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Sample records for acid cycle fluxes

  1. Systems-level metabolic flux profiling elucidates a complete, bifurcated tricarboxylic acid cycle in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Fan, Jing; Roquet, Nathaniel; Rabitz, Herschel; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2010-09-01

    Obligatory anaerobic bacteria are major contributors to the overall metabolism of soil and the human gut. The metabolic pathways of these bacteria remain, however, poorly understood. Using isotope tracers, mass spectrometry, and quantitative flux modeling, here we directly map the metabolic pathways of Clostridium acetobutylicum, a soil bacterium whose major fermentation products include the biofuels butanol and hydrogen. While genome annotation suggests the absence of most tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes, our results demonstrate that this bacterium has a complete, albeit bifurcated, TCA cycle; oxaloacetate flows to succinate both through citrate/alpha-ketoglutarate and via malate/fumarate. Our investigations also yielded insights into the pathways utilized for glucose catabolism and amino acid biosynthesis and revealed that the organism's one-carbon metabolism is distinct from that of model microbes, involving reversible pyruvate decarboxylation and the use of pyruvate as the one-carbon donor for biosynthetic reactions. This study represents the first in vivo characterization of the TCA cycle and central metabolism of C. acetobutylicum. Our results establish a role for the full TCA cycle in an obligatory anaerobic organism and demonstrate the importance of complementing genome annotation with isotope tracer studies for determining the metabolic pathways of diverse microbes.

  2. Changes in citric acid cycle flux and anaplerosis antedate the functional decline in isolated rat hearts utilizing acetoacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, R R; Taegtmeyer, H

    1991-01-01

    To determine the temporal relationship between changes in contractile performance and flux through the citric acid cycle in hearts oxidizing acetoacetate, we perfused isolated working rat hearts with either glucose or acetoacetate (both 5 mM) and freeze-clamped the tissue at defined times. After 60 min of perfusion, hearts utilizing acetoacetate exhibited lower systolic and diastolic pressures and lower cardiac outputs. The oxidation of acetoacetate increased the tissue content of 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate and decreased the content of succinyl-CoA suggesting inhibition of citric acid cycle flux through 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. Whereas hearts perfused with either acetoacetate or glucose were similar with respect to their function for the first 20 min, changes in tissue metabolites were already observed within 5 min of perfusion at near-physiological workloads. The addition of lactate or propionate, but not acetate, to hearts oxidizing acetoacetate improved contractile performance, although inhibition of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase was probably not diminished. If lactate or propionate were added, malate and citrate accumulated indicating utilization of anaplerotic pathways for the citric acid cycle. We conclude that a decreased rate of flux through 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase in hearts oxidizing acetoacetate precedes, and may be responsible for, contractile failure and is not the result of decreased cardiac work. Further, anaplerosis play an important role in the maintenance of contractile function in hearts utilizing acetoacetate. Images PMID:1671390

  3. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in soldering fluxes are called hydrocarbons. They include: Ammonium chloride Rosin Hydrochloric acid Zinc ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  4. Increased tricarboxylic acid cycle flux in rat brain during forepaw stimulation detected with 1H[13C]NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Hyder, F; Chase, J R; Behar, K L; Mason, G F; Siddeek, M; Rothman, D L; Shulman, R G

    1996-01-01

    NMR spectroscopy was used to test recent proposals that the additional energy required for brain activation is provided through nonoxidative glycolysis. Using localized NMR spectroscopic methods, the rate of C4-glutamate isotopic turnover from infused [1-(13)C]glucose was measured in the somatosensory cortex of rat brain both at rest and during forepaw stimulation. Analysis of the glutamate turnover data using a mathematical model of cerebral glucose metabolism showed that the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux [(V(TCA)] increased from 0.49 +/- 0.03 at rest to 1.48 +/- 0.82 micromol/g/min during stimulation (P < 0.01). The minimum fraction of C4-glutamate derived from C1-glucose was approximately 75%, and this fraction was found in both the resting and stimulated rats. Hence, the percentage increase in oxidative cerebral metabolic rate of glucose use (CMRglc) equals the percentage increases in V(TCA) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO2). Comparison with previous work for the same rat model, which measured total CMRglc [Ueki, M., Linn, F. & Hossman, K. A. (1988) J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab. 8, 486-4941, indicates that oxidative CMRglc supplies the majority of energy during sustained brain activation. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8755523

  5. 13C-NMR spectroscopic evaluation of the citric acid cycle flux in conditions of high aspartate transaminase activity in glucose-perfused rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Tran-Dinh, S; Hoerter, J A; Mateo, P; Gyppaz, F; Herve, M

    1998-12-01

    A new mathematical model, based on the observation of 13C-NMR spectra of two principal metabolites (glutamate and aspartate), was constructed to determine the citric acid cycle flux in the case of high aspartate transaminase activity leading to the formation of large amounts of labeled aspartate and glutamate. In this model, the labeling of glutamate and aspartate carbons by chemical and isotopic exchange with the citric acid cycle are considered to be interdependent. With [U-13C]Glc or [1,2-(13)C]acetate as a substrate, all glutamate and aspartate carbons can be labeled. The isotopic transformations of 32 glutamate isotopomers into 16 aspartate isotopomers or vice versa were studied using matrix operations; the results were compiled in two matrices. We showed how the flux constants of the citric acid cycle and the 13C-enrichment of acetyl-CoA can be deduced from 13C-NMR spectra of glutamate and/or aspartate. The citric acid cycle flux in beating Wistar rat hearts, aerobically perfused with [U-13C]glucose in the absence of insulin, was investigated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Surprisingly, aspartate instead of glutamate was found to be the most abundantly-labeled metabolite, indicating that aspartate transaminase (which catalyses the reversible reaction: (glutamate + oxaloacetate <--> 2-oxoglutarate + aspartate) is highly active in the absence of insulin. The amount of aspartate was about two times larger than glutamate. The quantities of glutamate (G0) or aspartate (A0) were approximately the same for all hearts and remained constant during perfusion: G0 = (0.74 +/- 0.03) micromol/g; A0 = (1.49 +/- 0.05) micromol/g. The flux constants, i.e., the fraction of glutamate and aspartate in exchange with the citric acid cycle, were about 1.45 min(-1) and 0.72 min(-1), respectively; the flux of this cycle is about (1.07 +/- 0.02) micromol min(-1) g(-1). Excellent agreement between the computed and experimental data was obtained, showing that: i) in the absence of insulin

  6. Metal and acidity fluxes controlled by precipitation/dissolution cycles of sulfate salts in an anthropogenic mine aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cánovas, C. R.; Macías, F.; Pérez-López, R.

    2016-05-01

    Underground mine drainages are extremely difficult to study due to the lack of information about the flow path and source proximity in relation to the outflow adit. Geochemical processes controlling metals and acidity fluxes in a complex anthropogenic mine aquifer in SW Spain during the dry and rainy season were investigated by geochemical and statistical tools. High concentrations of acidity, sulfate, metals and metalloids (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Ni, Co) were observed due to intense sulfide oxidation processes. The high residence time inside the anthropogenic aquifer, around 40 days, caused the release of significant quantities of metals linked to host rocks (e.g. Al, Ca, Ge, Li, Mg, REE). The most outstanding characteristic of the acid mine drainage (AMD) outflows is the existence of higher Fe/SO4 molar ratios than those theoretical of pyrite (0.50) during most of the monitored period, due to a fire which occurred in 1949 and remained active for decades. Permanent and temporal retention mechanisms of acidity and metals were observed in the galleries. Once released from sulfide oxidation, Pb and As are sorbed on Fe oxyhydroxysulfate or precipitated as low solubility minerals (i.e. anglesite) inside the galleries. The precipitation of evaporitic sulfate salts during the dry season and the subsequent re-dissolution after rainfall control the fluxes of acidity and main metals (i.e. Fe, Mg, Al) from this anthropogenic aquifer. Some elements, such as Cd, Cu, Ni, REE and Zn, are retained in highly soluble sulfate salts while other elements, such as Ge, Pb and Sc, have a lower response to washout processes due to its incorporation in less soluble sulfate salts. In this way, metal concentration during the washout processes would be controlled by the proportion and solubility of each type of evaporitic sulfate salt stored during the dry season. The recovery of metals of economic interest contained in the AMD could help to self-finance the remediation of these waters in

  7. Impaired cytosolic NADH shuttling and elevated UCP3 contribute to inefficient citric acid cycle flux support of postischemic cardiac work in diabetic hearts.

    PubMed

    Banke, Natasha H; Lewandowski, E Douglas

    2015-02-01

    Diabetic hearts are subject to more extensive ischemia/reperfusion (ISC/REP) damage. This study examined the efficiency of citric acid cycle (CAC) flux and the transfer of cytosolic reducing equivalents into the mitochondria for oxidative support of cardiac work following ISC/REP in hearts of c57bl/6 (NORM) and type 2 diabetic, db/db mouse hearts. Flux through the CAC and malate-aspartate shuttle (MA) were monitored via dynamic (13)C NMR of isolated hearts perfused with (13)C palmitate+glucose. MA flux was lower in db/db than NORM. Oxoglutarate malate carrier (OMC) was elevated in the db/db heart, suggesting a compensatory response to low NADHc. Baseline CAC flux per unit work (rate-pressure-product, RPP) was similar between NORM and db/db, but ISC/REP reduced the efficiency of CAC flux/RPP by 20% in db/db. ISC/REP also increased UCP3 transcription, indicating potential for greater uncoupling. Therefore, ISC/REP induces inefficient carbon utilization through the CAC in hearts of diabetic mice due to the combined inefficiencies in NADHc transfer per OMC content and increased uncoupling via UCP3. Ischemia and reperfusion exacerbated pre-existing mitochondrial defects and metabolic limitations in the cytosol of diabetic hearts. These limitations and defects render diabetic hearts more susceptible to inefficient carbon fuel utilization for oxidative energy metabolism.

  8. Regulation of flux through metabolic cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, K.

    1984-01-01

    The branchpoint of the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate shunt was characterized in the intact organism by a multidimensional approach. Theory and methodology were developed to determine velocities for the net flow of carbon through the major steps of acetate metabolism in E. coli. Rates were assigned based on the /sup 13/C-NMR spectrum of intracellular glutamate, measured rates of substrate incorporation into end products, the constituent composition of E. coli and a series of conservation equations which described the system at steady state. The in vivo fluxes through the branchpoint of the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate cycles were compared to rates calculated from the kinetic constants of the branchpoint enzymes and the intracellular concentrations of their substrates. These studies elucidated the role of isocitrate dehydrogenase phosphorylation in the Krebs cycle and led to the development of a generalized mathematical description of the sensitivity of branchpoints to regulatory control. This theoretical analysis was termed the branchpoint effect and it describes conditions which result in large changes in the flux through an enzyme even though that enzyme is not subject to direct regulatory control. The theoretical and experimental characterization of this system provided a framework to study the effects of enzyme overproduction and underproduction on metabolic processes in the cell. An in vivo method was developed to determine the extent to which an enzyme catalyzes a rate-controlling reaction. The enzyme chosen for this study was citrate synthase.

  9. Solar cycle variation of magnetic flux emergence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; Golub, L.; Kreiger, A. S.

    1977-01-01

    The number of X-ray bright points (XBP) has been measured from solar X-ray images obtained during two rocket flights in 1976. When compared with the data obtained during the Skylab mission (1973), the number is found to be higher by a factor of 2. As the probability of obtaining the result by chance is less than 1 in 5 million, it is concluded that the number of XBP has increased in the three year interval. As all other indicators of activity have decreased between 1973 and 1976, the cyclical variation of the short-lifetime end of the magnetic-flux-emergence spectrum is out of phase with the solar cycle as defined by active regions or sunspots. Since XBP in 1973 contributed more to the emerging magnetic flux than did active regions, the possibility exists that the total amount of emerging magnetic flux may be maximized at a sunspot minimum.

  10. Acetate stimulates flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle in rabbit renal proximal tubules synthesizing glutamine from alanine: a 13C NMR study.

    PubMed Central

    Dugelay, S; Chauvin, M F; Megnin-Chanet, F; Martin, G; Laréal, M C; Lhoste, J M; Baverel, G

    1999-01-01

    Although glutamine synthesis has a major role in the control of acid-base balance and ammonia detoxification in the kidney of herbivorous species, very little is known about the regulation of this process. We therefore studied the influence of acetate, which is readily metabolized by the kidney and whose metabolism is accompanied by the production of bicarbonate, on glutamine synthesis from variously labelled [(13)C]alanine and [(14)C]alanine molecules in isolated rabbit renal proximal tubules. With alanine as sole exogenous substrate, glutamine and, to a smaller extent, glutamate and CO(2), were the only significant products of the metabolism of this amino acid, which was removed at high rates. Absolute fluxes through the enzymes involved in alanine conversion into glutamine were assessed by using a novel model describing the corresponding reactions in conjunction with the (13)C NMR, and to a smaller extent, the radioactive and enzymic data. The presence of acetate (5 mM) led to a large stimulation of fluxes through citrate synthase and alpha-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase. These effects were accompanied by increases in the removal of alanine, in the accumulation of glutamate and in flux through the anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase. Acetate did not alter fluxes through glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase; as a result, acetate did not change the accumulation of ammonia, which was negligible under both experimental conditions. We conclude that acetate, which seems to be an important energy-provider to the rabbit renal proximal tubule, simultaneously traps as glutamate the extra nitrogen removed as alanine, thus preventing the release of additional ammonia by the glutamate dehydrogenase reaction. PMID:10477267

  11. Tropospheric cycle of nitrous acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Roy M.; Peak, John D.; Collins, Gareth M.

    1996-06-01

    Measurements of the land surface exchange of nitrous acid over grass and sugar beet surfaces reveal both upward and downward fluxes with flux reversal occurring at an ambient concentration of nitrogen dioxide of about 10 ppb. This confirms earlier preliminary findings and strengthens the hypothesis that substantial production of nitrous acid can occur on land surfaces from reaction of nitrogen dioxide and water vapor. Detailed measurements of nitrous acid have been made in central urban, suburban, and rural environments. These measurements, in conjunction with a simple box model, indicate that the atmospheric concentrations of nitrous acid are explicable in terms of a small number of basic processes in which the most important are the surface production of nitrous acid from nitrogen dioxide, atmospheric production from the NO-OH reaction and loss of nitrous acid by photolysis and dry deposition. In the suburban atmosphere, concentrations of nitrous acid are strongly correlated with nitrogen dioxide. In the rural atmosphere a different behavior is seen, with much higher nitrous acid to nitrogen dioxide ratios occurring in more polluted air with nitrogen dioxide concentrations in excess of 10 ppb. At lower nitrogen dioxide concentrations, net deposition of nitrous acid at the ground leads to very low concentrations in advected air. The model study indicates that during daytime in the suburban atmosphere, production of HONO from the NO-OH reaction can compete with photolysis giving a HONO concentration of a few tenths of a part per billion. At the highest observed daytime concentrations of HONO, production of OH radical from its photolysis can proceed at a rate more than 10 times faster than from photolysis of ozone.

  12. Estimates of carbon cycle surface fluxes from the NASA Carbon Monitoring System Flux Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, K. W.; Liu, J.; Lee, M.; Gurney, K. R.; Menemenlis, D.; Brix, H.; Hill, C. N.; Denning, S.; Haynes, K.; Baker, I. T.; Henze, D. K.; Bousserez, N.; Marland, G.; Marland, E.; Badurek, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    The goal of NASA Carbon Monitoring Study (CMS) Flux Pilot Project is to incorporate the full suite of NASA observational, modeling, and assimilation capabilities in order to attribute changes in globally distributed CO2 concentrations to spatially resolved surface fluxes across the entire carbon cycle. To that end, CMS has initiated a coordinated effort between land surface, ocean, fossil fuel, and atmospheric scientists to provide global estimates of CO2 constrained by satellite observations and informed by contemporaneous estimates of 'bottom up' fluxes from land surface, ocean, and fossil fuel models. The CMS Flux has evolved to incorporate a spatially explicit fossil fuel data assimilation system (FFDAS), an updated ECCO2 Darwin biogeochemical adjoint ocean state estimation system, and the new Simple Biospheric Model (Sib4) terrestrial ecosystem model. We compare GOSAT xCO2 observations, processed by the JPL ACOS v33, to predicted CMS Flux atmospheric CO2 concentrations for 2010-2011, and attribute the differences to spatially-resolved fluxes. We examine these fluxes in terms of interannual variability, correlative satellite measurements, and uncertainty across the carbon cycle

  13. Systems-level metabolic flux profiling identifies fatty acid synthesis as a target for antiviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Munger, Joshua; Bennett, Bryson D; Parikh, Anuraag; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; McArdle, Jessica; Rabitz, Herschel A; Shenk, Thomas; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2010-01-01

    Viruses rely on the metabolic network of their cellular hosts to provide energy and building blocks for viral replication. We developed a flux measurement approach based on liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry to quantify changes in metabolic activity induced by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). This approach reliably elucidated fluxes in cultured mammalian cells by monitoring metabolome labeling kinetics after feeding cells 13C-labeled forms of glucose and glutamine. Infection with HCMV markedly upregulated flux through much of the central carbon metabolism, including glycolysis. Particularly notable increases occurred in flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle and its efflux to the fatty acid biosynthesis pathway. Pharmacological inhibition of fatty acid biosynthesis suppressed the replication of both HCMV and influenza A, another enveloped virus. These results show that fatty acid synthesis is essential for the replication of two divergent enveloped viruses and that systems-level metabolic flux profiling can identify metabolic targets for antiviral therapy. PMID:18820684

  14. Sediment flux modeling: Simulating nitrogen, phosphorus, and silica cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, Jeremy M.; Brady, Damian C.; Di Toro, Dominic M.; Boynton, Walter R.; Cornwell, Jeffrey C.; Kemp, W. Michael

    2013-10-01

    Sediment-water exchanges of nutrients and oxygen play an important role in the biogeochemistry of shallow coastal environments. Sediments process, store, and release particulate and dissolved forms of carbon and nutrients and sediment-water solute fluxes are significant components of nutrient, carbon, and oxygen cycles. Consequently, sediment biogeochemical models of varying complexity have been developed to understand the processes regulating porewater profiles and sediment-water exchanges. We have calibrated and validated a two-layer sediment biogeochemical model (aerobic and anaerobic) that is suitable for application as a stand-alone tool or coupled to water-column biogeochemical models. We calibrated and tested a stand-alone version of the model against observations of sediment-water flux, porewater concentrations, and process rates at 12 stations in Chesapeake Bay during a 4-17 year period. The model successfully reproduced sediment-water fluxes of ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3-), phosphate (PO43-), and dissolved silica (Si(OH)4 or DSi) for diverse chemical and physical environments. A root mean square error (RMSE)-minimizing optimization routine was used to identify best-fit values for many kinetic parameters. The resulting simulations improved the performance of the model in Chesapeake Bay and revealed (1) the need for an aerobic-layer denitrification formulation to account for NO3- reduction in this zone, (2) regional variability in denitrification that depends on oxygen levels in the overlying water, (3) a regionally-dependent solid-solute PO43- partitioning that accounts for patterns in Fe availability, and (4) a simplified model formulation for DSi, including limited sorption of DSi onto iron oxyhydroxides. This new calibration balances the need for a universal set of parameters that remain true to biogeochemical processes with site-specificity that represents differences in physical conditions. This stand-alone model can be rapidly executed on a

  15. Ca cycling and isotopic fluxes in forested ecosystems in Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, B. A.; Chadwick, O. A.; Vitousek, P. M.; Wooden, J. L.

    2005-06-01

    Biogeochemical processes fractionate Ca isotopes in plants and soils along a 4 million year developmental sequence in the Hawaiian Islands. We observed that plants preferentially take up 40Ca relative to 44Ca, and that biological fractionation and changes in the relative contributions from volcanic and marine sources produce a significant increase in 44Ca in soil exchangeable pools. Our results imply moderate fluxes enriched in 44Ca from strongly nutrient-depleted old soils, in contrast with high 40Ca fluxes in young and little weathered environments. In addition, biological fractionation controls divergent geochemical pathways of Ca and Sr in the plant-soil system. While Ca depletes progressively with increasing soil age, Sr/Ca ratios increase systematically. Sr isotope ratios provide a valuable tracer for provenance studies of alkaline earth elements in forested ecosystems, but its usefulness is limited when deciphering biogeochemical processes involved in the terrestrial Ca cycle. Ca isotopes in combination with Sr/Ca ratios reveal more complex processes involved in the biogeochemistry of Ca and Sr.

  16. Fatty acid and amino acid modulation of glucose cycling in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, L A; Neeft, M; Reijngoud, D J; Kuipers, F; Sauerwein, H P; Romijn, J A; Herling, A W; Burger, H J; Meijer, A J

    2001-01-01

    We studied the influence of glucose/glucose 6-phosphate cycling on glycogen deposition from glucose in fasted-rat hepatocytes using S4048 and CP320626, specific inhibitors of glucose-6-phosphate translocase and glycogen phosphorylase respectively. The effect of amino acids and oleate was also examined. The following observations were made: (1) with glucose alone, net glycogen production was low. Inhibition of glucose-6-phosphate translocase increased intracellular glucose 6-phosphate (3-fold), glycogen accumulation (5-fold) without change in active (dephosphorylated) glycogen synthase (GSa) activity, and lactate production (4-fold). With both glucose 6-phosphate translocase and glycogen phosphorylase inhibited, glycogen deposition increased 8-fold and approached reported in vivo rates of glycogen deposition during the fasted-->fed transition. Addition of a physiological mixture of amino acids in the presence of glucose increased glycogen accumulation (4-fold) through activation of GS and inhibition of glucose-6-phosphatase flux. Addition of oleate with glucose present decreased glycolytic flux and increased the flux through glucose 6-phosphatase with no change in glycogen deposition. With glucose 6-phosphate translocase inhibited by S4048, oleate increased intracellular glucose 6-phosphate (3-fold) and net glycogen production (1.5-fold), without a major change in GSa activity. It is concluded that glucose cycling in hepatocytes prevents the net accumulation of glycogen from glucose. Amino acids activate GS and inhibit flux through glucose-6-phosphatase, while oleate inhibits glycolysis and stimulates glucose-6-phosphatase flux. Variation in glucose 6-phosphate does not always result in activity changes of GSa. Activation of glucose 6-phosphatase flux by fatty acids may contribute to the increased hepatic glucose production as seen in Type 2 diabetes. PMID:11535127

  17. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli MG1655 under octanoic acid (C8) stress.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanfen; Yoon, Jong Moon; Jarboe, Laura; Shanks, Jacqueline V

    2015-05-01

    Systems metabolic engineering has made the renewable production of industrial chemicals a feasible alternative to modern operations. One major example of a renewable process is the production of carboxylic acids, such as octanoic acid (C8), from Escherichia coli, engineered to express thioesterase enzymes. C8, however, is toxic to E. coli above a certain concentration, which limits the final titer. (13)C metabolic flux analysis of E. coli was performed for both C8 stress and control conditions using NMR2Flux with isotopomer balancing. A mixture of labeled and unlabeled glucose was used as the sole carbon source for bacterial growth for (13)C flux analysis. By comparing the metabolic flux maps of the control condition and C8 stress condition, pathways that were altered under the stress condition were identified. C8 stress was found to reduce carbon flux in several pathways: the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, the CO2 production, and the pyruvate dehydrogenase pathway. Meanwhile, a few pathways became more active: the pyruvate oxidative pathway, and the extracellular acetate production. These results were statistically significant for three biological replicates between the control condition and C8 stress. As a working hypothesis, the following causes are proposed to be the main causes for growth inhibition and flux alteration for a cell under stress: membrane disruption, low activity of electron transport chain, and the activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase regulator (PdhR).

  18. Global Flux Balance in the Terrestrial H2O Cycle: Reconsidering the Post-Arc Subducted H2O Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parai, R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative estimates of H2O fluxes between the mantle and the exosphere (i.e., the atmosphere, oceans and crust) are critical to our understanding of the chemistry and dynamics of the solid Earth: the abundance and distribution of water in the mantle has dramatic impacts upon mantle melting, degassing history, structure and style of convection. Water is outgassed from the mantle is association with volcanism at mid-ocean ridges, ocean islands and convergent margins. H2O is removed from the exosphere at subduction zones, and some fraction of the subducted flux may be recycled past the arc into the Earth’s deep interior. Estimates of the post-arc subducted H2O flux are primarily based on the stability of hydrous phases at subduction zone pressures and temperatures (e.g. Schmidt and Poli, 1998; Rüpke et al., 2004; Hacker, 2008). However, the post-arc H2O flux remains poorly quantified, in part due to large uncertainties in the water content of the subducting slab. Here we evaluate estimated post-arc subducted fluxes in the context of mantle-exosphere water cycling, using a Monte Carlo simulation of the global H2O cycle. Literature estimates of primary magmatic H2O abundances and magmatic production rates at different tectonic settings are used with estimates of the total subducted H2O flux to establish the parameter space under consideration. Random sampling of the allowed parameter space affords insight into which input and output fluxes satisfy basic constraints on global flux balance, such as a limit on sea-level change over time. The net flux of H2O between mantle and exosphere is determined by the total mantle output flux (via ridges and ocean islands, with a small contribution from mantle-derived arc output) and the input flux subducted beyond the arc. Arc and back-arc output is derived mainly from the slab, and therefore cancels out a fraction of the trench intake in an H2O subcycle. Limits on sea-level change since the end of the Archaean place

  19. Correlation between TCA cycle flux and glucose uptake rate during respiro-fermentative growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Heyland, Jan; Fu, Jianan; Blank, Lars M

    2009-12-01

    Glucose repression of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated under different environmental conditions using (13)C-tracer experiments. Real-time quantification of the volatile metabolites ethanol and CO(2) allowed accurate carbon balancing. In all experiments with the wild-type, a strong correlation between the rates of growth and glucose uptake was observed, indicating a constant yield of biomass. In contrast, glycerol and acetate production rates were less dependent on the rate of glucose uptake, but were affected by environmental conditions. The glycerol production rate was highest during growth in high-osmolarity medium (2.9 mmol g(-1) h(-1)), while the highest acetate production rate of 2.1 mmol g(-1) h(-1) was observed in alkaline medium of pH 6.9. Under standard growth conditions (25 g glucose l(-1) , pH 5.0, 30 degrees C) S. cerevisiae had low fluxes through the pentose phosphate pathway and the TCA cycle. A significant increase in TCA cycle activity from 0.03 mmol g(-1) h(-1) to about 1.7 mmol g(-1) h(-1) was observed when S. cerevisiae grew more slowly as a result of environmental perturbations, including unfavourable pH values and sodium chloride stress. Compared to experiments with high glucose uptake rates, the ratio of CO(2) to ethanol increased more than 50 %, indicating an increase in flux through the TCA cycle. Although glycolysis and the ethanol production pathway still exhibited the highest fluxes, the net flux through the TCA cycle increased significantly with decreasing glucose uptake rates. Results from experiments with single gene deletion mutants partially impaired in glucose repression (hxk2, grr1) indicated that the rate of glucose uptake correlates with this increase in TCA cycle flux. These findings are discussed in the context of regulation of glucose repression.

  20. Sulfuric acid-sulfur heat storage cycle

    DOEpatents

    Norman, John H.

    1983-12-20

    A method of storing heat is provided utilizing a chemical cycle which interconverts sulfuric acid and sulfur. The method can be used to levelize the energy obtained from intermittent heat sources, such as solar collectors. Dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated by evaporation of water, and the concentrated sulfuric acid is boiled and decomposed using intense heat from the heat source, forming sulfur dioxide and oxygen. The sulfur dioxide is reacted with water in a disproportionation reaction yielding dilute sulfuric acid, which is recycled, and elemental sulfur. The sulfur has substantial potential chemical energy and represents the storage of a significant portion of the energy obtained from the heat source. The sulfur is burned whenever required to release the stored energy. A particularly advantageous use of the heat storage method is in conjunction with a solar-powered facility which uses the Bunsen reaction in a water-splitting process. The energy storage method is used to levelize the availability of solar energy while some of the sulfur dioxide produced in the heat storage reactions is converted to sulfuric acid in the Bunsen reaction.

  1. Citric acid cycle intermediates in cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    Czibik, Gabor; Steeples, Violetta; Yavari, Arash; Ashrafian, Houman

    2014-10-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a concerted clinical effort to deliver on the laboratory promise that a variety of maneuvers can profoundly increase cardiac tolerance to ischemia and/or reduce additional damage consequent upon reperfusion. Here we will review the proximity of the metabolic approach to clinical practice. Specifically, we will focus on how the citric acid cycle is involved in cardioprotection. Inspired by cross-fertilization between fundamental cancer biology and cardiovascular medicine, a set of metabolic observations have identified novel metabolic pathways, easily manipulable in man, which can harness metabolism to robustly combat ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  2. Evaluating the effects of sub-zero temperature cycling on mercury flux from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett-Hains, Hamish; Walters, Nicholas E.; Van Heyst, Bill J.

    2012-12-01

    A number of mechanisms have been shown to facilitate the flux of mercury from soils, although at sub-zero temperatures, there is evidence to suggest that alternate mechanisms may exist. Field studies at sub-zero temperatures have observed spikes in flux under certain conditions however very little laboratory work has been done to characterize the specific effects or mechanisms. A Dynamic Flux Chamber (DFC) and Tekran Model 2537A were used to analyse mercury flux from a naturally enriched soil. Soil moisture contents were varied between 30%, 60%, and 75% of field capacity while temperatures were cycled between 0 and -25 °C. The results, which were compared to room temperature baseline runs, showed that, at sub-zero temperatures, the mercury flux was suppressed in general. However, during the temperature cycling runs, soil flux spikes were evident during positive temperature change or warming. A one-way ANOVA by ranks proved that statistically significant fluxes were occurring during the runs at 30% and 60% of field capacity for positive rates of temperature changes. Arrhenius plots showed that for positive soil temperatures flux and temperature correlated well with the Arrhenius relationship. At sub-zero conditions however, no relationship was present, indicating another mechanism was present. The proposed mechanism for this enhanced flux is the physical evacuation of interstitial pore space gaseous mercury by the expansion and contraction of the freeze-thaw cycle.

  3. On Polar Magnetic Field Reversal and Surface Flux Transport During Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xudong; Hoeksema, J. Todd; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2015-01-01

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33-2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in 2013 October; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60° latitude) reversed in 2012 November and 2014 March, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR tilt, higher total AR flux, or slower mid-latitude near-surface meridional flow, while exceptions occur during low magnetic activity. In particular, the AR flux and the mid-latitude poleward flow speed exhibit a clear anti-correlation. We discuss how these features can be explained in a surface flux transport process that includes a field-dependent converging flow toward the ARs, a characteristic that may contribute to solar cycle variability.

  4. ON POLAR MAGNETIC FIELD REVERSAL AND SURFACE FLUX TRANSPORT DURING SOLAR CYCLE 24

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xudong; Todd Hoeksema, J.; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Junwei

    2015-01-10

    As each solar cycle progresses, remnant magnetic flux from active regions (ARs) migrates poleward to cancel the old-cycle polar field. We describe this polarity reversal process during Cycle 24 using four years (2010.33-2014.33) of line-of-sight magnetic field measurements from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. The total flux associated with ARs reached maximum in the north in 2011, more than two years earlier than the south; the maximum is significantly weaker than Cycle 23. The process of polar field reversal is relatively slow, north-south asymmetric, and episodic. We estimate that the global axial dipole changed sign in 2013 October; the northern and southern polar fields (mean above 60° latitude) reversed in 2012 November and 2014 March, respectively, about 16 months apart. Notably, the poleward surges of flux in each hemisphere alternated in polarity, giving rise to multiple reversals in the north. We show that the surges of the trailing sunspot polarity tend to correspond to normal mean AR tilt, higher total AR flux, or slower mid-latitude near-surface meridional flow, while exceptions occur during low magnetic activity. In particular, the AR flux and the mid-latitude poleward flow speed exhibit a clear anti-correlation. We discuss how these features can be explained in a surface flux transport process that includes a field-dependent converging flow toward the ARs, a characteristic that may contribute to solar cycle variability.

  5. Sensitivity of Amazonian TOA flux diurnal cycle composite monthly variability to choice of reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, J. Brant; Taylor, Patrick C.

    2016-05-01

    Amazonian deep convection experiences a strong diurnal cycle driven by the cycle in surface sensible heat flux, which contributes to a significant diurnal cycle in the top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative flux. Even when accounting for seasonal variability, the TOA flux diurnal cycle varies significantly on the monthly timescale. Previous work shows evidence supporting a connection between variability in the convective and radiative cycles, likely modulated by variability in monthly atmospheric state (e.g., convective instability). The hypothesized relationships are further investigated with regression analysis of the radiative diurnal cycle and atmospheric state using additional meteorological variables representing convective instability and upper tropospheric humidity. The results are recalculated with three different reanalyses to test the reliability of the results. The radiative diurnal cycle sensitivity to upper tropospheric humidity is about equal in magnitude to that of convective instability. In addition, the results are recalculated with the data subdivided into the wet and dry seasons. Overall, clear-sky radiative effects have a dominant role in radiative diurnal cycle variability during the dry season. Because of this, even in a convectively active region, the clear-sky radiative effects must be accounted for in order to fully explain the monthly variability in diurnal cycle. Finally, while there is general agreement between the different reanalysis-based results when examining the full data time domain (without regard to time of year), there are significant disagreements when the data are divided into wet and dry seasons. The questionable reliability of reanalysis data is a major limitation.

  6. Sensitivity of Amazonian TOA flux diurnal cycle composite monthly variability to choice of reanalysis.

    PubMed

    Dodson, J Brant; Taylor, Patrick C

    2016-05-16

    Amazonian deep convection experiences a strong diurnal cycle driven by the cycle in surface sensible heat flux, which contributes to a significant diurnal cycle in the top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative flux. Even when accounting for seasonal variability, the TOA flux diurnal cycle varies significantly on the monthly timescale. Previous work shows evidence supporting a connection between variability in the convective and radiative cycles, likely modulated by variability in monthly atmospheric state (e.g., convective instability). The hypothesized relationships are further investigated with regression analysis of the radiative diurnal cycle and atmospheric state using additional meteorological variables representing convective instability and upper tropospheric humidity. The results are recalculated with three different reanalyses to test the reliability of the results. The radiative diurnal cycle sensitivity to upper tropospheric humidity is about equal in magnitude to that of convective instability. In addition, the results are recalculated with the data subdivided into the wet and dry seasons. Overall, clear-sky radiative effects have a dominant role in radiative diurnal cycle variability during the dry season. Because of this, even in a convectively active region, the clear-sky radiative effects must be accounted for in order to fully explain the monthly variability in diurnal cycle. Finally, while there is general agreement between the different reanalysis-based results when examining the full data time domain (without regard to time of year), there are significant disagreements when the data are divided into wet and dry seasons. The questionable reliability of reanalysis data is a major limitation.

  7. Extraction, purification, methylation and GC-MS analysis of short-chain carboxylic acids for metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Tivendale, Nathan D; Jewett, Erin M; Hegeman, Adrian D; Cohen, Jerry D

    2016-08-15

    Dynamic metabolic flux analysis requires efficient and effective methods for extraction, purification and analysis of a plethora of naturally-occurring compounds. One area of metabolism that would be highly informative to study using metabolic flux analysis is the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which consists of short-chain carboxylic acids. Here, we describe a newly-developed method for extraction, purification, derivatization and analysis of short-chain carboxylic acids involved in the TCA cycle. The method consists of snap-freezing the plant material, followed by maceration and a 12-15h extraction at -80 °C. The extracts are then subject to reduction (to stabilize β-keto acids), purified by strong anion exchange solid phase extraction and methylated with methanolic HCl. This method could also be readily adapted to quantify many other short-chain carboxylic acids.

  8. Lipotoxicity in steatohepatitis occurs despite an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Rainey E.; Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Williams, Caroline M.; Nautiyal, Manisha; Mathew, Justin T.; Martinez, Janie; Reinhard, Mary K.; McDougall, Danielle J.; Rocca, James R.; Yost, Richard A.; Cusi, Kenneth; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The hepatic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is central to integrating macronutrient metabolism and is closely coupled to cellular respiration, free radical generation, and inflammation. Oxidative flux through the TCA cycle is induced during hepatic insulin resistance, in mice and humans with simple steatosis, reflecting early compensatory remodeling of mitochondrial energetics. We hypothesized that progressive severity of hepatic insulin resistance and the onset of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) would impair oxidative flux through the hepatic TCA cycle. Mice (C57/BL6) were fed a high-trans-fat high-fructose diet (TFD) for 8 wk to induce simple steatosis and NASH by 24 wk. In vivo fasting hepatic mitochondrial fluxes were determined by 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based isotopomer analysis. Hepatic metabolic intermediates were quantified using mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomics. Hepatic triglyceride accumulation and insulin resistance preceded alterations in mitochondrial metabolism, since TCA cycle fluxes remained normal during simple steatosis. However, mice with NASH had a twofold induction (P < 0.05) of mitochondrial fluxes (μmol/min) through the TCA cycle (2.6 ± 0.5 vs. 5.4 ± 0.6), anaplerosis (9.1 ± 1.2 vs. 16.9 ± 2.2), and pyruvate cycling (4.9 ± 1.0 vs. 11.1 ± 1.9) compared with their age-matched controls. Induction of the TCA cycle activity during NASH was concurrent with blunted ketogenesis and accumulation of hepatic diacylglycerols (DAGs), ceramides (Cer), and long-chain acylcarnitines, suggesting inefficient oxidation and disposal of excess free fatty acids (FFA). Sustained induction of mitochondrial TCA cycle failed to prevent accretion of “lipotoxic” metabolites in the liver and could hasten inflammation and the metabolic transition to NASH. PMID:26814015

  9. Lipotoxicity in steatohepatitis occurs despite an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Rainey E; Kalavalapalli, Srilaxmi; Williams, Caroline M; Nautiyal, Manisha; Mathew, Justin T; Martinez, Janie; Reinhard, Mary K; McDougall, Danielle J; Rocca, James R; Yost, Richard A; Cusi, Kenneth; Garrett, Timothy J; Sunny, Nishanth E

    2016-04-01

    The hepatic tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is central to integrating macronutrient metabolism and is closely coupled to cellular respiration, free radical generation, and inflammation. Oxidative flux through the TCA cycle is induced during hepatic insulin resistance, in mice and humans with simple steatosis, reflecting early compensatory remodeling of mitochondrial energetics. We hypothesized that progressive severity of hepatic insulin resistance and the onset of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) would impair oxidative flux through the hepatic TCA cycle. Mice (C57/BL6) were fed a high-trans-fat high-fructose diet (TFD) for 8 wk to induce simple steatosis and NASH by 24 wk. In vivo fasting hepatic mitochondrial fluxes were determined by(13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based isotopomer analysis. Hepatic metabolic intermediates were quantified using mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomics. Hepatic triglyceride accumulation and insulin resistance preceded alterations in mitochondrial metabolism, since TCA cycle fluxes remained normal during simple steatosis. However, mice with NASH had a twofold induction (P< 0.05) of mitochondrial fluxes (μmol/min) through the TCA cycle (2.6 ± 0.5 vs. 5.4 ± 0.6), anaplerosis (9.1 ± 1.2 vs. 16.9 ± 2.2), and pyruvate cycling (4.9 ± 1.0 vs. 11.1 ± 1.9) compared with their age-matched controls. Induction of the TCA cycle activity during NASH was concurrent with blunted ketogenesis and accumulation of hepatic diacylglycerols (DAGs), ceramides (Cer), and long-chain acylcarnitines, suggesting inefficient oxidation and disposal of excess free fatty acids (FFA). Sustained induction of mitochondrial TCA cycle failed to prevent accretion of "lipotoxic" metabolites in the liver and could hasten inflammation and the metabolic transition to NASH.

  10. Cycle flux algebra for ion and water flux through the KcsA channel single-file pore links microscopic trajectories and macroscopic observables.

    PubMed

    Oiki, Shigetoshi; Iwamoto, Masayuki; Sumikama, Takashi

    2011-01-31

    In narrow pore ion channels, ions and water molecules diffuse in a single-file manner and cannot pass each other. Under such constraints, ion and water fluxes are coupled, leading to experimentally observable phenomena such as the streaming potential. Analysis of this coupled flux would provide unprecedented insights into the mechanism of permeation. In this study, ion and water permeation through the KcsA potassium channel was the focus, for which an eight-state discrete-state Markov model has been proposed based on the crystal structure, exhibiting four ion-binding sites. Random transitions on the model lead to the generation of the net flux. Here we introduced the concept of cycle flux to derive exact solutions of experimental observables from the permeation model. There are multiple cyclic paths on the model, and random transitions complete the cycles. The rate of cycle completion is called the cycle flux. The net flux is generated by a combination of cyclic paths with their own cycle flux. T.L. Hill developed a graphical method of exact solutions for the cycle flux. This method was extended to calculate one-way cycle fluxes of the KcsA channel. By assigning the stoichiometric numbers for ion and water transfer to each cycle, we established a method to calculate the water-ion coupling ratio (CR(w-i)) through cycle flux algebra. These calculations predicted that CR(w-i) would increase at low potassium concentrations. One envisions an intuitive picture of permeation as random transitions among cyclic paths, and the relative contributions of the cycle fluxes afford experimental observables.

  11. Metabolic flux responses to genetic modification for shikimic acid production by Bacillus subtilis strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shikimic acid (SA) is a key chiral starting molecule for the synthesis of the neuramidase inhibitor GS4104 against viral influenza. Microbial production of SA has been extensively investigated in Escherichia coli, and to a less extent in Bacillus subtilis. However, metabolic flux of the high SA-producing strains has not been explored. In this study, we constructed with genetic manipulation and further determined metabolic flux with 13C-labeling test of high SA-producing B. subtilis strains. Results B. subtilis 1A474 had a mutation in SA kinase gene (aroI) and accumulated 1.5 g/L of SA. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA, aroB, aroC or aroD in B. subtilis revealed that aroD had the most significantly positive effects on SA production. Simultaneous overexpression of genes for 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase (aroA) and SA dehydrogenase (aroD) in B. subtilis BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD resulted in SA production of 3.2 g/L. 13C-Metabolic flux assay (MFA) on the two strains BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu and BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD indicated the carbon flux from glucose to SA increased to 4.6% in BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD from 1.9% in strain BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu. The carbon flux through tricarboxylic acid cycle significantly reduced, while responses of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glycolysis to high SA production were rather weak, in the strain BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD. Based on the results from MFA, two potential targets for further optimization of SA production were identified. Experiments on genetic deletion of phosphoenoylpyruvate kinase gene confirmed its positive influence on SA production, while the overexpression of the transketolase gene did not lead to increase in SA production. Conclusion Of the genes involved in shikimate pathway in B. subtilis, aroD exerted most significant influence on SA accumulation. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA and aroD doubled SA production than its parent strain. MFA revealed metabolic flux

  12. Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2009-09-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

  13. The solar cycle variation of coronal mass ejections and the solar wind mass flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, David F.; Howard, Russell A.

    1994-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are an important aspect of coronal physics and a potentially significant contributor to perturbations of the solar wind, such as its mass flux. Sufficient data on CMEs are now available to permit study of their longer-term occurrency patterns. Here we present the results of a study of CME occurrence rates over more than a complete 11-year solar sunspot cycle and a comparison of these rates with those of other activity related to CMEs and with the solar wind particle flux at 1 AU. The study includes an evaluation of correlations to the CME rates, which include instrument duty cycles, visibility functions, mass detection thresholds, and geometrical considerations. The main results are as follows: (1) The frequency of occurrence of CMEs tends to track the solar activity cycle in both amplitude and phase; (2) the CME rates from different instruments, when corrected for both duty cycles and visibility functions, are reasonably consistent; (3) considering only longer-term averages, no one class of solar activity is better correlated with CME rate than any other; (4) the ratio of the annualized CME to solar wind mass flux tends to track the solar cycle; and (5) near solar maximum, CMEs can provide a significant fraction (i.e., approximately equals 15%) of the average mass flux to the near-ecliptic solar wind.

  14. D-brane networks in flux vacua, generalized cycles and calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evslin, Jarah; Martucci, Luca

    2007-07-01

    We consider chains of generalized submanifolds, as defined by Gualtieri in the context of generalized complex geometry, and define a boundary operator that acts on them. This allows us to define generalized cycles and the corresponding homology theory. Gauge invariance demands that D-brane networks on flux vacua must wrap these generalized cycles, while deformations of generalized cycles inside of a certain homology class describe physical processes such as the dissolution of D-branes in higher-dimensional D-branes and MMS-like instantonic transitions. We introduce calibrations that identify the supersymmetric D-brane networks, which minimize their energy inside of the corresponding homology class of generalized cycles. Such a calibration is explicitly presented for type II Script N = 1 flux compactifications to four dimensions. In particular networks of walls and strings in compactifications on warped Calabi-Yau's are treated, with explicit examples on a toroidal orientifold vacuum and on the Klebanov-Strassler geometry.

  15. The Yeast Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Routes Carbon Fluxes to Fuel Cell Cycle Progression.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Jennifer C; Kuehne, Andreas; Zamboni, Nicola; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-05-19

    Cell division entails a sequence of processes whose specific demands for biosynthetic precursors and energy place dynamic requirements on metabolism. However, little is known about how metabolic fluxes are coordinated with the cell division cycle. Here, we examine budding yeast to show that more than half of all measured metabolites change significantly through the cell division cycle. Cell cycle-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism are controlled by the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1), a major cell cycle regulator, and the metabolic regulator protein kinase A. At the G1/S transition, Cdk1 phosphorylates and activates the enzyme Nth1, which funnels the storage carbohydrate trehalose into central carbon metabolism. Trehalose utilization fuels anabolic processes required to reliably complete cell division. Thus, the cell cycle entrains carbon metabolism to fuel biosynthesis. Because the oscillation of Cdk activity is a conserved feature of the eukaryotic cell cycle, we anticipate its frequent use in dynamically regulating metabolism for efficient proliferation.

  16. Correlation of Sulfuric Acid Hydrate Abundance with Charged Particle Flux at the Surface of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, James B.; Paranicas, C. P.; Cassidy, T. A.; Shirley, J. H.

    2010-10-01

    The trailing hemisphere of Jupiter's moon Europa is bombarded by charged particles trapped within Jupiter's magnetosphere. Sulfur ion implantation and impacting energetic electrons strongly affect the surface chemistry of Europa. Understanding these processes is important for disentangling the extrinsic and intrinsic components of Europa's surface chemistry. In the sulfur cycle model of Carlson et al. (Science 286, 97, 1999), hydrated sulfuric acid represents the dominant reaction product of radiolytic surface modification processes on Europa. In recent compositional investigations employing linear mixture modeling, Dalton et al. (LPSC XV, #2511, 2009) and Shirley et al. (Icarus, in press, 2010) document a well-defined gradient of hydrated sulfuric acid abundance for a study area spanning the leading side - trailing side boundary in Argadnel Regio. Sulfuric acid hydrate abundance in this region increases toward the trailing side apex. Here we compare the derived sulfuric acid hydrate abundances at 41 locations on Europa's surface with independent model results describing 1) the sulfur ion flux (Hendrix et al., 2010, in preparation), and 2) the energetic electron flux, at the same locations. We improve upon the prior calculation of electron energy into the surface of Paranicas et al. (2009, in Europa, U. Arizona, p529; Pappalardo, McKinnon, & Khurana eds.) by incorporating a realistic pitch angle dependence of the distribution. While the sulfur ion implantation and electron energy deposition model distributions differ in important details, both show trailing side gradients similar to that found for the sulfuric acid hydrate. Correlation coefficients exceed 0.9 in comparisons of each of these models with the sulfuric acid hydrate distribution. Our results support models in which the electron energy flux drives reactions that utilize implanted sulfur to produce sulfuric acid hydrate. This work was performed at the California Institute of Technology-Jet Propulsion

  17. Cell cycle nucleic acids, polypeptides and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Lowe, Keith S.; Larkins, Brian A.; Dilkes, Brian R.; Sun, Yuejin

    2007-08-14

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids and their encoded proteins that are involved in cell cycle regulation. The invention further provides recombinant expression cassettes, host cells, transgenic plants, and antibody compositions. The present invention provides methods and compositions relating to altering cell cycle protein content, cell cycle progression, cell number and/or composition of plants.

  18. Sensitivity of Amazonian TOA flux diurnal cycle composite monthly variability to choice of reanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Patrick C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Amazonian deep convection experiences a strong diurnal cycle driven by the cycle in surface sensible heat flux, which contributes to a significant diurnal cycle in the top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative flux. Even when accounting for seasonal variability, the TOA flux diurnal cycle varies significantly on the monthly timescale. Previous work shows evidence supporting a connection between variability in the convective and radiative cycles, likely modulated by variability in monthly atmospheric state (e.g., convective instability). The hypothesized relationships are further investigated with regression analysis of the radiative diurnal cycle and atmospheric state using additional meteorological variables representing convective instability and upper tropospheric humidity. The results are recalculated with three different reanalyses to test the reliability of the results. The radiative diurnal cycle sensitivity to upper tropospheric humidity is about equal in magnitude to that of convective instability. In addition, the results are recalculated with the data subdivided into the wet and dry seasons. Overall, clear‐sky radiative effects have a dominant role in radiative diurnal cycle variability during the dry season. Because of this, even in a convectively active region, the clear‐sky radiative effects must be accounted for in order to fully explain the monthly variability in diurnal cycle. Finally, while there is general agreement between the different reanalysis‐based results when examining the full data time domain (without regard to time of year), there are significant disagreements when the data are divided into wet and dry seasons. The questionable reliability of reanalysis data is a major limitation. PMID:27840782

  19. Citric acid cycle and role of its intermediates in metabolism.

    PubMed

    Akram, Muhammad

    2014-04-01

    The citric acid cycle is the final common oxidative pathway for carbohydrates, fats and amino acids. It is the most important metabolic pathway for the energy supply to the body. TCA is the most important central pathway connecting almost all the individual metabolic pathways. In this review article, introduction, regulation and energetics of TCA cycle have been discussed. The present study was carried out to review literature on TCA cycle.

  20. MAGNETIC FLUX CONSERVATION IN THE HELIOSHEATH INCLUDING SOLAR CYCLE VARIATIONS OF MAGNETIC FIELD INTENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, A. T.; Opher, M.; Provornikova, E.; Richardson, J. D.; Tóth, G. E-mail: mopher@bu.edu E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu

    2015-04-10

    In the heliosheath (HS), Voyager 2 has observed a flow with constant radial velocity and magnetic flux conservation. Voyager 1, however, has observed a decrease in the flow’s radial velocity and an order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux. We investigate the role of the 11 yr solar cycle variation of the magnetic field strength on the magnetic flux within the HS using a global 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the heliosphere. We use time and latitude-dependent solar wind velocity and density inferred from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/SWAN and interplanetary scintillations data and implemented solar cycle variations of the magnetic field derived from 27 day averages of the field magnitude average of the magnetic field at 1 AU from the OMNI database. With the inclusion of the solar cycle time-dependent magnetic field intensity, the model matches the observed intensity of the magnetic field in the HS along both Voyager 1 and 2. This is a significant improvement from the same model without magnetic field solar cycle variations, which was over a factor of two larger. The model accurately predicts the radial velocity observed by Voyager 2; however, the model predicts a flow speed ∼100 km s{sup −1} larger than that derived from LECP measurements at Voyager 1. In the model, magnetic flux is conserved along both Voyager trajectories, contrary to observations. This implies that the solar cycle variations in solar wind magnetic field observed at 1 AU does not cause the order of magnitude decrease in magnetic flux observed in the Voyager 1 data.

  1. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium’s growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports. PMID:26684737

  2. A Functional Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Operates during Growth of Bordetella pertussis on Amino Acid Mixtures as Sole Carbon Substrates.

    PubMed

    Izac, Marie; Garnier, Dominique; Speck, Denis; Lindley, Nic D

    2015-01-01

    It has been claimed that citrate synthase, aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase activities are non-functional in Bordetella pertussis and that this might explain why this bacterium's growth is sometimes associated with accumulation of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and/or free fatty acids. However, the sequenced genome includes the entire citric acid pathway genes. Furthermore, these genes were expressed and the corresponding enzyme activities detected at high levels for the pathway when grown on a defined medium imitating the amino acid content of complex media often used for growth of this pathogenic microorganism. In addition, no significant PHB or fatty acids could be detected. Analysis of the carbon balance and stoichiometric flux analysis based on specific rates of amino acid consumption, and estimated biomass requirements coherent with the observed growth rate, clearly indicate that a fully functional tricarboxylic acid cycle operates in contrast to previous reports.

  3. Counting and correcting thermodynamically infeasible flux cycles in genome-scale metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    De Martino, Daniele; Capuani, Fabrizio; Mori, Matteo; De Martino, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo

    2013-10-14

    Thermodynamics constrains the flow of matter in a reaction network to occur through routes along which the Gibbs energy decreases, implying that viable steady-state flux patterns should be void of closed reaction cycles. Identifying and removing cycles in large reaction networks can unfortunately be a highly challenging task from a computational viewpoint. We propose here a method that accomplishes it by combining a relaxation algorithm and a Monte Carlo procedure to detect loops, with ad hoc rules (discussed in detail) to eliminate them. As test cases, we tackle (a) the problem of identifying infeasible cycles in the E. coli metabolic network and (b) the problem of correcting thermodynamic infeasibilities in the Flux-Balance-Analysis solutions for 15 human cell-type-specific metabolic networks. Results for (a) are compared with previous analyses of the same issue, while results for (b) are weighed against alternative methods to retrieve thermodynamically viable flux patterns based on minimizing specific global quantities. Our method, on the one hand, outperforms previous techniques and, on the other, corrects loopy solutions to Flux Balance Analysis. As a byproduct, it also turns out to be able to reveal possible inconsistencies in model reconstructions.

  4. Annual cycle of radiation fluxes over the Arctic ocean: Sensitivity to cloud optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J.A. ); Ebert, E.E. )

    1992-11-01

    The relationship between cloud optical properties and the radiative fluxes over the Arctic Ocean is explored by conducting a series of modeling experiments. The annual cycle of arctic cloud optical properties that are required to reproduce both the outgoing radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere as determined from satellite observations and the available determinations of surface radiative fluxes are derived. Existing data on cloud fraction and cloud microphysical properties are utilized. Four types of cloud are considered: low stratus clouds, midlevel clouds, citrus clouds, and wintertime ice crystal precipitation. Internally consistent annual cycles of surface temperature, surface albedo, cloud fraction and cloud optical properties, components of surface and top of atmosphere radiative fluxes, and cloud radiative forcing are presented. The modeled total cloud optical depth (weighted by cloud fraction) ranges from a low value in winter of 2 to a high summertime value of 8. Infrared emmissivities for liquid water clouds are shown to be substantially less than unity during the cold half of the year. Values of modeled surface cloud radiative forcing are positive except for two weeks in midsummer; over the course of the year clouds have a net warming effect on the surface in the Arctic. Total cloud radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere is determined to be positive only briefly in early autumn. Surface longwave fluxes are shown to be very sensitive to the presence of lower-tropospheric ice crystal precipitation during the cold half of the year.

  5. 22 year cycle in the imbalance of the photospheric magnetic fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernova, Elena; Baranov, Dmitrii; Tyasto, Marta

    The manifestation of the 22 year solar magnetic cycle in the imbalance of positive and negative photospheric magnetic fluxes is studied. For the analysis we use synoptic maps of the photospheric magnetic field of Kitt Peak Observatory (1976 - 2003) and John Wilcox Observatory in Stanford (1976 - 2012). We consider strong magnetic fields for the heliolatitudes in the interval from +40° to -40°. It is shown that the sign of the imbalance between positive and negative fluxes remains constant during 11 years from one inversion of the Sun’s global magnetic field to the next one and always coincides with the sign of the polar field in the Northern hemisphere. Thus, the imbalance between the magnetic fluxes of different polarities changes according to the 22 year cycle. The sign of the imbalance is determined both by the phase of the solar cycle (before or after the inversion) and by the parity of the solar cycle. The imbalance of positive and negative magnetic fluxes can be observed not only for the strong fields in the sunspot zone. The mean magnetic field of the Sun (Sun as a star), which is determined by the net flux of the background fields, changes according to the same pattern as the imbalance of the strong fields. The regular changes of the imbalance of the photospheric magnetic fields are reflected also in the parameters of heliosphere. We show the connection of the imbalance with the quadrupole component of the photospheric magnetic field and with the imbalance of the interplanetary magnetic field (the difference between the numbers of the days with positive and negative polarities of the interplanetary magnetic field near Earth).

  6. The Glyoxylate Cycle in an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus. Carbon Flux and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lammers, Peter J.; Jun, Jeongwon; Abubaker, Jehad; Arreola, Raul; Gopalan, Anjali; Bago, Berta; Hernandez-Sebastia, Cinta; Allen, James W.; Douds, David D.; Pfeffer, Philip E.; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2001-01-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is responsible for huge fluxes of photosynthetically fixed carbon from plants to the soil. Lipid, which is the dominant form of stored carbon in the fungal partner and which fuels spore germination, is made by the fungus within the root and is exported to the extraradical mycelium. We tested the hypothesis that the glyoxylate cycle is central to the flow of carbon in the AM symbiosis. The results of 13C labeling of germinating spores and extraradical mycelium with 13C2-acetate and 13C2-glycerol and analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicate that there are very substantial fluxes through the glyoxylate cycle in the fungal partner. Full-length sequences obtained by polymerase chain reaction from a cDNA library from germinating spores of the AM fungus Glomus intraradices showed strong homology to gene sequences for isocitrate lyase and malate synthase from plants and other fungal species. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction measurements show that these genes are expressed at significant levels during the symbiosis. Glyoxysome-like bodies were observed by electron microscopy in fungal structures where the glyoxylate cycle is expected to be active, which is consistent with the presence in both enzyme sequences of motifs associated with glyoxysomal targeting. We also identified among several hundred expressed sequence tags several enzymes of primary metabolism whose expression during spore germination is consistent with previous labeling studies and with fluxes into and out of the glyoxylate cycle. PMID:11706207

  7. Evaluation of Site and Continental Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Simulations with North American Flux Tower Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raczka, B. M.; Davis, K. J.; Regional-Interim Synthesis Participants, N.; Site Level Interim Synthesis, N.; Regional/Continental Interim Synthesis Team

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial carbon models are widely used to diagnose past ecosystem-atmosphere carbon flux responses to climate variability, and are a critical component of coupled climate-carbon model used to predict global climate change. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Interim Regional and Site Interim Synthesis activities collected a broad sampling of terrestrial carbon model results run at both regional and site level. The Regional Interim Synthesis Activity aims to determine our current knowledge of the carbon balance of North America by comparing the flux estimates provided by the various terrestrial carbon cycle models. Moving beyond model-model comparison is challenging, however, because no continental-scale reference values exist to validate modeled fluxes. This paper presents an effort to evaluate the continental-scale flux estimates of these models using North American flux tower observations brought together by the Site Interim Synthesis Activity. Flux towers present a standard for evaluation of the modeled fluxes, though this evaluation is challenging because of the mismatch in spatial scales between the spatial resolution of continental-scale model runs and the size of a flux tower footprint. We compare model performance with flux tower observations at monthly and annual integrals using the statistical criteria of normalized standard deviation, correlation coefficient, centered root mean square deviation and chi-squared. Models are evaluated individually and according to common model characteristics including spatial resolution, photosynthesis, soil carbon decomposition and phenology. In general all regional models are positively biased for GPP, Re and NEE at both annual and monthly time scales. Further analysis links this result to a positive bias in many solar radiation reanalyses. Positively biased carbon fluxes are also observed for enzyme-kinetic models and models using no nitrogen limitation for soil carbon decomposition. While the former result is

  8. Metabolism: Part II. The Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA), Citric Acid, or Krebs Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Differentiates the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (or Krebs cycle) from glycolysis, and describes the bridge between the two as being the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl coenzyme A. Discusses the eight steps in the TCA cycle, the results of isotopic labeling experiments, and the net effects of the TCA cycle. (TW)

  9. Flux-tube geometry and solar wind speed during an activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.; Rouillard, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The solar wind speed at 1 AU shows cyclic variations in latitude and in time which reflect the evolution of the global background magnetic field during the activity cycle. It is commonly accepted that the terminal (asymptotic) wind speed in a given magnetic flux-tube is generally anti-correlated with its total expansion ratio, which motivated the definition of widely used semi-empirical scaling laws relating one to the other. In practice, such scaling laws require ad hoc corrections (especially for the slow wind in the vicinities of streamer/coronal hole boundaries) and empirical fits to in situ spacecraft data. A predictive law based solely on physical principles is still missing. Aims: We test whether the flux-tube expansion is the controlling factor of the wind speed at all phases of the cycle and at all latitudes (close to and far from streamer boundaries) using a very large sample of wind-carrying open magnetic flux-tubes. We furthermore search for additional physical parameters based on the geometry of the coronal magnetic field which have an influence on the terminal wind flow speed. Methods: We use numerical magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of the corona and wind coupled to a dynamo model to determine the properties of the coronal magnetic field and of the wind velocity (as a function of time and latitude) during a whole 11-yr activity cycle. These simulations provide a large statistical ensemble of open flux-tubes which we analyse conjointly in order to identify relations of dependence between the wind speed and geometrical parameters of the flux-tubes which are valid globally (for all latitudes and moments of the cycle). Results: Our study confirms that the terminal (asymptotic) speed of the solar wind depends very strongly on the geometry of the open magnetic flux-tubes through which it flows. The total flux-tube expansion is more clearly anti-correlated with the wind speed for fast rather than for slow wind flows, and effectively controls the

  10. Stable runoff and weathering fluxes into the oceans over Quaternary climate cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Bouchez, Julien; Ibarra Daniel, E.; Kate, Maher

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the Quaternary, erosion and biogeochemical cycles at the Earth surface responded to large oscillations in temperature and precipitation. Such changes are recorded in sedimentary archives and radiogenic isotope mass balances. In contrast, climate models combined with empirical relationships between measures of climate and weatheringindicate minimal change in global weathering rates. Here we resolve the extent to which the supply of dissolved elements to oceans was altered by glacial-interglacial oscillations with a new weathering proxy. We estimate relative weathering fluxes from the ratio of cosmogenic beryllium-10, produced in the atmosphere, to the stable isotope beryllium-9, introduced into the oceans by the riverine silicate weathering flux [1]. Using sedimentary Be records,we show over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles, and over the last 2 Myr, shifts in global silicate weathering inputs are not detectable [2]. Combining climate model simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum with a new model for silicate weathering, we show how large regional variability in runoff between glacial and interglacial periods was insufficient to shift global weathering fluxes. The observed and modeled stability explains why removal of atmospheric CO2 by silicate weathering has been balanced to within 2% of net CO2 degassing over the last 600 kyr. Because over >104 yr time scales weathering and erosion are also coupled, our study provides additional evidence that global erosion rates did not shift along any long-term trend over the Quaternary [3]. [1] von Blanckenburg, F. and Bouchez, J. (2014). "River fluxes to the sea from the oceans 10Be/9Be ratio." Earth and Planetary Science Letters 387: 34-43. [2] von Blanckenburg, F., Bouchez. J. Ibarra, D.E., Maher, K. (2015). "Stable runoff and weathering fluxes into the oceans over Quaternary climate cycles." Nature Geosciences 10.1038/ngeo2452. [3] Willenbring, J. K. and von Blanckenburg, F. (2010). "Long-term stability of

  11. [Flux cytometry of the cellular cycle of leukemic cells of the blood].

    PubMed

    Pierrez, J; Guerci, A; Guerci, O

    1988-01-01

    The coordination of flux cytometry and of a techniques of leukoconcentration allowed to determine the cellular cycle of nucleated cells of circulating blood, without logs nor enrichment of cellular type on a definitive moment. The study of acute leukemias allow to conclude that: 1) it exists in peripheral blood a synthetic activity of ADN bound to the presence of leukemic or blastic cells; 2) this activity allows to appreciate the spontaneous variations of synthesis and the incidence of chemotherapy.

  12. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, R. W.; Johnson, R. E.; Anderson, M. S.

    1999-01-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  13. Sulfuric acid on Europa and the radiolytic sulfur cycle.

    PubMed

    Carlson, R W; Johnson, R E; Anderson, M S

    1999-10-01

    A comparison of laboratory spectra with Galileo data indicates that hydrated sulfuric acid is present and is a major component of Europa's surface. In addition, this moon's visually dark surface material, which spatially correlates with the sulfuric acid concentration, is identified as radiolytically altered sulfur polymers. Radiolysis of the surface by magnetospheric plasma bombardment continuously cycles sulfur between three forms: sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur polymers, with sulfuric acid being about 50 times as abundant as the other forms. Enhanced sulfuric acid concentrations are found in Europa's geologically young terrains, suggesting that low-temperature, liquid sulfuric acid may influence geological processes.

  14. In vivo urea cycle flux distinguishes and correlates with phenotypic severity in disorders of the urea cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Brendan; Yu, Hong; Jahoor, Farook; O'Brien, William; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Reeds, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Urea cycle disorders are a group of inborn errors of hepatic metabolism that result in often life-threatening hyperammonemia and hyperglutaminemia. Clinical and laboratory diagnosis of partial deficiencies during asymptomatic periods is difficult, and correlation of phenotypic severity with either genotype and/or in vitro enzyme activity is often imprecise. We hypothesized that stable isotopically determined in vivo rates of total body urea synthesis and urea cycle-specific nitrogen flux would correlate with both phenotypic severity and carrier status in patients with a variety of different enzymatic deficiencies of the urea cycle. We studied control subjects, patients, and their relatives with different enzymatic deficiencies affecting the urea cycle while consuming a low protein diet. On a separate occasion the subjects either received a higher protein intake or were treated with an alternative route medication sodium phenylacetate/benzoate (Ucephan), or oral arginine supplementation. Total urea synthesis from all nitrogen sources was determined from [18O]urea labeling, and the utilization of peripheral nitrogen was estimated from the relative isotopic enrichments of [15N]urea and [15N]glutamine during i.v. co-infusions of [5-(amide)15N]glutamine and [18O]urea. The ratio of the isotopic enrichments of 15N-urea/15N-glutamine distinguished normal control subjects (ratio = 0.42 ± 0.06) from urea cycle patients with late (0.17 ± 0.03) and neonatal (0.003 ± 0.007) presentations irrespective of enzymatic deficiency. This index of urea cycle activity also distinguished asymptomatic heterozygous carriers of argininosuccinate synthetase deficiency (0.22 ± 0.03), argininosuccinate lyase deficiency (0.35 ± 0.11), and partial ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (0.26 ± 0.06) from normal controls. Administration of Ucephan lowered, and arginine increased, urea synthesis to the degree predicted from their respective rates of metabolism. The 15N-urea/15N-glutamine ratio

  15. CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS AND THE SOLAR CYCLE VARIATION OF THE SUN’S OPEN FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R. Jr. E-mail: neil.sheeley@nrl.navy.mil

    2015-08-20

    The strength of the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), which is a measure of the Sun’s total open flux, is observed to vary by roughly a factor of two over the 11 year solar cycle. Several recent studies have proposed that the Sun’s open flux consists of a constant or “floor” component that dominates at sunspot minimum, and a time-varying component due to coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Here, we point out that CMEs cannot account for the large peaks in the IMF strength which occurred in 2003 and late 2014, and which coincided with peaks in the Sun’s equatorial dipole moment. We also show that near-Earth interplanetary CMEs, as identified in the catalog of Richardson and Cane, contribute at most ∼30% of the average radial IMF strength even during sunspot maximum. We conclude that the long-term variation of the radial IMF strength is determined mainly by the Sun’s total dipole moment, with the quadrupole moment and CMEs providing an additional boost near sunspot maximum. Most of the open flux is rooted in coronal holes, whose solar cycle evolution in turn reflects that of the Sun’s lowest-order multipoles.

  16. Measuring diurnal cycles of plant transpiration fluxes in the Arctic with an automated clear chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, L. R.; Raz Yaseef, N.; Curtis, J. B.; Rahn, T. A.; Young, J. M.; Newman, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important greenhouse gas and a major component of the hydrological cycle, but methodological challenges still limit our knowledge of this flux. Measuring evapotranspiration is even more difficult when aiming to partition plant transpiration and soil evaporation. Information on this process for arctic systems is very limited. In order to decrease this gap, our objective was to directly measure plant transpiration in Barrow, Alaska (71.3°N 156.7°W). A commercial system allows measuring carbon soil respiration fluxes with an automated clear chamber connected to an infrared gas-analyzer (Licor 8100), and while it simultaneously measures water concentrations, it is not calibrated to measure vapor fluxes. We calibrated the clear chamber against a previously established method based on a Licor 6400 soil chamber, and we developed a code to calculate fluxes. We performed laboratory comparisons in New Mexico and field comparisons in the Arctic, suggesting that this is a valid tool for a large range of climates. In the field we found a strong correlation between the two instruments with R2 of 0.79. Even with 24 hours of daylight in the Arctic, the system captures a clear diurnal transpiration flux, peaking at 0.9 mmol m-2 s-1 and showing no flux at the lowest points. This new method should be a powerful approach for long term measurements of specific vegetation types or surface features. Such Data can also be used to help understand controls on larger scale eddy covariance tower measurements of evapotranspiration.

  17. Benchmarking the seasonal cycle of CO2 fluxes simulated by terrestrial ecosystem models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shushi; Ciais, Philippe; Chevallier, Frédéric; Peylin, Philippe; Cadule, Patricia; Sitch, Stephen; Piao, Shilong; Ahlström, Anders; Huntingford, Chris; Levy, Peter; Li, Xiran; Liu, Yongwen; Lomas, Mark; Poulter, Benjamin; Viovy, Nicolas; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xuhui; Zaehle, Sönke; Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Zhao, Hongfang

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the seasonality of CO2 fluxes simulated by nine terrestrial ecosystem models of the TRENDY project against (1) the seasonal cycle of gross primary production (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) measured at flux tower sites over different biomes, (2) gridded monthly Model Tree Ensembles-estimated GPP (MTE-GPP) and MTE-NEE obtained by interpolating many flux tower measurements with a machine-learning algorithm, (3) atmospheric CO2 mole fraction measurements at surface sites, and (4) CO2 total columns (XCO2) measurements from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). For comparison with atmospheric CO2 measurements, the LMDZ4 transport model was run with time-varying CO2 fluxes of each model as surface boundary conditions. Seven out of the nine models overestimate the seasonal amplitude of GPP and produce a too early start in spring at most flux sites. Despite their positive bias for GPP, the nine models underestimate NEE at most flux sites and in the Northern Hemisphere compared with MTE-NEE. Comparison with surface atmospheric CO2 measurements confirms that most models underestimate the seasonal amplitude of NEE in the Northern Hemisphere (except CLM4C and SDGVM). Comparison with TCCON data also shows that the seasonal amplitude of XCO2 is underestimated by more than 10% for seven out of the nine models (except for CLM4C and SDGVM) and that the MTE-NEE product is closer to the TCCON data using LMDZ4. From CO2 columns measured routinely at 10 TCCON sites, the constrained amplitude of NEE over the Northern Hemisphere is of 1.6 ± 0.4 gC m-2 d-1, which translates into a net CO2 uptake during the carbon uptake period in the Northern Hemisphere of 7.9 ± 2.0 PgC yr-1.

