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Sample records for acid dca trichloroacetic

  1. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 09 / 003F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF TRICHLOROACETIC ACID ( CAS No . 76 - 03 - 9 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2011 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER This document has

  2. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA), that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment Development Process. Comments received from other Federal agencies and White House Offices are provided below with external peer review panel comments. The draft Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard identification and dose-response assessment pertaining to chronic exposure to trichloroacetic acid.

  3. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. The draft Toxicological Review of trichloroacetic acid provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard and dose-response assessment pertaining to chronic exposure to trichloroacetic acid.

  4. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On September 24, 2009, the Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Offices before public release. In the new IRIS process, introduced by the EPA Administrator, all written comments on IRIS assessments submitted by other federal agencies and White House Offices will be made publicly available. Accordingly, interagency comments and the interagency science consultation draft of the IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid and the charge to external peer reviewers are posted on this site. The draft Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard identification and dose-response assessment pertaining to chronic exposure to trichloroacetic acid.

  5. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (Tca) (Final ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has finalized the Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Now final, this assessment may be used by EPA’s program and regional offices to inform decisions to protect human health. The draft Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard identification and dose-response assessment pertaining to chronic exposure to trichloroacetic acid.

  6. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY DOCUMENTS FOR TRICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetic acid is a crystalline solid with sharp, pungent odor. It is used as a soil sterilizer; and as a laboratory intermediate or reagent in the synthesis of a variety of medicinal products and organic chemicals. Trichloroacetic acid is also used industrially as an etc...

  7. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (Tca) (Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has finalized the Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Now final, this assessment may be used by EPA’s program and regional offices to inform decisions to protect human health.

  9. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  10. DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) INHIBITS PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS IN NORMAL HEPATOCYTES OF MALE F344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA} inhibits proliferation and apoptosis in nonnal hepatocytes of
    male F344 rats.

    Large segments of the population are chronically exposed to dichloroacetic acid (DCA}: DCA is a by product of the chlorine disinfection of drinking water, a metab...

  11. The ecological effects of trichloroacetic acid in the environment.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T E; Wolfinger, T F; Barta, M L

    2004-10-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) is a member of the family of compounds known as chloroacetic acids, which includes mono-, di- and trichloroacetic acid. The significant property these compounds share is that they are all phytotoxic. TCAA once was widely used as a potent herbicide. However, long after TCAA's use as a herbicide was discontinued, its presence is still detected in the environment in various compartments. Methods for quantifying TCAA in aqueous and solid samples are summarized. Concentrations in various environmental compartments are presented, with a discussion of the possible formation of TCAA through natural processes. Concentrations of TCAA found to be toxic to aquatic and terrestrial organisms in laboratory and field studies were compiled and used to estimate risk quotients for soil and surface waters. TCAA levels in most water bodies not directly affected by point sources appear to be well below toxicity levels for the most sensitive aquatic organisms. Given the phytotoxicity of TCAA, aquatic plants and phytoplankton would be the aquatic species to monitor for potential effects. Given the concentrations of TCAA measured in various soils, there appears to be a risk to terrestrial organisms. Soil uptake of TCAA by plants has been shown to be rapid. Also, combined uptake of TCAA from soil and directly from the atmosphere has been shown. Therefore, risk quotients derived from soil exposure may underestimate the risk TCAA poses to plants. Moreover, TCE and TCA have been shown to be taken up by plants and converted to TCAA, thus leading to an additional exposure route. Mono- and di-chloroacetic acids can co-occur with TCAA in the atmosphere and soil and are more phytotoxic than TCAA. The cumulative effects of TCAA and compounds with similar toxic effects found in air and soil must be considered in subsequent terrestrial ecosystem risk assessments.

  12. Microbiological aspects of determination of trichloroacetic acid in soil.

    PubMed

    Matucha, M; Gryndler, M; Uhlírová, H; Fuksová, K; Rohlenová, J; Forczek, S T; Schröder, P

    2004-01-01

    Soils have been shown to possess a strong microbial trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-degrading activity. High TCA-degradation rate was also observed during soil extraction with water. For correct measurements of TCA levels in soil all TCA-degrading activities have to be inhibited immediately after sampling before analysis. We used rapid freezing of soil samples (optimally in liquid nitrogen) with subsequent storage and slow thawing before analysis as an efficient technique for suppressing the degradation. Frozen soil samples stored overnight at -20 degrees C and then thawed slowly exhibited very low residual TCA-degrading activity for several hours. Omitting the above procedure could lead to the confusing differences between the TCA levels previously reported in the literature.

