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Sample records for acid cycle enzymes

  1. Patterns of diversity of citric acid cycle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, P D

    1987-01-01

    The citric acid cycle performs a dual role in cell metabolism, acting as a source of both 'energy' and biosynthetic starting materials. The widespread occurrence of the cycle throughout Nature is an excellent example of the unity of biochemistry, but closer examination reveals that there is considerable diversity in the citric acid cycle of different organisms with respect to metabolic role, molecular enzymology and mode of regulation. Two enzymes of the cycle--citrate synthase and succinate thiokinase--have been found to exhibit particularly striking patterns of diversity in structure and catalytic and regulatory function. Some of these patterns show a correlation with the taxonomic groupings of the organisms and with their physiological characteristics. Comparative enzyme studies have a contribution to make to an ultimate understanding of the cycle and its cellular operation, and there are substantial benefits to be gained from interactive studies on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems.

  2. Activities of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Enzymes, Glyoxylate Cycle Enzymes, and Fructose Diphosphatase in Bakers' Yeast During Adaptation to Acetate Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Gosling, J. P.; Duggan, P. F.

    1971-01-01

    Bakers' yeast oxidizes acetate at a high rate only after an adaptation period during which the capacity of the glyoxylate cycle is found to increase. There was apparently no necessity for the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase, the capacity of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, or the concentrations of the cytochromes to increase for this adaptation to occur. Elevation of fructose 1,6 diphosphatase occurred only when acetate oxidation was nearly maximal. Cycloheximide almost completely inhibited adaptation as well as increases in the activities of isocitrate lyase and aconitate hydratase, the only enzymes assayed. p-Fluorophenylalanine was partially effective and chloramphenicol did not inhibit at all. The presence of ammonium, which considerably delayed adaptation of the yeast to acetate oxidation, inhibited the increases in the activities of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes to different degrees, demonstrating noncoordinate control of these enzymes. Under the various conditions, the only enzyme activity increase consistently related to the rising oxygen uptake rate was that of isocitrate lyase which apparently limited the activity of the cycle. PMID:5557595

  3. Photosynthesis in Rhodospirillum rubrum. III. Metabolic Control of Reductive Pentose Phosphate and Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Enzymes 1

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Louise; Fuller, R. C.

    1967-01-01

    Enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle including ribulose-diphosphate carboxylase, ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and alkaline fructose-1,6-diphos-phatase were shown to be present in autotrophically grown Rhodospirillum rubrum. Enzyme levels were measured in this organism grown photo- and dark heterotrophically as well. Several, but not all, of these enzymes appeared to be under metabolic control, mediated by exogenous carbon and nitrogen compounds. Light had no effect on the presence or levels of any of these enzymes in this photosynthetic bacterium. The enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and enolase were shown to be present in R. rubrum cultured aerobically, autotrophically, or photoheterotrophically, both in cultures evolving hydrogen and under conditions where hydrogen evolution is not observed. Light had no clearly demonstrable effect on the presence or levels of any of these enzymes. PMID:6042359

  4. Translational regulation of mammalian and Drosophila citric acid cycle enzymes via iron-responsive elements.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, N K; Pantopoulos, K; Dandekar, T; Ackrell, B A; Hentze, M W

    1996-01-01

    The posttranscriptional control of iron uptake, storage, and utilization by iron-responsive elements (IREs) and iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) provides a molecular framework for the regulation of iron homeostasis in many animals. We have identified and characterized IREs in the mRNAs for two different mitochondrial citric acid cycle enzymes. Drosophila melanogaster IRP binds to an IRE in the 5' untranslated region of the mRNA encoding the iron-sulfur protein (Ip) subunit of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). This interaction is developmentally regulated during Drosophila embryogenesis. In a cell-free translation system, recombinant IRP-1 imposes highly specific translational repression on a reporter mRNA bearing the SDH IRE, and the translation of SDH-Ip mRNA is iron regulated in D. melanogaster Schneider cells. In mammals, an IRE was identified in the 5' untranslated regions of mitochondrial aconitase mRNAs from two species. Recombinant IRP-1 represses aconitase synthesis with similar efficiency as ferritin IRE-controlled translation. The interaction between mammalian IRPs and the aconitase IRE is regulated by iron, nitric oxide, and oxidative stress (H2O2), indicating that these three signals can control the expression of mitochondrial aconitase mRNA. Our results identify a regulatory link between energy and iron metabolism in vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest biological functions for the IRE/IRP regulatory system in addition to the maintenance of iron homeostasis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8643505

  5. Polymorphisms in Genes of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Key Enzymes Are Associated with Early Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shaogui; Wu, Yousheng; Zhou, Xingchun; Chen, Yibing; An, Jiaze; Yu, Xiaohe; Zhang, Huiqing; Yang, Hushan; Xing, Jinliang

    2015-01-01

    Alterations of activity and expression in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle key enzymes have been indicated in several malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). They play an important role in the progression of cancer. However, the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding these key enzymes on the recurrence of HCC has not been investigated. In this study, we genotyped 17 SNPs in genes encoding TCA cycle key enzymes and analyzed their association with recurrence-free survival (RFS) in a cohort of 492 Chinese HCC patients by Cox proportional hazard model and survival tree analysis. We identified 7 SNPs in SDHC, SDHD, FH, and IDH2 genes to be significantly associated with the RFS of HCC patients. Moreover, all these SNPs were associated with the early recurrence (within 2 years after surgery) risk of diseases. Cumulative effect analysis showed that these SNPs exhibited a dose-dependent effect on the overall and early recurrence. Further stratified analysis suggested that number of risk genotypes modified the protective effect on HCC recurrence conferred by transcatheter arterial chemoembolization treatment. Finally, the survival tree analysis revealed that SNP rs10789859 in SDHD gene was the primary factor contributing to HCC recurrence in our population. To the best of our knowledge, we for the first time observed the association between SNPs in genes encoding TCA cycle key enzymes and HCC recurrence risk. Further observational and functional studies are needed to validate our findings and generalize its clinical usage. PMID:25894340

  6. Evolution of the enzymes of the citric acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle of higher plants. A case study of endosymbiotic gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Schnarrenberger, Claus; Martin, William

    2002-02-01

    The citric acid or tricarboxylic acid cycle is a central element of higher-plant carbon metabolism which provides, among other things, electrons for oxidative phosphorylation in the inner mitochondrial membrane, intermediates for amino-acid biosynthesis, and oxaloacetate for gluconeogenesis from succinate derived from fatty acids via the glyoxylate cycle in glyoxysomes. The tricarboxylic acid cycle is a typical mitochondrial pathway and is widespread among alpha-proteobacteria, the group of eubacteria as defined under rRNA systematics from which mitochondria arose. Most of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes, and several have been previously shown to branch with their homologues from alpha-proteobacteria, indicating that the eukaryotic nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. Here, we investigate the individual evolutionary histories of all of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle using protein maximum likelihood phylogenies, focusing on the evolutionary origin of the nuclear-encoded proteins in higher plants. The results indicate that about half of the proteins involved in this eukaryotic pathway are most similar to their alpha-proteobacterial homologues, whereas the remainder are most similar to eubacterial, but not specifically alpha-proteobacterial, homologues. A consideration of (a) the process of lateral gene transfer among free-living prokaryotes and (b) the mechanistics of endosymbiotic (symbiont-to-host) gene transfer reveals that it is unrealistic to expect all nuclear genes that were acquired from the alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria to branch specifically with their homologues encoded in the genomes of contemporary alpha-proteobacteria. Rather, even if molecular phylogenetics were to work perfectly (which it does not), then some nuclear-encoded proteins that were acquired from the alpha

  7. Evolution of the enzymes of the citric acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle of higher plants. A case study of endosymbiotic gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Schnarrenberger, Claus; Martin, William

    2002-02-01

    The citric acid or tricarboxylic acid cycle is a central element of higher-plant carbon metabolism which provides, among other things, electrons for oxidative phosphorylation in the inner mitochondrial membrane, intermediates for amino-acid biosynthesis, and oxaloacetate for gluconeogenesis from succinate derived from fatty acids via the glyoxylate cycle in glyoxysomes. The tricarboxylic acid cycle is a typical mitochondrial pathway and is widespread among alpha-proteobacteria, the group of eubacteria as defined under rRNA systematics from which mitochondria arose. Most of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes, and several have been previously shown to branch with their homologues from alpha-proteobacteria, indicating that the eukaryotic nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. Here, we investigate the individual evolutionary histories of all of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle using protein maximum likelihood phylogenies, focusing on the evolutionary origin of the nuclear-encoded proteins in higher plants. The results indicate that about half of the proteins involved in this eukaryotic pathway are most similar to their alpha-proteobacterial homologues, whereas the remainder are most similar to eubacterial, but not specifically alpha-proteobacterial, homologues. A consideration of (a) the process of lateral gene transfer among free-living prokaryotes and (b) the mechanistics of endosymbiotic (symbiont-to-host) gene transfer reveals that it is unrealistic to expect all nuclear genes that were acquired from the alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria to branch specifically with their homologues encoded in the genomes of contemporary alpha-proteobacteria. Rather, even if molecular phylogenetics were to work perfectly (which it does not), then some nuclear-encoded proteins that were acquired from the alpha

  8. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders. PMID:26476839

  9. Acute Carnosine Administration Increases Respiratory Chain Complexes and Citric Acid Cycle Enzyme Activities in Cerebral Cortex of Young Rats.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Levy W; Cararo, José H; Maravai, Soliany G; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Guerra Martinez, Camila; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Bogo, Maurício R; Hipkiss, Alan R; Streck, Emilio L; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C

    2016-10-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) is an imidazole dipeptide synthesized in excitable tissues of many animals, whose biochemical properties include carbonyl scavenger, anti-oxidant, bivalent metal ion chelator, proton buffer, and immunomodulating agent, although its precise physiological role(s) in skeletal muscle and brain tissues in vivo remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vivo effects of acute carnosine administration on various aspects of brain bioenergetics of young Wistar rats. The activity of mitochondrial enzymes in cerebral cortex was assessed using a spectrophotometer, and it was found that there was an increase in the activities of complexes I-III and II-III and succinate dehydrogenase in carnosine-treated rats, as compared to vehicle-treated animals. However, quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) data on mRNA levels of mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf1), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1-α (Ppargc1α), and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam)) were not altered significantly and therefore suggest that short-term carnosine administration does not affect mitochondrial biogenesis. It was in agreement with the finding that immunocontent of respiratory chain complexes was not altered in animals receiving carnosine. These observations indicate that acute carnosine administration increases the respiratory chain and citric acid cycle enzyme activities in cerebral cortex of young rats, substantiating, at least in part, a neuroprotector effect assigned to carnosine against oxidative-driven disorders.

  10. Expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in the one carbon cycle in rat placenta is determined by maternal micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B12) and omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Khot, Vinita; Kale, Anvita; Joshi, Asmita; Chavan-Gautam, Preeti; Joshi, Sadhana

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that folic acid, vitamin B12, and omega-3 fatty acids are interlinked in the one carbon cycle and have implications for fetal programming. Our earlier studies demonstrate that an imbalance in maternal micronutrients influence long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and global methylation in rat placenta. We hypothesize that these changes are mediated through micronutrient dependent regulation of enzymes in one carbon cycle. Pregnant dams were assigned to six dietary groups with varying folic acid and vitamin B12 levels. Vitamin B12 deficient groups were supplemented with omega-3 fatty acid. Placental mRNA levels of enzymes, levels of phospholipids, and glutathione were determined. Results suggest that maternal micronutrient imbalance (excess folic acid with vitamin B12 deficiency) leads to lower mRNA levels of methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase , but higher cystathionine b-synthase (CBS) and Phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) as compared to control. Omega-3 supplementation normalized CBS and MTHFR mRNA levels. Increased placental phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC), in the same group was also observed. Our data suggests that adverse effects of a maternal micronutrient imbalanced diet may be due to differential regulation of key genes encoding enzymes in one carbon cycle and omega-3 supplementation may ameliorate most of these changes.

  11. The Pyruvate-Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Node

    PubMed Central

    Bücker, René; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Becker, Judith; Dersch, Petra; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge of the specific pathogenicity factors in bacteria, the contribution of metabolic processes to virulence is largely unknown. Here, we elucidate a tight connection between pathogenicity and core metabolism in the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis by integrated transcriptome and [13C]fluxome analysis of the wild type and virulence-regulator mutants. During aerobic growth on glucose, Y. pseudotuberculosis reveals an unusual flux distribution with a high level of secreted pyruvate. The absence of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators RovA, CsrA, and Crp strongly perturbs the fluxes of carbon core metabolism at the level of pyruvate metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and these perturbations are accompanied by transcriptional changes in the corresponding enzymes. Knock-outs of regulators of this metabolic branch point and of its central enzyme, pyruvate kinase (ΔpykF), result in mutants with significantly reduced virulence in an oral mouse infection model. In summary, our work identifies the pyruvate-TCA cycle node as a focal point for controlling the host colonization and virulence of Yersinia. PMID:25164818

  12. [Enzyme immunoassay of usnic acid in lichens].

    PubMed

    Burkin, A A; Kononenko, G P; Tolpysheva, T Iu

    2013-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay for usnic acid in lichens was developed, the sensitivity of which was 0.1 microg/g of air-dried material (0.00001%). Polyclonal rabbit antibodies against bovine serum albumin conjugated to (+)-usnic acid under the conditions of formaldehyde condensation made it possible to determine the analyzed substance in solutions at concentrations from 1 ng/mL when it interacts with an immobilized gelatin conjugate homologous in the binding mode. Usnic acid in 2-26600 microg/g (0.0002-2.6%) amounts was found in all 236 studied samples of lichens belonging to 53 species and 8 families.

  13. Enzyme immunoassay for carminic acid in foods.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, A; Takagaki, Y; Nishimune, T

    1995-01-01

    A competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for carminic acid was investigated. Monoclonal anticarminic acid antibody was obtained from A/J mice immunized with carminic acid-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) conjugate. Carminic acid was extracted with distilled water from beverage, jelly, candy, pasta sauce, yogurt, or ice cream samples. Ham or fish paste samples were digested with pronase, then carminic acid was extracted from samples with sodium hydroxide solution. The extract was diluted more than 10-fold with 1% gelatin in borate buffer solution. Microtiter plates were coated with carminic acid-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate or just BSA. Goat anti-mouse IgG(H+L)-peroxidase complex was used as a second antibody, and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine was used as a substrate for the peroxidase. The working range for quantitative analysis was 0.3-10 ng/mL, and the detection limit was 0.2 micrograms/g original sample. Recoveries of carminic acid by this assay were > 95% for milk beverage and jelly, and > 85% for yogurt and fish paste. Carminic acid was detected in 7 of 26 red-colored commercial food products and ranged from 3.5 to 356 micrograms/g. This EIA system also responded to the structural analogue of carminic acid, laccaic acid. PMID:7756895

  14. ENZYME ACTIVITIES DURING THE ASEXUAL CYCLE OF NEUROSPORA CRASSA

    PubMed Central

    Stine, G. J.

    1968-01-01

    Three enzymes, (a) nicotinamide adenine diphosphate-dependent glutamic dehydrogenase (NAD enzyme), (b) nictoinamide adenine triphosphate-dependent glutamic dehydrogenase (NADP enzyme), and (c) nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotidase (NADase), were measured in separate extracts of Neurospora crassa grown in Vogel's medium N and medium N + glutamate. Specific activities and total units per culture of each enzyme were determined at nine separate intervals phased throughout the asexual cycle. The separate dehydrogenases were lowest in the conidia, increased slowly during germination, and increased rapidly during logarithmic mycelial growth. The amounts of these enzymes present during germination were small when compared with those found later during the production of the conidiophores. The NAD enzyme may be necessary for pregermination synthesis. The NADP-enzyme synthesis was associated with the appearance of the germ tube. Although higher levels of the dehydrogenases in the conidiophores resulted in more enzyme being found in the differentiated conidia, the rate of germination was uneffected. The greatest activity for the NADase enzyme was associated with the conidia, early phases of germination, and later production of new conidia. NADase decreased significantly with the onset of logarithmic growth, remained low during the differentiation of conidiophores, and increased considerably as the conidiophores aged. PMID:4384627

  15. Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis-based enzyme engineering.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Yuvaraj; Nadarajan, Saravanan Prabhu; Yoo, Tae Hyeon; Lee, Chong-soon; Yun, Hyungdon

    2015-08-01

    Traditional enzyme engineering relies on substituting one amino acid by one of the other 19 natural amino acids to change the functional properties of an enzyme. However, incorporation of unnatural amino acids (UAAs) has been harnessed to engineer efficient enzymes for biocatalysis. Residue-specific and site-specific in vivo incorporation methods are becoming the preferred approach for producing enzymes with altered or improved functions. We describe the contribution of in vivo UAA incorporation methodologies to enzyme engineering as well as the future prospects for the field, including the integration of UAAs with other new advances in enzyme engineering.

  16. Tropospheric cycle of nitrous acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Roy M.; Peak, John D.; Collins, Gareth M.

    1996-06-01

    Measurements of the land surface exchange of nitrous acid over grass and sugar beet surfaces reveal both upward and downward fluxes with flux reversal occurring at an ambient concentration of nitrogen dioxide of about 10 ppb. This confirms earlier preliminary findings and strengthens the hypothesis that substantial production of nitrous acid can occur on land surfaces from reaction of nitrogen dioxide and water vapor. Detailed measurements of nitrous acid have been made in central urban, suburban, and rural environments. These measurements, in conjunction with a simple box model, indicate that the atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid are explicable in terms of a small number of basic processes in which the most important are the surface production of nitrous acid from nitrogen dioxide, atmospheric production from the NO-OH reaction and loss of nitrous acid by photolysis and dry deposition. In the suburban atmosphere, concentrations of nitrous acid are strongly correlated with nitrogen dioxide. In the rural atmosphere a different behavior is seen, with much higher nitrous acid to nitrogen dioxide ratios occurring in more polluted air with nitrogen dioxide concentrations in excess of 10 ppb. At lower nitrogen dioxide concentrations, net deposition of nitrous acid at the ground leads to very low concentrations in advected air. The model study indicates that during daytime in the suburban atmosphere, production of HONO from the NO-OH reaction can compete with photolysis giving a HONO concentration of a few tenths of a part per billion. At the highest observed daytime concentrations of HONO, production of OH radical from its photolysis can proceed at a rate more than 10 times faster than from photolysis of ozone.

  17. Extracellular enzyme activity and biogeochemical cycling in restored prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, L.; Hernandez, D.; Schade, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    during the spring. Microbial biomass C:N ratios increased from October to March, and decreased through the summer, while production of CBH, LAP and PHOS all showed the opposite pattern, decreasing through March and increasing in the summer. Following snowmelt, enzyme production preceded a recovery in microbial biomass, possibly as a result of increased competition for available resources between plant and microbial communities, or a shift to organic sources of C, N, and P which required a higher investment in enzymes. Due to their rapid growth rates and turnover, microbes are a particularly reactive component of terrestrial ecosystems and significantly influence biogeochemical cycling. Because carbon degradation may be constrained by nutrient availability, understanding how extracellular enzyme production, decomposition rate, and nutrient flux change over time is essential if we are to anticipate ecosystem responses to environmental changes.

  18. Fat-to-glucose interconversion by hydrodynamic transfer of two glyoxylate cycle enzyme genes

    PubMed Central

    Cordero, P; Campion, J; Milagro, FI; Marzo, F; Martinez, JA

    2008-01-01

    The glyoxylate cycle, which is well characterized in higher plants and some microorganisms but not in vertebrates, is able to bypass the citric acid cycle to achieve fat-to-carbohydrate interconversion. In this context, the hydrodynamic transfer of two glyoxylate cycle enzymes, such as isocytrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (MS), could accomplish the shift of using fat for the synthesis of glucose. Therefore, 20 mice weighing 23.37 ± 0.96 g were hydrodinamically gene transferred by administering into the tail vein a bolus with ICL and MS. After 36 hours, body weight, plasma glucose, respiratory quotient and energy expenditure were measured. The respiratory quotient was increased by gene transfer, which suggests that a higher carbohydrate/lipid ratio is oxidized in such animals. This application could help, if adequate protocols are designed, to induce fat utilization for glucose synthesis, which might be eventually useful to reduce body fat depots in situations of obesity and diabetes. PMID:19077206

  19. Tricarboxylic-acid-cycle intermediates and cycle endurance capacity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy C; Macrae, Holden S H; Turner, Nathan S

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether ingestion of a multinutrient supplement containing 3 tricarboxylic-acid-cycle intermediates (TCAIs; pyridoxine-alpha-ketoglutarate, malate, and succinate) and other substances potentially supporting the TCA cycle (such as aspartate and glutamate) would improve cyclists' time to exhaustion during a submaximal endurance-exercise test (approximately 70 % to 75 % VO2peak) and rate of recovery. Seven well-trained male cyclists (VO2max 67.4 2.1 mL x kg(-1) x in(-1), 28.6 +/- 2.4 y) participated in a randomized, double-blind crossover study for 7 wk. Each took either the treatment or a placebo 30 min before and after their normal training sessions for 3 wk and before submaximal exercise tests. There were no significant differences between the TCAI group (KI) and placebo group (P) in time to exhaustion during cycling (KI = 105 +/- 18, P = 113 +/- 11 min); respiratory-exchange ratio at 20-min intervals; blood lactate and plasma glucose before, after, and at 30-min intervals during exercise; perceived exertion at 20-min intervals during exercise; or time to fatigue after the 30-min recovery (KI = 16.1 +/- 3.2, P = 15 +/- 2 min). Taking a dietary sport supplement containing several TCAIs and supporting substances for 3 wk does not improve cycling performance at 75 % VO2peak or speed recovery from previously fatiguing exercise.

  20. Affinity labelling enzymes with esters of aromatic sulfonic acids

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Show-Chu; Shaw, Elliott

    1977-01-01

    Novel esters of aromatic sulfonic acids are disclosed. The specific esters are nitrophenyl p- and m-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate. Also disclosed is a method for specific inactivation of the enzyme, thrombin, employing nitrophenyl p-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate.

  1. Fatty acid biosynthesis during the life cycle of Debaryomyces etchellsii.

    PubMed

    Arous, Fatma; Mechichi, Tahar; Nasri, Moncef; Aggelis, George

    2016-07-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis during the life cycle of the ascomycetous yeast Debaryomyces etchellsii cultivated on a non-fermentable substrate, i.e. glycerol, in nitrogen rich media (NRM) and nitrogen limited media (NLM) has been studied. Although considerable activities of key lipogenic enzymes, such as ATP citrate lyase (ACL) and malic enzyme (ME), were detected in vegetative cells during asexual proliferation (which occurred in the first growth stages in both NRM and NLM), lipid accumulation was restricted due to the high activities of NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD+-ICDH). A similar enzymatic profile has been found in ascii and free ascospores produced in NRM; thus lipid accumulation was low. On the contrary, very high activities of both ACL and ME and low activities of NAD+-ICDH were detected in ascii and free ascospores produced in NLM resulting in lipid accumulation. Neutral lipids (NL) were the predominant fraction of cellular lipids produced in vegetative cells and ascospores in both NRM and NLM. On the other hand, phospholipids (P) were the major polar lipids while glycolipids (G) were synthesized in low proportions. During transition from asexual to sexual phase, the percentage of NL increased with a significant decrease of P and, to a lesser extent, of G. High quantities of linoleic acid were found esterified in polar lipids, especially in P, during the vegetative stage of growth, while, with a few exceptions, during transition from asexual to sexual stage, linoleic acid concentration decreased markedly, mainly in P, while oleic acid concentration increased. PMID:27129978

  2. Method for Enzyme Design with Genetically Encoded Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hu, C; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    We describe the methodologies for the design of artificial enzymes with genetically encoded unnatural amino acids. Genetically encoded unnatural amino acids offer great promise for constructing artificial enzymes with novel activities. In our studies, the designs of artificial enzyme were divided into two steps. First, we considered the unnatural amino acids and the protein scaffold separately. The scaffold is designed by traditional protein design methods. The unnatural amino acids are inspired by natural structure and organic chemistry methods, and synthesized by either organic chemistry methods or enzymatic conversion. With the increasing number of published unnatural amino acids with various functions, we described an unnatural amino acids toolkit containing metal chelators, redox mediators, and click chemistry reagents. These efforts enable a researcher to search the toolkit for appropriate unnatural amino acids for the study, rather than design and synthesize the unnatural amino acids from the beginning. After the first step, the model enzyme was optimized by computational methods and directed evolution. Lastly, we describe a general method for evolving aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and expressing unnatural amino acids incorporated into a protein. PMID:27586330

  3. Method for Enzyme Design with Genetically Encoded Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hu, C; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    We describe the methodologies for the design of artificial enzymes with genetically encoded unnatural amino acids. Genetically encoded unnatural amino acids offer great promise for constructing artificial enzymes with novel activities. In our studies, the designs of artificial enzyme were divided into two steps. First, we considered the unnatural amino acids and the protein scaffold separately. The scaffold is designed by traditional protein design methods. The unnatural amino acids are inspired by natural structure and organic chemistry methods, and synthesized by either organic chemistry methods or enzymatic conversion. With the increasing number of published unnatural amino acids with various functions, we described an unnatural amino acids toolkit containing metal chelators, redox mediators, and click chemistry reagents. These efforts enable a researcher to search the toolkit for appropriate unnatural amino acids for the study, rather than design and synthesize the unnatural amino acids from the beginning. After the first step, the model enzyme was optimized by computational methods and directed evolution. Lastly, we describe a general method for evolving aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase and expressing unnatural amino acids incorporated into a protein.

  4. The Roles of Acids and Bases in Enzyme Catalysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2007-01-01

    Many organic reactions are catalyzed by strong acids or bases that protonate or deprotonate neutral reactants leading to reactive cations or anions that proceed to products. In enzyme reactions, only weak acids and bases are available to hydrogen bond to reactants and to transfer protons in response to developing charges. Understanding this…

  5. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  6. Citric acid cycle intermediates in cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Czibik, Gabor; Steeples, Violetta; Yavari, Arash; Ashrafian, Houman

    2014-10-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a concerted clinical effort to deliver on the laboratory promise that a variety of maneuvers can profoundly increase cardiac tolerance to ischemia and/or reduce additional damage consequent upon reperfusion. Here we will review the proximity of the metabolic approach to clinical practice. Specifically, we will focus on how the citric acid cycle is involved in cardioprotection. Inspired by cross-fertilization between fundamental cancer biology and cardiovascular medicine, a set of metabolic observations have identified novel metabolic pathways, easily manipulable in man, which can harness metabolism to robustly combat ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  7. Combinatorial mutagenesis to restrict amino acid usage in an enzyme to a reduced set

    PubMed Central

    Akanuma, Satoshi; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2002-01-01

    We developed an effective strategy to restrict the amino acid usage in a relatively large protein to a reduced set with conservation of its in vivo function. The 213-residue Escherichia coli orotate phosphoribosyltransferase was subjected to 22 cycles of segment-wise combinatorial mutagenesis followed by 6 cycles of site-directed random mutagenesis, both coupled with a growth-related phenotype selection. The enzyme eventually tolerated 73 amino acid substitutions: In the final variant, 9 amino acid types (A, D, G, L, P, R, T, V, and Y) occupied 188 positions (88%), and none of 7 amino acid types (C, H, I, M, N, Q, and W) appeared. Therefore, the catalytic function associated with a relatively large protein may be achieved with a subset of the 20 amino acid. The converged sequence also implies simpler constituents for proteins in the early stage of evolution. PMID:12361984

  8. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  9. Beyond Vmax and Km: How details of enzyme function influence geochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Enzymes catalyze the vast majority of chemical reactions relevant to geomicrobiology. Studies of the activities of enzymes in environmental systems often report Vmax (the maximum possible rate of reaction; often proportional to the concentration of enzymes in the system) and sometimes Km (a measure of the affinity between enzymes and their substrates). However, enzyme studies - particularly those related to enzymes involved in organic carbon oxidation - are often limited to only those parameters, and a relatively limited and mixed set of enzymes. Here I will discuss some novel methods to assay and characterize the specific sets of enzymes that may be important to the carbon cycle in aquatic environments. First, kinetic experiments revealed the collective properties of the complex mixtures of extracellular peptidases that occur where microbial communities are diverse. Crystal structures combined with biochemical characterization of specific enzymes can yield more detailed information about key steps in organic carbon transformations. These new techniques have the potential to provide mechanistic grounding to geomicrobiological models.

  10. Evolution and functional implications of the tricarboxylic acid cycle as revealed by phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, João Henrique Frota; Esteves-Ferreira, Alberto A; Quinhones, Carla G S; Pereira-Lima, Italo A; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R; Araújo, Wagner L

    2014-10-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, a crucial component of respiratory metabolism, is composed of a set of eight enzymes present in the mitochondrial matrix. However, most of the TCA cycle enzymes are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes. In addition, evidence has accumulated demonstrating that nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. For this reason, we here analyzed the evolutionary history of all TCA cycle enzymes in attempt to better understand the origin of these nuclear-encoded proteins. Our results indicate that prior to endosymbiotic events the TCA cycle seemed to operate only as isolated steps in both the host (eubacterial cell) and mitochondria (alphaproteobacteria). The origin of isoforms present in different cell compartments might be associated either with gene-transfer events which did not result in proper targeting of the protein to mitochondrion or with duplication events. Further in silico analyses allow us to suggest new insights into the possible roles of TCA cycle enzymes in different tissues. Finally, we performed coexpression analysis using mitochondrial TCA cycle genes revealing close connections among these genes most likely related to the higher efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in this specialized organelle. Moreover, these analyses allowed us to identify further candidate genes which might be used for metabolic engineering purposes given the importance of the TCA cycle during development and/or stress situations.

  11. Evolution and Functional Implications of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle as Revealed by Phylogenetic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, João Henrique Frota; Esteves-Ferreira, Alberto A.; Quinhones, Carla G.S.; Pereira-Lima, Italo A.; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Araújo, Wagner L.

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, a crucial component of respiratory metabolism, is composed of a set of eight enzymes present in the mitochondrial matrix. However, most of the TCA cycle enzymes are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes. In addition, evidence has accumulated demonstrating that nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. For this reason, we here analyzed the evolutionary history of all TCA cycle enzymes in attempt to better understand the origin of these nuclear-encoded proteins. Our results indicate that prior to endosymbiotic events the TCA cycle seemed to operate only as isolated steps in both the host (eubacterial cell) and mitochondria (alphaproteobacteria). The origin of isoforms present in different cell compartments might be associated either with gene-transfer events which did not result in proper targeting of the protein to mitochondrion or with duplication events. Further in silico analyses allow us to suggest new insights into the possible roles of TCA cycle enzymes in different tissues. Finally, we performed coexpression analysis using mitochondrial TCA cycle genes revealing close connections among these genes most likely related to the higher efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation in this specialized organelle. Moreover, these analyses allowed us to identify further candidate genes which might be used for metabolic engineering purposes given the importance of the TCA cycle during development and/or stress situations. PMID:25274566

  12. Structural and functional insights into enzymes of the vitamin K cycle.

    PubMed

    Tie, J-K; Stafford, D W

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin K-dependent proteins require carboxylation of certain glutamates for their biological functions. The enzymes involved in the vitamin K-dependent carboxylation include: gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX), vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) and an as-yet-unidentified vitamin K reductase (VKR). Due to the hydrophobicity of vitamin K, these enzymes are likely to be integral membrane proteins that reside in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, structure-function studies on these enzymes have been challenging, and some of the results are notably controversial. Patients with naturally occurring mutations in these enzymes, who mainly exhibit bleeding disorders or are resistant to oral anticoagulant treatment, provide valuable information for the functional study of the vitamin K cycle enzymes. In this review, we discuss: (i) the discovery of the enzymatic activities and gene identifications of the vitamin K cycle enzymes; (ii) the identification of their functionally important regions and their active site residues; (iii) the membrane topology studies of GGCX and VKOR; and (iv) the controversial issues regarding the structure and function studies of these enzymes, particularly, the membrane topology, the role of the conserved cysteines and the mechanism of active site regeneration of VKOR. We also discuss the possibility that a paralogous protein of VKOR, VKOR-like 1 (VKORL1), is involved in the vitamin K cycle, and the importance of and possible approaches for identifying the unknown VKR. Overall, we describe the accomplishments and the remaining questions in regard to the structure and function studies of the enzymes in the vitamin K cycle.

  13. Krebs cycle metabolon formation: metabolite concentration gradient enhanced compartmentation of sequential enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Pelster, Lindsey N; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-01-25

    Dynamics of metabolon formation in mitochondria was probed by studying diffusional motion of two sequential Krebs cycle enzymes in a microfluidic channel. Enhanced directional co-diffusion of both enzymes against a substrate concentration gradient was observed in the presence of intermediate generation. This reveals a metabolite directed compartmentation of metabolic pathways.

  14. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson’s Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  15. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities.

    PubMed

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying; Naleway, John Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson's Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  16. Liver Enzymes and Uric acid in Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vakilian, Farveh; Rafighdoost, Abbas Ali; Rafighdoost, Amir Hossein; Amin, Ahmad; Salehi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute heart failure (AHF) is defined as the new onset or recurrence of gradual or rapidly worsening signs and symptoms of heart failure, requiring urgent or emergent therapy. Objectives: This study attempts to assess the association of liver function tests (LFT) and uric acid level with in hospital outcome and echocardiography parameters, in patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Patients and Methods: A total of 100 patients (aged 16 - 90 years, 60% men) admitted with AHF were enrolled. LFTs and uric acid levels were assessed on first day and before discharge, and patients were followed for 3 months. Results: In-hospital outcomes were considered. Mean Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction (LVEF) was 35% (20 - 45%). Mean Uric acid level was 8.4 mg/dL, significantly higher than chronic HF and normal groups (P < 0.02). Elevated liver enzymes were seen in 52% patients, mostly (87%) in transaminases. Liver enzymes were decreased in 85% patients before discharge. LFT and uric acid levels were inversely and significantly correlated with LVEF on echocardiography (P = 0.02), but not with diastolic parameters. Although there was no significant correlation between uric acid level and in-hospital mortality, risk of intubation and rehospitalization in 3 months, enzyme levels increased in these groups. Increased aspartate transaminase (AST level) was associated with inotrope infusion in AHF patients (42 vs. 82 mg/dL, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Abnormal transaminases and uric acid levels are seen in AHF patients. Increased AST levels may be a predictor of the need for inotrope during hospital course in these patients. PMID:26528447

  17. Regulation of amino acid metabolic enzymes and transporters in plants.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Réjane; Pilot, Guillaume

    2014-10-01

    Amino acids play several critical roles in plants, from providing the building blocks of proteins to being essential metabolites interacting with many branches of metabolism. They are also important molecules that shuttle organic nitrogen through the plant. Because of this central role in nitrogen metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, degradation, and transport are tightly regulated to meet demand in response to nitrogen and carbon availability. While much is known about the feedback regulation of the branched biosynthesis pathways by the amino acids themselves, the regulation mechanisms at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and protein levels remain to be identified. This review focuses mainly on the current state of our understanding of the regulation of the enzymes and transporters at the transcript level. Current results describing the effect of transcription factors and protein modifications lead to a fragmental picture that hints at multiple, complex levels of regulation that control and coordinate transport and enzyme activities. It also appears that amino acid metabolism, amino acid transport, and stress signal integration can influence each other in a so-far unpredictable fashion.

  18. Cell cycle nucleic acids, polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Lowe, Keith S.; Larkins, Brian A.; Dilkes, Brian R.; Sun, Yuejin

    2007-08-14

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content, cell cycle progression, cell number and/or composition of plants.

  19. Citric acid cycle and role of its intermediates in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    The citric acid cycle is the final common oxidative pathway for carbohydrates, fats and amino acids. It is the most important metabolic pathway for the energy supply to the body. TCA is the most important central pathway connecting almost all the individual metabolic pathways. In this review article, introduction, regulation and energetics of TCA cycle have been discussed. The present study was carried out to review literature on TCA cycle.

  20. Inhibitors of the Glyoxylate Cycle Enzyme ICL1 in Candida albicans for Potential Use as Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cheah, Hong-Leong; Lim, Vuanghao; Sandai, Doblin

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that causes candidiasis in humans. In recent years, metabolic pathways in C. albicans have been explored as potential antifungal targets to treat candidiasis. The glyoxylate cycle, which enables C. albicans to survive in nutrient-limited host niches and its. Key enzymes (e.g., isocitrate lyase (ICL1), are particularly attractive antifungal targets for C. albicans. In this study, we used a new screening approach that better reflects the physiological environment that C. albicans cells experience during infection to identify potential inhibitors of ICL. Three compounds (caffeic acid (CAFF), rosmarinic acid (ROS), and apigenin (API)) were found to have antifungal activity against C. albicans when tested under glucose-depleted conditions. We further confirmed the inhibitory potential of these compounds against ICL using the ICL enzyme assay. Lastly, we assessed the bioavailability and toxicity of these compounds using Lipinski's rule-of-five and ADMET analysis. PMID:24781056

  1. Reduction of 7-ketolithocholic acid by human liver enzyme preparations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Amuro, Y; Yamade, W; Kudo, K; Yamamoto, T; Hada, T; Higashino, K

    1989-01-01

    The formation of chenodeoxycholic and ursodeoxycholic acids from 7-ketolithocholic acid by human liver preparations was examined in vitro. Liver preparations were incubated with 7-ketolithocholic acid at pH 5.5 in a sodium-potassium-phosphate buffer containing NADPH or NADH. The products formed were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results showed that chenodeoxycholic and ursodeoxycholic acids could be formed from 7-ketolithocholic acid by human liver enzyme(s). The enzyme(s) required NADPH but not NADH as coenzyme and was localized largely in the microsomes. The conjugated 7-ketolithocholic acid, especially the taurine conjugated, was predominantly reduced to chenodeoxycholic acid, whereas the unconjugated 7-ketolithocholic acid was not reduced well to either chenodeoxycholic acid or ursodeoxycholic acid. Thus the reduction of 7-ketolithocholic acid by human liver enzyme(s) was found to be dependent on whether the substrate was conjugated or not. PMID:2912152

  2. Waiting cycle times and generalized Haldane equality in the steady-state cycle kinetics of single enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hao

    2008-01-10

    Enzyme kinetics are cyclic. A more realistic reversible three-step mechanism of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics is investigated in detail, and three kinds of waiting cycle times T, T+, T- are defined. It is shown that the mean waiting cycle times T, T+, and T- are the reciprocal of the steady-state cycle flux Jss, the forward steady-state cycle flux Jss+ and the backward steady-state cycle flux Jss, respectively. We also show that the distribution of T+ conditioned on T+cycle time of T+ conditioned on T+cycle fluxes and waiting cycle times. Furthermore, we extend the same results to the n-step cycle, and finally, experimental and theoretically based evidence are also included. PMID:18069809

  3. Measuring in vivo elasticities of Calvin cycle enzymes: network structure and patterns of modulations.

    PubMed

    Kreim, Michael; Giersch, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    To measure the kinetics of enzymes, the proteins are usually assayed in vitro after isolation from their parent organisms. We make an attempt to show how one might determine enzyme elasticities in an intact system by a multiple modulation approach. Certain target enzymes are modulated in their activities and the changes in metabolite concentrations and flux rates upon the modulations are used to calculate the enzyme elasticities. Central to this approach is that the modulations must be independent of each other, and an algorithm is developed for finding all independent modulations that allow determining the elasticities of a given enzyme. This approach is applied to a mass-action model of the Calvin cycle. The goal is to determine the elasticities of as many enzymes as possible by modulating the activities of as few of them as possible. It is shown that the elasticities of 20 (out of 22) Calvin cycle enzymes can be determined by modulating just five reactions. Moreover, visualization of independence of modulations may be used to decompose the Calvin cycle into several sections that are independent of each other regarding flow of matter and information.

  4. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates.

    PubMed

    Izac, Marie; Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis; Lindley, Nic D

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium's growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports.

  5. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium’s growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports. PMID:26684737

  6. Regulation of leukocyte tricarboxylic acid cycle in drug-naïve Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Rafael T; Streck, Emilio L; Forlenza, Orestes V; Brunoni, Andre R; Zanetti, Marcus V; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Diniz, Breno S; Portela, Luis V; Carvalho, André F; Zarate, Carlos A; Gattaz, Wagner F; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo

    2015-09-25

    Several lines of evidence suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD). The tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) is fundamental for mitochondrial energy production and produces substrates used in oxidative phosphorylation by the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The activity of the key TCA cycle enzymes citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase has never been evaluated in BD. In the present study, these enzymes were assayed from leukocytes of drug-naïve BD patients in a major depressive episode (n=18) and compared to 24 age-matched healthy controls. Drug-naïve BD patients did not show differences in activities of citrate synthase (p=0.79), malate dehydrogenase (p=0.17), and succinate dehydrogenase (p=0.35) compared with healthy controls. No correlation between any TCA cycle enzyme activity and severity of depressive symptoms was observed. Overall, these data suggest that the activities of the TCA cycle enzymes are not altered in major depressive episodes of recent-onset BD, which may support the concept of illness staging and neuroprogression in BD. PMID:26297865

  7. Regulation of leukocyte tricarboxylic acid cycle in drug-naïve Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Rafael T; Streck, Emilio L; Forlenza, Orestes V; Brunoni, Andre R; Zanetti, Marcus V; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Diniz, Breno S; Portela, Luis V; Carvalho, André F; Zarate, Carlos A; Gattaz, Wagner F; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo

    2015-09-25

    Several lines of evidence suggest a role for mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD). The tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) is fundamental for mitochondrial energy production and produces substrates used in oxidative phosphorylation by the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The activity of the key TCA cycle enzymes citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase has never been evaluated in BD. In the present study, these enzymes were assayed from leukocytes of drug-naïve BD patients in a major depressive episode (n=18) and compared to 24 age-matched healthy controls. Drug-naïve BD patients did not show differences in activities of citrate synthase (p=0.79), malate dehydrogenase (p=0.17), and succinate dehydrogenase (p=0.35) compared with healthy controls. No correlation between any TCA cycle enzyme activity and severity of depressive symptoms was observed. Overall, these data suggest that the activities of the TCA cycle enzymes are not altered in major depressive episodes of recent-onset BD, which may support the concept of illness staging and neuroprogression in BD.

  8. Phloem-specific expression of Yang cycle genes and identification of novel Yang cycle enzymes in Plantago and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Feussner, Kirstin; Zierer, Wolfgang; Rabinovych, Valentyna; Klebl, Franz; Feussner, Ivo; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA) or Yang cycle is a set of reactions that recycle MTA to Met. In plants, MTA is a byproduct of polyamine, ethylene, and nicotianamine biosynthesis. Vascular transcriptome analyses revealed phloem-specific expression of the Yang cycle gene 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE KINASE1 (MTK1) in Plantago major and Arabidopsis thaliana. As Arabidopsis has only a single MTK gene, we hypothesized that the expression of other Yang cycle genes might also be vascular specific. Reporter gene studies and quantitative analyses of mRNA levels for all Yang cycle genes confirmed this hypothesis for Arabidopsis and Plantago. This includes the Yang cycle genes 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE-1-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE1 and DEHYDRATASE-ENOLASE-PHOSPHATASE-COMPLEX1. We show that these two enzymes are sufficient for the conversion of methylthioribose-1-phosphate to 1,2-dihydroxy-3-keto-5-methylthiopentene. In bacteria, fungi, and animals, the same conversion is catalyzed in three to four separate enzymatic steps. Furthermore, comparative analyses of vascular and nonvascular metabolites identified Met, S-adenosyl Met, and MTA preferentially or almost exclusively in the vascular tissue. Our data represent a comprehensive characterization of the Yang cycle in higher plants and demonstrate that the Yang cycle works primarily in the vasculature. Finally, expression analyses of polyamine biosynthetic genes suggest that the Yang cycle in leaves recycles MTA derived primarily from polyamine biosynthesis.

  9. Phloem-specific expression of Yang cycle genes and identification of novel Yang cycle enzymes in Plantago and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Feussner, Kirstin; Zierer, Wolfgang; Rabinovych, Valentyna; Klebl, Franz; Feussner, Ivo; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-05-01

    The 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA) or Yang cycle is a set of reactions that recycle MTA to Met. In plants, MTA is a byproduct of polyamine, ethylene, and nicotianamine biosynthesis. Vascular transcriptome analyses revealed phloem-specific expression of the Yang cycle gene 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE KINASE1 (MTK1) in Plantago major and Arabidopsis thaliana. As Arabidopsis has only a single MTK gene, we hypothesized that the expression of other Yang cycle genes might also be vascular specific. Reporter gene studies and quantitative analyses of mRNA levels for all Yang cycle genes confirmed this hypothesis for Arabidopsis and Plantago. This includes the Yang cycle genes 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE-1-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE1 and DEHYDRATASE-ENOLASE-PHOSPHATASE-COMPLEX1. We show that these two enzymes are sufficient for the conversion of methylthioribose-1-phosphate to 1,2-dihydroxy-3-keto-5-methylthiopentene. In bacteria, fungi, and animals, the same conversion is catalyzed in three to four separate enzymatic steps. Furthermore, comparative analyses of vascular and nonvascular metabolites identified Met, S-adenosyl Met, and MTA preferentially or almost exclusively in the vascular tissue. Our data represent a comprehensive characterization of the Yang cycle in higher plants and demonstrate that the Yang cycle works primarily in the vasculature. Finally, expression analyses of polyamine biosynthetic genes suggest that the Yang cycle in leaves recycles MTA derived primarily from polyamine biosynthesis. PMID:21540433

  10. Dual Enzyme-Responsive Capsules of Hyaluronic Acid-block-Poly(Lactic Acid) for Sensing Bacterial Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tücking, Katrin-Stephanie; Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Schönherr, Holger

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of novel amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HYA) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) block copolymers is reported as the key element of a strategy to detect the presence of pathogenic bacterial enzymes. In addition to the formation of defined HYA-block-PLA assemblies, the encapsulation of fluorescent reporter dyes and the selective enzymatic degradation of the capsules by hyaluronidase and proteinase K are studied. The synthesis of the dual enzyme-responsive HYA-b-PLA is carried out by copper-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The resulting copolymers are assembled in water to form vesicular structures, which are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). DLS measurements show that both enzymes cause a rapid decrease in the hydrodynamic diameter of the nanocapsules. Fluorescence spectroscopy data confirm the liberation of encapsulated dye, which indicates the disintegration of the capsules and validates the concept of enzymatically triggered payload release. Finally, cytotoxicity assays confirm that the HYA-b-PLA nanocapsules are biocompatible with primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:25940300

  11. Dual Enzyme-Responsive Capsules of Hyaluronic Acid-block-Poly(Lactic Acid) for Sensing Bacterial Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tücking, Katrin-Stephanie; Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Schönherr, Holger

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of novel amphiphilic hyaluronic acid (HYA) and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) block copolymers is reported as the key element of a strategy to detect the presence of pathogenic bacterial enzymes. In addition to the formation of defined HYA-block-PLA assemblies, the encapsulation of fluorescent reporter dyes and the selective enzymatic degradation of the capsules by hyaluronidase and proteinase K are studied. The synthesis of the dual enzyme-responsive HYA-b-PLA is carried out by copper-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The resulting copolymers are assembled in water to form vesicular structures, which are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). DLS measurements show that both enzymes cause a rapid decrease in the hydrodynamic diameter of the nanocapsules. Fluorescence spectroscopy data confirm the liberation of encapsulated dye, which indicates the disintegration of the capsules and validates the concept of enzymatically triggered payload release. Finally, cytotoxicity assays confirm that the HYA-b-PLA nanocapsules are biocompatible with primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells.

  12. Sodium butyrate reverses the inhibition of Krebs cycle enzymes induced by amphetamine in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Valvassori, Samira S; Calixto, Karen V; Budni, Josiane; Resende, Wilson R; Varela, Roger B; de Freitas, Karolina V; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the possibility that mitochondrial impairment may play an important role in bipolar disorder (BD). The Krebs cycle is the central point of oxidative metabolism, providing carbon for biosynthesis and reducing agents for generation of ATP. Recently, studies have suggested that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may have antimanic effects. The present study aims to investigate the effects of sodium butyrate (SB), a HDAC inhibitor, on Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the brain of rats subjected to an animal model of mania induced by D-amphetamine (D-AMPH). Wistar rats were first given D-AMPH or saline (Sal) for 14 days, and then, between days 8 and 14, rats were treated with SB or Sal. The citrate synthase (CS), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were evaluated in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats. The D-AMPH administration inhibited Krebs cycle enzymes activity in all analyzed brain structures and SB reversed D-AMPH-induced dysfunction analyzed in all brain regions. These findings suggest that Krebs cycle enzymes' inhibition can be an important link for the mitochondrial dysfunction seen in BD and SB exerts protective effects against the D-AMPH-induced Krebs cycle enzymes' dysfunction.

  13. Metabolism: Part II. The Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA), Citric Acid, or Krebs Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Differentiates the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (or Krebs cycle) from glycolysis, and describes the bridge between the two as being the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl coenzyme A. Discusses the eight steps in the TCA cycle, the results of isotopic labeling experiments, and the net effects of the TCA cycle. (TW)

  14. ALDH Enzyme Expression Is Independent of the Spermatogenic Cycle, and Their Inhibition Causes Misregulation of Murine Spermatogenic Processes.

    PubMed

    Kent, Travis; Arnold, Samuel L; Fasnacht, Rachael; Rowsey, Ross; Mitchell, Debra; Hogarth, Cathryn A; Isoherranen, Nina; Griswold, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Perturbations in the vitamin A metabolism pathway could be a significant cause of male infertility, as well as a target toward the development of a male contraceptive, necessitating the need for a better understanding of how testicular retinoic acid (RA) concentrations are regulated. Quantitative analyses have recently demonstrated that RA is present in a pulsatile manner along testis tubules. However, it is unclear if the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes, which are responsible for RA synthesis, contribute to the regulation of these RA concentration gradients. Previous studies have alluded to fluctuations in ALDH enzymes across the spermatogenic cycle, but these inferences have been based primarily on qualitative transcript localization experiments. Here, we show via various quantitative methods that the three well-known ALDH enzymes (ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3), and an ALDH enzyme previously unreported in the murine testis (ALDH8A1), are not expressed in a stage-specific manner in the adult testis, but do fluctuate throughout juvenile development in perfect agreement with the first appearance of each advancing germ cell type. We also show, via treatments with a known ALDH inhibitor, that lowered testicular RA levels result in an increase in blood-testis barrier permeability, meiotic recombination, and meiotic defects. Taken together, these data further our understanding of the complex regulatory actions of RA on various spermatogenic events and, in contrast with previous studies, also suggest that the ALDH enzymes are not responsible for regulating the recently measured RA pulse.

  15. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  16. Indoleacetic Acid and the Synthesis of Glucanases and Pectic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Datko, Anne Harmon; Maclachlan, G. A.

    1968-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA) and/or inhibitors of DNA, RNA or protein synthesis were added to the apex of decapitated seedlings of Pisum sativum L. var. Alaska. At various times up to 4 days, enzymic protein was extracted from a segment of epicotyl immediately below the apex and assayed for its ability to hydrolyse polysaccharides or their derivatives. With the exception of amylase, the total amounts per segment of all of the tested enzymes increased due to IAA treatment. The development of β-1,4-glucanase (cellulase) activity per unit of protein or fresh weight proceeded according to a typical sigmoid induction curve. Pectinase was formed for about 2 days in control segments and IAA treatment resulted in continued synthesis for at least another 2 days provided cell division took place. β-1,3-glucanase and pectinesterase activities were only enhanced by IAA to the extent that total protein levels increased. Reaction mechanisms for these effects and functions for the enzymes during growth are discussed. PMID:16656834

  17. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  18. [Influence of chosen metals on the citric acid cycle].

    PubMed

    Rojczyk-Gołebiewska, Ewa; Kucharzewski, Marek

    2013-03-01

    Industrial activity growth influenced not only technological progress, but also had negative effects on human natural environment. It results among others in increased human exposition to heavy metals. In case of detoxication mechanisms disturbance in organism, heavy metals cumulate in tissues causing mutations and disrupting metabolism, including Krebs cycle. Recent studies have revealed that iron, zinc and manganese have especially strong influence on Krebs cycle. These elements act as cofactors or inhibitors regulating activity of particular enzymes of this cycle, which has a reflection in cellular energy production disturbances.

  19. Combinatorial Effects of Fatty Acid Elongase Enzymes on Nervonic Acid Production in Camelina sativa

    PubMed Central

    Huai, Dongxin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chunyu; Cahoon, Edgar B.; Zhou, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) with chain lengths of 20 carbons and longer provide feedstocks for various applications; therefore, improvement of VLCFA contents in seeds has become an important goal for oilseed enhancement. VLCFA biosynthesis is controlled by a multi-enzyme protein complex referred to as fatty acid elongase, which is composed of β-ketoacyl-CoA synthase (KCS), β-ketoacyl-CoA reductase (KCR), β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase (HCD) and enoyl reductase (ECR). KCS has been identified as the rate-limiting enzyme, but little is known about the involvement of other three enzymes in VLCFA production. Here, the combinatorial effects of fatty acid elongase enzymes on VLCFA production were assessed by evaluating the changes in nervonic acid content. A KCS gene from Lunaria annua (LaKCS) and the other three elongase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana were used for the assessment. Five seed-specific expressing constructs, including LaKCS alone, LaKCS with AtKCR, LaKCS with AtHCD, LaKCS with AtECR, and LaKCS with AtKCR and AtHCD, were transformed into Camelina sativa. The nervonic acid content in seed oil increased from null in wild type camelina to 6-12% in LaKCS-expressing lines. However, compared with that from the LaKCS-expressing lines, nervonic acid content in mature seeds from the co-expressing lines with one or two extra elongase genes did not show further increases. Nervonic acid content from LaKCS, AtKCR and AtHCD co-expressing line was significantly higher than that in LaKCS-expressing line during early seed development stage, while the ultimate nervonic acid content was not significantly altered. The results from this study thus provide useful information for future engineering of oilseed crops for higher VLCFA production. PMID:26121034

  20. Vitamin A deficiency increases protein catabolism and induces urea cycle enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Pretel, Guillermo; Marín, M Pilar; Cabezuelo, Francisco; Moreno, Verónica; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Timoneda, Joaquín; Barber, Teresa

    2010-04-01

    Chronic vitamin A deficiency induces a substantial delay in the rates of weight and height gain in both humans and experimental animals. This effect has been associated with an impaired nutrient metabolism and loss of body protein. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of vitamin A deficiency on endogenous proteolysis and nitrogen metabolism and its reversibility with all-trans retinoic acid (RA). Male weanling rats, housed in pairs, were pair-fed a vitamin A-deficient (VAD) or control diet until they were 60 d old. A group of deficient rats were further treated with daily intraperitoneal injections of all-trans RA for 10 d. Final body and tissue (i.e. liver and heart) weights were significantly lower and tissue:body weight ratios were similar in VAD rats and in controls. Conversely, the epididymal white fat:body weight ratio and the plasma concentrations of alanine aminotransferase and adiponectin were significantly higher in VAD rats, which also had hepatic macrovesicular lipid accumulations. Plasma and gastrocnemius muscle 3-methylhistidine, urine nitrogen, and plasma and urine urea concentrations were all significantly higher in the VAD group. The expression of the genes encoding urea cycle enzymes and their activities increased in VAD livers. These changes were partially reverted by all-trans RA. We propose that fuel partitioning in vitamin A deficiency may shift from fatty acids to protein catabolism as an energy source. Our results emphasize the importance of vitamin A on the energy balance control system and they provide an explanation for the role of vitamin A in protein turnover, development, and growth.

  1. Boronic acid-based enzyme inhibitors: a review of recent progress.

    PubMed

    Fu, H; Fang, H; Sun, Jie; Wang, H; Liu, A; Sun, J; Wu, Z

    2014-01-01

    Since Bortezomib was approved by US FDA as the first drug to treat multiple myeloma, various boronic acid compounds have been developed as enzyme inhibitors. This paper reviewed the progress of boronic acid-based inhibitors against enzymes including proteasome, serine protease, HDACs and other enzymes in the past decade.

  2. Effects of sex and site on amino acid metabolism enzyme gene expression and activity in rat white adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Arriarán, Sofía; Agnelli, Silvia; Remesar, Xavier; Fernández-López, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. White adipose tissue (WAT) shows marked sex- and diet-dependent differences. However, our metabolic knowledge of WAT, especially on amino acid metabolism, is considerably limited. In the present study, we compared the influence of sex on the amino acid metabolism profile of the four main WAT sites, focused on the paths related to ammonium handling and the urea cycle, as a way to estimate the extent of WAT implication on body amino-nitrogen metabolism. Experimental Design. Adult female and male rats were maintained, undisturbed, under standard conditions for one month. After killing them under isoflurane anesthesia. WAT sites were dissected and weighed. Subcutaneous, perigonadal, retroperitoneal and mesenteric WAT were analyzed for amino acid metabolism gene expression and enzyme activities. Results. There was a considerable stability of the urea cycle activities and expressions, irrespective of sex, and with only limited influence of site. Urea cycle was more resilient to change than other site-specialized metabolic pathways. The control of WAT urea cycle was probably related to the provision of arginine/citrulline, as deduced from the enzyme activity profiles. These data support a generalized role of WAT in overall amino-N handling. In contrast, sex markedly affected WAT ammonium-centered amino acid metabolism in a site-related way, with relatively higher emphasis in males’ subcutaneous WAT. Conclusions. We found that WAT has an active amino acid metabolism. Its gene expressions were lower than those of glucose-lipid interactions, but the differences were quantitatively less important than usually reported. The effects of sex on urea cycle enzymes expression and activity were limited, in contrast with the wider variations observed in other metabolic pathways. The results agree with a centralized control of urea cycle operation affecting the adipose organ as a whole. PMID:26587356

  3. Effects of aluminum on activity of krebs cycle enzymes and glutamate dehydrogenase in rat brain homogenate.

    PubMed

    Zatta, P; Lain, E; Cagnolini, C

    2000-05-01

    Aluminum is a neurotoxic agent for animals and humans that has been implicated as an etiological factor in several neurodegenerative diseases and as a destabilizer of cell membranes. Due to its high reactivity, Al3+ is able to interfere with several biological functions, including enzymatic activities in key metabolic pathways. In this paper we report that, among the enzymes that constitute the Krebs cycle, only two are activated by aluminum: alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase. In contrast, aconitase, shows decreased activity in the presence of the metal ion. Al3+ also inhibits glutamate dehydrogenase, an allosteric enzyme that is closely linked to the Krebs cycle. A possible correlation between aluminum, the Krebs cycle and aging processes is discussed.

  4. MARINE SULFUR CYCLE. Identification of the algal dimethyl sulfide-releasing enzyme: A missing link in the marine sulfur cycle.

    PubMed

    Alcolombri, Uria; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Feldmesser, Ester; Levin, Yishai; Tawfik, Dan S; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-06-26

    Algal blooms produce large amounts of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a volatile with a diverse signaling role in marine food webs that is emitted to the atmosphere, where it can affect cloud formation. The algal enzymes responsible for forming DMS from dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) remain unidentified despite their critical role in the global sulfur cycle. We identified and characterized Alma1, a DMSP lyase from the bloom-forming algae Emiliania huxleyi. Alma1 is a tetrameric, redox-sensitive enzyme of the aspartate racemase superfamily. Recombinant Alma1 exhibits biochemical features identical to the DMSP lyase in E. huxleyi, and DMS released by various E. huxleyi isolates correlates with their Alma1 levels. Sequence homology searches suggest that Alma1 represents a gene family present in major, globally distributed phytoplankton taxa and in other marine organisms. PMID:26113722

  5. MARINE SULFUR CYCLE. Identification of the algal dimethyl sulfide-releasing enzyme: A missing link in the marine sulfur cycle.

    PubMed

    Alcolombri, Uria; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Feldmesser, Ester; Levin, Yishai; Tawfik, Dan S; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-06-26

    Algal blooms produce large amounts of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a volatile with a diverse signaling role in marine food webs that is emitted to the atmosphere, where it can affect cloud formation. The algal enzymes responsible for forming DMS from dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) remain unidentified despite their critical role in the global sulfur cycle. We identified and characterized Alma1, a DMSP lyase from the bloom-forming algae Emiliania huxleyi. Alma1 is a tetrameric, redox-sensitive enzyme of the aspartate racemase superfamily. Recombinant Alma1 exhibits biochemical features identical to the DMSP lyase in E. huxleyi, and DMS released by various E. huxleyi isolates correlates with their Alma1 levels. Sequence homology searches suggest that Alma1 represents a gene family present in major, globally distributed phytoplankton taxa and in other marine organisms.

  6. Krebs cycle enzymes from livers of old mice are differentially regulated by caloric restriction.

    PubMed

    Hagopian, Kevork; Ramsey, Jon J; Weindruch, Richard

    2004-08-01

    Krebs cycle enzyme activities and levels of five metabolites were determined from livers of old mice (30 months) maintained either on control or on long-term caloric restriction (CR) diets (28 months). In CR mice, the cycle was divided into two major blocks, the first containing citrate synthase, aconitase and NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase which showed decreased activities, while the second block, containing the remaining enzymes, displayed increased activity (except for fumarase, which was unchanged). CR also resulted in decreased levels of citrate, glutamate and alpha-ketoglutarate, increased levels of malate, and unchanged levels of aspartate. The alpha-ketoglutarate/glutamate and malate/alpha-ketoglutarate ratios were higher in CR, in parallel with previously reported increases with CR in pyruvate carboxylase activity and glucagon levels, respectively. The results indicate that long-term CR induces a differential regulation of Krebs cycle in old mice and this regulation may be the result of changes in gene expression levels, as well as a complex interplay between enzymes, hormones and other effectors. Truncation of Krebs cycle by CR may be an important adaptation to utilize available substrates for the gluconeogenesis necessary to sustain glycolytic tissues, such as brain.

  7. Thioredoxin, a master regulator of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Daloso, Danilo M; Müller, Karolin; Obata, Toshihiro; Florian, Alexandra; Tohge, Takayuki; Bottcher, Alexandra; Riondet, Christophe; Bariat, Laetitia; Carrari, Fernando; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Buchanan, Bob B; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2015-03-17

    Plant mitochondria have a fully operational tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that plays a central role in generating ATP and providing carbon skeletons for a range of biosynthetic processes in both heterotrophic and photosynthetic tissues. The cycle enzyme-encoding genes have been well characterized in terms of transcriptional and effector-mediated regulation and have also been subjected to reverse genetic analysis. However, despite this wealth of attention, a central question remains unanswered: "What regulates flux through this pathway in vivo?" Previous proteomic experiments with Arabidopsis discussed below have revealed that a number of mitochondrial enzymes, including members of the TCA cycle and affiliated pathways, harbor thioredoxin (TRX)-binding sites and are potentially redox-regulated. We have followed up on this possibility and found TRX to be a redox-sensitive mediator of TCA cycle flux. In this investigation, we first characterized, at the enzyme and metabolite levels, mutants of the mitochondrial TRX pathway in Arabidopsis: the NADP-TRX reductase a and b double mutant (ntra ntrb) and the mitochondrially located thioredoxin o1 (trxo1) mutant. These studies were followed by a comparative evaluation of the redistribution of isotopes when (13)C-glucose, (13)C-malate, or (13)C-pyruvate was provided as a substrate to leaves of mutant or WT plants. In a complementary approach, we evaluated the in vitro activities of a range of TCA cycle and associated enzymes under varying redox states. The combined dataset suggests that TRX may deactivate both mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase and activate the cytosolic ATP-citrate lyase in vivo, acting as a direct regulator of carbon flow through the TCA cycle and providing a mechanism for the coordination of cellular function.

  8. Thioredoxin, a master regulator of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in plant mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Daloso, Danilo M.; Müller, Karolin; Obata, Toshihiro; Florian, Alexandra; Tohge, Takayuki; Bottcher, Alexandra; Riondet, Christophe; Bariat, Laetitia; Carrari, Fernando; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Buchanan, Bob B.; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Araújo, Wagner L.; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2015-01-01

    Plant mitochondria have a fully operational tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that plays a central role in generating ATP and providing carbon skeletons for a range of biosynthetic processes in both heterotrophic and photosynthetic tissues. The cycle enzyme-encoding genes have been well characterized in terms of transcriptional and effector-mediated regulation and have also been subjected to reverse genetic analysis. However, despite this wealth of attention, a central question remains unanswered: “What regulates flux through this pathway in vivo?” Previous proteomic experiments with Arabidopsis discussed below have revealed that a number of mitochondrial enzymes, including members of the TCA cycle and affiliated pathways, harbor thioredoxin (TRX)-binding sites and are potentially redox-regulated. We have followed up on this possibility and found TRX to be a redox-sensitive mediator of TCA cycle flux. In this investigation, we first characterized, at the enzyme and metabolite levels, mutants of the mitochondrial TRX pathway in Arabidopsis: the NADP-TRX reductase a and b double mutant (ntra ntrb) and the mitochondrially located thioredoxin o1 (trxo1) mutant. These studies were followed by a comparative evaluation of the redistribution of isotopes when 13C-glucose, 13C-malate, or 13C-pyruvate was provided as a substrate to leaves of mutant or WT plants. In a complementary approach, we evaluated the in vitro activities of a range of TCA cycle and associated enzymes under varying redox states. The combined dataset suggests that TRX may deactivate both mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase and activate the cytosolic ATP-citrate lyase in vivo, acting as a direct regulator of carbon flow through the TCA cycle and providing a mechanism for the coordination of cellular function. PMID:25646482

  9. Reengineering Rate-Limiting, Millisecond Enzyme Motions by Introduction of an Unnatural Amino Acid

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Eric D.; Rivalta, Ivan; Whittier, Sean K.; Batista, Victor S.; Loria, J. Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Rate-limiting millisecond motions in wild-type (WT) Ribonuclease A (RNase A) are modulated by histidine 48. Here, we incorporate an unnatural amino acid, thia-methylimidazole, at this site (H48C-4MI) to investigate the effects of a single residue on protein motions over multiple timescales and on enzyme catalytic turnover. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that H48C-4MI retains some crucial WT-like hydrogen bonding interactions but the extent of protein-wide correlated motions in the nanosecond regime is decreased relative to WT. NMR Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill relaxation dispersion experiments demonstrate that millisecond conformational motions in H48C-4MI are present over a similar pH range compared to WT. Furthermore, incorporation of this nonnatural amino acid allows retention of WT-like catalytic activity over the full pH range. These studies demonstrate that the complexity of the protein energy landscape during the catalytic cycle can be maintained using unnatural amino acids, which may prove useful in enzyme design efforts. PMID:21767494

  10. Abnormalities in the tricarboxylic Acid cycle in Huntington disease and in a Huntington disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Nima N; Xu, Hui; Bonica, Joseph; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Cortes, Etty P; Park, Larry C; Arjomand, Jamshid; Gibson, Gary E

    2015-06-01

    Glucose metabolism is reduced in the brains of patients with Huntington disease (HD). The mechanisms underlying this deficit, its link to the pathology of the disease, and the vulnerability of the striatum in HD remain unknown. Abnormalities in some of the key mitochondrial enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, including the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, may contribute to these deficits. Here, activities for these enzymes and select protein levels were measured in human postmortem cortex and in striatum and cortex of an HD mouse model (Q175); mRNA levels encoding for these enzymes were also measured in the Q175 mouse cortex. The activities of PDHC and nearly all of the TCA cycle enzymes were dramatically lower (-50% to 90%) in humans than in mice. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase increased with HD in human (35%) and mouse (23%) cortex. No other changes were detected in the human HD cortex or mouse striatum. In Q175 cortex, there were increased activities of PDHC (+12%) and aconitase (+32%). Increased mRNA levels for succinyl thiokinase (+88%) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (+64%) suggested an upregulation of the TCA cycle. These patterns of change differ from those reported in other diseases, which may offer unique metabolic therapeutic opportunities for HD patients.

  11. Diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid, and their metabolic enzymes in synaptic vesicle recycling.