  18. Evaluate the seasonal cycle and interannual variability of carbon fluxes and the associated uncertainties using modeled and observed data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, F.; Collatz, G. J.; Ivanoff, A.

    2013-12-01

    We assessed the performance of the Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach - Global Fire Emissions Database (CASA-GFED3) terrestrial carbon cycle model in simulating seasonal cycle and interannual variability (IAV) of global and regional carbon fluxes and uncertainties associated with model parameterization. Key model parameters were identified from sensitivity analyses and their uncertainties were propagated through model processes using the Monte Carlo approach to estimate the uncertainties in carbon fluxes and pool sizes. Three independent flux data sets, the global gross primary productivity (GPP) upscaled from eddy covariance flux measurements by Jung et al. (2011), the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) estimated by CarbonTracker, and the eddy covariance flux observations, were used to evaluate modeled fluxes and the uncertainties. Modeled fluxes agree well with both Jung's GPP and CarbonTracker NEE in the amplitude and phase of seasonal cycle, except in the case of GPP in tropical regions where Jung et al. (2011) showed larger fluxes and seasonal amplitude. Modeled GPP IAV is positively correlated (p < 0.1) with Jung's GPP IAV except in the tropics and temperate South America. The correlations between modeled NEE IAV and CarbonTracker NEE IAV are weak at regional to continental scales but stronger when fluxes are aggregated to >40°N latitude. At regional to continental scales flux uncertainties were larger than the IAV in the fluxes for both Jung's GPP and CarbonTracker NEE. Comparisons with eddy covariance flux observations are focused on sites within regions and years of recorded large-scale climate anomalies. We also evaluated modeled biomass using other independent continental biomass estimates and found good agreement. From the comparisons we identify the strengths and weaknesses of the model to capture the seasonal cycle and IAV of carbon fluxes and highlight ways to improve model performance.

  19. Modeling and Depletion Simulations for a High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle with a Representative Experiment Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, David; Betzler, Ben; Hirtz, Gregory John; Ilas, Germina; Sunny, Eva

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a high-fidelity VESTA/MCNP High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core model that features a new, representative experiment loading. This model, which represents the current, high-enriched uranium fuel core, will serve as a reference for low-enriched uranium conversion studies, safety-basis calculations, and other research activities. A new experiment loading model was developed to better represent current, typical experiment loadings, in comparison to the experiment loading included in the model for Cycle 400 (operated in 2004). The new experiment loading model for the flux trap target region includes full length 252Cf production targets, 75Se production capsules, 63Ni production capsules, a 188W production capsule, and various materials irradiation targets. Fully loaded 238Pu production targets are modeled in eleven vertical experiment facilities located in the beryllium reflector. Other changes compared to the Cycle 400 model are the high-fidelity modeling of the fuel element side plates and the material composition of the control elements. Results obtained from the depletion simulations with the new model are presented, with a focus on time-dependent isotopic composition of irradiated fuel and single cycle isotope production metrics.

  20. Development of a Scale Model for High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle 400

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan

    2012-03-01

    The development of a comprehensive SCALE computational model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is documented and discussed in this report. The SCALE model has equivalent features and functionality as the reference MCNP model for Cycle 400 that has been used extensively for HFIR safety analyses and for HFIR experiment design and analyses. Numerical comparisons of the SCALE and MCNP models for the multiplication constant, power density distribution in the fuel, and neutron fluxes at several locations in HFIR indicate excellent agreement between the results predicted with the two models. The SCALE HFIR model is presented in sufficient detail to provide the users of the model with a tool that can be easily customized for various safety analysis or experiment design requirements.

  1. Combined cycle phosphoric acid fuel cell electric power system

    SciTech Connect

    Mollot, D.J.; Micheli, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    By arranging two or more electric power generation cycles in series, combined cycle systems are able to produce electric power more efficiently than conventional single cycle plants. The high fuel to electricity conversion efficiency results in lower plant operating costs, better environmental performance, and in some cases even lower capital costs. Despite these advantages, combined cycle systems for the 1 - 10 megawatt (MW) industrial market are rare. This paper presents a low noise, low (oxides of nitrogen) NOx, combined cycle alternative for the small industrial user. By combining a commercially available phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) with a low-temperature Rankine cycle (similar to those used in geothermal applications), electric conversion efficiencies between 45 and 47 percent are predicted. While the simple cycle PAFC is competitive on a cost of energy basis with gas turbines and diesel generators in the 1 to 2 MW market, the combined cycle PAFC is competitive, on a cost of energy basis, with simple cycle diesel generators in the 4 to 25 MW market. In addition, the efficiency and low-temperature operation of the combined cycle PAFC results in a significant reduction in carbon dioxide emissions with NO{sub x} concentration on the order of 1 parts per million (per weight) (ppmw).

  2. Substrate cycles in Penicillium chrysogenum quantified by isotopic non-stationary flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Penicillium chrysogenum, the main production strain for penicillin-G, has a high content of intracellular carbohydrates, especially reduced sugars such as mannitol, arabitol, erythritol, as well as trehalose and glycogen. In previous steady state 13C wash-in experiments a delay of labeling enrichments in glycolytic intermediates was observed, which suggests turnover of storage carbohydrates. The turnover of storage pools consumes ATP which is expected to reduce the product yield for energy demanding production pathways like penicillin-G. Results In this study, a 13C labeling wash-in experiment of 1 hour was performed to systematically quantify the intracellular flux distribution including eight substrate cycles. The experiments were performed using a mixed carbon source of 85% CmolGlc/CmolGlc+EtOH labeled glucose (mixture of 90% [1-13C1] and 10% [U-13C6]) and 15% ethanol [U-13C2]. It was found, that (1) also several extracellular pools are enriched with 13C labeling rapidly (trehalose, mannitol, and others), (2) the intra- to extracellular metabolite concentration ratios were comparable for a large set of metabolites while for some carbohydrates (mannitol, trehalose, and glucose) the measured ratios were much higher. Conclusions The fast enrichment of several extracellular carbohydrates and a concentration ratio higher than the ratio expected from cell lysis (2%) indicate active (e.g. ATP consuming) transport cycles over the cellular membrane. The flux estimation indicates, that substrate cycles account for about 52% of the gap in the ATP balance based on metabolic flux analysis. PMID:23098235

  3. LONG-TERM (SOLAR CYCLE) VARIATION OF THE EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION AND 10.7CENTIMETER FLUX FROM THE SUN.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The proposal is made that the 10.7-cm flux from the sun , generally regarded as a good index of the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation (EUV), does...in some degree, since many features of the sun vary with the solar cycle. With regard to the radio waves represented by the flux and optical

  4. Citric acid cycle and the origin of MARS.

    PubMed

    Eswarappa, Sandeepa M; Fox, Paul L

    2013-05-01

    The vertebrate multiaminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex (MARS) is an assemblage of nine aminoacyl tRNA synthetases (ARSs) and three non-synthetase scaffold proteins, aminoacyl tRNA synthetase complex-interacting multifunctional protein (AIMP)1, AIMP2, and AIMP3. The evolutionary origin of the MARS is unclear, as is the significance of the inclusion of only nine of 20 tRNA synthetases. Eight of the nine amino acids corresponding to ARSs of the MARS are derived from two citric acid cycle intermediates, α-ketoglutatrate and oxaloacetate. We propose that the metabolic link with the citric acid cycle, the appearance of scaffolding proteins AIMP2 and AIMP3, and the subsequent disappearance of the glyoxylate cycle, together facilitated the origin of the MARS in a common ancestor of metazoans and choanoflagellates.

  5. The Martian hydrologic cycle - Effects of CO2 mass flux on global water distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, P. B.

    1985-01-01

    The Martian CO2 cycle, which includes the seasonal condensation and subsequent sublimation of up to 30 percent of the planet's atmosphere, produces meridional winds due to the consequent mass flux of CO2. These winds currently display strong seasonal and hemispheric asymmetries due to the large asymmetries in the distribution of insolation on Mars. It is proposed that asymmetric meridional advection of water vapor on the planet due to these CO2 condensation winds is capable of explaining the observed dessication of Mars' south polar region at the current time. A simple model for water vapor transport is used to verify this hypothesis and to speculate on the effects of changes in orbital parameters on the seasonal water cycle.

  6. Citric acid cycle biomimic on a carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Sokic-Lazic, Daria; Minteer, Shelley D

    2008-12-01

    The citric acid cycle is one of the main metabolic pathways living cells utilize to completely oxidize biofuels to carbon dioxide and water. The overall goal of this research is to mimic the citric acid cycle at the carbon surface of an electrode in order to achieve complete oxidation of ethanol at a bioanode to increase biofuel cell energy density. In order to mimic this process, dehydrogenase enzymes (known to be the electron or energy producing enzymes of the citric acid cycle) are immobilized in cascades at an electrode surface along with non-energy producing enzymes necessary for the cycle to progress. Six enzymatic schemes were investigated each containing an additional dehydrogenase enzyme involved in the complete oxidation of ethanol. An increase in current density is observed along with an increase in power density with each additional dehydrogenase immobilized on an electrode, reflecting increased electron production at the bioanode with deeper oxidation of the ethanol biofuel. By mimicking the complete citric acid cycle on a carbon electrode, power density was increased 8.71-fold compared to a single enzyme (alcohol dehydrogenase)-based ethanol/air biofuel cell.

  7. Tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolites during ischemia in isolated perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Peuhkurinen, K J; Takala, T E; Nuutinen, E M; Hassinen, I E

    1983-02-01

    Isolated rat hearts were, after a retrograde perfusion by the Langendorff procedure, rendered ischemic by lowering the aortic pressure to zero. The rate of proteolysis and temporal patterns of the changes in the concentrations of the metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, related amino acids, ammonia, and breakdown products of the adenine nucleotides were determined. The most significant change in the amino acid metabolism was a decrease of the proteolysis to one-tenth and a large accumulation of alanine, which was almost stoichiometric to the degradation of aspartate plus asparagine. The accumulation of malate and succinate was small compared with the metabolic net fluxes of aspartate and alanine. The metabolic balance sheet suggests that aspartate was converted to alanine. A prerequisite for this would be a feed in of carbon of aspartate to the tricarboxylic acid cycle as oxalacetate, reversal of the malate dehydrogenase, and production of pyruvate by the malic enzyme reaction. Alanine accumulating during ischemia is not glycolytic in origin but occurs through a concerted operation of anaplerotic reactions and tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolite disposal. The data also suggest that the potentially energy-yielding reduction of fumarate to succinate is not significant in the ischemic myocardium.

  8. Lysophosphatidic acids. Influence on platelet aggregation and intracellular calcium flux.

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, J. M.; Kindom, S. E.; Peterson, D. A.; Peller, J.; Krantz, K. E.; White, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Decanoyl-, palmitoyl-, and oleoyl-lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) were studied for their effects on platelet aggregation and intracellular calcium flux. Palmitoyl-LPA and oleoyl-LPA both caused a concentration-dependent aggregation of human blood platelets at concentrations of 12--300 microM. Aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was enhanced at slightly lower concentrations. First-wave aggregation induced by these LPAs was not blocked by aspirin, indomethacin, or heparin, suggesting similarities to ADP aggregation. However, in washed platelets with a high calcium concentration, no serotonin secretion was observed, even though full aggregation occurred, suggesting that aggregation was not due to released ADP. This concept was supported by studies of platelets deficient in the storage pool of ADP and serotonin, which had a normal first-wave aggregation response to palmitoyl-LPA. Aggregation induced by palmitoyl LPA was inhibited by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), theophylline, and ethylenediaminotetraacetate (EDTA), though in the presence of EDTA shape change occurred. Aggregation stimulated by palmitoyl-LPA or oleoyl-LPA was characterized by changes in the shape of the platelets with development of pseudopods and centralization of granules closely surrounded by contractile microfilaments and supporting microtubules. The addition of palmitoyl-LPA and oleoyl-LPA, but not decanoyl-LPA, caused the release of calcium from a platelet membrane fraction that contains elements of the intracellular calcium storage system and actively concentrates this cation in the presence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and magnesium. It is suggested that LPAs cause aggregation by stimulating the release of calcium intracellularly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Text-Figure 6 PMID:112871

  9. Stable runoff and weathering fluxes into the oceans over Quaternary climate cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm; Bouchez, Julien; Ibarra, Daniel E.; Maher, Kate

    2015-07-01

    Throughout the Quaternary period, the Earth’s surface has been subject to large changes in temperature and precipitation associated with fluctuations between glacial and interglacial states that have affected biogeochemical cycling. However, the effect of these climate oscillations on weathering is debated, with climate modelling efforts using empirical relationships between measures of climate and weathering suggesting minimal changes in global weathering rates between these two climate states. The ratio of the cosmogenic isotope 10Be, which is produced in the atmosphere and deposited to the oceans and the land surface, to 9Be, which is introduced to the oceans by the riverine silicate weathering flux, can be used to track relative weathering fluxes. Here we apply this proxy to marine sediment beryllium records spanning the past two million years, and find no detectable shifts in inputs from global silicate weathering into the oceans. Using climate model simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum along with a model for silicate weathering, we find that there was large regional variability in runoff between glacial and interglacial periods, but that this regional variability was insufficient to shift global weathering fluxes. We suggest that this stability in weathering explains the observation that the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere by silicate weathering has been in approximate balance with CO2 degassing over the past 600,000 years.

  10. LES of large wind farm during a diurnal cycle: Analysis of Energy and Scalar flux budgets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, V.; Calaf, M.; Parlange, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    With an expanding role of wind energy in satisfying energy demands around the world, wind farms are covering increasingly larger surfaces to the point where interaction between wind farms and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) might have significant implications. Furthermore, many wind farm sites lie over existing farmland for which water is a precious resource. In this context, a relevant question yet to be fully understood, is whether large wind farms alter near surface temperatures and evaporation rates and if so, by how much. In the present study, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a geostrophic wind driven ABL with two active scalars, temperature and specific humidity, in the presence of Coriolis forces with an embedded wind farm are performed. Multiple 'synthetic' diurnal cycles are simulated by imposing a time-varying surface temperature and specific humidity. Wind turbines are modeled using the "actuator disk" approach along with the flexibility to reorient according to varying flow directions. LES is performed using the "pseudo-spectral" approach implying that an infinitely large wind farm is simulated. Comparison of simulations with and without wind farms show clear differences in vertical profiles of horizontal velocity magnitude and direction, turbulent kinetic energy and scalar fluxes. To better understand these differences, a detailed analysis of the constituent terms of budget equations of mean and turbulent kinetic energy and sensible and latent heat fluxes has been performed for different stratification regimes as the ABL evolves during the diurnal cycle. The analyses help explain the effect of wind farms on the characteristics of the low-level jet, depth of the stable boundary layer, formation and growth of the convective boundary layer (CBL) and scalar fluxes at the surface.

  11. Diurnal Variability of the Hydrologic Cycle and Radiative Fluxes: Comparisons Between Observation and a GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Xin; Randall, David A.; Fowler, Laura D.

    2000-01-01

    The simulated diurnal cycle is in many ways an ideal test bed for new physical parameterizations. The purpose of this paper is to compare observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission, the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment, the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Experiment, and the Anglo-Brazilian Amazonian Climate Observation Study with the diurnal variability of the Amazonian hydrologic cycle and radiative energy budget as simulated by the Colorado State University general circulation model, and to evaluate improvements and deficiencies of the model physics. The model uses a prognostic cumulus kinetic energy (CKE) to relax the quasi-equilibrium closure of the Arakawa-Schubert cumulus parameterization. A parameter, alpha, is used to relate the CKE to the cumulus mass flux. This parameter is expected to vary with cloud depth, mean shear, and the level of convective activity, but up to now a single constant value for all cloud types has been used. The results of the present study show clearly that this approach cannot yield realistic simulations of both the diurnal cycle and the monthly mean climate state. Improved results are obtained using a version of the model in which alpha is permitted to vary with cloud depth.

  12. High upward fluxes of formic acid from a boreal forest canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobesberger, Siegfried; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe D.; Taipale, Ditte; Millet, Dylan B.; D'Ambro, Emma L.; Rantala, Pekka; Mammarella, Ivan; Zhou, Putian; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Lee, Ben H.; Boy, Michael; Thornton, Joel A.

    2016-09-01

    Eddy covariance fluxes of formic acid, HCOOH, were measured over a boreal forest canopy in spring/summer 2014. The HCOOH fluxes were bidirectional but mostly upward during daytime, in contrast to studies elsewhere that reported mostly downward fluxes. Downward flux episodes were explained well by modeled dry deposition rates. The sum of net observed flux and modeled dry deposition yields an upward "gross flux" of HCOOH, which could not be quantitatively explained by literature estimates of direct vegetative/soil emissions nor by efficient chemical production from other volatile organic compounds, suggesting missing or greatly underestimated HCOOH sources in the boreal ecosystem. We implemented a vegetative HCOOH source into the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to match our derived gross flux and evaluated the updated model against airborne and spaceborne observations. Model biases in the boundary layer were substantially reduced based on this revised treatment, but biases in the free troposphere remain unexplained.

  13. Constraining future terrestrial carbon cycle projections using observation-based water and carbon flux estimates.

    PubMed

    Mystakidis, Stefanos; Davin, Edouard L; Gruber, Nicolas; Seneviratne, Sonia I

    2016-06-01

    The terrestrial biosphere is currently acting as a sink for about a third of the total anthropogenic CO2  emissions. However, the future fate of this sink in the coming decades is very uncertain, as current earth system models (ESMs) simulate diverging responses of the terrestrial carbon cycle to upcoming climate change. Here, we use observation-based constraints of water and carbon fluxes to reduce uncertainties in the projected terrestrial carbon cycle response derived from simulations of ESMs conducted as part of the 5th phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). We find in the ESMs a clear linear relationship between present-day evapotranspiration (ET) and gross primary productivity (GPP), as well as between these present-day fluxes and projected changes in GPP, thus providing an emergent constraint on projected GPP. Constraining the ESMs based on their ability to simulate present-day ET and GPP leads to a substantial decrease in the projected GPP and to a ca. 50% reduction in the associated model spread in GPP by the end of the century. Given the strong correlation between projected changes in GPP and in NBP in the ESMs, applying the constraints on net biome productivity (NBP) reduces the model spread in the projected land sink by more than 30% by 2100. Moreover, the projected decline in the land sink is at least doubled in the constrained ensembles and the probability that the terrestrial biosphere is turned into a net carbon source by the end of the century is strongly increased. This indicates that the decline in the future land carbon uptake might be stronger than previously thought, which would have important implications for the rate of increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration and for future climate change.

  14. The carbon cycle in Mexico: past, present and future of C stocks and fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Tortarolo, G.; Friedlingstein, P.; Sitch, S.; Jaramillo, V. J.; Murguía-Flores, F.; Anav, A.; Liu, Y.; Arneth, A.; Arvanitis, A.; Harper, A.; Jain, A.; Kato, E.; Koven, C.; Poulter, B.; Stocker, B. D.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the carbon (C) cycle in Mexico with a process-based approach. We used different available products (satellite data, field measurements, models and flux towers) to estimate C stocks and fluxes in the country at three different time frames: present (defined as the period 2000-2005), the past century (1901-2000) and the remainder of this century (2010-2100). Our estimate of the gross primary productivity (GPP) for the country was 2137 ± 1023 TgC yr-1 and a total C stock of 34 506 ± 7483 TgC, with 20 347 ± 4622 TgC in vegetation and 14 159 ± 3861 in the soil.

    Contrary to other current estimates for recent decades, our results showed that Mexico was a C sink over the period 1990-2009 (+31 TgC yr-1) and that C accumulation over the last century amounted to 1210 ± 1040 TgC. We attributed this sink to the CO2 fertilization effect on GPP, which led to an increase of 3408 ± 1060 TgC, while both climate and land use reduced the country C stocks by -458 ± 1001 and -1740 ± 878 TgC, respectively. Under different future scenarios, the C sink will likely continue over the 21st century, with decreasing C uptake as the climate forcing becomes more extreme. Our work provides valuable insights on relevant driving processes of the C cycle such as the role of drought in drylands (e.g., grasslands and shrublands) and the impact of climate change on the mean residence time of soil C in tropical ecosystems.

  15. The carbon cycle in Mexico: past, present and future of C stocks and fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray-Tortarolo, G.; Friedlingstein, P.; Sitch, S.; Jaramillo, V. J.; Murguía-Flores, F.; Anav, A.; Liu, Y.; Arneth, A.; Arvanitis, A.; Harper, A.; Jain, A.; Kato, E.; Koven, C.; Poulter, B.; Stocker, B. D.; Wiltshire, A.; Zaehle, S.; Zeng, N.

    2015-08-01

    We modelled the carbon (C) cycle in Mexico with a process-based approach. We used different available products (satellite data, field measurements, models and flux towers) to estimate C stocks and fluxes in the country at three different time frames: present (defined as the period 2000-2005), the past century (1901-2000) and the remainder of this century (2010-2100). Our estimate of the gross primary productivity (GPP) for the country was 2137 ± 1023 Tg C yr-1 and a total C stock of 34 506 ± 7483 Tg C, with 20 347 ± 4622 Pg C in vegetation and 14 159 ± 3861 in the soil. Contrary to other current estimates for recent decades, our results showed that Mexico was a C sink over the period 1990-2009 (+31 Tg C yr-1) and that C accumulation over the last century amounted to 1210 ± 1040 Tg C. We attributed this sink to the CO2 fertilization effect on GPP, which led to an increase of 3408 ± 1060 Tg C, while both climate and land use reduced the country C stocks by -458 ± 1001 and -1740 ± 878 Tg C, respectively. Under different future scenarios the C sink will likely continue over 21st century, with decreasing C uptake as the climate forcing becomes more extreme. Our work provides valuable insights on relevant driving processes of the C-cycle such as the role of drought in marginal lands (e.g. grasslands and shrublands) and the impact of climate change on the mean residence time of C in tropical ecosystems.

  16. The inconvenient truth about eddy covariance flux partitioning and implications for global carbon cycle estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Galvagno, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross primary productivity (GPP) are key carbon cycle concepts. Global estimates of ER and GPP are largely based on measurements of the net ecosystem CO2 exchange by means of the eddy covariance method from which ER and GPP are inferred using so-called flux partitioning algorithms. Using a simple two-source model of ecosystem respiration, consisting of an above-ground respiration source driven by simulated air temperature and a below-ground respiration source driven by simulated soil temperature, we demonstrate that the two most popular flux partitioning algorithms are unable to provide unbiased estimates of daytime ER (ignoring any reduction of leaf mitochondrial respiration) and thus GPP. The bias is demonstrated to be either positive or negative and to depend in a complex fashion on the driving temperature, the ratio of above- to below-ground respiration, the respective temperature sensitivities, the soil depth where the below-ground respiration source originates from (and thus phase and amplitude of soil vs. surface temperature) and day length. The insights from the modeling analysis are subject to a reality check using direct measurements of ER at a grassland where measurements of ER were conducted both during night and day using automated opaque chambers. Consistent with the modeling analysis we find that using air temperature to extrapolate from nighttime to daytime conditions overestimates daytime ER (by 20% or ca. 65 gC m-2 over a 100 day study period), while soil temperature results in an underestimation (by 4% or 12 gC m-2). We conclude with practical recommendations for eddy covariance flux partitioning in the context of the FLUXNET project.

  17. Element Cycling and Energy Flux Responses in Ecosystem Simulations Conducted at the Chinese Lunar Palace-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chen; Fu, Yuming; Xie, Beizhen; Wang, Minjuan; Liu, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS) address interactions between organisms and their environment as an integrated system through the study of factors that regulate the pools and fluxes of materials and energy through ecological systems. As a simple model, using BLSS is very important in the investigation of element cycling and energy flux for sustainable development on Earth. A 105-day experiment with a high degree of closure was carried out in this system from February to May, 2014, with three volunteers. The results indicate that 247 g·d-1 carbon was imported into the system from stored food. Most hydrogen is circulated as water, and more than 99% H2O can be lost through leaf transpiration into the atmosphere. A total of 1.8 g·d-1 "unknown oxygen" emerged between the input and output of the plant growth module. For the urine processing module, 20.5% nitrogen was reused and 5.35 g·d-1 was put into the nutrient solution.

  18. C-Myc induced compensated cardiac hypertrophy increases free fatty acid utilization for the citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Olson, Aaron K; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam) injections. Isolated working hearts and (13)Carbon ((13)C)-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing (13)C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (Cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was assessed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contributions in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus Cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc versus Cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to Cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes for the citric acid cycle did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the

  19. Carbon fluxes in an acid rain impacted boreal headwater catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, Anne; Hintze, Simone; Jankovec, Jakub; Sanda, Martin; Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; van Geldern, Robert; Barth, Johannes A. C.

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial carbon export via inland aquatic systems is a key process in the budget of the global carbon cycle. This includes loss of carbon to the atmosphere via gas evasion from rivers or reservoirs as well as carbon fixation in freshwater sediments. Headwater streams are the first endmembers of the transition of carbon between soils, groundwater and surface waters and the atmosphere. In order to quantify these processes the experimental catchment Uhlirska (1.78 km2) located in the northern Czech Republic was studied. Dissolved inorganic, dissolved organic and particulate organic carbon (DIC, DOC, POC) concentrations and isotopes were analyzed in ground-, soil -and stream waters between 2014 and 2015. In addition, carbon dioxide degassing was quantified via a stable isotope modelling approach. Results show a discharge-weighted total carbon export of 31.99 g C m-2 yr-1 of which CO2 degassing accounts 79 %. Carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) of DIC, DOC, and POC (in ‰ VPDB) ranged from -26.6 to -12.4 ‰ from -29.4 to -22.7 ‰ and from -30.6 to -26.6 ‰ respectively. The mean values for DIC are -21.8 ±3.8 ‰ -23.6 ±0.9 ‰ and -19.5 ±3.0 ‰ for soil, shallow ground and surface water compartments. For DOC, these compartments have mean values of -27.1 ±0.3 ‰ -27.0 ±0.8 ‰ and -27.4 ±0.7 ‰Ṁean POC value of shallow groundwaters and surface waters are -28.8 ±0.8 ‰ and -29.3 ±0.5 ‰ respectively. These isotope ranges indicate little turnover of organic material and predominant silicate weathering. The degassing of CO2 caused an enrichment of the δ13C-DIC values of up to 6.8 ‰ between a catchment gauge and the catchment outlet over a distance of 866 m. In addition, the Uhlirska catchment has only negligible natural sources of sulphate, yet SO42- accounts for 21 % of major stream water ions. This is most likely a remainder from acid rain impacts in the area.

  20. Thioredoxin, a master regulator of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Daloso, Danilo M; Müller, Karolin; Obata, Toshihiro; Florian, Alexandra; Tohge, Takayuki; Bottcher, Alexandra; Riondet, Christophe; Bariat, Laetitia; Carrari, Fernando; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Buchanan, Bob B; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2015-03-17

    Plant mitochondria have a fully operational tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that plays a central role in generating ATP and providing carbon skeletons for a range of biosynthetic processes in both heterotrophic and photosynthetic tissues. The cycle enzyme-encoding genes have been well characterized in terms of transcriptional and effector-mediated regulation and have also been subjected to reverse genetic analysis. However, despite this wealth of attention, a central question remains unanswered: "What regulates flux through this pathway in vivo?" Previous proteomic experiments with Arabidopsis discussed below have revealed that a number of mitochondrial enzymes, including members of the TCA cycle and affiliated pathways, harbor thioredoxin (TRX)-binding sites and are potentially redox-regulated. We have followed up on this possibility and found TRX to be a redox-sensitive mediator of TCA cycle flux. In this investigation, we first characterized, at the enzyme and metabolite levels, mutants of the mitochondrial TRX pathway in Arabidopsis: the NADP-TRX reductase a and b double mutant (ntra ntrb) and the mitochondrially located thioredoxin o1 (trxo1) mutant. These studies were followed by a comparative evaluation of the redistribution of isotopes when (13)C-glucose, (13)C-malate, or (13)C-pyruvate was provided as a substrate to leaves of mutant or WT plants. In a complementary approach, we evaluated the in vitro activities of a range of TCA cycle and associated enzymes under varying redox states. The combined dataset suggests that TRX may deactivate both mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase and activate the cytosolic ATP-citrate lyase in vivo, acting as a direct regulator of carbon flow through the TCA cycle and providing a mechanism for the coordination of cellular function.

  1. Glucose metabolic flux distribution of Lactobacillus amylophilus during lactic acid production using kitchen waste saccharified solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Qunhui; Zou, Hui; Liu, Yingying; Wang, Juan; Gan, Kemin; Xiang, Juan

    2013-11-01

    The (13) C isotope tracer method was used to investigate the glucose metabolic flux distribution and regulation in Lactobacillus amylophilus to improve lactic acid production using kitchen waste saccharified solution (KWSS). The results demonstrate that L. amylophilus is a homofermentative bacterium. In synthetic medium, 60.6% of the glucose entered the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) to produce lactic acid, whereas 36.4% of the glucose entered the pentose phosphate metabolic pathway (HMP). After solid-liquid separation of the KWSS, the addition of Fe(3+) during fermentation enhanced the NADPH production efficiency and increased the NADH content. The flux to the EMP was also effectively increased. Compared with the control (60.6% flux to EMP without Fe(3+) addition), the flux to the EMP with the addition of Fe(3+) (74.3%) increased by 23.8%. In the subsequent pyruvate metabolism, Fe(3+) also increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, and inhibited alcohol dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase, thereby increasing the lactic acid production to 9.03 g l(-1) , an increase of 8% compared with the control. All other organic acid by-products were lower than in the control. However, the addition of Zn(2+) showed an opposite effect, decreasing the lactic acid production. In conclusion it is feasible and effective means using GC-MS, isotope experiment and MATLAB software to integrate research the metabolic flux distribution of lactic acid bacteria, and the results provide the theoretical foundation for similar metabolic flux distribution.

  2. Commercial Alloys for Sulfuric Acid Vaporization in Thermochemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas M. Lillo; Karen M. Delezene-Briggs

    2005-10-01

    Most thermochemical cycles being considered for producing hydrogen include a processing stream in which dilute sulfuric acid is concentrated, vaporized and then decomposed over a catalyst. The sulfuric acid vaporizer is exposed to highly aggressive conditions. Liquid sulfuric acid will be present at a concentration of >96 wt% (>90 mol %) H2SO4 and temperatures exceeding 400oC [Brown, et. al, 2003]. The system will also be pressurized, 0.7-3.5 MPa, to keep the sulfuric acid in the liquid state at this temperature and acid concentration. These conditions far exceed those found in the commercial sulfuric acid generation, regeneration and handling industries. Exotic materials, e.g. ceramics, precious metals, clad materials, etc., have been proposed for this application [Wong, et. al., 2005]. However, development time, costs, reliability, safety concerns and/or certification issues plague such solutions and should be considered as relatively long-term, optimum solutions. A more cost-effective (and relatively near-term) solution would be to use commercially-available metallic alloys to demonstrate the cycle and study process variables. However, the corrosion behavior of commercial alloys in sulfuric acid is rarely characterized above the natural boiling point of concentrated sulfuric acid (~250oC at 1 atm). Therefore a screening study was undertaken to evaluate the suitability of various commercial alloys for concentration and vaporization of high-temperature sulfuric acid. Initially alloys were subjected to static corrosion tests in concentrated sulfuric acid (~95-97% H2SO4) at temperatures and exposure times up to 200oC and 480 hours, respectively. Alloys with a corrosion rate of less than 5 mm/year were then subjected to static corrosion tests at a pressure of 1.4 MPa and temperatures up to 375oC. Exposure times were shorter due to safety concerns and ranged from as short as 5 hours up to 144 hours. The materials evaluated included nickel-, iron- and cobalt

  3. 2-Oxoglutarate: linking TCA cycle function with amino acid, glucosinolate, flavonoid, alkaloid, and gibberellin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Wagner L.; Martins, Auxiliadora O.; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Tohge, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) is used as an obligatory substrate in a range of oxidative reactions catalyzed by 2-OG-dependent dioxygenases. These enzymes are widespread in nature being involved in several important biochemical processes. We have recently demonstrated that tomato plants in which the TCA cycle enzyme 2-OG dehydrogenase (2-ODD) was antisense inhibited were characterized by early senescence and modified fruit ripening associated with differences in the levels of bioactive gibberellin (GA). Accordingly, there is now compelling evidence that the TCA cycle plays an important role in modulating the rate of flux from 2-OG to amino acid metabolism. Here we discuss recent advances in the biochemistry and molecular biology of 2-OG metabolism occurring in different biological systems indicating the importance of 2-OG and 2-OG dependent dioxygenases not only in glucosinolate, flavonoid and alkaloid metabolism but also in GA and amino acid metabolism. We additionally summarize recent findings regarding the impact of modification of 2-OG metabolism on biosynthetic pathways involving 2-ODDs. PMID:25360142

  4. Load and Pi control flux through the branched kinetic cycle of myosin V.

    PubMed

    Kad, Neil M; Trybus, Kathleen M; Warshaw, David M

    2008-06-20

    Myosin V is a processive actin-based motor protein that takes multiple 36-nm steps to deliver intracellular cargo to its destination. In the laser trap, applied load slows myosin V heavy meromyosin stepping and increases the probability of backsteps. In the presence of 40 mm phosphate (P(i)), both forward and backward steps become less load-dependent. From these data, we infer that P(i) release commits myosin V to undergo a highly load-dependent transition from a state in which ADP is bound to both heads and its lead head trapped in a pre-powerstroke conformation. Increasing the residence time in this state by applying load increases the probability of backstepping or detachment. The kinetics of detachment indicate that myosin V can detach from actin at two distinct points in the cycle, one of which is turned off by the presence of P(i). We propose a branched kinetic model to explain these data. Our model includes P(i) release prior to the most load-dependent step in the cycle, implying that P(i) release and load both act as checkpoints that control the flux through two parallel pathways.

  5. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and citric acid cycle intermediates during high cardiac power generation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naveen; Okere, Isidore C; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; McElfresh, Tracy A; King, Kristen L; Sterk, Joseph P; Huang, Hazel; Chandler, Margaret P; Stanley, William C

    2005-01-15

    A high rate of cardiac work increases citric acid cycle (CAC) turnover and flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH); however, the mechanisms for these effects are poorly understood. We tested the hypotheses that an increase in cardiac energy expenditure: (1) activates PDH and reduces the product/substrate ratios ([NADH]/[NAD(+)] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH]); and (2) increases the content of CAC intermediates. Measurements were made in anaesthetized pigs under control conditions and during 15 min of a high cardiac workload induced by dobutamine (Dob). A third group was made hyperglycaemic (14 mm) to stimulate flux through PDH during the high work state (Dob + Glu). Glucose and fatty acid oxidation were measured with (14)C-glucose and (3)H-oleate. Compared with control, the high workload groups had a similar increase in myocardial oxygen consumption ( and cardiac power. Dob increased PDH activity and glucose oxidation above control, but did not reduce the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] and [acetyl-CoA]/[CoA-SH] ratios, and there were no differences between the Dob and Dob + Glu groups. An additional group was treated with Dob + Glu and oxfenicine (Oxf) to inhibit fatty acid oxidation: this increased [CoA-SH] and glucose oxidation compared with Dob; however, there was no further activation of PDH or decrease in the [NADH]/[NAD(+)] ratio. Content of the 4-carbon CAC intermediates succinate, fumarate and malate increased 3-fold with Dob, but there was no change in citrate content, and the Dob + Glu and Dob + Glu + Oxf groups were not different from Dob. In conclusion, compared with normal conditions, at high myocardial energy expenditure (1) the increase in flux through PDH is regulated by activation of the enzyme complex and continues to be partially controlled through inhibition by fatty acid oxidation, and (2) there is expansion of the CAC pool size at the level of 4-carbon intermediates that is largely independent of myocardial fatty acid oxidation.

  6. A dynamo theory prediction for solar cycle 22 - Sunspot number, radio flux, exospheric temperature, and total density at 400 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Hedin, A. E.

    1984-01-01

    Using the 'dynamo theory' method to predict solar activity, a value for the smoothed sunspot number of 109 + or - 20 is obtained for solar cycle 22. The predicted cycle is expected to peak near December, 1990 + or - 1 year. Concommitantly, F(10.7) radio flux is expected to reach a smoothed value of 158 + or - 18 flux units. Global mean exospheric temperature is expected to reach 1060 + or - 50 K and global total average total thermospheric density at 400 km is expected to reach 4.3 x 10 to the -15th gm/cu cm + or - 25 percent.

  7. A dynamo theory prediction for solar cycle 22: Sunspot number, radio flux, exospheric temperature, and total density at 400 km

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Hedin, A. E.

    1986-01-01

    Using the dynamo theory method to predict solar activity, a value for the smoothed sunspot number of 109 + or - 20 is obtained for solar cycle 22. The predicted cycle is expected to peak near December, 1990 + or - 1 year. Concommitantly, F(10.7) radio flux is expected to reach a smoothed value of 158 + or - 18 flux units. Global mean exospheric temperature is expected to reach 1060 + or - 50 K and global total average total thermospheric density at 400 km is expected to reach 4.3 x 10 to the -15th gm/cu cm + or - 25 percent.

  8. Modeling and Simulations for the High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle 400

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Germina; Chandler, David; Ade, Brian J; Sunny, Eva E; Betzler, Benjamin R; Pinkston, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    A concerted effort over the past few years has been focused on enhancing the core model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), as part of a comprehensive study for HFIR conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. At this time, the core model used to perform analyses in support of HFIR operation is an MCNP model for the beginning of Cycle 400, which was documented in detail in a 2005 technical report. A HFIR core depletion model that is based on current state-of-the-art methods and nuclear data was needed to serve as reference for the design of an LEU fuel for HFIR. The recent enhancements in modeling and simulations for HFIR that are discussed in the present report include: (1) revision of the 2005 MCNP model for the beginning of Cycle 400 to improve the modeling data and assumptions as necessary based on appropriate primary reference sources HFIR drawings and reports; (2) improvement of the fuel region model, including an explicit representation for the involute fuel plate geometry that is characteristic to HFIR fuel; and (3) revision of the Monte Carlo-based depletion model for HFIR in use since 2009 but never documented in detail, with the development of a new depletion model for the HFIR explicit fuel plate representation. The new HFIR models for Cycle 400 are used to determine various metrics of relevance to reactor performance and safety assessments. The calculated metrics are compared, where possible, with measurement data from preconstruction critical experiments at HFIR, data included in the current HFIR safety analysis report, and/or data from previous calculations performed with different methods or codes. The results of the analyses show that the models presented in this report provide a robust and reliable basis for HFIR analyses.

  9. Life-cycle assessment of net greenhouse-gas flux for bioenergy cropping systems.

    PubMed

    Adler, Paul R; Del Grosso, Stephen J; Parton, William J

    2007-04-01

    Bioenergy cropping systems could help offset greenhouse gas emissions, but quantifying that offset is complex. Bioenergy crops offset carbon dioxide emissions by converting atmospheric CO2 to organic C in crop biomass and soil, but they also emit nitrous oxide and vary in their effects on soil oxidation of methane. Growing the crops requires energy (e.g., to operate farm machinery, produce inputs such as fertilizer) and so does converting the harvested product to usable fuels (feedstock conversion efficiency). The objective of this study was to quantify all these factors to determine the net effect of several bioenergy cropping systems on greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions. We used the DAYCENT biogeochemistry model to assess soil GHG fluxes and biomass yields for corn, soybean, alfalfa, hybrid poplar, reed canarygrass, and switchgrass as bioenergy crops in Pennsylvania, USA. DAYCENT results were combined with estimates of fossil fuels used to provide farm inputs and operate agricultural machinery and fossil-fuel offsets from biomass yields to calculate net GHG fluxes for each cropping system considered. Displaced fossil fuel was the largest GHG sink, followed by soil carbon sequestration. N20 emissions were the largest GHG source. All cropping systems considered provided net GHG sinks, even when soil C was assumed to reach a new steady state and C sequestration in soil was not counted. Hybrid poplar and switchgrass provided the largest net GHG sinks, >200 g CO2e-C x m(-2) x yr(-1) for biomass conversion to ethanol, and >400 g CO2e-C x m(-2) x yr(-1) for biomass gasification for electricity generation. Compared with the life cycle of gasoline and diesel, ethanol and biodiesel from corn rotations reduced GHG emissions by approximately 40%, reed canarygrass by approximately 85%, and switchgrass and hybrid poplar by approximately 115%.

  10. Varicella-Zoster Virus Infectious Cycle: ER Stress, Autophagic Flux, and Amphisome-Mediated Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Grose, Charles; Buckingham, Erin M.; Carpenter, John E.; Kunkel, Jeremy P.

    2016-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) induces abundant autophagy. Of the nine human herpesviruses, the VZV genome is the smallest (~124 kbp), lacking any known inhibitors of autophagy, such as the herpes simplex virus ICP34.5 neurovirulence gene. Therefore, this review assesses the evidence for VZV-induced cellular stress, endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), and autophagic flux during the VZV infectious cycle. Even though VZV is difficult to propagate in cell culture, the biosynthesis of the both N- and O-linked viral glycoproteins was found to be abundant. In turn, this biosynthesis provided evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, including a greatly enlarged ER and a greatly diminished production of cellular glycoproteins. Other signs of ER stress following VZV infection included detection of the alternatively spliced higher-molecular-weight form of XBP1 as well as CHOP. VZV infection in cultured cells leads to abundant autophagosome production, as was visualized by the detection of the microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II). The degree of autophagy induced by VZV infection is comparable to that induced in uninfected cells by serum starvation. The inhibition of autophagic flux by chemicals such as 3-methyladenine or ATG5 siRNA, followed by diminished virus spread and titers, has been observed. Since the latter observation pointed to the virus assembly/trafficking compartments, we purified VZ virions by ultracentrifugation and examined the virion fraction for components of the autophagy pathway. We detected LC3-II protein (an autophagy marker) as well as Rab11 protein, a component of the endosomal pathway. We also observed that the virion-containing vesicles were single-walled; thus, they are not autophagosomes. These results suggested that some VZ virions after secondary envelopment were transported to the outer cell membrane in a vesicle derived from both the autophagy and endosomal pathways, such as an amphisome. Thus, these

  11. CO2 fluxes exchanged by a 4-year crop rotation cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubinet, M.; Moureaux, C.; Bodson, B.; Dufranne, D.; Heinesch, B.; Suleau, M.; Vancutsem, F.; Vilret, A.

    2009-04-01

    This study analyses carbon fluxes exchanged by a production crop during a four year cycle. Between 2004 and 2008, the successive crops were sugar beet, winter wheat, potato and again winter wheat. Eddy covariance, automatic and manual soil chamber, leaf diffusion and biomass measurements were performed continuously in order to obtain the daily and seasonal Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), Gross Primary Productivity (GPP), Total Ecosystem Respiration (TER), Net Primary Productivity (NPP), Autotrophic Respiration, Heterotrophic Respiration and Net Biome Production (NBP). The whole cycle budget showed that NEE was negative and the rotation behaved as a sink of 1.59 kgC m-2 over the 4-year rotation. However, if exports were deducted from the budget, the crop would become a small source of 0.22 (+/- 0.14) kgC m-2, which also suggests that the crop soil carbon content decreased. This could partly be explained by the crop management, as neither farmyard manure nor slurry had been applied to the crop for more than 10 years and as cereal straw had been systematically exported for livestock. This result is also strongly dependent on climate: the fluxes were subjected to a large inter-annual variability due to differences between crops but also to climate variability. In particular, the mild winter and the dry spring underwent in 2007 induced an increase of the biomass fraction that returned to the soil, at the expense of harvested biomass. If 2007 had been a ‘normal' year, the carbon emission by the crop rotation would have been twice as great. This is analysed more in detail in a companion presentation (Dufranne et al., this session). The impacts of some farmer interventions were quantified. In particular, the impact of ploughing was found to be limited both in intensity (1 to 2 micromol m-2 s-1) and duration (not more than 1 day). Seasonal budgets showed that, during cropping periods, the TER/GPP ratio varied between 40 and 60% and that TER was dominated mainly by the

  12. Inverse relationship of leucine flux and oxidation to free fatty acid availability in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Tessari, P; Nissen, S L; Miles, J M; Haymond, M W

    1986-01-01

    To determine the effect of fatty acid availability on leucine metabolism, 14-h fasted dogs were infused with either glycerol or triglyceride plus heparin, and 46-h fasted dogs were infused with either nicotinic acid or nicotinic acid plus triglyceride and heparin. Leucine metabolism was assessed using a simultaneous infusion of L-[4,5-3H]leucine and alpha-[1-14C]ketoisocaproate. Leucine, alpha-ketoisocaproate (KIC), and totalleucine carbon (leucine plus KIC) flux and oxidation rates were calculated at steady state. In 14-h fasted animals, infusion of triglyceride and heparin increased plasma free fatty acids (FFA) by 0.7 mM (P less than 0.01) and decreased leucine (P less than 0.01), total leucine carbon flux (P less than 0.02), and oxidation (P less than 0.05). The estimated rate of leucine utilization not accounted for by oxidation and KIC flux decreased, but the changes were not significant. During glycerol infusion, leucine and KIC flux and oxidation did not change. In 46-h fasted dogs, nicotinic acid decreased FFA by 1.0 mM (P less than 0.01) and increased (P less than 0.05) the rate of leucine and total leucine carbon flux, but did not affect KIC flux. Leucine oxidation increased (P less than 0.01) by nearly threefold, whereas nonoxidized leucine utilization decreased. Infusion of triglyceride plus heparin together with nicotinic acid blunted some of the responses observed with nicotinic acid alone. In that changes in oxidation under steady state condition reflect changes in net leucine balance, these data suggest that FFA availability may positively affect the sparing of at least one essential amino acid and may influence whole body protein metabolism. PMID:3080479

  13. Maintenance Carbon Cycle in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, William H.; Severson, Ray F.; Black, Clanton C.

    1985-01-01

    The reciprocal relationship between diurnal changes in organic acid and storage carbohydrate was examined in the leaves of three Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. It was found that depletion of leaf hexoses at night was sufficient to account quantitatively for increase in malate in Ananas comosus but not in Sedum telephium or Kalanchoë daigremontiana. Fructose and to a lesser extent glucose underwent the largest changes. Glucose levels in S. telephium leaves oscillated diurnally but were not reciprocally related to malate fluctuations. Analysis of isolated protoplasts and vacuoles from leaves of A. comosus and S. telephium revealed that vacuoles contain a large percentage (>50%) of the protoplast glucose, fructose and malate, citrate, isocitrate, ascorbate and succinate. Sucrose, a major constituent of intact leaves, was not detectable or was at extremely low levels in protoplasts and vacuoles from both plants. In isolated vacuoles from both A. comosus and S. telephium, hexose levels decreased at night at the same time malate increased. Only in A. comosus, however, could hexose metabolism account for a significant amount of the nocturnal increase in malate. We conclude that, in A. comosus, soluble sugars are part of the daily maintenance carbon cycle and that the vacuole plays a dynamic role in the diurnal carbon assimilation cycle of this Crassulacean acid metabolism plant. PMID:16664005

  14. Bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) system for nucleic acid quantification assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassibi, Arjang; Lee, Thomas H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Pourmand, Nader

    2003-07-01

    A new label-free methodology for nucleic acid quantification has been developed where the number of pyrophosphate molecules (PPi) released during polymerization of the target nucleic acid is counted and correlated to DNA copy number. The technique uses the enzymatic complex of ATP-sulfurylase and firefly luciferase to generate photons from PPi. An enzymatic unity gain positive feedback is also implemented to regenerate the photon generation process and compensate any decay in light intensity by self regulation. Due to this positive feedback, the total number of photons generated by the bioluminescence regenerative cycle (BRC) can potentially be orders of magnitude higher than typical chemiluminescent processes. A system level kinetic model that incorporates the effects of contaminations and detector noise was used to show that the photon generation process is in fact steady and also proportional to the nucleic acid quantity. Here we show that BRC is capable of detecting quantities of DNA as low as 1 amol (10-18 mole) in 40μlit aqueous solutions, and this enzymatic assay has a controllable dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude. The sensitivity of this technology, due to the excess number of photons generated by the regenerative cycle, is not constrained by detector performance, but rather by possible PPi or ATP (adenosine triphosphate) contamination, or background bioluminescence of the enzymatic complex.

  15. Connecting the dots: linking nitrogen cycle gene expression to nitrogen fluxes in marine sediment mesocosms

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Jennifer L.; Babbin, Andrew R.; Kearns, Patrick J.; Ward, Bess B.

    2014-01-01

    Connecting molecular information directly to microbial transformation rates remains a challenge, despite the availability of molecular methods to investigate microbial biogeochemistry. By combining information on gene abundance and expression for key genes with quantitative modeling of nitrogen fluxes, we can begin to understand the scales on which genetic signals vary and how they relate to key functions. We used quantitative PCR of DNA and cDNA, along with biogeochemical modeling to assess how the abundance and expression of microbes responsible for two steps in the nitrogen cycle changed over time in estuarine sediment mesocosms. Sediments and water were collected from coastal Massachusetts and maintained in replicated 20 L mesocosms for 45 days. Concentrations of all major inorganic nitrogen species were measured daily and used to derive rates of nitrification and denitrification from a Monte Carlo-based non-negative least-squares analysis of finite difference equations. The mesocosms followed a classic regeneration sequence in which ammonium released from the decomposition of organic matter was subsequently oxidized to nitrite and then further to nitrate, some portion of which was ultimately denitrified. Normalized abundances of ammonia oxidizing archaeal ammonia monoxoygenase (amoA) transcripts closely tracked rates of ammonia oxidation throughout the experiment. No such relationship, however, was evident between denitrification rates and the normalized abundance of nitrite reductase (nirS and nirK) transcripts. These findings underscore the complexity of directly linking the structure of the microbial community to rates of biogeochemical processes. PMID:25191309

  16. Ocean Carbon Cycle Data from the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The U.S. JGOFS program, a component of the U.S Global Change Research Program, grew out of the recommendations of a National Academy of Sciences workshop in 1984. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP). Data are available throughout the U.S. JGOFS web site at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/ and from the U.S. JGOFS Data System at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/jg/dir/jgofs/. Major named segments of the project are: Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) Study, Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Study, Equatorial Pacific Process Study, North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (1989), Arabian Sea Process Study, and the Southern Ocean Process Study.

  17. Integrated, step-wise, mass-isotopomeric flux analysis of the TCA Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Tiago C.; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Zhao, Xiaojian; Yarborough, Orlando; Sereda, Sam; Shirihai, Orian; Cline, Gary W.; Mason, Graeme; Kibbey, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mass isotopomer multi-ordinate spectral analysis (MIMOSA) is a step-wise flux analysis platform to measure discrete glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolic rates. Importantly, direct citrate synthesis rates were obtained by deconvolving the mass spectra generated from [U-13C6]-D-glucose labeling for position-specific enrichments of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA, oxaloacetate and citrate. Comprehensive steady-state and dynamic analyses of key metabolic rates (pyruvate dehydrogenase, β-oxidation, pyruvate carboxylase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and PEP/pyruvate cycling) were calculated from the position-specific transfer of 13C from sequential precursors to their products. Important limitations of previous techniques were identified. In INS-1 cells, citrate synthase rates correlated with both insulin secretion and oxygen consumption. Pyruvate carboxylase rates were substantially lower than previously reported but showed the highest fold change in response to glucose stimulation. In conclusion, MIMOSA measures key metabolic rates from the precursor/product position-specific transfer of 13C label between metabolites and has broad applicability to any glucose-oxidizing cell. PMID:26411341

  18. C-Myc Induced Compensated Cardiac Hypertrophy Increases Free Fatty Acid Utilization for the Citric Acid Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc-induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam). Isolated working hearts and 13Carbon (13C )-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was confirmed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contribution in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc vs cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the mechanisms whereby this change maintained

  19. Phosphorus constrains accelerated nitrogen cycling in limed acidic forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforest, J. L.; Shaw, A. N.; Kluber, L. A.; Burke, D. J.; Carrino-Kyker, S. R.; Smemo, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic deposition can increase phosphorus (P) limitation by abiotic and biotic means. Soil acidification can remove P from available pools and nitrogen (N) deposition can increase the demand for P. We reason that chronic acidic deposition is promoting P limitation in acidic hardwood forests and thereby altering N cycling. The objectives of this study were to investigate the interactive influence of P availability and soil pH on N and P cycling and availability to determine if the response varies between two physiographic regions experiencing similar chronic acidic deposition. We addressed these objectives by experimentally manipulating soil pH, P, or both in strongly acidic glaciated and unglaciated hardwood forests in eastern Ohio, USA. Our results suggest complex interactions between P, soil pH, and the N cycle. Glaciated soils were found to be more N-saturated with nitrification rates 18 times greater than in unglaciated soils. Elevating pH, with or without added P, doubled nitrification rates in glaciated soils. For unglaciated soils, raising pH increased nitrification 10-fold, but increased nitrification only 5-fold in combination with P. This result suggests raising soil pH lowered the demand of soil N, or directly stimulated nitrifying activity, and that increasing P availability could limit N availability. To various degrees, readily available P was geochemically or biologically immobilized in all treatments, suggesting chronic P deficiency in these ecosystems. Phosphorus immobilization decreased as soil pH was elevated, but elevated P either had no effect (glaciated) or doubled P immobilization rates (unglaciated). These results suggest that raising soil pH reduces microbial P limitation for phosphate, whereas adding P appears to make phosphate scarcer. We suggest that P plays an important role in N transformations and cycling, but appears more important in unglaciated soils than in glaciated soils. Chronic soil acidification may have a greater

  20. Comparison of interannual CO2 fluxes as deduced by inverse modeling and by models of the biogeochemical carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peylin, P.; Bousquet, P.; Lequere, C.; Sitch, S.; Friedlingstein, P.; McKinley, G.; Ciais, P.; Rayner, P.; Gruber, N.

    2003-04-01

    Long record of atmospheric CO2 measurements have recently been used in conjunction with atmospheric transport model to estimate the interannual variation (IAV) of regional CO2 fluxes using inverse procedures (top-down approach). On the other hand, biogeochemical models of land ecosystems and of the ocean carbon cycle, provide direct estimates of these fluxes IAV (bottom-up approach). Reconciling the results from the 2 approaches is a key challenge in order to improve our current knowledge of the global carbon cycle and its major controls. In this study, we compare the fluxes IAV of 2 land biosphere models (SLAVE and LPJ) and of 2 ocean carbon models (OPA-HAMOC3 and MIT) together with an ensemble of inversions, for the 1980-1998 period on a monthly basis. Over land, fairly good agreement appears for major climatic anomalies, like the El-Nino events or the post Pinatubo period, when considering large continental regions. Insight from the model processes that control the IAV (Net Primary Production or Heterotrophic Respiration) will be presented. In particular, the differences between SLAVE and LPJ result from different sensitivity of the models' respiration fluxes to climate variability. For the ocean, extra-tropical areas show large discrepancies with much smaller IAV for the direct models than for the inversions, a feature not present in the tropics. The predominant role of the ocean mixing-layer depth variations in controling the flux IAV will be discuss and illustrated with data collected at the BATS atlantic stations.

  1. Amino Acid Flux from Metabolic Network Benefits Protein Translation: the Role of Resource Availability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Pan; Yang, Yi; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2015-06-09

    Protein translation is a central step in gene expression and affected by many factors such as codon usage bias, mRNA folding energy and tRNA abundance. Despite intensive previous studies, how metabolic amino acid supply correlates with protein translation efficiency remains unknown. In this work, we estimated the amino acid flux from metabolic network for each protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using Flux Balance Analysis. Integrated with the mRNA expression level, protein abundance and ribosome profiling data, we provided a detailed description of the role of amino acid supply in protein translation. Our results showed that amino acid supply positively correlates with translation efficiency and ribosome density. Moreover, with the rank-based regression model, we found that metabolic amino acid supply facilitates ribosome utilization. Based on the fact that the ribosome density change of well-amino-acid-supplied genes is smaller than poorly-amino-acid-supply genes under amino acid starvation, we reached the conclusion that amino acid supply may buffer ribosome density change against amino acid starvation and benefit maintaining a relatively stable translation environment. Our work provided new insights into the connection between metabolic amino acid supply and protein translation process by revealing a new regulation strategy that is dependent on resource availability.

  2. A meta-analysis of soil salinization effects on nitrogen pools, cycles and fluxes in coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghua; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Vereecken, Harry; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2017-03-01

    Salinity intrusion caused by land subsidence resulting from increasing groundwater abstraction, decreasing river sediment loads and increasing sea level because of climate change has caused widespread soil salinization in coastal ecosystems. Soil salinization may greatly alter nitrogen (N) cycling in coastal ecosystems. However, a comprehensive understanding of the effects of soil salinization on ecosystem N pools, cycling processes and fluxes is not available for coastal ecosystems. Therefore, we compiled data from 551 observations from 21 peer-reviewed papers and conducted a meta-analysis of experimental soil salinization effects on 19 variables related to N pools, cycling processes and fluxes in coastal ecosystems. Our results showed that the effects of soil salinization varied across different ecosystem types and salinity levels. Soil salinization increased plant N content (18%), soil NH4(+) (12%) and soil total N (210%), although it decreased soil NO3(-) (2%) and soil microbial biomass N (74%). Increasing soil salinity stimulated soil N2 O fluxes as well as hydrological NH4(+) and NO2(-) fluxes more than threefold, although it decreased the hydrological dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) flux (59%). Soil salinization also increased the net N mineralization by 70%, although salinization effects were not observed on the net nitrification, denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium in this meta-analysis. Overall, this meta-analysis improves our understanding of the responses of ecosystem N cycling to soil salinization, identifies knowledge gaps and highlights the urgent need for studies on the effects of soil salinization on coastal agro-ecosystem and microbial N immobilization. Additional increases in knowledge are critical for designing sustainable adaptation measures to the predicted intrusion of salinity intrusion so that the productivity of coastal agro-ecosystems can be maintained or improved and the N losses and pollution of the natural

  3. Annual cycles of deep-ocean biogeochemical export fluxes in subtropical and subantarctic waters, southwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nodder, Scott D.; Chiswell, Stephen M.; Northcote, Lisa C.

    2016-04-01

    The annual cycles of particle fluxes derived from moored sediment trap data collected during 2000-2012 in subtropical (STW) and subantarctic waters (SAW) east of New Zealand are presented. These observations are the most comprehensive export flux time series from temperate Southern Hemisphere latitudes to date. With high levels of variability, fluxes in SAW were markedly lower than in STW, reflecting the picophytoplankton-dominated communities in the iron-limited, high nutrient-low chlorophyll SAW. Austral spring chlorophyll blooms in surface STW were near synchronous with elevated fluxes of bio-siliceous, carbonate, and organic carbon-rich materials to the deep ocean, probably facilitated by diatom and/or coccolithophorid sedimentation. Lithogenic fluxes were also high in STW, compared to SAW, reflecting proximity to the New Zealand landmass. In contrast, the highest biogenic fluxes in SAW occurred in spring when surface chlorophyll concentrations were low, while highest annual chlorophyll concentrations were in summer with no associated flux increase. We hypothesize that the high spring export in SAW results from subsurface chlorophyll accumulation that is not evident from remote-sensing satellites. This material was also rich in biogenic silica, perhaps related to the preferential export of diatoms and other silica-producing organisms, such as silicoflagellates and radiolarians. Organic carbon fluxes in STW are similar to that of other mesotrophic to oligotrophic waters (˜6-7 mg C m-2 d-1), whereas export from SAW is below the global average (˜3 mg C m-2 d-1). Regional differences in flux across the SW Pacific and Tasman region reflect variations in physical processes and ecosystem structure and function.

  4. The response of streambed nitrogen cycling to spatial and temporal hyporheic vertical flux patterns and associated residence times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. A.; Lautz, L. K.; Hare, D. K.

    2011-12-01

    Small beaver dams enhance the development of patchy micro-environments along the stream corridor by trapping sediment and creating complex streambed morphologies. This generates intricate hyporheic flux patterns that govern the exchange of oxygen and redox sensitive solutes between the water column and the streambed, and exert control on the biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen. Specifically, flowpaths from the stream into the subsurface with low residence times create oxic conditions that favor nitrification, while flowpaths with longer residence times become anoxic and favor denitrification. To investigate these processes we collected vertical profiles of pore water upstream of two beaver dams in Wyoming, USA at nine locations with varied morphology. We sampled pore water to the 0.55 m depth every week for five weeks as stream discharge dropped by 45% and subsequently measured concentrations of dissolved oxygen and several redox sensitive solutes, including nitrate. Additionally, estimates of hyporheic flux along these nine vertical profiles through time were made using high-resolution heat data combined with 1-D heat transport modeling. The data show that areas of rapid, deep hyporheic flux at the glides immediately upstream of the dams were oxygen rich, and were generally sites of moderate net nitrification to at least the 0.35 m depth. These conditions were relatively steady over the study period. Hyporheic zones at sediment bars closest to the dams were hotspots of nitrate production to a depth of 0.35 m, with nitrate concentrations increasing by as much as 400% as vertical flux fell sharply and residence times increased over the study period. In contrast, shallow bars farther upstream from the dams showed increasing fluxes and decreased residence times, which caused a shift from net denitrification to net nitrification over the period at shallow depths. These results support previous work indicating threshold behavior of nitrogen cycling in response to

  5. The impact of electrogenic sulfide oxidation on elemental cycling and solute fluxes in coastal sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Alexandra M. F.; Malkin, Sairah Y.; Hidalgo-Martinez, Silvia; Meysman, Filip J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous sulfide oxidizing cable bacteria are capable of linking the oxidation of free sulfide in deep anoxic layers of marine sediments to the reduction of oxygen or nitrate in surface sediments by conducting electrons over centimeter-scale distances. Previous studies have shown that this newly discovered microbial process, referred to as electrogenic sulfide oxidation (e-SOx), may alter elemental cycling in sediments, but the nature and rates of the resulting biogeochemical transformations and their influence on benthic-pelagic coupling remain largely unknown. Here we quantify changes in sediment geochemistry and solute fluxes at the sediment-water interface as e-SOx develops and declines over time in laboratory incubations of organic-rich sediments from a seasonally hypoxic coastal basin (Marine Lake Grevelingen, The Netherlands). Our results show that e-SOx enhanced sediment O2 consumption and acidified subsurface sediment, resulting in the dissolution of calcium carbonate and iron sulfide minerals in deeper sediment horizons and the associated accumulation of dissolved iron, manganese, and calcium in porewater. Remobilized Fe diffusing upward was reoxidized at the sediment-water interface, producing an amorphous Fe oxide crust, while dissolved Fe diffusing downward was reprecipitated in the form of FeS as it encountered the free sulfide horizon. The development of e-SOx enhanced the diffusive release of dissolved Mn at the sediment-water interface, capped the phosphate efflux, generated a buildup of organic matter in surface sediments, and strongly stimulated the release of alkalinity from the sediment. About 75% of this alkalinity production was associated with net CaCO3 dissolution, while the remaining 25% was attributed to a pumping mechanism that transfers alkalinity from anodic H2S oxidation (an alkalinity sink) in deeper sediments to cathodic O2 reduction (an alkalinity source) near the sediment-water interface. The resulting sediment alkalinity

  6. Identification of a Chemoreceptor for Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Lacal, Jesús; Alfonso, Carlos; Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Rebecca E.; Morel, Bertrand; Conejero-Lara, Francisco; Rivas, Germán; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L.; Krell, Tino

    2010-01-01

    We report the identification of McpS as the specific chemoreceptor for 6 tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and butyrate in Pseudomonas putida. The analysis of the bacterial mutant deficient in mcpS and complementation assays demonstrate that McpS is the only chemoreceptor of TCA cycle intermediates in the strain under study. TCA cycle intermediates are abundantly present in root exudates, and taxis toward these compounds is proposed to facilitate the access to carbon sources. McpS has an unusually large ligand-binding domain (LBD) that is un-annotated in InterPro and is predicted to contain 6 helices. The ligand profile of McpS was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry of purified recombinant LBD (McpS-LBD). McpS recognizes TCA cycle intermediates but does not bind very close structural homologues and derivatives like maleate, aspartate, or tricarballylate. This implies that functional similarity of ligands, such as being part of the same pathway, and not structural similarity is the primary element, which has driven the evolution of receptor specificity. The magnitude of chemotactic responses toward these 7 chemoattractants, as determined by qualitative and quantitative chemotaxis assays, differed largely. Ligands that cause a strong chemotactic response (malate, succinate, and fumarate) were found by differential scanning calorimetry to increase significantly the midpoint of protein unfolding (Tm) and unfolding enthalpy (ΔH) of McpS-LBD. Equilibrium sedimentation studies show that malate, the chemoattractant that causes the strongest chemotactic response, stabilizes the dimeric state of McpS-LBD. In this respect clear parallels exist to the Tar receptor and other eukaryotic receptors, which are discussed. PMID:20498372

  7. Luminal hydrochloric acid stimulates rapid transepithelial ion fluxes in rodent esophageal stratified squamous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Lin, B R; Hsieh, H T; Lee, J M; Lai, I R; Chen, C F; Yu, L C H

    2008-09-01

    It remains unclear whether enhanced ion fluxes occur in the esophageal stratified squamous epithelium upon acid exposure. Rat esophageal tissues devoid of submucosal glands displayed basal short-circuit current (Isc) of 5.03 +/- 1.93 microA/cm(2) and lumen-negative potential difference (PD) in association with net absorption of Na+ and Cl-, and secretion of HCO3(-). Luminal hydrochloric acid (HCl) challenge (pH = 1.6) triggered an acute rise of the Isc and increment of negative PD to seven-fold of baseline, which was diminished in HCO3(-)-free, but not Na+- free buffer. The rise of Isc was inhibited by pretreatment with di-isothiocyanatostilbene-2, 2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) and 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride (EIPA). Topical carbachol, capsaicin, forskolin or CFTR(inh)-172 had no effect on basal Isc.CFTR(inh)-172 did not reduce the acid-increased Isc. Functional ablation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves had no effect on the acid-induced Isc. The phenomenon of enhanced ion fluxes upon acid stimulation was confirmed in human esophageal specimens. Our results demonstrated that the mechanism of acid-induced rapid transepithelial ion fluxes is dependent on the presence of bicarbonate ions as well as functional anion transporters and Na+/H+ exchanger, but independent of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). The capsaicin-sensitive and muscarinic-dependent nerve pathways did not play roles in the mechanism.

  8. Glutamate is the major anaplerotic substrate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle of isolated rumen epithelial and duodenal mucosal cells from beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to determine the contribution of substrates to tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle fluxes in rumen epithelial (REC) and duodenal mucosal (DMC) cells isolated from bulls (n = 6) fed either a 75% forage (HF) or 75% concentrate (HC) diet. In separate incubations, [13C6]glucose, [13C5]glutam...

  9. Design principles of autocatalytic cycles constrain enzyme kinetics and force low substrate saturation at flux branch points

    PubMed Central

    Barenholz, Uri; Davidi, Dan; Reznik, Ed; Bar-On, Yinon; Antonovsky, Niv; Noor, Elad; Milo, Ron

    2017-01-01

    A set of chemical reactions that require a metabolite to synthesize more of that metabolite is an autocatalytic cycle. Here, we show that most of the reactions in the core of central carbon metabolism are part of compact autocatalytic cycles. Such metabolic designs must meet specific conditions to support stable fluxes, hence avoiding depletion of intermediate metabolites. As such, they are subjected to constraints that may seem counter-intuitive: the enzymes of branch reactions out of the cycle must be overexpressed and the affinity of these enzymes to their substrates must be relatively weak. We use recent quantitative proteomics and fluxomics measurements to show that the above conditions hold for functioning cycles in central carbon metabolism of E. coli. This work demonstrates that the topology of a metabolic network can shape kinetic parameters of enzymes and lead to seemingly wasteful enzyme usage. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20667.001 PMID:28169831

  10. Inorganic Nitrogen Cycling in an Extreme Acid Mine Drainage Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnejais, L. H.; Smith, R. L.; Nordstrom, D. K.; Banfield, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    Weathering of the massive sulfide ore body at Iron Mountain, northern California has generated sulfuric acid solutions with pH values ranging from 0.5 to 1, temperatures up to 50°C and high concentrations of toxic metals. Communities of microorganisms catalyze the oxidation of iron and sulfur that generates this extreme environment. The nitrogen requirements of these organisms and the nitrogen cycling within these waters are not understood. By adapting the chemiluminescence detection method of Baeseman (2004) we have constrained the stability of nitrate and nitrite species in acidic, high ferrous iron solutions and have measured a time series of the nitrate concentrations at sites within Iron Mountain. The half-life of nitrite is less than an hour due to reactions with ferrous ions, while nitrate is found at concentrations of up to 10 μM within the mine. By coupling this information with geochemical and microbial community information at each site together with culture enrichment studies using various nitrogen sources we hope to gain insight into the pathways of nitrogen utilization in this extreme environment. References Baeseman, J.L. (2004) Denitrification in acid-impacted mountain stream sediments. Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Colorado, Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering.

  11. The gamma-aminobutyric acid shunt contributes to closing the tricarboxylic acid cycle in Synechocystis sp PCC 6803

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, W; Brune, D; Vermaas, WFJ

    2014-07-16

    A traditional 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex is missing in the cyanobacterial tricarboxylic acid cycle. To determine pathways that convert 2-oxoglutarate into succinate in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, a series of mutant strains, Delta sll1981, Delta slr0370, Delta slr1022 and combinations thereof, deficient in 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase (Sll1981), succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (Slr0370), and/or in gamma-aminobutyrate metabolism (Slr1022) were constructed. Like in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, N-acetylornithine aminotransferase, encoded by slr1022, was shown to also function as gamma-aminobutyrate aminotransferase, catalysing gamma-aminobutyrate conversion to succinic semialdehyde. As succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase converts succinic semialdehyde to succinate, an intact gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is present in Synechocystis. The Delta sll1981 strain, lacking 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase, exhibited a succinate level that was 60% of that in wild type. However, the succinate level in the Delta slr1022 and Delta slr0370 strains and the Delta sll1981/Delta slr1022 and Delta sll1981/Delta slr0370 double mutants was reduced to 20-40% of that in wild type, suggesting that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt has a larger impact on metabolite flux to succinate than the pathway via 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase. C-13-stable isotope analysis indicated that the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt catalysed conversion of glutamate to succinate. Independent of the 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase bypass, the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt is a major contributor to flux from 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate to succinate in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

  12. Generation of high-photon flux-coherent soft x-ray radiation with few-cycle pulses.

    PubMed

    Demmler, Stefan; Rothhardt, Jan; Hädrich, Steffen; Krebs, Manuel; Hage, Arvid; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    We present a tabletop source of coherent soft x-ray radiation with high-photon flux. Two-cycle pulses delivered by a fiber-laser-pumped optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier operating at 180 kHz repetition rate are upconverted via high harmonic generation in neon to photon energies beyond 200 eV. A maximum photon flux of 1.3·10(8) photons/s is achieved within a 1% bandwidth at 125 eV photon energy. This corresponds to a conversion efficiency of ~10(-9), which can be reached due to a gas jet simultaneously providing a high target density and phase matching. Further scaling potential toward higher photon flux as well as higher photon energies are discussed.