  13. Acetylated deoxycholic (DCA) and cholic (CA) acids are potent ligands of pregnane X (PXR) receptor.

    PubMed

    Carazo, Alejandro; Hyrsova, Lucie; Dusek, Jan; Chodounska, Hana; Horvatova, Alzbeta; Berka, Karel; Bazgier, Vaclav; Gan-Schreier, Hongying; Chamulitrat, Waleé; Kudova, Eva; Pavek, Petr

    2017-01-04

    The Pregnane X (PXR), Vitamin D (VDR) and Farnesoid X (FXR) nuclear receptors have been shown to be receptors of bile acids controlling their detoxification or synthesis. Chenodeoxycholic (CDCA) and lithocholic (LCA) acids are ligands of FXR and VDR, respectively, whereas 3-keto and acetylated derivates of LCA have been described as ligands for all three receptors. In this study, we hypothesized that oxidation or acetylation at position 3, 7 and 12 of bile acids DCA (deoxycholic acid), LCA, CA (cholic acid), and CDCA by detoxification enzymes or microbiome may have an effect on the interactions with bile acid nuclear receptors. We employed reporter gene assays in HepG2 cells, the TR-FRET assay with recombinant PXR and RT-PCR to study the effects of acetylated and keto bile acids on the nuclear receptors activation and their target gene expression in differentiated hepatic HepaRG cells. We demonstrate that the DCA 3,12-diacetate and CA 3,7,12-triacetate derivatives are ligands of PXR and DCA 3,12-diacetate induces PXR target genes such as CYP3A4, CYP2B6 and ABCB1/MDR1. In conclusion, we found that acetylated DCA and CA are potent ligands of PXR. Whether the acetylated bile acid derivatives are novel endogenous ligands of PXR with detoxification or physiological functions should be further studied in ongoing experiments.

  14. APOPTOSIS AND PROLIFERATION DURING DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) INDUCED HEPTACELLULAR CARCINOGENESIS IN THE F344 MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis and Proliferation During DicWoroacetic Acid (DCA) Induced Hepatocellular
    Carcinogenesis in the F344 Male Rat

    Chlorine, introduced into public drinking \\\\'ater supplies for disinfection, can react with organic compounds in surface waters to form toxic by-prod...

  15. Differential regulation of EGFR-MAPK signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Centuori, Sara M; Martinez, Jesse D

    2014-10-01

    A high-fat diet coincides with increased levels of bile acids. This increase in bile acids, particularly deoxycholic acid (DCA), has been strongly associated with the development of colon cancer. Conversely, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) may have chemopreventive properties. Although structurally similar, DCA and UDCA present different biological and pathological effects in colon cancer progression. The differential regulation of cancer by these two bile acids is not yet fully understood. However, one possible explanation for their diverging effects is their ability to differentially regulate signaling pathways involved in the multistep progression of colon cancer, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. This review will examine the biological effects of DCA and UDCA on colon cancer development, as well as the diverging effects of these bile acids on the oncogenic signaling pathways that play a role in colon cancer development, with a particular emphasis on bile acid regulation of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

  16. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA), that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment Development ...

  17. Stability-time profile of trichloroacetic acid at various concentrations and storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Spinowitz, A L; Rumsfield, J

    1989-09-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is a deliquescent chemical widely used for a variety of procedures. Stability of various concentrations of TCA in both amber glass and plastic bottles stored under refrigeration and at room temperature was measured at several time points. Extended stability data suggest that TCA potency is stable for 23 weeks and would best be maintained in glass amber bottles stored under refrigeration.

  18. A MULTISTAGE BIOLOGICALLY BASED MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR MOUSE LIVER TUMORS INDUCED BY DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) - EXPLORATION OF THE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A biologically based mathematical model for the induction of liver tumors in mice by dichloroacetic acid (DCA) has been developed from histopathologic analysis of the livers of exposed mice. This analysis suggests that following chronic exposure to DCA, carcinomas can arise dire...

  19. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) can inhibit deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced apoptosis via modulation of EGFR/Raf-1/ERK signaling in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Eunok; Martinez, Jesse D

    2004-02-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a hydrophilic bile acid, is known as a cytoprotective agent. UDCA prevents apoptosis induced by a variety of stress stimuli including cytotoxic bile acids such as deoxycholic acid (DCA). Here we examined the molecular mechanism by which UDCA can antagonize DCA-induced apoptosis in human colon cancer cells. UDCA pretreatment decreases the number of apoptotic cells caused by exposure to DCA and UDCA. Further studies of the signaling pathway showed that UDCA pretreatment suppressed DNA binding activity of activator protein-1 and this was accompanied by downregulation of both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Raf-1 kinase activities stimulated by exposure to DCA. DCA was also found to activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activity and UDCA inhibited this. Collectively, these findings suggest that the inhibitory effect of UDCA in DCA-induced apoptosis is partly mediated by modulation of EGFR/Raf-1/ERK signaling.

