissel, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pompe disease is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen-degrading lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase. Late-onset Pompe disease is a multisystem condition, with a heterogeneous clinical presentation that mimics other neuromuscular disorders. Methods Objective is to propose consensus-based treatment and management recommendations for late-onset Pompe disease. Methods A systematic review of the literature by a panel of specialists with expertise in Pompe disease was undertaken. Conclusions A multidisciplinary team should be involved to properly treat the pulmonary, neuromuscular, orthopedic, and gastrointestinal elements of late-onset Pompe disease. Presymptomatic patients with subtle objective signs of Pompe disease (and patients symptomatic at diagnosis) should begin treatment with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) immediately; presymptomatic patients without symptoms or signs should be observed without use of ERT. After 1 year of ERT, patients’ condition should be reevaluated to determine whether ERT should be continued. PMID:22173792

  20. 43 CFR 46.110 - Incorporating consensus-based management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... carry out those plans and activities. For the purposes of this Part, consensus-based management involves..., whenever practicable, use a consensus-based management approach to the NEPA process. (d) If the Responsible... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Incorporating consensus-based...

  1. 43 CFR 46.110 - Incorporating consensus-based management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... carry out those plans and activities. For the purposes of this Part, consensus-based management involves..., whenever practicable, use a consensus-based management approach to the NEPA process. (d) If the Responsible... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Incorporating consensus-based...

  2. 43 CFR 46.110 - Incorporating consensus-based management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... carry out those plans and activities. For the purposes of this Part, consensus-based management involves..., whenever practicable, use a consensus-based management approach to the NEPA process. (d) If the Responsible... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Incorporating consensus-based...

  3. 43 CFR 46.110 - Incorporating consensus-based management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... carry out those plans and activities. For the purposes of this Part, consensus-based management involves..., whenever practicable, use a consensus-based management approach to the NEPA process. (d) If the Responsible... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Incorporating consensus-based...

  4. A Self-Categorization Explanation for Opinion Consensus Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jinguang; Reid, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The public expression of opinions (and related communicative activities) hinges upon the perception of opinion consensus. Current explanations for opinion consensus perceptions typically focus on egocentric and other biases, rather than functional cognitions. Using self-categorization theory we showed that opinion consensus perceptions flow from…

  5. Lack of Consensus on Education: What Are Its Dimensions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozycki, Edward G.

    2010-01-01

    This article offers an analysis of the dimensions of consensus on education using Diane Ravitch's statement: "The single biggest problem in American education is that no one agrees on why they educate." The interesting problem is to determine which consensus on educational issues varies, whose consensus it is, and how and why it varies. The author…

  6. Bruxism defined and graded: an international consensus.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Ahlberg, J; Glaros, A G; Kato, T; Koyano, K; Lavigne, G J; de Leeuw, R; Manfredini, D; Svensson, P; Winocur, E

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus about the definition and diagnostic grading of bruxism. A written consensus discussion was held among an international group of bruxism experts as to formulate a definition of bruxism and to suggest a grading system for its operationalisation. The expert group defined bruxism as a repetitive jaw-muscle activity characterised by clenching or grinding of the teeth and/or by bracing or thrusting of the mandible. Bruxism has two distinct circadian manifestations: it can occur during sleep (indicated as sleep bruxism) or during wakefulness (indicated as awake bruxism). For the operationalisation of this definition, the expert group proposes a diagnostic grading system of 'possible', 'probable' and 'definite' sleep or awake bruxism. The proposed definition and grading system are suggested for clinical and research purposes in all relevant dental and medical domains.

  7. Consensus and transitions in coupled Sznajd networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludden, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    In this work we investigate two coupled square lattice networks undergoing Sznajd model dynamics. The coupling between the networks is quantified by a coupling strength p. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the exit probability of each network (to reach either all spins up or all down) depends on p and the initial density of up spins d in the other network. For fixed initial densities, we find a critical coupling pc, above which no further changes in the exit probability are observed. We also find pc to decrease linearly with increasing d. The consensus time scales with system size as Lα, where α = α(p, d). The conditions that must be met for the two networks to reach consensus are also considered. Thomas E. Stone: Husson University, Susan R. McKay: University of Maine

  8. [Consensus on safe infant's furniture: brief version].

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    Several products that are used for support, transportation or recreation in infants and children can cause non intentional injuries. This consensus tries to provide pediatricians and families with the necessary elements to recognize and choose safe infant's furniture. A group of 24 experts developed a consensus according to Delphi's method, which consists in successiverounds of questions. Recommendations are supported with bibliography. Infant walkers are not recommended, as they are considered useless and dangerous. Guidelines are given to choose appropriate child restraint systems, when and how to use them, and how to install them in a safe way. Injuries and prevention measures related to strollers, high chairs, cribs and bunk beds are described. Risks and the way to avoid them are diagrammed in figures that can be used to transmit recommendations to families.

  9. The Temporal Structure of Scientific Consensus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Shwed, Uri; Bearman, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    This article engages with problems that are usually opaque: What trajectories do scientific debates assume, when does a scientific community consider a proposition to be a fact, and how can we know that? We develop a strategy for evaluating the state of scientific contestation on issues. The analysis builds from Latour’s black box imagery, which we observe in scientific citation networks. We show that as consensus forms, the importance of internal divisions to the overall network structure declines. We consider substantive cases that are now considered facts, such as the carcinogenicity of smoking and the non-carcinogenicity of coffee. We then employ the same analysis to currently contested cases: the suspected carcinogenicity of cellular phones, and the relationship between vaccines and autism. Extracting meaning from the internal structure of scientific knowledge carves a niche for renewed sociological commentary on science, revealing a typology of trajectories that scientific propositions may experience en route to consensus. PMID:21886269

  10. After seven years, where's the consensus

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.R.

    1993-04-01

    It has been 7 years since the discovery of copper oxide superconductors, yet there is no consensus on the correct theory for this phenomenon. The theory can be divided into 3 groups: ordinary (phonons), exotic (AF spin fluctuations, nested Fermi liquid, excitons, spin bags, odd frequency pairing), and revolutionary (Luttinger liquid, spin-charge separation, gauge theories, anyons, marginal Fermi liquid). C-axis dispersion, dHvA, and magneto-oscillations are also discussed.

  11. Shoulder biomechanics: today's consensus and tomorrow's perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cutti, Andrea Giovanni; Veeger, H E J DirkJan

    2009-05-01

    Shoulder biomechanics is a fast growing field, which is progressively expanding its focus to include more applied research. The papers included in this Special Issue confirm this trend. After a classification of the papers as dealing with fundamental or applied research through theoretical or experimental methods, in this Editorial we tried to summarize the elements of consensus and the open issues discussed during the last International Shoulder Group meeting, held in Bologna (Italy) in 2008.

  12. Consensus contact prediction by linear programming.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Bu, Dongbo; Li, Shuai Cheng; Li, Ming; Xu, Jinbo

    2007-01-01

    Protein inter-residue contacts are of great use for protein structure determination or prediction. Recent CASP events have shown that a few accurately predicted contacts can help improve both computational efficiency and prediction accuracy of the ab inito folding methods. This paper develops an integer linear programming (ILP) method for consensus-based contact prediction. In contrast to the simple "majority voting" method assuming that all the individual servers are equal and independent, our method evaluates their correlations using the maximum likelihood method and constructs some latent independent servers using the principal component analysis technique. Then, we use an integer linear programming model to assign weights to these latent servers in order to maximize the deviation between the correct contacts and incorrect ones; our consensus prediction server is the weighted combination of these latent servers. In addition to the consensus information, our method also uses server-independent correlated mutation (CM) as one of the prediction features. Experimental results demonstrate that our contact prediction server performs better than the "majority voting" method. The accuracy of our method for the top L/5 contacts on CASP7 targets is 73.41%, which is much higher than previously reported studies. On the 16 free modeling (FM) targets, our method achieves an accuracy of 37.21%.

  13. Molecular subgroups of medulloblastoma: the current consensus.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael D; Northcott, Paul A; Korshunov, Andrey; Remke, Marc; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Clifford, Steven C; Eberhart, Charles G; Parsons, D Williams; Rutkowski, Stefan; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W; Lichter, Peter; Gilbertson, Richard J; Pomeroy, Scott L; Kool, Marcel; Pfister, Stefan M

    2012-04-01

    Medulloblastoma, a small blue cell malignancy of the cerebellum, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric oncology. Current mechanisms for clinical prognostication and stratification include clinical factors (age, presence of metastases, and extent of resection) as well as histological subgrouping (classic, desmoplastic, and large cell/anaplastic histology). Transcriptional profiling studies of medulloblastoma cohorts from several research groups around the globe have suggested the existence of multiple distinct molecular subgroups that differ in their demographics, transcriptomes, somatic genetic events, and clinical outcomes. Variations in the number, composition, and nature of the subgroups between studies brought about a consensus conference in Boston in the fall of 2010. Discussants at the conference came to a consensus that the evidence supported the existence of four main subgroups of medulloblastoma (Wnt, Shh, Group 3, and Group 4). Participants outlined the demographic, transcriptional, genetic, and clinical differences between the four subgroups. While it is anticipated that the molecular classification of medulloblastoma will continue to evolve and diversify in the future as larger cohorts are studied at greater depth, herein we outline the current consensus nomenclature, and the differences between the medulloblastoma subgroups.

  14. International consensus on ANA patterns (ICAP): the bumpy road towards a consensus on reporting ANA results.

    PubMed

    Damoiseaux, Jan; von Mühlen, Carlos A; Garcia-De La Torre, Ignacio; Carballo, Orlando Gabriel; de Melo Cruvinel, Wilson; Francescantonio, Paulo Luiz Carvalho; Fritzler, Marvin J; Herold, Manfred; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Satoh, Minoru; Andrade, Luis E C; Chan, Edward K L; Conrad, Karsten

    2016-12-01

    The International Consensus on ANA Patterns (ICAP) was initiated as a workshop aiming to thoroughly discuss and achieve consensus regarding the morphological patterns observed in the indirect immunofluorescence assay on HEp-2 cells. One of the topics discussed at the second ICAP workshop, and addressed in this paper, was the harmonization of reporting ANA test results. This discussion centered on the issue if cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns should be reported as positive or negative. This report outlines the issues that impact on two major different reporting methods. Although it was appreciated by all participants that cytoplasmic and mitotic patterns are clinically relevant, implications for existing diagnostic/classification criteria for ANA-associated diseases in particular hampered a final consensus on this topic. Evidently, a more concerted action of all relevant stakeholders is required. Future ICAP workshops may help to facilitate this action.

  15. Developing consensus criteria for sarcopenia: an update.

    PubMed

    McLean, Robert R; Kiel, Douglas P

    2015-04-01

    Sarcopenia, the age-related loss of muscle mass and strength, is a major cause of impaired physical function, which contributes to mobility disability, falls and hospitalizations in older adults. Lower muscle mass and strength are also associated with lower bone mineral density and greater risk for osteoporotic fractures. Thus, identification of sarcopenia could be important for fracture prevention as it may help improve fracture risk assessment, and muscle mass and strength can be improved with exercise, even among the frailest older adults. Unfortunately, there are no consensus diagnostic criteria for sarcopenia. Consequently there is no guidance to help clinicians identify older adults with clinically meaningful low muscle mass or weakness. Further, development of novel sarcopenia therapies is hindered not only due to the difficulty in identifying participants for clinical trials, and but also because there are no validated, clinically appropriate endpoints for assessment of treatment efficacy. There is currently a major push to establish a consensus definition of sarcopenia, and recent work holds promise that this goal may be within reach. This article discusses the evolution of the definition of sarcopenia, and focuses on the latest recommended diagnostic criteria proposed by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) Sarcopenia Project. While these empirically-based cut-points for clinically important low muscle mass and weakness are a significant step forward for the sarcopenia field, important questions remain to be answered before consensus diagnostic criteria can be definitively established. Ongoing work to refine sarcopenia criteria will further advance the field and bring this important contributor to falls, fractures and disability into the mainstream of clinical care and ultimately lead to better quality of life with aging.

  16. Diabetes and cancer: a consensus report.

    PubMed

    Giovannucci, Edward; Harlan, David M; Archer, Michael C; Bergenstal, Richard M; Gapstur, Susan M; Habel, Laurel A; Pollak, Michael; Regensteiner, Judith G; Yee, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiologic evidence suggests that cancer incidence is associated with diabetes as well as certain diabetes risk factors and treatments. This consensus statement of experts assembled jointly by the American Diabetes Association and the American Cancer Society reviews the state of science concerning 1) the association between diabetes and cancer incidence or prognosis; 2) risk factors common to both diabetes and cancer; 3) possible biologic links between diabetes and cancer risk; and 4) whether diabetes treatments influence the risk of cancer or cancer prognosis. In addition, key unanswered questions for future research are posed.

  17. Distributed Estimation using Bayesian Consensus Filtering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-06

    22] and Bayesian programming [23]. This paper focuses on developing a consensus framework for distributed Bayesian filters. The statistics literature...denote the set of inclusive neighbors. Let N, R, and Rm×n be the sets of natural numbers (positive integers ), real numbers, and m by n matrices. Let λ and...the bounded integral (´ X |f(x)| pdµ(x) )1/p , where µ is a measure on X . II. PRELIMINARIES In this section, we first state four assumptions used

  18. Automated protein classification using consensus decision.

    PubMed

    Can, Tolga; Camoğlu, Orhan; Singh, Ambuj K; Wang, Yuan-Fang

    2004-01-01

    We propose a novel technique for automatically generating the SCOP classification of a protein structure with high accuracy. High accuracy is achieved by combining the decisions of multiple methods using the consensus of a committee (or an ensemble) classifier. Our technique is rooted in machine learning which shows that by judicially employing component classifiers, an ensemble classifier can be constructed to outperform its components. We use two sequence- and three structure-comparison tools as component classifiers. Given a protein structure, using the joint hypothesis, we first determine if the protein belongs to an existing category (family, superfamily, fold) in the SCOP hierarchy. For the proteins that are predicted as members of the existing categories, we compute their family-, superfamily-, and fold-level classifications using the consensus classifier. We show that we can significantly improve the classification accuracy compared to the individual component classifiers. In particular, we achieve error rates that are 3-12 times less than the individual classifiers' error rates at the family level, 1.5-4.5 times less at the superfamily level, and 1.1-2.4 times less at the fold level.

  19. Consensus and ordering in language dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelló, X.; Baronchelli, A.; Loreto, V.

    2009-10-01

    We consider two social consensus models, the AB-model and the Naming Game restricted to two conventions, which describe a population of interacting agents that can be in either of two equivalent states (A or B) or in a third mixed (AB) state. Proposed in the context of language competition and emergence, the AB state was associated with bilingualism and synonymy respectively. We show that the two models are equivalent in the mean field approximation, though the differences at the microscopic level have non-trivial consequences. To point them out, we investigate an extension of these dynamics in which confidence/trust is considered, focusing on the case of an underlying fully connected graph, and we show that the consensus-polarization phase transition taking place in the Naming Game is not observed in the AB model. We then consider the interface motion in regular lattices. Qualitatively, both models show the same behavior: a diffusive interface motion in a one-dimensional lattice, and a curvature driven dynamics with diffusing stripe-like metastable states in a two-dimensional one. However, in comparison to the Naming Game, the AB-model dynamics is shown to slow down the diffusion of such configurations.

  20. Military consensus behind Soviet arms control proposals

    SciTech Connect

    Weickhardt, G.C.

    1987-09-01

    For nearly two years General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev has tried to entice the West with a spectacular array of arms control proposals and initiatives. On issues such as on-site inspections and European missile reductions, he has made such significant concessions over previous Soviet positions that questions have been raised, and not satisfactorily answered, about how much support Gorbachev's diplomacy enjoys among the Soviet military. For example, have Gorbachev's proposals been a bold personal gamble to achieve agreement without the prior approval of the Soviet military bureaucracy. Or does his arms control diplomacy represent a broad consensus among the military leadership and a realignment of Soviet military doctrine and grand strategy. A careful examination of recent Soviet military thought shows that such a consensus exists. A broad and stable coalition of key military leaders supports the General Secretary's policies. Moreover, recent Soviet concessions are not, as commonly argued, a stopgap ploy to halt the US Strategic Defense Initiative or Star Wars. Rather, the military's support for Gorbachev's arms-control diplomacy is based on some serious strategic analysis and stems from broad, fundamental, and enduring changes in Soviet national security policy.

  1. Consensus document on allergic conjunctivitis (DECA).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, M C; Montero, J; Rondon, C; Benitez del Castillo, J M; Velázquez, E; Herreras, J M; Fernández-Parra, B; Merayo-Lloves, J; Del Cuvillo, A; Vega, F; Valero, A; Panizo, C; Montoro, J; Matheu, V; Lluch-Bernal, M; González, M L; González, R; Dordal, M T; Dávila, I; Colás, C; Campo, P; Antón, E; Navarro, A

    2015-01-01

    Allergic conjunctivitis (AC) is an inflammatory disease of the conjunctiva caused mainly by an IgE-mediated mechanism. It is the most common type of ocular allergy. Despite being the most benign form of conjunctivitis, AC has a considerable effect on patient quality of life, reduces work productivity, and increases health care costs. No consensus has been reached on its classification, diagnosis, or treatment. Consequently, the literature provides little information on its natural history, epidemiological data are scarce, and it is often difficult to ascertain its true morbidity. The main objective of the Consensus Document on Allergic Conjunctivitis (Documento dE Consenso sobre Conjuntivitis Alérgica [DECA]), which was drafted by an expert panel from the Spanish Society of Allergology and Spanish Society of Ophthalmology, was to reach agreement on basic criteria that could prove useful for both specialists and primary care physicians and facilitate the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of AC. This document is the first of its kind to describe and analyze aspects of AC that could make it possible to control symptoms.

  2. Consensus in networks of mobile communicating agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Populations of mobile and communicating agents describe a vast array of technological and natural systems, ranging from sensor networks to animal groups. Here, we investigate how a group-level agreement may emerge in the continuously evolving network defined by the local interactions of the moving individuals. We adopt a general scheme of motion in two dimensions and we let the individuals interact through the minimal naming game, a prototypical scheme to investigate social consensus. We distinguish different regimes of convergence determined by the emission range of the agents and by their mobility, and we identify the corresponding scaling behaviors of the consensus time. In the same way, we rationalize also the behavior of the maximum memory used during the convergence process, which determines the minimum cognitive/storage capacity needed by the individuals. Overall, we believe that the simple and general model presented in this paper can represent a helpful reference for a better understanding of the behavior of populations of mobile agents.

  3. Consensus in evolving networks of mobile agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronchelli, Andrea; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2012-02-01

    Populations of mobile and communicating agents describe a vast array of technological and natural systems, ranging from sensor networks to animal groups. Here, we investigate how a group-level agreement may emerge in the continuously evolving networks defined by the local interactions of the moving individuals. We adopt a general scheme of motion in two dimensions and we let the individuals interact through the minimal naming game, a prototypical scheme to investigate social consensus. We distinguish different regimes of convergence determined by the emission range of the agents and by their mobility, and we identify the corresponding scaling behaviors of the consensus time. In the same way, we rationalize also the behavior of the maximum memory used during the convergence process, which determines the minimum cognitive/storage capacity needed by the individuals. Overall, we believe that the simple and general model presented in this talk can represent a helpful reference for a better understanding of the behavior of populations of mobile agents.

  4. Frailty Consensus: A Call to Action

    PubMed Central

    Morley, John E.; Vellas, Bruno; van Kan, G. Abellan; Anker, Stefan D.; Bauer, Juergen M.; Bernabei, Roberto; Cesari, Matteo; Chumlea, W.C.; Doehner, Wolfram; Evans, Jonathan; Fried, Linda P.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Katz, Paul R.; Malmstrom, Theodore K.; McCarter, Roger J.; Gutierrez Robledo, Luis M.; Rockwood, Ken; von Haehling, Stephan; Vandewoude, Maurits F.; Walston, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Frailty is a clinical state in which there is an increase in an individual’s vulnerability for developing increased dependency and/or mortality when exposed to a stressor. Frailty can occur as the result of a range of diseases and medical conditions. A consensus group consisting of delegates from 6 major international, European, and US societies created 4 major consensus points on a specific form of frailty: physical frailty. Physical frailty is an important medical syndrome. The group defined physical frailty as “a medical syndrome with multiple causes and contributors that is characterized by diminished strength, endurance, and reduced physiologic function that increases an individual’s vulnerability for developing increased dependency and/or death.”Physical frailty can potentially be prevented or treated with specific modalities, such as exercise, protein-calorie supplementation, vitamin D, and reduction of polypharmacy.Simple, rapid screening tests have been developed and validated, such as the simple FRAIL scale, to allow physicians to objectively recognize frail persons.For the purposes of optimally managing individuals with physical frailty, all persons older than 70 years and all individuals with significant weight loss (≥5%) due to chronic disease should be screened for frailty. PMID:23764209

  5. Dialogic Consensus In Clinical Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Walker, Paul; Lovat, Terry

    2016-12-01

    This paper is predicated on the understanding that clinical encounters between clinicians and patients should be seen primarily as inter-relations among persons and, as such, are necessarily moral encounters. It aims to relocate the discussion to be had in challenging medical decision-making situations, including, for example, as the end of life comes into view, onto a more robust moral philosophical footing than is currently commonplace. In our contemporary era, those making moral decisions must be cognizant of the existence of perspectives other than their own, and be attuned to the demands of inter-subjectivity. Applicable to clinical practice, we propose and justify a Habermasian approach as one useful means of achieving what can be described as dialogic consensus. The Habermasian approach builds around, first, his discourse theory of morality as universalizable to all and, second, communicative action as a cooperative search for truth. It is a concrete way to ground the discourse which must be held in complex medical decision-making situations, in its actual reality. Considerations about the theoretical underpinnings of the application of dialogic consensus to clinical practice, and potential difficulties, are explored.

  6. Consensus Paper: Management of Degenerative Cerebellar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ilg, W.; Bastian, A. J.; Boesch, S.; Burciu, R. G.; Celnik, P.; Claaßen, J.; Feil, K.; Kalla, R.; Miyai, I.; Nachbauer, W.; Schöls, L.; Strupp, M.; Synofzik, M.; Teufel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of motor symptoms of degenerative cerebellar ataxia remains difficult. Yet there are recent developments that are likely to lead to significant improvements in the future. Most desirable would be a causative treatment of the underlying cerebellar disease. This is currently available only for a very small subset of cerebellar ataxias with known metabolic dysfunction. However, increasing knowledge of the pathophysiology of hereditary ataxia should lead to an increasing number of medically sensible drug trials. In this paper, data from recent drug trials in patients with recessive and dominant cerebellar ataxias will be summarized. There is consensus that up to date, no medication has been proven effective. Aminopyridines and acetazolamide are the only exception, which are beneficial in patients with episodic ataxia type 2. Aminopyridines are also effective in a subset of patients presenting with downbeat nystagmus. As such, all authors agreed that the mainstays of treatment of degenerative cerebellar ataxia are currently physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. For many years, well-controlled rehabilitation studies in patients with cerebellar ataxia were lacking. Data of recently published studies show that coordinative training improves motor function in both adult and juvenile patients with cerebellar degeneration. Given the well-known contribution of the cerebellum to motor learning, possible mechanisms underlying improvement will be outlined. There is consensus that evidence-based guidelines for the physiotherapy of degenerative cerebellar ataxia need to be developed. Future developments in physiotherapeutical interventions will be discussed including application of non-invasive brain stimulation. PMID:24222635

  7. [SECOT consensus on painful knee replacement].

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J; Macule, F; Bello, S; Chana, F; Forriol, F

    2013-01-01

    The opinions of 21 experts in knee surgery were evaluated in this study, using a DELPHI questionnaire method in two successive rounds, on 64 controversial scenarios that covered both the diagnosis and possible treatment of painful knee replacements. The level of consensus was significantly unanimous in 42 items and of the design in 5, with no agreement in 17 of the questions presented. light of the published scientific evidence, the surgeons who took part showed to have a notable level of information on the most effective diagnostic tests, although, it should be pointed out that there was a lack of confidence in the possibility of ruling out an infection when the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the C-reactive protein were within normal values, which have been demonstrated in the literature to have a high negative predictive value As regards the treatments to employ in the different situations, the responses of the expert panel were mainly in agreement with the data in the literature. The conclusions of this consensus may help other surgeons when they are faced with a painful knee prosthesis.

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C molecular phylogeny: consensus sequence for an AIDS vaccine design?

    PubMed

    Novitsky, V; Smith, U R; Gilbert, P; McLane, M F; Chigwedere, P; Williamson, C; Ndung'u, T; Klein, I; Chang, S Y; Peter, T; Thior, I; Foley, B T; Gaolekwe, S; Rybak, N; Gaseitsiwe, S; Vannberg, F; Marlink, R; Lee, T H; Essex, M

    2002-06-01

    An evolving dominance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C (HIV-1C) in the AIDS epidemic has been associated with a high prevalence of HIV-1C infection in the southern African countries and with an expanding epidemic in India and China. Understanding the molecular phylogeny and genetic diversity of HIV-1C viruses may be important for the design and evaluation of an HIV vaccine for ultimate use in the developing world. In this study we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships (i) between 73 non-recombinant HIV-1C near-full-length genome sequences, including 51 isolates from Botswana; (ii) between HIV-1C consensus sequences that represent different geographic subsets; and (iii) between specific isolates and consensus sequences. Based on the phylogenetic analyses of 73 near-full-length genomes, 16 "lineages" (a term that is used hereafter for discussion purposes and does not imply taxonomic standing) were identified within HIV-1C. The lineages were supported by high bootstrap values in maximum-parsimony and neighbor-joining analyses and were confirmed by the maximum-likelihood method. The nucleotide diversity between the 73 HIV-1C isolates (mean value of 8.93%; range, 2.9 to 11.7%) was significantly higher than the diversity of the samples to the consensus sequence (mean value of 4.86%; range, 3.3 to 7.2%, P < 0.0001). The translated amino acid distances to the consensus sequence were significantly lower than distances between samples within all HIV-1C proteins. The consensus sequences of HIV-1C proteins accompanied by amino acid frequencies were presented (that of Gag is presented in this work; those of Pol, Vif, Vpr, Tat, Rev, Vpu, Env, and Nef are presented elsewhere [http://www.aids.harvard.edu/lab_research/concensus_sequence.htm]). Additionally, in the promoter region three NF-kappa B sites (GGGRNNYYCC) were identified within the consensus sequences of the entire set or any subset of HIV-1C isolates. This study suggests that the consensus sequence

  9. Consensus and Stability Analysis of Networked Multiagent Predictive Control Systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guo-Ping

    2016-03-17

    This paper is concerned with the consensus and stability problem of multiagent control systems via networks with communication delays and data loss. A networked multiagent predictive control scheme is proposed to achieve output consensus and also compensate for the communication delays and data loss actively. The necessary and sufficient conditions of achieving both consensus and stability of the closed-loop networked multiagent control systems are derived. An important result that is obtained is that the consensus and stability of closed-loop networked multiagent predictive control systems are not related to the communication delays and data loss. An example illustrates the performance of the networked multiagent predictive control scheme.

  10. Rural/urban elderly and siblings: their value consensus.

    PubMed

    Suggs, P K; Kivett, V R

    Consensus is the level of agreement about life felt among kin and has been identified as a dimension of family solidarity with important implications for the family network. This investigation studied the factors contributing to the consensus between older adults (age sixty-five and older) and the sibling with whom they had the most contact. Respondents (N = 275) lived in a rural/urban area. Seven independent variables were entered into a multiple-regression model to determine their relative importance to consensus of the sibling relationship. Results showed that 7 percent of the variance in consensus could be explained. Filial expectations, educational disparity, and the brother/sister link were the only variables of relative importance to older adult/sibling consensus. There was greater consensus when there were fewer expectations of the sibling, similarity of educational backgrounds, and when the respondent was male and his sibling was female. Brother/sister and brother/brother links, residential proximity, communication by mail or telephone, helping behaviors, and marital status were of no relative importance to consensus. The results suggest that factors previously found to be associated with intergenerational consensus may vary in their importance to intragenerational consensus.

  11. Climate science, character, and the "hard-won" consensus.

    PubMed

    Ranalli, Brent

    2012-06-01

    What makes a consensus among scientists credible and convincing? This paper introduces the notion of a "hard-won" consensus and uses examples from recent debates over climate change science to show that this heuristic standard for evaluating the quality of a consensus is widely shared. The extent to which a consensus is "hard won" can be understood to depend on the personal qualities of the participating experts; the article demonstrates the continuing utility of the norms of modern science introduced by Robert K. Merton by showing that individuals on both sides of the climate science debate rely intuitively on Mertonian ideas--interpreted in terms of character--to frame their arguments.

  12. Current level of consensus on probiotic science

    PubMed Central

    Capurso, Lucio; Collins, Kevin; Cummings, John; Delzenne, Nathalie; Goulet, Olivier; Guarner, Francisco; Marteau, Philippe; Meier, Rémy

    2010-01-01

    The present paper summarizes the consensus views of a group of 9 European clinicians and scientists on the current state of scientific knowledge on probiotics, covering those areas where there is substantial evidence for beneficial effects and those where the evidence base is poor or inconsistent. There was general agreement that probiotic effects were species and often strain specific. The experts agreed that some probiotics were effective in reducing the incidence and duration of rotavirus diarrhea in infants, antibiotic-associated diarrhea in adults and, for certain probiotics, Clostridium difficile infections. Some probiotics are associated with symptomatic improvements in irritable bowel syndrome and alleviation of digestive discomfort. Probiotics can reduce the frequency and severity of necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants and have been shown to regulate intestinal immunity. Several other clinical effects of probiotics, including their role in inflammatory bowel disease, atopic dermatitis, respiratory or genito-urinary infections or H. pylori adjuvant treatment were thought promising but inconsistent. PMID:21637035

  13. American National Standards: The Consensus Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schafer, Thom

    2000-01-01

    Since the early 20th Century, technical and professional societies have developed standards within their areas of expertise addressing aspects of their industries which they feel would benefit from a degree of standardization. From the beginning, the use of these standards was strictly voluntary. It did not take jurisdictional authorities long, however, to recognize that application of these voluntary standards enhanced public safety, as well as leveling the playing field in trade. Hence, laws were passed mandating their use. Purchasers of goods and services also recognized the advantages of standardization, and began requiring the use of standards in their procurement contracts. But how do jurisdictions and purchasers know that the standard they are mandating is a broad-based industry standard, or a narrowly focused set of rules which only apply to one company or institution, thereby giving them an unfair advantage? The answer is "consensus", and a unified approach in achieving it.

  14. Using Network Dynamical Influence to Drive Consensus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punzo, Giuliano; Young, George F.; MacDonald, Malcolm; Leonard, Naomi E.

    2016-05-01

    Consensus and decision-making are often analysed in the context of networks, with many studies focusing attention on ranking the nodes of a network depending on their relative importance to information routing. Dynamical influence ranks the nodes with respect to their ability to influence the evolution of the associated network dynamical system. In this study it is shown that dynamical influence not only ranks the nodes, but also provides a naturally optimised distribution of effort to steer a network from one state to another. An example is provided where the “steering” refers to the physical change in velocity of self-propelled agents interacting through a network. Distinct from other works on this subject, this study looks at directed and hence more general graphs. The findings are presented with a theoretical angle, without targeting particular applications or networked systems; however, the framework and results offer parallels with biological flocks and swarms and opportunities for design of technological networks.

  15. [Neonatal screening: trends, debates and consensus].

    PubMed

    Vailly, Joëlle

    2007-03-01

    This study focuses on the social and political implications of the substantial expansion of genetic tests and neonatal screening. The introduction of neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis is one of the significant developments that have fuelled debate on their appropriateness. It has raised a series of questions on the pros and cons, the role of evidence in biomedicine, and the articulation between the therapeutic approach and foetal selection. In this respect France provides an ideal research field as it was one of the first countries to generalize this screening, launched in January 2002. Several questions arise: What were the terms of the debate in France and their underlying logics? How was consensus reached? More generally, what does this screening tell us about policies on life forms today?

  16. Consensus control of flexible-joint robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Becerril, Sofía; Espinosa-Pérez, Gerardo; Panteley, Elena; Ortega, Romeo

    2015-06-01

    Synchronisation of networks composed by fully actuated robot manipulators has received a lot of attention from the control theory community. Unfortunately, the case of under-actuated robots has not been deeply studied. The aim of this paper is to extend previous results reported by the authors addressing the particular (but of practical interest) case of networks composed by flexible-joint robots. The main feature of the contribution is to consider a change of coordinates, first introduced in Nuno, Ortega, Basanes and Hill, to solve the consensus problem assuming the existence of unknown delays in the communication channels. The extension is twofold, namely: the presentation of a control scheme that, in contrast to the one considered in Avila-Becerril and Espinosa-Perez, does not require knowledge of the initial conditions and the proof that the controller can also be implemented in Cartesian coordinates. The usefulness of the contribution is illustrated through numerical simulations.

  17. The Consensus Molecular Subtypes of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guinney, Justin; Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Wang, Xin; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Schlicker, Andreas; Soneson, Charlotte; Marisa, Laetitia; Roepman, Paul; Nyamundanda, Gift; Angelino, Paolo; Bot, Brian M.; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Simon, Iris M.; Gerster, Sarah; Fessler, Evelyn; de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Ramay, Hena; Barras, David; Homicsko, Krisztian; Maru, Dipen; Manyam, Ganiraju C.; Broom, Bradley; Boige, Valerie; Perez-Villamil, Beatriz; Laderas, Ted; Salazar, Ramon; Gray, Joe W.; Hanahan, Douglas; Tabernero, Josep; Bernards, Rene; Friend, Stephen H.; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Medema, Jan Paul; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wessels, Lodewyk; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kopetz, Scott; Vermeulen, Louis; Tejpar, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequently lethal disease with heterogeneous outcomes and drug responses. To resolve inconsistencies among the reported gene expression–based CRC classifications and facilitate clinical translation, we formed an international consortium dedicated to large-scale data sharing and analytics across expert groups. We show marked interconnectivity between six independent classification systems coalescing into four consensus molecular subtypes (CMS) with distinguishing features: CMS1 (MSI Immune, 14%), hypermutated, microsatellite unstable, strong immune activation; CMS2 (Canonical, 37%), epithelial, chromosomally unstable, marked WNT and MYC signaling activation; CMS3 (Metabolic, 13%), epithelial, evident metabolic dysregulation; and CMS4 (Mesenchymal, 23%), prominent transforming growth factor β activation, stromal invasion, and angiogenesis. Samples with mixed features (13%) possibly represent a transition phenotype or intra-tumoral heterogeneity. We consider the CMS groups the most robust classification system currently available for CRC – with clear biological interpretability – and the basis for future clinical stratification and subtype–based targeted interventions. PMID:26457759

  18. Toward a consensus in protein structure nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    DaSilva, Linder C; Gurry, Thomas; Stultz, Collin M

    2014-01-01

    In a recent article, published in Intrinsically Disordered Proteins, a valuable consensus view regarding the nomenclature for disordered proteins was presented.1 In this work the authors present a thoughtful and systemic review of terms that have been used in the literature to describe proteins that sample a heterogeneous set of structures during their biological lifetime. We agree that the term “intrinsically disordered proteins” (IDPs) is an appropriate single descriptor to refer to this particular class of proteins, although it does not fully capture much of the nuanced complexities that are inherent to this class. In what follows we suggest a refinement to this nomenclature based on an analysis of the underlying ensemble that describes the thermally accessible states of a given IDP.

  19. Using Network Dynamical Influence to Drive Consensus

    PubMed Central

    Punzo, Giuliano; Young, George F.; Macdonald, Malcolm; Leonard, Naomi E.

    2016-01-01

    Consensus and decision-making are often analysed in the context of networks, with many studies focusing attention on ranking the nodes of a network depending on their relative importance to information routing. Dynamical influence ranks the nodes with respect to their ability to influence the evolution of the associated network dynamical system. In this study it is shown that dynamical influence not only ranks the nodes, but also provides a naturally optimised distribution of effort to steer a network from one state to another. An example is provided where the “steering” refers to the physical change in velocity of self-propelled agents interacting through a network. Distinct from other works on this subject, this study looks at directed and hence more general graphs. The findings are presented with a theoretical angle, without targeting particular applications or networked systems; however, the framework and results offer parallels with biological flocks and swarms and opportunities for design of technological networks. PMID:27210291

  20. Definition of a consensus transportin-specific nucleocytoplasmic transport signal.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, H P; Benson, R E; Truant, R; Herold, A; Phingbodhipakkiya, M; Cullen, B R

    1999-04-02

    The low cytoplasmic and high nuclear concentration of the GTP-bound form of Ran provides directionality for both nuclear protein import and export. Both import and export factors bind RanGTP directly, yet this interaction produces opposite effects; in the former case, RanGTP binding induces nuclear cargo release, whereas in the latter, RanGTP binding induces nuclear cargo assembly. Therefore, nuclear import and export receptors and their protein recognition sites are predicted to be distinct. Nevertheless, the approximately 38-amino acid M9 sequence present in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 has been reported to serve as both a nuclear localization signal and a nuclear export signal, even though only one protein, the nuclear import factor transportin, has been shown to bind M9 directly. We have used a combination of mutational randomization followed by selection for transportin binding to exhaustively define amino acids in M9 that are critical for transportin binding in vivo. As expected, the resultant approximately 12-amino acid transportin-binding consensus sequence is also predictive of nuclear localization signal activity. Surprisingly, however, this extensive mutational analysis failed to dissect M9 nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal function. Nevertheless, transportin appears unlikely to be the M9 export receptor, as RanGTP can be shown to block M9 binding by transportin not only in vitro, but also in the nucleus in vivo. This analysis therefore predicts the existence of a nuclear export receptor distinct from transportin that nevertheless shares a common protein-binding site on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1.

  1. Early Gnathostome Phylogeny Revisited: Multiple Method Consensus

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Tuo; King, Benedict; Long, John A.; Ahlberg, Per E.; Zhu, Min

    2016-01-01

    A series of recent studies recovered consistent phylogenetic scenarios of jawed vertebrates, such as the paraphyly of placoderms with respect to crown gnathostomes, and antiarchs as the sister group of all other jawed vertebrates. However, some of the phylogenetic relationships within the group have remained controversial, such as the positions of Entelognathus, ptyctodontids, and the Guiyu-lineage that comprises Guiyu, Psarolepis and Achoania. The revision of the dataset in a recent study reveals a modified phylogenetic hypothesis, which shows that some of these phylogenetic conflicts were sourced from a few inadvertent miscodings. The interrelationships of early gnathostomes are addressed based on a combined new dataset with 103 taxa and 335 characters, which is the most comprehensive morphological dataset constructed to date. This dataset is investigated in a phylogenetic context using maximum parsimony (MP), Bayesian inference (BI) and maximum likelihood (ML) approaches in an attempt to explore the consensus and incongruence between the hypotheses of early gnathostome interrelationships recovered from different methods. Our findings consistently corroborate the paraphyly of placoderms, all ‘acanthodians’ as a paraphyletic stem group of chondrichthyans, Entelognathus as a stem gnathostome, and the Guiyu-lineage as stem sarcopterygians. The incongruence using different methods is less significant than the consensus, and mainly relates to the positions of the placoderm Wuttagoonaspis, the stem chondrichthyan Ramirosuarezia, and the stem osteichthyan Lophosteus—the taxa that are either poorly known or highly specialized in character complement. Given that the different performances of each phylogenetic approach, our study provides an empirical case that the multiple phylogenetic analyses of morphological data are mutually complementary rather than redundant. PMID:27649538

  2. A healthy bladder: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Lukacz, E S; Sampselle, C; Gray, M; Macdiarmid, S; Rosenberg, M; Ellsworth, P; Palmer, M H

    2011-10-01

    A panel of experts in urology, urogynecology, nursing, and behavioral therapy convened in 2010 to discuss the importance of a healthy bladder on overall health. They determined that a consensus statement was necessary to raise awareness among the general public, healthcare providers, payors, and policymakers, with the goals of minimizing the impact of poor bladder health and stimulating primary prevention of bladder conditions. In this statement, 'healthy' bladder function is described, as well as internal and external factors that influence bladder health. It is suggested that primary prevention strategies should be aimed at providing education regarding normal lower urinary tract structures and functioning to the public, including patients and healthcare providers. This education may promote the achievement of optimal bladder health by increasing healthy bladder habits and behaviors, awareness of risk factors, healthcare seeking, and clinician engagement and reducing stigma and other barriers to treatment. Promoting optimal bladder health may reduce the personal, societal and economic impact of bladder conditions, including anxiety and depression and costs associated with conditions or diseases and their treatment. While adopting healthy bladder habits and behaviors and behaviors may improve or maintain bladder health, it is important to recognize that certain symptoms may indicate the presence of conditions that require medical attention; many bladder conditions are treatable with a range of options for most bladder conditions. Lastly, the authors propose clinical directives based on persuasive and convergent research to improve and maintain bladder health. The authors hope that this statement will lead to promotion and achievement of optimal bladder health, which may improve overall health and help minimize the effects of bladder conditions on the public, healthcare professionals, educators, employers, and payors. The advisors are in consensus regarding the

  3. Robust point matching via vector field consensus.

    PubMed

    Jiayi Ma; Ji Zhao; Jinwen Tian; Yuille, Alan L; Zhuowen Tu

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm, called vector field consensus, for establishing robust point correspondences between two sets of points. Our algorithm starts by creating a set of putative correspondences which can contain a very large number of false correspondences, or outliers, in addition to a limited number of true correspondences (inliers). Next, we solve for correspondence by interpolating a vector field between the two point sets, which involves estimating a consensus of inlier points whose matching follows a nonparametric geometrical constraint. We formulate this a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation of a Bayesian model with hidden/latent variables indicating whether matches in the putative set are outliers or inliers. We impose nonparametric geometrical constraints on the correspondence, as a prior distribution, using Tikhonov regularizers in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. MAP estimation is performed by the EM algorithm which by also estimating the variance of the prior model (initialized to a large value) is able to obtain good estimates very quickly (e.g., avoiding many of the local minima inherent in this formulation). We illustrate this method on data sets in 2D and 3D and demonstrate that it is robust to a very large number of outliers (even up to 90%). We also show that in the special case where there is an underlying parametric geometrical model (e.g., the epipolar line constraint) that we obtain better results than standard alternatives like RANSAC if a large number of outliers are present. This suggests a two-stage strategy, where we use our nonparametric model to reduce the size of the putative set and then apply a parametric variant of our approach to estimate the geometric parameters. Our algorithm is computationally efficient and we provide code for others to use it. In addition, our approach is general and can be applied to other problems, such as learning with a badly corrupted training data set.

  4. Case definitions integrating empiric and consensus perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; McManimen, Stephanie; Sunnquist, Madison; Brown, Abigail; Furst, Jacob; Newton, Julia L.; Strand, Elin Bolle

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been considerable controversy regarding how to name and define the illnesses known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The IOM report has proposed a new clinical criteria and name for this illness, but aspects of these recommendations have been scrutinized by patients and scientists. Purpose It is possible that both empiric and consensus approaches could be used to help settle some of these diagnostic challenges. Using patient samples collected in the United States, Great Britain, and Norway (N=556), the current study attempted to categorize patients using more general as well as more restricted case definitions. Results Overall, the outcomes suggest that there might be four groupings of patients, with the broadest category involving those with chronic fatigue (N=62), defined by 6 or more months of fatigue which can be cannot be explained by medical or psychiatric conditions. A second category involves those patients that have chronic fatigue that can be explained by a medical or psychiatric condition (N=47). A third category involves more specific criteria that have been posited both by the IOM report, a Canadian Clinical Case criteria, a ME-ICC criteria and a more empiric approach. These efforts have specified domains of substantial reductions of activity, post-exertional malaise, neurocognitive impairment, and sleep dysfunction (N=346). Patients with these characteristics were more functionally impaired than those meeting just chronic fatigue criteria, p < .05. Finally, those meeting even more restrictive ME criteria proposed by Ramsay, identified a smaller and even more impaired group, p < .05. Discussion The advantages of using such empirical and consensus approaches to develop reliable classification and diagnostic efforts are discussed. PMID:27088059

  5. Methodological Quality of Consensus Guidelines in Implant Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano; Apaza, Karol; Ariza-Fritas, Tania; Málaga, Lilian; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Alarcón, Marco Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background Consensus guidelines are useful to improve clinical decision making. Therefore, the methodological evaluation of these guidelines is of paramount importance. Low quality information may guide to inadequate or harmful clinical decisions. Objective To evaluate the methodological quality of consensus guidelines published in implant dentistry using a validated methodological instrument. Methods The six implant dentistry journals with impact factors were scrutinised for consensus guidelines related to implant dentistry. Two assessors independently selected consensus guidelines, and four assessors independently evaluated their methodological quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument. Disagreements in the selection and evaluation of guidelines were resolved by consensus. First, the consensus guidelines were analysed alone. Then, systematic reviews conducted to support the guidelines were included in the analysis. Non-parametric statistics for dependent variables (Wilcoxon signed rank test) was used to compare both groups. Results Of 258 initially retrieved articles, 27 consensus guidelines were selected. Median scores in four domains (applicability, rigour of development, stakeholder involvement, and editorial independence), expressed as percentages of maximum possible domain scores, were below 50% (median, 26%, 30.70%, 41.70%, and 41.70%, respectively). The consensus guidelines and consensus guidelines + systematic reviews data sets could be compared for 19 guidelines, and the results showed significant improvements in all domain scores (p < 0.05). Conclusions Methodological improvement of consensus guidelines published in major implant dentistry journals is needed. The findings of the present study may help researchers to better develop consensus guidelines in implant dentistry, which will improve the quality and trust of information needed to make proper clinical decisions. PMID:28107405

  6. Ensemble distribution models in conservation prioritization: from consensus predictions to consensus reserve networks

    PubMed Central

    Meller, Laura; Cabeza, Mar; Pironon, Samuel; Barbet-Massin, Morgane; Maiorano, Luigi; Georges, Damien; Thuiller, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Aim Conservation planning exercises increasingly rely on species distributions predicted either from one particular statistical model or, more recently, from an ensemble of models (i.e. ensemble forecasting). However, it has not yet been explored how different ways of summarizing ensemble predictions affect conservation planning outcomes. We evaluate these effects and compare commonplace consensus methods, applied before the conservation prioritization phase, to a novel method that applies consensus after reserve selection. Location Europe. Methods We used an ensemble of predicted distributions of 146 Western Palaearctic bird species in alternative ways: four different consensus methods, as well as distributions discounted with variability, were used to produce inputs for spatial conservation prioritization. In addition, we developed and tested a novel method, in which we built 100 datasets by sampling the ensemble of predicted distributions, ran a conservation prioritization analysis on each of them and averaged the resulting priority ranks. We evaluated the conservation outcome against three controls: (i) a null control, based on random ranking of cells; (2) the reference solution, based on an expert-refined dataset; and (3) the independent solution, based on an independent dataset. Results Networks based on predicted distributions were more representative of rare species than randomly selected networks. Alternative methods to summarize ensemble predictions differed in representativeness of resulting reserve networks. Our novel method resulted in better representation of rare species than pre-selection consensus methods. Main conclusions Retaining information about the variation in the predicted distributions throughout the conservation prioritization seems to provide better results than summarizing the predictions before conservation prioritization. Our results highlight the need to understand and consider model-based uncertainty when using predicted

  7. The Consensus Definition Redefined from a Representational Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zand Scholten, Annemarie

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the author's critique to Paul E. Newton's article titled "Clarifying the consensus definition of validity." In his article, Newton not only clarifies but also redefines the consensus definition of validity. In this redefinition he omits the term "construct" and introduces the term "measurement." Both omission and introduction…

  8. The Search for a Value Consensus. Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockefeller Foundation, New York, NY.

    These papers by four social scientists were prepared for a conference to analyze the current absence of a value consensus in American life and to examine grounds for a consensus. Further, the contribution of education and the media to the shaping and dissemination of values is explored. Kenneth Boulding contends that underlying moral diversity is…

  9. Rural/Urban Elderly and Siblings: Their Value Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Patricia K.; Kivett, Vira R.

    Consensus has been identified as a dimension of family solidarity with important implications for the family network. To investigate the factors contributing to consensus between older adults and their sibling of most contact, 275 adults (173 females, 102 males), with a mean age of 74 years, were interviewed using a questionnaire covering work and…

  10. Evidentiary Standards for Consensus Standards in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    The standards that currently define a quality teacher or teacher education program derive their authority from the consensus of experts, who negotiate and craft statements that codify their views of best practice. In education, these consensus statements are rarely rooted in the field's established scholarship (as is the case for many standards in…

  11. Part Two: Infantile Spasms--The New Consensus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellock, John M.; O'Hara, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the conclusion made by the consensus group regarding infantile spasms. The consensus group concluded that "infantile spasms are a major form of severe epileptic encephalopathy of early childhood that results in neurodevelopmental regression and imposes a significant health burden." The entire group agrees that the best…

  12. 43 CFR 46.110 - Incorporating consensus-based management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT OF 1969 Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality... a course of action. (b) In incorporating consensus-based management in the NEPA process, bureaus... reasonable consensus-based alternative, if any, is reflected in the evaluation of the proposed action...