  13. Cycle life testing of a 24-V, 15-Ah sealed lead-acid aircraft battery

    SciTech Connect

    Vutetakis, D.G.; Viswanathan, V.V.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents the results of cycle life testing of 24-V, 15-Ah sealed lead-acid batteries intended for use in the B-1B aircraft. Test samples were procured from two different manufacturers and subjected to cycle testing at 33% and 100% depth-of-discharge (DOD). The cycle life at 33% DOD ranged from 500 to 750 cycles. The cycle life at 100% DOD ranged from 160 to 260 cycles.

  14. The seasonal cycle as a mode to diagnose biases in modelled CO2 fluxes in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongwe, N. Precious; Chang, Nicolette; Monteiro, Pedro M. S.

    2016-10-01

    The Southern Ocean forms a key component of the global carbon budget, taking up about 1.0 Pg C yr-1 of anthropogenic CO2 emitted annually (∼10.7 ± 0.5 Pg C yr-1 for 2012). However, despite its importance, it still remains undersampled with respect to surface ocean carbon flux variability, resulting in weak constraints for ocean carbon and carbon - climate models. As a result, atmospheric inversion and coupled physics-biogeochemical ocean models still play a central role in constraining the air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Southern Ocean. A recent synthesis study (Lenton et al., 2013a), however, showed that although ocean biogeochemical models (OBGMs) agree on the mean annual flux of CO2 in the Southern Ocean, they disagree on both amplitude and phasing of the seasonal cycle and compare poorly to observations. In this study, we develop and present a methodological framework to diagnose the controls on the seasonal variability of sea-air CO2 fluxes in model outputs relative to observations. We test this framework by comparing the NEMO-PISCES ocean model ORCA2-LIM2-PISCES to the Takahashi 2009 (T09) CO2 dataset. Here we demonstrate that the seasonal cycle anomaly for CO2 fluxes in ORCA2LP is linked to an underestimation of winter convective CO2 entrainment as well as the impact of biological CO2 uptake during the spring-summer season, relative to T09 observations. This resulted in sea surface temperature (SST) becoming the dominant driver of seasonal scale of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) variability and hence of the differences in the seasonality of CO2 sea-air flux between the model and observations.

  15. The effect of nitrogen enrichment on c(1)-cycling microorganisms and methane flux in salt marsh sediments.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Irina C; Vivanco, Lucía; Bentley, Peris N; Martiny, Jennifer B H

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH(4)) flux from ecosystems is driven by C(1)-cycling microorganisms - the methanogens and the methylotrophs. Little is understood about what regulates these communities, complicating predictions about how global change drivers such as nitrogen enrichment will affect methane cycling. Using a nitrogen addition gradient experiment in three Southern California salt marshes, we show that sediment CH(4) flux increased linearly with increasing nitrogen addition (1.23 μg CH(4) m(-2) day(-1) for each g N m(-2) year(-1) applied) after 7 months of fertilization. To test the reason behind this increased CH(4) flux, we conducted a microcosm experiment altering both nitrogen and carbon availability under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Methanogenesis appeared to be both nitrogen and carbon (acetate) limited. N and C each increased methanogenesis by 18%, and together by 44%. In contrast, methanotrophy was stimulated by carbon (methane) addition (830%), but was unchanged by nitrogen addition. Sequence analysis of the sediment methylotroph community with the methanol dehydrogenase gene (mxaF) revealed three distinct clades that fall outside of known lineages. However, in agreement with the microcosm results, methylotroph abundance (assayed by qPCR) and composition (assayed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis) did not vary across the experimental nitrogen gradient in the field. Together, these results suggest that nitrogen enrichment to salt marsh sediments increases methane flux by stimulating the methanogen community.

  16. Statistical study of low-energy heliosphere particle fluxes from 1.4 to 5 AU over a solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, C.; Reza, J. Z.; Nelson, A. J.; Patterson, J. D.; Armstrong, T. P.; Maclennan, C. G.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2007-07-01

    Throughout the entire Ulysses mission, the Heliosphere Instrument for Spectra, Composition, and Anisotropy at Low Energies (HI-SCALE) has collected measurements of low-energy interplanetary ions and electrons. Time series of electron, proton, and ion fluxes have been obtained since 1990. We present statistical studies of high-resolution ion and electron energy spectra (~50 keV to ~5 MeV) as measured by the HI-SCALE instrument on the Ulysses spacecraft over a time interval longer than a solar cycle (1990 to 2004). Ulysses is the only spacecraft that continually measured the inner (~1.4 to ~5 AU) heliosphere particle population during these years. The data thus provide measures of the lower-energy population of particles that a spacecraft traveling outward from Earth would have encountered and that also could have impacted the atmosphere and surface of Mars and of its satellites during this interval. Comparisons of Ulysses particle fluxes with those from the Electron, Proton, and Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument on the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft (the HI-SCALE backup instrument) have shown that azimuthal and heliolatitude dependencies of particle fluxes in the inner heliosphere following solar events are not as extreme as might be expected. Thus the Ulysses measurements, while taken over a range of heliolatitudes, can provide important statistical information that can be used to estimate the low-energy radiation dosages and potential sputtering fluxes to planetary surfaces and to heliosphere spacecraft surfaces and solar arrays over a solar cycle.

  17. The Effect of Nitrogen Enrichment on C1-Cycling Microorganisms and Methane Flux in Salt Marsh Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Irvine, Irina C.; Vivanco, Lucía; Bentley, Peris N.; Martiny, Jennifer B. H.

    2012-01-01

    Methane (CH4) flux from ecosystems is driven by C1-cycling microorganisms – the methanogens and the methylotrophs. Little is understood about what regulates these communities, complicating predictions about how global change drivers such as nitrogen enrichment will affect methane cycling. Using a nitrogen addition gradient experiment in three Southern California salt marshes, we show that sediment CH4 flux increased linearly with increasing nitrogen addition (1.23 μg CH4 m−2 day−1 for each g N m−2 year−1 applied) after 7 months of fertilization. To test the reason behind this increased CH4 flux, we conducted a microcosm experiment altering both nitrogen and carbon availability under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Methanogenesis appeared to be both nitrogen and carbon (acetate) limited. N and C each increased methanogenesis by 18%, and together by 44%. In contrast, methanotrophy was stimulated by carbon (methane) addition (830%), but was unchanged by nitrogen addition. Sequence analysis of the sediment methylotroph community with the methanol dehydrogenase gene (mxaF) revealed three distinct clades that fall outside of known lineages. However, in agreement with the microcosm results, methylotroph abundance (assayed by qPCR) and composition (assayed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis) did not vary across the experimental nitrogen gradient in the field. Together, these results suggest that nitrogen enrichment to salt marsh sediments increases methane flux by stimulating the methanogen community. PMID:22470369

  18. Modelling of heat flux received by a bubble pump of absorption-diffusion refrigeration cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhmidene, Ali; Chaouachi, Béchir; Gabsi, Slimane; Bourouis, Mahmoud

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, the heat flux received by a bubble pump, which was simulated to a vertical tube 1 m long and with a variable diameter, was optimized. A numerical study was carried out in order to solve balance equations concerning the water-ammonia mixture in the up flow. The two-fluid model was used to derive the equations. A numerical study was carried out on a heat flux between 1 and 70 kW m-2 and the liquid velocity was determined. The optimum flux was determined for a tube diameter equal to 4, 6, 8 and 10 mm and a mass flow rate ranging from 10 to 90 kg m-2 s-1. The optimum heat flux was correlated as a function of the tube diameter and mass flow rate, while the minimum heat flux required for pumping was correlated as a function of the tube diameter.

  19. Tracking the Solar Cycle through IBEX Observations of Energetic Neutral Atom Flux Variations at the Heliospheric Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisenfeld, D. B.; Bzowski, M.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galli, A.; Janzen, P. H.; Karna, N.; Kubiak, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Sokół, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    With seven years of Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observations, from 2009 to 2015, we can now trace the time evolution of heliospheric energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) through over half a solar cycle. At the north and south ecliptic poles, the spacecraft attitude allows for continuous coverage of the ENA flux; thus, signal from these regions has much higher statistical accuracy and time resolution than anywhere else in the sky. By comparing the solar wind dynamic pressure measured at 1 au with the heliosheath plasma pressure derived from the observed ENA fluxes, we show that the heliosheath pressure measured at the poles correlates well with the solar cycle. The analysis requires time-shifting the ENA measurements to account for the travel time out and back from the heliosheath, which allows us to estimate the scale size of the heliosphere in the polar directions. We arrive at an estimated distance to the center of the ENA source region in the north of 220 au and in the south a distance of 190 au. We also find a good correlation between the solar cycle and the ENA energy spectra at the poles. In particular, the ENA flux for the highest IBEX energy channel (4.3 keV) is quite closely correlated with the areas of the polar coronal holes, in both the north and south, consistent with the notion that polar ENAs at this energy originate from pickup ions of the very high speed wind (˜700 km s-1) that emanates from polar coronal holes.

  20. Diurnal cycle of methane flux from a lake, with high emissions during nighttime caused by convection in the water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgrajsek, E.; Sahlee, E.; Rutgersson, A.

    2012-12-01

    Many studies have stressed the importance of lakes as major contributors of methane to the atmosphere (e.g. Bastviken et al 2011). However there is still a lack of continuous long time flux measurements over lakes as well as poor understanding of the magnitude of methane fluxes through ebullition and vegetation pathways. In this study the Eddy covariance method has been used for measuring methane fluxes from a lake in central Sweden. At several occasions during the long time measuring campaign (autumn 2010-autumn 2012), a diurnal cycle of methane, with high fluxes during night and low during day, has been captured. Some of the high flux events during nighttime were comparable in magnitude to what previously only been measured from vegetation regions in lakes at these latitudes (e.g. Kankaala et al 2004) and from tropical reservoirs (e.g. Bastviken 2009). During these occasions the difference between air and water temperature (ΔT=Ta-Tw) also displayed an diurnal cycle, with ΔT being positive during day and negative during night with the corresponding change in the sensible heat flux i.e. negative during daytime and positive during nighttime. The high nighttime methane fluxes could be explained with this difference in air and water temperature, which will cool the water surface during night, creating convective mixing in the lake, while during daytime the water will be stably stratified. Temperature measurements made at different vertical levels in the lake water confirm this water stratification. The nighttime convective mixing may act to disturb the bottom water, triggering methane ebullition events and bringing methane rich water up to the surface, which can be emitted to the atmosphere. With this study we want to emphasis the necessity of introducing also complex physical processes when estimating air-water exchange fluxes and also measure methane fluxes not only at few occasions during daytime but also during night and for longer measuring periods. References

  1. Vascular plant controls on carbon cycling and greenhouse gas fluxes in wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, L.; Christensen, T.

    2003-04-01

    carbon cycling of ecosystems is highly species-specific. In accordance with the field experiment in Greenland we found higher formation rates of acetate in the root vicinity of the Eriophorum species. The data from this experiment, however, also points to the importance of plants as transporters of oxygen to anoxic layers. When 14CH_3-COO^- (which theoretically would result exclusively in 14CH_4 emission if no oxidation to 14CO_2 takes place) was added to monoliths containing these three species E. vaginatum and J. effucum was shown to almost completely oxidize their root vicinity, whereas, C. rostrata did not. At the end of the experiment E. vaginatum and J. effucum had emitted the added 14C to >90% as 14CO_2 and C. rostrata to 70% as 14CH_4. In conclusion, our results point toward a direct and very important linkage between plant species diversity and the functioning of wetland ecosystems and indicate that changes in species composition may alter important processes relating to controls on and interactions between greenhouse gas fluxes with significant implications for feedback mechanisms in a changing climate as result.

  2. Rates of insulin secretion in INS-1 cells are enhanced by coupling to anaplerosis and Kreb's cycle flux independent of ATP synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, Gary W.; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Zhao, Xiaojian; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied media effects on mechanisms of insulin secretion of INS-1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion was higher in DMEM than KRB despite identical ATP synthesis rates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin secretion rates correlated with rates of anaplerosis and TCA cycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitochondria metabolism and substrate cycles augment secretion signal of ATP. -- Abstract: Mechanistic models of glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) established in minimal media in vitro, may not accurately describe the complexity of coupling metabolism with insulin secretion that occurs in vivo. As a first approximation, we have evaluated metabolic pathways in a typical growth media, DMEM as a surrogate in vivo medium, for comparison to metabolic fluxes observed under the typical experimental conditions using the simple salt-buffer of KRB. Changes in metabolism in response to glucose and amino acids and coupling to insulin secretion were measured in INS-1 832/13 cells. Media effects on mitochondrial function and the coupling efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation were determined by fluorometrically measured oxygen consumption rates (OCRs) combined with {sup 31}P NMR measured rates of ATP synthesis. Substrate preferences and pathways into the TCA cycle, and the synthesis of mitochondrial 2nd messengers by anaplerosis were determined by {sup 13}C NMR isotopomer analysis of the fate of [U-{sup 13}C] glucose metabolism. Despite similar incremental increases in insulin secretion, the changes of OCR in response to increasing glucose from 2.5 to 15 mM were blunted in DMEM relative to KRB. Basal and stimulated rates of insulin secretion rates were consistently higher in DMEM, while ATP synthesis rates were identical in both DMEM and KRB, suggesting greater mitochondrial uncoupling in DMEM. The relative rates of anaplerosis, and hence synthesis and export of 2nd messengers from the mitochondria were found

  3. Advances in Acid Concentration Membrane Technology for the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart; Christopher J. Orme

    2006-11-01

    One of the most promising cycles for the thermochemical generation of hydrogen is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) process, where aqueous HI is thermochemically decomposed into H2 and I2 at approximately 350 degrees Celsius. Regeneration of HI is accomplished by the Bunsen reaction (reaction of SO2, water, and iodine to generate H2SO4 and HI). Furthermore, SO2 is regenerated from the decomposition of H2SO4 at 850 degrees Celsius yielding the SO2 as well as O2. Thus, the cycle actually consists of two concurrent oxidation-reduction loops. As HI is regenerated, co-produced H2SO4 must be separated so that each may be decomposed. Current flowsheets employ a large amount (~83 mol% of the entire mixture) of elemental I2 to cause the HI and the H2SO4 to separate into two phases. To aid in the isolation of HI, which is directly decomposed into hydrogen, water and iodine must be removed. Separation of iodine is facilitated by removal of water. Sulfuric acid concentration is also required to facilitate feed recycling to the sulfuric acid decomposer. Decomposition of the sulfuric acid is an equilibrium limited process that leaves a substantial portion of the acid requiring recycle. Distillation of water from sulfuric acid involves significant corrosion issues at the liquid-vapor interface. Thus, it is desirable to concentrate the acid without boiling. Recent efforts at the INL have concentrated on applying pervaporation through Nafion-117, Nafion-112, and sulfonated poly(etheretherketone) (S-PEEK) membranes for the removal of water from HI/water and HI/Iodine/water feedstreams. In pervaporation, a feed is circulated at low pressure across the upstream side of the membrane, while a vacuum is applied downstream. Selected permeants sorb into the membrane, transport through it, and are vaporized from the backside. Thus, a concentration gradient is established, which provides the driving force for transport. In this work, membrane separations have been performed at temperatures as high as

  4. Evidence of Microbial Regulation of Biogeochemical Cycles from a Study on Methane Flux and Land Use Change

    PubMed Central

    Nazaries, Loïc; Pan, Yao; Bodrossy, Levente; Baggs, Elizabeth M.; Millard, Peter; Murrell, J. Colin

    2013-01-01

    Microbes play an essential role in ecosystem functions, including carrying out biogeochemical cycles, but are currently considered a black box in predictive models and all global biodiversity debates. This is due to (i) perceived temporal and spatial variations in microbial communities and (ii) lack of ecological theory explaining how microbes regulate ecosystem functions. Providing evidence of the microbial regulation of biogeochemical cycles is key for predicting ecosystem functions, including greenhouse gas fluxes, under current and future climate scenarios. Using functional measures, stable-isotope probing, and molecular methods, we show that microbial (community diversity and function) response to land use change is stable over time. We investigated the change in net methane flux and associated microbial communities due to afforestation of bog, grassland, and moorland. Afforestation resulted in the stable and consistent enhancement in sink of atmospheric methane at all sites. This change in function was linked to a niche-specific separation of microbial communities (methanotrophs). The results suggest that ecological theories developed for macroecology may explain the microbial regulation of the methane cycle. Our findings provide support for the explicit consideration of microbial data in ecosystem/climate models to improve predictions of biogeochemical cycles. PMID:23624469

  5. The interaction of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle in rat liver in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Heath, D. F.; Threlfall, C. J.

    1968-01-01

    oxaloacetate did not equilibrate with fumarate in either. From this and other findings it was deduced: (b) that malate or fumarate or both left the mitochondrion, and not oxaloacetate; (c) that there was a loss from the mitochondrion of a fraction of the malate or fumarate or both formed from succinate, and (d) the resulting deficiency of oxaloacetate for the perpetuation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle was made up from pyruvate in fed and post-absorptive rats, but (e) in the starved rat could only be made up by utilization of glutamate. (f) In the fed rat the tricarboxylic acid cycle ran mostly on pyruvate, but in the post-absorptive and starved rat mostly on fat. (g) In the injured rat the tricarboxylic acid cycle was slowed, label in oxaloacetate was completely symmetrized (cf. conclusion a), and the tricarboxylic acid cycle utilized glutamate. (h) The conclusions were not invalidated by isotopic exchange, i.e. flux of label without net flux of compound, nor by interaction with lipogenic processes. (i) In the kidneys interaction between the tricarboxylic acid cycle and gluconeogenesis was different from in the liver, and was much less. The effects on the theory were roughly assessed, and were small. 4. The experiments and optimum experimental conditions required to check the theory are listed, and several predictions, open to experimental confirmation, are made. PMID:5726212

  6. The Variation of Solar Fe 14 and Fe 10 Flux over 1.5 Solar Activity Cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altrock, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A new source of data on the solar output, namely limb flux from the one- and two-million degree corona is presented. This parameter is derived from data obtained at the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak with the 40 cm coronagraph of the John W. Evans Solar Facility and the Emission Line Coronal Photometer. The limb flux is defined to be the latitude-averaged intensity in millionths of the brightness of disk center from an annulus of width 1.1 minutes centered at a height of 0.15 solar constant above the limb of emission from lines at 6374A (Fe X) or 5303A (Fe XIV). Fe XIV data have been obtained since 1973 and Fe X since 1984. Examination of the Fe XIV data shows that there is ambiguity in the definition of the last two solar activity minima, which can affect the determination of cycle rise times and lengths. There is an indication that a constant minimum or basal corona may exist at solar minimum. Cycle 22 has had a much faster onset than Cycle 21 and has now overtaken Cycle 21. The rise characteristics of the two cycles were very similar up until Jul. to Aug. 1989, at which time a long-term maximum occurred in Fe X and Fe XIV, which could possibly be the solar maximum. Another maximum is developing at the current time. Cycle 21 was characterized in Fe XIV by at least 4 major thrusts or bursts of activity, each lasting on the order of a year and all having similar maximum limb fluxes which indicates that coronal energy output is sustained over periods in which the sunspot number declines significantly. Dramatic increases in the limb fluxes occur from minimum to maximum, ranging from factors of 14 to 21 in the two lines. Two different techniques to predict the epoch of solar maximum have been applied to the Fe XIV data, resulting in estimates of April 1989 (plus or minus 1 mo) and May 1990 (plus or minus 2 mos).

  7. Coronal mass ejections and solar wind mass fluxes over the heliosphere during solar cycles 23 and 24 (1996-2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, P.; Floyd, O.; Quémerais, E.; Boclet, B.; Ferron, S.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) play a major role in the heliosphere, and their contribution to the solar wind mass flux, already considered in the Skylab and Solwind eras with conflicting results, is reexamined in the light of 19 years (1996-2014) of SOHO observations with the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO-C2) for the CMEs and extended for the first time to all latitudes thanks to the whole-heliosphere data from the Solar Wind ANisotropies (SWAN) instrument supplemented by in situ data aggregated in the OMNI database. First, several mass estimates reported in the ARTEMIS (Automated Recognition of Transient Events and Marseille Inventory from Synoptic maps) catalog of LASCO CMEs are compared with determinations based on the combined observations with the twin STEREO/Sun Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation coronagraphs in order to ascertain their validity. A simple geometric model of the CMEs is introduced to generate Carrington maps of their mass flux and then to produce annualized synoptic maps. The Lyman α SWAN data are inverted to similarly produce synoptic maps to be compared with those of the CME flux. The ratio of the annualized CME to solar wind mass flux is found to closely track the solar cycle over the heliosphere. In the near-ecliptic region and at latitudes up to ˜55°, this ratio was negligibly small during the solar minima of cycles 22/23 and 23/24 and rose to 6% and 5%, respectively, at the maximum of solar cycles 23 and 24. These maximum ratios increased at higher latitudes, but this result is likely biased by the inherent limitation of determining the true latitude of CMEs.

  8. Metabolic engineering in the biotechnological production of organic acids in the tricarboxylic acid cycle of microorganisms: Advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xian; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Organic acids, which are chemically synthesized, are also natural intermediates in the metabolic pathways of microorganisms, among which the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the most crucial route existing in almost all living organisms. Organic acids in the TCA cycle include citric acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, l-malic acid, and oxaloacetate, which are building-block chemicals with wide applications and huge markets. In this review, we summarize the synthesis pathways of these organic acids and review recent advances in metabolic engineering strategies that enhance organic acid production. We also propose further improvements for the production of organic acids with systems and synthetic biology-guided metabolic engineering strategies.

  9. Materials study supporting thermochemical hydrogen cycle sulfuric acid decomposer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Michael S.

    Increasing global climate change has been driven by greenhouse gases emissions originating from the combustion of fossil fuels. Clean burning hydrogen has the potential to replace much of the fossil fuels used today reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere. The sulfur iodine and hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles coupled with high temperature heat from advanced nuclear reactors have shown promise for economical large-scale hydrogen fuel stock production. Both of these cycles employ a step to decompose sulfuric acid to sulfur dioxide. This decomposition step occurs at high temperatures in the range of 825°C to 926°C dependent on the catalysis used. Successful commercial implementation of these technologies is dependent upon the development of suitable materials for use in the highly corrosive environments created by the decomposition products. Boron treated diamond film was a potential candidate for use in decomposer process equipment based on earlier studies concluding good oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. However, little information was available relating the interactions of diamond and diamond films with sulfuric acid at temperatures greater than 350°C. A laboratory scale sulfuric acid decomposer simulator was constructed at the Nuclear Science and Engineering Institute at the University of Missouri-Columbia. The simulator was capable of producing the temperatures and corrosive environments that process equipment would be exposed to for industrialization of the sulfur iodide or hybrid sulfur thermochemical cycles. A series of boron treated synthetic diamonds were tested in the simulator to determine corrosion resistances and suitability for use in thermochemical process equipment. These studies were performed at twenty four hour durations at temperatures between 600°C to 926°C. Other materials, including natural diamond, synthetic diamond treated with titanium, silicon carbide, quartz, aluminum nitride, and Inconel

  10. Competition for amino acid flux among translation, growth and detoxification in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Iolanda; Chelysheva, Irina; Ignatova, Zoya

    2017-03-15

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are central entities for translation that deliver amino acids to the ribosome to translate genetic information in an mRNA-template dependent manner. Recent discoveries from our laboratory show that in E. coli and B. licheniformis, some tRNAs are poorly charged despite the plentiful intracellular cognate amino acid. Specifically, tRNAs carrying amino acids that exert toxicity and inhibit bacterial growth when added separately to the growth medium are poorly charged. Here, we discuss various evolutionary strategies different bacterial cells have adopted to precisely hone the competition between amino acid utilization for translation and proliferation and combat the inhibitory effect towards maximizing bacterial fitness. These data add a new twist to the amino acid flux models and to our understanding of the complex intimate link between dynamics of translation and bacterial growth.

  11. Tissue amino acid flux after exposure of rats to Diplococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Wannemacher, R W; Powanda, M C; Pekarek, R S; Beisel, W R

    1971-11-01

    The concentration of 21 individual free amino acids in serum, liver, and skeletal muscle was determined in rats during the incubation, acute illness, and terminal stages of experimental infection with Diplococcus pneumoniae. By 4 hr after subcutaneous inoculation with bacteria, the concentration of total and many individual free amino acids in serum, liver, and muscle was significantly decreased in comparison to findings in noninfected, pair-fed control rats. By use of a nonmetabolizable amino acid analogue (cycloleucine), it was possible to detect a flux of amino acids from muscle to liver in the infected rat. The endogenous amino acids which moved to the liver were rapidly utilized for the synthesis of serum proteins.

  12. Gluconeogenesis is associated with high rates of tricarboxylic acid and pyruvate cycling in fasting northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Cory D; Houser, Dorian S; Fowler, Melinda A; Costa, Daniel P; Crocker, Daniel E

    2012-08-01

    Animals that endure prolonged periods of food deprivation preserve vital organ function by sparing protein from catabolism. Much of this protein sparing is achieved by reducing metabolic rate and suppressing gluconeogenesis while fasting. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) endure prolonged fasts of up to 3 mo at multiple life stages. During these fasts, elephant seals maintain high levels of activity and energy expenditure associated with breeding, reproduction, lactation, and development while maintaining rates of glucose production typical of a postabsorptive mammal. Therefore, we investigated how fasting elephant seals meet the requirements of glucose-dependent tissues while suppressing protein catabolism by measuring the contribution of glycogenolysis, glycerol, and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to endogenous glucose production (EGP) during their natural 2-mo postweaning fast. Additionally, pathway flux rates associated with the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle were measured specifically, flux through phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and pyruvate cycling. The rate of glucose production decreased during the fast (F(1,13) = 5.7, P = 0.04) but remained similar to that of postabsorptive mammals. The fractional contributions of glycogen, glycerol, and PEP did not change with fasting; PEP was the primary gluconeogenic precursor and accounted for ∼95% of EGP. This large contribution of PEP to glucose production occurred without substantial protein loss. Fluxes through the TCA cycle, PEPCK, and pyruvate cycling were higher than reported in other species and were the most energetically costly component of hepatic carbohydrate metabolism. The active pyruvate recycling fluxes detected in elephant seals may serve to rectify gluconeogeneic PEP production during restricted anaplerotic inflow in these fasting-adapted animals.

  13. The Statistical Properties of Low Energy Heliosphere Particle Fluxes from 1.4 to 5 AU Over a Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, C.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Wang, H.; Maclennan, C. G.; Armstrong, T. P.; Patterson, J. D.

    We present statistical studies of high resolution ion and electron energy spectra sim 50 keV to sim 5 MeV as measured by the HI-SCALE instrument on the Ulysses spacecraft over a time interval longer than a solar cycle from launch in 1990 to nearly the present Ulysses was the only spacecraft that continually measured the inner sim 1 4 to sim 5 AU heliosphere particle population during these years The data thus provide measures of the lower energy population of particles that a spacecraft traveling outward from Earth would have encountered and that also impacted the atmosphere and surface of Mars and the surfaces of the Martian satellites Phobos and Deimos during this interval Comparisons of Ulysses particle fluxes with those from the EPAM instrument on the ACE spacecraft the HI-SCALE back-up instrument have shown that it is common for the particle fluxes in the inner heliosphere following solar events to be distributed quite uniformly in heliolatitude Thus the Ulysses measurements while taken over a range of heliolatitudes can provide important statistical information that can be used to estimate the low energy radiation dosages and potential sputtering fluxes to planetary surfaces and to heliosphere spacecraft surfaces and solar arrays over a solar cycle

  14. Crassulacean acid metabolism-cycling in Euphorbia milii

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) occurs in many Euphorbiaceae, particularly Euphorbia, a genus with C3 and C4 species as well. With the aim of contributing to our knowledge of the evolution of CAM in this genus, this study examined the possible occurrence of CAM in Euphorbia milii, a species with leaf succulence and drought tolerance suggestive of this carbon fixation pathway. Leaf anatomy consisted of a palisade parenchyma, a spongy parenchyma and a bundle sheath with chloroplasts, which indicates the possible functioning of C2 photosynthesis. No evidence of nocturnal CO2 fixation was found in plants of E. milii either watered or under drought; watered plants had a low nocturnal respiration rate (R). After 12 days without watering, the photosynthetic rate (PN) decreased 85 % and nocturnal R was nearly zero. Nocturnal H+ accumulation (ΔH+) in watered plants was 18 ± 2 (corresponding to malate) and 18 ± 4 (citrate) μmol H+ (g fresh mass)−1. Respiratory CO2 recycling through acid synthesis contributed to a night-time water saving of 2 and 86 % in watered plants and plants under drought, respectively. Carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) was −25.2 ± 0.7 ‰ in leaves and −24.7 ± 0.1 ‰ in stems. Evidence was found for the operation of weak CAM in E. milii, with statistically significant ΔH+, no nocturnal CO2 uptake and values of δ13C intermediate between C3 and constitutive CAM plants; ΔH+ was apparently attributable to both malate and citrate. The results suggest that daily malate accumulation results from recycling of part of the nocturnal respiratory CO2, which helps explain the occurrence of an intermediate value of leaf δ13C. Euphorbia milii can be considered as a CAM-cycling species. The significance of the operation of CAM-cycling in E. milii lies in water conservation, rather than carbon acquisition. The possible occurrence of C2 photosynthesis merits research. PMID:23596548

  15. Orbital pacing of carbon fluxes by a ∼9-My eccentricity cycle during the Mesozoic.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Mathieu; Dera, Guillaume

    2015-10-13

    Eccentricity, obliquity, and precession are cyclic parameters of the Earth's orbit whose climatic implications have been widely demonstrated on recent and short time intervals. Amplitude modulations of these parameters on million-year time scales induce "grand orbital cycles," but the behavior and the paleoenvironmental consequences of these cycles remain debated for the Mesozoic owing to the chaotic diffusion of the solar system in the past. Here, we test for these cycles from the Jurassic to the Early Cretaceous by analyzing new stable isotope datasets reflecting fluctuations in the carbon cycle and seawater temperatures. Our results document a prominent cyclicity of ∼9 My in the carbon cycle paced by changes in the seasonal dynamics of hydrological processes and long-term sea level fluctuations. These paleoenvironmental changes are linked to a great eccentricity cycle consistent with astronomical solutions. The orbital forcing signal was mainly amplified by cumulative sequestration of organic matter in the boreal wetlands under greenhouse conditions. Finally, we show that the ∼9-My cycle faded during the Pliensbachian, which could either reflect major paleoenvironmental disturbances or a chaotic transition affecting this cycle.

  16. Orbital pacing of carbon fluxes by a ∼9-My eccentricity cycle during the Mesozoic

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Mathieu; Dera, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    Eccentricity, obliquity, and precession are cyclic parameters of the Earth’s orbit whose climatic implications have been widely demonstrated on recent and short time intervals. Amplitude modulations of these parameters on million-year time scales induce ‟grand orbital cycles,” but the behavior and the paleoenvironmental consequences of these cycles remain debated for the Mesozoic owing to the chaotic diffusion of the solar system in the past. Here, we test for these cycles from the Jurassic to the Early Cretaceous by analyzing new stable isotope datasets reflecting fluctuations in the carbon cycle and seawater temperatures. Our results document a prominent cyclicity of ∼9 My in the carbon cycle paced by changes in the seasonal dynamics of hydrological processes and long-term sea level fluctuations. These paleoenvironmental changes are linked to a great eccentricity cycle consistent with astronomical solutions. The orbital forcing signal was mainly amplified by cumulative sequestration of organic matter in the boreal wetlands under greenhouse conditions. Finally, we show that the ∼9-My cycle faded during the Pliensbachian, which could either reflect major paleoenvironmental disturbances or a chaotic transition affecting this cycle. PMID:26417080

  17. Carbon dioxide flux from rice paddy soils in central China: effects of intermittent flooding and draining cycles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Wan, Kai-yuan; Tao, Yong; Li, Zhi-guo; Zhang, Guo-shi; Li, Shuang-lai; Chen, Fang

    2013-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to (i) examine the diurnal and seasonal soil carbon dioxide (CO(2)) fluxes pattern in rice paddy fields in central China and (ii) assess the role of floodwater in controlling the emissions of CO(2) from soil and floodwater in intermittently draining rice paddy soil. The soil CO(2) flux rates ranged from -0.45 to 8.62 µmol.m(-2).s(-1) during the rice-growing season. The net effluxes of CO(2) from the paddy soil were lower when the paddy was flooded than when it was drained. The CO(2) emissions for the drained conditions showed distinct diurnal variation with a maximum efflux observed in the afternoon. When the paddy was flooded, daytime soil CO(2) fluxes reversed with a peak negative efflux just after midday. In draining/flooding alternating periods, a sudden pulse-like event of rapidly increasing CO(2) efflux occured in response to re-flooding after draining. Correlation analysis showed a negative relation between soil CO(2) flux and temperature under flooded conditions, but a positive relation was found under drained conditions. The results showed that draining and flooding cycles play a vital role in controlling CO(2) emissions from paddy soils.

  18. Cavitation and water fluxes driven by ice water potential in Juglans regia during freeze-thaw cycles.

    PubMed

    Charra-Vaskou, Katline; Badel, Eric; Charrier, Guillaume; Ponomarenko, Alexandre; Bonhomme, Marc; Foucat, Loïc; Mayr, Stefan; Améglio, Thierry

    2016-02-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles induce major hydraulic changes due to liquid-to-ice transition within tree stems. The very low water potential at the ice-liquid interface is crucial as it may cause lysis of living cells as well as water fluxes and embolism in sap conduits, which impacts whole tree-water relations. We investigated water fluxes induced by ice formation during freeze-thaw cycles in Juglans regia L. stems using four non-invasive and complementary approaches: a microdendrometer, magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray microtomography, and ultrasonic acoustic emissions analysis. When the temperature dropped, ice nucleation occurred, probably in the cambium or pith areas, inducing high water potential gradients within the stem. The water was therefore redistributed within the stem toward the ice front. We could thus observe dehydration of the bark's living cells leading to drastic shrinkage of this tissue, as well as high tension within wood conduits reaching the cavitation threshold in sap vessels. Ultrasonic emissions, which were strictly emitted only during freezing, indicated cavitation events (i.e. bubble formation) following ice formation in the xylem sap. However, embolism formation (i.e. bubble expansion) in stems was observed only on thawing via X-ray microtomography for the first time on the same sample. Ultrasonic emissions were detected during freezing and were not directly related to embolism formation. These results provide new insights into the complex process and dynamics of water movements and ice formation during freeze-thaw cycles in tree stems.

  19. Effect of acetate and octanoate on tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolite disposal during propionate oxidation in the perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Sundqvist, K E; Peuhkurinen, K J; Hiltunen, J K; Hassinen, I E

    1984-10-16

    Tricarboxylic acid cycle pool size is determined by anaplerosis and metabolite disposal. The regulation of the latter during propionate metabolism was studied in isolated perfused rat hearts in the light of the characteristics of NADP-linked malic enzyme, which is inhibited by acetyl-CoA. The acetyl-CoA concentration was varied by infusions of acetate and octanoate, and the rate of metabolite disposal was calculated from a metabolic balance sheet compiled from the relevant metabolic fluxes. Propionate addition increased the tricarboxylic acid cycle pool size 4-fold and co-infusion of acetate or octanoate did not change it further. Propionate caused a decrease in the CoA-SH concentration and a 10-fold increase in the propionyl-CoA concentration. A paradoxical increase in the CoA-SH concentration was observed upon co-infusion of acetate in the presence of propionate, an effect probably caused by competitive inhibition of propionate activation. A more pronounced decline in the propionyl-CoA concentration was observed upon the co-infusion of octanoate. In a metabolic steady state, acetate and octanoate reduced propionate disposal only slightly, but did not increase the tricarboxylic acid cycle pool size. The results are in accord with the notion that the tricarboxylic acid pool size is mainly regulated by the anaplerotic mechanisms.

  20. Composition and flux of particulate amino acids and chloropigments in equatorial Pacific seawater and sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cindy; Wakeham, Stuart G.; Hedges, John I.

    2000-08-01

    Compositions and fluxes of amino acids and major chloropigments were measured in the central equatorial Pacific Ocean as part of the US JGOFS EqPac program. Fluxes decreased by several orders of magnitude, from 400 to 0.03 mg amino acid m -2 d -1 and from 9 mg to 0.0004 μg chloropigment m -2 d -1, between production in the surface waters and accumulation at the sea floor. Most rapid losses were in surface waters and at the sediment interface. Losses from the mid-water column were as great as those in surface waters or at the sediment interface, but occurred over a much greater depth range. Export flux estimates based on floating sediment traps were higher near the equator and decreased poleward, similar to primary production. Little meridional difference was apparent in composition of either amino acids or pigments in exported material over the 24° of latitude sampled in spite of the large (factor of 5-6) difference in fluxes. However, pigment composition changed dramatically with depth in the water column, and considerable diagenesis occurred before particles reached the sediment. Pigment compositions suggest that suspended particles were more degraded in the northern than in the southern hemisphere, possibly due to differences in food chain structure. Compositional changes in amino acids occurred in the water column, but were most noticeable at the sediment-seawater interface. Increases in the relative proportions of aspartic acid and glycine with depth were more consistent with preferential preservation within the particulate matrix than with any inherent stability of these compounds to heterotrophic consumption. The contribution of amino acids and pigments to total organic carbon clearly shows that selective degradation of organic matter occurs with depth; this is not evident from total organic carbon data alone. Amino acids contributed about a quarter of the total organic carbon (OC) in surface waters and 16% of the OC in sediment; pigments decreased from 1

  1. Eddy Fluxes and Sensitivity of the Water Cycle to Spatial Resolution in Idealized Regional Aquaplanet Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Gustafson, William I.; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-02-28

    A multi-scale moisture budget analysis is used to identify the mechanisms responsible for the sensitivity of the water cycle to spatial resolution using idealized regional aquaplanet simulations. In the higher resolution simulations, moisture transport by eddies fluxes dry the boundary layer enhancing evaporation and precipitation. This effect of eddies, which is underestimated by the physics parameterizations in the low-resolution simulations, is found to be responsible for the sensitivity of the water cycle both directly, and through its upscale effect, on the mean circulation. Correlations among moisture transport by eddies at adjacent ranges of scales provides the potential for reducing this sensitivity by representing the unresolved eddies by their marginally resolved counterparts.

  2. Seasonality in the fluxes of sugars, amino acids, and amino sugars to the deep ocean: Panama basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ittekkot, Venugopalan; Degens, Egon T.; Honjo, Susumu

    1984-09-01

    Time-series sediment traps were deployed for an entire year at depths of 890, 2590, and 3560 m at a station in the Panama Basin during 1980. Fluxes of sugars, amino acids, and amino sugars varied seasonally at each depth. Two peak fluxes were observed: one in February-March, the other in June-July. The peaks were associated with a high productivity period by regional upwelling and an unusual coccolithophorid bloom. There were significant differences in the distributions of sugars and amino acids associated with the fluxes. The peak flux of June/July was characterized by high amounts of arabinose and ribose within the sugar, and high amounts of aspartic acid in the amino acid fractions. The differences were observed at all three depths simultaneously, indicating rapid vertical transport without significant dissolution or decomposition. The observed pattern indicates the utility of specific compounds such as sugars and amino acids as tracers of source materials in the marine environment.

  3. Orbital pacing of carbon fluxes by a ~9-Myr eccentricity cycle during the Mesozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, M.; Dera, G.

    2015-12-01

    A 73.6-Myr long signal of d18O and d13C from the Sinemurian (Early Jurassic) to the Aptian (Early Cretaceous) measured on belemnite rostra from NW Tethys has been compiled and analyzed for measuring the trends and Myr-cycles in the Jurassic and the Early Cretaceous. The resulting series have more than 3500 points and an average sample step of 0.04 Myr, which currently constitutes the highest-resolution series for this time interval. The long-term trend in the d18O series shows three warming events in the Jurassic linked to the activity of three major volcanic provinces, but no significant cycle has been observed in the series. Unlikely, the d13C series shows a prominent cycle of 9.1 Myr, having an amplitude of 1-2‰ on the d13C throughout the whole time interval. This cycle is attributed to a Myr-eccentricity forcing, already identified in the Cenozoic, the late Cretaceous and the Triassic. In addition, the d13C series also displays a minor-amplitude cycle at 1.9 Myr, which can be related to the 2.4-Myr eccentricity. The fluctuations of the d13C at the 9.1-Myr time scale follows the 2nd-order eustatic changes and we suggest that Myr-eccentricity cycles, by controlling humid-arid cycles in the tropical realms and sea-level changes, modulated the continental and oceanic primary productivity, storage of organic matter, carbonate platform production which triggered the observed fluctuations in the d13C.

  4. Constraints on water cycling in a deep mountain valley from stable water isotope and sap flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorella, R.; Poulsen, C. J.; Matheny, A. M.; Bohrer, G.

    2015-12-01

    The stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in water are unequally partitioned during phase changes, with environmental conditions controlling the degree of partitioning. As a result, the isotopic composition of water reflects the thermodynamic history of water parcels in the water cycle. Recent advances in cavity ringdown spectrometry allow for the continuous measurement of water vapor isotope compositions, and provide insight into the processes influencing the concentration of near-surface water vapor at high resolution. We used stable water isotopes to investigate the processes controlling water vapor cycling in a deep mountain valley in northwestern Wyoming. A Picarro L2120-i Cavity Ring-Down spectrometer was deployed to measure the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapor at the University of Michigan Camp Davis Field Station near Jackson, WY for three consecutive summers (2012-2014) and during winter 2013. We also constructed a network of Granier-style sap flux probes to estimate the local transpiration flux from regionally dominant tree species in July 2014. A prominent diurnal cycle was observed during the summer that was mostly absent in the winter. Summer specific humidity, δD, δ18O, and sap flux all reach daily maximum values in the mid-to-late morning that we associate with the onset of transpiration. The mountain valley is capped by an inversion, which limits atmospheric mixing during the morning. After the breakup of the inversion, the atmospheric boundary layer develops quickly and results in decreases in near-surface specific humidity and δ18O. δD appears to be less affected following the inversion breakup, resulting in a strong diurnal cycle in d-excess. Specific humidity, δD, and δ18O all return to their morning values rapidly near sunset, marking the cessation of mixing and atmospheric stratification. This absence of this diurnal cycle in the winter is consistent with reduced transpiration and atmospheric mixing anticipated for the

  5. Seasonal cycles of biogenic volatile organic compound fluxes and concentrations in a California citrus orchard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fares, S.; Park, J.-H.; Gentner, D. R.; Weber, R.; Ormeño, E.; Karlik, J.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-07-01

    Orange trees are widely cultivated in Mediterranean climatic regions where they are an important agricultural crop. Citrus have been characterized as emitters of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in chamber studies under controlled environmental conditions, but an extensive characterization at field scale has never been performed using modern measurement methods, and is particularly needed considering the complex interactions between the orchards and the polluted atmosphere in which Citrus is often cultivated. For one year, in a Valencia orange orchard in Exeter, California, we measured fluxes using PTRMS (Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer) and eddy covariance for the most abundant VOC typically emitted from citrus vegetation: methanol, acetone, and isoprenoids. Concentration gradients of additional oxygenated and aromatic compounds from the ground level to above the canopy were also measured. In order to characterize concentrations of speciated biogenic VOC (BVOC) in leaves, we analyzed leaf content by GC-MS (Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometery) regularly throughout the year. We also characterize in more detail concentrations of speciated BVOC in the air above the orchard by in-situ GC-MS during a few weeks in spring flowering and summer periods. Here we report concentrations and fluxes of the main VOC species emitted by the orchard, discuss how fluxes measured in the field relate to previous studies made with plant enclosures, and describe how VOC content in leaves and emissions change during the year in response to phenological and environmental parameters. The orchard was a source of monoterpenes and oxygenated VOC. The highest emissions were observed during the springtime flowering period, with mid-day fluxes above 2 nmol m-2 s-1 for methanol and up to 1 nmol m-2 s-1 for acetone and monoterpenes. During hot summer days emissions were not as high as we expected considering the known dependence of biogenic emissions on temperature. We provide evidence

  6. Seasonal cycles of biogenic volatile organic compound fluxes and concentrations in a California citrus orchard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fares, S.; Park, J.-H.; Gentner, D. R.; Weber, R.; Ormeño, E.; Karlik, J.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-10-01

    Orange trees are widely cultivated in Mediterranean climatic regions where they are an important agricultural crop. Citrus have been characterized as emitters of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in chamber studies under controlled environmental conditions, but an extensive characterization at field scale has never been performed using modern measurement methods, and is particularly needed considering the complex interactions between the orchards and the polluted atmosphere in which Citrus is often cultivated. For one year, in a Valencia orange orchard in Exeter, California, we measured fluxes using PTRMS (Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer) and eddy covariance for the most abundant VOC typically emitted from citrus vegetation: methanol, acetone, and isoprenoids. Concentration gradients of additional oxygenated and aromatic compounds from the ground level to above the canopy were also measured. In order to characterize concentrations of speciated biogenic VOC (BVOC) in leaves, we analyzed leaf content by GC-MS (Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometery) regularly throughout the year. We also characterized in more detail concentrations of speciated BVOC in the air above the orchard by in-situ GC-MS during a few weeks in spring flowering and summer periods. Here we report concentrations and fluxes of the main VOC species emitted by the orchard, discuss how fluxes measured in the field relate to previous studies made with plant enclosures, and describe how VOC content in leaves and emissions change during the year in response to phenological and environmental parameters. The orchard was a source of monoterpenes and oxygenated VOC. The highest emissions were observed during the springtime flowering period, with mid-day fluxes above 2 nmol m-2 s-1 for methanol and up to 1 nmol m-2 s-1 for acetone and monoterpenes. During hot summer days emissions were not as high as we expected considering the known dependence of biogenic emissions on temperature. We provide

  7. Effect of dialysis dose and membrane flux on hemoglobin cycling in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    He, Liyu; Fu, Min; Chen, Xian; Liu, Hong; Chen, Xing; Peng, Xiaofei; Liu, Fuyou; Peng, Youming

    2015-04-01

    Many studies found that hemoglobin (Hb) fluctuation was closely related to the prognosis of the maintenance hemodialysis patients. We investigated the association of factors relating dialysis dose and dialyzer membrane with Hb levels. We undertook a randomized clinical trial in 140 patients undergoing thrice-weekly dialysis and assigned patients randomly to a standard or high dose of dialysis; Hb level was measured every month for 12 months. In the standard-dose group, the mean (±SD) urea reduction ratio was 65.1% ± 7.3%, the single-pool Kt/V was 1.26 ± 0.11, and the equilibrated Kt/V was 1.05 ± 0.09; in the high-dose group, the values were 73.5% ± 8.7%, 1.68 ± 0.15, and 1.47 ± 0.11, respectively. The standard deviation (SD) and residual SD (liner regression of Hb) values of Hb were significantly higher in the standard-dose group and low-flux group. The percentage achievement of target Hb in the high-dose dialysis group and high-flux dialyzer group was significantly higher than the standard-dose group and low-flux group, respectively. Patients undergoing hemodialysis thrice weekly appear to have benefit from a higher dialysis dose than that recommended by current KDQQI (Kidney Disease Qutcome Quality Initiative) guidelines or from the use of a high-flux membrane, which is in favor of maintaining stable Hb levels.

  8. Processes and fluxes during the initial stage of acid sulfate soil formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröger, J.; Hamer, K.; Schulz, H. D.

    2009-04-01

    Acid sulfate soils occur over a wide range of climatic zones, mainly in coastal landscapes. In these soils, the release of sulfuric acid by the oxidation of pyrite generates a very acidic environment (e.g., DENT and PONS, 1995, PONS, 1973). Two major types of acid sulfate soils can be distinguished: In actual acid sulfate soils, the initially contained pyrite was at least partly oxidized. This resulted in a severe acidification of the soil. Potential acid sulfate soils are generally unoxidized and contain large amounts of pyrite. Upon oxidation, these soils will turn into actual acid sulfate soils. By excavation or lowering of the groundwater table, potential acid sulfate soils can be exposed to atmospheric oxygen. During oxidation the pH drops sharply to values below pH 4. This acidification promotes the release of various metals, e.g., alumina, iron and heavy metals. Additionally, large quantities of sulfate are released. In order to assess the effects of disturbances of potential acid sulfate soils, for example by excavations during construction works, several large scale column experiments were conducted with various types of potential acid sulfate soils from Northern Germany. In these experiments, the oxidation and initial profile development of pyritic fen peats and thionic fluvisols were studied over a period of 14 months. The study focused on leaching and the translocation of various metals in the soil profile. To study mobilization processes, element fluxes and the progress of acidification, soil water and leachate were analyzed for total element concentrations. Furthermore, several redox-sensitive parameters, e.g., Fe2+ and sulfide, were measured and changes to the initial solid phase composition were analyzed. Chemical equilibria calculations of the soil water were used to gain insights into precipitation processes of secondary products of pyrite oxidation and leaching products. The results of this study will support the assessment of risks deriving from

  9. Loss of fatty acid control of gluconeogenesis and PDH complex flux in adrenalectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ciprés, G; Urcelay, E; Butta, N; Ayuso, M S; Parrilla, R; Martín-Requero, A

    1994-10-01

    This work aimed to determine the role played by the adrenal gland in the fatty acid control of gluconeogenesis in isolated perfused rat livers. The gluconeogenic substrate concentration responses were not altered in adrenalectomized (ADX) rats. This observation indicates that glucocorticoids are not essential to maintain normal basal gluconeogenic rates. In contrast, fatty acid failed to stimulate gluconeogenesis from lactate and elicited attenuated stimulation with pyruvate as substrate in livers from ADX rats. Fatty acid-induced stimulation of respiration and ketone body production were similar in control and ADX rats. Thus the diminished responsiveness of the gluconeogenic pathway to fatty acid cannot be the result of different rates of energy production and/or generation of reducing power. Fatty acids did not inhibit pyruvate decarboxylation in livers from ADX rats. Even though mitochondria isolated from livers of ADX rats showed normal basal rates of pyruvate metabolism, fatty acids failed to inhibit pyruvate decarboxylation and the activity of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This novel observation of the glucocorticoid effect in controlling the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex responsiveness indicates that the mitochondrial partitioning of pyruvate between carboxylation and decarboxylation reactions may be altered in livers from ADX rats. We propose that the diminished effect of fatty acid in stimulating gluconeogenesis in livers from ADX rats is the result of a limited pyruvate availability for the carboxylase reaction due to a lack of inhibition of flux through the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex.

  10. The Sub-Arctic Carbon Cycle: Assimilating Multi-Scale Chamber, Tower and Aircraft Flux Observations into Ecological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. C.; Stoy, P. C.; Baxter, R.; Clement, R.; Disney, M.; Evans, J.; Fletcher, B.; Gornall, J.; Harding, R.; Hartley, I. P.; Ineson, P.; Moncrieff, J.; Phoenix, G.; Sloan, V.; Poyatos, R.; Prieto-Blanco, A.; Subke, J.; Street, L.; Wade, T. J.; Wayolle, A.; Wookey, P.; Williams, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    The Arctic has already warmed significantly, and warming of 4-7 °C is expected over the next century. However, linkages between climate, the carbon cycle, the energy balance, and hydrology mean that the response of arctic ecosystems to these changes remains poorly understood. The release by warming of considerable but poorly quantified carbon stores from high latitude soils could accelerate the build-up of atmospheric CO2. The Arctic Biosphere Atmosphere Coupling at Multiple Scales (ABACUS) project, part of International Polar Year, was designed to improve predictions of the response of the Arctic terrestrial biosphere to climate change. The project operated at two sites (Abisko, Sweden and Kevo, Finland) over multiple years, utilising roving flux chambers (CO2/CH4), five flux towers (CO2/CH4/H2O) and a research aircraft equipped for fluxes (CO2/H2O) to directly measure multi-scale exchanges in-conjunction with other observations (both plot level and satellite). We show how these data can be combined using data assimilation approaches to address the question “what controls the temporal and spatial variability of carbon exchange by sub-Arctic ecosystems?” Eddy covariance measurements of mire methane exchanges agreed with chamber estimates, indicating that mires were strong summer sources, while birch woodland was a weak sink. However, remote sensing of mire extent was limited at resolutions > 30 m, and variations in sink/source activity suggested that upscaling CH4 exchanges (from chamber, to tower, to landscape) required higher resolution (ideally <10 m) landcover data in heterogeneous Arctic landscapes. Chamber and eddy covariance measurements of CO2 exchange recorded similar seasonal timing over a range of vegetation types. Birch woodlands had the greatest range of CO2 exchanges compared to tundra and mires. The challenge of measuring continuous fluxes across the full annual cycle, and inherent uncertainties in the methods, complicates the determination of

  11. Hydrogen Peroxide Cycling in Acidic Geothermal Environments and Potential Implications for Oxidative Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesle, M.; Beam, J.; Jay, Z.; Bodle, B.; Bogenschutz, E.; Inskeep, W.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be produced in natural waters via photochemical reactions between dissolved oxygen, organic carbon and light. Other reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydroxyl radicals are potentially formed in environments with high concentrations of ferrous iron (Fe(II), ~10-100 μM) by reaction between H2O2 and Fe(II) (i.e., Fenton chemistry). Thermophilic archaea and bacteria inhabiting acidic iron-oxide mats have defense mechanisms against both extracellular and intracellular peroxide, such as peroxiredoxins (which can degrade H2O2) and against other ROS, such as superoxide dismutases. Biological cycling of H2O2 is not well understood in geothermal ecosystems, and geochemical measurements combined with molecular investigations will contribute to our understanding of microbial response to oxidative stress. We measured H2O2 and other dissolved compounds (Fe(II), Fe(III), H2S, O2), as well as photon flux, pH and temperature, over time in surface geothermal waters of several acidic springs in Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, WY (Beowulf Spring and One Hundred Spring Plain). Iron-oxide mats were sampled in Beowulf Spring for on-going analysis of metatranscriptomes and RT-qPCR assays of specific stress-response gene transcription (e.g., superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, and peroxidases). In situ analyses show that H2O2 concentrations are lowest in the source waters of sulfidic systems (ca. 1 μM), and increase by two-fold in oxygenated waters corresponding to Fe(III)-oxide mat formation (ca. 2 - 3 μM). Channel transects confirm increases in H2O2 as a function of oxygenation (distance). The temporal dynamics of H2O2, O2, Fe(II), and H2S in Beowulf geothermal waters were also measured during a diel cycle, and increases in H2O2 were observed during peak photon flux. These results suggest that photochemical reactions may contribute to changes in H2O2. We hypothesize that increases in H2O2 and O2

  12. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  13. On the variation of the sun's X ray background flux and its relation to the sun's flaring rate, energetic event rate, and the solar cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    Daily averages of the sun's X-ray background flux as measured by the GOES satellite are combined to yield monthly means and 'smoothed' monthly means (12-month moving averages) for the interval January 1986 through May 1992 (minimum rise, maximum, and initial decline of solar cycle 22). These averages are then compared directly to the sun's optical flaring rate, energetic event rate, and the usual markers of the solar cycle (e.g., sunspot number, total corrected sunspot area, and 10.7-cm solar radio flux, number of groups, and number of spots). The results of this analysis support previous findings that there exists a remarkably close positive relationship between the optical flaring rate and the X-ray background flux rate (the independent variable), and that the X-ray background flux rate can be used as a proxy for the solar cycle. Additionally, this study has found that a strong positive relationship exists between the energetic event rate and the X-ray background flux rate (the independent variable), and that the lag between the maxima of the rates of optical flaring and X-ray background flux reported for cycle 21 did not recur for cycle 22.

  14. Carbon cycling in the upper waters of the Sargasso Sea: I. Numerical simulation of differential carbon and nitrogen fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissett, W. P.; Walsh, J. J.; Dieterle, D. A.; Carder, K. L.

    1999-02-01

    A complex ecosystem model is developed for the area around Bermuda in the Sargasso Sea. The model is physically driven by seasonal changes in spectral light, temperature, and water column mixing. Autotrophic growth is represented by four functional groups of phytoplankton. The groups have light and nutrient utilization characteristics that reflect those of Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and Chromophycota species. The model includes differential carbon and nitrogen cycling, nitrification, and nitrogen fixation to effect realistic allochthonous and autochthonous nutrient sources to the euphotic zone. This simulation yields realistic seasonal and vertical (1) succession of phytoplankton functional groups' biomass, productivity, and pigments; (2) profiles of dissolved inorganic carbon, nitrate, and ammonium; and (3) fluxes of carbon dioxide at the air-sea boundary and particulate carbon and nitrogen settling losses, when compared to the JGOFS BATS site. The addition of local nitrification, differential carbon and nitrogen remineralization, and nitrogen fixation removes the need for an unrealistically high upward vertical flux of nitrate to mimic the productivity and chlorophyll a stocks. The explicit numerical description of carbon and nitrogen utilization by heterotrophic bacteria simulated a population that was not nitrogen-limited in these waters. Instead, the heterotrophic bacteria community was limited by energy resources in the form of DOC, and was a nitrogen source for the autotrophic community through the excretion of excess NH 4 from the labile DOM energy source. Numerical descriptions of ecosystems based solely on nitrogen dynamics, or fixed carbon to nitrogen ratios, may yield an inaccurate prediction of carbon and nitrogen fluxes, and fail to properly predict the carbon cycle.

  15. The effect of propionic acid and valeric acid on the cell cycle in root meristems of Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Tramontano, W.A.; Yang, Shauyu; Delillo, A.R. )

    1990-01-01

    Propionic acid and valeric acid at 1mM reduced the mitotic index of root meristem cells of Pisum sativum to < 1% after 12 hr in aerated White's medium. This effect varied with different acid concentrations. After a 12 hr exposure to either acid, seedlings transferred to fresh medium without either acid, resumed their normal mitotic index after 12 hr, with a burst of mitosis 8 hr post-transfer. Exposure of root meristem cells to either acid also inhibited ({sup 3}H)-TdR incorporation. Neither acid significantly altered the distribution of meristematic cells in G1 and G2 after 12 hr. The incorporation of ({sup 3}H) - uridine was also unaltered by the addition of either acid. This information suggests that propionic acid and valeric acid, limit progression through the cell cycle by inhibiting DNA synthesis and arresting cells in G1 and G2. These results were consistent with previous data which utilized butyric acid.

  16. Developing Consistent Earth System Data Records for the Global Terrestrial Water Cycle: Focus on Shortwave and Longwave Radiative Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinker, R. T.; Ma, Y.; Nussbaumer, E. A.

    2012-04-01

    The overall goal of the MEaSUREs activity titled: "Developing Consistent Earth System Data Records for the Global Terrestrial Water Cycle" is to develop consistent, long-term Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) for the major components of the terrestrial water cycle at a climatic time scale. The shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative fluxes at the Earth's surface determine the exchange of energy between the land and the atmosphere are the focus of this presentation. During the last two decades, significant progress has been made in assessing the Earth Radiation Balance from satellite observations. Yet, satellite based estimates differ from each other and long term satellite observations at global scale are not readily available. There is a need to utilize existing records of satellite observations and to improve currently available estimates. This paper reports on improvements introduced to an existing methodology to estimate shortwave (SW) radiative fluxes within the atmospheric system, on the development of a new inference scheme for deriving LW fluxes, the implementation of the approach with the ISCCP DX observations and improved atmospheric inputs for the period of 1983-2007, evaluation against ground observations, and comparison with independent satellite methods and numerical models. The resulting ESDRs from the entire MEaSUREs Project are intended to provide a consistent basis for estimating the mean state and variability of the land surface water cycle at a spatial scale relevant to major global river basins. MEaSUREs Project "Developing Consistent Earth System Data Records for the Global Terrestrial Water Cycle" Team Members: E. F. Wood (PI)1, T. J Bohn2, J. L Bytheway3, X. Feng4, H. Gao2, P. R.Houser4 (CO-I), C. D Kummerow3 (CO-I), D. P Lettenmaier2 (CO-I), C. Li5, Y. Ma5, R. F MacCracken4, M. Pan1, R. T Pinker5 (CO-I), A. K. Sahoo1, J. Sheffield1 1. Dept of CEE, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA. 2. Dept of CEE, University of Washington, Seattle

  17. Phosphorus limitation strategy to increase propionic acid flux towards 3-hydroxyvaleric acid monomers in Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Grousseau, Estelle; Blanchet, Elise; Déléris, Stéphane; Albuquerque, Maria G E; Paul, Etienne; Uribelarrea, Jean-Louis

    2014-02-01

    Properties of polyhydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (P(3HB-co-3HV)) depend on their 3HV content. 3HV can be produced by Cupriavidus necator from propionic acid. Few studies explored carbon distribution and dynamics of 3HV and 3HB monomers production, and none of them have been done with phosphorus as limiting nutrient. In this study, fed-batch cultures of C. necator with propionic acid, as sole carbon source or mixed with butyric acid, were performed. Phosphorus deficiency allowed sustaining 3HV production rate and decreasing 3HB production rate, leading to an instant production of up to 100% of 3HV. When a residual growth is sustained by a phosphorus feeding, the maximum 3HV percentage produced from propionic acid is limited to 33% (Mole.Mole(-1)). The association of a second carbon source like butyric acid lead to higher conversion of propionic acid into 3HV. This study showed the importance of the limiting nutrient and of the culture strategy to get the appropriate product.

  18. Cavitation and water fluxes driven by ice water potential in Juglans regia during freeze–thaw cycles

    PubMed Central

    Charra-Vaskou, Katline; Badel, Eric; Charrier, Guillaume; Ponomarenko, Alexandre; Bonhomme, Marc; Foucat, Loïc; Mayr, Stefan; Améglio, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Freeze–thaw cycles induce major hydraulic changes due to liquid-to-ice transition within tree stems. The very low water potential at the ice–liquid interface is crucial as it may cause lysis of living cells as well as water fluxes and embolism in sap conduits, which impacts whole tree–water relations. We investigated water fluxes induced by ice formation during freeze–thaw cycles in Juglans regia L. stems using four non-invasive and complementary approaches: a microdendrometer, magnetic resonance imaging, X-ray microtomography, and ultrasonic acoustic emissions analysis. When the temperature dropped, ice nucleation occurred, probably in the cambium or pith areas, inducing high water potential gradients within the stem. The water was therefore redistributed within the stem toward the ice front. We could thus observe dehydration of the bark’s living cells leading to drastic shrinkage of this tissue, as well as high tension within wood conduits reaching the cavitation threshold in sap vessels. Ultrasonic emissions, which were strictly emitted only during freezing, indicated cavitation events (i.e. bubble formation) following ice formation in the xylem sap. However, embolism formation (i.e. bubble expansion) in stems was observed only on thawing via X-ray microtomography for the first time on the same sample. Ultrasonic emissions were detected during freezing and were not directly related to embolism formation. These results provide new insights into the complex process and dynamics of water movements and ice formation during freeze–thaw cycles in tree stems. PMID:26585223

  19. Photochemical synthesis of citric acid cycle intermediates based on titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Saladino, Raffaele; Brucato, John Robert; De Sio, Antonio; Botta, Giorgia; Pace, Emanuele; Gambicorti, Lisa

    2011-10-01

    The emergence of the citric acid cycle is one of the most remarkable occurrences with regard to understanding the origin and evolution of metabolic pathways. Although the chemical steps of the cycle are preserved intact throughout nature, diverse organisms make wide use of its chemistry, and in some cases organisms use only a selected portion of the cycle. However, the origins of this cycle would have arisen in the more primitive anaerobic organism or even back in the proto-metabolism, which likely arose spontaneously under favorable prebiotic chemical conditions. In this context, we report that UV irradiation of formamide in the presence of titanium dioxide afforded 6 of the 11 carboxylic acid intermediates of the reductive version of the citric acid cycle. Since this cycle is the central metabolic pathway of contemporary biology, this report highlights the role of photochemical processes in the origin of the metabolic apparatus.

  20. Impacts of Prognostic Phenology and Agriculture on the Seasonal Cycle of Carbon Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, K. D.; Baker, I. T.; Denning, A.; Stockli, R.; Lokupitiya, E. Y.

    2011-12-01

    Since terrestrial carbon fluxes cannot be measured directly on regional and global scales, land surface models are an important tool in improving estimates of carbon sources and sinks. One common limitation in biosphere models is requiring the use of remotely sensed data to represent vegetation phenology; however, prognostic phenology models are being developed to predict the phonological timing and leaf state of both natural vegetation and crops (Stockli et al., 2008; Lokupitiya et al., 2009; Stockli et al., 2011). Simulating phenology rather than relying on data products removes the uncertainty due to satellite retrievals, allows the short yet highly productive growing season of crops to be more accurately simulated, and enables predictive capabilities. The Simple Biosphere Model (SiB) has been modified to include prognostic phenology for twenty different plant functional types, including maize, soybean and wheat. Predicting the phenology will alter carbon fluxes regionally and globally on diurnal to seasonal timescales, and this study will discuss the impact of prognostic phenology on the resulting simulated net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide.

  1. Response of Soil Biogeochemistry to Freeze-thaw Cycles: Impacts on Greenhouse Gas Emission and Nutrient Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanezhad, F.; Parsons, C. T.; Smeaton, C. M.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-12-01

    Freeze-thaw is an abiotic stress applied to soils and is a natural process at medium to high latitudes. Freezing and thawing processes influence not only the physical properties of soil, but also the metabolic activity of soil microorganisms. Fungi and bacteria play a crucial role in soil organic matter degradation and the production of greenhouse gases (GHG) such as CO2, CH4 and N2O. Production and consumption of these atmospheric trace gases are the result of biological processes such as photosynthesis, aerobic respiration (CO2), methanogenesis, methanotrophy (CH4), nitrification and denitrification (N2O). To enhance our understanding of the effects of freeze-thaw cycles on soil biogeochemical transformations and fluxes, a highly instrumented soil column experiment was designed to realistically simulate freeze-thaw dynamics under controlled conditions. Pore waters collected periodically from different depths of the column and solid-phase analyses on core material obtained at the initial and end of the experiment highlighted striking geochemical cycling. CO2, CH4 and N2O production at different depths within the column were quantified from dissolved gas concentrations in pore water. Subsequent emissions from the soil surface were determined by direct measurement in the head space. Pulsed CO2 emission to the headspace was observed at the onset of thawing, however, the magnitude of the pulse decreased with each subsequent freeze-thaw cycle indicating depletion of a "freeze-thaw accessible" carbon pool. Pulsed CO2 emission was due to a combination of physical release of gases dissolved in porewater and entrapped below the frozen zone and changing microbial respiration in response to electron acceptor variability (O2, NO3-, SO42-). In this presentation, we focus on soil-specific physical, chemical, microbial factors (e.g. redox conditions, respiration, fermentation) and the mechanisms that drive GHG emission and nutrient cycling in soils under freeze-thaw cycles.

  2. Enhancement of volcanism and geothermal heat flux by ice-age cycling: A stress modeling study of Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Nathan T.; Parizek, Byron R.; Alley, Richard B.

    2016-08-01

    Ice-age cycling of the Greenland ice sheet likely contributed to locally elevated subglacial geothermal heat fluxes (GHFs), based on recent thermal modeling. Borehole and geophysical data indicate higher GHF in some areas than suggested by current knowledge of underlying geology, particularly at the head of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream. Changes in lithospheric loading during ice-sheet growth and decay cycles produce large and geologically rapid changes in the effective stress state beneath and near the ice sheet. Oscillations in melt fraction from cyclic loading through multiple ice-age cycles will enhance upward magma migration through the nonlinear increase of melt migration velocity with melt fraction. We simulate periodic ice-sheet loading scenarios along an east-west transect across central Greenland on an Elastic Lithosphere, Relaxed Asthenosphere Earth model. Under likely parameter ranges, deviatoric stresses in the elastic lithosphere across widespread regions are sufficiently high to meaningfully enhance dike emplacement and also allow vug-wave propagation in some scenarios. Stress patterns migrate laterally in response to ice-sheet dynamics, favoring multistage magma ascent. If melt occurs at depth, our modeling suggests that ice-age cycling could help it migrate upward to shallow depth or erupt, contributing to the high observed GHF. Furthermore, shallow magma emplacement might feed hydrothermal systems exploiting enhanced faulting or fracturing from ice-age cycling, adding to elevated GHF. The preglacial passage of the Iceland-Jan Mayen hot spot could have sourced such magmas. Direct observations of these lithospheric processes needed to further constrain our models are limited, highlighting the value of more targeted geophysical studies informing future modeling.

  3. [Influence of chosen metals on the citric acid cycle].

    PubMed

    Rojczyk-Gołebiewska, Ewa; Kucharzewski, Marek

    2013-03-01

    Industrial activity growth influenced not only technological progress, but also had negative effects on human natural environment. It results among others in increased human exposition to heavy metals. In case of detoxication mechanisms disturbance in organism, heavy metals cumulate in tissues causing mutations and disrupting metabolism, including Krebs cycle. Recent studies have revealed that iron, zinc and manganese have especially strong influence on Krebs cycle. These elements act as cofactors or inhibitors regulating activity of particular enzymes of this cycle, which has a reflection in cellular energy production disturbances.

  4. Central metabolic responses to the overproduction of fatty acids in Escherichia coli based on 13C-metabolic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    He, Lian; Xiao, Yi; Gebreselassie, Nikodimos; Zhang, Fuzhong; Antoniewiez, Maciek R; Tang, Yinjie J; Peng, Lifeng

    2014-03-01

    We engineered a fatty acid overproducing Escherichia coli strain through overexpressing tesA (“pull”) and fadR (“push”) and knocking out fadE (“block”). This “pull-push-block” strategy yielded 0.17 g of fatty acids (C12–C18) per gram of glucose (equivalent to 48% of the maximum theoretical yield) in batch cultures during the exponential growth phase under aerobic conditions. Metabolic fluxes were determined for the engineered E. coli and its control strain using tracer ([1,2-13C]glucose) experiments and 13C-metabolic flux analysis. Cofactor (NADPH) and energy (ATP) balances were also investigated for both strains based on estimated fluxes. Compared to the control strain, fatty acid overproduction led to significant metabolic responses in the central metabolism: (1) Acetic acid secretion flux decreased 10-fold; (2) Pentose phosphate pathway and Entner–Doudoroff pathway fluxes increased 1.5- and 2.0-fold, respectively; (3) Biomass synthesis flux was reduced 1.9-fold; (4) Anaplerotic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylation flux decreased 1.7-fold; (5) Transhydrogenation flux converting NADH to NADPH increased by 1.7-fold. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the engineered strain increased the transcription levels of pntA (encoding the membrane-bound transhydrogenase) by 2.1-fold and udhA (encoding the soluble transhydrogenase) by 1.4-fold, which is in agreement with the increased transhydrogenation flux. Cofactor and energy balances analyses showed that the fatty acid overproducing E. coli consumed significantly higher cellular maintenance energy than the control strain. We discussed the strategies to future strain development and process improvements for fatty acid production in E. coli.