    PubMed

    Tu-Sekine, Becky; Goldschmidt, Hana; Raben, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    The synaptic vesicle (SV) cycle includes exocytosis of vesicles loaded with a neurotransmitter such as glutamate, coordinated recovery of SVs by endocytosis, refilling of vesicles, and subsequent release of the refilled vesicles from the presynaptic bouton. SV exocytosis is tightly linked with endocytosis, and variations in the number of vesicles, and/or defects in the refilling of SVs, will affect the amount of neurotransmitter available for release (Sudhof, 2004). There is increasing interest in the roles synaptic vesicle lipids and lipid metabolizing enzymes play in this recycling. Initial emphasis was placed on the role of polyphosphoinositides in SV cycling as outlined in a number of reviews (Lim and Wenk, 2009; Martin, 2012; Puchkov and Haucke, 2013; Rohrbough and Broadie, 2005). Other lipids are now recognized to also play critical roles. For example, PLD1 (Humeau et al., 2001; Rohrbough and Broadie, 2005) and some DGKs (Miller et al., 1999; Nurrish et al., 1999) play roles in neurotransmission which is consistent with the critical roles for phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) and diacylglycerol (DAG) in the regulation of SV exo/endocytosis (Cremona et al., 1999; Exton, 1994; Huttner and Schmidt, 2000; Lim and Wenk, 2009; Puchkov and Haucke, 2013; Rohrbough and Broadie, 2005). PLD generates phosphatidic acid by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) and in some systems this PtdOH is de-phosphorylated to generate DAG. In contrast, DGK catalyzes the phosphorylation of DAG thereby converting it into PtdOH. While both enzymes are poised to regulate the levels of DAG and PtdOH, therefore, they both lead to the generation of PtdOH and could have opposite effects on DAG levels. This is particularly important for SV cycling as PtdOH and DAG are both needed for evoked exocytosis (Lim and Wenk, 2009; Puchkov and Haucke, 2013; Rohrbough and Broadie, 2005). Two lipids and their involved metabolic enzymes, two sphingolipids have also been implicated in

  12. Combined cycle phosphoric acid fuel cell electric power system

    SciTech Connect

    Mollot, D.J.; Micheli, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    By arranging two or more electric power generation cycles in series, combined cycle systems are able to produce electric power more efficiently than conventional single cycle plants. The high fuel to electricity conversion efficiency results in lower plant operating costs, better environmental performance, and in some cases even lower capital costs. Despite these advantages, combined cycle systems for the 1 - 10 megawatt (MW) industrial market are rare. This paper presents a low noise, low (oxides of nitrogen) NOx, combined cycle alternative for the small industrial user. By combining a commercially available phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) with a low-temperature Rankine cycle (similar to those used in geothermal applications), electric conversion efficiencies between 45 and 47 percent are predicted. While the simple cycle PAFC is competitive on a cost of energy basis with gas turbines and diesel generators in the 1 to 2 MW market, the combined cycle PAFC is competitive, on a cost of energy basis, with simple cycle diesel generators in the 4 to 25 MW market. In addition, the efficiency and low-temperature operation of the combined cycle PAFC results in a significant reduction in carbon dioxide emissions with NO{sub x} concentration on the order of 1 parts per million (per weight) (ppmw).

  13. Enzyme-assisted target recycling (EATR) for nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, Yulia V; Kolpashchikov, Dmitry M

    2014-09-01

    Fast, reliable and sensitive methods for nucleic acid detection are of growing practical interest with respect to molecular diagnostics of cancer, infectious and genetic diseases. Currently, PCR-based and other target amplification strategies are most extensively used in practice. At the same time, such assays have limitations that can be overcome by alternative approaches. There is a recent explosion in the design of methods that amplify the signal produced by a nucleic acid target, without changing its copy number. This review aims at systematization and critical analysis of the enzyme-assisted target recycling (EATR) signal amplification technique. The approach uses nucleases to recognize and cleave the probe-target complex. Cleavage reactions produce a detectable signal. The advantages of such techniques are potentially low sensitivity to contamination and lack of the requirement of a thermal cycler. Nucleases used for EATR include sequence-dependent restriction or nicking endonucleases or sequence independent exonuclease III, lambda exonuclease, RNase H, RNase HII, AP endonuclease, duplex-specific nuclease, DNase I, or T7 exonuclease. EATR-based assays are potentially useful for point-of-care diagnostics, single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyping and microRNA analysis. Specificity, limit of detection and the potential impact of EATR strategies on molecular diagnostics are discussed.

  14. Citric acid cycle and the origin of MARS.

    PubMed

    Eswarappa, Sandeepa M; Fox, Paul L

    2013-05-01

    The vertebrate multiaminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex (MARS) is an assemblage of nine aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and three non-synthetase scaffold proteins, aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex-interacting multifunctional protein (AIMP)1, AIMP2, and AIMP3. The evolutionary origin of the MARS is unclear, as is the significance of the inclusion of only nine of 20 tRNA synthetases. Eight of the nine amino acids corresponding to ARSs of the MARS are derived from two citric acid cycle intermediates, α-ketoglutatrate and oxaloacetate. We propose that the metabolic link with the citric acid cycle, the appearance of scaffolding proteins AIMP2 and AIMP3, and the subsequent disappearance of the glyoxylate cycle, together facilitated the origin of the MARS in a common ancestor of metazoans and choanoflagellates.

  15. Sarcocystis fusiformis: some Krebs cycle enzymes in various fractions of sarcocysts of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Gupta, R S; Kushwah, H S; Kushwah, A

    1995-01-01

    A biochemical investigation was carried out on the relative presence of some enzymes of the Krebs cycle and of the associated energy metabolism in various fractions (namely, cyst wall, cyst fluid and zoites) of sarcocysts of Sarcocystis fusiformis from the oesophageal muscles of naturally infected Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis). Except for malate dehydrogenase, the activities of aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase were beyond detectable limits, pointing to a non-functional Krebs cycle in the cysts of this parasite. The activities of adenosine triphosphatase and cytochromes were lowest in cyst fluid and were maximally depicted by cyst wall and zoites.

  16. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  17. Kinetics and spatial distribution of enzymes of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycles in earthworm biopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang Thi Thu, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2016-04-01

    Earthworms boost microbial activities and consequently form hotspots in soil. The distribution of enzyme activities inside the earthworm biopores is completely unknown. For the first time, we analyzed enzyme kinetics and visualized enzyme distribution inside and outside biopores by in situ soil zymography. Kinetic parameters (Vmax and Km) of 6 enzymes β-glucosidase (GLU), cellobiohydrolase (CBH), xylanase (XYL), chitinase (NAG), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and acid phosphatase (APT) were determined in biopores formed by Lumbricus terrestris L.. The spatial distributions of GLU, NAG and APT become visible via zymograms in comparison between earthworm-inhabited and earthworm-free soil. Zymography showed heterogeneous distribution of hotspots in the rhizosphere and biopores. The hotspot areas were 2.4 to 14 times larger in the biopores than in soil without earthworms. The significantly higher Vmax values for GLU, CBH, XYL, NAG and APT in biopores confirmed the stimulation of enzyme activities by earthworms. For CBH, XYL and NAG, the 2- to 3-fold higher Km values in biopores indicated different enzyme systems with lower substrate affinity compared to control soil. The positive effects of earthworms on Vmax were cancelled by the Km increase for CBH, XYL and NAG at a substrate concentration below 20 μmol g-1 soil. The change of enzyme systems reflected a shift in dominant microbial populations toward species with lower affinity to holo-celluloses and to N-acetylglucosamine, and with higher affinity to proteins as compared to the biopores-free soil. We conclude that earthworm biopores are microbial hotspots with much higher and dense distribution of enzyme activities compared to bulk soil. References Spohn M, Kuzyakov Y. (2014) Spatial and temporal dynamics of hotspots of enzyme activity in soil as affected by living and dead roots - a soil zymography analysis, Plant Soil 379: 67-77. Blagodatskaya, E., Kuzyakov, Y., 2013. Review paper: Active microorganisms in soil

  18. Novel Metabolic Abnormalities in the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Peripheral Cells From Huntington's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Nima N; Bonica, Joseph; Xu, Hui; Park, Larry C; Arjomand, Jamshid; Chen, Zhengming; Gibson, Gary E

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction is well-documented in Huntington's disease (HD). However, the link between the mutant huntingtin (mHTT) gene and the pathology is unknown. The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the main metabolic pathway for the production of NADH for conversion to ATP via the electron transport chain (ETC). The objective of this study was to test for differences in enzyme activities, mRNAs and protein levels related to the TCA cycle between lymphoblasts from healthy subjects and from patients with HD. The experiments utilize the advantages of lymphoblasts to reveal new insights about HD. The large quantity of homogeneous cell populations permits multiple dynamic measures to be made on exactly comparable tissues. The activities of nine enzymes related to the TCA cycle and the expression of twenty-nine mRNAs encoding for these enzymes and enzyme complexes were measured. Cells were studied under baseline conditions and during metabolic stress. The results support our recent findings that the activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are elevated in HD. The data also show a large unexpected depression in MDH activities. Furthermore, message levels for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) were markedly increased in in HD lymphoblasts and were responsive to treatments. The use of lymphoblasts allowed us to clarify that the reported decrease in aconitase activity in HD autopsy brains is likely due to secondary hypoxic effects. These results demonstrate the mRNA and enzymes of the TCA cycle are critical therapeutic targets that have been understudied in HD. PMID:27611087

  19. CP12-mediated protection of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Marri, Lucia; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Lebrun, Régine; Puppo, Rémy; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Trost, Paolo; Gontero, Brigitte; Sparla, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) are two energy-consuming enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle, whose regulation is crucial for the global balance of the photosynthetic process under different environmental conditions. In oxygen phototrophs, GAPDH and PRK regulation involves the redox-sensitive protein CP12. In the dark, oxidized chloroplast thioredoxins trigger the formation of a GAPDH/CP12/PRK complex in which both enzyme activities are down-regulated. In this report, we show that free GAPDH (A4-isoform) and PRK are also inhibited by oxidants like H2O2, GSSG and GSNO. Both in the land plant Arabidopsis thaliana and in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, both enzymes can be glutathionylated as shown by biotinylated-GSSG assay and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. CP12 is not glutathionylated but homodisulfides are formed upon oxidant treatments. In Arabidopsis but not in Chlamydomonas, the interaction between oxidized CP12 and GAPDH provides full protection from oxidative damage. In both organisms, preformed GAPDH/CP12/PRK complexes are protected from GSSG or GSNO oxidation, and in Arabidopsis also from H2O2 treatment. Overall, the results suggest that the role of CP12 in oxygen phototrophs needs to be extended beyond light/dark regulation, and include protection of enzymes belonging to Calvin-Benson cycle from oxidative stress.

  20. CP12-mediated protection of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Marri, Lucia; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Lebrun, Régine; Puppo, Rémy; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Trost, Paolo; Gontero, Brigitte; Sparla, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) are two energy-consuming enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle, whose regulation is crucial for the global balance of the photosynthetic process under different environmental conditions. In oxygen phototrophs, GAPDH and PRK regulation involves the redox-sensitive protein CP12. In the dark, oxidized chloroplast thioredoxins trigger the formation of a GAPDH/CP12/PRK complex in which both enzyme activities are down-regulated. In this report, we show that free GAPDH (A4-isoform) and PRK are also inhibited by oxidants like H2O2, GSSG and GSNO. Both in the land plant Arabidopsis thaliana and in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, both enzymes can be glutathionylated as shown by biotinylated-GSSG assay and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. CP12 is not glutathionylated but homodisulfides are formed upon oxidant treatments. In Arabidopsis but not in Chlamydomonas, the interaction between oxidized CP12 and GAPDH provides full protection from oxidative damage. In both organisms, preformed GAPDH/CP12/PRK complexes are protected from GSSG or GSNO oxidation, and in Arabidopsis also from H2O2 treatment. Overall, the results suggest that the role of CP12 in oxygen phototrophs needs to be extended beyond light/dark regulation, and include protection of enzymes belonging to Calvin-Benson cycle from oxidative stress. PMID:24211189

  1. Chloroplast and Cytoplasmic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Louise E.; Advani, Vimal R.

    1970-01-01

    Three pea (Pisum sativum) leaf chloroplast enzymes—triose phosphate isomerase, glyceric acid 3-phosphate kinase, and fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase—have been separated from the corresponding cytoplasmic enzymes by isoelectric focusing. These three enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle are therefore distinct proteins, not identical with the analogous enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. PMID:16657347

  2. Gallic acid and gallic acid derivatives: effects on drug metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ow, Yin-Yin; Stupans, Ieva

    2003-06-01

    Gallic acid and its structurally related compounds are found widely distributed in fruits and plants. Gallic acid, and its catechin derivatives are also present as one of the main phenolic components of both black and green tea. Esters of gallic acid have a diverse range of industrial uses, as antioxidants in food, in cosmetics and in the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, gallic acid is employed as a source material for inks, paints and colour developers. Studies utilising these compounds have found them to possess many potential therapeutic properties including anti-cancer and antimicrobial properties. In this review, studies of the effects of gallic acid, its esters, and gallic acid catechin derivatives on Phase I and Phase II enzymes are examined. Many published reports of the effects of the in vitro effects of gallic acid and its derivatives on drug metabolising enzymes concern effects directly on substrate (generally drug or mutagen) metabolism or indirectly through observed effects in Ames tests. In the case of the Ames test an antimutagenic effect may be observed through inhibition of CYP activation of indirectly acting mutagens and/or by scavenging of metabolically generated mutagenic electrophiles. There has been considerable interest in the in vivo effects of the gallate esters because of their incorporation into foodstuffs as antioxidants and in the catechin gallates with their potential role as chemoprotective agents. Principally an induction of Phase II enzymes has been observed however more recent studies using HepG2 cells and primary cultures of human hepatocytes provide evidence for the overall complexity of actions of individual components versus complex mixtures, such as those in food. Further systematic studies of mechanisms of induction and inhibition of drug metabolising enzymes by this group of compounds are warranted in the light of their distribution and consequent ingestion, current uses and suggested therapeutic potential. However, it

  3. AcalPred: a sequence-based tool for discriminating between acidic and alkaline enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment.

  4. AcalPred: A Sequence-Based Tool for Discriminating between Acidic and Alkaline Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Chen, Wei; Ding, Hui

    2013-01-01

    The structure and activity of enzymes are influenced by pH value of their surroundings. Although many enzymes work well in the pH range from 6 to 8, some specific enzymes have good efficiencies only in acidic (pH<5) or alkaline (pH>9) solution. Studies have demonstrated that the activities of enzymes correlate with their primary sequences. It is crucial to judge enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment from its amino acid sequence in molecular mechanism clarification and the design of high efficient enzymes. In this study, we developed a sequence-based method to discriminate acidic enzymes from alkaline enzymes. The analysis of variance was used to choose the optimized discriminating features derived from g-gap dipeptide compositions. And support vector machine was utilized to establish the prediction model. In the rigorous jackknife cross-validation, the overall accuracy of 96.7% was achieved. The method can correctly predict 96.3% acidic and 97.1% alkaline enzymes. Through the comparison between the proposed method and previous methods, it is demonstrated that the proposed method is more accurate. On the basis of this proposed method, we have built an online web-server called AcalPred which can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AcalPred). We believe that the AcalPred will become a powerful tool to study enzyme adaptation to acidic or alkaline environment. PMID:24130738

  5. Restoring enzyme activity in nonfunctional low erucic acid Brassica napus fatty acid elongase 1 by a single amino acid substitution.

    PubMed

    Katavic, Vesna; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Barton, Dennis L; Giblin, E Michael; Reed, Darwin W; Taylor, David C

    2002-11-01

    Genomic fatty acid elongation 1 (FAE1) clones from high erucic acid (HEA) Brassica napus, Brassica rapa and Brassica oleracea, and low erucic acid (LEA) B. napus cv. Westar, were amplified by PCR and expressed in yeast cells under the control of the strong galactose-inducible promoter. As expected, yeast cells expressing the FAE1 genes from HEA Brassica spp. synthesized very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids that are not normally found in yeast, while fatty acid profiles of yeast cells expressing the FAE1 gene from LEA B. napus were identical to control yeast samples. In agreement with published findings regarding different HEA and LEA B. napus cultivars, comparison of FAE1 protein sequences from HEA and LEA Brassicaceae revealed one crucial amino acid difference: the serine residue at position 282 of the HEA FAE1 sequences is substituted by phenylalanine in LEA B. napus cv. Westar. Using site directed mutagenesis, the phenylalanine 282 residue was substituted with a serine residue in the FAE1 polypeptide from B. napus cv. Westar, the mutated gene was expressed in yeast and GC analysis revealed the presence of very long chain monounsaturated fatty acids (VLCMFAs), indicating that the elongase activity was restored in the LEA FAE1 enzyme by the single amino acid substitution. Thus, for the first time, the low erucic acid trait in canola B. napus can be attributed to a single amino acid substitution which prevents the biosynthesis of the eicosenoic and erucic acids.

  6. Reciprocal enzyme regulation as a source of bistability in covalent modification cycles.

    PubMed

    Straube, Ronny; Conradi, Carsten

    2013-08-01

    Covalent modification cycles (CMCs) are the building blocks of many regulatory networks in biological systems. Under proper kinetic conditions such mono-cyclic enzyme systems can show a higher sensitivity to effectors than enzymes subject to direct allosteric regulation. Using methods from reaction network theory it has been argued that CMCs can potentially exhibit multiple steady states if the converter enzymes are regulated in a reciprocal manner, but the underlying mechanism as well as the kinetic requirements for the emergence of such a behavior remained unclear. Here, we reinvestigate CMCs with reciprocal regulation of the converter enzymes for two common regulatory mechanisms: allosteric regulation and covalent modification. To analyze the steady state behavior of the corresponding mass-action equations, we derive reduced models by means of a quasi-steady state approximation (QSSA). We also derive reduced models using the total QSSA which often better reproduces the transient dynamics of enzyme-catalyzed reaction systems. Through a steady state analysis of the reduced models we show that the occurrence of bistability can be associated with the presence of a double negative feedback loop. We also derive constraints for the model parameters which might help to evaluate the potential significance of the mechanisms described here for the generation of bistability in natural systems. In particular, our results support the view of a possible bistable response in the metabolic PFK1/F1,6BPase cycle as observed experimentally in rat liver extracts, and it suggests an alternative view on the origin of bistability in the Cdk1-Wee1-Cdc25 system.

  7. Acetaminophen toxicity and 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid): a tale of two cycles, one an ATP-depleting futile cycle and the other a useful cycle.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The acquired form of 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid) metabolic acidosis was first described in 1989 and its relationship to chronic acetaminophen ingestion was proposed the next year. Since then, this cause of chronic anion gap metabolic acidosis has been increasingly recognized. Many cases go unrecognized because an assay for 5-oxoproline is not widely available. Most cases occur in malnourished, chronically ill women with a history of chronic acetaminophen ingestion. Acetaminophen levels are very rarely in the toxic range; rather, they are usually therapeutic or low. The disorder generally resolves with cessation of acetaminophen and administration of intravenous fluids. Methionine or N-acetyl cysteine may accelerate resolution and methionine is protective in a rodent model. The disorder has been attributed to glutathione depletion and activation of a key enzyme in the γ-glutamyl cycle. However, the specific metabolic derangements that cause the 5-oxoproline accumulation remain unclear. An ATP-depleting futile 5-oxoproline cycle can explain the accumulation of 5-oxoproline after chronic acetaminophen ingestion. This cycle is activated by the depletion of both glutathione and cysteine. This explanation contributes to our understanding of acetaminophen-induced 5-oxoproline metabolic acidosis and the beneficial role of N-acetyl cysteine therapy. The ATP-depleting futile 5-oxoproline cycle may also play a role in the energy depletions that occur in other acetaminophen-related toxic syndromes.

  8. The krebs cycle enzyme α-ketoglutarate decarboxylase is an essential glycosomal protein in bloodstream African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Steven; Szempruch, Anthony; Hajduk, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    α-Ketoglutarate decarboxylase (α-KDE1) is a Krebs cycle enzyme found in the mitochondrion of the procyclic form (PF) of Trypanosoma brucei. The bloodstream form (BF) of T. brucei lacks a functional Krebs cycle and relies exclusively on glycolysis for ATP production. Despite the lack of a functional Krebs cycle, α-KDE1 was expressed in BF T. brucei and RNA interference knockdown of α-KDE1 mRNA resulted in rapid growth arrest and killing. Cell death was preceded by progressive swelling of the flagellar pocket as a consequence of recruitment of both flagellar and plasma membranes into the pocket. BF T. brucei expressing an epitope-tagged copy of α-KDE1 showed localization to glycosomes and not the mitochondrion. We used a cell line transfected with a reporter construct containing the N-terminal sequence of α-KDE1 fused to green fluorescent protein to examine the requirements for glycosome targeting. We found that the N-terminal 18 amino acids of α-KDE1 contain overlapping mitochondrion- and peroxisome-targeting sequences and are sufficient to direct localization to the glycosome in BF T. brucei. These results suggest that α-KDE1 has a novel moonlighting function outside the mitochondrion in BF T. brucei.

  9. Structural Dissection of the Maltodextrin Disproportionation Cycle of the Arabidopsis Plastidial Disproportionating Enzyme 1 (DPE1).

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Ellis C; Stevenson, Clare E M; Tantanarat, Krit; Latousakis, Dimitrios; Donaldson, Matthew I; Rejzek, Martin; Nepogodiev, Sergey A; Limpaseni, Tipaporn; Field, Robert A; Lawson, David M

    2015-12-11

    The degradation of transitory starch in the chloroplast to provide fuel for the plant during the night requires a suite of enzymes that generate a series of short chain linear glucans. However, glucans of less than four glucose units are no longer substrates for these enzymes, whereas export from the plastid is only possible in the form of either maltose or glucose. In order to make use of maltotriose, which would otherwise accumulate, disproportionating enzyme 1 (DPE1; a 4-α-glucanotransferase) converts two molecules of maltotriose to a molecule of maltopentaose, which can now be acted on by the degradative enzymes, and one molecule of glucose that can be exported. We have determined the structure of the Arabidopsis plastidial DPE1 (AtDPE1), and, through ligand soaking experiments, we have trapped the enzyme in a variety of conformational states. AtDPE1 forms a homodimer with a deep, long, and open-ended active site canyon contained within each subunit. The canyon is divided into donor and acceptor sites with the catalytic residues at their junction; a number of loops around the active site adopt different conformations dependent on the occupancy of these sites. The "gate" is the most dynamic loop and appears to play a role in substrate capture, in particular in the binding of the acceptor molecule. Subtle changes in the configuration of the active site residues may prevent undesirable reactions or abortive hydrolysis of the covalently bound enzyme-substrate intermediate. Together, these observations allow us to delineate the complete AtDPE1 disproportionation cycle in structural terms.

  10. Structural Dissection of the Maltodextrin Disproportionation Cycle of the Arabidopsis Plastidial Disproportionating Enzyme 1 (DPE1)*

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Ellis C.; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Tantanarat, Krit; Latousakis, Dimitrios; Donaldson, Matthew I.; Rejzek, Martin; Nepogodiev, Sergey A.; Limpaseni, Tipaporn; Field, Robert A.; Lawson, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of transitory starch in the chloroplast to provide fuel for the plant during the night requires a suite of enzymes that generate a series of short chain linear glucans. However, glucans of less than four glucose units are no longer substrates for these enzymes, whereas export from the plastid is only possible in the form of either maltose or glucose. In order to make use of maltotriose, which would otherwise accumulate, disproportionating enzyme 1 (DPE1; a 4-α-glucanotransferase) converts two molecules of maltotriose to a molecule of maltopentaose, which can now be acted on by the degradative enzymes, and one molecule of glucose that can be exported. We have determined the structure of the Arabidopsis plastidial DPE1 (AtDPE1), and, through ligand soaking experiments, we have trapped the enzyme in a variety of conformational states. AtDPE1 forms a homodimer with a deep, long, and open-ended active site canyon contained within each subunit. The canyon is divided into donor and acceptor sites with the catalytic residues at their junction; a number of loops around the active site adopt different conformations dependent on the occupancy of these sites. The “gate” is the most dynamic loop and appears to play a role in substrate capture, in particular in the binding of the acceptor molecule. Subtle changes in the configuration of the active site residues may prevent undesirable reactions or abortive hydrolysis of the covalently bound enzyme-substrate intermediate. Together, these observations allow us to delineate the complete AtDPE1 disproportionation cycle in structural terms. PMID:26504082

  11. Evolutionary History of the Enzymes Involved in the Calvin-Benson Cycle in Euglenids.

    PubMed

    Markunas, Chelsea M; Triemer, Richard E

    2016-05-01

    Euglenids are an ancient lineage that may have existed as early as 2 billion years ago. A mere 65 years ago, Melvin Calvin and Andrew A. Benson performed experiments on Euglena gracilis and elucidated the series of reactions by which carbon was fixed and reduced during photosynthesis. However, the evolutionary history of this pathway (Calvin-Benson cycle) in euglenids was more complex than Calvin and Benson could have imagined. The chloroplast present today in euglenophytes arose from a secondary endosymbiosis between a phagotrophic euglenid and a prasinophyte green alga. A long period of evolutionary time existed before this secondary endosymbiotic event took place, which allowed for other endosymbiotic events or gene transfers to occur prior to the establishment of the green chloroplast. This research revealed the evolutionary history of the major enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle throughout the euglenid lineage and showed that the majority of genes for Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes shared an ancestry with red algae and/or chromophytes suggesting they may have been transferred to the nucleus prior to the acquisition of the green chloroplast.

  12. Prebiotic Metabolism: Production by Mineral Photoelectrochemistry of α-Ketocarboxylic Acids in the Reductive Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Marcelo I.; Martin, Scot T.

    2009-11-01

    A reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle could have fixed carbon dioxide as bio chemically useful energy-storage molecules on early Earth. Nonenzymatic chemical pathways for some steps of the rTCA cycle, however, such as the production of the α-ketocarboxylic acids pyruvate and α-ketoglutarate, remain a challenging problem for the viability of the proposed prebiotic cycle. As a class of compounds, α-ketocarboxylic acids have high free energies of formation that disfavor their production. We report herein the production of pyruvate from lactate and of α-ketoglutarate from pyruvate in the millimolar concentration range as promoted by ZnS mineral photoelectrochemistry. Pyruvate is produced from the photooxidation of lactate with 70% yield and a quantum efficiency of 0.009 at 15°C across the wavelength range of 200-400 nm. The produced pyruvate undergoes photoreductive back reaction to lactate at a 30% yield and with a quantum efficiency of 0.0024. Pyruvate alternatively continues in photooxidative forward reaction to α-ketoglutarate with a 50% yield and a quantum efficiency of 0.0036. The remaining 20% of the carbon follows side reactions that produce isocitrate, glutarate, and succinate. Small amounts of acetate are also produced. The results of this study suggest that α-ketocarboxylic acids produced by mineral photoelectrochemistry could have participated in a viable enzyme-free cycle for carbon fixation in an environment where light, sulfide minerals, carbon dioxide, and other organic compounds interacted on prebiotic Earth.

  13. C-Myc induced compensated cardiac hypertrophy increases free fatty acid utilization for the citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Olson, Aaron K; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam) injections. Isolated working hearts and (13)Carbon ((13)C)-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing (13)C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (Cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was assessed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contributions in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus Cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc versus Cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to Cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes for the citric acid cycle did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the

  14. Commercial Alloys for Sulfuric Acid Vaporization in Thermochemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas M. Lillo; Karen M. Delezene-Briggs

    2005-10-01

    Most thermochemical cycles being considered for producing hydrogen include a processing stream in which dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated, vaporized and then decomposed over a catalyst. The sulfuric acid vaporizer is exposed to highly aggressive conditions. Liquid sulfuric acid will be present at a concentration of >96 wt% (>90 mol %) H2SO4 and temperatures exceeding 400oC [Brown, et. al, 2003]. The system will also be pressurized, 0.7-3.5 MPa, to keep the sulfuric acid in the liquid state at this temperature and acid concentration. These conditions far exceed those found in the commercial sulfuric acid generation, regeneration and handling industries. Exotic materials, e.g. ceramics, precious metals, clad materials, etc., have been proposed for this application [Wong, et. al., 2005]. However, development time, costs, reliability, safety concerns and/or certification issues plague such solutions and should be considered as relatively long-term, optimum solutions. A more cost-effective (and relatively near-term) solution would be to use commercially-available metallic alloys to demonstrate the cycle and study process variables. However, the corrosion behavior of commercial alloys in sulfuric acid is rarely characterized above the natural boiling point of concentrated sulfuric acid (~250oC at 1 atm). Therefore a screening study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of various commercial alloys for concentration and vaporization of high-temperature sulfuric acid. Initially alloys were subjected to static corrosion tests in concentrated sulfuric acid (~95-97% H2SO4) at temperatures and exposure times up to 200oC and 480 hours, respectively. Alloys with a corrosion rate of less than 5 mm/year were then subjected to static corrosion tests at a pressure of 1.4 MPa and temperatures up to 375oC. Exposure times were shorter due to safety concerns and ranged from as short as 5 hours up to 144 hours. The materials evaluated included nickel-, iron- and cobalt

  15. Sporulation of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Mutants of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Yousten, Allan A.; Hanson, Richard S.

    1972-01-01

    A mutant of Bacillus subtilis 168 lacking aconitase (EC 4.2.1.3) was found to be blocked at stage 0 or I of sporulation. Although adenosine triphosphate levels, which normally decrease in tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants at the completion of exponential growth, could be maintained at higher levels by feeding metabolizable carbon sources, this did not permit the cells to progress further into the sporulation sequence. When post-exponential-phase cells of mutants blocked in the first half of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were resuspended with an energy source in culture fluid from post-exponential-phase wild-type B. subtilis or Escherichia coli, good sporulation occurred. The spores produced retained the mutant genotype and were heat stable but lost refractility and heat stability several hours after their production. Images PMID:4110146

  16. Non-enzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doctor, V. M.; Oro, J.

    1972-01-01

    Study of the mechanism of nonenzymic beta-decarboxylation of aspartic acid in the presence of metal ions and pyridoxal. The results suggest that aspartic acid is first converted to oxalacetic acid by transamination with pyridoxal which in turn is converted to pyridoxamine. This is followed by decarboxylation of oxalacetic acid to form pyruvic acid which transaminates with pyridoxamine to form alanine. The possible significance of these results to prebiotic molecular evolution is briefly discussed.

  17. Evaluation of Krebs cycle enzymes in the brain of rats after chronic administration of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Scaini, Giselli; Santos, Patricia M; Benedet, Joana; Rochi, Natália; Gomes, Lara M; Borges, Lislaine S; Rezin, Gislaine T; Pezente, Daiana P; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2010-05-31

    Several works report brain impairment of metabolism as a mechanism underlying depression. Citrate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase are enzymes localized within cells in the mitochondrial matrix and are important steps of Krebs cycle. In addition, citrate synthase has been used as a quantitative enzyme marker for the presence of intact mitochondria. Thus, we investigated citrate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase activities from rat brain after chronic administration of paroxetine, nortriptiline and venlafaxine. Adult male Wistar rats received daily injections of paroxetine (10mg/kg), nortriptiline (15mg/kg), venlafaxine (10mg/kg) or saline in 1.0mL/kg volume for 15 days. Twelve hours after the last administration, the rats were killed by decapitation, the hippocampus, striatum and prefrontal cortex were immediately removed, and activities of citrate synthase and succinate dehydrogenase were measured. We verified that chronic administration of paroxetine increased citrate synthase activity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex of adult rats; cerebellum was not affected. Chronic administration of nortriptiline and venlafaxine did not affect the enzyme activity in these brain areas. Succinate dehydrogenase activity was increased by chronic administration of paroxetine and nortriptiline in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex of adult rats; cerebellum was not affected either. Chronic administration of venlafaxine increased succinate dehydrogenase activity in prefrontal cortex, but did not affect the enzyme activity in cerebellum, hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. Considering that metabolism impairment is probably involved in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders, an increase in these enzymes by antidepressants may be an important mechanism of action of these drugs.

  18. Use of immobilized enzymes in automated clinical analysis: determination of uric acid and glucose using immobilized enzymes in column form.

    PubMed

    Endo, J; Tabata, M; Okada, S; Murachi, T

    1979-07-16

    We studied the use of immobilized enzymes, covalently bound to alkylaminosilane derivative of porous glass, to automated clinical analysis on uric acid and glucose in blood, serum and urine. A microcolumn with an immobilized enzyme was prepared and used in an AutoAnalyzer I continuous flow system. Uricase (EC 1.7.3.3) from Candida utilis and glucose oxidase (EC 1.1.3.4) from Aspergillus niger were immobilized for the determination of uric acid and glucose, respectively. Hydrogen peroxide produced by these oxidases was colorimetrically determined using horse-radish peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) and a hydrogen acceptor in solution. Sensitivity and wash charactertistics of a column with immobilized enzyme, 1.5 mm of inner diameter and up to 40 mm in length, were satisfactory at an assay speed of 50 samples per hour. The results correlated well with those obtained by other well established methods utilizing the AutoAnalyzer system. The immobilized enzymes were sufficiently stable for at least two months of 2000 tests when used repeatedly. Clinical trials proved that this method is capable of replacing the soluble enzyme method, giving reliable and reproducible results at lower cost.

  19. Genetic and biochemical interactions involving tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) function using a collection of mutants defective in all TCA cycle genes.

    PubMed

    Przybyla-Zawislak, B; Gadde, D M; Ducharme, K; McCammon, M T

    1999-05-01

    The eight enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle are encoded by at least 15 different nuclear genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have constructed a set of yeast strains defective in these genes as part of a comprehensive analysis of the interactions among the TCA cycle proteins. The 15 major TCA cycle genes can be sorted into five phenotypic categories on the basis of their growth on nonfermentable carbon sources. We have previously reported a novel phenotype associated with mutants defective in the IDH2 gene encoding the Idh2p subunit of the NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH). Null and nonsense idh2 mutants grow poorly on glycerol, but growth can be enhanced by extragenic mutations, termed glycerol suppressors, in the CIT1 gene encoding the TCA cycle citrate synthase and in other genes of oxidative metabolism. The TCA cycle mutant collection was utilized to search for other genes that can suppress idh2 mutants and to identify TCA cycle genes that display a similar suppressible growth phenotype on glycerol. Mutations in 7 TCA cycle genes were capable of functioning as suppressors for growth of idh2 mutants on glycerol. The only other TCA cycle gene to display the glycerol-suppressor-accumulation phenotype was IDH1, which encodes the companion Idh1p subunit of NAD-IDH. These results provide genetic evidence that NAD-IDH plays a unique role in TCA cycle function.

  20. Systems-level metabolic flux profiling elucidates a complete, bifurcated tricarboxylic acid cycle in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Fan, Jing; Roquet, Nathaniel; Rabitz, Herschel; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2010-09-01

    Obligatory anaerobic bacteria are major contributors to the overall metabolism of soil and the human gut. The metabolic pathways of these bacteria remain, however, poorly understood. Using isotope tracers, mass spectrometry, and quantitative flux modeling, here we directly map the metabolic pathways of Clostridium acetobutylicum, a soil bacterium whose major fermentation products include the biofuels butanol and hydrogen. While genome annotation suggests the absence of most tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes, our results demonstrate that this bacterium has a complete, albeit bifurcated, TCA cycle; oxaloacetate flows to succinate both through citrate/alpha-ketoglutarate and via malate/fumarate. Our investigations also yielded insights into the pathways utilized for glucose catabolism and amino acid biosynthesis and revealed that the organism's one-carbon metabolism is distinct from that of model microbes, involving reversible pyruvate decarboxylation and the use of pyruvate as the one-carbon donor for biosynthetic reactions. This study represents the first in vivo characterization of the TCA cycle and central metabolism of C. acetobutylicum. Our results establish a role for the full TCA cycle in an obligatory anaerobic organism and demonstrate the importance of complementing genome annotation with isotope tracer studies for determining the metabolic pathways of diverse microbes.

  1. The synthesis of glutamic acid in the absence of enzymes: Implications for biogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morowitz, Harold; Peterson, Eta; Chang, Sherwood

    1995-01-01

    This paper reports on the non-enzymatic aqueous phase synthesis of amino acids from keto acids, ammonia and reducing agents. The facile synthesis of key metabolic intermediates, particularly in the glycolytic pathway, the citric acid cycle, and the first step of amino acid synthesis, lead to new ways of looking at the problem of biogenesis.

  2. Evolution of an Enzyme from a Noncatalytic Nucleic Acid Sequence.

    PubMed

    Gysbers, Rachel; Tram, Kha; Gu, Jimmy; Li, Yingfu

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which enzymes arose from both abiotic and biological worlds remains an unsolved natural mystery. We postulate that an enzyme can emerge from any sequence of any functional polymer under permissive evolutionary conditions. To support this premise, we have arbitrarily chosen a 50-nucleotide DNA fragment encoding for the Bos taurus (cattle) albumin mRNA and subjected it to test-tube evolution to derive a catalytic DNA (DNAzyme) with RNA-cleavage activity. After only a few weeks, a DNAzyme with significant catalytic activity has surfaced. Sequence comparison reveals that seven nucleotides are responsible for the conversion of the noncatalytic sequence into the enzyme. Deep sequencing analysis of DNA pools along the evolution trajectory has identified individual mutations as the progressive drivers of the molecular evolution. Our findings demonstrate that an enzyme can indeed arise from a sequence of a functional polymer via permissive molecular evolution, a mechanism that may have been exploited by nature for the creation of the enormous repertoire of enzymes in the biological world today. PMID:26091540

  3. Resistance to vanadium in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 caused by mutations in TCA cycle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Denayer, Sarah; Matthijs, Sandra; Cornelis, Pierre

    2006-11-01

    Vanadium inhibits the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 in the low-iron casamino acids medium and even more when iron is added to the medium. Analysis of transposon mutants allowed the isolation of two mutants with increased resistance to vanadium. One mutant had an insertion in the idh gene coding for the tricarboxylic acid enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase. The second mutant had the transposon inserted into acnD, one out of three genes coding for a 2-methyl-isocitrate dehydratase (aconitase). In this mutant, there was a higher level of acnB aconitase transcripts while the levels of acnA transcripts were unchanged. A nonpolar idh mutant was obtained, which showed the same level of resistance against vanadium as the original transposon mutant. PMID:17020548

  4. Kinetic characteristics of polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyzing galacturonic acid oligomers using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polygalacturonase enzymes hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid chains found in pectin. Interest in polygalacturonase enzymes continues as they are useful in a number of industrial processes and conversely, detrimental, as they are involved in maceration of economically important crops. While a good...

  5. Effects of Non-Natural Amino Acid Incorporation into the Enzyme Core Region on Enzyme Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wong, H. Edward; Kwon, Inchan

    2015-01-01

    Techniques to incorporate non-natural amino acids (NNAAs) have enabled biosynthesis of proteins containing new building blocks with unique structures, chemistry, and reactivity that are not found in natural amino acids. It is crucial to understand how incorporation of NNAAs affects protein function because NNAA incorporation may perturb critical function of a target protein. This study investigates how the site-specific incorporation of NNAAs affects catalytic properties of an enzyme. A NNAA with a hydrophobic and bulky sidechain, 3-(2-naphthyl)-alanine (2Nal), was site-specifically incorporated at six different positions in the hydrophobic core of a model enzyme, murine dihydrofolate reductase (mDHFR). The mDHFR variants with a greater change in van der Waals volume upon 2Nal incorporation exhibited a greater reduction in the catalytic efficiency. Similarly, the steric incompatibility calculated using RosettaDesign, a protein stability calculation program, correlated with the changes in the catalytic efficiency. PMID:26402667

  6. Bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) system for nucleic acid quantification assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassibi, Arjang; Lee, Thomas H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Pourmand, Nader

    2003-07-01

    A new label-free methodology for nucleic acid quantification has been developed where the number of pyrophosphate molecules (PPi) released during polymerization of the target nucleic acid is counted and correlated to DNA copy number. The technique uses the enzymatic complex of ATP-sulfurylase and firefly luciferase to generate photons from PPi. An enzymatic unity gain positive feedback is also implemented to regenerate the photon generation process and compensate any decay in light intensity by self regulation. Due to this positive feedback, the total number of photons generated by the bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) can potentially be orders of magnitude higher than typical chemiluminescent processes. A system level kinetic model that incorporates the effects of contaminations and detector noise was used to show that the photon generation process is in fact steady and also proportional to the nucleic acid quantity. Here we show that BRC is capable of detecting quantities of DNA as low as 1 amol (10-18 mole) in 40μlit aqueous solutions, and this enzymatic assay has a controllable dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. The sensitivity of this technology, due to the excess number of photons generated by the regenerative cycle, is not constrained by detector performance, but rather by possible PPi or ATP (adenosine triphosphate) contamination, or background bioluminescence of the enzymatic complex.

  7. Maintenance Carbon Cycle in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, William H.; Severson, Ray F.; Black, Clanton C.

    1985-01-01

    The reciprocal relationship between diurnal changes in organic acid and storage carbohydrate was examined in the leaves of three Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. It was found that depletion of leaf hexoses at night was sufficient to account quantitatively for increase in malate in Ananas comosus but not in Sedum telephium or Kalanchoë daigremontiana. Fructose and to a lesser extent glucose underwent the largest changes. Glucose levels in S. telephium leaves oscillated diurnally but were not reciprocally related to malate fluctuations. Analysis of isolated protoplasts and vacuoles from leaves of A. comosus and S. telephium revealed that vacuoles contain a large percentage (>50%) of the protoplast glucose, fructose and malate, citrate, isocitrate, ascorbate and succinate. Sucrose, a major constituent of intact leaves, was not detectable or was at extremely low levels in protoplasts and vacuoles from both plants. In isolated vacuoles from both A. comosus and S. telephium, hexose levels decreased at night at the same time malate increased. Only in A. comosus, however, could hexose metabolism account for a significant amount of the nocturnal increase in malate. We conclude that, in A. comosus, soluble sugars are part of the daily maintenance carbon cycle and that the vacuole plays a dynamic role in the diurnal carbon assimilation cycle of this Crassulacean acid metabolism plant. PMID:16664005

  8. Characterization of mouse lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase 3: an enzyme with dual functions in the testis1s⃞

    PubMed Central

    Yuki, Koichi; Shindou, Hideo; Hishikawa, Daisuke; Shimizu, Takao

    2009-01-01

    Glycerophospholipids are structural and functional components of cellular membranes as well as precursors of various lipid mediators. Using acyl-CoAs as donors, glycerophospholipids are formed by the de novo pathway (Kennedy pathway) and modified in the remodeling pathway (Lands' cycle). Various acyltransferases, including two lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferases (LPAATs), have been discovered from a 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase (AGPAT) family. Proteins of this family contain putative acyltransferase motifs, but their biochemical properties and physiological roles are not completely understood. Here, we demonstrated that mouse LPAAT3, previously known as mouse AGPAT3, possesses strong LPAAT activity and modest lysophosphatidylinositol acyltransferase activity with a clear preference for arachidonoyl-CoA as a donor. This enzyme is highly expressed in the testis, where CDP-diacylglycerol synthase 1 preferring 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-phosphatidic acid as a substrate is also highly expressed. Since 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl species are the main components of phosphatidylinositol, mouse LPAAT3 may function in both the de novo and remodeling pathways and contribute to effective biogenesis of 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl-phosphatidylinositol in the testis. Additionally, the expression of this enzyme in the testis increases significantly in an age-dependent manner, and β-estradiol may be an important regulator of this enzyme's induction. Our findings identify this acyltransferase as an alternative important enzyme to produce phosphatidylinositol in the testis. PMID:19114731

  9. Comparative analysis on the key enzymes of the glycerol cycle metabolic pathway in Dunaliella salina under osmotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Lu, Yan; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2012-01-01

    The glycerol metabolic pathway is a special cycle way; glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3pdh), glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (G3pp), dihydroxyacetone reductase (Dhar), and dihydroxyacetone kinase (Dhak) are the key enzymes around the pathway. Glycerol is an important osmolyte for Dunaliella salina to resist osmotic stress. In this study, comparative activities of the four enzymes in D. salina and their activity changes under various salt stresses were investigated, from which glycerol metabolic flow direction in the glycerol metabolic pathway was estimated. Results showed that the salinity changes had different effects on the enzymes activities. NaCl could stimulate the activities of all the four enzymes in various degrees when D. salina was grown under continuous salt stress. When treated by hyperosmotic or hypoosmotic shock, only the activity of G3pdh in D. salina was significantly stimulated. It was speculated that, under osmotic stresses, the emergency response of the cycle pathway in D. salina was driven by G3pdh via its response to the osmotic stress. Subsequently, with the changes of salinity, other three enzymes started to respond to osmotic stress. Dhar played a role of balancing the cycle metabolic pathway by its forward and backward reactions. Through synergy, the four enzymes worked together for the effective flow of the cycle metabolic pathways to maintain the glycerol requirements of cells in order to adapt to osmotic stress environments.

  10. Phosphorus constrains accelerated nitrogen cycling in limed acidic forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, J. L.; Shaw, A. N.; Kluber, L. A.; Burke, D. J.; Carrino-Kyker, S. R.; Smemo, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic deposition can increase phosphorus (P) limitation by abiotic and biotic means. Soil acidification can remove P from available pools and nitrogen (N) deposition can increase the demand for P. We reason that chronic acidic deposition is promoting P limitation in acidic hardwood forests and thereby altering N cycling. The objectives of this study were to investigate the interactive influence of P availability and soil pH on N and P cycling and availability to determine if the response varies between two physiographic regions experiencing similar chronic acidic deposition. We addressed these objectives by experimentally manipulating soil pH, P, or both in strongly acidic glaciated and unglaciated hardwood forests in eastern Ohio, USA. Our results suggest complex interactions between P, soil pH, and the N cycle. Glaciated soils were found to be more N-saturated with nitrification rates 18 times greater than in unglaciated soils. Elevating pH, with or without added P, doubled nitrification rates in glaciated soils. For unglaciated soils, raising pH increased nitrification 10-fold, but increased nitrification only 5-fold in combination with P. This result suggests raising soil pH lowered the demand of soil N, or directly stimulated nitrifying activity, and that increasing P availability could limit N availability. To various degrees, readily available P was geochemically or biologically immobilized in all treatments, suggesting chronic P deficiency in these ecosystems. Phosphorus immobilization decreased as soil pH was elevated, but elevated P either had no effect (glaciated) or doubled P immobilization rates (unglaciated). These results suggest that raising soil pH reduces microbial P limitation for phosphate, whereas adding P appears to make phosphate scarcer. We suggest that P plays an important role in N transformations and cycling, but appears more important in unglaciated soils than in glaciated soils. Chronic soil acidification may have a greater

  11. The "manganese(III)-containing" purple acid phosphatase from sweet potatoes is an iron enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hefler, S K; Averill, B A

    1987-08-14

    An improved purification of the purple acid phosphatase from sweet potatoes has been developed, and the properties of the enzyme have been reexamined. Contrary to previous reports, (e.g., Y. Sugiura, et al., J. Biol. Chem., 256, 10664-10670 (1981) ), the enzyme contains two moles of iron and insignificant amounts of manganese. The specific activity of the iron-containing preparations is ca. 14 times higher than that reported previously for the purported "Mn(III)" enzyme. The sweet potato purple acid phosphatase does indeed bind manganese, but it can be removed by dialysis with no changes in specific activity or spectral properties.

  12. C-Myc Induced Compensated Cardiac Hypertrophy Increases Free Fatty Acid Utilization for the Citric Acid Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc-induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam). Isolated working hearts and 13Carbon (13C )-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was confirmed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contribution in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc vs cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the mechanisms whereby this change maintained

  13. DUBbing Cancer: Deubiquitylating Enzymes Involved in Epigenetics, DNA Damage and the Cell Cycle As Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Fernandez, Adan; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2016-01-01

    Controlling cell proliferation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. A number of critical checkpoints ascertain progression through the different stages of the cell cycle, which can be aborted when perturbed, for instance by errors in DNA replication and repair. These molecular checkpoints are regulated by a number of proteins that need to be present at the right time and quantity. The ubiquitin system has emerged as a central player controlling the fate and function of such molecules such as cyclins, oncogenes and components of the DNA repair machinery. In particular, proteases that cleave ubiquitin chains, referred to as deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), have attracted recent attention due to their accessibility to modulation by small molecules. In this review, we describe recent evidence of the critical role of DUBs in aspects of cell cycle checkpoint control, associated DNA repair mechanisms and regulation of transcription, representing pathways altered in cancer. Therefore, DUBs involved in these processes emerge as potentially critical targets for the treatment of not only hematological, but potentially also solid tumors. PMID:27516771

  14. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70–4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes. PMID:27537184

  15. DUBbing Cancer: Deubiquitylating Enzymes Involved in Epigenetics, DNA Damage and the Cell Cycle As Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Fernandez, Adan; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2016-01-01

    Controlling cell proliferation is one of the hallmarks of cancer. A number of critical checkpoints ascertain progression through the different stages of the cell cycle, which can be aborted when perturbed, for instance by errors in DNA replication and repair. These molecular checkpoints are regulated by a number of proteins that need to be present at the right time and quantity. The ubiquitin system has emerged as a central player controlling the fate and function of such molecules such as cyclins, oncogenes and components of the DNA repair machinery. In particular, proteases that cleave ubiquitin chains, referred to as deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), have attracted recent attention due to their accessibility to modulation by small molecules. In this review, we describe recent evidence of the critical role of DUBs in aspects of cell cycle checkpoint control, associated DNA repair mechanisms and regulation of transcription, representing pathways altered in cancer. Therefore, DUBs involved in these processes emerge as potentially critical targets for the treatment of not only hematological, but potentially also solid tumors. PMID:27516771

  16. Coevolution and Life Cycle Specialization of Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes in a Hemibiotrophic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Patrick C.; Torriani, Stefano F.F.; Croll, Daniel; Stukenbrock, Eva H.; McDonald, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Zymoseptoria tritici is an important fungal pathogen on wheat that originated in the Fertile Crescent. Its closely related sister species Z. pseudotritici and Z. ardabiliae infect wild grasses in the same region. This recently emerged host–pathogen system provides a rare opportunity to investigate the evolutionary processes shaping the genome of an emerging pathogen. Here, we investigate genetic signatures in plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) that are likely affected by or driving coevolution in plant-pathogen systems. We hypothesize four main evolutionary scenarios and combine comparative genomics, transcriptomics, and selection analyses to assign the majority of PCWDEs in Z. tritici to one of these scenarios. We found widespread differential transcription among different members of the same gene family, challenging the idea of functional redundancy and suggesting instead that specialized enzymatic activity occurs during different stages of the pathogen life cycle. We also find that natural selection has significantly affected at least 19 of the 48 identified PCWDEs. The majority of genes showed signatures of purifying selection, typical for the scenario of conserved substrate optimization. However, six genes showed diversifying selection that could be attributed to either host adaptation or host evasion. This study provides a powerful framework to better understand the roles played by different members of multigene families and to determine which genes are the most appropriate targets for wet laboratory experimentation, for example, to elucidate enzymatic function during relevant phases of a pathogen’s life cycle. PMID:23515261

  17. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan; Trnka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70-4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes.

  18. Mitochondrial Probe Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) Inhibits the Krebs Cycle Enzyme 2-Oxoglutarate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Elkalaf, Moustafa; Tůma, Petr; Weiszenstein, Martin; Polák, Jan; Trnka, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Methyltriphenylphosphonium (TPMP) salts have been widely used to measure the mitochondrial membrane potential and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP+) moiety has been attached to many bioactive compounds including antioxidants to target them into mitochondria thanks to their high affinity to accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix. The adverse effects of these compounds on cellular metabolism have been insufficiently studied and are still poorly understood. Micromolar concentrations of TPMP cause a progressive inhibition of cellular respiration in adherent cells without a marked effect on mitochondrial coupling. In permeabilized cells the inhibition was limited to NADH-linked respiration. We found a mixed inhibition of the Krebs cycle enzyme 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGDHC) with an estimated IC50 3.93 [3.70-4.17] mM, which is pharmacologically plausible since it corresponds to micromolar extracellular concentrations. Increasing the lipophilic character of the used TPP+ compound further potentiates the inhibition of OGDHC activity. This effect of TPMP on the Krebs cycle ought to be taken into account when interpreting observations on cells and mitochondria in the presence of TPP+ derivatives. Compounds based on or similar to TPP+ derivatives may also be used to alter OGDHC activity for experimental or therapeutic purposes. PMID:27537184

  19. Cell cycle effect on the activity of deoxynucleoside analogue metabolising enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Fyrberg, Anna; Albertioni, Freidoun; Lotfi, Kourosh . E-mail: koulo@imv.liu.se

    2007-06-15

    Deoxynucleoside analogues (dNAs) are cytotoxic towards both replicating and indolent malignancies. The impact of fluctuations in the metabolism of dNAs in relation to cell cycle could have strong implications regarding the activity of dNAs. Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and deoxyguanosine kinase (dGK) are important enzymes for phosphorylation/activation of dNAs. These drugs can be dephosphorylated/deactivated by 5'-nucleotidases (5'-NTs) and elevated activities of 5'-NTs and decreased dCK and/or dGK activities represent resistance mechanisms towards dNAs. The activities of dCK, dGK, and three 5'-NTs were investigated in four human leukemic cell lines in relationship to cell cycle progression and cytotoxicity of dNAs. Synchronization of cell cultures to arrest in G0/G1 by serum-deprivation was performed followed by serum-supplementation for cell cycle progression. The activities of dCK and dGK increased up to 3-fold in CEM, HL60, and MOLT-4 cells as they started to proliferate, while the activity of cytosolic nucleotidase I was reduced in proliferating cells. CEM, HL60, and MOLT-4 cells were also more sensitive to cladribine, cytarabine, 9-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylguanine and clofarabine than K562 cells which demonstrated lower levels and less alteration of these enzymes and were least susceptible to the cytotoxic effects of most dNAs. The results suggest that, in the cell lines studied, the proliferation process is associated with a general shift in the direction of activation of dNAs by inducing activities of dCK/dGK and reducing the activity of cN-I which is favourable for the cytotoxic effects of cladribine, cytarabine and, 9-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylguanine. These results emphasize the importance of cellular proliferation and dNA metabolism by both phosphorylation and dephosphorylation for susceptibility to dNAs. It underscores the need to understand the mechanisms of action and resistance to dNAs in order to increase efficacy of dNAs treatment by new rational.

  20. Synthesis of Oxalic Acid by Enzymes from Lettuce Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Davies, David D.; Asker, Hassan

    1983-01-01

    A rapid purification of lactate dehydrogenase and glycolate oxidase from lettuce (Lactuca sativa) leaves is described. The kinetics of both enzymes are reported in relation to their possible roles in the production of oxalate. Lettuce lactate dehydrogenase behaves like mammalian dehydrogenase, catalyzing the dismutation of glyoxylate to glycolate and oxalate. A model is proposed in which glycolate oxidase in the peroxisomes and lactate dehydrogenase in the cytosol are involved in the production of oxalate. The effect of pH on the balance between oxalate and glycolate produced from glyoxylate suggests that in leaves lactate dehydrogenase may function as part of an oxalate-based biochemical, pH-stat. PMID:16662946

  1. Lipase-catalyzed process in an anhydrous medium with enzyme reutilization to produce biodiesel with low acid value.

    PubMed

    Azócar, Laura; Ciudad, Gustavo; Heipieper, Hermann J; Muñoz, Robinson; Navia, Rodrigo

    2011-12-01

    One major problem in the lipase-catalyzed production of biodiesel or fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) is the high acidity of the product, mainly caused by water presence, which produces parallel hydrolysis and esterification reactions instead of transesterification to FAME. Therefore, the use of reaction medium in absence of water (anhydrous medium) was investigated in a lipase-catalyzed process to improve FAME yield and final product quality. FAME production catalyzed by Novozym 435 was carried out using waste frying oil (WFO) as raw material, methanol as acyl acceptor, and 3Å molecular sieves to extract the water. The anhydrous conditions allowed the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) from feedstock at the initial reaction time. However, after the initial esterification process, water absence avoided the consecutives reactions of hydrolysis and esterification, producing FAME mainly by transesterification. Using this anhydrous medium, a decreasing in both the acid value and the diglycerides content in the product were observed, simultaneously improving FAME yield. Enzyme reuse in the anhydrous medium was also studied. The use of the moderate polar solvent tert-butanol as a co-solvent led to a stable catalysis using Novozym 435 even after 17 successive cycles of FAME production under anhydrous conditions. These results indicate that a lipase-catalyzed process in an anhydrous medium coupled with enzyme reuse would be suitable for biodiesel production, promoting the use of oils of different origin as raw materials.

  2. Discrimination of acidic and alkaline enzyme using Chou's pseudo amino acid composition in conjunction with probabilistic neural network model.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zaheer Ullah; Hayat, Maqsood; Khan, Muazzam Ali

    2015-01-21

    Enzyme catalysis is one of the most essential and striking processes among of all the complex processes that have evolved in living organisms. Enzymes are biological catalysts, which play a significant role in industrial applications as well as in medical areas, due to profound specificity, selectivity and catalytic efficiency. Refining catalytic efficiency of enzymes has become the most challenging job of enzyme engineering, into acidic and alkaline. Discrimination of acidic and alkaline enzymes through experimental approaches is difficult, sometimes impossible due to lack of established structures. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a computational model for discriminating acidic and alkaline enzymes from primary sequences. In this study, we have developed a robust, accurate and high throughput computational model using two discrete sample representation methods Pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC) and split amino acid composition. Various classification algorithms including probabilistic neural network (PNN), K-nearest neighbor, decision tree, multi-layer perceptron and support vector machine are applied to predict acidic and alkaline with high accuracy. 10-fold cross validation test and several statistical measures namely, accuracy, F-measure, and area under ROC are used to evaluate the performance of the proposed model. The performance of the model is examined using two benchmark datasets to demonstrate the effectiveness of the model. The empirical results show that the performance of PNN in conjunction with PseAAC is quite promising compared to existing approaches in the literature so for. It has achieved 96.3% accuracy on dataset1 and 99.2% on dataset2. It is ascertained that the proposed model might be useful for basic research and drug related application areas. PMID:25452135

  3. Characterisation and expression of fatty acid modifying enzyme produced by Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, N R; Brueggemann, S A

    1997-08-01

    The production of fatty-acid modifying enzyme (FAME) - first identified as a possible virulence factor in Staphylococcus aureus - has also been identified in S. epidermidis. This extracellular enzyme inactivates bactericidal fatty acids by esterifying them to cholesterol. FAME may provide protection for S. epidermidis by inactivating these lipids present on the skin. Over 88% of 51 randomly collected S. epidermidis isolates produced FAME; 92.2% and 13.7% of the same strains produced lipase and slime, respectively. There appeared to be no correlation of lipase activity or slime production with FAME production. The temperature optimum for FAME was between 20 degrees C and 35 degrees C, and the pH optimum was 6.0. Optimal enzyme activity was present at NaCl concentrations of between 250 and 500 mM. FAME was not detected in culture filtrates until early stationary phase, indicating some regulatory control over enzyme production.

  4. Characterisation and expression of fatty acid modifying enzyme produced by Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, N R; Brueggemann, S A

    1997-08-01

    The production of fatty-acid modifying enzyme (FAME) - first identified as a possible virulence factor in Staphylococcus aureus - has also been identified in S. epidermidis. This extracellular enzyme inactivates bactericidal fatty acids by esterifying them to cholesterol. FAME may provide protection for S. epidermidis by inactivating these lipids present on the skin. Over 88% of 51 randomly collected S. epidermidis isolates produced FAME; 92.2% and 13.7% of the same strains produced lipase and slime, respectively. There appeared to be no correlation of lipase activity or slime production with FAME production. The temperature optimum for FAME was between 20 degrees C and 35 degrees C, and the pH optimum was 6.0. Optimal enzyme activity was present at NaCl concentrations of between 250 and 500 mM. FAME was not detected in culture filtrates until early stationary phase, indicating some regulatory control over enzyme production. PMID:9511818

  5. The Catalytic Machinery of a Key Enzyme in Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, Ronald E.; Faehnle, Christopher R.; Blanco, Julio; Moore, Roger A.; Liu, Xuying; Arachea, Buenafe T.; Pavlovsky, Alexander G.

    2013-02-28

    The aspartate pathway of amino acid biosynthesis is essential for all microbial life but is absent in mammals. Characterizing the enzyme-catalyzed reactions in this pathway can identify new protein targets for the development of antibiotics with unique modes of action. The enzyme aspartate {beta}-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ASADH) catalyzes an early branch point reaction in the aspartate pathway. Kinetic, mutagenic, and structural studies of ASADH from various microbial species have been used to elucidate mechanistic details and to identify essential amino acids involved in substrate binding, catalysis, and enzyme regulation. Important structural and functional differences have been found between ASADHs isolated from these bacterial and fungal organisms, opening the possibility for developing species-specific antimicrobial agents that target this family of enzymes.

  6. Correlation between citric acid and nitrate metabolisms during CAM cycle in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana.

    PubMed

    Freschi, Luciano; Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Tiné, Marco Aurélio Silva; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-12-15

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) confers crucial adaptations for plants living under frequent environmental stresses. A wide metabolic plasticity can be found among CAM species regarding the type of storage carbohydrate, organic acid accumulated at night and decarboxylating system. Consequently, many aspects of the CAM pathway control are still elusive while the impact of this photosynthetic adaptation on nitrogen metabolism has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated a possible link between the CAM cycle and the nitrogen assimilation in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana by simultaneously characterizing the diel changes in key enzyme activities and metabolite levels of both organic acid and nitrate metabolisms. The results revealed that T. pohliana performed a typical CAM cycle in which phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase phosphorylation seemed to play a crucial role to avoid futile cycles of carboxylation and decarboxylation. Unlike all other bromeliads previously investigated, almost equimolar concentrations of malate and citrate were accumulated at night. Moreover, a marked nocturnal depletion in the starch reservoirs and an atypical pattern of nitrate reduction restricted to the nighttime were also observed. Since reduction and assimilation of nitrate requires a massive supply of reducing power and energy and considering that T. pohliana lives overexposed to the sunlight, we hypothesize that citrate decarboxylation might be an accessory mechanism to increase internal CO₂ concentration during the day while its biosynthesis could provide NADH and ATP for nocturnal assimilation of nitrate. Therefore, besides delivering photoprotection during the day, citrate might represent a key component connecting both CAM pathway and nitrogen metabolism in T. pohliana; a scenario that certainly deserves further study not only in this species but also in other CAM plants that nocturnally accumulate citrate.

  7. Effect of organic/inorganic compounds on the enzymes in soil under acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang-shen; Xu, Dong-mei; Wang, Li-ming; Li, Ke-bin; Liu, Wei-ping

    2004-01-01

    The main effects of pollutions including acid rain, Cu2+, atrazine and their combined products on the activities of urease, invertin, acid phosphatase and catalase were studied by means of orthogonal test. The results showed that H+ and Cu2+ had significant influence on the activities of four enzymes and the ability of their inhibiting followed the order: H+ > Cu2+. Al3+ and atrazine only had litter effects on the activity of urease and phosphatase, respectively. Furthermore, interaction analysis revealed that Cu2+ -H+ affected on the activity of acid phosphatase significantly and antagonism on invertin and urease, Cu2+ -atrazine only exhibited the synergism on the activity of acid phosphatase. But atrazine-H+ had non-interaction within the investigated concentration range. Among four enzymes, acid phosphatase was the most sensitive one to the contaminations.

  8. Oxidase-peroxidase enzymes of Datura innoxia. Oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester.

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, V S; Mahadevan, S; Kumar, S A

    1975-01-01

    An enzyme system from Datura innoxia roots oxidizing formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was purified 38-fold by conventional methods such as (NH4)2SO4 fractionation, negative adsorption on alumina Cy gel and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. The purified enzyme was shown to catalyse the stoicheiometric oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester to benzoylformic acid ethyl ester and formic acid, utilizing molecular O2. Substrate analogues such as phenylacetaldehyde and phenylpyruvate were oxidized at a very low rate, and formylphenylacetonitrile was an inhilating agents, cyanide, thiol compounds and ascorbic acid. This enzyme was identical with an oxidase-peroxidase isoenzyme. Another oxidase-peroxidase isoenzyme which separated on DEAE-chromatography also showed formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester oxidase activity, albeit to a lesser extent. The properties of the two isoenzymes of the oxidase were compared and shown to differ in their oxidation and peroxidation properties. The oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was also catalysed by horseradish peroxidase. The Datura isoenzymes exhibited typical haemoprotein spectra. The oxidation of formylphenylacetic acid ethyl ester was different from other peroxidase-catalysed reactions in not being activated by either Mn2+ or monophenols. The oxidation was inhibited by several mono- and poly-phenols and by catalase. A reaction mechanism for the oxidation is proposed. PMID:997

  9. SOLUBLE HEPATIC δ-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID SYNTHETASE: END-PRODUCT INHIBITION OF THE PARTIALLY PURIFIED ENZYME*

    PubMed Central

    Scholnick, Perry L.; Hammaker, Lydia E.; Marver, Harvey S.

    1969-01-01

    The present study confirms the existence of hepatic δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in the cytosol of the liver, suggests that this enzyme may be in transit to the mitochondria, and defines some of the characteristics of the partially purified enzyme. The substrate and cofactor requirements are similar to those of mitochondrial δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase. Heme strongly inhibits the partially purified enzyme. A number of proteins that bind heme block this inhibition, which explains previous failures to demonstrate heme inhibition in crude systems. End-product inhibition of δ-aminolevulinic acid synthetase in the mitochondria may play an important role in the regulation of heme biosynthesis in eukaryotic cells. PMID:5257968

  10. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea B.; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-10-26

    It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. In this study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of the γ-proteobacterium S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. In addition, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and demonstrated its expression experimentally. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. This work delineates an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other γ-proteobacteria.

  11. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. It is unclear in the g-proteobacterium S. oneidensis whether TCA is also regulated by Fur and RyhB. Results: In the present study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. Consistently, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and experimentally demonstrated the gene expression. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. Conclusions: These cumulative results delineate an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other g-proteobacteria. This work represents a step forward for understanding the unique regulation in S. oneidensis.

  12. Phloem-Specific Expression of Yang Cycle Genes and Identification of Novel Yang Cycle Enzymes in Plantago and Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Feussner, Kirstin; Zierer, Wolfgang; Rabinovych, Valentyna; Klebl, Franz; Feussner, Ivo; Sauer, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    The 5-methylthioadenosine (MTA) or Yang cycle is a set of reactions that recycle MTA to Met. In plants, MTA is a byproduct of polyamine, ethylene, and nicotianamine biosynthesis. Vascular transcriptome analyses revealed phloem-specific expression of the Yang cycle gene 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE KINASE1 (MTK1) in Plantago major and Arabidopsis thaliana. As Arabidopsis has only a single MTK gene, we hypothesized that the expression of other Yang cycle genes might also be vascular specific. Reporter gene studies and quantitative analyses of mRNA levels for all Yang cycle genes confirmed this hypothesis for Arabidopsis and Plantago. This includes the Yang cycle genes 5-METHYLTHIORIBOSE-1-PHOSPHATE ISOMERASE1 and DEHYDRATASE-ENOLASE-PHOSPHATASE-COMPLEX1. We show that these two enzymes are sufficient for the conversion of methylthioribose-1-phosphate to 1,2-dihydroxy-3-keto-5-methylthiopentene. In bacteria, fungi, and animals, the same conversion is catalyzed in three to four separate enzymatic steps. Furthermore, comparative analyses of vascular and nonvascular metabolites identified Met, S-adenosyl Met, and MTA preferentially or almost exclusively in the vascular tissue. Our data represent a comprehensive characterization of the Yang cycle in higher plants and demonstrate that the Yang cycle works primarily in the vasculature. Finally, expression analyses of polyamine biosynthetic genes suggest that the Yang cycle in leaves recycles MTA derived primarily from polyamine biosynthesis. PMID:21540433

  13. Phosphoribulokinase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a Benson-Calvin cycle enzyme enslaved to its cysteine residues.

    PubMed

    Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Remy, Thérèse; Lignon, Sabrina; Lebrun, Régine; Gontero, Brigitte

    2015-04-01

    Phosphoribulokinase (PRK) in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a finely regulated and well-studied enzyme of the Benson-Calvin cycle. PRK can form a complex with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and the small chloroplast protein CP12. This study aimed to determine the molecular determinants on PRK involved in the complex and the mechanism of action of a recently described novel regulation of PRK that involves glutathionylation. A combination of mass spectrometry, mutagenesis and activity analyses showed that Cys16, besides its role as the binding site of ATP, was also the site for S-glutathionylation. Previous kinetic analysis of the C55S mutant showed that in the oxidized inactive form of PRK, this residue formed a disulfide bridge with the Cys16 residue. This is the only bridge reported for PRK in the literature. Our data show for the first time that a disulfide bridge between Cys243 and Cys249 on PRK is required to form the PRK-GAPDH-CP12 complex. These results uncover a new mechanism for the PRK-GAPDH-CP12 formation involving a thiol disulfide exchange reaction with CP12 and identify Cys16 of PRK as a target of glutathionylation acting against oxidative stress. Although Cys16 is the key residue involved in binding ATP and acting as a defense against oxidative damage, the formation of the algal ternary complex requires the formation of another disulfide bridge on PRK involving Cys243 and Cys249.