  20. A STUDY COMPARING CHEMICAL PEELING USING MODIFIED JESSNER'S SOLUTION AND 15%TRICHLOROACETIC ACID VERSUS 15% TRICHLOROACETIC ACID IN THE TREATMENT OF MELASMA

    PubMed Central

    Safoury, Omar Soliman; Zaki, Nagla Mohamed; El Nabarawy, Eman Ahmad; Farag, Eman Abas

    2009-01-01

    Background: Melasma is a symmetric progressive hyperpigmentation of the facial skin that occurs in all races but has a predilection for darker skin phenotypes. Depigmenting agents, laser and chemical peeling as classic Jessner's solution, modified Jessner's solution and trichloroacetic acid have been used alone and in combination in the treatment of melasma. Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the therapeutic effect of combined 15% Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and modified Jessner's solution with 15% TCA on melasma. Materials and Methods: Twenty married females with melasma (epidermal type), with a mean age of 38.25 years, were included in this study. All were of skin type III or IV. Fifteen percent TCA was applied to the whole face, with the exception of the left malar area to which combined TCA 15% and modified Jessner's solution was applied. Results: Our results revealed statistically highly significant difference between MASI Score (Melasma Area and Severity Index) between the right malar area and the left malar area. Conclusion: Modified Jessner's solution proved to be useful as an adjuvant treatment with TCA in the treatment of melasma, improving the results and minimizing postinflammatory hyperpigmentation. PMID:20049268

  1. Expression patterns of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in trichloroacetic acid peeled skin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Uede, Koji; Yonei, Nozomi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2007-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peeling induces cellular proliferation in human skin using an immunohistochemical method. A 40% TCA peel resulted in a greater number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive cells in the whole epidermis as compared with 60% TCA or phenol peels. This finding suggests that long-term and frequent TCA peelings of low concentration would require special attention for unexpected cutaneous lesions such as skin tumors.

  2. EFFECT OF PRETREATMENT WITH DICHLOROACETIC OR TRICHLOROACETIC ACID IN DRINKING WATER ON THE PHARMACOKINETICS OF A SUBSEQUENT CHALLENGE DOSE IN B6C3F1 MICE. (R825954)

    EPA Science Inventory

    h2>Abstract

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) are prominent by-products of chlorination of drinking water. Both chemicals have been shown to be hepatic carcinogens in mice. Prior work has demonstrated that DCA inhibits its own metabolism in rats and humans. ...

  3. Conductometric simultaneous determination of acetic acid, monochloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid using orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, R; Ghasemi, J; Abdollahi, B

    2006-04-17

    A simultaneous conductometric titration method for determination of mixtures of acetic acid, monochloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid based on the multivariate calibration partial least squares is proposed. It is possible to obtain an adjustable model to relate squared concentration values of the mixtures used in the calibration range by conductance. The effect of orthogonal signal correction (OSC) as a preprocessing technique used to remove the information unrelated to the target variables is studied. The calibration model was build using conductometric titrations data of 16 mixtures of three acids. The concentration matrix was designed by a orthogonal design. The root mean squares error of prediction (RMSEP) for acetic acid, monochloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid with and without OSC were 0.08, 0.30 and 0.08, and 0.15, 0.40 and 0.18, respectively. The results obtained by OSC-PLS are better than the PLS and this indicate the successful application of the OSC filter as a good preprocessing method in multivariate calibration methods. The proposed procedure allows the simultaneous determination of these acids, in the synthetic mixtures.

  4. 35CI NQR Spectroscopy on Salts and Molecular Compounds of Trichloroacetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fichtner, Winfried; Markworth, Axel; Weiden, Norbert; Weiss, Alarich

    1986-02-01

    The temperature dependence of salts M(1)H(Cl3CCOO)2 and molecular compounds of trichloroacetic acid with amines and benzaldehydes, TCA · X, was studied, The data fit rather well to the known dependence of the mean frequency shift Δ on the pkadifference of X with respect to TCA. A linear relation is observed between the bleaching out temperature Tb of the 35Cl NQR lines and Δ for M(1)H(Cl3CCOO)2 and for TCA · X, X = benzaldehydes.