  5. Closed cycle ion exchange method for regenerating acids, bases and salts

    DOEpatents

    Dreyfuss, Robert M.

    1976-01-01

    A method for conducting a chemical reaction in acidic, basic, or neutral solution as required and then regenerating the acid, base, or salt by means of ion exchange in a closed cycle reaction sequence which comprises contacting the spent acid, base, or salt with an ion exchanger, preferably a synthetic organic ion-exchange resin, so selected that the counter ions thereof are ions also produced as a by-product in the closed reaction cycle, and then regenerating the spent ion exchanger by contact with the by-product counter ions. The method is particularly applicable to closed cycle processes for the thermochemical production of hydrogen.

  6. Effects of intermediate metabolite carboxylic acids of TCA cycle on Microcystis with overproduction of phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shijie; Dai, Jingcheng; Xia, Ming; Ruan, Jing; Wei, Hehong; Yu, Dianzhen; Li, Ronghui; Jing, Hongmei; Tian, Chunyuan; Song, Lirong; Qiu, Dongru

    2015-04-01

    Toxic Microcystis species are the main bloom-forming cyanobacteria in freshwaters. It is imperative to develop efficient techniques to control these notorious harmful algal blooms (HABs). Here, we present a simple, efficient, and environmentally safe algicidal way to control Microcystis blooms, by using intermediate carboxylic acids from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. The citric acid, alpha-ketoglutaric acid, succinic acid, fumaric acid, and malic acid all exhibited strong algicidal effects, and particularly succinic acid could cause the rapid lysis of Microcystis in a few hours. It is revealed that the Microcystis-lysing activity of succinic acid and other carboxylic acids was due to their strong acidic activity. Interestingly, the acid-lysed Microcystis cells released large amounts of phycocyanin, about 27-fold higher than those of the control. On the other hand, the transcription of mcyA and mcyD of the microcystin biosynthesis operon was not upregulated by addition of alpha-ketoglutaric acid and other carboxylic acids. Consider the environmental safety of intermediate carboxylic acids. We propose that administration of TCA cycle organic acids may not only provide an algicidal method with high efficiency and environmental safety but also serve as an applicable way to produce and extract phycocyanin from cyanobacterial biomass.

  7. Spatial variation in landscape-level CO2 and CH4 fluxes from arctic coastal tundra: influence from vegetation, wetness, and the thaw lake cycle.

    PubMed

    Sturtevant, Cove S; Oechel, Walter C

    2013-09-01

    Regional quantification of arctic CO2 and CH4 fluxes remains difficult due to high landscape heterogeneity coupled with a sparse measurement network. Most of the arctic coastal tundra near Barrow, Alaska is part of the thaw lake cycle, which includes current thaw lakes and a 5500-year chronosequence of vegetated thaw lake basins. However, spatial variability in carbon fluxes from these features remains grossly understudied. Here, we present an analysis of whole-ecosystem CO2 and CH4 fluxes from 20 thaw lake cycle features during the 2011 growing season. We found that the thaw lake cycle was largely responsible for spatial variation in CO2 flux, mostly due to its control on gross primary productivity (GPP). Current lakes were significant CO2 sources that varied little. Vegetated basins showed declining GPP and CO2 sink with age (R(2) = 67% and 57%, respectively). CH4 fluxes measured from a subset of 12 vegetated basins showed no relationship with age or CO2 flux components. Instead, higher CH4 fluxes were related to greater landscape wetness (R(2) = 57%) and thaw depth (additional R(2) = 28%). Spatial variation in CO2 and CH4 fluxes had good satellite remote sensing indicators, and we estimated the region to be a small CO2 sink of -4.9 ± 2.4 (SE) g C m(-2) between 11 June and 25 August, which was countered by a CH4 source of 2.1 ± 0.2 (SE) g C m(-2) . Results from our scaling exercise showed that developing or validating regional estimates based on single tower sites can result in significant bias, on average by a factor 4 for CO2 flux and 30% for CH4 flux. Although our results are specific to the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska, the degree of landscape-scale variability, large-scale controls on carbon exchange, and implications for regional estimation seen here likely have wide relevance to other arctic landscapes.

  8. Reproducing the Photospheric Magnetic Field Evolution During the Rise of Cycle 24 with Flux Transport by Supergranules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    We simulate the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun s photosphere by an evolving pattern of cellular horizontal flows (supergranules). Characteristics of the simulated flow pattern match observed characteristics including the velocity power spectrum, cell lifetimes, and cell pattern motion in longitude and latitude. Simulations using an average, and north-south symmetric, meridional motion of the cellular pattern produce polar magnetic fields that are too weak in the North and too strong in the South. Simulations using cellular patterns with meridional motions that evolve with the observed changes in strength and north-south asymmetry will be analyzed to see if they reproduce the polar field evolution observed during the rise of Cycle 24.

  9. Reproducing the Photospheric Magnetic Field Evolution during the Rise of Cycle 24 with Flux Transport by Supergranules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David; Upton, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    We simulate the transport of magnetic flux in the Sun s photosphere by an evolving pattern of cellular horizontal flows (supergranules). Characteristics of the simulated flow pattern can match observed characteristics including the velocity power spectrum, cell lifetimes, and cell motions in longitude and latitude. Simulations using an average, and north-south symmetric, meridional motion of the cellular pattern produce polar magnetic fields that are too weak in the North and too strong in the South. Simulations using cellular patterns with meridional motions that evolve with the observed changes in strength and north-south asymmetry will be analyzed to see if they reproduce the polar field evolution observed during the rise of Cycle 24.

  10. Impact of climate variability on N and C flux within the life cycle of biofuels produced from crop residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourhashem, G.; Block, P. J.; Adler, P. R.; Spatari, S.

    2013-12-01

    Biofuels from agricultural feedstocks (lignocellulose) are under development to meet national policy objectives for producing domestic renewable fuels. Using crop residues such as corn stover as feedstock for biofuel production can minimize the risks associated with food market disruption; however, it demands managing residue removal to minimize soil carbon loss, erosion, and to ensure nutrient replacement. Emissions of nitrous oxide and changes to soil organic carbon (SOC) are subject to variability in time due to local climate conditions and cultivation practices. Our objective is to investigate the effect of climate inputs (precipitation and temperature) on biogeochemical greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (N2O and SOC expressed as CO2) within the life cycle of biofuels produced from agricultural residues. Specifically, we investigate the impact of local climate variability on soil carbon and nitrogen fluxes over a 20-year biorefinery lifetime where biomass residue is used for lignocellulosic ethanol production. We investigate two cases studied previously (Pourhashem et al, 2013) where the fermentable sugars in the agricultural residue are converted to ethanol (biofuel) and the lignin byproduct is used in one of two ways: 1) power co-generation; or 2) application to land as a carbon/nutrient-rich amendment to soil. In the second case SOC losses are mitigated through returning the lignin component to land while the need for fertilizer addition is also eliminated, however in both cases N2O and SOC are subject to variability due to variable climate conditions. We used the biogeochemical model DayCent to predict soil carbon and nitrogen fluxes considering soil characteristics, tillage practices and local climate (e.g. temperature and rainfall). We address the impact of climate variability on the soil carbon and nitrogen fluxes by implementing a statistical bootstrap resampling method based on a historic data set (1980 to 2000). The ensuing probabilistic outputs from the

  11. Effects of vegetation on soil moisture distribution and flux with implications for the global hydrologic cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macari, Emir Jose

    1991-01-01

    Recent climate modeling experiments have identified the critical need for a better understanding of land surface - atmosphere interactions. An important issue in global climate modeling is to be able to relate land surface and atmospheric processes. In the past this link has been inadequately represented due to the lack of understanding of the interaction between the processes and also due to the large spatial variability of the hydrological and soil properties. A project was initiated at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in FY-90 under the Center's Directorate Discretionary Fund (CDDF) to study small-scale effects of vegetation on the distribution and fluxes of soil moisture. Installation of a large array of instruments was accomplished during that first year (FY-90). During this second year of the project, the instrumentation and data collection systems were improved and data has begun to be taken. Preliminary analysis of the data show that the equipment has been functioning properly. Some of the preliminary results that have recently been analyzed are given.

  12. Analisys of Helium fluxes and Helium Enhancement in 24th solar cycle with PAMELA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergé, Matteo

    2015-04-01

    The properties of solar energetic particles (SEPs) have long been modeled to constrain the proposed scenarios for particle acceleration. The challenge, however, is that the signatures of acceleration gleaned from SEP observations are modified as a consequence of transport within interplanetary space. PAMELA (Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics) is a space-borne experiment launched in a semi-polar orbit on 15 June 2006 and continuously collecting data since then. On-board instrumentation is built around a permanent magnet with a silicon microstrip tracker, providing charge and track deflection information. The unique observations from PAMELA provide an essential link between highest and lowest energy particles. Several events registered during the 24th solar activity cycle showed an increase in the helium particle density, those events are good candidates to study the helium enhancement phenomena (an increase in H to He ratio at low energies) and to address the charge/mass dependence of acceleration mechanisms.

  13. Coronal Holes and Open Magnetic Flux over Cycles 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowder, Chris; Qiu, Jiong; Leamon, Robert

    2017-01-01

    As the observational signature of the footprints of solar magnetic field lines open into the heliosphere, coronal holes provide a critical measure of the structure and evolution of these lines. Using a combination of Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (SOHO/EIT), Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA), and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (STEREO/EUVI A/B) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations spanning 1996 - 2015 (nearly two solar cycles), coronal holes are automatically detected and characterized. Coronal hole area distributions show distinct behavior in latitude, defining the domain of polar and low-latitude coronal holes. The northern and southern polar regions show a clear asymmetry, with a lag between hemispheres in the appearance and disappearance of polar coronal holes.

  14. Fluxes of 13 selected pharmaceuticals in the water cycle of Stockholm, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Wahlberg, C; Björlenius, B; Paxéus, N

    2011-01-01

    Mass flows of 13 pharmaceutical active ingredients (APIS) found in drinking water were studied in the water cycle of Stockholm. Data were collected by analyzing samples of surface water, raw water and drinking water as well as influents, effluents and sludges from waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) in Stockholm area. A mass balance was performed, based on sold amounts of pharmaceuticals and the measured concentrations in water and sludge. The selected APls were all present in WWTP effluents and the removal rates for many of them were poor. Mass balance calculations showed that the three studied WWTPs in Stockholm release considerable amounts of the selected APIs into the Baltic Sea while the portions ending up in WWTP sludge were significantly lower. The levels of APIs found in drinking water are low at present, but may increase in the future unless the releases from WWTPs in the catchment of Lake Mälären are mitigated.

  15. Stoichiometry of Reducing Equivalents and Splitting of Water in the Citric Acid Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madeira, Vitor M. C.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a solution to the problem of finding the source of extra reducing equivalents, and accomplishing the stoichiometry of glucose oxidation reactions. Discusses the citric acid cycle and glycolysis. (CW)

  16. Microbial Sulfur Cycling in an Acid Mine Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, L.; Warren, L. A.

    2004-12-01

    Geochemical dynamics of a tailings impacted lake in Northern Ontario were investigated over a three-year period, in which active pyrrhotite slurry disposal was initiated in year two. A strong seasonal trend of decreasing epilimnetic pH with significant diurnal acid production, pre-, during and post slurry deposition was observed with high rates observed compared to pre-slurry. Slurry deposition occurred at the surface of the lake and acted as a reaction stimulant for acid generation. Over the diurnal timescale investigated, the highest rates of acid production occurred not at the lake surface but within the metaliminetic region of the lake. This region was exemplified by strong decreasing oxygen gradients, and thus observed high rates of acid generation are more consistent with microbial pathways of sulfur oxidation than with abiotic, oxygen catalyzed pathways. Consistent with microbial catalysis, metalimnetic rates of acid generation were highest during June and July when microbial populations and metabolic rates were maximal. These results indicate that microbial oxidation of sulfur species play a major role in acid generation in this system. Further, observed rates of acid generation exceed those predicted by published abiotic rates of pyrrhotite oxidation, but are consistent with literature estimates of acid generation catalyzed by microbial activity. Acidithiobacilli accounted for up to 50% of the microbial community pre slurry, but were absent post slurry deposition. These results are the first to demonstrate quantitatively that microbial sulfur oxidation can play a predominant role in acid generation within mine tailings impacted systems. They further highlight the need to evaluate the more complex pathways by which microorganisms process sulfur as the conditions, controls and process rates differ from those observed for abiotic reactions.

  17. Uncertainty of Prebiotic Scenarios: The Case of the Non-Enzymatic Reverse Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zubarev, Dmitry Yu; Rappoport, Dmitrij; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2015-01-01

    We consider the hypothesis of the primordial nature of the non-enzymatic reverse tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle and describe a modeling approach to quantify the uncertainty of this hypothesis due to the combinatorial aspect of the constituent chemical transformations. Our results suggest that a) rTCA cycle belongs to a degenerate optimum of auto-catalytic cycles, and b) the set of targets for investigations of the origin of the common metabolic core should be significantly extended. PMID:25620471

  18. The extraordinary mitochondrion and unusual citric acid cycle in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    van Hellemond, J J; Opperdoes, F R; Tielens, A G M

    2005-11-01

    African trypanosomes are parasitic protozoa that cause sleeping sickness and nagana. Trypanosomes are not only of scientific interest because of their clinical importance, but also because these protozoa contain several very unusual biological features, such as their specially adapted mitochondrion and the compartmentalization of glycolytic enzymes in glycosomes. The energy metabolism of Trypanosoma brucei differs significantly from that of their hosts and changes drastically during the life cycle. Despite the presence of all citric acid cycle enzymes in procyclic insect-stage T. brucei, citric acid cycle activity is not used for energy generation. Recent investigations on the influence of substrate availability on the type of energy metabolism showed that absence of glycolytic substrates did not induce a shift from a fermentative metabolism to complete oxidation of substrates. Apparently, insect-stage T. brucei use parts of the citric acid cycle for other purposes than for complete degradation of mitochondrial substrates. Parts of the cycle are suggested to be used for (i) transport of acetyl-CoA units from the mitochondrion to the cytosol for the biosynthesis of fatty acids, (ii) degradation of proline and glutamate to succinate, (iii) generation of malate, which can then be used for gluconeogenesis. Therefore the citric acid cycle in trypanosomes does not function as a cycle.

  19. A Global Mass Balance of Isotope Ratios in Hydrologic Fluxes Provides Constraints on Terrestrial and Oceanic Water Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, S. P.; Noone, D. C.; Kurita, N.; Benetti, M.; Bowen, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    The global budget of isotope ratios in the Earth's water cycle is poorly understood because of large uncertainties in the isotopic composition of continental evapotranspiration. Additional uncertainties exist in the global pattern of marine boundary layer vapor D/H isotope ratios and the magnitude of their influence on oceanic evaporation. Here, we use satellite retrievals of marine boundary layer vapor HDO and H2O from the Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer (TES) corrected to match surface vapor collected during cruises in the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, and Arctic Oceans to resolve the global D/H isotope ratio budget. After our correction, satellite retrievals are un-biased, and have an average error of 14 permil when compared with 1341 satellite retrievals that were co-located with surface observations. Using TES retrieval spanning the globe, we calculate the global oceanic evaporation flux isotopic composition as approximately -30 permil, and combined with estimates of precipitation isotope ratios, a global mass balance is applied to quantify terrestrial evapotranspiration and runoff composition. The flux-weighted average isotopic composition of precipitation is estimated at approximately -37 permil, with oceanic precipitation having a value of approximately -32 permil and terrestrial precipitation having a value of approximately -52 permil. Based on our mass balance, terrestrial evapotranspiration has a flux-weighted average composition of -69 permil and terrestrial runoff has an average composition of -16 permil, which corresponds to a terrestrial enrichment of 37 permil for runoff relative to terrestrial precipitation. Knowledge of the entire HDO budget provides constraints on terrestrial evaporation/transpiration partitioning as well as tropospheric entrainment of moisture into the boundary layer, both poorly understood components of the global hydrologic cycle. These calculations provide a critical test of an essential global closure theory upon which many

  20. Modeling of the solar cycle modulated interstellar He, Ne, and O pick-up ion flux along the Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzowski, M.; Sokol, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Moebius, E.

    2015-12-01

    Interstellar pick-up ions (PUIs) are used to study in-situ the interstellar flow through the heliosphere. The locations of the peaks of the downwind focusing cone and the upwind crescent as observed in the PUI flux have been used as signatures for the flow direction of neutral interstellar (ISN) gas into the heliosphere. We study the modulation of interstellar He, Ne, and O PUI along the Earth orbit over almost the entire solar activity cycle from 2002 to 2013. We present the expected density of ISN atoms and the resulting PUI fluxes with their modulation due to varying ionization over the solar cycle. Considering the important role of the finite injection speed of ISN atoms and of adiabatic PUI cooling, we show that Ne and O always form an upwind crescent in the PUI flux, but that the crescent formation for He PUIs strongly depends on the integration boundaries for the PUI distribution. Because the crescent has been observed for all three species, we find that the classical model of PUI evolution by Vasyliunas & Siscoe (1976) may not be sufficient to reproduce the upwind structure of He PUIs. We also find that ecliptic longitude of the PUI peak in the focusing cone is a good proxy for the inflow direction of ISN He and Ne during solar minimum, but not for ISN O, which exhibits a systematic shift in the model. On the other hand, the peak location derived from the crescent may not be a good proxy to determine the inflow longitude because it is highly modulated by short-time (few months) variations in the ionization losses. These lead to a corrugated crescent structure and may shift the fitted position of the crescent peak used to determine the inflow direction by up to 10°, with the strongest effects for the species that are heavily affected by ionization, i.e., O and Ne. These findings are in a qualitative agreement with results of in-situ PUI measurements, which showed that the location of PUI maximum varies.

  1. Hydrogen Storage in the Carbon Dioxide - Formic Acid Cycle.

    PubMed

    Fink, Cornel; Montandon-Clerc, Mickael; Laurenczy, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    This year Mankind will release about 39 Gt carbon dioxide into the earth's atmosphere, where it acts as a greenhouse gas. The chemical transformation of carbon dioxide into useful products becomes increasingly important, as the CO(2) concentration in the atmosphere has reached 400 ppm. One approach to contribute to the decrease of this hazardous emission is to recycle CO(2), for example reducing it to formic acid. The hydrogenation of CO(2) can be achieved with a series of catalysts under basic and acidic conditions, in wide variety of solvents. To realize a hydrogen-based charge-discharge device ('hydrogen battery'), one also needs efficient catalysts for the reverse reaction, the dehydrogenation of formic acid. Despite of the fact that the overwhelming majority of these reactions are carried out using precious metals-based catalysts (mainly Ru), we review here developments for catalytic hydrogen evolution from formic acid with iron-based complexes.

  2. NASA's Carbon Monitoring System Flux-Pilot Project: A Multi-Component Analysis System for Carbon-Cycle Research and Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, S.; Gunson, M.; Potter, C.; Jucks, K.

    2012-01-01

    The importance of greenhouse gas increases for climate motivates NASA s observing strategy for CO2 from space, including the forthcoming Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) mission. Carbon cycle monitoring, including attribution of atmospheric concentrations to regional emissions and uptake, requires a robust modeling and analysis infrastructure to optimally extract information from the observations. NASA's Carbon-Monitoring System Flux-Pilot Project (FPP) is a prototype for such analysis, combining a set of unique tools to facilitate analysis of atmospheric CO2 along with fluxes between the atmosphere and the terrestrial biosphere or ocean. NASA's analysis system is unique, in that it combines information and expertise from the land, oceanic, and atmospheric branches of the carbon cycle and includes some estimates of uncertainty. Numerous existing space-based missions provide information of relevance to the carbon cycle. This study describes the components of the FPP framework, assessing the realism of computed fluxes, thus providing the basis for research and monitoring applications. Fluxes are computed using data-constrained terrestrial biosphere models and physical ocean models, driven by atmospheric observations and assimilating ocean-color information. Use of two estimates provides a measure of uncertainty in the fluxes. Along with inventories of other emissions, these data-derived fluxes are used in transport models to assess their consistency with atmospheric CO2 observations. Closure is achieved by using a four-dimensional data assimilation (inverse) approach that adjusts the terrestrial biosphere fluxes to make them consistent with the atmospheric CO2 observations. Results will be shown, illustrating the year-to-year variations in land biospheric and oceanic fluxes computed in the FPP. The signals of these surface-flux variations on atmospheric CO2 will be isolated using forward modeling tools, which also incorporate estimates of transport error. The

  3. Protein turnover, amino acid profile and amino acid flux in juvenile shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei: effects of dietary protein source.

    PubMed

    Mente, Eleni; Coutteau, Peter; Houlihan, Dominic; Davidson, Ian; Sorgeloos, Patrick

    2002-10-01

    The effect of dietary protein on protein synthesis and growth of juvenile shrimps Litopenaeus vannamei was investigated using three different diets with equivalent protein content. Protein synthesis was investigated by a flooding dose of tritiated phenylalanine. Survival, specific growth and protein synthesis rates were higher, and protein degradation was lower, in shrimps fed a fish/squid/shrimp meal diet, or a 50% laboratory diet/50% soybean meal variant diet, than in those fed a casein-based diet. The efficiency of retention of synthesized protein as growth was 94% for shrimps fed the fish meal diet, suggesting a very low protein turnover rate; by contrast, the retention of synthesized protein was only 80% for shrimps fed the casein diet. The amino acid profile of the casein diet was poorly correlated with that of the shrimps. 4 h after a single meal the protein synthesis rates increased following an increase in RNA activity. A model was developed for amino acid flux, suggesting that high growth rates involve a reduction in the turnover of proteins, while amino acid loss appears to be high.

  4. Final Technical Report. Supporting carbon cycle and earth systems modeling with measurements and analysis from the Howland AmeriFlux Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, David; Davidson, E.; Dail, D. B.; Richardson, A.

    2016-01-11

    This report provides and overview of the work carried out and lists the products produced under the terms of agreement SC0005578 with the USDA Forest Service. This relates to scientific investigation of the carbon cycle at the Howland Forest AmeriFlux site located in central Maine, USDA. The overall goal of this work was to understand the various (and interacting) impacts of a changing climate on carbon cycling at the Howland AmeriFlux site, representative of an important component of the North American boreal forest.

  5. New Insights in Nutritional Management and Amino Acid Supplementation in Urea Cycle Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scaglia, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Sodium phenylbutyrate is used in the pharmacological treatment of urea cycle disorders to create alternative pathways for nitrogen excretion. The primary metabolite, phenylacetate, conjugates glutamine in the liver and kidney to form phenylacetylglutamine that is readily excreted in the urine. Patients with urea cycle disorders taking sodium phenylbutyrate have a selective reduction in the plasma concentrations of branched chain amino acids despite adequate dietary protein intake. Moreover, this depletion is usually the harbinger of a metabolic crisis. Plasma branched chain amino acids and other essential amino acids were measured in control subjects, untreated ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency females, and treated patients with urea cycle disorders (ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and argininosuccinate synthetase deficiency) in the absorptive state during the course of stable isotope studies. Branched chain amino acid levels were significantly lower in treated patients with urea cycle disorders when compared to untreated ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency females or control subjects. These results were replicated in control subjects who had low steady-state branched chain amino acid levels when treated with sodium phenylbutyrate. These studies suggested that alternative pathway therapy with sodium phenylbutyrate causes a substantial impact on the metabolism of branched chain amino acids in patients with urea cycle disorders, implying that better titration of protein restriction can be achieved with branched chain amino acid supplementation in these patients who are on alternative pathway therapy. PMID:20299258

  6. Geobiochemistry of metabolism: Standard state thermodynamic properties of the citric acid cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canovas, Peter A.; Shock, Everett L.

    2016-12-01

    Integrating microbial metabolism into geochemical modeling allows assessments of energy and mass transfer between the geosphere and the microbial biosphere. Energy and power supplies and demands can be assessed from analytical geochemical data given thermodynamic data for compounds involved in catabolism and anabolism. Results are reported here from a critique of the available standard state thermodynamic data for organic acids and acid anions involved in the citric acid cycle (also known as the tricarboxylic acid cycle or the Krebs cycle). The development of methods for estimating standard state data unavailable from experiments is described, together with methods to predict corresponding values at elevated temperatures and pressures using the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state for aqueous species. Internal consistency is maintained with standard state thermodynamic data for organic and inorganic aqueous species commonly used in geochemical modeling efforts. Standard state data and revised-HKF parameters are used to predict equilibrium dissociation constants for the organic acids in the citric acid cycle, and to assess standard Gibbs energies of reactions for each step in the cycle at elevated temperatures and pressures. The results presented here can be used with analytical data from natural and experimental systems to assess the energy and power demands of microorganisms throughout the habitable ranges of pressure and temperature, and to assess the consequences of abiotic organic compound alteration processes at conditions of subsurface aquifers, sedimentary basins, hydrothermal systems, meteorite parent bodies, and ocean worlds throughout the solar system.

  7. Fatty acid labeling from glutamine in hypoxia can be explained by isotope exchange without net reductive isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) flux.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Kamphorst, Jurre J; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Shlomi, Tomer

    2013-10-25

    Acetyl-CoA is an important anabolic precursor for lipid biosynthesis. In the conventional view of mammalian metabolism, acetyl-CoA is primarily derived by the oxidation of glucose-derived pyruvate in mitochondria. Recent studies have employed isotope tracers to show that in cancer cells grown in hypoxia or with defective mitochondria, a major fraction of acetyl-CoA is produced via another route, reductive carboxylation of glutamine-derived α-ketoglutarate (catalyzed by reverse flux through isocitrate dehydrogenase, IDH). Here, we employ a quantitative flux model to show that in hypoxia and in cells with defective mitochondria, oxidative IDH flux persists and may exceed the reductive flux. Therefore, IDH flux may not be a net contributor to acetyl-CoA production, although we cannot rule out net reductive IDH flux in some compartments. Instead of producing large amounts of net acetyl-CoA reductively, the cells adapt by reducing their demand for acetyl-CoA by importing rather than synthesizing fatty acids. Thus, fatty acid labeling from glutamine in hypoxia can be explained by spreading of label without net reductive IDH flux.

  8. (13)C Metabolic Flux Analysis for Systematic Metabolic Engineering of S. cerevisiae for Overproduction of Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amit; Ando, David; Gin, Jennifer; Runguphan, Weerawat; Denby, Charles; Wang, George; Baidoo, Edward E K; Shymansky, Chris; Keasling, Jay D; García Martín, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Efficient redirection of microbial metabolism into the abundant production of desired bioproducts remains non-trivial. Here, we used flux-based modeling approaches to improve yields of fatty acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We combined (13)C labeling data with comprehensive genome-scale models to shed light onto microbial metabolism and improve metabolic engineering efforts. We concentrated on studying the balance of acetyl-CoA, a precursor metabolite for the biosynthesis of fatty acids. A genome-wide acetyl-CoA balance study showed ATP citrate lyase from Yarrowia lipolytica as a robust source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA and malate synthase as a desirable target for downregulation in terms of acetyl-CoA consumption. These genetic modifications were applied to S. cerevisiae WRY2, a strain that is capable of producing 460 mg/L of free fatty acids. With the addition of ATP citrate lyase and downregulation of malate synthase, the engineered strain produced 26% more free fatty acids. Further increases in free fatty acid production of 33% were obtained by knocking out the cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which flux analysis had shown was competing for carbon flux upstream with the carbon flux through the acetyl-CoA production pathway in the cytoplasm. In total, the genetic interventions applied in this work increased fatty acid production by ~70%.

  9. 13C Metabolic Flux Analysis for Systematic Metabolic Engineering of S. cerevisiae for Overproduction of Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Amit; Ando, David; Gin, Jennifer; Runguphan, Weerawat; Denby, Charles; Wang, George; Baidoo, Edward E. K.; Shymansky, Chris; Keasling, Jay D.; García Martín, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    Efficient redirection of microbial metabolism into the abundant production of desired bioproducts remains non-trivial. Here, we used flux-based modeling approaches to improve yields of fatty acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We combined 13C labeling data with comprehensive genome-scale models to shed light onto microbial metabolism and improve metabolic engineering efforts. We concentrated on studying the balance of acetyl-CoA, a precursor metabolite for the biosynthesis of fatty acids. A genome-wide acetyl-CoA balance study showed ATP citrate lyase from Yarrowia lipolytica as a robust source of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA and malate synthase as a desirable target for downregulation in terms of acetyl-CoA consumption. These genetic modifications were applied to S. cerevisiae WRY2, a strain that is capable of producing 460 mg/L of free fatty acids. With the addition of ATP citrate lyase and downregulation of malate synthase, the engineered strain produced 26% more free fatty acids. Further increases in free fatty acid production of 33% were obtained by knocking out the cytoplasmic glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, which flux analysis had shown was competing for carbon flux upstream with the carbon flux through the acetyl-CoA production pathway in the cytoplasm. In total, the genetic interventions applied in this work increased fatty acid production by ~70%. PMID:27761435

  10. Climatology of low latitude ionosphere under effect of varying solar flux during solar cycle 23 and 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashora, Nirvikar; Suresh, Sunanda

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of quiet time equatorial and low latitude total electron content (TEC) over the Indian sector using GIM data (1998-2014) is obtained. For the first time the analysis is carried filtering out the solar flare and storm effects and time series of quiet time VTEC data from three locations namely dip equator and two low latitude conjugate locations in Indian sector are obtained. It is well known that a complex interplay among drivers of equatorial electrodynamics like Solar flux, dynamo electric field and meridional winds determine the daytime ionization and distribution in equatorial ionization anomaly zone. In this study, we have critically examined the role of varying solar flux and response of low latitude ionosphere with new and standardized definitions. The results are examined and interpreted in the context of large number of previous studies. The newly found features from this study are as follows. Marked difference in nature of equinoctial asymmetry is noted between solar cycle 23 and 24. Long absence of winter anomaly both during low and high solar activity (HSA) in LL (low latitude) regions is found. Climatology of the diurnal cycle is provided in four categories using new criteria for demarcation of solar activity levels. Highest correlation (~77%) between GIM ionospheric electron content (IEC) and PI (solar EUV proxy index) is noted over equator in contrast to previous studies. The minimum positive contribution of PI in variation of IEC requires minimum of 2 years of data and if more than 7-8 years of data is used, it saturates. RMS (root mean square) width of PI can be used to define the HSA. Strong QBO (quasi biennial oscillations) in IEC is noted in tune with the one in PI over both the LL location but QBO remains surprisingly subdued over equator. The semi-annual oscillations in GIM-IEC are found to be stronger at all locations during high solar activity and weaker between 2005 and 2011, whereas, the annual oscillations are found to

  11. Simultaneous investigation of cardiac pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, Krebs cycle metabolism and pH, using hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C2]pyruvate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Albert P; Hurd, Ralph E; Schroeder, Marie A; Lau, Angus Z; Gu, Yi-ping; Lam, Wilfred W; Barry, Jennifer; Tropp, James; Cunningham, Charles H

    2012-02-01

    (13)C MR spectroscopy studies performed on hearts ex vivo and in vivo following perfusion of prepolarized [1-(13)C]pyruvate have shown that changes in pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) flux may be monitored non-invasively. However, to allow investigation of Krebs cycle metabolism, the (13)C label must be placed on the C2 position of pyruvate. Thus, the utilization of either C1 or C2 labeled prepolarized pyruvate as a tracer can only afford a partial view of cardiac pyruvate metabolism in health and disease. If the prepolarized pyruvate molecules were labeled at both C1 and C2 positions, then it would be possible to observe the downstream metabolites that were the results of both PDH flux ((13)CO(2) and H(13)CO(3)(-)) and Krebs cycle flux ([5-(13)C]glutamate) with a single dose of the agent. Cardiac pH could also be monitored in the same experiment, but adequate SNR of the (13)CO(2) resonance may be difficult to obtain in vivo. Using an interleaved selective RF pulse acquisition scheme to improve (13)CO(2) detection, the feasibility of using dual-labeled hyperpolarized [1,2-(13)C(2)]pyruvate as a substrate for dynamic cardiac metabolic MRS studies to allow simultaneous investigation of PDH flux, Krebs cycle flux and pH, was demonstrated in vivo.

  12. Interactive enhancements of ascorbic acid and iron in hydroxyl radical generation in quinone redox cycling.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhu, Tong; Zhao, Jincai; Xu, Bingye

    2012-09-18

    Quinones are toxicological substances in inhalable particulate matter (PM). The mechanisms by which quinones cause hazardous effects can be complex. Quinones are highly active redox molecules that can go through a redox cycle with their semiquinone radicals, leading to formation of reactive oxygen species. Electron spin resonance spectra have been reported for semiquinone radicals in PM, indicating the importance of ascorbic acid and iron in quinone redox cycling. However, these findings are insufficient for understanding the toxicity associated with quinone exposure. Herein, we investigated the interactions among anthraquinone (AQ), ascorbic acid, and iron in hydroxyl radical (·OH) generation through the AQ redox cycling process in a physiological buffer. We measured ·OH concentration and analyzed the free radical process. Our results showed that AQ, ascorbic acid, and iron have synergistic effects on ·OH generation in quinone redox cycling; i.e., ascorbyl radical oxidized AQ to semiquinone radical and started the redox cycling, iron accelerated this oxidation and enhanced ·OH generation through Fenton reactions, while ascorbic acid and AQ could help iron to release from quartz surface and enhance its bioavailability. Our findings provide direct evidence for the redox cycling hypothesis about airborne particle surface quinone in lung fluid.

  13. Photoreduction fuels biogeochemical cycling of iron in Spain's acid rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gammons, C.H.; Nimick, D.A.; Parker, S.R.; Snyder, D.M.; McCleskey, R.B.; Amils, R.; Poulson, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    A number of investigations have shown that photoreduction of Fe(III) causes midday accumulations of dissolved Fe(II) in rivers and lakes, leading to large diel (24-h) fluctuations in the concentration and speciation of total dissolved iron. Less well appreciated is the importance of photoreduction in providing chemical energy for bacteria to thrive in low pH waters. Diel variations in water chemistry from the highly acidic (pH 2.3 to 3.1) Ri??o Tinto, Ri??o Odiel, and Ri??o Agrio of southwestern Spain (Iberian Pyrite Belt) resulted in daytime increases in Fe(II) concentration of 15 to 66????M at four diel sampling locations. Dissolved Fe(II) concentrations increased with solar radiation, and one of the stream sites showed an antithetic relationship between dissolved Fe(II) and Fe(III) concentrations; both results are consistent with photoreduction. The diel data were used to estimate rates of microbially catalyzed Fe(II) oxidation (1 to 3??nmol L- 1 s- 1) and maximum rates of Fe(III) photoreduction (1.7 to 4.3??nmol L- 1 s- 1). Bioenergetic calculations indicate that the latter rates are sufficient to build up a population of Fe-oxidizing bacteria to the levels observed in the Ri??o Tinto in about 30??days. We conclude that photoreduction plays an important role in the bioenergetics of the bacterial communities of these acidic rivers, which have previously been shown to be dominated by autotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans. Given the possibility of the previous existence of acidic, Fe(III)-rich water on Mars, photoreduction may be an important process on other planets, a fact that could have implications to astrobiological research. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Citric acid cycle intermediates as ligands for orphan G-protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    He, Weihai; Miao, Frederick J-P; Lin, Daniel C-H; Schwandner, Ralf T; Wang, Zhulun; Gao, Jinhai; Chen, Jin-Long; Tian, Hui; Ling, Lei

    2004-05-13

    The citric acid cycle is central to the regulation of energy homeostasis and cell metabolism. Mutations in enzymes that catalyse steps in the citric acid cycle result in human diseases with various clinical presentations. The intermediates of the citric acid cycle are present at micromolar concentration in blood and are regulated by respiration, metabolism and renal reabsorption/extrusion. Here we show that GPR91 (ref. 3), a previously orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), functions as a receptor for the citric acid cycle intermediate succinate. We also report that GPR99 (ref. 4), a close relative of GPR91, responds to alpha-ketoglutarate, another intermediate in the citric acid cycle. Thus by acting as ligands for GPCRs, succinate and alpha-ketoglutarate are found to have unexpected signalling functions beyond their traditional roles. Furthermore, we show that succinate increases blood pressure in animals. The succinate-induced hypertensive effect involves the renin-angiotensin system and is abolished in GPR91-deficient mice. Our results indicate a possible role for GPR91 in renovascular hypertension, a disease closely linked to atherosclerosis, diabetes and renal failure.

  15. Low to middle tropospheric profiles and biosphere/troposphere fluxes of acidic gases in the summertime Canadian taiga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemm, O.; Talbot, R. W.; Fitzgerald, D. R.; Klemm, K. I.; Lefer, B. L.

    1994-01-01

    We report features of acidic gases in the troposphere from 9 to 5000 m altitude above ground over the Canadian taiga in the summer of 1990. The measurements were conducted at a 30-m meteorological tower and from the NASA Wallops Electra aircraft as part of the joint U.S.-Canadian Arctic Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B Northern Wetland Studies (NOWES). We sampled air for acidic gases using the mist chamber collector coupled with subsequent analysis using ion chromatography. At the tower we collected samples at two heights during a 13-day period, including diurnal studies. Using eddy flux and profile data, we estimated the biosphere/troposphere fluxes of nitric, formic, and acetic acids and sulfur dioxide. For the organic acids, emissions from the taiga in the afternoon hours and deposition during the predawn morning hours were observed. The flux intensities alone were however not high enough to explain the observed changes in mixing ratios. The measured deposition fluxes of nitric acid were high enough to have a significant influence on its mixing ratio in the boundary layer. On three days we measured vertical profiles of nitric, formic, and acetic acids through the lower to midtroposphere. We found that the chemical composition of the troposphere was extremely heterogenous. Pronounced layers of polluted air were readily apparent from our measurements. Local photochemical production and episodic long-range transport of trace components, originating from biomass burning and possibly industrial emissions, appear to have a strong influence on the composition of the troposphere and biosphere/troposphere fluxes of acidic gases at this site.

  16. Snowmelt controls on concentration-discharge relationships and the balance of oxidative and acid-base weathering fluxes in an alpine catchment, East River, Colorado

    DOE PAGES

    Winnick, Matthew J.; Carroll, Rosemary; Williams, Kenneth; ...

    2017-03-02

    Although important for riverine solute and nutrient fluxes, the connections between biogeochemical processes and subsurface hydrology remain poorly characterized. We investigate these couplings in the East River, CO, a high-elevation shale-dominated catchment in the Rocky Mountains, using concentration-discharge (C-Q) relationships for major cations, anions, and organic carbon. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) displays a positive C-Q relationship with clockwise hysteresis, indicating mobilization and depletion of DOC in the upper soil horizons and emphasizing the importance of shallow flowpaths during snowmelt. Cation and anion concentrations demonstrate that carbonate weathering, which dominates solute fluxes, is promoted by both sulfuric acid derived from pyritemore » oxidation in the shale bedrock and carbonic acid derived from subsurface respiration. Sulfuric acid weathering dominates during baseflow conditions when waters infiltrate below the inferred pyrite oxidation front, whereas carbonic acid weathering plays a dominant role during snowmelt as a result of shallow flowpaths. Differential C-Q relationships between solutes suggest that infiltrating waters approach calcite saturation before reaching the pyrite oxidation front, after which sulfuric acid reduces carbonate alkalinity. This reduction in alkalinity results in CO2 outgassing when waters equilibrate to surface conditions, and reduces the riverine export of carbon and alkalinity by roughly 33% annually. In conclusion, future changes in snowmelt dynamics that control the balance of carbonic and sulfuric acid weathering may substantially alter carbon cycling in the East River. Ultimately, we demonstrate that differential C-Q relationships between major solutes can provide unique insights into the complex subsurface flow and biogeochemical dynamics that operate at catchment scales.« less

  17. Metabolic flux modeling of detoxification of acetic acid by Ralstonia eutropha at slightly alkaline pH levels.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Wang, J

    2001-06-20

    Ralstonia eutropha grows on and produces polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from fermentation acids. Acetic acid, one major organic acid from acidogenesis of organic wastes, has an inhibitory effect on the bacterium at slightly alkaline pH (6 g HAc/L at pH 8). The tolerance of R. eutropha to acetate, however, was increased significantly up to 15 g/L at the slightly alkaline pH level with high cell mass concentration. A metabolic cell model with five fluxes is proposed to depict the detoxification mechanism including mass transfer and acetyl-CoA formation of acetic acid and the formation of three final metabolic products, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), active biomass, and CO(2). The fluxes were measured under different conditions such as cell mass concentration, acetic acid concentration, and medium composition. The experimental results indicate that the acetate detoxification by high cell mass concentration is attributed to the increased fluxes at high extracellular acetate concentrations. The fluxes could be doubled to reduce and hence detoxify the accumulated intracellular acetate anions.

  18. Structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids and T cell cycle blockade.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Kathleen M; DeLoose, Annick; Valentine, Jimmie L; Fifer, E Kim

    2006-04-04

    This study was designed to examine the potential structure-activity relationship between carboxylic acids, histone acetylation and T cell cycle blockade. Toward this goal a series of structural homologues of the short-chain carboxylic acid n-butyrate were studied for their ability to block the IL-2-stimulated proliferation of cloned CD4+ T cells. The carboxylic acids were also tested for their ability to inhibit histone deacetylation. In addition, Western blotting was used to examine the relative capacity of the carboxlic acids to upregulate the cyclin kinase-dependent inhibitor p21cip1 in T cells. As shown earlier n-butyrate effectively inhibited histone deacetylation. The increased acetylation induced by n-butyrate was associated with the upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1 and the cell cycle blockade of CD4+ T cells. Of the other carboxylic acids studied, the short chain acids, C3-C5, without branching were the best inhibitors of histone deacetylase. This inhibition correlated with increased expression of the cell cycle blocker p21cip1, and the associated suppression of CD4+ T cell proliferation. The branched-chain carboxylic acids tested were ineffective in all the assays. These results underline the relationship between the ability of a carboxylic acid to inhibit histone deacetylation, and their ability to block T cell proliferation, and suggests that branching inhibits these effects.

  19. A Method for the Measurement of Nitrous Acid Flux Using Relaxed Eddy Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertman, S.; Marchewka, M.; King, J.

    2003-12-01

    HONO has recently received renewed attention as a byproduct of condensed nitrogen photolysis and as a potential atmospheric radical source. In particular, several recent accounts suggesting a photochemical source in forests have lead us to develop a method for assessing nitrous acid flux above a hardwood forest in northern Michigan. The technique was based on nitrous acid in ambient air being scrubbed into a 1mM phosphate buffer that was then derivatized into a light absorbing complex. A separate scrubbing system was used for updrafts and downdrafts after the air had been separated through Teflon valves according to input from a sonic anemometer. The detection of the complex was performed via UV absorption through a capillary flowthrough cell. Detection limit for this analytical method is around 10 pptv. Derivatized solution from each flow system was injected into the capillary cell via an 8-port valve with two sample loops. Each sample loop was injected as soon as it filled, which allowed measurement of all of the scrubbed material in each flow system. Laboratory tests were performed to assess the accuracy and suitability of this method. The field worthiness of the instrument was determined during the summer of 2003 at the University of Michigan Biological Station in northern Michigan where it was placed on top of a 35m tower above a forest canopy.

  20. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids: A new class of organic micropollutants in the water cycle.

    PubMed

    Zahn, Daniel; Frömel, Tobias; Knepper, Thomas P

    2016-09-15

    Mobile and persistent organic micropollutants may impact raw and drinking waters and are thus of concern for human health. To identify such possible substances of concern nineteen water samples from five European countries (France, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Spain and Germany) and different compartments of the water cycle (urban effluent, surface water, ground water and drinking water) were enriched with mixed-mode solid phase extraction. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry non-target screening of these samples led to the detection and structural elucidation of seven novel organic micropollutants. One structure could already be confirmed by a reference standard (trifluoromethanesulfonic acid) and six were tentatively identified based on experimental evidence (chloromethanesulfonic acid, dichloromethanesulfonic acid, trichloromethanesulfonic acid, bromomethanesulfonic acid, dibromomethanesulfonic acid and bromochloromethanesulfonic acid). Approximated concentrations for these substances show that trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, a chemical registered under the European Union regulation REACH with a production volume of more than 100 t/a, is able to spread along the water cycle and may be present in concentrations up to the μg/L range. Chlorinated and brominated methanesulfonic acids were predominantly detected together which indicates a common source and first experimental evidence points towards water disinfection as a potential origin. Halogenated methanesulfonic acids were detected in drinking waters and thus may be new substances of concern.

  1. Measurement of the rates of acetyl-CoA hydrolysis and synthesis from acetate in rat hepatocytes and the role of these fluxes in substrate cycling.

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree, B; Gordon, M J; Christie, S L

    1990-01-01

    1. Acetyl-CoA hydrolysis, acetyl-CoA synthesis from acetate and several related fluxes were measured in rat hepatocytes. 2. In contrast with acetyl-CoA hydrolysis, most of the acetyl-CoA synthesis from acetate occurred in the mitochondria. 3. Acetyl-CoA hydrolysis was not significantly affected by 24 h starvation or (-)-hydroxycitrate. 4. In the cytoplasm there was a net flux of acetyl-CoA to acetate, and substrate cycling between acetate and acetyl-CoA in this compartment was very low, accounting for less than 0.1% of the total heat production by the animal. 5. A larger cycle, involving mitochondrial and cytoplasmic acetate and acetyl-CoA, may operate in fed animals, but would account for only approx 1% of total heat production. 6. It is proposed that the opposing fluxes of mitochondrial acetate utilization and cytoplasmic net acetate production may provide sensitivity, feedback and buffering, even when these fluxes are not linked to form a conventional substrate cycle. PMID:2396982

  2. Chopper-controlled discharge life cycling studies on lead-acid batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraml, J. J.; Ames, E. P.

    1982-01-01

    State-of-the-art 6 volt lead-acid golf car batteries were tested. A daily charge/discharge cycling to failure points under various chopper controlled pulsed dc and continuous current load conditions was undertaken. The cycle life and failure modes were investigated for depth of discharge, average current chopper frequency, and chopper duty cycle. It is shown that battery life is primarily and inversely related to depth of discharge and discharge current. Failure mode is characterized by a gradual capacity loss with consistent evidence of cell element aging.

  3. Results of chopper-controlled discharge life cycling studies on lead acid batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewashinka, J. G.; Sidik, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    A group of 108 state of the art nominally 6 volt lead acid batteries were tested in a program of one charge/discharge cycle per day for over two years or to ultimate battery failure. The primary objective was to determine battery cycle life as a function of depth of discharge (25 to 75 percent), chopper frequency (100 to 1000 Hz), duty cycle (25 to 87.5 percent), and average discharge current (20 to 260 A). The secondary objective was to determine the types of battery failure modes, if any, were due to the above parameters. The four parameters above were incorporated in a statistically designed test program.

  4. Acetaminophen toxicity and 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid): a tale of two cycles, one an ATP-depleting futile cycle and the other a useful cycle.

    PubMed

    Emmett, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The acquired form of 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid) metabolic acidosis was first described in 1989 and its relationship to chronic acetaminophen ingestion was proposed the next year. Since then, this cause of chronic anion gap metabolic acidosis has been increasingly recognized. Many cases go unrecognized because an assay for 5-oxoproline is not widely available. Most cases occur in malnourished, chronically ill women with a history of chronic acetaminophen ingestion. Acetaminophen levels are very rarely in the toxic range; rather, they are usually therapeutic or low. The disorder generally resolves with cessation of acetaminophen and administration of intravenous fluids. Methionine or N-acetyl cysteine may accelerate resolution and methionine is protective in a rodent model. The disorder has been attributed to glutathione depletion and activation of a key enzyme in the γ-glutamyl cycle. However, the specific metabolic derangements that cause the 5-oxoproline accumulation remain unclear. An ATP-depleting futile 5-oxoproline cycle can explain the accumulation of 5-oxoproline after chronic acetaminophen ingestion. This cycle is activated by the depletion of both glutathione and cysteine. This explanation contributes to our understanding of acetaminophen-induced 5-oxoproline metabolic acidosis and the beneficial role of N-acetyl cysteine therapy. The ATP-depleting futile 5-oxoproline cycle may also play a role in the energy depletions that occur in other acetaminophen-related toxic syndromes.

  5. NHI-Acid Concentration Membranes -- Membrane Recommendations for the S-I Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F Stewart

    2007-03-01

    Scope: The purpose of this draft report is to make recommendations concerning the applicability of specific membrane materials for acid concentration processes to the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle integrated laboratory scale (ILS) demonstration. Introduction Acid concentration membrane processes have been studied for possible inclusion in the Sulfur-Iodine integrated laboratory scale (S-I ILS) demonstration. The need for this technology is driven by the chemical processes required for economical water splitting using the S-I cycle. Of the chemical processes inherent to the S-I cycle that have been identified as targets for deployment of membrane technology, three have been studied during the past three fiscal years as a part of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. First, the ability to concentrate hydriodic acid (HI) and iodine mixtures was sought as a method for aiding in the isolation of HI away from water and iodine. Isolated HI would then be delivered to the HI decomposition process for liberation of product hydrogen. Second, an extension of this technology to sulfuric acid was proposed to benefit sulfuric acid decomposition recycle. Third, decomposition of HI to form hydrogen is equilibrium limited. Removal of hydrogen, utilizing Le Chatelier’s principle, will increase to overall conversion and thus increasing the efficiency of the S-I cycle.

  6. Effect of boric acid treatment on the secondary cycle at ANO-2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Siegwarth, D.P.; McNea, D.A.; Sawochka, S.G.

    1985-11-01

    Because of the rapid progression of denting at the steam generator upper support plates at Arkansas Nuclear One-Unit 2 (ANO-2), Arkansas Power and Light (AP and L) implemented boric acid treatment during the third fuel cycle. Minimal effects of boric acid on secondary cycle ionic transport were observed; however, indications of accelerated corrosion of copper alloys in portions of the cycle were noted. Since the primary-to-secondary hydrogen diffusion rate data did not conform to the relation expected based on laboratory studies with Alloy 600, hydrogen transport data could not be employed to conclusively demonstrate the effect of boric acid on steam generator corrosion. Assuming that the basic form of the diffusion relation remained the same during operation with and without boric acid, a net increase in corrosion-generated hydrogen transport appeared to result from the adoption of boric acid treatment. This increase may be attributable to an increase in secondary cycle copper alloy corrosion rates, although additional measurements would be required to confirm this hypothesis.

  7. A Proposed Paradigm for Solar Cycle Dynamics Mediated via Turbulent Pumping of Magnetic Flux in Babcock-Leighton-type Solar Dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazra, Soumitra; Nandy, Dibyendu

    2016-11-01

    At present, the Babcock-Leighton flux transport solar dynamo models appear to be the most promising models for explaining diverse observational aspects of the sunspot cycle. The success of these flux transport dynamo models is largely dependent upon a single-cell meridional circulation with a deep equatorward component at the base of the Sun’s convection zone. However, recent observations suggest that the meridional flow may in fact be very shallow (confined to the top 10% of the Sun) and more complex than previously thought. Taken together, these observations raise serious concerns on the validity of the flux transport paradigm. By accounting for the turbulent pumping of magnetic flux, as evidenced in magnetohydrodynamic simulations of solar convection, we demonstrate that flux transport dynamo models can generate solar-like magnetic cycles even if the meridional flow is shallow. Solar-like periodic reversals are recovered even when meridional circulation is altogether absent. However, in this case, the solar surface magnetic field dynamics does not extend all the way to the polar regions. Very importantly, our results demonstrate that the Parker-Yoshimura sign rule for dynamo wave propagation can be circumvented in Babcock-Leighton dynamo models by the latitudinal component of turbulent pumping, which can generate equatorward propagating sunspot belts in the absence of a deep, equatorward meridional flow. We also show that variations in turbulent pumping coefficients can modulate the solar cycle amplitude and periodicity. Our results suggest the viability of an alternate magnetic flux transport paradigm—mediated via turbulent pumping—for sustaining solar-stellar dynamo action.

  8. The pulse of a montane ecosystem: coupled diurnal cycles in solar flux, snowmelt, evapotranspiration, groundwater, and streamflow at Sagehen Creek (Sierra Nevada, California)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, James

    2016-04-01

    Forested catchments in the subalpine snow zone provide interesting opportunities to study the interplay between energy and water fluxes under seasonally variable degrees of forcing by transpiration and snowmelt. In such catchments, diurnal cycles in solar flux drive snowmelt and evapotranspiration, which in turn lead to diurnal cycles (with opposing phases) in groundwater levels. These in turn are linked to diurnal cycles in stream stage and discharge, which potentially provide a spatially integrated measure of snowmelt and evapotranspiration rates in the surrounding landscape. Here I analyze ecohydrological controls on diurnal stream and groundwater fluctuations induced by snowmelt and evapotranspiration (ET) at Sagehen Creek, in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California. There is a clear 6-hour lag between radiation forcing and the stream or groundwater response. This is not a travel-time delay, but instead a 90-degree dynamical phase lag arising from the integro-differential relationship between groundwater storage and recharge, ET, and streamflow. The time derivative of groundwater levels is strongly positively correlated with solar flux during snowmelt periods, reflecting snowmelt recharge to the riparian aquifer during daytime. Conversely, this derivative is strongly negatively correlated with solar flux during snow-free summer months, reflecting transpiration withdrawals from the riparian aquifer. As the snow cover disappears, the correlation between the solar flux and the time derivative of groundwater levels abruptly shifts from positive (snowmelt dominance) to negative (ET dominance). During this transition, the groundwater cycles briefly vanish when the opposing forcings (snowmelt and ET) are of equal magnitude, and thus cancel each other out. Stream stage fluctuations integrate these relationships over the altitude range of the catchment. Rates of rise and fall in stream stage are positively correlated with solar flux when the whole catchment is snow

  9. Melatonin Increases the Chilling Tolerance of Chloroplast in Cucumber Seedlings by Regulating Photosynthetic Electron Flux and the Ascorbate-Glutathione Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hailiang; Ye, Lin; Wang, Yuping; Zhou, Xiaoting; Yang, Junwei; Wang, Jiawei; Cao, Kai; Zou, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to monitor the effects of exogenous melatonin on cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) chloroplasts and explore the mechanisms through which it mitigates chilling stress. Under chilling stress, chloroplast structure was seriously damaged as a result of over-accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as evidenced by the high levels of superoxide anion (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). However, pretreatment with 200 μM melatonin effectively mitigated this by suppressing the levels of ROS in chloroplasts. On the one hand, melatonin enhanced the scavenging ability of ROS by stimulating the ascorbate–glutathione (AsA–GSH) cycle in chloroplasts. The application of melatonin led to high levels of AsA and GSH, and increased the activity of total superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR, EC 1.6.5.4) dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, EC 1.5.5.1), glutathione reductase (GR, EC1.6.4.2) in the AsA–GSH cycle. On the other hand, melatonin lessened the production of ROS in chloroplasts by balancing the distribution of photosynthetic electron flux. Melatonin helped maintain a high level of electron flux in the PCR cycle [Je(PCR)] and in the PCO cycle [Je(PCO)], and suppressed the O2-dependent alternative electron flux Ja(O2-dependent) which is one important ROS source. Results indicate that melatonin increased the chilling tolerance of chloroplast in cucumber seedlings by accelerating the AsA–GSH cycle to enhance ROS scavenging ability and by balancing the distribution of photosynthetic electron flux so as to suppress ROS production. PMID:27999581

  10. Mechanisms behind changes in gastric acid and bicarbonate outputs during the human interdigestive motility cycle.

    PubMed

    Dalenbäck, J; Fändriks, L; Olbe, L; Sjövall, H

    1996-01-01

    Human gastric interdigestive acid and bicarbonate outputs vary cyclically in association with the migrating motor complex (MMC). These phenomena were studied in 26 healthy volunteers by constant-flow gastric perfusion, with continuous recording of pH and Pco2 in mixed gastric effluent and concomitant open-tip manometry of gastroduodenal motility. Stable acid and bicarbonate outputs were registered during less than 50% of the MMC cycle. Acid secretion started to increase 71 +/- 3% into the cycle, with maximum output during antral phase III. Bicarbonate output increased biphasically 1) 40 +/- 5% into the cycle, coinciding with reflux of bile, and 2) at the end of duodenal phase III when the aspirate was devoid of bile. The bicarbonate peak associated with phase III was abolished by atropine (0.01 mg/kg iv, n = 8) and by pyloric occlusion (n = 9) but remained unchanged after omeprazole (n = 10). The acid peak was abolished by both atropine and omeprazole. It is concluded that the MMC-related changes in acid and alkaline outputs represent two different and independent phenomena. Acid secretion cyclicity is due to periodical variations in cholinergic stimulation of the parietal cells. In contrast, the phase III-associated increase in bicarbonate output is due to duodenogastric reflux.

  11. Solder Flux Residues and Humidity-Related Failures in Electronics: Relative Effects of Weak Organic Acids Used in No-Clean Flux Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdingovas, Vadimas; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Ambat, Rajan

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the results of humidity testing of weak organic acids (WOAs), namely adipic, succinic, glutaric, dl-malic, and palmitic acids, which are commonly used as activators in no-clean solder fluxes. The study was performed under humidity conditions varying from 60% relative humidity (RH) to ˜99%RH at 25°C. The following parameters were used for characterization of WOAs: mass gain due to water adsorption and deliquescence of the WOA (by quartz crystal microbalance), resistivity of the water layer formed on the printed circuit board (by impedance spectroscopy), and leakage current measured using the surface insulation resistance pattern in the potential range from 0 V to 10 V. The combined results indicate the importance of the WOA chemical structure for the water adsorption and therefore conductive water layer formation on the printed circuit board assembly (PCBA). A substantial increase of leakage currents and probability of electrochemical migration was observed at humidity levels above the RH corresponding to the deliquescence point of WOAs present as contaminants on the printed circuit boards. The results suggest that use of solder fluxes with WOAs having higher deliquescence point could improve the reliability of electronics operating under circumstances in which exposure to high humidity is likely to occur.

  12. gamma-Aminobutyric acid agonists and antagonists alter chloride flux across brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Allan, A M; Harris, R A

    1986-05-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, increases membrane chloride conductance. Previously, we reported that GABA increases 36Cl- uptake by membrane vesicles (microsacs) prepared from mouse brain. Employing this technique, we found that the GABAA agonists, muscimol, isoguvacine, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo(5,4-C)pyridine-3-ol, and 3-amino-1-propane sulfonate, all produced a concentration-dependent increase in 36Cl- influx, but baclofen, a GABAB agonist, failed to alter 36Cl- flux. Inhibition of GABA-dependent 36Cl- influx was produced by the convulsant drugs, bicuculline, picrotoxin, and pentylenetetrazole. Ion specificity was demonstrated by a failure of GABA agonists to stimulate influx of 45Ca2+, 86Rb+, 22Na+, or 35SO4(2). GABA-stimulated uptake of 36Cl- was largest in cortex and cerebellum and smaller in hippocampus and striatum. There was little difference in sensitivity to GABA among the areas. Analysis of subcellular fractions prepared from mouse brain demonstrated that the GABA-dependent 36Cl- influx was enriched in the synaptosomal fraction. The nonspecific (GABA-independent) uptake of 36Cl- was enriched in the myelin fraction. These experiments provide evidence for a functional coupling among GABA receptors and the chloride ionophore and suggest that the GABA-activated chloride channel is a site of action for several convulsant compounds.

  13. Iron-dependent changes in cellular energy metabolism: influence on citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Oexle, H; Gnaiger, E; Weiss, G

    1999-11-10

    Iron modulates the expression of the critical citric acid cycle enzyme aconitase via a translational mechanism involving iron regulatory proteins. Thus, the present study was undertaken to investigate the consequences of iron perturbation on citric acid cycle activity, oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial respiration in the human cell line K-562. In agreement with previous data iron increases the activity of mitochondrial aconitase while it is reduced upon addition of the iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFO). Interestingly, iron also positively affects three other citric acid cycle enzymes, namely citrate synthase, isocitric dehydrogenase, and succinate dehydrogenase, while DFO decreases the activity of these enzymes. Consequently, iron supplementation results in increased formation of reducing equivalents (NADH) by the citric acid cycle, and thus in increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption and ATP formation via oxidative phosphorylation as shown herein. This in turn leads to downregulation of glucose utilization. In contrast, all these metabolic pathways are reduced upon iron depletion, and thus glycolysis and lactate formation are significantly increased in order to compensate for the decrease in ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation in the presence of DFO. Our results point to a complex interaction between iron homeostasis, oxygen supply and cellular energy metabolism in human cells.

  14. Cross-ecosystem fluxes: Export of polyunsaturated fatty acids from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems via emerging insects.

    PubMed

    Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik; Kowarik, Carmen; Straile, Dietmar

    2017-01-15

    Cross-ecosystem fluxes can crucially influence the productivity of adjacent habitats. Emerging aquatic insects represent one important pathway through which freshwater-derived organic matter can enter terrestrial food webs. Aquatic insects may be of superior food quality for terrestrial consumers because they contain high concentrations of essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). We quantified the export of PUFA via emerging insects from a midsize, mesotrophic lake. Insects were collected using emergence traps installed above different water depths and subjected to fatty acid analyses. Insect emergence from different depth zones and seasonal mean fatty acid concentrations in different insect groups were used to estimate PUFA fluxes. In total, 80.5mg PUFA m(-2)yr(-1) were exported, of which 32.8mgm(-2)yr(-1) were eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 7.8mgm(-2)yr(-1) were arachidonic acid (ARA), and 2.6mgm(-2)yr(-1) were docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). While Chironomidae contributed most to insect biomass and total PUFA export, Chaoborus flavicans contributed most to the export of EPA, ARA, and especially DHA. The export of total insect biomass from one square meter declined with depth and the timing at which 50% of total insect biomass emerged was correlated with the water depths over which the traps were installed, suggesting that insect-mediated PUFA fluxes are strongly affected by lake morphometry. Applying a conceptual model developed to assess insect deposition rates on land to our insect-mediated PUFA export data revealed an average total PUFA deposition rate of 150mgm(-2)yr(-1) within 100m inland from the shore. We propose that PUFA export can be reliably estimated using taxon-specific information on emergent insect biomass and seasonal mean body PUFA concentrations of adult insects provided here. Our data indicate that insect-mediated PUFA fluxes from lakes are substantial, implying that freshwater-derived PUFA can crucially influence food web processes in adjacent

  15. Assessing and Synthesizing the Last Decade of Research on the Major Pools and Fluxes of the Carbon Cycle in the US and North America: An Interagency Governmental Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, N.; Shrestha, G.; Stover, D. B.; Zhu, Z.; Ombres, E. H.; Deangelo, B.

    2015-12-01

    The 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2) is focused on US and North American carbon stocks and fluxes in managed and unmanaged systems, including relevant carbon management science perspectives and tools for supporting and informing decisions. SOCCR-2 is inspired by the US Carbon Cycle Science Plan (2011) which emphasizes global scale research on long-lived, carbon-based greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide and methane, and the major pools and fluxes of the global carbon cycle. Accordingly, the questions framing the Plan inform this report's topical roadmap, with a focus on US and North America in the global context: 1) How have natural processes and human actions affected the global carbon cycle on land, in the atmosphere, in the oceans and in the ecosystem interfaces (e.g. coastal, wetlands, urban-rural)? 2) How have socio-economic trends affected the levels of the primary carbon-containing gases, carbon dioxide and methane, in the atmosphere? 3) How have species, ecosystems, natural resources and human systems been impacted by increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, the associated changes in climate, and by carbon management decisions and practices? To address these aspects, SOCCR-2 will encompass the following broad assessment framework: 1) Carbon Cycle at Scales (Global Perspective, North American Perspective, US Perspective, Regional Perspective); 2) Role of carbon in systems (Soils; Water, Oceans, Vegetation; Terrestrial-aquatic Interfaces); 3) Interactions/Disturbance/Impacts from/on the carbon cycle. 4) Carbon Management Science Perspective and Decision Support (measurements, observations and monitoring for research and policy relevant decision-support etc.). In this presentation, the Carbon Cycle Interagency Working Group and the U.S. Global Change Research Program's U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program Office will highlight the scientific context, strategy, structure, team and production process of the report, which is part of the USGCRP's Sustained

  16. Inter-annual Variability of Biomass Burning Aerosol Optical Depth in Southern Amazonia, and the Impact of These Aerosols on the Diurnal Cycle of Solar Flux Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J. S.; Artaxo, P.; Yamasoe, M. A.; Procopio, A. S.; Prins, E. M.; Feltz, J. M.; Smirnov, A.; Dubovik, O.; Reid, J. S.

    2002-12-01

    The inter-annual variability of the magnitude of biomass burning in southern Amazonia has been relatively large over the last decade. The extent of the burning in the latter half of a given dry season (July-October) depends largely on the rainfall amount and timing, with drought years exhibiting many more fires and smoke than average. Additionally, new regulations aimed at controlling burning may also affect inter-annual variability. We present measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from biomass burning smoke as measured by AERONET sites in Rondonia and Mato Grosso from 1993-2002. These AOD measurements are shown to follow similar inter-annual variability as the fire counts determined by the multi-spectral radiance measurements obtained with GOES-8. However, the AOD at these sites exhibit relatively little diurnal variation despite a very large diurnal cycle in satellite detected fire counts. In order to quantify the changes in the diurnal cycle of solar flux reduction as a result of aerosol attenuation at the peak of the burning season, we model the diurnal cycle of total shortwave (SW; 300-4000 nm), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), and Ultraviolet- A (UVA; 320-400 nm) fluxes in mid-September using the AERONET monthly average AOD measurements (AOD(550 nm) = 1.11). These average diurnal cycle flux reductions show significant temporal delays in the morning for equivalent flux levels in all three spectral bands, of ~50 min to 2 hr 15 min at mid-morning (midpoint between sunrise and solar noon). The largest time delays in flux occur in the UVA band and the smallest in the total SW broadband due to a rapid decrease in AOD as wavelength increases for the accumulation mode smoke aerosols. The time delays in solar flux have implications for possible delay of the onset of cumulus convection, the shortening of the photo-period when plants photosynthesize, and reduced time interval for UVA fluxes which may have implications for photochemical

  17. Redirection of Metabolic Flux into Novel Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Production Pathway by Introduction of Synthetic Scaffolds Strategy in Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Pham, Van Dung; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-04-01

    In general, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) pathway involves the decarboxylation of glutamate, which is produced from sugar by Corynebacterium fermentation. GABA can be used for the production of pharmaceuticals and functional foods. Due to the increasing demand of GABA, it is essential to create an effective alternative pathway for the GABA production. In this study, Escherichia coli were engineered to produce GABA from glucose via GABA shunt, which consists of succinate dehydrogenase, succinate-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, and GABA aminotransferase. The three enzymes were physically attached to each other through a synthetic scaffold, and the Krebs cycle flux was redirected to the GABA pathway. By introduction of synthetic scaffold, 0.75 g/l of GABA was produced from 10 g/l of glucose at 30 °C and pH 6.5. The inactivation of competing metabolic pathways provided 15.4 % increase in the final GABA concentration.

  18. Effect of alternative pathway therapy on branched chain amino acid metabolism in urea cycle disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Fernando; Carter, Susan; O'Brien, William E; Lee, Brendan

    2004-04-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCDs) are a group of inborn errors of hepatic metabolism caused by the loss of enzymatic activities that mediate the transfer of nitrogen from ammonia to urea. These disorders often result in life-threatening hyperammonemia and hyperglutaminemia. A combination of sodium phenylbutyrate and sodium phenylacetate/benzoate is used in the clinical management of children with urea cycle defects as a glutamine trap, diverting nitrogen from urea synthesis to alternatives routes of excretion. We have observed that patients treated with these compounds have selective branched chain amino acid (BCAA) deficiency despite adequate dietary protein intake. However, the direct effect of alternative therapy on the steady state levels of plasma branched chain amino acids has not been well characterized. We have measured steady state plasma branched chain and other essential non-branched chain amino acids in control subjects, untreated ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency females and treated null activity urea cycle disorder patients in the fed steady state during the course of stable isotope studies. Steady-state leucine levels were noted to be significantly lower in treated urea cycle disorder patients when compared to either untreated ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency females or control subjects (P<0.0001). This effect was reproduced in control subjects who had depressed leucine levels when treated with sodium phenylacetate/benzoate (P<0.0001). Our studies suggest that this therapeutic modality has a substantial impact on the metabolism of branched chain amino acids in urea cycle disorder patients. These findings suggest that better titration of protein restriction could be achieved with branched chain amino acid supplementation in patients with UCDs who are on alternative route therapy.

  19. Unsuspected task for an old team: succinate, fumarate and other Krebs cycle acids in metabolic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Bénit, Paule; Letouzé, Eric; Rak, Malgorzata; Aubry, Laetitia; Burnichon, Nelly; Favier, Judith; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule; Rustin, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    Seventy years from the formalization of the Krebs cycle as the central metabolic turntable sustaining the cell respiratory process, key functions of several of its intermediates, especially succinate and fumarate, have been recently uncovered. The presumably immutable organization of the cycle has been challenged by a number of observations, and the variable subcellular location of a number of its constitutive protein components is now well recognized, although yet unexplained. Nonetheless, the most striking observations have been made in the recent period while investigating human diseases, especially a set of specific cancers, revealing the crucial role of Krebs cycle intermediates as factors affecting genes methylation and thus cell remodeling. We review here the recent advances and persisting incognita about the role of Krebs cycle acids in diverse aspects of cellular life and human pathology.

  20. SIMULATIONS OF A DYNAMIC SOLAR CYCLE AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON AND GLOBALLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V.; McComas, D. J.; Dayeh, M. A.

    2015-05-01

    Since 2009, observations by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) have vastly improved our understanding of the interaction between the solar wind (SW) and local interstellar medium through direct measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), which inform us about the heliospheric conditions that produced them. An enhanced feature of flux in the sky, the so-called IBEX ribbon, was not predicted by any global models before the first IBEX observations. A dominating theory of the origin of the ribbon, although still under debate, is a secondary charge-exchange process involving secondary ENAs originating from outside the heliopause. According to this mechanism, the evolution of the solar cycle should be visible in the ribbon flux. Therefore, in this paper we simulate a fully time-dependent ribbon flux, as well as globally distributed flux from the inner heliosheath (IHS), using time-dependent SW parameters from Sokół et al. as boundary conditions for our time-dependent heliosphere simulation. After post-processing the results to compute H ENA fluxes, our results show that the secondary ENA ribbon indeed should be time dependent, evolving with a period of approximately 11 yr, with differences depending on the energy and direction. Our results for the IHS flux show little periodic change with the 11 yr solar cycle, but rather with short-term fluctuations in the background plasma. While the secondary ENA mechanism appears to emulate several key characteristics of the observed IBEX ribbon, it appears that our simulation does not yet include all of the relevant physics that produces the observed ribbon.