  14. Comprehensive expression analysis of prostanoid enzymes and receptors in the human endometrium across the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Rob D; Wilson, Martin R; Boddy, Sheila C; Jabbour, Henry N

    2011-03-01

    Prostanoids are well-described primary mediators of inflammatory processes and are essential for the normal physiological function of the female reproductive system. The aim of this study was to determine the temporal expression of the prostanoid biosynthetic enzymes (PTGS1, PTGS2, PTGES, PTGES2, PTGES3, AKR1B1, AKR1C3, CBR1, HPGDS, PTGDS, PTGIS, TBXAS1 and HPGD) and the prostanoid receptors (PTGER1, PTGER2, PTGER3, PTGER4, PTGFR, PTGDR, GPR44, PTGIR and TBXA2R) in the human endometrium throughout the menstrual cycle. The analysis identified PTGFR to have a distinct expression profile compared with other components of the prostanoid system, as expression is maximal during the proliferative phase. Immunohistochemical analysis for PTGER1 suggests a dual function for this receptor depending on its temporal (proliferative versus secretory) and spatial (nuclear versus cell membrane) expression. The expression profiles of the PGF(2α) synthases identified AKR1B1 and CBR1 as the likely regulators of PGF(2α) production during the menstrual phase. Immunohistochemical analysis for AKR1B1, CBR1 and AKR1C3 suggest expression to be in the glandular epithelium and vasculature. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of the components of prostanoid biosynthetic and signalling pathway in the human endometrium. The expression profiles described have the potential to identify specific prostanoid components that may be dysregulated in inflammatory-associated disorders of the endometrium. PMID:21112968

  15. Characterization of Anammox Hydrazine Dehydrogenase, a Key N2-producing Enzyme in the Global Nitrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Maalcke, Wouter J; Reimann, Joachim; de Vries, Simon; Butt, Julea N; Dietl, Andreas; Kip, Nardy; Mersdorf, Ulrike; Barends, Thomas R M; Jetten, Mike S M; Keltjens, Jan T; Kartal, Boran

    2016-08-12

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria derive their energy for growth from the oxidation of ammonium with nitrite as the electron acceptor. N2, the end product of this metabolism, is produced from the oxidation of the intermediate, hydrazine (N2H4). Previously, we identified N2-producing hydrazine dehydrogenase (KsHDH) from the anammox organism Kuenenia stuttgartiensis as the gene product of kustc0694 and determined some of its catalytic properties. In the genome of K. stuttgartiensis, kustc0694 is one of 10 paralogs related to octaheme hydroxylamine (NH2OH) oxidoreductase (HAO). Here, we characterized KsHDH as a covalently cross-linked homotrimeric octaheme protein as found for HAO and HAO-related hydroxylamine-oxidizing enzyme kustc1061 from K. stuttgartiensis Interestingly, the HDH trimers formed octamers in solution, each octamer harboring an amazing 192 c-type heme moieties. Whereas HAO and kustc1061 are capable of hydrazine oxidation as well, KsHDH was highly specific for this activity. To understand this specificity, we performed detailed amino acid sequence analyses and investigated the catalytic and spectroscopic (electronic absorbance, EPR) properties of KsHDH in comparison with the well defined HAO and kustc1061. We conclude that HDH specificity is most likely derived from structural changes around the catalytic heme 4 (P460) and of the electron-wiring circuit comprising seven His/His-ligated c-type hemes in each subunit. These nuances make HDH a globally prominent N2-producing enzyme, next to nitrous oxide (N2O) reductase from denitrifying microorganisms. PMID:27317665

  16. Production of Cell Wall Hydrolyzing Enzymes by Barley Aleurone Layers in Response to Gibberellic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Taiz, Lincoln; Honigman, William A.

    1976-01-01

    The cell walls of barley (Hordeum vulgare var. Himalaya) aleurone layers undergo extensive degradation during the tissue's response to gibberellic acid. Previous work had shown that these cell walls consist almost entirely of arabinoxylan. In this study we show that gibberellic acid stimulates endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity in isolated aleurone layers. In addition, gibberellic acid enhances the activity of two glycosidases: β-xylopyranosidase and α-arabinofuranosidase. No gibberellic acid-stimulated cellulase activity was detected. Germination studies showed a similar pattern of enzyme development in intact seeds. Images PMID:16659683

  17. Novel Metabolic Abnormalities in the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Peripheral Cells From Huntington’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Nima N.; Bonica, Joseph; Xu, Hui; Park, Larry C.; Arjomand, Jamshid; Chen, Zhengming; Gibson, Gary E.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction is well-documented in Huntington’s disease (HD). However, the link between the mutant huntingtin (mHTT) gene and the pathology is unknown. The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the main metabolic pathway for the production of NADH for conversion to ATP via the electron transport chain (ETC). The objective of this study was to test for differences in enzyme activities, mRNAs and protein levels related to the TCA cycle between lymphoblasts from healthy subjects and from patients with HD. The experiments utilize the advantages of lymphoblasts to reveal new insights about HD. The large quantity of homogeneous cell populations permits multiple dynamic measures to be made on exactly comparable tissues. The activities of nine enzymes related to the TCA cycle and the expression of twenty-nine mRNAs encoding for these enzymes and enzyme complexes were measured. Cells were studied under baseline conditions and during metabolic stress. The results support our recent findings that the activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are elevated in HD. The data also show a large unexpected depression in MDH activities. Furthermore, message levels for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) were markedly increased in in HD lymphoblasts and were responsive to treatments. The use of lymphoblasts allowed us to clarify that the reported decrease in aconitase activity in HD autopsy brains is likely due to secondary hypoxic effects. These results demonstrate the mRNA and enzymes of the TCA cycle are critical therapeutic targets that have been understudied in HD. PMID:27611087

  18. Metabolic engineering in the biotechnological production of organic acids in the tricarboxylic acid cycle of microorganisms: Advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xian; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Organic acids, which are chemically synthesized, are also natural intermediates in the metabolic pathways of microorganisms, among which the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the most crucial route existing in almost all living organisms. Organic acids in the TCA cycle include citric acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, l-malic acid, and oxaloacetate, which are building-block chemicals with wide applications and huge markets. In this review, we summarize the synthesis pathways of these organic acids and review recent advances in metabolic engineering strategies that enhance organic acid production. We also propose further improvements for the production of organic acids with systems and synthetic biology-guided metabolic engineering strategies.

  19. Novel Enzyme Family Found in Filamentous Fungi Catalyzing trans-4-Hydroxylation of l-Pipecolic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Hibi, Makoto; Mori, Ryosuke; Miyake, Ryoma; Kawabata, Hiroshi; Kozono, Shoko; Takahashi, Satomi

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxypipecolic acids are bioactive compounds widely distributed in nature and are valuable building blocks for the organic synthesis of pharmaceuticals. We have found a novel hydroxylating enzyme with activity toward l-pipecolic acid (l-Pip) in a filamentous fungus, Fusarium oxysporum c8D. The enzyme l-Pip trans-4-hydroxylase (Pip4H) of F. oxysporum (FoPip4H) belongs to the Fe(II)/α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily, catalyzes the regio- and stereoselective hydroxylation of l-Pip, and produces optically pure trans-4-hydroxy-l-pipecolic acid (trans-4-l-HyPip). Amino acid sequence analysis revealed several fungal enzymes homologous with FoPip4H, and five of these also had l-Pip trans-4-hydroxylation activity. In particular, the homologous Pip4H enzyme derived from Aspergillus nidulans FGSC A4 (AnPip4H) had a broader substrate specificity spectrum than other homologues and reacted with the l and d forms of various cyclic and aliphatic amino acids. Using FoPip4H as a biocatalyst, a system for the preparative-scale production of chiral trans-4-l-HyPip was successfully developed. Thus, we report a fungal family of l-Pip hydroxylases and the enzymatic preparation of trans-4-l-HyPip, a bioactive compound and a constituent of secondary metabolites with useful physiological activities. PMID:26801577

  20. Role of malic enzyme during fatty acid synthesis in the oleaginous fungus Mortierella alpina.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guangfei; Chen, Haiqin; Wang, Lei; Gu, Zhennan; Song, Yuanda; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei; Chen, Yong Q

    2014-05-01

    The generation of NADPH by malic enzyme (ME) was postulated to be a rate-limiting step during fatty acid synthesis in oleaginous fungi, based primarily on the results from research focusing on ME in Mucor circinelloides. This hypothesis is challenged by a recent study showing that leucine metabolism, rather than ME, is critical for fatty acid synthesis in M. circinelloides. To clarify this, the gene encoding ME isoform E from Mortierella alpina was homologously expressed. ME overexpression increased the fatty acid content by 30% compared to that for a control. Our results suggest that ME may not be the sole rate-limiting enzyme, but does play a role, during fatty acid synthesis in oleaginous fungi.

  1. Effect of the bile-acid sequestrant colestipol on postprandial serum bile-acid concentration: evaluation by bioluminescent enzymic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, S S; Wayne, M L; Smith, R B; Wright, C E; Andreadis, N A; Hofmann, A F

    1989-02-01

    Chronic ingestion of bile-acid sequestrants has been shown to decrease the serum cholesterol concentration and coronary events in hypercholesterolaemic patients. To develop improved sequestrants, a rapid, convenient method for testing the bile-acid binding efficacy of sequestrants is needed. Serum bile-acid concentrations could be used to detect bile-acid binding by an administered sequestrant, since the serum bile-acid concentration is determined largely by the rate of intestinal absorption in healthy individuals. To test this, serum bile-acid concentrations were measured at frequent intervals over 24 h in five otherwise healthy hypercholesterolaemic subjects during the ingestion of three standard meals, with or without the addition of 5 g colestipol granules administered 30 min before each meal. Total serum bile-acid concentration was measured with a previously reported bioluminescent enzymic assay, that uses a 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, an oxido-reductase, and a bacterial luciferase co-immobilized on to Sepharose beads. Bile acids in 1 ml of serum were isolated by solid-phase extraction chromatography with reversed-phase C18 cartridges. Colestipol lowered the postprandial elevation of serum bile acids by one half, with a subsequent decrease in the cumulative area under the curve. The data suggest that measurement of serum bile-acid concentrations by bioluminescence is a rapid, simple way to document the efficacy of bile-acid sequestrants.

  2. Gene-Enzyme Relationships of Aromatic Amino Acid Biosynthesis in Higher Plants

    SciTech Connect

    2002-08-12

    Inhibition studies of amino acids in Nicotiana silvestris suspension cells gave clues to the difficulties for obtaining mutants deficient in post prephenate pathway proteins of aromatic amino acid biosynthesis (prephenate aminotransferase, arogenate dehydrogenase and arogenate dehydratase). Such mutants, if successfully obtained, would allow gene-enzyme relationships of aromatic amino acid proteins to be studied. We found that amino acids were inhibitory toward plant cell growth, and thus were unable to rescue analog resistant mutants. Toxicity of all amino acids toward exponentially dividing Nicotiana silvestris suspension cultured cells was monitored by following growth rates. Except for L-glutamine, all 19 protein amino acids inhibited cell growth. Inhibition of growth progressed to cell deterioration. Electron microscopy showed that amino acids triggered a state of cell shrinkage that eventually degenerated to total cellular disorganization. L-glutamine was not only an effective agent for prevention of amino acid toxicity, but enhanced the final growth yield. L-glutamine also was able to completely reverse inhibition effects in cells that had been in the slowed exponential phase. Two types of inhibition occurred and we have proposed that any amino acid inhibition that can be completely antagonized by L-glutamine be called ''general amino acid inhibition''. ''Specific amino acid inhibition'' resulting from particular pathway imbalances caused by certain exogenous amino acids, can be recognized and studied in the presence of L-glutamine which can abolishes the complication effects of general amino acid inhibition.

  3. Materials study supporting thermochemical hydrogen cycle sulfuric acid decomposer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Michael S.

    Increasing global climate change has been driven by greenhouse gases emissions originating from the combustion of fossil fuels. Clean burning hydrogen has the potential to replace much of the fossil fuels used today reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere. The sulfur iodine and hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles coupled with high temperature heat from advanced nuclear reactors have shown promise for economical large-scale hydrogen fuel stock production. Both of these cycles employ a step to decompose sulfuric acid to sulfur dioxide. This decomposition step occurs at high temperatures in the range of 825°C to 926°C dependent on the catalysis used. Successful commercial implementation of these technologies is dependent upon the development of suitable materials for use in the highly corrosive environments created by the decomposition products. Boron treated diamond film was a potential candidate for use in decomposer process equipment based on earlier studies concluding good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. However, little information was available relating the interactions of diamond and diamond films with sulfuric acid at temperatures greater than 350°C. A laboratory scale sulfuric acid decomposer simulator was constructed at the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute at the University of Missouri-Columbia. The simulator was capable of producing the temperatures and corrosive environments that process equipment would be exposed to for industrialization of the sulfur iodide or hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles. A series of boron treated synthetic diamonds were tested in the simulator to determine corrosion resistances and suitability for use in thermochemical process equipment. These studies were performed at twenty four hour durations at temperatures between 600°C to 926°C. Other materials, including natural diamond, synthetic diamond treated with titanium, silicon carbide, quartz, aluminum nitride, and Inconel

  4. Production of Glucaric Acid from Hemicellulose Substrate by Rosettasome Enzyme Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Charles C; Kibblewhite, Rena E; Paavola, Chad D; Orts, William J; Wagschal, Kurt

    2016-07-01

    Hemicellulose biomass is a complex polymer with many different chemical constituents that can be utilized as industrial feedstocks. These molecules can be released from the polymer and transformed into value-added chemicals through multistep enzymatic pathways. Some bacteria produce cellulosomes which are assemblies composed of lignocellulolytic enzymes tethered to a large protein scaffold. Rosettasomes are artificial engineered ring scaffolds designed to mimic the bacterial cellulosome. Both cellulosomes and rosettasomes have been shown to facilitate much higher rates of biomass hydrolysis compared to the same enzymes free in solution. We investigated whether tethering enzymes involved in both biomass hydrolysis and oxidative transformation to glucaric acid onto a rosettasome scaffold would result in an analogous production enhancement in a combined hydrolysis and bioconversion metabolic pathway. Three different enzymes were used to hydrolyze birchwood hemicellulose and convert the substituents to glucaric acid, a top-12 DOE value added chemical feedstock derived from biomass. It was demonstrated that colocalizing the three different enzymes to the synthetic scaffold resulted in up to 40 % higher levels of product compared to uncomplexed enzymes. PMID:27198564

  5. The enzymic oxidation of chlorogenic acid and some reactions of the quinone produced

    PubMed Central

    Pierpoint, W. S.

    1966-01-01

    1. Partially purified preparations of tobacco-leaf o-diphenol oxidase (o-quinol–oxygen oxidoreductase; EC 1.10.3.1) oxidize chlorogenic acid to brown products, absorbing, on average, 1·6atoms of oxygen/mol. oxidized, and evolving a little carbon dioxide. 2. The effect of benzenesulphinic acid on the oxidation suggests that the first stage is the formation of a quinone; the solution does not go brown, oxygen uptake is restricted to 1 atom/mol. oxidized, and a compound is produced whose composition corresponds to that of a sulphone of the quinone derived from chlorogenic acid. 3. Several other compounds that react with quinones affect the oxidation of chlorogenic acid. The colour of the products formed and the oxygen absorbed in their formation suggest that the quinone formed in the oxidation reacts with these compounds in the same way as do simpler quinones. 4. Some compounds that are often used to prevent the oxidation of polyphenols were tested to see if they act by inhibiting o-diphenol oxidase, by reacting with quinone intermediates, or both. 5. Ascorbate inhibits the enzyme and also reduces the quinone. 6. Potassium ethyl xanthate, diethyldithiocarbamate and cysteine inhibit the enzyme to different extents, and also react with the quinone. The nature of the reaction depends on the relative concentrations of inhibitor and chlorogenic acid. Excess of inhibitor prevents the solution from turning brown and restricts oxygen uptake to 1 atom/mol. of chlorogenic acid oxidized; smaller amounts do not prevent browning and slightly increase oxygen uptake. 7. 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole inhibits the enzyme, and also probably reacts with the quinone; inhibited enzyme is reactivated as if the inhibitor is removed as traces of quinone are produced. 8. Thioglycollate and polyvinylpyrrolidone inhibit the enzyme. Thioglycollate probably reduces the quinone to a small extent. PMID:5941350

  6. Crassulacean acid metabolism-cycling in Euphorbia milii

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) occurs in many Euphorbiaceae, particularly Euphorbia, a genus with C3 and C4 species as well. With the aim of contributing to our knowledge of the evolution of CAM in this genus, this study examined the possible occurrence of CAM in Euphorbia milii, a species with leaf succulence and drought tolerance suggestive of this carbon fixation pathway. Leaf anatomy consisted of a palisade parenchyma, a spongy parenchyma and a bundle sheath with chloroplasts, which indicates the possible functioning of C2 photosynthesis. No evidence of nocturnal CO2 fixation was found in plants of E. milii either watered or under drought; watered plants had a low nocturnal respiration rate (R). After 12 days without watering, the photosynthetic rate (PN) decreased 85 % and nocturnal R was nearly zero. Nocturnal H+ accumulation (ΔH+) in watered plants was 18 ± 2 (corresponding to malate) and 18 ± 4 (citrate) μmol H+ (g fresh mass)−1. Respiratory CO2 recycling through acid synthesis contributed to a night-time water saving of 2 and 86 % in watered plants and plants under drought, respectively. Carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) was −25.2 ± 0.7 ‰ in leaves and −24.7 ± 0.1 ‰ in stems. Evidence was found for the operation of weak CAM in E. milii, with statistically significant ΔH+, no nocturnal CO2 uptake and values of δ13C intermediate between C3 and constitutive CAM plants; ΔH+ was apparently attributable to both malate and citrate. The results suggest that daily malate accumulation results from recycling of part of the nocturnal respiratory CO2, which helps explain the occurrence of an intermediate value of leaf δ13C. Euphorbia milii can be considered as a CAM-cycling species. The significance of the operation of CAM-cycling in E. milii lies in water conservation, rather than carbon acquisition. The possible occurrence of C2 photosynthesis merits research. PMID:23596548

  7. Chloroplastic thioredoxin m functions as a major regulator of Calvin cycle enzymes during photosynthesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Okegawa, Yuki; Motohashi, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) regulate the activity of various chloroplastic proteins in a light-dependent manner. Five types of Trxs function in different physiological processes in the chloroplast of Arabidopsis thaliana. Previous in vitro experiments have suggested that the f-type Trx (Trx f) is the main redox regulator of chloroplast enzymes, including Calvin cycle enzymes. To investigate the in vivo contribution of each Trx isoform to the redox regulatory system, we first quantified the protein concentration of each Trx isoform in the chloroplast stroma. The m-type Trx (Trx m), which consists of four isoforms, was the most abundant type. Next, we analyzed several Arabidopsis Trx-m-deficient mutants to elucidate the physiological role of Trx m in vivo. Deficiency of Trx m impaired plant growth and decreased the CO2 assimilation rate. We also determined the redox state of Trx target enzymes to examine their photo-reduction, which is essential for enzyme activation. In the Trx-m-deficient mutants, the reduction level of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase was lower than that in the wild type. Inconsistently with the historical view, our in vivo study suggested that Trx m plays a more important role than Trx f in the activation of Calvin cycle enzymes.

  8. Mycolic acid biosynthesis and enzymic characterization of the beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase A-condensing enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Laurent; Dover, Lynn G; Carrère, Séverine; Nampoothiri, K Madhavan; Lesjean, Sarah; Brown, Alistair K; Brennan, Patrick J; Minnikin, David E; Locht, Camille; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2002-06-01

    Mycolic acids consist of long-chain alpha-alkyl-beta-hydroxy fatty acids that are produced by successive rounds of elongation catalysed by a type II fatty acid synthase (FAS-II). A key feature in the elongation process is the condensation of a two-carbon unit from malonyl-acyl-carrier protein (ACP) to a growing acyl-ACP chain catalysed by a beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase (Kas). In the present study, we provide evidence that kasA from Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes an enzyme that elongates in vivo the meromycolate chain, in both Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium chelonae. We demonstrate that KasA belongs to the FAS-II system, which utilizes primarily palmitoyl-ACP rather than short-chain acyl-ACP primers. Furthermore, in an in vitro condensing assay using purified recombinant KasA, palmitoyl-AcpM and malonyl-AcpM, KasA was found to express Kas activity. Also, mutated KasA proteins, with mutation of Cys(171), His(311), Lys(340) and His(345) to Ala abrogated the condensation activity of KasA in vitro completely. Finally, purified KasA was highly sensitive to cerulenin, a well-known inhibitor of Kas, which may lead to the development of novel anti-mycobacterial drugs targeting KasA. PMID:12023885

  9. Molecular annotation of ketol-acid reductoisomerases from Streptomyces reveals a novel amino acid biosynthesis interlock mediated by enzyme promiscuity

    PubMed Central

    Verdel-Aranda, Karina; López-Cortina, Susana T; Hodgson, David A; Barona-Gómez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase superfamily oxidize and reduce a wide range of substrates, making their functional annotation challenging. Ketol-acid reductoisomerase (KARI), encoded by the ilvC gene in branched-chain amino acids biosynthesis, is a promiscuous reductase enzyme within this superfamily. Here, we obtain steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters for 10 IlvC homologues from the genera Streptomyces and Corynebacterium, upon eight selected chemically diverse substrates, including some not normally recognized by enzymes of this superfamily. This biochemical data suggested a Streptomyces biosynthetic interlock between proline and the branched-chain amino acids, mediated by enzyme substrate promiscuity, which was confirmed via mutagenesis and complementation analyses of the proC, ilvC1 and ilvC2 genes in Streptomyces coelicolor. Moreover, both ilvC orthologues and paralogues were analysed, such that the relationship between gene duplication and functional diversification could be explored. The KARI paralogues present in S. coelicolor and Streptomyces lividans, despite their conserved high sequence identity (97%), were shown to be more promiscuous, suggesting a recent functional diversification. In contrast, the KARI paralogue from Streptomyces viridifaciens showed selectivity towards the synthesis of valine precursors, explaining its recruitment within the biosynthetic gene cluster of valanimycin. These results allowed us to assess substrate promiscuity indices as a tool to annotate new molecular functions with metabolic implications. PMID:25296650

  10. Changes in the activities of key enzymes of glycolysis during the cell cycle in yeast: a rectification.

    PubMed

    de Koning, W; Groeneveld, K; Oehlen, L J; Berden, J A; van Dam, K

    1991-04-01

    Activities of glycolytic enzymes were determined in elutriation fractionated cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown on different carbon sources. Almost pure fractions of single cells at the G1 state of cell division were obtained for some of the growth conditions tested, whereas other stages were enriched in particular fractions. Specific activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase were found to be constant during the cell cycle, as reported by van Doorn et al. (1988a), Journal of Bacteriology 170, 4808-4815, and (1988b), Journal of General Microbiology 134, 785-790. In contrast to the earlier reports, the activities of hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase and trehalase were also constant in different states of the cell cycle. For hexokinase and phosphofructokinase it was shown that the apparent specific activity in a cell-free extract strongly diminished when extracts contained less that 0.5-1 mg protein ml-1. In the experiments of van Doorn et al. (1988a) the protein content of the outer fractions was up to 20 times lower than that of the central fractions, suggesting an alternative explanation for the observed changes in enzyme activities during the cell cycle. Therefore, we want to rectify the observations presented by van Doorn et al. (1988a), and conclude that the activities of the glycolytic enzymes do not vary greatly during the cell cycle of S. cervisiae. PMID:1856683

  11. Enzymophoresis of nucleic acids by tandem capillary enzyme reactor-capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nashabeh, W; el Rassi, Z

    1992-04-10

    Enzymophoresis with coupled heterogeneous capillary enzyme reactor-capillary zone electrophoresis was developed and evaluated in the area of nucleic acids. Ribonuclease T1, hexokinase and adenosine deaminase were successfully immobilized on the inner walls of short fused-silica capillaries through glutaraldehyde attachment. These open-tubular capillary enzyme reactors were quite stable for a prolonged period of use under operation conditions normally used in capillary zone electrophoresis. The capillary enzyme reactors coupled in series with capillary zone electrophoresis served as peak locator on the electropherogram, improved the system selectivity, and facilitated the quantitative determination of the analytes with good accuracy. Also, they allowed the on-line digestion and mapping of minute amounts of transfer ribonucleic acids, and the simultaneous synthesis and separation of nanogram quantities of oligonucleotides.

  12. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S.; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria. These enzymes were present in all heterofermentative lactobacilli and most leuconostocs but were absent in all the homofermentative lactobacilli and pediococci examined. There was a good correlation among arginine degradation, formation of ammonia and citrulline, and the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes. Urea was not detected during arginine degradation, suggesting that the catabolism of arginine did not proceed via the arginase-catalyzed reaction, as has been suggested in some earlier studies. Detection of ammonia with Nessler's reagent was shown to be a simple, rapid test to assess the ability of wine lactic acid bacteria to degrade arginine, although in media containing relatively high concentrations (>0.5%) of fructose, ammonia formation is inhibited. PMID:16534912

  13. Biological Monitoring of 3-Phenoxybenzoic Acid in Urine by an Enzyme -Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method was employed for determination of the pyrethroid biomarker, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) in human urine samples. The optimized coating antigen concentration was 0.5 ng/mL with a dilution of 1:4000 for the 3-PBA antibody and 1:6...

  14. Zeolite molecular sieves have dramatic acid-base effects on enzymes in nonaqueous media.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Nuno; Partridge, Johann; Halling, Peter J; Barreiros, Susana

    2002-02-01

    Zeolite molecular sieves very commonly are used as in situ drying agents in reaction mixtures of enzymes in nonaqueous media. They often affect enzyme behavior, and this has been interpreted in terms of altered hydration. Here, we show that zeolites can also have dramatic acid-base effects on enzymes in low water media, resulting from their cation-exchange ability. Initial rates of transesterification catalyzed by cross-linked crystals of subtilisin were compared in supercritical ethane, hexane, and acetonitrile with water activity fixed by pre-equilibration. Addition of zeolite NaA (4 A powder) still caused remarkable rate enhancements (up to 20-fold), despite the separate control of hydration. In the presence of excess of an alternative solid-state acid-base buffer, however, zeolite addition had no effect. The more commonly used Merck molecular sieves (type 3 A beads) had similar but somewhat smaller effects. All zeolites have ion-exchange ability and can exchange H+ for cations such as Na+ and K+. These exchanges will tend to affect the protonation state of acidic groups in the protein and, hence, enzymatic activity. Zeolites pre-equilibrated in aqueous suspensions of varying pH-pNa gave very different enzyme activities. Their differing basicities were demonstrated directly by equilibration with an indicator dissolved in toluene. The potential of zeolites as acid-base buffers for low-water media is discussed, and their ability to overcome pH memory is demonstrated.

  15. [Lactate dehydrogenase and Krebs cycle enzyme activity in rat liver during the growth of transplanted and spontaneous tumors].

    PubMed

    Morozkina, T S

    1978-03-01

    Certain distinctions in the mouse and rat liver responses to transplanted and spontaneous tumours have been discovered at the initial periods of their growth. The most pronounced changes (the mosaic distribution of enzymatic activity in the lobe) are observed in the case of spontaneous tumours. Activities the Krebs cycle enzymes, especially of NAD-dependent enzymes are seen inhibited in the tumour-bearing liver at the terminal periods of growth of both spontaneous and transplanted tumours; lactate dehydrogenase activity increases (with the exception of mitochondrial lactate dehydrogenase in the rat liver with transplanted sarcomas). PMID:684845

  16. Application of ionic liquids based enzyme-assisted extraction of chlorogenic acid from Eucommia ulmoides leaves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Sui, Xiaoyu; Li, Li; Zhang, Jie; Liang, Xin; Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Honglian; Fu, Shuang

    2016-01-15

    A new approach for ionic liquid based enzyme-assisted extraction (ILEAE) of chlorogenic acid (CGA) from Eucommia ulmoides is presented in which enzyme pretreatment was used in ionic liquids aqueous media to enhance extraction yield. For this purpose, the solubility of CGA and the activity of cellulase were investigated in eight 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids. Cellulase in 0.5 M [C6mim]Br aqueous solution was found to provide better performance in extraction. The factors of ILEAE procedures including extraction time, extraction phase pH, extraction temperatures and enzyme concentrations were investigated. Moreover, the novel developed approach offered advantages in term of yield and efficiency compared with other conventional extraction techniques. Scanning electronic microscopy of plant samples indicated that cellulase treated cell wall in ionic liquid solution was subjected to extract, which led to more efficient extraction by reducing mass transfer barrier. The proposed ILEAE method would develope a continuous process for enzyme-assisted extraction including enzyme incubation and solvent extraction process. In this research, we propose a novel view for enzyme-assisted extraction of plant active component, besides concentrating on enzyme facilitated cell wall degradation, focusing on improvement of bad permeability of ionic liquids solutions. PMID:26709302

  17. Application of ionic liquids based enzyme-assisted extraction of chlorogenic acid from Eucommia ulmoides leaves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Sui, Xiaoyu; Li, Li; Zhang, Jie; Liang, Xin; Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Honglian; Fu, Shuang

    2016-01-15

    A new approach for ionic liquid based enzyme-assisted extraction (ILEAE) of chlorogenic acid (CGA) from Eucommia ulmoides is presented in which enzyme pretreatment was used in ionic liquids aqueous media to enhance extraction yield. For this purpose, the solubility of CGA and the activity of cellulase were investigated in eight 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids. Cellulase in 0.5 M [C6mim]Br aqueous solution was found to provide better performance in extraction. The factors of ILEAE procedures including extraction time, extraction phase pH, extraction temperatures and enzyme concentrations were investigated. Moreover, the novel developed approach offered advantages in term of yield and efficiency compared with other conventional extraction techniques. Scanning electronic microscopy of plant samples indicated that cellulase treated cell wall in ionic liquid solution was subjected to extract, which led to more efficient extraction by reducing mass transfer barrier. The proposed ILEAE method would develope a continuous process for enzyme-assisted extraction including enzyme incubation and solvent extraction process. In this research, we propose a novel view for enzyme-assisted extraction of plant active component, besides concentrating on enzyme facilitated cell wall degradation, focusing on improvement of bad permeability of ionic liquids solutions.

  18. Chemical modification of an alpha 3-fucosyltransferase; definition of amino acid residues essential for enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Britten, C J; Bird, M I

    1997-02-11

    The biosynthesis of the carbohydrate antigen sialyl Lewis X (sLe(x)) is dependent on the activity of an alpha 3-fucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.152, GDP-fucose:Gal beta (1-4)GlcNAc-R alpha (1-3)fucosyltransferase). This enzyme catalyses the transfer of fucose from GDP-beta-fucose to the 3-OH of N-acetylglucosamine present in lactosamine acceptors. In this report, we have investigated the amino acids essential for the activity of a recombinant alpha 3-fucosyltransferase (FucT-VI) through chemical modification of the enzyme with group-selective reagents. FucT-VI activity was found to be particularly sensitive to the histidine-selective reagent diethylpyrocarbonate and the cysteine reagent N-ethylmaleimide, with IC50 values of less than 200 microM. Reagents selective for arginine and lysine had no effect on enzyme activity. The inclusion of GDP-beta-fucose during preincubation with NEM reduces the rate of inactivation whereas inclusion of an acceptor saccharide for the enzyme, Gal beta (1-4)GlcNAc, had no effect. No protective effect with either GDP-beta-fucose or Gal beta (1-4)GlcNAc was observed on treatment of the enzyme with diethylpyrocarbonate. These data suggest that in addition to an NEM-reactive cysteine in, or adjacent to, the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, FucT-VI possesses histidine residue(s) that are essential for enzyme activity.

  19. Controlling enzyme inhibition using an expanded set of genetically encoded amino acids.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shun; Kwon, Inchan

    2013-09-01

    Enzyme inhibition plays an important role in drug development, metabolic pathway regulation, and biocatalysis with product inhibition. When an inhibitor has high structural similarities to the substrate of an enzyme, controlling inhibitor binding without affecting enzyme substrate binding is often challenging and requires fine-tuning of the active site. We hypothesize that an extended set of genetically encoded amino acids can be used to design an enzyme active site that reduces enzyme inhibitor binding without compromising substrate binding. As a model case, we chose murine dihydrofolate reductase (mDHFR), substrate dihydrofolate, and inhibitor methotrexate. Structural models of mDHFR variants containing non-natural amino acids complexed with each ligand were constructed to identify a key residue for inhibitor binding and non-natural amino acids to replace the key residue. Then, we discovered that replacing the key phenylalanine residue with two phenylalanine analogs (p-bromophenylalanine (pBrF) and L-2-naphthylalanine (2Nal)) enhances binding affinity toward the substrate dihydrofolate over the inhibitor by 4.0 and 5.8-fold, respectively. Such an enhanced selectivity is mainly due to a reduced inhibitor binding affinity by 2.1 and 4.3-fold, respectively. The catalytic efficiency of the mDHFR variant containing pBrF is comparable to that of wild-type mDHFR, whereas the mDHFR variant containing 2Nal exhibits a moderate decrease in the catalytic efficiency. The work described here clearly demonstrates the feasibility of selectively controlling enzyme inhibition using an expanded set of genetically encoded amino acids.

  20. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J; Jones, Patrik R

    2013-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C(6)-C(18)) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C(8)-C(16)) or fatty alkanes (C(7)-C(15)) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L(-1) was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C(8)-C(18)). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities.

  1. Malonyl-Coenzyme A Reductase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus, a Key Enzyme of the 3-Hydroxypropionate Cycle for Autotrophic CO2 Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Hügler, Michael; Menendez, Castor; Schägger, Hermann; Fuchs, Georg

    2002-01-01

    The 3-hydroxypropionate cycle is a new autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in Chloroflexus aurantiacus and some archaebacteria. The initial step is acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylation to malonyl-CoA by acetyl-CoA carboxylase, followed by NADPH-dependent reduction of malonyl-CoA to 3-hydroxypropionate. This reduction step was studied in Chloroflexus aurantiacus. A new enzyme was purified, malonyl-CoA reductase, which catalyzed the two-step reduction malonyl-CoA + NADPH + H+ → malonate semialdehyde + NADP+ + CoA and malonate semialdehyde + NADPH + H+ → 3-hydroxypropionate + NADP+. The bifunctional enzyme (aldehyde dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase) had a native molecular mass of 300 kDa and consisted of a single large subunit of 145 kDa, suggesting an α2 composition. The N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined, and the incomplete gene was identified in the genome database. Obviously, the enzyme consists of an N-terminal short-chain alcohol dehydrogenase domain and a C-terminal aldehyde dehydrogenase domain. No indication of the presence of a prosthetic group was obtained; Mg2+ and Fe2+ stimulated and EDTA inhibited activity. The enzyme was highly specific for its substrates, with apparent Km values of 30 μM malonyl-CoA and 25 μM NADPH and a turnover number of 25 s−1 subunit−1. The specific activity in autotrophically grown cells was 0.08 μmol of malonyl-CoA reduced min−1 (mg of protein)−1, compared to 0.03 μmol min−1 (mg of protein)−1 in heterotrophically grown cells, indicating downregulation under heterotrophic conditions. Malonyl-CoA reductase is not required in any other known pathway and therefore can be taken as a characteristic enzyme of the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle. Furthermore, the enzyme may be useful for production of 3-hydroxypropionate and for a coupled spectrophotometric assay for activity screening of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, a target enzyme of potent herbicides. PMID:11948153

  2. The viability of a nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle - Kinetics and thermochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate ??? pyruvate ??? oxaloacetate ??? malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite-magnetite-quartz and pyrrhotite-pyrite-magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life. ?? 2006 Springer Science + Business Media B.V.

  3. The Viability of a Nonenzymatic Reductive Citric Acid Cycle Kinetics and Thermochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, David S.

    2007-02-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate → pyruvate → oxaloacetate → malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite magnetite quartz and pyrrhotite pyrite magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life.

  4. Bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) system: theoretical considerations for nucleic acid quantification assays.

    PubMed

    Hassibi, Arjang; Contag, Christopher; Vlad, Marcel O; Hafezi, Maryam; Lee, Thomas H; Davis, Ronald W; Pourmand, Nader

    2005-08-01

    A novel application of bioluminescence for nucleic acid quantification, the bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC), is described in theoretical terms and supported by preliminary experimental data. In the BRC system, pyrophosphate (PPi) molecules are released during biopolymerization and are counted and correlated to DNA copy number. The enzymes ATP-sulfurylase and firefly luciferase are employed to generate photons quantitatively from PPi. Enzymatic unity-gain positive feedback is implemented to amplify photon generation and to compensate for decay in light intensity by self-regulation. The cumulative total of photons can be orders of magnitude higher than in typical chemiluminescent processes. A system level theoretical model is developed, taking into account the kinetics of the regenerative cycle, contamination, and detector noise. Data and simulations show that the photon generation process achieves steady state for the time range of experimental measurements. Based on chain reaction theory, computations show that BRC is very sensitive to variations in the efficiencies of the chemical reactions involved and less sensitive to variations in the quantum yield of the process. We show that BRC can detect attomolar quantities of DNA (10(-18) mol), and that the useful dynamic range is five orders of magnitude. Sensitivity is not constrained by detector performance but rather by background bioluminescence caused by contamination by either PPi or ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

  5. Impacts of simulated acid rain on soil enzyme activities in a latosol.

    PubMed

    Ling, Da-Jiong; Huang, Qian-Chun; Ouyang, Ying

    2010-11-01

    Acid rain pollution is a serious environmental problem in the world. This study investigated impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon four types of soil enzymes, namely the catalase, acid phosphatase, urease, and amylase, in a latosol. Latosol is an acidic red soil and forms in the tropical rainforest biome. Laboratory experiments were performed by spraying the soil columns with the SAR at pH levels of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5., 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, and 7.0 (control) over a 20-day period. Mixed results were obtained in enzyme activities for different kinds of enzymes under the influences of the SAR. The catalase activities increased rapidly from day 0 to 5, then decreased slightly from day 5 to 15, and finally decreased sharply to the end of the experiments, whereas the acid phosphatase activities decreased rapidly from day 0 to 5, then increased slightly from day 5 to 15, and finally decreased dramatically to the end of the experiments. A decrease in urease activities was observed at all of the SAR pH levels for the entire experimental period, while an increase from day 0 to 5 and then a decrease from day 5 to 20 in amylase activities were observed at all of the SAR pH levels. In general, the catalase, acid phosphatase, and urease activities increased with the SAR pH levels. However, the maximum amylase activity was found at pH 4.0 and decreased as the SAR pH increased from 4.0 to 5.0 or decreased from 4.0 to 2.5. It is apparent that acid rain had adverse environmental impacts on soil enzyme activities in the latosol. Our study further revealed that impacts of the SAR upon soil enzyme activities were in the following order: amylase>catalase>acid phosphatase>urease. These findings provide useful information on better understanding and managing soil biological processes in the nature under the influence of acid rains.

  6. Global transcription analysis of Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants reveals an alternating pattern of gene expression and effects on hypoxic and oxidative genes.

    PubMed

    McCammon, Mark T; Epstein, Charles B; Przybyla-Zawislak, Beata; McAlister-Henn, Lee; Butow, Ronald A

    2003-03-01

    To understand the many roles of the Krebs tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in cell function, we used DNA microarrays to examine gene expression in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. mRNA was analyzed from yeast strains harboring defects in each of 15 genes that encode subunits of the eight TCA cycle enzymes. The expression of >400 genes changed at least threefold in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. Many genes displayed a common response to TCA cycle dysfunction indicative of a shift away from oxidative metabolism. Another set of genes displayed a pairwise, alternating pattern of expression in response to contiguous TCA cycle enzyme defects: expression was elevated in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutants, diminished in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA ligase mutants, elevated again in succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants, and diminished again in malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase mutants. This pattern correlated with previously defined TCA cycle growth-enhancing mutations and suggested a novel metabolic signaling pathway monitoring TCA cycle function. Expression of hypoxic/anaerobic genes was elevated in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutants, whereas expression of oxidative genes was diminished, consistent with a heme signaling defect caused by inadequate levels of the heme precursor, succinyl-CoA. These studies have revealed extensive responses to changes in TCA cycle function and have uncovered new and unexpected metabolic networks that are wired into the TCA cycle.

  7. The Impact of Enzyme Characteristics on Corn Stover Fiber Degradation and Acid Production During Ensiled Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haiyu; Richard, Tom L.; Moore, Kenneth J.

    Ensilage can be used to store lignocellulosic biomass before industrial bioprocessing. This study investigated the impacts of seven commerical enzyme mixtures derived from Aspergillus niger, Trichoderma reesei, and T. longibrachiatum. Treatments included three size grades of corn stover, two enzyme levels (1.67 and 5 IU/g dry matter based on hemicellulase), and various ratios of cellulase to hemicellulase (C ∶ H). The highest C ∶ H ratio tested, 2.38, derived from T. reesei, resulted in the most effective fermentation, with lactic acid as the dominant product. Enzymatic activity during storage may complement industrial pretreatment; creating synergies that could reduce total bioconversion costs.

  8. Medium chain fatty acid ethyl esters - activation of antimicrobial effects by Malassezia enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mayser, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Free medium and short chain fatty acids are known to have broad antimicrobial activity. However, their practical use in topical therapy is limited by their intensive smell and acidity. Surprisingly, a nearly identical antimicrobial effect was found with the ethyl ester derivatives of these fatty acids, but only against Malassezia (M.) yeast, not against Candida spp. Obviously, these esters are hydrolysed by M. enzymes, thus generating a selective activation of antimicrobial activity especially in areas well populated with these yeast ('targeting'). Octanoic acid ethyl ester (CAS 106-32-1) was found to be most suitable. In an agar dilution test, the minimal inhibitory concentrations against M. globosa, M. pachydermatis and M. sympodialis, respectively, ranged between ~5 and 10 mmol l(-1) after 10 days of incubation. The effect started immediately and was not delayed by other lipid sources applied simultaneously. Based on these data, fatty acid monoesters may represent a new therapeutic concept in M.-associated diseases. PMID:25676074

  9. Morphological characteristics, oxidative stability and enzymic hydrolysis of amylose-fatty acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Marinopoulou, Anna; Papastergiadis, Efthimios; Raphaelides, Stylianos N; Kontominas, Michael G

    2016-05-01

    Complexes of amylose with fatty acids varying in carbon chain length and degree of unsaturation were prepared at 30, 50 or 70°C by dissolving amylose in 0.1N KOH and mixing with fatty acid potassium soap solution. The complexes were obtained in solid form as precipitates after neutralization. SEM microscopy revealed that the morphology of the complexes was that of ordered lamellae separated from amorphous regions whereas confocal laser scanning microscopy showed images of the topography of the guest molecules in the complex matrix. FTIR spectroscopy revealed that the absorption peak attributed to carbonyl group of free fatty acid was shifted when the fatty acid was in the form of amylose complex. Thermo-gravimetry showed that the unsaturated fatty acids were effectively protected from oxidation when they were complexed with amylose whereas enzymic hydrolysis experiments showed that the guest molecules were quantitatively released from the amylose complexes. PMID:26877002

  10. Morphological characteristics, oxidative stability and enzymic hydrolysis of amylose-fatty acid complexes.

    PubMed

    Marinopoulou, Anna; Papastergiadis, Efthimios; Raphaelides, Stylianos N; Kontominas, Michael G

    2016-05-01

    Complexes of amylose with fatty acids varying in carbon chain length and degree of unsaturation were prepared at 30, 50 or 70°C by dissolving amylose in 0.1N KOH and mixing with fatty acid potassium soap solution. The complexes were obtained in solid form as precipitates after neutralization. SEM microscopy revealed that the morphology of the complexes was that of ordered lamellae separated from amorphous regions whereas confocal laser scanning microscopy showed images of the topography of the guest molecules in the complex matrix. FTIR spectroscopy revealed that the absorption peak attributed to carbonyl group of free fatty acid was shifted when the fatty acid was in the form of amylose complex. Thermo-gravimetry showed that the unsaturated fatty acids were effectively protected from oxidation when they were complexed with amylose whereas enzymic hydrolysis experiments showed that the guest molecules were quantitatively released from the amylose complexes.

  11. Production of L-lactic Acid from Biomass Wastes Using Scallop Crude Enzymes and Novel Lactic Acid Bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Mitsunori; Nakamura, Kanami; Nakasaki, Kiyohiko

    In the present study, biomass waste raw materials including paper mill sludge, bamboo, sea lettuce, and shochu residue (from a distiller) and crude enzymes derived from inedible and discarded scallop parts were used to produce L-lactic acid for the raw material of biodegradable plastic poly-lactic acid. The activities of cellulase and amylase in the crude enzymes were 22 and 170units/L, respectively, and L-lactic acid was produced from every of the above mentioned biomass wastes, by the method of liquid-state simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) . The L-lactic acid concentrations produced from sea lettuce and shochu residue, which contain high concentration of starch were 3.6 and 9.3g/L, respectively, and corresponded to greater than 25% of the conversion of glucans contained in these biomass wastes. Furthermore, using the solid state SSF method, concentrations as high as 13g/L of L-lactic acid were obtained from sea lettuce and 26g/L were obtained from shochu residue.

  12. The effect of propionic acid and valeric acid on the cell cycle in root meristems of Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Tramontano, W.A.; Yang, Shauyu; Delillo, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Propionic acid and valeric acid at 1mM reduced the mitotic index of root meristem cells of Pisum sativum to < 1% after 12 hr in aerated White's medium. This effect varied with different acid concentrations. After a 12 hr exposure to either acid, seedlings transferred to fresh medium without either acid, resumed their normal mitotic index after 12 hr, with a burst of mitosis 8 hr post-transfer. Exposure of root meristem cells to either acid also inhibited ({sup 3}H)-TdR incorporation. Neither acid significantly altered the distribution of meristematic cells in G1 and G2 after 12 hr. The incorporation of ({sup 3}H) - uridine was also unaltered by the addition of either acid. This information suggests that propionic acid and valeric acid, limit progression through the cell cycle by inhibiting DNA synthesis and arresting cells in G1 and G2. These results were consistent with previous data which utilized butyric acid.

  13. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gallage, Nethaji J.; Hansen, Esben H.; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  14. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Hansen, Esben H; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco. PMID:24941968

  15. Vanillin formation from ferulic acid in Vanilla planifolia is catalysed by a single enzyme.

    PubMed

    Gallage, Nethaji J; Hansen, Esben H; Kannangara, Rubini; Olsen, Carl Erik; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Holme, Inger; Hebelstrup, Kim; Grisoni, Michel; Møller, Birger Lindberg

    2014-06-19

    Vanillin is a popular and valuable flavour compound. It is the key constituent of the natural vanilla flavour obtained from cured vanilla pods. Here we show that a single hydratase/lyase type enzyme designated vanillin synthase (VpVAN) catalyses direct conversion of ferulic acid and its glucoside into vanillin and its glucoside, respectively. The enzyme shows high sequence similarity to cysteine proteinases and is specific to the substitution pattern at the aromatic ring and does not metabolize caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid as demonstrated by coupled transcription/translation assays. VpVAN localizes to the inner part of the vanilla pod and high transcript levels are found in single cells located a few cell layers from the inner epidermis. Transient expression of VpVAN in tobacco and stable expression in barley in combination with the action of endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and UDP-glucosyltransferases result in vanillyl alcohol glucoside formation from endogenous ferulic acid. A gene encoding an enzyme showing 71% sequence identity to VpVAN was identified in another vanillin-producing plant species Glechoma hederacea and was also shown to be a vanillin synthase as demonstrated by transient expression in tobacco.

  16. Inhibition profile of a series of phenolic acids on bovine lactoperoxidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Sarikaya, S Beyza Ozturk; Sisecioglu, Melda; Cankaya, Murat; Gulcin, İlhami; Ozdemir, Hasan

    2015-06-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) catalyzes the oxidation of numerous of organic and inorganic substrates by hydrogen peroxide. It has very vital activity in the innate immune system by decreasing or stopping the activation of the bacteria in milk and mucosal secretions. This study's purpose was to investigate in vitro effect of some phenolic acids (ellagic, gallic, ferulic, caffeic, quercetin, p-coumaric, syringic, catechol and epicatechin) on the purified LPO. This enzyme was purified from milk by using different methods such as Amberlite CG-50 resin, CM-Sephadex C-50 ion-exchange and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration chromatography. LPO was purified 28.7-fold with a yield of 20.03%. We found phenolic acids have inhibition effects on bovine LPO enzyme to different concentrations. Our study showed lower concentrations of caffeic acid, ferulic acid and quercetin exhibited much higher inhibitory effect on enzyme, so these three of them were clearly a more potent inhibitor than the others were. All of compounds were non-competitive inhibitors.

  17. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  18. The Secreted Enzyme PM20D1 Regulates Lipidated Amino Acid Uncouplers of Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Long, Jonathan Z; Svensson, Katrin J; Bateman, Leslie A; Lin, Hua; Kamenecka, Theodore; Lokurkar, Isha A; Lou, Jesse; Rao, Rajesh R; Chang, Mi Ra; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Paulo, Joao A; Gygi, Steven P; Griffin, Patrick R; Nomura, Daniel K; Spiegelman, Bruce M

    2016-07-14

    Brown and beige adipocytes are specialized cells that express uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and dissipate chemical energy as heat. These cells likely possess alternative UCP1-independent thermogenic mechanisms. Here, we identify a secreted enzyme, peptidase M20 domain containing 1 (PM20D1), that is enriched in UCP1(+) versus UCP1(-) adipocytes. We demonstrate that PM20D1 is a bidirectional enzyme in vitro, catalyzing both the condensation of fatty acids and amino acids to generate N-acyl amino acids and also the reverse hydrolytic reaction. N-acyl amino acids directly bind mitochondria and function as endogenous uncouplers of UCP1-independent respiration. Mice with increased circulating PM20D1 have augmented respiration and increased N-acyl amino acids in blood. Lastly, administration of N-acyl amino acids to mice improves glucose homeostasis and increases energy expenditure. These data identify an enzymatic node and a family of metabolites that regulate energy homeostasis. This pathway might be useful for treating obesity and associated disorders. PMID:27374330

  19. CYP4 Enzymes as potential drug targets: focus on enzyme multiplicity, inducers and inhibitors, and therapeutic modulation of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthase and fatty acid ω-hydroxylase activities

    PubMed Central

    Edson, Katheryne Z.; Rettie, Allan E.

    2014-01-01

    The Cytochrome P450 4 (CYP4) family of enzymes in humans is comprised of thirteen isozymes that typically catalyze the ω-oxidation of endogenous fatty acids and eicosanoids. Several CYP4 enzymes can biosynthesize 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid or 20-HETE, an important signaling eicosanoid involved in regulation of vascular tone and kidney reabsorption. Additionally, accumulation of certain fatty acids is a hallmark of the rare genetic disorders, Refsum disease and X-ALD. Therefore, modulation of CYP4 enzyme activity, either by inhibition or induction, is a potential strategy for drug discovery. Here we review the substrate specificities, sites of expression, genetic regulation, and inhibition by exogenous chemicals of the human CYP4 enzymes, and discuss the targeting of CYP4 enzymes in the development of new treatments for hypertension, stroke, certain cancers and the fatty acid-linked orphan diseases. PMID:23688133

  20. CYP4 enzymes as potential drug targets: focus on enzyme multiplicity, inducers and inhibitors, and therapeutic modulation of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) synthase and fatty acid ω-hydroxylase activities.

    PubMed

    Edson, Katheryne Z; Rettie, Allan E

    2013-01-01

    The Cytochrome P450 4 (CYP4) family of enzymes in humans is comprised of thirteen isozymes that typically catalyze the ω-oxidation of endogenous fatty acids and eicosanoids. Several CYP4 enzymes can biosynthesize 20- hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, or 20-HETE, an important signaling eicosanoid involved in regulation of vascular tone and kidney reabsorption. Additionally, accumulation of certain fatty acids is a hallmark of the rare genetic disorders, Refsum disease and X-ALD. Therefore, modulation of CYP4 enzyme activity, either by inhibition or induction, is a potential strategy for drug discovery. Here we review the substrate specificities, sites of expression, genetic regulation, and inhibition by exogenous chemicals of the human CYP4 enzymes, and discuss the targeting of CYP4 enzymes in the development of new treatments for hypertension, stroke, certain cancers and the fatty acid-linked orphan diseases.

  1. Gluconeogenic carbon flow of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is critical for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish and maintain infection.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Joeli; Rhee, Kyu Y; Schnappinger, Dirk; Pethe, Kevin; Ehrt, Sabine

    2010-05-25

    Metabolic adaptation to the host niche is a defining feature of the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In vitro, Mtb is able to grow on a variety of carbon sources, but mounting evidence has implicated fatty acids as the major source of carbon and energy for Mtb during infection. When bacterial metabolism is primarily fueled by fatty acids, biosynthesis of sugars from intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle is essential for growth. The role of gluconeogenesis in the pathogenesis of Mtb however remains unaddressed. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) catalyzes the first committed step of gluconeogenesis. We applied genetic analyses and (13)C carbon tracing to confirm that PEPCK is essential for growth of Mtb on fatty acids and catalyzes carbon flow from tricarboxylic acid cycle-derived metabolites to gluconeogenic intermediates. We further show that PEPCK is required for growth of Mtb in isolated bone marrow-derived murine macrophages and in mice. Importantly, Mtb lacking PEPCK not only failed to replicate in mouse lungs but also failed to survive, and PEPCK depletion during the chronic phase of infection resulted in mycobacterial clearance. Mtb thus relies on gluconeogenesis throughout the infection. PEPCK depletion also attenuated Mtb in IFNgamma-deficient mice, suggesting that this enzyme represents an attractive target for chemotherapy.

  2. Amino acid network for prediction of catalytic residues in enzymes: a comparison survey.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianhong; Yan, Wenying; Hu, Guang; Shen, Bairong

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic residues play a significant role in enzyme functions. With the recent accumulation of experimentally determined enzyme 3D structures and network theory on protein structures, the prediction of catalytic residues by amino acid network (AAN, where nodes are residues and links are residue interactions) has gained much interest. Computational methods of identifying catalytic residues are traditionally divided into two groups: sequence-based and structure-based methods. Two new structure- based methods are proposed in current advances: AAN and Elastic Network Model (ENM) of enzyme structures. By concentrating on AAN-based approach, we herein summarized network properties for predictions of catalytic residues. AAN attributes were showed responsible for performance improvement, and therefore the combination of AAN with previous sequence and structural information will be a promising direction for further improvement. Advantages and limitations of AAN-based methods, future perspectives on the application of AAN to the study of protein structure-function relationships are discussed.

  3. Efficient production of optically pure L-lactic acid from food waste at ambient temperature by regulating key enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Chen, Yinguang; Zhao, Shu; Chen, Hong; Zheng, Xiong; Luo, Jinyang; Liu, Yanan

    2015-03-01

    Bio-production of optically pure L-lactic acid from food waste has attracted much interest as it can treat organic wastes with simultaneous recovery of valuable by-products. However, the yield of L-lactic acid was very low and no optically pure L-lactic acid was produced in the literature due to (1) the lower activity of enzymes involved in hydrolysis and L-lactic acid generation, and (2) the participation of other enzymes related to D-lactic acid and acetic and propionic acids production. In this paper, a new strategy was reported for effective production of optically pure L-lactic acid from food waste at ambient temperature, i.e. via regulating key enzyme activity by sewage sludge supplement and intermittent alkaline fermentation. It was found that not only optically pure L-lactic acid was produced, but the yield was enhanced by 2.89-fold. The mechanism study showed that the activities of enzymes relevant to food waste hydrolysis and lactic acid production were enhanced, and the key enzymes related to volatile fatty acids and D-lactic acid generations were severally decreased or inhibited. Also, the microbes responsible for L-lactic acid production were selectively proliferated. Finally, the pilot-scale continuous experiment was conducted to testify the feasibility of this new technique.

  4. Early lignin pathway enzymes and routes to chlorogenic acid in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.).

    PubMed

    Escamilla-Treviño, Luis L; Shen, Hui; Hernandez, Timothy; Yin, Yanbin; Xu, Ying; Dixon, Richard A

    2014-03-01

    Studying lignin biosynthesis in Panicum virgatum (switchgrass) has provided a basis for generating plants with reduced lignin content and increased saccharification efficiency. Chlorogenic acid (CGA, caffeoyl quinate) is the major soluble phenolic compound in switchgrass, and the lignin and CGA biosynthetic pathways potentially share intermediates and enzymes. The enzyme hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA: quinate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HQT) is responsible for CGA biosynthesis in tobacco, tomato and globe artichoke, but there are no close orthologs of HQT in switchgrass or in other monocotyledonous plants with complete genome sequences. We examined available transcriptomic databases for genes encoding enzymes potentially involved in CGA biosynthesis in switchgrass. The protein products of two hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (HCT) genes (PvHCT1a and PvHCT2a), closely related to lignin pathway HCTs from other species, were characterized biochemically and exhibited the expected HCT activity, preferring shikimic acid as acyl acceptor. We also characterized two switchgrass coumaroyl shikimate 3'-hydroxylase (C3'H) enzymes (PvC3'H1 and PvC3'H2); both of these cytochrome P450s had the capacity to hydroxylate 4-coumaroyl shikimate or 4-coumaroyl quinate to generate caffeoyl shikimate or CGA. Another switchgrass hydroxycinnamoyl transferase, PvHCT-Like1, is phylogenetically distant from HCTs or HQTs, but exhibits HQT activity, preferring quinic acid as acyl acceptor, and could therefore function in CGA biosynthesis. The biochemical features of the recombinant enzymes, the presence of the corresponding activities in plant protein extracts, and the expression patterns of the corresponding genes, suggest preferred routes to CGA in switchgrass.

  5. Assembly of Lipoic Acid on Its Cognate Enzymes: an Extraordinary and Essential Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Cronan, John E

    2016-06-01

    Although the structure of lipoic acid and its role in bacterial metabolism were clear over 50 years ago, it is only in the past decade that the pathways of biosynthesis of this universally conserved cofactor have become understood. Unlike most cofactors, lipoic acid must be covalently bound to its cognate enzyme proteins (the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases and the glycine cleavage system) in order to function in central metabolism. Indeed, the cofactor is assembled on its cognate proteins rather than being assembled and subsequently attached as in the typical pathway, like that of biotin attachment. The first lipoate biosynthetic pathway determined was that of Escherichia coli, which utilizes two enzymes to form the active lipoylated protein from a fatty acid biosynthetic intermediate. Recently, a more complex pathway requiring four proteins was discovered in Bacillus subtilis, which is probably an evolutionary relic. This pathway requires the H protein of the glycine cleavage system of single-carbon metabolism to form active (lipoyl) 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases. The bacterial pathways inform the lipoate pathways of eukaryotic organisms. Plants use the E. coli pathway, whereas mammals and fungi probably use the B. subtilis pathway. The lipoate metabolism enzymes (except those of sulfur insertion) are members of PFAM family PF03099 (the cofactor transferase family). Although these enzymes share some sequence similarity, they catalyze three markedly distinct enzyme reactions, making the usual assignment of function based on alignments prone to frequent mistaken annotations. This state of affairs has possibly clouded the interpretation of one of the disorders of human lipoate metabolism. PMID:27074917

  6. Production of 5-aminolevulinic acid by cell free multi-enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinglong; Zhang, Yanfei; Ju, Xiaozhi; Ma, Chunling; Ma, Hongwu; Chen, Jiuzhou; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Jibin; Zhu, Jun; Ma, Yanhe; Zhao, Xueming; Chen, Tao

    2016-05-20

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is the precursor for the biosynthesis of tetrapyrroles and has broad agricultural and medical applications. Currently ALA is mainly produced by chemical synthesis and microbial fermentation. Cell free multi-enzyme catalysis is a promising method for producing high value chemicals. Here we reported our work on developing a cell free process for ALA production using thermostable enzymes. Cheap substrates (succinate and glycine) were used for ALA synthesis by two enzymes: 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS) from Laceyella sacchari (LS-ALAS) and succinyl-CoA synthase (Suc) from Escherichia coli. ATP was regenerated by polyphosphate kinase (Ppk) using polyphosphate as the substrate. Succinate was added into the reaction system in a fed-batch mode to avoid its inhibition effect on Suc. After reaction for 160min, ALA concentration was increased to 5.4mM. This is the first reported work on developing the cell free process for ALA production. Through further process and enzyme optimization the cell free process could be an effective and economic way for ALA production.

  7. Plastid-localized amino acid biosynthetic pathways of Plantae are predominantly composed of non-cyanobacterial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Moustafa, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Studies of photosynthetic eukaryotes have revealed that the evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria involved the recruitment of non-cyanobacterial proteins. Our phylogenetic survey of >100 Arabidopsis nuclear-encoded plastid enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis identified only 21 unambiguous cyanobacterial-derived proteins. Some of the several non-cyanobacterial plastid enzymes have a shared phylogenetic origin in the three Plantae lineages. We hypothesize that during the evolution of plastids some enzymes encoded in the host nuclear genome were mistargeted into the plastid. Then, the activity of those foreign enzymes was sustained by both the plastid metabolites and interactions with the native cyanobacterial enzymes. Some of the novel enzymatic activities were favored by selective compartmentation of additional complementary enzymes. The mosaic phylogenetic composition of the plastid amino acid biosynthetic pathways and the reduced number of plastid-encoded proteins of non-cyanobacterial origin suggest that enzyme recruitment underlies the recompartmentation of metabolic routes during the evolution of plastids. PMID:23233874

  8. Enzyme-free translation of DNA into sequence-defined synthetic polymers structurally unrelated to nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Jia; Hili, Ryan; Liu, David R.

    2013-04-01

    The translation of DNA sequences into corresponding biopolymers enables the production, function and evolution of the macromolecules of life. In contrast, methods to generate sequence-defined synthetic polymers with similar levels of control have remained elusive. Here, we report the development of a DNA-templated translation system that enables the enzyme-free translation of DNA templates into sequence-defined synthetic polymers that have no necessary structural relationship with nucleic acids. We demonstrate the efficiency, sequence-specificity and generality of this translation system by oligomerizing building blocks including polyethylene glycol, α-(D)-peptides, and β-peptides in a DNA-programmed manner. Sequence-defined synthetic polymers with molecular weights of 26 kDa containing 16 consecutively coupled building blocks and 90 densely functionalized β-amino acid residues were translated from DNA templates using this strategy. We integrated the DNA-templated translation system developed here into a complete cycle of translation, coding sequence replication, template regeneration and re-translation suitable for the iterated in vitro selection of functional sequence-defined synthetic polymers unrelated in structure to nucleic acids.

  9. Photochemical synthesis of citric acid cycle intermediates based on titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Saladino, Raffaele; Brucato, John Robert; De Sio, Antonio; Botta, Giorgia; Pace, Emanuele; Gambicorti, Lisa

    2011-10-01

    The emergence of the citric acid cycle is one of the most remarkable occurrences with regard to understanding the origin and evolution of metabolic pathways. Although the chemical steps of the cycle are preserved intact throughout nature, diverse organisms make wide use of its chemistry, and in some cases organisms use only a selected portion of the cycle. However, the origins of this cycle would have arisen in the more primitive anaerobic organism or even back in the proto-metabolism, which likely arose spontaneously under favorable prebiotic chemical conditions. In this context, we report that UV irradiation of formamide in the presence of titanium dioxide afforded 6 of the 11 carboxylic acid intermediates of the reductive version of the citric acid cycle. Since this cycle is the central metabolic pathway of contemporary biology, this report highlights the role of photochemical processes in the origin of the metabolic apparatus.

  10. Synthesis of amino-acid derivatives and dipeptides with an original peptidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Auriol, D; Paul, F; Yoshpe, I; Gripon, J C; Monsan, P

    1991-01-01

    A peptidase from the non pathogenic Staphylococcus sp. strain BEC 299 was purified to a final specific activity of 84,400 U/mg protein. Its molecular weight is 450 kDa and optimum pH 10.0. This enzyme catalyzes the synthesis of dipeptides (aspartame) and alpha-amino acid derivatives (N-L-malyl-L-tyrosine ethyl ester). The influence of cosolvents and pH on dipeptides and alpha-amino acid derivative synthesis is described. Finally, we detail the use of the peptidase as a reagent in protease-catalyzed peptide synthesis.

  11. Enhanced production of polyunsaturated fatty acids by enzyme engineering of tandem acyl carrier proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shohei; Satoh, Yasuharu; Ujihara, Tetsuro; Takata, Yusuke; Dairi, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    In some microorganisms, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are biosynthesized by PUFA synthases characterized by tandem acyl carrier proteins (ACPs) in subunit A. These ACPs were previously shown to be important for PUFA productivity. In this study, we examined their function in more detail. PUFA productivities increased depending on the number of ACPs without profile changes in each subunit A of eukaryotic and prokaryotic PUFA synthases. We also constructed derivative enzymes from subunit A with 5 × ACPs. Enzymes possessing one inactive ACP at any position produced ~30% PUFAs compared with the parental enzyme but unexpectedly had ~250% productivity compared with subunit A with 4 × ACPs. Enzymes constructed by replacing the 3rd ACP with an inactive ACP from another subunit A or ACP-unrelated sequences produced ~100% and ~3% PUFAs compared with the parental 3rd ACP-inactive enzyme, respectively. These results suggest that both the structure and number of ACP domains are important for PUFA productivity. PMID:27752094

  12. Okadaic acid disrupts Golgi structure and impairs enzyme synthesis and secretion in the rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Waschulewski, I H; Kruse, M L; Agricola, B; Kern, H F; Schmidt, W E

    1996-06-01

    Okadaic acid, a serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, has been shown to inhibit rat pancreatic enzyme secretion by interference with late processes in stimulus-secretion coupling. To further characterize its action, we studied the effect of okadaic acid on secretion of newly synthesized proteins, protein synthesis, and cellular ultrastructure in pancreatic lobules derived from rats stimulated in vivo by feeding the synthetic proteinase inhibitor FOY-305. Okadaic acid completely blocked protein secretion at concentrations that inhibit the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase 2b, calcineurin. Protein synthesis was abolished at 10(-6) mol/l and reduced by 60% at 5 x 10(-7) mol/l okadaic acid. Pancreatic lobules exposed to 5 x 10(-7) mol/l okadaic acid for 20 min fully restored their secretory capacity on removal of the drug; whereas, after a preincubation with okadaic acid for > 40 min, protein secretion remained impaired during the recovery period. Electron microscopic examination of pancreatic acinar cells treated with 5 x 10(-7) mol/l okadaic acid revealed a dilated Golgi complex after 15 and 30 min and a subsequent fragmentation of Golgi cisternae into clouds of small uniform vesicles after 60 min. Reassembly of Golgi stacks occurred after a 60-min recovery without okadaic acid. These data indicate that serine/threonine phosphatases play an important role not only in the regulation of pancreatic enzyme synthesis and exocytosis but also are crucial for the maintenance of normal Golgi architecture and function in the exocrine rat pancreas. These effects are probably not exclusively mediated via type 2b calcineurin-like protein phosphatases.

  13. Plasmid control of 6-aminohexanoic acid cyclic dimer degradation enzymes of Flavobacterium sp. KI72.

    PubMed

    Negoro, S; Shinagawa, H; Nakata, A; Kinoshita, S; Hatozaki, T; Okada, H

    1980-07-01

    Flavobacterium sp. K172, which is able to grow on 6-aminohexanoic acid cyclic dimer as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, and plasmid control of the responsible enzymes, 6-aminohexanoic acid cyclic dimer hydrolase and 6-aminohexanoic acid linear oligomer hydrolase, were studied. The wild strain of K172 harbors three kinds of plasmid, pOAD1 (26.2 megadaltons), pOAD2 (28.8 megadaltons), and pOAD3 (37.2 megadaltons). The wild strain K172 was readily cured of its ability to grow on the cyclic dimer by mitomycin C, and the cyclic dimer hydrolase could not be detected either as catalytic activity or by antibody precipitation. No reversion of the cured strains was detected. pOAD2 was not detected in every cured strain tested but was restored in a transformant. The transformant recovered both of the enzyme activities, and the cyclic dimer hydrolase of the transformant was immunologically identical with that of the wild strain. All of the strains tested, including the wild, cured, and transformant ones, possessed identical pOAD3 irrespective of the metabolizing activity. Some of the cured strains possessed pOAD1 identical with the wild strain, but the others harbored plasmids with partially altered structures which were likely to be derived from pOAD1 by genetic rearrangements such as deletion, insertion, or substitution. These results suggested that the genes of the enzymes were borne on pOAD2.