  5. Chemical composition of phase I Coxiella burnetii soluble antigen prepared by trichloroacetic acid extraction.

    PubMed

    Lukácová, M; Brezina, R; Schramek, S; Pastorek, J

    1989-01-01

    Optimal conditions of extraction (time and temperature) by trichloroacetic acid of soluble antigen from phase I Coxiella burnetii (TCAE), possessing protective properties and used as a chemovaccine against Q fever in men, were studied. Extracts prepared under various conditions were analysed for their polysaccharide, protein and phosphorus contents. Forty-five min of extraction at 0 degrees C were sufficient to obtain a soluble antigen reacting in immunodiffusion with hyperimmune rabbit antiserum. The polysaccharide contents decreased with prolonged extraction at 0 degrees C. At higher extraction temperatures (37 and 100 degrees C), the polysaccharide contents increased while that of proteins decreased. TCAE prepared at 100 degrees C gave no positive immunodiffusion reaction.

  6. Pharmacokinetic analysis of trichloroethylene metabolism in male B6C3F1 mice: Formation and disposition of trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sungkyoon; Kim, David; Pollack, Gary M.; Collins, Leonard B.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2009-07-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a well-known carcinogen in rodents and concerns exist regarding its potential carcinogenicity in humans. Oxidative metabolites of TCE, such as dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA), are thought to be hepatotoxic and carcinogenic in mice. The reactive products of glutathione conjugation, such as S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl) glutathione (DCVG), are associated with renal toxicity in rats. Recently, we developed a new analytical method for simultaneous assessment of these TCE metabolites in small-volume biological samples. Since important gaps remain in our understanding of the pharmacokinetics of TCE and its metabolites, we studied a time-course of DCA, TCA, DCVG and DCVG formation and elimination after a single oral dose of 2100 mg/kg TCE in male B6C3F1 mice. Based on systemic concentration-time data, we constructed multi-compartment models to explore the kinetic properties of the formation and disposition of TCE metabolites, as well as the source of DCA formation. We conclude that TCE-oxide is the most likely source of DCA. According to the best-fit model, bioavailability of oral TCE was {approx} 74%, and the half-life and clearance of each metabolite in the mouse were as follows: DCA: 0.6 h, 0.081 ml/h; TCA: 12 h, 3.80 ml/h; DCVG: 1.4 h, 16.8 ml/h; DCVC: 1.2 h, 176 ml/h. In B6C3F1 mice, oxidative metabolites are formed in much greater quantities ({approx} 3600 fold difference) than glutathione-conjugative metabolites. In addition, DCA is produced to a very limited extent relative to TCA, while most of DCVG is converted into DCVC. These pharmacokinetic studies provide insight into the kinetic properties of four key biomarkers of TCE toxicity in the mouse, representing novel information that can be used in risk assessment.

  7. Electrochemical degradation of trichloroacetic acid in aqueous media: influence of the electrode material.

    PubMed

    Esclapez, M D; Díez-García, M I; Sàez, V; Bonete, P; González-García, José

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical degradation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in water has been analysed through voltammetric studies with a rotating disc electrode and controlled-potential bulk electrolyses. The influence of the mass-transport conditions and initial concentration of TCAA for titanium, stainless steel and carbon electrodes has been studied. It is shown that the electrochemical reduction of TCAA takes place prior to the massive hydrogen evolution in the potential window for all electrode materials studied. The current efficiency is high (> 18%) compared with those normally reported in the literature, and the fractional conversion is above 50% for all the electrodes studied. Only dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and chloride anions were routinely detected as reduction products for any of the electrodes, and reasonable values of mass balance error were obtained. Of the three materials studied, the titanium cathode gave the best results.

  8. P-cadherin expression in skin peeled with phenol or trichloroacetic acid (TCA).

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Uede, Koji; Ohtani, Toshio; Wakita, Hisashi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2003-12-01

    P-cadherin expression patterns were studied in trichloroacetic acid (TCA) or phenol treated skin. The expression was absent or very weak on the basal cell surfaces by day 2. Seven days after peeling, P-cadherin was clearly distributed in a continuous granular pattern over the cell surface of the entire epidermis of the 40% TCA treated skin, in a weak granular pattern on a few suprabasal cells and basal cells of the phenol treated skin, and very weakly expressed on the lateral surfaces and in the cytoplasm of basal cells of the 60% TCA treated skin. Based on the present results and previous reports, it is likely that there are distinct patterns of P cadherin expression. Furthermore, a specific type of P cadherin expression might be involved in wound healing in general, which could provide new insights into tissue repair mechanisms after chemical peeling.