  1. Potential of the compound specific isotope analysis of individual amino acid for studying past nitrogen cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bohyung; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    The nitrogen isotope ratio of bulk sediment has been widely used for studying nitrogen cycle in the marine environment. However, since organic nitrogen in sediment is regarded as a mixture of organic matter, it is challenging to identify its exact sources. Recently, compound specific nitrogen isotope analysis of amino acid (CSIA AAs) has been introduced as a potential tool for complement of bulk nitrogen isotope since amino acid more directly reflects information on primary producer and trophic position. However, studies on CSIA of amino acid in sediments are scarce due to the complexities of the analytical method and relatively high analytica costl. In this study, we established a method of the CSIA AAs which is more suitable for the analysis of sediments and accessed if the CSIA AAs can be used for the study of past nitrogen cycle.

  2. Benthic metal fluxes and sediment diagenesis in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage: A laboratory experiment and reactive transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, E.; Ayora, C.; Jiménez-Arias, J. L.; García-Robledo, E.; Papaspyrou, S.; Corzo, A.

    2014-08-01

    Reservoirs are one of the primary water supply sources. Knowledge of the metal fluxes at the water-sediment interfaces of reservoirs is essential for predicting their ecological quality. Redox oscillations in the water column are promoted by stratification; turnover events may significantly alter metal cycling, especially in reservoirs impacted by acid mine drainage (AMD). To study this phenomenon, an experiment was performed under controlled laboratory conditions. Sediment cores from an AMD-affected reservoir were maintained in a tank with reservoir water for approximately two months and subjected to alternating oxic-hypoxic conditions. A detailed metal speciation in solid phases of the sediment was initially performed by sequential extraction, and pore water was analyzed at the end of each redox period. Tank water metals concentrations were systematically monitored throughout the experiment. The experimental results were then used to calibrate a diffusion-reaction model and quantify the reaction rates and sediment-water fluxes. Under oxic conditions, pH, Fe and As concentrations decreased in the tank due to schwertmannite precipitation, whereas the concentrations of Al, Zn, Cu, Ni, and Co increased due to Al(OH)3 and sulfide dissolution. The reverse trends occurred under hypoxic conditions. Under oxic conditions, the fluxes calculated by applying Fick’s first law to experimental concentration gradients contradicted the fluxes expected based on the evolution of the tank water. According to the reactive transport calculations, this discrepancy can be attributed to the coarse resolution of sediment sampling. The one-cm-thick slices failed to capture effectively the notably narrow (1-2 mm) concentration peaks of several elements in the shallow pore water resulting from sulfide and Al(OH)3 dissolution. The diffusion-reaction model, extended to the complete year, computed that between 25% and 50% of the trace metals and less than 10% of the Al that precipitated under

  3. Rainwater trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in Guangzhou, South China: levels, wet deposition fluxes and source implication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiaoyun; Wang, Xinming; Ding, Xiang

    2014-01-15

    The origin of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) occurring in hydrosphere has long been a controversial issue. Hydrochlorofluorocarbons and hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs/HFCs) as replacements of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are precursors of TFA in the atmosphere, their contribution to rainwater TFA is a concern as their ambient mixing ratios are continually growing. Here we present rainwater TFA monitored from April 2007 to March 2008 in urban Guangzhou, a central city in south China's highly industrialized and densely populated Pearl River Delta region. Rainwater TFA levels ranged 45.8-974 ng L(-1) with a median of 166 ng L(-1). TFA levels negatively correlated with rainfall amount, the yearly rainfall-weighted average for TFA was 152 ng L(-1). The annual TFA wet deposition flux was estimated to be 229 g km(-2) yr(-1), and the total wet deposition of TFA reached ~1.7 tyr(-1) in Guangzhou. The Two-Box model was applied to estimate attributions of HCFCs/HFCs and fluoropolymers to rainwater TFA assuming TFA generated was proportional to gross domestic product (GDP), gross industrial product (GIP) or number of private cars. The results revealed that the degradation of HCFCs/HFCs and fluoropolymers could explain 131.5-152.4 ng L(-1) rainwater TFA, quite near the observed rainfall-weighted annual mean of 152 ng L(-1), suggesting rainwater TFA in Guangzhou was predominantly originated from these anthropogenic precursors. HCFCs/HFCs accounted for 83.3-96.5% of rainwater TFA observed, while fluoropolymers' contributions were minor (~5%). HFC-134a alone could explain 55.9-90.0% of rainwater TFA, and its contribution would be greatly enhanced with its wide use in mobile air conditioning systems and rapid increase in ambient mixing ratios.

  4. A specialized citric acid cycle requiring succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase (AarC) confers acetic acid resistance on the acidophile Acetobacter aceti.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Elwood A; Francois, Julie A; Kappock, T Joseph

    2008-07-01

    Microbes tailor macromolecules and metabolism to overcome specific environmental challenges. Acetic acid bacteria perform the aerobic oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid and are generally resistant to high levels of these two membrane-permeable poisons. The citric acid cycle (CAC) is linked to acetic acid resistance in Acetobacter aceti by several observations, among them the oxidation of acetate to CO2 by highly resistant acetic acid bacteria and the previously unexplained role of A. aceti citrate synthase (AarA) in acetic acid resistance at a low pH. Here we assign specific biochemical roles to the other components of the A. aceti strain 1023 aarABC region. AarC is succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetate CoA-transferase, which replaces succinyl-CoA synthetase in a variant CAC. This new bypass appears to reduce metabolic demand for free CoA, reliance upon nucleotide pools, and the likely effect of variable cytoplasmic pH upon CAC flux. The putative aarB gene is reassigned to SixA, a known activator of CAC flux. Carbon overflow pathways are triggered in many bacteria during metabolic limitation, which typically leads to the production and diffusive loss of acetate. Since acetate overflow is not feasible for A. aceti, a CO(2) loss strategy that allows acetic acid removal without substrate-level (de)phosphorylation may instead be employed. All three aar genes, therefore, support flux through a complete but unorthodox CAC that is needed to lower cytoplasmic acetate levels.

  5. 4-Coumaroyl and caffeoyl shikimic acids inhibit 4-coumaric acid:coenzyme A ligases and modulate metabolic flux for 3-hydroxylation in monolignol biosynthesis of Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Yuan; Wang, Jack P; Li, Quanzi; Chen, Hsi-Chuan; Liu, Jie; Loziuk, Philip; Song, Jina; Williams, Cranos; Muddiman, David C; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L

    2015-01-01

    Downregulation of 4-coumaric acid:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) can reduce lignin content in a number of plant species. In lignin precursor (monolignol) biosynthesis during stem wood formation in Populus trichocarpa, two enzymes, Ptr4CL3 and Ptr4CL5, catalyze the coenzyme A (CoA) ligation of 4-coumaric acid to 4-coumaroyl-CoA and caffeic acid to caffeoyl-CoA. CoA ligation of 4-coumaric acid is essential for the 3-hydroxylation of 4-coumaroyl shikimic acid. This hydroxylation results from sequential reactions of 4-hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimic acid hydroxycinnamoyl transferases (PtrHCT1 and PtrHCT6) and 4-coumaric acid 3-hydroxylase 3 (PtrC3H3). Alternatively, 3-hydroxylation of 4-coumaric acid to caffeic acid may occur through an enzyme complex of cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase 1 and 2 (PtrC4H1 and PtrC4H2) and PtrC3H3. We found that 4-coumaroyl and caffeoyl shikimic acids are inhibitors of Ptr4CL3 and Ptr4CL5. 4-Coumaroyl shikimic acid strongly inhibits the formation of 4-coumaroyl-CoA and caffeoyl-CoA. Caffeoyl shikimic acid inhibits only the formation of 4-coumaroyl-CoA. 4-Coumaroyl and caffeoyl shikimic acids both act as competitive and uncompetitive inhibitors. Metabolic flux in wild-type and PtrC3H3 downregulated P. trichocarpa transgenics has been estimated by absolute protein and metabolite quantification based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, mass action kinetics, and inhibition equations. Inhibition by 4-coumaroyl and caffeoyl shikimic acids may play significant regulatory roles when these inhibitors accumulate.

  6. Teaching about citric acid cycle using plant mitochondrial preparations: Some assays for use in laboratory courses*.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Joaquim A F; Gomes-Santos, Carina S S; Sousa, Ana Paula M; Madeira, Vítor M C

    2005-03-01

    Potato tubers and turnip roots were used to prepare purified mitochondria for laboratory practical work in the teaching of the citric acid cycle (TCA cycle). Plant mitochondria are particularly advantageous over the animal fractions to demonstrate the TCA cycle enzymatic steps, by using simple techniques to measure O(2) consumption and transmembrane potential (ΔΨ). The several TCA cycle intermediates induce specific enzyme activities, which can be identified by respiratory parameters. Such a strategy is also used to evidence properties of the TCA cycle enzymes: ADP stimulation of isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase; activation by citrate of downstream oxidation steps, e.g. succinate dehydrogenase; and regulation of the activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase by citrate action on the citrate/isocitrate carrier. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that, in the absence of exogenous Mg(2+) , isocitrate-dependent respiration favors the alternative oxidase pathway, as judged by changes of the ADP/O elicited by the inhibitor n-propyl galate. These are some examples of assays related with TCA cycle intermediates we can use in laboratory courses.

  7. Accelerated cycle-life testing of small sealed lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I.; Oh, S. H.; Kang, H. Y.

    An attempt has been made to devise methods for reducing the cycle-testing time of long-life sealed lead/acid batteries. In order for the accelerated test results to equate to the actual field operations, it is assumed that the failure modes under both normal and accelerated conditions must be the same. As a first step in the search for a reliable accelerated test, observations of the battery ageing process have been made under different daily duty cycles, viz., 1 (normal), 8 and 16 cycles/day at ambient temperature and 80% depth-of-discharge. It has been found that the main cause of failure is different for a given duty cycle. This complicates the task of applying accelerated test results to field operations. For the 8 cycles/day schedule, the main cause of failure is degradation of the positive active material. Positive grid corrosion is the main factor in the 16 cycles/day case. Under normal conditions, both grid corrosion and PbO 2 degradation appear to be equally significant.

  8. Humic acid acts as a natural antidote of graphene by regulating nanomaterial translocation and metabolic fluxes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiangang; Mu, Li; Kang, Jia; Lu, Kaicheng; Zhou, Ruiren; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-06-17

    Graphene-related research has intensified rapidly in a wide range of disciplines, but few studies have examined ecosystem risks, particularly phytotoxicity. This study revealed that graphene significantly inhibits the number of wheat roots and the biosynthesis of chlorophyll, and altered the morphology of shoots. Humic acid (HA), a ubiquitous form of natural organic matter, significantly (P < 0.05) relieved this phytotoxicity and recovered the sharp morphology of shoot tips. Both graphene and graphene-HA were transferred from wheat roots to shoots and were found in the cytoplasms and chloroplasts. HA increased the disordered structure and surface negative charges, and reduced the aggregation of graphene. HA enhanced the storage of graphene in vacuoles, potentially indicating an effective detoxification path. The content of cadaverine, alkane, glyconic acid, and aconitic acid was up-regulated by graphene, greatly contributing to the observed phytotoxicity. Conversely, inositol, phenylalanine, phthalic acid, and octadecanoic acid were up-regulated by graphene-HA. The metabolic pathway analysis revealed that the direction of metabolic fluxes governed nanotoxicity. This work presents the innovative concept that HA acts as a natural antidote of graphene by regulating its translocation and metabolic fluxes in vivo. This knowledge is critical for avoiding the overestimation of nanomaterial risks and can be used to control nanomaterial contamination.

  9. Suppression of tricarboxylic acid cycle in Escherichia coli exposed to sub-MICs of aminoglycosides.

    PubMed Central

    Cavallero, A; Eftimiadi, C; Radin, L; Schito, G C

    1990-01-01

    The metabolic activity of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 challenged with sub-MICs of aminoglycosides was analyzed with a batch calorimeter. High-performance and gas-liquid chromatographic techniques were utilized to evaluate the concentrations of metabolic reactants, intermediates, and end products. The data reported indicate that aminoglycosides inhibit or delay bacterial catabolism of carboxylic acids, with the following relative degrees of activity: amikacin greater than gentamicin greater than sisomicin greater than netilmicin greater than kanamycin. The decrease in total biomass production was proportional to the degree of tricarboxylic acid cycle inhibition. PMID:2183717

  10. On a hypothetical generational relationship between HCN and constituents of the reductive citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Eschenmoser, Albert

    2007-04-01

    Encouraged by observations made on the course of reactions the HCN-tetramer can undergo with acetaldehyde, I delineate a constitutional and potentially generational relationship between HCN and those constituents of the reductive citric acid cycle that are direct precursors of amino acids in contemporary metabolism. In this context, the robustness postulate of classical prebiotic chemistry is questioned, and, by an analysis of the (hypothetical) reaction-tree of a stepwise hydrolysis of the HCN-tetramer, it is shown how such a non-robust chemical reaction platform could harbor the potential for the emergence of autocatalytic cycles. It is concluded that the chemistry of HCN should be revisited by focussing on its non-robust parts in order to demonstrate its full potential as one of the possible roots of prebiotic self-organizing chemical processes.

  11. A study on the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the synthesis of acetylcholine in the lobster nerve

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, S.-C.; Nakamura, R.

    1970-01-01

    1. The pattern of metabolism of 14C-labelled substrates in the lobster nerve suggested a normal tricarboxylic acid cycle with a slow turnover. 2. Acetylcholine was synthesized from [2-14C]acetate, [2-14C]pyruvate and [1,5-14C]citrate, implying the presence of acetate thiokinase, choline acetylase and citrate-cleavage enzyme. 3. [2-14C]Acetate was the best precursor. 4. The formation of acetyl-CoA from citrate was limited, probably by the citrate-cleavage enzyme, although the magnitude of the reversed reactions of the tricarboxylic acid cycle was large when compared with that of the forward reactions. 5. The relative magnitude of the two pathways (acetyl-CoA and carbon dioxide fixation) in pyruvate utilization was nearly equal. 6. The probable presence of metabolic compartments in the lobster nerve is discussed. PMID:5472173

  12. Protein and Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis During the Diploid Life Cycle of Allomyces arbuscula

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Daniel J.; Seale, Thomas W.; McCarthy, Brian J.

    1972-01-01

    The diploid life cycle of Allomyces arbuscula may be divided into four parts: spore induction, germination, vegetative growth, and mitosporangium formation. Spore induction, germination, and mitosporangium formation are insensitive to inhibition of actinomycin D, probably indicating that stable, pre-existing messenger ribonucleic acid (RNA) is responsible for these developmental events. Protein synthesis is necessary during the entire life cycle except for cyst formation. A system for obtaining synchronous germination of mitospores is described. During germination there is a characteristic increase in the rate of synthesis of RNA and protein although none of the other morphogenetic changes occurring during the life cycle are necessarily accompanied by an appreciable change in the rate of macromolecular synthesis. PMID:4113121

  13. Effect on combined cycle efficiency of stack gas temperature constraints to avoid acid corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1980-01-01

    To avoid condensation of sulfuric acid in the gas turbine exhaust when burning fuel oils contaning sulfur, the exhaust stack temperature and cold-end heat exchanger surfaces must be kept above the condensation temperature. Raising the exhaust stack temperature, however, results in lower combined cycle efficiency compared to that achievable by a combined cycle burning a sulfur-free fuel. The maximum difference in efficiency between the use of sulfur-free and fuels containing 0.8 percent sulfur is found to be less than one percentage point. The effect of using a ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) and a fuel containing sulfur is also evaluated. The combined-cycle efficiency gain using a TBC with a fuel containing sulfur compared to a sulfur-free fuel without TBC is 0.6 to 1.0 percentage points with air-cooled gas turbines and 1.6 to 1.8 percentage points with water-cooled gas turbines.

  14. Time variations of proton flux in Earth inner radiation belt during 23/24 solar cycles based on the PAMELA and the ARINA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malakhov, V. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Mayorov, A. G.; Mayorova, M. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Aleksandrin, S. Yu; Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Krutkov, S. Yu; Kvashnin, A. A.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A. A.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Menn, W.; Merge, M.; Mocchuuitti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Vacci, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.

    2015-08-01

    The PAMELA and the ARINA experiments are carried out on the board of satellite RESURS-DK1 since 2006 up to now. Main goal of the PAMELA instrument is measurements of high energy antiparticles in cosmic rays while the ARINA instrument is intended studying high energy charged particle bursts in the magnetosphere. Both of these experiments have a possibility to study trapped particles in the inner radiation belt. Complex of these two instruments covers proton energy range from 30 MeV up to trapping limit (E= ∼2 GeV). Continuous measurements with the PAMELA and the ARINA spectrometers include falling and rising phases of 23/24 solar cycles and maximum of 24th one. In this report we present temporal profiles of proton flux in the inner zone of the radiation belt (1.11 < L < 1.18, 0.18 < B < 0.22G). Dependence of proton fluxes on a magnitude of the solar activity was studied for various phases of 23/24 solar cycles. At that it was shown that proton fluxes at the solar minimum are several times greater than at the solar maximum.

  15. Dynamics of nutrient cycling and related benthic nutrient and oxygen fluxes during a spring phytoplankton bloom in South San Francisco Bay (USA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grenz, C.; Cloern, J.E.; Hager, S.W.; Cole, B.E.

    2000-01-01

    Benthic oxygen uptake and nutrient releases of N, P and Si were measured weekly at 2 sites in South San Francisco Bay around the 1996 spring bloom. Exchanges across the sediment-water interface were estimated from whole core incubations performed in the laboratory at in situ temperature and in dark. Fluxes changed significantly on a weekly time scale. Over a period of 15 wk the fluxes of dissolved inorganic N, P and Si ranged from -40 to +200, 0 to 13 and from 30 to 400 ??mol m-2 h-1 respectively. Sediment oxygen demand increased from 10 before to 64 mg O2 m-2 h-1 just after the bloom period. During the bloom, nutrient fluxes represented about 20, 16 and 9% of the Si, P and N requirements for primary production. Before and after the bloom period, Si fluxes contributed up to 30 and > 100% of this requirement and P and N fluxes up to 15 and 50% respectively. Simple empirical models explain most of the spatial-temporal variability of benthic fluxes of Si, P and NH4 (but not NO3) from 3 predictor variables: sediment porosity, nutrient concentration in bottom waters and chlorophyll content of surficial sediments. These models show that algal blooms influence benthic-pelagic nutrient exchange through 2 processes: (1) depletion of nutrients from the water column (which enhances gradient-driven transports across the sediment-water interface) and (2) sedimentation of labile phytodetritus (which promotes remineralization in or on the surficial sediments). Rates and patterns of nutrient cycling were very different at the shallow and deep study sites, illustrating the challenge of extrapolating measurements of coupled algae-nutrient dynamics to whole ecosystems.

  16. The response of amino acid cycling to global change across multiple biomes: Feedbacks on soil nitrogen availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzostek, E. R.; Finzi, A. C.

    2010-12-01

    The cycling of organic nitrogen (N) in soil links soil organic matter decomposition to ecosystem productivity. Amino acids are a key pool of organic N in the soil, whose cycling is sensitive to alterations in microbial demand for carbon and N. Further, the amino acids released from the breakdown of protein by proteolytic enzymes are an important source of N that supports terrestrial productivity. The objective of this study was to measure changes in amino acid cycling in response to experimental alterations of precipitation and temperature in twelve global change experiments during the 2009 growing season. The study sites ranged from arctic tundra to xeric grasslands. The treatments experimentally increased temperature, increased or decreased precipitation, or some combination of both factors. The response of amino acid cycling to temperature and precipitation manipulations tended to be site specific, but the responses could be placed into a common framework. Changes in soil moisture drove a large response in amino acid cycling. Precipitation augmentation in xeric and mesic sites increased both amino acid pool sizes and production. However, treatments that decreased precipitation drove decreases in amino acid cycling in xeric sites, but led to increases in amino acid cycling in more mesic sites. Across sites, the response to soil warming was horizon specific. Amino acid cycling in organic rich horizons responded positively to warming, while negative responses were exhibited in lower mineral soil horizons. The variable response likely reflects a higher availability of protein substrate to sustain high rates of proteolytic enzyme activity in organic rich horizons. Overall, these results suggest that soil moisture and the availability of protein substrate may be important factors that mediate the response of amino acid cycling to predicted increases in soil temperatures.

  17. Another unusual type of citric acid cycle enzyme in Helicobacter pylori: the malate:quinone oxidoreductase.

    PubMed

    Kather, B; Stingl, K; van der Rest, M E; Altendorf, K; Molenaar, D

    2000-06-01

    The only enzyme of the citric acid cycle for which no open reading frame (ORF) was found in the Helicobacter pylori genome is the NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase. Here, it is shown that in this organism the oxidation of malate to oxaloacetate is catalyzed by a malate:quinone oxidoreductase (MQO). This flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent membrane-associated enzyme donates electrons to quinones of the electron transfer chain. Similar to succinate dehydrogenase, it is part of both the electron transfer chain and the citric acid cycle. MQO activity was demonstrated in isolated membranes of H. pylori. The enzyme is encoded by the ORF HP0086, which is shown by the fact that expression of the HP0086 sequence from a plasmid induces high MQO activity in mqo deletion mutants of Escherichia coli or Corynebacterium glutamicum. Furthermore, this plasmid was able to complement the phenotype of the C. glutamicum mqo deletion mutant. Interestingly, the protein predicted to be encoded by this ORF is only distantly related to known or postulated MQO sequences from other bacteria. The presence of an MQO shown here and the previously demonstrated presence of a 2-ketoglutarate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a succinyl-coenzyme A (CoA):acetoacetyl-CoA transferase indicate that H. pylori possesses a complete citric acid cycle, but one which deviates from the standard textbook example in three steps.

  18. In the aging housefly aconitase is the only citric acid cycle enzyme to decline significantly.

    PubMed

    Yarian, Connie S; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2005-04-01

    The main objective of this study was to determine if the activities of the mitochondrial citric acid cycle enzymes are altered during the normal aging process. Flight muscle mitochondria of houseflies of different ages were used as a model system because of their apparent age-related decline in bioenergetic efficiency, evident as a failure of flying ability. The maximal activities of each of the citric acid cycle enzymes were determined in preparations of mitochondria from flies of relatively young, middle, and old age. Aconitase was the only enzyme exhibiting altered activity during aging. The maximal activity of aconitase from old flies was decreased by 44% compared to that from young flies while the other citric acid cycle enzymes showed no change in activity with age. It is suggested that the selective age-related decrease in aconitase activity is likely to contribute to a decline in the efficiency of mitochondrial bioenergetics, as well as result in secondary effects associated with accumulation of citrate and redox-active iron.

  19. Inhibition of the Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle by moronic acid.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Rong; Hsieh, Yi-Chung; Chang, Yung-Fu; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Li-Kwan

    2010-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) expresses two transcription factors, Rta and Zta, during the immediate-early stage of the lytic cycle to activate the transcription of viral lytic genes. Our immunoblotting and flow cytometry analyses find that moronic acid, found in galls of Rhus chinensis and Brazilian propolis, at 10microM inhibits the expression of Rta, Zta, and an EBV early protein, EA-D, after lytic induction with sodium butyrate. This study also finds that moronic acids inhibits the capacity of Rta to activate a promoter that contains an Rta-response element, indicating that moronic acid interferes with the function of Rta. On the other hand, moronic acid does not appear to influence with the transactivation function of Zta. Therefore, the lack of expression of Zta and EA-D after moronic acid treatment is attributable to the inhibition of the transactivation functions of Rta. Because the expression of Zta, EA-D and many EBV lytic genes depends on Rta, the treatment of P3HR1 cells with moronic acid substantially reduces the numbers of EBV particles produced by the cells after lytic induction. This study suggests that moronic acid is a new structural lead for anti-EBV drug development.

  20. Renal contribution to acid-base regulation during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Takano, N; Kaneda, T

    1983-03-01

    Menstruating women exhibit a light but sustained hypocapnia during the luteal phase. To elucidate whether the hypocapnia results primarily from a respiratory or renal mechanism, we measured the rate of urinary excretion of acid at intervals during the menstrual cycle in five subjects. The acid-base composition of arterial blood in three subjects and end-tidal PCO2 in the remaining two subjects were also determined. During the follicular phase, the acid-base composition of blood and the rate of net acid excretion remained virtually constant. After ovulation, significant decreases in PaCO2 (3.5 mmHg), [HCO3]p (2 meq/liter), and net acid excretion (2 meq/h) occurred in the first 4-6 days of the luteal phase (14 days long). Following this, net acid excretion returned to the preovulatory level. PaCO2 and [HCO3]p, however, remained decreased for 3 more days. At the end of the luteal phase, restoration of PaCO2 proceeded faster than that of [HCO3]p. The acid-base changes in blood and urine observed during the luteal phase were comparable to those occurring during adaptation and recovery from sustained hypocapnia, suggesting that hypocapnia during the luteal phase is primarily respiratory in origin.

  1. Post-operative changes in hepatic, intestinal, splenic and muscle fluxes of amino acids and ammonia in pigs.

    PubMed

    Deutz, N E; Reijven, P L; Athanasas, G; Soeters, P B

    1992-11-01

    1. After operation, changes in nitrogen metabolism occur. Although increased flux of amino acids from peripheral to splanchnic organs after operation has been described, substrate utilization by the individual organs in the splanchnic area is less well characterized. We were specifically interested in substrate flux across the spleen as it is an organ with important immunological functions. 2. Therefore, hindquarter, gut, spleen and liver fluxes of amino acids, ammonia, glucose, lactate and blood gases were measured for 4 days after a standard operation in pigs. In a separate control group, fluxes were measured 2-3 weeks after this operation and these values were assumed to represent the normal situation. 3. One day after operation, the hindquarter effluxes of glutamine, alanine and several essential amino acids were increased (P > 0.001), but these normalized at the end of the observation period. In the same period, liver glutamine uptake increased (P < 0.01), concomitantly with increased HCO3-, glucose and urea production, which also normalized. Portal drained viscera ammonia production decreased, concomitant with decreased glutamine uptake (P < 0.001). After operation, the splenic release of ammonia increased sevenfold (P < 0.05) and that of lactate increased from -158 +/- 544 to 3294 +/- 642 nmol min-1 kg-1 body weight (P < 0.001). Glucose uptake increased from -964 +/- 632 to -3933 +/- 1524 nmol min-1 kg-1 body weight and glutamine efflux (391 +/- 143) reversed to uptake (-752 +/- 169 nmol min-1 kg-1 body weight) (P < 0.001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Functionalised carboxylic acids in atmospheric particles: An annual cycle revealing seasonal trends and possible sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Monique; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Carboxylic acids represent a major fraction of the water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in atmospheric particles. Among the particle phase carboxylic acids, straight-chain monocarboxylic acids (MCA) and dicarboxylic acids (DCA) with 2-10 carbon atoms have extensively been studied in the past. However, only a few studies exist dealing with functionalised carboxylic acids, i.e. having additional hydroxyl-, oxo- or nitro-groups. Regarding atmospheric chemistry, these functionalised carboxylic acids are of particular interest as they are supposed to be formed during atmospheric oxidation processes, e.g. through radical reactions. Therefore they can provide insights into the tropospheric multiphase chemistry. During this work 28 carboxylic acids (4 functionalised aliphatic MCAs, 5 aromatic MCAs, 3 nitroaromatic MCAs, 6 aliphatic DCAs, 6 functionalised aliphatic DCAs, 4 aromatic DCAs) were quantitatively determined in 256 filter samples taken at the rural research station Melpitz (Saxony, Germany) with a PM10 Digitel DHA-80 filter sampler. All samples were taken in 2010 covering a whole annual cycle. The resulting dataset was examined for a possible seasonal dependency of the acid concentrations. Furthermore the influence of the air mass origin on the acid concentrations was studied based on a simple two-sector classification (western or eastern sector) using a back trajectory analysis. Regarding the annual average, adipic acid was found to be the most abundant compound with a mean concentration of 7.8 ng m-3 followed by 4-oxopimelic acid with 6.1 ng m-3. The sum of all acid concentrations showed two maxima during the seasonal cycle; one in summer and one in winter, whereas the highest overall acid concentrations were found in summer. In general the target acids could be divided into two different groups, where one group has its maximum concentration in summer and the other group during winter. The first group contains all investigated aliphatic mono- and dicarboxylic

  3. High pressure sulfuric acid decomposition experiments for the sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, Carlos E; Reay, Andrew R.; Andazola, James C.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Gelbard, Fred

    2005-09-01

    A series of three pressurized sulfuric acid decomposition tests were performed to (1) obtain data on the fraction of sulfuric acid catalytically converted to sulfur dioxide, oxygen, and water as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) demonstrate real-time measurements of acid conversion for use as process control, (3) obtain multiple measurements of conversion as a function of temperature within a single experiment, and (4) assess rapid quenching to minimize corrosion of metallic components by undecomposed acid. All four of these objectives were successfully accomplished. This report documents the completion of the NHI milestone on high pressure H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition tests for the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle project. All heated sections of the apparatus, (i.e. the boiler, decomposer, and condenser) were fabricated from Hastelloy C276. A ceramic acid injection tube and a ceramic-sheathed thermocouple were used to minimize corrosion of hot liquid acid on the boiler surfaces. Negligible fracturing of the platinum on zirconia catalyst was observed in the high temperature decomposer. Temperature measurements at the exit of the decomposer and at the entry of the condenser indicated that the hot acid vapors were rapidly quenched from about 400 C to less than 20 C within a 14 cm length of the flow path. Real-time gas flow rate measurements of the decomposition products provided a direct measurement of acid conversion. Pressure in the apparatus was preset by a pressure-relief valve that worked well at controlling the system pressure. However, these valves sometimes underwent abrupt transitions that resulted in rapidly varying gas flow rates with concomitant variations in the acid conversion fraction.

  4. Effect of Zooplankton Community Structure on Particle Flux and Nutrient Cycling at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberg, D. K.; Madin, L. P.

    2001-12-01

    The structure of zooplankton communities has a significant impact on vertical transport and cycling of elements in the sea. Zooplankton play an integral role in the flux of material out of the euphotic zone at BATS via active transport by vertical migrators and by production of rapidly sinking fecal pellets. Zooplankton biomass in the upper 200 m at BATS is on average 1.7 times higher at night than day due to vertical migration. Migrating zooplankton actively transport a substantial amount of dissolved inorganic and organic carbon and nitrogen to deep water at BATS (via respiration and excretion), which can be significant relative to the passive flux of sinking particles. Active transport of C is equal to a mean of 8% (maximum 39%), and N equal to a mean of 13% (maximum 164%) of the gravitational vertical export of particulate organic C and N, respectively, measured with sediment traps at 150 m. Substantial excretion of dissolved organic material by migrators (mean of 24% of total C and 32% of total N metabolized) could be important to the microbial community at depth. Dissolved material exported by zooplankton is usually not at a Redfield C:N ratio of 6.6, contributing to non-Redfield remineralization patterns seen at depth. Changes in the zooplankton community can also dramatically affect the composition and sedimentation rate of fecal pellets, and thus the export of organic material. However, zooplankton biomass alone is not necessarily a good predictor of flux; the species composition of the resident community may at times more considerably affect export of organic material to the deep ocean. For example, there is a positive but weak relationship between monthly zooplankton biomass and organic C flux at BATS. Analysis of the bloom dynamics of salps (large gelatinous zooplankton) over the ten-year time series at BATS indicates salps graze on average 4% of the primary production, but fecal flux from salps can constitute on average 33% (maximum over 10-fold) of

  5. Acid-Tolerant Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Play a Major Role in Iron Cycling in Acidic Iron Rich Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, K. A.; Moreau, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    Climate change drives drying and acidification of many rivers and lakes. Abundant sedimentary iron in these systems oxidizes chemically and biologically to form iron-ox(yhydrox)ide crusts and "hardpans". Given generally high sulfate concentrations, the mobilization and cycling of iron in these environments can be strongly influenced by bacterial sulfate reduction. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) induce reductive dissolution of oxidized iron phases by producing the reductant bisulfide as a metabolic product. These environmentally ubiquitous microbes also recycle much of the fixed carbon in sediment-hosted microbial mat communities. With prevalent drying, the buffering capacity for protons liberated from iron oxidation is exceeded, and the activity of sulfate-reducers is restricted to those species capable of tolerating low pH (and generally highly saline, i.e. sulfate-rich) conditions. These species will sustain the recycling of iron from more crystalline phases to more bioavailable species, as well as act as the only source of bisulfide for photosynthesizing microbial communities. The phylogeny and physiology of acid-tolerant SRB is therefore important to Fe, S and C cycling in iron-rich sedimentary environments, particularly those on a geochemical trajectory towards acidification. Previous studies have shown that these SRB species tend to be highly novel. We studied two distinct environments along a geochemical continuum towards acidification. In both settings, iron redox transformations exert a major, if not controlling, influence on reduction potential. An acidified, iron- rich tidal marsh receiving acid-mine drainage (San Francisco Bay, CA, USA) contained abundant textural evidence for reductive dissolution of Fe(III) in sediments with pH values varying from 2.4 - 3.8. From these sediments, full-length novel dsrAB gene sequences from acid-tolerant SRB were recovered, and sulfur isotope profiles reflected biological fractionation of sulfur under even the most

  6. Taenia crassiceps: host treatment alters glycolisis and tricarboxilic acid cycle in cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Carolina Miguel; Costa, Tatiane Luiza; Bezerra, José Clecildo Barreto; de Souza Lino, Ruy; Vinaud, Marina Clare

    2012-02-01

    Human cysticercosis by Taenia crassiceps is rare although it is considered of zoonotic risk, especially to immunocompromised individuals. Albendazole and praziquantel are widely used and effective in its treatment. Their active forms inhibit the glucose uptake by the parasite and induce muscle contractions that alter its glycogen levels interfering in the energetic metabolism of the parasite and leading to its death. The aim of this study was to evaluate alterations in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and glucose concentrations caused by low dosage treatments of the hosts with albendazole and praziquantel. Therefore, T. crassiceps intraperitoneally infected mice were treated by gavage feeding with 5.75 or 11.5 mg/kg of albendazole and 3.83 or 7.67 mg/kg of praziquantel. The treated mice were euthanized after 24 h and the cysticerci collected were morphologically classified into initial, larval or final phases. Concentrations of the organic acid produced and glucose were evaluated to detect alterations into the glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways through chromatography and spectrophotometry. The low dosage treatment caused a partial blockage of the glucose uptake by the cysticerci in spite of the non significant difference between its concentrations. An activation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle was noted in the cysticerci that received the treatment due to an increase in the production of citrate, malate and α-ketoglutarate and the consumption of oxaloacetate, succinate and fumarate. The detection of α-ketoglutarate indicates that the cysticerci which were exposed to the drugs after host treatment present different metabolic pathways than the ones previously described after in vitro treatment.

  7. Sodium phenylbutyrate decreases plasma branched-chain amino acids in patients with urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Burrage, Lindsay C; Jain, Mahim; Gandolfo, Laura; Lee, Brendan H; Nagamani, Sandesh C S

    2014-01-01

    Sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPBA) is a commonly used medication for the treatment of patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs). Previous reports involving small numbers of patients with UCDs have shown that NaPBA treatment can result in lower plasma levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) but this has not been studied systematically. From a large cohort of patients (n=553) with UCDs enrolled in the Longitudinal Study of Urea Cycle Disorders, a collaborative multicenter study of the Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium, we evaluated whether treatment with NaPBA leads to a decrease in plasma BCAA levels. Our analysis shows that NaPBA use independently affects the plasma BCAA levels even after accounting for multiple confounding covariates. Moreover, NaPBA use increases the risk for BCAA deficiency. This effect of NaPBA seems specific to plasma BCAA levels, as levels of other essential amino acids are not altered by its use. Our study, in an unselected population of UCD subjects, is the largest to analyze the effects of NaPBA on BCAA metabolism and potentially has significant clinical implications. Our results indicate that plasma BCAA levels should to be monitored in patients treated with NaPBA since patients taking the medication are at increased risk for BCAA deficiency. On a broader scale, these findings could open avenues to explore NaPBA as a therapy in maple syrup urine disease and other common complex disorders with dysregulation of BCAA metabolism.

  8. Glutamine is required for snakehead fish vesiculovirus propagation via replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lindan; Yi, Lizhu; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xiaodan; Feng, Shuangshuang; Chen, Wenjie; Lan, Jiangfeng; Zhao, Lijuan; Tu, Jiagang; Lin, Li

    2016-11-01

    Snakehead fish vesiculovirus (SHVV), a member of the family Rhabdoviridae, has caused mass mortality in snakehead fish culture in China. Previous transcriptomic sequencing of SHVV-infected and non-infected striped snakehead fish cells (SSN-1) showed that glutaminase (GLS), the critical enzyme of glutamine metabolism, was upregulated upon SHVV infection. It therefore drew our attention to investigating the role of glutamine in SHVV propagation. Glutamine deprivation significantly reduced the expression of the mRNAs and proteins of SHVV, and the production of virus particles, indicating that glutamine was required for SHVV propagation. Glutamine can be converted to glutamate by GLS, and then be converted to α-ketoglutarate, to join in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Addition of the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate, oxaloacetic acid or pyruvate significantly restored SHVV propagation, indicating that the requirement of glutamine for SHVV propagation was due to its replenishment of the TCA cycle. Inhibiting the activity of GLS in SSN-1 cells by an inhibitor, bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide, decreased SHVV propagation, while overexpression of GLS increased SHVV propagation. Taken together, our data have revealed the relationship between glutamine metabolism and SHVV propagation.

  9. Disrupted cell cycle arrest and reduced proliferation in corneal fibroblasts from GCD2 patients: A potential role for altered autophagy flux

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seung-il; Dadakhujaev, Shorafidinkhuja; Maeng, Yong-Sun; Ahn, So-yeon; Kim, Tae-im; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Reduced cell proliferation in granular corneal dystrophy type 2. • Abnormal cell cycle arrest by defective autophagy. • Decreased Cyclin A1, B1, and D1 in Atg7 gene knockout cells. • Increase in p16 and p27 expressions were observed in Atg7 gene knockout cells. - Abstract: This study investigates the role of impaired proliferation, altered cell cycle arrest, and defective autophagy flux of corneal fibroblasts in granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2) pathogenesis. The proliferation rates of homozygous (HO) GCD2 corneal fibroblasts at 72 h, 96 h, and 120 h were significantly lower (1.102 ± 0.027, 1.397 ± 0.039, and 1.527 ± 0.056, respectively) than those observed for the wild-type (WT) controls (1.441 ± 0.029, 1.758 ± 0.043, and 2.003 ± 0.046, respectively). Flow cytometry indicated a decreased G{sub 1} cell cycle progression and the accumulation of cells in the S and G{sub 2}/M phases in GCD2 cells. These accumulations were associated with decreased levels of Cyclin A1, B1, and E1, and increased expression of p16 and p27. p21 and p53 expression was also significantly lower in GCD2 cells compared to the WT. Interestingly, treatment with the autophagy flux inhibitor, bafilomycin A{sub 1}, resulted in similarly decreased Cyclin A1, B1, D1, and p53 expression in WT fibroblasts. Furthermore, similar findings, including a decrease in Cyclin A1, B1, and D1 and an increase in p16 and p27 expression were observed in autophagy-related 7 (Atg7; known to be essential for autophagy) gene knockout cells. These data provide new insight concerning the role of autophagy in cell cycle arrest and cellular proliferation, uncovering a number of novel therapeutic possibilities for GCD2 treatment.

  10. Valproic acid induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Maria G; Fortunati, Nicoletta; Pugliese, Mariateresa; Costantino, Lucia; Poli, Roberta; Bosco, Ornella; Boccuzzi, Giuseppe

    2005-03-01

    Poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma is an aggressive human cancer that is resistant to conventional therapy. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are a promising class of drugs, acting as antiproliferative agents by promoting differentiation, as well as inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Valproic acid (VPA), a class I selective histone deacetylase inhibitor widely used as an anticonvulsant, promotes differentiation in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cells by inducing Na(+)/I(-) symporter and increasing iodine uptake. Here, we show that it is also highly effective at suppressing growth in poorly differentiated thyroid cancer cell lines (N-PA and BHT-101). Apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest are the underlying mechanisms of VPA's effect on cell growth. It induces apoptosis by activating the intrinsic pathway; caspases 3 and 9 are activated but not caspase 8. Cell cycle is selectively arrested in G(1) and is associated with the increased expression of p21 and the reduced expression of cyclin A. Both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are induced by treatment with 1 mm VPA, a dose that promotes cell redifferentiation and that is slightly above the serum concentration reached in patients treated for epilepsy. These multifaceted properties make VPA of clinical interest as a new approach to treating poorly differentiated thyroid cancer.

  11. Staphylococcus epidermidis Polysaccharide Intercellular Adhesin Production Significantly Increases during Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Cuong; Kidder, Joshua B.; Jacobson, Erik R.; Otto, Michael; Proctor, Richard A.; Somerville, Greg A.

    2005-01-01

    Staphylococcal polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) is important for the development of a mature biofilm. PIA production is increased during growth in a nutrient-replete or iron-limited medium and under conditions of low oxygen availability. Additionally, stress-inducing stimuli such as heat, ethanol, and high concentrations of salt increase the production of PIA. These same environmental conditions are known to repress tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, leading us to hypothesize that altering TCA cycle activity would affect PIA production. Culturing Staphylococcus epidermidis with a low concentration of the TCA cycle inhibitor fluorocitrate dramatically increased PIA production without impairing glucose catabolism, the growth rate, or the growth yields. These data lead us to speculate that one mechanism by which staphylococci perceive external environmental change is through alterations in TCA cycle activity leading to changes in the intracellular levels of biosynthetic intermediates, ATP, or the redox status of the cell. These changes in the metabolic status of the bacteria result in the attenuation or augmentation of PIA production. PMID:15838022

  12. Energy metabolism and alginate biosynthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: role of the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Schlictman, D; Kavanaugh-Black, A; Shankar, S; Chakrabarty, A M

    1994-01-01

    Infection with mucoid, alginate-producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of mortality among patients with cystic fibrosis. Alginate production by P. aeruginosa is not constitutive but is triggered by stresses such as starvation. The algR2 (also termed algQ) gene has been previously identified as being necessary for mucoidy; an algR2 mutant strain is unable to produce alginate when grown at 37 degrees C. We show here that the levels of phosphorylated succinyl coenzyme A synthetase (Scs) and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), which form a complex in P. aeruginosa, are reduced in the algR2 mutant. We were able to correlate the lower level of phosphorylated Scs with a decrease in Scs activity. Western blots (immunoblots) also showed a decreased level of Ndk in the algR2 mutant, but the presence of another kinase activity sensitive to Tween 20 provides the missing Ndk function. The effect of AlgR2 on tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes appears to be specific for Scs, since none of the other TCA cycle enzymes measured showed a significant decrease in activity. Furthermore, the ability of the algR2 mutant to grow on TCA cycle intermediates, but not glucose, is impaired. These data indicate that AlgR2 is responsible for maintaining proper operation of the TCA cycle and energy metabolism. Images PMID:7928963

  13. Triiodothyronine increases myocardial function and pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle after reperfusion in a model of infant cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Olson, Aaron K; Bouchard, Bertrand; Ning, Xue-Han; Isern, Nancy; Rosiers, Christine Des; Portman, Michael A

    2012-03-01

    Triiodothyronine (T3) supplementation improves clinical outcomes in infants after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass by unknown mechanisms. We utilized a translational model of infant cardiopulmonary bypass to test the hypothesis that T3 modulates pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC), thereby providing the energy support for improved cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). Neonatal piglets received intracoronary [2-(13)Carbon((13)C)]pyruvate for 40 min (8 mM) during control aerobic conditions (control) or immediately after reperfusion (I/R) from global hypothermic ischemia. A third group (I/R-Tr) received T3 (1.2 μg/kg) during reperfusion. We assessed absolute CAC intermediate levels and flux parameters into the CAC through oxidative pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC) and anaplerotic carboxylation (PC) using [2-(13)C]pyruvate and isotopomer analysis by gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. When compared with I/R, T3 (group I/R-Tr) increased cardiac power and oxygen consumption after I/R while elevating flux of both PDC and PC (∼4-fold). Although neither I/R nor I/R-Tr modified absolute CAC levels, T3 inhibited I/R-induced reductions in their molar percent enrichment. Furthermore, (13)C-labeling of CAC intermediates suggests that T3 may decrease entry of unlabeled carbons at the level of oxaloacetate through anaplerosis or exchange reaction with asparate. T3 markedly enhances PC and PDC fluxes, thereby providing potential substrate for elevated cardiac function after reperfusion. This T3-induced increase in pyruvate fluxes occurs with preservation of the CAC intermediate pool. Our labeling data raise the possibility that T3 reduces reliance on amino acids for anaplerosis after reperfusion.

  14. Carbon Flux Trapping: Highly Efficient Production of Polymer-Grade d-Lactic Acid with a Thermophilic d-Lactate Dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Tao, Fei; Xu, Ping

    2016-08-17

    High production of polymer-grade d-lactic acid is urgently required, particularly for the synthesis of polylactic acid. High-temperature fermentation has multiple advantages, such as lower equipment requirement and energy consumption, which are essential for lowering operating costs. We identified and introduced a unique d-lactate dehydrogenase into a thermotolerant butane-2,3-diol-producing strain. Carbon flux "trapping" was achieved by a "trapping point" created by combination of the introduced enzyme and the host efflux pump, which afforded irreversible transport of d-lactic acid. The overall carbon flux of the engineered strain was significantly enhanced and was redistributed predominantly to d-lactic acid. Under optimized conditions at 50 °C, d-lactic acid reached the highest titer (226.6 g L(-1) ) reported to date. This discovery allows us to extend the carbon flux trapping strategy to engineering complex metabolic networks.

  15. Correlation between citric acid and nitrate metabolisms during CAM cycle in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana.

    PubMed

    Freschi, Luciano; Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Tiné, Marco Aurélio Silva; Mercier, Helenice

    2010-12-15

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) confers crucial adaptations for plants living under frequent environmental stresses. A wide metabolic plasticity can be found among CAM species regarding the type of storage carbohydrate, organic acid accumulated at night and decarboxylating system. Consequently, many aspects of the CAM pathway control are still elusive while the impact of this photosynthetic adaptation on nitrogen metabolism has remained largely unexplored. In this study, we investigated a possible link between the CAM cycle and the nitrogen assimilation in the atmospheric bromeliad Tillandsia pohliana by simultaneously characterizing the diel changes in key enzyme activities and metabolite levels of both organic acid and nitrate metabolisms. The results revealed that T. pohliana performed a typical CAM cycle in which phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase phosphorylation seemed to play a crucial role to avoid futile cycles of carboxylation and decarboxylation. Unlike all other bromeliads previously investigated, almost equimolar concentrations of malate and citrate were accumulated at night. Moreover, a marked nocturnal depletion in the starch reservoirs and an atypical pattern of nitrate reduction restricted to the nighttime were also observed. Since reduction and assimilation of nitrate requires a massive supply of reducing power and energy and considering that T. pohliana lives overexposed to the sunlight, we hypothesize that citrate decarboxylation might be an accessory mechanism to increase internal CO₂ concentration during the day while its biosynthesis could provide NADH and ATP for nocturnal assimilation of nitrate. Therefore, besides delivering photoprotection during the day, citrate might represent a key component connecting both CAM pathway and nitrogen metabolism in T. pohliana; a scenario that certainly deserves further study not only in this species but also in other CAM plants that nocturnally accumulate citrate.

  16. Transport and cycling of iron and hydrogen peroxide in a freshwater stream: Influence of organic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, D.T.; Runkel, R.L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Voelker, B.M.; Kimball, B.A.; Carraway, E.R.

    2003-01-01

    An in-stream injection of two dissolved organic acids (phthalic and aspartic acids) was performed in an acidic mountain stream to assess the effects of organic acids on Fe photoreduction and H2O2 cycling. Results indicate that the fate of Fe is dependent on a net balance of oxidative and reductive processes, which can vary over a distance of several meters due to changes in incident light and other factors. Solution phase photoreduction rates were high in sunlit reaches and were enhanced by the organic acid addition but were also limited by the amount of ferric iron present in the water column. Fe oxide photoreduction from the streambed and colloids within the water column resulted in an increase in the diurnal load of total filterable Fe within the experimental reach, which also responded to increases in light and organic acids. Our results also suggest that Fe(II) oxidation increased in response to the organic acids, with the result of offsetting the increase in Fe(II) from photoreductive processes. Fe(II) was rapidly oxidized to Fe(III) after sunset and during the day within a well-shaded reach, presumably through microbial oxidation. H2O 2, a product of dissolved organic matter photolysis, increased downstream to maximum concentrations of 0.25 ??M midday. Kinetic calculations show that the buildup of H2O2 is controlled by reaction with Fe(III), but this has only a small effect on Fe(II) because of the small formation rates of H2O2 compared to those of Fe(II). The results demonstrate the importance of incorporating the effects of light and dissolved organic carbon into Fe reactive transport models to further our understanding of the fate of Fe in streams and lakes.

  17. Analysis of the citric acid cycle intermediates using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kombu, Rajan S; Brunengraber, Henri; Puchowicz, Michelle A

    2011-01-01

    Researchers view analysis of the citric acid cycle (CAC) intermediates as a metabolomic approach to identifying unexpected correlations between apparently related and unrelated pathways of metabolism. Relationships of the CAC intermediates, as measured by their concentrations and relative ratios, offer useful information to understanding interrelationships between the CAC and metabolic pathways under various physiological and pathological conditions. This chapter presents a relatively simple method that is sensitive for simultaneously measuring concentrations of CAC intermediates (relative and absolute) and other related intermediates of energy metabolism using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  18. Corrosive Resistant Diamond Coatings for the Acid Based Thermo-Chemical Hydrogen Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Mark A. Prelas

    2009-06-25

    This project was designed to test diamond, diamond-like and related materials in environments that are expected in thermochemical cycles. Our goals were to build a High Temperature Corrosion Resistance (HTCR) test stand and begin testing the corrosive properties of barious materials in a high temperature acidic environment in the first year. Overall, we planned to test 54 samples each of diamond and diamond-like films (of 1 cm x 1 cm area). In addition we use a corrosion acceleration method by treating the samples at a temperature much larger than the expected operating temperature. Half of the samples will be treated with boron using the FEDOA process.

  19. The acid and alkalinity budgets of weathering in the Andes-Amazon system: Insights into the erosional control of global biogeochemical cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Mark A.; West, A. Joshua; Clark, Kathryn E.; Paris, Guillaume; Bouchez, Julien; Ponton, Camilo; Feakins, Sarah J.; Galy, Valier; Adkins, Jess F.

    2016-09-01

    The correlation between chemical weathering fluxes and denudation rates suggests that tectonic activity can force variations in atmospheric pCO2 by modulating weathering fluxes. However, the effect of weathering on pCO2 is not solely determined by the total mass flux. Instead, the effect of weathering on pCO2 also depends upon the balance between 1) alkalinity generation by carbonate and silicate mineral dissolution and 2) sulfuric acid generation by the oxidation of sulfide minerals. In this study, we explore how the balance between acid and alkalinity generation varies with tectonic uplift to better understand the links between tectonics and the long-term carbon cycle. To trace weathering reactions across the transition from the Peruvian Andes to the Amazonian foreland basin, we measured a suite of elemental concentrations (Na, K, Ca, Mg, Sr, Si, Li, SO4, and Cl) and isotopic ratios (87Sr/86Sr and δ34S) on both dissolved and solid phase samples. Using an inverse model, we quantitatively link systematic changes in solute geochemistry with elevation to downstream declines in sulfuric acid weathering as well as the proportion of cations sourced from silicates. With a new carbonate-system framework, we show that weathering in the Andes Mountains is a CO2 source whereas foreland weathering is a CO2 sink. These results are consistent with the theoretical expectation that the ratio of sulfide oxidation to silicate weathering increases with increasing erosion. Altogether, our results suggest that the effect of tectonically-enhanced weathering on atmospheric pCO2 is strongly modulated by sulfide mineral oxidation.

  20. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Dennis G.; Jaramillo Riveri, Sebastian I.; Baxter, Douglas J.; Cannon, William R.

    2014-12-15

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux in the different oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on equations of state and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the selforganization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals, such as biofuels.

  1. Comparison of Optimal Thermodynamic Models of the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle from Heterotrophs, Cyanobacteria, and Green Sulfur Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dennis G; Jaramillo-Riveri, Sebastian; Baxter, Douglas J; Cannon, William R

    2014-12-26

    We have applied a new stochastic simulation approach to predict the metabolite levels, material flux, and thermodynamic profiles of the oxidative TCA cycles found in E. coli and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and in the reductive TCA cycle typical of chemolithoautotrophs and phototrophic green sulfur bacteria such as Chlorobaculum tepidum. The simulation approach is based on modeling states using statistical thermodynamics and employs an assumption similar to that used in transition state theory. The ability to evaluate the thermodynamics of metabolic pathways allows one to understand the relationship between coupling of energy and material gradients in the environment and the self-organization of stable biological systems, and it is shown that each cycle operates in the direction expected due to its environmental niche. The simulations predict changes in metabolite levels and flux in response to changes in cofactor concentrations that would be hard to predict without an elaborate model based on the law of mass action. In fact, we show that a thermodynamically unfavorable reaction can still have flux in the forward direction when it is part of a reaction network. The ability to predict metabolite levels, energy flow, and material flux should be significant for understanding the dynamics of natural systems and for understanding principles for engineering organisms for production of specialty chemicals.

  2. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-06-15

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed (13)C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation.

  3. IDH1 Mutations Alter Citric Acid Cycle Metabolism and Increase Dependence on Oxidative Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grassian, Alexandra R.; Parker, Seth J.; Davidson, Shawn M.; Divakarun, Ajit S.; Green, Courtney R.; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L.; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D.; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Murphy, Anne N.; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed 13C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation. PMID:24755473

  4. Metal cycling during sediment early diagenesis in a water reservoir affected by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Torres, E; Ayora, C; Canovas, C R; García-Robledo, E; Galván, L; Sarmiento, A M

    2013-09-01

    The discharge of acid mine drainage (AMD) into a reservoir may seriously affect the water quality. To investigate the metal transfer between the water and the sediment, three cores were collected from the Sancho Reservoir (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain) during different seasons: turnover event; oxic, stratified period; anoxic and under shallow perennially oxic conditions. The cores were sliced in an oxygen-free atmosphere, after which pore water was extracted by centrifugation and analyzed. A sequential extraction was then applied to the sediments to extract the water-soluble, monosulfide, low crystallinity Fe(III)-oxyhydroxide, crystalline Fe(III)-oxide, organic, pyrite and residual phases. The results showed that, despite the acidic chemistry of the water column (pH<4), the reservoir accumulated a high amount of autochthonous organic matter (up to 12 wt.%). Oxygen was consumed in 1mm of sediment due to organic matter and sulfide oxidation. Below the oxic layer, Fe(III) and sulfate reduction peaks developed concomitantly and the resulting Fe(II) and S(II) were removed as sulfides and probably as S linked to organic matter. During the oxic season, schwertmannite precipitated in the water column and was redissolved in the organic-rich sediment, after which iron and arsenic diffused upwards again to the water column. The flux of precipitates was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than the aqueous one, and therefore the sediment acted as a sink for As and Fe. Trace metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Ni, Co) and Al always diffused from the reservoir water and were incorporated into the sediments as sulfides and oxyhydroxides, respectively. In spite of the fact that the benthic fluxes estimated for trace metal and Al were much higher than those reported for lake and marine sediments, they only accounted for less than 10% of their total inventory dissolved in the column water.

  5. Reconsideration of the significance of substrate-level phosphorylation in the citric acid cycle*.

    PubMed

    Lambeth, David O

    2006-01-01

    For nearly 50 years, students of metabolism in animals have been taught that a substrate-level phosphorylation in the Krebs citric acid cycle produces GTP that subsequently undergoes a transphosphorylation with ADP catalyzed by nucleoside diphosphate kinase. Research in the past decade has revealed that animals also express an ADP-forming succinate-CoA ligase whose activity exceeds that of the GDP-forming enzyme in some tissues. Here I argue that the primary fate of GTP is unlikely to be transphosphorylation with ADP. Rather, two succinate-CoA ligases with different nucleotide specificities have evolved to better integrate and regulate the central metabolic pathways that involve the citric acid cycle. The products of substrate-level phosphorylation, ATP and/or GTP, may represent a pool of nucleotide that has a different phosphorylation potential than the ATP made by oxidative phosphorylation and may be channeled to meet specific needs within mitochondria and the cell. Further research is needed to determine the applicable mechanisms and how they vary in tissues.

  6. Biochar impacts soil microbial community composition and nitrogen cycling in an acidic soil planted with rape.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui-Juan; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Li, Hu; Yao, Huai-Ying; Su, Jian-Qiang; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2014-08-19

    Biochar has been suggested to improve acidic soils and to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. However, little has been done on the role of biochar in ameliorating acidified soils induced by overuse of nitrogen fertilizers. In this study, we designed a pot trial with an acidic soil (pH 4.48) in a greenhouse to study the interconnections between microbial community, soil chemical property changes, and N2O emissions after biochar application. The results showed that biochar increased plant growth, soil pH, total carbon, total nitrogen, C/N ratio, and soil cation exchange capacity. The results of high-throughput sequencing showed that biochar application increased α-diversity significantly and changed the relative abundances of some microbes that are related with carbon and nitrogen cycling at the family level. Biochar amendment stimulated both nitrification and denitrification processes, while reducing N2O emissions overall. Results of redundancy analysis indicated biochar could shift the soil microbial community by changing soil chemical properties, which modulate N-cycling processes and soil N2O emissions. The significantly increased nosZ transcription suggests that biochar decreased soil N2O emissions by enhancing its further reduction to N2.

  7. Cell cycle regulatory effects of retinoic Acid and forskolin are mediated by the cyclin C gene.

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Katri M; Malinen, Marjo; Ropponen, Antti; Väisänen, Sami; Carlberg, Carsten

    2009-10-23

    As a partner of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 3, Cyclin C controls cellular proliferation and, together with CDK8, represses gene transcription. In this study, we showed that the highly expressed Cyclin C gene is a direct target of the nuclear hormone all-trans retinoic acid (RA) in HEK293 human embryonal kidney cells. The RA receptor (RAR) gamma associates with a Cyclin C promoter region containing two RAR binding sites. The Cyclin C gene also directly responds to the cAMP activator Forskolin via the transcription factor CREB1 (cAMP response element-binding protein 1), for which we identified four binding sites within the first 2250 bp of its promoter. RARgamma and CREB1 show functional convergence via the corepressor NCoR1, which controls in particular the Forskolin response of Cyclin C. The histone deacetylases 1, 5, 6, 7 and 11 are involved in the basal expression of Cyclin C, but in HEK293 and MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells the antiproliferative effects of the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid) are not mediated by Cyclin C. However, cell cycle progressing effects of all-trans RA and Forskolin are dependent on Cyclin C expression levels. This suggests that the primary regulation of Cyclin C by all-trans RA and Forskolin mediates some of the cell cycle control actions of these compounds.

  8. THE EFFECT OF ANOLYTE PRODUCT ACID CONCENTRATION ON HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Summers, W.

    2010-03-24

    The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycle (Fig. 1) is one of the simplest, all-fluids thermochemical cycles that has been devised for splitting water with a high-temperature nuclear or solar heat source. It was originally patented by Brecher and Wu in 1975 and extensively developed by Westinghouse in the late 1970s and early 1980s. As its name suggests, the only element used besides hydrogen and oxygen is sulfur, which is cycled between the +4 and +6 oxidation states. HyS comprises two steps. One is the thermochemical (>800 C) decomposition of sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) to sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), oxygen (O{sub 2}), and water. H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} = SO{sub 2} + 1/2 O{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O. The other is the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis of water to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and hydrogen (H{sub 2}), SO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}O = H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + H{sub 2}, E{sup o} = -0.156 V, explaining the 'hybrid' designation. These two steps taken together split water into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} using heat and electricity. Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and at the University of South Carolina (USC) have successfully demonstrated the use of proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzers (Fig. 2) for the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis (sulfur oxidation) step, while Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) successfully demonstrated the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition (sulfur reduction) step using a bayonet-type reactor (Fig. 3). This latter work was performed as part of the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) cycle Integrated Laboratory Scale demonstration at General Atomics (GA). The combination of these two operations results in a simple process that will be more efficient and cost-effective for the massive production of hydrogen than alkaline electrolysis. Recent developments suggest that the use of PEMs other than Nafion will allow sulfuric acid to be produced at higher concentrations (>60 wt%), offering the possibility of net thermal efficiencies around 50% (HHV basis

  9. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea B.; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-10-26

    It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. In this study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of the γ-proteobacterium S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. In addition, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and demonstrated its expression experimentally. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. This work delineates an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other γ-proteobacteria.

  10. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. It is unclear in the g-proteobacterium S. oneidensis whether TCA is also regulated by Fur and RyhB. Results: In the present study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. Consistently, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and experimentally demonstrated the gene expression. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. Conclusions: These cumulative results delineate an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other g-proteobacteria. This work represents a step forward for understanding the unique regulation in S. oneidensis.

  11. Abnormalities in the tricarboxylic Acid cycle in Huntington disease and in a Huntington disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Naseri, Nima N; Xu, Hui; Bonica, Joseph; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Cortes, Etty P; Park, Larry C; Arjomand, Jamshid; Gibson, Gary E

    2015-06-01

    Glucose metabolism is reduced in the brains of patients with Huntington disease (HD). The mechanisms underlying this deficit, its link to the pathology of the disease, and the vulnerability of the striatum in HD remain unknown. Abnormalities in some of the key mitochondrial enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, including the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, may contribute to these deficits. Here, activities for these enzymes and select protein levels were measured in human postmortem cortex and in striatum and cortex of an HD mouse model (Q175); mRNA levels encoding for these enzymes were also measured in the Q175 mouse cortex. The activities of PDHC and nearly all of the TCA cycle enzymes were dramatically lower (-50% to 90%) in humans than in mice. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase increased with HD in human (35%) and mouse (23%) cortex. No other changes were detected in the human HD cortex or mouse striatum. In Q175 cortex, there were increased activities of PDHC (+12%) and aconitase (+32%). Increased mRNA levels for succinyl thiokinase (+88%) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (+64%) suggested an upregulation of the TCA cycle. These patterns of change differ from those reported in other diseases, which may offer unique metabolic therapeutic opportunities for HD patients.

  12. Abnormalities in the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Huntington Disease and in a Huntington Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Nima N.; Xu, Hui; Bonica, Joseph; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G.; Cortes, Etty P.; Park, Larry C.; Arjomand, Jamshid; Gibson, Gary E.

    2015-01-01

    Glucose metabolism is reduced in the brains of patients with Huntington disease (HD). The mechanisms underlying this deficit, its link to the pathology of the disease and the vulnerability of the striatum in HD remain unknown. Abnormalities in some of the key mitochondrial enzymes involved in glucose metabolism, including the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, may contribute to these deficits. Here, activities for these enzymes and select protein levels were measured in human postmortem cortex and in striatum and cortex of an HD mouse model (Q175); mRNA levels encoding for these enzymes were also measured in the Q175 mouse cortex. The activities of PDHC and nearly all of the TCA cycle enzymes were dramatically lower (−50%–90%) in humans than in mice. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase increased with HD in human (35%) and mouse (23%) cortex. No other changes were detected in the HD cortex or mouse striatum. In Q175 cortex, there were increased activities of PDHC (+12%) and aconitase (+32%). Increased mRNA levels for succinyl thiokinase (+88%) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (+64%), suggested an upregulation of the TCA cycle. These patterns of change differ from those reported in other diseases, which may offer unique metabolic therapeutic opportunities for HD patients. PMID:25978848

  13. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS OF ESTRADIOL IN THE CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMOZED/ESTRADIOL-IMPLANTED FEMALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations of Estradiol in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized / Estradiol-implanted Female Rats

    ABSTRACT
    Haloacetic acids are one of the principal classes of disinfection by-products generated by the chlorination of mun...

  14. Improved Cycling Performance of a Si Nanoparticle Anode Utilizing Citric Acid as a Surface-Modifying Agent.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cao Cuong; Seo, Daniel M; Chandrasiri, K W D K; Lucht, Brett L

    2016-12-20

    Citric acid and its analogues have been investigated as surface-modifying agents for Si nanoparticle anodes using electrochemical cycling, attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A Si nanoparticle anode prepared with citric acid (CA) has better capacity retention than one containing 1,2,3,4-butanetetracarboxylic acid (BA), but both electrodes outperform Si-PVDF. The Si-CA anode has an initial specific capacity of 3530 mA h/g and a first cycle efficiency of 82%. Surprisingly, the Si-CA electrode maintains a high specific capacity of ∼2200 mA h/g after 250 cycles, corresponding to 64% capacity retention, which is similar to the Si prepared with long-chain poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). On the contrary, the silicon electrode prepared with PVDF has a fast capacity fade and retains only 980 mA h/g after 50 cycles. The IR and XPS data show that the Si-CA electrode has an SEI composed primarily of lithium citrate during the first 50 cycles, resulting from the electrochemical reduction of citric acid. Only low concentrations of electrolyte reduction products are observed. The lithium citrate layer derived from CA stabilizes the silicon surface and suppresses electrolyte reduction, which likely contributes to the enhanced cycling performance of the Si nanoparticle anode.

  15. Single-step enantioselective amino acid flux analysis by capillary electrophoresis using on-line sample preconcentration with chemical derivatization.

    PubMed

    Ptolemy, Adam S; Tran, Lara; Britz-McKibbin, Philip

    2006-07-15

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) represents a versatile platform for integrating sample pretreatment with chemical analysis because of its ability to tune analyte electromigration and band dispersion properties in discontinuous electrolyte systems. In this article, a single-step method that combines on-line sample preconcentration with in-capillary chemical derivatization is developed for rapid, sensitive, and enantioselective analysis of micromolar levels of amino acids that lack intrinsic chromophores by CE with UV detection. Time-resolved electrophoretic studies revealed two distinct stages of amino acid band narrowing within the original long sample injection plug occurring both prior to and after in-capillary labeling via zone passing by ortho-phthalaldehyde/N-acetyl l-cysteine (OPA/NAC). This technique enabled direct analysis of d-amino acids in a 95% enantiomeric excess mixture with sub-micromolar detection limits and minimal sample handling, where the capillary functions as a preconcentrator, microreactor, and chiral selector. On-line sample preconcentration with chemical derivatization CE (SPCD-CE) was applied to study the enantioselective amino acid flux in Escherichia coli bacteria cultures, which demonstrated a unique l-Ala efflux into the extracellular medium. New strategies for high-throughput analyses of low-abundance metabolites are important for understanding fundamental physiological processes in bacteria required for screening the efficacy of new classes of antibiotics as well as altered metabolism in genetically modified mutant strains.

  16. Regulation of adipose branched chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated blood branched chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. One possibility is that under these conditions there is a reduced cellular utilization and/or lower complete oxidation of BCAAs. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a...

  17. Evolution of the enzymes of the citric acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle of higher plants. A case study of endosymbiotic gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Schnarrenberger, Claus; Martin, William

    2002-02-01

    The citric acid or tricarboxylic acid cycle is a central element of higher-plant carbon metabolism which provides, among other things, electrons for oxidative phosphorylation in the inner mitochondrial membrane, intermediates for amino-acid biosynthesis, and oxaloacetate for gluconeogenesis from succinate derived from fatty acids via the glyoxylate cycle in glyoxysomes. The tricarboxylic acid cycle is a typical mitochondrial pathway and is widespread among alpha-proteobacteria, the group of eubacteria as defined under rRNA systematics from which mitochondria arose. Most of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle are encoded in the nucleus in higher eukaryotes, and several have been previously shown to branch with their homologues from alpha-proteobacteria, indicating that the eukaryotic nuclear genes were acquired from the mitochondrial genome during the course of evolution. Here, we investigate the individual evolutionary histories of all of the enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle using protein maximum likelihood phylogenies, focusing on the evolutionary origin of the nuclear-encoded proteins in higher plants. The results indicate that about half of the proteins involved in this eukaryotic pathway are most similar to their alpha-proteobacterial homologues, whereas the remainder are most similar to eubacterial, but not specifically alpha-proteobacterial, homologues. A consideration of (a) the process of lateral gene transfer among free-living prokaryotes and (b) the mechanistics of endosymbiotic (symbiont-to-host) gene transfer reveals that it is unrealistic to expect all nuclear genes that were acquired from the alpha-proteobacterial ancestor of mitochondria to branch specifically with their homologues encoded in the genomes of contemporary alpha-proteobacteria. Rather, even if molecular phylogenetics were to work perfectly (which it does not), then some nuclear-encoded proteins that were acquired from the alpha

  18. Detection of climate change impacts on boreal soil carbon cycling: A model-based analysis of carbon stock and flux changes over the coming decades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Z.; Neff, J.

    2009-12-01

    Future changes in organic carbon (OC) cycling of northern soils due to climate change may have significant impacts on global C cycling. However such changes are still complex and poorly understood in part because boreal soils have unique factors that preserve OC (e.g. permafrost) and loss pathways that include CO2, CH4 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fluxes. Additionally, boreal soils contain large stocks of OC that challenge attempts to measure OC loss through repeat measurements of OC pools. With multiple pathways of OC loss and challenges to OC monitoring, it becomes critical to determine which component or property of boreal soil OC (e.g. thickness of OC layer, 14C in solid, liquid, or gas phase) is likely to most sensitive to potential climate changes and when changes in these components would become detectable using laboratory or field measurement. The objective of this study is to provide theoretical answers to the above questions using one single complex biogeochemical model along with various sensitivity analyses. Several existing models have been incorporated into the biogeochemical model, including 1) a multi-isotope OC dynamic model simulating the dynamics of OC layers through time, 2) soil thermal dynamics model simulating the soil heat transported by conduction and by convection via movement of liquid water and water vapor, 3) DOC dynamics model simulating the production, fate, and transport of DOC, and 4) CO2 dynamics model simulating the production and transport of CO2. Six synthesis sites with a factorial combination of drainage class (i.e., well-drained, intermediate well-drained, and poorly drained) and permafrost status (i.e., with or without permafrost underlain) were studied in this research. The results highlight the importance of DOC fluxes from the OC layers to the mineral soils; however the importance of DOC fluxes varied among sites and was strongly dependent on the soil physical properties including soil texture and moisture content

  19. Identification of a chemoreceptor for tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates: differential chemotactic response towards receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Lacal, Jesús; Alfonso, Carlos; Liu, Xianxian; Parales, Rebecca E; Morel, Bertrand; Conejero-Lara, Francisco; Rivas, Germán; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan L; Krell, Tino

    2010-07-23

    We report the identification of McpS as the specific chemoreceptor for 6 tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and butyrate in Pseudomonas putida. The analysis of the bacterial mutant deficient in mcpS and complementation assays demonstrate that McpS is the only chemoreceptor of TCA cycle intermediates in the strain under study. TCA cycle intermediates are abundantly present in root exudates, and taxis toward these compounds is proposed to facilitate the access to carbon sources. McpS has an unusually large ligand-binding domain (LBD) that is un-annotated in InterPro and is predicted to contain 6 helices. The ligand profile of McpS was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry of purified recombinant LBD (McpS-LBD). McpS recognizes TCA cycle intermediates but does not bind very close structural homologues and derivatives like maleate, aspartate, or tricarballylate. This implies that functional similarity of ligands, such as being part of the same pathway, and not structural similarity is the primary element, which has driven the evolution of receptor specificity. The magnitude of chemotactic responses toward these 7 chemoattractants, as determined by qualitative and quantitative chemotaxis assays, differed largely. Ligands that cause a strong chemotactic response (malate, succinate, and fumarate) were found by differential scanning calorimetry to increase significantly the midpoint of protein unfolding (T(m)) and unfolding enthalpy (DeltaH) of McpS-LBD. Equilibrium sedimentation studies show that malate, the chemoattractant that causes the strongest chemotactic response, stabilizes the dimeric state of McpS-LBD. In this respect clear parallels exist to the Tar receptor and other eukaryotic receptors, which are discussed.