  14. Plasmid Control of 6-Aminohexanoic Acid Cyclic Dimer Degradation Enzymes of Flavobacterium sp. K172

    PubMed Central

    Negoro, Seiji; Shinagawa, Hideo; Nakata, Atsuo; Kinoshita, Shinichi; Hatozaki, Tomoya; Okada, Hirosuke

    1980-01-01

    Flavobacterium sp. K172, which is able to grow on 6-aminohexanoic acid cyclic dimer as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, and plasmid control of the responsible enzymes, 6-aminohexanoic acid cyclic dimer hydrolase and 6-aminohexanoic acid linear oligomer hydrolase, were studied. The wild strain of K172 harbors three kinds of plasmid, pOAD1 (26.2 megadaltons), pOAD2 (28.8 megadaltons), and pOAD3 (37.2 megadaltons). The wild strain K172 was readily cured of its ability to grow on the cyclic dimer by mitomycin C, and the cyclic dimer hydrolase could not be detected either as catalytic activity or by antibody precipitation. No reversion of the cured strains was detected. pOAD2 was not detected in every cured strain tested but was restored in a transformant. The transformant recovered both of the enzyme activities, and the cyclic dimer hydrolase of the transformant was immunologically identical with that of the wild strain. All of the strains tested, including the wild, cured, and transformant ones, possessed identical pOAD3 irrespective of the metabolizing activity. Some of the cured strains possessed pOAD1 identical with the wild strain, but the others harbored plasmids with partially altered structures which were likely to be derived from pOAD1 by genetic rearrangements such as deletion, insertion, or substitution. These results suggested that the genes of the enzymes were borne on pOAD2. Images PMID:7400094

  15. Catalytic nucleic acid enzymes for the study and development of therapies in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Tritz, Richard; Habita, Cellia; Robbins, Joan M.; Gomez, German G.; Kruse, Carol A.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Nucleic acid enzymes have been used with great success for studying natural processes in the central nervous system (CNS). We first provide information on the structural and enzymatic differences of various ribozymes and DNAzymes. We then discuss how they have been used to explore new therapeutic approaches for treating diseases of the CNS. They have been tested in various systems modeling retinitis pigmentosum, proliferative vitreoretinopathy, Alzheimer's disease, and malignant brain tumors. For these models, effective targets for nucleic acid enzymes have been readily identified and the rules for selecting cleavage sites have been well established. The bulk of studies, including those from our laboratory, have emphasized their use for gliomas. With the availability of multiple excellent animal models to test glioma treatments, good progress has been made in the initial testing of nucleic acid enzymes for brain tumor therapy. However, opportunities still exist to significantly improve the delivery and efficacy of ribozymes to achieve effective treatment. The future holds significant potential for the molecular targeting and therapy of eye diseases, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors with these unique treatment agents. PMID:16467915

  16. Isocholic acid formation from 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid with human liver enzyme.

    PubMed

    Amuro, Y; Yamade, W; Yamamoto, T; Kudo, K; Fujikura, M; Maebo, A; Hada, T; Higashino, K

    1986-12-01

    The formation of isocholic acid from 7 alpha, 12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid by human liver preparations was examined in vitro. Liver preparations were incubated with 7 alpha, 12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid at pH 7.4 in a phosphate buffer containing NADPH or NADH. The products formed were analyzed by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results showed that 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid was reduced mainly to isocholic acid and to cholic acid in a smaller amount in the presence of NADPH, while it was reduced only to cholic acid in the presence of NADH. The reducing enzyme participating in the formation of isocholic acid was localized largely in the cytosol and had more specificity to the unconjugated form as substrate than to the conjugated forms. 3-Keto bile acid analogues, 3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic and 7 alpha-hydroxy-3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acids were not reduced to the corresponding iso-bile acids by the cytosol in the same conditions used in the isocholic acid formation and the activity of the enzyme catalyzing the reduction of 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid to isocholic acid was not inhibited by the addition of 3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid or 7 alpha-hydroxy-3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid to the reaction mixture. Furthermore, on column chromatography of Affi-Gel Blue, the peak of the enzyme catalyzing the reduction of 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid to isocholic acid was clearly distinguished from that of the enzyme catalyzing the reduction of 3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid to isolithocholic acid and that of alcohol dehydrogenase. These results indicate that this enzyme catalyzing the reduction of 7 alpha,12 alpha-dihydroxy-3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acid to isocholic acid is different from the enzyme(s) catalyzing the reduction 3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic and 7 alpha-hydroxy-3-keto-5 beta-cholanoic acids to the corresponding iso-bile acids

  17. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, M. Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J.; Jones, Patrik R.

    2013-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C6–C18) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C8–C16) or fatty alkanes (C7–C15) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L−1 was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C8–C18). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities. PMID:23248280

  18. Carboxylic acid reductase is a versatile enzyme for the conversion of fatty acids into fuels and chemical commodities.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M Kalim; Turner, Nicholas J; Jones, Patrik R

    2013-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons such as fatty alcohols and petroleum-derived alkanes have numerous applications in the chemical industry. In recent years, the renewable synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons has been made possible by engineering microbes to overaccumulate fatty acids. However, to generate end products with the desired physicochemical properties (e.g., fatty aldehydes, alkanes, and alcohols), further conversion of the fatty acid is necessary. A carboxylic acid reductase (CAR) from Mycobacterium marinum was found to convert a wide range of aliphatic fatty acids (C(6)-C(18)) into corresponding aldehydes. Together with the broad-substrate specificity of an aldehyde reductase or an aldehyde decarbonylase, the catalytic conversion of fatty acids to fatty alcohols (C(8)-C(16)) or fatty alkanes (C(7)-C(15)) was reconstituted in vitro. This concept was applied in vivo, in combination with a chain-length-specific thioesterase, to engineer Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains that were capable of synthesizing fatty alcohols and alkanes. A fatty alcohol titer exceeding 350 mg·L(-1) was obtained in minimal media supplemented with glucose. Moreover, by combining the CAR-dependent pathway with an exogenous fatty acid-generating lipase, natural oils (coconut oil, palm oil, and algal oil bodies) were enzymatically converted into fatty alcohols across a broad chain-length range (C(8)-C(18)). Together with complementing enzymes, the broad substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of CAR opens the road for direct and tailored enzyme-catalyzed conversion of lipids into user-ready chemical commodities. PMID:23248280

  19. Closed cycle ion exchange method for regenerating acids, bases and salts

    DOEpatents

    Dreyfuss, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    A method for conducting a chemical reaction in acidic, basic, or neutral solution as required and then regenerating the acid, base, or salt by means of ion exchange in a closed cycle reaction sequence which comprises contacting the spent acid, base, or salt with an ion exchanger, preferably a synthetic organic ion-exchange resin, so selected that the counter ions thereof are ions also produced as a by-product in the closed reaction cycle, and then regenerating the spent ion exchanger by contact with the by-product counter ions. The method is particularly applicable to closed cycle processes for the thermochemical production of hydrogen.

  20. The crystal structure of the adenylation enzyme VinN reveals a unique β-amino acid recognition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-11-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp(230) residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  1. The Crystal Structure of the Adenylation Enzyme VinN Reveals a Unique β-Amino Acid Recognition Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp230 residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  2. Induction of Arabidopsis tryptophan pathway enzymes and camalexin by amino acid starvation, oxidative stress, and an abiotic elicitor.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J; Williams, C C; Last, R L

    1998-01-01

    The tryptophan (Trp) biosynthetic pathway leads to the production of many secondary metabolites with diverse functions, and its regulation is predicted to respond to the needs for both protein synthesis and secondary metabolism. We have tested the response of the Trp pathway enzymes and three other amino acid biosynthetic enzymes to starvation for aromatic amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, or methionine. The Trp pathway enzymes and cytosolic glutamine synthetase were induced under all of the amino acid starvation test conditions, whereas methionine synthase and acetolactate synthase were not. The mRNAs for two stress-inducible enzymes unrelated to amino acid biosynthesis and accumulation of the indolic phytoalexin camalexin were also induced by amino acid starvation. These results suggest that regulation of the Trp pathway enzymes under amino acid deprivation conditions is largely a stress response to allow for increased biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Consistent with this hypothesis, treatments with the oxidative stress-inducing herbicide acifluorfen and the abiotic elicitor alpha-amino butyric acid induced responses similar to those induced by the amino acid starvation treatments. The role of salicylic acid in herbicide-mediated Trp and camalexin induction was investigated. PMID:9501110

  3. Nitric oxide inhibits specific enzymes in the Krebs cycle and the respiratory chain of rat hepatocyte mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, J.; Billiar, T.R.; Curran, R.D.; Kim, R.; Simmons, R.L. )

    1990-02-26

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly-reactive molecule produced from L-arginine as recently described. In macrophages and tumor cells, NO inhibits specific mitochondrial enzymes presumably by attacking their intrinsic 4Fe-4S centers. The susceptible enzymes include aconitase of the Krebs cycle and oxidoreductase (complex II) of the electron transport chain. The authors have recently demonstrated that hepatocytes (HC) produce NO in large amounts in response to endotoxin and inflammatory cytokines. To determine whether HC suffer a similar enzyme inhibition, the authors exposed rat HC to increasing concentrations of NO solutions for 5 minutes. The activity of aconitase, complex 1, complex 2, and complex 4 (cytochrome oxidase) was determined by measuring O{sub 2} consumption after addition of enzyme-specific substrates. An NO concentration-dependent inhibition of aconitase, complex 1, and complex 2 was measured. After exposure to 0.6 mM solution, the activity of aconitase was blocked to non-measurable values while complex 1 was reduced to 11 + 8%, and complex 2 to 36 + 2% of the activity of control HC. Complex 4 of the respiratory chain remained intact at 100 + 8%. These data indicate that HC, like other cell types, are susceptible to inhibition of important steps of energy production by NO. As NO is produced in response to septic stimuli, this mechanism may play a role in the metabolic dysfunction of HC in sepsis.

  4. Retinoic acid signalling centres in the avian embryo identified by sites of expression of synthesising and catabolising enzymes.

    PubMed

    Blentic, Aida; Gale, Emily; Maden, Malcolm

    2003-05-01

    Retinoic acid is an important signalling molecule in the developing embryo, but its precise distribution throughout development is very difficult to determine by available techniques. Examining the distribution of the enzymes by which it is synthesised by using in situ hybridisation is an alternative strategy. Here, we describe the distribution of three retinoic acid synthesising enzymes and one retinoic acid catabolic enzyme during the early stages of chick embryogenesis with the intention of identifying localized retinoic acid signalling regions. The enzymes involved are Raldh1, Raldh2, Raldh3, and Cyp26A1. Although some of these distributions have been described before, here we assemble them all in one species and several novel sites of enzyme expression are identified, including Hensen's node, the cardiac endoderm, the presumptive pancreatic endoderm, and the dorsal lens. This study emphasizes the dynamic pattern of expression of the enzymes that control the availability of retinoic acid as well as the role that retinoic acid plays in the development of many regions of the embryo throughout embryogenesis. This strategy provides a basis for understanding the phenotypes of retinoic acid teratology and retinoic acid-deficiency syndromes.

  5. Effects of intermediate metabolite carboxylic acids of TCA cycle on Microcystis with overproduction of phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shijie; Dai, Jingcheng; Xia, Ming; Ruan, Jing; Wei, Hehong; Yu, Dianzhen; Li, Ronghui; Jing, Hongmei; Tian, Chunyuan; Song, Lirong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-04-01

    Toxic Microcystis species are the main bloom-forming cyanobacteria in freshwaters. It is imperative to develop efficient techniques to control these notorious harmful algal blooms (HABs). Here, we present a simple, efficient, and environmentally safe algicidal way to control Microcystis blooms, by using intermediate carboxylic acids from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The citric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, and malic acid all exhibited strong algicidal effects, and particularly succinic acid could cause the rapid lysis of Microcystis in a few hours. It is revealed that the Microcystis-lysing activity of succinic acid and other carboxylic acids was due to their strong acidic activity. Interestingly, the acid-lysed Microcystis cells released large amounts of phycocyanin, about 27-fold higher than those of the control. On the other hand, the transcription of mcyA and mcyD of the microcystin biosynthesis operon was not upregulated by addition of alpha-ketoglutaric acid and other carboxylic acids. Consider the environmental safety of intermediate carboxylic acids. We propose that administration of TCA cycle organic acids may not only provide an algicidal method with high efficiency and environmental safety but also serve as an applicable way to produce and extract phycocyanin from cyanobacterial biomass.

  6. Study and comparison of two enzyme membrane reactors for fatty acids and glycerol production

    SciTech Connect

    Molinari, R.; Santoro, M.E.; Drioli, E. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Inst. on Membranes and Chemical Reactors-CNR, Arcavacata di Rende )

    1994-11-01

    Two enzyme membrane reactors (EMR), (1) with one substrate (olive oil) in an oil-in-water emulsion (E-EMR) and (2) with two separated liquid phases (oil and water) (TSLP-EMR), have been studied for the conversion of the triglycerides to fatty acids and glycerol. The enzyme was Candida cylindracea lipase confined on the pressurized face or entrapped in the sponge side of capillary ultrafiltration membranes. Two methods for immobilizing the enzyme in the TSLP-EMR were used: ultrafiltration on a virgin membrane and ultrafiltration on glutaraldehyde pretreated membranes. A multiple use of the reactor was obtained immobilizing the enzyme on the membrane preactivated with glutaraldehyde. The TSLP-EMR showed a specific activity of 0.529 mmol/(mg[center dot]h) versus a specific activity of 0.170 mmol/(mg[center dot]h) of the E-EMR. The rate of fatty acid production in the TSLP-EMR was linear with time showing no enzyme deactivation in an operating time of 80 h. The kinetics observed in the two reactors was different: an equilibrium reaction product-inhibited for the E-EMR and an apparent irreversible reaction of zero order for the TSLP-EMR. Taking into account that in the TSLP-EMR, compared to the E-EMR, (1) the specific activity was higher, (2) the specific rate was constant with the time, and (3) the two products were already separated after the reaction, the TSLP-EMR configuration seems the more convenient.

  7. Impact of repeated dry-wet cycles on soil greenhouse gas emissions, extracellular enzyme activity and nutrient cycling in a temperate forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Sonja; Zimmermann, Michael; Bockholt, Jan; Schartner, Markus; Brugner, Paul; Holtermann, Christian; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2014-05-01

    Climate change research predicts that both frequency and intensity of weather extremes such as long drought periods and heavy rainfall events will increase in mid Europe over the next decades. Soil moisture is one of the major factors controlling microbial soil processes, and it has been widely agreed that feedback effects between altered precipitation and changed soil fluxes of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4 and N2O could intensify climate change. In a field experiment in an Austrian beech forest, we established a precipitation manipulation experiment, which will be conducted for 3 years. We use roofs to exclude rainfall from reaching the forest soil and simulate drought periods, and a sprinkler system to simulate heavy rainfall events. We applied repeated dry-wet cycles in two intensities: one treatment received 6 cycles of 1 month drought followed by 75mm irrigation within 2 hours, and a parallel treatment received 3 cycles of 2 months drought followed by 150mm irrigation within 3 hours. We took soil samples 1 day before, 1 day after and 1 week after rewetting events and analyzed them for soil nutrients and extracellular enzyme activities. Soil fluxes of CO2, N2O and CH4 were constantly monitored with an automated flux chamber system, and environmental parameters were recorded via dataloggers. In addition, we determined fluxes and nutrient concentrations of bulk precipitation, throughfall, stemflow, litter percolate and soil water. Next we plan to analyze soil microbial community composition via PLFAs to investigate microbial stress resistance and resilience, and we will use ultrasonication to measure soil aggregate stability and protection of soil organic matter in stressed and control plots. The results of the first year show that experimental rainfall manipulation has influenced soil extracellular enzymes. Potential phenoloxidase activity was significantly reduced in stressed treatments compared to control plots. All measured hydrolytic enzymes (cellulase

  8. Identification of the algal dimethyl sulfide-releasing enzyme: A missing link in the marine sulfur cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcolombri, Uria; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Feldmesser, Ester; Levin, Yishai; Tawfik, Dan S.; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-06-01

    Algal blooms produce large amounts of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), a volatile with a diverse signaling role in marine food webs that is emitted to the atmosphere, where it can affect cloud formation. The algal enzymes responsible for forming DMS from dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) remain unidentified despite their critical role in the global sulfur cycle. We identified and characterized Alma1, a DMSP lyase from the bloom-forming algae Emiliania huxleyi. Alma1 is a tetrameric, redox-sensitive enzyme of the aspartate racemase superfamily. Recombinant Alma1 exhibits biochemical features identical to the DMSP lyase in E. huxleyi, and DMS released by various E. huxleyi isolates correlates with their Alma1 levels. Sequence homology searches suggest that Alma1 represents a gene family present in major, globally distributed phytoplankton taxa and in other marine organisms.

  9. Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Supplement on Antioxidant Enzymes Activity in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    TOORANG, Fatemeh; DJAZAYERY, Abolghassem; DJALALI, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is a major cause of death. Oxidative stress mainly caused by hyperglycemia is the primary reason of related complications. Omega-3 fatty acids are prescribed in diabetes but the effect on antioxidant defense is controversial. This study investigated effects of omega-3 supplementation on antioxidant enzymes activity in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: A randomized, placebo controlled, double blind clinical trial was performed on 90 type2 diabetic patients. The treatment group took, daily, three capsules of omega-3 for two mo, which totally provided 2714mg omega-3 (EPA=1548 mg, DHA=828 mg and 338 mg of other omega=3 fatty acids). Placebo contained 2100 mg sunflower oil (12% SFA, 65% linoleic acid, 23% MUFA), which is the main oil used in the study population. Food intakes, anthropometric and demographic characteristics, and therapeutic regimen data were recorded before and after the intervention. Fasting blood samples were taken before and after the intervention to measure super oxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, catalase and total antioxidant capacity in erythrocytes. Results: A total of 81 subjects completed the study. Two study groups were similar as regards duration of diabetes, age and the enzymes at baseline. Energy and macro- and micronutrients intakes, weight and hypoglycemic agent consumption were similar in the two groups at baseline and did not change. Supplementation had no effect on antioxidant enzyme status. Glycated hemoglobin showed a significant reduction by supplementation. Conclusion: Daily supplementation of 2714 mg mega-3 for two mo results in a significant reduction in HbA1c level in type2 diabetic patients with no effects on antioxidant enzymes activity. PMID:27141496

  10. Experiment K-7-21: Effect of Microgravity on 1: Metabolic Enzymes of Type 1 and Type 2 Muscle Fibers, and on 2: Metabolic Enzymes, Neurotransmitter Amino Acids, and Neurotransmitter Associated Enzymes in Selected Regions of the Central Nervous System. Part 2; The Distribution of Selected Enzymes and Amino Acids in the Hippocampal Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O. H.; Krasnov, I.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Nemeth, P. M.; McDougal, D. B., Jr.; Choksi, R.; Carter, J. G.; Chi, M. M. Y.; Manchester, J. K.; Pusateri, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Six key metabolic enzymes plus glutaminase and glutamate decarboxylase, as well as glutamate, aspartate and GABA, were measured in 11 regions of the hippocampal formation of synchronous, flight and tail suspension rats. Major differences were observed in the normal distribution patterns of each enzyme and amino acid, but no substantive effects of either microgravity or tail suspension on these patterns were clearly demonstrated.

  11. Dissecting Proton Delocalization in an Enzyme's Hydrogen Bond Network with Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yufan; Fried, Stephen D; Boxer, Steven G

    2015-12-01

    Extended hydrogen bond networks are a common structural motif of enzymes. A recent analysis proposed quantum delocalization of protons as a feature present in the hydrogen bond network spanning a triad of tyrosines (Y(16), Y(32), and Y(57)) in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), contributing to its unusual acidity and large isotope shift. In this study, we utilized amber suppression to substitute each tyrosine residue with 3-chlorotyrosine to test the delocalization model and the proton affinity balance in the triad. X-ray crystal structures of each variant demonstrated that the structure, notably the O-O distances within the triad, was unaffected by 3-chlorotyrosine substitutions. The changes in the cluster's acidity and the acidity's isotope dependence in these variants were assessed via UV-vis spectroscopy and the proton sharing pattern among individual residues with (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance. Our data show pKa detuning at each triad residue alters the proton delocalization behavior in the H-bond network. The extra stabilization energy necessary for the unusual acidity mainly comes from the strong interactions between Y(57) and Y(16). This is further enabled by Y(32), which maintains the right geometry and matched proton affinity in the triad. This study provides a rich picture of the energetics of the hydrogen bond network in enzymes for further model refinement. PMID:26571340

  12. Dissecting Proton Delocalization in an Enzyme's Hydrogen Bond Network with Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yufan; Fried, Stephen D; Boxer, Steven G

    2015-12-01

    Extended hydrogen bond networks are a common structural motif of enzymes. A recent analysis proposed quantum delocalization of protons as a feature present in the hydrogen bond network spanning a triad of tyrosines (Y(16), Y(32), and Y(57)) in the active site of ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), contributing to its unusual acidity and large isotope shift. In this study, we utilized amber suppression to substitute each tyrosine residue with 3-chlorotyrosine to test the delocalization model and the proton affinity balance in the triad. X-ray crystal structures of each variant demonstrated that the structure, notably the O-O distances within the triad, was unaffected by 3-chlorotyrosine substitutions. The changes in the cluster's acidity and the acidity's isotope dependence in these variants were assessed via UV-vis spectroscopy and the proton sharing pattern among individual residues with (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance. Our data show pKa detuning at each triad residue alters the proton delocalization behavior in the H-bond network. The extra stabilization energy necessary for the unusual acidity mainly comes from the strong interactions between Y(57) and Y(16). This is further enabled by Y(32), which maintains the right geometry and matched proton affinity in the triad. This study provides a rich picture of the energetics of the hydrogen bond network in enzymes for further model refinement.

  13. Distribution of Two C Cycle Enzymes in Soil Aggregates of a Prairie Chronosequence

    SciTech Connect

    Fansler, Sarah J.; Smith, Jeffery L.; Bolton, Harvey; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2005-11-01

    Recently attention has focused on the potential of using soil as a sink for atmospheric CO2. The objective of this study was to use soil enzymes and classical methods of soil aggregate fractionation to explore the relationship between microbial community function and soil structure of a tallgrass prairie chronosequence. The soils within the chronosequence were: (1) remnant native prairie, (2) agricultural soil, and (3, 4) tallgrass prairies restored from agriculture in 1979 and 1993. β-glucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.21) and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase (NAGase, EC 3.2.1.30) assays were conducted on four different aggregate size fractions (>2 mm, 1 -2 mm, 250µm-1 mm, and 2 - 250 µm) from each soil. Specific activities for both enzymes (µg PNP g-1 soil h-1) were greatest in the microaggregate (2 µm -250 µm) fractions across the chronosequence; however, this size fraction makes up only a small proportion of the whole soil. Therefore, it is the larger macroaggregate-derived enzyme activities that have the greatest impact on the activity of the whole soil. Analyzing both enzymes and the physical structure, a reversion from an agricultural soil through the restored to more like the prairie soil, was not detected. It appears that the function of these microbial community systems in the native tallgrass prairie and agricultural soils of the chronosequence are in equilibria while the lands restored to tallgrass prairie are in an ongoing state of recovery.

  14. The activity of Krebs cycle enzymes in the visual analyzer of rats in the norm and under stress.

    PubMed

    Lutsenko, N S; Yakushev, V S

    1993-01-01

    Higher activity of the NAD-dependent dehydrogenases of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TAC) is observed in the optic retina, and of FAD-dependent dehydrogenases in the occipital lobes of the brain, in the visual analyzer of intact rats. The influence of stress using Desiderato's method induces a compensatory increase in the activity of succinate dehydrogenase. Acute stress induces a change in the regulation of the activity of the TAC dehydrogenases, assessed on the basis of the reaction to functional load. The animals' remaining in the dark following stress promotes the restoration of the activity of the TAC cycle to the normal level. PMID:8413911

  15. Antioxidant enzymes and fatty acid composition as related to disease resistance in postharvest loquat fruit.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shifeng; Yang, Zhenfeng; Cai, Yuting; Zheng, Yonghua

    2014-11-15

    Two cultivars of loquat fruit were stored at 20°C for 10days to investigate the relationship between disease resistance, and fatty acid composition and activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. The results showed that decay incidence increased with storage time in both cultivars. A significantly lower disease incidence was observed in 'Qingzhong' fruit than in 'Fuyang', suggesting 'Qingzhong' had increased disease resistance. Meanwhile, 'Qingzhong' fruit also had lower levels of superoxide radical and hydrogen peroxide, and lower lipoxygenase activity, but higher levels of linolenic and linoleic acids and higher activities of catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) compared with 'Fuyang'. These results suggest that the higher levels of linolenic and linoleic acids and the higher activity of CAT and APX have a role in disease resistance of postharvest loquat fruit.

  16. Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle-Dependent Attenuation of Staphylococcus aureus In Vivo Virulence by Selective Inhibition of Amino Acid Transport▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yefei; Xiong, Yan Q.; Sadykov, Marat R.; Fey, Paul D.; Lei, Mei G.; Lee, Chia Y.; Bayer, Arnold S.; Somerville, Greg A.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading causes of endovascular infections worldwide. Commonly, these infections involve the formation of biofilms on the surface of biomaterials. Biofilms are a complex aggregation of bacteria commonly encapsulated by an adhesive exopolysaccharide matrix. In staphylococci, this exopolysaccharide matrix is composed of polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA). PIA is synthesized when the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is repressed. The inverse correlation between PIA synthesis and TCA cycle activity led us to hypothesize that increasing TCA cycle activity would decrease PIA synthesis and biofilm formation and reduce virulence in a rabbit catheter-induced model of biofilm infection. TCA cycle activity can be induced by preventing staphylococci from exogenously acquiring a TCA cycle-derived amino acid necessary for growth. To determine if TCA cycle induction would decrease PIA synthesis in Staphylococcus aureus, the glutamine permease gene (glnP) was inactivated and TCA cycle activity, PIA accumulation, biofilm forming ability, and virulence in an experimental catheter-induced endovascular biofilm (endocarditis) model were determined. Inactivation of this major glutamine transporter increased TCA cycle activity, transiently decreased PIA synthesis, and significantly reduced in vivo virulence in the endocarditis model in terms of achievable bacterial densities in biofilm-associated cardiac vegetations, kidneys, and spleen. These data confirm the close linkage of TCA cycle activity and virulence factor production and establish that this metabolic linkage can be manipulated to alter infectious outcomes. PMID:19667045

  17. In vitro evidence that D-serine disturbs the citric acid cycle through inhibition of citrate synthase activity in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Angela; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Viegas, Carolina Maso; Knebel, Lisiane Aurélio; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Moura, Alana Pimentel; Wajner, Moacir

    2009-11-17

    The present work investigated the in vitro effects of D-serine (D-Ser) on important parameters of energy metabolism in cerebral cortex of young rats. The parameters analyzed were CO(2) generation from glucose and acetate, glucose uptake and the activities of the respiratory chain complexes I-IV, of the citric acid cycle enzymes citrate synthase, aconitase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, fumarase and malate dehydrogenase and of creatine kinase and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Our results show that D-Ser significantly reduced CO(2) production from acetate, but not from glucose, reflecting an impairment of the citric acid cycle function. Furthermore, D-Ser did not affect glucose uptake. We also observed that the activity of the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase from mitochondrial preparations and purified citrate synthase was significantly inhibited by D-Ser, whereas the other activities of the citric acid cycle as well as the activities of complexes I-III, II-III, II and IV of the respiratory chain, creatine kinase and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were not affected by this D-amino acid. We also found that L-serine did not affect citrate synthase activity from mitochondrial preparations and purified enzyme. The data indicate that D-Ser impairs the citric acid cycle activity via citrate synthase inhibition, therefore compromising energy metabolism production in cerebral cortex of young rats. Therefore, it is presumed that this mechanism may be involved at least in part in the neurological damage found in patients affected by disorders in which D-Ser metabolism is impaired, with altered cerebral concentrations of this D-amino acid.

  18. Combined Effects of Lanthanum (III) and Acid Rain on Antioxidant Enzyme System in Soybean Roots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Du, Yuping; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua; Sun, Zhaoguo

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element pollution (REEs) and acid rain (AR) pollution simultaneously occur in many regions, which resulted in a new environmental issue, the combined pollution of REEs and AR. The effects of the combined pollution on the antioxidant enzyme system of plant roots have not been reported. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum ion (La3+), one type of REE, and AR on the antioxidant enzyme system of soybean roots were investigated. In the combined treatment of La3+ (0.08 mM) and AR, the cell membrane permeability and the peroxidation of cell membrane lipid of soybean roots increased, and the superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and reduced ascorbic acid served as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. In other combined treatments of La3+ (0.40 mM, 1.20 mM) and AR, the membrane permeability, malonyldialdehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content increased, while the catalase activity decreased. The increased superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content were inadequate to scavenge the excess hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, leading to the damage of the cell membrane, which was aggravated with the increase in the concentration of La3+ and the level of AR. The deleterious effects of the combined treatment of La3+ and AR were stronger than those of the single treatment of La3+ or AR. Moreover, the activity of antioxidant enzyme system in the combined treatment group was affected directly and indirectly by mineral element content in soybean plants. PMID:26230263

  19. Combined Effects of Lanthanum (III) and Acid Rain on Antioxidant Enzyme System in Soybean Roots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Du, Yuping; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua; Sun, Zhaoguo

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element pollution (REEs) and acid rain (AR) pollution simultaneously occur in many regions, which resulted in a new environmental issue, the combined pollution of REEs and AR. The effects of the combined pollution on the antioxidant enzyme system of plant roots have not been reported. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum ion (La3+), one type of REE, and AR on the antioxidant enzyme system of soybean roots were investigated. In the combined treatment of La3+ (0.08 mM) and AR, the cell membrane permeability and the peroxidation of cell membrane lipid of soybean roots increased, and the superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and reduced ascorbic acid served as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. In other combined treatments of La3+ (0.40 mM, 1.20 mM) and AR, the membrane permeability, malonyldialdehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content increased, while the catalase activity decreased. The increased superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content were inadequate to scavenge the excess hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, leading to the damage of the cell membrane, which was aggravated with the increase in the concentration of La3+ and the level of AR. The deleterious effects of the combined treatment of La3+ and AR were stronger than those of the single treatment of La3+ or AR. Moreover, the activity of antioxidant enzyme system in the combined treatment group was affected directly and indirectly by mineral element content in soybean plants.

  20. Combined Effects of Lanthanum (III) and Acid Rain on Antioxidant Enzyme System in Soybean Roots

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuanbo; Du, Yuping; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua; Sun, Zhaoguo

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth element pollution (REEs) and acid rain (AR) pollution simultaneously occur in many regions, which resulted in a new environmental issue, the combined pollution of REEs and AR. The effects of the combined pollution on the antioxidant enzyme system of plant roots have not been reported. Here, the combined effects of lanthanum ion (La3+), one type of REE, and AR on the antioxidant enzyme system of soybean roots were investigated. In the combined treatment of La3+ (0.08 mM) and AR, the cell membrane permeability and the peroxidation of cell membrane lipid of soybean roots increased, and the superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and reduced ascorbic acid served as scavengers of reactive oxygen species. In other combined treatments of La3+ (0.40 mM, 1.20 mM) and AR, the membrane permeability, malonyldialdehyde content, superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content increased, while the catalase activity decreased. The increased superoxide dismutase activity, peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbic acid content were inadequate to scavenge the excess hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, leading to the damage of the cell membrane, which was aggravated with the increase in the concentration of La3+ and the level of AR. The deleterious effects of the combined treatment of La3+ and AR were stronger than those of the single treatment of La3+ or AR. Moreover, the activity of antioxidant enzyme system in the combined treatment group was affected directly and indirectly by mineral element content in soybean plants. PMID:26230263

  1. Stoichiometry of Reducing Equivalents and Splitting of Water in the Citric Acid Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madeira, Vitor M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a solution to the problem of finding the source of extra reducing equivalents, and accomplishing the stoichiometry of glucose oxidation reactions. Discusses the citric acid cycle and glycolysis. (CW)

  2. Importance of ALDH1A enzymes in determining human testicular retinoic acid concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Samuel L.; Kent, Travis; Hogarth, Cathryn A.; Schlatt, Stefan; Prasad, Bhagwat; Haenisch, Michael; Walsh, Thomas; Muller, Charles H.; Griswold, Michael D.; Amory, John K.; Isoherranen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, is required for spermatogenesis and many other biological processes. RA formation requires irreversible oxidation of retinal to RA by aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes of the 1A family (ALDH1A). While ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3 all form RA, the expression pattern and relative contribution of these enzymes to RA formation in the testis is unknown. In this study, novel methods to measure ALDH1A protein levels and intrinsic RA formation were used to accurately predict RA formation velocities in individual human testis samples and an association between RA formation and intratesticular RA concentrations was observed. The distinct localization of ALDH1A in the testis suggests a specific role for each enzyme in controlling RA formation. ALDH1A1 was found in Sertoli cells, while only ALDH1A2 was found in spermatogonia, spermatids, and spermatocytes. In the absence of cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP)1, ALDH1A1 was predicted to be the main contributor to intratesticular RA formation, but when CRBP1 was present, ALDH1A2 was predicted to be equally important in RA formation as ALDH1A1. This study provides a comprehensive novel methodology to evaluate RA homeostasis in human tissues and provides insight to how the individual ALDH1A enzymes mediate RA concentrations in specific cell types. PMID:25502770

  3. A novel enzyme-based acidizing system: Matrix acidizing and drilling fluid damage removal

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, R.E.; McKay, D.M.; Moses, V.

    1995-12-31

    A novel acidizing process is used to increase the permeability of carbonate rock cores in the laboratory and to remove drilling fluid damage from cores and wafers. Field results show the benefits of the technology as applied both to injector and producer wells.

  4. Oligomeric structure of proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase: evolution of a hydrolytic enzyme in clavulanic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Elkins, Jonathan M; Clifton, Ian J; Hernández, Helena; Doan, Linh X; Robinson, Carol V; Schofield, Christopher J; Hewitson, Kirsty S

    2002-01-01

    During biosynthesis of the clinically used beta-lactamase inhibitor clavulanic acid, one of the three steps catalysed by clavaminic acid synthase is separated from the other two by a step catalysed by proclavaminic acid amidino hydrolase (PAH), in which the guanidino group of an intermediate is hydrolysed to give proclavaminic acid and urea. PAH shows considerable sequence homology with the primary metabolic arginases, which hydrolyse arginine to ornithine and urea, but does not accept arginine as a substrate. Like other members of the bacterial sub-family of arginases, PAH is hexameric in solution and requires Mn2+ ions for activity. Other metal ions, including Co2+, can substitute for Mn2+. Two new substrates for PAH were identified, N-acetyl-(L)-arginine and (3R)-hydroxy-N-acetyl-(L)-arginine. Crystal structures of PAH from Streptomyces clavuligerus (at 1.75 A and 2.45 A resolution, where 1 A=0.1 nm) imply how it binds beta-lactams rather than the amino acid substrate of the arginases from which it evolved. The structures also suggest how PAH selects for a particular alcohol intermediate in the clavam biosynthesis pathway. As observed for the arginases, each PAH monomer consists of a core of beta-strands surrounded by alpha-helices, and its active site contains a di-Mn2+ centre with a bridging water molecule responsible for hydrolytic attack on to the guanidino group of the substrate. Comparison of structures obtained under different conditions reveals different conformations of a flexible loop, which must move to allow substrate binding. PMID:12020346

  5. Reactive oxygen species production and antioxidant enzyme expression after Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle induction in Raji cell line.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, Bochra; Nasr, Rihab; ben Mansour, Riadh; Lassoued, Saloua; Mseddi, Malek; Attia, Hammadi; El Feki, Abd el Fatteh; Van Pelt, Jos

    2011-12-01

    In a previous study, we have described oxidative stress during Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle induction. Oxidative stress was evidenced by the observed high MDA levels and the decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes. We hypothesised that the lower activities of the antioxidant enzymes decrease were the result of either the excessive production of reactive oxygen radical species (ROS) or a negative regulation of the antioxidant enzyme gene expressions. In an attempt to clarify this situation, EBV lytic cycle was induced in Raji cell line by a non-stressing dose of 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. BZLF-1, superoxide dismutase, and catalase gene expressions were then analysed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, simultaneously at a kinetic of 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h. ROS production was evaluated by chemiluminescence. A study was conducted to establish whether ROS production, BZLF-1, and the expression of antioxidant genes were inter-correlated. Induction of the lytic cycle resulted in increased expressions of the genes of superoxide dismutase and catalase, which began at 24 h (p < 0.05) and reached a peak at 48 h (p < 0.05). Significant increases of the ROS levels were observed in TPA-treated Raji cell line at 12 h, as compared with untreated cells, reaching a peak at 48 h after EBV lytic cycle induction. ROS production correlates positively with BZLF-1, SOD, and CAT gene expressions (p < 0.05; r = 0.913, r = 0.978, and r = 0.955, respectively). A positive correlation was also observed between BZLF-1 and antioxidant gene expressions (p < 0.05; r = 0.961 and r = 0.987, respectively). In conclusion, the observed increases of the SOD and CAT gene expressions eliminate the hypothesis of a repression of the respective genes during the induction of the lytic cycle. On the other hand, the observed direct correlation between the BZLF-1 gene expression and the ROS production is indicative of a role of this gene in oxidative stress.

  6. Azospirillum brasilense Produces the Auxin-Like Phenylacetic Acid by Using the Key Enzyme for Indole-3-Acetic Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Somers, E.; Ptacek, D.; Gysegom, P.; Srinivasan, M.; Vanderleyden, J.

    2005-01-01

    An antimicrobial compound was isolated from Azospirillum brasilense culture extracts by high-performance liquid chromatography and further identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as the auxin-like molecule, phenylacetic acid (PAA). PAA synthesis was found to be mediated by the indole-3-pyruvate decarboxylase, previously identified as a key enzyme in indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production in A. brasilense. In minimal growth medium, PAA biosynthesis by A. brasilense was only observed in the presence of phenylalanine (or precursors thereof). This observation suggests deamination of phenylalanine, decarboxylation of phenylpyruvate, and subsequent oxidation of phenylacetaldehyde as the most likely pathway for PAA synthesis. Expression analysis revealed that transcription of the ipdC gene is upregulated by PAA, as was previously described for IAA and synthetic auxins, indicating a positive feedback regulation. The synthesis of PAA by A. brasilense is discussed in relation to previously reported biocontrol properties of A. brasilense. PMID:15812004

  7. Hydrogen Storage in the Carbon Dioxide - Formic Acid Cycle.

    PubMed

    Fink, Cornel; Montandon-Clerc, Mickael; Laurenczy, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    This year Mankind will release about 39 Gt carbon dioxide into the earth's atmosphere, where it acts as a greenhouse gas. The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important, as the CO(2) concentration in the atmosphere has reached 400 ppm. One approach to contribute to the decrease of this hazardous emission is to recycle CO(2), for example reducing it to formic acid. The hydrogenation of CO(2) can be achieved with a series of catalysts under basic and acidic conditions, in wide variety of solvents. To realize a hydrogen-based charge-discharge device ('hydrogen battery'), one also needs efficient catalysts for the reverse reaction, the dehydrogenation of formic acid. Despite of the fact that the overwhelming majority of these reactions are carried out using precious metals-based catalysts (mainly Ru), we review here developments for catalytic hydrogen evolution from formic acid with iron-based complexes. PMID:26842324

  8. Uncertainty of Prebiotic Scenarios: The Case of the Non-Enzymatic Reverse Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubarev, Dmitry Yu; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-01-01

    We consider the hypothesis of the primordial nature of the non-enzymatic reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle and describe a modeling approach to quantify the uncertainty of this hypothesis due to the combinatorial aspect of the constituent chemical transformations. Our results suggest that a) rTCA cycle belongs to a degenerate optimum of auto-catalytic cycles, and b) the set of targets for investigations of the origin of the common metabolic core should be significantly extended.

  9. Relationship of lipogenic enzyme activities to the rate of rat liver fatty acid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, G.; Kelley, D.; Schmidt, P.; Virk, S.; Serrato, C.

    1986-05-01

    The mechanism by which diet regulates liver lipogenesis is unclear. Here the authors report how dietary alterations effect the activities of key enzymes of fatty acid (FA) synthesis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, 400-500 g, were fasted for 48h and then refed a fat-free, high carbohydrate (HC) diet (75% cal. from sucrose) for 0,3,9,24 and 48h, or refed a HC diet for 48h, then fed a high-fat (HF) diet (44% cal. from corn oil) for 3,9,24 and 48h. The FA synthesis rate and the activities of acetyl CoA carboxylase (AC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), ATP citrate lyase (CL), and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) were determined in the livers. FA synthesis was assayed with /sup 3/H/sub 2/O, enzyme activities were measured spectrophotometrically except for AC which was assayed with /sup 14/C-bicarbonate. There was no change in the activity of AC during fasting or on the HC diet. Fasting decreased the rate of FA synthesis by 25% and the activities of FAS and CL by 50%; refeeding the HC diet induced parallel changes in FA synthesis and the activities of FAS, CL, and G6PDH. After 9h on the HF diet, FA synthesis had decreased sharply, AC activity increased significantly while no changes were detected in the other activities. Subsequently FA synthesis did not change while the activities of the enzymes decreased slowly. These enzymes did not appear to regulate FA synthesis during inhibition of lipogenesis, but FAS, CL or G6PDH may be rate limiting in the induction phase. Other key factors may regulate FA synthesis during dietary alterations.

  10. Amino Acid Pools and Metabolism During the Cell Division Cycle of Arginine-Grown Candida utilis

    PubMed Central

    Nurse, P.; Wiemken, A.

    1974-01-01

    Synchronous cultures obtained by isopycnic density gradient centrifugation are used to investigate amino acid metabolism during the cell division cycle of the food yeast Candida utilis. Isotopic labeling experiments demonstrate that the rates of uptake and catabolism of arginine, the sole source of nitrogen, double abruptly during the first half of the cycle, while the cells undergo bud expansion. This is accompanied by a doubling in rate of amino acid biosynthesis, and an accumulation of amino acids. The accumulation probably occurs within the storage pools of the vacuoles. Amino acids derived from protein degradation contribute little to this accumulation. For the remainder of the cell cycle, during cell separation and until the next bud initiation, the rates of uptake and catabolism of arginine and amino acid biosynthesis remain constant. Despite the abrupt doubling in the rate of formation of amino acid pools, their rate of utilization for macromolecular synthesis increases steadily throughout the cycle. The significance of this temporal organization of nitrogen source uptake and amino acid metabolism during the cell division cycle is discussed. Images PMID:4591945

  11. New insights in nutritional management and amino acid supplementation in urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Sodium phenylbutyrate is used in the pharmacological treatment of urea cycle disorders to create alternative pathways for nitrogen excretion. The primary metabolite, phenylacetate, conjugates glutamine in the liver and kidney to form phenylacetylglutamine that is readily excreted in the urine. Patients with urea cycle disorders taking sodium phenylbutyrate have a selective reduction in the plasma concentrations of branched chain amino acids despite adequate dietary protein intake. Moreover, this depletion is usually the harbinger of a metabolic crisis. Plasma branched chain amino acids and other essential amino acids were measured in control subjects, untreated ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency females, and treated patients with urea cycle disorders (ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and argininosuccinate synthetase deficiency) in the absorptive state during the course of stable isotope studies. Branched chain amino acid levels were significantly lower in treated patients with urea cycle disorders when compared to untreated ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency females or control subjects. These results were replicated in control subjects who had low steady-state branched chain amino acid levels when treated with sodium phenylbutyrate. These studies suggested that alternative pathway therapy with sodium phenylbutyrate causes a substantial impact on the metabolism of branched chain amino acids in patients with urea cycle disorders, implying that better titration of protein restriction can be achieved with branched chain amino acid supplementation in these patients who are on alternative pathway therapy.

  12. Enzymes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle in the anterior cingulate cortex in postmortem brain of subjects with autism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that dysfunction in the glutamatergic system may underlie the pathophysiology of autism. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) has been implicated in autism as well as in glutamatergic neurotransmission. We hypothesized that alterations in the glutamate-glutamine cycle in the ACC might play a role in the pathophysiology of autism. Methods We performed Western blot analyses for the protein expression levels of enzymes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle, including glutamine synthetase, kidney-type glutaminase, liver-type glutaminase, and glutamate dehydrogenases 1 and 2, in the ACC of postmortem brain of individuals with autism (n = 7) and control subjects (n = 13). Results We found that the protein levels of kidney-type glutaminase, but not those of the other enzymes measured, in the ACC were significantly lower in subjects with autism than in controls. Conclusion The results suggest that reduced expression of kidney-type glutaminase may account for putative alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission in the ACC in autism. PMID:23531457

  13. Isolation and compositional analysis of a CP12-associated complex of calvin cycle enzymes from Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Marri, Lucia; Sparla, Francesca; Salvucci, Michael E

    2011-06-01

    Two Calvin Cycle enzymes, NAD(P)-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) form a multiprotein complex with CP12, a small intrinsically-unstructured protein. Under oxidizing conditions, association with CP12 confers redox-sensitivity to the otherwise redox-insensitive A isoform of GAPDH (GapA) and provides an additional level of down-regulation to the redox-regulated PRK. To determine if CP12-mediated regulation is specific for GAPDH and PRK in vivo, a high molecular weight complex containing CP12 was isolated from tobacco chloroplasts and leaves and its protein composition was characterized. Gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analyses after separation of stromal proteins by size fractionation verified that the GAPDH (both isoforms) and PRK co-migrated with CP12 in dark- but not light-adapted chloroplasts. Nano-liquid-chromatography-mass-spectrometry of the isolated complex identified only CP12, GAPDH and PRK. Since nearly all of the CP12 from darkened chloroplasts migrates with GADPH and PRK as a high molecular mass species, these data indicate that the tight association of tobacco CP12 with GAPDH and PRK is specific and involves no other Calvin Cycle enzymes.

  14. Characterization of two Streptomyces enzymes that convert ferulic acid to vanillin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenwen; Tang, Hongzhi; Ni, Jun; Wu, Qiulin; Hua, Dongliang; Tao, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Production of flavors from natural substrates by microbial transformation has become a growing and expanding field of study over the past decades. Vanillin, a major component of vanilla flavor, is a principal flavoring compound used worldwide. Streptomyces sp. strain V-1 is known to be one of the most promising microbial producers of natural vanillin from ferulic acid. Although identification of the microbial genes involved in the biotransformation of ferulic acid to vanillin has been previously reported, purification and detailed characterization of the corresponding enzymes with important functions have rarely been studied. In this study, we isolated and identified 2 critical genes, fcs and ech, encoding feruloyl-CoA synthetase and enoyl-CoA hydratase/aldolase, respectively, which are involved in the vanillin production from ferulic acid. Both genes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resting cell reactions for converting ferulic acid to vanillin were performed. The corresponding crucial enzymes, Fcs and Ech, were purified for the first time and the enzymatic activity of each purified protein was studied. Furthermore, Fcs was comprehensively characterized, at an optimal pH of 7.0 and temperature of 30°C. Kinetic constants for Fcs revealed the apparent Km, kcat, and Vmax values to be 0.35 mM, 67.7 s(-1), and 78.2 U mg(-1), respectively. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) value of Fcs was 193.4 mM(-1) s(-1) for ferulic acid. The characterization of Fcs and Ech may be helpful for further research in the field of enzymatic engineering and metabolic regulation.

  15. Characterization of Two Streptomyces Enzymes That Convert Ferulic Acid to Vanillin

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wenwen; Tang, Hongzhi; Ni, Jun; Wu, Qiulin; Hua, Dongliang; Tao, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Production of flavors from natural substrates by microbial transformation has become a growing and expanding field of study over the past decades. Vanillin, a major component of vanilla flavor, is a principal flavoring compound used worldwide. Streptomyces sp. strain V-1 is known to be one of the most promising microbial producers of natural vanillin from ferulic acid. Although identification of the microbial genes involved in the biotransformation of ferulic acid to vanillin has been previously reported, purification and detailed characterization of the corresponding enzymes with important functions have rarely been studied. In this study, we isolated and identified 2 critical genes, fcs and ech, encoding feruloyl-CoA synthetase and enoyl-CoA hydratase/aldolase, respectively, which are involved in the vanillin production from ferulic acid. Both genes were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resting cell reactions for converting ferulic acid to vanillin were performed. The corresponding crucial enzymes, Fcs and Ech, were purified for the first time and the enzymatic activity of each purified protein was studied. Furthermore, Fcs was comprehensively characterized, at an optimal pH of 7.0 and temperature of 30°C. Kinetic constants for Fcs revealed the apparent Km, kcat, and Vmax values to be 0.35 mM, 67.7 s−1, and 78.2 U mg−1, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) value of Fcs was 193.4 mM−1 s−1 for ferulic acid. The characterization of Fcs and Ech may be helpful for further research in the field of enzymatic engineering and metabolic regulation. PMID:23840666

  16. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors modulate kynurenic acid production in rat brain cortex in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zakrocka, Izabela; Turski, Waldemar A; Kocki, Tomasz

    2016-10-15

    It is well established that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is present in the brain and that glutamate activates the brain centers responsible for blood pressure control. An antagonist of glutamate, kynurenic acid (KYNA) was shown to decrease blood pressure after intracerebral administration. KYNA is an endogenous metabolite of tryptophan produced from the breakdown of kynurenine by kynurenine aminotransferases (KAT), mainly within astrocytes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of three angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (lisinopril, perindopril and ramipril) on KYNA production and KAT activity in the rat brain cortex in vitro. The effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on KYNA production was examined on rat brain cortical slices incubated for 2h in the presence of l-kynurenine and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. To analyze KAT I and KAT II activity, brain cortical homogenates were incubated for 2h with L-kynurenine and the tested drugs. KYNA was separated by HPLC and quantified fluorometrically. Among the examined angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, lisinopril increased KYNA production, perindopril was ineffective, and ramipril decreased KYNA synthesis in rat brain cortical slices. Lisinopril increased KAT I activity and perindopril did not affect it. However, ramipril lowered KAT I activity in rat brain cortex in vitro. Neither lisinopril nor perindopril affected KAT II activity, but ramipril decreased KAT II activity in the rat brain cortex in vitro. Our study reveals that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors show various influences on KYNA production in rat brain cortical slices and activity of KATs.

  17. Isolation of a multi-enzyme complex of fatty acid oxidation from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Binstock, J F; Pramanik, A; Schulz, H

    1977-01-01

    A multi-enzyme complex of fatty acid oxidation has been isolated from E. coli B cells and has been purified to near homogeneity by a simple two-step procedure. The complex exhibits thiolase (EC 2.3.1.9), enoyl-CoA hydratase (EC 4.2.1.17), and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.35) activities towards short-, medium-, and long-chain substrates. The complex has been estimated to have a molecular weight of approximately 300,000 and is apparently composed of two types of subunits with molecular weights of 78,000 and 42,000. Images PMID:322129

  18. Gluconeogenic carbon flow of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is critical for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish and maintain infection

    PubMed Central

    Marrero, Joeli; Rhee, Kyu Y.; Schnappinger, Dirk; Pethe, Kevin; Ehrt, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation to the host niche is a defining feature of the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In vitro, Mtb is able to grow on a variety of carbon sources, but mounting evidence has implicated fatty acids as the major source of carbon and energy for Mtb during infection. When bacterial metabolism is primarily fueled by fatty acids, biosynthesis of sugars from intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle is essential for growth. The role of gluconeogenesis in the pathogenesis of Mtb however remains unaddressed. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) catalyzes the first committed step of gluconeogenesis. We applied genetic analyses and 13C carbon tracing to confirm that PEPCK is essential for growth of Mtb on fatty acids and catalyzes carbon flow from tricarboxylic acid cycle–derived metabolites to gluconeogenic intermediates. We further show that PEPCK is required for growth of Mtb in isolated bone marrow–derived murine macrophages and in mice. Importantly, Mtb lacking PEPCK not only failed to replicate in mouse lungs but also failed to survive, and PEPCK depletion during the chronic phase of infection resulted in mycobacterial clearance. Mtb thus relies on gluconeogenesis throughout the infection. PEPCK depletion also attenuated Mtb in IFNγ-deficient mice, suggesting that this enzyme represents an attractive target for chemotherapy. PMID:20439709

  19. Co-Localization of GABA Shunt Enzymes for the Efficient Production of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid via GABA Shunt Pathway in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pham, Van Dung; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-04-28

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid, which is an important inhibitor of neurotransmission in the human brain. GABA is also used as the precursor of biopolymer Nylon-4 production. In this study, the carbon flux from the tricarboxylic acid cycle was directed to the GABA shunt pathway for the production of GABA from glucose. The GABA shunt enzymes succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GabD) and GABA aminotransferase (GabT) were co-localized along with the GABA transporter (GadC) by using a synthetic scaffold complex. The co-localized enzyme scaffold complex produced 0.71 g/l of GABA from 10 g/l of glucose. Inactivation of competing metabolic pathways in mutant E. coli strains XBM1 and XBM6 increased GABA production 13% to reach 0.80 g/l GABA by the enzymes co-localized and expressed in the mutant strains. The recombinant E. coli system developed in this study demonstrated the possibility of the pathway of the GABA shunt as a novel GABA production pathway.

  20. Legacy effects overwhelm the short-term effects of exotic plant invasion and restoration on soil microbial community structure, enzyme activities, and nitrogen cycling.

    PubMed

    Elgersma, Kenneth J; Ehrenfeld, Joan G; Yu, Shen; Vor, Torsten

    2011-11-01

    Plant invasions can have substantial consequences for the soil ecosystem, altering microbial community structure and nutrient cycling. However, relatively little is known about what drives these changes, making it difficult to predict the effects of future invasions. In addition, because most studies compare soils from uninvaded areas to long-established dense invasions, little is known about the temporal dependence of invasion impacts. We experimentally manipulated forest understory vegetation in replicated sites dominated either by exotic Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii), native Viburnums, or native Vacciniums, so that each vegetation type was present in each site-type. We compared the short-term effect of vegetation changes to the lingering legacy effects of the previous vegetation type by measuring soil microbial community structure (phospholipid fatty acids) and function (extracellular enzymes and nitrogen mineralization). We also replaced the aboveground litter in half of each plot with an inert substitute to determine if changes in the soil microbial community were driven by aboveground or belowground plant inputs. We found that after 2 years, the microbial community structure and function was largely determined by the legacy effect of the previous vegetation type, and was not affected by the current vegetation. Aboveground litter removal had only weak effects, suggesting that changes in the soil microbial community and nutrient cycling were driven largely by belowground processes. These results suggest that changes in the soil following either invasion or restoration do not occur quickly, but rather exhibit long-lasting legacy effects from previous belowground plant inputs. PMID:21618010

  1. Inhibitory activities of 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid analogs on phytogrowth and enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Y; Tsujibo, H; Hirai, Y; Yamada, T; Numata, A; Inamori, Y

    1999-11-01

    Five 2-pyridinecarboxylic acid-related compounds (1, 2 and 5-7) showed germination inhibition against the seed of Brassica campestris L. subsp. rapa HOOK fil et ANDERS at a concentration of 5.0 x 10(-4) M. These compounds also demonstrated inhibitory activity on the growth of the root of this plant at a concentration of 3.0 x 10(-4) M; among these compounds, 2-pyridylacetic acid (5) showed the strongest inhibitory activity, and the effect was slightly stronger than that of sodium 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D) used as a positive control. The amounts of chlorophyll in the cotyledons of this plant treated with these active compounds was lower than that of the control group. Four compounds (1 and 5-7) with germination inhibition also showed inhibitory activities against alpha-amylase and carboxypeptidase A, and 5 was the strongest inhibitor toward both enzymes.

  2. Guanine nanowire based amplification strategy: Enzyme-free biosensing of nucleic acids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhong Feng; Huang, Yan Li; Ren, Wang; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2016-04-15

    Sensitive and specific detection of nucleic acids and proteins plays a vital role in food, forensic screening, clinical and environmental monitoring. There remains a great challenge in the development of signal amplification method for biomolecules detection. Herein, we describe a novel signal amplification strategy based on the formation of guanine nanowire for quantitative detection of nucleic acids and proteins (thrombin) at room temperature. In the presence of analytes and magnesium ions, the guanine nanowire could be formed within 10 min. Compared to the widely used single G-quadruplex biocatalytic label unit, the detection limits are improved by two orders of magnitude in our assay. The proposed enzyme-free method avoids fussy chemical label-ling process, complex programming task, and sophisticated equipment, which might provide an ideal candidate for the fabrication of selective and sensitive biosensing platform.

  3. The citric acid-modified, enzyme-resistant dextrin from potato starch as a potential prebiotic.

    PubMed

    Sliżewska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, enzyme-resistant dextrin, prepared by heating of potato starch in the presence of hydrochloric (0.1% dsb) and citric (0.1% dsb) acid at 130ºC for 3 h (CA-dextrin), was tested as a source of carbon for probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria cultured with intestinal bacteria isolated from feces of three healthy 70-year old volunteers. The dynamics of growth of bacterial monocultures in broth containing citric acid (CA)-modified dextrin were estimated. It was also investigated whether lactobacilli and bifidobacteria cultured with intestinal bacteria in the presence of resistant dextrin would be able to dominate the intestinal isolates. Prebiotic fermentation of resistant dextrin was analyzed using prebiotic index (PI). In co-cultures of intestinal and probiotic bacteria, the environment was found to be dominated by the probiotic strains of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, which is a beneficial effect.

  4. Molecular characterization of the Calvin cycle enzyme phosphoribulokinase in the stramenopile alga Vaucheria litorea and the plastid hosting mollusc Elysia chlorotica.

    PubMed

    Rumpho, Mary E; Pochareddy, Sirisha; Worful, Jared M; Summer, Elizabeth J; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Pelletreau, Karen N; Tyler, Mary S; Lee, Jungho; Manhart, James R; Soule, Kara M

    2009-11-01

    Phosphoribulokinase (PRK), a nuclear-encoded plastid-localized enzyme unique to the photosynthetic carbon reduction (Calvin) cycle, was cloned and characterized from the stramenopile alga Vaucheria litorea. This alga is the source of plastids for the mollusc (sea slug) Elysia chlorotica which enable the animal to survive for months solely by photoautotrophic CO2 fixation. The 1633-bp V. litorea prk gene was cloned and the coding region, found to be interrupted by four introns, encodes a 405-amino acid protein. This protein contains the typical bipartite target sequence expected of nuclear-encoded proteins that are directed to complex (i.e. four membrane-bound) algal plastids. De novo synthesis of PRK and enzyme activity were detected in E. chlorotica in spite of having been starved of V. litorea for several months. Unlike the algal enzyme, PRK in the sea slug did not exhibit redox regulation. Two copies of partial PRK-encoding genes were isolated from both sea slug and aposymbiotic sea slug egg DNA using PCR. Each copy contains the nucleotide region spanning exon 1 and part of exon 2 of V. litorea prk, including the bipartite targeting peptide. However, the larger prk fragment also includes intron 1. The exon and intron sequences of prk in E. chlorotica and V. litorea are nearly identical. These data suggest that PRK is differentially regulated in V. litorea and E. chlorotica and at least a portion of the V. litorea nuclear PRK gene is present in sea slugs that have been starved for several months.

  5. Characterization of inulin hydrolyzing enzyme(s) in commercial glucoamylases and its application in lactic acid production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Jat).

    PubMed

    Dao, Thai Ha; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2013-11-01

    A high inulinase activity was found in three commercially available glucoamylase enzymes. Its origin was investigated and two proteins in the commercial glucoamylases were identified as the potential enzymes showing inulinase activity. One of the commercial glucoamylases, GA-L New from Genencor, was used for Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Jat) hydrolysis and a high hydrolysis yield of fructose was obtained. The simultaneous saccharification and lactic acid fermentation (SSF) of Jat was carried out using GA-L New as the inulinase and Pediococcus acidilactici DQ2 as the fermenting strain. A high lactic acid titer, yield, and productivity of 111.5 g/L, 0.46 g/g DM, and 1.55 g/L/h, respectively, were obtained within 72 h. The enzyme cost using the commercial glucoamylase as inulinase was compared to that using the typical inulinase and a large profit margin was identified. The results provided a practical way of Jat application for lactic acid production using cheap commercial glucoamylase enzyme.

  6. Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid profile of starry flounder Platichthys stellatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhidong; Wang, Jiying; Qiao, Hongjin; Li, Peiyu; Zhang, Limin; Xia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Ontogenetic changes in digestive enzyme activities and the amino acid (AA) profile of starry flounder, Platichthys stellatus, were investigated and limiting amino acids were estimated compared with the essential AA profile between larvae and live food to clarify starry flounder larval nutritional requirements. Larvae were collected at the egg stage and 0, 2, 4, 7, 12, 17, 24 days after hatching (DAH) for analysis. Larvae grew from 1.91 mm at hatching to 12.13 mm at 24 DAH. Trypsin and chymotrypsin activities changed slightly by 4 DAH and then increased significantly 4 DAH. Pepsin activity increased sharply beginning 17 DAH. Lipase activity increased significantly 4 DAH and increased progressively with larval growth. Amylase activity was also detected in newly hatched larvae and increased 7 DAH followed by a gradual decrease. High free amino acid (FAA) content was detected in starry flounder eggs (110.72 mg/g dry weight). Total FAA content dropped to 43.29 mg/g in 4-DAH larvae and then decreased gradually to 13.74 mg/g in 24-DAH larvae. Most FAAs (except lysine and methionine) decreased >50% in 4-DAH larvae compared with those in eggs and then decreased to the lowest values in 24-DAH larvae. Changes in the protein amino acid (PAA) profile were much milder than those observed for FAAs. Most PAAs increased gradually during larval development, except lysine and phenylalanine. The percentages of free threonine, valine, isoleucine, and leucine decreased until the end of the trial, whereas the protein forms of these four AAs followed the opposite trend. A comparison of the essential AA composition of live food (rotifers, Artemia nauplii, and Artemia metanauplii) and larvae suggested that methionine was potentially the first limiting AA. These results may help develop starry flounder larviculture methods by solving the AA imbalance in live food. Moreover, the increased digestive enzyme activities indicate the possibility of introducing artificial compound feed.

  7. Characterization of fatty acid modifying enzyme activity in staphylococcal mastitis isolates and other bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fatty acid modifying enzyme (FAME) has been shown to modify free fatty acids to alleviate their bactericidal effect by esterifying fatty acids to cholesterol or alcohols. Although it has been shown in previous studies that FAME is required for Staphylococcus aureus survival in skin abscesses, FAME is poorly studied compared to other virulence factors. FAME activity had also been detected in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS). However, FAME activity was only surveyed after a bacterial culture was grown for 24 h. Therefore if FAME activity was earlier in the growth phase, it would not have been detected by the assay and those strains would have been labeled as FAME negative. Results Fifty CNS bovine mastitis isolates and several S. aureus, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus uberis strains were assayed for FAME activity over 24 h. FAME activity was detected in 54% of CNS and 80% S. aureus strains surveyed but none in E. coli or S. uberis. While some CNS strains produced FAME activity comparable to the lab strain of S. aureus, the pattern of FAME activity varied among strains and across species of staphylococci. All CNS that produced FAME activity also exhibited lipase activity. Lipase activity relative to colony forming units of these CNS decreased over the 24 h growth period. No relationship was observed between somatic cell count in the milk and FAME activity in CNS. Conclusions Some staphylococcal species surveyed produced FAME activity, but E. coli and S. uberis strains did not. All FAME producing CNS exhibited lipase activity which may indicate that both these enzymes work in concert to alter fatty acids in the bacterial environment. PMID:22726316

  8. Gluconic acid production from sucrose in an airlift reactor using a multi-enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Mafra, Agnes Cristina Oliveira; Furlan, Felipe Fernando; Badino, Alberto Colli; Tardioli, Paulo Waldir

    2015-04-01

    Sucrose from sugarcane is produced in abundance in Brazil, which provides an opportunity to manufacture other high-value products. Gluconic acid (GA) can be produced by multi-enzyme conversion of sucrose using the enzymes invertase, glucose oxidase, and catalase. In this process, one of the byproducts is fructose, which has many commercial applications. This work concerns the batch mode production of GA in an airlift reactor fed with sucrose as substrate. Evaluation was made of the influence of temperature and pH, as well as the thermal stability of the enzymes. Operational conditions of 40 °C and pH 6.0 were selected, based on the enzymatic activity profiles and the thermal stabilities. Under these conditions, the experimental data could be accurately described by kinetic models. The maximum yield of GA was achieved within 3.8 h, with total conversion of sucrose and glucose and a volumetric productivity of around 7.0 g L(-1) h(-1).

  9. Structural and Mechanistic Insight into the Listeria monocytogenes Two-enzyme Lipoteichoic Acid Synthesis System*

    PubMed Central

    Campeotto, Ivan; Percy, Matthew G.; MacDonald, James T.; Förster, Andreas; Freemont, Paul S.; Gründling, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acid (LTA) is an important cell wall component required for proper cell growth in many Gram-positive bacteria. In Listeria monocytogenes, two enzymes are required for the synthesis of this polyglycerolphosphate polymer. The LTA primase LtaPLm initiates LTA synthesis by transferring the first glycerolphosphate (GroP) subunit onto the glycolipid anchor and the LTA synthase LtaSLm extends the polymer by the repeated addition of GroP subunits to the tip of the growing chain. Here, we present the crystal structures of the enzymatic domains of LtaPLm and LtaSLm. Although the enzymes share the same fold, substantial differences in the cavity of the catalytic site and surface charge distribution contribute to enzyme specialization. The eLtaSLm structure was also determined in complex with GroP revealing a second GroP binding site. Mutational analysis confirmed an essential function for this binding site and allowed us to propose a model for the binding of the growing chain. PMID:25128528

  10. Continuous Decolorization of Acid Blue 62 Solution in an Enzyme Membrane Reactor.

    PubMed

    Lewańczuk, Marcin; Bryjak, Jolanta

    2015-09-01

    This paper focuses on using an enzyme membrane reactor (EMR) for the effective continuous decolorization of Acid Blue 62 (AB62). The following factors were considered for the effective use of Cerrena unicolor laccase immobilized in the EMR volume: the enzyme was stable in six successive runs in a batch reactor; no aeration was necessary; AB62 and the oxidized products were sorbed onto the membrane but were not rejected; and the enzyme was stable in the EMR system. It is obvious that any continuous process must be predictable, and thus, the objective was to verify the process model experimentally. For this reason, a proper isoenzyme kinetic equation was selected and the parameters were evaluated. The obtained kinetic parameters were used to plan processes and to verify their applicability to long-term AB62 decolorization, and a very good agreement between the calculated and the measured data was obtained. In the main designed continuous decolorization process, the conversion reached 98 % and was stable for 4 days. The membrane reactor with C. unicolor laccase appears to be very promising for AB62 decolorization.

  11. Biosynthesis of the mycotoxin tenuazonic acid by a fungal NRPS–PKS hybrid enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Choong-Soo; Motoyama, Takayuki; Osada, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Tenuazonic acid (TeA) is a well-known mycotoxin produced by various plant pathogenic fungi. However, its biosynthetic gene has been unknown to date. Here we identify the TeA biosynthetic gene from Magnaporthe oryzae by finding two TeA-inducing conditions of a low-producing strain. We demonstrate that TeA is synthesized from isoleucine and acetoacetyl-coenzyme A by TeA synthetase 1 (TAS1). TAS1 is a unique non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase (NRPS–PKS) hybrid enzyme that begins with an NRPS module. In contrast to other NRPS/PKS hybrid enzymes, the PKS portion of TAS1 has only a ketosynthase (KS) domain and this domain is indispensable for TAS1 activity. Phylogenetic analysis classifies this KS domain as an independent clade close to type I PKS KS domain. We demonstrate that the TAS1 KS domain conducts the final cyclization step for TeA release. These results indicate that TAS1 is a unique type of NRPS–PKS hybrid enzyme. PMID:26503170

  12. The pyruvate-tricarboxylic acid cycle node: a focal point of virulence control in the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bücker, René; Heroven, Ann Kathrin; Becker, Judith; Dersch, Petra; Wittmann, Christoph

    2014-10-24

    Despite our increasing knowledge of the specific pathogenicity factors in bacteria, the contribution of metabolic processes to virulence is largely unknown. Here, we elucidate a tight connection between pathogenicity and core metabolism in the enteric pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis by integrated transcriptome and [(13)C]fluxome analysis of the wild type and virulence-regulator mutants. During aerobic growth on glucose, Y. pseudotuberculosis reveals an unusual flux distribution with a high level of secreted pyruvate. The absence of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators RovA, CsrA, and Crp strongly perturbs the fluxes of carbon core metabolism at the level of pyruvate metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and these perturbations are accompanied by transcriptional changes in the corresponding enzymes. Knock-outs of regulators of this metabolic branch point and of its central enzyme, pyruvate kinase (ΔpykF), result in mutants with significantly reduced virulence in an oral mouse infection model. In summary, our work identifies the pyruvate-TCA cycle node as a focal point for controlling the host colonization and virulence of Yersinia.