  9. The effectiveness of matrix cauterization with trichloroacetic acid in the treatment of ingrown toenails

    PubMed Central

    Terzi, Erdinc; Guvenc, Ulas; Türsen, Belma; Kaya, Tamer İrfan; Erdem, Teoman; Türsen, Ümit

    2015-01-01

    Ingrown toenail is an often painful clinical condition that usually affects the big toe. Chemical matricectomy with phenol has a low recurrence rate and good cosmetic results. However, it produces extensive tissue destruction that can result in drainage and delayed healing. Alternatives such as sodium hydroxide and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) have therefore come into vogue. A total of 39 patients with 56 ingrown toenail edges underwent chemical matricectomy with 90% TCA after partial nail avulsion. In most of the patients, adverse effects such as postoperative pain and drainage were minimal. One patient who underwent matricectomy had recurrence in a single nail edge (1.8%) at 12 months follow-up. No recurrence was observed among 38 patients during the mean follow-up period. This was considered to be statistically significant (P < 0.001). Partial nail avulsion followed by TCA matricectomy is a safe, simple, and effective method with low rates of postoperative morbidity and high rates of success. PMID:25657908

  10. Superficial basal cell carcinoma treated with 70% trichloroacetic acid applied topically: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Chiriac, Anca; Brzezinski, Piotr; Moldovan, Cosmin; Podoleanu, Cristian; Coros, Marius Florin; Stolnicu, Simona

    2017-01-01

    Background Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of skin cancer, affecting millions of people worldwide. The treatment concept for BCCs is the surgical one, but it is costly, as such, searching for alternative medical therapeutics is justified. Aim To highlight the efficacy of high concentration (70%) trichloroacetic acid (TCA) as a choice therapy for low-risk BCC. Method and patient Authors present, for the first time, the use of a high concentration TCA applied once a week for 2 consecutive weeks with a toothpick, on a patient with BCC on the right preauricular area. Results On examination 4 weeks later, the lesion was not clinically and dermatoscopically evidenced. Conclusion High concentration TCA could be an effective and safe, non-invasive choice of therapy for low-risk BCC, easy to perform, not expensive, with good cosmetic results, especially for patients who are not likely to undergo invasive or expensive treatments. PMID:28260938

  11. GENOTOXICITY STUDIES OF SODIUM DICHLOROACETATE AND SODIUM TRICHLOROACETATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The genotoxic properties of sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) and sodium trichloroacetate (TCA)were evaluated in several short-term in vitro and in vivo assays. Neither compound was mutagenic in tester strain TA102 in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. Both DCA and TCA were weak induc...

  12. Effectiveness and safety profile of 40% trichloroacetic acid and cryotherapy for plantar warts.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Emiroglu, Nazan; Su, Ozlem; Onsun, Nahide

    2016-09-01

    Plantar warts are one of the most common infectious skin disease caused by the human papillomavirus. In this study, cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen delivered by the physician, up to four treatments 2 weeks apart. Forty percent trichloroacetic acid (TCA) was applied to warts weekly up to four treatments. At the end of 4 weeks, the clinical improvement of the TCA group (n = 30) was six patients (20%) with no change, one patient (3.3%) with a mild response, 13 patients (43.3%) with a moderate response and 10 patients (33.3%) with a good response. In the cryotherapy group, clinical responses were 12 patients (40%) with no change, four patients (13.3%) with a mild response, 12 patients (40%) with a moderate response and two patients (6.7%) with a good response. There was a statistically significant difference in improvement between the two treatment groups (P = 0.027). According to our results, TCA 40% is more effective for clearance of plantar warts with significantly improved long-term safety profile.

  13. Improved proteomic analysis following trichloroacetic acid extraction of Bacillus anthracis spore proteins.

    PubMed

    Deatherage Kaiser, Brooke L; Wunschel, David S; Sydor, Michael A; Warner, Marvin G; Wahl, Karen L; Hutchison, Janine R