  13. Is Liberalism Strong Enough for a Moral Consensus?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, John

    1990-01-01

    Argues that liberalism is strong enough to sustain a moral consensus if its logic and psychological bases are understood. Rejects ideological positions, emphasizing the value of rational discourse for reaching consensus. Encourages liberal educators to make clear their commitment to a liberalism that avoids both authoritarianism and paranoia. (CH)

  14. DASACT: A decision aiding software for axiomatic consensus theory.

    PubMed

    Domenach, Florent; Tayari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    There have been various attempts, solutions, and approaches towards constructing an appropriate consensus tree based on a given set of phylogenetic trees. However, for practitioners, it is not always clear, for a given data set, which of these would create the most relevant consensus tree. In this paper, we introduce an open-source software called DASACT (Decision Aiding Software for Axiomatic Consensus Theory) created to assist practitioners on choosing the most appropriate consensus function. It is based on an exhaustive evaluation of axiomatic properties and consensus functions, which define the knowledge space as a concept lattice. Using a selection of axiomatic properties provided by the user, it is able to aid the user in choosing the most suitable function. DASACT is freely available at http://www.cs.unic.ac.cy/florent/software.htm.

  15. Consensus preferred hydration sites in six FKBP12-drug complexes.

    PubMed

    Faerman, C H; Karplus, P A

    1995-09-01

    A set of consensus hydration sites for the FK506-FKBP12 complex are derived by comparing six FKBP12-drug complexes. These hydration sites include a subset of the observed water molecules plus some sites that are occupied by neighboring protein atoms in the FK506-FKBP12 crystal structure. Two hydration prediction algorithms, AUTO-SOL and AQUARIUS2, showed significant increases in apparent efficacy using these consensus water sites, suggesting that our proposed set of consensus hydration sites is truly a better representation of the hydration properties of FKBP12 in solution. Predictably, the consensus hydration sites include all buried water molecules. Otherwise, the features of solvation sites included in the consensus list versus those discarded reveal no distinctive features that would allow them to be selected unambiguously without reference to multiple crystal forms. We suggest that analyses such as this one are a crucial prelude to any theoretical analysis aimed at understanding hydration properties.

  16. The "golden section" and bias in perceptions of social consensus.

    PubMed

    Gross, S R; Miller, N

    1997-01-01

    Meta-analytic examination of I28 false consensus effect issues supports the hypothesis that the "Golden Section" (61.8% group size) approximates the level of actual consensus that separates overestimation of consensus (group size < 61.8%) from underestimation (group size > 61.8%). Overestimation of the actual percentage of others who endorse one's own view increases as actual consensus decreases from 61.8%, and underestimation increases as it exceeds 61.8%. The form of the response (viz, a yes or no answer to a question) moderates this conclusion. The Golden Section holds for majorities and minorities defined by agreement with an issue. For majority and minority groups defined by disagreement, the inflection point is higher. Contrary to Mullen and Hu (1988), for agreeing majorities, the slope for consensus underestimation as a function of increased majority size does not differ from that of minority overestimation.

  17. Prediction of collective opinion in consensus formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lei; Liu, Jianguo; Pan, Xue; Song, Wen-Jun; Li, Xu-Dong

    2014-12-01

    In the consensus formation dynamics, the effect of leaders and interventions have been widely studied for it has many applications such as in politics and commerce. However, the problem is how to know if it is necessary for one to make an intervention. In this paper, we theoretically propose a method for predicting the tendency and final state of collective opinion. By giving each agent a conviction ci which measures the ability to insist on his opinion, we present an opinion formation model in which agents with high convictions naturally show up properties of the opinion leaders. Results reveal that, although each agent initially gets an opinion evenly distributed in the range [-1, 1], the collective opinion of the steady-state may deviate to the positive or negative direction because of the initial bias of the leaders' opinions. We further get the correlation coefficient of the linear relationship between the collective opinion and the initial bias according to both the experimental and theoretical analysis. Thus, we could predict the final state at the very beginning of the dynamic only if we get the opinions of a small portion of the population. The prediction would afford us more time and opportunities to make reactions and interventions.

  18. Bleeding Avoidance Strategies: Consensus and Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Dauerman, Harold L.; Rao, Sunil V.; Resnic, Frederic S.; Applegate, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Bleeding complications after coronary intervention are associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased hospital costs, patient dissatisfaction, morbidity and one year mortality. Bleeding Avoidance Strategies represent a term incorporating multiple modalities that aim to reduce bleeding and vascular complications after cardiovascular catheterization. Recent improvements in the rates of bleeding complications after invasive cardiovascular procedures suggests that the clinical community has successfully embraced specific strategies and improved patient care in this area. There remains controversy regarding the efficacy, safety and/or practicality of 3 key bleeding avoidance strategies for cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention: procedural (radial artery approach, safezone arteriotomy), pharmacologic (multiple agents) and technological (vascular closure devices) approaches to improved access. In this article, we address areas of consensus with respect to selected modalities in order to define the role of each strategy in current practice. Furthermore, we focus on areas of controversy for selected modalities in order to define key areas warranting cautious clinical approaches and the need for future randomized clinical trials in this area. PMID:21700085

  19. Bleeding avoidance strategies. Consensus and controversy.

    PubMed

    Dauerman, Harold L; Rao, Sunil V; Resnic, Frederic S; Applegate, Robert J

    2011-06-28

    Bleeding complications after coronary intervention are associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased hospital costs, patient dissatisfaction, morbidity, and 1-year mortality. Bleeding avoidance strategies is a term incorporating multiple modalities that aim to reduce bleeding and vascular complications after cardiovascular catheterization. Recent improvements in the rates of bleeding complications after invasive cardiovascular procedures suggest that the clinical community has successfully embraced specific strategies and improved patient care in this area. There remains controversy regarding the efficacy, safety, and/or practicality of 3 key bleeding avoidance strategies for cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention: procedural (radial artery approach, safezone arteriotomy), pharmacological (multiple agents), and technological (vascular closure devices) approaches to improved access. In this paper, we address areas of consensus with respect to selected modalities in order to define the role of each strategy in current practice. Furthermore, we focus on areas of controversy for selected modalities in order to define key areas warranting cautious clinical approaches and the need for future randomized clinical trials in this area.

  20. The role of fanatics in consensus formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gündüç, Semra

    2015-08-01

    A model of opinion dynamics with two types of agents as social actors are presented, using the Ising thermodynamic model as the dynamics template. The agents are considered as opportunists which live at sites and interact with the neighbors, or fanatics/missionaries which move from site to site randomly in persuasion of converting agents of opposite opinion with the help of opportunists. Here, the moving agents act as an external influence on the opportunists to convert them to the opposite opinion. It is shown by numerical simulations that such dynamics of opinion formation may explain some details of consensus formation even when one of the opinions are held by a minority. Regardless the distribution of the opinion, different size societies exhibit different opinion formation behavior and time scales. In order to understand general behavior, the scaling relations obtained by comparing opinion formation processes observed in societies with varying population and number of randomly moving agents are studied. For the proposed model two types of scaling relations are observed. In fixed size societies, increasing the number of randomly moving agents give a scaling relation for the time scale of the opinion formation process. The second type of scaling relation is due to the size dependent information propagation in finite but large systems, namely finite-size scaling.

  1. Managing Carious Lesions: Consensus Recommendations on Terminology.

    PubMed

    Innes, N P T; Frencken, J E; Bjørndal, L; Maltz, M; Manton, D J; Ricketts, D; Van Landuyt, K; Banerjee, A; Campus, G; Doméjean, S; Fontana, M; Leal, S; Lo, E; Machiulskiene, V; Schulte, A; Splieth, C; Zandona, A; Schwendicke, F

    2016-05-01

    Variation in the terminology used to describe clinical management of carious lesions has contributed to a lack of clarity in the scientific literature and beyond. In this article, the International Caries Consensus Collaboration presents 1) issues around terminology, a scoping review of current words used in the literature for caries removal techniques, and 2) agreed terms and definitions, explaining how these were decided.Dental cariesis the name of the disease, and thecarious lesionis the consequence and manifestation of the disease-the signs or symptoms of the disease. The termdental caries managementshould be limited to situations involving control of the disease through preventive and noninvasive means at a patient level, whereascarious lesion managementcontrols the disease symptoms at the tooth level. While it is not possible to directly relate the visual appearance of carious lesions' clinical manifestations to the histopathology, we have based the terminology around the clinical consequences of disease (soft, leathery, firm, and hard dentine). Approaches to carious tissue removal are defined: 1)selective removal of carious tissue-includingselective removal to soft dentineandselective removal to firm dentine; 2)stepwise removal-including stage 1,selective removal to soft dentine, and stage 2,selective removal to firm dentine6 to 12 mo later; and 3)nonselective removal to hard dentine-formerly known ascomplete caries removal(technique no longer recommended). Adoption of these terms, around managing dental caries and its sequelae, will facilitate improved understanding and communication among researchers and within dental educators and the wider clinical dentistry community.

  2. Finding Optimal Alignment and Consensus of Circular Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehyung; Na, Joong Chae; Park, Heejin; Park, Kunsoo; Sim, Jeong Seop

    We consider the problem of finding the optimal alignment and consensus (string) of circular strings. Circular strings are different from linear strings in that the first (leftmost) symbol of a circular string is wrapped around next to the last (rightmost) symbol. In nature, for example, bacterial and mitochondrial DNAs typically form circular strings. The consensus string problem is finding a representative string (consensus) of a given set of strings, and it has been studied on linear strings extensively. However, only a few efforts have been made for the consensus problem for circular strings, even though circular strings are biologically important. In this paper, we introduce the consensus problem for circular strings and present novel algorithms to find the optimal alignment and consensus of circular strings under the Hamming distance metric. They are O(n 2logn)-time algorithms for three circular strings and an O(n 3logn)-time algorithm for four circular strings. Our algorithms are O(n/ logn) times faster than the naïve algorithm directly using the solutions for the linear consensus problems, which takes O(n 3) time for three circular strings and O(n 4) time for four circular strings. We achieved this speedup by adopting a convolution and a system of linear equations into our algorithms to reflect the characteristics of circular strings that we found.

  3. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment.

  4. [Preliminary evaluation of Chile's First Citizen Consensus Conference].

    PubMed

    Pellegrini Filho, Alberto; Zurita, Laura

    2004-05-01

    This piece provides an initial assessment of the First Citizen Consensus Conference, an event held in the city of Santiago, Chile, from 22-24 November 2003, on the subject of "The Management of My Medical Record." This conference was the first citizen consensus conference that has been held in Chile as well as the first such conference in Latin America. Consensus conferences were devised by the Danish Board of Technology in 1987 as a way to assess science and technology issues through discussions between experts and a panel of lay persons. At the end of a consensus conference, the lay persons express their opinions and recommendations in a consensus report that is directed at policymakers, decision-makers, and the public in general. The objective of a consensus conference is to bridge the gaps that routinely exist among the general public, experts, and elected officials. So far, the Danish Board of Technology has organized more than 20 of these conferences, using a methodology that has become established as a model. Taking into account the changes that have occurred in the relationship between science and society at large, the Pan American Health Organization has decided to support the holding of consensus conferences in Latin America and the Caribbean. The First Citizen Consensus Conference adapted the Danish methodology to conditions in Chile, and this piece assesses the modifications that were made. In addition, some 6 to 12 months after the conference, there will be an external evaluation of the outcomes and impact of the conference, especially in the communications media, public debate, decision-making, and perceptions of the persons who were involved. Despite the criticisms made in this piece and some shortcomings that are pointed out, the First Citizen Consensus Conference achieved all of its objectives and will serve as an excellent model for similar conferences in other countries of the Americas.

  5. Weighted Average Consensus-Based Unscented Kalman Filtering.

    PubMed

    Li, Wangyan; Wei, Guoliang; Han, Fei; Liu, Yurong

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we are devoted to investigate the consensus-based distributed state estimation problems for a class of sensor networks within the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) framework. The communication status among sensors is represented by a connected undirected graph. Moreover, a weighted average consensus-based UKF algorithm is developed for the purpose of estimating the true state of interest, and its estimation error is bounded in mean square which has been proven in the following section. Finally, the effectiveness of the proposed consensus-based UKF algorithm is validated through a simulation example.

  6. Admissible consensus for heterogeneous descriptor multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin-Rong; Liu, Guo-Ping

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on the admissible consensus problem for heterogeneous descriptor multi-agent systems. Based on algebra, graph and descriptor system theory, the necessary and sufficient conditions are proposed for heterogeneous descriptor multi-agent systems achieving admissible consensus. The provided conditions depend on not only the structure properties of each agent dynamics but also the topologies within the descriptor multi-agent systems. Moreover, an algorithm is given to design the novel consensus protocol. A numerical example demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed design approach.

  7. Inhibition of LtxA toxicity by blocking cholesterol binding with peptides.

    PubMed

    Brown, A C; Koufos, E; Balashova, N V; Boesze-Battaglia, K; Lally, E T

    2016-02-01

    The leukotoxin (LtxA) produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans kills host immune cells, allowing the bacterium to establish an ecological niche in the upper aerodigestive tract of its human host. The interaction of LtxA with human immune cells is both complex and multifaceted, involving membrane lipids as well as cell-surface proteins. In the initial encounter with the host cell, LtxA associates with lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1, a cell surface adhesion glycoprotein. However, we have also demonstrated that the toxin associates strongly with the plasma membrane lipids, specifically cholesterol. This association with cholesterol is regulated by a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif, with a sequence of (334) LEEYSKR(340), in the N-terminal region of the toxin. Here, we have demonstrated that removal of cholesterol from the plasma membrane or mutation of the LtxA CRAC motif inhibits the activity of the toxin in THP-1 cells. To inhibit LtxA activity, we designed a short peptide corresponding to the CRAC(336) motif of LtxA (CRAC(336WT)). This peptide binds to cholesterol and thereby inhibits the toxicity of LtxA in THP-1 cells. Previously, we showed that this peptide inhibits LtxA toxicity against Jn.9 (Jurkat) cells, indicating that peptides derived from the cholesterol-binding site of LtxA may have a potential clinical applicability in controlling infections of repeats-in-toxin-producing organisms.

  8. Inhibition of LtxA Toxicity by Blocking Cholesterol Binding With Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angela C.; Koufos, Evan; Balashova, Nataliya; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Lally, Edward T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The leukotoxin (LtxA) produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans kills host immune cells, allowing the bacterium to establish an ecological niche in the upper aerodigestive tract of its human host. The interaction of LtxA with human immune cells is both complex and multifaceted, involving membrane lipids as well as cell-surface proteins. In the initial encounter with the host cell, LtxA associates with lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), a cell surface adhesion glycoprotein. However, we have also demonstrated that the toxin associates strongly with the plasma membrane lipids, specifically cholesterol. This association with cholesterol is regulated by a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) motif, with a sequence of 334LEEYSKR340, in the N-terminal region of the toxin. Here, we have demonstrated that removal of cholesterol from the plasma membrane or mutation of the LtxA CRAC motif inhibits the activity of the toxin in THP-1 cells. To inhibit LtxA activity, we designed a short peptide corresponding to the CRAC336 motif of LtxA (CRAC336WT). This peptide binds to cholesterol and thereby inhibits the toxicity of LtxA in THP-1 cells. Previously, we showed that this peptide inhibits LtxA toxicity against Jn.9 (Jurkat) cells, indicating that peptides derived from the cholesterol-binding site of LtxA may have a potential clinical applicability in controlling infections of RTX-producing organisms. PMID:26352738

  9. Management of Neuroblastoma: ICMR Consensus Document.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Deepak; Totadri, Sidharth; Chinnaswamy, Girish; Agarwala, Sandeep; Vora, Tushar; Arora, Brijesh; Prasad, Maya; Kapoor, Gauri; Radhakrishnan, Venkatraman; Laskar, Siddharth; Kaur, Tanvir; Rath, G K; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2017-04-03

    Neuroblastoma (NBL) is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor in childhood. High-risk NBL is considered challenging and has one of the least favourable outcomes amongst pediatric cancers. Primary tumor can arise anywhere along the sympathetic chain. Advanced disease at presentation is common. Diagnosis is established by tumor biopsy and elevated urinary catecholamines. Staging is performed using bone marrow and mIBG scan (FDG-PET/bone scan if mIBG unavailable or non-avid). Age, stage, histopathological grading, MYCN amplification and 11q aberration are important prognostic factors utilized in risk stratification. Low-risk disease including Stage 1 and asymptomatic Stage 2 disease has an excellent prognosis with non-mutilating surgery alone. Perinatal adrenal neuroblastoma may be managed with close observation alone. Intermediate-risk disease consisting largely of unresectable/symptomatic Stage 2/3 disease and infants with Stage 4 disease has good outcome with few cycles of chemotherapy followed by surgical resection. Paraspinal neuroblastomas with cord compression are treated emergently, typically with upfront chemotherapy. Asymptomatic Stage 4S disease may be followed closely without treatment. Organ dysfunction and age below 3 mo would warrant chemotherapy in 4S. High-risk disease includes older children with Stage 4 disease and MYCN amplified tumors. High-risk disease has a suboptimal outcome, though the survival is improving with multimodality therapy including autologous stem cell transplant and immunotherapy. Relapse after multimodality therapy is difficult to salvage. Late presentation, lack of transplant facility, malnutrition and treatment abandonment are additional hurdles for survival in India. The review provides a consensus document on management of NBL for developing countries, including India.

  10. In control? IQC consensus and statutory regulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Graham R; Fitzgibbon, Maria C; O'Shea, Paula

    2016-06-13

    have provided a template to potentially harmonise IQC practice nationally. Given the central and critical role that IQC practice plays in ensuring the quality of patient results' importance, the authors contend that the time has come for international consensus and statutory regulation regarding the minimally acceptable criteria for its implementation, monitoring and review.

  11. Undescended testes: a consensus on management.

    PubMed

    Ritzén, E Martin

    2008-12-01

    The mode of treatment best for undescended testes is controversial, and local traditions often override knowledge gained from randomized controlled studies. In order to reach a consensus within the Nordic countries on the current state-of-the-art of treatment, a group of specialists in testicular physiology, paediatric surgery/urology, endocrinology, andrology, pathology and anaesthesiology from all the Nordic countries met for 2 days. Before the meeting, reviews of the literature had been prepared by the participants. Judging from published meta-analyses, hormonal treatment has low efficacy. Although 15-20% of retained testes descend during hormonal treatment, one-fifth of these re-ascend later on. Also, treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) may be harmful to future spermatogenesis through increased apoptosis of germ cells. Orchiopexy, on the contrary, results in about 95% anatomical success, with a low (about 1%) risk of complications. The optimal time for orchiopexy has also been debated. However, a recent randomized controlled study shows that surgery at 9 months of age is followed by a better post-operative growth of the testes than surgery at 3 years, which supports previous arguments for early surgery. The unanimous conclusion of the group was that surgery is generally the preferred mode of treatment, rather than hCG or GnRH treatments. Orchiopexy should be performed between 6 and 12 months of age, or soon after diagnosis, if that occurs later. If a testis is found to be undescended at any age after 6 months, the patient should be referred for surgery. Referral should be to paediatric rather than general surgeons/urologists if the boy is less than 1 year old, if he has bilateral or non-palpable testes, or if he has got relapse of cryptorchidism.

  12. Carotid endarterectomy: current consensus and controversies.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Hermus, Linda; Reijnen, Michel M P J; Zeebregts, Clark J

    2010-10-01

    Stroke is the third most common cause of mortality, and carotid artery stenosis causes 8% to 29% of all ischemic strokes. Best medical treatment forms the basis of carotid stenosis treatment, and carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has an additional beneficial effect in high-grade stenosis. Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) has challenged CEA as a primary carotid intervention. At present, CEA remains the gold standard, but in the future, CAS techniques will evolve and might become beneficial for subgroups of patients with carotid stenosis. This chapter briefly describes the history of carotid interventions and current consensus and controversies in CEA. In the last two years, several meta-analyses were published on a variety of aspects of best medical treatment, CEA, and CAS. It is still a matter of debate as to whether asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis should undergo a carotid intervention. Especially because medical treatment has dramatically evolved since the early carotid trials. On the other hand, it is clear that carotid interventions in symptomatic patients with a high-grade stenosis should be performed as early as possible after the initial neurological event in order to achieve optimal stroke risk reduction. In CEA, the use of patching is advocated above primary closure, while the role of selective patching is still unclear. No differences in stroke and mortality rates are observed for routine versus selective shunting, for conventional versus eversion CEA, or for local versus general anesthesia. It is anticipated that in the future, there will be several interesting developments in carotid interventions such as plaque morphology analysis, acute interventions during stroke in progress, and further evolvement of CAS techniques.

  13. Consensus statement on diabetes in children

    PubMed Central

    Prasanna Kumar, K. M.; Dev, N. Prabhu; Raman, K. V.; Desai, Rajnanda; Prasadini, T. Geetha; Das, A. K.; Ramoul, Soraya

    2014-01-01

    While T1DM has been traditionally seen as a minor concern in the larger picture of pediatric ailments, new data reveals that the incidence of T1DM has assumed alarming proportions. It has long been clear that while the disease may be diagnosed at an early age, its impact is not isolated to afflicted children. The direct impact of the disease on the patient is debilitating due to the nature of the disease and lack of proper access to treatment in India. But this impact is further compounded by the utter apathy and often times antipathy, which patients withT1DM have to face. Lack of awareness of the issue in all stakeholders, low access to quality healthcare, patient, physician, and system level barriers to the delivery of optimal diabetes care are some of the factors which hinder successful management of T1DM. The first international consensus meet on diabetes in children was convened with the aim of providing a common platform to all the stakeholders in the management of T1DM, to discuss the academic, administrative and healthcare system related issues. The ultimate aim was to articulate the problems faced by children with diabetes in a way that centralized their position and focused on creating modalities of management sensitive to their needs and aspirations. It was conceptualized to raise a strong voice of advocacy for improving the management of T1DM and ensuring that “No child should die of diabetes”. The unique clinical presentations of T1DM coupled with ignorance on the part of the medical community and society in general results in outcomes that are far worse than that seen with T2DM. So there is a need to substantially improve training of HCPs at all levels on this neglected aspect of healthcare. PMID:24944917

  14. The development of a consensus definition for healthcare improvement science (HIS) in seven European countries: A consensus methods approach

    PubMed Central

    Macrae, Rhoda; Lillo-Crespo, Manuel; Rooney, Kevin D

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction There is a limited body of research in the field of healthcare improvement science (HIS). Quality improvement and ‘change making’ should become an intrinsic part of everyone’s job, every day in all parts of the healthcare system. The lack of theoretical grounding may partly explain the minimal transfer of health research into health policy. Methods This article seeks to present the development of the definition for healthcare improvement science. A consensus method approach was adopted with a two-stage Delphi process, expert panel and consensus group techniques. A total of 18 participants were involved in the expert panel and consensus group, and 153 answers were analysed as a part of the Delphi survey. Participants were researchers, educators and healthcare professionals from Scotland, Slovenia, Spain, Italy, England, Poland, and Romania. Results A high level of consensus was achieved for the broad definition in the 2nd Delphi iteration (86%). The final definition was agreed on by the consensus group: ‘Healthcare improvement science is the generation of knowledge to cultivate change and deliver person-centred care that is safe, effective, efficient, equitable and timely. It improves patient outcomes, health system performance and population health.’ Conclusions The process of developing a consensus definition revealed different understandings of healthcare improvement science between the participants. Having a shared consensus definition of healthcare improvement science is an important step forward, bringing about a common understanding in order to advance the professional education and practice of healthcare improvement science. PMID:28289467

  15. Efficient Globally Optimal Consensus Maximisation with Tree Search.

    PubMed

    Chin, Tat-Jun; Purkait, Pulak; Eriksson, Anders; Suter, David

    2017-04-01

    Maximum consensus is one of the most popular criteria for robust estimation in computer vision. Despite its widespread use, optimising the criterion is still customarily done by randomised sample-and-test techniques, which do not guarantee optimality of the result. Several globally optimal algorithms exist, but they are too slow to challenge the dominance of randomised methods. Our work aims to change this state of affairs by proposing an efficient algorithm for global maximisation of consensus. Under the framework of LP-type methods, we show how consensus maximisation for a wide variety of vision tasks can be posed as a tree search problem. This insight leads to a novel algorithm based on A* search. We propose efficient heuristic and support set updating routines that enable A* search to efficiently find globally optimal results. On common estimation problems, our algorithm is much faster than previous exact methods. Our work identifies a promising direction for globally optimal consensus maximisation.

  16. NIH Blood and Marrow Transplant Late Effects Consensus Conference

    Cancer.gov

    This day and a half symposium will bring together experts in blood and marrow transplantation, late effects, and health care delivery to discuss current evidence and knowledge gaps, develop consensus guidelines, and inform future research in the BMT survivor population.

  17. Consensus statement on standard of care for congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching H; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Rutkowski, Anne; Sejersen, Thomas; Bellini, Jonathan; Battista, Vanessa; Florence, Julaine M; Schara, Ulrike; Schuler, Pamela M; Wahbi, Karim; Aloysius, Annie; Bash, Robert O; Béroud, Christophe; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Cohn, Ronald D; Connolly, Anne M; Deconinck, Nicolas; Desguerre, Isabelle; Eagle, Michelle; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Ferreiro, Ana; Fujak, Albert; Goemans, Nathalie; Iannaccone, Susan T; Jouinot, Patricia; Main, Marion; Melacini, Paola; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Muntoni, Francesco; Nelson, Leslie L; Rahbek, Jes; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Simonds, Anita; Tseng, Brian; Vajsar, Jiri; Vianello, Andrea; Zeller, Reinhard

    2010-12-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies are a group of rare neuromuscular disorders with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of congenital muscular dystrophy have enabled better diagnosis. However, medical care for patients with congenital muscular dystrophy remains very diverse. Advances in many areas of medical technology have not been adopted in clinical practice. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy was established to identify current care issues, review literature for evidence-based practice, and achieve consensus on care recommendations in 7 areas: diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, orthopedics/rehabilitation, gastroenterology/ nutrition/speech/oral care, cardiology, and palliative care. To achieve consensus on the care recommendations, 2 separate online surveys were conducted to poll opinions from experts in the field and from congenital muscular dystrophy families. The final consensus was achieved in a 3-day workshop conducted in Brussels, Belgium, in November 2009. This consensus statement describes the care recommendations from this committee.

  18. Adaptive neural network consensus based control of robot formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzey, H. M.; Sarangapani, Jagannathan

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, adaptive consensus based formation control scheme is derived for mobile robots in a pre-defined formation when full dynamics of the robots which include inertia, Corolis, and friction vector are considered. It is shown that dynamic uncertainties of robots can make overall formation unstable when traditional consensus scheme is utilized. In order to estimate the affine nonlinear robot dynamics, a NN based adaptive scheme is utilized. In addition to this adaptive feedback control input, an additional control input is introduced based on the consensus approach to make the robots keep their desired formation. Subsequently, the outer consensus loop is redesigned for reduced communication. Lyapunov theory is used to show the stability of overall system. Simulation results are included at the end.

  19. Scientific consensus, the law, and same sex parenting outcomes.

    PubMed

    adams, Jimi; Light, Ryan

    2015-09-01

    While the US Supreme Court was considering two related cases involving the constitutionality of same-sex marriage, one major question informing that decision was whether scientific research had achieved consensus regarding how children of same-sex couples fare. Determining the extent of consensus has become a key aspect of how social science evidence and testimony is accepted by the courts. Here, we show how a method of analyzing temporal patterns in citation networks can be used to assess the state of social scientific literature as a means to inform just such a question. Patterns of clustering within these citation networks reveal whether and when consensus arises within a scientific field. We find that the literature on outcomes for children of same-sex parents is marked by scientific consensus that they experience "no differences" compared to children from other parental configurations.

  20. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO Consensus Conference on Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic; Bosse, Tjalling; González-Martín, Antonio; Ledermann, Jonathan; Marth, Christian; Nout, Remi; Querleu, Denis; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sessa, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11–13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent disease. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question and a consensus was reached. Results of this consensus conference, together with a summary of evidence supporting each recommendation, are detailed in this article. All participants have approved this final article. PMID:26645990

  1. Consensus Statement on Standard of Care for Congenital Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching H.; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Rutkowski, Anne; Sejersen, Thomas; Bellini, Jonathan; Battista, Vanessa; Florence, Julaine M.; Schara, Ulrike; Schuler, Pamela M.; Wahbi, Karim; Aloysius, Annie; Bash, Robert O.; Béroud, Christophe; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Cohn, Ronald D.; Connolly, Anne M.; Deconinck, Nicolas; Desguerre, Isabelle; Eagle, Michelle; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Ferreiro, Ana; Fujak, Albert; Goemans, Nathalie; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Jouinot, Patricia; Main, Marion; Melacini, Paola; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Muntoni, Francesco; Nelson, Leslie L.; Rahbek, Jes; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Simonds, Anita; Tseng, Brian; Vajsar, Jiri; Vianello, Andrea; Zeller, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies are a group of rare neuromuscular disorders with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of congenital muscular dystrophy have enabled better diagnosis. However, medical care for patients with congenital muscular dystrophy remains very diverse. Advances in many areas of medical technology have not been adopted in clinical practice. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy was established to identify current care issues, review literature for evidence-based practice, and achieve consensus on care recommendations in 7 areas: diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, orthopedics/rehabilitation, gastroenterology/ nutrition/speech/oral care, cardiology, and palliative care. To achieve consensus on the care recommendations, 2 separate online surveys were conducted to poll opinions from experts in the field and from congenital muscular dystrophy families. The final consensus was achieved in a 3-day workshop conducted in Brussels, Belgium, in November 2009. This consensus statement describes the care recommendations from this committee. PMID:21078917

  2. ABC3 Consensus: Assessment by a German Group of Experts

    PubMed Central

    Thomssen, Christoph; Augustin, Doris; Ettl, Johannes; Haidinger, Renate; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Lüftner, Diana; Marmé, Frederik; Marschner, Norbert; Müller, Lothar; Overkamp, Friedrich; Ruckhäberle, Eugen; Thill, Marc; Untch, Michael; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Harbeck, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Advanced Breast Cancer Third International Consensus Conference on the diagnosis and treatment of advanced breast cancer took place in Lisbon, Portugal, on November 5-7, 2015. This year's conference (ABC3) was focused on the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (stage IV), as it was 4 years ago at the first consensus meeting (ABC1). A matter of particular interest was the patients’ perspective. Thus, patient-relevant issues were addressed by the consensus discussions, such as those on treatment goals, quality of life, care of long-term survivors (‘survivorship issues’), and coping with disease-related symptoms and the side effects of treatment. Further important issues on the agenda were the use of standardized instruments for the assessment of individual treatment success (‘patient-reported outcome measures’) and the evaluation of the benefit of novel drugs (e.g. the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Magnitude of Clinical Benefit Scale). Diagnosis and treatment of inoperable locally advanced breast cancer had already been discussed 2 years earlier at the ABC2 Consensus and were not dealt with in the framework of this year's ABC3 Consensus. With regard to country-specific peculiarities, which unavoidably found their way into the ABC Consensus, a working group of German breast cancer experts commented on the voting results of the ABC panelists. As for the past consensus, the group specially considered the German guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer (AGO (Gyneco-Oncology Working Group), S3, DGHO (German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology)) in order to adapt the ABC3 consensus for everyday therapy in Germany. PMID:27051399

  3. Consensus algorithm in smart grid and communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfagee, Husain Abdulaziz

    On a daily basis, consensus theory attracts more and more researches from different areas of interest, to apply its techniques to solve technical problems in a way that is faster, more reliable, and even more precise than ever before. A power system network is one of those fields that consensus theory employs extensively. The use of the consensus algorithm to solve the Economic Dispatch and Load Restoration Problems is a good example. Instead of a conventional central controller, some researchers have explored an algorithm to solve the above mentioned problems, in a distribution manner, using the consensus algorithm, which is based on calculation methods, i.e., non estimation methods, for updating the information consensus matrix. Starting from this point of solving these types of problems mentioned, specifically, in a distribution fashion, using the consensus algorithm, we have implemented a new advanced consensus algorithm. It is based on the adaptive estimation techniques, such as the Gradient Algorithm and the Recursive Least Square Algorithm, to solve the same problems. This advanced work was tested on different case studies that had formerly been explored, as seen in references 5, 7, and 18. Three and five generators, or agents, with different topologies, correspond to the Economic Dispatch Problem and the IEEE 16-Bus power system corresponds to the Load Restoration Problem. In all the cases we have studied, the results met our expectations with extreme accuracy, and completely matched the results of the previous researchers. There is little question that this research proves the capability and dependability of using the consensus algorithm, based on the estimation methods as the Gradient Algorithm and the Recursive Least Square Algorithm to solve such power problems.

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of acromegaly and its complications: consensus guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bonadonna, S; Doga, M; Gola, M; Mazziotti, G; Giustina, A

    2005-01-01

    In February 1999, May 2000 and April 2002, three workshops were held in Cortina, Montecarlo and Versailles, respectively, to develop a consensus defining the diagnosis and treatment of acromegaly and its complications. The workshops were sponsored by the Pituitary Society and European Neuroendocrine Association. Invited international participants included endocrinologists, neurosurgeons and radiotherapists skilled in the management of acromegaly. This review paper summarizes the main points of the three consensus statements published following these three workshops.

  5. Consensus time and conformity in the adaptive voter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Tim; Gross, Thilo

    2013-09-01

    The adaptive voter model is a paradigmatic model in the study of opinion formation. Here we propose an extension for this model, in which conflicts are resolved by obtaining another opinion, and analytically study the time required for consensus to emerge. Our results shed light on the rich phenomenology of both the original and extended adaptive voter models, including a dynamical phase transition in the scaling behavior of the mean time to consensus.

  6. A consensus opinion model based on the evolutionary game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Han-Xin

    2016-08-01

    We propose a consensus opinion model based on the evolutionary game. In our model, both of the two connected agents receive a benefit if they have the same opinion, otherwise they both pay a cost. Agents update their opinions by comparing payoffs with neighbors. The opinion of an agent with higher payoff is more likely to be imitated. We apply this model in scale-free networks with tunable degree distribution. Interestingly, we find that there exists an optimal ratio of cost to benefit, leading to the shortest consensus time. Qualitative analysis is obtained by examining the evolution of the opinion clusters. Moreover, we find that the consensus time decreases as the average degree of the network increases, but increases with the noise introduced to permit irrational choices. The dependence of the consensus time on the network size is found to be a power-law form. For small or larger ratio of cost to benefit, the consensus time decreases as the degree exponent increases. However, for moderate ratio of cost to benefit, the consensus time increases with the degree exponent. Our results may provide new insights into opinion dynamics driven by the evolutionary game theory.

  7. Globular glial tauopathies (GGT): consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zeshan; Bigio, Eileen H; Budka, Herbert; Dickson, Dennis W; Ferrer, Isidro; Ghetti, Bernardino; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Holton, Janice L; Josephs, Keith A; Powers, James; Spina, Salvatore; Takahashi, Hitoshi; White, Charles L; Revesz, Tamas; Kovacs, Gabor G

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have highlighted a group of 4-repeat (4R) tauopathies that are characterised neuropathologically by widespread, globular glial inclusions (GGIs). Tau immunohistochemistry reveals 4R immunoreactive globular oligodendroglial and astrocytic inclusions and the latter are predominantly negative for Gallyas silver staining. These cases are associated with a range of clinical presentations, which correlate with the severity and distribution of underlying tau pathology and neurodegeneration. Their heterogeneous clinicopathological features combined with their rarity and under-recognition have led to cases characterised by GGIs being described in the literature using various and redundant terminologies. In this report, a group of neuropathologists form a consensus on the terminology and classification of cases with GGIs. After studying microscopic images from previously reported cases with suspected GGIs (n = 22), this panel of neuropathologists with extensive experience in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases and a documented record of previous experience with at least one case with GGIs, agreed that (1) GGIs were present in all the cases reviewed; (2) the morphology of globular astrocytic inclusions was different to tufted astrocytes and finally that (3) the cases represented a number of different neuropathological subtypes. They also agreed that the different morphological subtypes are likely to be part of a spectrum of a distinct disease entity, for which they recommend that the overarching term globular glial tauopathy (GGT) should be used. Type I cases typically present with frontotemporal dementia, which correlates with the fronto-temporal distribution of pathology. Type II cases are characterised by pyramidal features reflecting motor cortex involvement and corticospinal tract degeneration. Type III cases can present with a combination of frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease with fronto-temporal cortex, motor cortex and

  8. Globular glial tauopathies (GGT): consensus recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Bigio, Eileen H.; Budka, Herbert; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ferrer, Isidro; Ghetti, Bernardino; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Holton, Janice L.; Josephs, Keith A.; Powers, James; Spina, Salvatore; Takahashi, Hitoshi; White, Charles L.; Revesz, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Rrecent studies have highlighted a group of 4-repeat (4R) tauopathies that are characterised neuropathologically by widespread, globular glial inclusions (GGIs). Tau immunohistochemistry reveals 4R immunore-active globular oligodendroglial and astrocytic inclusions and the latter are predominantly negative for Gallyas silver staining. These cases are associated with a range of clinical presentations, which correlate with the severity and distribution of underlying tau pathology and neurodegeneration. Their heterogeneous clinicopathological features combined with their rarity and under-recognition have led to cases characterised by GGIs being described in the literature using various and redundant terminologies. In this report, a group of neuropathologists form a consensus on the terminology and classification of cases with GGIs. After studying microscopic images from previously reported cases with suspected GGIs (n = 22), this panel of neuropathologists with extensive experience in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases and a documented record of previous experience with at least one case with GGIs, agreed that (1) GGIs were present in all the cases reviewed; (2) the morphology of globular astrocytic inclusions was different to tufted astrocytes and finally that (3) the cases represented a number of different neuropathological subtypes. They also agreed that the different morphological subtypes are likely to be part of a spectrum of a distinct disease entity, for which they recommend that the overarching term globular glial tauopathy (GGT) should be used. Type I cases typically present with frontotemporal dementia, which correlates with the fronto-temporal distribution of pathology. Type II cases are characterised by pyramidal features reflecting motor cortex involvement and corticospinal tract degeneration. Type III cases can present with a combination of frontotemporal dementia and motor neuron disease with fronto-temporal cortex, motor cortex and

  9. Building of multilevel stakeholder consensus in radioactive waste repository siting

    SciTech Connect

    Dreimanis, A.

    2007-07-01

    This report considers the problem of multilevel consensus building for siting and construction of shared multinational/regional repositories for radioactive waste (RW) deep disposal. In the siting of a multinational repository there appears an essential innovative component of stakeholder consensus building, namely: to reach consent - political, social, economic, ecological - among international partners, in addition to solving the whole set of intra-national consensus building items. An entire partnering country is considered as a higher-level stakeholder - the national stakeholder, represented by the national government, being faced to simultaneous seeking an upward (international) and a downward (intra-national) consensus in a psychologically stressed environment, possibly being characterized by diverse political, economic and social interests. The following theses as a possible interdisciplinary approach towards building of shared understanding and stakeholder consensus on the international scale of RW disposal are forwarded and developed: a) building of international stakeholder consensus would be promoted by activating and diversifying on the international scale multilateral interactions between intra- and international stakeholders, including web-based networks of the RW disposal site investigations and decision-making, as well as networks for international cooperation among government authorities in nuclear safety, b) gradual progress in intergovernmental consensus and reaching multilateral agreements on shared deep repositories will be the result of democratic dialogue, via observing the whole set of various interests and common resolving of emerged controversies by using advanced synergetic approaches of conflict resolution, c) cross-cultural thinking and world perception, mental flexibility, creativity and knowledge are considered as basic prerogatives for gaining a higher level of mutual understanding and consensus for seeking further consensus, for

  10. 2014 consensus statement from the first Economics of Physical Inactivity Consensus (EPIC) conference (Vancouver).

    PubMed

    Davis, Jennifer C; Verhagen, Evert; Bryan, Stirling; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Borland, Jeff; Buchner, David; Hendriks, Marike R C; Weiler, Richard; Morrow, James R; van Mechelen, Willem; Blair, Steven N; Pratt, Mike; Windt, Johann; al-Tunaiji, Hashel; Macri, Erin; Khan, Karim M

    2014-06-01

    This article describes major topics discussed from the 'Economics of Physical Inactivity Consensus Workshop' (EPIC), held in Vancouver, Canada, in April 2011. Specifically, we (1) detail existing evidence on effective physical inactivity prevention strategies; (2) introduce economic evaluation and its role in health policy decisions; (3) discuss key challenges in establishing and building health economic evaluation evidence (including accurate and reliable costs and clinical outcome measurement) and (4) provide insight into interpretation of economic evaluations in this critically important field. We found that most methodological challenges are related to (1) accurately and objectively valuing outcomes; (2) determining meaningful clinically important differences in objective measures of physical inactivity; (3) estimating investment and disinvestment costs and (4) addressing barriers to implementation. We propose that guidelines specific for economic evaluations of physical inactivity intervention studies are developed to ensure that related costs and effects are robustly, consistently and accurately measured. This will also facilitate comparisons among future economic evidence.

  11. A Consensus on Mantle Potential Temperatures? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putirka, K. D.

    2009-12-01

    Recent publications may indicate a mounting consensus regarding mantle temperatures - an agreement that can be crucial for improving our understanding of mantle dynamics. To compare temperatures at various localities, McKenzie & Bickle (1988) proposed the concept of a mantle potential temperature (Tp) as a reference; Tp is the temperature the mantle would have at the surface, if it ascended along an adiabat without undergoing melting. Perhaps the most precise method to estimate Tp involves estimating the conditions of partial melting, and then correcting for the heat of fusion. The several sources of error include estimation of: a parental liquid, an equilibrium mantle olivine, the degree of partial melting (F), and the depth at which the parental melt is generated. There is also model error inherent to any thermometer. And when correcting for the heat of fusion we assume that we are correcting up to the convective adiabat, but if the parental melt was generated within the conductive lithosphere, Tp will be low. In any case, if we accept that the highest Tp estimates at Hawaii are of most interest (since magmas generated away from a plume centerline will not reflect the full heat content of a high T source), then in spite of these sources of error, recent estimates, published over a span of 10 months by three independent research groups, indicate considerable convergence. At Hawaii maximum Tp values are: 1600 deg. C by Herzberg & Asimow (2008), ca. 1630 deg. C by Lee et al. (2009; their Fig. 2B), and using two slightly different equation sets, 1687 deg. C by Putirka (2008; Geology) and 1660 deg. C by Putirka (2008; RiMG volume 69), yielding an average of 1644±38oC. Similarly, there is convergence for mean Tp at MORs (accepting that MORs are not isothermal; Klein and Langmuir, 1987): Herzberg & Asimow (2008) and Lee et al. (2009) estimate that Tp is ca. 1350 deg. C, and Putirka (2008; Geology) estimates a Tp of 1396 deg. C; these estimates average to 1365±26o

  12. Big cat phylogenies, consensus trees, and computational thinking.

    PubMed

    Sul, Seung-Jin; Williams, Tiffani L

    2011-07-01

    Phylogenetics seeks to deduce the pattern of relatedness between organisms by using a phylogeny or evolutionary tree. For a given set of organisms or taxa, there may be many evolutionary trees depicting how these organisms evolved from a common ancestor. As a result, consensus trees are a popular approach for summarizing the shared evolutionary relationships in a group of trees. We examine these consensus techniques by studying how the pantherine lineage of cats (clouded leopard, jaguar, leopard, lion, snow leopard, and tiger) evolved, which is hotly debated. While there are many phylogenetic resources that describe consensus trees, there is very little information, written for biologists, regarding the underlying computational techniques for building them. The pantherine cats provide us with a small, relevant example to explore the computational techniques (such as sorting numbers, hashing functions, and traversing trees) for constructing consensus trees. Our hope is that life scientists enjoy peeking under the computational hood of consensus tree construction and share their positive experiences with others in their community.

  13. Expert Consensus Panel Guidelines on Geriatric Assessment in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, A.; Mohile, S.G.; Leech, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite consensus guidelines on best practice in the care of older patients with cancer, geriatric assessment (GA) has yet to be optimally integrated into the field of oncology in most countries. There is a relative lack of consensus in the published literature as to the best approach to take, and there is a degree of uncertainty as to how integration of geriatric medicine principles might optimally predict patient outcomes. The aim of the current study was to obtain consensus on GA in oncology to inform the implementation of a geriatric oncology programme. Methods A four round Delphi process was employed. The Delphi method is a structured group facilitation process, using multiple iterations in order to gain consensus on a given topic Results Consensus was reached on the optimal assessment method and interventions required for the commonly employed domains of GA. Other aspects of GA, such as screening methods and age cutoff for assessment represented a higher degree of disagreement. Discussion The expert panel employed in this study clearly identified the criteria that should be included in a clinical geriatric oncology programme. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, this may prove useful in the care of older cancer patients. PMID:25757457

  14. ncRNA consensus secondary structure derivation using grammar strings.

    PubMed

    Achawanantakun, Rujira; Sun, Yanni; Takyar, Seyedeh Shohreh

    2011-04-01

    Many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through both their sequences and secondary structures. Thus, secondary structure derivation is an important issue in today's RNA research. The state-of-the-art structure annotation tools are based on comparative analysis, which derives consensus structure of homologous ncRNAs. Despite promising results from existing ncRNA aligning and consensus structure derivation tools, there is a need for more efficient and accurate ncRNA secondary structure modeling and alignment methods. In this work, we introduce a consensus structure derivation approach based on grammar string, a novel ncRNA secondary structure representation that encodes an ncRNA's sequence and secondary structure in the parameter space of a context-free grammar (CFG) and a full RNA grammar including pseudoknots. Being a string defined on a special alphabet constructed from a grammar, grammar string converts ncRNA alignment into sequence alignment. We derive consensus secondary structures from hundreds of ncRNA families from BraliBase 2.1 and 25 families containing pseudoknots using grammar string alignment. Our experiments have shown that grammar string-based structure derivation competes favorably in consensus structure quality with Murlet and RNASampler. Source code and experimental data are available at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~yannisun/grammar-string.

  15. Consensus and stratification in the affective meaning of human sociality

    PubMed Central

    Ambrasat, Jens; von Scheve, Christian; Conrad, Markus; Schauenburg, Gesche; Schröder, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    We investigate intrasocietal consensus and variation in affective meanings of concepts related to authority and community, two elementary forms of human sociality. Survey participants (n = 2,849) from different socioeconomic status (SES) groups in German society provided ratings of 909 social concepts along three basic dimensions of affective meaning. Results show widespread consensus on these meanings within society and demonstrate that a meaningful structure of socially shared knowledge emerges from organizing concepts according to their affective similarity. The consensus finding is further qualified by evidence for subtle systematic variation along SES differences. In relation to affectively neutral words, high-status individuals evaluate intimacy-related and socially desirable concepts as less positive and powerful than middle- or low-status individuals, while perceiving antisocial concepts as relatively more threatening. This systematic variation across SES groups suggests that the affective meaning of sociality is to some degree a function of social stratification. PMID:24843121

  16. Dysglycemias in pregnancy: from diagnosis to treatment. Brazilian consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    There is an urgent need to find consensus on screening, diagnosing and treating all degrees of DYSGLYCEMIA that may occur during pregnancies in Brazil, considering that many cases of DYSGLYCEMIA in pregnant women are currently not diagnosed, leading to maternal and fetal complications. For this reason the Brazilian Diabetes Society (SBD) and the Brazilian Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Societies (FEBRASGO), got together to introduce this proposal. We present here a joint consensus regarding the standardization of clinical management for pregnant women with any degree of Dysglycemia, on the basis of current information, to improve medical assistance and to avoid related complications of Dysglycemia in pregnancy to the mother and the fetus. This consensus aims to standardize the diagnosis among general practitioners, endocrinologists and obstetricians allowing the dissemination of information in basic health units, public and private services, that are responsible for screening, diagnosing and treating disglycemic pregnant patients. PMID:20416099

  17. Quantised consensus of multi-agent systems with nonlinear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yunru; Zheng, Yuanshi; Wang, Long

    2015-08-01

    This paper studies the consensus problem of first-order and second-order multi-agent systems with nonlinear dynamics and quantised interactions. Continuous-time and impulsive control inputs are designed for the multi-agent systems on the logarithmic quantised relative state measurements of agents, respectively. By using nonsmooth analysis tools, we get some sufficient conditions for the consensus of multi-agent systems under the continuous-time inputs. Compared with continuous-time control inputs, impulsive distributed control inputs just use the state variables of the systems at discrete-time instances. Based on impulsive control theory, we prove that the multi-agent systems can reach consensus by choosing proper control gains and impulsive intervals. The simulation results are given to verify the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  18. Cultural Consensus Theory: Aggregating Continuous Responses in a Finite Interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelder, William H.; Strashny, Alex; Romney, A. Kimball

    Cultural consensus theory (CCT) consists of cognitive models for aggregating responses of "informants" to test items about some domain of their shared cultural knowledge. This paper develops a CCT model for items requiring bounded numerical responses, e.g. probability estimates, confidence judgments, or similarity judgments. The model assumes that each item generates a latent random representation in each informant, with mean equal to the consensus answer and variance depending jointly on the informant and the location of the consensus answer. The manifest responses may reflect biases of the informants. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods were used to estimate the model, and simulation studies validated the approach. The model was applied to an existing cross-cultural dataset involving native Japanese and English speakers judging the similarity of emotion terms. The results sharpened earlier studies that showed that both cultures appear to have very similar cognitive representations of emotion terms.