  13. Effects of traditionally used anxiolytic botanicals on enzymes of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system.

    PubMed

    Awad, R; Levac, D; Cybulska, P; Merali, Z; Trudeau, V L; Arnason, J T

    2007-09-01

    In Canada, the use of botanical natural health products (NHPs) for anxiety disorders is on the rise, and a critical evaluation of their safety and efficacy is required. The purpose of this study was to determine whether commercially available botanicals directly affect the primary brain enzymes responsible for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) metabolism. Anxiolytic plants may interact with either glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or GABA transaminase (GABA-T) and ultimately influence brain GABA levels and neurotransmission. Two in vitro rat brain homogenate assays were developed to determine the inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of aqueous and ethanolic plant extracts. Approximately 70% of all extracts that were tested showed little or no inhibitory effect (IC50 values greater than 1 mg/mL) and are therefore unlikely to affect GABA metabolism as tested. The aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis (lemon balm) exhibited the greatest inhibition of GABA-T activity (IC50 = 0.35 mg/mL). Extracts from Centella asiatica (gotu kola) and Valeriana officinalis (valerian) stimulated GAD activity by over 40% at a dose of 1 mg/mL. On the other hand, both Matricaria recutita (German chamomile) and Humulus lupulus (hops) showed significant inhibition of GAD activity (0.11-0.65 mg/mL). Several of these species may therefore warrant further pharmacological investigation. The relation between enzyme activity and possible in vivo mode of action is discussed. PMID:18066140

  14. Ferulsinaic Acid Modulates SOD, GSH, and Antioxidant Enzymes in Diabetic Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Ahmed Amir Radwan

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of Ferulsinaic acid (FA) to modulate the antioxidant enzymes and to reduce oxidative stress induced-diabetic nephropathy (DN) was studied. Rats were fed diets enriched with sucrose (50%, wt/wt), lard (30%, wt/wt), and cholesterol (2.5%, wt/wt) for 8 weeks to induce insulin resistance. After a DN model was induced by streptozotocin; 5, 50 and 500 mg/kg of FA were administrated by oral intragastric intubation for 12 weeks. In FA-treated diabetic rats, glucose, kidney/body weight ratio, creatinine, BUN, albuminurea, and creatinine clearance were significantly decreased compared with non treated diabetic rats. Diabetic rats showed decreased activities of SOD and GSH; increased concentrations of malondialdehyde and IL-6 in the serum and kidney, and increased levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine in urine and renal cortex. FA-treatment restored the altered parameters in a dose-dependent manner. The ultra morphologic abnormalities in the kidney of diabetic rats were markedly ameliorated by FA treatment. Furthermore, FA acid was found to attenuate chronic inflammation induced by both Carrageenan and dextran in rats. We conclude that FA confers protection against injuries in the kidneys of diabetic rats by increasing activities of antioxidant enzymes and inhibiting accumulation of oxidized DNA in the kidney, suggesting a potential drug for the prevention and therapy of DN. PMID:22991571

  15. Methods for the isolation of genes encoding novel PHB cycle enzymes from complex microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Nordeste, Ricardo F; Trainer, Maria A; Charles, Trevor C

    2010-01-01

    Development of different PHAs as alternatives to petrochemically derived plastics can be facilitated by mining metagenomic libraries for diverse PHA cycle genes that might be useful for synthesis of bioplastics. The specific phenotypes associated with mutations of the PHA synthesis pathway genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti allows for the use of powerful selection and screening tools to identify complementing novel PHA synthesis genes. Identification of novel genes through their function rather than sequence facilitates finding functional proteins that may otherwise have been excluded through sequence-only screening methodology. We present here methods that we have developed for the isolation of clones expressing novel PHA metabolism genes from metagenomic libraries.

  16. Methods for the isolation of genes encoding novel PHB cycle enzymes from complex microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Nordeste, Ricardo F; Trainer, Maria A; Charles, Trevor C

    2010-01-01

    Development of different PHAs as alternatives to petrochemically derived plastics can be facilitated by mining metagenomic libraries for diverse PHA cycle genes that might be useful for synthesis of bioplastics. The specific phenotypes associated with mutations of the PHA synthesis pathway genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti allows for the use of powerful selection and screening tools to identify complementing novel PHA synthesis genes. Identification of novel genes through their function rather than sequence facilitates finding functional proteins that may otherwise have been excluded through sequence-only screening methodology. We present here methods that we have developed for the isolation of clones expressing novel PHA metabolism genes from metagenomic libraries. PMID:20830568

  17. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis FAS-II condensing enzymes: their role in mycolic acid biosynthesis, acid-fastness, pathogenesis and in future drug development.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Apoorva; Molle, Virginie; Besra, Gurdyal S; Jacobs, William R; Kremer, Laurent

    2007-06-01

    Mycolic acids are very long-chain fatty acids representing essential components of the mycobacterial cell wall. Considering their importance, characterization of key enzymes participating in mycolic acid biosynthesis not only allows an understanding of their role in the physiology of mycobacteria, but also might lead to the identification of new drug targets. Mycolates are synthesized by at least two discrete elongation systems, the type I and type II fatty acid synthases (FAS-I and FAS-II respectively). Among the FAS-II components, the condensing enzymes that catalyse the formation of carbon-carbon bonds have received considerable interest. Four condensases participate in initiation (mtFabH), elongation (KasA and KasB) and termination (Pks13) steps, leading to full-length mycolates. We present the recent biochemical and structural data for these important enzymes. Special emphasis is given to their role in growth, intracellular survival, biofilm formation, as well as in the physiopathology of tuberculosis. Recent studies demonstrated that phosphorylation of these enzymes by mycobacterial kinases affects their activities. We propose here a model in which kinases that sense environmental changes can phosphorylate the condensing enzymes, thus representing a novel mechanism of regulating mycolic acid biosynthesis. Finally, we discuss the attractiveness of these enzymes as valid targets for future antituberculosis drug development. PMID:17555433

  18. Phylogenetically-based variation in the regulation of the Calvin cycle enzymes, phosphoribulokinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, in algae.

    PubMed

    Maberly, Stephen C; Courcelle, Carine; Groben, Rene; Gontero, Brigitte

    2010-03-01

    Aquatic photosynthesis is responsible for about half of the global production and is undertaken by a huge phylogenetic diversity of algae that are poorly studied. The diversity of redox-regulation of phosphoribulokinase (PRK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was investigated in a wide range of algal groups under standard conditions. Redox-regulation of PRK was greatest in chlorophytes, low or absent in a red alga and most chromalveolates, and linked to the number of amino acids between two regulatory cysteine residues. GAPDH regulation was not strongly-related to the different forms of this enzyme and was less variable than for PRK. Addition of recombinant CP12, a protein that forms a complex with PRK and GAPDH, to crude extracts inhibited GAPDH and PRK inversely in the Plantae, but in most chromalveolates had little effect on GAPDH and inhibited or stimulated PRK depending on the species. Patterns of enzyme regulation were used to produce a phylogenetic tree in which cryptophytes and haptophytes, at the base of the chromalveolates, formed a distinct clade. A second clade comprised only chromalveolates. A third clade comprised a mixture of Plantae, an excavate and three chromalveolates: a marine diatom and two others (a xanthophyte and eustigmatophyte) that are distinguished by a low content of chlorophyll c and a lack of fucoxanthin. Regulation of both enzymes was greater in freshwater than in marine taxa, possibly because most freshwaters are more dynamic than oceans. This work highlights the importance of understanding enzyme regulation in diverse algae if their ecology and productivity is to be understood.

  19. Photoreduction fuels biogeochemical cycling of iron in Spain's acid rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gammons, C.H.; Nimick, D.A.; Parker, S.R.; Snyder, D.M.; McCleskey, R.B.; Amils, R.; Poulson, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    A number of investigations have shown that photoreduction of Fe(III) causes midday accumulations of dissolved Fe(II) in rivers and lakes, leading to large diel (24-h) fluctuations in the concentration and speciation of total dissolved iron. Less well appreciated is the importance of photoreduction in providing chemical energy for bacteria to thrive in low pH waters. Diel variations in water chemistry from the highly acidic (pH 2.3 to 3.1) Ri??o Tinto, Ri??o Odiel, and Ri??o Agrio of southwestern Spain (Iberian Pyrite Belt) resulted in daytime increases in Fe(II) concentration of 15 to 66????M at four diel sampling locations. Dissolved Fe(II) concentrations increased with solar radiation, and one of the stream sites showed an antithetic relationship between dissolved Fe(II) and Fe(III) concentrations; both results are consistent with photoreduction. The diel data were used to estimate rates of microbially catalyzed Fe(II) oxidation (1 to 3??nmol L- 1 s- 1) and maximum rates of Fe(III) photoreduction (1.7 to 4.3??nmol L- 1 s- 1). Bioenergetic calculations indicate that the latter rates are sufficient to build up a population of Fe-oxidizing bacteria to the levels observed in the Ri??o Tinto in about 30??days. We conclude that photoreduction plays an important role in the bioenergetics of the bacterial communities of these acidic rivers, which have previously been shown to be dominated by autotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans. Given the possibility of the previous existence of acidic, Fe(III)-rich water on Mars, photoreduction may be an important process on other planets, a fact that could have implications to astrobiological research. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Enzymes Catalyzing the Early Steps of Clavulanic Acid Biosynthesis Are Encoded by Two Sets of Paralogous Genes in Streptomyces clavuligerus

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Susan E.; Elder, Kenneth J.; Aidoo, Kwamena A.; Paradkar, Ashish S.

    2000-01-01

    Genes encoding the proteins required for clavulanic acid biosynthesis and for cephamycin biosynthesis are grouped into a “supercluster” in Streptomyces clavuligerus. Nine open reading frames (ORFs) associated with clavulanic acid biosynthesis were located in a 15-kb segment of the supercluster, including six ORFs encoding known biosynthetic enzymes or regulatory proteins, two ORFs that have been reported previously but whose involvement in clavulanic acid biosynthesis is unclear, and one ORF not previously reported. Evidence for the involvement of these ORFs in clavulanic acid production was obtained by generating mutants and showing that all were defective for clavulanic acid production when grown on starch asparagine medium. However, when five of the nine mutants, including mutants defective in known clavulanic acid biosynthetic enzymes, were grown in a soy-based medium, clavulanic acid-producing ability was restored. This ability to produce clavulanic acid when seemingly essential biosynthetic enzymes have been mutated suggests that paralogous genes encoding functionally equivalent proteins exist for each of the five genes but that these paralogues are expressed only in the soy-based medium. The five genes that have paralogues encode proteins involved in the early steps of the pathway common to the biosynthesis of both clavulanic acid and the other clavam metabolites produced by this organism. No evidence was seen for paralogues of the four remaining genes involved in late, clavulanic acid-specific steps in the pathway. PMID:10681345

  1. An alternative mechanism for guanidinoacetic acid to affect methylation cycle.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2014-12-01

    Guanidinoacetic acid (also known as glycocyamine; GAA) is an endogenous substance which occurs in humans and plays a central role in the biosynthesis of creatine. The formation of creatine from GAA consumes methyl groups, and increases production of homocysteine. GAA may have the potential to stimulate insulin secretion. Insulin reduces plasma homocysteine and raises methyl group supply. It is possible that the ability of GAA to trigger the insulin secretion modulates methyl group metabolism, and comparatively counterbalance for the direct effect of GAA on increased methylation demand. Possible insulinotropic effect of GAA may contribute to total in vivo methylation demand during biotransformation. PMID:25468046

  2. Derepression of certain aromatic amino acid biosynthetic enzymes of Escherichia coli K-12 by growth in Fe3+-deficient medium.

    PubMed Central

    McCray, J W; Herrmann, K M

    1976-01-01

    3-Deoxy-arabino-heptulosonic acid 7-phosphate synthase, prephenate dehydratase, tryptophan synthase, and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoylserine synthase enzyme activities are derepressed in wild-type Escherichia coli K-12 cells grown on Fe3+-deficient medium. This derepression is reversed when FeSO4 is added to the growth medium. Addition of shikimic acid to the Fe3+-deficient growth medium caused repression of the first three enzyme activities but not of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoylserine synthase activity. Addition of 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid to the Fe3+-deficient growth medium has no effect on any of the above-mentioned enzyme activities. The Fe3+ deficiency-mediated derepression of 3-deoxyarabino-heptulosonic acid 7-phosphate synthase activity is due to an elevation of the tyrosine-sensitive isoenzyme; the phenylalanine-sensitive isoenzyme is not derepressed under these conditions. PMID:1383

  3. Clostridium thermocellum releases coumaric acid during degradation of untreated grasses by the action of an unknown enzyme.

    PubMed

    Herring, Christopher D; Thorne, Philip G; Lynd, Lee R

    2016-03-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is an anaerobic thermophile with the ability to digest lignocellulosic biomass that has not been pretreated with high temperatures. Thermophilic anaerobes have previously been shown to more readily degrade grasses than wood. Part of the explanation for this may be the presence of relatively large amounts of coumaric acid in grasses, with linkages to both hemicellulose and lignin. We found that C. thermocellum and cell-free cellulase preparations both release coumaric acid from bagasse and switchgrass. Cellulase preparations from a mutant strain lacking the scaffoldin cipA still showed activity, though diminished. Deletion of all three proteins in C. thermocellum with ferulic acid esterase domains, either singly or in combination, did not eliminate the activity. Further work will be needed to identify the novel enzyme(s) responsible for the release of coumaric acid from grasses and to determine whether these enzymes are important factors of microbial biomass degradation.

  4. Structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids and T cell cycle blockade.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; DeLoose, Annick; Valentine, Jimmie L; Fifer, E Kim

    2006-04-01

    This study was designed to examine the potential structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids, histone acetylation and T cell cycle blockade. Toward this goal a series of structural homologues of the short-chain carboxylic acid n-butyrate were studied for their ability to block the IL-2-stimulated proliferation of cloned CD4+ T cells. The carboxylic acids were also tested for their ability to inhibit histone deacetylation. In addition, Western blotting was used to examine the relative capacity of the carboxlic acids to upregulate the cyclin kinase-dependent inhibitor p21cip1 in T cells. As shown earlier n-butyrate effectively inhibited histone deacetylation. The increased acetylation induced by n-butyrate was associated with the upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1 and the cell cycle blockade of CD4+ T cells. Of the other carboxylic acids studied, the short chain acids, C3-C5, without branching were the best inhibitors of histone deacetylase. This inhibition correlated with increased expression of the cell cycle blocker p21cip1, and the associated suppression of CD4+ T cell proliferation. The branched-chain carboxylic acids tested were ineffective in all the assays. These results underline the relationship between the ability of a carboxylic acid to inhibit histone deacetylation, and their ability to block T cell proliferation, and suggests that branching inhibits these effects.

  5. Highly sensitive and selective microRNA detection based on DNA-bio-bar-code and enzyme-assisted strand cycle exponential signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haifeng; Meng, Xiangdan; Dai, Wenhao; Cao, Yu; Lu, Huiting; Zhou, Shufeng; Zhang, Xueji

    2015-04-21

    Herein, a highly sensitive and selective microRNA (miRNA) detection strategy using DNA-bio-bar-code amplification (BCA) and Nb·BbvCI nicking enzyme-assisted strand cycle for exponential signal amplification was designed. The DNA-BCA system contains a locked nucleic acid (LNA) modified DNA probe for improving hybridization efficiency, while a signal reported molecular beacon (MB) with an endonuclease recognition site was designed for strand cycle amplification. In the presence of target miRNA, the oligonucleotides functionalized magnetic nanoprobe (MNP-DNA) and gold nanoprobe (AuNP-DNA) with numerous reported probes (RP) can hybridize with target miRNA, respectively, to form a sandwich structure. After sandwich structures were separated from the solution by the magnetic field, the RP were released under high temperature to recognize the MB and cleaved the hairpin DNA to induce the dissociation of RP. The dissociated RP then triggered the next strand cycle to produce exponential fluorescent signal amplification for miRNA detection. Under optimized conditions, the exponential signal amplification system shows a good linear range of 6 orders of magnitude (from 0.3 pM to 3 aM) with limit of detection (LOD) down to 52.5 zM, while the sandwich structure renders the system with high selectivity. Meanwhile, the feasibility of the proposed strategy for cell miRNA detection was confirmed by analyzing miRNA-21 in HeLa lysates. Given the high-performance for miRNA analysis, the strategy has a promising application in biological detection and in clinical diagnosis.

  6. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids: A new class of organic micropollutants in the water cycle.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Daniel; Frömel, Tobias; Knepper, Thomas P

    2016-09-15

    Mobile and persistent organic micropollutants may impact raw and drinking waters and are thus of concern for human health. To identify such possible substances of concern nineteen water samples from five European countries (France, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Spain and Germany) and different compartments of the water cycle (urban effluent, surface water, ground water and drinking water) were enriched with mixed-mode solid phase extraction. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry non-target screening of these samples led to the detection and structural elucidation of seven novel organic micropollutants. One structure could already be confirmed by a reference standard (trifluoromethanesulfonic acid) and six were tentatively identified based on experimental evidence (chloromethanesulfonic acid, dichloromethanesulfonic acid, trichloromethanesulfonic acid, bromomethanesulfonic acid, dibromomethanesulfonic acid and bromochloromethanesulfonic acid). Approximated concentrations for these substances show that trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, a chemical registered under the European Union regulation REACH with a production volume of more than 100 t/a, is able to spread along the water cycle and may be present in concentrations up to the μg/L range. Chlorinated and brominated methanesulfonic acids were predominantly detected together which indicates a common source and first experimental evidence points towards water disinfection as a potential origin. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids were detected in drinking waters and thus may be new substances of concern. PMID:27267477

  7. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids: A new class of organic micropollutants in the water cycle.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Daniel; Frömel, Tobias; Knepper, Thomas P

    2016-09-15

    Mobile and persistent organic micropollutants may impact raw and drinking waters and are thus of concern for human health. To identify such possible substances of concern nineteen water samples from five European countries (France, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Spain and Germany) and different compartments of the water cycle (urban effluent, surface water, ground water and drinking water) were enriched with mixed-mode solid phase extraction. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry non-target screening of these samples led to the detection and structural elucidation of seven novel organic micropollutants. One structure could already be confirmed by a reference standard (trifluoromethanesulfonic acid) and six were tentatively identified based on experimental evidence (chloromethanesulfonic acid, dichloromethanesulfonic acid, trichloromethanesulfonic acid, bromomethanesulfonic acid, dibromomethanesulfonic acid and bromochloromethanesulfonic acid). Approximated concentrations for these substances show that trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, a chemical registered under the European Union regulation REACH with a production volume of more than 100 t/a, is able to spread along the water cycle and may be present in concentrations up to the μg/L range. Chlorinated and brominated methanesulfonic acids were predominantly detected together which indicates a common source and first experimental evidence points towards water disinfection as a potential origin. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids were detected in drinking waters and thus may be new substances of concern.

  8. A novel efficient enzyme-immobilization reaction on NH2 polymers by means of L-ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Tiller, J; Berlin, P; Klemm, D

    1999-10-01

    A new enzyme-immobilization reaction by means of L-ascorbic acid (ASA) is described using NH(2) polymers based on cellulose or poly(vinyl alcohol) with the example of oxidoreductase enzymes. In this way, enzyme proteins such as glucose oxidase (GOD), glutamate oxidase, lactate oxidase, urate oxidase and peroxidase can be covalently fixed with a high surface loading to ultrathin and transparent NH(2)-polymer films if their surfaces are previously treated with an ASA solution, in, for example, N,N-dimethyl acetamide, DMSO or methanol. ASA then obviously reacts like a diketo compound with amino groups of the NH(2)-polymer film and enzyme protein, forming dehydroascorbic acid derivatives with neighbouring Schiff's-base structures. In a subsequent fragmentation reaction, the latter presumably form stable oxalic acid diamide derivatives as coupling structures between enzyme protein and NH(2)-polymer film, as suggested by results from investigations of the ASA reaction with n-butylamine. The immobilized enzymes can be stored at 4 degrees C in bidistilled water for at least 1 month without becoming detached from the NH(2)-polymer film and without diminished enzyme activity. The apparent K(m) values of the immobilized enzymes are in part clearly smaller than those of the dissolved enzymes or those found in other immobilization processes such as the diazo coupling or the bifunctional glutardialdehyde reaction. For example, the K(m) value of the immobilized GOD with different NH(2) polymers as the matrix structure is smaller by a factor of approx. 20 than that of the dissolved enzyme. PMID:10512795

  9. Prediction of Thermostability from Amino Acid Attributes by Combination of Clustering with Attribute Weighting: A New Vista in Engineering Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mansour; Lakizadeh, Amir; Agha-Golzadeh, Parisa; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2011-01-01

    The engineering of thermostable enzymes is receiving increased attention. The paper, detergent, and biofuel industries, in particular, seek to use environmentally friendly enzymes instead of toxic chlorine chemicals. Enzymes typically function at temperatures below 60°C and denature if exposed to higher temperatures. In contrast, a small portion of enzymes can withstand higher temperatures as a result of various structural adaptations. Understanding the protein attributes that are involved in this adaptation is the first step toward engineering thermostable enzymes. We employed various supervised and unsupervised machine learning algorithms as well as attribute weighting approaches to find amino acid composition attributes that contribute to enzyme thermostability. Specifically, we compared two groups of enzymes: mesostable and thermostable enzymes. Furthermore, a combination of attribute weighting with supervised and unsupervised clustering algorithms was used for prediction and modelling of protein thermostability from amino acid composition properties. Mining a large number of protein sequences (2090) through a variety of machine learning algorithms, which were based on the analysis of more than 800 amino acid attributes, increased the accuracy of this study. Moreover, these models were successful in predicting thermostability from the primary structure of proteins. The results showed that expectation maximization clustering in combination with uncertainly and correlation attribute weighting algorithms can effectively (100%) classify thermostable and mesostable proteins. Seventy per cent of the weighting methods selected Gln content and frequency of hydrophilic residues as the most important protein attributes. On the dipeptide level, the frequency of Asn-Glu was the key factor in distinguishing mesostable from thermostable enzymes. This study demonstrates the feasibility of predicting thermostability irrespective of sequence similarity and will serve as a

  10. Inhibition of the hepatitis C virus helicase-associated ATPase activity by the combination of ADP, NaF, MgCl2, and poly(rU). Two ADP binding sites on the enzyme-nucleic acid complex.

    PubMed

    Porter, D J

    1998-03-27

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) helicase has an intrinsic ATPase activity and a nucleic acid (poly(rU))-stimulated ATPase activity. The poly(rU)-stimulated ATPase activity was inhibited by F- in a time-dependent manner during ATP hydrolysis. Inhibition was the result of trapping an enzyme-bound ADP-poly(rU) ternary complex generated during the catalytic cycle and was not the result of generating enzyme-free ADP that subsequently inhibited the enzyme. However, catalysis was not required for efficient inhibition by F-. The stimulated and the intrinsic ATPase activities were also inhibited by treatment of the enzyme with F-, ADP, and poly(rU). The inhibited enzyme slowly recovered (t1/2 = 23 min) ATPase activity after a 2000-fold dilution into assay buffer. The onset of inhibition by 500 microM ADP and 15 mM F- in the absence of nucleic acid was very slow (t1/2 > 40 min). However, the sequence of addition of poly(rU) to a diluted solution of ADP/NaF-treated enzyme had a profound effect on the extent of inhibition. If the ADP/NaF-treated enzyme was diluted into an assay that lacked poly(rU) and the assay was subsequently initiated with poly(rU), the treated enzyme was not inhibited. Alternatively, if the treated enzyme was diluted into an assay containing poly(rU), the enzyme was inhibited. ATP protected the enzyme from inhibition by ADP/NaF. The stoichiometry between ADP and enzyme monomer in the inhibited enzyme complex was 2, as determined from titration of the ATPase activity ([ADP]/[E] = 2.2) and from the number of radiolabeled ADP bound to the inhibited enzyme ([ADP]/[E] = 1.7) in the presence of excess NaF, MgCl2, and poly(rU). The Hill coefficient for titration of ATPase activity with F- (n = 2.8) or MgCl2 (n = 2.1) in the presence of excess ADP and poly(rU) suggested that multiple F- and Mg2+ were involved in forming the inhibited enzyme complex. The stoichiometry between (dU)18, a defined oligomeric nucleic acid substituting for poly(rU), and enzyme monomer in the

  11. Development of a solid-phase enzyme immunoassay for ursodeoxycholic acid: application to plasma disappearance of injected ursodeoxycholic acid in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y; Setoguchi, T; Katsuki, T; Ishikawa, E

    1979-11-01

    A bile acid disappearance test using an enzyme immunoassay for ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is presented. The immunoassay employs an antiserum produced in rabbits with UDCA coupled by amide linkage to egg albumin. An antigen (UDCA)-enzyme (beta-D-galactosidase) complex was prepared by adding the N-hydroxy-succinimide ester of UDCA to beta-D-galactosidase in a molar ratio of 5000:1. The anti-UDCA serum was coupled to glass beads and a competitive reaction between bile acids and UDCA coupled to the enzyme on the glass beads was measured by determining enzyme activity. One bead was used for each test tube. Thus it was convenient to wash and transfer the bead to a fresh test tube after incubation. The procedure requires 2.5 hr at 30 degrees C for the competitive reaction and enzyme assay. Using a 1:100 dilution of anti-serum, the intensity of fluorescence of 4-methylumbelliferone produced from 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-galactoside by the enzyme decreased linearly with a logarithmic increase of UDCA concentration over a range of from 0.1 to 10 pmnd taurine conjugates, and good recovery data were obtained. The development of the enzyme immunoassay using glass beads shortens analysis time; furthermore, the method makes it possible to detect obstructive jaundice in rabbits before the serum bilirubin level is elevated.

  12. The effects of climate change on the nitrogen cycle and acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Walton, J.J. ); Graboske, B.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Increases in greenhouse gases are expected to lead to a number of changes to the atmosphere which may impact regional and global chemical cycles. With the increasing awareness of climate change and the possibility of global chemical changes to the atmosphere, it becomes important to ask whether these changes to global climate and chemical cycles might benefit or hinder control programs aimed at reducing acid deposition. In the following, we review several possible changes to climate that may be expected to impact the global cycle of reactive nitrogen. We then use our global model of the reactive nitrogen cycle to estimate the effects of several of the more important changes on the continental-scale deposition of nitric acid. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Molecular modeling and simulation of FabG, an enzyme involved in the fatty acid pathway of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed

    Shafreen, Rajamohmed Beema; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2013-09-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (SP) is the major cause of pharyngitis accompanied by strep throat infections in humans. 3-keto acyl reductase (FabG), an important enzyme involved in the elongation cycle of the fatty acid pathway of S. pyogenes, is essential for synthesis of the cell-membrane, virulence factors and quorum sensing-related mechanisms. Targeting SPFabG may provide an important aid for the development of drugs against S. pyogenes. However, the absence of a crystal structure for FabG of S. pyogenes limits the development of structure-based drug designs. Hence, in the present study, a homology model of FabG was generated using the X-ray crystallographic structure of Aquifex aeolicus (PDB ID: 2PNF). The modeled structure was refined using energy minimization. Furthermore, active sites were predicted, and a large dataset of compounds was screened against SPFabG. The ligands were docked using the LigandFit module that is available from Discovery Studio version 2.5. From this list, 13 best hit ligands were chosen based on the docking score and binding energy. All of the 13 ligands were screened for Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion and Toxicity (ADMET) properties. From this, the two best descriptors, along with one descriptor that lay outside the ADMET plot, were selected for molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. In vitro testing of the ligands using biological assays further substantiated the efficacy of the ligands that were screened based on the in silico methods.

  14. A complete enzymatic recovery of ferulic acid from corn residues with extracellular enzymes from Neosartorya spinosa NRRL185.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun-Dong; McClendon, Shara; Le, Tien; Taylor, Frank; Chen, Rachel Ruizhen

    2006-12-20

    An economic ferulic acid recovery from biomass via biological methods is of interest for a number of reasons. Ferulic acid is a precursor to vanillin synthesis. It is also a known antioxidant with potential food and medical applications. Despite its universal presence in all plant cell wall material, the complex structure of the plant cell wall makes ferulic acid recovery from biomass a challenging bioprocess. Previously, without pretreatment, very low (3-13%) recovery of ferulic acid from corn residues was achieved. We report here the discovery of a filamentous fungus Neosartorya spinosa NRRL185 capable of producing a full complement of enzymes to release ferulic acid and the development of an enzymatic process for a complete recovery of ferulic acid from corn bran and corn fibers. A partial characterization of the extracellular proteome of the microbe revealed the presence of at least seven cellulases and hemicellulases activities, including multiple iso-forms of xylanase and ferulic acid esterase. The recovered ferulic acid was bio-converted to vanillin, demonstrating its potential application in natural vanillin synthesis. The enzymatic ferulic acid recovery accompanied a significant release of reducing sugars (76-100%), suggesting much broader applications of the enzymes and enzyme mixtures from this organism.

  15. Enzyme-mimetic effects of gold@platinum nanorods on the antioxidant activity of ascorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu-Ting; He, Weiwei; Wamer, Wayne G.; Hu, Xiaona; Wu, Xiaochun; Lo, Y. Martin; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Au@Pt nanorods were prepared by growing platinum nanodots on gold nanorods. Using electron spin resonance (ESR), we determined that the mechanisms for oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA) by Au@Pt nanorods and ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) were kinetically similar and yielded similar products. In addition we observed that Au@Pt nanorods were stable with respect to temperature and pH. Using UV-VIS spectroscopy, the apparent kinetics of enzyme-mimetic activity of Au@Pt nanorods were studied and compared with the activity of AAO. With the help of ESR, we found that Au@Pt nanorods did not scavenge hydroxyl radicals but inhibited the antioxidant ability of AA for scavenging hydroxyl radicals produced by photoirradiating solutions containing titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. Moreover, the Au@Pt nanorods reduced the ability of AA to scavenge DPPH radicals and superoxide radicals. These results demonstrate that Au@Pt nanorods can reduce the antioxidant activity of AA. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the effects of using Pt nanoparticles together with other reducing agents or antioxidants such as AA due to the oxidase-like property of Au@Pt nanorods.Au@Pt nanorods were prepared by growing platinum nanodots on gold nanorods. Using electron spin resonance (ESR), we determined that the mechanisms for oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA) by Au@Pt nanorods and ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) were kinetically similar and yielded similar products. In addition we observed that Au@Pt nanorods were stable with respect to temperature and pH. Using UV-VIS spectroscopy, the apparent kinetics of enzyme-mimetic activity of Au@Pt nanorods were studied and compared with the activity of AAO. With the help of ESR, we found that Au@Pt nanorods did not scavenge hydroxyl radicals but inhibited the antioxidant ability of AA for scavenging hydroxyl radicals produced by photoirradiating solutions containing titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. Moreover, the Au@Pt nanorods reduced the ability of AA to scavenge

  16. Secretion of three enzymes for fatty acid synthesis into mouse milk in association with fat globules, and rapid decrease of the secreted enzymes by treatment with rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Hitomi; Uchida, Kana; Okajima, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Nadano, Daita

    2011-04-01

    The mammary epithelium produces numerous lipid droplets during lactation and secretes them in plasma membrane-enclosed vesicles known as milk fat globules. The biogenesis of such fat globules is considered to provide a model for clarifying the mechanisms of lipogenesis in mammals. In the present study, we identified acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, ATP citrate lyase, and fatty acid synthase in mouse milk. Fractionation of milk showed that these three enzymes were located predominantly in milk fat globules. The three enzymes were resistant to trypsin digestion without Triton X-100, indicating that they were not located on the outer surface of the globules and thus associated with the precursors of the globules before secretion. When a low dose of rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), was injected into lactating mice, the levels of the three enzymes in milk were decreased within 3h after injection. Since the protein levels of the three enzymes in tissues were not obviously altered by this short-term treatment, known transcriptional control by mTOR signaling was unlikely to account for this decrease in their levels in milk. Our findings suggest a new, putatively mTOR-dependent localization of the three enzymes for de novo lipogenesis. PMID:21281598

  17. [Reconstitution of polyunsaturated fatty acid synthesis enzymes in mammalian cells to convert LA to DHA].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guiming; Saleh, Abdulmomen Ali Mohammed; Bahwal, Said Ahmed; Qiu, Lihong; Sun, Jie; Shang, Yu; Jiang, Xudong; Ge, Tangdong; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-01

    DHA (22:6n-3) is a Ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid with 22 carbon atoms and 6 double bonds, which has important biological functions in human body. Human and other mammals synthesize only limited amounts of DHA, more requirements must be satisfied from food resources. However, the natural resources of DHA (Mainly deep-sea fish and other marine products) are prone to depletion. New resources development is still insufficient to satisfy the growing market demand. Previous studies have revealed that the mammals can increase the synthesis of DHA and other long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids after transgenic procedures. In this study, mammalian cells were transfected with Δ6, Δ5 desaturase, Δ6, Δ5 elongase, Δ15 desaturase (Isolated from nematode Caenorhabditis elegans) and Δ4 desaturase (Isolated from Euglena gracilis), simultaneously. Results show that the expression or overexpression of these 6 enzymes is capable of conversion of the o-6 linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6) in DHA (22:6n-3). DHA content has increased from 16.74% in the control group to 25.3% in the experimental group. The strategy and related technology in our research provided important data for future production the valuable DHA (22:6n-3) by using genetically modified animals.

  18. Single-Cell Measurements of Enzyme Levels as a Predictive Tool for Cellular Fates during Organic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Zdraljevic, Stefan; Wagner, Drew; Cheng, Kevin; Ruohonen, Laura; Jäntti, Jussi; Penttilä, Merja; Resnekov, Orna

    2013-01-01

    Organic acids derived from engineered microbes can replace fossil-derived chemicals in many applications. Fungal hosts are preferred for organic acid production because they tolerate lignocellulosic hydrolysates and low pH, allowing economic production and recovery of the free acid. However, cell death caused by cytosolic acidification constrains productivity. Cytosolic acidification affects cells asynchronously, suggesting that there is an underlying cell-to-cell heterogeneity in acid productivity and/or in resistance to toxicity. We used fluorescence microscopy to investigate the relationship between enzyme concentration, cytosolic pH, and viability at the single-cell level in Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered to synthesize xylonic acid. We found that cultures producing xylonic acid accumulate cells with cytosolic pH below 5 (referred to here as “acidified”). Using live-cell time courses, we found that the probability of acidification was related to the initial levels of xylose dehydrogenase and sharply increased from 0.2 to 0.8 with just a 60% increase in enzyme abundance (Hill coefficient, >6). This “switch-like” relationship likely results from an enzyme level threshold above which the produced acid overwhelms the cell's pH buffering capacity. Consistent with this hypothesis, we showed that expression of xylose dehydrogenase from a chromosomal locus yields ∼20 times fewer acidified cells and ∼2-fold more xylonic acid relative to expression of the enzyme from a plasmid with variable copy number. These results suggest that strategies that further reduce cell-to-cell heterogeneity in enzyme levels could result in additional gains in xylonic acid productivity. Our results demonstrate a generalizable approach that takes advantage of the cell-to-cell variation of a clonal population to uncover causal relationships in the toxicity of engineered pathways. PMID:24038690

  19. Differentiated effect of ageing on the enzymes of Krebs' cycle, electron transfer complexes and glutamate metabolism of non-synaptic and intra-synaptic mitochondria from cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Villa, R F; Gorini, A; Hoyer, S

    2006-11-01

    The effect of ageing on the activity of enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain and glutamate metabolism was studied in three different types of mitochondria of cerebral cortex of 1-year old and 2-year old male Wistar rats. We assessed the maximum rate (V(max)) of the mitochondrial enzyme activities in non-synaptic perikaryal mitochondria, and in two populations of intra-synaptic mitochondria. The results indicated that: (i) in normal, steady-state cerebral cortex the values of the catalytic activities of the enzymes markedly differed in the various populations of mitochondria; (ii) in intra-synaptic mitochondria, ageing affected the catalytic properties of the enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain and glutamate metabolism; (iii) these changes were more evident in intra-synaptic "heavy" than "light" mitochondria. These results indicate a different age-related vulnerability of subpopulations of mitochondria in vivo located into synapses than non-synaptic ones.

  20. Effects of oxolinic acid on the sleep-wakefulness cycle of the rat

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, L.; Monti, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    1 A study was carried out in rats (prepared for chronic sleep recording) of the effects of oxolinic acid on the sleep-wakefulness cycle. 2 In addition, the actions of oxolinic acid on the sleep-wake cycle were assessed after pretreatment with drugs interfering with central catecholamine mechanisms or facilitating central γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) activity. 3 Oxolinic acid (8-32 mg/kg) induced a significant and dose-related increase of waking EEG, while slow wave and REM sleep were decreased. 4 The effects of oxolinic acid on waking, slow wave and REM sleep were antagonized by α-methyl-p-tyrosine (50-100 mg/kg) which interferes with the synthesis of catecholamines. 5 FLA-63 (25 mg/kg) which is a specific inhibitor of noradrenaline synthesis, was effective in blocking oxolinic acid-related increase of waking and decrease of slow wave sleep. 6 Haloperidol (0.4-0.6 mg/kg) which blocks central dopamine and noradrenaline receptors, reversed oxolinic acid-induced actions on waking and slow wave sleep. Spiroperidol (2-4 mg/kg) which interferes with dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine mechanisms, only antagonized the effect of oxolinic acid on light slow wave sleep. REM sleep was further decreased by both neuroleptic agents. 7 γ-Hydroxybutyrate (25-50 mg/kg), which acts as a GABA agonist and amino-oxyacetic acid (20 mg/kg), which considerably increases central GABA levels, were ineffective in blocking oxolinic acid-related disruption of the sleep-wake cycle. 8 Our results suggest that the catecholamines are involved in the arousing effect of oxolinic acid. PMID:7317689

  1. Aberrant expression and distribution of enzymes of the urea cycle and other ammonia metabolizing pathways in dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts.

    PubMed

    van Straten, Giora; van Steenbeek, Frank G; Grinwis, Guy C M; Favier, Robert P; Kummeling, Anne; van Gils, Ingrid H; Fieten, Hille; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Holstege, Frank C P; Rothuizen, Jan; Spee, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The detoxification of ammonia occurs mainly through conversion of ammonia to urea in the liver via the urea cycle and glutamine synthesis. Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) in dogs cause hyperammonemia eventually leading to hepatic encephalopathy. In this study, the gene expression of urea cycle enzymes (carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS1), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC), argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1), argininosuccinate lyase (ASL), and arginase (ARG1)), N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), Glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD1), and glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL) was evaluated in dogs with CPSS before and after surgical closure of the shunt. Additionally, immunohistochemistry was performed on urea cycle enzymes and GLUL on liver samples of healthy dogs and dogs with CPSS to investigate a possible zonal distribution of these enzymes within the liver lobule and to investigate possible differences in distribution in dogs with CPSS compared to healthy dogs. Furthermore, the effect of increasing ammonia concentrations on the expression of the urea cycle enzymes was investigated in primary hepatocytes in vitro. Gene-expression of CPS1, OTC, ASL, GLUD1 and NAGS was down regulated in dogs with CPSS and did not normalize after surgical closure of the shunt. In all dogs GLUL distribution was localized pericentrally. CPS1, OTC and ASS1 were localized periportally in healthy dogs, whereas in CPSS dogs, these enzymes lacked a clear zonal distribution. In primary hepatocytes higher ammonia concentrations induced mRNA levels of CPS1. We hypothesize that the reduction in expression of urea cycle enzymes, NAGS and GLUD1 as well as the alterations in zonal distribution in dogs with CPSS may be caused by a developmental arrest of these enzymes during the embryonic or early postnatal phase. PMID:24945279

  2. Conformational Itinerary of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1,6-Anhydro-N-acetylmuramic Acid Kinase during Its Catalytic Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Bacik, John-Paul; Tavassoli, Marjan; Patel, Trushar R.; McKenna, Sean A.; Vocadlo, David J.; Khajehpour, Mazdak; Mark, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Anhydro-sugar kinases are unique from other sugar kinases in that they must cleave the 1,6-anhydro ring of their sugar substrate to phosphorylate it using ATP. Here we show that the peptidoglycan recycling enzyme 1,6-anhydro-N-acetylmuramic acid kinase (AnmK) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes large conformational changes during its catalytic cycle, with its two domains rotating apart by up to 32° around two hinge regions to expose an active site cleft into which the substrates 1,6-anhydroMurNAc and ATP can bind. X-ray structures of the open state bound to a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog (AMPPCP) and 1,6-anhydroMurNAc provide detailed insight into a ternary complex that forms preceding an operative Michaelis complex. Structural analysis of the hinge regions demonstrates a role for nucleotide binding and possible cross-talk between the bound ligands to modulate the opening and closing of AnmK. Although AnmK was found to exhibit similar binding affinities for ATP, ADP, and AMPPCP according to fluorescence spectroscopy, small angle x-ray scattering analyses revealed that AnmK adopts an open conformation in solution in the absence of ligand and that it remains in this open state after binding AMPPCP, as we had observed for our crystal structure of this complex. In contrast, the enzyme favored a closed conformation when bound to ADP in solution, consistent with a previous crystal structure of this complex. Together, our findings show that the open conformation of AnmK facilitates binding of both the sugar and nucleotide substrates and that large structural rearrangements must occur upon closure of the enzyme to correctly align the substrates and residues of the enzyme for catalysis. PMID:24362022

  3. Chopper-controlled discharge life cycling studies on lead-acid batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraml, J. J.; Ames, E. P.

    1982-01-01

    State-of-the-art 6 volt lead-acid golf car batteries were tested. A daily charge/discharge cycling to failure points under various chopper controlled pulsed dc and continuous current load conditions was undertaken. The cycle life and failure modes were investigated for depth of discharge, average current chopper frequency, and chopper duty cycle. It is shown that battery life is primarily and inversely related to depth of discharge and discharge current. Failure mode is characterized by a gradual capacity loss with consistent evidence of cell element aging.

  4. Results of chopper-controlled discharge life cycling studies on lead acid batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewashinka, J. G.; Sidik, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    A group of 108 state of the art nominally 6 volt lead acid batteries were tested in a program of one charge/discharge cycle per day for over two years or to ultimate battery failure. The primary objective was to determine battery cycle life as a function of depth of discharge (25 to 75 percent), chopper frequency (100 to 1000 Hz), duty cycle (25 to 87.5 percent), and average discharge current (20 to 260 A). The secondary objective was to determine the types of battery failure modes, if any, were due to the above parameters. The four parameters above were incorporated in a statistically designed test program.

  5. Uncertainty of Prebiotic Scenarios: The Case of the Non-Enzymatic Reverse Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubarev, Dmitry; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2015-03-01

    We consider the much discussed hypothesis of the primordial nature of the non-enzymatic reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle and describe a modeling approach that quantifies the uncertainty of this hypothesis due to the combinatorial aspect of the constituent chemical transformations. Our results suggest that a) rTCA cycle belongs to a degenerate optimum of auto-catalytic cycles, and b) the set of targets for the investigations of the origin of the common metabolic core should be significantly extended. This work was supported by a grant from the Simons Foundation (SCOL 291937, Dmitry Zubarev).

  6. NHI-Acid Concentration Membranes -- Membrane Recommendations for the S-I Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F Stewart

    2007-03-01

    Scope: The purpose of this draft report is to make recommendations concerning the applicability of specific membrane materials for acid concentration processes to the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle integrated laboratory scale (ILS) demonstration. Introduction Acid concentration membrane processes have been studied for possible inclusion in the Sulfur-Iodine integrated laboratory scale (S-I ILS) demonstration. The need for this technology is driven by the chemical processes required for economical water splitting using the S-I cycle. Of the chemical processes inherent to the S-I cycle that have been identified as targets for deployment of membrane technology, three have been studied during the past three fiscal years as a part of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. First, the ability to concentrate hydriodic acid (HI) and iodine mixtures was sought as a method for aiding in the isolation of HI away from water and iodine. Isolated HI would then be delivered to the HI decomposition process for liberation of product hydrogen. Second, an extension of this technology to sulfuric acid was proposed to benefit sulfuric acid decomposition recycle. Third, decomposition of HI to form hydrogen is equilibrium limited. Removal of hydrogen, utilizing Le Chatelier’s principle, will increase to overall conversion and thus increasing the efficiency of the S-I cycle.

  7. [Effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids on Krebs cycle in the rat kidney in chronic phosphorus intoxication].

    PubMed

    Kulkybaev, G A; Merkusheva, N V

    1992-01-01

    The investigation of Krebs cycle state in kidney homogenates of August rats subjected to oral intoxication with oil solution of yellow phosphorus in a dose of 0.3 mg/kg, has shown that under conditions of balanced nutrition the activity of NAD-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase and accumulation of the substrate fund of the cycle decreased 3.5-fold as compared to the control. The addition of polyunsaturated fatty acids to the ration produced a positive effect on Krebs cycle state: dehydrogenase activity was not significantly changed, accumulation of Krebs cycle substrate was two-fold lower. However, this ration did not completely abolish the toxic action of yellow phosphorus on Krebs cycle.

  8. The role of CYP26 enzymes in defining appropriate retinoic acid exposure during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pennimpede, Tracie; Cameron, Don A; MacLean, Glenn A; Li, Hui; Abu-Abed, Suzan; Petkovich, Martin

    2010-10-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a pleiotropic derivative of vitamin A, or retinol, which is responsible for all of the bioactivity associated with this vitamin. The teratogenic influences of vitamin A deficiency and excess RA in rodents were first observed more than 50 years ago. Efforts over the last 15-20 years have refined these observations by defining the molecular mechanisms that control RA availability and signaling during murine embryonic development. This review will discuss our current understanding of the role of RA in teratogenesis, with specific emphasis on the essential function of the RA catabolic CYP26 enzymes in preventing teratogenic consequences caused by uncontrolled distribution of RA. Particular focus will be paid to the RA-sensitive tissues of the caudal and cranial regions, the limb, and the testis, and how genetic mutation of factors controlling RA distribution have revealed important roles for RA during embryogenesis.

  9. Lysosomal Acid Phosphatase Biosynthesis and Dysfunction: A Mini Review Focused on Lysosomal Enzyme Dysfunction in Brain.

    PubMed

    Ashtari, N; Jiao, X; Rahimi-Balaei, M; Amiri, S; Mehr, S E; Yeganeh, B; Marzban, H

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are membrane-bound organelles that are responsible for degrading and recycling macromolecules. Lysosomal dysfunction occurs in enzymatic and non-enzymatic deficiencies, which result in abnormal accumulation of materials. Although lysosomal storage disorders affect different organs, the central nervous system is the most vulnerable. Evidence shows the role of lysosomal dysfunction in different neurodegenerative diseases, such as Niemann-Pick Type C disease, juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Lysosomal enzymes such as lysosomal acid phosphatase 2 (Acp2) play a critical role in mannose-6-phosphate removal and Acp2 controls molecular and cellular functions in the brain during development and adulthood. Acp2 is essential in cerebellar development, and mutations in this gene cause severe cerebellar neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. In this mini-review, we highlight lysosomal dysfunctions in the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental and/or neurodegenerative diseases with special attention to Acp2 dysfunction. PMID:27132795

  10. Aptamer- and nucleic acid enzyme-based systems for simultaneous detection of multiple analytes

    DOEpatents

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Juewen

    2011-11-15

    The present invention provides aptamer- and nucleic acid enzyme-based systems for simultaneously determining the presence and optionally the concentration of multiple analytes in a sample. Methods of utilizing the system and kits that include the sensor components are also provided. The system includes a first reactive polynucleotide that reacts to a first analyte; a second reactive polynucleotide that reacts to a second analyte; a third polynucleotide; a fourth polynucleotide; a first particle, coupled to the third polynucleotide; a second particle, coupled to the fourth polynucleotide; and at least one quencher, for quenching emissions of the first and second quantum dots, coupled to the first and second reactive polynucleotides. The first particle includes a quantum dot having a first emission wavelength. The second particle includes a second quantum dot having a second emission wavelength different from the first emission wavelength. The third polynucleotide and the fourth polynucleotide are different.

  11. [Effects of different tillage methods on phospholipid fatty acids and enzyme activities in calcareous cinnamon soil].

    PubMed

    Pei, Xue-Xia; Dang, Jian-You; Zhang, Ding-Yi; Wang, Jiao-Ai; Zhang, Jing

    2014-08-01

    In order to study changes of physical and chemical characteristics and microbial activities in soil under different tillage methods, effects of four tillage methods, rotary tillage (RT), subsoil tillage (ST), conventional tillage (CT) with corn straw returned to soil, and rotary tillage with no corn straw returned to soil (CK), on phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) characteristics and hydrolase enzymes activities in calcareous cinnamon soil were investigated. The results showed that soil hydrolase enzymes activities, nutrient contents, microbial diversity varied greatly with the different tillage methods. Returning corn straw to soil increased the kinds, amount of soil total PLFAs, bacteria PLFAs and actonomycetes PLFAs, while decreased the fungi PLFAs, indicating that fungi was more adaptable than bacteria to an infertile environment. ST and CT resulted in higher amounts of total PLFAs, which were 74.7% and 53.3% higher than that of CK, indicating they were more beneficial to the growth of plants. They could also improve soil physical and chemical properties, increase alk-phosphatase, protease and urease activities, which would provide a favorable soil condition for high and stable crop yields.

  12. Activity-based protein profiling of hydrolytic enzymes induced by gibberellic acid in isolated aleurone layers of malting barley.

    PubMed

    Daneri-Castro, Sergio N; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Grosse-Holz, Friederike M; van der Hoorn, Renier A L; Roberts, Thomas H

    2016-09-01

    During barley germination, the aleurone layer secretes most of the enzymes required to degrade the endosperm, many of which are yet to be characterized. We used activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) to detect a range of active enzymes extracted from aleurone layers isolated from grains of a commercial malting barley variety incubated with or without gibberellic acid (GA). Enzymes found to be induced by GA were putative aleurains, cathepsin-B-like proteases and serine hydrolases. By using an inhibitory sugar panel, a specific active retaining β-glycosidase in the barley aleurone was identified as a putative xylanase. Our results show that ABPP can be used rapidly to identify a variety of active enzyme isoforms in cereal aleurone without the need for enzyme purification.

  13. [Effect of trace metals on cell morphology, enzyme activation, and production of citric acid in a strain of Aspergillus wentii].

    PubMed

    Majolli, M V; Aguirre, S N

    1999-01-01

    Data concerning the effect of very low concentrations of metals on citric acid production by microorganisms, as well as on the activity of enzymes presumptively involved in the process, are confuse. The bulk of information was obtained mainly studying selected strains of Aspergillus niger. Information concerning other citric acid producer filamentous fungi, such as A. wentii, is scanty. In the present article we report the effect of different cations on the growth pattern of A. wentii P1 as well as on the related citric acid production and the activity of several enzymes. It was found that without any addition to the culture medium the fungus developed a pelleted form of growth, pellets being about 1.5 mm in diameter. The citric acid yield was about 90%. The addition of Cu2+ impaired the sugar uptake, as well as the production of citric acid and biomass. The uptake of sugar increased in the presence of Zn2+, and there was a marked increase of the biomass production, which could account for the low citric acid production. The addition of Fe2+ impaired the citric acid production and, as sulfate, the sugar uptake. The presence of Fe3+ markedly impaired the citric acid production and increased the sugar uptake. There is no agreement about the enzymes involved in the accumulation of citric acid by microorganisms. In spite of this, aconitase (Ac), isocitrate lyase (IL), isocitrate dehydrogenase NAD(+)-dependent (ICDH- NAD+) and isocitrate dehydrogenase NADP(+)-dependent (ICDH-NADP+) are often postulated as key enzymes. In our case, these enzymes were active during the standard fermentation, although with variations, particularly concerning Ac and IL. The behavior of enzymes might be different when tested in vivo or in vitro, mainly from the quantitative point of view. Nevertheless, the activity determined in vitro might give some indication concerning the effect on fermentation of substances present in the medium. It was found that all the enzymes tested increased their

  14. Production of succinic acid through overexpression of NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme in an Escherichia coli mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Stols, L; Donnelly, M I

    1997-01-01

    NAD(+)-dependent malic enzyme was cloned from the Escherichia coli genome by PCR based on the published partial sequence of the gene. The enzyme was overexpressed and purified to near homogeneity in two chromatographic steps and was analyzed kinetically in the forward and reverse directions. The Km values determined in the presence of saturating cofactor and manganese ion were 0.26 mM for malate (physiological direction) and 16 mM for pyruvate (reverse direction). When malic enzyme was induced under appropriate culture conditions in a strain of E. coli that was unable to ferment glucose and accumulated pyruvate, fermentative metabolism of glucose was restored. Succinic acid was the major fermentation product formed. When this fermentation was performed in the presence of hydrogen, the yield of succinic acid increased. The constructed pathway represents an alternative metabolic route for the fermentative production of dicarboxylic acids from renewable feedstocks. PMID:9212416

  15. Structure of Escherichia coli Ribose-5-Phosphate Isomerase: A Ubiquitous Enzyme of the Pentose Phosphate Pathway and the Calvin Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong-guang; Andersson, C. Evalena; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Evdokimova, Elena; Beasley, Steven; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Edwards, Aled M.; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Mowbray, Sherry L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase A (RpiA; EC 5.3.1.6) interconverts ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. This enzyme plays essential roles in carbohydrate anabolism and catabolism; it is ubiquitous and highly conserved. The structure of RpiA from Escherichia coli was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing, and refined to 1.5 Å resolution (R factor 22.4%, Rfree 23.7%). RpiA exhibits an α/β/(α/β)/β/α fold, some portions of which are similar to proteins of the alcohol dehydrogenase family. The two subunits of the dimer in the asymmetric unit have different conformations, representing the opening/closing of a cleft. Active site residues were identified in the cleft using sequence conservation, as well as the structure of a complex with the inhibitor arabinose-5-phosphate at 1.25 Å resolution. A mechanism for acid-base catalysis is proposed. PMID:12517338

  16. Structure of escherichia coli ribose-5-phosphate isomerase : a ubiquitous enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.; Andersson, C. E.; Savchenko, A.; Skarina, T.; Evdokimova, E.; Beasley, S.; Arrowsmith, C. H.; Edwards, A.; Joachimiak, A.; Mowbray, S. L.; Biosciences Division; Uppsala Univ.; Univ. Health Network; Univ. of Toronto; Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences

    2003-01-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase A (RpiA; EC 5.3.1.6) interconverts ribose-5-phosphate and ribulose-5-phosphate. This enzyme plays essential roles in carbohydrate anabolism and catabolism; it is ubiquitous and highly conserved. The structure of RpiA from Escherichia coli was solved by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing, and refined to 1.5 Angstroms resolution (R factor 22.4%, R{sub free} 23.7%). RpiA exhibits an {alpha}/{beta}/({alpha}/{beta})/{beta}/{alpha} fold, some portions of which are similar to proteins of the alcohol dehydrogenase family. The two subunits of the dimer in the asymmetric unit have different conformations, representing the opening/closing of a cleft. Active site residues were identified in the cleft using sequence conservation, as well as the structure of a complex with the inhibitor arabinose-5-phosphate at 1.25 A resolution. A mechanism for acid-base catalysis is proposed.

  17. Thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.; Soliman, M. A.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Cox, K. E.; Lawson, D.

    1975-01-01

    The thermochemical production of hydrogen is described along with the HYDRGN computer program which attempts to rate the various thermochemical cycles. Specific thermochemical cycles discussed include: iron sulfur cycle; iron chloride cycle; and hybrid sulfuric acid cycle.

  18. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the anthropogenic marker isolithocholic acid in water.

    PubMed

    Baldofski, Stefanie; Hoffmann, Holger; Lehmann, Andreas; Breitfeld, Stefan; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Schneider, Rudolf J

    2016-11-01

    Bile acids are promising chemical markers to assess the pollution of water samples with fecal material. This study describes the optimization and validation of a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the bile acid isolithocholic acid (ILA). The quantification range of the optimized assay was between 0.09 and 15 μg/L. The assay was applied to environmental water samples. Most studies until now were focused on bile acid fractions in the particulate phase of water samples. In order to avoid tedious sample preparation, we undertook to evaluate the dynamics and significance of ILA levels in the aqueous phase. Very low concentrations in tap and surface water samples made a pre-concentration step necessary for this matrix as well as for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. Mean recoveries for spiked water samples were between 97% and 109% for tap water and WWTP influent samples and between 102% and 136% for WWTP effluent samples. 90th percentiles of intra-plate and inter-plate coefficients of variation were below 10% for influents and below 20% for effluents and surface water. ILA concentrations were quantified in the range of 33-72 μg/L in influent, 21-49 ng/L in effluent and 18-48 ng/L in surface water samples. During wastewater treatment the ILA levels were reduced by more than 99%. ILA concentrations of influents determined by ELISA and LC-MS/MS were in good agreement. However, findings in LC-ELISA experiments suggest that the true ILA levels in concentrated samples are lower due to interfering effects of matrix compounds and/or cross-reactants. Yet, the ELISA will be a valuable tool for the performance check and comparison of WWTPs and the localization of fecal matter input into surface waters. PMID:27544648

  19. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the anthropogenic marker isolithocholic acid in water.

    PubMed

    Baldofski, Stefanie; Hoffmann, Holger; Lehmann, Andreas; Breitfeld, Stefan; Garbe, Leif-Alexander; Schneider, Rudolf J

    2016-11-01

    Bile acids are promising chemical markers to assess the pollution of water samples with fecal material. This study describes the optimization and validation of a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the bile acid isolithocholic acid (ILA). The quantification range of the optimized assay was between 0.09 and 15 μg/L. The assay was applied to environmental water samples. Most studies until now were focused on bile acid fractions in the particulate phase of water samples. In order to avoid tedious sample preparation, we undertook to evaluate the dynamics and significance of ILA levels in the aqueous phase. Very low concentrations in tap and surface water samples made a pre-concentration step necessary for this matrix as well as for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. Mean recoveries for spiked water samples were between 97% and 109% for tap water and WWTP influent samples and between 102% and 136% for WWTP effluent samples. 90th percentiles of intra-plate and inter-plate coefficients of variation were below 10% for influents and below 20% for effluents and surface water. ILA concentrations were quantified in the range of 33-72 μg/L in influent, 21-49 ng/L in effluent and 18-48 ng/L in surface water samples. During wastewater treatment the ILA levels were reduced by more than 99%. ILA concentrations of influents determined by ELISA and LC-MS/MS were in good agreement. However, findings in LC-ELISA experiments suggest that the true ILA levels in concentrated samples are lower due to interfering effects of matrix compounds and/or cross-reactants. Yet, the ELISA will be a valuable tool for the performance check and comparison of WWTPs and the localization of fecal matter input into surface waters.

  20. Implementing bacterial acid resistance into cell-free protein synthesis for buffer-free expression and screening of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Cheol; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Kang, Taek-Jin; Choi, Jong Hyun; Song, Jae Jun; Choi, Yun Hee; Kim, Byung-Gee; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2015-12-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis utilizes translational machinery isolated from the cells for in vitro expression of template genes. Because it produces proteins without gene cloning and cell cultivation steps, cell-free protein synthesis can be used as a versatile platform for high-throughput expression of enzyme libraries. Furthermore, the open nature of cell-free protein synthesis allows direct integration of enzyme synthesis with subsequent screening steps. However, the presence of high concentration of chemical buffers in the conventional reaction mixture makes it difficult to streamline cell-free protein synthesis with pH-based assay of the synthesized enzymes. In this study, we have implemented an enzyme-assisted bacterial acid resistance mechanism into an Escherichia coli (E.coli) extract-based cell-free protein synthesis system in place of chemical buffers. When deployed in the reaction mixture for cell-free synthesis of enzymes, through proton-consuming conversion of glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an engineered glutamate decarboxylase (GADβ) was able to maintain the pH of reaction mixture during enzyme synthesis. Because the reaction mixture becomes free of buffering capacity upon the depletion of glutamate, synthesized enzyme could be directly assayed without purification steps. The designed method was successfully applied to the screening of mutant library of sialyltransferase genes to identify mutants with improved enzymatic activity.

  1. Glyoxylate cycle and metabolism of organic acids in the scutellum of barley seeds during germination.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhenguo; Marsolais, Frédéric; Bernards, Mark A; Sumarah, Mark W; Bykova, Natalia V; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2016-07-01

    During the developmental processes from dry seeds to seedling establishment, the glyoxylate cycle becomes active in the mobilization of stored oils in the scutellum of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seeds, as indicated by the activities of isocitrate lyase and malate synthase. The succinate produced is converted to carbohydrates via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and to amino acids via aminotransferases, while free organic acids may participate in acidifying the endosperm tissue, releasing stored starch into metabolism. The abundant organic acid in the scutellum was citrate, while malate concentration declined during the first three days of germination, and succinate concentration was low both in scutellum and endosperm. Malate was more abundant in endosperm tissue during the first three days of germination; before citrate became predominant, indicating that malate may be the main acid acidifying the endosperm. The operation of the glyoxylate cycle coincided with an increase in the ATP/ADP ratio, a buildup of H2O2 and changes in the redox state of ascorbate and glutathione. It is concluded that operation of the glyoxylate cycle in the scutellum of cereals may be important not only for conversion of fatty acids to carbohydrates, but also for the acidification of endosperm and amino acid synthesis. PMID:27181945

  2. Influence of sodium chloride on the regulation of Krebs cycle intermediates and enzymes of respiratory chain in mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Saha, Papiya; Kunda, Pranamita; Biswas, Asok K

    2012-11-01

    The effect of common salt (NaCl) on ion contents, Krebs cycle intermediates and its regulatory enzymes was investigated in growing mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek, B 105) seedlings. Sodium and chloride ion contents increased in both root and shoot whereas potassium ion content decreased in shoot of test seedlings with increasing concentrations of NaCl. Organic acids like pyruvate and citrate levels increased whereas malate level decreased under stress in both roots and shoots. Salt stress also variedly affected the activities of different enzymes of respiratory chain. The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.2.4.1) decreased in 50 mM NaCl but increased in 100 mM and 150 mM concentrations, in both root and shoot samples. Succinate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.3.5.1) activity was reduced in root whereas stimulated in shoot under increasing concentrations of salt. The activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.41) and malate dehydrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.37) decreased in both root and shoot samples under salt stress. On the contrary, pretreatment of mungbean seeds with sublethal dose of NaCl was able to overcome the adverse effects of stress imposed by NaCl to variable extents with significant alterations of all the tested parameters, resulting in better growth and efficient respiration in mungbean seedlings. Thus, plants can acclimate to lethal level of salinity by pretreatment of seeds with sublethal level of NaCl, which serves to improve their health and production under saline condition, but the sublethal concentration of NaCl should be carefully chosen.

  3. Submolecular regulation of cell transformation by deuterium depleting water exchange reactions in the tricarboxylic acid substrate cycle.

    PubMed

    Boros, László G; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Katz, Howard E; Roth, Justine P; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Somlyai, Gábor

    2016-02-01

    The naturally occurring isotope of hydrogen ((1)H), deuterium ((2)H), could have an important biological role. Deuterium depleted water delays tumor progression in mice, dogs, cats and humans. Hydratase enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle control cell growth and deplete deuterium from redox cofactors, fatty acids and DNA, which undergo hydride ion and hydrogen atom transfer reactions. A model is proposed that emphasizes the terminal complex of mitochondrial electron transport chain reducing molecular oxygen to deuterium depleted water (DDW); this affects gluconeogenesis as well as fatty acid oxidation. In the former, the DDW is thought to diminish the deuteration of sugar-phosphates in the DNA backbone, helping to preserve stability of hydrogen bond networks, possibly protecting against aneuploidy and resisting strand breaks, occurring upon exposure to radiation and certain anticancer chemotherapeutics. DDW is proposed here to link cancer prevention and treatment using natural ketogenic diets, low deuterium drinking water, as well as DDW production as the mitochondrial downstream mechanism of targeted anti-cancer drugs such as Avastin and Glivec. The role of (2)H in biology is a potential missing link to the elusive cancer puzzle seemingly correlated with cancer epidemiology in western populations as a result of excessive (2)H loading from processed carbohydrate intake in place of natural fat consumption.

  4. [Development of direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the determination of domoic acid].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Cheng, Jin-Ping; Gao, Li-Li; Dong, Yu; Xi, Lei

    2012-02-01

    To develop a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for rapid detection of domoic acid concentrations, HRP (horse radish peroxidase) was successfully linked to DA using EDC. The concentration of DA was quantitatively analyzed on the basic of the specific immune responses between the DA- HRP and the monoclonal antibodies made in advance. Calibration curve were established after the optimization of reaction conditions such as the type of blocking solution, the blocking time and the incubation temperature. The results show that, the best reaction condition of the direct competitive ELISA is 1% gelatin, blocking 1 h at 37 degrees C, incubating 1 h at 37 degrees C after the monoclonal antibodies added. The detect limit is 3.58 ng x mL(-1), the coefficient of variation between the holes is below 15%, and the recovery is 80% - 120%. The whole analysis process could be completed within 1.5 h. It meets the requirements of rapid and batch detection of domoic acid. The method will have broad development prospects.

  5. [Development of direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the determination of domoic acid].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Cheng, Jin-Ping; Gao, Li-Li; Dong, Yu; Xi, Lei

    2012-02-01

    To develop a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for rapid detection of domoic acid concentrations, HRP (horse radish peroxidase) was successfully linked to DA using EDC. The concentration of DA was quantitatively analyzed on the basic of the specific immune responses between the DA- HRP and the monoclonal antibodies made in advance. Calibration curve were established after the optimization of reaction conditions such as the type of blocking solution, the blocking time and the incubation temperature. The results show that, the best reaction condition of the direct competitive ELISA is 1% gelatin, blocking 1 h at 37 degrees C, incubating 1 h at 37 degrees C after the monoclonal antibodies added. The detect limit is 3.58 ng x mL(-1), the coefficient of variation between the holes is below 15%, and the recovery is 80% - 120%. The whole analysis process could be completed within 1.5 h. It meets the requirements of rapid and batch detection of domoic acid. The method will have broad development prospects. PMID:22509610

  6. Metabolism of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid and naphthalene via gentisic acid by distinctly different sets of enzymes in Burkholderia sp. strain BC1.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Piyali Pal; Sarkar, Jayita; Basu, Soumik; Dutta, Tapan K

    2014-05-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain BC1, a soil bacterium, isolated from a naphthalene balls manufacturing waste disposal site, is capable of utilizing 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid (2H1NA) and naphthalene individually as the sole source of carbon and energy. To deduce the pathway for degradation of 2H1NA, metabolites isolated from resting cell culture were identified by a combination of chromatographic and spectrometric analyses. Characterization of metabolic intermediates, oxygen uptake studies and enzyme activities revealed that strain BC1 degrades 2H1NA via 2-naphthol, 1,2,6-trihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene and gentisic acid. In addition, naphthalene was found to be degraded via 1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene, salicylic acid and gentisic acid, with the putative involvement of the classical nag pathway. Unlike most other Gram-negative bacteria, metabolism of salicylic acid in strain BC1 involves a dual pathway, via gentisic acid and catechol, with the latter being metabolized by catechol 1,2-dioxygenase. Involvement of a non-oxidative decarboxylase in the enzymic transformation of 2H1NA to 2-naphthol indicates an alternative catabolic pathway for the bacterial degradation of hydroxynaphthoic acid. Furthermore, the biochemical observations on the metabolism of structurally similar compounds, naphthalene and 2-naphthol, by similar but different sets of enzymes in strain BC1 were validated by real-time PCR analyses.

  7. Metabolic effects of intestinal absorption and enterohepatic cycling of bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Ferrebee, Courtney B.; Dawson, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The classical functions of bile acids include acting as detergents to facilitate the digestion and absorption of nutrients in the gut. In addition, bile acids also act as signaling molecules to regulate glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism and energy expenditure. The signaling potential of bile acids in compartments such as the systemic circulation is regulated in part by an efficient enterohepatic circulation that functions to conserve and channel the pool of bile acids within the intestinal and hepatobiliary compartments. Changes in hepatobiliary and intestinal bile acid transport can alter the composition, size, and distribution of the bile acid pool. These alterations in turn can have significant effects on bile acid signaling and their downstream metabolic targets. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of the inter-relationship between the enterohepatic cycling of bile acids and the metabolic consequences of signaling via bile acid-activated receptors, such as farnesoid X nuclear receptor (FXR) and the G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor (TGR5). PMID:26579438

  8. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Ward, Thomas E

    2014-04-08

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  9. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Ward, Thomas E

    2013-07-23

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  10. Methods of combined bioprocessing and related microorganisms, thermophilic and/or acidophilic enzymes, and nucleic acids encoding said enzymes

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Ward, Thomas E.