    2015-11-01

    Proteomic analysis of bacterial samples provides valuable information about cellular responses and functions under different environmental pressures. Analysis of cellular proteins is dependent upon efficient extraction from bacterial samples, which can be challenging with increasing complexity and refractory characteristics. While no single method can recover 100% of the bacterial proteins, selected protocols can improve overall protein isolation, peptide recovery, or enrichment for certain classes of proteins. The method presented here is technically simple, does not require specialized equipment such as a mechanical disrupter, and is effective for protein extraction of the particularly challenging sample type of Bacillus anthracis Sterne spores. The ability of Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) extraction to isolate proteins from spores and enrich for spore-specific proteins was compared to the traditional mechanical disruption method of bead beating. TCA extraction improved the total average number of proteins identified within a sample as compared to bead beating (547 vs 495, respectively). Further, TCA extraction enriched for 270 spore proteins, including those typically identified by first isolating the spore coat and exosporium layers. Bead beating enriched for 156 spore proteins more typically identified from whole spore proteome analyses. The total average number of proteins identified was equal using TCA or bead beating for easily lysed samples, such as B. anthracis vegetative cells. As with all assays, supplemental methods such as implementation of an alternative preparation method may simplify sample preparation and provide additional insight to the protein biology of the organism being studied.

  14. Improved Proteomic Analysis Following Trichloroacetic Acid Extraction of Bacillus anthracis Spore Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Brooke LD; Wunschel, David S.; Sydor, Michael A.; Warner, Marvin G.; Wahl, Karen L.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2015-08-07

    Proteomic analysis of bacterial samples provides valuable information about cellular responses and functions under different environmental pressures. Proteomic analysis is dependent upon efficient extraction of proteins from bacterial samples without introducing bias toward extraction of particular protein classes. While no single method can recover 100% of the bacterial proteins, selected protocols can improve overall protein isolation, peptide recovery, or enrich for certain classes of proteins. The method presented here is technically simple and does not require specialized equipment such as a mechanical disrupter. Our data reveal that for particularly challenging samples, such as B. anthracis Sterne spores, trichloroacetic acid extraction improved the number of proteins identified within a sample compared to bead beating (714 vs 660, respectively). Further, TCA extraction enriched for 103 known spore specific proteins whereas bead beating resulted in 49 unique proteins. Analysis of C. botulinum samples grown to 5 days, composed of vegetative biomass and spores, showed a similar trend with improved protein yields and identification using our method compared to bead beating. Interestingly, easily lysed samples, such as B. anthracis vegetative cells, were equally as effectively processed via TCA and bead beating, but TCA extraction remains the easiest and most cost effective option. As with all assays, supplemental methods such as implementation of an alternative preparation method may provide additional insight to the protein biology of the bacteria being studied.

  15. Influence of trichloroacetic acid peeling on the skin stress response system.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ayako; Kanazawa, Nobuo; Li, Hong-Jin; Yonei, Nozomi; Yamamoto, Yuki; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2011-08-01

    Although trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peeling is widely applied for cosmetic treatment of photodamaged skin, the entire biological mechanisms have yet to be determined. The skin stress response system (SSRS) involves corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) products that are locally-generated in response to locally-provided stressors or pro-inflammatory cytokines. This system would restrict tissue damage and restore local homeostasis. To determine the influence of TCA peeling on the SSRS in vitro and in vivo, expressions of POMC, melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R), CRH and CRH receptor 1 (CRHR1) mRNA were examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in Pam212 murine keratinocytes, murine plantar and healthy human abdominal skin specimens after TCA treatment. In addition, their protein expressions as well as those of POMC-derived peptides were examined immunohistochemically. After TCA treatment, transient upregulation of POMC and MC1R mRNA expressions was observed in both murine and human skin, as well as in Pam212. Enhanced POMC protein, recovery of once-impaired MC1R protein, and no enhancement of POMC-derived peptide productions were revealed immunohistochemically in both murine and human epidermis. In contrast, neither expression levels of CRH and CRHR1 mRNA nor epidermal protein were enhanced after TCA application in murine and human skin, except for induction of human CRH mRNA expression. These results suggest that TCA activates the SSRS by inducing POMC and MC1R productions of keratinocytes in the CRH-independent manner, and that the biological effects of POMC itself are responsible for the TCA-induced epidermal SSRS activation.

  16. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) prevents DCA effects on male mouse liver via up-regulation of CYP [correction of CXP] and preservation of BSEP activities.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Moreno; Pozzetti, Laura; Montagnani, Marco; Potenza, Giuseppa; Sabatini, Laura; Antelli, Alessandra; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Roda, Aldo