  19. Consensus and stratification in the affective meaning of human sociality.

    PubMed

    Ambrasat, Jens; von Scheve, Christian; Conrad, Markus; Schauenburg, Gesche; Schröder, Tobias

    2014-06-03

    We investigate intrasocietal consensus and variation in affective meanings of concepts related to authority and community, two elementary forms of human sociality. Survey participants (n = 2,849) from different socioeconomic status (SES) groups in German society provided ratings of 909 social concepts along three basic dimensions of affective meaning. Results show widespread consensus on these meanings within society and demonstrate that a meaningful structure of socially shared knowledge emerges from organizing concepts according to their affective similarity. The consensus finding is further qualified by evidence for subtle systematic variation along SES differences. In relation to affectively neutral words, high-status individuals evaluate intimacy-related and socially desirable concepts as less positive and powerful than middle- or low-status individuals, while perceiving antisocial concepts as relatively more threatening. This systematic variation across SES groups suggests that the affective meaning of sociality is to some degree a function of social stratification.

  20. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Berenson, James R; Anderson, Kenneth C; Audell, Robert A; Boccia, Ralph V; Coleman, Morton; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Drake, Matthew T; Fonseca, Rafael; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Joshua, Douglas; Lonial, Sagar; Niesvizky, Ruben; Palumbo, Antonio; Roodman, G David; San-Miguel, Jesus F; Singhal, Seema; Weber, Donna M; Zangari, Maurizio; Wirtschafter, Eric; Yellin, Ori; Kyle, Robert A

    2010-07-01

    On February 25, 2009, a panel of international experts on plasma cell dyscrasia and skeletal disease met to discuss monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). This non-malignant B-cell disorder is the most common plasma cell dyscrasia and is associated with an increased risk of developing serious B-cell disorders. Individuals with MGUS also have an increased risk of osteoporosis and osteopenia associated with an increased likelihood of developing fractures especially in the vertebral column, peripheral neuropathy and thromboembolic events. The goal of the meeting was to develop a consensus statement regarding the appropriate tests to screen, evaluate and follow-up patients with MGUS. The panel also addressed the identification and treatment of MGUS-related skeletal problems, thromboembolic events and neurological complications. The following consensus statement outlines the conclusions and marks the first time that a consensus statement for the screening and treatment of MGUS has been clearly stated.

  1. Consensus of synchronization-preferential scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongyong, Yang; Lan, Lu; Siying, Zhang

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, the relations of the scale-free network topology and the moving consensus of multi-agent systems are studied. A synchronization-preferential BA (SPBA) network with the combinatorial preferential attachment is presented for the prestissimo consensus. The effects of the SPBA network on the algebraic connectivity of the topology graph are compared with the standard BA network. The robustness gain to delay is analyzed for variable network topologies with the same size. The characteristics of dramatic increase for the algebraic connectivity and slightly increase for the robustness gain to delay are unfolded in SPBA network. By comparing the convergence time of the different network structures, the consensuses are studied for multiagent systems with and without communication delays.

  2. The importance of assessing and communicating scientific consensus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maibach, Edward W.; van der Linden, Sander L.

    2016-09-01

    The spread of influential misinformation, such as conspiracy theories about the existence of a secret, large-scale atmospheric spraying program (SLAP), is contributing to the politicization of science. In an important recent study, Shearer et al (2016 Environ. Res. Lett. 11 084011) employ a novel methodology to quantify the expert consensus of popular SLAP assertions. The authors find that 99% (76/77) of surveyed experts have not encountered any evidence that would support the existence of such a program. Here we argue that this finding is important because a growing body of research has shown that the public’s perception of expert consensus on key societal issues acts an important ‘gateway’ to science acceptance. Furthermore, communicating normative agreement among experts, such as the strong scientific consensus against the existence of a SLAP, can help limit the spread of misinformation and promote more effective public decision-making about science and society.

  3. Social and strategic imitation: the way to consensus

    PubMed Central

    Vilone, Daniele; Ramasco, José J.; Sánchez, Angel; Miguel, Maxi San

    2012-01-01

    Humans do not always make rational choices, a fact that experimental economics is putting on solid grounds. The social context plays an important role in determining our actions, and often we imitate friends or acquaintances without any strategic consideration. We explore here the interplay between strategic and social imitative behavior in a coordination problem on a social network. We observe that for interactions on 1D and 2D lattices any amount of social imitation prevents the freezing of the network in domains with different conventions, thus leading to global consensus. For interactions on complex networks, the interplay of social and strategic imitation also drives the system towards global consensus while neither dynamics alone does. We find an optimum value for the combination of imitative behaviors to reach consensus in a minimum time, and two different dynamical regimes to approach it: exponential when social imitation predominates, power-law when strategic considerations prevail. PMID:23008751

  4. Climate Consensus and `Misinformation': A Rejoinder to Agnotology, Scientific Consensus, and the Teaching and Learning of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legates, David R.; Soon, Willie; Briggs, William M.; Monckton of Brenchley, Christopher

    2015-04-01

    Agnotology is the study of how ignorance arises via circulation of misinformation calculated to mislead. Legates et al. (Sci Educ 22:2007-2017, 2013) had questioned the applicability of agnotology to politically-charged debates. In their reply, Bedford and Cook (Sci Educ 22:2019-2030, 2013), seeking to apply agnotology to climate science, asserted that fossil-fuel interests had promoted doubt about a climate consensus. Their definition of climate `misinformation' was contingent upon the post-modernist assumptions that scientific truth is discernible by measuring a consensus among experts, and that a near unanimous consensus exists. However, inspection of a claim by Cook et al. (Environ Res Lett 8:024024, 2013) of 97.1 % consensus, heavily relied upon by Bedford and Cook, shows just 0.3 % endorsement of the standard definition of consensus: that most warming since 1950 is anthropogenic. Agnotology, then, is a two-edged sword since either side in a debate may claim that general ignorance arises from misinformation allegedly circulated by the other. Significant questions about anthropogenic influences on climate remain. Therefore, Legates et al. appropriately asserted that partisan presentations of controversies stifle debate and have no place in education.

  5. Expert consensus document: Semantics in active surveillance for men with localized prostate cancer - results of a modified Delphi consensus procedure.

    PubMed

    Bruinsma, Sophie M; Roobol, Monique J; Carroll, Peter R; Klotz, Laurence; Pickles, Tom; Moore, Caroline M; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J; Villers, Arnauld; Rannikko, Antti; Valdagni, Riccardo; Frydenberg, Mark; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki; Filson, Christopher P; Bangma, Chris H

    2017-03-14

    Active surveillance (AS) is broadly described as a management option for men with low-risk prostate cancer, but semantic heterogeneity exists in both the literature and in guidelines. To address this issue, a panel of leading prostate cancer specialists in the field of AS participated in a consensus-forming project using a modified Delphi method to reach international consensus on definitions of terms related to this management option. An iterative three-round sequence of online questionnaires designed to address 61 individual items was completed by each panel member. Consensus was considered to be reached if ≥70% of the experts agreed on a definition. To facilitate a common understanding among all experts involved and resolve potential ambiguities, a face-to-face consensus meeting was held between Delphi survey rounds two and three. Convenience sampling was used to construct the panel of experts. In total, 12 experts from Australia, France, Finland, Italy, the Netherlands, Japan, the UK, Canada and the USA participated. By the end of the Delphi process, formal consensus was achieved for 100% (n = 61) of the terms and a glossary was then developed. Agreement between international experts has been reached on relevant terms and subsequent definitions regarding AS for patients with localized prostate cancer. This standard terminology could support multidisciplinary communication, reduce the extent of variations in clinical practice and optimize clinical decision making.

  6. Consensus Conference on North American Training in Hepatopancreaticobiliary Surgery: A Review of the Conference and Presentation of Consensus Statements.

    PubMed

    Jeyarajah, D R; Berman, R S; Doyle, M B; Geevarghese, S K; Posner, M C; Farmer, D; Minter, R M

    2016-04-01

    The findings and recommendations of the North American consensus conference on training in hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) surgery held in October 2014 are presented. The conference was hosted by the Society for Surgical Oncology (SSO), the Americas Hepato-Pancreatico-Biliary Association (AHPBA), and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons (ASTS). The current state of training in HPB surgery in North America was defined through three pathways-HPB, surgical oncology, and solid organ transplant fellowships. Consensus regarding programmatic requirements included establishment of minimum case volumes and inclusion of quality metrics. Formative assessment, using milestones as a framework and inclusive of both operative and nonoperative skills, must be present. Specific core HPB cases should be defined and used for evaluation of operative skills. The conference concluded with a focus on the optimal means to perform summative assessment to evaluate the individual fellow completing a fellowship in HPB surgery. Presentations from the hospital perspective and the American Board of Surgery led to consensus that summative assessment was desired by the public and the hospital systems and should occur in a uniform but possibly modular manner for all HPB fellowship pathways. A task force composed of representatives of the SSO, AHPBA, and ASTS are charged with implementation of the consensus statements emanating from this consensus conference.

  7. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Sugano, Kentaro; Tack, Jan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Graham, David Y; El-Omar, Emad M; Miura, Soichiro; Haruma, Ken; Asaka, Masahiro; Uemura, Naomi; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate diagnostic assessment of gastritis and (4) when, whom and how to treat H. pylori gastritis. Design Twenty-three clinical questions addressing the above-mentioned four domains were drafted for which expert panels were asked to formulate relevant statements. A Delphi method using an anonymous electronic system was adopted to develop the consensus, the level of which was predefined as ≥80%. Final modifications of clinical questions and consensus were achieved at the face-to-face meeting in Kyoto. Results All 24 statements for 22 clinical questions after extensive modifications and omission of one clinical question were achieved with a consensus level of >80%. To better organise classification of gastritis and duodenitis based on aetiology, a new classification of gastritis and duodenitis is recommended for the 11th international classification. A new category of H. pylori-associated dyspepsia together with a diagnostic algorithm was proposed. The adoption of grading systems for gastric cancer risk stratification, and modern image-enhancing endoscopy for the diagnosis of gastritis, were recommended. Treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection before preneoplastic changes develop, if feasible, was recommended to minimise the risk of more serious complications of the infection. Conclusions A global consensus for gastritis was developed for the first time, which will be the basis for an international classification system and for further research on the subject. PMID:26187502

  8. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of a family of steroids acutely controlling steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Midzak, Andrew; Rammouz, Georges; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2012-11-01

    Steroids metabolically derive from lipid cholesterol, and vertebrate steroids additionally derive from the steroid pregnenolone. Pregnenolone is derived from cholesterol by hydrolytic cleavage of the aliphatic tail by mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP11A1, located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Delivery of cholesterol to CYP11A1 comprises the principal control step of steroidogenesis, and requires a series of proteins spanning the mitochondrial double membranes. A critical member of this cholesterol translocation machinery is the integral outer mitochondrial membrane translocator protein (18kDa, TSPO), a high-affinity drug- and cholesterol-binding protein. The cholesterol-binding site of TSPO consists of a phylogenetically conserved cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC). Previous studies from our group identified 5-androsten-3β,17,19-triol (19-Atriol) as drug ligand for the TSPO CRAC motif inhibiting cholesterol binding to CRAC domain and steroidogenesis. To further understand 19-Atriol's mechanism of action as well as the molecular recognition by the TSPO CRAC motif, we undertook structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of the 19-Atriol molecule with a variety of substituted steroids oxygenated at positions around the steroid backbone. We found that in addition to steroids hydroxylated at carbon C19, hydroxylations at C4, C7, and C11 contributed to inhibition of cAMP-mediated steroidogenesis in a minimal steroidogenic cell model. However, only substituted steroids with C19 hydroxylations exhibited specificity to TSPO, its CRAC motif, and mitochondrial cholesterol transport, as the C4, C7, and C11 hydroxylated steroids inhibited the metabolic transformation of cholesterol by CYP11A1. We thus provide new insights into structure-activity relationships of steroids inhibiting mitochondrial cholesterol transport and steroidogenic cholesterol metabolic enzymes.

  9. Goal-directed Focused Ultrasound Milestones Revised: A Multiorganizational Consensus.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Mathew; Abdi, Amin; Adhikari, Srikar; Boniface, Michael; Bramante, Robert M; Egan, Daniel J; Matthew Fields, J; Leo, Megan M; Liteplo, Andrew S; Liu, Rachel; Nomura, Jason T; Pigott, David C; Raio, Christopher C; Ruskis, Jennifer; Strony, Robert; Thom, Chris; Lewiss, Resa E

    2016-11-01

    In 2012 the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Emergency Medicine released the emergency medicine milestones. The Patient Care 12 (PC12) subcompetency delineates staged and progressive accomplishment in emergency ultrasound. While valuable as an initial framework for ultrasound resident education, there are limitations to PC12. This consensus paper provides a revised description of criteria to define the subcompetency. A multiorganizational task force was formed between the American College of Emergency Physicians Ultrasound Section, the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors, and the Academy of Emergency Ultrasound of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. Representatives from each organization created this consensus document and revision.

  10. Eating Disorders: Cultural Model and Consensus Regarding Food.

    PubMed

    Manochio-Pina, Marina; Dos Santos, José Ernesto; Dressler, William W; Pessa Ribeiro, Rosane Pilot

    2015-01-01

    The cultural model of food was applied to 112 adult patients with eating disorders (PG) and 36 healthy adult women (CG) of similar age. The Free List and Ranking of Foods was used to group foods and verify consensus and cultural aspects. Calories, health, and taste were the dimensions used by the participants to group the foods, and strong consensus was achieved in regard to calories and health. There were, however, inter- and intra-group divergences in regard to these ideas, especially in the PG. The CG used distinct criteria, showing a more complex model.

  11. [GEITDAH consensus on conduct disorders in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Sasot-Llevadot, Jordi; Ibáñez-Bordas, Rosa M; Soto-López, Antonio; Montañés-Rada, Francisco; Gastaminza-Pérez, Xavier; Alda-Díez, José A; Cantó-Díez, Tomás; Catalá, Miguel A; Ferrin-Erdozáin, Maite; García-Giral, Marta; Graell-Bernal, Montserrat; Granada-Jiménez, Olvido; Herreros-Rodríguez, Óscar; Mardomingo-Sanz, María J; Mojarro-Práxedes, Dolores; Morey-Canyelles, Jaume; Ortiz-Guerra, Juan; Pàmies-Massana, Montserrat; Rey-Sánchez, Francisco; Romera-Torrens, María; Rubio-Morell, Belén; Ruiz-Lázaro, Pedro M; Ruiz-Sanz, Francisco

    2015-08-16

    In this paper, the Special Interest Group on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (GEITDAH, from its name in Spanish) presents a consensus reached by experts from all over Spain on conduct disorders in children and adolescents. Following the initial work by the team at the Pedopsychiatry Unit at the Quiron-Teknon Hospital in Barcelona, agreements have been reached on a number of basic aspects that could be the starting point for future consensuses. A top priority aim of the work was also to update the criteria in the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fifth edition, for conduct disorders in children and adolescents, together with their comorbidity with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

  12. Necessary and sufficient conditions of stationary average consensus for second-order multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yongquan; Sun, Jitao

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the stationary average consensus problem for second-order discrete-time multi-agent systems (SDMAS). A stationary consensus problem is to find a control algorithm that brings the state of a group of agents to a common constant value which is called the collective decision. We introduce the concept of stationary average consensus of SDMAS and propose a consensus algorithm. Based on the polynomial stability and the graph theory, we obtain two necessary and sufficient conditions of stationary average consensus of SDMAS. The last theorem provides an algebraic criterion of stationary average consensus, and can help us to determine the parameters in the consensus algorithm. Furthermore, in this consensus algorithm, only the states of the agents are transferred among the agents. Therefore, this algorithm can not only solve the stationary average consensus problem but also reduce the amount of transferred data. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the efficiency of our results.

  13. Expert Consensus on Characteristics of Wisdom: A Delphi Method Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeste, Dilip V.; Ardelt, Monika; Blazer, Dan; Kraemer, Helena C.; Vaillant, George; Meeks, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Wisdom has received increasing attention in empirical research in recent years, especially in gerontology and psychology, but consistent definitions of wisdom remain elusive. We sought to better characterize this concept via an expert consensus panel using a 2-phase Delphi method. Design and Methods: A survey questionnaire comprised 53…

  14. ISPMD consensus on the management of premenstrual disorders

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Patrick Michael Shaughn; Bäckström, Torbjorn; Brown, Candace; Dennerstein, Lorraine; Endicott, Jean; Epperson, C. Neill; Eriksson, Elias; Freeman, Ellen W.; Halbreich, Uriel; Ismail, Khalid; Panay, Nicholas; Pearlstein, Teri; Rapkin, Andrea; Reid, Robert; Rubinow, David; Schmidt, Peter; Steiner, Meir; Studd, John; Sundström-Poromaa, Inger; Yonkers, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    The second consensus meeting of the International Society for Premenstrual Disorders (ISPMD) took place in London during March 2011. The primary goal was to evaluate the published evidence and consider the expert opinions of the ISPMD members to reach a consensus on advice for the management of premenstrual disorders. Gynaecologists, psychiatrists, psychologists and pharmacologists each formally presented the evidence within their area of expertise; this was followed by an in-depth discussion leading to consensus recommendations. This article provides a comprehensive review of the outcomes from the meeting. The group discussed and agreed that careful diagnosis based on the recommendations and classification derived from the first ISPMD consensus conference is essential and should underlie the appropriate management strategy. Options for the management of premenstrual disorders fall under two broad categories, (a) those influencing central nervous activity, particularly the modulation of the neurotransmitter serotonin and (b) those that suppress ovulation. Psychotropic medication, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, probably acts by dampening the influence of sex steroids on the brain. Oral contraceptives, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, danazol and estradiol all most likely function by ovulation suppression. The role of oophorectomy was also considered in this respect. Alternative therapies are also addressed, with, e.g. cognitive behavioural therapy, calcium supplements and Vitex agnus castus warranting further exploration. PMID:23624686

  15. Functional Analysis of HIV/AIDS Stigma: Consensus or Divergence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hosseinzadeh, Hassan; Hossain, Syeda Zakia

    2011-01-01

    Functional theory proposes that attitudes may serve a variety of purposes for individuals. This study aimed to determine whether stigmatized attitudes toward HIV/AIDS serve the same function for all (consensus function) or serve different functions for different individuals (divergence function) by assessing various aspects of HIV/AIDS stigma…

  16. Brain Hemispheric Consensus and the Quality of Investment Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Michael

    This on-going study explores the hypothesis that stock fund managers who underperform do so because they make bad decisions, and examines whether their choices can be improved by using a decision model that invokes principles of brain hemispheric consensus. The study, begun in fall 1999, involves two groups of business students: the control group…

  17. Consensus and Dissent: Teaching English Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Marjorie N., Ed.

    Published in conjunction with the diamond jubilee of the National Council of Teachers of English, the essays in this yearbook explore the dichotomies characterizing Council debates over the years, such as freedom and discipline, tradition and reform, theory and practice--all reflecting a profession defining itself in a rhythm of consensus and…

  18. Scalable and Fault Tolerant Failure Detection and Consensus

    SciTech Connect

    Katti, Amogh; Di Fatta, Giuseppe; Naughton III, Thomas J; Engelmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Future extreme-scale high-performance computing systems will be required to work under frequent component failures. The MPI Forum's User Level Failure Mitigation proposal has introduced an operation, MPI_Comm_shrink, to synchronize the alive processes on the list of failed processes, so that applications can continue to execute even in the presence of failures by adopting algorithm-based fault tolerance techniques. This MPI_Comm_shrink operation requires a fault tolerant failure detection and consensus algorithm. This paper presents and compares two novel failure detection and consensus algorithms. The proposed algorithms are based on Gossip protocols and are inherently fault-tolerant and scalable. The proposed algorithms were implemented and tested using the Extreme-scale Simulator. The results show that in both algorithms the number of Gossip cycles to achieve global consensus scales logarithmically with system size. The second algorithm also shows better scalability in terms of memory and network bandwidth usage and a perfect synchronization in achieving global consensus.

  19. [Consensus for the prevention of cervical cancer in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Kably Ambe, Alberto; Ruiz Moreno, José Antonio; Ponce, Eduardo Lazcano; Vargas Hernández, Victor Manuel; Aguado Pérez, Rogelio A; Alonso de Ruiz, Patricia

    2011-12-01

    Cervical cancer remains a serious public health problem in the world; that is why the Mexican Federation of Schools of Obstetrics and Gynecology convened the elaboration of a consensus that is devoted this number of Ginecologia y Obstetricia de Mexico. In recent years has strengthened perceptions (public and private) in the need for preventive strategies in the medium and long terms. The development of effective vaccines against the human papilloma virus and the application of new methods of detection from viral DNA (completely automated for personal application) allow some degree of optimism. It is proposed a consensus with general recommendations in two consecutive stages: (a) primary prevention consisting of education for the prevention of cervical cancer and universal immunization and (b) secondary prevention by early detection of infections or injuries that could favor carcinogenesis. The consensus reviewed characteristics of available vaccines in detail and proposes strategies for implementation in Mexican population. Also, check out main methods of early detection of infection (or predisposing lesions) and suggests public and private strategies for implementation. Consensus places particular emphasis on early immunization for female population and correct use of methods for detection of infections or injuries that might cause cervical cancer.

  20. When Consensus Decision-Making Fails: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Grant T.

    Habermas's theory of dialogue was used to evaluate the process of decision making that occurred in a labor-management committee's meeting to discuss flextime. The study attempted to determine why, at that meeting, the committee's consensus process of decision making failed. W.R. Bion's theory of unconscious group motives was also used to…

  1. 78 FR 35085 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004. ASTM International Committee F37 on Light Sport Aircraft developed the new and revised standards with Federal...

  2. 76 FR 45647 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... to the provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004. ASTM International Committee F37 on Light Sport Aircraft developed the...

  3. 77 FR 24251 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004. ASTM International Committee F37 on Light Sport Aircraft developed the new and revised standards with...

  4. 75 FR 70074 - Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Light-Sport Aircraft AGENCY: Federal Aviation... provisions of the Sport Pilot and Light-Sport Aircraft rule issued July 16, 2004, and effective September 1, 2004. ASTM International Committee F37 on Light Sport Aircraft developed the revised standards...

  5. IV Spanish Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection treatment.

    PubMed

    Gisbert, Javier P; Molina-Infante, Javier; Amador, Javier; Bermejo, Fernando; Bujanda, Luis; Calvet, Xavier; Castro-Fernández, Manuel; Cuadrado-Lavín, Antonio; Elizalde, J Ignasi; Gene, Emili; Gomollón, Fernando; Lanas, Ángel; Martín de Argila, Carlos; Mearin, Fermín; Montoro, Miguel; Pérez-Aisa, Ángeles; Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; McNicholl, Adrián G

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori approximately infect 50% of Spanish population and causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Until now, three consensus meetings on H.pylori infection had been performed in Spain (the last in 2012). The changes in the treatment schemes, and the increasing available evidence, have justified organizing the IVSpanish Consensus Conference (March 2016), focused on the treatment of this infection. Nineteen experts participated, who performed a systematic review of the scientific evidence and developed a series of recommendation that were subjected to an anonymous Delphi process of iterative voting. Scientific evidence and the strength of the recommendation were classified using GRADE guidelines. As starting point, this consensus increased the minimum acceptable efficacy of recommended treatments that should reach, or preferably surpass, the 90% cure rate when prescribed empirically. Therefore, only quadruple therapies (with or without bismuth), and generally lasting 14 days, are recommended both for first and second line treatments. Non-bismuth quadruple concomitant regimen, including a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, amoxicillin and metronidazole, is recommended as first line. In the present consensus, other first line alternatives and rescue treatments are also reviewed and recommended.

  6. Ethics & Agenda 21: Moral Implications of a Global Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Noel J., Ed.; Quiblier, Pierre, Ed.

    At the Earth Summit held at Rio in June 1992, the leaders of more than 170 countries were able to adopt by consensus a common global strategy, an agenda for action, namely Agenda 21, that envisions a future that will be prosperous, equitable, and sustainable. This book contains a collection of essays by leading environmental philosophers,…

  7. Groping and Hoping for a Consensus on Calculator Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Education Dialogues, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This issue of Mathematics Education Dialogues focuses on the use of calculators in the mathematics classroom. The eleven articles on this theme include: (1) "Groping and Hoping for a Consensus on Calculator Use" (Zalman Usiskin); (2) "Let's Abolish Pencil-and-Paper Arithmetic" (Anthony Ralston); (3) "Do We Need Calculators?" (Kim Mackey); (4) "How…

  8. Eisenhower: Decision-making and Consensus in an Unfamiliar Context

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-17

    modern design theory in action, particularly managing the interests of multiple stakeholders, building consensus, and confronting complex problems...The creation of a National Security Council, provided many of the foundational materials for Eisenhower’s national security strategy. Project...Solarium, a planning exercise directed by Eisenhower during the creation of his administration’s national security policy, illustrates an approach to

  9. Educational Standards, Assessment, and the Search for Consensus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Pamela A.; Schutz, Aaron

    2001-01-01

    Examines the nature of the "consensus" reflected in educational standards used to orient high-stakes assessment programs and considers the discourse of standards creation and how standards are used to orient assessment development and performance judgments. Discusses the theoretical perspectives of J. Habermas and H. Gadamer. (Author/SLD)

  10. European consensus statement on "HPV Vaccination and Colposcopy".

    PubMed

    Shafi, Mahmood I; Petry, Ulrich; Bosch, Xavier F; Gissman, Lutz; Kocken, Marielle; Helmerhorst, Theo J M; Stanley, Margaret; Nazeer, Saloney; European Federation for Colposcopy

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a Europe-wide consensus statement on "HPV Vaccination and Colposcopy" under the aegis of the European Federation for Colposcopy. We look at the historical perspective, the currently available vaccines, cervical vaccination programs, future perspectives, and the impact all this will have on cervical cancer screening and colposcopy services.

  11. International consensus guidance for management of myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Gil I.; Benatar, Michael; Evoli, Amelia; Gilhus, Nils E.; Illa, Isabel; Kuntz, Nancy; Massey, Janice M.; Melms, Arthur; Murai, Hiroyuki; Nicolle, Michael; Palace, Jacqueline; Richman, David P.; Verschuuren, Jan; Narayanaswami, Pushpa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop formal consensus-based guidance for the management of myasthenia gravis (MG). Methods: In October 2013, the Myasthenia Gravis Foundation of America appointed a Task Force to develop treatment guidance for MG, and a panel of 15 international experts was convened. The RAND/UCLA appropriateness methodology was used to develop consensus guidance statements. Definitions were developed for goals of treatment, minimal manifestations, remission, ocular MG, impending crisis, crisis, and refractory MG. An in-person panel meeting then determined 7 treatment topics to be addressed. Initial guidance statements were developed from literature summaries. Three rounds of anonymous e-mail votes were used to attain consensus on guidance statements modified on the basis of panel input. Results: Guidance statements were developed for symptomatic and immunosuppressive treatments, IV immunoglobulin and plasma exchange, management of impending and manifest myasthenic crisis, thymectomy, juvenile MG, MG associated with antibodies to muscle-specific tyrosine kinase, and MG in pregnancy. Conclusion: This is an international formal consensus of MG experts intended to be a guide for clinicians caring for patients with MG worldwide. PMID:27358333

  12. Relevance of Web Documents:Ghosts Consensus Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorbunov, Andrey L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to improve the quality of Internet search systems and introduces the Ghosts Consensus Method which is free from the drawbacks of digital democracy algorithms and is based on linear programming tasks. Highlights include vector space models; determining relevant documents; and enriching query terms. (LRW)

  13. Canadian Athletic Therapists' Association Education Task Force Consensus Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafave, Mark R.; Bergeron, Glen; Klassen, Connie; Parr, Kelly; Valdez, Dennis; Elliott, Jacqueline; Peeler, Jason; Orecchio, Elsa; McKenzie, Kirsty; Streed, Kristin; DeMont, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Context: A published commentary from 2 of the current authors acted as a catalyst for raising some key issues that have arisen in athletic therapy education in Canada over the years. Objective: The purpose of this article is to report on the process followed to establish a number of consensus statements related to postsecondary athletic therapy…

  14. The "Beijing Consensus" and the Chinese Model of University Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zha, Qiang; Hayhoe, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to address connections between the Chinese model for development or the "Beijing Consensus" and Chinese universities. Chinese universities seem to be caught between serving governmental agendas and pursuing their own goals as an academic community. Up until recently, they had become used to following the lead of the…

  15. Position Statements, Issue Briefs, Resolutions and Consensus Statements. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article presents position statements, issue briefs, and resolutions and consensus statements of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN). The Position Statements include: (1) Allergy/Anaphylaxis Management in the School Setting; (2) Caseload Assignments; (3) Child Mortality in the School Setting; (4) Chronic Health Conditions, Managed…

  16. A consensus on protein structure accuracy in NMR?

    PubMed

    Billeter, Martin

    2015-02-03

    The precision of an NMR structure may be manipulated by calculation parameters such as calibration factors. Its accuracy is, however, a different issue. In this issue of Structure, Buchner and Güntert present "consensus structure bundles," where precision analysis allows estimation of accuracy.

  17. Nurses' Perceptions of Consensus Reports Containing Recommendations for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Sheila T.; Hill, Martha N.; Santamaria, Barbara; Howard, Cheryl; Jadack, Rose

    1997-01-01

    Responses from 1,107 nurses working with asthma patients showed positive to neutral views of consensus reports with practice recommendations from professional associations, government, and health agencies. Most felt the reports were a better source of information than colleagues, textbooks, or journals. However, 75% were unaware of one major set…

  18. When goals diverge: Staff consensus and the organizational climate.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Gerald; Ulaszek, Wendy R; Lin, Hsiu-Ju; Wexler, Harry K

    2009-08-01

    A sample of correctional officers and prison substance abuse treatment staff collected by the National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices Survey is used to provide an exploratory study of an aspect of organizational culture consisting of consensus (agreement) among prison personnel regarding their beliefs about rehabilitation in the presence of conflicting organizational goals and aspects of the organizational climate important to change. Findings show that among those staff members responding to the survey, the belief in rehabilitation scale mean score was associated with higher levels of organizational commitment, and interdepartmental coordination. However, an hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analysis that used an index score derived from the standard deviation for staff consensus regarding these same beliefs about rehabilitation produced a different pattern of results, showing that high levels of consensus were associated with job frustration, cynicism towards the ability of the institution to change, and lower levels of organizational commitment. The authors conclude that, although the sample may not express the beliefs of corrections officers or prison-based treatment staff at large, within the sample, consensus appeared to play a unique role in evaluating the effect of divergent goals on organizational climate as it relates to change, and warrants consideration when considering the effects of organizational climate.

  19. Consensus and Difference: American Students' Perspectives on the National History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dan, Yongjun; Todd, Reese; Lan, William

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to re-examine the consensus and difference in American students' understanding of national history, on which there were divergent research results. With three sets of questions that examined students' perspectives of the collective memory, historical significance, and credibility of historical sources, we found that…

  20. Identification of consensus biomarkers for predicting non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shan-Han; Tung, Chun-Wei

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGHCs) is currently relying on two-year rodent bioassays. Toxicogenomics biomarkers provide a potential alternative method for the prioritization of NGHCs that could be useful for risk assessment. However, previous studies using inconsistently classified chemicals as the training set and a single microarray dataset concluded no consensus biomarkers. In this study, 4 consensus biomarkers of A2m, Ca3, Cxcl1, and Cyp8b1 were identified from four large-scale microarray datasets of the one-day single maximum tolerated dose and a large set of chemicals without inconsistent classifications. Machine learning techniques were subsequently applied to develop prediction models for NGHCs. The final bagging decision tree models were constructed with an average AUC performance of 0.803 for an independent test. A set of 16 chemicals with controversial classifications were reclassified according to the consensus biomarkers. The developed prediction models and identified consensus biomarkers are expected to be potential alternative methods for prioritization of NGHCs for further experimental validation.

  1. Consensus tracking for multiagent systems with nonlinear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dong, Runsha

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns the problem of consensus tracking for multiagent systems with a dynamical leader. In particular, it proposes the corresponding explicit control laws for multiple first-order nonlinear systems, second-order nonlinear systems, and quite general nonlinear systems based on the leader-follower and the tree shaped network topologies. Several numerical simulations are given to verify the theoretical results.

  2. National consensus on the management of constipation in indonesia 2010.

    PubMed

    2011-10-01

    Constipation is a common complaint in our daily practice, which may occur in young adult or elderly patients. Recently, the incidence has been increasing; however, most patients try to have self-medication using over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, which is usually inappropriate. Moreover, there has been unequal distribution of knowledge and vigilance of medical practitioners, both general physician and specialist doctors on the constipation issue. Therefore, patients usually present with greater complications. The Organizing Committee of Indonesian Society of Gastroenterology or Pengurus Besar Perkumpulan Gastroenterologi Indonesia (PB PGI) considers that it is important to compose a National Consensus on the Management of Constipation in Indonesia. The Consensus is expected to be a guideline for doctors to deal with patients who have constipation in their daily practice, so that optimal results could be achieved. Nowadays, there are new data on definition, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of constipation; thus, the Organizing Committee of ISG feels that it is necessary to revise the established consensus. We expect that the consensus may bring advantages for medical practitioners in Indonesia and in general, it may cause community health improvement.

  3. Identification of consensus biomarkers for predicting non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shan-Han; Tung, Chun-Wei

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGHCs) is currently relying on two-year rodent bioassays. Toxicogenomics biomarkers provide a potential alternative method for the prioritization of NGHCs that could be useful for risk assessment. However, previous studies using inconsistently classified chemicals as the training set and a single microarray dataset concluded no consensus biomarkers. In this study, 4 consensus biomarkers of A2m, Ca3, Cxcl1, and Cyp8b1 were identified from four large-scale microarray datasets of the one-day single maximum tolerated dose and a large set of chemicals without inconsistent classifications. Machine learning techniques were subsequently applied to develop prediction models for NGHCs. The final bagging decision tree models were constructed with an average AUC performance of 0.803 for an independent test. A set of 16 chemicals with controversial classifications were reclassified according to the consensus biomarkers. The developed prediction models and identified consensus biomarkers are expected to be potential alternative methods for prioritization of NGHCs for further experimental validation. PMID:28117354

  4. A FRET Biosensor for ROCK Based on a Consensus Substrate Sequence Identified by KISS Technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunjie; Imanishi, Ayako; Komatsu, Naoki; Terai, Kenta; Amano, Mutsuki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2017-01-11

    Genetically-encoded biosensors based on Förster/fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are versatile tools for studying the spatio-temporal regulation of signaling molecules within not only the cells but also tissues. Perhaps the hardest task in the development of a FRET biosensor for protein kinases is to identify the kinase-specific substrate peptide to be used in the FRET biosensor. To solve this problem, we took advantage of kinase-interacting substrate screening (KISS) technology, which deduces a consensus substrate sequence for the protein kinase of interest. Here, we show that a consensus substrate sequence for ROCK identified by KISS yielded a FRET biosensor for ROCK, named Eevee-ROCK, with high sensitivity and specificity. By treating HeLa cells with inhibitors or siRNAs against ROCK, we show that a substantial part of the basal FRET signal of Eevee-ROCK was derived from the activities of ROCK1 and ROCK2. Eevee-ROCK readily detected ROCK activation by epidermal growth factor, lysophosphatidic acid, and serum. When cells stably-expressing Eevee-ROCK were time-lapse imaged for three days, ROCK activity was found to increase after the completion of cytokinesis, concomitant with the spreading of cells. Eevee-ROCK also revealed a gradual increase in ROCK activity during apoptosis. Thus, Eevee-ROCK, which was developed from a substrate sequence predicted by the KISS technology, will pave the way to a better understanding of the function of ROCK in a physiological context.

  5. Improved thermostability of Clostridium thermocellum endoglucanase Cel8A by using consensus-guided mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Anbar, Michael; Gul, Ozgur; Lamed, Raphael; Sezerman, Ugur O; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-05-01

    The use of thermostable cellulases is advantageous for the breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass toward the commercial production of biofuels. Previously, we have demonstrated the engineering of an enhanced thermostable family 8 cellulosomal endoglucanase (EC 3.2.1.4), Cel8A, from Clostridium thermocellum, using random error-prone PCR and a combination of three beneficial mutations, dominated by an intriguing serine-to-glycine substitution (M. Anbar, R. Lamed, E. A. Bayer, ChemCatChem 2:997-1003, 2010). In the present study, we used a bioinformatics-based approach involving sequence alignment of homologous family 8 glycoside hydrolases to create a library of consensus mutations in which residues of the catalytic module are replaced at specific positions with the most prevalent amino acids in the family. One of the mutants (G283P) displayed a higher thermal stability than the wild-type enzyme. Introducing this mutation into the previously engineered Cel8A triple mutant resulted in an optimized enzyme, increasing the half-life of activity by 14-fold at 85°C. Remarkably, no loss of catalytic activity was observed compared to that of the wild-type endoglucanase. The structural changes were simulated by molecular dynamics analysis, and specific regions were identified that contributed to the observed thermostability. Intriguingly, most of the proteins used for sequence alignment in determining the consensus residues were derived from mesophilic bacteria, with optimal temperatures well below that of C. thermocellum Cel8A.

  6. Genetic map of artichoke × wild cardoon: toward a consensus map for Cynara cardunculus.

    PubMed

    Sonnante, Gabriella; Gatto, Angela; Morgese, Anita; Montemurro, Francesco; Sarli, Giulio; Blanco, Emanuela; Pignone, Domenico

    2011-11-01

    An integrated consensus linkage map is proposed for globe artichoke. Maternal and paternal genetic maps were constructed on the basis of an F(1) progeny derived from crossing an artichoke genotype (Mola) with its progenitor, the wild cardoon (Tolfa), using EST-derived SSRs, genomic SSRs, AFLPs, ten genes, and two morphological traits. For most genes, mainly belonging to the chlorogenic acid pathway, new markers were developed. Five of these were SNP markers analyzed through high-resolution melt technology. From the maternal (Mola) and paternal (Tolfa) maps, an integrated map was obtained, containing 337 molecular and one morphological markers ordered in 17 linkage groups (LGs), linked between Mola and Tolfa. The integrated map covers 1,488.8 cM, with an average distance of 4.4 cM between markers. The map was aligned with already existing maps for artichoke, and 12 LGs were linked via 31 bridge markers. LG numbering has been proposed. A total of 124 EST-SSRs and two genes were mapped here for the first time, providing a framework for the construction of a functional map in artichoke. The establishment of a consensus map represents a necessary condition to plan a complete sequencing of the globe artichoke genome.

  7. Consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primers for amplification of distantly related sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, T M; Schultz, E R; Henikoff, J G; Pietrokovski, S; McCallum, C M; Henikoff, S

    1998-01-01

    We describe a new primer design strategy for PCR amplification of unknown targets that are related to multiply-aligned protein sequences. Each primer consists of a short 3' degenerate core region and a longer 5' consensus clamp region. Only 3-4 highly conserved amino acid residues are necessary for design of the core, which is stabilized by the clamp during annealing to template molecules. During later rounds of amplification, the non-degenerate clamp permits stable annealing to product molecules. We demonstrate the practical utility of this hybrid primer method by detection of diverse reverse transcriptase-like genes in a human genome, and by detection of C5DNA methyltransferase homologs in various plant DNAs. In each case, amplified products were sufficiently pure to be cloned without gel fractionation. This COnsensus-DEgenerate Hybrid Oligonucleotide Primer (CODEHOP) strategy has been implemented as a computer program that is accessible over the World Wide Web (http://blocks.fhcrc.org/codehop.html) and is directly linked from the BlockMaker multiple sequence alignment site for hybrid primer prediction beginning with a set of related protein sequences. PMID:9512532

  8. Identification of potential inhibitors against the Zika virus using consensus scoring.

    PubMed

    Onawole, Abdulmujeeb T; Sulaiman, Kazeem O; Adegoke, Rukayat O; Kolapo, Temitope U

    2017-02-09

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is a life threatening pathogen of zoonotic importance with prevalence in some parts of Africa and America. Unfortunately, there is yet to be a single approved vaccine or antiviral drug to treat the diseases and deformations being caused by the Zika virus infection. In this study, about 36 million compounds from MCULE database were virtually screened against a real matured ZIKV protein using a consensus scoring method to get improved hit rates. The consensus scoring method combined the result from the 25 top ranked molecules from both MCULE and Drug Score eXtended (DSX) docking programs which led to the selection of two hit compounds. The inhibition constant (Ki) values of 0.08 and 0.30μm were obtained for the two selected compounds MCULE-8830369631-0-1 and MCULE-9236850811-0-1 respectively, to remark them as hit compounds. The molecular interactions of the two selected hit compounds with the amino acids (ALA 48, ILE 49, ILE 468 and LEU 472) present in the ZIKV protein indicated that they both have similar binding modes. The result of the computationally predicted physicochemical properties including ADMET for the selected compounds showed their great potential in becoming lead compounds upon optimization and thus could be used in treating the Zika virus diseases.

  9. Noise and Hearing Loss. NIH Consensus Development Conference Consensus Statement (January 22-24, 1990). Volume 8, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This report is the product of a National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference on Noise and Hearing Loss which addressed the characteristics of noise-induced hearing loss, acoustic parameters of hazardous noise exposure, individual and age-specific susceptibility, and prevention strategies. The report examines the incidence of…

  10. Consensus Conference on North American Training in Hepatopancreaticobiliary Surgery: A Review of the Conference and Presentation of Consensus Statements.

    PubMed

    Jeyarajah, D Rohan; Berman, Russell S; Doyle, Majella; Geevarghese, Sunil K; Posner, Mitchell C; Farmer, Douglas; Minter, Rebecca M

    2016-07-01

    The findings and recommendations of the North American Consensus Conference on Training in HPB Surgery held October 2014 are presented. The conference was hosted by the Society for Surgical Oncology (SSO), Americas Hepatopancreaticobiliary Association (AHPBA), and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons (ASTS). The current state of training in HPB surgery in North America was defined through three pathways-HPB, Surgical Oncology, and Solid Organ Transplant fellowships. Consensus regarding programmatic requirements included establishment of minimum case volumes and inclusion of quality metrics. Formative assessment, using milestones as a framework and inclusive of both operative and non-operative skills, must be present. Specific core HPB cases should be defined and used for evaluation of operative skills. The conference concluded with a focus on the optimal means to perform summative assessment to evaluate the individual fellow completing a fellowship in HPB surgery. Presentations from the hospital perspective and the American Board of Surgery led to consensus that summative assessment was desired by the public and the hospital systems, and should occur in a uniform but possibly modular manner for all HPB fellowship pathways. A task force comprised of representatives of the SSO, AHPBA, and ASTS are charged with implementation of the consensus statements emanating from this consensus conference.Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Transplantation, the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, and the Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission by The American Society of Transplantation, the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, or the Society of Surgical Oncology.

  11. Consensus on the standardization of terminology in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and related thrombotic microangiopathies.

    PubMed

    Scully, M; Cataland, S; Coppo, P; de la Rubia, J; Friedman, K D; Kremer Hovinga, J; Lämmle, B; Matsumoto, M; Pavenski, K; Sadler, E; Sarode, R; Wu, H

    2017-02-01

    Essentials An international collaboration provides a consensus for clinical definitions. This concerns thrombotic microangiopathies and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). The consensus defines diagnosis, disease monitoring and response to treatment. Requirements for ADAMTS-13 are given.

  12. Children trust a consensus composed of outgroup members--but do not retain that trust.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eva E; Corriveau, Kathleen H; Harris, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    Children prefer to learn from informants in consensus with one another. However, no research has examined whether this preference exists across cultures, and whether the race of the informants impacts that preference. In 2 studies, one hundred thirty-six 4- to 7-year-old European American and Taiwanese children demonstrated a systematic preference for a consensus. Nevertheless, the initial strength and persistence of that preference depended on the racial composition of the consensus. Children's preference for consensus members belonging to the same race as themselves persisted even when only one consensus member remained to provide information. When the consensus consisted of different-race informants, preference for the consensus was initially apparent but lost when only one member from the consensus remained with the dissenting informant.

  13. The pivotal role of perceived scientific consensus in acceptance of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewandowsky, Stephan; Gignac, Gilles E.; Vaughan, Samuel

    2013-04-01

    Although most experts agree that CO2 emissions are causing anthropogenic global warming (AGW), public concern has been declining. One reason for this decline is the `manufacture of doubt' by political and vested interests, which often challenge the existence of the scientific consensus. The role of perceived consensus in shaping public opinion is therefore of considerable interest: in particular, it is unknown whether consensus determines people's beliefs causally. It is also unclear whether perception of consensus can override people's `worldviews', which are known to foster rejection of AGW. Study 1 shows that acceptance of several scientific propositions--from HIV/AIDS to AGW--is captured by a common factor that is correlated with another factor that captures perceived scientific consensus. Study 2 reveals a causal role of perceived consensus by showing that acceptance of AGW increases when consensus is highlighted. Consensus information also neutralizes the effect of worldview.

  14. Optimal Topology Control and Power Allocation for Minimum Energy Consumption in Consensus Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-16

    network topology can be modeled as a random graph model. It can be shown [22], [23] that the system in (3) converges to consensus almost surely, i.e...Terms— Consensus algorithms, minimum energy con- sumption, random graphs, sensor networks, topology control. I. INTRODUCTION A VERAGE consensus ...network context, it is necessary to minimize the en- ergy consumption necessary to reach consensus . Clearly, the network topology plays a fundamental role

  15. Nutritional objectives for the Spanish population. Consensus from the Spanish Society of Community Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Serra-Majem, L; Aranceta, J

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present the development of the Nutritional Objectives for the Spanish Population. Preparation of draft documents contributed by different working groups was followed by a consensus meeting held in Bilbao on 5-7 October 2000, hosted by the Spanish Society of Community Nutrition and sponsored by the World Health Organisation. Establishing nutritional guidelines was conducted by: (1) analysing current food and nutritional data from nutritional surveys, for intermediate objectives; and (2) reviewing current scientific knowledge for final objectives. The objectives include intermediate and ultimate figures, and comprise percentage of energy from macronutrients and fatty acids, fruit and vegetable consumption, frequency of sweets, physical activity and body mass index, folate, calcium, sodium, fluoride and iodine intake, dietary fibre, cholesterol, alcohol and duration of breast-feeding. The nutritional objectives for the Spanish population create a rational framework for the development of dietary guidelines and nutritional policies in Spain, within a Mediterranean context.

  16. Food Security: The Elaboration of Contested Claims to a Consensus Frame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Patrick H.; Hunt, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    This article demonstrates Gamson's claim that behind the apparent agreement implied by "consensus frames" lies considerable dissensus. Ironically, the very potency of consensus frames may generate contested claims to the ownership of a social problem. Food security is a potent consensus frame that has generated at least three distinct collective…

  17. Boltzmann-type control of opinion consensus through leaders

    PubMed Central

    Albi, G.; Pareschi, L.; Zanella, M.

    2014-01-01

    The study of formations and dynamics of opinions leading to the so-called opinion consensus is one of the most important areas in mathematical modelling of social sciences. Following the Boltzmann-type control approach recently introduced by the first two authors, we consider a group of opinion leaders who modify their strategy accordingly to an objective functional with the aim of achieving opinion consensus. The main feature of the Boltzmann-type control is that, owing to an instantaneous binary control formulation, it permits the minimization of the cost functional to be embedded into the microscopic leaders’ interactions of the corresponding Boltzmann equation. The related Fokker–Planck asymptotic limits are also derived, which allow one to give explicit expressions of stationary solutions. The results demonstrate the validity of the Boltzmann-type control approach and the capability of the leaders’ control to strategically lead the followers’ opinion. PMID:25288820

  18. Engineering large-scale agent-based systems with consensus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokma, A.; Slade, A.; Kerridge, S.; Johnson, K.

    1994-01-01

    The paper presents the consensus method for the development of large-scale agent-based systems. Systems can be developed as networks of knowledge based agents (KBA) which engage in a collaborative problem solving effort. The method provides a comprehensive and integrated approach to the development of this type of system. This includes a systematic analysis of user requirements as well as a structured approach to generating a system design which exhibits the desired functionality. There is a direct correspondence between system requirements and design components. The benefits of this approach are that requirements are traceable into design components and code thus facilitating verification. The use of the consensus method with two major test applications showed it to be successful and also provided valuable insight into problems typically associated with the development of large systems.

  19. Consensus Guidelines for the Management and Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Pamela L.; Reidy-Lagunes, Diane; Anthony, Lowell B.; Bertino, Erin M.; Brendtro, Kari; Chan, Jennifer A.; Chen, Herbert; Jensen, Robert T.; Kim, Michelle Kang; Klimstra, David S.; Kulke, Matthew H.; Liu, Eric H.; Metz, David C.; Phan, Alexandria T.; Sippel, Rebecca S.; Strosberg, Jonathan R.; Yao, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors originating in various anatomic locations. The management of this disease poses a significant challenge because of the heterogeneous clinical presentations and varying degree of aggressiveness. The recent completion of several phase III trials, including those evaluating octreotide, sunitinib, and everolimus, demonstrate that rigorous evaluation of novel agents in this disease is possible and can lead to practice-changing outcomes. Nevertheless, there are many aspects to the treatment of NETs that remain unclear and controversial. The North American Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (NANETS) published a set of consensus guidelines in 2010 which provided an overview for the treatment of patients with these malignancies. Here, we present a set of consensus tables intended to complement these guidelines and serve as a quick, accessible reference for the practicing physician. PMID:23591432

  20. Bladder Cancer Molecular Taxonomy: Summary from a Consensus Meeting.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Seth P; McConkey, David J; Hoadley, Katherine A; Chan, Keith S; Kim, William Y; Radvanyi, François; Höglund, Mattias; Real, Francisco X

    2016-01-07

    The advent of Omics technologies has been key to the molecular subclassification of urothelial bladder cancer. Several groups have used different strategies to this aim, with partially overlapping findings. The meeting at the Spanish National Cancer Research Center-CNIO was held to discuss such classifications and reach consensus where appropriate. After updated presentations on the work performed by the teams attending the meeting, a consensus was reached regarding the existence of a group of Basal-Squamous-like tumors - designated BASQ - charaterized the high expression of KRT5/6 and KRT14 and low/undetectable expression of FOXA1 and GATA3. An additional tumor subgroup with urothelial differentiation features was recognized whose optimal molecular definition is required. For other subtypes described, more work is needed to determine how robust they are and how to best define them at the molecular level.