    2016-03-22

    A genetically modified organism comprising: at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid isolated from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and encoding a polypeptide involved in at least partially degrading, cleaving, transporting, metabolizing, or removing polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups; and at least one nucleic acid sequence and/or at least one recombinant nucleic acid encoding a polypeptide involved in fermenting sugar molecules to a product. Additionally, enzymatic and/or proteinaceous extracts may be isolated from one or more genetically modified organisms. The extracts are utilized to convert biomass into a product. Further provided are methods of converting biomass into products comprising: placing the genetically modified organism and/or enzymatic extracts thereof in fluid contact with polysaccharides, cellulose, lignocellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, starch, sugars, sugar oligomers, carbohydrates, complex carbohydrates, chitin, heteroxylans, glycosides, and/or xylan-, glucan-, galactan-, or mannan-decorating groups.

  11. Effect of alternative pathway therapy on branched chain amino acid metabolism in urea cycle disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Fernando; Carter, Susan; O'Brien, William E; Lee, Brendan

    2004-04-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCDs) are a group of inborn errors of hepatic metabolism caused by the loss of enzymatic activities that mediate the transfer of nitrogen from ammonia to urea. These disorders often result in life-threatening hyperammonemia and hyperglutaminemia. A combination of sodium phenylbutyrate and sodium phenylacetate/benzoate is used in the clinical management of children with urea cycle defects as a glutamine trap, diverting nitrogen from urea synthesis to alternatives routes of excretion. We have observed that patients treated with these compounds have selective branched chain amino acid (BCAA) deficiency despite adequate dietary protein intake. However, the direct effect of alternative therapy on the steady state levels of plasma branched chain amino acids has not been well characterized. We have measured steady state plasma branched chain and other essential non-branched chain amino acids in control subjects, untreated ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency females and treated null activity urea cycle disorder patients in the fed steady state during the course of stable isotope studies. Steady-state leucine levels were noted to be significantly lower in treated urea cycle disorder patients when compared to either untreated ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency females or control subjects (P<0.0001). This effect was reproduced in control subjects who had depressed leucine levels when treated with sodium phenylacetate/benzoate (P<0.0001). Our studies suggest that this therapeutic modality has a substantial impact on the metabolism of branched chain amino acids in urea cycle disorder patients. These findings suggest that better titration of protein restriction could be achieved with branched chain amino acid supplementation in patients with UCDs who are on alternative route therapy.

  12. Methylphenidate treatment leads to abnormalities on krebs cycle enzymes in the brain of young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Réus, Gislaine Z; Scaini, Giselli; Furlanetto, Camila B; Morais, Meline O S; Jeremias, Isabela C; Mello-Santos, Lis Mairá; Freitas, Karolina V; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2013-08-01

    Studies have shown a relationship between energy metabolism and methylphenidate (MPH); however, there are no studies evaluating the effects of MPH in Krebs cycle. So, we investigated if MPH treatment could alter the activity of citrate synthase (CS), malate dehydrogenase (MD), and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ID) in the brain of young and adult Wistar rats. Our results showed that MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) reduced CS in the striatum and prefrontal cortex (PF), with MPH at all doses in the cerebellum and hippocampus after chronic treatment in young rats. In adult rats the CS was reduced in the cerebellum after acute treatment with MPH at all doses, and after chronic treatment in the PF and cerebellum with MPH (10 mg/kg), and in the hippocampus with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg). The ID decreased in the hippocampus and striatum with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg), and in the cortex (10 mg/kg) after acute treatment in young rats. In adult rats acute treatment with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) reduced ID in the cerebellum, and with MPH (10 mg/kg) in the cortex; chronic treatment with MPH (10 mg/kg) decreased ID in the PF; with MPH (2 and 10 mg/kg) in the cerebellum, and with MPH at all doses in the hippocampus. The MD did not alter. In conclusion, our results suggest that MPH can alter enzymes of Krebs cycle in brain areas involved with circuits related with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; however, such effects depend on age of animal and treatment regime.

  13. Isofunctional enzymes PAD1 and UbiX catalyze formation of a novel cofactor required by ferulic acid decarboxylase and 4-hydroxy-3-polyprenylbenzoic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fengming; Ferguson, Kyle L; Boyer, David R; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina; Marsh, E Neil G

    2015-04-17

    The decarboxylation of antimicrobial aromatic acids such as phenylacrylic acid (cinnamic acid) and ferulic acid by yeast requires two enzymes described as phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase (PAD1) and ferulic acid decarboxylase (FDC). These enzymes are of interest for various biotechnological applications, such as the production of chemical feedstocks from lignin under mild conditions. However, the specific role of each protein in catalyzing the decarboxylation reaction remains unknown. To examine this, we have overexpressed and purified both PAD1 and FDC from E. coli. We demonstrate that PAD1 is a flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-containing protein. However, it does not function as a decarboxylase. Rather, PAD1 catalyzes the formation of a novel, diffusible cofactor required by FDC for decarboxylase activity. Coexpression of FDC and PAD1 results in the production of FDC with high levels cofactor bound. Holo-FDC catalyzes the decarboxylation of phenylacrylic acid, coumaric acid and ferulic acid with apparent kcat ranging from 1.4-4.6 s(-1). The UV-visible and mass spectra of the cofactor indicate that it appears to be a novel, modified form of reduced FMN; however, its instability precluded determination of its structure. The E. coli enzymes UbiX and UbiD are related by sequence to PAD1 and FDC respectively and are involved in the decarboxylation of 4-hydroxy-3-octaprenylbenzoic acid, an intermediate in ubiquinone biosynthesis. We found that endogenous UbiX can also activate FDC. This implies that the same cofactor is required for decarboxylation of 4-hydroxy-3-polyprenylbenzoic acid by UbiD and suggests a wider role for this cofactor in metabolism.

  14. Unsuspected task for an old team: succinate, fumarate and other Krebs cycle acids in metabolic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Bénit, Paule; Letouzé, Eric; Rak, Malgorzata; Aubry, Laetitia; Burnichon, Nelly; Favier, Judith; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Rustin, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    Seventy years from the formalization of the Krebs cycle as the central metabolic turntable sustaining the cell respiratory process, key functions of several of its intermediates, especially succinate and fumarate, have been recently uncovered. The presumably immutable organization of the cycle has been challenged by a number of observations, and the variable subcellular location of a number of its constitutive protein components is now well recognized, although yet unexplained. Nonetheless, the most striking observations have been made in the recent period while investigating human diseases, especially a set of specific cancers, revealing the crucial role of Krebs cycle intermediates as factors affecting genes methylation and thus cell remodeling. We review here the recent advances and persisting incognita about the role of Krebs cycle acids in diverse aspects of cellular life and human pathology.

  15. Identification of RALDH2 as a Visually Regulated Retinoic Acid Synthesizing Enzyme in the Chick Choroid

    PubMed Central

    Hollaway, Lindsey R.; Lam, Wengtse; Li, Nan; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. All-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) has been implicated in the local regulation of scleral proteoglycan synthesis in vivo. The purpose of the present study was to identify the enzymes involved in the synthesis of atRA during visually guided ocular growth, the cells involved in modulation of atRA biosynthesis in the choroid, and the effect of choroid-derived atRA on scleral proteoglycan synthesis. Methods. Myopia was induced in White leghorn chicks by form deprivation for 10 days, followed by up to 15 days of unrestricted vision (recovery). Expression of atRA synthesizing enzymes was evaluated by semiquantitative qRT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. atRA synthesis was measured in organ cultures of isolated choroids using LC-tandem MS quantification. Scleral proteoglycan synthesis was measured in vitro by the incorporation of 35SO4 in CPC-precipitable glycosaminoglycans. Results. RALDH2 was the predominant RALDH transcript in the choroid (>100-fold that of RALDH3). RALDH2 mRNA was elevated after 12 and 24 hours of recovery (60% and 188%, respectively; P < 0.01). The atRA concentration was significantly higher in cultures of choroids from 24-hour to 15-day recovering eyes than in paired controls (∼195%; P < 0.01). Choroid conditioned medium from recovering choroids inhibited proteoglycan synthesis to 43% of controls (P < 0.02, paired t-test; n = 16) and produced a relative inhibition corresponding to a RA concentration of 7.20 × 10−8 M. Conclusions. The results of this study suggest that RALDH2 is the major retinal dehydrogenase in the chick choroid and is responsible for increased atRA synthesis in response to myopic defocus. PMID:22323456

  16. Enzymes involved in a novel anaerobic cyclohexane carboxylic acid degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Kung, Johannes W; Meier, Anne-Katrin; Mergelsberg, Mario; Boll, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    The anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHC) has so far been studied only in Rhodopseudomonas palustris, in which CHC is activated to cyclohexanoyl coenzyme A (cyclohexanoyl-CoA [CHCoA]) and then dehydrogenated to cyclohex-1-ene-1-carboxyl-CoA (CHeneCoA). This intermediate is further degraded by reactions of the R. palustris-specific benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway of aromatic compounds. However, CHeneCoA is not an intermediate in the degradation of aromatic compounds in all other known anaerobic bacteria; consequently, degradation of CHC was mostly unknown in anaerobic bacteria. We identified a previously unknown CHC degradation pathway in the Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter metallireducens by determining the following CHC-induced in vitro activities: (i) the activation of CHC to CHCoA by a succinyl-CoA:CHC CoA transferase, (ii) the 1,2-dehydrogenation of CHCoA to CHeneCoA by CHCoA dehydrogenase, and (iii) the unusual 1,4-dehydrogenation of CHeneCoA to cyclohex-1,5-diene-1-carboxyl-CoA. This last represents a previously unknown joint intermediate of the CHC and aromatic compound degradation pathway in bacteria other than R. palustris. The enzymes catalyzing the three reactions were purified and characterized as specific enzymes after heterologous expression of the encoding genes. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that expression of these genes was highly induced during growth with CHC but not with benzoate. The newly identified CHC degradation pathway is suggested to be present in nearly all CHC-degrading anaerobic bacteria, including denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and fermenting bacteria. Remarkably, all three CHC degradation pathways always link CHC catabolism to the catabolic pathways of aromatic compounds. We propose that the capacity to use CHC as a carbon source evolved from already-existing aromatic compound degradation pathways. PMID:25112478

  17. In Silico Phylogenetic Analysis and Molecular Modelling Study of 2-Haloalkanoic Acid Dehalogenase Enzymes from Bacterial and Fungal Origin

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Raghunath; Konkimalla, V. B.; Ratha, Jagnyeswar

    2016-01-01

    2-Haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase enzymes have broad range of applications, starting from bioremediation to chemical synthesis of useful compounds that are widely distributed in fungi and bacteria. In the present study, a total of 81 full-length protein sequences of 2-haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase from bacteria and fungi were retrieved from NCBI database. Sequence analysis such as multiple sequence alignment (MSA), conserved motif identification, computation of amino acid composition, and phylogenetic tree construction were performed on these primary sequences. From MSA analysis, it was observed that the sequences share conserved lysine (K) and aspartate (D) residues in them. Also, phylogenetic tree indicated a subcluster comprised of both fungal and bacterial species. Due to nonavailability of experimental 3D structure for fungal 2-haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase in the PDB, molecular modelling study was performed for both fungal and bacterial sources of enzymes present in the subcluster. Further structural analysis revealed a common evolutionary topology shared between both fungal and bacterial enzymes. Studies on the buried amino acids showed highly conserved Leu and Ser in the core, despite variation in their amino acid percentage. Additionally, a surface exposed tryptophan was conserved in all of these selected models. PMID:26880911

  18. Lipotoxicity in steatohepatitis occurs despite an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Rainey E; Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Williams, Caroline M; Nautiyal, Manisha; Mathew, Justin T; Martinez, Janie; Reinhard, Mary K; McDougall, Danielle J; Rocca, James R; Yost, Richard A; Cusi, Kenneth; Garrett, Timothy J; Sunny, Nishanth E

    2016-04-01

    The hepatic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is central to integrating macronutrient metabolism and is closely coupled to cellular respiration, free radical generation, and inflammation. Oxidative flux through the TCA cycle is induced during hepatic insulin resistance, in mice and humans with simple steatosis, reflecting early compensatory remodeling of mitochondrial energetics. We hypothesized that progressive severity of hepatic insulin resistance and the onset of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) would impair oxidative flux through the hepatic TCA cycle. Mice (C57/BL6) were fed a high-trans-fat high-fructose diet (TFD) for 8 wk to induce simple steatosis and NASH by 24 wk. In vivo fasting hepatic mitochondrial fluxes were determined by(13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based isotopomer analysis. Hepatic metabolic intermediates were quantified using mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomics. Hepatic triglyceride accumulation and insulin resistance preceded alterations in mitochondrial metabolism, since TCA cycle fluxes remained normal during simple steatosis. However, mice with NASH had a twofold induction (P< 0.05) of mitochondrial fluxes (μmol/min) through the TCA cycle (2.6 ± 0.5 vs. 5.4 ± 0.6), anaplerosis (9.1 ± 1.2 vs. 16.9 ± 2.2), and pyruvate cycling (4.9 ± 1.0 vs. 11.1 ± 1.9) compared with their age-matched controls. Induction of the TCA cycle activity during NASH was concurrent with blunted ketogenesis and accumulation of hepatic diacylglycerols (DAGs), ceramides (Cer), and long-chain acylcarnitines, suggesting inefficient oxidation and disposal of excess free fatty acids (FFA). Sustained induction of mitochondrial TCA cycle failed to prevent accretion of "lipotoxic" metabolites in the liver and could hasten inflammation and the metabolic transition to NASH.

  19. Lipotoxicity in steatohepatitis occurs despite an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Rainey E; Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Williams, Caroline M; Nautiyal, Manisha; Mathew, Justin T; Martinez, Janie; Reinhard, Mary K; McDougall, Danielle J; Rocca, James R; Yost, Richard A; Cusi, Kenneth; Garrett, Timothy J; Sunny, Nishanth E

    2016-04-01

    The hepatic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is central to integrating macronutrient metabolism and is closely coupled to cellular respiration, free radical generation, and inflammation. Oxidative flux through the TCA cycle is induced during hepatic insulin resistance, in mice and humans with simple steatosis, reflecting early compensatory remodeling of mitochondrial energetics. We hypothesized that progressive severity of hepatic insulin resistance and the onset of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) would impair oxidative flux through the hepatic TCA cycle. Mice (C57/BL6) were fed a high-trans-fat high-fructose diet (TFD) for 8 wk to induce simple steatosis and NASH by 24 wk. In vivo fasting hepatic mitochondrial fluxes were determined by(13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based isotopomer analysis. Hepatic metabolic intermediates were quantified using mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomics. Hepatic triglyceride accumulation and insulin resistance preceded alterations in mitochondrial metabolism, since TCA cycle fluxes remained normal during simple steatosis. However, mice with NASH had a twofold induction (P< 0.05) of mitochondrial fluxes (μmol/min) through the TCA cycle (2.6 ± 0.5 vs. 5.4 ± 0.6), anaplerosis (9.1 ± 1.2 vs. 16.9 ± 2.2), and pyruvate cycling (4.9 ± 1.0 vs. 11.1 ± 1.9) compared with their age-matched controls. Induction of the TCA cycle activity during NASH was concurrent with blunted ketogenesis and accumulation of hepatic diacylglycerols (DAGs), ceramides (Cer), and long-chain acylcarnitines, suggesting inefficient oxidation and disposal of excess free fatty acids (FFA). Sustained induction of mitochondrial TCA cycle failed to prevent accretion of "lipotoxic" metabolites in the liver and could hasten inflammation and the metabolic transition to NASH. PMID:26814015

  20. Endophytic Fungi from Frankincense Tree Improves Host Growth and Produces Extracellular Enzymes and Indole Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Al-Farsi, Zainab; Al-Mamari, Aza; Waqas, Muhammad; Asaf, Sajjad; Elyassi, Ali; Mabood, Fazal; Shin, Jae-Ho; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Boswellia sacra, an economically important frankincense-producing tree found in the desert woodlands of Oman, is least known for its endophytic fungal diversity and the potential of these fungi to produce extracellular enzymes and auxins. We isolated various fungal endophytes belonging to Eurotiales (11.8%), Chaetomiaceae (17.6%), Incertae sadis (29.5%), Aureobasidiaceae (17.6%), Nectriaceae (5.9%) and Sporomiaceae (17.6%) from the phylloplane (leaf) and caulosphere (stem) of the tree. Endophytes were identified using genomic DNA extraction, PCR amplification and sequencing the internal transcribed spacer regions, whereas a detailed phylogenetic analysis of the same gene fragment was made with homologous sequences. The endophytic colonization rate was significantly higher in the leaf (5.33%) than the stem (0.262%). The Shannon-Weiner diversity index was H′ 0.8729, while Simpson index was higher in the leaf (0.583) than in the stem (0.416). Regarding the endophytic fungi’s potential for extracellular enzyme production, fluorogenic 4-methylumbelliferone standards and substrates were used to determine the presence of cellulases, phosphatases and glucosidases in the pure culture. Among fungal strains, Penicillum citrinum BSL17 showed significantly higher amounts of glucosidases (62.15±1.8 μM-1min-1mL) and cellulases (62.11±1.6 μM-1min-1mL), whereas Preussia sp. BSL10 showed significantly higher secretion of glucosidases (69.4±0.79 μM-1min-1mL) and phosphatases (3.46±0.31μM-1min-1mL) compared to other strains. Aureobasidium sp. BSS6 and Preussia sp. BSL10 showed significantly higher potential for indole acetic acid production (tryptophan-dependent and independent pathways). Preussia sp. BSL10 was applied to the host B. sacra tree saplings, which exhibited significant improvements in plant growth parameters and accumulation of photosynthetic pigments. The current study concluded that endophytic microbial resources producing extracellular enzymes and auxin

  1. Endophytic Fungi from Frankincense Tree Improves Host Growth and Produces Extracellular Enzymes and Indole Acetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Al-Farsi, Zainab; Al-Mamari, Aza; Waqas, Muhammad; Asaf, Sajjad; Elyassi, Ali; Mabood, Fazal; Shin, Jae-Ho; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Boswellia sacra, an economically important frankincense-producing tree found in the desert woodlands of Oman, is least known for its endophytic fungal diversity and the potential of these fungi to produce extracellular enzymes and auxins. We isolated various fungal endophytes belonging to Eurotiales (11.8%), Chaetomiaceae (17.6%), Incertae sadis (29.5%), Aureobasidiaceae (17.6%), Nectriaceae (5.9%) and Sporomiaceae (17.6%) from the phylloplane (leaf) and caulosphere (stem) of the tree. Endophytes were identified using genomic DNA extraction, PCR amplification and sequencing the internal transcribed spacer regions, whereas a detailed phylogenetic analysis of the same gene fragment was made with homologous sequences. The endophytic colonization rate was significantly higher in the leaf (5.33%) than the stem (0.262%). The Shannon-Weiner diversity index was H' 0.8729, while Simpson index was higher in the leaf (0.583) than in the stem (0.416). Regarding the endophytic fungi's potential for extracellular enzyme production, fluorogenic 4-methylumbelliferone standards and substrates were used to determine the presence of cellulases, phosphatases and glucosidases in the pure culture. Among fungal strains, Penicillum citrinum BSL17 showed significantly higher amounts of glucosidases (62.15±1.8 μM-1min-1mL) and cellulases (62.11±1.6 μM-1min-1mL), whereas Preussia sp. BSL10 showed significantly higher secretion of glucosidases (69.4±0.79 μM-1min-1mL) and phosphatases (3.46±0.31μM-1min-1mL) compared to other strains. Aureobasidium sp. BSS6 and Preussia sp. BSL10 showed significantly higher potential for indole acetic acid production (tryptophan-dependent and independent pathways). Preussia sp. BSL10 was applied to the host B. sacra tree saplings, which exhibited significant improvements in plant growth parameters and accumulation of photosynthetic pigments. The current study concluded that endophytic microbial resources producing extracellular enzymes and auxin could

  2. Endophytic Fungi from Frankincense Tree Improves Host Growth and Produces Extracellular Enzymes and Indole Acetic Acid.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al-Rawahi, Ahmed; Al-Farsi, Zainab; Al-Mamari, Aza; Waqas, Muhammad; Asaf, Sajjad; Elyassi, Ali; Mabood, Fazal; Shin, Jae-Ho; Lee, In-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Boswellia sacra, an economically important frankincense-producing tree found in the desert woodlands of Oman, is least known for its endophytic fungal diversity and the potential of these fungi to produce extracellular enzymes and auxins. We isolated various fungal endophytes belonging to Eurotiales (11.8%), Chaetomiaceae (17.6%), Incertae sadis (29.5%), Aureobasidiaceae (17.6%), Nectriaceae (5.9%) and Sporomiaceae (17.6%) from the phylloplane (leaf) and caulosphere (stem) of the tree. Endophytes were identified using genomic DNA extraction, PCR amplification and sequencing the internal transcribed spacer regions, whereas a detailed phylogenetic analysis of the same gene fragment was made with homologous sequences. The endophytic colonization rate was significantly higher in the leaf (5.33%) than the stem (0.262%). The Shannon-Weiner diversity index was H' 0.8729, while Simpson index was higher in the leaf (0.583) than in the stem (0.416). Regarding the endophytic fungi's potential for extracellular enzyme production, fluorogenic 4-methylumbelliferone standards and substrates were used to determine the presence of cellulases, phosphatases and glucosidases in the pure culture. Among fungal strains, Penicillum citrinum BSL17 showed significantly higher amounts of glucosidases (62.15±1.8 μM-1min-1mL) and cellulases (62.11±1.6 μM-1min-1mL), whereas Preussia sp. BSL10 showed significantly higher secretion of glucosidases (69.4±0.79 μM-1min-1mL) and phosphatases (3.46±0.31μM-1min-1mL) compared to other strains. Aureobasidium sp. BSS6 and Preussia sp. BSL10 showed significantly higher potential for indole acetic acid production (tryptophan-dependent and independent pathways). Preussia sp. BSL10 was applied to the host B. sacra tree saplings, which exhibited significant improvements in plant growth parameters and accumulation of photosynthetic pigments. The current study concluded that endophytic microbial resources producing extracellular enzymes and auxin could

  3. Identification of enzyme activity that conjugates indole-3-acetic acid to aspartate in immature seeds of pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Maciej; Jakubowska, Anna

    2008-01-01

    This study describes the first identification of plant enzyme activity catalyzing the conjugation of indole-3-acetic acid to amino acids. Enzymatic synthesis of indole-3-acetylaspartate (IAA-Asp) by a crude enzyme preparation from immature seeds of pea (Pisum sativum) was observed. The reaction yielded a product with the same Rf as IAA-Asp standard after thin layer chromatography. The identity of IAA-Asp was verified by HPLC analysis. IAA-Asp formation was dependent on ATP and Mg2+, and was linear during a 60 min period. The enzyme preparation obtained after poly(ethylene glycol) 6000 fractionation showed optimum activity at pH 8.0, and the temperature optimum for IAA-Asp synthesis was 30 degrees C. PMID:17920159

  4. Activation Energies for an Enzyme-Catalyzed and Acid-Catalyzed Hydrolysis: An Introductory Interdisciplinary Experiment for Chemists and Biochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, K. R.; Meyers, M. B.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment in which students determine and compare the Arrhenius activation energies (Ea) for the hydrolysis of salicin. This reaction is subject to catalysis both by acid and by the enzyme emulsin (beta-d-glucoside glycohydrolase). (JN)

  5. EVALUATION OF AN ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR BIOLOGICAL MONITORING OF 3-PHENOXYBENZOIC ACID IN URINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract describes the development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method for monitoring 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D exposures). The ELISA is compared with a gas chromatograhy/mass spectrometry procedure. ELISA method development steps and comparative ...

  6. Effect of simulated acid rain on the litter decomposition of Quercus acutissima and Pinus massoniana in forest soil microcosms and the relationship with soil enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congyan; Guo, Peng; Han, Guomin; Feng, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Peng; Tian, Xingjun

    2010-06-01

    With the continuing increase in human activities, ecologists are increasingly interested in understanding the effects of acid rain on litter decomposition. Two dominant litters were chosen from Zijin Mountain in China: Quercus acutissima from a broad-leaved forest and Pinus massoniana from a coniferous forest. The litters were incubated in microcosms and treated with simulated acid rain (gradient pH levels). During a six-month incubation, changes in chemical composition (i.e., lignin, total carbohydrate, and nitrogen), litter mass losses, soil pH values, and activities of degradative enzymes were determined. Results showed that litter mass losses were depressed after exposure to acid rain and the effects of acid rain on the litter decomposition rates of needles were higher than on those of leaves. Results also revealed that simulated acid rain restrained the activities of cellulase, invertase, nitrate reductase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, and urease, while it enhanced the activities of catalase in most cases during the six-month decomposition process. Catalase and polyphenol oxidase were primarily responsible for litter decomposition in the broad-leaved forest, while invertase, nitrate reductase, and urease were primarily responsible for litter decomposition in the coniferous forest. The results suggest acid rain-restrained litter decomposition may be due to the depressed enzymatic activities. According to the results of this study, soil carbon in subtropical forests would accumulate as a long-term consequence of continued acid rain. This may presumably alter the balance of ecosystem carbon flux, nutrient cycling, and humus formation, which may, in turn, have multiple effects on forest ecosystems.

  7. Effect of simulated acid rain on the litter decomposition of Quercus acutissima and Pinus massoniana in forest soil microcosms and the relationship with soil enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congyan; Guo, Peng; Han, Guomin; Feng, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Peng; Tian, Xingjun

    2010-06-01

    With the continuing increase in human activities, ecologists are increasingly interested in understanding the effects of acid rain on litter decomposition. Two dominant litters were chosen from Zijin Mountain in China: Quercus acutissima from a broad-leaved forest and Pinus massoniana from a coniferous forest. The litters were incubated in microcosms and treated with simulated acid rain (gradient pH levels). During a six-month incubation, changes in chemical composition (i.e., lignin, total carbohydrate, and nitrogen), litter mass losses, soil pH values, and activities of degradative enzymes were determined. Results showed that litter mass losses were depressed after exposure to acid rain and the effects of acid rain on the litter decomposition rates of needles were higher than on those of leaves. Results also revealed that simulated acid rain restrained the activities of cellulase, invertase, nitrate reductase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, and urease, while it enhanced the activities of catalase in most cases during the six-month decomposition process. Catalase and polyphenol oxidase were primarily responsible for litter decomposition in the broad-leaved forest, while invertase, nitrate reductase, and urease were primarily responsible for litter decomposition in the coniferous forest. The results suggest acid rain-restrained litter decomposition may be due to the depressed enzymatic activities. According to the results of this study, soil carbon in subtropical forests would accumulate as a long-term consequence of continued acid rain. This may presumably alter the balance of ecosystem carbon flux, nutrient cycling, and humus formation, which may, in turn, have multiple effects on forest ecosystems. PMID:20382410

  8. Enzyme immobilization on ultrafine cellulose fibers via poly(acrylic acid) electrolyte grafts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hsieh, You-Lo

    2005-05-20

    Ultrafine cellulose fiber (diameter 200-400 nm) surfaces were grafted with polyacrylic acid (PAA) via either ceric ion initiated polymerization or methacrylation of cellulose with methacrylate chloride (MACl) and subsequent free-radical polymerization of acrylic acid. PAA grafts by ceric ion initiated polymerization increased with increasing reaction time (2-24 h), monomer (0.3-2.4 M), and initiator (1-10 mM) concentrations, and spanned a broad range from 5.5-850%. PAA grafts on the methacrylated cellulose fibers also increased with increasing molar ratios of MACl to cellulosic hydroxyl groups (MACl/OH, 2-6.4) and monomer acrylic acid (AA) to initiator potassium persulfate (KPS) ratios ([AA]/[KPS], 1.5-6), and were in a much narrower range between 12.8% and 29.4%. The adsorption of lipase (at 1 mg/ml lipase and pH 7) and the activity of adsorbed lipase (pH 8.5, 30 degrees C), in both cases decreased with increasing PAA grafts. The highest adsorption and activity of the lipase on the ceric ion initiated grafted fibers were 1.28 g/g PAA and 4.3 U/mg lipase, respectively, at the lowest grafting level of 5.5% PAA, whereas they were 0.33 g/g PAA and 7.1 U/mg lipase, respectively, at 12.8% PAA grafts on the methacrylated and grafted fibers. The properties of the grafted fibers and the absorption behavior and activity of lipase suggest that the PAA grafts are gel-like by ceric-initiated reaction and brush-like by methacrylation and polymerization. The adsorbed lipase on the ceric ion-initiated grafted surface possessed greatly improved organic solvent stability over the crude lipase. The adsorbed lipases exhibited 0.5 and 0.3 of the initial activity in the second and third assay cycles, respectively. PMID:15816022

  9. Gas-aerosol cycling of ammonia and nitric acid in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Geert-Jan; Derksen, Jeroen

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric ammonia and nitric acid are present over NW Europe in large abundance. Observations made during the IMPACT measurement campaign (May 2008, Cabauw, The Netherlands) show a pronounced diurnal cycle of aerosol ammonium and nitrate on relatively dry days. Simultaneously, AERONET data show a distinct diurnal cycle in aerosol optical thickness (AOT). We used a global aerosol-climate model (ECHAM5-HAM) and a detailed aerosol-cloud column model to help analyse the observations from this period. The study shows that the diurnal cycle in AOT is partly associated with particle number concentration, with distinct peaks in the morning and evening. More important is relative humidity (RH). RH maximizes in the night and early morning, decreases during the morning and increases again in the evening. The particle wet radius, and therefore AOT, changes accordingly. In addition, the RH variability also influences chemistry associated with ammonia and nitric acid (formation of ammonium nitrate, dissolution in aerosol water), resulting in the observed diurnal cycle of aerosol ammonium and nitrate. The additional aerosol matter increases the hygroscopicity of the particles, and this leads to further swelling by water vapor condensation and a further increase of AOT. During the day, as RH decreases and the particles shrink, aerosol ammonium and nitrate are again partly expelled to the gas phase. This behaviour contributes significantly to the observed diurnal cycle in AOT, and it illustrates the complexity of using AOT as a proxy for aerosol concentrations in aerosol climate studies in the case of heavily polluted areas.

  10. Temperature effects on sealed lead acid batteries and charging techniques to prolong cycle life.

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, Ronda

    2004-06-01

    Sealed lead acid cells are used in many projects in Sandia National Laboratories Department 2660 Telemetry and Instrumentation systems. The importance of these cells in battery packs for powering electronics to remotely conduct tests is significant. Since many tests are carried out in flight or launched, temperature is a major factor. It is also important that the battery packs are properly charged so that the test is completed before the pack cannot supply sufficient power. Department 2665 conducted research and studies to determine the effects of temperature on cycle time as well as charging techniques to maximize cycle life and cycle times on sealed lead acid cells. The studies proved that both temperature and charging techniques are very important for battery life to support successful field testing and expensive flight and launched tests. This report demonstrates the effects of temperature on cycle time for SLA cells as well as proper charging techniques to get the most life and cycle time out of SLA cells in battery packs.

  11. Biosynthesis of a D-amino acid in peptide linkage by an enzyme from frog skin secretions

    PubMed Central

    Jilek, Alexander; Mollay, Christa; Tippelt, Christa; Grassi, Jacques; Mignogna, Giuseppina; Müllegger, Johannes; Sander, Veronika; Fehrer, Christine; Barra, Donatella; Kreil, Günther

    2005-01-01

    d-amino acids are present in some peptides from amphibian skin. These residues are derived from the corresponding l-amino acids present in the respective precursors. From skin secretions of Bombinae, we have isolated an enzyme that catalyzes the isomerization of an l-Ile in position 2 of a model peptide to d-allo-Ile. In the course of this reaction, which proceeds without the addition of a cofactor, radioactivity from tritiated water is incorporated into the second position of the product. The amino acid sequence of this isomerase could be deduced from cloned cDNA and genomic DNA. After expression of this cDNA in oocytes of Xenopus laevis, isomerase activity could be detected. Polypeptides related to the frog skin enzyme are present in several vertebrate species, including humans. PMID:15758070

  12. Novel flowering and fatty acid characters in rapid cycling Brassica napus L. resynthesized by protoplast fusion.

    PubMed

    Hansen, L N; Earle, E D

    1994-12-01

    Novel rapid cycling Brassica napus lines have been produced by protoplast fusion between rapid cycling B. oleracea and rapid cycling B. rapa. Fusion products were selected based on iodoacetate inactivation and regeneration ability. A total of 36 plants was recovered from 3 regenerating calli. All were confirmed as somatic hybrids by morphological features, flow cytometric estimation of nuclear DNA content, RAPD analysis and/or DNA hybridization. Plants from two of the calli contained chloroplasts from B. rapa, and plants from the third contained B. oleracea chloroplasts. Some plants flowered in vitro, but on average flowering was initiated 22 days after transfer to soil. Although seed set was fairly low after self pollination, more seeds were obtained from pollination of open flowers than from pollination of buds. Seeds of the somatic hybrid B. napus showed novel fatty acid compositions, different from the mean of the two parental lines. Flowering was monitored in plants grown from seeds of the somatic hybrids, rapid cycling B. napus (CrGC 5-1) and the two diploid parental genotypes. Progeny of the somatic hybrids flowered faster and were more vigorous than rapid cycling B. napus (CrGC 5-1). The improved lines contain chloroplasts from B. rapa, unlike rapid cycling B. napus (CrGC 5-1), which has B. oleracea chloroplasts. The somatic hybrid lines produced may be useful for genetic studies or further in vitro manipulations.

  13. Pull-in urea cycle for the production of fumaric acid in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Wang, Zening; Deng, Li; Tan, Tianwei; Wang, Fang; Yan, Yajun

    2015-06-01

    Fumaric acid (FA) is an important raw material in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. In this work, Escherichia coli was metabolically engineered for the production of FA. The fumA, fumB, fumC, and frdABCD genes were deleted to cut off the downstream pathway of FA. In addition, the iclR and arcA genes were also deleted to activate the glyoxylate shunt and to reinforce the oxidative Krebs cycle. To increase the FA yield, this base strain was further engineered to be pulled in the urea cycle by overexpressing the native carAB, argI, and heterologous rocF genes. The metabolites and the proteins of the Krebs cycle and the urea cycle were analyzed to confirm that the induced urea cycle improved the FA accumulation. With the induced urea cycle, the resulting strain ABCDIA-RAC was able to produce 11.38 mmol/L of FA from 83.33 mmol/L of glucose in a flask culture during 24 h of incubation.

  14. Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase, the ultimate enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of juvenile hormone III, exhibits substrate control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report on the cloning, sequencing, characterization, 3D modeling and docking of Aedes aegypti juvenile hormone acid methyl transferase (AeaJHAMT), the enzyme that converts juvenile hormone acid (JHA) into juvenile hormone (JH). Purified recombinant AeaJHAMT was extensively characterized for enzym...

  15. L-Malate dehydrogenase activity in the reductive arm of the incomplete citric acid cycle of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2013-11-01

    The autotrophic nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea does not synthesize 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase under aerobic conditions and so has an incomplete citric acid cycle. L-malate (S-malate) dehydrogenase (MDH) from N. europaea was predicted to show similarity to the NADP(+)-dependent enzymes from chloroplasts and was separated from the NAD(+)-dependent proteins from most other bacteria or mitochondria. MDH activity in a soluble fraction from N. europaea ATCC 19718 was measured spectrophotometrically and exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the reductive direction, activity with NADH increased from pH 6.0 to 8.5 but activity with NADPH was consistently lower and decreased with pH. At pH 7.0, the K m for oxaloacetate was 20 μM; the K m for NADH was 22 μM but that for NADPH was at least 10 times higher. In the oxidative direction, activity with NAD(+) increased with pH but there was very little activity with NADP(+). At pH 7.0, the K m for L-malate was 5 mM and the K m for NAD(+) was 24 μM. The reductive activity was quite insensitive to inhibition by L-malate but the oxidative activity was very sensitive to oxaloacetate. MDH activity was not strongly activated or inhibited by glycolytic or citric acid cycle metabolites, adenine nucleotides, NaCl concentrations, or most metal ions, but increased with temperature up to about 55 °C. The reductive activity was consistently 10-20 times higher than the oxidative activity. These results indicate that the L-malate dehydrogenase in N. europaea is similar to other NAD(+)-dependent MDHs (EC 1.1.1.37) but physiologically adapted for its role in a reductive biosynthetic sequence.

  16. Enzymic measurement of primary bile acids and the primary bile acid ratio in serum with the IL-Multistat III Fluorescence Light-Scattering Centrifugal Analyzer.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou-Diamandi, A; Diamandis, E P; Soldin, S J

    1984-08-01

    Enzymic fluorimetric methods are described for the determination of primary bile acids and of chenodeoxycholic acid (CDC) and cholic acid (C) in serum. Bile acids are extracted from 0.3 mL of serum in a simple 5-min step with use of Sep-Pak C cartridges. Total primary bile acids are measured by an equilibrium technique after reaction with beta-NAD in the presence of 7 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Chenodeoxycholic acid (and its conjugates) is measured by a reaction-rate technique employing the same reaction as above but under different experimental conditions. A small contribution of cholic acid (and its conjugates) to the reaction rate is eliminated by simple calculations. Cholic acid is calculated by difference of the two determinations. In both assays NADH fluorescence is measured with the Multistat centrifugal analyzer. Absolute recovery of bile acids from serum was about 87%. Day-to-day standard deviations for CDC and C were 1.6 and 2.0 mumol/L at serum concentrations of 22.1 and 24.1 mumol/L respectively. Comparison data with a cholylglycine RIA procedure gave the following correlation coefficients (x = RIA, y = proposed method): r = 0.980 (RIA vs total primary bile acids), r = 0.918 (RIA vs CDC) and r = 0.989 (RIA vs C). The methods described appear more practical for use on a routine basis than methods in the literature for the calculation of the primary bile acid ratio. PMID:6090040

  17. Suppression of tricarboxylic acid cycle in Escherichia coli exposed to sub-MICs of aminoglycosides.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallero, A; Eftimiadi, C; Radin, L; Schito, G C

    1990-01-01

    The metabolic activity of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 challenged with sub-MICs of aminoglycosides was analyzed with a batch calorimeter. High-performance and gas-liquid chromatographic techniques were utilized to evaluate the concentrations of metabolic reactants, intermediates, and end products. The data reported indicate that aminoglycosides inhibit or delay bacterial catabolism of carboxylic acids, with the following relative degrees of activity: amikacin greater than gentamicin greater than sisomicin greater than netilmicin greater than kanamycin. The decrease in total biomass production was proportional to the degree of tricarboxylic acid cycle inhibition. PMID:2183717

  18. On a hypothetical generational relationship between HCN and constituents of the reductive citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Eschenmoser, Albert

    2007-04-01

    Encouraged by observations made on the course of reactions the HCN-tetramer can undergo with acetaldehyde, I delineate a constitutional and potentially generational relationship between HCN and those constituents of the reductive citric acid cycle that are direct precursors of amino acids in contemporary metabolism. In this context, the robustness postulate of classical prebiotic chemistry is questioned, and, by an analysis of the (hypothetical) reaction-tree of a stepwise hydrolysis of the HCN-tetramer, it is shown how such a non-robust chemical reaction platform could harbor the potential for the emergence of autocatalytic cycles. It is concluded that the chemistry of HCN should be revisited by focussing on its non-robust parts in order to demonstrate its full potential as one of the possible roots of prebiotic self-organizing chemical processes.

  19. Effect on combined cycle efficiency of stack gas temperature constraints to avoid acid corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    To avoid condensation of sulfuric acid in the gas turbine exhaust when burning fuel oils contaning sulfur, the exhaust stack temperature and cold-end heat exchanger surfaces must be kept above the condensation temperature. Raising the exhaust stack temperature, however, results in lower combined cycle efficiency compared to that achievable by a combined cycle burning a sulfur-free fuel. The maximum difference in efficiency between the use of sulfur-free and fuels containing 0.8 percent sulfur is found to be less than one percentage point. The effect of using a ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) and a fuel containing sulfur is also evaluated. The combined-cycle efficiency gain using a TBC with a fuel containing sulfur compared to a sulfur-free fuel without TBC is 0.6 to 1.0 percentage points with air-cooled gas turbines and 1.6 to 1.8 percentage points with water-cooled gas turbines.

  20. An ATP and Oxalate Generating Variant Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Counters Aluminum Toxicity in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ranji; Lemire, Joseph; Mailloux, Ryan J.; Chénier, Daniel; Hamel, Robert; Appanna, Vasu D.

    2009-01-01

    Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is essential in almost all aerobic organisms, its precise modulation and integration in global cellular metabolism is not fully understood. Here, we report on an alternative TCA cycle uniquely aimed at generating ATP and oxalate, two metabolites critical for the survival of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The upregulation of isocitrate lyase (ICL) and acylating glyoxylate dehydrogenase (AGODH) led to the enhanced synthesis of oxalate, a dicarboxylic acid involved in the immobilization of aluminum (Al). The increased activity of succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS) and oxalate CoA-transferase (OCT) in the Al-stressed cells afforded an effective route to ATP synthesis from oxalyl-CoA via substrate level phosphorylation. This modified TCA cycle with diminished efficacy in NADH production and decreased CO2-evolving capacity, orchestrates the synthesis of oxalate, NADPH, and ATP, ingredients pivotal to the survival of P. fluorescens in an Al environment. The channeling of succinyl-CoA towards ATP formation may be an important function of the TCA cycle during anaerobiosis, Fe starvation and O2-limited conditions. PMID:19809498

  1. Hypertonic stress regulates amino acid transport and cell cycle proteins in chick embryo hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Bruscalupi, Giovannella; Massimi, Mara; Spagnuolo, Silvana; Fiore, Anna Maria; Leoni, Silvia

    2012-02-01

    Hyperosmotic stress affects cell growth, decreasing cell volume and increasing the uptake of organic osmolytes. However, the sensitivity of embryonic cells to osmotic treatment remains to be established. We have analysed some aspects of cell-cycle control and amino-acid transport in hypertonic conditions during prenatal life. The effects of hyperosmotic stress on amino-acid uptake mediated by system A, (3)H-thymidine incorporation, and regulation of cell-cycle proteins were analysed in chick embryo hepatocytes. Hypertonic stress increased system A activity and caused cell-cycle delay. Effects on amino-acid transport involved p38 kinase activation and new carrier synthesis. Cyclin D1, cdk4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4) and PCNA (proliferating-cell nuclear antigen) levels decreased, whereas cyclin E, p21 and p53 levels were unchanged. Incorporation of (3)H-leucine indicated decreased synthesis of cyclin D1. In contrast, analysis of mRNA by qRT-PCR (quantitative real-time PCR) showed a net increase of cyclin D1 transcripts, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation. The data show that chick embryo hepatocytes respond to hyperosmotic conditions by arresting cell growth to prevent DNA damage and increasing osmolyte uptake to regulate cell volume, indicating that the adaptive response to environmental stress exists during prenatal life.

  2. Cross-Species Analysis of Protein Dynamics Associated with Hydride and Proton Transfer in the Catalytic Cycle of the Light-Driven Enzyme Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Hoeven, Robin; Hardman, Samantha J O; Heyes, Derren J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-02-16

    Experimental interrogation of the relationship between protein dynamics and enzyme catalysis is challenging. Light-activated protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) is an excellent model for investigating this relationship because photoinitiation of the reaction cycle enables coordinated turnover in a "dark-assembled" ternary enzyme-substrate complex. The catalytic cycle involves sequential hydride and proton transfers (from NADPH and an active site tyrosine residue, respectively) to the substrate protochlorophyllide. Studies with a limited cross-species subset of POR enzymes (n = 4) have suggested that protein dynamics associated with hydride and proton transfer are distinct [Heyes, D. J., Levy, C., Sakuma, M., Robertson, D. L., and Scrutton, N. S. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 11849-11854]. Here, we use steady-state assays and single-turnover laser flash spectroscopy to analyze hydride and proton transfer dynamics in an extended series of POR enzymes taken from many species, including cyanobacteria, algae, embryophytes, and angiosperms. Hydride/proton transfer in all eukaryotic PORs is faster compared to prokaryotic PORs, suggesting active site architecture has been optimized in eukaryotic PORs following endosymbiosis. Visible pump-probe spectroscopy was also used to demonstrate a common photoexcitation mechanism for representative POR enzymes from different branches of the phylogenetic tree. Dynamics associated with hydride transfer are localized to the active site of all POR enzymes and are conserved. However, dynamics associated with proton transfer are variable. Protein dynamics associated with proton transfer are also coupled to solvent dynamics in cyanobacterial PORs, and these networks are likely required to optimize (shorten) the donor-acceptor distance for proton transfer. These extended networks are absent in algal and plant PORs. Our analysis suggests that extended networks of dynamics are disfavored, possibly through natural selection. Implications for

  3. Cross-Species Analysis of Protein Dynamics Associated with Hydride and Proton Transfer in the Catalytic Cycle of the Light-Driven Enzyme Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Hoeven, Robin; Hardman, Samantha J O; Heyes, Derren J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-02-16

    Experimental interrogation of the relationship between protein dynamics and enzyme catalysis is challenging. Light-activated protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) is an excellent model for investigating this relationship because photoinitiation of the reaction cycle enables coordinated turnover in a "dark-assembled" ternary enzyme-substrate complex. The catalytic cycle involves sequential hydride and proton transfers (from NADPH and an active site tyrosine residue, respectively) to the substrate protochlorophyllide. Studies with a limited cross-species subset of POR enzymes (n = 4) have suggested that protein dynamics associated with hydride and proton transfer are distinct [Heyes, D. J., Levy, C., Sakuma, M., Robertson, D. L., and Scrutton, N. S. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 11849-11854]. Here, we use steady-state assays and single-turnover laser flash spectroscopy to analyze hydride and proton transfer dynamics in an extended series of POR enzymes taken from many species, including cyanobacteria, algae, embryophytes, and angiosperms. Hydride/proton transfer in all eukaryotic PORs is faster compared to prokaryotic PORs, suggesting active site architecture has been optimized in eukaryotic PORs following endosymbiosis. Visible pump-probe spectroscopy was also used to demonstrate a common photoexcitation mechanism for representative POR enzymes from different branches of the phylogenetic tree. Dynamics associated with hydride transfer are localized to the active site of all POR enzymes and are conserved. However, dynamics associated with proton transfer are variable. Protein dynamics associated with proton transfer are also coupled to solvent dynamics in cyanobacterial PORs, and these networks are likely required to optimize (shorten) the donor-acceptor distance for proton transfer. These extended networks are absent in algal and plant PORs. Our analysis suggests that extended networks of dynamics are disfavored, possibly through natural selection. Implications for

  4. Tricarboxylic acid cycle-sustained oxidative phosphorylation in isolated myelin vesicles.

    PubMed

    Ravera, Silvia; Bartolucci, Martina; Calzia, Daniela; Aluigi, Maria Grazia; Ramoino, Paola; Morelli, Alessandro; Panfoli, Isabella

    2013-11-01

    The Central Nervous System (CNS) function was shown to be fueled exclusively by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). This is in line with the sensitivity of brain to hypoxia, but less with the scarcity of the mitochondria in CNS. Consistently with the ectopic expression of FoF1-ATP synthase and the electron transfer chain in myelin, we have reported data demonstrating that isolated myelin vesicles (IMV) conduct OXPHOS. It may suggest that myelin sheath could be a site for the whole aerobic degradation of glucose. In this paper, we assayed the functionality of glycolysis and of TCA cycle enzymes in IMV purified from bovine forebrain. We found the presence and activity of all of the glycolytic and TCA cycle enzymes, comparable to those in mitochondria-enriched fractions, in the same experimental conditions. IMV also contain consistent carbonic anhydrase activity. These data suggest that myelin may be a contributor in energy supply for the axon, performing an extra-mitochondrial aerobic OXPHOS. The vision of myelin as the site of aerobic metabolism may shed a new light on many demyelinating pathologies, that cause an a yet unresolved axonal degeneration and whose clinical onset coincides with myelin development completion.

  5. Studies on the nephrotoxicity of p-nitrophenylarsonic acid: changes in rat kidney and urinary enzyme activities following the administration of p-nitrophenylarsonic acid.

    PubMed

    Price, R G

    1979-02-01

    Histological studies showed that the administration of p-nitrophenylarsonic acid to rats resulted in renal tubular necrosis. The nephrotoxin was administered intraperitoneally and doses greater than 30 mg/kg were found to be fatal. The severity of the renal lesion depended on the amount of the nephrotoxin used. Elevated serum urea levels, urinary protein and volume were recorded over an 8-day period following the injection of the nephrotoxin. These changes were paralleled by an increase in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase, acid and alkaline phosphatase, N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase and beta-glucosidase in the urine. beta-Glycosidase activities increased in kidney homogenates, immediately after the injection of the nephrotoxin, but this eventually fell to well below the normal range. Subcellular fractions were prepared from sucrose homogenates by differential centrifugation and beta-glycosidases and cytochrome oxidase were used as enzyme markers. Only minor changes in the activity of cytochrome oxidase activity resulted from the administration of p-nitrophenylarsonic acid. One of the earliest indications of renal damage was a decrease in lysosomal latency. The activities of the lysosomal and soluble enzymes were elevated above normal during the first two days after the injection of p-nitrophenylarsonic acid, but they fell to values, significantly lower than normal, on the third day. The isoenzymic forms of beta-galactosidase, beta-glucosidase and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase in normal and damaged kidneys were studied, using starch gel electrophoresis. The activities of both the lysosomal and the soluble forms of these enzymes decreased following the injection of the nephrotoxin, confirming the results obtained with whole homogenates. The relationship between the changes in renal enzyme activity and urinary enzyme excretion during the nephrotoxic process is discussed.

  6. Expression of the retinoic acid catabolic enzyme CYP26B1 in the human brain to maintain signaling homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stoney, Patrick N; Fragoso, Yara D; Saeed, Reem Bu; Ashton, Anna; Goodman, Timothy; Simons, Claire; Gomaa, Mohamed S; Sementilli, Angelo; Sementilli, Leonardo; Ross, Alexander W; Morgan, Peter J; McCaffery, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a potent regulator of gene transcription via its activation of a set of nuclear receptors controlling transcriptional activation. Precise maintenance of where and when RA is generated is essential and achieved by local expression of synthetic and catabolic enzymes. The catabolic enzymes Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1 have been studied in detail in the embryo, where they limit gradients of RA that form patterns of gene expression, crucial for morphogenesis. This paracrine role of RA has been assumed to occur in most tissues and that the RA synthetic enzymes release RA at a site distant from the catabolic enzymes. In contrast to the embryonic CNS, relatively little is known about RA metabolism in the adult brain. This study investigated the distribution of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1 transcripts in the rat brain, identifying several novel regions of expression, including the cerebral cortex for both enzymes and striatum for Cyp26b1. In vivo use of a new and potent inhibitor of the Cyp26 enzymes, ser 2-7, demonstrated a function for endogenous Cyp26 in the brain and that hippocampal RA levels can be raised by ser 2-7, altering the effect of RA on differential patterning of cell proliferation in the hippocampal region of neurogenesis, the subgranular zone. The expression of CYP26A1 and CYP26B1 was also investigated in the adult human brain and colocalization of CYP26A1 and the RA synthetic enzyme RALDH2 indicated a different, autocrine role for RA in human hippocampal neurons. Studies with the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line implied that the co-expression of RA synthetic and catabolic enzymes maintains retinoid homeostasis within neurons. This presents a novel view of RA in human neurons as part of an autocrine, intracellular signaling system.

  7. Classifying Multifunctional Enzymes by Incorporating Three Different Models into Chou's General Pseudo Amino Acid Composition.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hong-Liang; Xiao, Xuan

    2016-08-01

    With the avalanche of the newly found protein sequences in the post-genomic epoch, there is an increasing trend for annotating a number of newly discovered enzyme sequences. Among the various proteins, enzyme was considered as the one of the largest kind of proteins. It takes part in most of the biochemical reactions and plays a key role in metabolic pathways. Multifunctional enzyme is enzyme that plays multiple physiological roles. Given a multifunctional enzyme sequence, how can we identify its class? Especially, how can we deal with the multi-classes problem since an enzyme may simultaneously belong to two or more functional classes? To address these problems, which are obviously very important both to basic research and drug development, a multi-label classifier was developed via three different prediction models with multi-label K-nearest algorithm. Experimental results obtained on a stringent benchmark dataset of enzymes by jackknife cross-validation test show that the predicting results were exciting, indicating that the current method could be an effective and promising high throughput method in the enzyme research. We hope it could play an important complementary role to the existing predictors in identifying the classes of enzymes. PMID:27113936

  8. Enzyme inhibition as a possible mechanism of the mutagenicity of dithiocarbamic acid derivatives in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Rannug, A; Rannug, U

    1984-05-01

    In recent years data have accumulated regarding genotoxic properties of dithiocarbamic acid derivatives. The results from the present work indicate that the mutagenicity of these compounds depends on an indirect effect via oxygen radicals. Mutagenicity of tetramethylthiuram disulfide ( TMTD ), that was used as a model substance, was established with both frameshift and base substitution sensitive strains of Salmonella typhimurium. Addition of copper ions resulted in a decreased survival at low dithiocarbamate doses. The dose response curves seem to correlate with the formation of two types of metal dithiocarbamate complexes. At low doses charged complexes are formed, while the formation of uncharged complexes is favoured at higher dosages. The data suggest that this formation of uncharged metal complexes implies a decreased toxicity but at the same time an increased mutagenicity. The mutagenicity of both TMTD and its ethyl analogue TETD was enhanced by oxygen. Furthermore, TMTD potentiates the mutagenic action of menadione, a substance that produces O(2) and H2O2 by redox cycling with molecular oxygen. Interaction of uncharged metal dithiocarbamate complexes with both production and detoxification of reactive forms of oxygen is suggested to be responsible for the direct mutagenic effects via oxidative damage to DNA. A further enhancement of the oxygen radical content of the cells by adding microsomes that produce oxygen radicals via autoxidation of cytochrome P-450 is proposed as the mechanism for the 'metabolic activation of TMTD '.

  9. In vivo effect of triptolide combined with glycyrrhetinic acid on rat cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Han, Feng-Mei; Peng, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Jun-Jun; Chen, Yong

    2013-07-01

    Triptolide (TP) is a major active component in Tripterygium root, but its therapeutic window was very narrow due to its severe multi-organ toxicity. In this work, the effect of TP combined with glycyrrhetic acid (GA) on mRNA expression and activity of four cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in rat liver was studied after intragastric administration of TP (0.05, 0.3 and 0.6 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1)) and TP (0.6 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1)) combined with GA (30 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1)) for 7 consecutive days. Compared with the control, the high dose of TP significantly up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of CYP2E1, 1A2, 3A1 and 2C11, the co-administration of TP and GA further up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of CYP3A1, 2C11 and 2E1 as compared with the high dose of TP. Meanwhile, TP at high dose and combined with GA significantly increased CYP3A-associated testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation activity (2.2-fold and 4.1-fold, respectively) as compared with the control. Because TP is mainly metabolized by CYP3A2 in male rats, the present work indicated that TP-induced increase of CYP3A activity might be an important reason for the rapidly metabolic clearance of TP in rat liver, and GA can reduce the hepatotoxicity of TP by promoting its hepatic metabolic clearance. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the drug interactions might be occurred when TP and GA were co-administered with other CYP3A substrate drug.

  10. Biological denitrification of brine: the effect of compatible solutes on enzyme activities and fatty acid degradation.

    PubMed

    Cyplik, Paweł; Piotrowska-Cyplik, Agnieszka; Marecik, Roman; Czarny, Jakub; Drozdzyńska, Agnieszka; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2012-09-01

    The effect of the addition of compatible solutes (ectoine and trehalose) on the denitrification process of saline wastewater was studied. In saline wastewater, it was observed that the initial concentration of nitrates was 500 mg N l⁻¹. A fatty substance isolated from oiled bleaching earth (waste of vegetable oil refining process) was used as a source of carbon.The consortium, which was responsible for the denitrification process originated from the wastewater of the vegetable oil industry. The consortium of microorganisms was identified by the use of restriction fragment length polymorphism of 16S rRNA gene amplicons and sequencing techniques. It was noted that ectoine affects significantly the activity of lipase and nitrate reductase, and resulted in faster denitrification compared to saline wastewater with the addition of trehalose or control saline wastewater (without compatible solutes). It was observed that relative enzyme activities of lipase and nitrate reductase increased by 32 and 35%, respectively, in the presence of 1 mM ectoine. This resulted in an increase in specific nitrate reduction rate in the presence of 1 mM ectoine to 5.7 mg N g⁻¹ VSS h⁻¹, which was higher than in the absence of ectoine (3.2 mg N g⁻¹ VSS h⁻¹). The addition of trehalose did not have an effect on nitrate removals. Moreover, it was found that trehalose was used up completely by bacteria as a source of carbon in the denitrification process. The fatty acids were biodegraded by 74% in the presence of 1 mM ectoine.

  11. Versatile DNAzyme-based amplified biosensing platforms for nucleic acid, protein, and enzyme activity detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu-Hua; Gong, Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Yang, Bin; Fu, Ting; Hu, Rong; Tan, Weihong; Yu, Ruqin

    2013-04-01

    DNAzymes have been widely applied as signal amplifiers for enzyme-free and highly sensitive detection of DNA. A few of them have also been employed for amplified detection of other biomolecules via a target-triggered assembly of split or mutated DNAzyme strategy. However, most of these designs adopt Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme as the catalytic unit, which suffered from low catalytic cleavage activity. Meanwhile, some DNAzymes with high catalytic activity are not suitable for these designs because the slight modification of the catalytic core might results in remarkably decreased or even no catalytic activity of these DNAzymes. On the basis of DNAzyme topological effect or the terminal protection of small-molecule-linked DNA, we developed two versatile sensing platforms for amplified detection of different biotargets. Since no modification is necessary for the catalytic core of the DNAzyme in these designs, they can employ any DNAzyme with high catalytic activity as amplified unit, which affords a high amplified efficiency for the sensing platform. A catalytic and molecular beacon design was further employed to realize the true enzymatic multiple turnover of DNAzyme. These designs together allow a high sensitivity for the biotargets, resulting in a detection limit of 20 pM, 0.2 U/mL, and 1 ng/mL for target DNA, DNA adenine methylation methyltransferase (Dam MTase), and streptavidin, respectively, much lower than previously reported biosensors. In addition, the proposed sensing strategy is versatile. By conjugating with various recognition units, it can be employed to detect a wide range of biotargets, varying from nucleic acids to proteins with high sensitivity.

  12. Berries and Ellagic Acid Prevent Estrogen-Induced Mammary Tumorigenesis by Modulating Enzymes of Estrogen Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Aiyer, Harini S.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2010-01-01

    In order to determine whether dietary berries and ellagic acid prevent 17β estradiol (E2) -induced mammary tumors by altering estrogen metabolism, we randomized ACI rats (n=6/group) into 5 groups − sham implant + control diet (SH-CD), E2 − implant + control diet (E2-CD), E2+2.5% black raspberry (E2-BRB); E2+2.5% blueberry (E2-BB) and E2+ 400ppm ellagic acid (E2-EA). Animals were euthanized at early (6wk), intermediate (18wk) and late (24wk) phases of E2-carcinogenesis and the mammary tissue analyzed for gene-expression changes using quantitative real-time PCR. At 6 weeks, E2-treatment caused 48-fold increase in cytochrome P4501A1(CYP1A1) (p<0.0001), which was attenuated by both BRB and BB diets to 12- and 21-fold, respectively (p<0.001). E2 did not alter CYP1B1 levels, but both berry and EA diets significantly suppressed it by 11- and 3.5-fold, respectively from baseline (p<0.05). There was a 5-fold increase in 17β-Hydroxysteroid dehyrdogenase(17βHSD7) and this was moderately abrogated to about 2-fold by all supplementation (p<0.05). At 18 weeks, CYP1A1 was elevated by 15-fold in E2-CD and only E2-BB reduced this increase to 7-fold (p<0.05). Catechol-O-methyl transferase(COMT) expression was elevated 2-fold by E2-treatment (p<0.05) and all supplementation reversed this. At 24 weeks, CYP1A1 expression was less pronounced, but still high (8-fold) in E2-treated rats. This increase was reduced to 3.2 and 4.6-fold, by E2-BRB and E2-EA, respectively (p<0.05), but not by E2-BB. Supplementation did not alter the effect of E2 on steroid receptors. The diets also significantly suppressed mammary tumor incidence (10–30%), volume (41–67%) and multiplicity (38 to 51%) (p<0.05). Berries may prevent mammary tumors by suppressing the levels of E2-metabolizing enzymes during the early phase of E2-carcinogenesis. PMID:20501861

  13. Sex-dependent activity of the spinal excitatory amino acid transporter: Role of estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Sajjad, Jahangir; Felice, Valeria D; Golubeva, Anna V; Cryan, John F; O'Mahony, Siobhain M

    2016-10-01

    Females are more likely to experience visceral pain than males, yet mechanisms underlying this sex bias are not fully elucidated. Moreover, pain sensitivity can change throughout the menstrual cycle. Alterations in the glutamatergic system have been implicated in several pain-disorders; however, whether these are sex-dependent is unclear. Thus, we aimed to investigate sex differences in the spinal cord glutamate uptake and how it varies across the estrous cycle. The activity of the glutamate transporters, excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) was assessed using an ex vivo aspartate radioactive uptake assay in the lumbosacral spinal cord in Sprague-Dawley male and female rats. The gene expression of EAATs, glutamate receptor subunits NR1 and NR2B and the estrogen receptors ERα & ERβ in the spinal cord were also analyzed. EAAT activity was lower in females, particularly during the estrus phase, and this was the only cycle stage that was responsive to the pharmacological effects of the EAATs activator riluzole. Interestingly, EAAT1 mRNA expression was lower in high-estrogen and high-ERα states compared to diestrus in females. We conclude that the Spinal EAAT activity in females is different to that in males, and varies across the estrous cycle. Furthermore, the expression levels of estrogen receptors also showed a cycle-dependent pattern that may affect EAATs function and expression. PMID:27471194

  14. [Effects of applying different kind fertilizers on enzyme activities related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in reddish paddy soil].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Li; Wang, Qiu-Bing; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Sun, Xiao-Min; Dai, Xiao-Qin; Yang, Feng-Ting; Bu, Jin-Feng; Wang, Hui-min

    2013-04-01

    Based on the long-term fixed position experimental data from Qianyanzhou Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1998, this paper analyzed the effects of applying different kind fertilizers (straw, ST; pig manure, OM; and chemical fertilizer, NPK) on the nutrients (C, N, and P) status and the activities of related enzymes ( beta-1,4-glucosidase, betaG; beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, NAG; L-leucine aminopeptidase, LAP; and acid phosphatase, AP) in reddish paddy soil. With the application of OM, the activities of soil betaG, NAG, and LAP increased significantly, as compared with other treatments, and were 1.4, 2. 6, and 1.9 times higher than the control (CK) , respectively. Applying OM also improved the ratio of soil organic carbon to total nitrogen (C/N), but decreased the soil betaG/(NAG+LAP) ratio, suggesting that pig manure could benefit the degradation of soil cellulose and the accumulation of soil organic carbon. Applying NPK increased the activities of soil betaG, NAG, and LAP, but decreased the AP activity, with a decrement of 34% as compared with CK. Under the application of NPK, the soilbetaG/AP and (NAG+ LAP)/AP ratios increased, but the ratios of soil organic carbon to total phosphorus (C/P) and of soil total nitrogen to total phosphorus (N/P) decreased, indicating that chemical fertilizers could induce the accumulation of soil inorganic phosphorus, and inhibit the microbial functions of degrading polysaccharides and phosphate phospholipids.

  15. High pressure sulfuric acid decomposition experiments for the sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, Carlos E; Reay, Andrew R.; Andazola, James C.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Gelbard, Fred

    2005-09-01

    A series of three pressurized sulfuric acid decomposition tests were performed to (1) obtain data on the fraction of sulfuric acid catalytically converted to sulfur dioxide, oxygen, and water as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) demonstrate real-time measurements of acid conversion for use as process control, (3) obtain multiple measurements of conversion as a function of temperature within a single experiment, and (4) assess rapid quenching to minimize corrosion of metallic components by undecomposed acid. All four of these objectives were successfully accomplished. This report documents the completion of the NHI milestone on high pressure H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition tests for the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle project. All heated sections of the apparatus, (i.e. the boiler, decomposer, and condenser) were fabricated from Hastelloy C276. A ceramic acid injection tube and a ceramic-sheathed thermocouple were used to minimize corrosion of hot liquid acid on the boiler surfaces. Negligible fracturing of the platinum on zirconia catalyst was observed in the high temperature decomposer. Temperature measurements at the exit of the decomposer and at the entry of the condenser indicated that the hot acid vapors were rapidly quenched from about 400 C to less than 20 C within a 14 cm length of the flow path. Real-time gas flow rate measurements of the decomposition products provided a direct measurement of acid conversion. Pressure in the apparatus was preset by a pressure-relief valve that worked well at controlling the system pressure. However, these valves sometimes underwent abrupt transitions that resulted in rapidly varying gas flow rates with concomitant variations in the acid conversion fraction.

  16. Acid-Tolerant Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Play a Major Role in Iron Cycling in Acidic Iron Rich Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, K. A.; Moreau, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Climate change drives drying and acidification of many rivers and lakes. Abundant sedimentary iron in these systems oxidizes chemically and biologically to form iron-ox(yhydrox)ide crusts and "hardpans". Given generally high sulfate concentrations, the mobilization and cycling of iron in these environments can be strongly influenced by bacterial sulfate reduction. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) induce reductive dissolution of oxidized iron phases by producing the reductant bisulfide as a metabolic product. These environmentally ubiquitous microbes also recycle much of the fixed carbon in sediment-hosted microbial mat communities. With prevalent drying, the buffering capacity for protons liberated from iron oxidation is exceeded, and the activity of sulfate-reducers is restricted to those species capable of tolerating low pH (and generally highly saline, i.e. sulfate-rich) conditions. These species will sustain the recycling of iron from more crystalline phases to more bioavailable species, as well as act as the only source of bisulfide for photosynthesizing microbial communities. The phylogeny and physiology of acid-tolerant SRB is therefore important to Fe, S and C cycling in iron-rich sedimentary environments, particularly those on a geochemical trajectory towards acidification. Previous studies have shown that these SRB species tend to be highly novel. We studied two distinct environments along a geochemical continuum towards acidification. In both settings, iron redox transformations exert a major, if not controlling, influence on reduction potential. An acidified, iron- rich tidal marsh receiving acid-mine drainage (San Francisco Bay, CA, USA) contained abundant textural evidence for reductive dissolution of Fe(III) in sediments with pH values varying from 2.4 - 3.8. From these sediments, full-length novel dsrAB gene sequences from acid-tolerant SRB were recovered, and sulfur isotope profiles reflected biological fractionation of sulfur under even the most

  17. Variability in antioxidant/detoxification enzymes of Labeo rohita exposed to an azo dye, acid black (AB).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Satinder; Kaur, Arvinder

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate effect of a highly toxic azo dye, acid black (AB) (CI: 20470, 96 h LC50=10 mg/L) on the biochemical responses of Labeo rohita. Antioxidant/detoxification enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), acid phosphatase (AcP), alkaline phosphatase (AKP), alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) were determined in liver, kidney, gill, muscle and brain of L. rohita after 96 h exposure to 6 mg/L (LC10), 8 mg/L (LC30) and 10 mg/L (LC50) of dye with an aim to find out the target tissue and biomarker enzyme for AB. The fish were then kept for a recovery period of 90 days, and activity of the selected enzymes was determined at the end of this period. Present dye altered the activities of all these enzymes in the selected tissues of the experimental fish in a dose-dependent manner. SOD was the maximally affected enzyme, and liver was the most affected tissue. The results indicate that AB is very toxic to L. rohita as there was a significant effect of even 6 mg/L dose of the dye and the toxicity prolonged for a long time because the fish was not able to recover from the stress even 90 days after the exposure. The study suggests that SOD can be used as a biomarker enzyme and liver is the target tissue for AB.