  20. Clinical benefit using sperm hyaluronic acid binding technique in ICSI cycles: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Beck-Fruchter, Ronit; Shalev, Eliezer; Weiss, Amir

    2016-03-01

    The human oocyte is surrounded by hyaluronic acid, which acts as a natural selector of spermatozoa. Human sperm that express hyaluronic acid receptors and bind to hyaluronic acid have normal shape, minimal DNA fragmentation and low frequency of chromosomal aneuploidies. Use of hyaluronic acid binding assays in intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles to improve clinical outcomes has been studied, although none of these studies had sufficient statistical power. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, electronic databases were searched up to June 2015 to identify studies of ICSI cycles in which spermatozoa able to bind hyaluronic acid was selected. The main outcomes were fertilization rate and clinical pregnancy rate. Secondary outcomes included cleavage rate, embryo quality, implantation rate, spontaneous abortion and live birth rate. Seven studies and 1437 cycles were included. Use of hyaluronic acid binding sperm selection technique yielded no improvement in fertilization and pregnancy rates. A meta-analysis of all available studies showed an improvement in embryo quality and implantation rate; an analysis of prospective studies only showed an improvement in embryo quality. Evidence does not support routine use of hyaluronic acid binding assays in all ICSI cycles. Identification of patients that might benefit from this technique needs further study.

  1. Fluxes of CO2, CH4, CO, BVOCs, NOx, and O3 in an Old Growth Amazonian Forest: Ecosystem Processes, Carbon Cycle, Atmospheric Chemistry, and Feedbacks on Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Wofsy, Steven C.

    2016-12-20

    A comprehensive, merged data set of trace gases (NO, NO2, CO2, CH4 and O3) along with has been tabulated and subjected to meticulous quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC). The merged data set is being submitted to the ARM website dedicated to the Green Ocean Experiment: https://www.arm.gov/research/campaigns/amf2014goamazon Analysis using the final data set is in progress to determine the magnitudes of the fluxes for CH4, H2O, CO2, O3, NOx, sensible and latent heat, momentum, and their seasonal variations. Here are summary statements, from the discussion above: Total NO fluxes were calculated following Keller et al., 1986. A vertical gradient is established in the mixing ratio of NO because it is emitted at the soil surface and mixed upward in the atmosphere (see above). Once in the atmosphere, the NO reacts rapidly with O3 to produce NO2 (NO + O3 → NO2 + O2). Therefore, if the vertical profiles of the mixing ratios of NO and O3 are known, the surface flux of NO may be determined. If any other reaction removes NO (e.g., deposition on leaves), FNO should estimate the lower limit to the NO flux from the soil in this forest. Our preliminary results show fluxes of NO averaged 133 x 109 molecules cm-2 s-1, a factor of 4 higher than fluxes previously observed in white sand soils in the Amazon, and a factor of 3 to 14 higher than fluxes observed for yellow clay soils (Bakwin et al., 1990 and references therein). The soil in the km 67 site is predominately oxisol with pockets of sandy ultisols, both having low reduced nutrient contents, mostly due to efficient microorganism decomposition and acid leaching by rain water. Oxisols contain both oxidized and reduced forms of nitrogen, of which concentrations vary independently of leaching (Jordan et al., 1982), with most

  2. Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Diets with Improved Omega-3 Fatty Acid Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Carla R. V.; Pernollet, Franck; van der Werf, Hayo M. G.

    2016-01-01

    A high incidence of cardiovascular disease is observed worldwide, and dietary habits are one of the risk factors for these diseases. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the diet help to prevent cardiovascular disease. We used life cycle assessment to analyse the potential of two strategies to improve the nutritional and environmental characteristics of French diets: 1) modifying diets by changing the quantities and proportions of foods and 2) increasing the omega-3 contents in diets by replacing mainly animal foods with equivalent animal foods having higher omega-3 contents. We also investigated other possibilities for reducing environmental impacts. Our results showed that a diet compliant with nutritional recommendations for macronutrients had fewer environmental impacts than the current average French diet. Moving from an omnivorous to a vegetarian diet further reduced environmental impacts. Increasing the omega-3 contents in animal rations increased Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) in animal food products. Providing these enriched animal foods in human diets increased their EPA and DHA contents without affecting their environmental impacts. However, in diets that did not contain fish, EPA and DHA contents were well below the levels recommended by health authorities, despite the inclusion of animal products enriched in EPA and DHA. Reducing meat consumption and avoidable waste at home are two main avenues for reducing environmental impacts of diets. PMID:27504959

  3. Development of an HPLC-fluorescence determination method for carboxylic acids related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle as a metabolome tool.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Kazuyuki; Fukushima, Takeshi; Yuji, Reiko; Miyano, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Kazuo; Santa, Tomofumi; Imai, Kazuhiro

    2005-12-01

    We report the simultaneous determination of the carboxylic acids related to the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which plays an important role in producing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and generating energy in mitochondria. Seven carboxylic acids from the TCA cycle, and pyruvic acid and 2-methylsuccinic acid, as an internal standard, were derivatized with a fluorescent reagent for carboxyl groups, 4-N,N-dimethylaminosulfonyl-7-piperazino-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (DBD-PZ), in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and 4-N,N-dimethyaminopyridine as the coupling reagents, at 60 degrees C for 120 min. Subsequently, the excess DBD-PZ was removed efficiently using a cation-exchange cartridge, SDB-RPS (Empore). These fluorescent derivatives were separated well from each other on an octadecyl silica column (TSKgel ODS-80Ts, 250 x 4.6 mm, i.d.) with an eluent of acetonitrile-water containing 1% formic acid at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, and were detected fluorometrically at 560 nm, with excitation at 450 nm. The validation data were satisfactory in the range of 2.5-100 microm citric acid, isocitric acid, 2-oxoglutaric acid, succinic acid and fumaric acid. The detection limit (S/N = 3) for citric acid was 2 fmol on the column. The structures of these derivatives were confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, which proved that their carboxylic groups were completely labeled with DBD-PZ, except for oxaloacetic acid. This HPLC method was successfully applied to the analysis of TCA cycle metabolites in rat urine. The method will also be useful for metabolome research, such as for target analyses of metabolites with carboxyl groups, not only in urine but also in cells and organs.

  4. Synthesis and regulation of chlorogenic acid in potato: Rerouting phenylpropanoid flux in HQT silenced lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is the major phenolic sink in potato tubers and can constitute over 90% of total phenylpropanoids. The regulation of CGA biosynthesis in potato and the role of the CGA biosynthetic gene hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) was characterized. A sucros...

  5. Experiment explores inter-calibration of biogeochemical flux and nucleic acid measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkhof, Lee; Corredor, Jorge; López, José; Paul, John; Bronk, Deborah; Cherrier, Jennifer

    In the ocean, biologically active elements undergo continuous cycling between the biota, the water column, and the atmosphere. Biological processes and the resultant air/sea exchange of atmospherically active gases are closely modulated by the availability and distribution of key elements. Such processes have been traditionally measured by incubation of representative microbial communities and tracking of end-product appearance or substrate disappearance. The recent advent of molecular techniques allows for the quantification of DNA and the RNA messenger responsible for the synthesis of the enzymes catalyzing specific biochemical processes. However, there is little information on how levels of gene expression for natural populations of micro-organisms correlate with biogeochemical processes.

  6. Amino acid accumulation in frog muscle. II. Are cycloleucine fluxes consistent with an adsorption model for concentrative uptake of amino acid?

    PubMed

    Neville, M C

    1975-03-25

    Cycloleucine accumulation by frog muscle was studied at 0 degrees C and 25 degrees C. At external concentrations less than 5 mM the distribution ratio of cycloleucine is higher at 0 degrees C. At concentrations greater than 5 mM the converse is true due to apparent exclusion of cycloleucine from a larger portion of the cell water at 0 degrees C than at 25 degrees C. The steady state data are consistent with an adsorption model for amino acid accumulation. Flux studies provide a means to rule out this model if all the possible rate-limiting steps in the movement of amino acid into and out of the cell are considered. These steps include intra-cytoplasmic diffusion, desorption from cytoplasmic or membrane sites and passage through the cell membrane. The assumption is made that the rate-limiting step for influx and efflux is the same, allowing the use of either influx or efflux data to examine the model. Diffusion-limited flux is ruled out on the basis of "influx profile analysis" of the time course of cycloleucine entry at both 0 degrees C and 25 degrees C. At least 95% of all intracellular cycloleucine leaves frog muscle cells with a single exponential time course at both 0 degrees C and 25 degrees C. The rate constant of efflux does not vary with cellular concentration. These findings are shown to be incompatible with desorption-limited efflux. They are compatible with membrane-limited efflux only if (i) adsorption sites are located on membranes with direct access to the extracellular space and (ii) the rate constant for desorption is equal to the rate constant of membrane-limited efflux of free amino acid. It is considered unlikely that such a coincidence would occur at both 0 degrees C and 25 degrees C. Therefore, an adsorption model for cycloleucine accumulation in frog muscle appears to be untenable.

  7. Analysis of the sensitivity of the composition and temperature of the stratosphere to the variability of spectral solar radiation fluxes induced by the 11-year cycle of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyshlyaev, S. P.; Galin, V. Ya.; Blakitnaya, P. A.; Lemishchenko, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of the gas composition of the atmosphere and its temperature to the changes in spectral radiation fluxes during the 11-year cycle of solar activity has been analyzed with a chemistry-climate model of the lower and middle atmosphere. For this, the data of satellite measurements acquired in the first decade of the 21st century were used. The results of the model calculations showed that, in addition to the increase in the spectral flux in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen that leads to the growth of the ozone content, the changes in the flux at longer wavelengths are significant for the composition and temperature of the atmosphere. The changes of the ozone destruction rate in different catalytic cycles partly compensate each other; in these processes, the destruction rate increases in the reaction with atomic oxygen, while it decreases in the hydrogen and chlorine cycles.

  8. Equilibrium concentrations for pyruvate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle at specified concentrations of certain coenzymes.

    PubMed

    Alberty, Robert A

    2004-04-01

    It is of interest to calculate equilibrium compositions of systems of biochemical reactions at specified concentrations of coenzymes because these reactants tend to be in steady states. Thermodynamic calculations under these conditions require the definition of a further transformed Gibbs energy G" by use of a Legendre transform. These calculations are applied to the pyruvate dehydrogenase reaction plus the citric acid cycle, but steady-state concentrations of CoA, acetyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA cannot be specified because they are involved in the conservation of carbon atoms. These calculations require the use of linear algebra to obtain further transformed Gibbs energies of formation of reactants and computer programs to calculate equilibrium compositions. At specified temperature, pH, ionic strength and specified concentrations of several coenzymes, the equilibrium composition depends on the specified concentrations of the coenzymes and the initial amounts of reactants.

  9. Manganese toxicity in the CNS: the glutamine/glutamate-γ-aminobutyric acid cycle

    PubMed Central

    Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential trace element that is required for maintaining proper function and regulation of numerous biochemical and cellular reactions. Despite its essentiality, at excessive levels Mn is toxic to the CNS. Increased accumulation of Mn in specific brain regions, such as the substantia nigra, globus pallidus and striatum, triggers neurotoxicity resulting in a neurological brain disorder, termed manganism. Mn has been also implicated in the pathophysiology of several other neurodegenerative diseases. Its toxicity is associated with disruption of the glutamine (Gln)/glutamate (Glu)-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) cycle (GGC) between astrocytes and neurons, thus leading to changes in Glu-ergic and/or GABAergic transmission and Gln metabolism. Here we discuss the common mechanisms underlying Mn-induced neurotoxicity and their relationship to CNS pathology and GGC impairment. PMID:23360507

  10. Mitochondrial TCA cycle intermediates regulate body fluid and acid-base balance.

    PubMed

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-07-01

    Intrarenal control mechanisms play an important role in the maintenance of body fluid and electrolyte balance and pH homeostasis. Recent discoveries of new ion transport and regulatory pathways in the distal nephron and collecting duct system have helped to better our understanding of these critical kidney functions and identified new potential therapeutic targets and approaches. In this issue of the JCI, Tokonami et al. report on the function of an exciting new paracrine mediator, the mitochondrial the citric acid(TCA) cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), which via its OXGR1 receptor plays an unexpected, nontraditional role in the adaptive regulation of renal HCO(3⁻) secretion and salt reabsorption.

  11. Mitochondrial TCA cycle intermediates regulate body fluid and acid-base balance

    PubMed Central

    Peti-Peterdi, János

    2013-01-01

    Intrarenal control mechanisms play an important role in the maintenance of body fluid and electrolyte balance and pH homeostasis. Recent discoveries of new ion transport and regulatory pathways in the distal nephron and collecting duct system have helped to better our understanding of these critical kidney functions and identified new potential therapeutic targets and approaches. In this issue of the JCI, Tokonami et al. report on the function of an exciting new paracrine mediator, the mitochondrial the citric acid (TCA) cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), which via its OXGR1 receptor plays an unexpected, nontraditional role in the adaptive regulation of renal HCO3– secretion and salt reabsorption. PMID:23926603

  12. Platelet adhesion, contact phase coagulation activation, and C5a generation of polyethylene glycol acid-grafted high flux cellulosic membrane with varieties of grafting amounts.

    PubMed

    Fushimi, F; Nakayama, M; Nishimura, K; Hiyoshi, T

    1998-10-01

    Grafting of polyethylene glycol chains onto cellulosic membrane can be expected to reduce the interaction between blood (plasma protein and cells) and the membrane surface. Alkylether carboxylic acid (PEG acid) grafted high flux cellulosic membranes for hemodialysis, in which the polyethylene glycol chain bears an alkyl group at one side and a carboxyl group at the other side, have been developed and evaluated. PEG acid-grafted high flux cellulosic membranes with various grafting amounts have been compared with respect to platelet adhesion, the contact phase of blood coagulation, and complement activation in vitro. A new method of quantitating platelet adhesion on hollow-fiber membrane surfaces has been developed, which is based on the determination of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity after lysis of the adhered platelets. PEG acid-grafted high flux cellulosic membranes showed reduced platelet adhesion and complement activation effects in grafting amounts of 200 ppm or higher without detecting adverse effects up to grafting amounts of 850 ppm. The platelet adhesion of a PEG acid-grafted cellulosic membrane depends on both the flux and grafting amounts of the membrane. It is concluded that the grafting of PEG acid onto a cellulosic membrane improves its biocompatibility as evaluated in terms of platelet adhesion, complement activation, and thrombogenicity.

  13. Recent Advances in Detection of Ammonia and Nitric Acid on Short Timescales Suitable for Eddy Covariance Flux Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscioli, Joseph; Herndon, Scott; Zahniser, Mark; Nelson, David; McManus, Barry

    2015-04-01

    Ammonia and nitric acid play important roles in aerosol, cloud, and NOx chemistry. Accurately measuring these species' concentrations on a fast timescale has historically been complicated due to their tendency to slowly and irreversibly interact with instrument surfaces. Here we present recent efforts aimed at mitigating these effects using new inlet technologies. First, an inlet that combines an inertial impactor with a pressure drop across a critical orifice provides particle removal without a traditional filter. This approach is used to reduce instrumental time responses for NH3 and HNO3 to 3-15 seconds. Second, a further reduction in time response is achieved by entraining functionalized perfluoroalkane vapor into the inlet sampling stream. This "active passivation" method is used to achieve time responses of ~0.5 seconds for both NH3 and HNO3, and is found to be applicable to a variety of inlet designs. These technologies enable fast time response sampling suitable for eddy covariance flux measurements.

  14. Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes (230Thxs-normalized) in central Baffin Bay sediments during the last glacial cycle: Paleoenvironmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Quentin; Thouveny, Nicolas; Bourlès, Didier L.; Nuttin, Laurence; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; St-Onge, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Authigenic 10Be/9Be ratios and 10Be-fluxes reconstructed using the 230Thxs normalization, proxies of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be production rate in the atmosphere, have been measured in a sedimentary core from Baffin Bay (North Atlantic) spanning the last 136 ka BP. The normalization applied on the exchangeable (authigenic) 10Be concentrations using the authigenic 9Be isotope and 230Thxs methods yield equivalent results strongly correlated with sedimentological parameters (grain-size and mineralogy). Lower authigenic beryllium (Be) concentrations and 10Be/9Be ratios are associated with coarse-grained carbonate-rich layers, while higher authigenic Be values are related to fine-grained felspar-rich sediments. This variability is due to: i) sediment composition control over beryllium-scavenging efficiency and, ii) glacial history that contributed to modify the 10Be concentration in Baffin Bay by input and boundary scavenging condition changes. Most paleo-denudation rates inferred from the 10Be/9Be ratio vary weakly around 220 ± 76 tons.km-2.yr-1 (0.09 ± 0.03 mm.yr-1) corresponding to relatively steady weathering fluxes over the last glacial cycle except for six brief intervals characterized by sharp increases of the denudation rate. These intervals are related to ice-surging episodes coeval with Heinrich events and the last deglaciation period. An average freshwater flux of 180.6 km3.yr-1 (0.006 Sv), consistent with recent models, has been calculated in order to sustain glacially-derived 10Be inputs into Baffin Bay. It is concluded that in such environments, the authigenic 10Be measured mainly depends on climatic effects related to the glacial dynamics, which masks the 10Be production variation modulated by geomagnetic field changes. Altogether, these results challenge the simple interpretation of 10Be-concentration variation as a proxy of Interglacial/Glacial (interstadial/stadial) cycles in Arctic and sub-Arctic regions. They rather suggest the effect of

  15. Differential effects of heptanoate and hexanoate on myocardial citric acid cycle intermediates following ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Okere, Isidore C; McElfresh, Tracy A; Brunengraber, Daniel Z; Martini, Wenjun; Sterk, Joseph P; Huang, Hazel; Chandler, Margaret P; Brunengraber, Henri; Stanley, William C

    2006-01-01

    In the normal heart, there is loss of citric acid cycle (CAC) intermediates that is matched by the entry of intermediates from outside the cycle, a process termed anaplerosis. Previous in vitro studies suggest that supplementation with anaplerotic substrates improves cardiac function during myocardial ischemia and/or reperfusion. The present investigation assessed whether treatment with the anaplerotic medium-chain fatty acid heptanoate improves contractile function during ischemia and reperfusion. The left anterior descending coronary artery of anesthetized pigs was subjected to 60 min of 60% flow reduction and 30 min of reperfusion. Three treatment groups were studied: saline control, heptanoate (0.4 mM), or hexanoate as a negative control (0.4 mM). Treatment was initiated after 30 min of ischemia and continued through reperfusion. Myocardial CAC intermediate content was not affected by ischemia-reperfusion; however, treatment with heptanoate resulted in a more than twofold increase in fumarate and malate, with no change in citrate and succinate, while treatment with hexanoate did not increase fumarate or malate but increased succinate by 1.8-fold. There were no differences among groups in lactate exchange, glucose oxidation, oxygen consumption, and contractile power. In conclusion, despite a significant increase in the content of carbon-4 CAC intermediates, treatment with heptanoate did not result in improved mechanical function of the heart in this model of reversible ischemia-reperfusion. This suggests that reduced anaplerosis and CAC dysfunction do not play a major role in contractile and metabolic derangements observed with a 60% decrease in coronary flow followed by reperfusion.

  16. Citric acid cycle in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum grown autotrophically, heterotrophically, and mixotrophically with acetate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yajing; Holden, James F

    2006-06-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrobaculum islandicum uses the citric acid cycle in the oxidative and reductive directions for heterotrophic and autotrophic growth, respectively, but the control of carbon flow is poorly understood. P. islandicum was grown at 95 degrees C autotrophically, heterotrophically, and mixotrophically with acetate, H2, and small amounts of yeast extract and with thiosulfate as the terminal electron acceptor. The autotrophic growth rates and maximum concentrations of cells were significantly lower than those in other media. The growth rates on H2 and 0.001% yeast extract with and without 0.05% acetate were the same, but the maximum concentration of cells was fourfold higher with acetate. There was no growth with acetate if 0.001% yeast extract was not present, and addition of H2 to acetate-containing medium greatly increased the growth rates and maximum concentrations of cells. P. islandicum cultures assimilated 14C-labeled acetate in the presence of H2 and yeast extract with an efficiency of 55%. The activities of 11 of 19 enzymes involved in the central metabolism of P. islandicum were regulated under the three different growth conditions. Pyruvate synthase and acetate:coenzyme A (CoA) ligase (ADP-forming) activities were detected only in heterotrophically grown cultures. Citrate synthase activity decreased in autotrophic and acetate-containing cultures compared to the activity in heterotrophic cultures. Acetylated citrate lyase, acetate:CoA ligase (AMP forming), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities increased in autotrophic and acetate-containing cultures. Citrate lyase activity was higher than ATP citrate synthase activity in autotrophic cultures. These data suggest that citrate lyase and AMP-forming acetate:CoA ligase, but not ATP citrate synthase, work opposite citrate synthase to control the direction of carbon flow in the citric acid cycle.

  17. Ellagic acid suppresses lipid accumulation by suppressing early adipogenic events and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Woo, Mi-Seon; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Seo, Min-Jung; Jeon, Hui-Jeon; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2015-03-01

    Ellagic acid (EA) is a natural polyphenol found in various fruits and vegetables. In this study, we examined the inhibitory effect of EA on fat accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells during adipogenesis. Our data showed that EA reduced fat accumulation by down-regulating adipogenic markers such as peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) at the mRNA and protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. We found that the decrease in adipogenic markers resulted from reduced expression of some early adipogenic transcription factors such as KLF4, KLF5, Krox20, and C/EBPβ within 24 h. Also, these inhibitions were correlated with down-regulation of TG synthetic enzymes, causing inhibition of triglyceride (TG) levels in 3T3-L1 cells investigated by ORO staining and in zebrafish investigated by TG assay. Additionally, the cell cycle analysis showed that EA inhibited cell cycle progression by arresting cells at the G0/G1 phase.

  18. The viability of a nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle--kinetics and thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Ross, David S

    2007-02-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate --> pyruvate --> oxaloacetate --> malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite-magnetite-quartz and pyrrhotite-pyrite-magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life.

  19. The viability of a nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle - Kinetics and thermochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ross, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate ??? pyruvate ??? oxaloacetate ??? malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite-magnetite-quartz and pyrrhotite-pyrite-magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life. ?? 2006 Springer Science + Business Media B.V.

  20. Insights into the Indian Peanut Genotypes for ahFAD2 Gene Polymorphism Regulating Its Oleic and Linoleic Acid Fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Nawade, Bhagwat; Bosamia, Tejas C.; Thankappan, Radhakrishnan; Rathnakumar, Arulthambi L.; Kumar, Abhay; Dobaria, Jentilal R.; Kundu, Rahul; Mishra, Gyan P.

    2016-01-01

    In peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), the customization of fatty acid profile is an evolving area to fulfill the nutritional needs in the modern market. A total of 174 peanut genotypes, including 167 Indian cultivars, 6 advanced breeding lines and “SunOleic95R”—a double mutant line, were investigated using AS-PCRs, CAPS and gene sequencing for the ahFAD2 allele polymorphism, along with its fatty acid compositions. Of these, 80 genotypes were found having substitution (448G>A) mutation only in ahFAD2A gene, while none recorded 1-bp insertion (441_442insA) mutation in ahFAD2B gene. Moreover, 22 wild peanut accessions found lacking both the mutations. Among botanical types, the ahFAD2A mutation was more frequent in ssp. hypogaea (89%) than in ssp. fastigiata (17%). This single allele mutation, found affecting not only oleic to linoleic acid fluxes, but also the composition of other fatty acids in the genotypes studied. Repeated use of a few selected genotypes in the Indian varietal development programs were also eminently reflected in its ahFAD2 allele polymorphism. Absence of known mutations in the wild-relatives indicated the possible origin of these mutations, after the allotetraploidization of cultivated peanut. The SNP analysis of both ahFAD2A and ahFAD2B genes, revealed haplotype diversity of 1.05% and 0.95%, while Ka/Ks ratio of 0.36 and 0.39, respectively, indicating strong purifying selection pressure on these genes. Cluster analysis, using ahFAD2 gene SNPs, showed presence of both mutant and non-mutant genotypes in the same cluster, which might be due the presence of ahFAD2 gene families. This investigation provided insights into the large number of Indian peanut genotypes, covering various aspects related to O/L flux regulation and ahFAD2 gene polymorphism. PMID:27610115

  1. Extending food deprivation reverses the short-term lipolytic response to fasting: role of the triacylglycerol/fatty acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jean-Michel; Reidy, Shannon P

    2012-05-01

    The effects of short-term food deprivation on lipid metabolism are well documented, but little is known about prolonged fasting. This study monitored the kinetics of glycerol (rate of appearance, R(a) glycerol) and non-esterified fatty acids (R(a) NEFA) in fasting rabbits. Our goals were to determine whether lipolysis is stimulated beyond values seen for short-term fasting, and to characterize the roles of primary (intracellular) and secondary (with transit through the circulation) triacylglycerol/fatty acid cycling (TAG/FA cycling) in regulating fatty acid allocation to oxidation or re-esterification. R(a) glycerol (9.62±0.72 to 15.29±0.96 μmol kg(-1) min(-1)) and R(a) NEFA (18.05±2.55 to 31.25±1.93 μmol kg(-1) min(-1)) were stimulated during the first 2 days of fasting, but returned to baseline after 4 days. An initial increase in TAG/FA cycling was followed by a reduction below baseline after 6 days without food, with primary and secondary cycling contributing to these responses. We conclude that the classic activation of lipolysis caused by short-term fasting is abolished when food deprivation is prolonged. High rates of re-esterification may become impossible to sustain, and TAG/FA cycling could decrease to reduce its cost to 3% of total energy expenditure. Throughout prolonged fasting, fatty acid metabolism gradually shifts towards increased oxidation and reduced re-esterification. Survival is achieved by pressing fuel selection towards the fatty acid dominance of energy metabolism and by slowing substrate cycles to assist metabolic suppression. However, TAG/FA cycling remains active even after prolonged fasting, suggesting that re-esterification is a crucial mechanism that cannot be stopped without harmful consequences.

  2. Artificial Autopolyploidization Modifies the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and GABA Shunt in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Fredd; Kikuchi, Jun; Breuer, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Autopolyploidy is a process whereby the chromosome set is multiplied and it is a common phenomenon in angiosperms. Autopolyploidy is thought to be an important evolutionary force that has led to the formation of new plant species. Despite its relevance, the consequences of autopolyploidy in plant metabolism are poorly understood. This study compares the metabolic profiles of natural diploids and artificial autotetraploids of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0. Different physiological parameters are compared between diploids and autotetraploids using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), elemental analysis (carbon:nitrogen balance) and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The main difference between diploid and autotetraploid A. thaliana Col-0 is observed in the concentration of metabolites related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) shunt, as shown by multivariate statistical analysis of NMR spectra. qRT-PCR shows that genes related to the TCA and GABA shunt are also differentially expressed between diploids and autotetraploids following similar trends as their corresponding metabolites. Solid evidence is presented to demonstrate that autopolyploidy influences core plant metabolic processes.

  3. Glutamate Utilization Couples Oxidative Stress Defense and the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Francisella Phagosomal Escape

    PubMed Central

    Ramond, Elodie; Gesbert, Gael; Rigard, Mélanie; Dairou, Julien; Dupuis, Marion; Dubail, Iharilalao; Meibom, Karin; Henry, Thomas; Barel, Monique; Charbit, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have developed a variety of strategies to avoid degradation by the host innate immune defense mechanisms triggered upon phagocytocis. Upon infection of mammalian host cells, the intracellular pathogen Francisella replicates exclusively in the cytosolic compartment. Hence, its ability to escape rapidly from the phagosomal compartment is critical for its pathogenicity. Here, we show for the first time that a glutamate transporter of Francisella (here designated GadC) is critical for oxidative stress defense in the phagosome, thus impairing intra-macrophage multiplication and virulence in the mouse model. The gadC mutant failed to efficiently neutralize the production of reactive oxygen species. Remarkably, virulence of the gadC mutant was partially restored in mice defective in NADPH oxidase activity. The data presented highlight links between glutamate uptake, oxidative stress defense, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and phagosomal escape. This is the first report establishing the role of an amino acid transporter in the early stage of the Francisella intracellular lifecycle. PMID:24453979

  4. Developments in absorptive glass mat separators for cycling applications and 36 V lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toniazzo, V.; Lambert, U.

    The major markets for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries are undergoing a radical upheaval. In particular, the telecommunications industry requires more reliable power supplies, and the familiar 12 V electrical system in cars will probably be soon replaced by a 36/42 V system, or by other electrical systems if part of the automotive market is taken over by hybrid electrical vehicles (HEVs). In order to meet these new challenges and enable VRLA batteries to provide a satisfactory life in float and cycling applications in the telecommunication field, or in the high-rate-partial-state-of-charge service required by both 36/42 V automobiles and HEVs, the lead-acid battery industry has to improve substantially the quality of present VRLA batteries based on absorptive glass mat (AGM) technology. Therefore, manufacturing steps and cell components have to be optimized, especially AGM separators as these are key components for better production yields and battery performance. This paper shows how the optimal segregation of the coarse and fine fibres in an AGM separator structure can improve greatly the properties of the material. The superior capillarity, springiness and mechanical properties of the 100% glass Amerglass multilayer separator compared with commercial monolayer counterparts with the same specific surface-area is highlighted.

  5. Functional citric acid cycle in an arcA mutant of Escherichia coli during growth with nitrate under anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Prohl, C; Wackwitz, B; Vlad, D; Unden, G

    1998-07-01

    The operation of the citric acid cycle of Escherichia coli during nitrate respiration (anoxic conditions) was studied by measuring end products and enzyme activities. Excretion of products other than CO2, such as acetate or ethanol, was taken as an indication for a non-functional cycle. From glycerol, approximately 0.3 mol acetate was produced; the residual portion was completely oxidized, indicating the presence of a partially active citric acid cycle. In an arcA mutant devoid of the transcriptional regulator ArcA, glycerol was completely oxidized with nitrate as an electron acceptor, demonstrating derepression and function of the complete pathway. Glucose, on the other hand, was excreted mostly as acetate by the wild-type and by the arcA mutant. During growth on glucose, but not on glycerol, activities of succinate dehydrogenase and of 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase were missing nearly completely. Thus, the previously described strong repression of the citric acid cycle during nitrate respiration occurs only during growth on glucose and is the effect of anaerobic and, more important, of glucose repression. In Pseudomonas fluorescens (but not Pseudomonas stutzeri), a similar decrease of citric acid cycle function during anaerobic growth with nitrate was found, indicating a broad distribution of this regulatory principle.

  6. A microbial arsenic cycle in sediments of an acidic mine impoundment: Herman Pit, Clear Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blum, Jodi S.; McCann, Shelley; Bennett, S.; Miller, Laurence G.; Stolz, J. R.; Stoneburner, B.; Saltikov, C.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of prokaryotes in the redox reactions of arsenic occurring between its +5 [arsenate; As(V)] and +3 [arsenite; As(III)] oxidation states has been well established. Most research to date has focused upon circum-neutral pH environments (e.g., freshwater or estuarine sediments) or arsenic-rich “extreme” environments like hot springs and soda lakes. In contrast, relatively little work has been conducted in acidic environments. With this in mind we conducted experiments with sediments taken from the Herman Pit, an acid mine drainage impoundment of a former mercury (cinnabar) mine. Due to the large adsorptive capacity of the abundant Fe(III)-rich minerals, we were unable to initially detect in solution either As(V) or As(III) added to the aqueous phase of live sediment slurries or autoclaved controls, although the former consumed added electron donors (i.e., lactate, acetate, hydrogen), while the latter did not. This prompted us to conduct further experiments with diluted slurries using the live materials from the first incubation as inoculum. In these experiments we observed reduction of As(V) to As(III) under anoxic conditions and reduction rates were enhanced by addition of electron donors. We also observed oxidation of As(III) to As(V) in oxic slurries as well as in anoxic slurries amended with nitrate. We noted an acid-tolerant trend for sediment slurries in the cases of As(III) oxidation (aerobic and anaerobic) as well as for anaerobic As(V) reduction. These observations indicate the presence of a viable microbial arsenic redox cycle in the sediments of this extreme environment, a result reinforced by the successful amplification of arsenic functional genes (aioA, and arrA) from these materials.

  7. Quantifying the impacts of piñon mortality on ecosystem-scale carbon and water cycling: a twinned flux tower approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, A. M.; Litvak, M. E.; McDowell, N.; Rahn, T.; Ryan, M. G.

    2010-12-01

    Piñon-juniper (PJ) woodlands, which occupy 24 million ha throughout the Southwest, proved to be extremely vulnerable to an extended drought that began in 1999, leading to an abrupt die-off of 40 to 95% of piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and 2-25% of juniper (Juniperus monosperma) in less than 3 years. Climate predictions for the region suggest such droughts are likely to become more frequent and widespread in the future, extending northwards. Such large-scale change in vegetation has the potential to trigger rapid changes in ecosystem carbon dynamics and the local and regional hydrologic cycle. We are using a twinned ecosystem-scale manipulation study to quantify the transient dynamics of carbon and water flux responses to piñon mortality. A combination of eddy covariance, soil respiration and moisture, sap flow and biomass carbon pool measurements are being made at an undisturbed PJ woodland (control) site and at a manipulation site within 2 miles of the control where all piñon trees greater than 7 cm diameter at breast height within the 4 ha flux footprint were killed in September 2009 using girdling and herbicide injection following 6 months of background measurements. We hypothesis that piñon mortality alters the local scale carbon cycle by shifting a large stock of carbon from productive biomass to detritus, leading to an initial decrease in net primary production and an increase in ecosystem respiration and net carbon flux to the atmosphere. However, reduced competition for water in these water-limited ecosystems and increased light availability may lead to compensatory growth in surviving small piñon, juniper and understory vegetation, offsetting or exceeding the expected reduction in NPP from piñon mortality. Because litter and coarse woody debris are slow to decompose in semiarid environments we hypothesize that the manipulation site will continue to be net carbon sources even after NPP recovers. Our general hypothesis for the local scale water cycle is

  8. [EFfect of quinazolone-alkyl-carboxylic acid derivatives on the transmembrane Ca2+ ion flux mediated by AMPA receptors].

    PubMed

    Szárics, Eva; LaszTóczi, Bálint; Nyikos, Lajos; Barabás, Péter; Kovács, Ilona; Skuban, Nina; Nagy, Péter I; Kökösi, József; Takácsné, Novák Krisztina; Kardos, Julianna

    2002-01-01

    The excitatory neurotransmitter, Glu, plays a crucial role in many sensory and motor functions as well as in brain development, learning and memory and it is also involved in the pathogenesis of a number of neurological disorders, including epilepsy, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Therefore, the study of Glu receptors (GluRs) is of therapeutical importance. We showed here by fluorescence monitoring of transmembrane Ca2+ ion fluxes in response to (S)-alpha-amino-3-hidroxi-5-metil-4-izoxazol propionic acid ((S)-AMPA) on the time scale of 0.00004-10 s that Ca2+ ion influx proceeds through faster and slower desensitizing receptors. Pharmacological isolation of the slower and faster desensitizing AMPA receptor was possible by fluorescence monitoring of Ca2+ ion translocation in response to (S)-AMPA in the presence and absence of various 2-methyl-4-oxo-3H-quinazoline-3-alkyl-carboxilic acid derivatives (Qxs): the acetic acid Q1 inhibits the slower desensitizing receptor response specifically, while the acetyl-piperidine Q5 is a more potent inhibitor of the faster desensitizing receptor response. In addition, spontaneous interictal activity, as induced by high [K+] conditions in hippocampal slices, was reduced significantly by Q5, suggesting a possible anticonvulsant property of Q5. Substitutions of Qxs into the GluR2 S1S2 binding core were consistent with their effect by causing variable degree of S1S2 bridging interaction as one of the main determinants of AMPA receptor agonist activity. The exploitation of differences between similar receptors will be important in the development and use of drugs with high pharmacological specificity.

  9. Effect of Acid Etching, Silane and Thermal Cycling on the Bond Strength of Metallic Brackets to Ceramic.

    PubMed

    Matos, Natália Regina Santos de; Costa, Ana Rosa; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo; Vedovello, Silvia Amélia; Santamaria, Milton; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silanes, thermal cycling and acid etching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic brackets to feldspathic ceramic. Feldspathic ceramic cylinders (Groups 1, 2, 5 and 6) were etched for 60 s with 10% hydrofluoric acid and Groups 3, 4, 7 and 8, without acid etching. Two layers of silane Clearfil Ceramic Primer (CCP, Groups 1 to 4) and two layers of RelyX Ceramic Primer (RCP, groups 5 to 8) were applied and dried for 60 s. Brackets were bonded to the cylinders with Transbond XT and light-activated for 40 s with Bluephase G2. All specimens were stored in deionized water at 37 °C for 24 h, and the specimens of groups 1, 3, 5 and 7 were submitted to 7,000 thermal cycles (5 °C/55 °C). After storage, the SBS test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were subjected to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (α=0.05). The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated at 8x magnification. The SBS of CCP was significantly greater than of RCP (p<0.05), with or without thermal cycling. Thermal cycling significantly reduced the SBS (p<0.05). The groups submitted to acid etching showed significantly higher SBS than those without acid etching (p<0.05). In conclusion, thermal cycling reduced SBS for all groups. The best ceramic surface treatment for bracket bonding was achieved by acid etching and CCP silane. The ARI results showed predominance of score 0 for all groups.

  10. GLYCOENGINEERING OF ESTERASE ACTIVITY THROUGH METABOLIC FLUX-BASED MODULATION OF SIALIC ACID.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mohit; Tan, Elaine; Labonte, Jason W; Shah, Shivam; Saeui, Christopher T; Liu, Lingshu; Bhattacharya, Rahul; Bovonratwet, Patawut; Gray, Jeffrey J; Yarema, Kevin

    2017-02-20

    This report describes the metabolic glycoengineering (MGE) of intracellular esterase activity in human colon cancer (LS174T) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In silico analysis of the carboxylesterases CES1 and CES2 suggested that these enzymes are modified with sialylated N-glycans, which are proposed to stabilize the active multimeric forms of these enzymes. This premise was supported by treating cells with butanolylated ManNAc to increase sialylation, which in turn increased esterase activity. By contrast, hexosamine analogs not targeted to sialic acid biosynthesis (e.g., butanoylated GlcNAc or GalNAc) had minimal impact. Measurement of mRNA and protein confirmed that esterase activity was controlled through glycosylation and not through transcription or translation. Azide-modified ManNAc analogs widely used in MGE also enhanced esterase activity and provided a way to enrich targeted "glycoengineered" proteins (such as CES2), thereby providing unambiguous evidence that the compounds were converted to sialosides and installed into the glycan structures of esterases as intended. Overall, this study provides a pioneering example of the modulation of intracellular enzyme activity through MGE, which expands the value of this technology from its current status as a labeling strategy and modulator of cell surface biological events.

  11. Krebs cycle intermediates modulate thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) production in rat brain in vitro.

    PubMed

    Puntel, Robson L; Nogueira, Cristina W; Rocha, João B T

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Krebs cycle intermediates on basal and quinolinic acid (QA)- or iron-induced TBARS production in brain membranes. Oxaloacetate, citrate, succinate and malate reduced significantly the basal and QA-induced TBARS production. The potency for basal TBARS inhibition was in the order (IC50 is given in parenthesis as mM) citrate (0.37) > oxaloacetate (1.33) = succinate (1.91) > > malate (12.74). alpha-Ketoglutarate caused an increase in TBARS production without modifying the QA-induced TBARS production. Cyanide (CN-) did not modify the basal or QA-induced TBARS production; however, CN- abolished the antioxidant effects of succinate. QA-induced TBARS production was enhanced by iron ions, and abolished by desferrioxamine (DFO). The intermediates used in this study, except for alpha-ketoglutarate, prevented iron-induced TBARS production. Oxaloacetate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate and malate, but no succinate and QA, exhibited significantly iron-chelating properties. Only alpha-ketoglutarate and oxaloacetate protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced deoxyribose degradation, while succinate and malate showed a modest effect against Fe2+/H2O2-induced deoxyribose degradation. Using heat-treated preparations citrate, malate and oxaloacetate protected against basal or QA-induced TBARS production, whereas alpha-ketoglutarate induced TBARS production. Succinate did not offer protection against basal or QA-induced TBARS production. These results suggest that oxaloacetate, malate, succinate, and citrate are effective antioxidants against basal and iron or QA-induced TBARS production, while alpha-ketoglutarate stimulates TBARS production. The mechanism through which Krebs cycle intermediates offer protection against TBARS production is distinct depending on the intermediate used. Thus, under pathological conditions such as ischemia, where citrate concentrations vary it can assume an important role as a modulator of oxidative

  12. Interplay between cell cycle and autophagy induced by boswellic acid analog

    PubMed Central

    Pathania, Anup S.; Guru, Santosh K.; Kumar, Suresh; Kumar, Ashok; Ahmad, Masroor; Bhushan, Shashi; Sharma, Parduman R.; Mahajan, Priya; Shah, Bhahwal A.; Sharma, Simmi; Nargotra, Amit; Vishwakarma, Ram; Korkaya, Hasan; Malik, Fayaz

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of autophagy induced by boswellic acid analog BA145 on cell cycle progression in pancreatic cancer cells. BA145 induced robust autophagy in pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 and exhibited cell proliferation inhibition by inducing cells to undergo G2/M arrest. Inhibition of G2/M progression was associated with decreased expression of cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin E, cdc2, cdc25c and CDK-1. Pre-treatment of cells with autophagy inhibitors or silencing the expression of key autophagy genes abrogated BA145 induced G2/M arrest and downregulation of cell cycle regulatory proteins. It was further observed that BA145 induced autophagy by targeting mTOR kinase (IC50 1 μM), leading to reduced expression of p-mTOR, p-p70S6K (T389), p-4EBP (T37/46) and p-S6 (S240/244). Notably, inhibition of mTOR signalling by BA145 was followed by attendant activation of AKT and its membrane translocation. Inhibition of Akt through pharmacological inhibitors or siRNAs enhanced BA145 mediated autophagy, G2/M arrest and reduced expression of G2/M regulators. Further studies revealed that BA145 arbitrated inhibition of mTOR led to the activation of Akt through IGFR/PI3k/Akt feedback loop. Intervention in IGFR/PI3k/Akt loop further depreciated Akt phosphorylation and its membrane translocation that culminates in augmented autophagy with concomitant G2/M arrest and cell death. PMID:27680387

  13. Lead acid battery performance and cycle life increased through addition of discrete carbon nanotubes to both electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugumaran, Nanjan; Everill, Paul; Swogger, Steven W.; Dubey, D. P.

    2015-04-01

    Contemporary applications are changing the failure mechanisms of lead acid batteries. Sulfation at the negative electrode, acid stratification, and dendrite formation now precede positive electrode failures such as grid corrosion and active material shedding. To attenuate these failures, carbon has been explored as a negative electrode additive to increase charge acceptance, eliminate sulfation, and extend cycle life. Frequently, however, carbon incorporation decreases paste density and hinders manufacturability. Discrete carbon nanotubes (dCNT), also known as Molecular Rebar®, are lead acid battery additives which can be stably incorporated into either electrode to increase charge acceptance and cycle life with no change to paste density and without impeding the manufacturing process. Here, full-scale automotive batteries containing dCNT in the negative electrode or both negative and positive electrodes are compared to control batteries. dCNT batteries show little change to Reserve Capacity, improved Cold Cranking, increased charge acceptance, and enhanced overall system efficiency. Life cycle tests show >60% increases when dCNT are incorporated into the negative electrode (HRPSoC/SBA) and up to 500% when incorporated into both electrodes (SBA), with water loss per cycle reduced >20%. Failure modes of cycled batteries are discussed and a hypothesis of dCNT action is introduced: the dCNT/Had Overcharge Reaction Mechanism.

  14. Crystal Chemistry of the Potassium and Rubidium Uranyl Borate Families Derived from Boric Acid Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-07-19

    The reaction of uranyl nitrate with a large excess of molten boric acid in the presence of potassium or rubidium nitrate results in the formation of three new potassium uranyl borates, K{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 12}O{sub 19}(OH){sub 4}]·0.3H{sub 2}O (KUBO-1), K[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 15}(OH){sub 5}] (KUBO-2), and K[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 3}]·0.7H{sub 2}O (KUBO-3) and two new rubidium uranyl borates Rb{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 13}O{sub 20}(OH){sub 5}] (RbUBO-1) and Rb[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 3}]·0.7H{sub 2}O (RbUBO-2). The latter is isotypic with KUBO-3. These compounds share a common structural motif consisting of a linear uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, cation surrounded by BO{sub 3} triangles and BO{sub 4} tetrahedra to create an UO{sub 8} hexagonal bipyramidal environment around uranium. The borate anions bridge between uranyl units to create sheets. Additional BO{sub 3} triangles extend from the polyborate layers and are directed approximately perpendicular to the sheets. All of these compounds adopt layered structures. With the exception of KUBO-1, the structures are all centrosymmetric. All of these compounds fluoresce when irradiated with long-wavelength UV light. The fluorescence spectrum yields well-defined vibronically coupled charge-transfer features.

  15. Cultures of rat astrocytes challenged with a steady supply of glutamate: new model to study flux distribution in the glutamate-glutamine cycle.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Luís L; Monteiro, Miguel A R; Alves, Paula M; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Santos, Helena

    2005-09-01

    Glutamate metabolism in astrocytes was studied using an experimental setup that simulates the role of neurons (glutamate producers and glutamine consumers) by the addition of glutaminase to the culture medium. Thereby, a steady supply of glutamate was imposed at the expense of glutamine, and the stress intensity was manipulated by changing the glutaminase concentration. Glutamate supply rates in the range 8-23 nmol/min/mg protein were examined for periods of up to 48 h. When the glutamate supply rate exceeded the uptake rate of this amino acid, a transient increase in the extracellular concentration of glutamate was observed. In response to this stress, the fluxes through the glutamate transporter and glutamine synthetase were increased considerably, and the extracellular concentration of glutamate was eventually restored to a low level. The increased levels of glutamine synthetase were demonstrated by immunoblotting analysis. The effect on glutamate metabolism of the transaminase inhibitor, aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), and of NH4Cl was also investigated. The supply of glutamate caused a concomitant reduction in the levels of phosphocreatine, phosphoethanolamine, and phosphocholine without affecting the ATP pool. Glutamine synthetase was shown to be is a key element in the control of glutamate metabolism in astrocytic cultures. The metabolic fate of glutamate depends greatly on the time of endurance to the challenge: in naive cells, glutamate was primarily metabolized through the transaminase pathway, while in well-adapted cells glutamate was converted almost exclusively through glutamine synthetase.

  16. DIBROMOACETIC ACID-INDUCED ELEVATIONS IN CIRCULATING ESTRADIOL: EFFECTS IN BOTH CYCLING AND OVARIECTOMIZED/STEROID-PRIMED FEMALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    RTD-03-031
    Goldman, JM and Murr, AS. Dibromoacetic Acid-induced Elevations in Circulating Estradiol: Effects in Both Cycling and Ovariectomized/Steroid-primed Female Rats. Reproductive Toxicology (in press).

    Abstract

    Oral exposures to high concentrations of th...

  17. Triglyceride accumulation and fatty acid profile changes in Chlorella (Chlorophyta) during high pH-induced cell cycle inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Guckert, J.B.; Cooksey, K.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Alkaline pH stress resulted in triglyceride (TG) accumulation in Chlorella CHLOR1 and was independent of medium nitrogen or carbon levels. Based on morphological observations, alkaline pH inhibited autospore release, thus increasing the time for cell cycle completion. Autospore release has been postulated to coincide with TG utilization within the microalgal cell division cycle. The alkaline pH stress affected lipid accumulation by inhibiting the cell division cycle prior to autospore release and, therefore, prior to TG utilization. Cells inhibited in this manner showed an increase in TG accumulation but a decrease in both membrane lipid classes (glycolipid and polar lipid). Unlike TG fatty acid profiles, membrane lipid fatty acid profiles were not stable during TG accumulation. The membrane profiles became similar to the TG, i.e. less unsaturated than in the membrane lipids of unstressed control cells.

  18. The antidiabetic drug metformin decreases mitochondrial respiration and tricarboxylic acid cycle activity in cultured primary rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Blumrich, Eva-Maria; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Dringen, Ralf

    2017-03-19

    Metformin is an antidiabetic drug that is used daily by millions of patients worldwide. Metformin is able to cross the blood-brain barrier and has recently been shown to increase glucose consumption and lactate release in cultured astrocytes. However, potential effects of metformin on mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolism in astrocytes are unknown. We investigated this by mapping (13) C labeling in TCA cycle intermediates and corresponding amino acids after incubation of primary rat astrocytes with [U-(13) C]glucose. The presence of metformin did not compromise the viability of cultured astrocytes during 4 hr of incubation, but almost doubled cellular glucose consumption and lactate release. Compared with control cells, the presence of metformin dramatically lowered the molecular (13) C carbon labeling (MCL) of the cellular TCA cycle intermediates citrate, α-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate, and malate, as well as the MCL of the TCA cycle intermediate-derived amino acids glutamate, glutamine, and aspartate. In addition to the total molecular (13) C labeling, analysis of the individual isotopomers of TCA cycle intermediates confirmed a severe decline in labeling and a significant lowering in TCA cycling ratio in metformin-treated astrocytes. Finally, the oxygen consumption of mitochondria isolated from metformin-treated astrocytes was drastically reduced in the presence of complex I substrates, but not of complex II substrates. These data demonstrate that exposure to metformin strongly impairs complex I-mediated mitochondrial respiration in astrocytes, which is likely to cause the observed decrease in labeling of mitochondrial TCA cycle intermediates and the stimulation of glycolytic lactate production. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Tricarboxylic acid cycle and one-carbon metabolism pathways are important in Edwardsiella ictaluri virulence.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Neeti; Abdelhamed, Hossam; Lu, Jingjun; Karsi, Attila; Lawrence, Mark L

    2013-01-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen causing enteric septicemia of channel catfish (ESC). The disease causes considerable economic losses in the commercial catfish industry in the United States. Although antibiotics are used as feed additive, vaccination is a better alternative for prevention of the disease. Here we report the development and characterization of novel live attenuated E. ictaluri mutants. To accomplish this, several tricarboxylic acid cycle (sdhC, mdh, and frdA) and one-carbon metabolism genes (gcvP and glyA) were deleted in wild type E. ictaluri strain 93-146 by allelic exchange. Following bioluminescence tagging of the E. ictaluri ΔsdhC, Δmdh, ΔfrdA, ΔgcvP, and ΔglyA mutants, their dissemination, attenuation, and vaccine efficacy were determined in catfish fingerlings by in vivo imaging technology. Immunogenicity of each mutant was also determined in catfish fingerlings. Results indicated that all of the E. ictaluri mutants were attenuated significantly in catfish compared to the parent strain as evidenced by 2,265-fold average reduction in bioluminescence signal from all the mutants at 144 h post-infection. Catfish immunized with the E. ictaluri ΔsdhC, Δmdh, ΔfrdA, and ΔglyA mutants had 100% relative percent survival (RPS), while E. ictaluri ΔgcvP vaccinated catfish had 31.23% RPS after re-challenge with the wild type E. ictaluri.

  20. Life cycle analysis of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and its salts in China.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jing; Lu, Yonglong; Wang, Tieyu; Wang, Pei; Giesy, John P; Sweetman, Andrew J; Li, Qifeng

    2017-03-15

    China has been the largest producer and emitter of perfluorooctanoic acid and its salts (PFOA/PFO). However, the flows of PFOA/PFO from manufacture and application to the environment are indistinct, especially flows from waste treatment sites to the environment. Here, a life cycle analysis of PFOA/PFO is conducted in which all major flows of PFOA/PFO have been characterized for 2012. Processes related to uses and possible releases of PFOA/PFO include manufacture and use, waste management, and environmental storage. During manufacture and use, emission from application was the most important (117.0 t), regardless of whether it flowed first to waste treatment facilities or was directly released to the environment, followed by manufacture of PFOA/PFO (3.9 t), while flows from the service life and end of life of consumer products were the lowest (1.2 t). Among five waste treatment routes, flows through wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were the highest (10.6 t), which resulted in 12.8 t of PFOA/PFO being emitted into the environment. Masses of PFOA/PFO emission were estimated to be 96.3 t to the hydrosphere, 25.6 t to the atmosphere, and 3.2 t to soils. Therefore, control over reduction of PFOA/PFO should focus on application of reliable alternatives and emission reduction from WWTPs using effective treatment techniques.

  1. Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle and One-Carbon Metabolism Pathways Are Important in Edwardsiella ictaluri Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Dahal, Neeti; Abdelhamed, Hossam; Lu, Jingjun; Karsi, Attila; Lawrence, Mark L.

    2013-01-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen causing enteric septicemia of channel catfish (ESC). The disease causes considerable economic losses in the commercial catfish industry in the United States. Although antibiotics are used as feed additive, vaccination is a better alternative for prevention of the disease. Here we report the development and characterization of novel live attenuated E. ictaluri mutants. To accomplish this, several tricarboxylic acid cycle (sdhC, mdh, and frdA) and one-carbon metabolism genes (gcvP and glyA) were deleted in wild type E. ictaluri strain 93-146 by allelic exchange. Following bioluminescence tagging of the E. ictaluri ΔsdhC, Δmdh, ΔfrdA, ΔgcvP, and ΔglyA mutants, their dissemination, attenuation, and vaccine efficacy were determined in catfish fingerlings by in vivo imaging technology. Immunogenicity of each mutant was also determined in catfish fingerlings. Results indicated that all of the E. ictaluri mutants were attenuated significantly in catfish compared to the parent strain as evidenced by 2,265-fold average reduction in bioluminescence signal from all the mutants at 144 h post-infection. Catfish immunized with the E. ictaluri ΔsdhC, Δmdh, ΔfrdA, and ΔglyA mutants had 100% relative percent survival (RPS), while E. ictaluri ΔgcvP vaccinated catfish had 31.23% RPS after re-challenge with the wild type E. ictaluri. PMID:23762452

  2. Effect of process parameters on succinic acid production in Escherichia coli W3110 and enzymes involved in the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Isar, Jasmine; Agarwal, Lata; Saran, Saurabh; Gupta, Pritesh; Saxena, Rajendra Kumar

    2006-09-01

    The effect of process optimization on succinic acid production by Escherichia coli W3110 and on enzymes involved in the reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle was studied. Approximately, 7.02 g L-1 of succinic acid was produced in 60 h at pH 7.0 in 500 mL anaerobic bottles containing 300 mL of the medium, wherein the sucrose concentration was 2.5%, the ratio of tryptone to ammonium hydrogen phosphate was 1:1, and the concentration of magnesium carbon ate was 1.5%. When these optimized fermentation conditions were employed in a 10 L bioreactor, 11.2 g L-1 of succinic acid was produced in 48 h. This is a 10-fold increase in succinic acid production from the initial titer of 0.94 g L-1. This clearly indicates the importance of process optimization, where by manipulating the media composition and production conditions, a remarkable increase in the production of the desired biomolecule can be obtained. The production of succinic acid is a multi-step reaction through the reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle. A linear relationship was observed between succinic acid production and the enzyme activities. The enzyme activities were found to increase in the order phospho-enol-pyruvate carboxylaseacid, since it catalyzes the phosphorylation of oxaloacetic acid to yield phospho-enol-pyruvate.

  3. TRIIODOTHYRONINE INCREASES MYOCARDIAL FUNCTION AND PYRUVATE ENTRY INTO THE CITRIC ACID CYCLE AFTER REPERFUSION IN A MODEL OF INFANT CARDIOPULMONARY BYPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Bouchard, Bertrand; Ning, Xue-Han; Isern, Nancy G.; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2012-03-01

    We utilized a translational model of infant CPB to test the hypothesis that T3 modulates pyruvate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) thereby providing the energy support for improved cardiac function after ischemia-reperfusion. Methods and Results: Neonatal piglets received intracoronary [2-13Carbon(13C)]-pyruvate for 40 minutes (8 mM) during control aerobic conditions (Cont) or immediately after reperfusion (IR) from global hypothermic ischemia. A third group (IR-Tr) received T3 (1.2 ug/kg) during reperfusion. We assessed absolute CAC intermediate levels (aCAC) and flux parameters into the CAC through oxidative pyruvate decarboxylation (PDC ) and anaplerotic carboxylation (PC; ) using 13C-labeled pyruvate and isotopomer analysis by gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13C NMR. Neither IR nor IR-Tr modified aCAC. However, compared to IR, T3 (group IR-Tr) increased cardiac power and oxygen consumption after CPB while elevating both PDC and PC (~ four-fold). T3 inhibited IR induced reductions in CAC intermediate molar percent enrichment (MPE) and oxaloacetate(citrate)/malate MPE ratio; an index of aspartate entry into the CAC. Conclusions: T3 markedly enhances PC and PDC thereby providing substrate for elevated cardiac function and work after reperfusion. The increases in pyruvate flux occur with preservation of the CAC intermediate pool. Additionally, T3 inhibition of reductions in CAC intermediate MPEs indicates that T3 reduces the reliance on amino acids (AA) for anaplerosis after reperfusion. Thus, AA should be more available for other functions such as protein synthesis.

  4. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study

    SciTech Connect

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Marras, Roberto; Rigamonti, Lucia

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Two scenarios of acid gases removal in WTE plants were compared in an LCA study. • A detailed inventory based on primary data has been reported for the production of the new dolomitic sorbent. • Results show that the comparison between the two scenarios does not show systematic differences. • The potential impacts are reduced only if there is an increase in the energy efficiency of the WTE plant. - Abstract: The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO{sub 2} emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in

  5. Synoptic evaluation of carbon cycling in Beaufort Sea during summer: contrasting river inputs, ecosystem metabolism and air-sea CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, A.; Coupel, P.; Else, B.; Nahavandian, S.; Lansard, B.; Raimbault, P.; Papakyriakou, T.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2013-10-01

    The accelerated decline in Arctic sea ice combined with an ongoing trend toward a more dynamic atmosphere is modifying carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. A critical issue is to understand how net community production (NCP; the balance between gross primary production and community respiration) responds to changes and modulates air-sea CO2 fluxes. Using data collected as part of the ArcticNet-Malina 2009 expedition in southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), we synthesize information on sea ice, wind, river, water column properties, metabolism of the planktonic food web, organic carbon fluxes and pools, as well as air-sea CO2 exchange, with the aim of identifying indices of ecosystem response to environmental changes. Data were analyzed to develop a non-steady-state carbon budget and an assessment of NCP against air-sea CO2 fluxes. The mean atmospheric forcing was a mild upwelling-favorable wind (~5 km h-1) blowing from the N-E and a decaying ice cover (<80% concentration) was observed beyond the shelf, the latter being fully exposed to the atmosphere. We detected some areas where the surface mixed layer was net autotrophic owing to high rates of primary production (PP), but the ecosystem was overall net heterotrophic. The region acted nonetheless as a sink for atmospheric CO2 with a mean uptake rate of -2.0 ± 3.3 mmol C m-2d-1. We attribute this discrepancy to: (1) elevated PP rates (>600 mg C m-2d-1) over the shelf prior to our survey, (2) freshwater dilution by river runoff and ice melt, and (3) the presence of cold surface waters offshore. Only the Mackenzie River delta and localized shelf areas directly affected by upwelling were identified as substantial sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (>10mmol C m-2d-1). Although generally <100 mg C m-2d-1, daily PP rates cumulated to a total PP of ~437.6 × 103 t C, which was roughly twice higher than the organic carbon delivery by river inputs (~241.2 × 103 t C). Subsurface PP represented 37.4% of total PP for the

  6. Bile acid flux through portal but not peripheral veins inhibits CYP7A1 expression without involvement of ileal FGF19 in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Shang, Quan; Guo, Grace L; Honda, Akira; Shi, Daniel; Saumoy, Monica; Salen, Gerald; Xu, Guorong

    2014-08-15

    It was proposed that CYP7A1 expression is suppressed through the gut-hepatic signaling pathway fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 15/19-fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, which is initiated by activation of farnesoid X receptor in the intestine rather than in the liver. The present study tested whether portal bile acid flux alone without ileal FGF19 could downregulate CYP7A1 expression in rabbits. A rabbit model was developed by infusing glycodeoxycholic acid (GDCA) through the splenic vein to bypass ileal FGF19. Study was conducted in four groups of rabbits: control; bile fistula + bovine serum albumin solution perfusion (BF); BF + GDCA (by portal perfusion); and BF + GDCA-f (by femoral perfusion). Compared with only BF, BF + GDCA (6 h portal perfusion) suppressed CYP7A1 mRNA, whereas BF + GDCA-f (via femoral vein) with the same perfusion rate of GDCA did not show inhibitory effects. Meanwhile, there was a decrease in ileal FGF19 expression and portal FGF19 protein levels, but an equivalent increase in biliary bile acid outputs in both GDCA perfusion groups. This study demonstrated that portal bile acid flux alone downregulated CYP7A1 expression with diminished FGF19 expression and protein levels, whereas the same bile acid flux reaching the liver through the hepatic artery via femoral vein had no inhibitory effect on CYP7A1. We propose that bile acid flux through the portal venous system may be a kind of "intestinal factor" that suppresses CYP7A1 expression.

  7. Methane Suppression: The Impacts of Fe(III) and Humic Acids on Net Methane Flux from Arctic Tundra Wetlands in Alaska and Finland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipson, D.; Miller, K.; Lai, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic soils contain large reservoirs of carbon (C) that are vulnerable to loss from climatic warming. However the potential global impacts of this C depend on whether it is lost primarily in the form of methane (CH4) or carbon dioxide (CO2), two gases with very different greenhouse warming potentials. In anaerobic environments, the relative production of CH4 vs. CO2 may be controlled by the presence of alternative terminal electron acceptors, which allow more thermodynamically favorable anaerobic respiratory pathways to dominate over methanogenesis. This work investigated how the addition of terminal electron acceptors, ferric iron (Fe(III)) and humic acids, affected net CH4 fluxes from high-latitude wetland ecosystems. We conducted two manipulative field experiments in Barrow, Alaska (71° N) and Finnish Lapland (69° N). The ecosystem in Barrow was known from previous studies to be rich in Fe(III) and to harbor a microbial community that is dominated by Fe(III)- and humic acid-reducing microorganisms. The role of these alternative electron acceptors had not previously been studied at the Finnish site. CH4 and CO2 fluxes were measured using a portable trace gas analyzer from experimental plots, before and after amendments with Fe(III) (in the chelated form, ferric nitrilotriacetic acid), humic acids, or water as a control. Both in the ecosystem with permafrost and naturally high levels of soil Fe (Barrow, AK) and in the ecosystem with no permafrost and naturally low levels of soil Fe (Petsikko, Finland), the addition of the alternative electron acceptors Fe(III) and humic acids significantly reduced net CH4 flux. CO2 fluxes were not significantly altered by the treatments. The reduction in CH4 flux persisted for at least several weeks post-treatment. There was no significant difference between the reduction caused by humic acids versus that from Fe(III). These results show that the suppression of CH4 flux by Fe(III) and humic acids is a widespread phenomenon that

  8. Hybridization-modulated ion fluxes through peptide-nucleic-acid- functionalized gold nanotubes. A new approach to quantitative label-free DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Jágerszki, Gyula; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E; Höfler, Lajos; Pretsch, Ernö

    2007-06-01

    The inner walls of gold nanotubes, prepared by template synthesis in the nanopores of polycarbonate track etch membranes, have been chemically modified with peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and used for label-free quantification of complementary DNA sequences. Selective binding of DNA to the PNA-modified nanotubes is shown to decrease the flux of optically detected anionic markers through the nanotubes in a concentration-dependent manner. The strong dependence of the biorecognition-modulated ion transport through the nanopores on the ionic strength suggests a dominantly electrostatic exclusion mechanism of the ion flux decrease as a result of DNA binding to the PNA-modified nanopores.

  9. Phragmites australis response to Cu in terms of low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs) exudation: Influence of the physiological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, A. Cristina S.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.; Basto, M. Clara P.; Vasconcelos, M. Teresa S. D.

    2014-06-01

    Plant roots have the ability to produce and secrete substances, such as aliphatic low molecular weight organic acids (ALMWOAs), into the rhizosphere for several purposes, including in response to metal contamination. Despite this, little is yet known about the exudation of such substances from marsh plants roots in response to metal exposure. This work aimed at assessing the influence of the physiological cycle of marsh plants on the exudation of ALMWOAs in response to Cu contamination. In vitro experiments were carried out with Phragmites australis specimens, collected in different seasons. Plant roots were exposed to freshwater contaminated with two different Cu concentrations (67 μg/L and 6.9 mg/L), being the ALMWOAs released by the roots measured. Significant differences (both qualitative and quantitative) were observed during the Phragmites australis life cycle. At growing stage, Cu stimulated the exudation of oxalic and formic acids but no significant stimulation was observed for citric acid. At developing stage, exposure to Cu caused inhibition of oxalic acid exudation whereas citric acid liberation was stimulated but only in the media spiked with the lowest Cu concentration tested. At the decaying stage, no significant variation on oxalic acid was observed, whereas the citric and formic acids release increased as a consequence of the plant exposure to Cu. The physiological cycle of Phragmites australis, and probably also of other marsh plants, is therefore an important feature conditioning plants response to Cu contamination, in terms of ALMWOAs exudation. Hence this aspect should be considered when conducting studies on rhizodeposition involving marsh plants exposed to metals and in the event of using marsh plants for phytoremediation purposes in contaminated estuarine areas.

  10. Metabolic flux rearrangement in the amino acid metabolism reduces ammonia stress in the α1-antitrypsin producing human AGE1.HN cell line.

    PubMed

    Priesnitz, Christian; Niklas, Jens; Rose, Thomas; Sandig, Volker; Heinzle, Elmar

    2012-03-01

    This study focused on metabolic changes in the neuronal human cell line AGE1.HN upon increased ammonia stress. Batch cultivations of α(1)-antitrypsin (A1AT) producing AGE1.HN cells were carried out in media with initial ammonia concentrations ranging from 0mM to 5mM. Growth, A1AT production, metabolite dynamics and finally metabolic fluxes calculated by metabolite balancing were compared. Growth and A1AT production decreased with increasing ammonia concentration. The maximum A1AT concentration decreased from 0.63g/l to 0.51g/l. Central energy metabolism remained relatively unaffected exhibiting only slightly increased glycolytic flux at high initial ammonia concentration in the medium. However, the amino acid metabolism was significantly changed. Fluxes through transaminases involved in amino acid degradation were reduced concurrently with a reduced uptake of amino acids. On the other hand fluxes through transaminases working in the direction of amino acid synthesis, i.e., alanine and phosphoserine, were increased leading to increased storage of excess nitrogen in extracellular alanine and serine. Glutamate dehydrogenase flux was reversed increasingly fixing free ammonia with increasing ammonia concentration. Urea production additionally observed was associated with arginine uptake by the cells and did not increase at high ammonia stress. It was therefore not used as nitrogen sink to remove excess ammonia. The results indicate that the AGE1.HN cell line can adapt to ammonia concentrations usually present during the cultivation process to a large extent by changing metabolism but with slightly reduced A1AT production and growth.

  11. Control analysis of lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from oil crops shows that flux control is shared between fatty acid synthesis and lipid assembly.

    PubMed Central

    Ramli, Umi S; Baker, Darren S; Quant, Patti A; Harwood, John L

    2002-01-01

    Top-Down (Metabolic) Control Analysis (TDCA) was used to examine, quantitatively, lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from two commercially important oil crops, olive (Olea europaea L.) and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.). A conceptually simplified system was defined comprising two blocks of reactions: fatty acid synthesis (Block A) and lipid assembly (Block B), which produced and consumed, respectively, a common and unique system intermediate, cytosolic acyl-CoA. We manipulated the steady-state levels of the system intermediate by adding exogenous oleic acid and, using two independent assays, measured the effect of the addition on the system fluxes (J(A) and J(B)). These were the rate of incorporation of radioactivity: (i) through Block A from [1-(14)C]acetate into fatty acids and (ii) via Block B from [U-(14)C]glycerol into complex lipids respectively. The data showed that fatty acid formation (Block A) exerted higher control than lipid assembly (Block B) in both tissues with the following group flux control coefficients (C):(i) Oil palm: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.64+/-0.05 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.36+/-0.05(ii) Olive: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.57+/-0.10 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.43+/-0.10where *C indicates the group flux control coefficient over the lipid biosynthesis flux (J(TL)) and the subscripts BlkA and BlkB refer to defined blocks of the system, Block A and Block B. Nevertheless, because both parts of the lipid biosynthetic pathway exert significant flux control, we suggest strongly that manipulation of single enzyme steps will not affect product yield appreciably. The present study represents the first use of TDCA to examine the overall lipid biosynthetic pathway in any tissue, and its findings are of immediate academic and economic relevance to the yield and nutritional quality of oil crops. PMID:12023882

  12. Control analysis of lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from oil crops shows that flux control is shared between fatty acid synthesis and lipid assembly.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Umi S; Baker, Darren S; Quant, Patti A; Harwood, John L

    2002-06-01

    Top-Down (Metabolic) Control Analysis (TDCA) was used to examine, quantitatively, lipid biosynthesis in tissue cultures from two commercially important oil crops, olive (Olea europaea L.) and oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.). A conceptually simplified system was defined comprising two blocks of reactions: fatty acid synthesis (Block A) and lipid assembly (Block B), which produced and consumed, respectively, a common and unique system intermediate, cytosolic acyl-CoA. We manipulated the steady-state levels of the system intermediate by adding exogenous oleic acid and, using two independent assays, measured the effect of the addition on the system fluxes (J(A) and J(B)). These were the rate of incorporation of radioactivity: (i) through Block A from [1-(14)C]acetate into fatty acids and (ii) via Block B from [U-(14)C]glycerol into complex lipids respectively. The data showed that fatty acid formation (Block A) exerted higher control than lipid assembly (Block B) in both tissues with the following group flux control coefficients (C):(i) Oil palm: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.64+/-0.05 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.36+/-0.05(ii) Olive: *C(J(TL))(BlkA)=0.57+/-0.10 and *C(J(TL))(BlkB)=0.43+/-0.10where *C indicates the group flux control coefficient over the lipid biosynthesis flux (J(TL)) and the subscripts BlkA and BlkB refer to defined blocks of the system, Block A and Block B. Nevertheless, because both parts of the lipid biosynthetic pathway exert significant flux control, we suggest strongly that manipulation of single enzyme steps will not affect product yield appreciably. The present study represents the first use of TDCA to examine the overall lipid biosynthetic pathway in any tissue, and its findings are of immediate academic and economic relevance to the yield and nutritional quality of oil crops.