    2002-08-01

    To investigate whether ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) can prevent metabolic impairment induced by deoxycholic acid (DCA), we evaluated the effects of these bile acids on murine CYP enzymes and the relationship with canalicular bile salt export pump (Bsep) expression. In Swiss Albino CD1 mice, UDCA and DCA were injected intraperitoneally either singly, concurrently, or sequentially (UDCA 1 hour before DCA) at equimolar 24.4 mg/kg body weight (BW) doses. CYP content, NADPH-CYP-c-reductase, and individual mixed function oxidases (MFO) were measured 24 hours later. Modulations were observed mainly in males: whereas DCA decreased MFO activities to various isoenzymes with respect to controls (up to 43%, CYP1A2-linked activity), UDCA boosted them (up to 6-fold, testosterone 16 beta-hydroxylase); concurrent administration of UDCA and DCA provided a preventive effect, enhancing MFO activity with respect to single administration of DCA by up to 4.4-fold in the CYP3A1/2 and CYP2B1/2 (6 beta-hydroxylase) and by 2.1-fold in the CYP2E1 (p-nitrophenol hydroxylase). In males (but not females), sequential administration (UDCA then DCA) produced a rather similar protective pattern, but the extent of recovery was generally smaller. Western immunoblotting results for the most affected isoenzymes (CYP3A1/2 and CYP2E1) and Bsep confirmed that UDCA can both prevent and reduce the CYP-dependent MFO inactivation and Bsep down-regulation caused by DCA. These findings may shed further light on the mechanisms responsible for UDCA's protective role in the treatment of cholestatic liver disease.

  17. Comparison of efficacy of chemical peeling with 25% trichloroacetic acid and 0.1% retinoic acid for facial rejuvenation

    PubMed Central

    Gurel, Mehmet Salih; Gungor, Sule; Tekeli, Omur; Canat, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Skin aging is a problem which negatively affects the psyche of the person, social relations, as well as work life and health and which compels the patients to find appropriate treatment methods. Numerous treatment methods have been developed in order to delay aging and to reduce the aging effects in addition to having a younger, healthier and more beautiful facial appearance. Aim To compare the efficiency, cosmetic results and possible adverse effects of the peeling treatment with 25% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and 0.1% retinoic acid for facial rejuvenation in patients presenting with skin aging. Material and methods Fifty female patients in total presenting with medium and advanced degree skin aging were subject to this study. Two separate treatment groups were formed; the first group underwent chemical skin treatment with 25% TCA while the other group was applied with 0.1% retinoic acid treatment. Following the 4 months’ treatment the patients were controlled three times in total for post lesional hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentation, scars, skin irritation and other possible changes per month. The pretreatment and first follow-up visit, and final control images were comparatively evaluated by three observers via specific software. Results The healing rates of the group subject to retinoic acid were statistically higher (p < 0.05) compared to patients in the TCA group in the final follow-up visit following the treatment according to the first and second observers. On the other hand, according to the third observer, patients applied with retinoic acid presented with higher healing rates compared to those treated with TCA, however; this rate was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The frequency of TCA- and retinoic acid-associated adverse effects was similar in both groups (p > 0.05). As a result of both treatments, a reduction in the quality of life scores as well as a pronounced recovery (p = 0.001) in the quality of life of those patients

  18. THE INDUCTION OF HEPATOCELLULAR NEOPLASIA BY TRICHLOROACETIC ACID ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING WATER OF THE MALE B6C3F1 MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Summary What is the study? The study is a chronic bioassay (2 years) of trichloroacetic acid, a drinking water disinfection by-product, in the male B6C3F1 mouse.
    What is the impact to the field and the Agency?
    The impact of this study will derive from the use of...

  19. Synthesis, characterization and performance of two new Co(II) complexes as electrocatalyst of hydrogen peroxide and trichloroacetic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, RuiRui; Jian, FangFang; Wang, KeFei

    2009-12-01

    Two new complexes of [Co(C 4H 9-bim) 2Cl 2] ( 1) and [Co(C 4H 9-bim) 2(SCN) 2] ( 2) (bim = benzimidazole) were synthesized and the structures were characterized by X-ray crystallography, IR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The cobalt atoms of the two complexes both adopt distorted tetrahedral geometry. Two new cobalt complexes were used as bulk modifier to fabricate two carbon paste electrodes (Co-CPE : 1-CPE and 2-CPE). The electrochemical behaviors of two modified electrodes were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. They have similar electrochemical behaviors and good electrocatalytic activities toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide and trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Two modified electrodes have good reproducibility, high stability, low detection limit, technical simplicity and possibility of rapid preparation, which is important for practical application.