  18. The Human UGT1A3 Enzyme Conjugates Norursodeoxycholic Acid into a C23-ester Glucuronide in the Liver*

    PubMed Central

    Trottier, Jocelyn; El Husseini, Diala; Perreault, Martin; Pâquet, Sophie; Caron, Patrick; Bourassa, Sylvie; Verreault, Mélanie; Inaba, Ted T.; Poirier, Guy G.; Bélanger, Alain; Guillemette, Chantal; Trauner, Michael; Barbier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) exhibits efficient anti-cholestatic properties in an animal model of sclerosing cholangitis. norUDCA is eliminated as a C23-ester glucuronide (norUDCA-23G) in humans. The present study aimed at identifying the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzyme(s) involved in hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation and at evaluating the consequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding region of UGT genes on norUDCA-23G formation. The effects of norUDCA on the formation of the cholestatic lithocholic acid-glucuronide derivative and of rifampicin on hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation were also explored. In vitro glucuronidation assays were performed with microsomes from human tissues (liver and intestine) and HEK293 cells expressing human UGT enzymes and variant allozymes. UGT1A3 was identified as the major hepatic UGT enzyme catalyzing the formation of norUDCA-23G. Correlation studies using samples from a human liver bank (n = 16) indicated that the level of UGT1A3 protein is a strong determinant of in vitro norUDCA glucuronidation. Analyses of the norUDCA-conjugating activity by 11 UGT1A3 variant allozymes identified three phenotypes with high, low, and intermediate capacity. norUDCA is also identified as a competitive inhibitor for the hepatic formation of the pro-cholestatic lithocholic acid-glucuronide derivative, whereas norUDCA glucuronidation is weakly stimulated by rifampicin. This study identifies human UGT1A3 as the major enzyme for the hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation and supports that some coding polymorphisms affecting the conjugating activity of UGT1A3 in vitro may alter the pharmacokinetic properties of norUDCA in cholestasis treatment. PMID:19889628

  19. The human UGT1A3 enzyme conjugates norursodeoxycholic acid into a C23-ester glucuronide in the liver.

    PubMed

    Trottier, Jocelyn; El Husseini, Diala; Perreault, Martin; Pâquet, Sophie; Caron, Patrick; Bourassa, Sylvie; Verreault, Mélanie; Inaba, Ted T; Poirier, Guy G; Bélanger, Alain; Guillemette, Chantal; Trauner, Michael; Barbier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) exhibits efficient anti-cholestatic properties in an animal model of sclerosing cholangitis. norUDCA is eliminated as a C(23)-ester glucuronide (norUDCA-23G) in humans. The present study aimed at identifying the human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzyme(s) involved in hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation and at evaluating the consequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the coding region of UGT genes on norUDCA-23G formation. The effects of norUDCA on the formation of the cholestatic lithocholic acid-glucuronide derivative and of rifampicin on hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation were also explored. In vitro glucuronidation assays were performed with microsomes from human tissues (liver and intestine) and HEK293 cells expressing human UGT enzymes and variant allozymes. UGT1A3 was identified as the major hepatic UGT enzyme catalyzing the formation of norUDCA-23G. Correlation studies using samples from a human liver bank (n = 16) indicated that the level of UGT1A3 protein is a strong determinant of in vitro norUDCA glucuronidation. Analyses of the norUDCA-conjugating activity by 11 UGT1A3 variant allozymes identified three phenotypes with high, low, and intermediate capacity. norUDCA is also identified as a competitive inhibitor for the hepatic formation of the pro-cholestatic lithocholic acid-glucuronide derivative, whereas norUDCA glucuronidation is weakly stimulated by rifampicin. This study identifies human UGT1A3 as the major enzyme for the hepatic norUDCA glucuronidation and supports that some coding polymorphisms affecting the conjugating activity of UGT1A3 in vitro may alter the pharmacokinetic properties of norUDCA in cholestasis treatment.

  20. Lead-acid battery with improved cycle life and increased efficiency for lead leveling application and electric road vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winsel, A.; Schulz, J.; Guetlich, K. F.

    1983-11-01

    Lifetime and efficiency of lead acid batteries are discussed. A gas lift pump was used to prevent acid stratification and to reduce the charging factor (down to 1.03 to 1.05). A re-expansion method was applied and an expander depot and a compound separation were built in. Cycle life is increased from 700 cycles to 1690 cycles. Efficiency is increased by energy and time saving due to the reduced charging factor and by the use of a recombination stopper and a charge indicator with remote control. It is suggested that the lead acid system is still one of the best possibilities for electric road vehicle applications.

  1. X-ray absorption studies of the purple acid phosphatase from red kidney beans (native enzyme, metal exchanged form)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, F.; Zippel, F.; Klabunde, T.; Krebs, B.; Löcke, R.; Witzel, H.; Nolting, H.-F.

    1995-02-01

    Purple acid phosphatase from red kidney beans (KBP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of activated phosphoric acid monoesters and contains a heterodinuclear Fe(III)Zn(II) core in its active site. Iron K-edge X-ray absorption data have been obtained for the native enzyme and for a metal exchanged derivative, where Zn(II) was substituted by Fe(III). The environment of the native enzyme consists of 2.5 O/N at 1.91 Å, 3 O/N at 2.09 Å, and 1 Zn at 4.05 Å. For the metal exchanged form we obtained 2.5 O/N at 1.94 Å, 2.5 O/N at 2.09 Å, and 1 Fe at 3.79 Å.

  2. Production of Cellulose-Hydrogen from Corn Stalk based on Acid-enzyme Two-Stage Pretreatment by Mixed Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Y.; Fan, Y. T.; Hou, H. W.

    2010-03-01

    Production of cellulose-hydrogen from corn stalk based on acid-enzyme two-stage pretreatment by lesser panda manure was carried out in batch tests. The acid-enzyme two-stage pretreatment of corn stalk was found most effective, in which the yields of soluble saccharides (SS) were 470 mg/g-TS. The maximum cumulative H2 yield (165.8 ml H2/g-TS) and H2 production rate (12.8 ml H2/g-TS h-1) were obtained at pH 5.5, 36 °C by treating a substrate of 15 g/L. The hydrogen content in biogas was 57.0% and there was no significant methane gas observed.

  3. Hypouricemic effect of allopurinol are improved by Pallidifloside D based on the uric acid metabolism enzymes PRPS, HGPRT and PRPPAT.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Gang; Hou, Pi-Yong; Zhang, Xi; He, Yi; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Shu-Qing; Anderson, Samantha; Zhang, Yan-Wen; Wu, Xiao-Hui

    2016-09-01

    Allopurinol is a commonly used medication to treat hyperuricemia and its complications. Pallidifloside D, a saponin glycoside constituent from the total saponins of Smilax riparia, had been proved to enhanced hypouricemic effect of allopurinol based on uric acid metabolism enzyme XOD. In this study, we evaluated whether Pallidifloside D (5mg/kg) enhanced hypouricemic effect of allopurinol (5mg/kg) related to others uric acid metabolism enzymes such as PRPS, HGPRT and PRPPAT. We found that, compared with allopurinol alone, the combination of allopurinol and Pallidifloside D significantly up-regulated HGPRT mRNA expression and down-regulated the mRNA expression of PRPS and PRPPAT in PC12 cells (all P<0.01). These results strongly suggest that hypouricemic effect of allopurinol are improved by Pallidifloside D via numerous mechanisms and our data may have a potential value in clinical practice in the treatment of gout and other hyperuricemic conditions. PMID:27370097

  4. New low-antimony alloy for straps and cycling service in lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prengaman, R. David

    Lead-antimony alloys used for the positive grids in lead-acid batteries for cycling service have generally used antimony contents of 4.5 wt.% and above. Tubular batteries for cycling service that impart high compression of the active material to the grid surface via gauntlet use alloys with antimony contents as low as 1.5 wt.%. These batteries are generally employed in less-severe cycling service. Value-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries can give good cycling service without lead-antimony in the positive grid, but require a high tin content and high compression. The change in automotive battery positive grid alloys to lead-calcium-tin and the tin contents of VRLA positive grids and straps have dramatically increased the tin content of the recycled grid and strap lead in the USA, Europe, and Australia. The higher tin contents can contaminate the lead used for lead-antimony battery grids and generally must be removed to low levels to meet the specifications. This study describes a low-antimony alloy that contains a substantial amount of tin. The high tin content reduces the rate of corrosion of low-antimony positive grid alloys, improves conductivity, increases the bond between the grid and the active material, and cycles as well as the traditional 5-6 wt.% antimony alloys employed in conventional flat-plate batteries. The alloy is also used as a corrosion-resistant cast-on strap alloy for automotive batteries for high temperature service, as well as for posts, bushings, and connectors for all wet batteries.

  5. Modulation of fatty acid metabolism and tricarboxylic acid cycle to enhance the lipstatin production through medium engineering in Streptomyces toxytricini.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Punit; Dubey, Kashyap Kumar

    2016-08-01

    This work investigated the potential of medium engineering to obtain maximum biomass, non-conventional carbon sources for lipstatin production and modulation of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle to promote lipstatin synthesis. It was found that 2:3 carbon and nitrogen ratio, produced maximum biomass of 7.9g/L in growth medium and 6.6g/L in pre-seed medium. Among the studied non-conventional carbon sources i.e., soya flour 40g/L and sesame oil 30mL/L were found producing 1109.37mg/L (1.24-fold of control) and 1196.75mg/L (1.34-fold of control) lipstatin respectively. Supplementation of TCA cycle intermediates revealed that NADH and succinic acid showed lipstatin production to 1132.99mg/L and 1171.10mg/L respectively. Experimental outcome was validated in 7L bioreactor and produced 2242.63mg/L lipstatin which was ∼14% higher than shake flask. PMID:26897471

  6. Structural basis for specificity and promiscuity in a carrier protein/enzyme system from the sulfur cycle.

    PubMed

    Grabarczyk, Daniel B; Chappell, Paul E; Johnson, Steven; Stelzl, Lukas S; Lea, Susan M; Berks, Ben C

    2015-12-29

    The bacterial Sox (sulfur oxidation) pathway is an important route for the oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds. Intermediates in the Sox pathway are covalently attached to the heterodimeric carrier protein SoxYZ through conjugation to a cysteine on a protein swinging arm. We have investigated how the carrier protein shuttles intermediates between the enzymes of the Sox pathway using the interaction between SoxYZ and the enzyme SoxB as our model. The carrier protein and enzyme interact only weakly, but we have trapped their complex by using a "suicide enzyme" strategy in which an engineered cysteine in the SoxB active site forms a disulfide bond with the incoming carrier arm cysteine. The structure of this trapped complex, together with calorimetric data, identifies sites of protein-protein interaction both at the entrance to the enzyme active site tunnel and at a second, distal, site. We find that the enzyme distinguishes between the substrate and product forms of the carrier protein through differences in their interaction kinetics and deduce that this behavior arises from substrate-specific stabilization of a conformational change in the enzyme active site. Our analysis also suggests how the carrier arm-bound substrate group is able to outcompete the adjacent C-terminal carboxylate of the carrier arm for binding to the active site metal ions. We infer that similar principles underlie carrier protein interactions with other enzymes of the Sox pathway.

  7. Mechanism and inhibition of human UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase, the key enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hung; Lai, Shu-Jung; Yang, Chia Shin; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Lin, Ching-Heng; Fu, Pin-Kuei; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Yeh

    2016-01-01

    The bifunctional enzyme UDP-GlcNAc 2-epimerase/ManNAc kinase (GNE) plays a key role in sialic acid production. It is different from the non-hydrolyzing enzymes for bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, and it is feed-back inhibited by the downstream product CMP-Neu5Ac. Here the complex crystal structure of the N-terminal epimerase part of human GNE shows a tetramer in which UDP binds to the active site and CMP-Neu5Ac binds to the dimer-dimer interface. The enzyme is locked in a tightly closed conformation. By comparing the UDP-binding modes of the non-hydrolyzing and hydrolyzing UDP-GlcNAc epimerases, we propose a possible explanation for the mechanistic difference. While the epimerization reactions of both enzymes are similar, Arg113 and Ser302 of GNE are likely involved in product hydrolysis. On the other hand, the CMP-Neu5Ac binding mode clearly elucidates why mutations in Arg263 and Arg266 can cause sialuria. Moreover, full-length modelling suggests a channel for ManNAc trafficking within the bifunctional enzyme. PMID:26980148

  8. Determining soil enzyme activities for the assessment of fungi and citric acid-assisted phytoextraction under cadmium and lead contamination.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liang; Tang, Dong; Feng, Haiwei; Gao, Yang; Zhou, Pei; Xu, Lurong; Wang, Lumei

    2015-12-01

    Microorganism or chelate-assisted phytoextraction is an effective remediation tool for heavy metal polluted soil, but investigations into its impact on soil microbial activity are rarely reported. Consequently, cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-resistant fungi and citric acid (CA) were introduced to enhance phytoextraction by Solanum nigrum L. under varied Cd and Pb pollution levels in a greenhouse pot experiment. We then determined accumulation of Cd and Pb in S. nigrum and the soil enzyme activities of dehydrogenase, phosphatase, urease, catalase, sucrase, and amylase. Detrended canonical correspondence analysis (DCCA) was applied to assess the interactions between remediation strategies and soil enzyme activities. Results indicated that the addition of fungi, CA, or their combination enhanced the root biomass of S. nigrum, especially at the high-pollution level. The combined treatment of CA and fungi enhanced accumulation of Cd about 22-47 % and of Pb about 13-105 % in S. nigrum compared with the phytoextraction alone. However, S. nigrum was not shown to be a hyperaccumulator for Pb. Most enzyme activities were enhanced after remediation. The DCCA ordination graph showed increasing enzyme activity improvement by remediation in the order of phosphatase, amylase, catalase, dehydrogenase, and urease. Responses of soil enzyme activities were similar for both the addition of fungi and that of CA. In summary, results suggest that fungi and CA-assisted phytoextraction is a promising approach to restoring heavy metal polluted soil. PMID:26286803

  9. Determining soil enzyme activities for the assessment of fungi and citric acid-assisted phytoextraction under cadmium and lead contamination.

    PubMed

    Mao, Liang; Tang, Dong; Feng, Haiwei; Gao, Yang; Zhou, Pei; Xu, Lurong; Wang, Lumei

    2015-12-01

    Microorganism or chelate-assisted phytoextraction is an effective remediation tool for heavy metal polluted soil, but investigations into its impact on soil microbial activity are rarely reported. Consequently, cadmium (Cd)- and lead (Pb)-resistant fungi and citric acid (CA) were introduced to enhance phytoextraction by Solanum nigrum L. under varied Cd and Pb pollution levels in a greenhouse pot experiment. We then determined accumulation of Cd and Pb in S. nigrum and the soil enzyme activities of dehydrogenase, phosphatase, urease, catalase, sucrase, and amylase. Detrended canonical correspondence analysis (DCCA) was applied to assess the interactions between remediation strategies and soil enzyme activities. Results indicated that the addition of fungi, CA, or their combination enhanced the root biomass of S. nigrum, especially at the high-pollution level. The combined treatment of CA and fungi enhanced accumulation of Cd about 22-47 % and of Pb about 13-105 % in S. nigrum compared with the phytoextraction alone. However, S. nigrum was not shown to be a hyperaccumulator for Pb. Most enzyme activities were enhanced after remediation. The DCCA ordination graph showed increasing enzyme activity improvement by remediation in the order of phosphatase, amylase, catalase, dehydrogenase, and urease. Responses of soil enzyme activities were similar for both the addition of fungi and that of CA. In summary, results suggest that fungi and CA-assisted phytoextraction is a promising approach to restoring heavy metal polluted soil.

  10. A unique enzyme of acetic acid bacteria, PQQ-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase, is also present in Frateuria aurantia.

    PubMed

    Trček, Janja; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2013-08-01

    A membrane-bound, pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was purified from Frateuria aurantia LMG 1558(T). Although F. aurantia belongs to a group of γ-Proteobacteria, the characteristics of its PQQ-ADH were similar to the enzyme characteristics of the typical high-acetic acid-resistant bacterium Gluconacetobacter europaeus from the group of α-Proteobacteria. The PQQ-dependent ADH was solubilized from the membranes and purified after anionic, cationic, and affinity chromatography with specific activity of 117 U/mg. The purified enzyme was estimated to be composed of two subunits of ca. 72 and 45 kDa, as judged by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified enzyme had maximum activity at pH 4.5 and showed the highest substrate specificity to ethanol, isoamyl alcohol, 1-butanol, and 1-propanol. The deduced sequences of cloned genes adhA and adhB encoding subunits I and II of PQQ-ADH showed 80 % amino acid (AA) identity to AdhA and 68 % AA identity to AdhB of Ga. europaeus V3 (LMG 18494). Because of the high similarity between genes encoding subunits I and II of PQQ-ADH and its homologous genes found in a distantly related taxonomic group of acetic acid bacteria, the results suggest the possibility of horizontal gene transfer between these two groups of genera.

  11. The shikimate pathway: review of amino acid sequence, function and three-dimensional structures of the enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mir, Rafia; Jallu, Shais; Singh, T P

    2015-06-01

    The aromatic compounds such as aromatic amino acids, vitamin K and ubiquinone are important prerequisites for the metabolism of an organism. All organisms can synthesize these aromatic metabolites through shikimate pathway, except for mammals which are dependent on their diet for these compounds. The pathway converts phosphoenolpyruvate and erythrose 4-phosphate to chorismate through seven enzymatically catalyzed steps and chorismate serves as a precursor for the synthesis of variety of aromatic compounds. These enzymes have shown to play a vital role for the viability of microorganisms and thus are suggested to present attractive molecular targets for the design of novel antimicrobial drugs. This review focuses on the seven enzymes of the shikimate pathway, highlighting their primary sequences, functions and three-dimensional structures. The understanding of their active site amino acid maps, functions and three-dimensional structures will provide a framework on which the rational design of antimicrobial drugs would be based. Comparing the full length amino acid sequences and the X-ray crystal structures of these enzymes from bacteria, fungi and plant sources would contribute in designing a specific drug and/or in developing broad-spectrum compounds with efficacy against a variety of pathogens.

  12. Sodium phenylbutyrate decreases plasma branched-chain amino acids in patients with urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Lindsay C; Jain, Mahim; Gandolfo, Laura; Lee, Brendan H; Nagamani, Sandesh C S

    2014-01-01

    Sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPBA) is a commonly used medication for the treatment of patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs). Previous reports involving small numbers of patients with UCDs have shown that NaPBA treatment can result in lower plasma levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) but this has not been studied systematically. From a large cohort of patients (n=553) with UCDs enrolled in the Longitudinal Study of Urea Cycle Disorders, a collaborative multicenter study of the Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium, we evaluated whether treatment with NaPBA leads to a decrease in plasma BCAA levels. Our analysis shows that NaPBA use independently affects the plasma BCAA levels even after accounting for multiple confounding covariates. Moreover, NaPBA use increases the risk for BCAA deficiency. This effect of NaPBA seems specific to plasma BCAA levels, as levels of other essential amino acids are not altered by its use. Our study, in an unselected population of UCD subjects, is the largest to analyze the effects of NaPBA on BCAA metabolism and potentially has significant clinical implications. Our results indicate that plasma BCAA levels should to be monitored in patients treated with NaPBA since patients taking the medication are at increased risk for BCAA deficiency. On a broader scale, these findings could open avenues to explore NaPBA as a therapy in maple syrup urine disease and other common complex disorders with dysregulation of BCAA metabolism. PMID:25042691

  13. Celluloytic enzymes, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Kevin A.; Zhao, Lishan; Cayouette, Michelle H.

    2015-09-08

    The invention is directed to polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-glucosidase, xylanase, mannanse, .beta.-xylosidase, arabinofuranosidase, and/or oligomerase activity, including thermostable and thermotolerant activity, and polynucleotides encoding these enzymes, and making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. The polypeptides of the invention can be used in a variety of pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and feed processing and industrial contexts. The invention also provides compositions or products of manufacture comprising mixtures of enzymes comprising at least one enzyme of this invention.

  14. Celluloytic enzymes, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Kevin A; Zhao, Lishan; Cayouette, Michelle H

    2015-11-04

    The invention is directed to polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-glucosidase, xylanase, mannanse, .beta.-xylosidase, arabinofuranosidase, and/or oligomerase activity, including thermostable and thermotolerant activity, and polynucleotides encoding these enzymes, and making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. The polypeptides of the invention can be used in a variety of pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and feed processing and industrial contexts. The invention also provides compositions or products of manufacture comprising mixtures of enzymes comprising at least one enzyme of this invention.

  15. Structural basis for specificity and promiscuity in a carrier protein/enzyme system from the sulfur cycle

    PubMed Central

    Grabarczyk, Daniel B.; Chappell, Paul E.; Johnson, Steven; Stelzl, Lukas S.; Berks, Ben C.

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial Sox (sulfur oxidation) pathway is an important route for the oxidation of inorganic sulfur compounds. Intermediates in the Sox pathway are covalently attached to the heterodimeric carrier protein SoxYZ through conjugation to a cysteine on a protein swinging arm. We have investigated how the carrier protein shuttles intermediates between the enzymes of the Sox pathway using the interaction between SoxYZ and the enzyme SoxB as our model. The carrier protein and enzyme interact only weakly, but we have trapped their complex by using a “suicide enzyme” strategy in which an engineered cysteine in the SoxB active site forms a disulfide bond with the incoming carrier arm cysteine. The structure of this trapped complex, together with calorimetric data, identifies sites of protein–protein interaction both at the entrance to the enzyme active site tunnel and at a second, distal, site. We find that the enzyme distinguishes between the substrate and product forms of the carrier protein through differences in their interaction kinetics and deduce that this behavior arises from substrate-specific stabilization of a conformational change in the enzyme active site. Our analysis also suggests how the carrier arm-bound substrate group is able to outcompete the adjacent C-terminal carboxylate of the carrier arm for binding to the active site metal ions. We infer that similar principles underlie carrier protein interactions with other enzymes of the Sox pathway. PMID:26655737

  16. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Katrin; Jensen, Niels Berg; Yuen, Macaire M S; Madilao, Lina; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I-IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes. PMID:26936895

  17. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Katrin; Jensen, Niels Berg; Yuen, Macaire M S; Madilao, Lina; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I-IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes.

  18. Modularity of Conifer Diterpene Resin Acid Biosynthesis: P450 Enzymes of Different CYP720B Clades Use Alternative Substrates and Converge on the Same Products1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Macaire M.S.; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the CYP720B subfamily play a central role in the biosynthesis of diterpene resin acids (DRAs), which are a major component of the conifer oleoresin defense system. CYP720Bs exist in families of up to a dozen different members in conifer genomes and fall into four different clades (I–IV). Only two CYP720B members, loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) PtCYP720B1 and Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) PsCYP720B4, have been characterized previously. Both are multisubstrate and multifunctional clade III enzymes, which catalyze consecutive three-step oxidations in the conversion of diterpene olefins to DRAs. These reactions resemble the sequential diterpene oxidations affording ent-kaurenoic acid from ent-kaurene in gibberellin biosynthesis. Here, we functionally characterized the CYP720B clade I enzymes CYP720B2 and CYP720B12 in three different conifer species, Sitka spruce, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and jack pine (Pinus banksiana), and compared their activities with those of the clade III enzymes CYP720B1 and CYP720B4 of the same species. Unlike the clade III enzymes, clade I enzymes were ultimately found not to be active with diterpene olefins but converted the recently discovered, unstable diterpene synthase product 13-hydroxy-8(14)-abietene. Through alternative routes, CYP720B enzymes of both clades produce some of the same profiles of conifer oleoresin DRAs (abietic acid, neoabietic acid, levopimaric acid, and palustric acid), while clade III enzymes also function in the formation of pimaric acid, isopimaric acid, and sandaracopimaric acid. These results highlight the modularity of the specialized (i.e. secondary) diterpene metabolism, which produces conifer defense metabolites through variable combinations of different diterpene synthase and CYP720B enzymes. PMID:26936895

  19. Synthesis of cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum. VI. Growth on citric acid-cycle intermediates.

    PubMed

    GROMET-ELHANAN, Z; HESTRIN, S

    1963-02-01

    Gromet-Elhanan, Zippora (The Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel) and Shlomo Hestrin. Synthesis of cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum. VI. Growth on citric acid-cycle intermediates. J. Bacteriol. 85:284-292. 1963.-Acetobacter xylinum could be made to grow on ethanol, acetate, succinate, or l-malate. The growth was accompanied by formation of opaque leathery pellicles on the surface of the growth medium. These pellicles were identified as cellulose on the basis of their chemical properties, solubility behavior, and infrared absorption spectra. Washed-cell suspensions prepared from cultures grown on ethanol or the organic acids, in contrast to washed sugar-grown cells, were able to transform citric-cycle intermediates into cellulose. The variations in the substrate spectrum of cellulose synthesis between sugar-grown cells and organic acids-grown cells were found to be correlated with differences in the oxidative capacity of the cells. The significance of the findings that A. xylinum could be made to grow on ethanol on complex as well as synthetic media is discussed from the viewpoint of the whole pattern of Acetobacter classification.

  20. Cinnamic acid derivatives induce cell cycle arrest in carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sova, Matej; Žižak, Željko; Stanković, Jelena A Antic; Prijatelj, Matevž; Turk, Samo; Juranić, Zorica D; Mlinarič-Raščan, Irena; Gobec, Stanislav

    2013-08-01

    Cinnamic acid derivatives can be found in plant material, and they possess a remarkable variety of biological effects. In the present study, we have investigated the cytotoxic effects of representative cinnamic acid esters and amides. The cytotoxicity was determined by MTT test on human cervix adenocarcinoma (HeLa), myelogenous leukemia (K562), malignant melanoma (Fem-x), and estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer (MCF-7) cells, versus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) without or with the addition of the plant lectin phytohemaglutinin (PHA). The compounds tested showed significant cytotoxicity (IC50s between 42 and 166 µM) and furthermore selectivity of these cytotoxic effects on the malignant cell lines versus the PBMCs was also seen, especially when electron-withdrawing groups, such as a cyano group (compound 5), were present on the aromatic rings of the alcohol or amine parts of the cinnamic acid derivatives. The additional study on cell cycle phase distribution indicated that novel cinnamic acid derivatives inhibit cell growth by induction of cell death. Thus, cinnamic acids derivatives represent important lead compounds for further development of antineoplastic agents.

  1. Staphylococcus epidermidis Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin Production Significantly Increases during Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Cuong; Kidder, Joshua B.; Jacobson, Erik R.; Otto, Michael; Proctor, Richard A.; Somerville, Greg A.

    2005-01-01

    Staphylococcal polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) is important for the development of a mature biofilm. PIA production is increased during growth in a nutrient-replete or iron-limited medium and under conditions of low oxygen availability. Additionally, stress-inducing stimuli such as heat, ethanol, and high concentrations of salt increase the production of PIA. These same environmental conditions are known to repress tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, leading us to hypothesize that altering TCA cycle activity would affect PIA production. Culturing Staphylococcus epidermidis with a low concentration of the TCA cycle inhibitor fluorocitrate dramatically increased PIA production without impairing glucose catabolism, the growth rate, or the growth yields. These data lead us to speculate that one mechanism by which staphylococci perceive external environmental change is through alterations in TCA cycle activity leading to changes in the intracellular levels of biosynthetic intermediates, ATP, or the redox status of the cell. These changes in the metabolic status of the bacteria result in the attenuation or augmentation of PIA production. PMID:15838022

  2. Application of an enzyme-based biofuel cell containing a bioelectrode modified with deoxyribonucleic acid-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes to serum.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Young; Shin, Hyun Yong; Kang, Seong Woo; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme-based biofuel cells (EFCs) are a form of biofuel cells (BFCs) that can utilize redox enzymes as biocatalysts. Applications of an EFC to an implantable system are evaluated under mild conditions, such as ambient temperature or neutral pH. In the present study, an EFC containing a bioelectrode modified with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was applied to a serum system. The protection of immobilized glucose oxidase (GOD) using DNA-wrapped SWNTs was investigated in a trypsin environment, which can exist in a serum. GOD is immobilized by masking the active site onto the anode electrode. The anode/cathode system in the cell was composed of GOD/laccase as the biocatalysts and glucose/oxygen as the substrates in serum. The electrical properties of the anode in serum according to cyclic voltammetry (CV cycle) were improved using the DNA-wrapped SWNTs. Overall, an EFC that employed DNA-wrapped SWNTs and GOD immobilization in conjunction with protection of the active site increased the stability of GOD in serum, which enabled a high level of power production (ca. 190 μW/cm(2)) for up to 1 week.

  3. Influence of different forms of acidities on soil microbiological properties and enzyme activities at an acid mine drainage contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Prafulla Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Tripathy, Subhasish; Equeenuddin, Sk Md; Panigrahi, M K

    2010-07-15

    Assessment of microbial parameters, viz. microbial biomass, fluorescence diacetate, microbial respiration, acid phosphatase, beta-glucosidase and urease with respect to acidity helps in evaluating the quality of soils. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different forms of acidities on soil microbial parameters in an acid mine drainage contaminated site around coal deposits in Jainta Hills of India. Total potential and exchangeable acidity, extractable and exchangeable aluminium were significantly higher in contaminated soil compared to the baseline (p<0.01). Different forms of acidity were significantly and positively correlated with each other (p<0.05). Further, all microbial properties were positively and significantly correlated with organic carbon and clay (p<0.05). The ratios of microbial parameters with organic carbon were negatively correlated with different forms of acidity. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses showed that the microbial activities are not directly influenced by the total potential acidity and extractable aluminium. Though acid mine drainage affected soils had higher microbial biomass and activities due to higher organic matter content than those of the baseline soils, the ratios of microbial parameters/organic carbon indicated suppression of microbial growth and activities due to acidity stress. PMID:20417031

  4. Models for gibberellic acid transport and enzyme production and transport in the aleurone layer of barley.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Ricky; Fowkes, Nev; Bassom, Andrew P

    2010-11-01

    Gibberellins are growth hormones produced in the embryo of grain released during germination. They promote growth through the production of enzymes in the aleurone layer surrounding the endosperm. These enzymes then diffuse into the endosperm and produce the sugars required by the growing acrospire. Here we model the transport of gibberellins into and along the aleurone layer, the consequent production of enzymes, and their transport into the endosperm. Simple approximate solutions of the governing equations are obtained which suggest that the enzymes are released immediately behind a gibberellin front which travels with almost constant speed along the aleurone layer. The model also suggests that this propagation speed is determined primarily by conditions near the scutellum-aleurone junction, which may enable the embryo to actively control the germination process.

  5. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate pool size: functional importance for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Marwood, Simon; Bruce, Mark; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2007-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major final common pathway for oxidation of carbohydrates, lipids and some amino acids, which produces reducing equivalents in the form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide that result in production of large amounts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via oxidative phosphorylation. Although regulated primarily by the products of ATP hydrolysis, in particular adenosine diphosphate, the rate of delivery of reducing equivalents to the electron transport chain is also a potential regulatory step of oxidative phosphorylation. The TCA cycle is responsible for the generation of approximately 67% of all reducing equivalents per molecule of glucose, hence factors that influence TCA cycle flux will be of critical importance for oxidative phosphorylation. TCA cycle flux is dependent upon the supply of acetyl units, activation of the three non-equilibrium reactions within the TCA cycle, and it has been suggested that an increase in the total concentration of the TCA cycle intermediates (TCAi) is also necessary to augment and maintain TCA cycle flux during exercise. This article reviews the evidence of the functional importance of the TCAi pool size for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle. In parallel with increased oxidative metabolism and TCA cycle flux during exercise, there is an exercise intensity-dependent 4- to 5-fold increase in the concentration of the TCAi. TCAi concentration reaches a peak after 10-15 minutes of exercise, and thereafter tends to decline. This seems to support the suggestion that the concentration of TCAi may be of functional importance for oxidative phosphorylation. However, researchers have been able to induce dissociations between TCAi pool size and oxidative energy provision using a variety of nutritional, pharmacological and exercise interventions. Brief periods of endurance training (5 days or 7 weeks) have been found to result in reduced TCAi pool

  6. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate pool size: functional importance for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bowtell, Joanna L; Marwood, Simon; Bruce, Mark; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2007-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major final common pathway for oxidation of carbohydrates, lipids and some amino acids, which produces reducing equivalents in the form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide that result in production of large amounts of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via oxidative phosphorylation. Although regulated primarily by the products of ATP hydrolysis, in particular adenosine diphosphate, the rate of delivery of reducing equivalents to the electron transport chain is also a potential regulatory step of oxidative phosphorylation. The TCA cycle is responsible for the generation of approximately 67% of all reducing equivalents per molecule of glucose, hence factors that influence TCA cycle flux will be of critical importance for oxidative phosphorylation. TCA cycle flux is dependent upon the supply of acetyl units, activation of the three non-equilibrium reactions within the TCA cycle, and it has been suggested that an increase in the total concentration of the TCA cycle intermediates (TCAi) is also necessary to augment and maintain TCA cycle flux during exercise. This article reviews the evidence of the functional importance of the TCAi pool size for oxidative metabolism in exercising human skeletal muscle. In parallel with increased oxidative metabolism and TCA cycle flux during exercise, there is an exercise intensity-dependent 4- to 5-fold increase in the concentration of the TCAi. TCAi concentration reaches a peak after 10-15 minutes of exercise, and thereafter tends to decline. This seems to support the suggestion that the concentration of TCAi may be of functional importance for oxidative phosphorylation. However, researchers have been able to induce dissociations between TCAi pool size and oxidative energy provision using a variety of nutritional, pharmacological and exercise interventions. Brief periods of endurance training (5 days or 7 weeks) have been found to result in reduced TCAi pool

  7. Efficacy of azelaic acid on hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high fat diet induced type 2 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Muthulakshmi, Shanmugam; Saravanan, Ramalingam

    2013-06-01

    Azelaic acid (AzA), a C9 linear α,ω-dicarboxylic acid, is found in whole grains namely wheat, rye, barley, oat seeds and sorghum. The study was performed to investigate whether AzA exerts beneficial effect on hepatic key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in high fat diet (HFD) induced type 2 diabetic C57BL/6J mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed high fat diet for 10 weeks and subjected to intragastric administration of various doses (20 mg, 40 mg and 80 mg/kg BW) of AzA daily for the subsequent 5 weeks. Rosiglitazone (RSG) was used as reference drug. Body weight, food intake, plasma glucose, plasma insulin, blood haemoglobin (Hb), blood glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), liver glycolytic enzyme (hexokinase), hepatic shunt enzyme (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), gluconeogenic enzymes(glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase), liver glycogen, plasma and liver triglycerides were examined in mice fed with normal standard diet (NC), high fat diet (HFD), HFD with AzA (HFD + AzA) and HFD with rosiglitazone (HFD + RSG). Among the three doses, 80 mg/kg BW of AzA was able to positively regulate plasma glucose, insulin, blood HbA1c and haemoglobin levels by significantly increasing the activity of hexokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and significantly decreasing the activity of glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase thereby increasing the glycogen content in the liver. From this study, we put forward that AzA could significantly restore the levels of plasma glucose, insulin, HbA1c, Hb, liver glycogen and carbohydrate metabolic key enzymes to near normal in diabetic mice and hence, AzA may be useful as a biomaterial in the development of therapeutic agents against high fat diet induced T2DM.

  8. Heating of vegetable oils influences the activity of enzymes participating in arachidonic acid formation in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Stawarska, Agnieszka; Białek, Agnieszka; Tokarz, Andrzej

    2015-10-01

    Dietary intake of lipids and their fatty acids profile influence many aspects of health. Thermal processing changes the properties of edible oils and can also modify their metabolism, for example, eicosanoids formation. The aim of our study was to verify whether the activity of desaturases can be modified by lipids intake, especially by the fatty acids content. The experimental diets contained rapeseed oil, sunflower oil, and olive oil, both unheated and heated (for 10 minutes at 200 °C each time before administration), and influenced the fatty acids composition in serum and the activity of enzymes participating in arachidonic acid (AA) formation. The activity of desaturases was determined by measuring the amounts of AA formed in vitro derived from linoleic acid as determined in liver microsomes of Wistar rats. In addition, the indices of ∆(6)-desaturase (D6D) and ∆(5)-desaturase (D5D) have been determined. To realize this aim, the method of high-performance liquid chromatography has been used with ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry detection. Diet supplementation with the oils rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids affects the fatty acids profile in blood serum and the activity of D6D and ∆(5)-desaturase in rat liver microsomes, the above activities being dependent on the kind of oil applied. Diet supplementation with heated oils has been found to increase the amount of AA produced in hepatic microsomes; and in the case of rapeseed oil and sunflower oil, it has also increased D6D activity.

  9. Transport and cycling of iron and hydrogen peroxide in a freshwater stream: Influence of organic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, D.T.; Runkel, R.L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Voelker, B.M.; Kimball, B.A.; Carraway, E.R.

    2003-01-01

    An in-stream injection of two dissolved organic acids (phthalic and aspartic acids) was performed in an acidic mountain stream to assess the effects of organic acids on Fe photoreduction and H2O2 cycling. Results indicate that the fate of Fe is dependent on a net balance of oxidative and reductive processes, which can vary over a distance of several meters due to changes in incident light and other factors. Solution phase photoreduction rates were high in sunlit reaches and were enhanced by the organic acid addition but were also limited by the amount of ferric iron present in the water column. Fe oxide photoreduction from the streambed and colloids within the water column resulted in an increase in the diurnal load of total filterable Fe within the experimental reach, which also responded to increases in light and organic acids. Our results also suggest that Fe(II) oxidation increased in response to the organic acids, with the result of offsetting the increase in Fe(II) from photoreductive processes. Fe(II) was rapidly oxidized to Fe(III) after sunset and during the day within a well-shaded reach, presumably through microbial oxidation. H2O 2, a product of dissolved organic matter photolysis, increased downstream to maximum concentrations of 0.25 ??M midday. Kinetic calculations show that the buildup of H2O2 is controlled by reaction with Fe(III), but this has only a small effect on Fe(II) because of the small formation rates of H2O2 compared to those of Fe(II). The results demonstrate the importance of incorporating the effects of light and dissolved organic carbon into Fe reactive transport models to further our understanding of the fate of Fe in streams and lakes.

  10. In vitro and in silico studies of the inhibitory effects of some novel kojic acid derivatives on tyrosinase enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Asadzadeh, Azizeh; Sirous, Hajar; Pourfarzam, Morteza; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Afshin, Fassihi

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in pigment synthesis. Overproduction of melanin in parts of the skin results in hyperpigmentation diseases. This enzyme is also responsible for the enzymatic browning in fruits and vegetables. Thus, its inhibitors are of great importance in the medical, cosmetic and agricultural fields. Materials and Methods: A series of twelve kojic acid derivatives were designed to be evaluated as tyrosinase activity inhibitors. The potential inhibitory activity of these compounds was investigated in silico using molecular docking simulation method. Four compounds with a range of predicted tyrosinase inhibitory activities were prepared and their inhibitory effect on tyrosinase activity was evaluated. The antioxidant properties of these compounds were also investigated by in vitro DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) and hydrogen peroxide scavenging assays. Results: Compound IIId exhibited the highest tyrosinase inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.216 ± 0.009 mM which was in accordance with the in silico ΔGbind results (-13.24 Kcal/mol). Conclusion: Based on the docking studies, from the twelve compounds studied, one (IIId) appeared to have the highest inhibition on tyrosinase activity. This was confirmed by enzyme activity measurements. Compound IIId has an NO2 group which binds to both of Cu2+ ions located inside the active site of the enzyme. This compound appeared to be even stronger than kojic acid in inhibiting tyrosinase activity. The DPPH free radical scavenging ability of all the studied compounds was more than that of BHT. However, they were not as strong as BHT or gallic acid in scavenging hydrogen peroxide. PMID:27081457

  11. 9-O-Acetylation of sialic acids is catalysed by CASD1 via a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Anna-Maria T; Bakkers, Mark J G; Buettner, Falk F R; Hartmann, Maike; Grove, Melanie; Langereis, Martijn A; de Groot, Raoul J; Mühlenhoff, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acids, terminal sugars of glycoproteins and glycolipids, play important roles in development, cellular recognition processes and host-pathogen interactions. A common modification of sialic acids is 9-O-acetylation, which has been implicated in sialoglycan recognition, ganglioside biology, and the survival and drug resistance of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells. Despite many functional implications, the molecular basis of 9-O-acetylation has remained elusive thus far. Following cellular approaches, including selective gene knockout by CRISPR/Cas genome editing, we here show that CASD1--a previously identified human candidate gene--is essential for sialic acid 9-O-acetylation. In vitro assays with the purified N-terminal luminal domain of CASD1 demonstrate transfer of acetyl groups from acetyl-coenzyme A to CMP-activated sialic acid and formation of a covalent acetyl-enzyme intermediate. Our study provides direct evidence that CASD1 is a sialate O-acetyltransferase and serves as key enzyme in the biosynthesis of 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans. PMID:26169044

  12. Analysis of the citric acid cycle intermediates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kombu, Rajan S; Brunengraber, Henri; Puchowicz, Michelle A

    2011-01-01

    Researchers view analysis of the citric acid cycle (CAC) intermediates as a metabolomic approach to identifying unexpected correlations between apparently related and unrelated pathways of metabolism. Relationships of the CAC intermediates, as measured by their concentrations and relative ratios, offer useful information to understanding interrelationships between the CAC and metabolic pathways under various physiological and pathological conditions. This chapter presents a relatively simple method that is sensitive for simultaneously measuring concentrations of CAC intermediates (relative and absolute) and other related intermediates of energy metabolism using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  13. Corrosive Resistant Diamond Coatings for the Acid Based Thermo-Chemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Prelas

    2009-06-25

    This project was designed to test diamond, diamond-like and related materials in environments that are expected in thermochemical cycles. Our goals were to build a High Temperature Corrosion Resistance (HTCR) test stand and begin testing the corrosive properties of barious materials in a high temperature acidic environment in the first year. Overall, we planned to test 54 samples each of diamond and diamond-like films (of 1 cm x 1 cm area). In addition we use a corrosion acceleration method by treating the samples at a temperature much larger than the expected operating temperature. Half of the samples will be treated with boron using the FEDOA process.

  14. The Rho/ROCK pathway for lysophosphatidic acid-induced proteolytic enzyme expression and ovarian cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Jeong, K J; Park, S Y; Cho, K H; Sohn, J S; Lee, J; Kim, Y K; Kang, J; Park, C G; Han, J W; Lee, H Y

    2012-09-27

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a biolipid that has diverse biological activities implicated in ovarian cancer initiation and progression. Previous studies have shown the critical role of the Rho/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) pathway in LPA-induced ovarian cancer progression. However, detailed underlying mechanism by which the Rho/ROCK pathway induces ovarian cancer cell invasion is still incompletely understood. In the present study, we observed that the Rho/ROCK pathway is implicated in the production of proteolytic enzymes, leading to LPA-induced ovarian cancer cell invasion. LPA induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expression in CAOV-3 and PA-1 cells and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expression in SKOV-3 cells. LPA-induced proteolytic enzyme expression was required for the invasion of ovarian cancer cells expressing corresponding enzymes. Pretreatment of cells with a pharmacological inhibitor of Rho/ROCK (Y-27632) or overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of Rho (Rho N19) profoundly inhibited LPA-induced proteolytic enzyme expression as well as the invasive potential of ovarian cancer cells. In addition, transfection with dominant-negative Ras (Ras N17) significantly inhibited LPA-induced Rho activation as well as MMP-9 and uPA expression. Consistently, Y-27632 reduced LPA-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation that is critical for proteolytic enzyme expression and cellular invasion. Collectively, we demonstrate a mechanism by which LPA promotes ovarian cancer progression through coordinate activation of a Ras/Rho/ROCK/NF-κB signaling pathway and the proteolytic enzyme secretion, providing novel biomarkers and promising therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer cell progression.

  15. Schistosoma mansoni: possible involvement of protein kinase C in linoleic acid-induced proteolytic enzyme release from cercariae.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, K; Mitsui, Y; Sato, K; Sakamoto, M; Aoki, Y

    1991-04-01

    The possible involvement of protein kinase C and Ca2+ metabolism in the proteolytic enzyme release from schistosome cercariae was studied. Cercariae were placed in dechlorinated tap water containing 0.37 mM calcium in the small glass petri dish and exposed to the stimuli (linoleic acid, phorbol esters, and Ca2+ ionophore) with or without inhibitors of protein kinase C or Ca2+ metabolism. The proteolytic activity of incubation medium of cercariae thus treated was measured by the azocoll assay. The penetration response of cercariae induced by linoleic acid, a physiological stimulus, was mimicked by phorbol esters. When exposed to phorbol esters, 0.02 to 2 microM of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and 0.2 to 2 microM of phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), cercariae ceased the swimming movement, began a rhythmic thrusting of the anterior tip of the parasite, and released the proteolytic enzyme, but they did not shed the tails. Lowering Ca2+ in water by addition of 5 mM ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), phorbol ester-induced release of enzyme was completely inhibited. Phorbol ester-induced release of enzyme was partially inhibited by 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, at a concentration of 100 microM. H-7 alone, at a concentration of 100 microM, did not affect the swimming movement of cercariae. The cercariae were stimulated to release the enzyme by high concentrations (10 and 100 microM) of the Ca2+ ionophore, A23187, but enzyme was not released by low concentrations (0.5 and 1 microM) of this drug. Cercariae exposed to A23187 behaved differently from those exposed to phorbol esters. They ceased swimming, showed strong muscle contraction, and shed their tail. A23187 stimulated cercariae to release the enzyme in the water containing 5 mM EGTA. A23187-induced enzyme release was not inhibited by N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7), a calmodulin

  16. Evidence for separate elongation enzymes for very-long-chain-fatty-acid synthesis in potato (Solanum tuberosum).

    PubMed Central

    Walker, K A; Harwood, J L

    1986-01-01

    Aging potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber discs in a Ca2+-containing medium resulted in increased rates of fatty acid labelling from [1-14C]acetate with time. Maximal labelling rates were seen after 6-8 h aging in a number of varieties. Saturated very-long-chain fatty acids (C20 and particularly C22 and C24) were very poorly labelled in freshly cut tissue. They were synthesized in increasing amounts and in a homologous sequence with progressive aging times. Use of increasing induction times and cycloheximide or puromycin as protein-synthesis inhibitors indicated that the sequence of fatty acid elongation was dependent on protein synthesis de novo and was controlled by three separate specific elongase enzymes. PMID:3800889

  17. Enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (fabI) plays a determinant role in completing cycles of fatty acid elongation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Heath, R J; Rock, C O

    1995-11-01

    The role of enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (E.C. 1.3.1.9), the product of the fabI gene, was investigated in the type II, dissociated, fatty acid synthase system of Escherichia coli. All of the proteins required to catalyze one cycle of fatty acid synthesis from acetyl-CoA plus malonyl-CoA to butyryl-ACP in vitro were purified. These proteins were malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase (fabD), beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase III (fabH), beta-ketoacyl-ACP reductase (fabG), beta-hydroxydecanoyl-ACP dehydrase (fabA), and enoyl-ACP reductase (fabI). Unlike the other enzymes in the cycle, FabA did not efficiently convert its substrate beta-hydroxybutyryl-ACP to crotonyl-ACP, but rather the equilibrium favored formation of beta-hydroxybutyryl-ACP over crotonyl-ACP by a ratio of 9:1. The amount of butyryl-ACP formed depended on the amount of FabI protein added to the assay. Extracts from fabI(Ts) mutants accumulated beta-hydroxybutyryl-ACP, and the addition of FabI protein to the fabI(Ts) extract restored both butyryl-ACP and long-chain acyl-ACP synthesis. FabI was verified to be the only enoyl-ACP reductase required for the synthesis of fatty acids by demonstrating that purified FabI was required for the elongation of both long-chain saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. These results were corroborated by analysis of the intracellular ACP pool composition in fabI(Ts) mutants that showed beta-hydroxybutyryl-ACP and crotonyl-ACP accumulated at the nonpermissive temperature in the same ratio found in the fabI(Ts) extracts and in the in vitro reconstruction experiments that lacked FabI. We conclude that FabI is the only enoyl-ACP reductase involved in fatty acid synthesis in E. coli and that the activity of this enzyme plays a determinant role in completing cycles of fatty acid biosynthesis.

  18. Increased Biomass Yield of Lactococcus lactis by Reduced Overconsumption of Amino Acids and Increased Catalytic Activities of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Adamberg, Kaarel; Seiman, Andrus; Vilu, Raivo

    2012-01-01

    Steady state cultivation and multidimensional data analysis (metabolic fluxes, absolute proteome, and transcriptome) are used to identify parameters that control the increase in biomass yield of Lactococcus lactis from 0.10 to 0.12 C-mol C-mol−1 with an increase in specific growth rate by 5 times from 0.1 to 0.5 h−1. Reorganization of amino acid consumption was expressed by the inactivation of the arginine deiminase pathway at a specific growth rate of 0.35 h−1 followed by reduced over-consumption of pyruvate directed amino acids (asparagine, serine, threonine, alanine and cysteine) until almost all consumed amino acids were used only for protein synthesis at maximal specific growth rate. This balanced growth was characterized by a high glycolytic flux carrying up to 87% of the carbon flow and only amino acids that relate to nucleotide synthesis (glutamine, serine and asparagine) were consumed in higher amounts than required for cellular protein synthesis. Changes in the proteome were minor (mainly increase in the translation apparatus). Instead, the apparent catalytic activities of enzymes and ribosomes increased by 3.5 times (0.1 vs 0.5 h−1). The apparent catalytic activities of glycolytic enzymes and ribosomal proteins were seen to follow this regulation pattern while those of enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism increased more than the specific growth rate (over 5.5 times). Nucleotide synthesis formed the most abundant biomonomer synthetic pathway in the cells with an expenditure of 6% from the total ATP required for biosynthesis. Due to the increase in apparent catalytic activity, ribosome translation was more efficient at higher growth rates as evidenced by a decrease of protein to mRNA ratios. All these effects resulted in a 30% decrease of calculated ATP spilling (0.1 vs 0.5 h−1). Our results show that bioprocesses can be made more efficient (using a balanced metabolism) by varying the growth conditions. PMID:23133574

  19. Influence of certain essential oils on carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes and acid-soluble sulfhydryls in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S; Sharma, R; Kale, R K; Rao, A R

    1994-01-01

    The influence of essential oils from naturally occurring plant dietary items such as cardamom, celery seed, cumin seed, coriander, ginger, nutmeg, and zanthoxylum on the activities of hepatic carcinogen-metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450, aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase, and glutathione S-transferase) and acid-soluble sulfhydryl level was investigated in Swiss albino mice. Each oil was fed by gavage at 10 microliters/day for 14 days, and then the animals were sacrificed and their hepatic enzyme activities and sulfhydryl levels were evaluated. Only nutmeg and zanthoxylum oils induced cytochrome P450 level significantly (p < 0.05), whereas cardamom oil caused a significant reduction in its activity (p < 0.05). Furthermore, aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity was significantly elevated only by treatment with ginger oil (p < 0.01), whereas nutmeg oil caused a significant reduction in its activity (p < 0.01). The remaining oils did not significantly alter the level of cytochrome P450 and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity. Glutathione S-transferase activity was significantly elevated in all experimental groups (p < 0.1-p < 0.001) compared with controls. The acid-soluble sulfhydryl was significantly elevated only by the essential oils of cardamom (p < 0.05), nutmeg (p < 0.05), and zanthoxylum (p < 0.01). Our observations suggest that intake of essential oils affects the host enzymes associated with activation and detoxication of xenobiotic compounds, including chemical carcinogens and mutagens. PMID:8072879

  20. Delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme activity in blood, brain, and liver of lead-dosed ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.; Finley, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    Mallard ducks were dosed with a single shotgun pellet (ca. 200 mg lead). After 1 month there was about 1 ppm lead in blood, 2.5 in liver, and 0.5 in brain. Lead-induced inhibition of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme in blood and cerebellum was much greater than in cerebral hemisphere or liver and was strongly correlated with the lead concentration in these tissues. The cerebellar portion of the brain was more sensitive to delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase enzyme inhibition by lead than were the other tissues examined. There was also a greater increase in the glial cell marker enzyme, butyrylcholinesterase, in cerebellum than in cerebral hemisphere, suggesting that nonregenerating neuronal cells were destroyed by lead and replaced by glial cells in that portion of the brain. Even partial loss of cerebellar tissue is severely debilitating in waterfowl, because functions critical to survival such as visual, auditory, motor, and reflex responses are integrated at this brain center.

  1. Structure and function of ∆1-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase, the enzyme controlling the psychoactivity of Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Shoyama, Yoshinari; Tamada, Taro; Kurihara, Kazuo; Takeuchi, Ayako; Taura, Futoshi; Arai, Shigeki; Blaber, Michael; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Morimoto, Satoshi; Kuroki, Ryota

    2012-10-12

    ∆1-Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase catalyzes the oxidative cyclization of cannabigerolic acid (CBGA) into THCA, the precursor of the primary psychoactive agent ∆1-tetrahydrocannabinol in Cannabis sativa. The enzyme was overproduced in insect cells, purified, and crystallized in order to investigate the structure-function relationship of THCA synthase, and the tertiary structure was determined to 2.75Å resolution by X-ray crystallography (R(cryst)=19.9%). The THCA synthase enzyme is a member of the p-cresol methyl-hydroxylase superfamily, and the tertiary structure is divided into two domains (domains I and II), with a flavin adenine dinucleotide coenzyme positioned between each domain and covalently bound to His114 and Cys176 (located in domain I). The catalysis of THCA synthesis involves a hydride transfer from C3 of CBGA to N5 of flavin adenine dinucleotide and the deprotonation of O6' of CBGA. The ionized residues in the active site of THCA synthase were investigated by mutational analysis and X-ray structure. Mutational analysis indicates that the reaction does not involve the carboxyl group of Glu442 that was identified as the catalytic base in the related berberine bridge enzyme but instead involves the hydroxyl group of Tyr484. Mutations at the active-site residues His292 and Tyr417 resulted in a decrease in, but not elimination of, the enzymatic activity of THCA synthase, suggesting a key role for these residues in substrate binding and not direct catalysis.

  2. Changes in Enzyme Levels During Germination of Seeds of Triticum durum 1

    PubMed Central

    Firenzuoli, A. M.; Vanni, P.; Ramponi, G.; Baccari, V.

    1968-01-01

    The changes in level of activity during the germination of wheat seedling (Triticum durum) in the dark have been investigated with 4 enzymes of glycolysis, 2 enzymes of the pentose phosphate shunt, 2 of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, 2 of amino acid metabolism and acid phosphatase. For some enzymes, which function in photosynthesis (fructose diphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase NADP dependent), the level of activity was influenced by the presence of light. Images PMID:16656761

  3. Fundamental study of the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis by acids and enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, C. S.; Chang, M.

    1981-02-01

    There are three basic enzymes e.g., endoglucanase (C/sub x/), exoglucanase (C1) and cellobiase comprising the majority of extracellular cellulase enzymes produced by the cellulolytic mycelial fungi, Trichoderma reesei, and other cellulolytic microorganisms. The kinetics of cellobiase were developed on the basis of applying the pseudo-steady state assumption to hydrolyze cellobiose to glucose. The results indicated that cellobiase was bjected to end-product inhibition by glucose. The kinetic modeling of exoglucanase (C1) with respect to cellodextrins was studied. Both glucose and cellobiose were found to be inhibitors of this enzyme with cellobiose being a stronger inhibitor than glucose. Similarly, endoglucanase (C/sub x) is subject to end-product inhibition by glucose. Crystallinity of the cellulose affects the rate of hydrolysis by cellulases. Hence, the changes in crystallinity of cellulose in relation to chemical pretreatment and enzyme hydrolysis was compared. The study of cellulase biosynthesis resulted in the conclusion that exo-and endo-glucanases are coinduced while cellobiase is synthesized independent of the other two enzymes.

  4. Characterization of bovine aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase expressed in a mouse cell line: comparison with native enzyme.

    PubMed

    Park, D H; Kim, K T; Choi, M U; Samanta, H; Joh, T H

    1992-12-01

    Bovine aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) was expressed in a mouse cell line, using a bovine papilloma virus-derived expression vector containing the full coding region of bovine AADC. The recombinant bovine AADC was characterized biochemically and immunochemically and compared with the native bovine AADC. The specific activity of crude recombinant bovine AADC was 30-fold higher than that of crude native AADC. With regard to optimal pH, effects of pyridoxal phosphate concentration and Km for 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine as a substrate, both native and recombinant enzymes were essentially identical. Rabbit polyclonal antiserum directed against bovine adrenal AADC recognized on Western blot a single protein band (molecular mass = 55,000 Dalton) in both native and recombinant bovine AADC crude extracts. Furthermore, double immunodiffusion analysis showed a single precipitin line of confluence with both enzyme preparations, indicating immunological identity of native and recombinant bovine AADC. Northern blot analysis identified a single mRNA species (2.2 kb) from native and recombinant bovine AADC preparations. The recombinant bovine AADC has two charge isozymes corresponding to those of the native bovine enzyme, although their relative abundances are different between native and recombinant enzymes. Taken together, our results show that recombinant bovine AADC, expressed from bovine AADC cDNA in a mouse cell line is not only enzymatically active, but also shares many biochemical and immunochemical common features with native bovine AADC.

  5. Cloning and manipulation of the Escherichia coli cyclopropane fatty acid synthase gene: physiological aspects of enzyme overproduction.

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, D W; Cronan, J E

    1984-01-01

    Like many other eubacteria, cultures of Escherichia coli accumulate cyclopropane fatty acids (CFAs) at a well-defined stage of growth, due to the action of the cytoplasmic enzyme CFA synthase. We report the isolation of the putative structural gene, cfa, for this enzyme on an E. coli-ColE1 chimeric plasmid by the use of an autoradiographic colony screening technique. When introduced into a variety of E. coli strains, this plasmid, pLC18-11, induced corresponding increases in CFA content and CFA synthase activity. Subsequent manipulation of the cfa locus, facilitated by the insertion of pLC18-11 into a bacteriophage lambda vector, allowed genetic and physiological studies of CFA synthase in E. coli. Overproduction of this enzyme via multicopy cfa plasmids caused abnormally high levels of CFA in membrane phospholipid but no discernable growth perturbation. Infection with phage lambda derivatives bearing cfa caused transient overproduction of the enzyme, although pL-mediated expression of cfa could not be demonstrated in plasmids derived from such phages. CFA synthase specific activities could be raised to very high levels by using cfa runaway-replication plasmids. A variety of physiological factors were found to modulate the levels of CFA synthase in normal and gene-amplified cultures. These studies argue against several possible mechanisms for the temporal regulation of CFA formation. PMID:6325391

  6. RDH10 is the primary enzyme responsible for the first step of embryonic Vitamin A metabolism and retinoic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Farjo, Krysten M; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Nikolaeva, Olga; Sandell, Lisa L; Trainor, Paul A; Ma, Jian-xing

    2011-09-15

    Retinoic acid (atRA) signaling is essential for regulating embryonic development, and atRA levels must be tightly controlled in order to prevent congenital abnormalities and fetal death which can result from both excessive and insufficient atRA signaling. Cellular enzymes synthesize atRA from Vitamin A, which is obtained from dietary sources. Embryos express multiple enzymes that are biochemically capable of catalyzing the initial step of Vitamin A oxidation, but the precise contribution of these enzymes to embryonic atRA synthesis remains unknown. Using Rdh10(trex)-mutant embryos, dietary supplementation of retinaldehyde, and retinol dehydrogenase (RDH) activity assays, we demonstrate that RDH10 is the primary RDH responsible for the first step of embryonic Vitamin A oxidation. Moreover, we show that this initial step of atRA synthesis occurs predominantly in a membrane-bound cellular compartment, which prevents inhibition by the cytosolic cellular retinol-binding protein (RBP1). These studies reveal that widely expressed cytosolic enzymes with RDH activity play a very limited role in embryonic atRA synthesis under normal dietary conditions. This provides a breakthrough in understanding the precise cellular mechanisms that regulate Vitamin A metabolism and the synthesis of the essential embryonic regulatory molecule atRA.

  7. Stability of Supported Platinum Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Catalysts for use in Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Anne W. Glenn; Kyle C. Burch

    2007-03-01

    The activity and stability of several metal oxide supported platinum catalysts were explored for the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. The acid decomposition reaction is common to several sulfur based thermochemical water splitting cycles. Reactions were carried out using a feed of concentrated liquid sulfuric acid (96 wt%) at atmospheric pressure at temperatures between 800 and 850 °C and a weight hour space velocity of 52 g acid/g catalyst/hr. Reactions were run at these high space velocities such that variations in kinetics were not masked by surplus catalyst. The influence of exposure to reaction conditions was explored for three catalysts; 0.1-0.2 wt% Pt supported on alumina, zirconia and titania. The higher surface area Pt/Al2O3 and Pt/ZrO2 catalysts were found to have the highest activity but deactivated rapidly. A low surface area Pt/TiO2 catalyst was found to have good stability in short term tests, but slowly lost activity for over 200 hours of continuous operation.

  8. Palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex formulation enhances activities of Krebs cycle dehydrogenases and respiratory complexes I-IV in the heart of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Sudheesh, N P; Ajith, T A; Janardhanan, K K; Krishnan, C V

    2009-08-01

    Age-related decline in the capacity to withstand stress, such as ischemia and reperfusion, results in congestive heart failure. Though the mechanisms underlying cardiac decay are not clear, age dependent somatic damages to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), loss of mitochondrial function, and a resultant increase in oxidative stress in heart muscle cells may be responsible for the increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. The effect of a safe nutritional supplement, POLY-MVA, containing the active ingredient palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex, was evaluated on the activities of the Krebs cycle enzymes such as isocitrate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase as well as mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and IV in heart mitochondria of aged male albino rats of Wistar strain. Administration of 0.05 ml/kg of POLY-MVA (which is equivalent to 0.38 mg complexed alpha-lipoic acid/kg, p.o), once daily for 30 days, was significantly (p<0.05) effective to enhance the Krebs cycle dehydrogenases, and mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. The unique electronic and redox properties of palladium alpha-lipoic acid complex appear to be a key to this physiological effectiveness. The results strongly suggest that this formulation might be effective to protect the aging associated risk of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  9. [Combined effects of copper and simulated acid rain on copper accumulation, growth, and antioxidant enzyme activities of Rumex acetosa].

    PubMed

    He, Shan-Ying; Gao, Yong-Jie; Shentu, Jia-Li; Chen, Kun-Bai

    2011-02-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the combined effects of Cu (0-1500 mg x kg(-1)) and simulated acid rain (pH 2.5-5.6) on the copper accumulation, growth, and antioxidant enzyme activities of Rumex acetosa. With the increasing concentration of soil Cu, the Cu accumulation in R. acetosa increased, being higher in root than in stem and leaf. The exposure to low pH acid rain promoted the Cu uptake by R. acetosa. With the increase of soil Cu concentration and/or of acid rain acidity, the biomass of R. acetosa decreased, leaf and root MDA contents increased and had good correlation with soil Cu concentration, and the SOD and POD activities in leaf and root displayed a decreasing trend after an initial increase. This study showed that R. acetosa had a strong adaptive ability to Cu and acid rain stress, exhibiting a high application potential in the remediation of Cu-contaminated soil in acid rain areas.

  10. [Combined effects of copper and simulated acid rain on copper accumulation, growth, and antioxidant enzyme activities of Rumex acetosa].

    PubMed

    He, Shan-Ying; Gao, Yong-Jie; Shentu, Jia-Li; Chen, Kun-Bai

    2011-02-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the combined effects of Cu (0-1500 mg x kg(-1)) and simulated acid rain (pH 2.5-5.6) on the copper accumulation, growth, and antioxidant enzyme activities of Rumex acetosa. With the increasing concentration of soil Cu, the Cu accumulation in R. acetosa increased, being higher in root than in stem and leaf. The exposure to low pH acid rain promoted the Cu uptake by R. acetosa. With the increase of soil Cu concentration and/or of acid rain acidity, the biomass of R. acetosa decreased, leaf and root MDA contents increased and had good correlation with soil Cu concentration, and the SOD and POD activities in leaf and root displayed a decreasing trend after an initial increase. This study showed that R. acetosa had a strong adaptive ability to Cu and acid rain stress, exhibiting a high application potential in the remediation of Cu-contaminated soil in acid rain areas. PMID:21608265

  11. Metabolic bypass of the tricarboxylic acid cycle during lipid mobilization in germinating oilseeds. Regulation Of nad+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase versus fumarase

    PubMed

    Falk; Behal; Xiang; Oliver

    1998-06-01

    Biosynthesis of sucrose from triacylglycerol requires the bypass of the CO2-evolving reactions of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The regulation of the TCA cycle bypass during lipid mobilization was examined. Lipid mobilization in Brassica napus was initiated shortly after imbibition of the seed and proceeded until 2 d postimbibition, as measured by in vivo [1-14C]acetate feeding to whole seedlings. The activity of NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase (a decarboxylative enzyme) was not detected until 2 d postimbibition. RNA-blot analysis of B. napus seedlings demonstrated that the mRNA for NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase was present in dry seeds and that its level increased through the 4 d of the experiment. This suggested that NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase activity was regulated by posttranscriptional mechanisms during early seedling development but was controlled by mRNA level after the 2nd or 3rd d. The activity of fumarase (a component of the nonbypassed section of the TCA cycle) was low but detectable in B. napus seedlings at 12 h postimbibition, coincident with germination, and increased for the next 4 d. RNA-blot analysis suggested that fumarase activity was regulated primarily by the level of its mRNA during germination and early seedling development. It is concluded that posttranscriptional regulation of NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase activity is one mechanism of restricting carbon flux through the decarboxylative section of the TCA cycle during lipid mobilization in germinating oilseeds.

  12. The relationship between leaf rolling and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in apoplastic and symplastic areas of Ctenanthe setosa subjected to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Saruhan, Neslihan; Terzi, Rabiye; Saglam, Aykut; Kadioglu, Asim

    2009-01-01

    The ascorbate-glutathione (ASC-GSH) cycle has an important role in defensive processes against oxidative damage generated by drought stress. In this study, the changes that take place in apoplastic and symplastic ASC-GSH cycle enzymes of the leaf and petiole were investigated under drought stress causing leaf rolling in Ctenanthe setosa (Rose.) Eichler (Marantaceae). Apoplastic and symplastic extractions of leaf and petiole were performed at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others are intermediate forms). Glutathione reductase (GR), a key enzyme in the GSH regeneration cycle, and ascorbate (ASC) were present in apoplastic spaces of the leaf and petiole, whereas dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), which uses glutathione as reductant, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), which uses NAD(P)H as reductant, and glutathione were absent. GR, DHAR and MDHAR activities increased in the symplastic and apoplastic areas of the leaf. Apoplastic and symplastic ASC and dehydroascorbate (DHA), the oxidized form of ascorbate, rose at all scores except score 4 of symplastic ASC in the leaf. On the other hand, while reduced glutathione (GSH) content was enhanced, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) content decreased in the leaf during rolling. As for the petiole, GR activity increased in the apoplastic area but decreased in the symplastic area. DHAR and MDHAR activities increased throughout all scores, but decreased to the score 1 level at score 4. The ASC content of the apoplast increased during leaf rolling. Conversely, symplastic ASC content increased at score 2, however decreased at the later scores. While the apoplastic DHA content declined, symplastic DHA rose at score 2, but later was down to the level of score 1. While GSH content enhanced during leaf rolling, GSSG content did not change except at score 2. As well, there were good correlations between leaf rolling and ASC-GSH cycle enzyme activities in the leaf (GR and DHAR

  13. The relationship between leaf rolling and ascorbate-glutathione cycle enzymes in apoplastic and symplastic areas of Ctenanthe setosa subjected to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Saruhan, Neslihan; Terzi, Rabiye; Saglam, Aykut; Kadioglu, Asim

    2009-01-01

    The ascorbate-glutathione (ASC-GSH) cycle has an important role in defensive processes against oxidative damage generated by drought stress. In this study, the changes that take place in apoplastic and symplastic ASC-GSH cycle enzymes of the leaf and petiole were investigated under drought stress causing leaf rolling in Ctenanthe setosa (Rose.) Eichler (Marantaceae). Apoplastic and symplastic extractions of leaf and petiole were performed at different visual leaf rolling scores from 1 to 4 (1 is unrolled, 4 is tightly rolled and the others are intermediate forms). Glutathione reductase (GR), a key enzyme in the GSH regeneration cycle, and ascorbate (ASC) were present in apoplastic spaces of the leaf and petiole, whereas dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), which uses glutathione as reductant, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), which uses NAD(P)H as reductant, and glutathione were absent. GR, DHAR and MDHAR activities increased in the symplastic and apoplastic areas of the leaf. Apoplastic and symplastic ASC and dehydroascorbate (DHA), the oxidized form of ascorbate, rose at all scores except score 4 of symplastic ASC in the leaf. On the other hand, while reduced glutathione (GSH) content was enhanced, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) content decreased in the leaf during rolling. As for the petiole, GR activity increased in the apoplastic area but decreased in the symplastic area. DHAR and MDHAR activities increased throughout all scores, but decreased to the score 1 level at score 4. The ASC content of the apoplast increased during leaf rolling. Conversely, symplastic ASC content increased at score 2, however decreased at the later scores. While the apoplastic DHA content declined, symplastic DHA rose at score 2, but later was down to the level of score 1. While GSH content enhanced during leaf rolling, GSSG content did not change except at score 2. As well, there were good correlations between leaf rolling and ASC-GSH cycle enzyme activities in the leaf (GR and DHAR

  14. Tetrahydrofolate-specific enzymes in Methanosarcina barkeri and growth dependence of this methanogenic archaeon on folic acid or p-aminobenzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Buchenau, Bärbel; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2004-10-01

    Methanogenic archaea are generally thought to use tetrahydromethanopterin or tetrahydrosarcinapterin (H4SPT) rather than tetrahydrofolate (H4F) as a pterin C1 carrier. However, the genome sequence of Methanosarcina species recently revealed a cluster of genes, purN, folD, glyA and metF, that are predicted to encode for H4F-specific enzymes. We show here for folD and glyA from M. barkeri that this prediction is correct: FolD (bifunctional N5,N10-methylene-H4F dehydrogenase/N5,N10-methenyl-H4F cyclohydrolase) and GlyA (serine:H4F hydroxymethyltransferase) were heterologously overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified and found to be specific for methylene-H4F and H4F, respectively (apparent Km below 5 microM). Western blot analyses and enzyme activity measurements revealed that both enzymes were synthesized in M. barkeri. The results thus indicate that M. barkeri should contain H4F, which was supported by the finding that growth of M. barkeri was dependent on folic acid and that the vitamin could be substituted by p-aminobenzoic acid, a biosynthetic precursor of H4F. From the p-aminobenzoic acid requirement, an intracellular H4F concentration of approximately 5 M was estimated. Evidence is presented that the p-aminobenzoic acid taken up by the growing cells was not required for the biosynthesis of H4SPT, which was found to be present in the cells at a concentration above 3 mM. The presence of both H4SPT and H4F in M. barkeri is in agreement with earlier isotope labeling studies indicating that there are two separate C1 pools in these methanogens.