  1. [Neuroendocrine dysfunction and brain damage. A consensus statement].

    PubMed

    Leal-Cerro, Alfonso; Rincón, María Dolores; Domingo, Manel Puig

    2009-01-01

    This consensus statement aims to enhance awareness of the incidence and risks of hypopituitarism in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or brain hemorrhages among physicians treating patients with brain damage. The importance of this problem is related not only to the frequency of TBI but also to its prevalence in younger populations. The consequences of TBI are characterized by a series of symptoms that depend on the type of sequels related to neuroendocrine dysfunction. The signs and symptoms of hypopituitarism are often confused with those of other sequels of TBI. Consequently, patients with posttraumatic hypopituitarism may receive suboptimal rehabilitation unless the underlying hormone deficiency is identified and treated. This consensus is based on the recommendation supported by expert opinion that patients with a TBI and/or brain hemorrhage should undergo endocrine evaluation in order to assess pituitary function and, if deficiency is detected, should receive hormone replacement therapy.

  2. Bias, belief, and consensus: Collective opinion formation on fluctuating networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngampruetikorn, Vudtiwat; Stephens, Greg J.

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of online networks, societies have become substantially more interconnected with individual members able to easily both maintain and modify their own social links. Here, we show that active network maintenance exposes agents to confirmation bias, the tendency to confirm one's beliefs, and we explore how this bias affects collective opinion formation. We introduce a model of binary opinion dynamics on a complex, fluctuating network with stochastic rewiring and we analyze these dynamics in the mean-field limit of large networks and fast link rewiring. We show that confirmation bias induces a segregation of individuals with different opinions and stabilizes the consensus state. We further show that bias can have an unusual, nonmonotonic effect on the time to consensus and this suggests a novel avenue for large-scale opinion manipulation.

  3. A failed platform: The Citizen Consensus Conference travels to Chile.

    PubMed

    Ureta, Sebastián

    2016-05-01

    This article starts by reviewing the setbacks that the recent Science and Technology Studies literature has identified in the functioning of technologies of democracy, the different arrangements that look to enact deliberation on technoscientific issues. Putting a focus on the Citizen Consensus Conference, it then proposes that several of these setbacks are related to the kind of "work" that these technologies are expected to do, identifying two kinds of it: performing a laboratory-based experiment and constituting a platform for the dissemination of facts. It then applies this framework to study a Citizen Consensus Conference carried out in Chile in 2003. After a detailed genealogy of the planning, implementation and afterlife of this exercise, the article concludes that several of the limitations experienced are derived from a "successful outcome" conceived as solely running a neat lab-based experiment, arguing for the need to incorporate its functioning as a platform with all the associated transformations and messiness.

  4. Link-Prediction Enhanced Consensus Clustering for Complex Networks.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Matthew; Adar, Eytan; Cafarella, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Many real networks that are collected or inferred from data are incomplete due to missing edges. Missing edges can be inherent to the dataset (Facebook friend links will never be complete) or the result of sampling (one may only have access to a portion of the data). The consequence is that downstream analyses that "consume" the network will often yield less accurate results than if the edges were complete. Community detection algorithms, in particular, often suffer when critical intra-community edges are missing. We propose a novel consensus clustering algorithm to enhance community detection on incomplete networks. Our framework utilizes existing community detection algorithms that process networks imputed by our link prediction based sampling algorithm and merges their multiple partitions into a final consensus output. On average our method boosts performance of existing algorithms by 7% on artificial data and 17% on ego networks collected from Facebook.

  5. Expert Consensus for Discharge Referral Decisions Using Online Delphi

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Kathy H.; Holmes, John H.; Naylor, Mary D.; Liberatore, Matthew; Nydick, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the results of using a modified Delphi approach designed to achieve consensus from eight discharge planning experts regarding the decision to refer hospitalized older adults for post-discharge follow-up. Experts reviewed 150 cases using an online website designed to facilitate their interaction and efforts to reach agreement on the need for a referral for post-discharge care and the appropriate site for such care. In contrast to an average of eight weeks to complete just 50 cases using the traditional mail method, the first online Delphi round for 150 cases were completed in six weeks. Data provided by experts suggest that online Delphi is a time efficient and acceptable methodology for reaching group consensus. Other benefits include instant access to Delphi decision results, live knowledge of the time requirements and progress of each expert, and cost savings in postage, paper, copying, and storage of paper documents. This online Delphi methodology is highly recommended. PMID:14728143

  6. Efficient Reconstruction of Predictive Consensus Metabolic Network Models

    PubMed Central

    Martins dos Santos, Vitor A. P.; Stelling, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Understanding cellular function requires accurate, comprehensive representations of metabolism. Genome-scale, constraint-based metabolic models (GSMs) provide such representations, but their usability is often hampered by inconsistencies at various levels, in particular for concurrent models. COMMGEN, our tool for COnsensus Metabolic Model GENeration, automatically identifies inconsistencies between concurrent models and semi-automatically resolves them, thereby contributing to consolidate knowledge of metabolic function. Tests of COMMGEN for four organisms showed that automatically generated consensus models were predictive and that they substantially increased coherence of knowledge representation. COMMGEN ought to be particularly useful for complex scenarios in which manual curation does not scale, such as for eukaryotic organisms, microbial communities, and host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27563720

  7. Design and evaluation of consensus PCR assays for henipaviruses.

    PubMed

    Feldman, K S; Foord, A; Heine, H G; Smith, I L; Boyd, V; Marsh, G A; Wood, J L N; Cunningham, A A; Wang, L-F

    2009-10-01

    Henipaviruses were first discovered in the 1990s, and their potential threat to public health is of increasing concern with increasing knowledge. Old-world fruit bats are the reservoir hosts for these viruses, and spill-over events cause lethal infections in a wide range of mammalian species, including humans. In anticipation of these spill-over events, and to investigate further the geographical range of these genetically diverse viruses, assays for detection of known and potentially novel strains of henipaviruses are required. The development of multiple consensus PCR assays for the detection of henipaviruses, including both SYBR Green and TaqMan real-time PCRs and a conventional heminested PCR is described. The assays are highly sensitive and have defined specificity. In addition to being useful tools for detection of known and novel henipaviruses, evaluation of assay efficiency and sensitivity across both biological and synthetic templates has provided valuable insight into consensus PCR design and use.

  8. Boltzmann-type control of opinion consensus through leaders.

    PubMed

    Albi, G; Pareschi, L; Zanella, M

    2014-11-13

    The study of formations and dynamics of opinions leading to the so-called opinion consensus is one of the most important areas in mathematical modelling of social sciences. Following the Boltzmann-type control approach recently introduced by the first two authors, we consider a group of opinion leaders who modify their strategy accordingly to an objective functional with the aim of achieving opinion consensus. The main feature of the Boltzmann-type control is that, owing to an instantaneous binary control formulation, it permits the minimization of the cost functional to be embedded into the microscopic leaders' interactions of the corresponding Boltzmann equation. The related Fokker-Planck asymptotic limits are also derived, which allow one to give explicit expressions of stationary solutions. The results demonstrate the validity of the Boltzmann-type control approach and the capability of the leaders' control to strategically lead the followers' opinion.

  9. Consensus statement from the 2014 International Microdialysis Forum.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Peter J; Jalloh, Ibrahim; Helmy, Adel; Carpenter, Keri L H; Rostami, Elham; Bellander, Bo-Michael; Boutelle, Martyn G; Chen, Jeff W; Claassen, Jan; Dahyot-Fizelier, Claire; Enblad, Per; Gallagher, Clare N; Helbok, Raimund; Hillered, Lars; Le Roux, Peter D; Magnoni, Sandra; Mangat, Halinder S; Menon, David K; Nordström, Carl-Henrik; O'Phelan, Kristine H; Oddo, Mauro; Perez Barcena, Jon; Robertson, Claudia; Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth; Sahuquillo, Juan; Smith, Martin; Stocchetti, Nino; Belli, Antonio; Carpenter, T Adrian; Coles, Jonathan P; Czosnyka, Marek; Dizdar, Nil; Goodman, J Clay; Gupta, Arun K; Nielsen, Troels H; Marklund, Niklas; Montcriol, Ambroise; O'Connell, Mark T; Poca, Maria A; Sarrafzadeh, Asita; Shannon, Richard J; Skjøth-Rasmussen, Jane; Smielewski, Peter; Stover, John F; Timofeev, Ivan; Vespa, Paul; Zavala, Elizabeth; Ungerstedt, Urban

    2015-09-01

    Microdialysis enables the chemistry of the extracellular interstitial space to be monitored. Use of this technique in patients with acute brain injury has increased our understanding of the pathophysiology of several acute neurological disorders. In 2004, a consensus document on the clinical application of cerebral microdialysis was published. Since then, there have been significant advances in the clinical use of microdialysis in neurocritical care. The objective of this review is to report on the International Microdialysis Forum held in Cambridge, UK, in April 2014 and to produce a revised and updated consensus statement about its clinical use including technique, data interpretation, relationship with outcome, role in guiding therapy in neurocritical care and research applications.

  10. 2 nd Brazilian Consensus on Chagas Disease, 2015.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Carlos Pinto; Ramos, Alberto Novaes; Gontijo, Eliane Dias; Luquetti, Alejandro; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Coura, José Rodrigues; Torres, Rosália Morais; Melo, José Renan da Cunha; Almeida, Eros Antonio de; Oliveira, Wilson de; Silveira, Antônio Carlos; Rezende, Joffre Marcondes de; Pinto, Fabiane Scalabrini; Ferreira, Antonio Walter; Rassi, Anis; Fragata, Abílio Augusto; Sousa, Andréa Silvestre de; Correia, Dalmo; Jansen, Ana Maria; Andrade, Glaucia Manzan Queiroz; Britto, Constança Felícia De Paoli de Carvalho; Pinto, Ana Yecê das Neves; Rassi, Anis; Campos, Dayse Elisabeth; Abad-Franch, Fernando; Santos, Silvana Eloi; Chiari, Egler; Hasslocher-Moreno, Alejandro Marcel; Moreira, Eliane Furtado; Marques, Divina Seila de Oliveira; Silva, Eliane Lages; Marin-Neto, José Antonio; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Xavier, Sergio Salles; Valente, Sebastião Aldo da Silva; Carvalho, Noêmia Barbosa; Cardoso, Alessandra Viana; Silva, Rafaella Albuquerque E; Costa, Veruska Maia da; Vivaldini, Simone Monzani; Oliveira, Suelene Mamede; Valente, Vera da Costa; Lima, Mayara Maia; Alves, Renato Vieira

    2016-12-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected chronic condition with a high burden of morbidity and mortality. It has considerable psychological, social, and economic impacts. The disease represents a significant public health issue in Brazil, with different regional patterns. This document presents the evidence that resulted in the Brazilian Consensus on Chagas Disease. The objective was to review and standardize strategies for diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and control of Chagas disease in the country, based on the available scientific evidence. The consensus is based on the articulation and strategic contribution of renowned Brazilian experts with knowledge and experience on various aspects of the disease. It is the result of a close collaboration between the Brazilian Society of Tropical Medicine and the Ministry of Health. It is hoped that this document will strengthen the development of integrated actions against Chagas disease in the country, focusing on epidemiology, management, comprehensive care (including families and communities), communication, information, education, and research .

  11. Persistence of opinion in the Sznajd consensus model: computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, D.; de Oliveira, P. M. C.

    2002-12-01

    The density of never changed opinions during the Sznajd consensus-finding process decays with time t as 1/t^θ. We find θ simeq 3/8 for a chain, compatible with the exact Ising result of Derrida et al. In higher dimensions, however, the exponent differs from the Ising θ. With simultaneous updating of sublattices instead of the usual random sequential updating, the number of persistent opinions decays roughly exponentially. Some of the simulations used multi-spin coding.

  12. The Same Language Speak We Do - Consensus Terminology for Telehealth.

    PubMed

    Scott, Richard E; Mars, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    e-Health has grown to become interjurisdictional in scope and in practice. Central to successful implementation and scaling of e-heath solutions is clear and concise communication of ideas and principles, and instructions during construction. This paper addresses the need for an agreed taxonomy and terminology and focuses on explaining, proposing, and recommending terms and action for an international consensus-based terminology for telehealth.

  13. Interdisciplinary consensus document for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    de Miquel, C Alegre; Campayo, J García; Flórez, M Tomás; Arguelles, J M Gómez; Tarrio, E Blanco; Montoya, M Gobbo; Martin, Á Pérez; Salio, A Martínez; Fuentes, J Vidal; Alberch, E Altarriba; de la Cámara, A Gómez

    2010-01-01

    Backgrounds. The elevated prevalence and enormous clinical and social impact of fibromyalgia, together with the complexity of its treatment, require action consensuses that guide health care professionals. Although there are some similar documents in our language, most have been made from the perspective of a single discipline.Objective. To develop a consensus on the treatment of fibromyalgia made by selected representatives and supported by the principal medical associations that intervene in its treatment (rheumatology, neurology, psychiatry,rehabilitation and family medicine) and representatives of the associations of patients. On the other hand, understanding the disease not as a homogenous disorders but also as the sum of different clinical subtypes,having specific symptomatic characteristics and different therapeutic needs is stressed. This approach represented a need perceived by the clinicians and a novelty regarding previous consensuses.Methods. The different clinical classifications proposed in fibromyalgia and the scientific evidence of the treatments used in this disease were reviewed. For the selection of the classification used and performance of the therapeutic recommendations, some of the usual techniques to obtain the consensus (nominal group and brainstorming) were used.Conclusion. The classification of Giesecke of fibromyalgia into 3 subgroups seems to have the greatest scientific evidence and the most useful for the clinician. The guide offers a series of general recommendations for all the patients with fibromyalgia. However, in addition, for each subgroup, there are a series of specific pharmacological and psychological-type recommendations and those of modification of the environment, which will make it possible to have a personalized approach to the patient with fibromyalgia in accordance with their individual clinical characteristics (pain, catastrophizing levels, etc.).

  14. Consensus Tracking for Multiagent Systems with Nonlinear Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns the problem of consensus tracking for multiagent systems with a dynamical leader. In particular, it proposes the corresponding explicit control laws for multiple first-order nonlinear systems, second-order nonlinear systems, and quite general nonlinear systems based on the leader-follower and the tree shaped network topologies. Several numerical simulations are given to verify the theoretical results. PMID:25197689

  15. Iterative Approximate Byzantine Consensus under a Generalized Fault Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-21

    on Principles of distributed computing , PODC ’05, pages 138–147, New York, NY, USA, 2005. ACM. [3] S. Dasgupta, C. Papadimitriou , and U. Vazirani...Iterative Approximate Byzantine Consensus under a Generalized Fault Model∗ Lewis Tseng1,3, and Nitin Vaidya2,3 1 Department of Computer Science, 2...Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and 3 Coordinated Science Laboratory University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Email: {ltseng3, nhv

  16. After seven years, where`s the consensus?

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.R.

    1993-04-01

    It has been 7 years since the discovery of copper oxide superconductors, yet there is no consensus on the correct theory for this phenomenon. The theory can be divided into 3 groups: ordinary (phonons), exotic (AF spin fluctuations, nested Fermi liquid, excitons, spin bags, odd frequency pairing), and revolutionary (Luttinger liquid, spin-charge separation, gauge theories, anyons, marginal Fermi liquid). C-axis dispersion, dHvA, and magneto-oscillations are also discussed.

  17. Inhaled treatment of COPD: a Delphi consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Ninane, Vincent; Corhay, Jean-Louis; Germonpré, Paul; Janssens, Wim; Joos, Guy F; Liistro, Giuseppe; Vincken, Walter; Gurdain, Sandra; Vanvlasselaer, Evelyne; Lehouck, An

    2017-01-01

    Background Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) global strategy (2015) provides guidance for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with different first-choice options per GOLD category without specification. Objectives To evaluate the level of medical experts’ consensus on their preferred first-choice treatment within different COPD categories. Methods A two-round Delphi Panel consisting of 15 questions was completed by Belgian pulmonologists (n=31) and European (n=10) COPD experts. Results Good consensus was reached by both expert groups for long-acting bronchodilators instead of short-acting bronchodilators as first-choice treatment in GOLD A. Single bronchodilation with long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) was preferred over long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) and LABA/LAMA as first-choice treatment in GOLD B and GOLD C. For GOLD D patients based on the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)<50%, a very good consensus was reached for LAMA/LABA as first-choice treatment. For GOLD D patients based on frequent or severe exacerbations, there was a good consensus for LABA/LAMA/inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) as first choice in the Belgian group. According to the European experts, both LABA/LAMA and LABA/LAMA/ICS could be the first choice for these patients. Conclusion Belgian and European experts recommend long-acting bronchodilators as first-choice treatment. Treatment containing ICS was found only appropriate in patients with FEV1<50% and ≥2 moderate exacerbations or 1 severe exacerbation/year. PMID:28293106

  18. Global Consensus Recommendations on Prevention and Management of Nutritional Rickets

    PubMed Central

    Munns, Craig F.; Shaw, Nick; Kiely, Mairead; Specker, Bonny L.; Thacher, Tom D.; Ozono, Keiichi; Michigami, Toshimi; Tiosano, Dov; Mughal, M. Zulf; Mäkitie, Outi; Ramos-Abad, Lorna; Ward, Leanne; DiMeglio, Linda A.; Atapattu, Navoda; Cassinelli, Hamilton; Braegger, Christian; Pettifor, John M.; Seth, Anju; Idris, Hafsatu Wasagu; Bhatia, Vijayalakshmi; Fu, Junfen; Goldberg, Gail; Sävendahl, Lars; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Pludowski, Pawel; Maddock, Jane; Hyppönen, Elina; Oduwole, Abiola; Frew, Emma; Aguiar, Magda; Tulchinsky, Ted; Butler, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D and calcium deficiencies are common worldwide, causing nutritional rickets and osteomalacia, which have a major impact on health, growth, and development of infants, children, and adolescents; the consequences can be lethal or can last into adulthood. The goals of this evidence-based consensus document are to provide health care professionals with guidance for prevention, diagnosis, and management of nutritional rickets and to provide policy makers with a framework to work toward its eradication. Evidence: A systematic literature search examining the definition, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of nutritional rickets in children was conducted. Evidence-based recommendations were developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system that describe the strength of the recommendation and the quality of supporting evidence. Process: Thirty-three nominated experts in pediatric endocrinology, pediatrics, nutrition, epidemiology, public health, and health economics evaluated the evidence on specific questions within five working groups. The consensus group, representing 11 international scientific organizations, participated in a multiday conference in May 2014 to reach a global evidence-based consensus. Results: This consensus document defines nutritional rickets and its diagnostic criteria and describes the clinical management of rickets and osteomalacia. Risk factors, particularly in mothers and infants, are ranked, and specific prevention recommendations including food fortification and supplementation are offered for both the clinical and public health contexts. Conclusion: Rickets, osteomalacia, and vitamin D and calcium deficiencies are preventable global public health problems in infants, children, and adolescents. Implementation of international rickets prevention programs, including supplementation and food fortification, is urgently required. PMID:26745253

  19. [Atherothrombotic carotid disease: towards a consensus on its prevention].

    PubMed

    Gil, A C

    2004-05-01

    This consensus document was one of the objectives of the I Meeting of the Spanish Society of Angiology and Vascular Surgery, the Spanish Interventional Neuroradiology Group of the Spanish Society of Neuroradiology, and the Cerebrovascular Disease Study Group of the Spanish Society of Neurology, which was held in October 2002 in Cordoba. Atherosclerosis is a chronic vascular disease of true epidemic proportions. It is the first cause of death in developed countries and responsible for one quarter of documented deaths worldwide. Atherothrombotic ischemic stroke, transient ischemic attack and atherothrombotic origin symptomatic or asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease are all associated with a high risk of vascular death, myocardial infarction and recurrent stroke. In this context, vascular disease represents a serious public health problem, particularly if we take into account current forecasts on population ageing. The prevention of atherosclerosis - and its consequences, if its clinical manifestations are already apparent - is therefore a priority. This multidisciplinary consensus document draws on the different medical specialties dealing with these patients and combines efforts to obtain the greatest possible benefit as regards this disease's management. The consensus document makes a global analysis of atherosclerosis prevention, basically in terms of therapeutic objectives, lifestyle change measures, high bloodpressure management, dyslipidemia, other vascular risk factors and platelet antiaggregation. Emphasis is placed on the frequent coexistence of cerebrovascular and peripheral arterial involvement, and the methods of detecting silent involvement. Lastly, consensus is reached on the diagnostic methods and specific management of atherothrombotic carotid disease, including the benefits and risks of and indications for carotid endarterectomy, and the current role of carotid angioplasty.

  20. AMS 4.0: consensus prediction of post-translational modifications in protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Plewczynski, Dariusz; Basu, Subhadip; Saha, Indrajit

    2012-08-01

    We present here the 2011 update of the AutoMotif Service (AMS 4.0) that predicts the wide selection of 88 different types of the single amino acid post-translational modifications (PTM) in protein sequences. The selection of experimentally confirmed modifications is acquired from the latest UniProt and Phospho.ELM databases for training. The sequence vicinity of each modified residue is represented using amino acids physico-chemical features encoded using high quality indices (HQI) obtaining by automatic clustering of known indices extracted from AAindex database. For each type of the numerical representation, the method builds the ensemble of Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) pattern classifiers, each optimising different objectives during the training (for example the recall, precision or area under the ROC curve (AUC)). The consensus is built using brainstorming technology, which combines multi-objective instances of machine learning algorithm, and the data fusion of different training objects representations, in order to boost the overall prediction accuracy of conserved short sequence motifs. The performance of AMS 4.0 is compared with the accuracy of previous versions, which were constructed using single machine learning methods (artificial neural networks, support vector machine). Our software improves the average AUC score of the earlier version by close to 7 % as calculated on the test datasets of all 88 PTM types. Moreover, for the selected most-difficult sequence motifs types it is able to improve the prediction performance by almost 32 %, when compared with previously used single machine learning methods. Summarising, the brainstorming consensus meta-learning methodology on the average boosts the AUC score up to around 89 %, averaged over all 88 PTM types. Detailed results for single machine learning methods and the consensus methodology are also provided, together with the comparison to previously published methods and state-of-the-art software tools. The

  1. Probabilistic consensus scoring improves tandem mass spectrometry peptide identification.

    PubMed

    Nahnsen, Sven; Bertsch, Andreas; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Nordheim, Alfred; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2011-08-05

    Database search is a standard technique for identifying peptides from their tandem mass spectra. To increase the number of correctly identified peptides, we suggest a probabilistic framework that allows the combination of scores from different search engines into a joint consensus score. Central to the approach is a novel method to estimate scores for peptides not found by an individual search engine. This approach allows the estimation of p-values for each candidate peptide and their combination across all search engines. The consensus approach works better than any single search engine across all different instrument types considered in this study. Improvements vary strongly from platform to platform and from search engine to search engine. Compared to the industry standard MASCOT, our approach can identify up to 60% more peptides. The software for consensus predictions is implemented in C++ as part of OpenMS, a software framework for mass spectrometry. The source code is available in the current development version of OpenMS and can easily be used as a command line application or via a graphical pipeline designer TOPPAS.

  2. C1 inhibitor deficiency: 2014 United Kingdom consensus document.

    PubMed

    Longhurst, H J; Tarzi, M D; Ashworth, F; Bethune, C; Cale, C; Dempster, J; Gompels, M; Jolles, S; Seneviratne, S; Symons, C; Price, A; Edgar, D

    2015-06-01

    C1 inhibitor deficiency is a rare disorder manifesting with recurrent attacks of disabling and potentially life-threatening angioedema. Here we present an updated 2014 United Kingdom consensus document for the management of C1 inhibitor-deficient patients, representing a joint venture between the United Kingdom Primary Immunodeficiency Network and Hereditary Angioedema UK. To develop the consensus, we assembled a multi-disciplinary steering group of clinicians, nurses and a patient representative. This steering group first met in 2012, developing a total of 48 recommendations across 11 themes. The statements were distributed to relevant clinicians and a representative group of patients to be scored for agreement on a Likert scale. All 48 statements achieved a high degree of consensus, indicating strong alignment of opinion. The recommendations have evolved significantly since the 2005 document, with particularly notable developments including an improved evidence base to guide dosing and indications for acute treatment, greater emphasis on home therapy for acute attacks and a strong focus on service organization.

  3. C1 inhibitor deficiency: 2014 United Kingdom consensus document

    PubMed Central

    Longhurst, H J; Tarzi, M D; Ashworth, F; Bethune, C; Cale, C; Dempster, J; Gompels, M; Jolles, S; Seneviratne, S; Symons, C; Price, A; Edgar, D

    2015-01-01

    C1 inhibitor deficiency is a rare disorder manifesting with recurrent attacks of disabling and potentially life-threatening angioedema. Here we present an updated 2014 United Kingdom consensus document for the management of C1 inhibitor-deficient patients, representing a joint venture between the United Kingdom Primary Immunodeficiency Network and Hereditary Angioedema UK. To develop the consensus, we assembled a multi-disciplinary steering group of clinicians, nurses and a patient representative. This steering group first met in 2012, developing a total of 48 recommendations across 11 themes. The statements were distributed to relevant clinicians and a representative group of patients to be scored for agreement on a Likert scale. All 48 statements achieved a high degree of consensus, indicating strong alignment of opinion. The recommendations have evolved significantly since the 2005 document, with particularly notable developments including an improved evidence base to guide dosing and indications for acute treatment, greater emphasis on home therapy for acute attacks and a strong focus on service organization. PMID:25605519

  4. Taiwan consensus of pharmacological treatment for bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ya-Mei; Chang, Ching-Jui; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Chen, Yi-Chyan; Hsiao, Mei-Chun; Li, Cheng-Ta; Tu, Peichi; Chang, Shang-Wen; Shen, Winston W; Su, Tung-Ping

    2013-10-01

    Bipolar disorder is an important psychiatric disorder with different disease phases. The pharmacological treatment is complicated, and is updated frequently as new research evidence emerges. For the purpose of international collaboration, research, and education, the Taiwan consensus of pharmacological treatment for bipolar disorders was initiated by the Taiwanese Society of Biological Psychiatry and Neuropsychopharmacology (TSBPN) - the Bipolar Chapter, which was established in August 2010 and approved as a member of International Society of Bipolar Disorder. TSBPN is the country member of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP). The development of the Taiwan consensus for bipolar disorder was mainly based on the template of WFSBP Guidelines, with references to other international guidelines including the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments, and British Association for Psychopharmacology. We have also added Taiwanese experts' experience, Taiwan national health insurance data, and the indications for the pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder given by the Taiwan Department of Health, to emphasize the balance between efficacy and safety, and to make this consensus a concise, empirical, and important reference for clinical psychiatric practice.

  5. Spanish Consensus Statement: The Treatment of Muscle Tears in Sport.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Jaén, Tomas F; Rey, Guillermo Álvarez; Cuesta, Jordi Ardevol; Loureda, Rafael Arriaza; España, Fernando Ávila; Matas, Ramón Balius; Pazos, Fernando Baró; de Dios Beas Jiménez, Juan; Rosell, Jorge Candel; Fernandez, César Cobián; Ros, Francisco Esparza; Colmenero, Josefina Espejo; de Prado, Jorge Fernández; Cota, Juan José García; González, Jose Ignacio Garrido; Santander, Manuela González; Munilla, Miguel Ángel Herrador; Ruiz, Francisco Ivorra; Díaz, Fernando Jiménez; Marqueta, Pedro Manonelles; Fernandez, Antonio Maestro; Benito, Juan José Muñoz; Vilás, Ramón Olivé; Teres, Xavier Peirau; Amaro, José Peña; Roque, Juan Pérez San; Parenteu, Christophe Ramírez; Serna, Juan Ribas; Álvarez, Mikel Sánchez; Marchori, Carlos Sanchez; Soto, Miguel Del Valle; Alonso, José María Villalón; García, Pedro Guillen; de la Iglesia, Nicolas Hugo; Alcorocho, Juan Manuel Lopez

    2015-12-01

    On the 21st of March, 2015, experts met at Clínica CEMTRO in Madrid, Spain, under the patronage of The Spanish Society for Sports Traumatology (SETRADE), The Spanish Federation of Sports Medicine (FEMEDE), The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Football Clubs (AEMEF), and The Spanish Association of Medical Services for Basketball Clubs (AEMB) with the aim of establishing a round table that would allow specialists to consider the most appropriate current general actions to be taken when treating muscle tears in sport, based on proven scientific data described in the medical literature. Each expert received a questionnaire prior to the aforementioned meeting comprising a set of questions concerning therapeutic indications generally applied in the different stages present during muscle repair. The present Consensus Document is the result of the answers to the questionnaire and resulting discussion and consensus over which are the best current indications in the treatment of muscle tears in sport. Avoiding immobilization, not taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) randomly, fostering early mobilization, increasing vascularization of injured, site and regulating inflammatory mechanisms-without inhibiting these from the early stages of the recovery period-all stood out as main points of the Consensus Document. Additionally, there is controversy concerning cell stimulation techniques and the use of growth factors or cell inhibitors. The decision concerning discharge was unanimous, as was the criteria considered when it came to performing sport techniques without pain.

  6. Consensus+Innovations Distributed Kalman Filter With Optimized Gains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Subhro; Moura, Jose M. F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we address the distributed filtering and prediction of time-varying random fields represented by linear time-invariant (LTI) dynamical systems. The field is observed by a sparsely connected network of agents/sensors collaborating among themselves. We develop a Kalman filter type consensus+innovations distributed linear estimator of the dynamic field termed as Consensus+Innovations Kalman Filter. We analyze the convergence properties of this distributed estimator. We prove that the mean-squared error of the estimator asymptotically converges if the degree of instability of the field dynamics is within a pre-specified threshold defined as tracking capacity of the estimator. The tracking capacity is a function of the local observation models and the agent communication network. We design the optimal consensus and innovation gain matrices yielding distributed estimates with minimized mean-squared error. Through numerical evaluations, we show that, the distributed estimator with optimal gains converges faster and with approximately 3dB better mean-squared error performance than previous distributed estimators.

  7. Insulin Resistance in Children: Consensus, Perspective, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Levy-Marchal, Claire; Arslanian, Silva; Cutfield, Wayne; Sinaiko, Alan; Druet, Celine; Marcovecchio, M. Loredana; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Emerging data indicate that insulin resistance is common among children and adolescents and is related to cardiometabolic risk, therefore requiring consideration early in life. However, there is still confusion on how to define insulin resistance, how to measure it, what its risk factors are, and whether there are effective strategies to prevent and treat it. A consensus conference was organized in order to clarify these points. Participants: The consensus was internationally supported by all the major scientific societies in pediatric endocrinology and 37 participants. Evidence: An independent and systematic search of the literature was conducted to identify key articles relating to insulin resistance in children. Consensus Process: The conference was divided into five themes and working groups: background and definition; methods of measurement and screening; risk factors and consequences; prevention; and treatment. Each group selected key issues, searched the literature, and developed a draft document. During a 3-d meeting, these papers were debated and finalized by each group before presenting them to the full forum for further discussion and agreement. Conclusions: Given the current childhood obesity epidemic, insulin resistance in children is an important issue confronting health care professionals. There are no clear criteria to define insulin resistance in children, and surrogate markers such as fasting insulin are poor measures of insulin sensitivity. Based on current screening criteria and methodology, there is no justification for screening children for insulin resistance. Lifestyle interventions including diet and exercise can improve insulin sensitivity, whereas drugs should be implemented only in selected cases. PMID:20829185

  8. European consensus conference on faecal microbiota transplantation in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Cammarota, Giovanni; Ianiro, Gianluca; Tilg, Herbert; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Kump, Patrizia; Satokari, Reetta; Sokol, Harry; Arkkila, Perttu; Pintus, Cristina; Hart, Ailsa; Segal, Jonathan; Aloi, Marina; Masucci, Luca; Molinaro, Antonio; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Lopez-Sanroman, Antonio; Link, Alexander; de Groot, Pieter; de Vos, Willem M; Högenauer, Christoph; Malfertheiner, Peter; Mattila, Eero; Milosavljević, Tomica; Nieuwdorp, Max; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Simren, Magnus; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an important therapeutic option for Clostridium difficile infection. Promising findings suggest that FMT may play a role also in the management of other disorders associated with the alteration of gut microbiota. Although the health community is assessing FMT with renewed interest and patients are becoming more aware, there are technical and logistical issues in establishing such a non-standardised treatment into the clinical practice with safety and proper governance. In view of this, an evidence-based recommendation is needed to drive the practical implementation of FMT. In this European Consensus Conference, 28 experts from 10 countries collaborated, in separate working groups and through an evidence-based process, to provide statements on the following key issues: FMT indications; donor selection; preparation of faecal material; clinical management and faecal delivery and basic requirements for implementing an FMT centre. Statements developed by each working group were evaluated and voted by all members, first through an electronic Delphi process, and then in a plenary consensus conference. The recommendations were released according to best available evidence, in order to act as guidance for physicians who plan to implement FMT, aiming at supporting the broad availability of the procedure, discussing other issues relevant to FMT and promoting future clinical research in the area of gut microbiota manipulation. This consensus report strongly recommends the implementation of FMT centres for the treatment of C. difficile infection as well as traces the guidelines of technicality, regulatory, administrative and laboratory requirements.

  9. Consensus Statements on the Assessment of Older Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Hogan MD, David B.; Scialfa, Charles T.; Caird, Jeff K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The rapidly increasing number of older drivers is accentuating the challenges in concurrently identifying older drivers posing an unacceptable risk if they continue to drive, while not discriminating against those capable of safely driving. Attendees of an invitational meeting about the assessment of older drivers were asked to participate in a modified Delphi process designed to develop consensus statements on the assessment of older drivers. Methods Forty-one non-student symposium attendees were invited to participate in two rounds of a survey, in which they were asked to indicate their level of agreement (or disagreement) on a five-point Likert scale to a series of statements about the assessment of older drivers. Consensus was defined as 80% + of respondents either agreeing or disagreeing with a statement. Results More than one-half (n = 23) completed the first round of the survey and 12 participated in the second. There was consensus on the need for a modifiable, fair, rational, and widely accessible multi-step approach to the assessment of older drivers. This would require the engagement and support of physicians and other health-care practitioners in identifying and reporting medically at-risk drivers of any age. At a societal level, alternatives to driving a personal motor vehicle should be developed. Conclusions An on-going dialogue about this complex issue is required. Decisions should be based on explicitly stated principles and informed by the best available evidence. PMID:24883166

  10. Consensus-based recommendations for the management of juvenile dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Enders, Felicitas Bellutti; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Baildam, Eileen; Constantin, Tamas; Dolezalova, Pavla; Feldman, Brian M; Lahdenne, Pekka; Magnusson, Bo; Nistala, Kiran; Ozen, Seza; Pilkington, Clarissa; Ravelli, Angelo; Russo, Ricardo; Uziel, Yosef; van Brussel, Marco; van der Net, Janjaap; Vastert, Sebastiaan; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Wulffraat, Nicolaas; McCann, Liza J; van Royen-Kerkhof, Annet

    2017-01-01

    Background In 2012, a European initiative called Single Hub and Access point for pediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) was launched to optimise and disseminate diagnostic and management regimens in Europe for children and young adults with rheumatic diseases. Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a rare disease within the group of paediatric rheumatic diseases (PRDs) and can lead to significant morbidity. Evidence-based guidelines are sparse and management is mostly based on physicians' experience. Consequently, treatment regimens differ throughout Europe. Objectives To provide recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of JDM. Methods Recommendations were developed by an evidence-informed consensus process using the European League Against Rheumatism standard operating procedures. A committee was constituted, consisting of 19 experienced paediatric rheumatologists and 2 experts in paediatric exercise physiology and physical therapy, mainly from Europe. Recommendations derived from a validated systematic literature review were evaluated by an online survey and subsequently discussed at two consensus meetings using nominal group technique. Recommendations were accepted if >80% agreement was reached. Results In total, 7 overarching principles, 33 recommendations on diagnosis and 19 recommendations on therapy were accepted with >80% agreement among experts. Topics covered include assessment of skin, muscle and major organ involvement and suggested treatment pathways. Conclusions The SHARE initiative aims to identify best practices for treatment of patients suffering from PRD. Within this remit, recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of JDM have been formulated by an evidence-informed consensus process to produce a standard of care for patients with JDM throughout Europe. PMID:27515057

  11. National Cancer Centre Singapore Consensus Guidelines for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Pierce K. H.; Choo, Su Pin; Ng, David C. E.; Lo, Richard H. G.; Wang, Michael L. C.; Toh, Han Chong; Tai, David W. M.; Goh, Brian K. P.; Wong, Jen San; Tay, Kiang Hiong; Goh, Anthony S. W.; Yan, Sean X.; Loke, Kelvin S. H.; Thang, Sue Ping; Gogna, Apoorva; Too, Chow Wei; Irani, Farah Gillian; Leong, Sum; Lim, Kiat Hon; Thng, Choon Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 6th most common cancer in the world, but the second most common cause of cancer death. There is no universally accepted consensus practice guidelines for HCC owing to rapid developments in new treatment modalities, the heterogeneous epidemiology and clinical presentation of HCC worldwide. However, a number of regional and national guidelines currently exist which reflect practice relevant to the epidemiology and collective experience of the consensus group. In 2014, clinicians at the multidisciplinary Comprehensive Liver Cancer Clinic (CLCC) at the National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) reviewed the latest published scientific data and existing international and regional practice guidelines, such as those of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the Asian Pacific Association for the Study of the Liver, and modified them to reflect local practice. These would serve as a template by which treatment outcomes can be collated and benchmarked against international data. The NCCS Consensus Guidelines for HCC have been successfully implemented in the CLCC since their publication online on 26th September 2014, and the guidelines allow outcomes of treatment to be compared to international data. These guidelines will be reviewed periodically to incorporate new data. PMID:27386428

  12. Consensus Paper: Pathological Mechanisms Underlying Neurodegeneration in Spinocerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Matilla-Dueñas, A.; Ashizawa, T.; Brice, A.; Magri, S.; McFarland, K. N.; Pandolfo, M.; Pulst, S. M.; Riess, O.; Rubinsztein, D. C.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, T.; Scoles, D. R.; Stevanin, G.; Taroni, F.; Underwood, B. R.; Sánchez, I.

    2014-01-01

    Intensive scientific research devoted in the recent years to understand the molecular mechanisms or neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are identifying new pathways and targets providing new insights and a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis in these diseases. In this consensus manuscript, the authors discuss their current views on the identified molecular processes causing or modulating the neurodegenerative phenotype in spinocerebellar ataxias with the common opinion of translating the new knowledge acquired into candidate targets for therapy. The following topics are discussed: transcription dysregulation, protein aggregation, autophagy, ion channels, the role of mitochondria, RNA toxicity, modulators of neurodegeneration and current therapeutic approaches. Overall point of consensus includes the common vision of neurodegeneration in SCAs as a multifactorial, progressive and reversible process, at least in early stages. Specific points of consensus include the role of the dysregulation of protein folding, transcription, bioenergetics, calcium handling and eventual cell death with apoptotic features of neurons during SCA disease progression. Unresolved questions include how the dysregulation of these pathways triggers the onset of symptoms and mediates disease progression since this understanding may allow effective treatments of SCAs within the window of reversibility to prevent early neuronal damage. Common opinions also include the need for clinical detection of early neuronal dysfunction, for more basic research to decipher the early neurodegenerative process in SCAs in order to give rise to new concepts for treatment strategies and for the translation of the results to preclinical studies and, thereafter, in clinical practice. PMID:24307138

  13. Per oral cholangiopancreatoscopy in pancreatico biliary diseases - Expert consensus statements

    PubMed Central

    Ramchandani, Mohan; Reddy, Duvvur Nageshwar; Lakhtakia, Sundeep; Tandan, Manu; Maydeo, Amit; Chandrashekhar, Thoguluva Seshadri; Kumar, Ajay; Sud, Randhir; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Makmun, Dadang; Khor, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To provide consensus statements on the use of per-oral cholangiopancreatoscopy (POCPS). METHODS: A workgroup of experts in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), endosonography, and POCPS generated consensus statements summarizing the utility of POCPS in pancreaticobiliary disease. Recommendation grades used validated evidence ratings of publications from an extensive literature review. RESULTS: Six consensus statements were generated: (1) POCPS is now an important additional tool during ERCP; (2) in patients with indeterminate biliary strictures, POCS and POCS-guided targeted biopsy are useful for establishing a definitive diagnosis; (3) POCS and POCS-guided lithotripsy are recommended for treatment of difficult common bile duct stones when standard techniques fail; (4) in patients with main duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) POPS may be used to assess extent of tumor to assist surgical resection; (5) in difficult pancreatic ductal stones, POPS-guided lithotripsy may be useful in fragmentation and extraction of stones; and (6) additional indications for POCPS include selective guidewire placement, unexplained hemobilia, assessing intraductal biliary ablation therapy, and extracting migrated stents. CONCLUSION: POCPS is important in association with ERCP, particularly for diagnosis of indeterminate biliary strictures and for intra-ductal lithotripsy when other techniques failed, and may be useful for pre-operative assessment of extent of main duct IPMN, for extraction of difficult pancreatic stones, and for unusual indications involving selective guidewire placement, assessing unexplained hemobilia or intraductal biliary ablation therapy, and extracting migrated stents. PMID:25914484

  14. Perceptions of a fluid consensus: uniqueness bias, false consensus, false polarization, and pluralistic ignorance in a water conservation crisis.

    PubMed

    Monin, Benoît; Norton, Michael I

    2003-05-01

    A 5-day field study (N = 415) during and right after a shower ban demonstrated multifaceted social projection and the tendency to draw personality inferences from simple behavior in a time of drastic consensus change. Bathers thought showering was more prevalent than did non-bathers (false consensus) and respondents consistently underestimated the prevalence of the desirable and common behavior--be it not showering during the shower ban or showering after the ban (uniqueness bias). Participants thought that bathers and non-bathers during the ban differed greatly in their general concern for the community, but self-reports demonstrated that this gap was illusory (false polarization). Finally, bathers thought other bathers cared less than they did, whereas non-bathers thought other non-bathers cared more than they did (pluralistic ignorance). The study captures the many biases at work in social perception in a time of social change.

  15. Two-phase analysis in consensus genetic mapping.

    PubMed

    Ronin, Y; Mester, D; Minkov, D; Belotserkovski, R; Jackson, B N; Schnable, P S; Aluru, S; Korol, A

    2012-05-01

    Numerous mapping projects conducted on different species have generated an abundance of mapping data. Consequently, many multilocus maps have been constructed using diverse mapping populations and marker sets for the same organism. The quality of maps varies broadly among populations, marker sets, and software used, necessitating efforts to integrate the mapping information and generate consensus maps. The problem of consensus genetic mapping (MCGM) is by far more challenging compared with genetic mapping based on a single dataset, which by itself is also cumbersome. The additional complications introduced by consensus analysis include inter-population differences in recombination rate and exchange distribution along chromosomes; variations in dominance of the employed markers; and use of different subsets of markers in different labs. Hence, it is necessary to handle arbitrary patterns of shared sets of markers and different level of mapping data quality. In this article, we introduce a two-phase approach for solving MCGM. In phase 1, for each dataset, multilocus ordering is performed combined with iterative jackknife resampling to evaluate the stability of marker orders. In this phase, the ordering problem is reduced to the well-known traveling salesperson problem (TSP). Namely, for each dataset, we look for order that gives minimum sum of recombination distances between adjacent markers. In phase 2, the optimal consensus order of shared markers is selected from the set of allowed orders and gives the minimal sum of total lengths of nonconflicting maps of the chromosome. This criterion may be used in different modifications to take into account the variation in quality of the original data (population size, marker quality, etc.). In the foregoing formulation, consensus mapping is considered as a specific version of TSP that can be referred to as "synchronized TSP." The conflicts detected after phase 1 are resolved using either a heuristic algorithm over the

  16. [Kyoto global consensus report for treatment of Helicobacter pylori and its implications for China].

    PubMed

    Xie, Chuan; Lyu, Nonghua

    2016-01-01

    Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis (Gut, July 2015) is another important international consensus since the European Maastricht Ⅳ consensus was published. Kyoto consensus will improve the etiology-based classification, the diagnostic assessment of gastritis, and the treatment of H. pylori-associated dyspepsia and H. pylori gastritis. However, because of high rate of H. pylori infection and antibiotic resistance as well as limited health resources in China, we need to develop our own strategies of H. pylori infection control with the reference of the Kyoto global consensus.

  17. Non-consensus Opinion Models on Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Braunstein, Lidia A.; Wang, Huijuan; Shao, Jia; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2013-04-01

    Social dynamic opinion models have been widely studied to understand how interactions among individuals cause opinions to evolve. Most opinion models that utilize spin interaction models usually produce a consensus steady state in which only one opinion exists. Because in reality different opinions usually coexist, we focus on non-consensus opinion models in which above a certain threshold two opinions coexist in a stable relationship. We revisit and extend the non-consensus opinion (NCO) model introduced by Shao et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 103:01870, 2009). The NCO model in random networks displays a second order phase transition that belongs to regular mean field percolation and is characterized by the appearance (above a certain threshold) of a large spanning cluster of the minority opinion. We generalize the NCO model by adding a weight factor W to each individual's original opinion when determining their future opinion (NCO W model). We find that as W increases the minority opinion holders tend to form stable clusters with a smaller initial minority fraction than in the NCO model. We also revisit another non-consensus opinion model based on the NCO model, the inflexible contrarian opinion (ICO) model (Li et al. in Phys. Rev. E 84:066101, 2011), which introduces inflexible contrarians to model the competition between two opinions in a steady state. Inflexible contrarians are individuals that never change their original opinion but may influence the opinions of others. To place the inflexible contrarians in the ICO model we use two different strategies, random placement and one in which high-degree nodes are targeted. The inflexible contrarians effectively decrease the size of the largest rival-opinion cluster in both strategies, but the effect is more pronounced under the targeted method. All of the above models have previously been explored in terms of a single network, but human communities are usually interconnected, not isolated. Because opinions propagate not

  18. Scientists Are from Mars, Laypeople Are from Venus: An Evidence-Based Approach to Consensus Messaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J.; Jacobs, P.; Nuccitelli, D.

    2014-12-01

    Laypeople use expert opinion as a mental shortcut to form views on complex scientific issues. This heuristic is particularly relevant in the case of climate change, where perception of consensus is one of the main predictors of public support for climate action. A low public perception of consensus (around 60% compared to the actual 97% consensus) is a significant stumbling block to meaningful climate action, underscoring the importance of closing the "consensus gap". However, some scientists question the efficacy or appropriateness of emphasizing consensus in climate communication. I'll summarize the social science research examining the importance and effectiveness of consensus messaging. I'll also present several case studies of consensus messaging employed by the team of communicators at the Skeptical Science website.

  19. Developing a model osteoarthritis consultation: a Delphi consensus exercise

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common condition managed in general practice, but often not in line with published guidance. The ideal consultation for a patient presenting with possible OA is not known. The aim of the study was to develop the content of a model OA consultation for the assessment and treatment of older adults presenting in general practice with peripheral joint problems. Methods A postal Delphi consensus exercise was undertaken with two expert groups: i) general practitioners (GPs) with expertise in OA management and ii) patients with experience of living with OA. An advisory group generated 61 possible consultation tasks for consideration in the consensus exercise. Expert groups were asked to consider which tasks should be included in the model OA consultation. The exercise was completed by 15 GPs and 14 patients. The level of agreement for inclusion in the model was set at 90%. Results The model OA consultation included 25 tasks to be undertaken during the initial consultation between a GP and a patient presenting with peripheral joint pain. The 25 tasks provide detailed advice on how the following elements of the consultation should be addressed: i) assessment of chronic joint pain, ii) patient’s ideas and concerns, iii) exclusion of red flags, iv) examination, v) provision of the diagnosis and written information, vi) promotion of exercise and weight loss, vii) initial pain management and viii) arranging a follow-up appointment. Both groups prioritised a bio-medical approach to the consultation, rather than a bio-psycho-social one, suggesting a discordance between current thinking and research evidence. Conclusions This study has enabled the priorities of GPs and patients to be identified for a model OA consultation. The results of this consensus study will inform the development of best practice for the management of OA in primary care and the implementation of evidence-based guidelines for OA in primary care. PMID:23320630

  20. Moving Toward Consensus on a Photovoltaic Generation Capacity Valuation Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Perez; Mike Taylor; Tom Hoff; JP Ross

    2011-06-22

    Maintaining adequate generating capacity to meet electricity demand at all times is a fundamental principle for the electric utility industry. This is accomplished through a variety of means including providing/purchasing sufficient generation capacity as well as acquiring the associated ancillary services for the electricity grid. The generation capacity of dispatchable resources is assessed based on technology design parameters. While dispatchable resources have some uncertainty in their output due to unforeseen equipment failures, their dispatch is managed around the demand for electricity and their marginal operating costs. Photovoltaic resources are non-dispatchable because their electrical output is based on both technology design parameters (technology selection, installation characteristics, and site conditions) and a solar resource that varies over a range of time periods (seasonal, daily, hourly, second to second). These solar resource variations, however, are not random and there is an intuitively positive relationship between PV system output and summer peak electricity demand for many locations throughout the U.S. This is because system demand peaks for most utilities are driven by heat-wave cooling demand, and because heat waves are indirectly fed by solar gain, i.e., by the fuel for PV generation. Despite this relationship, there is no consensus across the utility or solar industries on a method for calculating PV capacity or its practical use in electricity markets and utility planning. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar America Initiative has provided funding to evaluate the variety of photovoltaic capacity valuation methods and to bring the solar industry, electric utility, and research communities together with the goal of moving toward consensus on what is the most appropriate PV generation capacity valuation methodology using a consensus-oriented process. Developing a framework for accurately and appropriately calculating photovoltaic

  1. Standard operating procedures for ESPEN guidelines and consensus papers.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Stephan C; Singer, Pierre; Koller, Michael; Barazzoni, Rocco; Cederholm, Tommy; van Gossum, André

    2015-12-01

    The ESPEN Guideline standard operating procedures (SOP) is based on the methodology provided by the Association of Scientific Medical Societies of Germany (AWMF), the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN), and the Centre for Evidence-based Medicine at the University of Oxford. The SOP is valid and obligatory for all future ESPEN-sponsored guideline projects aiming to generate high-quality guidelines on a regular basis. The SOP aims to facilitate the preparation of guideline projects, to streamline the consensus process, to ensure quality and transparency, and to facilitate the dissemination and publication of ESPEN guidelines. To achieve this goal, the ESPEN Guidelines Editorial board (GEB) has been established headed by two chairmen. The GEB will support and supervise the guideline processes and is responsible for the strategic planning of ESPEN guideline activities. Key elements of the SOP are the generation of well-built clinical questions according to the PICO system, a systemic literature search, a classification of the selected literature according to the SIGN evidence levels providing an evidence table, and a clear and straight-forward consensus procedure consisting of online voting's and a consensus conference. Only experts who meet the obligation to disclosure any potential conflict of interests and who are not employed by the Industry can participate in the guideline process. All recommendations will be graded according to the SIGN grading and novel outcome models besides biomedical endpoints. This approach will further extent the leadership of ESPEN in creating up-to-date and suitable for implementation guidelines and in sharing knowledge on malnutrition and clinical nutrition.