  13. Aconitase is the main functional target of aging in the citric acid cycle of kidney mitochondria from mice.

    PubMed

    Yarian, Connie S; Toroser, Dikran; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2006-01-01

    The activities of the citric acid cycle enzymes were determined in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of relatively young, middle age, and old mice. Aconitase exhibited the most significant decrease in activity with age. The activity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase exhibited a modest decrease in activity, while NADP(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP(+)-ICD) activity increased moderately with age. Activities of citrate synthase, NAD(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD(+)-ICD), succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS), succinate dehydrogenase (SD), fumarase (FUM), and malate dehydrogenase (MD) were not affected. The molar ratio of the intra-mitochondrial redox indicator, NADPH:NADP(+), was higher in young compared to old animals, while the NADH:NAD(+) molar ratio remained unchanged. It is suggested that an age-related decrease in aconitase activity along with relatively subtle alterations in activities of some other citric acid cycle enzymes are likely to contribute to a decline in the overall efficiency of mitochondrial bioenergetics. The biological consequences of such alterations include age-related fluctuations in the citric acid cycle intermediates, which are precursors of protein synthesis, activators of fatty acid synthesis, and can also act as ligands for orphan G-protein coupled receptors.

  14. Glutamine-Glutamate Cycle Flux Is Similar in Cultured Astrocytes and Brain and Both Glutamate Production and Oxidation Are Mainly Catalyzed by Aspartate Aminotransferase.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Leif; Rothman, Douglas L

    2017-02-24

    The glutamine-glutamate cycle provides neurons with astrocyte-generated glutamate/γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and oxidizes glutamate in astrocytes, and it returns released transmitter glutamate/GABA to neurons after astrocytic uptake. This review deals primarily with the glutamate/GABA generation/oxidation, although it also shows similarity between metabolic rates in cultured astrocytes and intact brain. A key point is identification of the enzyme(s) converting astrocytic α-ketoglutarate to glutamate and vice versa. Most experiments in cultured astrocytes, including those by one of us, suggest that glutamate formation is catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) and its degradation by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). Strongly supported by results shown in Table 1 we now propose that both reactions are primarily catalyzed by AAT. This is possible because the formation occurs in the cytosol and the degradation in mitochondria and they are temporally separate. High glutamate/glutamine concentrations abolish the need for glutamate production from α-ketoglutarate and due to metabolic coupling between glutamate synthesis and oxidation these high concentrations render AAT-mediated glutamate oxidation impossible. This necessitates the use of GDH under these conditions, shown by insensitivity of the oxidation to the transamination inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA). Experiments using lower glutamate/glutamine concentration show inhibition of glutamate oxidation by AOAA, consistent with the coupled transamination reactions described here.

  15. Glutamine-Glutamate Cycle Flux Is Similar in Cultured Astrocytes and Brain and Both Glutamate Production and Oxidation Are Mainly Catalyzed by Aspartate Aminotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Leif; Rothman, Douglas L

    2017-01-01

    The glutamine-glutamate cycle provides neurons with astrocyte-generated glutamate/γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and oxidizes glutamate in astrocytes, and it returns released transmitter glutamate/GABA to neurons after astrocytic uptake. This review deals primarily with the glutamate/GABA generation/oxidation, although it also shows similarity between metabolic rates in cultured astrocytes and intact brain. A key point is identification of the enzyme(s) converting astrocytic α-ketoglutarate to glutamate and vice versa. Most experiments in cultured astrocytes, including those by one of us, suggest that glutamate formation is catalyzed by aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) and its degradation by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). Strongly supported by results shown in Table 1 we now propose that both reactions are primarily catalyzed by AAT. This is possible because the formation occurs in the cytosol and the degradation in mitochondria and they are temporally separate. High glutamate/glutamine concentrations abolish the need for glutamate production from α-ketoglutarate and due to metabolic coupling between glutamate synthesis and oxidation these high concentrations render AAT-mediated glutamate oxidation impossible. This necessitates the use of GDH under these conditions, shown by insensitivity of the oxidation to the transamination inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA). Experiments using lower glutamate/glutamine concentration show inhibition of glutamate oxidation by AOAA, consistent with the coupled transamination reactions described here. PMID:28245547

  16. Which way does the citric acid cycle turn during hypoxia? The critical role of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex.

    PubMed

    Chinopoulos, Christos

    2013-08-01

    The citric acid cycle forms a major metabolic hub and as such it is involved in many disease states involving energetic imbalance. In spite of the fact that it is being branded as a "cycle", during hypoxia, when the electron transport chain does not oxidize reducing equivalents, segments of this metabolic pathway remain operational but exhibit opposing directionalities. This serves the purpose of harnessing high-energy phosphates through matrix substrate-level phosphorylation in the absence of oxidative phosphorylation. In this Mini-Review, these segments are appraised, pointing to the critical importance of the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex dictating their directionalities.

  17. Prolactin messenger ribonucleic acid concentrations throughout the ovine estrous cycle: Assessment relative to prolactin serum and pituitary amounts

    SciTech Connect

    Landefeld, T.; Roulia, V.; Bagnell, T.; Ballard, T.; Levitan, I. )

    1991-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) mRNA concentrations were assessed by nucleic acid hybridization assays in pituitaries of ewes representing the defined stages of the ovine estrous cycle. Concomitantly, pituitary and serum PRL concentrations were measured in these ewes using radioimmunoassays. It was observed that PRL serum, pituitary and mRNA concentrations tended to increase near the time of the gonadotropin preovulatory surge, particularly between 24 hrs before behavioral estrus to 5 hours after estrus. However, the changes in PRL mRNA, serum and pituitary concentrations were shown not to be statistically significant. These data suggest that PRL production during the sheep estrous cycle is maintained without dramatic changes in synthesis or secretion.

  18. Investigating the biophysical controls on mass and energy cycling in Southwestern US ecosystems using the New Mexico Elevation Gradient of flux towers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krofcheck, D. J.; Morillas, L.; Litvak, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Drylands and semi-arid ecosystems cover over 45% of the global landmass. These biomes have been shown to be extremely sensitive to changes in climate, specifically decreases in precipitation and increases in air temperature. Therefore, inter-annual variability in climate has the potential to dramatically impact the carbon budget at regional and global scales. In the Southwestern US, we are in a unique position to investigate these relationships by leveraging eight years of data from the New Mexico Elevation Gradient (NMEG), eight flux towers that span six representative biomes across the semi-arid Southwest. From C4 desert grasslands to subalpine mixed conifer forests, the NMEG flux towers use identical instrumentsand processing, and afford a unique opportunity to explore patterns in biome-specific ecosystem processes and climate sensitivity. Over the last eight years the gradient has experienced climatic variability that span from wet years to an episodic megadrought. Here we report the effects of this extreme inter-annual variability in climate on the ability of semi-arid ecosystems to cycle and store energy and carbon. We also investigated biome-specific patterns of ecosystem light and water use efficiency during a series of wet and dry years, and how these vary in response to air temperature, vapor pressure deficit, evaporative fraction, and precipitation. Our initial results suggest that significant drought reduced the maximum ecosystem assimilation of carbon most at the C4 grasslands, creosote shrublands, juniper savannas, and ponderosa pine forests, with 60%, 50%, 35%, and 50% reduction respectively, relative to a wet year. Ecosystem light use efficiency tends to show the highest maximum values at the low elevation sites as a function of water availability, with the highest annual values consistently at the middle elevation and ponderosa pine sites. Water use efficiency was strongly biome dependent with the middle elevation sites showing the highest

  19. Docosohaexanoic acid-supplemented PACA44 cell lines and over-activation of Krebs cycle: an integrated proteomic, metabolomic and interactomic overview.

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, Angelo; D'Amici, Gian Maria; Timperio, Anna Maria; Merendino, Nicolò; Zolla, Lello

    2011-09-06

    Recent investigations have pointed out the ability of fatty acids, in particular of docosohaexanoic acid (DHA), to induce growth inhibition and apoptosis in the human PaCa-44 pancreatic cancer cell line through a series of mechanisms which has been hypothesized to mimic apoptosis. While preliminary evidences indicated the involvement of lipid-targeting oxidative stress in DHA-induced apoptotic processes, mainly through the alteration of the glutathione (GSH) homeostasis and oxidized-glutathione (GSSG) turn-over through their extra-cellular extrusion, no further molecular data have been hitherto accumulated. To this end, we hereby propose simultaneous protein-targeting and metabolite-oriented analyses, which have been integrated through the auxilium of in silico elaboration of those protein-protein interaction pathways and enrichment of biological/molecular functions. To determine the most suitable time window for the early onset of the DHA-triggered apoptosis phenomena we performed flow cytometry-based apoptotic assessment at 24, 48 and 72 h. Results indicated that the focus of apoptosis onset ranged from 48 to 72 h. From these analyses it emerges that the metabolism of control human PaCa-44 pancreatic cancer cell line mainly leans on glycolytic pathways, while it is promptly switched to Kreb's cycle activation (overexpression of Kreb's cycle enzymes in DHA-treated cells against controls) and modulation of the GSH homeostasis through an increased production of GSSG-reducing NADPH coenzyme via the shift of the glycolytic energy flux towards the pentose phosphate pathway. Interestingly, it also emerges a role for structural protein alteration in DHA-treated cells, which might be linked to cytoskeletal alterations occurring during apoptosis.

  20. Pyruvate and citric acid cycle carbon requirements in isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Messer, Jeffrey I; Jackman, Matthew R; Willis, Wayne T

    2004-03-01

    Carbohydrate depletion precipitates fatigue in skeletal muscle, but, because pyruvate provides both acetyl-CoA for mainline oxidation and anaplerotic carbon to the citric acid cycle (CAC), the mechanism remains obscure. Thus pyruvate and CAC kinetic parameters were independently quantified in mitochondria isolated from rat mixed skeletal muscle. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate (Jo) was measured polarographically while either pyruvate or malate was added stepwise in the presence of a saturating concentration of the other substrate. These substrate titrations were carried out across a physiological range of fixed extramitochondrial ATP free energy states (DeltaGP), established with a creatine kinase energy clamp, and also at saturating [ADP]. The apparent Km,malate for mitochondrial Jo ranged from 21 to 32 microM, and the apparent Km,pyruvate ranged from 12 to 26 microM, with both substrate Km values increasing as DeltaGP declined. Vmax for both substrates also increased as DeltaGP fell, reflecting thermodynamic control of Jo. Reported in vivo skeletal muscle [malate] are >10-fold greater than the Km,malate determined in this study. In marked contrast, the K(m,pyruvate) determined is near the [pyruvate] reported in muscle approaching exhaustion associated with glycogen depletion. When data were evaluated in the context of a linear thermodynamic force-flow (DeltaGP-Jo) relationship, the DeltaGP-Jo slope was essentially insensitive to changes in [malate] in the range observed in vivo but decreased markedly with declining [pyruvate] across the physiological range. Mitochondrial respiration is particularly sensitive to variations in [pyruvate] in the physiological range. In contrast, physiological [malate] exerts very little, if any, influence on mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation measured in vitro.

  1. Contribution of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the glyoxylate shunt in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to succinic acid production during dough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mohammad N; Aslankoohi, Elham; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2015-07-02

    Succinic acid produced by yeast during bread dough fermentation can significantly affect the rheological properties of the dough. By introducing mutations in the model S288C yeast strain, we show that the oxidative pathway of the TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt contribute significantly to succinic acid production during dough fermentation. More specifically, deletion of ACO1 and double deletion of ACO1 and ICL1 resulted in a 36 and 77% decrease in succinic acid levels in fermented dough, respectively. Similarly, double deletion of IDH1 and IDP1 decreased succinic acid production by 85%, while also affecting the fermentation rate. By contrast, double deletion of SDH1 and SDH2 resulted in a two-fold higher succinic acid accumulation compared to the wild-type. Deletion of fumarate reductase activity (FRD1 and OSM1) in the reductive pathway of the TCA cycle did not affect the fermentation rate and succinic acid production. The changes in the levels of succinic acid produced by mutants Δidh1Δidp1 (low level) and Δsdh1Δsdh2 (high level) in fermented dough only resulted in small pH differences, reflecting the buffering capacity of dough at a pH of around 5.1. Moreover, Rheofermentometer analysis using these mutants revealed no difference in maximum dough height and gas retention capacity with the dough prepared with S288C. The impact of the changed succinic acid profile on the organoleptic or antimicrobial properties of bread remains to be demonstrated.

  2. Metagenomics, single cell genomics, and steady-state free energy flux provide insight into the biogeochemical cycling of deep, meteoric water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnabosco, C.; Lau, C. M.; Ryan, K.; Kieft, T. L.; Snyder, L.; Sherwood Lollar, B.; Lacrampe Couloume, G.; Hendrickson, S.; Pullin, M. J.; Slater, G. F.; Simkus, D.; Borgonie, G.; van Heerden, E.; Kuloyo, O.; Maleke, M.; Tlalajoe, T.; Vermeulen, J.; Vermeulen, F.; Munro, A.; Pienaar, M.; Stepanauskas, R.; Grim, S. L.; Onstott, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    Prior to the onset of high-throughput sequencing, the study of biogeochemical cycling in the terrestrial deep subsurface was limited to geochemical, thermodynamic, culture dependent microbial and low-throughput molecular analyses. Here, we present an integration of these traditional methods with high-throughput metagenomic and single cell analysis of 3.1 km deep water collected from a borehole (TT107) located in AngloGold Ashanti's TauTona Au Mine of South Africa and intersecting a fracture within a Witwatersrand Supergroup quartzite. The low salinity fracture water encountered at this depth is meteoric in origin and has a subsurface residence time on the order of a few thousand years. Aqueous geochemistry and estimated steady-state free energy flux values suggest that redox reactions are driven by the oxidation of abundant, energy-rich substrates including H2, CO, CH4, formate, and propanoate. The majority of the metagenome's sequences related to the phyla Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, which contain several bacterial species that are likely to exhibit chemoautotrophic metabolism. Sequence data confirms that many of these bacteria have the ability reduce of sulfur and nitrogen species via dissimilatory pathways. Thermincola were the most abundant firmicutes at this location and were sequenced at the single cell level. Notably, Thermincola sp. are capable of reducing metals and may utilize energy rich manganese reduction pathways at TT107. The CH4 at this site is of abiological origin (δ13C-C1-3 = -43.5 to -44.3 VPDB; δ2H-C1-3 = -345 to -200 VSMOW) despite the metagenome containing several sequences that are closely related to methanogens in the archaeal phyla Euryarchaeota. Alternatively, these archaea may belong to a group of euryarchaetoa commonly referred to as anaerobic mehanotrophic archaea (ANME) - suggesting that anaerobic oxidation (AOM) of abiogenic CH4 coupled to the reduction of sulfate species may be occurring at this site. Sequences for pmoA and s

  3. The contribution of chemical fluxes across the sediment-water interface to carbon cycling in estuarine regions: A case study at the Rhône River mouth (NW Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassmann, Jens; Eitel, Eryn; Bombled, Bruno; Lansard, Bruno; Taillefert, Martial; Rabouille, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Despite their small surface compared to the global oceans, continental shelf regions play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. Whereas shelf regions are seen as a sink for atmospheric CO2, estuarine regions are seen as a source. These regions are caracterized by the export of allochthonous terrigenous organic matter (OM) and the production of autochthonous marine organic carbon. An important fraction of this OM is mineralized in the sediments close to the river mouth. As a result, high exchange fluxes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), oxygen and nutriments cross the sediment-water interface (SWI) and cause acidification of the bottom waters. Potentially, primary production in the water column is enhanced by these fluxes. Therefore, OM mineralisation in estuarine regions plays a key role in the carbon cycle as a direct producer of DIC and as a potential control factor for primary production. This work aims to quantify chemical fluxes through the SWI at the prodelta of the Rhone River (Mediterranen). In September 2015, a benthic chamber has been deployed at several stations in the prodelta to measure directly (in situ) fluxes of DIC, TA, ammonium and dissolved calcium at the SWI. At the same stations, in situ microprofiles of oxygen and pH have been recorded and sediment cores were taken for pore water extraction and analysis (DIC, TA, NH4+ and Ca2+). The results show a strong decrease of the fluxes in offshore direction indicating a strong variation of respiration rates in this direction. From pore water profiles, diffusive fluxes have been calculated and compared with the fluxes measured by the benthic chamber. This comparison enables us to include pore water profiles from previous investigations to calculate a carbon mass budget of this region.

  4. Gluconeogenic carbon flow of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is critical for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish and maintain infection.

    PubMed

    Marrero, Joeli; Rhee, Kyu Y; Schnappinger, Dirk; Pethe, Kevin; Ehrt, Sabine

    2010-05-25

    Metabolic adaptation to the host niche is a defining feature of the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In vitro, Mtb is able to grow on a variety of carbon sources, but mounting evidence has implicated fatty acids as the major source of carbon and energy for Mtb during infection. When bacterial metabolism is primarily fueled by fatty acids, biosynthesis of sugars from intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle is essential for growth. The role of gluconeogenesis in the pathogenesis of Mtb however remains unaddressed. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) catalyzes the first committed step of gluconeogenesis. We applied genetic analyses and (13)C carbon tracing to confirm that PEPCK is essential for growth of Mtb on fatty acids and catalyzes carbon flow from tricarboxylic acid cycle-derived metabolites to gluconeogenic intermediates. We further show that PEPCK is required for growth of Mtb in isolated bone marrow-derived murine macrophages and in mice. Importantly, Mtb lacking PEPCK not only failed to replicate in mouse lungs but also failed to survive, and PEPCK depletion during the chronic phase of infection resulted in mycobacterial clearance. Mtb thus relies on gluconeogenesis throughout the infection. PEPCK depletion also attenuated Mtb in IFNgamma-deficient mice, suggesting that this enzyme represents an attractive target for chemotherapy.

  5. Production of tartrates by cyanide-mediated dimerization of glyoxylate: a potential abiotic pathway to the citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Butch, Christopher; Cope, Elizabeth D; Pollet, Pamela; Gelbaum, Leslie; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Liotta, Charles L

    2013-09-11

    An abiotic formation of meso- and DL-tartrates in 80% yield via the cyanide-catalyzed dimerization of glyoxylate under alkaline conditions is demonstrated. A detailed mechanism for this conversion is proposed, supported by NMR evidence and (13)C-labeled reactions. Simple dehydration of tartrates to oxaloacetate and an ensuing decarboxylation to form pyruvate are known processes that provide a ready feedstock for entry into the citric acid cycle. While glyoxylate and high hydroxide concentration are atypical in the prebiotic literature, there is evidence for natural, abiotic availability of each. It is proposed that this availability, coupled with the remarkable efficiency of tartrate production from glyoxylate, merits consideration of an alternative prebiotic pathway for providing constituents of the citric acid cycle.

  6. Enzymes in Glycolysis and the Citric Acid Cycle in the Yeast and Mycelial Forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori; Carbonell, Luis M.

    1966-01-01

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela), and Luis M. Carbonell. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1315–1320. 1966.—Enzymatic activities in glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, and the citric acid cycle in cell-free extracts of the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were examined comparatively. Both forms have the enzymes of these pathways. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase of the mycelial form were higher than those of the yeast form. Another 15 enzymatic activities of the mycelial form were lower than those of the yeast form. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed the most marked difference between the two forms, its activity in the mycelial form being about 20% of that in the yeast form. PMID:5924267

  7. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Kanetsuna, F; Carbonell, L M

    1966-11-01

    Kanetsuna, Fuminori (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas, Venezuela), and Luis M. Carbonell. Enzymes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle in the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. J. Bacteriol. 92:1315-1320. 1966.-Enzymatic activities in glycolysis, the hexose monophosphate shunt, and the citric acid cycle in cell-free extracts of the yeast and mycelial forms of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were examined comparatively. Both forms have the enzymes of these pathways. Activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic dehydrogenase of the mycelial form were higher than those of the yeast form. Another 15 enzymatic activities of the mycelial form were lower than those of the yeast form. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase showed the most marked difference between the two forms, its activity in the mycelial form being about 20% of that in the yeast form.

  8. Cell cycle activation in striatal neurons from Huntington's disease patients and rats treated with 3-nitropropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Pelegrí, Carme; Duran-Vilaregut, Joaquim; del Valle, Jaume; Crespo-Biel, Natàlia; Ferrer, Isidre; Pallàs, Mercè; Camins, Antoni; Vilaplana, Jordi

    2008-11-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the potential role of cell cycle re-entry in an experimental model of Huntington's disease and in human brain samples. We found that after treatment of rats with the mitochondrial neurotoxin 3-nitropropionic acid, the expression of cell cycle markers of G1 phase measured by immunohistochemistry was induced in the striatal brain region. Furthermore, we detected an increase in the nuclear and also cytoplasmatic E2F-1 expression, suggesting that this protein could activate the apoptotic cascade in rat brain. Western blot analysis of post-mortem brain samples from patients also showed an increase in the expression of E2F-1 and cyclin D1 in comparison with control samples. These results indicate that cell cycle re-entry is activated in Huntington's disease and may contribute to the neurodegenerative process.

  9. Metabolism of glycerol, glucose, and lactate in the citric acid cycle prior to incorporation into hepatic acylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Jin, Eunsook S; Sherry, A Dean; Malloy, Craig R

    2013-05-17

    During hepatic lipogenesis, the glycerol backbone of acylglycerols originates from one of three sources: glucose, glycerol, or substrates passing through the citric acid cycle via glyceroneogenesis. The relative contribution of each substrate source to glycerol in rat liver acylglycerols was determined using (13)C-enriched substrates and NMR. Animals received a fixed mixture of glucose, glycerol, and lactate; one group received [U-(13)C6]glucose, another received [U-(13)C3]glycerol, and the third received [U-(13)C3]lactate. After 3 h, the livers were harvested to extract fats, and the glycerol moiety from hydrolyzed acylglycerols was analyzed by (13)C NMR. In either fed or fasted animals, glucose and glycerol provided the majority of the glycerol backbone carbons, whereas the contribution of lactate was small. In fed animals, glucose contributed >50% of the total newly synthesized glycerol backbone, and 35% of this contribution occurred after glucose had passed through the citric acid cycle. By comparison, the glycerol contribution was ~40%, and of this, 17% of the exogenous glycerol passed first through the cycle. In fasted animals, exogenous glycerol became the major contributor to acylglycerols. The contribution from exogenous lactate did increase in fasted animals, but its overall contribution remained small. The contributions of glucose and glycerol that had passed through the citric acid cycle first increased in fasted animals from 35 to 71% for glucose and from 17 to 24% for glycerol. Thus, a substantial fraction from both substrate sources passed through the cycle prior to incorporation into the glycerol moiety of acylglycerols in the liver.

  10. The antiproliferative effect of dietary fiber phenolic compounds ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid on the cell cycle of Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Janicke, Birgit; Hegardt, Cecilia; Krogh, Morten; Onning, Gunilla; Akesson, Björn; Cirenajwis, Helena M; Oredsson, Stina M

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal studies have shown that dietary fiber is protective against the development of colon cancer. Dietary fiber is a rich source of the hydroxycinnamic acids ferulic acid (FA) and p-coumaric acid (p-CA), which both may contribute to the protective effect. We have investigated the effects of FA and p-CA treatment on global gene expression in Caco-2 colon cancer cells. The Caco-2 cells were treated with 150 μM FA or p-CA for 24 h, and gene expression was analyzed with cDNA microarray technique. A total of 517 genes were significantly affected by FA and 901 by p-CA. As we previously have found that FA or p-CA treatment delayed cell cycle progression, we focused on genes involved in proliferation and cell cycle regulation. The expressions of a number of genes involved in centrosome assembly, such as RABGAP1 and CEP2, were upregulated by FA treatment as well as the gene for the S phase checkpoint protein SMC1L1. p-CA treatment upregulated CDKN1A expression and downregulated CCNA2, CCNB1, MYC, and ODC1. Some proteins corresponding to the affected genes were also studied. Taken together, the changes found can partly explain the effects of FA or p-CA treatment on cell cycle progression, specifically in the S phase by FA and G(2)/M phase by p-CA treatment.

  11. A new method for assembling metabolic networks, with application to the Krebs citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Mittenthal, J E; Clarke, B; Waddell, T G; Fawcett, G

    2001-02-01

    To understand why a molecular network has a particular connectivity one can generate an ensemble of alternative networks, all of which meet the same performance criteria as the real network. We have generated alternatives to the Krebs cycle, allowing group transfers and B(12)-mediated shifts that were excluded in previous work. Our algorithm does not use a reaction list, but determines the reactants and products in generic reactions. It generates networks in order of increasing number of reaction steps. We find that alternatives to the Krebs cycle are very likely to be cycles. Many of the alternatives produce toxic or unstable compounds and use group transfer reactions, which have unfavorable consequences. Although alternatives are better than the Krebs cycle in some respects, the Krebs cycle has the most favorable combination of traits.

  12. Combined Flux Chamber and Genomics Approach Links Nitrous Acid Emissions to Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria and Archaea in Urban and Agricultural Soil.

    PubMed

    Scharko, Nicole K; Schütte, Ursel M E; Berke, Andrew E; Banina, Lauren; Peel, Hannah R; Donaldson, Melissa A; Hemmerich, Chris; White, Jeffrey R; Raff, Jonathan D

    2015-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is a photochemical source of hydroxyl radical and nitric oxide in the atmosphere that stems from abiotic and biogenic processes, including the activity of ammonia-oxidizing soil microbes. HONO fluxes were measured from agricultural and urban soil in mesocosm studies aimed at characterizing biogenic sources and linking them to indigenous microbial consortia. Fluxes of HONO from agricultural and urban soil were suppressed by addition of a nitrification inhibitor and enhanced by amendment with ammonium (NH4(+)), with peaks at 19 and 8 ng m(-2) s(-1), respectively. In addition, both agricultural and urban soils were observed to convert (15)NH4(+) to HO(15)NO. Genomic surveys of soil samples revealed that 1.5-6% of total expressed 16S rRNA sequences detected belonged to known ammonia oxidizing bacteria and archaea. Peak fluxes of HONO were directly related to the abundance of ammonia-oxidizer sequences, which in turn depended on soil pH. Peak HONO fluxes under fertilized conditions are comparable in magnitude to fluxes reported during field campaigns. The results suggest that biogenic HONO emissions will be important in soil environments that exhibit high nitrification rates (e.g., agricultural soil) although the widespread occurrence of ammonia oxidizers implies that biogenic HONO emissions are also possible in the urban and remote environment.

  13. Oxidation of acetate through reactions of the citric acid cycle by Geobacter sulfurreducens in pure culture and in syntrophic coculture.

    PubMed

    Galushko, A S; Schink, B

    2000-11-01

    Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA oxidized acetate to CO2 via citric acid cycle reactions during growth with acetate plus fumarate in pure culture, and with acetate plus nitrate in coculture with Wolinella succinogenes. Acetate was activated by succinyl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase and also via acetate kinase plus phosphotransacetylase. Citrate was formed by citrate synthase. Soluble isocitrate and malate dehydrogenases NADP+ and NAD+, respectively. Oxidation of 2-oxoglutarate was measured as benzyl viologen reduction and strictly CoA-dependent; a low activity was also observed with NADP+. Succinate dehydrogenase and fumarate ductase both were membrane-bound. Succinate oxidation was coupled to NADP+ reduction whereas fumarate reduction was coupled to NADPH and NADH Coupling of succinate oxidation to NADP+ or cytochrome(s) reduction required an ATP-dependent reversed electron transport. Net ATP synthesis proceeded exclusively through electron transport phosphorylation. During fumarate reduction, both NADPH and NADH delivered reducing equivalents into the electron transport chain, which contained a menaquinone. Overall, acetate oxidation with fumarate proceeded through an open loop of citric acid cycle reactions, excluding succinate dehydrogenase, with fumarate reductase as the key reaction for electron delivery, whereas acetate oxidation in the syntrophic coculture required the complete citric acid cycle.

  14. Metabolomic and mass isotopomer analysis of liver gluconeogenesis and citric acid cycle: II. Heterogeneity of metabolite labeling pattern.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Kasumov, Takhar; Kombu, Rajan S; Zhu, Shu-Han; Cendrowski, Andrea V; David, France; Anderson, Vernon E; Kelleher, Joanne K; Brunengraber, Henri

    2008-08-08

    In this second of two companion articles, we compare the mass isotopomer distribution of metabolites of liver gluconeogenesis and citric acid cycle labeled from NaH(13)CO(3) or dimethyl [1,4-(13)C(2)]succinate. The mass isotopomer distribution of intermediates reveals the reversibility of the isocitrate dehydrogenase + aconitase reactions, even in the absence of a source of alpha-ketoglutarate. In addition, in many cases, a number of labeling incompatibilities were found as follows: (i) glucose versus triose phosphates and phosphoenolpyruvate; (ii) differences in the labeling ratios C-4/C-3 of glucose versus (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate)/(dihydroxyacetone phosphate); and (iii) labeling of citric acid cycle intermediates in tissue versus effluent perfusate. Overall, our data show that gluconeogenic and citric acid cycle intermediates cannot be considered as sets of homogeneously labeled pools. This probably results from the zonation of hepatic metabolism and, in some cases, from differences in the labeling pattern of mitochondrial versus extramitochondrial metabolites. Our data have implications for the use of labeling patterns for the calculation of metabolic rates or fractional syntheses in liver, as well as for modeling liver intermediary metabolism.

  15. Boronic acid flux synthesis and crystal growth of uranium and neptunium boronates and borates: a low-temperature route to the first neptunium(V) borate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Miller, Hannah M; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2010-11-01

    Molten methylboronic acid has been used as a reactive flux to prepare the first neptunium(V) borate, NpO(2)[B(3)O(4)(OH)(2)] (NpBO-1), and the first actinide boronate, UO(2)(CH(3)BO(2))(H(2)O) (UCBO-1). NpBO-1 contains cation-cation interactions between the neptunyl units. In contrast, the presence of the methyl groups in the uranyl boronate leads to a one-dimensional structure.

  16. Quantifying Rates of Complete Microbial Iron Redox Cycling in Acidic Hot Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St Clair, B.; Pottenger, J. W.; Shock, E.

    2013-12-01

    concentrations of ferrous iron. Experimental design allowed us to measure biological and abiological rates independently. Results indicate a relatively consistent rate of biological iron oxidation between 20-100 ng Fe2+(gm wet sediment)-1 (second)-1 where oxide accumulations occur. Abiological oxidation rates increase significantly with increasing pH, and greatly limit soluble ferrous iron above a pH of 3.5 at high temperatures. Rates of biological iron reduction are typically comparable to oxidation, and can often double oxidation rates when supplemented with organic carbon. Abiological iron reduction rates are inconsequential when the pH is greater than 2, but increase sharply below this point. Results indicate that comparable rates of microbial oxidation and reduction are common in springs where biogenic iron oxide accumulates. It appears that the interplay of temperature, oxygen availability, and supply of organic carbon determines the extent and history of iron oxide accumulation. Taken together, our results show that complete microbial iron redox cycles are active in acidic hot springs wherever biogenic iron oxides accumulate.

  17. Anion channel sensitivity to cytosolic organic acids implicates a central role for oxaloacetate in integrating ion flux with metabolism in stomatal guard cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yizhou; Blatt, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells play a key role in gas exchange for photosynthesis and in minimizing transpirational water loss from plants by opening and closing the stomatal pore. The bulk of the osmotic content driving stomatal movements depends on ionic fluxes across both the plasma membrane and tonoplast, the metabolism of organic acids, primarily Mal (malate), and its accumulation and loss. Anion channels at the plasma membrane are thought to comprise a major pathway for Mal efflux during stomatal closure, implicating their key role in linking solute flux with metabolism. Nonetheless, little is known of the regulation of anion channel current (ICl) by cytosolic Mal or its immediate metabolite OAA (oxaloacetate). In the present study, we have examined the impact of Mal, OAA and of the monocarboxylic acid anion acetate in guard cells of Vicia faba L. and report that all three organic acids affect ICl, but with markedly different characteristics and sidedness to their activities. Most prominent was a suppression of ICl by OAA within the physiological range of concentrations found in vivo. These findings indicate a capacity for OAA to co-ordinate organic acid metabolism with ICl through the direct effect of organic acid pool size. The findings of the present study also add perspective to in vivo recordings using acetate-based electrolytes. PMID:21745184

  18. Abscisic Acid Flux Alterations Result in Differential Abscisic Acid Signaling Responses and Impact Assimilation Efficiency in Barley under Terminal Drought Stress1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Christiane; Harshavardhan, Vokkaliga T.; Reddy, Palakolanu S.; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Rajesh, Kalladan; Korzun, Viktor; Wobus, Ulrich; Lee, Justin; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Sreenivasulu, Nese

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a central player in plant responses to drought stress. How variable levels of ABA under short-term versus long-term drought stress impact assimilation and growth in crops is unclear. We addressed this through comparative analysis, using two elite breeding lines of barley (Hordeum vulgare) that show senescence or stay-green phenotype under terminal drought stress and by making use of transgenic barley lines that express Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (AtNCED6) coding sequence or an RNA interference (RNAi) sequence of ABA 8′-hydroxylase under the control of a drought-inducible barley promoter. The high levels of ABA and its catabolites in the senescing breeding line under long-term stress were detrimental for assimilate productivity, whereas these levels were not perturbed in the stay-green type that performed better. In transgenic barley, drought-inducible AtNCED expression afforded temporal control in ABA levels such that the ABA levels rose sooner than in wild-type plants but also subsided, unlike as in the wild type , to near-basal levels upon prolonged stress treatment due to down-regulation of endogenous HvNCED genes. Suppressing of ABA catabolism with the RNA interference approach of ABA 8′-hydroxylase caused ABA flux during the entire period of stress. These transgenic plants performed better than the wild type under stress to maintain a favorable instantaneous water use efficiency and better assimilation. Gene expression analysis, protein structural modeling, and protein-protein interaction analyses of the members of the PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE1/PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE1-LIKE/REGULATORY COMPONENT OF ABA RECEPTORS, TYPE 2C PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE Sucrose non-fermenting1-related protein kinase2, and ABA-INSENSITIVE5/ABA-responsive element binding factor family identified specific members that could potentially impact ABA metabolism and stress adaptation in barley. PMID:24610749

  19. Regulation of adipose branched-chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Denise E; Lynch, Christopher J; Olson, Kristine C; Mostaedi, Rouzbeh; Ali, Mohamed; Smith, William H; Karpe, Fredrik; Humphreys, Sandy; Bedinger, Daniel H; Dunn, Tamara N; Thomas, Anthony P; Oort, Pieter J; Kieffer, Dorothy A; Amin, Rajesh; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Haj, Fawaz G; Permana, Paska; Anthony, Tracy G; Adams, Sean H

    2013-06-01

    Elevated blood branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which might result from a reduced cellular utilization and/or incomplete BCAA oxidation. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a potential player in whole body BCAA metabolism. We tested if expression of the mitochondrial BCAA oxidation checkpoint, branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, is reduced in obese WAT and regulated by metabolic signals. WAT BCKD protein (E1α subunit) was significantly reduced by 35-50% in various obesity models (fa/fa rats, db/db mice, diet-induced obese mice), and BCKD component transcripts significantly lower in subcutaneous (SC) adipocytes from obese vs. lean Pima Indians. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes or mice with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists increased WAT BCAA catabolism enzyme mRNAs, whereas the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-d-glucose had the opposite effect. The results support the hypothesis that suboptimal insulin action and/or perturbed metabolic signals in WAT, as would be seen with insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, could impair WAT BCAA utilization. However, cross-tissue flux studies comparing lean vs. insulin-sensitive or insulin-resistant obese subjects revealed an unexpected negligible uptake of BCAA from human abdominal SC WAT. This suggests that SC WAT may not be an important contributor to blood BCAA phenotypes associated with insulin resistance in the overnight-fasted state. mRNA abundances for BCAA catabolic enzymes were markedly reduced in omental (but not SC) WAT of obese persons with metabolic syndrome compared with weight-matched healthy obese subjects, raising the possibility that visceral WAT contributes to the BCAA metabolic phenotype of metabolically compromised individuals.

  20. Amphipathic β2,2-Amino Acid Derivatives Suppress Infectivity and Disrupt the Intracellular Replication Cycle of Chlamydia pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Tiirola, Terttu M.; Strøm, Morten B.; Vuorela, Pia M.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate in the current work that small cationic antimicrobial β2,2-amino acid derivatives (Mw < 500 Da) are highly potent against Chlamydia pneumoniae at clinical relevant concentrations (< 5 μM, i.e. < 3.4 μg/mL). C. pneumoniae is an atypical respiratory pathogen associated with frequent treatment failures and persistent infections. This gram-negative bacterium has a biphasic life cycle as infectious elementary bodies and proliferating reticulate bodies, and efficient treatment is challenging because of its long and obligate intracellular replication cycle within specialized inclusion vacuoles. Chlamydicidal effect of the β2,2-amino acid derivatives in infected human epithelial cells was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Images of infected host cells treated with our lead derivative A2 revealed affected chlamydial inclusion vacuoles 24 hours post infection. Only remnants of elementary and reticulate bodies were detected at later time points. Neither the EM studies nor resazurin-based cell viability assays showed toxic effects on uninfected host cells or cell organelles after A2 treatment. Besides the effects on early intracellular inclusion vacuoles, the ability of these β2,2-amino acid derivatives to suppress Chlamydia pneumoniae infectivity upon treatment of elementary bodies suggested also a direct interaction with bacterial membranes. Synthetic β2,2-amino acid derivatives that target C. pneumoniae represent promising lead molecules for development of antimicrobial agents against this hard-to-treat intracellular pathogen. PMID:27280777

  1. Neurodegeneration in methylmalonic aciduria involves inhibition of complex II and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and synergistically acting excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Okun, Jürgen G; Hörster, Friederike; Farkas, Lilla M; Feyh, Patrik; Hinz, Angela; Sauer, Sven; Hoffmann, Georg F; Unsicker, Klaus; Mayatepek, Ertan; Kölker, Stefan

    2002-04-26

    Methylmalonic acidurias are biochemically characterized by an accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA) and alternative metabolites. There is growing evidence for basal ganglia degeneration in these patients. The pathomechanisms involved are still unknown, a contribution of toxic organic acids, in particular MMA, has been suggested. Here we report that MMA induces neuronal damage in cultures of embryonic rat striatal cells at a concentration range encountered in affected patients. MMA-induced cell damage was reduced by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, antioxidants, and succinate. These results suggest the involvement of secondary excitotoxic mechanisms in MMA-induced cell damage. MMA has been implicated in inhibition of respiratory chain complex II. However, MMA failed to inhibit complex II activity in submitochondrial particles from bovine heart. To unravel the mechanism underlying neuronal MMA toxicity, we investigated the formation of intracellular metabolites in MMA-loaded striatal neurons. There was a time-dependent intracellular increase in malonate, an inhibitor of complex II, and 2-methylcitrate, a compound with multiple inhibitory effects on the tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting their putative implication in MMA neurotoxicity. We propose that neuropathogenesis of methylmalonic aciduria may involve an inhibition of complex II and the tricarboxylic acid cycle by accumulating toxic organic acids, and synergistic secondary excitotoxic mechanisms.

  2. Synoptic evaluation of carbon cycling in the Beaufort Sea during summer: contrasting river inputs, ecosystem metabolism and air-sea CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, A.; Coupel, P.; Else, B.; Nahavandian, S.; Lansard, B.; Raimbault, P.; Papakyriakou, T.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2014-05-01

    The accelerated decline in Arctic sea ice and an ongoing trend toward more energetic atmospheric and oceanic forcings are modifying carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. A critical issue is to understand how net community production (NCP; the balance between gross primary production and community respiration) responds to changes and modulates air-sea CO2 fluxes. Using data collected as part of the ArcticNet-Malina 2009 expedition in the southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), we synthesize information on sea ice, wind, river, water column properties, metabolism of the planktonic food web, organic carbon fluxes and pools, as well as air-sea CO2 exchange, with the aim of documenting the ecosystem response to environmental changes. Data were analyzed to develop a non-steady-state carbon budget and an assessment of NCP against air-sea CO2 fluxes. During the field campaign, the mean wind field was a mild upwelling-favorable wind (~ 5 km h-1) from the NE. A decaying ice cover (< 80% concentration) was observed beyond the shelf, the latter being fully exposed to the atmosphere. We detected some areas where the surface mixed layer was net autotrophic owing to high rates of primary production (PP), but the ecosystem was overall net heterotrophic. The region acted nonetheless as a sink for atmospheric CO2, with an uptake rate of -2.0 ± 3.3 mmol C m-2 d-1 (mean ± standard deviation associated with spatial variability). We attribute this discrepancy to (1) elevated PP rates (> 600 mg C m-2 d-1) over the shelf prior to our survey, (2) freshwater dilution by river runoff and ice melt, and (3) the presence of cold surface waters offshore. Only the Mackenzie River delta and localized shelf areas directly affected by upwelling were identified as substantial sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (> 10 mmol C m-2 d-1). Daily PP rates were generally < 100 mg C m-2 d-1 and cumulated to a total PP of ~ 437.6 × 103 t C for the region over a 35-day period. This amount was about twice the

  3. Annual cycle and spatial trends in fatty acid composition of suspended particulate organic matter across the Beaufort Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, Tara L.; Businski, Tara N.; Deibel, Don; Parrish, Christopher C.; Trela, Piotr

    2016-11-01

    Fatty acid profiles of suspended particulate organic matter (POM) were determined over an annual cycle (September 2003 to August 2004) on the Beaufort Sea shelf, Canadian Arctic. Special emphasis was placed on the nutritional quality of the fatty acid pool available to zooplankton by examining spatial and temporal patterns in the proportions of total polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and the essential fatty acids 22:6n-3 (DHA) and 20:5n-3 (EPA). EPA and DHA were the two most abundant PUFA throughout the study period. A log-ratio multivariate (LRA) analysis revealed strong structure in fatty acid profiles related to season and depth. Dominant fatty acids accounting for the observed trend included 18:5n-3, 18:4n-3, 16:1n-7, 20:5n-3, 18:0 and 20:3n-3. We observed a shift in fatty acid profiles from summer to autumn (e.g., from 16:1n-7 and EPA to 18:5n-3 and 18:4n-3) that likely corresponded to a shift in the relative importance of diatoms versus dinoflagellates, prymnesiophytes and/or prasinophytes to the POM pool. Fatty acid composition during winter was dominated by more refractory saturated fatty acids. A surprising finding was the depth and seasonal trend of 20:3n-3, which was higher in winter, aligned with 18:0 in the LRA, but behaved differently than other n-3 PUFA. We interpret fatty acid profiles during summer to be predominantly driven by phytoplankton inputs, whereas fatty acid profiles in winter were dominated by fatty acids that were left over after consumption and/or were generated by heterotrophs. The highest diatom inputs (EPA, the diatom fatty acid marker), n-3/n-6 ratios, and C16 PUFA index were located in an upwelling region off Cape Bathurst. This study is the first annual time series of fatty acid profiles of POM in Arctic seas, expanding our knowledge of the composition of POM throughout the dark season.

  4. Amino acid export in plants: a missing link in nitrogen cycling.

    PubMed

    Okumoto, Sakiko; Pilot, Guillaume

    2011-05-01

    The export of nutrients from source organs to parts of the body where they are required (e.g. sink organs) is a fundamental biological process. Export of amino acids, one of the most abundant nitrogen species in plant long-distance transport tissues (i.e. xylem and phloem), is an essential process for the proper distribution of nitrogen in the plant. Physiological studies have detected the presence of multiple amino acid export systems in plant cell membranes. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the molecular identity of amino acid exporters, partially due to the technical difficulties hampering the identification of exporter proteins. In this short review, we will summarize our current knowledge about amino acid export systems in plants. Several studies have described plant amino acid transporters capable of bi-directional, facilitative transport, reminiscent of activities identified by earlier physiological studies. Moreover, recent expansion in the number of available amino acid transporter sequences have revealed evolutionary relationships between amino acid exporters from other organisms with a number of uncharacterized plant proteins, some of which might also function as amino acid exporters. In addition, genes that may regulate export of amino acids have been discovered. Studies of these putative transporter and regulator proteins may help in understanding the elusive molecular mechanisms of amino acid export in plants.

  5. Tandem dissolution of UO3 in amide-based acidic ionic liquid and in situ electrodeposition of UO2 with regeneration of the ionic liquid: a closed cycle

    DOE PAGES

    Wanigasekara, Eranda; Freiderich, John W.; Sun, Xiao-Guang; ...

    2016-05-19

    A closed cycle is demonstrated for the tandem dissolution and electroreduction of UO3 to UO2 with regeneration of the acidic ionic liquid. The dissolution is achieved by use of the acidic ionic liquid N,N-dimethylacetimidium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonimide) in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonimide) serving as the diluent. Bulk electrolysis performed at 1.0 V vs. Ag reference yields a dark brown-black uranium deposit (UO2) on the cathode. Anodic oxidation of water in the presence of dimethylacetamide regenerates the acidic ionic liquid. We have demonstrated the individual steps in the cycle together with a sequential dissolution, electroreduction, and regeneration cycle.

  6. Fatty acid fouling of forward osmosis membrane: Effects of pH, calcium, membrane orientation, initial permeate flux and foulant composition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pin; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Liu, Pan; Shon, Ho Kyong

    2016-08-01

    Octanoic acid (OA) was selected to represent fatty acids in effluent organic matter (EOM). The effects of feed solution (FS) properties, membrane orientation and initial permeate flux on OA fouling in forward osmosis (FO) were investigated. The undissociated OA formed a cake layer quickly and caused the water flux to decline significantly in the initial 0.5hr at unadjusted pH3.56; while the fully dissociated OA behaved as an anionic surfactant and promoted the water permeation at an elevated pH of 9.00. Moreover, except at the initial stage, the sudden decline of water flux (meaning the occurrence of severe membrane fouling) occurred in two conditions: 1. 0.5mmol/L Ca(2+), active layer facing draw solution (AL-DS) and 1.5mol/L NaCl (DS); 2. No Ca(2+), active layer-facing FS (AL-FS) and 4mol/L NaCl (DS). This demonstrated that cake layer compaction or pore blocking occurred only when enough foulants were absorbed into the membrane surface, and the water permeation was high enough to compact the deposit inside the porous substrate. Furthermore, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selected as a co-foulant. The water flux of both co-foulants was between the fluxes obtained separately for the two foulants at pH3.56, and larger than the two values at pH9.00. This manifested that, at pH3.56, BSA alleviated the effect of the cake layer caused by OA, and OA enhanced BSA fouling simultaneously; while at pH9.00, the mutual effects of OA and BSA eased the membrane fouling.

  7. Analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts by single pump cycling-column-switching ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhongping; Ni, Chengzhu; Zhu, Zhuyi; Pan, Zaifa; Wang, Lili; Zhu, Yan

    2015-05-01

    The application of ion chromatography with the single pump cycling-column-switching technique was described for the analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts within a single run. Due to the hydrogen ions provided by an anion suppressor electrolyzing water, weak acid anions could be transformed into weak acids, existing as molecules, after passing through the suppressor. Therefore, an anion suppressor and ion-exclusion column were adopted to achieve on-line matrix elimination of weak acid anions with high concentration for the analysis of trace inorganic anions in weak acid salts. A series of standard solutions consisting of target anions of various concentrations from 0.005 to 10 mg/L were analyzed, with correlation coefficients r ≥ 0.9990. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.67 to 1.51 μg/L, based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 and a 25 μL injection volume. Relative standard deviations for retention time, peak area, and peak height were all less than 2.01%. A spiking study was performed with satisfactory recoveries between 90.3 and 104.4% for all anions. The chromatographic system was successfully applied to the analysis of trace inorganic anions in five weak acid salts.

  8. Interconnection between tricarboxylic acid cycle and energy generation in microbial fuel cell performed by desulfuromonas acetoxidans IMV B-7384

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Oresta M.; Maslovska, Olga D.; Ferensovych, Yaroslav P.; Bilyy, Oleksandr I.; Hnatush, Svitlana O.

    2015-05-01

    Desulfuromonas acetoxidans IMV B-7384 is exoelectrogenic obligate anaerobic sulfur-reducing bacterium. Its one of the first described electrogenic bacterium that performs complete oxidation of an organic substrate with electron transfer directly to the electrode in microbial fuel cell (MFC). This bacterium is very promising for MFC development because of inexpensive cultivation medium, high survival rate and selective resistance to various heavy metal ions. The size of D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 cells is comparatively small (0.4-0.8×1-2 μm) that is highly beneficial while application of porous anode material because of complete bacterial cover of an electrode area with further significant improvement of the effectiveness of its usage. The interconnection between functioning of reductive stage of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle under anaerobic conditions, and MFC performance was established. Malic, pyruvic, fumaric and succinic acids in concentration 42 mM were separately added into the anode chamber of MFC as the redox agents. Application of malic acid caused the most stabile and the highest power generation in comparison with other investigated organic acids. Its maximum equaled 10.07±0.17mW/m2 on 136 hour of bacterial cultivation. Under addition of pyruvic, succinic and fumaric acids into the anode chamber of MFC the maximal power values equaled 5.80±0.25 mW/m2; 3.2±0.11 mW/m2, and 2.14±0.19 mW/m2 respectively on 40, 56 and 32 hour of bacterial cultivation. Hence the malic acid conversion via reductive stage of TCA cycle is shown to be the most efficient process in terms of electricity generation by D. acetoxidans IMV B-7384 in MFC under anaerobic conditions.

  9. The impact of acid mine drainage on the methylmercury cycling at the sediment-water interface in Aha Reservoir, Guizhou, China.

    PubMed

    He, Tianrong; Zhu, Yuzhen; Yin, Deliang; Luo, Guangjun; An, Yanlin; Yan, HaiYu; Qian, Xiaoli

    2015-04-01

    The methylmercury (MeHg) cycling at water-sediment interface in an acid mine drainage (AMD)-polluted reservoir (Aha Reservoir) and a reference site (Hongfeng Reservoir) were investigated and compared. Both reservoirs are seasonal anoxic and alkaline. The concentrations of sulfate, sulfide, iron, and manganese in Aha Reservoir were enriched compared to the reference levels in Hongfeng reservoir due to the AMD input. It was found that the MeHg accumulation layer in Aha Reservoir transitioned from the top sediment layer in winter to the water-sediment interface in spring and then to the overlying water above sediment in summer. It supported the assumption that spring methylation activity may start in sediments and migrate into the water column with seasonal variation. The weaker methylation in sediment during spring and summer was caused by the excessive sulfide (∼15-20 μM) that reduced the bioavailability of mercury, while sulfate reduction potential was in the optimal range for the methylation in the overlying water. This led to a transport flux of MeHg from water to sediment in spring and summer. In contrast, such inversion of MeHg accumulation layer did not occur in Hongfeng Reservoir. The sulfate reduction potential was in the optimal range for the methylation in top sediment, and dissolved MeHg was positively related to sulfide in pore water of Hongfeng Reservoir (r = 0.67, p < 0.001). This result suggested that accumulation of MeHg in lake water and cycling of MeHg at sediment-water interface associate with some sensitive environmental factors, such as sulfur.

  10. A systematic optimization of medium chain fatty acid biosynthesis via the reverse beta-oxidation cycle in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Junjun; Zhang, Xia; Xia, Xiudong; Dong, Mingsheng

    2017-04-06

    Medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs, 6-10 carbons) are valuable precursors to many industrial biofuels and chemicals, recently engineered reversal of the β-oxidation (r-BOX) cycle has been proposed as a potential platform for efficient synthesis of MCFAs. Previous studies have made many exciting achievements on functionally characterizing four core enzymes of this r-BOX cycle. However, the information about bottleneck nodes in this cycle is elusive. Here, a quantitative assessment of the inherent limitations of this cycle was conducted to capitalize on its potential. The selection of the core β-oxidation reversal enzymes in conjunction with acetyl-CoA synthetase endowed the ability to synthesize about 1g/L MCFAs. Furthermore, a gene dosage experiment was developed to identify two rate-limiting enzymes (acetyl-CoA synthetase and thiolase). The de novo pathway was then separated into two modules at thiolase and MCFA production titer increased to 2.8g/L after evaluating different construct environments. Additionally, the metabolism of host organism was reprogrammed to the desired biochemical product by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats interference system, resulted in a final MCFA production of 3.8g/L. These findings described here identified the inherent limitations of r-BOX cycle and further unleashed the lipogenic potential of this cycle, thus paving the way for the development of a bacterial platform for microbial production of high-value oleo-chemicals from low-value carbons in a sustainable and environmentally friendly manner.

  11. Regulation of metabolic flux in Lactobacillus casei for lactic acid production by overexpressed ldhL gene with two-stage oxygen supply strategy.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Yan; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Long-Yun

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a novel strategy to regulate the metabolic flux for lactic acid production in Lactobacillus casei. The ldhL gene encoding L-lactate dehydrogenase (L-LDH) was overexpressed in L. casei, and a two-stage oxygen supply strategy (TOS) that maintained a medium oxygen supply level during the early fermentation phase, and a low oxygen supply level in the later phase was carried out. As a consequence, a maximum L-LDH activity of 95.6 U/ml was obtained in the recombinant strain, which was over 4-fold higher than that of the initial strain. Under the TOS for L. casei (pMG-ldhL), the maximum lactic acid concentration of 159.6 g/l was obtained in 36 h, corresponding to a 62.8% increase. The results presented here provide a novel way to regulate the metabolic flux of L. casei for lactic acid production in different fermentation stages, which is available to enhance organic acid production in other strains.

  12. Retinoic acid metabolism links the periodical differentiation of germ cells with the cycle of Sertoli cells in mouse seminiferous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Ryo; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Yoshida, Shosei

    2012-01-01

    Homeostasis of tissues relies on the regulated differentiation of stem cells. In the epithelium of mouse seminiferous tubules, the differentiation process from undifferentiated spermatogonia (A(undiff)), which harbor the stem cell functions, to sperm occurs in a periodical manner, known as the "seminiferous epithelial cycle". To identify the mechanism underlying this periodic differentiation, we investigated the roles of Sertoli cells (the somatic supporting cells) and retinoic acid (RA) in the seminiferous epithelial cycle. Sertoli cells cyclically change their functions in a coordinated manner with germ cell differentiation and support the entire process of spermatogenesis. RA is known to play essential roles in this periodic differentiation, but its precise mode of action and its regulation remains largely obscure. We showed that an experimental increase in RA signaling was capable of both inducing A(undiff) differentiation and resetting the Sertoli cell cycle to the appropriate stage. However, these actions of exogenous RA signaling on A(undiff) and Sertoli cells were strongly interfered by the differentiating germ cells of intimate location. Based on the expression of RA metabolism-related genes among multiple cell types - including germ and Sertoli cells - and their regulation by RA signaling, we propose here that differentiating germ cells play a primary role in modulating the local RA metabolism, which results in the timed differentiation of A(undiff) and the appropriate cycling of Sertoli cells. Similar regulation by differentiating progeny through the modulation of local environment could also be involved in other stem cell systems.

  13. Projected stream water fluxes of NO3 and total organic carbon from the Storgama headwater catchment, Norway, under climate change and reduced acid deposition.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Heleen A; Wright, Richard F

    2008-02-01

    Fluctuations in the 20-year record of nitrate (NO3) and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations and fluxes in runoff at the small headwater catchment Storgama, southern Norway, were related to climate and acid deposition. The long-term decline in NO3 related to reduced NO3 deposition and increased winter discharge, whereas the long-term increase in TOC related to reduced sulfur deposition. Multiple regression models describing long-term trends and seasonal variability in these records were used to project future concentrations given scenarios of climate change and acid deposition. All scenarios indicated reduced NO3 fluxes and increased TOC fluxes; the largest projected changes for the period 2071-2100 were -86% and +24%, respectively. Uncertainties are that the predicted future temperatures are considerably higher than the historical record. Also, nonlinear responses of ecosystem processes (nitrogen [N] mineralization) to temperature, N-enrichment of soils, and step-changes in environmental conditions may affect future leaching of carbon and N.

  14. Pt/TiO2 (Rutile) Catalysts for Sulfuric Acid Decomposition in Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Petkovic; D. M. Ginosar; H. W. Rollins; K. C. Burch; P. J. Pinhero; H. H. Farrell

    2008-04-01

    Thermochemical cycles consist of a series of chemical reactions to produce hydrogen from water at lower temperatures than by direct thermal decomposition. All the sulfur-based cycles for water splitting employ the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. This work reports the studies performed on platinum supported on titania (rutile) catalysts to investigate the causes of catalyst deactivation under sulfuric acid decomposition reaction conditions. Samples of 1 wt% Pt/TiO2 (rutile) catalysts were submitted to flowing concentrated sulfuric acid at 1123 K and atmospheric pressure for different times on stream (TOS) between 0 and 548 h. Post-operation analyses of the spent catalyst samples showed that Pt oxidation and sintering occurred under reaction conditions and some Pt was lost by volatilization. Pt loss rate was higher at initial times but total loss appeared to be independent of the gaseous environment. Catalyst activity showed an initial decrease that lasted for about 66 h, followed by a slight recovery of activity between 66 and 102 h TOS, and a period of slower deactivation after 102 h TOS. Catalyst sulfation did not seem to be detrimental to catalyst activity and the activity profile suggested that a complex dynamical situation involving platinum sintering, volatilization, and oxidation, along with TiO2 morphological changes affected catalyst activity in a non-monotonic way.

  15. ENERGY EFFICIENCY LIMITS FOR A RECUPERATIVE BAYONET SULFURIC ACID DECOMPOSITION REACTOR FOR SULFUR CYCLE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Edwards, T.

    2009-06-11

    A recuperative bayonet reactor design for the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition step in sulfur-based thermochemical hydrogen cycles was evaluated using pinch analysis in conjunction with statistical methods. The objective was to establish the minimum energy requirement. Taking hydrogen production via alkaline electrolysis with nuclear power as the benchmark, the acid decomposition step can consume no more than 450 kJ/mol SO{sub 2} for sulfur cycles to be competitive. The lowest value of the minimum heating target, 320.9 kJ/mol SO{sub 2}, was found at the highest pressure (90 bar) and peak process temperature (900 C) considered, and at a feed concentration of 42.5 mol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This should be low enough for a practical water-splitting process, even including the additional energy required to concentrate the acid feed. Lower temperatures consistently gave higher minimum heating targets. The lowest peak process temperature that could meet the 450-kJ/mol SO{sub 2} benchmark was 750 C. If the decomposition reactor were to be heated indirectly by an advanced gas-cooled reactor heat source (50 C temperature difference between primary and secondary coolants, 25 C minimum temperature difference between the secondary coolant and the process), then sulfur cycles using this concept could be competitive with alkaline electrolysis provided the primary heat source temperature is at least 825 C. The bayonet design will not be practical if the (primary heat source) reactor outlet temperature is below 825 C.

  16. Alternative reactions at the interface of glycolysis and citric acid cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Harmen M; Kozak, Barbara U; Niemeijer, Matthijs S; Duine, Hendrik J; Luttik, Marijke A H; Boer, Viktor M; Kötter, Peter; Daran, Jean-Marc G; van Maris, Antonius J A; Pronk, Jack T

    2016-05-01

    Pyruvate and acetyl-coenzyme A, located at the interface between glycolysis and TCA cycle, are important intermediates in yeast metabolism and key precursors for industrially relevant products. Rational engineering of their supply requires knowledge of compensatory reactions that replace predominant pathways when these are inactivated. This study investigates effects of individual and combined mutations that inactivate the mitochondrial pyruvate-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex, extramitochondrial citrate synthase (Cit2) and mitochondrial CoA-transferase (Ach1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Additionally, strains with a constitutively expressed carnitine shuttle were constructed and analyzed. A predominant role of the PDH complex in linking glycolysis and TCA cycle in glucose-grown batch cultures could be functionally replaced by the combined activity of the cytosolic PDH bypass and Cit2. Strongly impaired growth and a high incidence of respiratory deficiency in pda1Δ ach1Δ strains showed that synthesis of intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA as a metabolic precursor requires activity of either the PDH complex or Ach1. Constitutive overexpression of AGP2, HNM1, YAT2, YAT1, CRC1 and CAT2 enabled the carnitine shuttle to efficiently link glycolysis and TCA cycle in l-carnitine-supplemented, glucose-grown batch cultures. Strains in which all known reactions at the glycolysis-TCA cycle interface were inactivated still grew slowly on glucose, indicating additional flexibility at this key metabolic junction.

  17. Partial Life-Cycle and Acute Toxicity of Perfluoroalkyl Acids to Freshwater Mussels

    EPA Science Inventory

    Freshwater mussels are among the most sensitive aquatic organisms to many contaminants and have complex life-cycles that include several distinct life stages with unique contaminant exposure pathways. Standard acute (24–96 h) and chronic (28 d) toxicity tests with free larva (glo...

  18. Recent new additives for electric vehicle lead-acid batteries for extending the cycle life and capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Kozawa, A.; Sato, A.; Fujita, K.; Brodd, D.

    1997-12-01

    An electrochemically prepared colloidal graphite was found to be an excellent additive for lead-acid batteries. The new additive extends the capacity and cycle life of new and old batteries and can regenerate old, almost dead, batteries. The colloidal graphite is stable in aqueous solution and the extremely fine particles are adsorbed mainly on the positive electrode. This additive has been given the name, {alpha}-Pholon. The amount required is very small: only 6% to 10% of volume of the {alpha}-Pholon solution (about 2% colloidal graphite in water solution). The beneficial effect of the new additive was demonstrated with motorcycle batteries and forklift batteries.

  19. A rheostat mechanism governs the bifurcation of carbon flux in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Murima, Paul; Zimmermann, Michael; Chopra, Tarun; Pojer, Florence; Fonti, Giulia; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Alonso, Sylvie; Sauer, Uwe; Pethe, Kevin; McKinney, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid metabolism is an important feature of the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during infection. Consumption of fatty acids requires regulation of carbon flux bifurcation between the oxidative TCA cycle and the glyoxylate shunt. In Escherichia coli, flux bifurcation is regulated by phosphorylation-mediated inhibition of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICD), a paradigmatic example of post-translational mechanisms governing metabolic fluxes. Here, we demonstrate that, in contrast to E. coli, carbon flux bifurcation in mycobacteria is regulated not by phosphorylation but through metabolic cross-activation of ICD by glyoxylate, which is produced by the glyoxylate shunt enzyme isocitrate lyase (ICL). This regulatory circuit maintains stable partitioning of fluxes, thus ensuring a balance between anaplerosis, energy production, and precursor biosynthesis. The rheostat-like mechanism of metabolite-mediated control of flux partitioning demonstrates the importance of allosteric regulation during metabolic steady-state. The sensitivity of this regulatory mechanism to perturbations presents a potentially attractive target for chemotherapy. PMID:27555519

  20. Rhizosphere bacterial carbon turnover is higher in nucleic acids than membrane lipids: implications for understanding soil carbon cycling

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Ashish A.; Dannert, Helena; Griffiths, Robert I.; Thomson, Bruce C.; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Using a pulse chase 13CO2 plant labeling experiment we compared the flow of plant carbon into macromolecular fractions of rhizosphere soil microorganisms. Time dependent 13C dilution patterns in microbial cellular fractions were used to calculate their turnover time. The turnover times of microbial biomolecules were found to vary: microbial RNA (19 h) and DNA (30 h) turned over fastest followed by chloroform fumigation extraction-derived soluble cell lysis products (14 days), while phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) had the slowest turnover (42 days). PLFA/NLFA 13C analyses suggest that both mutualistic arbuscular mycorrhizal and saprophytic fungi are dominant in initial plant carbon uptake. In contrast, high initial 13C enrichment in RNA hints at bacterial importance in initial C uptake due to the dominance of bacterial derived RNA in total extracts of soil RNA. To explain this discrepancy, we observed low renewal rate of bacterial lipids, which may therefore bias lipid fatty acid based interpretations of the role of bacteria in soil microbial food webs. Based on our findings, we question current assumptions regarding plant-microbe carbon flux and suggest that the rhizosphere bacterial contribution to plant assimilate uptake could be higher. This highlights the need for more detailed quantitative investigations with nucleic acid biomarkers to further validate these findings. PMID:25914679

  1. Studies on the increase in serum concentrations of urea cycle amino acids among subjects exposed to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, H.; Shiroishi, K. ); Kagamimori, S.; Naruse, Y. ); Watanabe, M. )

    1988-05-01

    Itai-itai disease (I disease) is a combination of renal tubular damage and osteomalacia accompanied by osteoporosis among subjects exposed to cadmium (Cd). When the renal tubular damage progresses, the excretion of amino acids, especially, threonine, hydroxyproline, proline, citrulline, ornithine, arginine, etc. increase in urine. It was reported that the increase in urinary excretion of citrulline, arginine and ornithine may be associated with an inhibition of urea synthesis in the urea cycle. The authors have found that serum citrulline, arginine and ornithine also increased in I disease patients. In order to investigate the mechanism of the increase in these serum amino acids, comparative studies were performed using both healthy subjects and patients with renal disease as control groups.

  2. Dynamic flux cartography of hairy roots primary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, M; Perrier, M; Jolicoeur, M

    2007-01-01

    A dynamic model for plant cell and hairy root primary metabolism is presented. The model includes nutrient uptake (Pi, sugars, nitrogen sources), the glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathways, the TCA cycle, amino acid biosynthesis, respiratory chain, biosynthesis of cell building blocks (structural hexoses, organic acids, lipids, and organic phosphated molecules). The energy shuttles (ATP, ADP) and cofactors (NAD/H, NADP/H) are also included. The model describes the kinetics of 44 biochemical reactions (fluxes) of the primary metabolism of plant cells and includes 41 biochemical species (metabolites, nutrients, biomass components). Multiple Michaelis-Menten type kinetics are used to describe biochemical reaction rates. Known regulatory phenomena on metabolic pathways are included using sigmoid switch functions. A visualization framework showing fluxes and metabolite concentrations over time is presented. The visualization of fluxes and metabolites is used to analyze simulation results from Catharanthus roseus hairy root 50 d batch cultures. The visualization of the metabolic system allows analyzing split ratios between pathways and flux time-variations. For carbon metabolism, the cells were observed to have relatively high and stable fluxes for the central carbon metabolism and low and variable fluxes for anabolic pathways. For phosphate metabolism, a very high free intracellular Pi turnover rate was observed with higher flux variations than for the carbon metabolism. Nitrogen metabolism also exhibited large flux variations. The potential uses of the model are also discussed.

  3. pH gradients and a micro-pore filter at the luminal surface affect fluxes of propionic acid across guinea pig large intestine.

    PubMed

    Busche, Roger; von Engelhardt, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    A neutral pH microclimate had been shown at the luminal surface of the large intestine. The aim was to estimate to what extent fluxes of propionic acid/propionate are affected by changes of the luminal pH when this microclimate is present, largely reduced or absent. Fluxes of propionic acid/propionate (J(Pr)) across epithelia from the caecum, the proximal and the distal colon of guinea pigs were measured in Ussing chambers with and without a filter at the luminal surface. With bicarbonate and with a neutral or an acid pH of mucosal solutions (pH 7.4 or 6.4), mucosal-to-serosal fluxes (J(ms)(Pr) ) were 1.5 to 1.9-fold higher at the lower pH, in bicarbonate-free solutions and carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibition 2.1 to 2.6-fold. With a filter at the mucosal surface and with bicarbonate containing solutions, J (ms) (Pr) was not or only little elevated at the lower pH. Without bicarbonate J(ms)(Pr) was clearly higher. We conclude that the higher J(ms)(Pr) after luminal acidification is due to vigorous mixing in Ussing chambers resulting in a markedly reduced unstirred layer. Therefore, an effective pH microclimate at the epithelial surface is missing. J(ms)(Pr) is not or is little affected by lowering of pH because in the presence of bicarbonate the filter maintains the pH microclimate. However, in bicarbonate-free solutions J(ms)(Pr) was higher at pH 6.4 because a pH microclimate does not develop. Findings confirm that 30-60% of J(ms)(Pr) results from non-ionic diffusion.

  4. Production of non-alcoholic beer using free and immobilized cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae deficient in the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Navrátil, Marián; Dömény, Zoltán; Sturdík, Ernest; Smogrovicová, Daniela; Gemeiner, Peter

    2002-04-01

    Production of non-alcoholic beer using Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied. Non-recombinant mutant strains with a defect in the synthesis of tricarboxylic-acid-cycle enzymes were used and applied in both free and pectate-immobilized form, using both batch and packed-bed continuous systems. After fermentation, basic parameters of the beer produced by five mutant strains were compared with a standard strain of brewing yeast. Results showed that the beer prepared by mutant yeast cells was characterized by lower levels of total alcohols, with ethanol concentrations between 0.07 and 0.31% (w/w). The organic acids produced, especially lactic acid, in concentrations up to 1.38 g x l(-1) had a strong protective effect on the microbial stability of the final product and thus the usual addition of lactic acid could be omitted. Application of the yeast mutants appears to be a good alternative to the classical methods for the production of non-alcoholic beer.

  5. Boronic Acid Flux Synthesis and Crystal Growth of Uranium and Neptunium Boronates and Borates: A Low Temperature Route to the First Neptunium(V) Borate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Miller, Hannah M.; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-10-04

    Molten methylboronic acid has been used as a reactive flux to prepare the first neptunium(V) borate, NpO2[B3O4(OH)2] (NpBO-1), and the first actinide boronate, UO2(CH3BO2)(H2O) (UCBO-1). NpBO-1 contains cation-cation interactions between the neptunyl units. In contrast, the presence of the methyl groups in the uranyl boronate leads to a one-dimensional structure.