  15. The cellular and compartmental profile of mouse retinal glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and ~P transferring kinases

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Elda M.; Johnson, Jerry E.; Giddabasappa, Anand; Swaroop, Anand; Brooks, Matthew J.; Sigel, Irena; Chaney, Shawnta Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The homeostatic regulation of cellular ATP is achieved by the coordinated activity of ATP utilization, synthesis, and buffering. Glucose is the major substrate for ATP synthesis through glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), whereas intermediary metabolism through the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle utilizes non-glucose-derived monocarboxylates, amino acids, and alpha ketoacids to support mitochondrial ATP and GTP synthesis. Cellular ATP is buffered by specialized equilibrium-driven high-energy phosphate (~P) transferring kinases. Our goals were twofold: 1) to characterize the gene expression, protein expression, and activity of key synthesizing and regulating enzymes of energy metabolism in the whole mouse retina, retinal compartments, and/or cells and 2) to provide an integrative analysis of the results related to function. Methods mRNA expression data of energy-related genes were extracted from our whole retinal Affymetrix microarray data. Fixed-frozen retinas from adult C57BL/6N mice were used for immunohistochemistry, laser scanning confocal microscopy, and enzymatic histochemistry. The immunoreactivity levels of well-characterized antibodies, for all major retinal cells and their compartments, were obtained using our established semiquantitative confocal and imaging techniques. Quantitative cytochrome oxidase (COX) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was determined histochemically. Results The Affymetrix data revealed varied gene expression patterns of the ATP synthesizing and regulating enzymes found in the muscle, liver, and brain. Confocal studies showed differential cellular and compartmental distribution of isozymes involved in glucose, glutamate, glutamine, lactate, and creatine metabolism. The pattern and intensity of the antibodies and of the COX and LDH activity showed the high capacity of photoreceptors for aerobic glycolysis and OXPHOS. Competition assays with pyruvate revealed that LDH-5 was localized in the photoreceptor

  16. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS OF ESTRADIOL IN THE CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMOZED/ESTRADIOL-IMPLANTED FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations of Estradiol in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized / Estradiol-implanted Female Rats

    ABSTRACT
    Haloacetic acids are one of the principal classes of disinfection by-products generated by the chlorination of mun...

  17. The Effect of Light on the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Green Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, E. A.; Graham, D.

    1974-01-01

    Long term feeding of acetate-2-14C, 14CO2, citrate-1,5-14C, fumarate-2,3-14C, and succinate-2,3-14C to mung bean (Phaseolus aureus L. var. Mungo) leaves in the dark gave labeling predominantly in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Kinetics of the intermediates during dark/light/dark transitions showed a light-induced interchange of 14C between malate and aspartate, usually resulting in an accumulation of 14C in malate and a decrease of it in aspartate. 14C-Phosphoenolpyruvate also showed a marked decrease during illumination. Changes in other intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle were relatively minor. The kinetic data have been analyzed using the Chance crossover theorem to locate control points during the dark/light/dark transitions. The major apparent control points are located at malate and isocitrate dehydrogenases, and less frequently at citrate synthase and fumarase. These findings are explained in terms of the light-induced changes in adenine nucleotides and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides. PMID:16658810

  18. Biochar impacts soil microbial community composition and nitrogen cycling in an acidic soil planted with rape.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Li, Hu; Yao, Huai-Ying; Su, Jian-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-08-19

    Biochar has been suggested to improve acidic soils and to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. However, little has been done on the role of biochar in ameliorating acidified soils induced by overuse of nitrogen fertilizers. In this study, we designed a pot trial with an acidic soil (pH 4.48) in a greenhouse to study the interconnections between microbial community, soil chemical property changes, and N2O emissions after biochar application. The results showed that biochar increased plant growth, soil pH, total carbon, total nitrogen, C/N ratio, and soil cation exchange capacity. The results of high-throughput sequencing showed that biochar application increased α-diversity significantly and changed the relative abundances of some microbes that are related with carbon and nitrogen cycling at the family level. Biochar amendment stimulated both nitrification and denitrification processes, while reducing N2O emissions overall. Results of redundancy analysis indicated biochar could shift the soil microbial community by changing soil chemical properties, which modulate N-cycling processes and soil N2O emissions. The significantly increased nosZ transcription suggests that biochar decreased soil N2O emissions by enhancing its further reduction to N2. PMID:25054835

  19. THE EFFECT OF ANOLYTE PRODUCT ACID CONCENTRATION ON HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Summers, W.

    2010-03-24

    The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycle (Fig. 1) is one of the simplest, all-fluids thermochemical cycles that has been devised for splitting water with a high-temperature nuclear or solar heat source. It was originally patented by Brecher and Wu in 1975 and extensively developed by Westinghouse in the late 1970s and early 1980s. As its name suggests, the only element used besides hydrogen and oxygen is sulfur, which is cycled between the +4 and +6 oxidation states. HyS comprises two steps. One is the thermochemical (>800 C) decomposition of sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), oxygen (O{sub 2}), and water. H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} = SO{sub 2} + 1/2 O{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O. The other is the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis of water to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and hydrogen (H{sub 2}), SO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}O = H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}, E{sup o} = -0.156 V, explaining the 'hybrid' designation. These two steps taken together split water into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} using heat and electricity. Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and at the University of South Carolina (USC) have successfully demonstrated the use of proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzers (Fig. 2) for the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis (sulfur oxidation) step, while Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) successfully demonstrated the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition (sulfur reduction) step using a bayonet-type reactor (Fig. 3). This latter work was performed as part of the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) cycle Integrated Laboratory Scale demonstration at General Atomics (GA). The combination of these two operations results in a simple process that will be more efficient and cost-effective for the massive production of hydrogen than alkaline electrolysis. Recent developments suggest that the use of PEMs other than Nafion will allow sulfuric acid to be produced at higher concentrations (>60 wt%), offering the possibility of net thermal efficiencies around 50% (HHV basis

  20. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, Simon A.J.; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Echeverria, Ignacia; Vogel, Jonathan T.; Guan, Jiahn Chou; Tan, Bao Cai; Klee, Harry J.; McCarty, Donald R.; Amzel, L. Mario

    2011-09-06

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  1. Structural Insights into Maize Viviparous14, a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Phytohormone Abscisic Acid W

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, S.; Gabelli, S; Echeverria, I; Vogel, J; Guan, J; Tan, B; Klee, H; McCarty, D; Amzela, M

    2010-01-01

    The key regulatory step in the biosynthesis of abscisic acid (ABA), a hormone central to the regulation of several important processes in plants, is the oxidative cleavage of the 11,12 double bond of a 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid. The enzyme viviparous14 (VP14) performs this cleavage in maize (Zea mays), making it a target for the rational design of novel chemical agents and genetic modifications that improve plant behavior through the modulation of ABA levels. The structure of VP14, determined to 3.2-{angstrom} resolution, provides both insight into the determinants of regio- and stereospecificity of this enzyme and suggests a possible mechanism for oxidative cleavage. Furthermore, mutagenesis of the distantly related CCD1 of maize shows how the VP14 structure represents a template for all plant carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs). In addition, the structure suggests how VP14 associates with the membrane as a way of gaining access to its membrane soluble substrate.

  2. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-06-15

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed (13)C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation.

  3. Enzymic formation of dehydrogenated and hydroxylated metabolites from lysergic acid diethylamide by rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Niwaguchi, T; Murata, T

    1980-05-01

    1. The metabolism of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) was studied using rat liver microsomes, and two minor metabolites were obtained in addition to lysergic acid ethylamide and N6-desmethyl-lysergic acid diethylamide (nor-LSD) which were reported previously. 2. One of the metabolites was identified as lysergic acid ethylvinylamide, apparently formed by dehydrogenation of a diethylamide group in the side chain at the 8-position, and the other as the phenol 13-hydroxy-LSD. 3. The formation of both lysergic acid ethylamide and lysergic acid ethylvinylamide was similarly induced by pretreatment of rats with either phenobarbitone sodium or 3-methylcholanthrene, while nor-LSD formation was induced only by phenobarbitone and that of 13-hydroxy-LSD only by methylcholanthrene.

  4. Effects of nitrogen dioxide and its acid mist on reactive oxygen species production and antioxidant enzyme activity in Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofang; Hou, Fen; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2015-08-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of the most common and harmful air pollutants. To analyze the response of plants to NO2 stress, we investigated the morphological change, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and antioxidant enzyme activity in Arabidopsis thaliana (Col-0) exposed to 1.7, 4, 8.5, and 18.8 mg/m(3) NO2. The results indicate that NO2 exposure affected plant growth and chlorophyll (Chl) content, and increased oxygen free radical (O2(-)) production rate in Arabidopsis shoots. Furthermore, NO2 elevated the levels of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation, accompanied by the induction of antioxidant enzyme activities and change of ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) contents. Following this, we mimicked nitric acid mist under experimental conditions, and confirmed the antioxidant mechanism of the plant to the stress. Our results imply that NO2 and its acid mist caused pollution risk to plant systems. During the process, increased ROS acted as a signal to induce a defense response, and antioxidant status played an important role in plant protection against NO2/nitric acid mist-caused oxidative damage.

  5. Cellulolytic enzymes, nucleic acids encoding them and methods for making and using them

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Kevin A.; Zhao, Lishan; Cayouette, Michelle H.

    2012-01-24

    The invention provides polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, a endoglucanase, a cellobiohydrolase, a beta-glucosidase, a xylanase, a mannanse, a .beta.-xylosidase, an arabinofuranosidase, and/or an oligomerase activity, polynucleotides encoding these polypeptides, and methods of making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. In one aspect, the invention is directed to polypeptides having any cellulolytic activity, e.g., a cellulase activity, e.g., endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, beta-glucosidase, xylanase, mannanse, .beta.-xylosidase, arabinofuranosidase, and/or oligomerase activity, including thermostable and thermotolerant activity, and polynucleotides encoding these enzymes, and making and using these polynucleotides and polypeptides. In one aspect, the invention provides polypeptides having an oligomerase activity, e.g., enzymes that convert recalcitrant soluble oligomers to fermentable sugars in the saccharification of biomass. The polypeptides of the invention can be used in a variety of pharmaceutical, agricultural, food and feed processing and industrial contexts. The invention also provides compositions or products of manufacture comprising mixtures of enzymes comprising at least one enzyme of this invention.

  6. Characterization of two key enzymes for aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in symbiotic archaea.

    PubMed

    Shlaifer, Irina; Turnbull, Joanne L

    2016-07-01

    Biosynthesis of L-tyrosine (L-Tyr) and L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) is directed by the interplay of three enzymes. Chorismate mutase (CM) catalyzes the rearrangement of chorismate to prephenate, which can be either converted to hydroxyphenylpyruvate by prephenate dehydrogenase (PD) or to phenylpyruvate by prephenate dehydratase (PDT). This work reports the first characterization of a trifunctional PD-CM-PDT from the smallest hyperthermophilic archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans and a bifunctional CM-PD from its host, the crenarchaeon Ignicoccus hospitalis. Hexa-histidine tagged proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Specific activities determined for the trifunctional enzyme were 21, 80, and 30 U/mg for CM, PD, and PDT, respectively, and 47 and 21 U/mg for bifunctional CM and PD, respectively. Unlike most PDs, these two archaeal enzymes were insensitive to regulation by L-Tyr and preferred NADP(+) to NAD(+) as a cofactor. Both the enzymes were highly thermally stable and exhibited maximal activity at 90 °C. N. equitans PDT was feedback inhibited by L-Phe (Ki = 0.8 µM) in a non-competitive fashion consistent with L-Phe's combination at a site separate from that of prephenate. Our results suggest that PD from the unique symbiotic archaeal pair encompass a distinct subfamily of prephenate dehydrogenases with regard to their regulation and co-substrate specificity. PMID:27290727

  7. Fatty acid composition of muscle fat and enzymes of storage lipid synthesis in whole muscle from beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Kazala, E Chris; Lozeman, Fred J; Mir, Priya S; Aalhus, Jennifer L; Schmutz, Sheila M; Weselake, Randall J

    2006-11-01

    Enhanced intramuscular fat content (i.e., marbling) in beef is a desirable trait, which can result in increased product value. This study was undertaken with the aim of revealing biochemical factors associated with the marbling trait in beef cattle. Samples of longissimus lumborum (LL) and pars costalis diaphragmatis (PCD) were taken from a group of intact crossbred males and females at slaughter, lipids extracted, and the resulting FAME examined for relationships with marbling fat deposition. For LL, significant associations were found between degree of marbling and myristic (14:0, r = 0.55, P < 0.01), palmitic (16:0, r = 0.80, P < 0.001), stearic (18:0, r = -0.58, P < 0.01), and oleic (18:1c-9, r = 0.79, P < 0.001) acids. For PCD, significant relationships were found between marbling and palmitic (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) and oleic (r = 0.74, P < 0.001) acids. Microsomal fractions prepared from PCD muscle were assayed for diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT), and phosphatidic acid phosphatase-1 (PAP-1) activity, and the results examined for relationships with degree of intramuscular fat deposition. None of the enzyme activities from PCD displayed an association with marbling fat content, but DGAT specific activity showed significant positive associations with LPAAT (r = 0.54, P < 0.01), total PAP (r = 0.66, P < 0.001), and PAP-1 (r = 0.63, P < 0.01) specific activities. The results on FA compositions of whole muscle tissues provide insight into possible enzyme action associated with the production of specific FA. The increased proportion of oleic acid associated with enhanced lipid content of whole muscle is noteworthy given the known health benefits of this FA. PMID:17263304

  8. Fatty acid composition of muscle fat and enzymes of storage lipid synthesis in whole muscle from beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Kazala, E Chris; Lozeman, Fred J; Mir, Priya S; Aalhus, Jennifer L; Schmutz, Sheila M; Weselake, Randall J

    2006-11-01

    Enhanced intramuscular fat content (i.e., marbling) in beef is a desirable trait, which can result in increased product value. This study was undertaken with the aim of revealing biochemical factors associated with the marbling trait in beef cattle. Samples of longissimus lumborum (LL) and pars costalis diaphragmatis (PCD) were taken from a group of intact crossbred males and females at slaughter, lipids extracted, and the resulting FAME examined for relationships with marbling fat deposition. For LL, significant associations were found between degree of marbling and myristic (14:0, r = 0.55, P < 0.01), palmitic (16:0, r = 0.80, P < 0.001), stearic (18:0, r = -0.58, P < 0.01), and oleic (18:1c-9, r = 0.79, P < 0.001) acids. For PCD, significant relationships were found between marbling and palmitic (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) and oleic (r = 0.74, P < 0.001) acids. Microsomal fractions prepared from PCD muscle were assayed for diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), lysophosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAAT), and phosphatidic acid phosphatase-1 (PAP-1) activity, and the results examined for relationships with degree of intramuscular fat deposition. None of the enzyme activities from PCD displayed an association with marbling fat content, but DGAT specific activity showed significant positive associations with LPAAT (r = 0.54, P < 0.01), total PAP (r = 0.66, P < 0.001), and PAP-1 (r = 0.63, P < 0.01) specific activities. The results on FA compositions of whole muscle tissues provide insight into possible enzyme action associated with the production of specific FA. The increased proportion of oleic acid associated with enhanced lipid content of whole muscle is noteworthy given the known health benefits of this FA.

  9. Impact of L-FABP and glucose on polyunsaturated fatty acid induction of PPARα-regulated β-oxidative enzymes.

    PubMed

    Petrescu, Anca D; Huang, Huan; Martin, Gregory G; McIntosh, Avery L; Storey, Stephen M; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-02-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is the major soluble protein that binds very-long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in hepatocytes. However, nothing is known about L-FABP's role in n-3 PUFA-mediated peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα) transcription of proteins involved in long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) β-oxidation. This issue was addressed in cultured primary hepatocytes from wild-type, L-FABP-null, and PPARα-null mice with these major findings: 1) PUFA-mediated increase in the expression of PPARα-regulated LCFA β-oxidative enzymes, LCFA/LCFA-CoA binding proteins (L-FABP, ACBP), and PPARα itself was L-FABP dependent; 2) PPARα transcription, robustly potentiated by high glucose but not maltose, a sugar not taken up, correlated with higher protein levels of these LCFA β-oxidative enzymes and with increased LCFA β-oxidation; and 3) high glucose altered the potency of n-3 relative to n-6 PUFA. This was not due to a direct effect of glucose on PPARα transcriptional activity nor indirectly through de novo fatty acid synthesis from glucose. Synergism was also not due to glucose impacting other signaling pathways, since it was observed only in hepatocytes expressing both L-FABP and PPARα. Ablation of L-FABP or PPARα as well as treatment with MK886 (PPARα inhibitor) abolished/reduced PUFA-mediated PPARα transcription of these genes, especially at high glucose. Finally, the PUFA-enhanced L-FABP distribution into nuclei with high glucose augmentation of the L-FABP/PPARα interaction reveals not only the importance of L-FABP for PUFA induction of PPARα target genes in fatty acid β-oxidation but also the significance of a high glucose enhancement effect in diabetes.

  10. Adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein and mitochondrial enzyme activities in muscles as relevant indicators of marbling in cattle.

    PubMed

    Jurie, C; Cassar-Malek, I; Bonnet, M; Leroux, C; Bauchart, D; Boulesteix, P; Pethick, D W; Hocquette, J F

    2007-10-01

    Marbling is an important criterion for beef quality grading in many countries. The purpose of the current study was to utilize the natural genetic variation to identify major metabolic indicators of marbling in cattle differing in genotypes. Rectus abdominis (RA, oxidative), semitendinosus (glycolytic), and longissimus thoracis (LT, oxido-glycolytic) muscles were taken from steers of different genotypes that expressed high [Angus, n = 16; and crossbred (Angus x Japanese Black), n = 10] or low (Limousin, n = 12) levels of marbling in their meat. Muscles from Angus and crossbred steers were characterized, as expected, by a greater triacylglycerol (TAG) content (P < 0.001) and also by greater protein contents of fatty acid-binding protein specific for heart and muscles (H-FABP; P < 0.001 for RA and P < 0.05 for LT muscle) or for adipocytes (A-FABP; P < 0.001 for RA and LT muscles). Moreover, oxidative enzyme activities (beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, cytochrome-c oxidase) were greater (P < 0.01 to 0.001) in the 3 muscles studied, whereas glycolytic enzyme activities (phosphofructokinase and lactate dehydrogenase) were lower (P < 0.001) in RA muscle in Angus and crossbred steers compared with Limousin steers. Significant correlations were observed between TAG content and H- and A-FABP protein contents, and oxidative (r > or = +0.55, P < 0.001) or glycolytic enzyme activities (r > or = -0.47, P < 0.001), when the 3 genotypes and muscles studied were considered as a whole. In addition, A-FABP protein content and some oxidative enzyme activities were significantly correlated with TAG content independently of the genotype and muscle effects. In conclusion, A-FABP protein content, as well as oxidative enzyme activities, may be used as indicators of the ability of steers from extreme genotypes to deposit intramuscular fat.

  11. Influences of Various Amino Acids on Tryptophan-Mediated Control of the Tryptophan Biosynthetic Enzymes in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, John D.; Stubbs, E. Ann

    1971-01-01

    Lysates of Escherichia coli Ymel obtained from cultures grown in the absence of tryptophan in minimal medium supplemented with 0.1% casein hydrolysate show an approximate fivefold increase in steady-state specific activity of both anthranilate synthetase and tryptophan synthetase A protein relative to cultures grown in nonsupplemented medium. In the presence of repressing levels of exogenous tryptophan, growth of cultures in casein hydrolysate-supplemented medium results in a noncoordinate enhancement of repression of 10-fold for anthranilate synthetase and twofold for tryptophan synthetase A protein. Similar, but less pronounced, effects are shown for strain W3110. Strains possessing tryptophan regulator gene mutations do not exhibit this first effect, but do yield an approximate twofold decrease in specific activity of both enzymes when grown in medium supplemented with tryptophan and casein hydrolysate. A stimulation of derepression of both enzymes in strain Ymel equivalent to that induced by casein hydrolysate can be reproduced by growth in minimal medium supplemented with threonine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, serine, glutamic acid, and glutamine. Doubling time in this medium is not significantly different from that in minimal medium. An enhancement of repression which partially mimics that observed on growth in medium supplemented with tryptophan plus casein hydrolysate is obtained when Ymel is grown on medium supplemented with tryptophan plus methionine. Threonine or phenylalanine plus tyrosine as separate medium supplements are independently capable of producing a 1.4-fold or 3.4-fold stimulation, respectively, but in combination only the phenylalanine plus tyrosine effect is manifested unless serine and glutamic acid or glutamine are included. Our data show that expression of the tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes can be significantly influenced in vivo as a result of growth in medium supplemented with a variety of amino acids. PMID:4945190

  12. Short-Term Responses of Soil Respiration and C-Cycle Enzyme Activities to Additions of Biochar and Urea in a Calcareous Soil.

    PubMed

    Song, Dali; Xi, Xiangyin; Huang, Shaomin; Liang, Guoqing; Sun, Jingwen; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xiubin

    2016-01-01

    Biochar (BC) addition to soil is a proposed strategy to enhance soil fertility and crop productivity. However, there is limited knowledge regarding responses of soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities to BC and nitrogen (N) additions in a calcareous soil. A 56-day incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the combined effects of BC addition rates (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0% by mass) and urea (U) application on soil nutrients, soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities in a calcareous soil in the North China Plain. Our results showed soil pH values in both U-only and U plus BC treatments significantly decreased within the first 14 days and then stabilized, and CO2emission rate in all U plus BC soils decreased exponentially, while there was no significant difference in the contents of soil total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and C/N ratio in each treatment over time. At each incubation time, soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), TOC, TN, C/N ratio, DOC and cumulative CO2 emission significantly increased with increasing BC addition rate, while soil potential activities of the four hydrolytic enzymes increased first and then decreased with increasing BC addition rate, with the largest values in the U + 1.0%BC treatment. However, phenol oxidase activity in all U plus BC soils showed a decreasing trend with the increase of BC addition rate. Our results suggest that U plus BC application at a rate of 1% promotes increases in hydrolytic enzymes, does not highly increase C/N and C mineralization, and can improve in soil fertility. PMID:27589265

  13. Short-Term Responses of Soil Respiration and C-Cycle Enzyme Activities to Additions of Biochar and Urea in a Calcareous Soil

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dali; Xi, Xiangyin; Huang, Shaomin; Liang, Guoqing; Sun, Jingwen; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xiubin

    2016-01-01

    Biochar (BC) addition to soil is a proposed strategy to enhance soil fertility and crop productivity. However, there is limited knowledge regarding responses of soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities to BC and nitrogen (N) additions in a calcareous soil. A 56-day incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the combined effects of BC addition rates (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0% by mass) and urea (U) application on soil nutrients, soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities in a calcareous soil in the North China Plain. Our results showed soil pH values in both U-only and U plus BC treatments significantly decreased within the first 14 days and then stabilized, and CO2emission rate in all U plus BC soils decreased exponentially, while there was no significant difference in the contents of soil total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and C/N ratio in each treatment over time. At each incubation time, soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), TOC, TN, C/N ratio, DOC and cumulative CO2 emission significantly increased with increasing BC addition rate, while soil potential activities of the four hydrolytic enzymes increased first and then decreased with increasing BC addition rate, with the largest values in the U + 1.0%BC treatment. However, phenol oxidase activity in all U plus BC soils showed a decreasing trend with the increase of BC addition rate. Our results suggest that U plus BC application at a rate of 1% promotes increases in hydrolytic enzymes, does not highly increase C/N and C mineralization, and can improve in soil fertility. PMID:27589265

  14. Short-Term Responses of Soil Respiration and C-Cycle Enzyme Activities to Additions of Biochar and Urea in a Calcareous Soil.

    PubMed

    Song, Dali; Xi, Xiangyin; Huang, Shaomin; Liang, Guoqing; Sun, Jingwen; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xiubin

    2016-01-01

    Biochar (BC) addition to soil is a proposed strategy to enhance soil fertility and crop productivity. However, there is limited knowledge regarding responses of soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities to BC and nitrogen (N) additions in a calcareous soil. A 56-day incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the combined effects of BC addition rates (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0% by mass) and urea (U) application on soil nutrients, soil respiration and C-cycle enzyme activities in a calcareous soil in the North China Plain. Our results showed soil pH values in both U-only and U plus BC treatments significantly decreased within the first 14 days and then stabilized, and CO2emission rate in all U plus BC soils decreased exponentially, while there was no significant difference in the contents of soil total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total nitrogen (TN), and C/N ratio in each treatment over time. At each incubation time, soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), TOC, TN, C/N ratio, DOC and cumulative CO2 emission significantly increased with increasing BC addition rate, while soil potential activities of the four hydrolytic enzymes increased first and then decreased with increasing BC addition rate, with the largest values in the U + 1.0%BC treatment. However, phenol oxidase activity in all U plus BC soils showed a decreasing trend with the increase of BC addition rate. Our results suggest that U plus BC application at a rate of 1% promotes increases in hydrolytic enzymes, does not highly increase C/N and C mineralization, and can improve in soil fertility.

  15. Microbial-processing of fruit and vegetable wastes for production of vital enzymes and organic acids: Biotechnology and scopes.

    PubMed

    Panda, Sandeep K; Mishra, Swati S; Kayitesi, Eugenie; Ray, Ramesh C

    2016-04-01

    Wastes generated from fruits and vegetables are organic in nature and contribute a major share in soil and water pollution. Also, green house gas emission caused by fruit and vegetable wastes (FVWs) is a matter of serious environmental concern. This review addresses the developments over the last one decade on microbial processing technologies for production of enzymes and organic acids from FVWs. The advances in genetic engineering for improvement of microbial strains in order to enhance the production of the value added bio-products as well as the concept of zero-waste economy have been briefly discussed.

  16. Microbial-processing of fruit and vegetable wastes for production of vital enzymes and organic acids: Biotechnology and scopes.

    PubMed

    Panda, Sandeep K; Mishra, Swati S; Kayitesi, Eugenie; Ray, Ramesh C

    2016-04-01

    Wastes generated from fruits and vegetables are organic in nature and contribute a major share in soil and water pollution. Also, green house gas emission caused by fruit and vegetable wastes (FVWs) is a matter of serious environmental concern. This review addresses the developments over the last one decade on microbial processing technologies for production of enzymes and organic acids from FVWs. The advances in genetic engineering for improvement of microbial strains in order to enhance the production of the value added bio-products as well as the concept of zero-waste economy have been briefly discussed. PMID:26761593

  17. Polymerization of pentachlorophenol and ferulic acid by fungal extracellular lignin-degrading enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Rüttimann-Johnson, C; Lamar, R T

    1996-01-01

    High-molecular-weight polymers were produced by a crude concentrated supernatant from ligninolytic Phanerochaete chrysosporium cultures in a reaction mixture containing pentachlorophenol and a humic acid precursor (ferulic acid) in the presence of a detergent and H2O2. Pure manganese peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and laccase were also shown to catalyze the reaction. PMID:8967777

  18. Phthalic acid induces oxidative stress and alters the activity of some antioxidant enzymes in roots of Malus prunifolia.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ru; Ma, Fengwang; Liang, Dong; Zhao, Xin

    2009-04-01

    Apple replant is a widespread agricultural problem documented in all of the major fruit-growing regions of the world. In order to better understand the phytotoxic mechanisms induced by allelochemicals involved with this problem, Malus prunifolia plants were grown hydroponically to the six-leaf-stage in the presence of phthalic acid (0 or 1 mM) for 5, 10, or 15 days. Apple plants were evaluated for: shoot and root length, fresh and dry weight, malondialdehyde (MDA) content, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) content, superoxide radical (O(2) (*-)) generation rate, and antioxidant enzyme activities. Shoot and root lengths and fresh and dry weights of M. prunifolia decreased in plants exposed to phthalic acid. MDA and H(2)O(2) content increased in phthalic acid-treated plants as did the generation rate of O(2) (*-) in M. prunifolia roots. The activities of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11), glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2), dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), and monodehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) increased in phthalic acid-stressed roots compared with control roots. These results suggest that activation of the antioxidant system by phthalic acid led to the formation of reactive oxygen species that resulted in cellular damage and the decrease of M. prunifolia growth. PMID:19352774

  19. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced oxidative stress, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Benedict, Sheela

    2011-10-01

    It is widely accepted that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, reduce the risk of cancer. The anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects of NSAIDs are associated with the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis and cyclooxygenase-2 activity. Several other mechanisms which contribute to the anti-cancer effect of these drugs in different cancer models both in vivo and in vitro are also presumed to be involved. The precise molecular mechanism, however, is still not clear. We investigated, therefore, the effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) on multiple cellular and functional targets, including mitochondrial bioenergetics, using human hepatoma HepG2 cancer cells in culture. Our results demonstrate that ASA induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. ASA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, reduced the cellular glutathione (GSH) pool and inhibited the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complexes, NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I), cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and the mitochondrial matrix enzyme, aconitase. Apoptosis was triggered by alteration in mitochondrial permeability transition, inhibition of ATP synthesis, decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, release of cytochrome c and activation of pro-apoptotic caspase-3 and the DNA repairing enzyme, poly (-ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). These findings strongly suggest that ASA-induced toxicity in human hepatoma HepG2 cells is mediated by increased metabolic and oxidative stress, accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction which result in apoptosis.

  20. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced oxidative stress, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Raza, Haider; John, Annie; Benedict, Sheela

    2011-10-01

    It is widely accepted that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin, reduce the risk of cancer. The anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory effects of NSAIDs are associated with the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis and cyclooxygenase-2 activity. Several other mechanisms which contribute to the anti-cancer effect of these drugs in different cancer models both in vivo and in vitro are also presumed to be involved. The precise molecular mechanism, however, is still not clear. We investigated, therefore, the effects of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) on multiple cellular and functional targets, including mitochondrial bioenergetics, using human hepatoma HepG2 cancer cells in culture. Our results demonstrate that ASA induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HepG2 cells. ASA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, reduced the cellular glutathione (GSH) pool and inhibited the activities of the mitochondrial respiratory enzyme complexes, NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I), cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and the mitochondrial matrix enzyme, aconitase. Apoptosis was triggered by alteration in mitochondrial permeability transition, inhibition of ATP synthesis, decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, release of cytochrome c and activation of pro-apoptotic caspase-3 and the DNA repairing enzyme, poly (-ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). These findings strongly suggest that ASA-induced toxicity in human hepatoma HepG2 cells is mediated by increased metabolic and oxidative stress, accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction which result in apoptosis. PMID:21722632

  1. A catalytic triad is responsible for acid-base chemistry in the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Karsten, William E; Liu, Dali; Rao, G S Jagannatha; Harris, Ben G; Cook, Paul F

    2005-03-01

    The pH dependence of kinetic parameters of several active site mutants of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme was investigated to determine the role of amino acid residues likely involved in catalysis on the basis of three-dimensional structures of malic enzyme. Lysine 199 is positioned to act as the general base that accepts a proton from the 2-hydroxyl of malate during the hydride transfer step. The pH dependence of V/K(malate) for the K199R mutant enzyme reveals a pK of 5.3 for an enzymatic group required to be unprotonated for activity and a second pK of 6.3 that leads to a 10-fold loss in activity above the pK of 6.3 to a new constant value up to pH 10. The V profile for K199R is pH independent from pH 5.5 to pH 10 and decreases below a pK of 4.9. Tyrosine 126 is positioned to act as the general acid that donates a proton to the enolpyruvate intermediate to form pyruvate. The pH dependence of V/K(malate) for the Y126F mutant is qualitatively similar to K199R, with a requirement for a group to be unprotonated for activity with a pK of 5.6 and a partial activity loss of about 3-fold above a pK of 6.7 to a new constant value. The Y126F mutant enzyme is about 60000-fold less active than the wild-type enzyme. In contrast to K199R, the V rate profile for Y126F also shows a partial activity loss above pH 6.6. The wild-type pH profiles were reinvestigated in light of the discovery of the partial activity change for the mutant enzymes. The wild-type V/K(malate) pH-rate profile exhibits the requirement for a group to be unprotonated for catalysis with a pK of 5.6 and also shows the partial activity loss above a pK of 6.4. The wild-type V pH-rate profile decreases below a pK of 5.2 and is pH independent from pH 5.5 to pH 10. Aspartate 294 is within hydrogen-bonding distance to K199 in the open and closed forms of malic enzyme. D294A is about 13000-fold less active than the wild-type enzyme, and the pH-rate profile for V/K(malate) indicates the mutant is only active above p

  2. Omega-3 fatty acid production from enzyme saccharified hemp hydrolysate using a novel marine thraustochytrid strain.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Adarsha; Abraham, Reinu E; Barrow, Colin J; Puri, Munish

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a newly isolated marine thraustochytrid strain, Schizochytrium sp. DT3, was used for omega-3 fatty acid production by growing on lignocellulose biomass obtained from local hemp hurd (Cannabis sativa) biomass. Prior to enzymatic hydrolysis, hemp was pretreated with sodium hydroxide to open the biomass structure for the production of sugar hydrolysate. The thraustochytrid strain was able to grow on the sugar hydrolysate and accumulated polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). At the lowest carbon concentration of 2%, the PUFAs productivity was 71% in glucose and 59% in the sugars hydrolysate, as a percentage of total fatty acids. Saturated fatty acids (SFAs) levels were highest at about 49% of TFA using 6% glucose as the carbon source. SFAs of 41% were produced using 2% of SH. This study demonstrates that SH produced from lignocellulose biomass is a potentially useful carbon source for the production of omega-3 fatty acids in thraustochytrids, as demonstrated using the new strain, Schizochytrium sp. DT3.

  3. Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Diets with Improved Omega-3 Fatty Acid Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Carla R. V.; Pernollet, Franck; van der Werf, Hayo M. G.

    2016-01-01

    A high incidence of cardiovascular disease is observed worldwide, and dietary habits are one of the risk factors for these diseases. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet help to prevent cardiovascular disease. We used life cycle assessment to analyse the potential of two strategies to improve the nutritional and environmental characteristics of French diets: 1) modifying diets by changing the quantities and proportions of foods and 2) increasing the omega-3 contents in diets by replacing mainly animal foods with equivalent animal foods having higher omega-3 contents. We also investigated other possibilities for reducing environmental impacts. Our results showed that a diet compliant with nutritional recommendations for macronutrients had fewer environmental impacts than the current average French diet. Moving from an omnivorous to a vegetarian diet further reduced environmental impacts. Increasing the omega-3 contents in animal rations increased Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) in animal food products. Providing these enriched animal foods in human diets increased their EPA and DHA contents without affecting their environmental impacts. However, in diets that did not contain fish, EPA and DHA contents were well below the levels recommended by health authorities, despite the inclusion of animal products enriched in EPA and DHA. Reducing meat consumption and avoidable waste at home are two main avenues for reducing environmental impacts of diets. PMID:27504959

  4. Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Diets with Improved Omega-3 Fatty Acid Profiles.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carla R V; Pernollet, Franck; van der Werf, Hayo M G

    2016-01-01

    A high incidence of cardiovascular disease is observed worldwide, and dietary habits are one of the risk factors for these diseases. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet help to prevent cardiovascular disease. We used life cycle assessment to analyse the potential of two strategies to improve the nutritional and environmental characteristics of French diets: 1) modifying diets by changing the quantities and proportions of foods and 2) increasing the omega-3 contents in diets by replacing mainly animal foods with equivalent animal foods having higher omega-3 contents. We also investigated other possibilities for reducing environmental impacts. Our results showed that a diet compliant with nutritional recommendations for macronutrients had fewer environmental impacts than the current average French diet. Moving from an omnivorous to a vegetarian diet further reduced environmental impacts. Increasing the omega-3 contents in animal rations increased Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) in animal food products. Providing these enriched animal foods in human diets increased their EPA and DHA contents without affecting their environmental impacts. However, in diets that did not contain fish, EPA and DHA contents were well below the levels recommended by health authorities, despite the inclusion of animal products enriched in EPA and DHA. Reducing meat consumption and avoidable waste at home are two main avenues for reducing environmental impacts of diets. PMID:27504959

  5. Enzyme-substrate complementarity governs access to a cationic reaction manifold in the P450(BM3)-catalysed oxidation of cyclopropyl fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Cryle, Max J; Hayes, Patricia Y; De Voss, James J

    2012-12-01

    The products of cytochrome P450(BM3)-catalysed oxidation of cyclopropyl-containing dodecanoic acids are consistent with the presence of a cationic reaction intermediate, which results in efficient dehydrogenation of the rearranged probes by the enzyme. These results highlight the importance of enzyme-substrate complementarity, with a cationic intermediate occurring only when the probes used begin to diverge from ideal substrates for this enzyme. This also aids in reconciling literature reports supporting the presence of cationic intermediates with certain cytochrome P450 enzyme/substrate pairs. PMID:23109039

  6. Computational estimation of tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes using noisy NMR data from cardiac biopsies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aerobic energy metabolism of cardiac muscle cells is of major importance for the contractile function of the heart. Because energy metabolism is very heterogeneously distributed in heart tissue, especially during coronary disease, a method to quantify metabolic fluxes in small tissue samples is desirable. Taking tissue biopsies after infusion of substrates labeled with stable carbon isotopes makes this possible in animal experiments. However, the appreciable noise level in NMR spectra of extracted tissue samples makes computational estimation of metabolic fluxes challenging and a good method to define confidence regions was not yet available. Results Here we present a computational analysis method for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolites. The method was validated using measurements on extracts of single tissue biopsies taken from porcine heart in vivo. Isotopic enrichment of glutamate was measured by NMR spectroscopy in tissue samples taken at a single time point after the timed infusion of 13C labeled substrates for the TCA cycle. The NMR intensities for glutamate were analyzed with a computational model describing carbon transitions in the TCA cycle and carbon exchange with amino acids. The model dynamics depended on five flux parameters, which were optimized to fit the NMR measurements. To determine confidence regions for the estimated fluxes, we used the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm for Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling to generate extensive ensembles of feasible flux combinations that describe the data within measurement precision limits. To validate our method, we compared myocardial oxygen consumption calculated from the TCA cycle flux with in vivo blood gas measurements for 38 hearts under several experimental conditions, e.g. during coronary artery narrowing. Conclusions Despite the appreciable NMR noise level, the oxygen consumption in the tissue samples, estimated from the NMR

  7. Determining the N and O isotope effects of microbial nitrite reduction: the global N cycle implications of an enzyme-dependent isotope effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. S.; Casciotti, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    The marine nitrogen (N) cycle is a dynamic system of critical importance, since nitrogen is the limiting nutrient in over half of the world's oceans. Denitrification and anammox, the main N loss processes from the ocean, have different effects on carbon cycling and greenhouse gas emission. Understanding the balance between the two processes is vital to understanding the role of the N cycle in global climate change. One approach for investigating these processes is by using stable isotope analysis to estimate the relative magnitudes of N fluxes, particularly for biologically mediated processes. In order to make the most of the currently available isotope analysis techniques, it is necessary to know the isotope effects for each processes occurring in the environment. Nitrite reduction is an important step in denitrification. Previous work had begun to explore the N isotope effects for nitrite reduction, but no oxygen (O) isotope effect has been measured. Additionally, no consideration has been given to the type of nitrite reductase carrying out the reaction. There are two main types of respiratory nitrite reductase, one that is Cu-based and another that is Fe-based. We performed batch culture experiments with denitrifier strains possessing either a Cu-type or Fe-type nitrite reductase. Both N and O isotope effects for nitrite reduction were determined for each of these experiments by measuring the NO2- concentration, as well as the N and O isotopes of nitrite and applying a Rayleigh fractionation model. Both the N and O isotope effects were found to be significantly different between the two types of enzymes. This enzyme-linked difference in isotope effects emphasizes the importance of microbial community composition within the global N cycle.

  8. Inter-species variation in the oligomeric states of the higher plant Calvin cycle enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoribulokinase.

    PubMed

    Howard, Thomas P; Lloyd, Julie C; Raines, Christine A

    2011-07-01

    In darkened leaves the Calvin cycle enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) form a regulatory multi-enzyme complex with the small chloroplast protein CP12. GAPDH also forms a high molecular weight regulatory mono-enzyme complex. Given that there are different reports as to the number and subunit composition of these complexes and that enzyme regulatory mechanisms are known to vary between species, it was reasoned that protein-protein interactions may also vary between species. Here, this variation is investigated. This study shows that two different tetramers of GAPDH (an A2B2 heterotetramer and an A4 homotetramer) have the capacity to form part of the PRK/GAPDH/CP12 complex. The role of the PRK/GAPDH/CP12 complex is not simply to regulate the 'non-regulatory' A4 GAPDH tetramer. This study also demonstrates that the abundance and nature of PRK/GAPDH/CP12 interactions are not equal in all species and that whilst NAD enhances complex formation in some species, this is not sufficient for complex formation in others. Furthermore, it is shown that the GAPDH mono-enzyme complex is more abundant as a 2(A2B2) complex, rather than the larger 4(A2B2) complex. This smaller complex is sensitive to cellular metabolites indicating that it is an important regulatory isoform of GAPDH. This comparative study has highlighted considerable heterogeneity in PRK and GAPDH protein interactions between closely related species and the possible underlying physiological basis for this is discussed.

  9. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors

    PubMed Central

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23–0.99 U mg−1 protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, < 0.03 U mg−1 protein) and butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase (But, 3.24–7.64 U mg−1 protein), were determined in cell free extracts of biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH3 and NH4+-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH3 and NH4+-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities. PMID:26086956

  10. Analysis of the key enzymes of butyric and acetic acid fermentation in biogas reactors.

    PubMed

    Gabris, Christina; Bengelsdorf, Frank R; Dürre, Peter

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of the mechanisms of acidogenesis, which is a key process during anaerobic digestion. To expose possible bottlenecks, specific activities of the key enzymes of acidification, such as acetate kinase (Ack, 0.23-0.99 U mg(-1) protein), butyrate kinase (Buk, < 0.03 U mg(-1) protein) and butyryl-CoA:acetate-CoA transferase (But, 3.24-7.64 U mg(-1) protein), were determined in cell free extracts of biogas reactor content from three different biogas reactors. Furthermore, the detection of Ack was successful via Western blot analysis. Quantification of corresponding functional genes encoding Buk (buk) and But (but) was not feasible, although an amplification was possible. Thus, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on respective gene fragments. Four new clades of possible butyrate-producing bacteria were postulated, as well as bacteria of the genera Roseburia or Clostridium identified. The low Buk activity was in contrast to the high specific But activity in the analysed samples. Butyrate formation via Buk activity does barely occur in the investigated biogas reactor. Specific enzyme activities (Ack, Buk and But) in samples drawn from three different biogas reactors correlated with ammonia and ammonium concentrations (NH₃ and NH₄(+)-N), and a negative dependency can be postulated. Thus, high concentrations of NH₃ and NH₄(+)-N may lead to a bottleneck in acidogenesis due to decreased specific acidogenic enzyme activities.

  11. Regulation of adipose branched chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated blood branched chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. One possibility is that under these conditions there is a reduced cellular utilization and/or lower complete oxidation of BCAAs. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a...

  12. Advances in Acid Concentration Membrane Technology for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme

    2006-11-01

    One of the most promising cycles for the thermochemical generation of hydrogen is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) process, where aqueous HI is thermochemically decomposed into H2 and I2 at approximately 350 degrees Celsius. Regeneration of HI is accomplished by the Bunsen reaction (reaction of SO2, water, and iodine to generate H2SO4 and HI). Furthermore, SO2 is regenerated from the decomposition of H2SO4 at 850 degrees Celsius yielding the SO2 as well as O2. Thus, the cycle actually consists of two concurrent oxidation-reduction loops. As HI is regenerated, co-produced H2SO4 must be separated so that each may be decomposed. Current flowsheets employ a large amount (~83 mol% of the entire mixture) of elemental I2 to cause the HI and the H2SO4 to separate into two phases. To aid in the isolation of HI, which is directly decomposed into hydrogen, water and iodine must be removed. Separation of iodine is facilitated by removal of water. Sulfuric acid concentration is also required to facilitate feed recycling to the sulfuric acid decomposer. Decomposition of the sulfuric acid is an equilibrium limited process that leaves a substantial portion of the acid requiring recycle. Distillation of water from sulfuric acid involves significant corrosion issues at the liquid-vapor interface. Thus, it is desirable to concentrate the acid without boiling. Recent efforts at the INL have concentrated on applying pervaporation through Nafion-117, Nafion-112, and sulfonated poly(etheretherketone) (S-PEEK) membranes for the removal of water from HI/water and HI/Iodine/water feedstreams. In pervaporation, a feed is circulated at low pressure across the upstream side of the membrane, while a vacuum is applied downstream. Selected permeants sorb into the membrane, transport through it, and are vaporized from the backside. Thus, a concentration gradient is established, which provides the driving force for transport. In this work, membrane separations have been performed at temperatures as high as

  13. Recombinant Trichoderma harzianum endoglucanase I (Cel7B) is a highly acidic and promiscuous carbohydrate-active enzyme.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Vanessa O A; Serpa, Viviane Isabel; Godoy, Andre S; Camilo, Cesar M; Bernardes, Amanda; Rezende, Camila A; Junior, Nei Pereira; Franco Cairo, João Paulo L; Squina, Fabio M; Polikarpov, Igor

    2015-11-01

    Trichoderma filamentous fungi have been investigated due to their ability to secrete cellulases which find various biotechnological applications such as biomass hydrolysis and cellulosic ethanol production. Previous studies demonstrated that Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 has a high degree of cellulolytic activity and potential for biomass hydrolysis. However, enzymatic, biochemical, and structural studies of cellulases from T. harzianum are scarce. This work reports biochemical characterization of the recombinant endoglucanase I from T. harzianum, ThCel7B, and its catalytic core domain. The constructs display optimum activity at 55 °C and a surprisingly acidic pH optimum of 3.0. The full-length enzyme is able to hydrolyze a variety of substrates, with high specific activity: 75 U/mg for β-glucan, 46 U/mg toward xyloglucan, 39 U/mg for lichenan, 26 U/mg for carboxymethyl cellulose, 18 U/mg for 4-nitrophenyl β-D-cellobioside, 16 U/mg for rye arabinoxylan, and 12 U/mg toward xylan. The enzyme also hydrolyzed filter paper, phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, Sigmacell 20, Avicel PH-101, and cellulose, albeit with lower efficiency. The ThCel7B catalytic domain displays similar substrate diversity. Fluorescence-based thermal shift assays showed that thermal stability is highest at pH 5.0. We determined kinetic parameters and analyzed a pattern of oligosaccharide substrates hydrolysis, revealing cellobiose as a final product of C6 degradation. Finally, we visualized effects of ThCel7B on oat spelt using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrating the morphological changes of the substrate during the hydrolysis. The acidic behavior of ThCel7B and its considerable thermostability hold a promise of its industrial applications and other biotechnological uses under extremely acidic conditions. PMID:26156238

  14. Recombinant Trichoderma harzianum endoglucanase I (Cel7B) is a highly acidic and promiscuous carbohydrate-active enzyme.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Vanessa O A; Serpa, Viviane Isabel; Godoy, Andre S; Camilo, Cesar M; Bernardes, Amanda; Rezende, Camila A; Junior, Nei Pereira; Franco Cairo, João Paulo L; Squina, Fabio M; Polikarpov, Igor

    2015-11-01

    Trichoderma filamentous fungi have been investigated due to their ability to secrete cellulases which find various biotechnological applications such as biomass hydrolysis and cellulosic ethanol production. Previous studies demonstrated that Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 has a high degree of cellulolytic activity and potential for biomass hydrolysis. However, enzymatic, biochemical, and structural studies of cellulases from T. harzianum are scarce. This work reports biochemical characterization of the recombinant endoglucanase I from T. harzianum, ThCel7B, and its catalytic core domain. The constructs display optimum activity at 55 °C and a surprisingly acidic pH optimum of 3.0. The full-length enzyme is able to hydrolyze a variety of substrates, with high specific activity: 75 U/mg for β-glucan, 46 U/mg toward xyloglucan, 39 U/mg for lichenan, 26 U/mg for carboxymethyl cellulose, 18 U/mg for 4-nitrophenyl β-D-cellobioside, 16 U/mg for rye arabinoxylan, and 12 U/mg toward xylan. The enzyme also hydrolyzed filter paper, phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, Sigmacell 20, Avicel PH-101, and cellulose, albeit with lower efficiency. The ThCel7B catalytic domain displays similar substrate diversity. Fluorescence-based thermal shift assays showed that thermal stability is highest at pH 5.0. We determined kinetic parameters and analyzed a pattern of oligosaccharide substrates hydrolysis, revealing cellobiose as a final product of C6 degradation. Finally, we visualized effects of ThCel7B on oat spelt using scanning electron microscopy, demonstrating the morphological changes of the substrate during the hydrolysis. The acidic behavior of ThCel7B and its considerable thermostability hold a promise of its industrial applications and other biotechnological uses under extremely acidic conditions.

  15. Function of heterologous Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA, a type 2 fatty acid synthase enzyme involved in extending C20 fatty acids to C60-to-C90 mycolic acids, during de novo lipoic acid synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gurvitz, Aner; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Kastaniotis, Alexander J

    2008-08-01

    We describe the physiological function of heterologously expressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA during de novo lipoic acid synthesis in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) mitochondria. InhA, representing 2-trans-enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase and the target for the front-line antituberculous drug isoniazid, is involved in the activity of dissociative type 2 fatty acid synthase (FASII) that extends associative type 1 fatty acid synthase (FASI)-derived C(20) fatty acids to form C(60)-to-C(90) mycolic acids. Mycolic acids are major constituents of the protective layer around the pathogen that contribute to virulence and resistance to certain antimicrobials. Unlike FASI, FASII is thought to be incapable of de novo biosynthesis of fatty acids. Here, the genes for InhA (Rv1484) and four similar proteins (Rv0927c, Rv3485c, Rv3530c, and Rv3559c) were expressed in S. cerevisiae etr1Delta cells lacking mitochondrial 2-trans-enoyl-thioester reductase activity. The phenotype of the yeast mutants includes the inability to produce sufficient levels of lipoic acid, form mitochondrial cytochromes, respire, or grow on nonfermentable carbon sources. Yeast etr1Delta cells expressing mitochondrial InhA were able to respire, grow on glycerol, and produce lipoic acid. Commensurate with a role in mitochondrial de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, InhA could accept in vivo much shorter acyl-thioesters (C(4) to C(8)) than was previously thought (>C(12)). Moreover, InhA functioned in the absence of AcpM or protein-protein interactions with its native FASII partners KasA, KasB, FabD, and FabH. None of the four proteins similar to InhA complemented the yeast mutant phenotype. We discuss the implications of our findings with reference to lipoic acid synthesis in M. tuberculosis and the potential use of yeast FASII mutants for investigating the physiological function of drug-targeted pathogen enzymes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis. PMID:18552191

  16. Biocatalyzed approach for the surface functionalization of poly(L-lactic acid) films using hydrolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Acero, Enrique Herrero; Weber, Hansjoerg; Obersriebnig, Michael; Breinbauer, Rolf; Srebotnik, Ewald; Guebitz, Georg M

    2015-09-01

    Poly(lactic acid) as a biodegradable thermoplastic polyester has received increasing attention. This renewable polyester has found applications in a wide range of products such as food packaging, textiles and biomedical devices. Its major drawbacks are poor toughness, slow degradation rate and lack of reactive side-chain groups. An enzymatic process for the grafting of carboxylic acids onto the surface of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) films was developed using Candida antarctica lipase B as a catalyst. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the PLLA film using Humicola insolens cutinase in order to increase the number of hydroxyl and carboxylic groups on the outer polymer chains for grafting was also assessed and showed a change of water contact angle from 74.6 to 33.1° while the roughness and waviness were an order of magnitude higher in comparison to the blank. Surface functionalization was demonstrated using two different techniques, (14) C-radiochemical analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using (14) C-butyric acid sodium salt and 4,4,4-trifluorobutyric acid as model molecules, respectively. XPS analysis showed that 4,4,4-trifluorobutyric acid was enzymatically coupled based on an increase of the fluor content from 0.19 to 0.40%. The presented (14) C-radiochemical analyses are consistent with the XPS data indicating the potential of enzymatic functionalization in different reaction conditions.

  17. Oxaloacetate-to-malate conversion by mineral photoelectrochemistry: implications for the viability of the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle in prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Marcelo I.; Martin, Scot T.

    2008-10-01

    The carboxylic acids produced by the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle are possibly a biosynthetic core of initial life, although several steps such as the reductive kinetics of oxaloacetate (OAA) to malate (MA) are problematic by conventional chemical routes. In this context, we studied the kinetics of this reaction as promoted by ZnS mineral photoelectrochemistry. The quantum efficiency φMA of MA production from the photoelectrochemical reduction of OAA followed φMA=0.13 [OAA] (2.1×10-3+[OAA])-1 and was independent of temperature (5 to 50°C). To evaluate the importance of this forward rate under a prebiotic scenario, we also studied the temperature-dependent rate of the backward thermal decarboxylation of OAA to pyruvate (PA), which followed an Arrhenius behavior as log (k-2)=11.74 4956/T, where k-2 is in units of s-1. These measured rates were employed in conjunction with the indirectly estimated carboxylation rate of PA to OAA to assess the possible importance of mineral photoelectrochemistry in the conversion of OAA to MA under several scenarios of prebiotic conditions on early Earth. As an example, our analysis shows that there is 90% efficiency with a forward velocity of 3 yr/cycle for the OAA→MA step of the rTCA cycle at 280 K. Efficiency and velocity both decrease for increasing temperature. These results suggest high viability for mineral photoelectrochemistry as an enzyme-free engine to drive the rTCA cycle through the early aeons of early Earth, at least for the investigated OAA→MA step.

  18. Amino acids flanking the central core of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase are important in retaining enzyme activity after autoclaving.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Randhawa, Vinay; Acharya, Vishal; Singh, Kashmir; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are known to be denatured upon boiling, although Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase of Potentilla atrosanguinea (Pot-SOD) retains significant catalytic activity even after autoclaving (heating at 121 °C at a pressure of 1.1 kg per square cm for 20 min). The polypeptide backbone of Pot-SOD consists of 152 amino acids with a central core spanning His45 to Cys145 that is involved in coordination of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions. While the central core is essential for imparting catalytic activity and structural stability to the enzyme, the role of sequences flanking the central core was not understood. Experiments with deletion mutants showed that the amino acid sequences flanking the central core were important in retaining activity of Pot-SOD after autoclaving. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated the unfavorable structure of mutants due to increased size of binding pocket and enhanced negative charge on the electrostatic surface, resulting in unavailability of the substrate superoxide radical ([Formula: see text]) to the catalytic pocket. Deletion caused destabilization of structural elements and reduced solvent accessibility that further produced unfavorable structural geometry of the protein. PMID:25990646

  19. Yarrowia lipolytica lipase Lip2: an efficient enzyme for the production of concentrates of docosahexaenoic acid ethyl ester.

    PubMed

    Casas-Godoy, Leticia; Meunchan, Muchalin; Cot, Marlène; Duquesne, Sophie; Bordes, Florence; Marty, Alain

    2014-06-20

    The production of Omega-3 (ω-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) rich in cis-4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was studied using lipase-catalysed hydrolysis of a mixture of ethyl esters from tuna oil. Lipases from Yarrowia lipolytica (YLL2), Thermomyces lanuginosus (TLL) and Candida rugosa (CRL1, CRL3 and CRL4) were tested. C. rugosa lipases discriminated esters on the basis of their chain length, with less affinity for γ-linolenate, 11-eicosenoate, arachidonate, EPA, DPA and DHA ethyl esters. However, YLL2 and TLL improved discrimination towards DHA, as enzyme selectivity was shown to be mainly based on the position of the double bond closest to the carboxylic group. From the point of view of kinetics, purity and yield, YLL2 was the most effective lipase for DHA purification. Using this enzyme in an open reactor process resulted in the highest concentrations of DHA ethyl ester (77%) and ω-3 esters (81%) with a recovery of 94% and 77% respectively. PMID:24657346

  20. Mandelic acid chiral separation utilizing a two-phase partitioning bioreactor built by polysulfone microspheres and immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyu; Cui, Yanjun; Chen, Xia; Zhu, Hao; Zhu, Weiwei; Li, Yanfeng

    2015-03-01

    A novel two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB) modified by polysulfone (PSF) microspheres and immobilized enzyme (novozym-435) was formed, and the resulting TPPB was applied into mandelic acid chiral separation. The PSF microspheres containing n-hexanol (named PSF/hexanol microspheres) was prepared by using the phase inversion method, which was used as the organic phase. Meanwhile, the immobilized enzyme novozym-435 was used as a biocatalyst. The water phase was composed of the phosphate buffer solution (PBS). (R, S)-Methyl mandelate was selected as the substrate to study enzymatic properties. Different reaction factors have been researched, such as pH, reaction time, temperature and the quantity of biocatalyst and PSF/hexanol microspheres added in. Finally, (S)-mandelic acid was obtained with an 80 % optical purity after 24 h in the two-phase partitioning bioreactor. The enantiomeric excess (eep) values were very low in the water phase, in which the highest eep value was only 46 %. The eep of the two-phase partitioning bioreactor had been enhanced more obviously than that catalyzed in the water phase.

  1. Cell cycle arrest evidence, parasiticidal and bactericidal properties induced by L-amino acid oxidase from Bothrops atrox snake venom.

    PubMed

    de Melo Alves Paiva, Raquel; de Freitas Figueiredo, Raquel; Antonucci, Gilmara Ausech; Paiva, Helder Henrique; de Lourdes Pires Bianchi, Maria; Rodrigues, Kelly C; Lucarini, Rodrigo; Caetano, Renato Cesar; Linhari Rodrigues Pietro, Rosemeire Cristina; Gomes Martins, Carlos Henrique; de Albuquerque, Sérgio; Sampaio, Suely Vilela

    2011-05-01

    The present article describes an l-amino acid oxidase from Bothrops atrox snake venom as with antiprotozoal activities in Trypanosoma cruzi and in different species of Leishmania (Leishmania braziliensis, Leishmania donovani and Leishmania major). Leishmanicidal effects were inhibited by catalase, suggesting that they are mediated by H(2)O(2) production. Leishmania spp. cause a spectrum of diseases, ranging from self-healing ulcers to disseminated and often fatal infections, depending on the species involved and the host's immune response. BatroxLAAO also displays bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The apoptosis induced by BatroxLAAO on HL-60 cell lines and PBMC cells was determined by morphological cell evaluation using a mix of fluorescent dyes. As revealed by flow cytometry analysis, suppression of cell proliferation with BatroxLAAO was accompanied by the significant accumulation of cells in the G0/G1 phase boundary in HL-60 cells. BatroxLAAO at 25 μg/mL and 50 μg/mL blocked G0-G1 transition, resulting in G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest, thereby delaying the progression of cells through S and G2/M phase in HL-60 cells. This was shown by an accentuated decrease in the proportion of cells in S phase, and the almost absence of G2/M phase cell population. BatroxLAAO is an interesting enzyme that provides a better understanding of the ophidian envenomation mechanism, and has biotechnological potential as a model for therapeutic agents. PMID:21300133

  2. Microbial Fe cycling and mineralization in sediments of an acidic, hypersaline lake (Lake Tyrell, Victoria, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, E. E.; Blöthe, M.; Shelobolina, E.

    2009-12-01

    Lake Tyrrell is a variably acidic, hypersaline, Fe-rich lake located in Victoria, Australia. Terrestrial acid saline lakes like Lake Tyrrell may be analogs for ancient Martian surface environments, as well as possible extant subsurface environments. To investigate the potential for microbial Fe cycling under acidic conditions and high salt concentration, we collected sediment core samples during three field trips between 2006 and 2008 from the southern, acidic edge of the lake. Materials from the cores were used for chemical and mineralogical analyses, as well as for molecular (16S rRNA genes) and culture-based microbiological studies. Near-surface (< 1 m depth) pore fluids contained low but detectable dissolved oxygen (ca. 50 uM), significant dissolved Fe(II) (ca. 500 uM), and nearly constant pH of around 4 - conditions conducive to enzymatic Fe(II) oxidation. High concentrations of Fe(III) oxides begin accumulate at a depth of ca. 10 cm, and may reflect the starting point for formation of massive iron concretions that are evident at and beneath the sediment surface. MPN analyses revealed low (10-100 cells/mL) but detectable populations of aerobic, halophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing organisms on the sediment surface and in the near-surface ground water. With culture-dependent methods at least three different halotolerant lithoautotrophic cultures growing on Fe(II), thiosulfate, or tetrathionate from different acidic sites were obtained. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that these organisms are similar to previous described gamma proteobacteria Thiobacillus prosperus (95%), Halothiobacillus kellyi (99%), Salinisphaera shabanense (95%) and a Marinobacter species. (98%). 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data from two different sites with a pH range between 3 and 4.5 revealed a dominance of gamma proteobacteria. 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing libraries from both cores were dominated by sequences related to the Ectothiorhodospiraceae family, which includes the taxa

  3. The Catalytic Scaffold fo the Haloalkanoic Acid Dehalogenase Enzyme Superfamily Acts as a Mold for the Trigonal Bipyramidal Transition State

    SciTech Connect

    Lu,Z.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of new catalytic activities and specificities within an enzyme superfamily requires the exploration of sequence space for adaptation to a new substrate with retention of those elements required to stabilize key intermediates/transition states. Here, we propose that core residues in the large enzyme family, the haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase enzyme superfamily (HADSF) form a 'mold' in which the trigonal bipyramidal transition states formed during phosphoryl transfer are stabilized by electrostatic forces. The vanadate complex of the hexose phosphate phosphatase BT4131 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 (HPP) determined at 1.00 Angstroms resolution via X-ray crystallography assumes a trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry with the nucleophilic Asp-8 and one oxygen ligand at the apical position. Remarkably, the tungstate in the complex determined to 1.03 Angstroms resolution assumes the same coordination geometry. The contribution of the general acid/base residue Asp-10 in the stabilization of the trigonal bipyramidal species via hydrogen-bond formation with the apical oxygen atom is evidenced by the 1.52 Angstroms structure of the D10A mutant bound to vanadate. This structure shows a collapse of the trigonal bipyramidal geometry with displacement of the water molecule formerly occupying the apical position. Furthermore, the 1.07 Angstroms resolution structure of the D10A mutant complexed with tungstate shows the tungstate to be in a typical 'phosphate-like' tetrahedral configuration. The analysis of 12 liganded HADSF structures deposited in the protein data bank (PDB) identified stringently conserved elements that stabilize the trigonal bipyramidal transition states by engaging in favorable electrostatic interactions with the axial and equatorial atoms of the transferring phosphoryl group.

  4. The Lys234Arg Substitution in the Enzyme SHV-72 Is a Determinant for Resistance to Clavulanic Acid Inhibition▿

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Nuno; Manageiro, Vera; Robin, Frédéric; Salgado, M. José; Ferreira, Eugénia; Caniça, Manuela; Bonnet, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The new β-lactamase SHV-72 was isolated from clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae INSRA1229, which exhibited the unusual association of resistance to the amoxicillin-clavulanic acid combination (MIC, 64 μg/ml) and susceptibility to cephalosporins, aztreonam, and imipenem. SHV-72 (pI 7.6) harbored the three amino acid substitutions Ile8Phe, Ala146Val, and Lys234Arg. SHV-72 had high catalytic efficiency against penicillins (kcat/Km, 35 to 287 μM−1·s−1) and no activity against oxyimino β-lactams. The concentration of clavulanic acid necessary to inhibit the enzyme activity by 50% was 10-fold higher for SHV-72 than for SHV-1. Molecular-dynamics simulation suggested that the Lys234Arg substitution in SHV-72 stabilized an atypical conformation of the Ser130 side chain, which moved the Oγ atom of Ser130 around 3.5 Å away from the key Oγ atom of the reactive serine (Ser70). This movement may therefore decrease the susceptibility to clavulanic acid by preventing cross-linking between Ser130 and Ser70. PMID:18316518

  5. Electrochemical gating of tricarboxylic acid cycle in electricity-producing bacterial cells of Shewanella.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shoichi; Liu, Huan; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakanishi, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    Energy-conversion systems mediated by bacterial metabolism have recently attracted much attention, and therefore, demands for tuning of bacterial metabolism are increasing. It is widely recognized that intracellular redox atmosphere which is generally tuned by dissolved oxygen concentration or by appropriate selection of an electron acceptor for respiration is one of the important factors determining the bacterial metabolism. In general, electrochemical approaches are valuable for regulation of redox-active objects. However, the intracellular redox conditions are extremely difficult to control electrochemically because of the presence of insulative phospholipid bilayer membranes. In the present work, the limitation can be overcome by use of the bacterial genus Shewanella, which consists of species that are able to respire via cytochromes abundantly expressed in their outer-membrane with solid-state electron acceptors, including anodes. The electrochemical characterization and the gene expression analysis revealed that the activity of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in Shewanella cells can be reversibly gated simply by changing the anode potential. Importantly, our present results for Shewanella cells cultured in an electrochemical system under poised potential conditions showed the opposite relationship between the current and electron acceptor energy level, and indicate that this unique behavior originates from deactivation of the TCA cycle in the (over-)oxidative region. Our result obtained in this study is the first demonstration of the electrochemical gating of TCA cycle of living cells. And we believe that our findings will contribute to a deeper understanding of redox-dependent regulation systems in living cells, in which the intracellular redox atmosphere is a critical factor determining the regulation of various metabolic and genetic processes.

  6. The gamma-aminobutyric acid shunt contributes to closing the tricarboxylic acid cycle in Synechocystis sp PCC 6803

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, W; Brune, D; Vermaas, WFJ

    2014-07-16

    A traditional 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is missing in the cyanobacterial tricarboxylic acid cycle. To determine pathways that convert 2-oxoglutarate into succinate in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a series of mutant strains, Delta sll1981, Delta slr0370, Delta slr1022 and combinations thereof, deficient in 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase (Sll1981), succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Slr0370), and/or in gamma-aminobutyrate metabolism (Slr1022) were constructed. Like in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, N-acetylornithine aminotransferase, encoded by slr1022, was shown to also function as gamma-aminobutyrate aminotransferase, catalysing gamma-aminobutyrate conversion to succinic semialdehyde. As succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase converts succinic semialdehyde to succinate, an intact gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is present in Synechocystis. The Delta sll1981 strain, lacking 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase, exhibited a succinate level that was 60% of that in wild type. However, the succinate level in the Delta slr1022 and Delta slr0370 strains and the Delta sll1981/Delta slr1022 and Delta sll1981/Delta slr0370 double mutants was reduced to 20-40% of that in wild type, suggesting that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt has a larger impact on metabolite flux to succinate than the pathway via 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase. C-13-stable isotope analysis indicated that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt catalysed conversion of glutamate to succinate. Independent of the 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase bypass, the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is a major contributor to flux from 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate to succinate in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  7. Germinating Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Seedlings Attenuated Selenite-Induced Toxicity by Activating