  2. Partial least squares and random sample consensus in outlier detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiangtao; Peng, Silong; Hu, Yong

    2012-03-16

    A novel outlier detection method in partial least squares based on random sample consensus is proposed. The proposed algorithm repeatedly generates partial least squares solutions estimated from random samples and then tests each solution for the support from the complete dataset for consistency. A comparative study of the proposed method and leave-one-out cross validation in outlier detection on simulated data and near-infrared data of pharmaceutical tablets is presented. In addition, a comparison between the proposed method and PLS, RSIMPLS, PRM is provided. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed method is highly efficient.

  3. [Consensus document on the aetiology, diagnosis and treatment of sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Martinez Campos, L; Albañil Ballesteros, R; de la Flor Bru, J; Piñeiro Pérez, R; Cervera, J; Baquero Artigao, F; Alfayate Miguelez, S; Moraga Llop, F; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Calvo Rey, C

    2013-11-01

    The Spanish National Consensus (Spanish Society of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Spanish Association of Primary Care Pediatrics, Spanish Society of Pediatric Outpatient and Primary Care, Spanish Society of Otorhinolaryngology and Cervical-Facial Pathology) on Sinusitis is presented. Rhinosinusitis is a difficult to diagnose and often unrecognised disease. The document discusses the aetiology, the clinical signs and symptoms, and the diagnostic criteria. A proposal for treatment is made based on the epidemiological situation in our country. Oral amoxicillin is the treatment of choice (80mg/kg/day divided every 8hours). Alternative treatment is proposed in special cases and when amoxicillin is not sufficient. The main complications are reviewed.

  4. Consensus guidelines for the use of ultrasound for diving research.

    PubMed

    Møllerløkken, Andreas; Blogg, S Lesley; Doolette, David J; Nishi, Ronald Y; Pollock, Neal W

    2016-03-01

    The International Meeting on Ultrasound for Diving Research produced expert consensus recommendations for ultrasound detection of vascular gas bubbles and the analysis, interpretation and reporting of such data. Recommendations for standardization of techniques to allow comparison between studies included bubble monitoring site selection, frequency and duration of monitoring, and use of the Spencer, Kisman-Masurel or Eftedal-Brubakk scales. Recommendations for reporting of results included description of subject posture and provocation manoeuvres during monitoring, reporting of untransformed data and the appropriate use of statistics. These guidelines are available from www.dhmjournal.com.

  5. Consensus statements from the Workshop "Probiotics and Health: Scientific evidence".

    PubMed

    Guarner, F; Requena, T; Marcos, A

    2010-01-01

    This report shows the level of scientific consensus on definition, characteristics and health benefits of probiotics. The content of the report has derived from the scientific meeting: Workshop on Probiotics and Health. Scientific evidence, that congregated several Spanish experts, including gastroenterologists, microbiologists, nutritionists, immunologists and food technologists, among others, who have agreed with the statements shown in this document. Each statement has been sustained with the most relevant scientific aspects that were discussed during the Workshop and the following evaluation of the report by all experts who approved and signed it.

  6. Towards a Consensus Annotation System (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema

    White, Owen [University of Maryland

    2016-07-12

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. "Comparing Annotations: Towards Consensus Annotation" at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 10, 2009

  7. BPROMPT: A consensus server for membrane protein prediction.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Paul D; Attwood, Teresa K; Flower, Darren R

    2003-07-01

    Protein structure prediction is a cornerstone of bioinformatics research. Membrane proteins require their own prediction methods due to their intrinsically different composition. A variety of tools exist for topology prediction of membrane proteins, many of them available on the Internet. The server described in this paper, BPROMPT (Bayesian PRediction Of Membrane Protein Topology), uses a Bayesian Belief Network to combine the results of other prediction methods, providing a more accurate consensus prediction. Topology predictions with accuracies of 70% for prokaryotes and 53% for eukaryotes were achieved. BPROMPT can be accessed at http://www.jenner.ac.uk/BPROMPT.

  8. Core Outcomes for Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Consensus Study

    PubMed Central

    Whistance, Robert N.; Forsythe, Rachael O.; Macefield, Rhiannon; Pullyblank, Anne M.; Avery, Kerry N. L.; Brookes, Sara T.; Thomas, Michael G.; Sylvester, Paul A.; Russell, Ann; Oliver, Alfred; Morton, Dion; Kennedy, Robin; Jayne, David G.; Huxtable, Richard; Hackett, Roland; Card, Mia; Brown, Julia; Blazeby, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. Surgical treatment is common, and there is a great need to improve the delivery of such care. The gold standard for evaluating surgery is within well-designed randomized controlled trials (RCTs); however, the impact of RCTs is diminished by a lack of coordinated outcome measurement and reporting. A solution to these issues is to develop an agreed standard “core” set of outcomes to be measured in all trials to facilitate cross-study comparisons, meta-analysis, and minimize outcome reporting bias. This study defines a core outcome set for CRC surgery. Methods and Findings The scope of this COS includes clinical effectiveness trials of surgical interventions for colorectal cancer. Excluded were nonsurgical oncological interventions. Potential outcomes of importance to patients and professionals were identified through systematic literature reviews and patient interviews. All outcomes were transcribed verbatim and categorized into domains by two independent researchers. This informed a questionnaire survey that asked stakeholders (patients and professionals) from United Kingdom CRC centers to rate the importance of each domain. Respondents were resurveyed following group feedback (Delphi methods). Outcomes rated as less important were discarded after each survey round according to predefined criteria, and remaining outcomes were considered at three consensus meetings; two involving international professionals and a separate one with patients. A modified nominal group technique was used to gain the final consensus. Data sources identified 1,216 outcomes of CRC surgery that informed a 91 domain questionnaire. First round questionnaires were returned from 63 out of 81 (78%) centers, including 90 professionals, and 97 out of 267 (35%) patients. Second round response rates were high for all stakeholders (>80%). Analysis of responses lead to 45 and 23 outcome domains being retained

  9. The Hartford Consensus IV: A Call for Increased National Resilience.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Lenworth M

    2016-03-01

    National implementation of the Hartford Consensus is a meticulous and incremental process. It consists of many elements that require collaboration and strategic leadership to achieve an efficient, effective, knowledgeable, resilient, and prepared citizenry. We strongly believe the public can and should act as immediate responders to stop bleeding from all hazards, including active shooter and intentional mass casualty events. The ACS has a long history of setting standards and educating responders through its Committee on Trauma and its programs. The ACS is therefore well-positioned to use its national and international networks to implement bleeding control education to improve survival and enhance resilience.

  10. Valuing certainty in a consensus-based water allocation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pande, Saket; McKee, Mac

    2007-02-01

    We present an interdisciplinary approach to attach economic value to model certainty. The central theme of this paper concerns valuing certainty in water resource management, specifically resource allocation. A conceptual framework is developed to study (1) a hypothetical scenario of three water users attempting to mutually agree on allocation of some fixed amount of water amongst themselves and (2) California water policy negotiations along the lines of Adams et al. (1996). We attempt to answer how uncertainty in a policy variable affects the "allocation solution" in such consensus-based decision-making processes. This study finally evolves into economic valuation of uncertainty reduction and willingness to pay for the same.

  11. SEPAR-ALAT Consensus Document on Antipneumoccal Vaccination in Smokers.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Ruiz, Carlos A; Buljubasich, Daniel; Sansores, Raúl; Riesco Miranda, Juan Antonio; Guerreros Benavides, Alfredo; Luhning, Susana; Chatkin, José Miguel; Zabert, Gustavo; de Granda Orive, José Ignacio; Solano Reina, Segismundo; Casas Herrera, Alejandro; de Lucas Ramos, Pilar

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is responsible for several clinical syndromes, such as community-acquired pneumonia, sinusitis, otitis media, and others. The most severe clinical entity caused by this bacteria is undoubtedly invasive pneumococcal disease. Certain factors are known to increase the risk of presenting invasive pneumococcal disease, the most important being smoking habit and underlying concomitant diseases. This article comprises a consensus document on antipneumococcal vaccination in smokers, drawn up by a Smoking Expert Group from the Spanish Society of Pulmonology and Thoracic Surgery and the Latin American Chest Association.

  12. Unexplained symptoms after terrorism and war: an expert consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Clauw, Daniel J; Engel, Charles C; Aronowitz, Robert; Jones, Edgar; Kipen, Howard M; Kroenke, Kurt; Ratzan, Scott; Sharpe, Michael; Wessely, Simon

    2003-10-01

    Twelve years of concern regarding a possible "Gulf War syndrome" has now given way to societal concerns of a "World Trade Center syndrome" and efforts to prevent unexplained symptoms following the most recent war in Iraq. These events serve to remind us that unexplained symptoms frequently occur after war and are likely after terrorist attacks. An important social priority is to recognize, define, prevent, and care for individuals with unexplained symptoms after war and related events (eg, terrorism, natural or industrial disasters). An international, multidisciplinary, and multiinstitutional consensus project was completed to summarize current knowledge on unexplained symptoms after terrorism and war.

  13. [3rd Hungarian Breast Cancer Consensus Conference - Surgery Guidelines].

    PubMed

    Lázár, György; Bursics, Attila; Farsang, Zoltán; Harsányi, László; Kósa, Csaba; Maráz, Róbert; Mátrai, Zoltán; Paszt, Attila; Pavlovics, Gábor; Tamás, Róbert

    2016-09-01

    Therapy for breast cancer today is characterised by ever more precise diagnostic methods and ever more effective oncological treatments, a trend which will certainly continue in the future. Breast preservation and the application of oncoplastic principles are increasingly popular. A sentinel lymph node biopsy in the surgical treatment of the axilla is primary, with the indication for axillary block dissection (ABD) narrowing and radiation therapy becoming an alternative to ABD in certain cases. This publication summarises our recommendations on the surgical treatment of breast cancer based on the content of the 2nd Breast Cancer Consensus Conference and considering the latest international studies and professional recommendations.

  14. Consensus statement on preventive and symptomatic care of leukodystrophy patients.

    PubMed

    Van Haren, Keith; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Bernard, Genevieve; Murphy, Jennifer L; Pizzino, Amy; Helman, Guy; Suhr, Dean; Waggoner, Jacque; Hobson, Don; Vanderver, Adeline; Patterson, Marc C

    2015-04-01

    Leukodystrophies are inherited disorders whose primary pathophysiology consists of abnormal deposition or progressive disruption of brain myelin. Leukodystrophy patients manifest many of the same symptoms and medical complications despite the wide spectrum of genetic origins. Although no definitive cures exist, all of these conditions are treatable. This report provides the first expert consensus on the recognition and treatment of medical and psychosocial complications associated with leukodystrophies. We include a discussion of serious and potentially preventable medical complications and propose several preventive care strategies. We also outline the need for future research to prioritize clinical needs and subsequently develop, validate, and optimize specific care strategies.

  15. International veterinary epilepsy task force consensus proposal: diagnostic approach to epilepsy in dogs.

    PubMed

    De Risio, Luisa; Bhatti, Sofie; Muñana, Karen; Penderis, Jacques; Stein, Veronika; Tipold, Andrea; Berendt, Mette; Farqhuar, Robyn; Fischer, Andrea; Long, Sam; Mandigers, Paul J J; Matiasek, Kaspar; Packer, Rowena M A; Pakozdy, Akos; Patterson, Ned; Platt, Simon; Podell, Michael; Potschka, Heidrun; Batlle, Martí Pumarola; Rusbridge, Clare; Volk, Holger A

    2015-08-28

    This article outlines the consensus proposal on diagnosis of epilepsy in dogs by the International Veterinary Epilepsy Task Force. The aim of this consensus proposal is to improve consistency in the diagnosis of epilepsy in the clinical and research settings. The diagnostic approach to the patient presenting with a history of suspected epileptic seizures incorporates two fundamental steps: to establish if the events the animal is demonstrating truly represent epileptic seizures and if so, to identify their underlying cause. Differentiation of epileptic seizures from other non-epileptic episodic paroxysmal events can be challenging. Criteria that can be used to make this differentiation are presented in detail and discussed. Criteria for the diagnosis of idiopathic epilepsy (IE) are described in a three-tier system. Tier I confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on a history of two or more unprovoked epileptic seizures occurring at least 24 h apart, age at epileptic seizure onset of between six months and six years, unremarkable inter-ictal physical and neurological examination, and no significant abnormalities on minimum data base blood tests and urinalysis. Tier II confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and unremarkable fasting and post-prandial bile acids, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain (based on an epilepsy-specific brain MRI protocol) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis. Tier III confidence level for the diagnosis of IE is based on the factors listed in tier I and II and identification of electroencephalographic abnormalities characteristic for seizure disorders. The authors recommend performing MRI of the brain and routine CSF analysis, after exclusion of reactive seizures, in dogs with age at epileptic seizure onset <6 months or >6 years, inter-ictal neurological abnormalities consistent with intracranial neurolocalisation, status epilepticus or cluster seizure at epileptic seizure onset

  16. Consensus Guideline Based Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) in Psychiatry and Neurology.

    PubMed

    Hiemke, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is a valuable tool for tailoring the dosage of the prescribed medication(s) to the individual pharmacokinetic characteristics of a patient. In psychiatry and neurology, however, proven evidence that TDM should be used for treatment with the multiple neuropsychiatric medications is restricted to few compounds. Well-designed clinical trials on medical and economic benefits of TDM are rare. The use of TDM is limited in most countries to few antiepileptics, especially carbamazepine, phenobarbital and phenytoin, some mood stabilizers, especially lithium and valproic acid, some antidepressants, especially tricyclic antidepressants and some antipsychotics, primarily clozapine because these drugs have a narrow therapeutic index. On the other hand, specific indications and distinct problems can make TDM most useful for individualized pharmacotherapy with almost any neuropsychiatric drug. Potential benefits of TDM can, however, only be reaped if the method is adequately integrated into the clinical treatment process. The TDM expert group of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Neuropsychopharmakologie und Pharmakopsychiatrie (AGNP) issued consensus guidelines for the best practice of TDM in psychiatry and neurology. A first version was published in 2004. These guidelines were extended in 2011 and are actually updated (see: www.agnp.de). Exemplified by single cases it is shown here how to use TDM consensus guidelines for problem solving in psychiatry and neurology. Studies on depressed patients give evidence for tricyclic antidepressants, venlafaxine and citalopram that TDM could become a standard of care in psychiatry and neurology. There is potential to accelerate improvement. Reducing phases of suffering will not only have medical benefits for the patients but also an impact on costs for the health system which needs to be clarified by controlled studies.

  17. Annotation and analysis of a large cuticular protein family with the R&R Consensus in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Cornman, R Scott; Togawa, Toru; Dunn, W Augustine; He, Ningjia; Emmons, Aaron C; Willis, Judith H

    2008-01-01

    Background The most abundant family of insect cuticular proteins, the CPR family, is recognized by the R&R Consensus, a domain of about 64 amino acids that binds to chitin and is present throughout arthropods. Several species have now been shown to have more than 100 CPR genes, inviting speculation as to the functional importance of this large number and diversity. Results We have identified 156 genes in Anopheles gambiae that code for putative cuticular proteins in this CPR family, over 1% of the total number of predicted genes in this species. Annotation was verified using several criteria including identification of TATA boxes, INRs, and DPEs plus support from proteomic and gene expression analyses. Two previously recognized CPR classes, RR-1 and RR-2, form separate, well-supported clades with the exception of a small set of genes with long branches whose relationships are poorly resolved. Several of these outliers have clear orthologs in other species. Although both clades are under purifying selection, the RR-1 variant of the R&R Consensus is evolving at twice the rate of the RR-2 variant and is structurally more labile. In contrast, the regions flanking the R&R Consensus have diversified in amino-acid composition to a much greater extent in RR-2 genes compared with RR-1 genes. Many genes are found in compact tandem arrays that may include similar or dissimilar genes but always include just one of the two classes. Tandem arrays of RR-2 genes frequently contain subsets of genes coding for highly similar proteins (sequence clusters). Properties of the proteins indicated that each cluster may serve a distinct function in the cuticle. Conclusion The complete annotation of this large gene family provides insight on the mechanisms of gene family evolution and clues about the need for so many CPR genes. These data also should assist annotation of other Anopheles genes. PMID:18205929

  18. Optimal treatment sequence in COPD: Can a consensus be found?

    PubMed

    Ferreira, J; Drummond, M; Pires, N; Reis, G; Alves, C; Robalo-Cordeiro, C

    2016-01-01

    There is currently no consensus on the treatment sequence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), although it is recognized that early diagnosis is of paramount importance to start treatment in the early stages of the disease. Although it is fairly consensual that initial treatment should be with an inhaled short-acting beta agonist, a short-acting muscarinic antagonist, a long-acting beta-agonist or a long-acting muscarinic antagonist. As the disease progresses, several therapeutic options are available, and which to choose at each disease stage remains controversial. When and in which patients to use dual bronchodilation? When to use inhaled corticosteroids? And triple therapy? Are the existing non-inhaled therapies, such as mucolytic agents, antibiotics, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, methylxanthines and immunostimulating agents, useful? If so, which patients would benefit? Should co-morbidities be taken into account when choosing COPD therapy for a patient? This paper reviews current guidelines and available evidence and proposes a therapeutic scheme for COPD patients. We also propose a treatment algorithm in the hope that it will help physicians to decide the best approach for their patients. The authors conclude that, at present, a full consensus on optimal treatment sequence in COPD cannot be found, mainly due to disease heterogeneity and lack of biomarkers to guide treatment. For the time being, and although some therapeutic approaches are consensual, treatment of COPD should be patient-oriented.

  19. Phenomenology and classification of dystonia: a consensus update

    PubMed Central

    Albanese, Alberto; Bhatia, Kailash; Bressman, Susan B.; DeLong, Mahlon R.; Fahn, Stanley; Fung, Victor S.C.; Hallett, Mark; Jankovic, Joseph; Jinnah, H.A.; Klein, Christine; Lang, Anthony E.; Mink, Jonathan W.; Teller, Jan K.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the consensus outcome of an international panel consisting of investigators with years of experience in this field that reviewed the definition and classification of dystonia. Agreement was obtained based on a consensus development methodology during three in-person meetings and manuscript review by mail. Dystonia is defined as a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements, postures, or both. Dystonic movements are typically patterned and twisting, and may be tremulous. Dystonia is often initiated or worsened by voluntary action and associated with overflow muscle activation. Dystonia is classified along two axes: clinical characteristics, including age at onset, body distribution, temporal pattern and associated features (additional movement disorders or neurological features), and etiology, which includes nervous system pathology and inheritance. The clinical characteristics fall into several specific dystonia syndromes that help to guide diagnosis and treatment. We provide here a new general definition of dystonia and propose a new classification. We encourage clinicians and researchers to use these innovative definition and classification and test them in the clinical setting on a variety of patients with dystonia. PMID:23649720

  20. Accurate construction of consensus genetic maps via integer linear programming.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yonghui; Close, Timothy J; Lonardi, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    We study the problem of merging genetic maps, when the individual genetic maps are given as directed acyclic graphs. The computational problem is to build a consensus map, which is a directed graph that includes and is consistent with all (or, the vast majority of) the markers in the input maps. However, when markers in the individual maps have ordering conflicts, the resulting consensus map will contain cycles. Here, we formulate the problem of resolving cycles in the context of a parsimonious paradigm that takes into account two types of errors that may be present in the input maps, namely, local reshuffles and global displacements. The resulting combinatorial optimization problem is, in turn, expressed as an integer linear program. A fast approximation algorithm is proposed, and an additional speedup heuristic is developed. Our algorithms were implemented in a software tool named MERGEMAP which is freely available for academic use. An extensive set of experiments shows that MERGEMAP consistently outperforms JOINMAP, which is the most popular tool currently available for this task, both in terms of accuracy and running time. MERGEMAP is available for download at http://www.cs.ucr.edu/~yonghui/mgmap.html.

  1. Consensus Paper: Pathological Role of the Cerebellum in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, S. Hossein; Aldinger, Kimberly A.; Ashwood, Paul; Bauman, Margaret L.; Blaha, Charles D.; Blatt, Gene J.; Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved; Dager, Stephen R.; Dickson, Price E.; Estes, Annette M.; Goldowitz, Dan; Heck, Detlef H.; Kemper, Thomas L.; King, Bryan H.; Martin, Loren A.; Millen, Kathleen J.; Mittleman, Guy; Mosconi, Matthew W.; Persico, Antonio M.; Sweeney, John A.; Webb, Sara J.; Welsh, John P.

    2013-01-01

    There has been significant advancement in various aspects of scientific knowledge concerning the role of cerebellum in the etiopathogenesis of autism. In the current consensus paper, we will observe the diversity of opinions regarding the involvement of this important site in the pathology of autism. Recent emergent findings in literature related to cerebellar involvement in autism are discussed, including: cerebellar pathology, cerebellar imaging and symptom expression in autism, cerebellar genetics, cerebellar immune function, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, GABAergic and glutamatergic systems, cholinergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic, and oxytocin related changes in autism, motor control and cognitive deficits, cerebellar coordination of movements and cognition, gene-environment interactions, therapeutics in autism and relevant animal models of autism. Points of consensus include presence of abnormal cerebellar anatomy, abnormal neurotransmitter systems, oxidative stress, cerebellar motor and cognitive deficits, and neuroinflammation in subjects with autism. Undefined areas or areas requiring further investigation include lack of treatment options for core symptoms of autism, vermal hypoplasia and other vermal abnormalities as a consistent feature of autism, mechanisms underlying cerebellar contributions to cognition, and unknown mechanisms underlying neuroinflammation. PMID:22370873

  2. [Consensus statement for accreditation of multidisciplinary thyroid cancer units].

    PubMed

    Díez, Juan José; Galofré, Juan Carlos; Oleaga, Amelia; Grande, Enrique; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Moreno, Pablo

    2016-03-01

    Thyroid cancer is the leading endocrine system tumor. Great advances have recently been made in understanding of the origin of these tumors and the molecular biology that makes them grow and proliferate, which have been associated to improvements in diagnostic procedures and increased availability of effective local and systemic treatments. All of the above makes thyroid cancer a paradigm of how different specialties should work together to achieve the greatest benefit for the patients. Coordination of all the procedures and patient flows should continue throughout diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up, and is essential for further optimization of resources and time. This manuscript was prepared at the request of the Working Group on Thyroid Cancer of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition, and is aimed to provide a consensus document on the definition, composition, requirements, structure, and operation of a multidisciplinary team for the comprehensive care of patients with thyroid cancer. For this purpose, we have included contributions by several professionals from different specialties with experience in thyroid cancer treatment at centers where multidisciplinary teams have been working for years, with the aim of developing a practical consensus applicable in clinical practice.

  3. [Consensus on Systemic Arterial Hypertension In México].

    PubMed

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Palomo-Piñón, Silvia; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Galván-Oseguera, Héctor; Magaña-Serrano, José Antonio; Saturno-Chiu, Guillermo; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Santos-Martínez, Efrén; Díaz-Díaz, Enrique; Salgado-Pastor, Selene Janette; Morales-Mora, Gerardo; Medina-Concebida, Luz Elena; Mejía-Rodríguez, Oliva; Pérez-Ruiz, Claudia Elsa; Chapa-Mejía, Luis Raúl; Álvarez-Aguilar, Cleto; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto; Castro-Martínez, María Guadalupe; López-Bárcena, Joaquín; Paniagua-Sierra, José Ramón

    2016-01-01

    This Consenso Nacional de Hipertensión Arterial Sistémica (National Consensus on Systemic Arterial Hypertension) brings together experiences and joint work of 79 specialists who have been in contact with the patient affected by systemic arterial hypertension. All concepts here presented were outlined on the basis of the real world practice of Mexican hypertensive population. The consensus was developed under strict methodological guidelines. The Delphi technique was applied in two rounds for the development of an appropriate statistical analysis of the concepts exposed by all the specialists, who posed key questions, later developed by the panel of experts of the Hospital de Cardiología, and specialists from the Centro Médico Nacional. Several angles of this illness are shown: detection, diagnosis, pathophysiology, classification, treatment and prevention. The evidence analysis was carried out using PRISMA method. More than 600 articles were reviewed, leaving only the most representative in the references. This document concludes with practical and useful recommendations for the three levels of health care of our country.

  4. [Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori infection].

    PubMed

    Coelho, Luiz Gonzaga Vaz; Zaterka, Schlioma

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress has been obtained since the First Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection held in 1995, in Belo Horizonte, MG, and justify a second meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on H. pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter and took place on June, 19-20, 2004 in São Paulo, SP. Thirty six delegates coming from 15 different Brazilian states including gastroenterologists, pathologists, microbiologists and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one the five main topics of the meeting: H. pylori and dyspepsia, H. pylori and NSAIDs, H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease, H. pylori treatment, and H. pylori retreatment. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. The results were presented during a special session on the VI Brazilian Week of Digestive System, in Recife, PE (October 2004), and this publication represents the summary of the main recommendations and conclusions emerged from the meeting.

  5. Assessment of the cortisol awakening response: Expert consensus guidelines.

    PubMed

    Stalder, Tobias; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Kudielka, Brigitte M; Adam, Emma K; Pruessner, Jens C; Wüst, Stefan; Dockray, Samantha; Smyth, Nina; Evans, Phil; Hellhammer, Dirk H; Miller, Robert; Wetherell, Mark A; Lupien, Sonia J; Clow, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The cortisol awakening response (CAR), the marked increase in cortisol secretion over the first 30-45 min after morning awakening, has been related to a wide range of psychosocial, physical and mental health parameters, making it a key variable for psychoneuroendocrinological research. The CAR is typically assessed from self-collection of saliva samples within the domestic setting. While this confers ecological validity, it lacks direct researcher oversight which can be problematic as the validity of CAR measurement critically relies on participants closely following a timed sampling schedule, beginning with the moment of awakening. Researchers assessing the CAR thus need to take important steps to maximize and monitor saliva sampling accuracy as well as consider a range of other relevant methodological factors. To promote best practice of future research in this field, the International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology initiated an expert panel charged with (i) summarizing relevant evidence and collective experience on methodological factors affecting CAR assessment and (ii) formulating clear consensus guidelines for future research. The present report summarizes the results of this undertaking. Consensus guidelines are presented on central aspects of CAR assessment, including objective control of sampling accuracy/adherence, participant instructions, covariate accounting, sampling protocols, quantification strategies as well as reporting and interpreting of CAR data. Meeting these methodological standards in future research will create more powerful research designs, thus yielding more reliable and reproducible results and helping to further advance understanding in this evolving field of research.

  6. Harmonization of quality indicators in laboratory medicine. A preliminary consensus.

    PubMed

    Plebani, Mario; Astion, Michael L; Barth, Julian H; Chen, Wenxiang; de Oliveira Galoro, César A; Escuer, Mercedes Ibarz; Ivanov, Agnes; Miller, Warren G; Petinos, Penny; Sciacovelli, Laura; Shcolnik, Wilson; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Sumarac, Zorica

    2014-07-01

    Quality indicators (QIs) are fundamental tools for enabling users to quantify the quality of all operational processes by comparing it against a defined criterion. QIs data should be collected over time to identify, correct, and continuously monitor defects and improve performance and patient safety by identifying and implementing effective interventions. According to the international standard for medical laboratories accreditation, the laboratory shall establish and periodically review QIs to monitor and evaluate performance throughout critical aspects of pre-, intra-, and post-analytical processes. However, while some interesting programs on indicators in the total testing process have been developed in some countries, there is no consensus for the production of joint recommendations focusing on the adoption of universal QIs and common terminology in the total testing process. A preliminary agreement has been achieved in a Consensus Conference organized in Padua in 2013, after revising the model of quality indicators (MQI) developed by the Working Group on "Laboratory Errors and Patient Safety" of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC). The consensually accepted list of QIs, which takes into consideration both their importance and applicability, should be tested by all potentially interested clinical laboratories to identify further steps in the harmonization project.

  7. Consensus Statement on Standard of Care for Congenital Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching H.; Dowling, James J.; North, Kathryn; Schroth, Mary K.; Sejersen, Thomas; Shapiro, Frederic; Bellini, Jonathan; Weiss, Hali; Guillet, Marc; Amburgey, Kimberly; Apkon, Susan; Bertini, Enrico; Bonnemann, Carsten; Clarke, Nigel; Connolly, Anne M.; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Fitzgerald, Dominic; Florence, Julaine M.; Gee, Richard; Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Glanzman, Allan M.; Hofmeister, Brittany; Jungbluth, Heinz; Koumbourlis, Anastassios C.; Laing, Nigel G.; Main, Marion; Morrison, Leslie A.; Munns, Craig; Rose, Kristy; Schuler, Pamela M.; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Vainzof, Mariz; Yuan, Nanci

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in scientific research has facilitated accurate genetic and neuropathological diagnosis of congenital myopathies. However, given their relatively low incidence, congenital myopathies remain unfamiliar to the majority of care providers, and the levels of patient care are extremely variable. This consensus statement aims to provide care guidelines for congenital myopathies. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Myopathies worked through frequent e-mail correspondences, periodic conference calls, 2 rounds of online surveys, and a 3-day workshop to achieve a consensus for diagnostic and clinical care recommendations. The committee includes 59 members from 10 medical disciplines. They are organized into 5 working groups: genetics/diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, gastroenterology/nutrition/speech/oral care, and orthopedics/rehabilitation. In each care area the authors summarize the committee’s recommendations for symptom assessments and therapeutic interventions. It is the committee’s goal that through these recommendations, patients with congenital myopathies will receive optimal care and improve their disease outcome. PMID:22431881

  8. A consensus approach to wound care in epidermolysis bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Elena; Lara-Corrales, Irene; Mellerio, Jemima; Martinez, Anna; Schultz, Gregory; Burrell, Robert; Goodman, Laurie; Coutts, Patricia; Wagner, John; Allen, Upton; Sibbald, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Background Wound care is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB); however, there are currently no guidelines to help practitioners care for these patients. Objectives The objective of this study was to generate a list of recommendations that will enable practitioners to better care for patients with EB. Methods An expert panel generated a list of recommendations based on the best evidence available. The recommendations were translated into a survey, and sent to other EB experts to generate consensus using an online-based modified Delphi method. The list was refined and grouped into themes and specific recommendations. Results There were15 respondents (45% response rate), with significant experience in the EB field (>10 years [67%]). Respondents included physicians (67%), nurses (17%), and allied health professionals (7%). There was more than 85% agreement for all the proposed items. These were further refined and grouped into 5 main themes (assessment and management of factors that impair healing, patient-centered concerns, local wound care, development of an individualized care plan, and organizational support) and 17 specific recommendations. Limitations There is a paucity of scientific evidence with most recommendations based on expert opinion. Conclusions These recommendations will provide practitioners with a framework for caring for these patients. Additional scientific research including effectiveness studies for everyday practice and expert consensus, may further refine these recommendations. PMID:22387035

  9. Modelling Adaptive Learning Behaviours for Consensus Formation in Human Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Guozhen; Lv, Hongtao; Wang, Zhen; Meng, Jun; Hao, Jianye; Ren, Fenghui

    2016-06-01

    Learning is an important capability of humans and plays a vital role in human society for forming beliefs and opinions. In this paper, we investigate how learning affects the dynamics of opinion formation in social networks. A novel learning model is proposed, in which agents can dynamically adapt their learning behaviours in order to facilitate the formation of consensus among them, and thus establish a consistent social norm in the whole population more efficiently. In the model, agents adapt their opinions through trail-and-error interactions with others. By exploiting historical interaction experience, a guiding opinion, which is considered to be the most successful opinion in the neighbourhood, can be generated based on the principle of evolutionary game theory. Then, depending on the consistency between its own opinion and the guiding opinion, a focal agent can realize whether its opinion complies with the social norm (i.e., the majority opinion that has been adopted) in the population, and adapt its behaviours accordingly. The highlight of the model lies in that it captures the essential features of people’s adaptive learning behaviours during the evolution and formation of opinions. Experimental results show that the proposed model can facilitate the formation of consensus among agents, and some critical factors such as size of opinion space and network topology can have significant influences on opinion dynamics.

  10. Combination therapy in hypertension: an Asia-Pacific consensus viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Abdul Rahman, Abdul Rashid; Reyes, Eugenio B; Sritara, Piyamitr; Pancholia, Arvind; Van Phuoc, Dang; Tomlinson, Brian

    2015-05-01

    Hypertension incurs a significant healthcare burden in Asia-Pacific countries, which have suboptimal rates of blood pressure (BP) treatment and control. A consensus meeting of hypertension experts from the Asia-Pacific region convened in Hanoi, Vietnam, in April 2013. The principal objectives were to discuss the growing problem of hypertension in the Asia-Pacific region, and to develop consensus recommendations to promote standards of care across the region. A particular focus was recommendations for combination therapy, since it is known that most patients with hypertension will require two or more antihypertensive drugs to achieve BP control, and also that combinations of drugs with complementary mechanisms of action achieve BP targets more effectively than monotherapy. The expert panel reviewed guidelines for hypertension management from the USA and Europe, as well as individual Asia-Pacific countries, and devised a treatment matrix/guide, in which they propose the preferred combination therapy regimens for patients with hypertension, both with and without compelling indications. This report summarizes key recommendations from the group, including recommended antihypertensive combinations for specific patient populations. These strategies generally entail initiating therapy with free drug combinations, starting with the lowest available dosage, followed by treatment with single-pill combinations once the BP target has been achieved. A single reference for the whole Asia-Pacific region may contribute to increased consistency of treatment and greater proportions of patients achieving BP control, and hence reducing hypertension-related morbidity and mortality.

  11. Collective learning and optimal consensus decisions in social animal groups.

    PubMed

    Kao, Albert B; Miller, Noam; Torney, Colin; Hartnett, Andrew; Couzin, Iain D

    2014-08-01

    Learning has been studied extensively in the context of isolated individuals. However, many organisms are social and consequently make decisions both individually and as part of a collective. Reaching consensus necessarily means that a single option is chosen by the group, even when there are dissenting opinions. This decision-making process decouples the otherwise direct relationship between animals' preferences and their experiences (the outcomes of decisions). Instead, because an individual's learned preferences influence what others experience, and therefore learn about, collective decisions couple the learning processes between social organisms. This introduces a new, and previously unexplored, dynamical relationship between preference, action, experience and learning. Here we model collective learning within animal groups that make consensus decisions. We reveal how learning as part of a collective results in behavior that is fundamentally different from that learned in isolation, allowing grouping organisms to spontaneously (and indirectly) detect correlations between group members' observations of environmental cues, adjust strategy as a function of changing group size (even if that group size is not known to the individual), and achieve a decision accuracy that is very close to that which is provably optimal, regardless of environmental contingencies. Because these properties make minimal cognitive demands on individuals, collective learning, and the capabilities it affords, may be widespread among group-living organisms. Our work emphasizes the importance and need for theoretical and experimental work that considers the mechanism and consequences of learning in a social context.

  12. Modelling Adaptive Learning Behaviours for Consensus Formation in Human Societies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chao; Tan, Guozhen; Lv, Hongtao; Wang, Zhen; Meng, Jun; Hao, Jianye; Ren, Fenghui

    2016-01-01

    Learning is an important capability of humans and plays a vital role in human society for forming beliefs and opinions. In this paper, we investigate how learning affects the dynamics of opinion formation in social networks. A novel learning model is proposed, in which agents can dynamically adapt their learning behaviours in order to facilitate the formation of consensus among them, and thus establish a consistent social norm in the whole population more efficiently. In the model, agents adapt their opinions through trail-and-error interactions with others. By exploiting historical interaction experience, a guiding opinion, which is considered to be the most successful opinion in the neighbourhood, can be generated based on the principle of evolutionary game theory. Then, depending on the consistency between its own opinion and the guiding opinion, a focal agent can realize whether its opinion complies with the social norm (i.e., the majority opinion that has been adopted) in the population, and adapt its behaviours accordingly. The highlight of the model lies in that it captures the essential features of people’s adaptive learning behaviours during the evolution and formation of opinions. Experimental results show that the proposed model can facilitate the formation of consensus among agents, and some critical factors such as size of opinion space and network topology can have significant influences on opinion dynamics. PMID:27282089

  13. Esophageal cancer screening in achalasia: is there a consensus?

    PubMed

    Ravi, K; Geno, D M; Katzka, D A

    2015-04-01

    Achalasia is an important but relatively uncommon disorder. While highly effective therapeutic options exist, esophageal cancer remains a long-term potential complication. The risk of esophageal cancer in achalasia remains unclear, with current guidelines recommending against routine endoscopic screening. However, given limited data and conflicting opinion, it is unknown whether consensus regarding screening practices in achalasia among experts exists. A 10-question survey to assess screening practices in achalasia was created and distributed to 28 experts in the area of achalasia. Experts were identified based on publications and meeting presentations in the field. Survey responses were received from 17 of 28 (61%) experts. Wide geographic distribution was seen among respondents, with eight (47%) from Europe or Australia, seven (41%) from the United States, and two (12%) from Asia. Screening for esophageal cancer was inconsistent, with nine (53%) experts endorsing the practice and eight (47%) not. Screening practices did not differ among geographic regions. No consensus regarding the risk for esophageal cancer in achalasia was seen, with three experts reporting no increased risk compared with the general population, eight experts a lifetime risk of 0.1-0.5%, three experts a 0.5-1% risk, two experts a 1-2% risk, and one expert a 3-5% risk. However, these differences in perception of risk did not influence screening practices. Upper endoscopy was utilized among all experts who endorsed screening. However, practices still varied with screening commencing at or within 1 year of diagnosis in two practices compared with 5 and 10 years in three respective practices each. Surveillance intervals also varied, performed every 2 years in four practices, every 3 years in four practices, and every 5 years in one practice. Practice variation in the management of achalasia itself was also seen, with initial treatment with Heller myotomy endorsed by eight experts, pneumatic

  14. The Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Cytolethal Distending Toxin Active Subunit CdtB Contains a Cholesterol Recognition Sequence Required for Toxin Binding and Subunit Internalization.

    PubMed

    Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen; Walker, Lisa P; Zekavat, Ali; Dlakić, Mensur; Scuron, Monika Damek; Nygren, Patrik; Shenker, Bruce J

    2015-10-01

    Induction of cell cycle arrest in lymphocytes following exposure to the Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans cytolethal distending toxin (Cdt) is dependent upon the integrity of lipid membrane microdomains. Moreover, we have previously demonstrated that the association of Cdt with target cells involves the CdtC subunit which binds to cholesterol via a cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus sequence (CRAC site). In this study, we demonstrate that the active Cdt subunit, CdtB, also is capable of binding to large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) containing cholesterol. Furthermore, CdtB binding to cholesterol involves a similar CRAC site as that demonstrated for CdtC. Mutation of the CRAC site reduces binding to model membranes as well as toxin binding and CdtB internalization in both Jurkat cells and human macrophages. A concomitant reduction in Cdt-induced toxicity was also noted, indicated by reduced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in Jurkat cells and a reduction in the proinflammatory response in macrophages (interleukin 1β [IL-1β] and tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] release). Collectively, these observations indicate that membrane cholesterol serves as an essential ligand for both CdtC and CdtB and, further, that this binding is necessary for both internalization of CdtB and subsequent molecular events leading to intoxication of cells.

  15. Populism vs. elitism: social consensus and social status as bases of attitude certainty.

    PubMed

    Prislin, Radmila; Shaffer, Emily; Crowder, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of social consensus and social status on attitude certainty that is conceptualized multi-dimensionally as perceived clarity and correctness of one's attitude. In a mock opinion exchange about a social issue, participants were either supported (high consensus) or opposed (low consensus) by most of the confederates. They were informed that their opinion (high status) or their opponents' opinion (low status) had the alleged psychological significance indicative of future success. Post-experimental attitude clarity was significantly greater when attitudinal position was associated with high rather than low status. Attitude correctness was interactively affected by social status and social consensus. Supporting the compensatory effect hypothesis, attitude correctness was comparable across the levels of social consensus as long as they were associated with high status, and across the levels of social status as long as they were associated with high social consensus.

  16. A STUDY ON THE STRUCTURE OF CONSENSUS BUILDING PROCESSES IN SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Tomoki; Toyoda, Mitsuyo; Sago, Junzo; Seki, Motoi; Akiyama, Kazuya; Kuwako, Toshio

    The assessment of stakeholders' interests is a critical step in consensus building processes in social infrastructure development. The coordinator of these processes needs to pay attention to both concrete interests and deeper concerns behind them for successful consensus building. The authors have engaged in the management of the consensus building process for the Ten-noh river restoration project carried out on Sado Island, Niigata, and have successfully developed a restoration plan by combining voices from different perspectives. One of the key conditions for the successful consensus building is to incorporate stepby-step problem solving processes responding to the issues identified by stakeholders. Such a steady approach leads to the consensus of the project as a whole. The authors have developed a framework to analyze the structure of consensus building processes in details by establishing a chart that layouts stakeholder's opinions, interests, deeper concerns, and concrete issues that arise when promoting a project of social infrastructure development.

  17. Distributed Tracking with Consensus on Noisy Time-varying Graphs: Convergence Results and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    R. M. Murray, “ Consensus problems in networks of agents with switching topology and time -delays,” IEEE Trans. Autom. Control, vol. 49, no. 9, pp... Distributed Tracking with Consensus on Noisy Time -varying Graphs: Convergence Results and Applications Sudharman K. Jayaweera and Y. Ruan ECE... distributed tracking with consensus on a time -varying graph with noisy communications links and sensing constraints. We develop a framework to handle the

  18. Leader-follower consensus control of Lipschitz nonlinear systems by output feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhiqin Mohd Isira, Ahmad; Zuo, Zongyu; Ding, Zhengtao

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with the leader-follower consensus problem of Lipschitz nonlinear systems under fixed directed communication networks. Both state and output feedback control are proposed based on state and output measurements of neighbouring agents, respectively. Laplacian matrix features are explored for the stability analysis, and the sufficient conditions are derived to solve the consensus problem. Finally, simulation results are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the output-based consensus controller.

  19. Cluster consensus of high-order multi-agent systems with switching topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Bo; Sun, Fuchun; Li, Hongbo; Chen, Yao; Xi, Jianxiang

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the cluster consensus problems of generic linear multi-agent systems with switching topologies. Sufficient criteria for cluster consensus, which generalise the results in existing literatures, are derived for both state feedback and observer-based control schemes. By using an averaging method, it is shown that cluster consensus can be achieved when the union of the acyclic topologies contains a directed spanning tree within each cluster frequently enough. We also provide a principle to construct digraphs with inter-cluster cyclic couplings that promote cluster consensus regardless of the magnitude of inter-agent coupling weights. Finally, numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  20. Higher order finite-time consensus protocol for heterogeneous multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yingjiang; Yu, Xinghuo; Sun, Changyin; Yu, Wenwu

    2015-02-01

    This paper studies the higher order finite-time consensus protocol for heterogeneous multi-agent systems (HMASs). By adding a power integrator method and using heterogeneous domination method, two kinds of consensus protocols are proposed with state feedback and output feedback, respectively. First, for the leaderless and leader-follower HMASs, the continuous finite-time consensus protocols are proposed. Then, by designing a finite-time observer, the output-feedback finite-time consensus protocol is developed. Finally, simulations are performed to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  1. Group consensus of multi-agent systems in directed networks with noises and time delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Yilun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, group consensus problems in fixed directed networks of dynamic agents are investigated. Group consensus means that the agents in each group share a consistent value while there is no agreement between any two groups. Based on algebraic graph theory, sufficient conditions guaranteeing group consensus under the proposed control protocol in the presence of random noises and communication delays are derived. The analysis uses a stability result of Mao for stochastic differential delay equations, which ensures the consensus can be achieved almost surely and exponentially fast. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the availability of the obtained results as well as the effect of time delay/noise intensity.

  2. Group consensus control for heterogeneous multi-agent systems with fixed and switching topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Guoguang; Huang, Jun; Wang, Chunyan; Chen, Zhi; Peng, Zhaoxia

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the group consensus problems of heterogeneous multi-agent systems with fixed and switching topologies are investigated. First, a class of distributed group consensus protocol is proposed for achieving the group consensus of heterogeneous multi-agent systems by using the neighbours' information. Then, some corresponding sufficient conditions are obtained to guarantee the achievement of group consensus. Rigorous proofs are given by using graph theory, matrix theory and Lyapunov theory. Finally, numerical simulations are also given to verify the theoretical analysis.

  3. Critical Resources for Hospital Surge Capacity: An Expert Consensus Panel

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Jamil D.; Sauer, Lauren M.; Catlett, Christina; Levin, Scott; Cole, Gai; Kirsch, Thomas D.; Toerper, Matthew; Kelen, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hospital surge capacity (HSC) is dependent on the ability to increase or conserve resources. The hospital surge model put forth by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) estimates the resources needed by hospitals to treat casualties resulting from 13 national planning scenarios. However, emergency planners need to know which hospital resource are most critical in order to develop a more accurate plan for HSC in the event of a disaster. Objective: To identify critical hospital resources required in four specific catastrophic scenarios; namely, pandemic influenza, radiation, explosive, and nerve gas. Methods: We convened an expert consensus panel comprised of 23 participants representing health providers (i.e., nurses and physicians), administrators, emergency planners, and specialists. Four disaster scenarios were examined by the panel. Participants were divided into 4 groups of five or six members, each of which were assigned two of four scenarios. They were asked to consider 132 hospital patient care resources- extracted from the AHRQ's hospital surge model- in order to identify the ones that would be critical in their opinion to patient care. The definition for a critical hospital resource was the following: absence of the resource is likely to have a major impact on patient outcomes, i.e., high likelihood of untoward event, possibly death. For items with any disagreement in ranking, we conducted a facilitated discussion (modified Delphi technique) until consensus was reached, which was defined as more than 50% agreement. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) were calculated for each scenario, and across all scenarios as a measure of participant agreement on critical resources. For the critical resources common to all scenarios, Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to measure the distribution of scores across all scenarios. Results: Of the 132 hospital resources, 25 were considered critical for all four scenarios by more than 50% of

  4. Multidisciplinary Management of Mastocytosis: Nordic Expert Group Consensus.

    PubMed

    Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Dybedal, Ingunn; Gülen, Theo; Kristensen, Thomas K; Møller, Michael B; Ackermann, Leena; Sääf, Maria; Karlsson, Maria A; Agertoft, Lone; Brixen, Kim; Hermann, Pernille; Stylianou, Eva; Mortz, Charlotte G; Torfing, Trine; Havelund, Troels; Sander, Birgitta; Bergström, Anna; Bendix, Marie; Garvey, Lene H; Bjerrum, Ole Weis; Valent, Peter; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Nilsson, Gunnar; Vestergaard, Hanne; Hägglund, Hans

    2016-06-15

    Mastocytosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases defined by an increased number and accumulation of mast cells, and often also by signs and symptoms of mast cell activation. Disease subtypes range from indolent to rare aggressive forms. Mastocytosis affects people of all ages and has been considered rare; however, it is probably underdiagnosed with potential severe implications. Diagnosis can be challenging and symptoms may be complex and involve multiple organ-systems. In general it is advised that patients should be referred to centres with experience in the disease offering an individualized, multidisciplinary approach. We present here consensus recommendations from a Nordic expert group for the diagnosis and general management of patients with mastocytosis.