  6. Identification of transport pathways for citric acid cycle intermediates in the human colon carcinoma cell line, Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Weerachayaphorn, Jittima; Pajor, Ana M

    2008-04-01

    Citric acid cycle intermediates are absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract through carrier-mediated mechanisms, although the transport pathways have not been clearly identified. This study examines the transport of citric acid cycle intermediates in the Caco-2 human colon carcinoma cell line, often used as a model of small intestine. Inulin was used as an extracellular volume marker instead of mannitol since the apparent volume measured with mannitol changed with time. The results show that Caco-2 cells contain at least three distinct transporters, including the Na+-dependent di- and tricarboxylate transporters, NaDC1 and NaCT, and one or more sodium-independent pathways, possibly involving organic anion transporters. Succinate transport is mediated mostly by Na+-dependent pathways, predominantly by NaDC1, but with some contribution by NaCT. RT-PCR and functional characteristics verified the expression of these transporters in Caco-2 cells. In contrast, citrate transport in Caco-2 cells occurs by a combination of Na+-independent pathways, possibly mediated by an organic anion transporter, and Na+-dependent mechanisms. The non-metabolizable dicarboxylate, methylsuccinate, is also transported by a combination of Na+-dependent and -independent pathways. In conclusion, we find that multiple pathways are involved in the transport of di- and tricarboxylates by Caco-2 cells. Since many of these pathways are not found in human intestine, this model may be best suited for studying Na+-dependent transport of succinate by NaDC1.

  7. Fatty acid and phospholipid syntheses are prerequisites for the cell cycle of Symbiodinium and their endosymbiosis within sea anemones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Hsueh; Lee, Hsieh-He; Fang, Lee-Shing; Mayfield, Anderson B; Chen, Chii-Shiarng

    2013-01-01

    Lipids are a source of metabolic energy, as well as essential components of cellular membranes. Although they have been shown to be key players in the regulation of cell proliferation in various eukaryotes, including microalgae, their role in the cell cycle of cnidarian-dinoflagellate (genus Symbiodinium) endosymbioses remains to be elucidated. The present study examined the effects of a lipid synthesis inhibitor, cerulenin, on the cell cycle of both cultured Symbiodinium (clade B) and those engaged in an endosymbiotic association with the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella. In the former, cerulenin exposure was found to inhibit free fatty acid (FFA) synthesis, as it does in other organisms. Additionally, while it also significantly inhibited the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), it did not affect the production of sterol ester (SE) or phosphatidylcholine (PC). Interestingly, cerulenin also significantly retarded cell division by arresting the cell cycles at the G0/G1 phase. Cerulenin-treated Symbiodinium were found to be taken up by anemone hosts at a significantly depressed quantity in comparison with control Symbiodinium. Furthermore, the uptake of cerulenin-treated Symbiodinium in host tentacles occurred much more slowly than in untreated controls. These results indicate that FFA and PE may play critical roles in the recognition, proliferation, and ultimately the success of endosymbiosis with anemones.

  8. USE OF THE COMPOSITION AND STABLE CARBONIISOTOPE RATIO OF MICROBIAL FATTY ACIDS TO STUDY CARBON CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use measurements of the concentration and stable carbon isotopic ratio (*13C) of individual microbial phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in soils and sediments as indicators of live microbial biomass levels and microbial carbon source. For studies of soil organic matter (SOM) cy...

  9. Sulfur amino acid deficiency upregulates intestinal methionine cycle activity and suppresses epithelial growth in neonatal pigs.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We recently showed that the developing gut is a significant site of methionine transmethylation to homocysteine and transsulfuration to cysteine. We hypothesized that sulfur amino acid (SAA) deficiency would preferentially reduce mucosal growth and antioxidant function in neonatal pigs. Neonatal pi...

  10. Soil nitrogen cycling and nitrous oxide flux in a Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir forest - Effects of fertilization, irrigation and carbon addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Pamela A.; Gower, Stith T.; Volkmann, Carol; Billow, Christine; Grier, Charles C.

    1992-01-01

    Nitrous oxide fluxes and soil nitrogen transformations were measured in experimentally-treated high elevation Douglas-fir forests in northwestern New Mexico. On an annual basis, forests that were fertilized with 200 kg N/ha emitted an average of 0.66 kg/ha of N2O-N, with highest fluxes occurring in July and August when soils were both warm and wet. Control, irrigated, and woodchip treated plots were not different from each other, and annual average fluxes ranged from 0.03 to 0.23 kg/ha. Fertilized soil mineralized 277 kg/ha per year in contrast to 18 kg/ha per year in control plots. Relative recovery of (N-15)H4-N applied to soil in laboratory incubations was principally in the form of NO3-N in the fertilized soils, while recovery was mostly in microbial biomass-N in the other treatments. Fertilization apparently added nitrogen that exceeded the heterotrophic microbial demand, resulting in higher rates of nitrate production and higher nitrous oxide fluxes. Global inputs of nitrogen into forests are not currently contributing significantly to the increasing concentrations of nitrous oxide in the atmosphere.

  11. Soil nitrogen cycling and nitrous oxide flux in a Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir forest - Effects of fertilization, irrigation and carbon addition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, Pamela A.; Gower, Stith T.; Volkmann, Carol; Billow, Christine; Grier, Charles C.

    1992-01-01

    Nitrous oxide fluxes and soil nitrogen transformations were measured in experimentally-treated high elevation Douglas-fir forests in northwestern New Mexico, USA. On an annual basis, forests that were fertilized with 200 kg N/ha emitted an average of 0.66 kg/ha of N2O-N, with highest fluxes occurring in July and August when soils were both warm and wet. Control, irrigated, and woodchip treated plots did not differ, and annual average fluxes ranged from 0.03 to 0.23 kg/ha. Annual net nitrogen mineralization and nitrate production were estimated in soil and forest floor using in situ incubations; fertilized soil mineralized 277 kg/ha/y in contrast to 18 kg/ha/y in control plots. Relative recovery of 15NH4-N applied to soil in laboratory incubations was principally in the form of NO3-N in the fertilized soils, while recovery was mostly in microbial biomass-N in the other treatments. Fertilization apparently added nitrogen that exceeded the heterotrophic microbial demand, resulting in higher rates of nitrate production and higher nitrous oxide fluxes. Despite the elevated nitrous oxide emission resulting from fertilization, we estimate that global inputs of nitrogen into forests are not currently contributing significantly to the increasing concentrations of nitrous oxide in the atmosphere.

  12. Using model analyses and surface-atmosphere exchange measurements from the Howland AmeriFlux Site in Maine, USA, to improve understanding of forest ecosystem C cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Hollinger, David Y.; Davidson, Eric A.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Dail, D. B.; Scott, N.

    2013-03-25

    Summary of research carried out under Interagency Agreement DE-AI02-07ER64355 with the USDA Forest Service at the Howland Forest AmeriFlux site in central Maine. Includes a list of publications resulting in part or whole from this support.

  13. Role of calcium signaling in the activation of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase and citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Traaseth, Nathaniel; Elfering, Sarah; Solien, Joseph; Haynes, Virginia; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2004-07-23

    An apparent discrepancy arises about the role of calcium on the rates of oxygen consumption by mitochondria: mitochondrial calcium increases the rate of oxygen consumption because of the activation of calcium-activated dehydrogenases, and by activating mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS), decreases the rates of oxygen consumption because nitric oxide is a competitive inhibitor of cytochrome oxidase. To this end, the rates of oxygen consumption and nitric oxide production were followed in isolated rat liver mitochondria in the presence of either L-Arg (to sustain a mtNOS activity) or N(G)-monomethyl-L-Arg (NMMA, a competitive inhibitor of mtNOS) under State 3 conditions. In the presence of NMMA, the rates of State 3 oxygen consumption exhibited a K(0.5) of 0.16 microM intramitochondrial free calcium, agreeing with those required for the activation of the Krebs cycle. By plotting the difference between the rates of oxygen consumption in State 3 with L-Arg and with NMMA at various calcium concentrations, a K(0.5) of 1.2 microM intramitochondrial free calcium was obtained, similar to the K(0.5) (0.9 microM) of the dependence of the rate of nitric oxide production on calcium concentrations. The activation of dehydrogenases, followed by the activation of mtNOS, would lead to the modulation of the Krebs cycle activity by the modulation of nitric oxide on the respiratory rates. This would ensue in changes in the NADH/NAD and ATP/ADP ratios, which would influence the rate of the cycle and the oxygen diffusion.

  14. The energetics of the reductive citric acid cycle in the pyrite-pulled surface metabolism in the early stage of evolution.

    PubMed

    Kalapos, Miklós Péter

    2007-09-21

    The chemoautotrophic theory concerning the origin of life postulates that a central role is played in the prebiotic chemical machinery by a reductive citric acid cycle operating without enzymes. The crucial point in this scenario is the formation of pyrite from hydrogen sulfide and ferrous sulfide, a reaction suggested to be linked to endergonic reactions, making them exergonic. This mechanism is believed to provide the driving force for the cycle to operate as a carbon dioxide fixation network. The present paper criticizes the thermodynamic calculations and their presentation in the original version of the archaic reductive citric acid cycle [Wächtershäuser, 1990. Evolution of the first metabolic cycles. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 87, 200-204.]. The most significant differences between the Wächtershäuser hypothesis and the present proposal: Wächtershäuser did not consider individual reactions in his calculations. A particularly questionable feature is the involvement of seven molecules of pyrite which does not emerge as a direct consequence of the chemical reactions presented in the archaic reductive citric acid cycle. The involvement of a considerable number of sulfur-containing organic intermediates as building blocks is also disputed. In the new scheme of the cycle proposed here, less free energy is liberated than hypothesized by Wächtershäuser, but it has the advantages that the free energy changes for the individual reactions can be calculated, the number of pyrite molecules involved in the cycle is reduced, and fewer sulfur-containing intermediates are required for the cycle to operate. In combination with a plausible route for the anaplerotic reactions [Kalapos, 1997a. Possible evolutionary role of methylglyoxalase pathway: anaplerotic route for reductive citric acid cycle of surface metabolists. J. Theor. Biol. 188, 201-206.], this new presentation of the cycle assigns a special meaning to hydrogen sulfide formation in the early stage of biochemical

  15. Aristolochic acid-induced apoptosis and G2 cell cycle arrest depends on ROS generation and MAP kinases activation.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Whyard, Terry C; Waltzer, Wayne C; Grollman, Arthur P; Rosenquist, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Ingestion of aristolochic acids (AAs) contained in herbal remedies results in a renal disease and, frequently, urothelial malignancy. The genotoxicity of AA in renal cells, including mutagenic DNA adducts formation, is well documented. However, the mechanisms of AA-induced tubular atrophy and renal fibrosis are largely unknown. To better elucidate some aspects of this process, we studied cell cycle distribution and cell survival of renal epithelial cells treated with AAI at low and high doses. A low dose of AA induces cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase via activation of DNA damage checkpoint pathway ATM-Chk2-p53-p21. DNA damage signaling pathway is activated more likely via increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by AA treatment then via DNA damage induced directly by AA. Higher AA concentration induced cell death partly via apoptosis. Since mitogen-activated protein kinases play an important role in cell survival, death and cell cycle progression, we assayed their function in AA-treated renal tubular epithelial cells. ERK1/2 and p38 but not JNK were activated in cells treated with AA. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 as well as suppression of ROS generation with N-acetyl-L-cysteine resulted in the partial relief of cells from G2/M checkpoint and a decline of apoptosis level. Cell cycle arrest may be a mechanism for DNA repair, cell survival and reprogramming of epithelial cells to the fibroblast type. An apoptosis of renal epithelial cells at higher AA dose might be necessary to provide space for newly reprogrammed fibrotic cells.

  16. Novel Metabolic Abnormalities in the Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle in Peripheral Cells From Huntington’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Naseri, Nima N.; Bonica, Joseph; Xu, Hui; Park, Larry C.; Arjomand, Jamshid; Chen, Zhengming; Gibson, Gary E.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic dysfunction is well-documented in Huntington’s disease (HD). However, the link between the mutant huntingtin (mHTT) gene and the pathology is unknown. The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the main metabolic pathway for the production of NADH for conversion to ATP via the electron transport chain (ETC). The objective of this study was to test for differences in enzyme activities, mRNAs and protein levels related to the TCA cycle between lymphoblasts from healthy subjects and from patients with HD. The experiments utilize the advantages of lymphoblasts to reveal new insights about HD. The large quantity of homogeneous cell populations permits multiple dynamic measures to be made on exactly comparable tissues. The activities of nine enzymes related to the TCA cycle and the expression of twenty-nine mRNAs encoding for these enzymes and enzyme complexes were measured. Cells were studied under baseline conditions and during metabolic stress. The results support our recent findings that the activities of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) are elevated in HD. The data also show a large unexpected depression in MDH activities. Furthermore, message levels for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) were markedly increased in in HD lymphoblasts and were responsive to treatments. The use of lymphoblasts allowed us to clarify that the reported decrease in aconitase activity in HD autopsy brains is likely due to secondary hypoxic effects. These results demonstrate the mRNA and enzymes of the TCA cycle are critical therapeutic targets that have been understudied in HD. PMID:27611087

  17. Expression pattern and intensity of protoporphyrin IX induced by liposomal 5-aminolevulinic acid in rat pilosebaceous unit throughout hair cycle.

    PubMed

    Han, Insook; Jun, Mee Sook; Kim, Soo-Kyun; Kim, Moonkyu; Kim, Jung Chul

    2005-11-01

    We have developed liposomal formulation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to enhance topical delivery and examined ALA-induced protoporpyrin (PpIX) expression in rat pilosebaceous unit throughout hair cycle. Two types of liposomes--glycerol dilaulate (GDL) and phosphatidylcholine (PC)--were formulated and both liposomal ALA increased PpIX expression in rat dorsal skin and pilosebaceous units when compared with free ALA. However, iontophoresis combined with liposomal ALA reduced the expression intensity of PpIX in hair bulbs although it achieved deeper and wider expression of PpIX through transfollicular pathway. After topical application in intact or depilated rat skin, liposomal ALA produced excellent PpIX expression in pilosebaceous units. The expression pattern and intensity of PpIX changed in hair cycle-dependent manner: specific expression only in sebaceous glands was observed at telogen; strong expression in whole pilosebaceous units was shown at anagen with intense expressions in hair bulbs and sebaceous glands; and a pattern similar to anagen but reduced intensity in the hair bulbs was seen at catagen. Throughout hair cycle, the expression pattern and intensity were dramatically changed in hair follicular epithelial cells depending on the cell density and proliferation activity of those cells, whereas those were consistent in sebaceous glands regardless of hair cycle. Little expression was shown in dermis. Photoactivation effect of 20% liposomal ALA-PDT using a red filtered-halogen lamp damaged sebaceous glands, hair follicles and epidermal layers. Formation of a thicker epidermal layer was observed, and hair induction after depilation was inhibited along with damage in sebaceous glands.

  18. Effect of Different Nutritional Conditions on the Synthesis of Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Richard S.; Cox, Donald P.

    1967-01-01

    The effect of various nutritional conditions on the levels of Krebs cycle enzymes in Bacillus subtilis, B. licheniformis, and Escherichia coli was determined. The addition of glutamate, α-ketoglutarate, or compounds capable of being catabolized to glutamate, to a minimal glucose medium resulted in complete repression of aconitase in B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. The synthesis of fumarase, succinic dehydrogenase, malic dehydrogenase, and isocitric dehydrogenase was not repressed by these compounds. It is postulated that glutamate or α-ketoglutarate is the true corepressor for the repression of aconitase. A rapidly catabolizable carbon source and α-ketoglutarate or glutamate must be simultaneously present for complete repression of the formation of aconitase. Conditions which repress the synthesis of aconitase in B. subtilis restrict the flow of carbon in the sequence of reactions leading to α-ketoglutarate but do not prevent glutamate oxidation in vivo. The data indicate that separate and independent mechanisms regulate the activity of the anabolic and catabolic reactions of the Krebs cycle in B. subtilis and B. licheniformis. The addition of glutamate to the minimal glucose medium results in the repression of aconitase, isocitric dehydrogenase, and fumarase, but not malic dehydrogenase in E. coli K-38. PMID:4960893

  19. C- and N-catabolic utilization of tricarboxylic acid cycle-related amino acids by Scheffersomyces stipitis and other yeasts.

    PubMed

    Freese, Stefan; Vogts, Tanja; Speer, Falk; Schäfer, Bernd; Passoth, Volkmar; Klinner, Ulrich

    2011-05-01

    Scheffersomyces stipitis and the closely related yeast Candida shehatae assimilated the L-amino acids glutamate, aspartate and proline as both carbon and nitrogen sole sources. We also found this rarely investigated ability in ascomycetous species such as Candida glabrata, C. reukaufii, C. utilis, Debaryomyces hansenii, Kluyveromyces lactis, K. marxianus, Candida albicans, L. elongisporus, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, C. maltosa, Pichia capsulata and Yarrowia lipolytica and in basidiomycetous species such as Rhodotorula rubra and Trichosporon beigelii. Glutamate was a very efficient carbon source for Sc. stipitis, which enabled a high biomass yield/mole, although the growth rate was lower when compared to growth on glucose medium. The cells secreted waste ammonium during growth on glutamate alone. In Sc. stipitis cultures grown in glucose medium containing glutamate as the nitrogen source the biomass yield was maximal, and ethanol concentration and specific ethanol formation rate were significantly higher than in glucose medium containing ammonium as the nitrogen source. Mainly C-assimilation of glutamate but also N-assimilation in glucose-containing medium correlated with enhanced activity of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase 2 (GDH2). A Δgdh2 disruptant was unable to utilize glutamate as either a carbon or a nitrogen source; moreover, this disruptant was also unable to utilize aspartate as a carbon source. The mutation was complemented by retransformation of the GDH2 ORF into the Δgdh2 strain. The results show that Gdh2p plays a dual role in Sc. stipitis as both C- and N-catabolic enzyme, which indicates its role as an interface between the carbon and nitrogen metabolism of this yeast.

  20. Low Molecular Weight Carboxylic Acids in the Sea. Photooxidative Production and Biological Cycling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-25

    scientist) were conducted on the R/V Iselin (cruise # CI-8ain and CI- 8703) in the central Sargasso Sea. SOLARS 1 (R. Zika , chieforh hi scientist) was also...photochemical experiments with Rod Zika can be carried out. 6. We have begun to determine action spectra (wavelength dependence of the apparent...quantum yield) for the photoproduction of alpha keto acids in seawater. This work is being done cooperatively with Rod Zika . 14 7. Using C-labelled

  1. Increased anaplerosis of the tricarboxylic acid cycle decreased meal size and energy intake of cows in the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Gualdrón-Duarte, Laura B; Allen, Michael S

    2017-03-22

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of anaplerosis of the tricarboxylic acid cycle on feeding behavior and energy intake of cows in the postpartum period. We infused propionic acid (PA) and glycerol (GL) continuously into the abomasum and hypothesized that PA will decrease meal size and energy intake compared with GL because PA enters the tricarboxylic acid cycle, likely stimulating oxidation of acetyl CoA and satiety compared with GL. Three experiments (Exp.) were conducted using 20 Holstein cows between 3 and 22 d postpartum (8 cows in Exp. 1 and 6 cows each for Exp. 2 and 3). Treatments were compared using isoenergetic (Exp. 1, 193 kcal/h) and isomolar (Exp. 2, ∼0.5 mol/h) continuous infusions of PA (99.5%) and GL (99.7%) to the abomasum using a double crossover design with four 2-d infusion periods each, and 2 mol of PA or GL pulse-dosed to the abomasum using a crossover design (Exp. 3). Treatment sequences were assigned alternately to cows based upon date of parturition. Feeding behavior was recorded by a computerized data acquisition system for Exp. 1 and 2. Propionic acid decreased dry matter intake (DMI) compared with GL 16.7 and 23.4% in Exp. 1 and 2, respectively. The decrease in DMI was because PA decreased meal size compared with GL by 12.6 and 15.3% in Exp. 1 and 2, respectively. Propionic acid decreased total metabolizable energy intake (diet plus treatment infusions) compared with GL for both experiments. Compared with PA, GL increased plasma glucose and insulin concentrations for Exp. 2 only. In Exp. 3, PA decreased hepatic acetyl CoA content 34%, whereas GL increased hepatic acetyl CoA content 32%, resulting in lower hepatic acetyl CoA content for PA compared with GL at 30 min (18.0 vs. 36.9 nmol/g), which persisted at 60 min after dosing (21.9 vs. 32.8 nmol/g). Consistent with our hypothesis, the obligatory anaplerotic metabolite PA decreased meal size, DMI, and total metabolizable energy intake compared with GL, likely

  2. Lactic Acid Bacteria in Durum Wheat Flour Are Endophytic Components of the Plant during Its Entire Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Minervini, Fabio; Celano, Giuseppe; Lattanzi, Anna; Tedone, Luigi; De Mastro, Giuseppe; Gobbetti, Marco; De Angelis, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed at assessing the dynamics of lactic acid bacteria and other Firmicutes associated with durum wheat organs and processed products. 16S rRNA gene-based high-throughput sequencing showed that Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and Lactococcus were the main epiphytic and endophytic genera among lactic acid bacteria. Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, Paenibacillus, and Staphylococcus completed the picture of the core genus microbiome. The relative abundance of each lactic acid bacterium genus was affected by cultivars, phenological stages, other Firmicutes genera, environmental temperature, and water activity (aw) of plant organs. Lactobacilli, showing the highest sensitivity to aw, markedly decreased during milk development (Odisseo) and physiological maturity (Saragolla). At these stages, Lactobacillus was mainly replaced by Streptococcus, Lactococcus, and Enterococcus. However, a key sourdough species, Lactobacillus plantarum, was associated with plant organs during the life cycle of Odisseo and Saragolla wheat. The composition of the sourdough microbiota and the overall quality of leavened baked goods are also determined throughout the phenological stages of wheat cultivation, with variations depending on environmental and agronomic factors.

  3. Lactic Acid Bacteria in Durum Wheat Flour Are Endophytic Components of the Plant during Its Entire Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Minervini, Fabio; Celano, Giuseppe; Lattanzi, Anna; Tedone, Luigi; De Mastro, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the dynamics of lactic acid bacteria and other Firmicutes associated with durum wheat organs and processed products. 16S rRNA gene-based high-throughput sequencing showed that Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Enterococcus, and Lactococcus were the main epiphytic and endophytic genera among lactic acid bacteria. Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, Paenibacillus, and Staphylococcus completed the picture of the core genus microbiome. The relative abundance of each lactic acid bacterium genus was affected by cultivars, phenological stages, other Firmicutes genera, environmental temperature, and water activity (aw) of plant organs. Lactobacilli, showing the highest sensitivity to aw, markedly decreased during milk development (Odisseo) and physiological maturity (Saragolla). At these stages, Lactobacillus was mainly replaced by Streptococcus, Lactococcus, and Enterococcus. However, a key sourdough species, Lactobacillus plantarum, was associated with plant organs during the life cycle of Odisseo and Saragolla wheat. The composition of the sourdough microbiota and the overall quality of leavened baked goods are also determined throughout the phenological stages of wheat cultivation, with variations depending on environmental and agronomic factors. PMID:26187970

  4. Submolecular regulation of cell transformation by deuterium depleting water exchange reactions in the tricarboxylic acid substrate cycle

    PubMed Central

    Boros, László G; D’Agostino, Dominic P.; Katz, Howard E.; Roth, Justine P.; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Somlyai, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    The naturally occurring isotope of hydrogen (1H), deuterium (2H), could have an important biological role. Deuterium depleted water delays tumor progression in mice, dogs, cats and humans. Hydratase enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle control cell growth and deplete deuterium from redox cofactors, fatty acids and DNA, which undergo hydride ion and hydrogen atom transfer reactions. A model is proposed that emphasizes the terminal complex of mitochondrial electron transport chain reducing molecular oxygen to deuterium depleted water (DDW); this affects gluconeogenesis as well as fatty acid oxidation. In the former, the DDW is thought to diminish the deuteration of sugar-phosphates in the DNA backbone, helping to preserve stability of hydrogen bond networks, possibly protecting against aneuploidy and resisting strand breaks, occurring upon exposure to radiation and certain anticancer chemotherapeutics. DDW is proposed here to link cancer prevention and treatment using natural ketogenic diets, low deuterium drinking water, as well as DDW production as the mitochondrial downstream mechanism of targeted anti-cancer drugs such as Avastin and Glivec. The role of 2H in biology is a potential missing link to the elusive cancer puzzle seemingly correlated with cancer epidemiology in western populations as a result of excessive 2H loading from processed carbohydrate intake in place of natural fat consumption. PMID:26826644

  5. Submolecular regulation of cell transformation by deuterium depleting water exchange reactions in the tricarboxylic acid substrate cycle.

    PubMed

    Boros, László G; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Katz, Howard E; Roth, Justine P; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J; Somlyai, Gábor

    2016-02-01

    The naturally occurring isotope of hydrogen ((1)H), deuterium ((2)H), could have an important biological role. Deuterium depleted water delays tumor progression in mice, dogs, cats and humans. Hydratase enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle control cell growth and deplete deuterium from redox cofactors, fatty acids and DNA, which undergo hydride ion and hydrogen atom transfer reactions. A model is proposed that emphasizes the terminal complex of mitochondrial electron transport chain reducing molecular oxygen to deuterium depleted water (DDW); this affects gluconeogenesis as well as fatty acid oxidation. In the former, the DDW is thought to diminish the deuteration of sugar-phosphates in the DNA backbone, helping to preserve stability of hydrogen bond networks, possibly protecting against aneuploidy and resisting strand breaks, occurring upon exposure to radiation and certain anticancer chemotherapeutics. DDW is proposed here to link cancer prevention and treatment using natural ketogenic diets, low deuterium drinking water, as well as DDW production as the mitochondrial downstream mechanism of targeted anti-cancer drugs such as Avastin and Glivec. The role of (2)H in biology is a potential missing link to the elusive cancer puzzle seemingly correlated with cancer epidemiology in western populations as a result of excessive (2)H loading from processed carbohydrate intake in place of natural fat consumption.

  6. PSL, a nuclear cell-cycle associated antigen is increased during retinoic acid-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Barque, J P; Lagaye, S; Ladoux, A; Della Valle, V; Abita, J P; Larsen, C J

    1987-09-30

    PSL(p55) is a nuclear 55kD antigen present in various mammalian cell systems, which has been first identified by use of human autoimmune antibodies (Barque et al. 1983, EMBO J. 2, 743). It has been shown to be associated with interphase chromatine and to be synthesized in during the S phase of the cell cycle. In this work, we have analysed the status of PSL in promyelocytic HL-60 human cells in exponential or stationary growth, or undergoing granulocytic differentiation in presence of Retinoic acid. By use of 2-dimensional electrophoresis, PSL was found to be composed of two acidic proteins designated p55A and p55B. Unexpectedly, estimated 10-20 fold higher amounts of each species were found in cells treated for 5 days with 10(-6)M Retinoic acid, than in asynchronously growing cells or resting cells. Moreover, the p55A protein was phosphorylated during the process. On the basis of these results, PSL appears to be involved in some steps of the granulocytic differentiation process.

  7. Tropospheric sulfur cycle: How acidity and ship emission impact on it

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, H.; Prather, M. J.

    2001-05-01

    The global tropospheric sulfur cycle has been simulated by a global three-dimensional chemistry-transport model (CTM) using a O3-NOx-NMHC-SOx photochemical model with four sulfur species SO2, SO-24, MSA, and DMS. A new emission inventory of sea ships and diagnosed pH value instead of fixed pH value have been used in the 3D CTM. Results indicate that sulfur simulations have been improved over the ocean areas by including ship emission and over the heavy pollutant areas by considering diagnosed pH value. The global mean tropospheric lifetimes of SO2, SO-24, MSA, and DMS are comparable to the previous researches. Model data of consistent and high mean molar ratios of MSA/nss-SO2-4 around high latitude south hemisphere and low ratios at low-to-middle latitudes of the south Pacific are consistent with the observations.

  8. Low Molecular Weight Carboxylic Acids in the Sea: Photooxidative Production and Biological Cycling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-26

    J.D. Burton, P.G. Brewer and R. Chesselet, Eds.). pp. 137-157, Plenum. 1987 Mo0per. K. and R.C. Zika . Free amino acids in marine rains: Evidence for...nitrophenylhydrazides. Anal. Chim. Acta, in press. MoDper, K. , R.G. Zika aivd A.M. Fischer. Photochemistry aid photophysics of marine humic substances. In: flumic...Blough, J.W. Moffett, O.C. Zafiriou, R.D. Jones, K. Mopp6e, R. Zika , W.S. Moore and T.D. Waite. Photochemistry of the -Eastern Caribbean: An overview

  9. Oxo-4-methylpentanoic acid directs the metabolism of GABA into the Krebs cycle in rat pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Fisac, Inés; Fernández-Pascual, Sergio; Ortsäter, Henrik; Pizarro-Delgado, Javier; Martín del Río, Rafael; Bergsten, Peter; Tamarit-Rodriguez, Jorge

    2006-11-15

    OMP (oxo-4-methylpentanoic acid) stimulates by itself a biphasic secretion of insulin whereas L-leucine requires the presence of L-glutamine. L-Glutamine is predominantly converted into GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) in rat islets and L-leucine seems to promote its metabolism in the 'GABA shunt' [Fernández-Pascual, Mukala-Nsengu-Tshibangu, Martín del Río and Tamarit-Rodríguez (2004) Biochem. J. 379, 721-729]. In the present study, we have investigated how 10 mM OMP affects L-glutamine metabolism to uncover possible differences with L-leucine that might help to elucidate whether they share a common mechanism of stimulation of insulin secretion. In contrast with L-leucine, OMP alone stimulated a biphasic insulin secretion in rat perifused islets and decreased the islet content of GABA without modifying its extracellular release irrespective of the concentration of L-glutamine in the medium. GABA was transaminated to L-leucine whose intracellular concentration did not change because it was efficiently transported out of the islet cells. The L-[U-14C]-Glutamine (at 0.5 and 10.0 mM) conversion to 14CO2 was enhanced by 10 mM OMP within 30% and 70% respectively. Gabaculine (250 microM), a GABA transaminase inhibitor, suppressed OMP-induced oxygen consumption but not L-leucine- or glucose-stimulated respiration. It also suppressed the OMP-induced decrease in islet GABA content and the OMP-induced increase in insulin release. These results support the view that OMP promotes islet metabolism in the 'GABA shunt' generating 2-oxo-glutarate, in the branched-chain alpha-amino acid transaminase reaction, which would in turn trigger GABA deamination by GABA transaminase. OMP, but not L-leucine, suppressed islet semialdehyde succinic acid reductase activity and this might shift the metabolic flux of the 'GABA shunt' from gamma-hydroxybutyrate to succinic acid production.

  10. The Solar Cycle.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, David H

    The solar cycle is reviewed. The 11-year cycle of solar activity is characterized by the rise and fall in the numbers and surface area of sunspots. A number of other solar activity indicators also vary in association with the sunspots including; the 10.7 cm radio flux, the total solar irradiance, the magnetic field, flares and coronal mass ejections, geomagnetic activity, galactic cosmic ray fluxes, and radioisotopes in tree rings and ice cores. Individual solar cycles are characterized by their maxima and minima, cycle periods and amplitudes, cycle shape, the equatorward drift of the active latitudes, hemispheric asymmetries, and active longitudes. Cycle-to-cycle variability includes the Maunder Minimum, the Gleissberg Cycle, and the Gnevyshev-Ohl (even-odd) Rule. Short-term variability includes the 154-day periodicity, quasi-biennial variations, and double-peaked maxima. We conclude with an examination of prediction techniques for the solar cycle and a closer look at cycles 23 and 24.

  11. The Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-01

    The solar cycle is reviewed. The 11-year cycle of solar activity is characterized by the rise and fall in the numbers and surface area of sunspots. A number of other solar activity indicators also vary in association with the sunspots including; the 10.7 cm radio flux, the total solar irradiance, the magnetic field, flares and coronal mass ejections, geomagnetic activity, galactic cosmic ray fluxes, and radioisotopes in tree rings and ice cores. Individual solar cycles are characterized by their maxima and minima, cycle periods and amplitudes, cycle shape, the equatorward drift of the active latitudes, hemispheric asymmetries, and active longitudes. Cycle-to-cycle variability includes the Maunder Minimum, the Gleissberg Cycle, and the Gnevyshev-Ohl (even-odd) Rule. Short-term variability includes the 154-day periodicity, quasi-biennial variations, and double-peaked maxima. We conclude with an examination of prediction techniques for the solar cycle and a closer look at cycles 23 and 24.

  12. Microbial Oxidation of Fe2+ and Pyrite Exposed to Flux of Micromolar H2O2 in Acidic Media

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingqun; Lin, Chuxia

    2013-01-01

    At an initial pH of 2, while abiotic oxidation of aqueous Fe2+ was enhanced by a flux of H2O2 at micromolar concentrations, bio-oxidation of aqueous Fe2+ could be impeded due to oxidative stress/damage in Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans caused by Fenton reaction-derived hydroxyl radical, particularly when the molar ratio of Fe2+ to H2O2 was low. When pyrite cubes were intermittently exposed to fluxes of micromolar H2O2, the reduced Fe2+-Fe3+ conversion rate in the solution (due to reduced microbial activity) weakened the Fe3+-catalyzed oxidation of cubic pyrite and added to relative importance of H2O2-driven oxidation in the corrosion of mineral surfaces for the treatments with high H2O2 doses. This had effects on reducing the build-up of a passivating coating layer on the mineral surfaces. Cell attachment to the mineral surfaces was only observed at the later stage of the experiment after the solutions became less favorable for the growth of planktonic bacteria. PMID:23760258

  13. Global transcription analysis of Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants reveals an alternating pattern of gene expression and effects on hypoxic and oxidative genes.

    PubMed

    McCammon, Mark T; Epstein, Charles B; Przybyla-Zawislak, Beata; McAlister-Henn, Lee; Butow, Ronald A

    2003-03-01

    To understand the many roles of the Krebs tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in cell function, we used DNA microarrays to examine gene expression in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. mRNA was analyzed from yeast strains harboring defects in each of 15 genes that encode subunits of the eight TCA cycle enzymes. The expression of >400 genes changed at least threefold in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. Many genes displayed a common response to TCA cycle dysfunction indicative of a shift away from oxidative metabolism. Another set of genes displayed a pairwise, alternating pattern of expression in response to contiguous TCA cycle enzyme defects: expression was elevated in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutants, diminished in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA ligase mutants, elevated again in succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants, and diminished again in malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase mutants. This pattern correlated with previously defined TCA cycle growth-enhancing mutations and suggested a novel metabolic signaling pathway monitoring TCA cycle function. Expression of hypoxic/anaerobic genes was elevated in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutants, whereas expression of oxidative genes was diminished, consistent with a heme signaling defect caused by inadequate levels of the heme precursor, succinyl-CoA. These studies have revealed extensive responses to changes in TCA cycle function and have uncovered new and unexpected metabolic networks that are wired into the TCA cycle.

  14. Scale prevention at high LSI, high cycles, and high pH without the need for acid feed

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, L.A.; Freese, D.T.

    1997-08-01

    Open recirculating cooling water systems are widely used in different industries, such as refineries, petrochemical, fertilizer, air conditioning, manufacturing operations, utility power stations, etc. Scale control at high LSI and high pH without acid feed is difficult to achieve. The problem dramatically increases in cooling towers when PVC tower film fill is used. Compounds that are able to enhance the performance of typical scale inhibitors have been developed. When topped off with these enhancing compounds, typical scale inhibitors are able to control calcium carbonate and silicate-related scale formation on metal heat exchanger and cooling water tower film fill surfaces in cycled waters having high LSI ({approximately} 3.0), high alkalinity (500--700 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}), and high pH (8.5 or higher). The enhancing compounds have excellent chlorine and soluble iron tolerance and are compatible with traditional biocides.

  15. Anticancer and apoptotic activities of oleanolic acid are mediated through cell cycle arrest and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, YUE-YONG; HUANG, HONG-YAN; WU, YIN-LIAN

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an aggressive form of cancer, with high rates of morbidity and mortality, a poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. The objective of the present study was to demonstrate the anticancer activity of oleanolic acid in HepG2 human HCC cells. Cell viability was evaluated using an MTT assay, following administration of various doses of oleanolic acid. The effect of oleanolic acid on cell cycle phase distribution and mitochondrial membrane potential was evaluated using flow cytometry with propidium iodide and rhodamine-123 DNA-binding cationic fluorescent dyes. Fluorescence microscopy was employed to detect morphological changes in HepG2 cells following oleanolic acid treatment. The results revealed that oleanolic acid induced a dose-dependent, as well as time-dependent inhibition in the growth of HepG2 cancer cells. Following acridine orange and ethidium bromide staining, treatment with various doses (0, 5, 25 and 50 µM) of oleanolic acid induced typical morphological changes associated with apoptosis, including cell shrinkage, membrane blebbing, nuclear condensation and apoptotic body formation. Cell cycle analysis revealed that oleanolic acid induced cell cycle arrest in HepG2 cells at the sub-G1 (apoptotic) phase of the cell cycle, in a dose-dependent manner. Staining with Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate and propidium iodide revealed that apoptosis occurred early in these cells. Oleanolic acid treatment also resulted in fragmentation of nuclear DNA in a dose-dependent manner, producing the typical features of DNA laddering on an agarose gel. The results also demonstrated that oleanolic acid treatment resulted in a potent loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which also occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, oleanolic acid may be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of human HCC. PMID:26151733

  16. L-Malate dehydrogenase activity in the reductive arm of the incomplete citric acid cycle of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2013-11-01

    The autotrophic nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea does not synthesize 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase under aerobic conditions and so has an incomplete citric acid cycle. L-malate (S-malate) dehydrogenase (MDH) from N. europaea was predicted to show similarity to the NADP(+)-dependent enzymes from chloroplasts and was separated from the NAD(+)-dependent proteins from most other bacteria or mitochondria. MDH activity in a soluble fraction from N. europaea ATCC 19718 was measured spectrophotometrically and exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the reductive direction, activity with NADH increased from pH 6.0 to 8.5 but activity with NADPH was consistently lower and decreased with pH. At pH 7.0, the K m for oxaloacetate was 20 μM; the K m for NADH was 22 μM but that for NADPH was at least 10 times higher. In the oxidative direction, activity with NAD(+) increased with pH but there was very little activity with NADP(+). At pH 7.0, the K m for L-malate was 5 mM and the K m for NAD(+) was 24 μM. The reductive activity was quite insensitive to inhibition by L-malate but the oxidative activity was very sensitive to oxaloacetate. MDH activity was not strongly activated or inhibited by glycolytic or citric acid cycle metabolites, adenine nucleotides, NaCl concentrations, or most metal ions, but increased with temperature up to about 55 °C. The reductive activity was consistently 10-20 times higher than the oxidative activity. These results indicate that the L-malate dehydrogenase in N. europaea is similar to other NAD(+)-dependent MDHs (EC 1.1.1.37) but physiologically adapted for its role in a reductive biosynthetic sequence.

  17. Chronic fluoxetine treatment directs energy metabolism towards the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in rat hippocampal nonsynaptic mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Filipović, Dragana; Costina, Victor; Perić, Ivana; Stanisavljević, Andrijana; Findeisen, Peter

    2017-03-15

    Fluoxetine (Flx) is the principal treatment for depression; however, the precise mechanisms of its actions remain elusive. Our aim was to identify protein expression changes within rat hippocampus regulated by chronic Flx treatment versus vehicle-controls using proteomics. Fluoxetine-hydrohloride (15mg/kg) was administered daily to adult male Wistar rats for 3weeks, and cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial hippocampal proteomes were analyzed. All differentially expressed proteins were functionally annotated according to biological process and molecular function using Uniprot and Blast2GO. Our comparative study revealed that in cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial fractions, 60 and 3 proteins respectively, were down-regulated, and 23 and 60 proteins, respectively, were up-regulated. Proteins differentially regulated in cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial fractions were primarily related to cellular and metabolic processes. Of the identified proteins, the expressions of calretinin and parvalbumine were confirmed. The predominant molecular functions of differentially expressed proteins in both cell hippocampal fractions were binding and catalytic activity. Most differentially expressed proteins in nonsynaptic mitochondria were catalytic enzymes involved in the pyruvate metabolism, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, ATP synthesis, ATP transduction and glutamate metabolism. Results indicate that chronic Flx treatment may influence proteins involved in calcium signaling, cytoskeletal structure, chaperone system and stimulates energy metabolism via the upregulation of GAPDH expression in cytoplasm, as well as directing energy metabolism toward the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in nonsynaptic mitochondria. This approach provides new insight into the chronic effects of Flx treatment on protein expression in a key brain region associated with stress response and memory.

  18. Microbial contributions to coupled arsenic and sulfur cycling in the acid-sulfide hot spring Champagne Pool, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hug, Katrin; Maher, William A; Stott, Matthew B; Krikowa, Frank; Foster, Simon; Moreau, John W

    2014-01-01

    Acid-sulfide hot springs are analogs of early Earth geothermal systems where microbial metal(loid) resistance likely first evolved. Arsenic is a metalloid enriched in the acid-sulfide hot spring Champagne Pool (Waiotapu, New Zealand). Arsenic speciation in Champagne Pool follows reaction paths not yet fully understood with respect to biotic contributions and coupling to biogeochemical sulfur cycling. Here we present quantitative arsenic speciation from Champagne Pool, finding arsenite dominant in the pool, rim and outflow channel (55-75% total arsenic), and dithio- and trithioarsenates ubiquitously present as 18-25% total arsenic. In the outflow channel, dimethylmonothioarsenate comprised ≤9% total arsenic, while on the outflow terrace thioarsenates were present at 55% total arsenic. We also quantified sulfide, thiosulfate, sulfate and elemental sulfur, finding sulfide and sulfate as major species in the pool and outflow terrace, respectively. Elemental sulfur concentration reached a maximum at the terrace. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes from metagenomic sequencing revealed the dominance of Sulfurihydrogenibium at all sites and an increased archaeal population at the rim and outflow channel. Several phylotypes were found closely related to known sulfur- and sulfide-oxidizers, as well as sulfur- and sulfate-reducers. Bioinformatic analysis revealed genes underpinning sulfur redox transformations, consistent with sulfur speciation data, and illustrating a microbial role in sulfur-dependent transformation of arsenite to thioarsenate. Metagenomic analysis also revealed genes encoding for arsenate reductase at all sites, reflecting the ubiquity of thioarsenate and a need for microbial arsenate resistance despite anoxic conditions. Absence of the arsenite oxidase gene, aio, at all sites suggests prioritization of arsenite detoxification over coupling to energy conservation. Finally, detection of methyl arsenic in the outflow channel, in conjunction with

  19. Microbial contributions to coupled arsenic and sulfur cycling in the acid-sulfide hot spring Champagne Pool, New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Hug, Katrin; Maher, William A.; Stott, Matthew B.; Krikowa, Frank; Foster, Simon; Moreau, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Acid-sulfide hot springs are analogs of early Earth geothermal systems where microbial metal(loid) resistance likely first evolved. Arsenic is a metalloid enriched in the acid-sulfide hot spring Champagne Pool (Waiotapu, New Zealand). Arsenic speciation in Champagne Pool follows reaction paths not yet fully understood with respect to biotic contributions and coupling to biogeochemical sulfur cycling. Here we present quantitative arsenic speciation from Champagne Pool, finding arsenite dominant in the pool, rim and outflow channel (55–75% total arsenic), and dithio- and trithioarsenates ubiquitously present as 18–25% total arsenic. In the outflow channel, dimethylmonothioarsenate comprised ≤9% total arsenic, while on the outflow terrace thioarsenates were present at 55% total arsenic. We also quantified sulfide, thiosulfate, sulfate and elemental sulfur, finding sulfide and sulfate as major species in the pool and outflow terrace, respectively. Elemental sulfur concentration reached a maximum at the terrace. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA genes from metagenomic sequencing revealed the dominance of Sulfurihydrogenibium at all sites and an increased archaeal population at the rim and outflow channel. Several phylotypes were found closely related to known sulfur- and sulfide-oxidizers, as well as sulfur- and sulfate-reducers. Bioinformatic analysis revealed genes underpinning sulfur redox transformations, consistent with sulfur speciation data, and illustrating a microbial role in sulfur-dependent transformation of arsenite to thioarsenate. Metagenomic analysis also revealed genes encoding for arsenate reductase at all sites, reflecting the ubiquity of thioarsenate and a need for microbial arsenate resistance despite anoxic conditions. Absence of the arsenite oxidase gene, aio, at all sites suggests prioritization of arsenite detoxification over coupling to energy conservation. Finally, detection of methyl arsenic in the outflow channel, in conjunction with

  20. Prolactin messenger ribonucleic acid levels, prolactin synthesis, and radioimmunoassayable prolactin during the estrous cycle in the Golden Syrian hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Massa, J.S. ); Blask, D.E. )

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the molecular dynamics of pituitary prolactin (PRL) gene expression during the estrous cycle of the Golden Syrian hamster. PRL messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels, PRL synthesis were measured in the morning on each day of the cycle. We observed that all of these PRL indices declined or did not change from Day 2 to Day 3 of the cycle. From Day 3 to Day 4 however, PRL mRNA levels increased 33-38% and media {sup 3}H-PRL increased 32-42%, while there were no significant changes in pituitary {sup 3}H-PRL, or RIA-PRL in the media or pituitary. From Day 4 to Day 1 (estrus) there was reciprocal change in the levels of {sup 3}H-PRL in the pituitary vs. the media, with the former increasing 37-50% and the latter decreasing 25-32%. Pituitary RIA-PRL did also increased 45-64% from Day 4 to Day 1 while media RIA-PRL did not change. These data are consistent with the following hypothesis: On the morning of proestrus(Day 4) in the hamster, PRL mRNA levels are elevated compared to those on Day 3, signaling an increase in PRL synthesis. This newly synthesized PRL is shunted into a readily releasable pool on the morning of Day 4 (contributing to the afternoon surge of serum PRL), and into a preferentially stored pool by the morning of Day 1.

  1. Analysis of Sporulation Mutants II. Mutants Blocked in the Citric Acid Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fortnagel, Peter; Freese, Ernst

    1968-01-01

    Sporulation mutants that were unable to incorporate uracil during the developmental period recovered this capacity with the addition of ribose and in most cases with the addition of glutamate. Of the mutants that responded to both ribose and glumate, all but three also responded to citrate, and all but five responded to acetate. One of the exceptional strains was deficient in aconitase and another one in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase; both required glutamate for growth. For the mutants which did not respond to glutamate, the products made from 14C-glutamate were determined by thin-layer chromatography. Significant differences were found which enabled the identification of mutant blocks. The deficiency of the corresponding enzyme activity was verified. Several mutants were deficient in α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and one lacked succinic dehydrogenase. These mutants could still grow on glucose as sole carbon source, but not on glutamate. The intact Krebs cycle is therefore not required for vegetative growth of aerobic Bacillis subtilis, but it is indispensable for sporulation. Images PMID:4967197

  2. Tissue persistence and vaccine efficacy of tricarboxylic acid cycle and one-carbon metabolism mutant strains of Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Neeti; Abdelhamed, Hossam; Karsi, Attila; Lawrence, Mark L

    2014-06-30

    Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia in fish. Recently, we reported construction of E. ictaluri mutants with single and double gene deletions in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and one-carbon (C-1) metabolism. Here, we report the tissue persistence, virulence, and vaccine efficacy of TCA cycle (EiΔsdhC, EiΔfrdA, and EiΔmdh), C-1 metabolism (EiΔgcvP and EiΔglyA), and combination mutants (EiΔfrdAΔsdhC, EiΔgcvPΔsdhC, EiΔmdhΔsdhC, and EiΔgcvPΔglyA) in channel catfish. The tissue persistence study showed that EiΔsdhC, EiΔfrdA, EiΔfrdAΔsdhC, and EiΔgcvPΔsdhC were able to invade catfish and persist until 11 days post-infection. Vaccination of catfish fingerlings with all nine mutants provided significant (P<0.05) protection against subsequent challenge with the virulent parental strain. Vaccinated catfish fingerlings had 100% survival when subsequently challenged by immersion with wild-type E. ictaluri except for EiΔgcvPΔglyA and EiΔgcvP. Mutant EiΔgcvPΔsdhC was found to be very good at protecting catfish fry, as evidenced by 10-fold higher survival compared to non-vaccinated fish.

  3. Effect of multiple mutations in tricarboxylic acid cycle and one-carbon metabolism pathways on Edwardsiella ictaluri pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dahal, N; Abdelhamed, H; Lu, J; Karsi, A; Lawrence, M L

    2014-02-21

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative intracellular pathogen causing enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC). We have shown recently that tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and one-carbon (C1) metabolism are involved in E. ictaluri pathogenesis. However, the effect of multiple mutations in these pathways is unknown. Here, we report four novel E. ictaluri mutants carrying double gene mutations in TCA cycle (EiΔmdhΔsdhC, EiΔfrdAΔsdhC), C1 metabolism (EiΔglyAΔgcvP), and both TCA and C1 metabolism pathways (EiΔgcvPΔsdhC). In-frame gene deletions were constructed by allelic exchange and mutants' virulence and vaccine efficacy were evaluated using in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) as well as end point mortality counts in catfish fingerlings. Results indicated that all the double gene mutants were attenuated compared to wild-type (wt) E. ictaluri. There was a 1.39-fold average reduction in bioluminescence, and hence bacterial numbers, from all the mutants except for EiΔfrdAΔsdhC at 144 h post-infection. Vaccination with mutants was very effective in protecting channel catfish against subsequent infection with virulent E. ictaluri 93-146 strain. In particular, immersion vaccination resulted in complete protection. Our results provide further evidence on the importance of TCA and C1 metabolism pathways in bacterial pathogenesis.

  4. Determination of sup 13 C labeling pattern of citric acid cycle intermediates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Di Donato, L.; Montgomery, J.A.; Des Rosiers, C.; David, F.; Garneau, M.; Brunengraber, H. )

    1990-02-26

    Investigations of the regulation of the citric acid cycle require determination of labeling patterns of cycle intermediates. These were assayed to date, using infusion of: (i) ({sup 14}C)tracer followed by chemical degradation of intermediates and (ii) ({sup 13}C)tracer followed by NMR analysis of intermediates. The authors developed a strategy to analyze by GC-MS the ({sup 13}C) labeling pattern of {mu}mole samples of citrate (CIT), isocitrate (ICIT), 2-ketoglutarate (2-KG), glutamate (GLU) and glutamine (GLN). These are enzymatically or chemically converted to 2-KG, ICIT, 4-aminobutyrate (GABA) and 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-OHG). GC-MS analyses of TMS or TBDMS derivatives of these compounds yield the enrichment of each carbon. The authors confirmed the identity of each fragment using the spectra of (1-{sup 13}C), (5-{sup 13}C), (2,3,3,4,4-{sup 2}H{sub 5})glutamate and (1-{sup 13}C), (1,4-{sup 13}C)GABA.

  5. The Southern Ocean silica cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tréguer, Paul J.

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Ocean is a major opal sink and plays a key role in the silica cycle of the world ocean. So far however, a complete cycle of silicon in the Southern Ocean has not been published. On one hand, Southern Ocean surface waters receive considerable amounts of silicic acid (dissolved silica, DSi) from the rest of the world ocean through the upwelling of the Circumpolar Deep Water, fed by contributions of deep waters of the Atlantic, Indian, and Pacific Oceans. On the other hand, the Southern Ocean exports a considerable flux of the silicic acid that is not used by diatoms in surface waters through the northward pathways of the Sub-Antarctic Mode Water, of the Antarctic Intermediate Water, and of the Antarctic Bottom Water. Thus the Southern Ocean is a source of DSi for the rest of the world ocean. Here we show that the Southern Ocean is a net importer of DSi: because there is no significant external input of DSi, the flux of DSi imported through the Circumpolar Deep Water pathway compensates the sink flux of biogenic silica in sediments.

  6. Induction of Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptotic Response of Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cells (Detroit 562) by Caffeic Acid and Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester Derivative

    PubMed Central

    Tanasiewicz, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Natural polyphenols have been observed to possess antiproliferative properties. The effects, including apoptotic potential of bioactive phenolic compounds, caffeic acid (CA) and its derivative caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human head and neck squamous carcinoma cells (HNSCC) line (Detroit 562) were investigated and compared. Cancer cells apoptosis rates and cell cycle arrests were analysed by flow cytometry. Exposure to CA and CAPE was found to result in a dose-dependent decrease in the viability of Detroit 562 cells at different levels. CA/CAPE treatment did significantly affect the viability of Detroit 562 cells (MTT results). CAPE-mediated loss of viability occurred at lower doses and was more pronounced, with the concentrations which inhibit the growth of cells by 50% estimated at 201.43 μM (CA) and 83.25 μM (CAPE). Dead Cell Assay with Annexin V labelling demonstrated that CA and CAPE treatment of Detroit 562 cells resulted in an induction of apoptosis at 50 μM and 100 μM doses. The rise of mainly late apoptosis was observed for 100 μM dose and CA/CAPE treatment did affect the distribution of cells in G0/G1 phase. A combination of different phenolic compounds, potentially with chemotherapeutics, could be considered as an anticancer drug. PMID:28167973

  7. Extending cycle life of lead-acid batteries: a new separation system allows the application of pressure on the plate group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, M.; Döring, H.; Ihmels, K.; Weiss, A.; Vogel, E.; Wagner, R.

    Since 1983, it has been claimed that pressure applied on a lead-acid battery increases its cycle life. But until now, the use of pressure in production batteries was limited by the mechanical properties of the conventional separation systems (absorptive glass mat (AGM), and gel) which cannot withstand mechanical pressure. In 1997, Daramic developed the new acid jellying separator (AJS) with the aim of combining the advantages of both conventional separation systems and to allow the application of lasting plate group pressure. The new separation system was evaluated and much information was gained on the effect of pressure in a lead-acid battery, e.g. on the evolution of the mechanical pressure during one cycle and during cycle life.

  8. Aquatic carbon fluxes in HD: using in-situ sensors to obtain a high definition picture of carbon cycling in streams (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, D. W.; Dornblaser, M.; Saraceno, J.; Pellerin, B. A.; Mast, A.; Shanley, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    In-situ sensors provide a means to collect water-quality data in streams at time resolutions ranging from minutes to days, weeks, or months. Instruments may be deployed individually to investigate specific constituents of interest or in sensor arrays to provide a more complete picture for a suite of related compounds. Data from the instruments can provide direct measurements of some constituents (e.g., nitrate or dissolved CO2), or may be used as surrogates for other parameters (e.g., FDOM as a surrogate for DOC). These data may be used to improve estimates of nutrient or carbon fluxes, and to investigate processes influencing high-frequency variability in constituent concentrations. In this study, we examine high-temporal-resolution data from a suite of sensor arrays installed in mountain streams in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado. The sensor arrays include fluorescing dissolved organic matter (FDOM), turbidity, and CO2 sensors, which are being used to characterize variability in dissolved and particulate forms of carbon. We will (1) compare these data to concentrations obtained through manual grab sampling to document the utility of in-situ measurements as surrogates for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC), (2) compare stream-water fluxes of carbon calculated using a conventional sample-based approach to those computed using high-temporal resolution data from in-situ sensors, and (3) use ancillary data from co-located stream gages (e.g. streamflow) and meteorological stations (e.g., solar radiation) to investigate the influences of hydrology and climate on high-frequency variability in carbon fluxes in streams.

  9. Diurnal changes in assimilate concentrations and fluxes in the phloem of castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) and tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Kallarackal, Jose; Bauer, Susanne N; Nowak, Heike; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Komor, Ewald

    2012-07-01

    Reports about diurnal changes of assimilates in phloem sap are controversial. We determined the diurnal changes of sucrose and amino acid concentrations and fluxes in exudates from cut aphid stylets on tansy leaves (Tanacetum vulgare), and sucrose, amino acid and K(+) concentrations and fluxes in bleeding sap of castor bean pedicel (Ricinus communis). Approximately half of the tansy sieve tubes exhibited a diurnal cycle of sucrose concentrations and fluxes in phloem sap. Data from many tansy plants indicated an increased sucrose flux in the phloem during daytime in case of low N-nutrition, not at high N-nutrition. The sucrose concentration in phloem sap of young Ricinus plants changed marginally between day and night, whereas the sucrose flux increased 1.5-fold during daytime (but not in old Ricinus plants). The amino acid concentrations and fluxes in tansy sieve tubes exhibited a similar diurnal cycle as the sucrose concentrations and fluxes, including their dependence on N-nutrition. The amino acid fluxes, but not the concentrations, in phloem sap of Ricinus were higher at daytime. The sucrose/amino acid ratio showed no diurnal cycle neither in tansy nor in Ricinus. The K(+)-concentrations in phloem sap of Ricinus, but not the K(+) fluxes, decreased slightly during daytime and the sucrose/K(+)-ratio increased. In conclusion, a diurnal cycle was observed in sucrose, amino acid and K(+) fluxes, but not necessarily in concentrations of these assimilates. Because of the large variations between different sieve tubes and different plants, the nutrient delivery to sink tissues is not homeostatic over time.

  10. Alternative Oxidase Activity in Tobacco Leaf Mitochondria (Dependence on Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle-Mediated Redox Regulation and Pyruvate Activation).

    PubMed

    Vanlerberghe, G. C.; Day, D. A.; Wiskich, J. T.; Vanlerberghe, A. E.; McIntosh, L.

    1995-10-01

    Transgenic Nicotiana tabacum (cv Petit Havana SR1) containing high levels of mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) protein due to the introduction of a sense transgene(s) of Aox1, the nuclear gene encoding AOX, were used to investigate mechanisms regulating AOX activity. After purification of leaf mitochondria, a large proportion of the AOX protein was present as the oxidized (covalently associated and less active) dimer. High AOX activity in these mitochondria was dependent on both reduction of the protein by DTT (to the noncovalently associated and more active dimer) and its subsequent activation by certain [alpha]-keto acids, particularly pyruvate. Reduction of AOX to its more active form could also be mediated by intramitochondrial reducing power generated by the oxidation of certain tricarboxylic acid cycle substrates, most notably isocitrate and malate. Our evidence suggests that NADPH may be specifically required for AOX reduction. All of the above regulatory mechanisms applied to AOX in wild-type mitochondria as well. Transgenic leaves lacking AOX due to the introduction of an Aox1 antisense transgene or multiple sense transgenes were used to investigate the potential physiological significance of the AOX-regulatory mechanisms. Under conditions in which respiratory carbon metabolism is restricted by the capacity of mitochondrial electron transport, feed-forward activation of AOX by mitochondrial reducing power and pyruvate may act to prevent redirection of carbon metabolism, such as to fermentative pathways.

  11. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid increases neural stem cell pool and neuronal conversion by regulating mitochondria-cell cycle retrograde signaling.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Joana M; Morgado, Ana L; Rodrigues, Cecília Mp; Solá, Susana

    2014-01-01

    The low survival and differentiation rates of stem cells after either transplantation or neural injury have been a major concern of stem cell-based therapy. Thus, further understanding long-term survival and differentiation of stem cells may uncover new targets for discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. We have previously described the impact of mitochondrial apoptosis-related events in modulating neural stem cell (NSC) fate. In addition, the endogenous bile acid, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) was shown to be neuroprotective in several animal models of neurodegenerative disorders by acting as an anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidant molecule at the mitochondrial level. Here, we hypothesize that TUDCA might also play a role on NSC fate decision. We found that TUDCA prevents mitochondrial apoptotic events typical of early-stage mouse NSC differentiation, preserves mitochondrial integrity and function, while enhancing self-renewal potential and accelerating cell cycle exit of NSCs. Interestingly, TUDCA prevention of mitochondrial alterations interfered with NSC differentiation potential by favoring neuronal rather than astroglial conversion. Finally, inhibition of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) scavenger and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthase revealed that the effect of TUDCA is dependent on mtROS and ATP regulation levels. Collectively, these data underline the importance of mitochondrial stress control of NSC fate decision and support a new role for TUDCA in this process.

  12. Citric-acid cycle key enzyme activities during in vitro growth and metacyclogenesis of Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Louassini, M; Foulquié, M; Benítez, R; Adroher, J

    1999-08-01

    The activities of 5 key regulatory enzymes in most energetic systems, namely citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7, CS), NADP-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.42, ICDH), succinate dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.99.1, SDH), L-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37, MDH), and decarboxylating malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40, ME), were measured during the growth and metacyclogenesis of a cutaneous (CL) and a visceral (VL) strain of Leishmania infantum. As occurs with other Leishmania species, infective promastigotes were present along all phases of growth, but their percentages were higher at the early stationary phase for VL and the end of the same phase for CL. High CS and SDH activities were detected in both strains, as compared with other trypanosomatids, bringing more evidence for an actively functional citric-acid cycle in L. infantum. Both strains showed higher levels of CS, ICDH, and MDH and lower SDH and ME activities when more metacyclic promastigotes were present, but in VL these changes paralleled an increase in glucose consumption, whereas in CL these changes coincided with an NH3 hyperproduction. This suggests that the energy metabolism during L. infantum growth and metacyclogenesis is affected by regulated enzymes that probably respond to changes in the culture medium in the levels of glucose and amino acids.

  13. Macrolide Antibiotics Exhibit Cytotoxic Effect under Amino Acid-Depleted Culture Condition by Blocking Autophagy Flux in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hirasawa, Kazuhiro; Moriya, Shota; Miyahara, Kana; Kazama, Hiromi; Hirota, Ayako; Takemura, Jun; Abe, Akihisa; Inazu, Masato; Hiramoto, Masaki; Tsukahara, Kiyoaki

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy, a self-digestive system for cytoplasmic components, is required to maintain the amino acid pool for cellular homeostasis. We previously reported that the macrolide antibiotics azithromycin (AZM) and clarithromycin (CAM) have an inhibitory effect on autophagy flux, and they potently enhance the cytocidal effect of various anticancer reagents in vitro. This suggests that macrolide antibiotics can be used as an adjuvant for cancer chemotherapy. Since cancer cells require a larger metabolic demand than normal cells because of their exuberant growth, upregulated autophagy in tumor cells has now become the target for cancer therapy. In the present study, we examined whether macrolides exhibit cytotoxic effect under an amino acid-starving condition in head and neck squamous cancer cell lines such as CAL 27 and Detroit 562 as models of solid tumors with an upregulated autophagy in the central region owing to hypovascularity. AZM and CAM induced cell death under the amino acid-depleted (AAD) culture condition in these cell lines along with CHOP upregulation, although they showed no cytotoxicity under the complete culture medium. CHOP knockdown by siRNA in the CAL 27 cells significantly suppressed macrolide-induced cell death under the AAD culture condition. CHOP-/- murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cell lines also attenuated AZM-induced cell death compared with CHOP+/+ MEF cell lines. Using a tet-off atg5 MEF cell line, knockout of atg5, an essential gene for autophagy, also induced cell death and CHOP in the AAD culture medium but not in the complete culture medium. This suggest that macrolide-induced cell death via CHOP induction is dependent on autophagy inhibition. The cytotoxicity of macrolide with CHOP induction was completely cancelled by the addition of amino acids in the culture medium, indicating that the cytotoxicity is due to the insufficient amino acid pool. These data suggest the possibility of using macrolides for “tumor-starving therapy”. PMID

  14. Fungi contribute critical but spatially varying roles in nitrogen and carbon cycling in acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Mosier, Annika C.; Miller, Christopher S.; Frischkorn, Kyle R.; Ohm, Robin A.; Li, Zhou; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lipzen, Anna; Chen, Cindy; Johnson, Jenifer; Lindquist, Erika A.; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert L.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Singer, Steven W.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2016-03-03

    The ecosystem roles of fungi have been extensively studied by targeting one organism and/or biological process at a time, but the full metabolic potential of fungi has rarely been captured in an environmental context. We hypothesized that fungal genome sequences could be assembled directly from the environment using metagenomics and that transcriptomics and proteomics could simultaneously reveal metabolic differentiation across habitats. We reconstructed the near-complete 27 Mbp genome of a filamentous fungus, Acidomyces richmondensis, and evaluated transcript and protein expression in floating and streamer biofilms from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system. A. richmondensis transcripts involved in denitrification and in the degradation of complex carbon sources (including cellulose) were up-regulated in floating biofilms, whereas central carbon metabolism and stress-related transcripts were significantly up-regulated in streamer biofilms. Finally, these findings suggest that the biofilm niches are distinguished by distinct carbon and nitrogen resource utilization, oxygen availability, and environmental challenges. An isolated A. richmondensis strain from this environment was used to validate the metagenomics-derived genome and confirm nitrous oxide production at pH 1. Overall, our analyses defined mechanisms of fungal adaptation and identified a functional shift related to different roles in carbon and nitrogen turnover for the same species of fungi growing in closely located but distinct biofilm niches.

  15. Fungi Contribute Critical but Spatially Varying Roles in Nitrogen and Carbon Cycling in Acid Mine Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Annika C.; Miller, Christopher S.; Frischkorn, Kyle R.; Ohm, Robin A.; Li, Zhou; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lipzen, Anna; Chen, Cindy; Johnson, Jenifer; Lindquist, Erika A.; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert L.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Singer, Steven W.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2016-01-01

    The ecosystem roles of fungi have been extensively studied by targeting one organism and/or biological process at a time, but the full metabolic potential of fungi has rarely been captured in an environmental context. We hypothesized that fungal genome sequences could be assembled directly from the environment using metagenomics and that transcriptomics and proteomics could simultaneously reveal metabolic differentiation across habitats. We reconstructed the near-complete 27 Mbp genome of a filamentous fungus, Acidomyces richmondensis, and evaluated transcript and protein expression in floating and streamer biofilms from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system. A. richmondensis transcripts involved in denitrification and in the degradation of complex carbon sources (including cellulose) were up-regulated in floating biofilms, whereas central carbon metabolism and stress-related transcripts were significantly up-regulated in streamer biofilms. These findings suggest that the biofilm niches are distinguished by distinct carbon and nitrogen resource utilization, oxygen availability, and environmental challenges. An isolated A. richmondensis strain from this environment was used to validate the metagenomics-derived genome and confirm nitrous oxide production at pH 1. Overall, our analyses defined mechanisms of fungal adaptation and identified a functional shift related to different roles in carbon and nitrogen turnover for the same species of fungi growing in closely located but distinct biofilm niches. PMID:26973616

  16. Fungi contribute critical but spatially varying roles in nitrogen and carbon cycling in acid mine drainage

    DOE PAGES

    Mosier, Annika C.; Miller, Christopher S.; Frischkorn, Kyle R.; ...

    2016-03-03

    The ecosystem roles of fungi have been extensively studied by targeting one organism and/or biological process at a time, but the full metabolic potential of fungi has rarely been captured in an environmental context. We hypothesized that fungal genome sequences could be assembled directly from the environment using metagenomics and that transcriptomics and proteomics could simultaneously reveal metabolic differentiation across habitats. We reconstructed the near-complete 27 Mbp genome of a filamentous fungus, Acidomyces richmondensis, and evaluated transcript and protein expression in floating and streamer biofilms from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system. A. richmondensis transcripts involved in denitrification and inmore » the degradation of complex carbon sources (including cellulose) were up-regulated in floating biofilms, whereas central carbon metabolism and stress-related transcripts were significantly up-regulated in streamer biofilms. Finally, these findings suggest that the biofilm niches are distinguished by distinct carbon and nitrogen resource utilization, oxygen availability, and environmental challenges. An isolated A. richmondensis strain from this environment was used to validate the metagenomics-derived genome and confirm nitrous oxide production at pH 1. Overall, our analyses defined mechanisms of fungal adaptation and identified a functional shift related to different roles in carbon and nitrogen turnover for the same species of fungi growing in closely located but distinct biofilm niches.« less

  17. Lewis acid promoted titanium alkylidene formation: off-cycle intermediates relevant to olefin trimerization catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Aaron; VanderVelde, David G; Labinger, Jay A; Bercaw, John E

    2014-07-30

    Two new precatalysts for ethylene and α-olefin trimerization, (FI)Ti(CH2SiMe3)2Me and (FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2Me (FI = phenoxy-imine), have been synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. (FI)Ti(CH2SiMe3)2Me can be activated with 1 equiv of B(C6F5)3 at room temperature to give the solvent-separated ion pair [(FI)Ti(CH2SiMe3)2][MeB(C6F5)3], which catalytically trimerizes ethylene or 1-pentene to produce 1-hexene or C15 olefins, respectively. The neopentyl analogue (FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2Me is unstable toward activation with B(C6F5)3 at room temperature, giving no discernible diamagnetic titanium complexes, but at -30 °C the following can be observed by NMR spectroscopy: (i) formation of the bis-neopentyl cation [(FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2](+), (ii) α-elimination of neopentane to give the neopentylidene complex [(FI)Ti(═CHCMe3)](+), and (iii) subsequent conversion to the imido-olefin complex [(MeOAr2N═)Ti(OArHC═CHCMe3)](+) via an intramolecular metathesis reaction with the imine fragment of the (FI) ligand. If the reaction is carried out at low temperature in the presence of ethylene, catalytic production of 1-hexene is observed, in addition to the titanacyclobutane complex [(FI)Ti(CH(CMe3)CH2CH2)](+), resulting from addition of ethylene to the neopentylidene [(FI)Ti(═CHCMe3)](+). None of the complexes observed spectroscopically subsequent to [(FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2](+) is an intermediate or precursor for ethylene trimerization, but notwithstanding these off-cycle pathways, [(FI)Ti(CH2CMe3)2](+) is a precatalyst that undergoes rapid initiation to generate a catalyst for trimerizing ethylene or 1-pentene.

  18. Measurement of (15)N enrichment of glutamine and urea cycle amino acids derivatized with 6-aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate using liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Karakawa, Sachise; Watanabe, Akiko; Kawamata, Yasuko; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Shimbo, Kazutaka; Sakai, Ryosei

    2015-05-01

    6-Aminoquinolyl-N-hydroxysuccinimidyl carbamate (AQC) is an amino acid-specific derivatizing reagent that has been used for sensitive amino acid quantification by liquid chromatography-tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the ability of this method to measure the isotopic enrichment of amino acids and to determine the positional (15)N enrichment of urea cycle amino acids (i.e., arginine, ornithine, and citrulline) and glutamine. The distribution of the M and M+1 isotopomers of each natural AQC-amino acid was nearly identical to the theoretical distribution. The standard deviation of the (M+1)/M ratio for each amino acid in repeated measurements was approximately 0.1%, and the ratios were stable regardless of the injected amounts. Linearity in the measurements of (15)N enrichment was confirmed by measuring a series of (15)N-labeled arginine standards. The positional (15)N enrichment of urea cycle amino acids and glutamine was estimated from the isotopic distribution of unique fragment ions generated at different collision energies. This method was able to identify their positional (15)N enrichment in the plasma of rats fed (15)N-labeled glutamine. These results suggest the utility of LC-MS/MS detection of AQC-amino acids for the measurement of isotopic enrichment in (15)N-labeled amino acids and indicate that this method