  5. Consensus statement: Virus taxonomy in the age of metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Peter; Adams, Mike J; Benkő, Mária; Breitbart, Mya; Brister, J Rodney; Carstens, Eric B; Davison, Andrew J; Delwart, Eric; Gorbalenya, Alexander E; Harrach, Balázs; Hull, Roger; King, Andrew M Q; Koonin, Eugene V; Krupovic, Mart; Kuhn, Jens H; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Nibert, Max L; Orton, Richard; Roossinck, Marilyn J; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Sullivan, Matthew B; Suttle, Curtis A; Tesh, Robert B; van der Vlugt, René A; Varsani, Arvind; Zerbini, F Murilo

    2017-03-01

    The number and diversity of viral sequences that are identified in metagenomic data far exceeds that of experimentally characterized virus isolates. In a recent workshop, a panel of experts discussed the proposal that, with appropriate quality control, viruses that are known only from metagenomic data can, and should be, incorporated into the official classification scheme of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). Although a taxonomy that is based on metagenomic sequence data alone represents a substantial departure from the traditional reliance on phenotypic properties, the development of a robust framework for sequence-based virus taxonomy is indispensable for the comprehensive characterization of the global virome. In this Consensus Statement article, we consider the rationale for why metagenomic sequence data should, and how it can, be incorporated into the ICTV taxonomy, and present proposals that have been endorsed by the Executive Committee of the ICTV.

  6. Management of Pediatric Malignant Germ Cell Tumors: ICMR Consensus Document.

    PubMed

    Agarwala, Sandeep; Mitra, Aparajita; Bansal, Deepak; Kapoor, Gauri; Vora, Tushar; Prasad, Maya; Chinnaswamy, Girish; Arora, Brijesh; Radhakrishnan, Venkatraman; Laskar, Siddharth; Kaur, Tanvir; Dhaliwal, Rupinder Singh; Rath, G K; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2017-04-01

    With the introduction of cisplatin, the outcome of children with malignant germ cell tumors (MGCT) has improved to nearly 90% 5 year survival. Over the years, through the results of various multinational co-operative trials, the chemotherapy and surgical guidelines for both the gonadal and extra-gonadal MGCTs have been refined to decrease the early and late morbidities and at the same time improve survival. Introduction of risk categorization has further added to this effort. There has been no recommendation on how the children with malignant germ cell tumors should be treated in India. The current manuscript is written with the objective of developing a consensus guideline for practitioners at a National level. Based on extensively reviewed literature and personal experience of the major pediatric oncology centres in India, the ICMR Expert group has made recommendations for management of children with MGCT India.

  7. An Interactive Multi-Model for Consensus on Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Kocarev, Ljupco

    2014-07-02

    This project purports to develop a new scheme for forming consensus among alternative climate models, that give widely divergent projections as to the details of climate change, that is more intelligent than simply averaging the model outputs, or averaging with ex post facto weighting factors. The method under development effectively allows models to assimilate data from one another in run time with weights that are chosen in an adaptive training phase using 20th century data, so that the models synchronize with one another as well as with reality. An alternate approach that is being explored in parallel is the automated combination of equations from different models in an expert-system-like framework.

  8. Italian consensus conference for colonic diverticulosis and diverticular disease.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Rosario; Barbara, Giovanni; Pace, Fabio; Annese, Vito; Bassotti, Gabrio; Binda, Gian Andrea; Casetti, Tino; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide; Fiocca, Roberto; Laghi, Andrea; Maconi, Giovanni; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Annibale, Bruno

    2014-10-01

    The statements produced by the Consensus Conference on Diverticular Disease promoted by GRIMAD (Gruppo Italiano Malattia Diverticolare, Italian Group on Diverticular Diseases) are reported. Topics such as epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of diverticular disease (DD) in patients with uncomplicated and complicated DD were reviewed by a scientific board of experts who proposed 55 statements graded according to level of evidence and strength of recommendation, and approved by an independent jury. Each topic was explored focusing on the more relevant clinical questions. Comparison and discussion of expert opinions, pertinent statements and replies to specific questions, were presented and approved based on a systematic literature search of the available evidence. Comments were added explaining the basis for grading the evidence, particularly for controversial areas.

  9. Science Organizations Remind Senators of Consensus on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chell, Kaitlin

    2009-11-01

    AGU and 17 other scientific organizations sent an open letter to the U.S. Senate on 21 October reminding senators of the scientific consensus on anthropogenic climate change. The letter was sent 1 week before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works began a series of hearings on climate change legislation, the Clean Energy Jobs and American Power Act (Senate bill 1733). The letter states, “Observations throughout the world make it clear that climate change is occurring, and rigorous scientific research demonstrates that the greenhouse gases emitted by human activities are the primary driver. These conclusions are based on multiple independent lines of evidence, and contrary assertions are inconsistent with an objective assessment of the vast body of peer-reviewed science.”

  10. [Argentine consensus on the treatment of bipolar disorders].

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Gustavo Héctor; Strejilevich, Sergio; García Bonetto, Gerardo; Cetkovich-Bakmas, Marcelo; Zaratiegui, Rodolfo; Lagomarsino, Alejandro; Goldchluk, Aníbal; Kalina, Eduardo; Herbst, Luis; Gutiérrez, Benigno

    2005-01-01

    The consensus guidelines of argentine experts in the treatment of bipolar disorders are the result of three days of work of the 10 main local experts under the organization of the Argentine Association of Biological Psychiatry (AAPB). It was adopted a mixed criterion for its preparation: all the recent data of the evidence medicine based published until now were discussed and were balanced with the knowledge acquired from clinical experience of the local experts on the bipolar field. It presents general recommendations and suggested therapeutic sequences for the phase of maintenance, the manic/hypomanic or mixed episode and the depressive episode. These have been divided according to the classification in type I and II; with or without rapid cycling. Since the group of experts identified the delay and miss-diagnoses like the most important barrier for a suitable treatment enclosed a series of recommendations for differential diagnosis of bipolar disorders.

  11. Outcome Measures for Artificial Pancreas Clinical Trials: A Consensus Report.

    PubMed

    Maahs, David M; Buckingham, Bruce A; Castle, Jessica R; Cinar, Ali; Damiano, Edward R; Dassau, Eyal; DeVries, J Hans; Doyle, Francis J; Griffen, Steven C; Haidar, Ahmad; Heinemann, Lutz; Hovorka, Roman; Jones, Timothy W; Kollman, Craig; Kovatchev, Boris; Levy, Brian L; Nimri, Revital; O'Neal, David N; Philip, Moshe; Renard, Eric; Russell, Steven J; Weinzimer, Stuart A; Zisser, Howard; Lum, John W

    2016-07-01

    Research on and commercial development of the artificial pancreas (AP) continue to progress rapidly, and the AP promises to become a part of clinical care. In this report, members of the JDRF Artificial Pancreas Project Consortium in collaboration with the wider AP community 1) advocate for the use of continuous glucose monitoring glucose metrics as outcome measures in AP trials, in addition to HbA1c, and 2) identify a short set of basic, easily interpreted outcome measures to be reported in AP studies whenever feasible. Consensus on a broader range of measures remains challenging; therefore, reporting of additional metrics is encouraged as appropriate for individual AP studies or study groups. Greater consistency in reporting of basic outcome measures may facilitate the interpretation of study results by investigators, regulatory bodies, health care providers, payers, and patients themselves, thereby accelerating the widespread adoption of AP technology to improve the lives of people with type 1 diabetes.

  12. A consensus statement on the gender perspective in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Isla, D; Majem, M; Viñolas, N; Artal, A; Blasco, A; Felip, E; Garrido, P; Remón, J; Baquedano, M; Borrás, J M; Die Trill, M; García-Campelo, R; Juan, O; León, C; Lianes, P; López-Ríos, F; Molins, L; Planchuelo, M Á; Cobo, M; Paz-Ares, L; Trigo, J M; de Castro, J

    2016-11-24

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer globally and has the highest mortality. Although this disease is not associated with a particular gender, its incidence is rising among women, who are diagnosed at an increasingly younger age compared with men. One of the main reasons for this rise is women taking up smoking. However, many non-smoking women also develop this disease. Other risk factors implicated in the differential development of lung cancer in women are genetic predisposition, tumour histology and molecular profile. Proportionally more women than men with lung cancer have a mutation in the EGFR gene. This consensus statement reviews the available evidence about the epidemiological, biological, diagnostic, therapeutic, social and psychological aspects of lung cancer in women.

  13. Consensus statements on occupational therapy ethics related to driving.

    PubMed

    Slater, Deborah Yarett

    2014-04-01

    As part of an expert panel convened to examine evidence and practice related to diverse aspects of driving evaluation and rehabilitation, consensus statements were developed on ethics. This paper provides context for the ethical obligation of practitioners to assess and make recommendations about the ability of clients to safely perform the activity of driving. It highlights key articles from the literature as well as principles from the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards (2010). The statements support the importance of identifying impairments affecting driving, which could result in harm to the client as well as to the public. The ethical and professional obligation of practitioners to evaluate, make recommendations, and possibly report and/or refer to a driver rehabilitation specialist for further services is reinforced.

  14. Consensus statement for diagnosis of subcortical small vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Anders; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Markus, Hugh S; Montaner, Joan; Wolfson, Leslie; Iadecola, Costantino; Zlokovic, Berislav V; Joutel, Anne; Dichgans, Martin; Duering, Marco; Schmidt, Reinhold; Korczyn, Amos D; Grinberg, Lea T; Chui, Helena C; Hachinski, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) is the diagnostic term used to describe a heterogeneous group of sporadic and hereditary diseases of the large and small blood vessels. Subcortical small vessel disease (SVD) leads to lacunar infarcts and progressive damage to the white matter. Patients with progressive damage to the white matter, referred to as Binswanger’s disease (BD), constitute a spectrum from pure vascular disease to a mixture with neurodegenerative changes. Binswanger’s disease patients are a relatively homogeneous subgroup with hypoxic hypoperfusion, lacunar infarcts, and inflammation that act synergistically to disrupt the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and break down myelin. Identification of this subgroup can be facilitated by multimodal disease markers obtained from clinical, cerebrospinal fluid, neuropsychological, and imaging studies. This consensus statement identifies a potential set of biomarkers based on underlying pathologic changes that could facilitate diagnosis and aid patient selection for future collaborative treatment trials. PMID:26198175

  15. Italian consensus conference for colonic diverticulosis and diverticular disease

    PubMed Central

    Barbara, Giovanni; Pace, Fabio; Annese, Vito; Bassotti, Gabrio; Binda, Gian Andrea; Casetti, Tino; Colecchia, Antonio; Festi, Davide; Fiocca, Roberto; Laghi, Andrea; Maconi, Giovanni; Nascimbeni, Riccardo; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Annibale, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The statements produced by the Consensus Conference on Diverticular Disease promoted by GRIMAD (Gruppo Italiano Malattia Diverticolare, Italian Group on Diverticular Diseases) are reported. Topics such as epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment of diverticular disease (DD) in patients with uncomplicated and complicated DD were reviewed by a scientific board of experts who proposed 55 statements graded according to level of evidence and strength of recommendation, and approved by an independent jury. Each topic was explored focusing on the more relevant clinical questions. Comparison and discussion of expert opinions, pertinent statements and replies to specific questions, were presented and approved based on a systematic literature search of the available evidence. Comments were added explaining the basis for grading the evidence, particularly for controversial areas. PMID:25360320

  16. The Spanish human papillomavirus vaccine consensus group: a working model.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Bordoy, Javier; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2010-08-01

    Successful implementation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in each country can only be achieved from a complementary and synergistic perspective, integrating all the different points of view of the diverse related professionals. It is this context where the Spanish HPV Vaccine Consensus Group (Grupo Español de Consenso sobre la Vacuna VPH, GEC-VPH) was created. GEC-VPH philosophy, objectives and experience are reported in this article, with particular attention to the management of negative publicity and anti-vaccine groups. Initiatives as GEC-VPH--adapted to each country's particular idiosyncrasies--might help to overcome the existing barriers and to achieve wide and early implementation of HPV vaccination.

  17. Statistical mechanics model for the emergence of consensus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffaelli, Giacomo; Marsili, Matteo

    2005-07-01

    The statistical properties of pairwise majority voting over S alternatives are analyzed in an infinite random population. We first compute the probability that the majority is transitive (i.e., that if it prefers A to B to C , then it prefers A to C ) and then study the case of an interacting population. This is described by a constrained multicomponent random field Ising model whose ferromagnetic phase describes the emergence of a strong transitive majority. We derive the phase diagram, which is characterized by a tricritical point and show that, contrary to intuition, it may be more likely for an interacting population to reach consensus on a number S of alternatives when S increases. This effect is due to the constraint imposed by transitivity on voting behavior. Indeed if agents are allowed to express nontransitive votes, the agents’ interaction may decrease considerably the probability of a transitive majority.

  18. International Consensus Document (ICON): Common Variable Immunodeficiency Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bonilla, Francisco A.; Barlan, Isil; Chapel, Helen; Costa-Carvalho, Beatriz T.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; de la Morena, M. Teresa; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco J.; Hammarström, Lennart; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Quinti, Isabella; Routes, John M.; Tang, Mimi L.K.; Warnatz, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The International Collaboration in Asthma, Allergy and Immunology initiated an international coalition among the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology; the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology; the World Allergy Organization; and the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology on common variable immunodeficiency. An author group was formed and then divided into individual committees. Within the committee, teams of authors were subgrouped to generate content for specific sections of the document. Content was derived from literature searches, relevant published guidelines, and clinical experience. After a draft of the document was assembled, it was collectively reviewed and revised by the authors. Where evidence was lacking or conflicting, the information presented represents the consensus expert opinion of the group. The full document was then independently reviewed by 5 international experts in the field, none of whom was among the authors of the original. The comments of these reviewers were incorporated before submission for publication. PMID:26563668

  19. Melanoma: diagnosis, staging, and treatment. Consensus group recommendations.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, Alfonso; Cabañas, Luis; Espinosa, Enrique; Fernández-de-Misa, Ricardo; Martín-Algarra, Salvador; Martínez-Cedres, José Carlos; Ríos-Buceta, Luis; Rodríguez-Peralto, José Luis

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing worldwide. In Spain, its incidence is increasing faster than any other cancer type, with a 5-year survival rate of about 85%. The impact and characteristics of malignant melanoma in the Spanish population can be ascertained from the national melanoma registry of the Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología. This review presents consensus group recommendations for the diagnosis, staging and treatment of malignant melanoma in Spain. Incidence and mortality are discussed, as well as evaluation of various prevention and treatment strategies. Prognostic factors, such as BRAF and C-KIT mutations, which are expected to become routine staging procedures over the next few years, are outlined, especially in relation to treatment options. The use of recently approved targeted agents such as ipilimumab, a cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitor, and vemurafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, in metastatic disease are also discussed.

  20. Consensus Prediction of Charged Single Alpha-Helices with CSAHserver.

    PubMed

    Dudola, Dániel; Tóth, Gábor; Nyitray, László; Gáspári, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    Charged single alpha-helices (CSAHs) constitute a rare structural motif. CSAH is characterized by a high density of regularly alternating residues with positively and negatively charged side chains. Such segments exhibit unique structural properties; however, there are only a handful of proteins where its existence is experimentally verified. Therefore, establishing a pipeline that is capable of predicting the presence of CSAH segments with a low false positive rate is of considerable importance. Here we describe a consensus-based approach that relies on two conceptually different CSAH detection methods and a final filter based on the estimated helix-forming capabilities of the segments. This pipeline was shown to be capable of identifying previously uncharacterized CSAH segments that could be verified experimentally. The method is available as a web server at http://csahserver.itk.ppke.hu and also a downloadable standalone program suitable to scan larger sequence collections.

  1. Surgical research in Canada: synopsis of a consensus conference

    PubMed Central

    Warnock, Garth L.; Tator, Charles H.

    1998-01-01

    Canadian surgical research requires careful nurturing if it is to flourish in tomorrow’s environment. A consensus conference organized by the Research Development Committee of the Canadian Association of Surgical Chairs has addressed a number of issues to promote Canadian surgical research. This synopsis is a summary of the proceedings of that conference. It reflects on the meaning of surgical science, elements of establishing a successful research program, leadership in surgical science, identification of talented trainees, and the means to make the most of opportunities for funding. The information contained in the synopsis should not only assist departments of surgery and surgical specialty societies but should challenge them to set goals and innovative approaches to plan for strong surgical research in a changing environment. PMID:9711162

  2. The Hartford Consensus IV: A Call for Increased National Resilience.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Lenworth M

    2016-04-01

    Despite advances in the response to active shooter and intentional mass casualty events, a gap remains in our national preparedness and resilience. Drawing from experiences at myriad mass casualty events, the immediate responder (volunteer responder) represents an underutilized resource, yet one capable of dramatically increasing our all-hazards (injuries from all natural and man-made causes) national resilience. The overarching principle of the Hartford Consensus, outlined in previous reports, is that no one should die from uncontrolled bleeding. We have championed the following acronym to summarize what we have determined are appropriate steps to ensure that the maximum number of victims of these tragic events can be saved: THREAT: Threat suppression. Hemorrhage control. Rapid Extrication to safety. Assessment by medical providers. Transport to definitive care.

  3. Decentralized energy planning and consensus in energy policy

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbanks, T. J.

    1980-05-02

    This paper explores the following three propositions and their relationships: (1) that, in our pluralistic policymaking environment, we cannot solve our nation's energy problems unless we can reach agreement among a diverse group of interested parties about specific actions; (2) that, short of a manifest emergency, such a consensus is difficult to reach unless the scale of the decision-making unit is relatively small; and therefore (3) that one of the keys to an effective energy policy in the United states is to rely heavily on local and regional energy planning and decision-making. First, the paper reviews our problem of irresolution and its roots, and it summaries the policy options for resolving it. Then it explores one of those options, decentralized planning, in a little more detail. Finally, it offers some speculations about the viability of a decentralized approach to energy planninng.

  4. Therapeutic monitoring of clozapine in Australia: the need for consensus.

    PubMed

    Oo, Thein Z; Wilson, John F; Naidoo, Divania; Chetty, Manoranjenni

    2006-10-01

    In the absence of well-defined guidelines for the monitoring of plasma concentrations of clozapine, this study examined the practices of seven laboratories from four states in Australia. Laboratories analyzed 5 freeze-dried serum samples containing a mixture of clozapine and norclozapine in varying concentrations and the measurement data were analyzed for accuracy and precision. Additional information on laboratory practices was obtained through questionnaire responses. Measurement precision amongst the laboratories was good but there were significant differences in the accuracy of measurements from one laboratory. There were differences in the ranges for which assays had been validated and in suggested therapeutic ranges. These differences could have a significant impact on the interpretation of measured concentrations and patient care, and emphasize the need for consensus in this area. Repeat concentration measurements are recommended in the case of drug concentration measurements that are inconsistent with clinical observations or previous measurements.

  5. [Kawasaki disease: interdisciplinary and intersocieties consensus (clinical guidelines). Brief version].

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute self-limiting systemic vasculitis. It is the most common cause of acquired heart disease, with the risk of developing coronary artery aneurysms, myocardial infarction and sudden death. Diagnosis is based on the presence of fever in addition to other clinical criteria. The quarter of the Kawasaki disease patients have "incomplete" presentation. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin within ten days of fever onset improves clinical outcomes and reduces the incidence of coronary artery dilation to less than 5%. Non-responders to standard therapy have shown a successful response with the use of corticosteroids and/or biological agents. The long-term management must be delineated according to the degree of coronary involvement in a multidisciplinary manner. To facilitate the pediatrician's diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of Kawasaki disease, a group of experts from the Argentine Society of Pediatrics and the Argentine Society of Cardiology carried out a consensus to develop practical clinical guidelines.

  6. Consensus Paper: Language and the Cerebellum: an Ongoing Enigma

    PubMed Central

    Mariën, Peter; Ackermann, Herman; Adamaszek, Michael; Barwood, Caroline H. S.; Beaton, Alan; Desmond, John; De Witte, Elke; Fawcett, Angela J.; Hertrich, Ingo; Küper, Michael; Leggio, Maria; Marvel, Cherie; Molinari, Marco; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Nicolson, Roderick I.; Schmahmann, Jeremy D.; Stoodley, Catherine J.; Thürling, Markus; Timmann, Dagmar; Wouters, Ellen; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    In less than three decades, the concept “cerebellar neurocognition” has evolved from a mere afterthought to an entirely new and multifaceted area of neuroscientific research. A close interplay between three main strands of contemporary neuroscience induced a substantial modification of the traditional view of the cerebellum as a mere coordinator of autonomic and somatic motor functions. Indeed, the wealth of current evidence derived from detailed neuroanatomical investigations, functional neuroimaging studies with healthy subjects and patients and in-depth neuropsychological assessment of patients with cerebellar disorders shows that the cerebellum has a cardinal role to play in affective regulation, cognitive processing, and linguistic function. Although considerable progress has been made in models of cerebellar function, controversy remains regarding the exact role of the “linguistic cerebellum” in a broad variety of nonmotor language processes. This consensus paper brings together a range of different viewpoints and opinions regarding the contribution of the cerebellum to language function. Recent developments and insights in the nonmotor modulatory role of the cerebellum in language and some related disorders will be discussed. The role of the cerebellum in speech and language perception, in motor speech planning including apraxia of speech, in verbal working memory, in phonological and semantic verbal fluency, in syntax processing, in the dynamics of language production, in reading and in writing will be addressed. In addition, the functional topography of the linguistic cerebellum and the contribution of the deep nuclei to linguistic function will be briefly discussed. As such, a framework for debate and discussion will be offered in this consensus paper. PMID:24318484

  7. Recommendations for intra-abdominal infections consensus report

    PubMed Central

    Avkan-Oğuz, Vildan; Baykam, Nurcan; Sökmen, Selman; Güner, Rahmet; Agalar, Fatih; Alp, Emine; Doğrul, Ahmet; Turhan, Özge; Ağalar, Canan; Kurtaran, Behice; Geçim, İbrahim Ethem; Özaras, Reşat; Yılmaz, Gürdal; Akbulut, Ayhan; Koksal, İftihar

    2016-01-01

    Guidelines include the recommendations of experts from various specialties within a topic in consideration of data specific to each country. However, to date there has not been a guideline standardizing the nomenclature and offering recommendations for intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) in Turkey. This is mainly due to the paucity of laboratory studies regarding the clinical diagnosis and treatment of IAIs or the sensitivity of microorganisms isolated from patients with IAIs. However, due to the diversification of host characteristics and advancements in technological treatment methods, it has become imperative to ‘speak a common language’. For this purpose May 2015, a group of 15 experts in intra-abdominal infections, under the leadership of the Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Specialty Society of Turkey (EKMUD) and with representatives from the Turkish Surgical Association, Turkish Society of Colon and Rectal Surgery, Hernia Society, Turkish Society of Hepato-pancreato-biliary Surgery, and the Turkish Society of Hospital Infections and Control, was formed to analyze relevant studies in the literature. Ultimately, the suggestions for adults found in this consensus report were developed using available data from Turkey, referring predominantly to the 2010 guidelines for diagnosing and managing complicated IAIs in adults and children by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the Surgical Infection Society. The recommendations are presented in two sections, from the initial diagnostic evaluation of patients to the treatment approach for IAI. This Consensus Report was presented at the EKMUD 2016 Congress in Antalya and was subsequently opened for suggestions on the official websites of the Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology Specialty Society of Turkey and Turkish Surgical Association for one month. The manuscript was revised according to the feedback received. PMID:28149134

  8. Seeking consensus for cyberinfrastructure governance in the USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. Lee; Zanzkerkia, Eva

    2014-05-01

    Governance of geosciences cyberinfrastructure is a complex and essential undertaking, critical in enabling distributed knowledge communities to collaborate and communicate across disciplines, distances, and cultures. Advancing science with respect to "grand challenges," such as global change, Earth system observation, modeling, and prediction, and core fundamental science, depends not just on technical cyber systems, but also on social systems for strategic planning, decision-making, project management, learning, teaching, and building a community of practice. Simply put, a robust, agile technical system depends on an equally robust and adaptable social system. Cyberinfrastructure development is wrapped in social, organizational and governance challenges which may significantly impede technical progress and result in inefficiencies, duplication of effort, incompatibilities, wasted resources or user frustration. These issues are also the most time consuming to resolve due to significant institutional and social inertia: hence the urgency for developing a governance blueprint. An agile development process is underway for governance of transformative investments in geosciences cyberinfrastructure through the US National Science Foundation's EarthCube Program. Agile development is iterative and incremental, and promotes adaptive planning and rapid and flexible response. Such iterative deployment across a variety of EarthCube stakeholders encourages transparency, consensus, accountability, and inclusiveness. A broad coalition of stakeholder groups comprises an Assembly to serve as a preliminary venue for identifying, evaluating, and testing potential governance models. To offer opportunity for ensure broader end-user input and buy-in, a crowd-source approach engages stakeholders not involved otherwise in the Assembly. Developmental evaluators from the social sciences embedded in the project will provide real-time review and adjustments. In order to ensure an open and

  9. Toward a consensus on radiobiology teaching to radiation oncology residents.

    PubMed

    Dynlacht, Joseph R; Dewhirst, Mark W; Hall, Eric J; Rosenstein, Barry S; Zeman, Elaine M

    2002-05-01

    There are approximately 82 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States, which provide training opportunities for about 400 residents. All accredited radiation oncology residency programs must have at least one basic scientist on the faculty, and it is these individuals who often assume, wholly or in part, the responsibility of teaching radiation and cancer biology to radiation oncology residents in preparation for the American College of Radiology (ACR) In-Training Examination in Radiation Oncology and the American Board of Radiology (ABR) written examinations. In response to a perceived lack of uniformity in radiation and cancer biology curricula currently being taught to residents and a perceived lack of guidance for instructors in formulating course content for this population, a special session was presented at the Forty-eighth Annual Radiation Research Society meeting on April 23, 2001. The session, entitled "Toward a Consensus on Radiobiology Teaching to Radiation Oncology Residents", was focused on issues related to teaching radiobiology to radiation oncology residents and targeted for individuals who actively teach radiation and cancer biology as well as coordinators of residency training programs. The speakers addressed current challenges and future problems facing instructors and programs. Among these were lack of feedback on resident performance on ABR and ACR written examinations and on course content, uncertainty about what topics residents must know to pass the ABR examination, and, in the near future, a reduction (due to retirement) of instructors qualified to teach radiobiology. This article provides a synopsis of the information that was presented during that session, offers a glimpse into how the ABR and ACR examinations are prepared and details of the content of past and future examinations, and summarizes the activities of the Joint Working Group on Radiobiology Teaching which was formed to educate instructors, to establish a

  10. Consensus on guidelines for stereotactic neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nuttin, Bart; Wu, Hemmings; Mayberg, Helen; Hariz, Marwan; Gabriëls, Loes; Galert, Thorsten; Merkel, Reinhard; Kubu, Cynthia; Vilela-Filho, Osvaldo; Matthews, Keith; Taira, Takaomi; Lozano, Andres M; Schechtmann, Gastón; Doshi, Paresh; Broggi, Giovanni; Régis, Jean; Alkhani, Ahmed; Sun, Bomin; Eljamel, Sam; Schulder, Michael; Kaplitt, Michael; Eskandar, Emad; Rezai, Ali; Krauss, Joachim K; Hilven, Paulien; Schuurman, Rick; Ruiz, Pedro; Chang, Jin Woo; Cosyns, Paul; Lipsman, Nir; Voges, Juergen; Cosgrove, Rees; Li, Yongjie; Schlaepfer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background For patients with psychiatric illnesses remaining refractory to ‘standard’ therapies, neurosurgical procedures may be considered. Guidelines for safe and ethical conduct of such procedures have previously and independently been proposed by various local and regional expert groups. Methods To expand on these earlier documents, representative members of continental and international psychiatric and neurosurgical societies, joined efforts to further elaborate and adopt a pragmatic worldwide set of guidelines. These are intended to address a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders, brain targets and neurosurgical techniques, taking into account cultural and social heterogeneities of healthcare environments. Findings The proposed consensus document highlights that, while stereotactic ablative procedures such as cingulotomy and capsulotomy for depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder are considered ‘established’ in some countries, they still lack level I evidence. Further, it is noted that deep brain stimulation in any brain target hitherto tried, and for any psychiatric or behavioural disorder, still remains at an investigational stage. Researchers are encouraged to design randomised controlled trials, based on scientific and data-driven rationales for disease and brain target selection. Experienced multidisciplinary teams are a mandatory requirement for the safe and ethical conduct of any psychiatric neurosurgery, ensuring documented refractoriness of patients, proper consent procedures that respect patient's capacity and autonomy, multifaceted preoperative as well as postoperative long-term follow-up evaluation, and reporting of effects and side effects for all patients. Interpretation This consensus document on ethical and scientific conduct of psychiatric surgery worldwide is designed to enhance patient safety. PMID:24444853

  11. Towards a consensus on diagnostic criteria, measurement and trial design of the premenstrual disorders: the ISPMD Montreal consensus

    PubMed Central

    Bäckström, Torbjorn; Brown, Candace; Dennerstein, Lorraine; Endicott, Jean; Epperson, C. Neill; Eriksson, Elias; Freeman, Ellen; Halbreich, Uriel; Ismail, Khaled M. K.; Panay, Nicholas; Pearlstein, Teri; Rapkin, Andrea; Reid, Robert; Schmidt, Peter; Steiner, Meir; Studd, John; Yonkers, Kimberley

    2014-01-01

    Premenstrual disorders (PMD) are characterised by a cluster of somatic and psychological symptoms of varying severity that occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and resolve during menses (Freeman and Sondheimer, Prim Care Companion J Clin Psychiatry 5:30–39, 2003; Halbreich, Gynecol Endocrinol 19:320–334, 2004). Although PMD have been widely recognised for many decades, their precise cause is still unknown and there are no definitive, universally accepted diagnostic criteria. To consider this issue, an international multidisciplinary group of experts met at a face-to-face consensus meeting to review current definitions and diagnostic criteria for PMD. This was followed by extensive correspondence. The consensus group formally became established as the International Society for Premenstrual Disorders (ISPMD). The inaugural meeting of the ISPMD was held in Montreal in September 2008. The primary aim was to provide a unified approach for the diagnostic criteria of PMD, their quantification and guidelines on clinical trial design. This report summarises their recommendations. It is hoped that the criteria proposed here will inform discussions of the next edition of the World Health Organisation's International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), and the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-V) criteria that are currently under consideration. It is also hoped that the proposed definitions and guidelines could be used by all clinicians and investigators to provide a consistent approach to the diagnosis and treatment of PMD and to aid scientific and clinical research in this field. PMID:21225438

  12. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart L of... - National Consensus Standards

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false National Consensus Standards B Appendix B to Subpart L of..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Fire Protection Pt. 1910, Subpt. L, App. B Appendix B to Subpart L of Part 1910—National Consensus Standards The following table contains a...

  13. Colorectal cancer: consensus for CRC screening, but who addresses the controversies?

    PubMed

    Hoff, Geir

    2014-06-01

    In an update on recommendations for colorectal cancer screening, an Asia–Pacific consensus group has set a good standard for presenting level of agreement to recommendation levels. However, this update also exposes how consensus groups might concentrate on the less controversial issues—leaving the tricky questions in the dark.

  14. A Toolkit for Democratizing Science and Technology Policy: The Practical Mechanics of Organizing a Consensus Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Daniel Lee; Powell, Maria; Grice, Joshua; Adrian, Judith; Lobes, Carol

    2007-01-01

    A widely touted approach to involving laypeople in science and technology policy-related decisions is the consensus conference. Virtually nothing written on the topic provides detailed discussion of the many steps from citizen recruitment to citizen report. Little attention is paid to how and why the mechanics of the consensus conference process…

  15. Review of Consensus Standard Spectra for Flat Plate and Concentrating Photovoltaic Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.

    2011-09-01

    Consensus standard reference terrestrial solar spectra are used to establish nameplate ratings for photovoltaic device performance at standard reporting conditions. This report describes reference solar spectra developed in the United States and international consensus standards community which are widely accepted as of this writing (June 2011).

  16. The Status of Learning Disabilities in the States: Consensus or Controversy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNutt, Gaye

    1986-01-01

    To determine the degree of controversy or consensus regarding definitions at the state level, questionnaires focusing on six learning disability topics were sent to each state education agency (SEA) and the District of Columbia. In general, more consensus than controversy exists when broad areas are considered. Changes in some SEA definitions…

  17. Genome-wide conserved consensus transcription factor binding motifs are hyper-methylated

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background DNA methylation can regulate gene expression by modulating the interaction between DNA and proteins or protein complexes. Conserved consensus motifs exist across the human genome ("predicted transcription factor binding sites": "predicted TFBS") but the large majority of these are proven by chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) not to be biological transcription factor binding sites ("empirical TFBS"). We hypothesize that DNA methylation at conserved consensus motifs prevents promiscuous or disorderly transcription factor binding. Results Using genome-wide methylation maps of the human heart and sperm, we found that all conserved consensus motifs as well as the subset of those that reside outside CpG islands have an aggregate profile of hyper-methylation. In contrast, empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs have a profile of hypo-methylation. 40% of empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs resided in CpG islands whereas only 7% of all conserved consensus motifs were in CpG islands. Finally we further identified a minority subset of TF whose profiles are either hypo-methylated or neutral at their respective conserved consensus motifs implicating that these TF may be responsible for establishing or maintaining an un-methylated DNA state, or whose binding is not regulated by DNA methylation. Conclusions Our analysis supports the hypothesis that at least for a subset of TF, empirical binding to conserved consensus motifs genome-wide may be controlled by DNA methylation. PMID:20875111

  18. Consensus Statement on Indications and Contraindications for Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berend, Keith R; Berend, Michael E; Dalury, David F; Argenson, Jean-Noel; Dodd, Chris A; Scott, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Previous work, now nearly 30 years dated, is frequently cited as the "gold standard" for the indications and contraindications for medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). The purpose of this article is to review current literature on the indications and contraindications to UKA and develop a consensus statement based on those data. Six surgeons with a combined experience of performing more than 8,000 partial knee arthroplasties were surveyed. Surgeons then participated in a discussion, emerging proposal, collaborative modification, and final consensus phase. The final consensus on primary indications and contraindications is presented. Notably, the authors provide consensus on previous contraindications, which are no longer considered to be contraindications. The authors provide an updated and concise review of the current indications and contraindications for medial UKA using scientifically based consensus-building methodology.

  19. Scaled cluster consensus of discrete-time multi-agent systems with general directed topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Bo; Sun, Fuchun; Li, Hongbo; Chen, Yao; Liu, Guangbin

    2016-12-01

    This note proposes a notion of scaled cluster consensus, wherein the final consensus states within different clusters converge to prescribed ratios. Unlike most results in existing literature on cluster consensus, no constraints are imposed on the system topologies under the designed protocol, i.e. the agents are not required to possess any cluster affiliation information of others. For the delay-free case, an explicit scaled cluster consensus function is provided by exploring the characteristics of stochastic matrices. Diverse input delays and asymmetric communication delays are both considered, and sufficient condition for scaled cluster consensus is derived based on frequency domain analysis. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the presented results.

  20. Leader-Following Consensus for Linear and Lipschitz Nonlinear Multiagent Systems With Quantized Communication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Lin; Hao, Fei; Wang, Long

    2016-06-21

    This paper studies the leader-following consensus problem for linear and Lipschitz nonlinear multiagent systems where the communication topology has a directed spanning tree with the leader as the root. Due to the constraints of communication bandwidth and storage space, agents can only receive uniform quantized information. We first consider the leader-following consensus problem for linear multiagent systems via quantized control. Then, in order to reduce the communication load, an event-triggered control strategy is investigated to solve the consensus problem for linear multiagent systems with uniform quantization. It is shown that leader-following practical consensus can be achieved and no Zeno behavior occurs in this case. Furthermore, the proposed control strategies are extended to investigate the leader-following consensus problem for multiagent systems with Lipschitz nonlinear dynamics. Simulation results are given to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the theoretical analysis.

  1. [Consensus on nursing diagnoses, interventions and outcomes for home care of patients with heart failure].

    PubMed

    Azzolin, Karina; de Souza, Emiliane Nogueira; Ruschel, Karen Brasil; Mussi, Cláudia Motta; de Lucena, Amália Fátima; Rabelo, Eneida Rejane

    2012-12-01

    This was a consensus study with six cardiology nurses with the objective of selecting nursing diagnoses, outcomes and interventions described by NANDA International (NANDA-I), Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC), Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC), for home care of patients with heart failure (HF). Eight nursing diagnoses (NDs) were pre-selected and a consensus was achieved in three stages, during which interventions/activities and outcomes/indicators of each NDs were validated and those considered valid obtained 70% to 100% consensus. From the eight pre-selected NDs, two were excluded due to the lack of consensus on appropriate interventions for the clinical home care scenario. Eleven interventions were selected from a total of 96 pre-selected ones and seven outcomes were validated out of 71. The practice of consensus among expert nurses provides assistance to the qualifications of the care process and deepens the knowledge about the use of tazonomies in nursing clinical practice.

  2. Multidisciplinary consensus on the therapeutic recommendations for iatrogenic hyperprolactinemia secondary to antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Montejo, Ángel L; Arango, Celso; Bernardo, Miquel; Carrasco, José L; Crespo-Facorro, Benidicto; Cruz, Juan J; Del Pino-Montes, Javier; García-Escudero, Miguel A; García-Rizo, Clemente; González-Pinto, Ana; Hernández, Ana I; Martín-Carrasco, Manuel; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermín; Mayoral-van Son, Jaqueline; Mories, M Teresa; Pachiarotti, Isabella; Pérez, Jesús; Ros, Salvador; Vieta, Eduard

    2017-04-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is an underappreciated/unknown adverse effects of antipsychotics. The consequences of hyperprolactinemia compromise therapeutic adherence and can be serious. We present the consensus recommendations made by a group of experts regarding the management of antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. The current consensus was developed in 3 phases: 1, review of the scientific literature; 2, subsequent round table discussion to attempt to reach a consensus among the experts; and 3, review by all of the authors of the final conclusions until reaching a complete consensus. We include recommendations on the appropriate time to act after hyperprolactinemia detection and discuss the evidence on available options: decreasing the dose of the antipsychotic drug, switching antipsychotics, adding aripiprazole, adding dopaminergic agonists, and other type of treatment. The consensus also included recommendations for some specific populations such as patients with a first psychotic episode and the pediatric-youth population, bipolar disorder, personality disorders and the elderly population.

  3. An observer-based consensus tracking control and application to event-triggered tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jiangping; Geng, Ji; Zhu, Hong

    2015-02-01

    Leader-follower mechanism provides an important framework for multi-agent consensus problems. In this paper, a consensus tracking problem is investigated for a second-order multi-agent system with a self-active leader. The input (acceleration) to the leader is assumed to be time-varying and unavailable to followers. An observer-based consensus tracking control is designed on the basis of a novel distributed velocity estimation technique. The ultimate boundedness and the stability of the tracking error system are analyzed by virtue of an Input-State-Stability (ISS) Lyapunov function approach. Then, the dynamic consensus tracking control is applied to solve an event-triggered tracking problem. Finally, some numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed consensus tracking control.

  4. Consensus analysis of switching multi-agent systems with fixed topology and time-delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yongquan; Sun, Jitao

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates the average consensus problems of the discrete-time Markov switching linear multi-agent systems (LMAS) with fixed topology and time-delay. Firstly, we introduce a concept of the average consensus to adapt the stochastic systems. Secondly, a time-delay switching consensus protocol is proposed. By developing a new signal mode, the switching signal of the systems and the time-delay signal of the controller can be merged into one signal. Thirdly, by Lyapunov technique, two LMIs criteria of average consensus are provided, and they reveal that the consensus of the multi-agent systems relates to the spectral radius of the Laplacian matrix. Furthermore, by our results and CCL-type algorithms, we can get the gain matrices. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the efficiency of our results.

  5. Allowable delay bound for consensus of linear multi-agent systems with communication delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ya; Tian, Yu-Ping

    2014-10-01

    This paper studies the consensus of a group of linear dynamic agents with a uniform communication delay and focuses on searching an allowable delay bound. As long as the delay is less than this bound, there exist linear feedback consensus protocols driving the multi-agent system to achieve consensus. Both fixed and switching topology cases are investigated. In both cases, the consensus problem is converted to the robust stability problem of corresponding uncertain state-delayed systems. By using Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional analysis, consensus conditions which contain the feedback gain conditions and delay conditions are proposed for systems over fixed and switching topologies, respectively. Furthermore, allowable delay bounds are obtained for both systems by solving the optimal robust stabilisation problems. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the results.

  6. Mutations in the mariner transposase: The D,D(35)E consensus sequence is nonfunctional

    PubMed Central

    Lohe, Allan R.; De Aguiar, Daniel; Hartl, Daniel L.

    1997-01-01

    Genetic analysis of eukaryote transposases and comparison with their prokaryote counterparts have been greatly hindered by difficulty in isolating mutations. We describe a simple eye-color screen that facilitates isolation and analysis of mutations in the mariner transposase in Drosophila melanogaster. Use of ethyl methanesulfonate and site-directed mutagenesis has identified 18 residues that are critical for in vivo excision of a target mariner element. When the mutations were examined in heterozygous mutant/nonmutant genotypes, more than half of the mutant transposase proteins were found to reduce the activity of the wild-type transposase, as assayed by the frequency of germline excision of a target element. Remarkably, transposase function is obliterated when the D,D(34)D acidic, ion-binding domain is replaced with the consensus sequence D,D(34)E found in the nematode Tc1 transposase and in many other transposases in the superfamily. A number of mutations strongly complement wild-type transposase in a dominant-negative manner, suggestive of subunit interactions in the excision reaction; these mutations are located in a small region that includes part of the D,D(34)D motif. Transposase function also is eliminated by a mutation in the inferred initiation codon and by a mutation in a putative nuclear localization signal. PMID:9037046

  7. Evidence-based consensus on the diagnosis, prevention and management of hepatitis C virus disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Mahrukh Akbar; Idrees, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a potent human pathogen and is one of the main causes of chronic hepatitis round the world. The present review describes the evidence-based consensus on the diagnosis, prevention and management of HCV disease. Various techniques, for the detection of anti-HCV immunoglobulin G immunoassays, detection of HCV RNA by identifying virus-specific molecules nucleic acid testings, recognition of core antigen for diagnosis of HCV, quantitative antigen assay, have been used to detect HCV RNA and core antigen. Advanced technologies such as nanoparticle-based diagnostic assays, loop-mediated isothermal amplification and aptamers and Ortho trak-C assay have also come to the front that provides best detection results with greater ease and specificity for detection of HCV. It is of immense importance to prevent this infection especially among the sexual partners, injecting drug users, mother-to-infant transmission of HCV, household contact, healthcare workers and people who get tattoos and piercing on their skin. Management of this infection is intended to eradicate it out of the body of patients. Management includes examining the treatment (efficacy and protection), assessment of hepatic condition before commencing therapy, controlling the parameters upon which dual and triple therapies work, monitoring the body after treatment and adjusting the co-factors. Examining the treatment in some special groups of people (HIV/HCV co-infected, hemodialysis patients, renal transplanted patients). PMID:25848486

  8. Consensus document for the use of the Polypill in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    González-Juanatey, José Ramón; Mostaza, José María; Lobos, José María; Abarca, Benjamín; Llisterri, José Luis; Baron-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Galve, Enrique; Lidón, Rosa María; Garcia-Moll, Francisco Xavier; Sánchez, Pedro Luis; Suárez, Carmen; Millán, Jesús; Pallares, Vicente; Alemán, José Juan; Egocheaga, Isabel

    2017-02-09

    Cardiovascular disease is a chronic disorder which is usually already at an advanced stage when the first symptoms develop. The fact that the initial clinical presentation can be lethal or highly incapacitating emphasizes the need for primary and secondary prevention. It is estimated that the ratio of patients with good adherence to secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease is low and also decreases gradually over time. The Polypill for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease is the first fixed-dose combination therapy of salicylic acid, atorvastatin and ramipril approved in Spain. The purpose of this consensus document was to define and recommend, through the evidence available in the literature and clinical expert opinion, the impact of treatment adherence in the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and the use of the Polypill in daily clinical practice as part of a global strategy including adjustments in patient lifestyle. A RAND/UCLA methodology based on scientific evidence, as well as the collective judgment and clinical expertise of an expert panel was used for this assessment. As a result, a final report of recommendations on the impact of the lack of adherence to treatment of secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and the effect of using a Polypill in adherence of patients was produced. The recommendations included in this document have been addressed to all those specialists, cardiologists, internists and primary care physicians with competence in prescribing and monitoring patients with high and very high cardiovascular risks.

  9. Constrained dynamics approach for motion synchronization and consensus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Divya

    In this research we propose to develop constrained dynamical systems based stable attitude synchronization, consensus and tracking (SCT) control laws for the formation of rigid bodies. The generalized constrained dynamics Equations of Motion (EOM) are developed utilizing constraint potential energy functions that enforce communication constraints. Euler-Lagrange equations are employed to develop the non-linear constrained dynamics of multiple vehicle systems. The constraint potential energy is synthesized based on a graph theoretic formulation of the vehicle-vehicle communication. Constraint stabilization is achieved via Baumgarte's method. The performance of these constrained dynamics based formations is evaluated for bounded control authority. The above method has been applied to various cases and the results have been obtained using MATLAB simulations showing stability, synchronization, consensus and tracking of formations. The first case corresponds to an N-pendulum formation without external disturbances, in which the springs and the dampers connected between the pendulums act as the communication constraints. The damper helps in stabilizing the system by damping the motion whereas the spring acts as a communication link relaying relative position information between two connected pendulums. Lyapunov stabilization (energy based stabilization) technique is employed to depict the attitude stabilization and boundedness. Various scenarios involving different values of springs and dampers are simulated and studied. Motivated by the first case study, we study the formation of N 2-link robotic manipulators. The governing EOM for this system is derived using Euler-Lagrange equations. A generalized set of communication constraints are developed for this system using graph theory. The constraints are stabilized using Baumgarte's techniques. The attitude SCT is established for this system and the results are shown for the special case of three 2-link robotic manipulators

  10. The Importance of Consensus Information in Acceptance of Climate Change (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J.; Lewandowsky, S.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, public perception of the scientific consensus on human-caused global warming has been disturbingly low, in contrast to the overwhelming level of agreement among climate scientists and in peer-reviewed research. The misperception is partly cultural, with a significant link between perceived consensus and political ideology, and partly informational with all cultural groups exhibiting the misperception to varying degrees. This universal 'consensus gap' is in large part due to a persistent and focused misinformation campaign casting doubt on the consensus, dating back as early as the 1980s. Opponents of climate action have long recognized that perception of scientific consensus is linked to support for climate policy, a link only acknowledged by social scientists in the last few years. How do we counter the all-too-effective misinformation campaign? Psychological research tells us that a crucial aspect of effective refutations is an alternative narrative. In this case, an important counter-narrative to the consensus story is the strategy to perpetuate the impression of ongoing scientific debate. I will also present recent research into the effect that consensus information has on climate beliefs of Australians and Americans. For both groups, the consensus message significantly increased beliefs about human-caused global warming and outperformed interventions that feature evidence or scientists' expertise. For the Australian sample, consensus information partially neutralised the biasing influence of ideology. However, for Americans, a backfire effect (reduced climate belief) was observed for a small minority holding strong conservative views. A psychological model employing Bayesian Networks indicates that a key element to the backfire effect is conspiratorial thinking, consistent with other research finding a link between rejection of climate science and conspiratorial ideation. Thus when presented to a general audience, consensus information has an

  11. Building Consensus on Community Standards for Reproducible Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Nielsen, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    As geochemists, the traditional model by which standard methods for generating, presenting, and using data have been generated relied on input from the community, the results of seminal studies, a variety of authoritative bodies, and has required a great deal of time. The rate of technological and related policy change has accelerated to the point that this historical model does not satisfy the needs of the community, publishers, or funders. The development of a new mechanism for building consensus raises a number of questions: Which aspects of our data are the focus of reproducibility standards? Who sets the standards? How do we subdivide the development of the consensus? We propose an open, transparent, and inclusive approach to the development of data and reproducibility standards that is organized around specific sub-disciplines and driven by the community of practitioners in those sub-disciplines. It should involve editors, program managers, and representatives of domain data facilities as well as professional societies, but avoid any single group to be the final authority. A successful example of this model is the Editors Roundtable, a cross section of editors, funders, and data facility managers that discussed and agreed on leading practices for the reporting of geochemical data in publications, including accessibility and format of the data, data quality information, and metadata and identifiers for samples (Goldstein et al., 2014). We argue that development of data and reproducibility standards needs to heavily rely on representatives from the community of practitioners to set priorities and provide perspective. Groups of editors, practicing scientists, and other stakeholders would be assigned the task of reviewing existing practices and recommending changes as deemed necessary. They would weigh the costs and benefits of changing the standards for that community, propose appropriate tools to facilitate those changes, work through the professional societies

  12. Establishing Consensus Turbulence Statistics for Hot Subsonic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James; Werner, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    velocimetry (LDV) data published in the open literature. Compare different datasets acquired at roughly the same flow conditions to establish uncertainties. Create a consensus dataset for a range of hot jet flows, including uncertainty bands. Analyze this consensus dataset for self-consistency and compare jet characteristics to those of the open literature. One final objective fulfilled by this work was the demonstration of a universal scaling for the jet flow fields, at least within the region of interest to aeroacoustics. The potential core length and the spread rate of the half-velocity radius were used to collapse of the mean and turbulent velocity fields over the first 20 jet diameters in a highly satisfying manner.

  13. Partial molecular cloning of the JHK retrovirus using gammaretrovirus consensus PCR primers

    PubMed Central

    Halligan, Brian D; Sun, Hai-Yuan; Kushnaryov, Vladimir M; Grossberg, Sidney E

    2013-01-01

    The JHK virus (JHKV) was previously described as a type C retrovirus that has some distinctive ultrastructural features and replicates constitutively in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell line, JHK-3. In order to facilitate the cloning of sequences from JHKV, a series of partially degenerate consensus retroviral PCR primers were created by a data-driven design approach based on an alignment of 14 diverse gammaretroviral genomes. These primers were used in the PCR amplification of purified JHK virion cDNA, and ana lysis of the resulting amplified sequence indicates that the JHKV is in the murine leukemia virus (MLV) family. The JHK sequence is nearly identical to the corresponding region of the Bxv-1 endogenous mouse retrovirus (GenBank accession AC115959) and distinct from XMRV. JHKV gag-specific amplification was demonstrated with nucleic acids from uncultivated, frozen, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of the index patient, but not in PBMCs from nine healthy blood donors. Unlike earlier reports, in which MLV-like sequences were identified in human source material, which may have been due to murine contamination, budding retrovirions were demonstrated repeatedly by electron microscopy in uncultivated lymphocytes of the index patient that were morphologically identical in their development to the virions in the JHK-3 cells, and immunological evidence was obtained that the index patient produced IgG antibodies that bound to the budding viral particles in patient PBMCs and in the JHK-3 cells. These data indicate that the patient had been infected by JHKV, lending significance to the demonstration of JHKV amplicons in nucleic acids of the patient’s PBMCs. In future studies, the PCR primer sets described herein may expand the detection of an amplifiable subset of viruses related to MLV. PMID:24159361

  14. The consensus motif for N-myristoylation of plant proteins in a wheat germ cell-free translation system.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Seiji; Fusada, Naoki; Hayashi, Hidenori; Utsumi, Toshihiko; Uozumi, Nobuyuki; Endo, Yaeta; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2010-09-01

    Protein N-myristoylation plays key roles in various cellular functions in eukaryotic organisms. To clarify the relationship between the efficiency of protein N-myristoylation and the amino acid sequence of the substrate in plants, we have applied a wheat germ cell-free translation system with high protein productivity to examine the N-myristoylation of various wild-type and mutant forms of Arabidopsis thaliana proteins. Evaluation of the relationship between removal of the initiating Met and subsequent N-myristoylation revealed that constructs containing Pro at position 3 do not undergo N-myristoylation, primarily because of an inhibitory effect of this amino acid on elimination of the initiating Met by methionyl aminopeptidase. Our analysis of the consensus sequence for N-myristoylation in plants focused on the variability of amino acids at positions 3, 6 and 7 of the motif. We found that not only Ser at position 6 but also Lys at position 7 affects the selectivity for the amino acid at position 3. The results of our analyses allowed us to identify several A. thaliana proteins as substrates for N-myristoylation that had previously been predicted not to be candidates for such modification with a prediction program. We have thus shown that a wheat germ cell-free system is a useful tool for plant N-myristoylome analysis. This in vitro approach will facilitate comprehensive determination of N-myristoylated proteins in plants.

  15. The climate change consensus extends beyond climate scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlton, J. S.; Perry-Hill, Rebecca; Huber, Matthew; Prokopy, Linda S.

    2015-09-01

    The existence of anthropogenic climate change remains a public controversy despite the consensus among climate scientists. The controversy may be fed by the existence of scientists from other disciplines publicly casting doubt on the validity of climate science. The extent to which non-climate scientists are skeptical of climate science has not been studied via direct survey. Here we report on a survey of biophysical scientists across disciplines at universities in the Big 10 Conference. Most respondents (93.6%) believe that mean temperatures have risen and most (91.9%) believe in an anthropogenic contribution to rising temperatures. Respondents strongly believe that climate science is credible (mean credibility score 6.67/7). Those who disagree about climate change disagree over basic facts (e.g., the effects of CO2 on climate) and have different cultural and political values. These results suggest that scientists who are climate change skeptics are outliers and that the majority of scientists surveyed believe in anthropogenic climate change and that climate science is credible and mature.

  16. CCTOP: a Consensus Constrained TOPology prediction web server.

    PubMed

    Dobson, László; Reményi, István; Tusnády, Gábor E

    2015-07-01

    The Consensus Constrained TOPology prediction (CCTOP; http://cctop.enzim.ttk.mta.hu) server is a web-based application providing transmembrane topology prediction. In addition to utilizing 10 different state-of-the-art topology prediction methods, the CCTOP server incorporates topology information from existing experimental and computational sources available in the PDBTM, TOPDB and TOPDOM databases using the probabilistic framework of hidden Markov model. The server provides the option to precede the topology prediction with signal peptide prediction and transmembrane-globular protein discrimination. The initial result can be recalculated by (de)selecting any of the prediction methods or mapped experiments or by adding user specified constraints. CCTOP showed superior performance to existing approaches. The reliability of each prediction is also calculated, which correlates with the accuracy of the per protein topology prediction. The prediction results and the collected experimental information are visualized on the CCTOP home page and can be downloaded in XML format. Programmable access of the CCTOP server is also available, and an example of client-side script is provided.

  17. Phyllodes tumours of the breast: a consensus review

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Benjamin Y; Acs, Geza; Apple, Sophia K; Badve, Sunil; Bleiweiss, Ira J; Brogi, Edi; Calvo, José P; Dabbs, David J; Ellis, Ian O; Eusebi, Vincenzo; Farshid, Gelareh; Fox, Stephen B; Ichihara, Shu; Lakhani, Sunil R; Rakha, Emad A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Richardson, Andrea L; Sahin, Aysegul; Schmitt, Fernando C; Schnitt, Stuart J; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Soares, Fernando A; Tse, Gary M; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Phyllodes tumours constitute an uncommon but complex group of mammary fibroepithelial lesions. Accurate and reproducible grading of these tumours has long been challenging, owing to the need to assess multiple stratified histological parameters, which may be weighted differently by individual pathologists. Distinction of benign phyllodes tumours from cellular fibroadenomas is fraught with difficulty, due to overlapping microscopic features. Similarly, separation of the malignant phyllodes tumour from spindle cell metaplastic carcinoma and primary breast sarcoma can be problematic. Phyllodes tumours are treated by surgical excision. However, there is no consensus on the definition of an appropriate surgical margin to ensure completeness of excision and reduction of recurrence risk. Interpretive subjectivity, overlapping histological diagnostic criteria, suboptimal correlation between histological classification and clinical behaviour and the lack of robust molecular predictors of outcome make further investigation of the pathogenesis of these fascinating tumours a matter of active research. This review consolidates the current understanding of their pathobiology and clinical behaviour, and includes proposals for a rational approach to the classification and management of phyllodes tumours. PMID:26768026

  18. Pregnancy registries in epilepsy: a consensus statement on health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Meador, K J; Pennell, P B; Harden, C L; Gordon, J C; Tomson, T; Kaplan, P W; Holmes, G L; French, J A; Hauser, W A; Wells, P G; Cramer, J A

    2008-09-30

    Most pregnant women with epilepsy require antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy. Present guidelines recommend optimizing treatment prior to conception, choosing the most effective AED for seizure type and syndrome, using monotherapy and lowest effective dose, and supplementing with folate. The Epilepsy Therapy Project established the international Health Outcomes in Pregnancy and Epilepsy (HOPE) forum to learn more about the impact of AEDs on the developing fetus, particularly the role of pregnancy registries in studying AED teratogenicity. The primary outcome of interest in these registries is the occurrence of major congenital malformations, with some data collected on minor malformations. Cognitive and behavioral outcomes are often beyond the timeframe for follow-up of these registries and require independent study. The HOPE consensus report describes the current state of knowledge and the limitations to interpretations of information from the various sources. Data regarding specific risks for both older and newer AEDs need to be analyzed carefully, considering study designs and confounding factors. There is a critical need for investigations to delineate the underlying mechanisms and explain the variance seen in outcomes across AEDs and within a single AED.

  19. [Consensus document: nutritional and metabolic importance of cow's milk].

    PubMed

    Fernández Fernández, Elena; Martínez Hernández, José Alfredo; Martínez Suárez, Venancio; Moreno Villares, José Manuel; Collado Yurrita, Luis Rodolfo; Hernández Cabria, Marta; Morán Rey, Francisco Javier

    2014-10-25

    Cow's milk is a staple food for human consumption at all stages of life. Industrial processing has allowed widespread access to its consumption by the population, which has helped to significantly improve their health. From its composition point of view, milk is a complete and balanced food that provides high nutrient content in relation to its calorie content, so its consumption should be considered necessary from childhood to elderly. The benefits of cow's milk are not limited to its nutritional value, but extend beyond and are a factor of prevention in certain non communicable pathologies as cardiovascular disease, some cancers, high blood pressure or bone or dental pathology. It can also help in the fight against childhood overweight and obesity. In recent years we have seen a worrying decline in milk consumption among the Spanish population, at least in part influenced by misconceptions about its consumption and of other dairy products. This consensus document aims to review the current state of the topic regarding the effects of milk consumption on health, while making a call to the institutions and scientific societies to develop programs and information campaigns about the benefits of milk and dairy products consumption.

  20. [Therapy of leishmaniasis in France: consensus on proposed guidelines].

    PubMed

    Buffet, Pierre A; Rosenthal, Éric; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Lightburne, Edward; Couppié, Pierre; Morizot, Gloria; Lachaud, Laurence; Marty, Pierre; Dedet, Jean-Pierre

    2011-02-01

    Because it relies on potentially toxic, difficult-to-handle, or expensive compounds the therapy of leishmaniasis is still a complex issue in 2010, especially for visceral leishmaniasis in immuno-suppressed subjects, or in patients with cutaneous and mucosal involvement. This induces a wide diversity of observed therapeutic practices, some being sub-optimal. The Société de Pathologie Exotique organised a meeting dedicated to the therapy of leishmaniasis in France that led to the first consensus on therapeutic guidelines. Liposomal amphotericin B is the first-line option for visceral leishmaniasis both in immunocompetent, and immunosuppressed patients (cumulated doses of 20 mg/kg and 30-40 mg/kg, respectively). Secondary prophylaxis with either liposomal amphotericin B, pentamidine or meglumine antimoniate is proposed to patients with heavy immunosuppression until immunity has been restored for at least 6 months. While the efficacy of new topical formulations of paromomycin is being tested, patients with Old World cutaneous leishmaniasis may be left untreated, or be administered a combination of superficial cryotherapy plus intralesional antimony, or even--in complex situations--receive systemic therapy. The efficacy of a short course of pentamidine (L. guyanensis/L. panamensis) and a 20-day schedule of meglumine antimoniate (L. braziliensis) is solidly established. However, in well-defined situations, local therapy of New World cutaneous leishmaniasis is now considered acceptable.

  1. Consensus Recommendations on Training and Competing in the Heat.

    PubMed

    Racinais, Sébastien; Alonso, Juan-Manuel; Coutts, Aaron J; Flouris, Andreas D; Girard, Olivier; González-Alonso, José; Hausswirth, Christophe; Jay, Ollie; Lee, Jason K W; Mitchell, Nigel; Nassis, George P; Nybo, Lars; Pluim, Babette M; Roelands, Bart; Sawka, Michael N; Wingo, Jonathan; Périard, Julien D

    2015-07-01

    Exercising in the heat induces thermoregulatory and other physiological strain that can lead to impairments in endurance exercise capacity. The purpose of this consensus statement is to provide up-to-date recommendations to optimize performance during sporting activities undertaken in hot ambient conditions. The most important intervention one can adopt to reduce physiological strain and optimize performance is to heat acclimatize. Heat acclimatization should comprise repeated exercise-heat exposures over 1-2 weeks. In addition, athletes should initiate competition and training in an euhydrated state and minimize dehydration during exercise. Following the development of commercial cooling systems (e.g., cooling vests), athletes can implement cooling strategies to facilitate heat loss or increase heat storage capacity before training or competing in the heat. Moreover, event organizers should plan for large shaded areas, along with cooling and rehydration facilities, and schedule events in accordance with minimizing the health risks of athletes, especially in mass participation events and during the first hot days of the year. Following the recent examples of the 2008 Olympics and the 2014 FIFA World Cup, sport governing bodies should consider allowing additional (or longer) recovery periods between and during events for hydration and body cooling opportunities when competitions are held in the heat.

  2. Chemotherapy drug shortages in pediatric oncology: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Decamp, Matthew; Joffe, Steven; Fernandez, Conrad V; Faden, Ruth R; Unguru, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Shortages of essential drugs, including critical chemotherapy drugs, have become commonplace. Drug shortages cost significant time and financial resources, lead to adverse patient outcomes, delay clinical trials, and pose significant ethical challenges. Pediatric oncology is particularly susceptible to drug shortages, presenting an opportunity to examine these ethical issues and provide recommendations for preventing and alleviating shortages. We convened the Working Group on Chemotherapy Drug Shortages in Pediatric Oncology (WG) and developed consensus on the core ethical values and practical actions necessary for a coordinated response to the problem of shortages by institutions, agencies, and other stakeholders. The interdisciplinary and multiinstitutional WG included practicing pediatric hematologist-oncologists, nurses, hospital pharmacists, bioethicists, experts in emergency management and public policy, legal scholars, patient/family advocates, and leaders of relevant professional societies and organizations. The WG endorsed 2 core ethical values: maximizing the potential benefits of effective drugs and ensuring equitable access. From these, we developed 6 recommendations: (1) supporting national polices to prevent shortages, (2) optimizing use of drug supplies, (3) giving equal priority to evidence-based uses of drugs whether they occur within or outside clinical trials, (4) developing an improved clearinghouse for sharing drug shortage information, (5) exploring the sharing of drug supplies among institutions, and (6) developing proactive stakeholder engagement strategies to facilitate prevention and management of shortages. Each recommendation includes an ethical rationale, action items, and barriers that must be overcome. Implemented together, they provide a blueprint for effective and ethical management of drug shortages in pediatric oncology and beyond.

  3. [Thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer: Brazilian consensus].

    PubMed

    Maia, Ana Luiza; Ward, Laura S; Carvalho, Gisah A; Graf, Hans; Maciel, Rui M B; Maciel, Léa M Zanini; Rosário, Pedro W; Vaisman, Mario

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common manifestation of thyroid diseases. It is estimated that approximately 10% of adults have palpable thyroid nodules with the frequency increasing throughout life. The major concern on nodule evaluation is the risk of malignancy (5-10%). Differentiated thyroid carcinoma accounts for 90% of all thyroid malignant neoplasias. Although most patients with cancer have a favorable outcome, some individuals present an aggressive form of the disease and poor prognostic despite recent advances in diagnosis and treatment. Here, a set of clinical guidelines for the evaluation and management of patients with thyroid nodules or differentiated thyroid cancer was developed through consensus by 8 member of the Department of Thyroid, Sociedade Brasileira de Endocrinologia e Metabologia. The participants are from different reference medical centers within Brazil, to reflect different practice patterns. Each committee participant was initially assigned to write a section of the document and to submit it to the chairperson, who revised and assembled the sections into a complete draft document, which was then circulated among all committee members for further revision. All committee members further revised and refined the document. The guidelines were developed based on the expert opinion of the committee participants, as well as on previously published information.

  4. Imaging After Nellix Endovascular Aneurysm Sealing: A Consensus Document.

    PubMed

    Holden, Andrew; Savlovskis, Janis; Winterbottom, Andrew; van den Ham, Leo H; Hill, Andrew; Krievins, Dainis; Hayes, Paul D; Reijnen, Michel M P J; Böckler, Dittmar; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; Carpenter, Jeffrey P; Thompson, Matt M

    2016-02-01

    Endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS) using the Nellix system is a new and different method of abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Normal postoperative imaging has unique appearances that change with time; complications also have different and specific appearances. This consensus document on the imaging findings after Nellix EVAS is based on the collective experience of the sites involved in the Nellix EVAS Global Forward Registry and the US Investigational Device Exemption Trial. The normal findings on computed tomography (CT), duplex ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, and plain radiography are described. With time, endobag appearances change on CT due to contrast migration to the margins of the hydrogel polymer within the endobag. Air within the endobag also has unique appearances that change over time. Among the complications after Nellix EVAS, type I endoleak usually presents as a curvilinear area of flow between the endobag and aortic wall, while type II endoleak is typically small and usually occurs where an aortic branch artery lies adjacent to an irregular aortic blood lumen that is not completely filled by the endobag. Procedural aortic injury is an uncommon but important complication that occurs as a result of overfilling of the endobags during Nellix EVAS. The optimum imaging surveillance algorithm after Nellix EVAS has yet to be defined but is largely CT-based, especially in the first year postprocedure. However, duplex ultrasound also appears to be a sensitive modality in identifying normal appearances and complications.

  5. Heterogeneous Preference and Local Nonlinearity in Consensus Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartnett, Andrew T.; Schertzer, Emmanuel; Levin, Simon A.; Couzin, Iain D.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a large body of research has focused on unveiling the fundamental physical processes that living systems utilize to perform functions, such as coordinated action and collective decision making. Here, we demonstrate that important features of collective decision making among higher organisms are captured effectively by a novel formulation of well-characterized physical spin systems, where the spin state is equivalent to two opposing preferences, and a bias in the preferred state represents the strength of individual opinions. We reveal that individuals (spins) without a preference (unbiased or uninformed) play a central role in collective decision making, both in maximizing the ability of the system to achieve consensus (via enhancement of the propagation of spin states) and in minimizing the time taken to do so (via a process reminiscent of stochastic resonance). Which state (option) is selected collectively, however, is shown to depend strongly on the nonlinearity of local interactions. Relatively linear social response results in unbiased individuals reinforcing the majority preference, even in the face of a strongly biased numerical minority (thus promoting democratic outcomes). If interactions are highly nonlinear, however, unbiased individuals exert the opposite influence, promoting a strongly biased minority and inhibiting majority preference. These results enhance our understanding of physical computation in biological collectives and suggest new avenues to explore in the collective dynamics of spin systems.

  6. South Asian consensus statement on women's health and Ramadan.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Sarita; Khan, Afreen; Fathima, Farah Naaz; Jaleel, Mohammed Abdul; Sheikh, Aisha; Azad, Kishwar; Fatima, Jalees; Mohsin, Fauzia

    2012-07-01

    Fasting during Ramadan, the holy month of Islam, is mandatory for all healthy adult Muslims. It is estimated that there are 1.1-1.5 billion Muslims worldwide, comprising 18-25% of the world population. About 62% of the world's Muslim population resides in Asia. Women comprise approximately 50% of this population. There is great religious fervor and enthusiasm in the majority of Muslims the world over for observing the religious fasting. Many of the Muslim women perhaps due to the family and societal pressures or lack of proper information hesitate and fail to avail themselves of the generous provisions of temporary or permanent exemptions from fasting available in Islam. It is therefore important that medical professionals as well as the general population be aware of potential risks that may be associated with fasting during Ramadan. This familiarity and knowledge is as important in South Asia and the Middle East as it is in Europe, North America, New Zealand, and Australia. There has not yet been any statement of consensus regarding women's health issues during Ramadan, namely menstruation, sexual obligations of married life, pregnancy, and lactation. This document aims to put forward some of the general guidelines for these issues especially for the South Asian Muslim women.

  7. Serving by local consensus in the public service location game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yi-Fan; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the issue of distributed and cooperative decision-making in a network game of public service location. Each node of the network can decide to host a certain public service incurring in a construction cost and serving all the neighboring nodes and itself. A pure consumer node has to pay a tax, and the collected tax is evenly distributed to all the hosting nodes to remedy their construction costs. If all nodes make individual best-response decisions, the system gets trapped in an inefficient situation of high tax level. Here we introduce a decentralized local-consensus selection mechanism which requires nodes to recommend their neighbors of highest local impact as candidate servers, and a node may become a server only if all its non-server neighbors give their assent. We demonstrate that although this mechanism involves only information exchange among neighboring nodes, it leads to socially efficient solutions with tax level approaching the lowest possible value. Our results may help in understanding and improving collective problem-solving in various networked social and robotic systems.

  8. Consensus recommendations on training and competing in the heat

    PubMed Central

    Racinais, S; Alonso, J M; Coutts, A J; Flouris, A D; Girard, O; González-Alonso, J; Hausswirth, C; Jay, O; Lee, J K W; Mitchell, N; Nassis, G P; Nybo, L; Pluim, B M; Roelands, B; Sawka, M N; Wingo, J; Périard, J D

    2015-01-01

    Exercising in the heat induces thermoregulatory and other physiological strain that can lead to impairments in endurance exercise capacity. The purpose of this consensus statement is to provide up-to-date recommendations to optimise performance during sporting activities undertaken in hot ambient conditions. The most important intervention one can adopt to reduce physiological strain and optimise performance is to heat acclimatise. Heat acclimatisation should comprise repeated exercise-heat exposures over 1–2 weeks. In addition, athletes should initiate competition and training in a euhydrated state and minimise dehydration during exercise. Following the development of commercial cooling systems (eg, cooling-vest), athletes can implement cooling strategies to facilitate heat loss or increase heat storage capacity before training or competing in the heat. Moreover, event organisers should plan for large shaded areas, along with cooling and rehydration facilities, and schedule events in accordance with minimising the health risks of athletes, especially in mass participation events and during the first hot days of the year. Following the recent examples of the 2008 Olympics and the 2014 FIFA World Cup, sport governing bodies should consider allowing additional (or longer) recovery periods between and during events, for hydration and body cooling opportunities, when competitions are held in the heat. PMID:26069301

  9. Consensus recommendations on training and competing in the heat.

    PubMed

    Racinais, S; Alonso, J M; Coutts, A J; Flouris, A D; Girard, O; González-Alonso, J; Hausswirth, C; Jay, O; Lee, J K W; Mitchell, N; Nassis, G P; Nybo, L; Pluim, B M; Roelands, B; Sawka, M N; Wingo, J; Périard, J D

    2015-09-01

    Exercising in the heat induces thermoregulatory and other physiological strain that can lead to impairments in endurance exercise capacity. The purpose of this consensus statement is to provide up-to-date recommendations to optimise performance during sporting activities undertaken in hot ambient conditions. The most important intervention one can adopt to reduce physiological strain and optimise performance is to heat acclimatise. Heat acclimatisation should comprise repeated exercise-heat exposures over 1-2 weeks. In addition, athletes should initiate competition and training in a euhydrated state and minimise dehydration during exercise. Following the development of commercial cooling systems (eg, cooling-vest), athletes can implement cooling strategies to facilitate heat loss or increase heat storage capacity before training or competing in the heat. Moreover, event organisers should plan for large shaded areas, along with cooling and rehydration facilities, and schedule events in accordance with minimising the health risks of athletes, especially in mass participation events and during the first hot days of the year. Following the recent examples of the 2008 Olympics and the 2014 FIFA World Cup, sport governing bodies should consider allowing additional (or longer) recovery periods between and during events, for hydration and body cooling opportunities, when competitions are held in the heat.

  10. Supporting communication in semantic dementia: clinical consensus from expert practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Kindell, Jacqueline; Sage, Karen; Cruice, Madeline

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to gain consensus regarding the clinical priorities and tasks required in supporting communication needs in those living with semantic dementia and their families, by specialist speech and language therapists (SLTs), working in clinical practice within dementia care settings in the UK. Design/methodology/approach A nominal group technique was used, followed by further exploration and refinement of issues using a modified Delphi technique with a group of six SLTs who specialised in dementia care and who had experience of working with individuals with semantic dementia and their families. Findings The findings in the study demonstrate a broader scope of practice than is evident within the research literature with this client group. Therapists identified a range of psychosocial issues for both the person with semantic dementia and their family, in particular finding ways to support activity and participation in conversation and explore barriers and facilitators within the communication environment. Originality/value This represents the first study to explore everyday practice in this rarer dementia and the information gathered here will be of use to a variety of health and social care professions interested in supporting those with semantic dementia and their families. PMID:28286641

  11. Consensus recommendations on training and competing in the heat.

    PubMed

    Racinais, S; Alonso, J M; Coutts, A J; Flouris, A D; Girard, O; González-Alonso, J; Hausswirth, C; Jay, O; Lee, J K W; Mitchell, N; Nassis, G P; Nybo, L; Pluim, B M; Roelands, B; Sawka, M N; Wingo, J E; Périard, J D

    2015-06-01

    Exercising in the heat induces thermoregulatory and other physiological strain that can lead to impairments in endurance exercise capacity. The purpose of this consensus statement is to provide up-to-date recommendations to optimize performance during sporting activities undertaken in hot ambient conditions. The most important intervention one can adopt to reduce physiological strain and optimize performance is to heat acclimatize. Heat acclimatization should comprise repeated exercise-heat exposures over 1-2 weeks. In addition, athletes should initiate competition and training in a euhydrated state and minimize dehydration during exercise. Following the development of commercial cooling systems (e.g., cooling vest), athletes can implement cooling strategies to facilitate heat loss or increase heat storage capacity before training or competing in the heat. Moreover, event organizers should plan for large shaded areas, along with cooling and rehydration facilities, and schedule events in accordance with minimizing the health risks of athletes, especially in mass participation events and during the first hot days of the year. Following the recent examples of the 2008 Olympics and the 2014 FIFA World Cup, sport governing bodies should consider allowing additional (or longer) recovery periods between and during events for hydration and body cooling opportunities when competitions are held in the heat.

  12. Consensus Conference Findings on Supragingival and Subgingival Air Polishing.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Charles M; Daubert, Diane M; Davis, Karen; Deming, Jodi; Flemmig, Thomas F; Pattison, Anna; Roulet, Jean-François; Stambaugh, Roger V

    2017-02-01

    A consensus conference was convened to evaluate and address issues of safety and efficacy when using glycine powder in an air-powder jet device for supra- and subgingival applications during dental prophylaxis and periodontal maintenance. The conference reported the following conclusions: 1) Supra- and subgingival air polishing using glycine powder is safe and effective for removal of biofilms from natural tooth structure and restorative materials; 2) there is no evidence of soft-tissue abrasion when using glycine powder in an air-polishing device; 3) in periodontal probing depths of 1 mm to 4 mm, glycine-powder air polishing, using a standard air-polishing nozzle, is more effective at removing subgingival biofilm than manual or ultrasonic instruments; and 4) at probing depths of 5 mm to 9 mm, using a subgingival nozzle, glycine powder air polishing is more effective at removing subgingival biofilm than manual or ultrasonic instrumentation. This conference statement, supported by an industry grant, was drafted by a panel of distinguished dental professionals.

  13. Chemotherapy Drug Shortages in Pediatric Oncology: A Consensus Statement

    PubMed Central

    DeCamp, Matthew; Joffe, Steven; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Faden, Ruth R.

    2014-01-01

    Shortages of essential drugs, including critical chemotherapy drugs, have become commonplace. Drug shortages cost significant time and financial resources, lead to adverse patient outcomes, delay clinical trials, and pose significant ethical challenges. Pediatric oncology is particularly susceptible to drug shortages, presenting an opportunity to examine these ethical issues and provide recommendations for preventing and alleviating shortages. We convened the Working Group on Chemotherapy Drug Shortages in Pediatric Oncology (WG) and developed consensus on the core ethical values and practical actions necessary for a coordinated response to the problem of shortages by institutions, agencies, and other stakeholders. The interdisciplinary and multiinstitutional WG included practicing pediatric hematologist-oncologists, nurses, hospital pharmacists, bioethicists, experts in emergency management and public policy, legal scholars, patient/family advocates, and leaders of relevant professional societies and organizations. The WG endorsed 2 core ethical values: maximizing the potential benefits of effective drugs and ensuring equitable access. From these, we developed 6 recommendations: (1) supporting national polices to prevent shortages, (2) optimizing use of drug supplies, (3) giving equal priority to evidence-based uses of drugs whether they occur within or outside clinical trials, (4) developing an improved clearinghouse for sharing drug shortage information, (5) exploring the sharing of drug supplies among institutions, and (6) developing proactive stakeholder engagement strategies to facilitate prevention and management of shortages. Each recommendation includes an ethical rationale, action items, and barriers that must be overcome. Implemented together, they provide a blueprint for effective and ethical management of drug shortages in pediatric oncology and beyond. PMID:24488741

  14. Multiple sclerosis in the Arabian Gulf countries: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Bohlega, Saeed; Inshasi, Jihad; Al Tahan, Abdel Rahman; Madani, Abu Bakr; Qahtani, Hussien; Rieckmann, Peter

    2013-12-01

    The epidemiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is rapidly changing in many parts of the world. Based on the Kurtzke classification, the Arabian Gulf Region is located in a low-risk zone for MS; however, recent studies suggest a moderate-to-high prevalence nearby (31-55 MS per 10,0000 individuals), with an increase in incidence in recent years. The relapsing-remitting disease course ratio is 2.5:1 versus the primary progressive type. In a geographic area that was previously associated with low prevalence; the recent high prevalence and fast rising incidence of MS in the gulf countries, encouraged the neurologists of this region to meet in a consensus panel, in order to share our latest findings in terms of MS epidemiology and consent on MS management in the Arabian Gulf. Therefore 20 key opinion leader neurologists and MS experts representing various countries of the Arabian Gulf have met in Dubai on the 2 and 3 February 2012, they shared their latest epidemiological findings, discussed recent MS aspects in the region, and consented on MS management relevantly to this geographic area.

  15. Physiotherapy for functional motor disorders: a consensus recommendation

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Glenn; Stone, Jon; Matthews, Audrey; Brown, Melanie; Sparkes, Chris; Farmer, Ross; Masterton, Lindsay; Duncan, Linsey; Winters, Alisa; Daniell, Laura; Lumsden, Carrie; Carson, Alan; David, Anthony S; Edwards, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with functional motor disorder (FMD) including weakness and paralysis are commonly referred to physiotherapists. There is growing evidence that physiotherapy is an effective treatment, but the existing literature has limited explanations of what physiotherapy should consist of and there are insufficient data to produce evidence-based guidelines. We aim to address this issue by presenting recommendations for physiotherapy treatment. Methods A meeting was held between physiotherapists, neurologists and neuropsychiatrists, all with extensive experience in treating FMD. A set of consensus recommendations were produced based on existing evidence and experience. Results We recommend that physiotherapy treatment is based on a biopsychosocial aetiological framework. Treatment should address illness beliefs, self-directed attention and abnormal habitual movement patterns through a process of education, movement retraining and self-management strategies within a positive and non-judgemental context. We provide specific examples of these strategies for different symptoms. Conclusions Physiotherapy has a key role in the multidisciplinary management of patients with FMD. There appear to be specific physiotherapy techniques which are useful in FMD and which are amenable to and require prospective evaluation. The processes involved in referral, treatment and discharge from physiotherapy should be considered carefully as a part of a treatment package. PMID:25433033

  16. [Consensus conference on acute bronchiolitis (I): methodology and recommendations].

    PubMed

    González de Dios, J; Ochoa Sangrador, C

    2010-03-01

    The recommendations of the Consensus Conference "Diagnostic and Therapeutic Management of Acute Bronchiolitis" are presented. Evidence on the frequency of bronchiolitis in the general population and risk groups, risk factors and markers of severe forms, severity scores and the clinical-etiological profile is summarized. The commonly used diagnostic tests are ineffective in the management of the disease; oxygen saturation measurement is considered necessary only in the initial assessment or to monitor changes in patients with respiratory distress. Other tests such as chest radiograph, rapid diagnostic tests for respiratory virus infection and screening tests for bacterial infection should be used only very selectively. There is sufficient evidence on the lack of effectiveness of most interventions tested in bronchiolitis. Apart from oxygen therapy, fluid therapy, aspiration of secretions and ventilation support, few treatment options will be beneficial. Only in moderate-severe bronchiolitis would it be justified to test a treatment with inhaled bronchodilators (salbutamol or epinephrine) with or without hypertonic saline solution. Heliox and non-invasive ventilation techniques could be used in cases with respiratory failure, methylxanthine in patients with apnea and surfactant in intubated critically ill patients. No treatment has proved effective in preventing persistence or recurrence of post-bronchiolitis symptoms. As for prevention of bronchiolitis, only palivizumab slightly reduces the risk of admissions for lower respiratory infections by respiratory syncytial virus, although its high cost justifies its use only in a small group of high-risk patients.

  17. Treatment of Seborrhoeic Dermatitis in Asia: A Consensus Guide

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Wai Kwong; Yeung, Chi Keung; Torsekar, Raghunandan Govind; Suh, Dae Hun; Ungpakorn, Rataporn; Widaty, Sandra; Azizan, Noor Zalmy; Gabriel, Maria Teresita; Tran, Hau Khang; Chong, Wei Sheng; Shih, I-Hsin; Dall'Oglio, Federica; Micali, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD) is common in Asia. Its prevalence is estimated to be 1-5% in adults. However, larger population-based studies into the epidemiology of SD in Asia are lacking, and the aetiology of SD may differ widely from Western countries and in different parts of Asia. In addition, clinically significant differences between Asian and Caucasian skin have been reported. There is a need to define standardized clinical diagnostic criteria and/or a grading system to help determine appropriate treatments for SD within Asia. With this in mind, experts from India, South Korea, Taiwan, Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, Thailand, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Italy convened to define the landscape of SD in Asia at a meeting held in Singapore. The consensus group developed a comprehensive algorithm to aid clinicians to recommend appropriate treatment of SD in both adults and children. In most cases, satisfactory therapeutic results can be accomplished with topical antifungal agents or topical corticosteroids. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents with antifungal properties have been shown to be a viable option for both acute and maintenance therapy. PMID:27386464

  18. Heteronormative consensus in the Norwegian same-sex adoption debate?

    PubMed

    Anderssen, Norman; Hellesund, Tone

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates the Norwegian newspaper debate (1998-2002) on the right of homosexual couples to adopt children. It identifies two patterns of meaning within which both anti-adoption and pro-adoption sides of the debate were located: 1) the nuclear family as reference point; and 2) a focus on innate qualities. Parallell to a continuous liberalization of sexualities in Norway we seem to witness a consensus on heteronormativity in Norway on both sides of the debate as the basic axiom in public discussions on homosexuality and adoption. In this article, we explore the nature of the heteronormative arguments and the reason for their appearance in this particular debate. The two patterns of meaning reproduce a perception of lesbians and gays as either a worthy or unworthy minority. These findings may be seen as reflecting fundamental positions regarding the Norwegian modernization project, where both sides of the debate see homosexuality as a central symbol. State feminism may also have played the role of reinforcing gender categories and thereby served as an important condition of possibility for contemporary heteronormativity.

  19. Contraceptive effects of extended lactational amenorrhoea: beyond the Bellagio Consensus.

    PubMed

    Short, R V; Lewis, P R; Renfree, M B; Shaw, G

    1991-03-23

    We have recorded the duration of lactational anovulation and amenorrhoea in a well-nourished group of Australian women who breastfed their babies throughout the study. The data enabled us to compare the theoretical cumulative probability of conception among breastfeeding women who had unprotected intercourse irrespective of their menstrual status with that of those who had unprotected intercourse only during lactational amenorrhoea. Breastfeeding alone is not an effective form of contraception, since all the women in our study resumed normal ovulation while still breastfeeding. However, among women who have unprotected intercourse only during lactational amenorrhoea but adopt other contraceptive measures when they resume menstruation, only 1.7% would have become pregnant during the first 6 months of amenorrhoea, only 7% after 12 months, and only 13% after 24 months. Thus for our women it would be possible to extend the Bellagio Consensus Conference guidelines which stated that lactational amenorrhoea can only be relied on as a contraceptive for the first 6 months post-partum in women who are fully or almost fully breastfeeding. The lactational amenorrhoea method can be relied on for excellent contraceptive protection in the first 6 months of breastfeeding, irrespective of when supplements are introduced into the baby's diet; for women who continue to breastfeed the method can also give good protection for up to 12 months post partum. Once menstruation has returned, other forms of contraception are essential to prevent pregnancy.

  20. Italian intersociety consensus on DOAC use in internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Prisco, Domenico; Ageno, Walter; Becattini, Cecilia; D'Angelo, Armando; Davì, Giovanni; De Cristofaro, Raimondo; Dentali, Francesco; Di Minno, Giovanni; Falanga, Anna; Gussoni, Gualberto; Masotti, Luca; Palareti, Gualtiero; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Santi, Roberto M; Santilli, Francesca; Silingardi, Mauro; Tufano, Antonella; Violi, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are drugs used in clinical practice since 2009 for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, and for the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism. The four DOACs, including the three factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) and one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) provide oral anticoagulation therapy alternatives to Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Despite their clear advantages, the DOACs require on the part of the internist a thorough knowledge of their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics to ensure their correct use, laboratory monitoring and the appropriate management of adverse events. This document represents a consensus paper on the use of DOACs by representatives of three Italian scientific societies: the Italian Society of Internal Medicine (SIMI), the Federation of the Associations of Hospital Managers (FADOI), and the Society for the Study of Haemostasis and Thrombosis (SISET). This document formulates expert opinion guidance for pragmatic managing, monitoring and reversing the anticoagulant effect of DOACs in both chronic and emergency settings. This practical guidance may help the internist to create adequate protocols for patients hospitalized ion internal medicine wards, where patients are often elderly subjects affected by poly-morbidities and renal insufficiency, and, thus, require particular attention to drug-drug interactions and peri-procedural protocols.

  1. [Insomnia in children and adolescents. A consensus document].

    PubMed

    Pin Arboledas, Gonzalo; Soto Insuga, Víctor; Jurado Luque, María José; Fernandez Gomariz, Cleofe; Hidalgo Vicario, Inés; Lluch Rosello, Amalia; Rodríguez Hernández, Pedro José; Madrid, Juan Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Insomnia is very common during childhood (30% of children under 5), and causes a serious cognitive and emotional consequence in learning, as well as significant medical comorbidity. It also affects the quality of life, not only of the child, but also of the whole family. Paediatrician training in its diagnosis and treatment is usually poor. For this reason a consensus document is presented on the management of insomnia in children and adolescents. This has been developed by members of the Spanish Paediatrics Association, the Spanish Sleep Society, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Outpatient and Primary Care, the Spanish Adolescent Medicine Society, the Spanish Child and Adolescent Society, and the Spanish Paediatric Neurology Society. The group suggests that diagnosis must be clinical and complementary tests will only be required in doubtful cases or when a differential diagnosis is needed. Likewise, treatment should be mainly based on cognitive-behavioural therapy and the modification of sleeping habits. Using medicines and other substances to make the sleep easier is currently quite common, even although there are no clinical guidelines to support this.

  2. Management of chronic urticaria in Asia: 2010 AADV consensus guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This guideline is a result of a consensus reached during the 19th Asian-Australasian Regional Conference of Dermatology by the Asian Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Study Group in collaboration with the League of Asian Dermatological Societies in 2010. Urticaria has a profound impact on the quality of life in Asia and the need for effective treatment is required. In line with the EAACI/GA2LEN/EDF/WAO guideline for the management of urticaria the recommended first-line treatment is new generation, non-sedating H1-antihistamines. If standard dosing is ineffective, increasing the dosage up to four-fold is recommended. For patients who do not respond to a four-fold increase in dosage of non-sedating H1-antihistamines, it is recommended that therapies such as H2-antihistamine, leukotriene antagonist, and cyclosporine A should be added to the antihistamine treatment. In the choice of second-line treatment, both their costs and risk/benefit profiles are the most important considerations. PMID:22701866

  3. Challenges in Diagnosing Narcolepsy without Cataplexy: A Consensus Statement

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Christian R.; Mignot, Emmanuel; Lammers, Gert Jan; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Arnulf, Isabelle; Rye, David; Dauvilliers, Yves; Honda, Makoto; Owens, Judith A.; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diagnosing narcolepsy without cataplexy is often a challenge as the symptoms are nonspecific, current diagnostic tests are limited, and there are no useful biomarkers. In this report, we review the clinical and physiological aspects of narcolepsy without cataplexy, the limitations of available diagnostic procedures, and the differential diagnoses, and we propose an approach for more accurate diagnosis of narcolepsy without cataplexy. Methods: A group of clinician-scientists experienced in narcolepsy reviewed the literature and convened to discuss current diagnostic tools, and to map out directions for research that should lead to a better understanding and more accurate diagnosis of narcolepsy without cataplexy. Recommendations: To aid in the identification of narcolepsy without cataplexy, we review key indicators of narcolepsy and present a diagnostic algorithm. A detailed clinical history is mainly helpful to rule out other possible causes of chronic sleepiness. The multiple sleep latency test remains the most important measure, and prior sleep deprivation, shift work, or circadian disorders should be excluded by actigraphy or sleep logs. A short REM sleep latency (≤ 15 minutes) on polysomnography can aid in the diagnosis of narcolepsy without cataplexy, although sensitivity is low. Finally, measurement of hypocretin levels can helpful, as levels are low to intermediate in 10% to 30% of narcolepsy without cataplexy patients. Citation: Baumann CR, Mignot E, Lammers GJ, Overeem S, Arnulf I, Rye D, Dauvilliers Y, Honda M, Owens JA, Plazzi G, Scammell TE. Challenges in diagnosing narcolepsy without cataplexy: a consensus statement. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1035-1042. PMID:24882898

  4. Behavioural Signs of Pain in Cats: An Expert Consensus

    PubMed Central

    Merola, Isabella; Mills, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To identify where a consensus can be reached between veterinary experts in feline medicine on the core signs sufficient for pain (sufficient to indicate pain when they occur, but not necessarily present in all painful conditions) and necessary for pain (necessary in the presence of pain, but not always indicative of pain). Methods A modified Delphi technique was used, consisting of four rounds of questions and evaluation using nineteen participants during the period December 2014 and May 2015. Agreement was considered to be established when 80% of the experts concurred with the same opinion. Results Twenty-five signs were considered sufficient to indicate pain, but no single sign was considered necessary for it. Discussion Further studies are needed to evaluate the validity of these 25 behavioural signs if a specific pain assessment tool is to be developed that is capable of assessing pain in cats based on observational methods alone. The signs reported here may nonetheless help both vets and owners form an initial evaluation of the pain status of cats in their care. PMID:26909809

  5. ICPD harnesses worldwide consensus on importance of population issues.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S A

    1994-10-14

    The UN International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo through September 5-13, 1994, will be remembered for having achieved the global consensus among 180 countries that population is a serious issue which merits attention at the highest levels of government, that population should be considered in the broader context of development, and that improving the status of women is integral not only to addressing issues of population growth but also to sustaining global development efforts. World governments and international organizations agreed to triple levels of current world spending upon population programs to $17 billion by the year 2000 for activities in the developing world and the former Soviet Union, with two-thirds of the funds coming from the recipient countries themselves and the rest from external sources. International agreement was even reached to view family planning as a component of more comprehensive reproductive health care and that the notion of sexual health is a critical aspect of reproductive health. Finally, thanks to Vatican stonewalling, this ICPD represents the first time that the reality of abortion was discussed at length and in depth at any international governmental meeting; the Vatican insisted that debate on abortion continue over three days and nights.

  6. Consensus sediment quality guidelines for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    Sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been derived from a variety of laboratory, field, and theoretical foundations. They include the screening level concentration, effects ranges-low and -median, equilibrium partitioning concentrations, apparent effects threshold, {Sigma}PAH model, and threshold and probable effects levels. The resolution of controversial differences among the PAH SQGs lies in an understanding of the effects of mixtures. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons virtually always occur in field-collected sediment as a complex mixture of covarying compounds. When expressed as a mixture concentration, that is, total PAH (TPAH), the guidelines form three clusters that were intended in their original derivations to represent threshold (TEC = 290 {micro}g/g organic carbon [OC]), median (MEC = 1,800 {micro}g/g OC), and extreme (EEC = 10,000 {micro}g/g OC) effects concentrations. The TEC/MEC/EEC consensus guidelines provide a unifying synthesis of other SQGs, reflect causal rather than correlative effects, account for mixtures, and predict sediment toxicity and benthic community perturbations at sites of PAH contamination. The TEC offers the most useful SQG because PAH mixtures are unlikely to cause adverse effects on benthic ecosystems below the TEC.

  7. Consensus Paper: The Cerebellum's Role in Movement and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Koziol, Leonard F.; Budding, Deborah; Andreasen, Nancy; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Bulgheroni, Sara; Imamizu, Hiroshi; Ito, Masao; Manto, Mario; Marvel, Cherie; Parker, Krystal; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Ramnani, Narender; Riva, Daria; Schmahmann, Jeremy; Vandervert, Larry; Yamazaki, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    While the cerebellum's role in motor function is well recognized, the nature of its concurrent role in cognitive function remains considerably less clear. The current consensus paper gathers diverse views on a variety of important roles played by the cerebellum across a range of cognitive and emotional functions. This paper considers the cerebellum in relation to neurocognitive development, language function, working memory, executive function, and the development of cerebellar internal control models and reflects upon some of the ways in which better understanding the cerebellum's status as a “supervised learning machine” can enrich our ability to understand human function and adaptation. As all contributors agree that the cerebellum plays a role in cognition, there is also an agreement that this conclusion remains highly inferential. Many conclusions about the role of the cerebellum in cognition originate from applying known information about cerebellar contributions to the coordination and quality of movement. These inferences are based on the uniformity of the cerebellum's compositional infrastructure and its apparent modular organization. There is considerable support for this view, based upon observations of patients with pathology within the cerebellum. PMID:23996631

  8. A consensus statement on lipid management after acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schiele, François; Farnier, Michel; Krempf, Michel; Bruckert, Eric; Ferrières, Jean

    2016-11-17

    In patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology give a Class I, Level A recommendation for the prescription of high-intensity statins to be initiated as early as possible, regardless of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level. Although statins are widely prescribed after ACS, the intensity of therapy and the proportion of patients achieving target LDL-C values are often not in line with recommendations due to a lack of compliance with guidelines by the physicians, a lack of compliance with treatment or poor tolerance by patients, and poor dose adaptation. In this context, a group of French physicians came together to define strategies to facilitate and improve the management of lipid-lowering therapy after ACS. This paper outlines the scientific rationale for the use of statins at the acute phase of ACS, the utility of ezetimibe, the measurement of LDL-C during the course of ACS, the opportunities for detecting familial hypercholesterolaemia and the results of the consensus for the management of lipid-lowering therapy, illustrated in two decision-making algorithms.

  9. Pediatric emergency medicine fellow training in ultrasound: consensus educational guidelines.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Rebecca L; Hsu, Deborah; Nagler, Joshua; Chen, Lei; Gallagher, Rachel; Levy, Jason A

    2013-03-01

    The importance of point-of-care emergency ultrasound (EUS) to the practice of emergency medicine (EM) is well established, and mounting research continues to demonstrate how EUS can benefit pediatric emergency department (ED) patients. As members of the EM community, pediatric EM (PEM) physicians should understand the potential value of EUS and seek opportunities to incorporate EUS into their daily practice. Currently, EUS education and training is at an early developmental stage for PEM fellows and varies greatly between programs. The goal of this article is to provide consensus education guidelines and to describe a sample curriculum that can be used by PEM fellowship programs when developing or revising their US training curricula. The authors recognize that programs may be at different stages of EUS development and will consequently need to tailor curricula to individual institutional needs and capabilities. This guideline was developed through a collaborative process between EUS educators and members of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section of EM Fellowship Directors Subcommittee. The guideline includes the following topics: important considerations regarding EUS in PEM, PEM US program framework, PEM US curriculum, PEM US education program, and competency assessment.

  10. [Consensus document on the treatment of dyslipidemia in diabetes].

    PubMed

    Hormigo-Pozo, A; Mancera-Romero, J; Perez-Unanua, M P; Alonso-Fernandez, M; Lopez-Simarro, F; Mediavilla-Bravo, J J

    2015-03-01

    People with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a 2 to 4 times higher risk of developing cardiovascular diseases when compared to general population of similar age and sex. This risk remains after adjustment of other traditional cardiovascular risk factors. The dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus is present in up to 60% of people with diabetes and contributes greatly to increased cardiovascular, morbidity and mortality risk in these patients. Diabetic dyslipidemia is a disorder of lipid metabolism characterized by an excess of triglycerides, a decrease in HDL-cholesterol and altered lipoprotein composition, consisting mainly in an excess of small, dense LDL particles. Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated the benefits of drug treatment of dyslipidemia (mainly statins) to prevent cardiovascular events and mortality in people with diabetes, both in primary and secondary prevention. This consensus document, developed by general practitioners, members of the Diabetes Group of the Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians (SEMERGEN), aims to assist in the management of patients with diabetes and dyslipidemia in accordance with the most recent recommendations.

  11. Medicinal plants in Mexico: healers' consensus and cultural importance.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, M; Ankli, A; Frei, B; Weimann, C; Sticher, O

    1998-12-01

    Medicinal plants are an important element of indigenous medical systems in Mexico. These resources are usually regarded as part of a culture's traditional knowledge. This study examines the use of medicinal plants in four indigenous groups of Mexican Indians, Maya, Nahua, Zapotec and - for comparative purposes - Mixe. With the first three the methodology was similar, making a direct comparison of the results possible. In these studies, the relative importance of a medicinal plant within a culture is documented using a quantitative method. For the analysis the uses were grouped into 9-10 categories of indigenous uses. This report compares these data and uses the concept of informant consensus originally developed by Trotter and Logan for analysis. This indicates how homogenous the ethnobotanical information is. Generally the factor is high for gastrointestinal illnesses and for culture bound syndromes. While the species used by the 3 indigenous groups vary, the data indicate that there exist well-defined criteria specific for each culture which lead to the selection of a plant as a medicine. A large number of species are used for gastrointestinal illnesses by two or more of the indigenous groups. At least in this case, the multiple transfer of species and their uses within Mexico seems to be an important reason for the widespread use of a species. Medicinal plants in other categories (e.g. skin diseases) are usually known only in one culture and seem to be part of its traditional knowledge.

  12. Exercise management in type 1 diabetes: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Michael C; Gallen, Ian W; Smart, Carmel E; Taplin, Craig E; Adolfsson, Peter; Lumb, Alistair N; Kowalski, Aaron; Rabasa-Lhoret, Remi; McCrimmon, Rory J; Hume, Carin; Annan, Francesca; Fournier, Paul A; Graham, Claudia; Bode, Bruce; Galassetti, Pietro; Jones, Timothy W; Millán, Iñigo San; Heise, Tim; Peters, Anne L; Petz, Andreas; Laffel, Lori M

    2017-01-24

    Type 1 diabetes is a challenging condition to manage for various physiological and behavioural reasons. Regular exercise is important, but management of different forms of physical activity is particularly difficult for both the individual with type 1 diabetes and the health-care provider. People with type 1 diabetes tend to be at least as inactive as the general population, with a large percentage of individuals not maintaining a healthy body mass nor achieving the minimum amount of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity per week. Regular exercise can improve health and wellbeing, and can help individuals to achieve their target lipid profile, body composition, and fitness and glycaemic goals. However, several additional barriers to exercise can exist for a person with diabetes, including fear of hypoglycaemia, loss of glycaemic control, and inadequate knowledge around exercise management. This Review provides an up-to-date consensus on exercise management for individuals with type 1 diabetes who exercise regularly, including glucose targets for safe and effective exercise, and nutritional and insulin dose adjustments to protect against exercise-related glucose excursions.

  13. Serving by local consensus in the public service location game

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi-Fan; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the issue of distributed and cooperative decision-making in a network game of public service location. Each node of the network can decide to host a certain public service incurring in a construction cost and serving all the neighboring nodes and itself. A pure consumer node has to pay a tax, and the collected tax is evenly distributed to all the hosting nodes to remedy their construction costs. If all nodes make individual best-response decisions, the system gets trapped in an inefficient situation of high tax level. Here we introduce a decentralized local-consensus selection mechanism which requires nodes to recommend their neighbors of highest local impact as candidate servers, and a node may become a server only if all its non-server neighbors give their assent. We demonstrate that although this mechanism involves only information exchange among neighboring nodes, it leads to socially efficient solutions with tax level approaching the lowest possible value. Our results may help in understanding and improving collective problem-solving in various networked social and robotic systems. PMID:27586793

  14. Cardiovascular–renal axis disorders in the domestic dog and cat: a veterinary consensus statement

    PubMed Central

    Pouchelon, J L; Atkins, C E; Bussadori, C; Oyama, M A; Vaden, S L; Bonagura, J D; Chetboul, V; Cowgill, L D; Elliot, J; Francey, T; Grauer, G F; Luis Fuentes, V; Sydney Moise, N; Polzin, D J; Van Dongen, A M; Van Israël, N

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES There is a growing understanding of the complexity of interplay between renal and cardiovascular systems in both health and disease. The medical profession has adopted the term “cardiorenal syndrome” (CRS) to describe the pathophysiological relationship between the kidney and heart in disease. CRS has yet to be formally defined and described by the veterinary profession and its existence and importance in dogs and cats warrant investigation. The CRS Consensus Group, comprising nine veterinary cardiologists and seven nephrologists from Europe and North America, sought to achieve consensus around the definition, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of dogs and cats with “cardiovascular-renal disorders” (CvRD). To this end, the Delphi formal methodology for defining/building consensus and defining guidelines was utilised. METHODS Following a literature review, 13 candidate statements regarding CvRD in dogs and cats were tested for consensus, using a modified Delphi method. As a new area of interest, well-designed studies, specific to CRS/CvRD, are lacking, particularly in dogs and cats. Hence, while scientific justification of all the recommendations was sought and used when available, recommendations were largely reliant on theory, expert opinion, small clinical studies and extrapolation from data derived from other species. RESULTS Of the 13 statements, 11 achieved consensus and 2 did not. The modified Delphi approach worked well to achieve consensus in an objective manner and to develop initial guidelines for CvRD. DISCUSSION The resultant manuscript describes consensus statements for the definition, classification, diagnosis and management strategies for veterinary patients with CvRD, with an emphasis on the pathological interplay between the two organ systems. By formulating consensus statements regarding CvRD in veterinary medicine, the authors hope to stimulate interest in and advancement of the understanding and management of CvRD in

  15. Design of output feedback consensus controllers for nonlinear sampled-data multi-agent systems of strict-feedback form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katayama, Hitoshi

    2014-09-01

    Design of reduced-order observer-based output feedback consensus controllers for nonlinear sampled-data multi-agent systems of strict-feedback form is considered based on nonlinear sampled-data control and consensus control theories. As a practical application of the proposed design method, output feedback consensus control for sampled-data fully actuated ships is also discussed.

  16. Texas Children's Medication Algorithm Project: Update from Texas Consensus Conference Panel on Medication Treatment of Childhood Major Depressive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Carroll W.; Emslie, Graham J.; Crismon, M. Lynn; Posner, Kelly; Birmaher, Boris; Ryan, Neal; Jensen, Peter; Curry, John; Vitiello, Benedetto; Lopez, Molly; Shon, Steve P.; Pliszka, Steven R.; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To revise and update consensus guidelines for medication treatment algorithms for childhood major depressive disorder based on new scientific evidence and expert clinical consensus when evidence is lacking. Method: A consensus conference was held January 13-14, 2005, that included academic clinicians and researchers, practicing…

  17. A reverse KREBS cycle in photosynthesis: consensus at last

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, B. B.; Arnon, D. I.

    1990-01-01

    The Krebs cycle (citric acid or tricarboxylic acid cycle), the final common pathway in aerobic metabolism for the oxidation of carbohydrates, fatty acids and amino acids, is known to be irreversible. It liberates CO2 and generates NADH whose aerobic oxidation yields ATP but it does not operate in reverse as a biosynthetic pathway for CO2 assimilation. In 1966, our laboratory described a cyclic pathway for CO2 assimilation (Evans, Buchanan and Arnon 1966) that was unusual in two respects: (i) it provided the first instance of an obligate photoautotroph that assimilated CO2 by a pathway different from Calvin's reductive pentose phosphate cycle (Calvin 1962) and (ii) in its overall effect the new cycle was a reversal of the Krebs cycle. Named the 'reductive carboxylic acid cycle' (sometimes also called the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle) the new cycle appeared to be the sole CO2 assimilation pathway in Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum (Evans et al. 1966) (now known as Chlorobium limicola forma thiosulfatophilum). Chlorobium is a photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium that grows anaerobically in an inorganic medium with sulfide and thiosulfate as electron donors and CO2 as an obligatory carbon source. In the ensuing years, the new cycle was viewed with skepticism. Not only was it in conflict with the prevailing doctrine that the 'one important property ... shared by all (our emphasis) autotrophic species is the assimilation of CO2 via the Calvin cycle' (McFadden 1973) but also some of its experimental underpinnings were challenged. It is only now that in the words of one of its early skeptics (Tabita 1988) 'a long and tortuous controversy' has ended with general acceptance of the reductive carboxylic acid cycle as a photosynthetic CO2 assimilation pathway distinct from the pentose cycle. (Henceforth, to minimize repetitiveness, the reductive pentose phosphate cycle will often be referred to as the pentose cycle and the reductive carboxylic acid cycle as the carboxylic

  18. Expert consensus document: Consensus statement on best practice management regarding the use of intravesical immunotherapy with BCG for bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Ashish M; Flaig, Thomas W; Grossman, H Barton; Konety, Badrinath; Lamm, Donald; O'Donnell, Michael A; Uchio, Edward; Efstathiou, Jason A; Taylor, John A

    2015-04-01

    Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) treatment reduces recurrences and progression in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). However, although BCG has been in use for almost 40 years, this agent is often underutilized and practice patterns of administration vary. This neglect is most likely caused by uncertainties about the optimal use of BCG, including unawareness of optimal treatment schedules and about patient populations that most benefit from BCG treatment. To address this deficit, a focus group of specialized urologic oncologists (urologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists) reviewed the current guidelines and clinical evidence, discussed their experiences and formed a consensus regarding the optimal use of BCG in the management of patients with NIMBC. The experts concluded that continuing therapy with 3-week BCG maintenance is superior to induction treatment only and is the single most important factor in improving outcomes in patients with NMIBC. They also concluded that a reliable alternative to radical cystectomy in truly BCG-refractory disease remains the subject of clinical trials. In addition, definitions for common terms of BCG failure, such as BCG-refractory and BCG-intolerant, have been formulated.

  19. The International Xenotransplantation Association consensus statement on conditions for undertaking clinical trials of xenocorneal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mee Kum; Choi, Hyuk Jin; Kwon, Ivo; Pierson, Richard N; Cooper, David K C; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; O'Connell, Philip J; Vabres, Bertrand; Maeda, Naoyuki; Hara, Hidetaka; Scobie, Linda; Gianello, Pierre; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Hwang, Eung-Soo; Kim, Sang Joon; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    To develop an international consensus regarding the appropriate conditions for undertaking clinical trials in xenocorneal transplantation, here we review specific ethical, logistical, scientific, and regulatory issues regarding xenocorneal transplantation, and propose guidelines for conduct of clinical xenocorneal transplantation trials. These proposed guidelines are modeled on the published consensus statement of the International Xenotransplantation Association regarding recommended guidelines for conduct of clinical islet xenotransplantation. It is expected that this initial consensus statement will be revised over time in response to scientific advances in the field, and changes in the regulatory framework based on accumulating clinical experience.

  20. Cluster consensus of second-order multi-agent systems via pinning control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiao-Qing; Francis, Austin; Chen, Shi-Hua

    2010-12-01

    This paper investigates the cluster consensus problem for second-order multi-agent systems by applying the pinning control method to a small collection of the agents. Consensus is attained independently for different agent clusters according to the community structure generated by the group partition of the underlying graph and sufficient conditions for both cluster and general consensus are obtained by using results from algebraic graph theory and the LaSalle Invariance Principle. Finally, some simple simulations are presented to illustrate the technique.

  1. 4D flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Dyverfeldt, Petter; Bissell, Malenka; Barker, Alex J; Bolger, Ann F; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Ebbers, Tino; Francios, Christopher J; Frydrychowicz, Alex; Geiger, Julia; Giese, Daniel; Hope, Michael D; Kilner, Philip J; Kozerke, Sebastian; Myerson, Saul; Neubauer, Stefan; Wieben, Oliver; Markl, Michael

    2015-08-10

    Pulsatile blood flow through the cavities of the heart and great vessels is time-varying and multidirectional. Access to all regions, phases and directions of cardiovascular flows has formerly been limited. Four-dimensional (4D) flow cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has enabled more comprehensive access to such flows, with typical spatial resolution of 1.5×1.5×1.5 - 3×3×3 mm(3), typical temporal resolution of 30-40 ms, and acquisition times in the order of 5 to 25 min. This consensus paper is the work of physicists, physicians and biomedical engineers, active in the development and implementation of 4D Flow CMR, who have repeatedly met to share experience and ideas. The paper aims to assist understanding of acquisition and analysis methods, and their potential clinical applications with a focus on the heart and greater vessels. We describe that 4D Flow CMR can be clinically advantageous because placement of a single acquisition volume is straightforward and enables flow through any plane across it to be calculated retrospectively and with good accuracy. We also specify research and development goals that have yet to be satisfactorily achieved. Derived flow parameters, generally needing further development or validation for clinical use, include measurements of wall shear stress, pressure difference, turbulent kinetic energy, and intracardiac flow components. The dependence of measurement accuracy on acquisition parameters is considered, as are the uses of different visualization strategies for appropriate representation of time-varying multidirectional flow fields. Finally, we offer suggestions for more consistent, user-friendly implementation of 4D Flow CMR acquisition and data handling with a view to multicenter studies and more widespread adoption of the approach in routine clinical investigations.

  2. Influenza among the elderly in the Americas: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Rüttimann, Ricardo W; Bonvehí, Pablo E; Vilar-Compte, Diana; Isturiz, Raúl E; Labarca, Jaime A; Vidal, Edison I

    2013-06-01

    Influenza exacts a heavy burden on the elderly, a segment of the population that is estimated to experience rapid growth in the near future. In the past decade most developed and several developing countries have recommended influenza vaccination for those > 65 years of age. The World Health Organization (WHO) set a goal of 75% influenza vaccination coverage among the elderly by 2010, but it was not achieved. In 2011, the Technical Advisory Group at the Pan American Health Organization, Regional Office of WHO for the Americas, reiterated the influenza vaccine recommendation for older adults. Relatively little information has been compiled on the immunological aspect of aging or on reducing its impact, information particularly relevant for clinicians and gerontologist with firsthand experience confronting its effects. To fill this data gap, in 2012 the Americas Health Foundation (Washington, D.C., United States) and the nonprofit, Fighting Infectious Diseases in Emerging Countries (Miami, Florida, United States), convened a panel of Latin American clinicians and gerontologists with expertise in influenza to discuss key issues and develop a consensus statement. The major recommendations were to improve influenza surveillance throughout Latin America so that its impact can be quantified; and to conduct laboratory confirmation of influenza for all patients who have flu-like symptoms and are frail, immunosuppressed, have comorbidities, are respiratory compromised, or have been admitted to a hospital. The panel also noted that: since evidence for antivirals in the elderly is unclear, their use should be handled on a case-by-case basis; despite decreased immunological response, influenza vaccination in older adults is still crucial; indirect immunization strategies should be encouraged; and traditional infection control measures are essential in long-term care facilities.

  3. Recommendations for the management of biofilm: a consensus document.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, T; Wolcott, R D; Peghetti, A; Leaper, D; Cutting, K; Polignano, R; Rosa Rita, Z; Moscatelli, A; Greco, A; Romanelli, M; Pancani, S; Bellingeri, A; Ruggeri, V; Postacchini, L; Tedesco, S; Manfredi, L; Camerlingo, Maria; Rowan, S; Gabrielli, A; Pomponio, G

    2016-06-01

    The potential impact of biofilm on healing in acute and chronic wounds is one of the most controversial current issues in wound care. A significant amount of laboratory-based research has been carried out on this topic, however, in 2013 the European Wound Management Association (EWMA) pointed out the lack of guidance for managing biofilms in clinical practice and solicited the need for guidelines and further clinical research. In response to this challenge, the Italian Nursing Wound Healing Society (AISLeC) initiated a project which aimed to achieve consensus among a multidisciplinary and multiprofessional international panel of experts to identify what could be considered part of 'good clinical practice' with respect to the recognition and management of biofilms in acute and chronic wounds. The group followed a systematic approach, developed by the GRADE working group, to define relevant questions and clinical recommendations raised in clinical practice. An independent librarian retrieved and screened approximately 2000 pertinent published papers to produce tables of levels of evidence. After a smaller focus group had a multistep structured discussion, and a formal voting process had been completed, ten therapeutic interventions were identified as being strongly recommendable for clinical practice, while another four recommendations were graded as being 'weak'. The panel subsequently formulated a preliminary statement (although with a weak grade of agreement): 'provided that other causes that prevent optimal wound healing have been ruled out, chronic wounds are chronically infected'. All members of the panel agreed that there is a paucity of reliable, well-conducted clinical trials which have produced clear evidence related to the effects of biofilm presence. In the meantime it was agreed that expert-based guidelines were needed to be developed for the recognition and management of biofilms in wounds and for the best design of future clinical trials. This is a

  4. Diabetic kidney disease: a report from an ADA Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Tuttle, Katherine R; Bakris, George L; Bilous, Rudolf W; Chiang, Jane L; de Boer, Ian H; Goldstein-Fuchs, Jordi; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Narva, Andrew S; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Neumiller, Joshua J; Patel, Uptal D; Ratner, Robert E; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Molitch, Mark E

    2014-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of diabetes mellitus have grown significantly throughout the world, due primarily to the increase in type 2 diabetes. This overall increase in the number of people with diabetes has had a major impact on development of diabetic kidney disease (DKD), one of the most frequent complications of both types of diabetes. DKD is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), accounting for approximately 50% of cases in the developed world. Although incidence rates for ESRD attributable to DKD have recently stabilized, these rates continue to rise in high-risk groups such as middle-aged African Americans, Native Americans, and Hispanics. The costs of care for people with DKD are extraordinarily high. In the Medicare population alone, DKD-related expenditures among this mostly older group were nearly $25 billion in 2011. Due to the high human and societal costs, the Consensus Conference on Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetes was convened by the American Diabetes Association in collaboration with the American Society of Nephrology and the National Kidney Foundation to appraise issues regarding patient management, highlighting current practices and new directions. Major topic areas in DKD included (1) identification and monitoring, (2) cardiovascular disease and management of dyslipidemia, (3) hypertension and use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockade and mineralocorticoid receptor blockade, (4) glycemia measurement, hypoglycemia, and drug therapies, (5) nutrition and general care in advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, (6) children and adolescents, and (7) multidisciplinary approaches and medical home models for health care delivery. This current state summary and research recommendations are designed to guide advances in care and the generation of new knowledge that will meaningfully improve life for people with DKD.

  5. Consensus statement on anaesthesia for day care surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Satish; Harsoor, SS; Chandrasekar, M; Bhaskar, S Bala; Bapat, Jitendra; Ramdas, Edakeparavan Keloth; Valecha, Umesh Kumar; Pradhan, Amol Shashikumar; Swami, Adarsh Chandra

    2017-01-01

    The primary aim of day-care surgery units is to allow for early recovery of the patients so that they can return to their familiar 'home' environment; the management hence should be focused towards achieving these ends. The benefits could include a possible reduction in the risk of thromboembolism and hospital-acquired infections. Furthermore, day-care surgery is believed to reduce the average unit cost of treatment by up to 70% as compared to inpatient surgery. With more than 20% of the world's disease burden, India only has 6% of the world's hospital beds. Hence, there is an immense opportunity for expansion in day-care surgery in India to ensure faster and safer, cost-effective patient turnover. For this to happen, there is a need of change in the mindset of all concerned clinicians, surgeons, anaesthesiologists and even the patients. A group of nine senior consultants from various parts of India, a mix of private and government anaesthesiologists, assembled in Mumbai and deliberated and discussed on the various aspects of day-care surgery. They formulated a consensus statement, the first of its kind in the Indian scenario, which can act as a guidance and tool for day-care anaesthesia in India. The statements are derived from the available published evidence in peer-reviewed literature including guidelines of several bodies such as the American Society of Anesthesiologists, British Association of Day Surgery and International Association of Ambulatory Surgery. The authors also offer interpretive comments wherever such evidence is inadequate or contradictory. PMID:28250479

  6. MRI reporting standard for chronic pelvic pain: consensus development

    PubMed Central

    Tirlapur, Seema A; Balogun, Moji; Priest, Lee; Khan, Khalid S; Zamora, Javier; Sahdev, Anju

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To identify radiological parameters that should be reported on gynaecological MRI in order to create a standardized assessment pro forma for reporting CPP, which may be used in clinical practice. Methods: Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) in females is a common problem presenting a major challenge to healthcare providers. The complex multifactorial aetiology requires a multidisciplinary approach and often necessitates diagnostic laparoscopy for assessment. MRI is emerging as a potential non-invasive alternative for evaluation of CPP; however, standardization of reporting is required for it to be used in routine clinical practice. A two-generational Delphi survey with an expert panel of 28 radiologists specializing in gynaecological MRI from across the UK was used to refine a proposed reporting template for CPP. Results: 75% response rate for the first round and 79% for the second. Following the second round, agreement was reached on the structure of the pro forma and the way in which information was sought, with overall consistency of agreement between experts deemed as fair (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.394). This was accepted as the final version by consensus. Conclusion: The standardized pro forma developed in this study will form the basis for future prospective evaluation of MRI in CPP. This template could be modified for the assessment of other benign gynaecological conditions. Advances in knowledge: Female CPP is a significant problem presenting challenges for clinicians. MRI is often used for evaluation and standardization of techniques, and reporting is required. The pro forma developed in this study will form the basis for future prospective MRI evaluation. PMID:26562496

  7. Consensus statement on anaesthesia for day care surgeries.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Satish; Harsoor, S S; Chandrasekar, M; Bhaskar, S Bala; Bapat, Jitendra; Ramdas, Edakeparavan Keloth; Valecha, Umesh Kumar; Pradhan, Amol Shashikumar; Swami, Adarsh Chandra

    2017-02-01

    The primary aim of day-care surgery units is to allow for early recovery of the patients so that they can return to their familiar 'home' environment; the management hence should be focused towards achieving these ends. The benefits could include a possible reduction in the risk of thromboembolism and hospital-acquired infections. Furthermore, day-care surgery is believed to reduce the average unit cost of treatment by up to 70% as compared to inpatient surgery. With more than 20% of the world's disease burden, India only has 6% of the world's hospital beds. Hence, there is an immense opportunity for expansion in day-care surgery in India to ensure faster and safer, cost-effective patient turnover. For this to happen, there is a need of change in the mindset of all concerned clinicians, surgeons, anaesthesiologists and even the patients. A group of nine senior consultants from various parts of India, a mix of private and government anaesthesiologists, assembled in Mumbai and deliberated and discussed on the various aspects of day-care surgery. They formulated a consensus statement, the first of its kind in the Indian scenario, which can act as a guidance and tool for day-care anaesthesia in India. The statements are derived from the available published evidence in peer-reviewed literature including guidelines of several bodies such as the American Society of Anesthesiologists, British Association of Day Surgery and International Association of Ambulatory Surgery. The authors also offer interpretive comments wherever such evidence is inadequate or contradictory.

  8. First International Consensus Report on Adnexal Masses: Management Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Glanc, Phyllis; Benacerraf, Beryl; Bourne, Tom; Brown, Douglas; Coleman, Beverly G; Crum, Christopher; Dodge, Jason; Levine, Deborah; Pavlik, Edward; Timmerman, Dirk; Ueland, Frederick R; Wolfman, Wendy; Goldstein, Steven R

    2017-03-07

    The First International Consensus Conference on Adnexal Masses was convened to thoroughly examine the state of the science and to formulate recommendations for clinical assessment and management. The panel included representatives of societies in the fields of gynecology, gynecologic oncology, radiology, and pathology and clinicians from Europe, Canada, and the United States. In the United States, there are approximately 9.1 surgeries per malignancy compared to the European International Ovarian Tumor Analysis center trials, with only 2.3 (oncology centers) and 5.9 (other centers) reported surgeries per malignancy, suggesting that there is room to improve our preoperative assessments. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Practice Bulletin on "Management of Adnexal Masses," reaffirmed in 2015 (Obstet Gynecol 2007; 110:201-214), still states, "With the exception of simple cysts on a transvaginal ultrasound finding, most pelvic masses in postmenopausal women will require surgical intervention." The panel concluded that patients would benefit not only from a more conservative approach to many benign adnexal masses but also from optimization of physician referral patterns to a gynecologic oncologist in cases of suspected ovarian malignancies. A number of next-step options were offered to aid in management of cases with sonographically indeterminate adnexal masses. This process would provide an opportunity to improve risk stratification for indeterminate masses via the provision of alternatives, including but not limited to evidence-based risk-assessment algorithms and referral to an "expert sonologist" or to a gynecologic oncologist. The panel believed that these efforts to improve clinical management and preoperative triage patterns would ultimately improve patient care.

  9. Expert Consensus on Characteristics of Wisdom: A Delphi Method Study

    PubMed Central

    Jeste, Dilip V.; Ardelt, Monika; Blazer, Dan; Kraemer, Helena C.; Vaillant, George; Meeks, Thomas W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Wisdom has received increasing attention in empirical research in recent years, especially in gerontology and psychology, but consistent definitions of wisdom remain elusive. We sought to better characterize this concept via an expert consensus panel using a 2-phase Delphi method. Design and Methods: A survey questionnaire comprised 53 Likert scale statements related to the concepts of wisdom, intelligence, and spirituality was developed to determine if and how wisdom was viewed as being distinct from the latter 2 concepts. Of the 57 international wisdom experts contacted by e-mail, 30 completed the Phase 1 survey and 27 also completed the Phase 2 survey. Results: In Phase 1, there were significant group differences among the concepts of wisdom, intelligence, and spirituality on 49 of the 53 items rated by the experts. Wisdom differed from intelligence on 46 of these 49 items, whereas wisdom differed from spirituality on 31 items. In Phase 2, we sought to define wisdom further by selecting 12 items based on Phase 1 results. Most experts agreed on many of the suggested characteristics of wisdom—that is, it is uniquely human; a form of advanced cognitive and emotional development that is experience driven; and a personal quality, albeit a rare one, which can be learned, increases with age, can be measured, and is not likely to be enhanced by taking medication. Implications: There was considerable agreement among the expert participants on wisdom being a distinct entity and a number of its characteristic qualities. These data should help in designing additional empirical research on wisdom. PMID:20233730

  10. Two-species-coagulation approach to consensus by group level interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Carlos; Macià, Fabricio; Velázquez, Juan J. L.

    2010-07-01

    We explore the self-organization dynamics of a set of entities by considering the interactions that affect the different subgroups conforming the whole. To this end, we employ the widespread example of coagulation kinetics, and characterize which interaction types lead to consensus formation and which do not, as well as the corresponding different macroscopic patterns. The crucial technical point is extending the usual one species coagulation dynamics to the two species one. This is achieved by means of introducing explicitly solvable kernels which have a clear physical meaning. The corresponding solutions are calculated in the long time limit, in which consensus may or may not be reached. The lack of consensus is characterized by means of scaling limits of the solutions. The possible applications of our results to some topics in which consensus reaching is fundamental, such as collective animal motion and opinion spreading dynamics, are also outlined.

  11. The scientific consensus on climate change as a gateway belief: experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Sander L; Leiserowitz, Anthony A; Feinberg, Geoffrey D; Maibach, Edward W

    2015-01-01

    There is currently widespread public misunderstanding about the degree of scientific consensus on human-caused climate change, both in the US as well as internationally. Moreover, previous research has identified important associations between public perceptions of the scientific consensus, belief in climate change and support for climate policy. This paper extends this line of research by advancing and providing experimental evidence for a "gateway belief model" (GBM). Using national data (N = 1104) from a consensus-message experiment, we find that increasing public perceptions of the scientific consensus is significantly and causally associated with an increase in the belief that climate change is happening, human-caused and a worrisome threat. In turn, changes in these key beliefs are predictive of increased support for public action. In short, we find that perceived scientific agreement is an important gateway belief, ultimately influencing public responses to climate change.

  12. Distributed robust finite-time nonlinear consensus protocols for multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Zongyu; Tie, Lin

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the robust finite-time consensus problem of multi-agent systems in networks with undirected topology. Global nonlinear consensus protocols augmented with a variable structure are constructed with the aid of Lyapunov functions for each single-integrator agent dynamics in the presence of external disturbances. In particular, it is shown that the finite settling time of the proposed general framework for robust consensus design is upper bounded for any initial condition. This makes it possible for network consensus problems to design and estimate the convergence time offline for a multi-agent team with a given undirected information flow. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the performance and effectiveness of our finite-time protocols.

  13. Use of Convexity in Ostomy Care: Results of an International Consensus Meeting.

    PubMed

    Hoeflok, Jo; Salvadalena, Ginger; Pridham, Sue; Droste, Werner; McNichol, Laurie; Gray, Mikel

    Ostomy skin barriers that incorporate a convexity feature have been available in the marketplace for decades, but limited resources are available to guide clinicians in selection and use of convex products. Given the widespread use of convexity, and the need to provide practical guidelines for appropriate use of pouching systems with convex features, an international consensus panel was convened to provide consensus-based guidance for this aspect of ostomy practice. Panelists were provided with a summary of relevant literature in advance of the meeting; these articles were used to generate and reach consensus on 26 statements during a 1-day meeting. Consensus was achieved when 80% of panelists agreed on a statement using an anonymous electronic response system. The 26 statements provide guidance for convex product characteristics, patient assessment, convexity use, and outcomes.

  14. National consensus in China on diagnosis and treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xichun; Jiang, Zefei; Li, Huiping; Chen, Jiayi; Cui, Shude; Li, Qing; Liao, Ning; Liu, Donggeng; Liu, Jian; Lu, Jinsong; Shen, Kunwei; Sun, Tao; Teng, Yuee; Tong, Zhongsheng; Wang, Shulian; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Xiaojia; Wang, Yongsheng; Wu, Jiong; Yuan, Peng; Zhang, Pin; Zhang, Qingyuan; Zheng, Hong; Pang, Da; Ren, Guosheng; Shao, Zhimin; Shen, Zhenzhou; Song, Erwei; Song, Santai

    2015-01-01

    The recently available guidelines on the management of advanced breast cancer (ABC) organized by Chinese Anti-Cancer Association, Committee of Breast Cancer Society (CACA-CBCS) do not elucidate ABC in details. To instruct clinicians in treatment of ABC, a Chinese expert consensus meeting on diagnosis and treatment of ABC was held in June 2014 and a consensus is developed. The following consensus provides the level of evidence and supporting documents for each recommendation, and introduces research topics to be urgently addressed. Notably, the consensus on diagnosis and treatment of ABC in China is developed to be applied nationwide. In different areas, multidisciplinary treatment (MDT) tailored to the each patient and the disease itself should be applied based on the basic principles of modern oncology. PMID:26605288

  15. The Scientific Consensus on Climate Change as a Gateway Belief: Experimental Evidence

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Sander L.; Leiserowitz, Anthony A.; Feinberg, Geoffrey D.; Maibach, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    There is currently widespread public misunderstanding about the degree of scientific consensus on human-caused climate change, both in the US as well as internationally. Moreover, previous research has identified important associations between public perceptions of the scientific consensus, belief in climate change and support for climate policy. This paper extends this line of research by advancing and providing experimental evidence for a “gateway belief model” (GBM). Using national data (N = 1104) from a consensus-message experiment, we find that increasing public perceptions of the scientific consensus is significantly and causally associated with an increase in the belief that climate change is happening, human-caused and a worrisome threat. In turn, changes in these key beliefs are predictive of increased support for public action. In short, we find that perceived scientific agreement is an important gateway belief, ultimately influencing public responses to climate change. PMID:25714347

  16. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO Consensus Conference on Endometrial Cancer: diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Colombo, N; Creutzberg, C; Amant, F; Bosse, T; González-Martín, A; Ledermann, J; Marth, C; Nout, R; Querleu, D; Mirza, M R; Sessa, C

    2016-01-01

    The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent disease. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question and a consensus was reached. Results of this consensus conference, together with a summary of evidence supporting each recommendation, are detailed in this article. All participants have approved this final article.

  17. 5th Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference: Individualized Therapy and Patient Factors.

    PubMed

    McGee, J; Bookman, M; Harter, P; Marth, C; McNeish, I; Moore, K N; Poveda, A; Hilpert, F; Hasegawa, K; Bacon, M; Gatsonis, C; Brand, A; Kridelka, F; Berek, J; Ottevanger, N; Levy, T; Silverberg, S; Kim, B-G; Hirte, H; Okamoto, A; Stuart, G; Ochiai, K

    2017-01-24

    This manuscript reports the consensus statements regarding the design and conduct of clinical trials in patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), following deliberation at the 5th Ovarian Cancer Consensus Conference (OCCC), held in Tokyo in November 2015. Three important questions were identified for discussion prior to the meeting and achieved consensus during the meeting: 1) What are the most important factors to be evaluated prior to initial therapy? 2) What are the most important factors to be evaluated specifically in recurrent disease? 3) Are there specific considerations for special patient subpopulations? In addition, we report a list of important unmet needs compiled during the consensus process, which is intended to guide future research initiatives.

  18. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO Consensus Conference on Endometrial Cancer: Diagnosis, Treatment and Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic; Bosse, Tjalling; González-Martín, Antonio; Ledermann, Jonathan; Marth, Christian; Nout, Remi; Querleu, Denis; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sessa, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent disease. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question and a consensus was reached. Results of this consensus conference, together with a summary of evidence supporting each recommendation, are detailed in this article. All participants have approved this final article.

  19. 76 FR 78307 - Manufactured Housing Consensus Committee; Notice Inviting Nominations of Individuals To Serve on...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... certifications regarding conflict-of- interest and eligibility for membership prior to finalizing an appointment... criteria as a prerequisite to final appointment. Consensus Committee--Advisory Role The MHCC's role...

  20. Using Behavioral Consensus to Learn about Social Conventions in Early Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wanying; Baron, Andrew S.; Hamlin, J. K.

    2016-01-01

    Adults make inferences about the conventionality of others’ behaviors based on their prevalence across individuals. Here, we look at whether children use behavioral consensus as a cue to conventionality, and whether this informs which cultural models children choose to learn from. We find that 2- to 5-year old children exhibit increasing sensitivity to behavioral consensus with age, suggesting that like adults, young humans use behavioral consensus to identify social conventions. However, unlike previous studies showing children’s tendencies to prefer and to learn from members of a consensus, the present study suggests that there are contexts in which children prefer and learn from unconventional individuals. The implications of these different preferences are discussed. PMID:27761119

  1. 75 FR 65051 - Consensus Standards, Standard Practice for Inspection of Airplane Electrical Wiring Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... of Airplane Electrical Wiring Systems. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: James Brady, Aerospace... Development and Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards and in Conformity Assessment Activities,'' dated February 10, 1998, industry and the FAA have been working with ASTM International to develop...

  2. [All-Russian Consensus on Diagnosis and Treatment of Celiac Disease in Children and Adults].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Bykova, S V; Sabel'nikova, E A; Maev, I V; Baranov, A A; Bakulin, I G; Krums, L M; Bel'mer, S V; Borovik, T E; Zakharova, I N; Dmitrieva, Yu A; Roslavtseva, E A; Kornienko, E A; Khavkin, A I; Potapov, A S; Revnova, M O; Mukhina, Yu G; Shcherbakov, P L; Fedorov, E D; Belousova, E A; Khalif, I L; Khomeriki, S G; Rotin, D L; Vorob'eva, N G; Pivnik, A V; Gudkova, R B; Chernin, V V; Vokhmyanina, N V; Pukhlikova, T V; Degtyarev, D A; Damulin, I V; Mkrtumyan, A M; Dzhulai, G S; Tetruashvili, N K; Baranovsky, A Yu; Nazarenko, L I; Kharitonov, A G; Loranskaya, I D; Saifutdinov, R G; Livzan, M A; Abramov, D A; Osipenko, M F; Oreshko, L V; Tkachenko, E I; Sitkin, S I; Efremov, L I

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the All-Russian consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease in children and adults, which has been elaborated by leading experts, such as gastroenterologists and pediatricians of Russia on the basis of the existing Russian and international guidelines. The consensus approved at the 42nd Annual Scientific Session of the Central Research Institute of Gastroenterology on Principles of Evidence-Based Medicine into Clinical Practice (March 2-3, 2016). The consensus is intended for practitioners engaged in the management and treatment of patients with celiac disease. Evidence for the main provisions of the consensus was sought in electronic databases. In making recommendations, the main source was the publications included in the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, and PubMed. The search depth was 10 years. Recommendations in the preliminary version were reviewed by independent experts. Voting was done by the Delphic polling system.

  3. Consensus statement on the treatment of multiple sclerosis by the Spanish Society of Neurology in 2016.

    PubMed

    García Merino, A; Ramón Ara Callizo, J; Fernández Fernández, O; Landete Pascual, L; Moral Torres, E; Rodríguez-Antigüedad Zarrantz, A

    2017-03-01

    With the advent of new disease-modifying drugs, the treatment of multiple sclerosis is becoming increasingly complex. Using consensus statements is therefore advisable. The present consensus statement, which was drawn up by the Spanish Society of Neurology's study group for demyelinating diseases, updates previous consensus statements on the disease. The present study lists the medications currently approved for multiple sclerosis and their official indications, and analyses such treatment-related aspects as activity, early treatment, maintenance, follow-up, treatment failure, changes in medication, and special therapeutic situations. This consensus statement includes treatment recommendations for a wide range of demyelinating diseases, from isolated demyelinating syndromes to the different forms of multiple sclerosis, as well as recommendations for initial therapy and changes in drug medication, and additional comments on induction and combined therapy and practical aspects of the use of these drugs.

  4. ESMO-ESGO-ESTRO consensus conference on endometrial cancer: Diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Nicoletta; Creutzberg, Carien; Amant, Frederic; Bosse, Tjalling; González-Martín, Antonio; Ledermann, Jonathan; Marth, Christian; Nout, Remi; Querleu, Denis; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sessa, Cristiana

    2015-12-01

    The first joint European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), European SocieTy for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO) and European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) consensus conference on endometrial cancer was held on 11-13 December 2014 in Milan, Italy, and comprised a multidisciplinary panel of 40 leading experts in the management of endometrial cancer. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared three clinically-relevant questions about endometrial cancer relating to the following four areas: Prevention and screening, surgery, adjuvant treatment and advanced and recurrent disease. All relevant scientific literature, as identified by the experts, was reviewed in advance. During the consensus conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question and a consensus was reached. Results of this consensus conference, together with a summary of evidence supporting each recommendation, are detailed in this article. All participants have approved this final article.

  5. Event-Based Consensus for Linear Multiagent Systems Without Continuous Communication.

    PubMed

    Xing, Lantao; Wen, Changyun; Guo, Fanghong; Liu, Zhitao; Su, Hongye

    2016-10-04

    In this paper, we propose a new distributed event-trigger consensus protocol for linear multiagent systems with external disturbances. Two consensus problems are considered: one is a leader-follower case and the other is a nonleader case. Different from the existing results, our proposed scheme enables each agent to decide when to transmit its state signals to its neighbors such that continuous communication between neighboring agents is avoided. Clearly, this can largely decrease the communication burden of the whole communication network. Besides, since the control signal for each agent is discontinuous because of the event-triggering mechanism, the existence of a solution for the closed-loop system in the classical sense may not be guaranteed. To solve this problem, we employ a nonsmooth analysis technique including differential inclusion and Filippov solution. Through nonsmooth Lyapunov analysis, it is shown that uniformly bounded consensus results are derived and the bound of the consensus error is adjustable by choosing suitable design parameters.

  6. Finite-time consensus of time-varying nonlinear multi-agent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingrong; Liang, Zhishan

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates the problem of leader-follower finite-time consensus for a class of time-varying nonlinear multi-agent systems. The dynamics of each agent is assumed to be represented by a strict feedback nonlinear system, where nonlinearities satisfy Lipschitz growth conditions with time-varying gains. The main design procedure is outlined as follows. First, it is shown that the leader-follower consensus problem is equivalent to a conventional control problem of multi-variable high-dimension systems. Second, by introducing a state transformation, the control problem is converted into the construction problem of two dynamic equations. Third, based on the Lyapunov stability theorem, the global finite-time stability of the closed-loop control system is proved, and the finite-time consensus of the concerned multi-agent systems is thus guaranteed. An example is given to verify the effectiveness of the proposed consensus protocol algorithm.

  7. 75 FR 65052 - Consensus Standards, Standard Practice for Maintenance of Airplane Electrical Wiring Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Consensus Standards, Standard Practice for Maintenance of Airplane... Practice for Maintenance of Airplane Electrical Wiring Systems (Standard Practice) as an acceptable means... FAA finds the standards to be acceptable methods and procedures for maintenance of electrical...

  8. Distributed MPC based consensus for single-integrator multi-agent systems.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhaomeng; Fan, Ming-Can; Zhang, Hai-Tao

    2015-09-01

    This paper addresses model predictive control schemes for consensus in multi-agent systems (MASs) with discrete-time single-integrator dynamics under switching directed interaction graphs. The control horizon is extended to be greater than one which endows the closed-loop system with extra degree of freedom. We derive sufficient conditions on the sampling period and the interaction graph to achieve consensus by using the property of infinite products of stochastic matrices. Consensus can be achieved asymptotically if the sampling period is selected such that the interaction graph among agents has a directed spanning tree jointly. Significantly, if the interaction graph always has a spanning tree, one can select an arbitrary large sampling period to guarantee consensus. Finally, several simulations are conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  9. Distributed consensus tracking for multiple uncertain nonlinear strict-feedback systems under a directed graph.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sung Jin

    2013-04-01

    In this brief, we study the distributed consensus tracking control problem for multiple strict-feedback systems with unknown nonlinearities under a directed graph topology. It is assumed that the leader's output is time-varying and has been accessed by only a small fraction of followers in a group. The distributed dynamic surface design approach is proposed to design local consensus controllers in order to guarantee the consensus tracking between the followers and the leader. The function approximation technique using neural networks is employed to compensate unknown nonlinear terms induced from the controller design procedure. From the Lyapunov stability theorem, it is shown that the consensus errors are cooperatively semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded and converge to an adjustable neighborhood of the origin.

  10. Optimization of conditions for high-level expression and purification of human recombinant consensus interferon (rh-cIFN) and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nadeem; Bashir, Hamid; Zafar, Ahmad Usman; Khan, Mohsin Ahmad; Tahir, Saad; Khan, Faidad; Khan, Muhammad Islam; Akram, Muhammad; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human consensus interferon (rh-cIFN) is an artificially engineered interferon (IFN) developed by recombining and reordering the protein sequences that exist in standard IFN. This recombination resulted into a drug that has the potential to work better than natural, standard IFN. In this study, we described optimized conditions for high-level expression and recovery of biologically active consensus IFN from inclusion bodies (IBs). A synthetic gene coding 166 amino acids of consensus IFN was cloned under the T7 promoter. Escherichia coli strain BL21DE3Plys was used to transform expression construct. For high-level expression, shake-flask fermentation conditions were standardized. For isolation of IBs, the sonication method was optimized. A variety of chaotropic agents including guanidine hydrochloride, urea, SDS, and detergents were studied for solubilization of IBs. For renaturation of solubilized denatured protein by the dilution process, parameters of dilution factor, temperature, and l-arginine were optimized. A one-step chromatography method was developed for high-yield purification of consensus IFN. rh-cIFN was characterized by SDS-PAGE, Western blot, and high-performance liquid chromatography. Purified protein has a molecular weight of 19.5 kDa and specific activity was 2.0 × 10(8) as determined by the cytopathic inhibition assay. This study concludes that by using optimized conditions, we obtained a yield of 100 mg/L of biologically active rh-cIFN, which is highest ever reported according to available data.

  11. Cholesterol and the interaction of proteins with membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2006-07-01

    Cholesterol is not uniformly distributed in biological membranes. One of the factors influencing the formation of cholesterol-rich domains in membranes is the unequal lateral distribution of proteins in membranes. Certain proteins are found in cholesterol-rich domains. In some of these cases, it is as a consequence of the proteins interacting directly with cholesterol. There are several structural features of a protein that result in the protein preferentially associating with cholesterol-rich domains. One of the best documented of these is certain types of lipidations. In addition, however, there are segments of a protein that can preferentially sequester cholesterol. We discuss two examples of these cholesterol-recognition elements: the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain and the sterol-sensing domain (SSD). The requirements for a CRAC motif are quite flexible and predict that a large number of sequences could recognize cholesterol. There are, however, certain proteins that are known to interact with cholesterol-rich domains of cell membranes that have CRAC motifs, and synthetic peptides corresponding to these segments also promote the formation of cholesterol-rich domains. Modeling studies have provided a rationale for certain requirements of the CRAC motif. The SSD is a larger protein segment comprising five transmembrane domains. The amino acid sequence YIYF is found in several SSD and in certain other proteins for which there is evidence that they interact with cholesterol-rich domains. The CRAC sequences as well as YIYF are generally found adjacent to a transmembrane helical segment. These regions appear to have a strong influence of the localization of certain proteins into domains in biological membranes. In addition to the SSD, there is also a domain found in soluble proteins, the START domain, that binds lipids. Certain proteins with START domains specifically bind cholesterol and are believed to function in

  12. [Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society].

    PubMed

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-01-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria.

  13. [Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society].

    PubMed

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-03-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria.

  14. Consensus on the detection and management of prediabetes. Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society.

    PubMed

    Mata-Cases, M; Artola, S; Escalada, J; Ezkurra-Loyola, P; Ferrer-García, J C; Fornos, J A; Girbés, J; Rica, I

    2015-03-01

    In Spain, according to the Di@bet.es study, 13.8% of the adult population suffers from diabetes and 14.8% from some form of prediabetes (impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting glucose or both). Since early detection of prediabetes can facilitate the implementation of therapeutic measures to prevent its progression to diabetes, we believe that preventive strategies in primary care and specialized clinical settings should be agreed. Screening for diabetes and prediabetes using a specific questionnaire (FINDRISC) and/or the measurement of fasting plasma glucose in high risk patients leads to detecting patients at risk of developing diabetes and it is necessary to consider how they should be managed. The intervention in lifestyle can reduce the progression to diabetes and reverse a prediabetic state to normal and is a cost-effective intervention. Some drugs, such as metformin, have also been shown effective in reducing the progression to diabetes but are not superior to non-pharmacological interventions. Finally, an improvement in some cardiovascular risk factors has been observed although there is no strong evidence supporting the effectiveness of screening in terms of morbility and mortality. The Consensus and Clinical Guidelines Working Group of the Spanish Diabetes Society has issued some recommendations that have been agreed by the Sociedad Española de Endocrinología y Nutrición, Sociedad Española de Endocrinología Pediátrica, Sociedad Española de Farmacia Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria, Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria, Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna, Asociación de Enfermería Comunitaria and Red de Grupos de Estudio de la Diabetes en Atención Primaria.

  15. Consensus-Based Formation Control of a Class of Multi-Agent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh; Gonzalez, Oscar R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a consensus-based formation control scheme for autonomous multi-agent systems represented by double integrator dynamics. Assuming that the information graph topology consists of an undirected connected graph, a leader-based consensus-type control law is presented and shown to provide asymptotic formation stability when subjected to piecewise constant formation velocity commands. It is also shown that global asymptotic stability is preserved in the presence of (0, infinity)- sector monotonic non-decreasing actuator nonlinearities.

  16. SC3: consensus clustering of single-cell RNA-seq data.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Vladimir Yu; Kirschner, Kristina; Schaub, Michael T; Andrews, Tallulah; Yiu, Andrew; Chandra, Tamir; Natarajan, Kedar N; Reik, Wolf; Barahona, Mauricio; Green, Anthony R; Hemberg, Martin

    2017-03-27

    Single-cell RNA-seq enables the quantitative characterization of cell types based on global transcriptome profiles. We present single-cell consensus clustering (SC3), a user-friendly tool for unsupervised clustering, which achieves high accuracy and robustness by combining multiple clustering solutions through a consensus approach (http://bioconductor.org/packages/SC3). We demonstrate that SC3 is capable of identifying subclones from the transcriptomes of neoplastic cells collected from patients.

  17. European evidence based consensus on the diagnosis and management of Crohn's disease: special situations

    PubMed Central

    Caprilli, R; Gassull, M A; Escher, J C; Moser, G; Munkholm, P; Forbes, A; Hommes, D W; Lochs, H; Angelucci, E; Cocco, A; Vucelic, B; Hildebrand, H; Kolacek, S; Riis, L; Lukas, M; de Franchis, R; Hamilton, M; Jantschek, G; Michetti, P; O'Morain, C; Anwar, M M; Freitas, J L; Mouzas, I A; Baert, F; Mitchell, R; Hawkey, C J

    2006-01-01

    This third section of the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation (ECCO) Consensus on the management of Crohn's disease concerns postoperative recurrence, fistulating disease, paediatrics, pregnancy, psychosomatics, extraintestinal manifestations, and alternative therapy. The first section on definitions and diagnosis reports on the aims and methods of the consensus, as well as sections on diagnosis, pathology, and classification of Crohn's disease. The second section on current management addresses treatment of active disease, maintenance of medically induced remission, and surgery of Crohn's disease. PMID:16481630

  18. Comparison of STR profiling from low template DNA extracts with and without the consensus profiling method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The consensus profiling method was introduced to overcome the exaggerated stochastic effects associated with low copy number DNA typing. However, little empirical evidence has been provided which shows that a consensus profile, derived from dividing a sample into separate aliquots and including only alleles seen at least twice, gives the most informative profile, compared to a profile obtained by amplifying the entire low template DNA extract in one reaction. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the quality of consensus profiles compared to profiles obtained using the whole low template extract for amplification. Methods A total of 100 pg and 25 pg DNA samples were amplified with the PowerPlex® ESI 16 Kits using 30 or 34 PCR cycles. A total of 100 pg and 25 pg DNA samples were then divided into three aliquots for a 34-cycle PCR and a consensus profile derived that included alleles that appeared in at least two of the replicates. Profiles from the non-split samples were compared to the consensus profiles focusing on peak heights, allele drop out, locus drop out and allele drop in. Results Performing DNA profiling on non-split extracts produced profiles with a higher percentage of correct loci compared to the consensus profiling technique. Consensus profiling did eliminate any spurious alleles from the final profile. However, there was a notable increase in allele and locus drop out when a LTDNA sample was divided prior to amplification. Conclusions The loss of information that occurs when a sample is split for amplification indicates that consensus profiling may not be producing the most informative DNA profile for samples where the template amount is limited. PMID:22748106

  19. SOSORT 2012 consensus paper: reducing x-ray exposure in pediatric patients with scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This 2012 Consensus paper reviews the literature on side effects of x-ray exposure in the pediatric population as it relates to scoliosis evaluation and treatment. Alternative methods of spinal assessment and imaging are reviewed, and strategies for reducing the number of radiographs are developed. Using the Delphi technique, SOSORT members developed consensus statements that describe how often radiographs should be taken in each of the pediatric and adolescent sub-populations. PMID:24782912

  20. [Key points for the management of dermatitis in Latin America. The SLAAI Consensus].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jorge; Páez, Bruno; Macías-Weinmann, Alejandra; De Falco, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of atopic dermatitis in Latin America, as in other regions, has been increasing in recent years. The SLAAI consensus is based on a systematic search for articles related to dermatitis, with focus in the pathophysiology and treatment and its impact on Latin America, and reviewed using the Delphi methodology (Revista Alergia Mexico 2014;61:178-211). In this article we highlight the key points of consensus and particular considerations in Latin America.