  20. Application of Carbon-Microsphere-Modified Electrodes for Electrochemistry of Hemoglobin and Electrocatalytic Sensing of Trichloroacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Cheng; Yan, Li-Jun; Shi, Fan; Niu, Xue-Liang; Huang, Guo-Lei; Zheng, Cai-Juan; Sun, Wei

    2015-01-01

    By using the hydrothermal method, carbon microspheres (CMS) were fabricated and used for electrode modification. The characteristics of CMS were investigated using various techniques. The biocompatible sensing platform was built by immobilizing hemoglobin (Hb) on the micrometer-sized CMS-modified electrode with a layer of chitosan membrane. On the cyclic voltammogram, a couple of quasi-reversible cathodic and anodic peaks appeared, showing that direct electrochemistry of Hb with the working electrode was achieved. The catalytic reduction peak currents of the bioelectrode to trichloroacetic acid was established in the linear range of 2.0~70.0 mmol·L−1 accompanied by a detection limit of 0.30 mmol·L−1 (3σ). The modified electrode displayed favorable sensitivity, good reproducibility and stability, which suggests that CMS is promising for fabricating third-generation bioelectrochemical sensors. PMID:26703621

  1. Universal sample preparation method integrating trichloroacetic acid/acetone precipitation with phenol extraction for crop proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Xiong, Erhui; Wang, Wei; Scali, Monica; Cresti, Mauro

    2014-02-01

    Crop plants contain large amounts of secondary compounds that interfere with protein extraction and gel-based proteomic analysis. Thus, a protein extraction protocol that can be easily applied to various crop materials with minimal optimization is essential. Here we describe a universal protocol for total protein extraction involving trichloroacetic acid (TCA)/acetone precipitation followed by SDS and phenol extraction. Through SDS extraction, the proteins precipitated by the TCA/acetone treatment can be fully resolubilized and then further purified by phenol extraction. This protocol combines TCA/acetone precipitation, which aggressively removes nonprotein compounds, and phenol extraction, which selectively dissolves proteins, resulting in effective purification of proteins from crop tissues. This protocol can also produce high-quality protein preparations from various recalcitrant tissues, and therefore it has a wide range of applications in crop proteomic analysis. Designed to run on a small scale, this protocol can be completed within 5 h.

  2. Temporal variability in urinary levels of drinking water disinfection byproducts dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid among men

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Xin; Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Le; Huang, Yue-Hui; Lu, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Peng; He, Meng-Jie; Huang, Xin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2014-11-15

    Urinary haloacetic acids (HAAs), such as dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), have been suggested as potential biomarkers of exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs). However, variable exposure to and the short elimination half-lives of these biomarkers can result in considerable variability in urinary measurements, leading to exposure misclassification. Here we examined the variability of DCAA and TCAA levels in the urine among eleven men who provided urine samples on 8 days over 3 months. The urinary concentrations of DCAA and TCAA were measured by gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detection. We calculated the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) to characterize the within-person and between-person variances and computed the sensitivity and specificity to assess how well single or multiple urine collections accurately determined personal 3-month average DCAA and TCAA levels. The within-person variance was much higher than the between-person variance for all three sample types (spot, first morning, and 24-h urine samples) for DCAA (ICC=0.08–0.37) and TCAA (ICC=0.09–0.23), regardless of the sampling interval. A single-spot urinary sample predicted high (top 33%) 3-month average DCAA and TCAA levels with high specificity (0.79 and 0.78, respectively) but relatively low sensitivity (0.47 and 0.50, respectively). Collecting two or three urine samples from each participant improved the classification. The poor reproducibility of the measured urinary DCAA and TCAA concentrations indicate that a single measurement may not accurately reflect individual long-term exposure. Collection of multiple urine samples from one person is an option for reducing exposure classification errors in studies exploring the effects of DBP exposure on reproductive health. - Highlights: • We evaluated the variability of DCAA and TCAA levels in the urine among men. • Urinary DCAA and TCAA levels varied greatly over a 3-month

  3. Evaluation of dynamic headspace with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for the determination of 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethanol, and trichloroacetic acid in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Johns, Douglas O; Dills, Russell L; Morgan, Michael S

    2005-03-25

    A sensitive and reproducible method is described for the analysis of trichloroacetic acid in urine and 1,1,1-trichloroethane in blood using dynamic headspace GC/MS. Samples were analyzed using the soil module of a modified purge and trap autosampler to facilitate the use of disposable purging vessels. Coefficients of variation were below 3.5% for both analytes, and response was linear in the range of 0.01-7.0 microg/ml for trichloroacetic acid and 0.9 ng/ml-2.2 microg/ml for 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Attempts at using dynamic headspace for the analysis of trichloroethanol in urine were unsuccessful.

  4. Deoxycholic acid (DCA) confers an intestinal phenotype on esophageal squamous epithelium via induction of the stemness-associated reprogramming factors OCT4 and SOX2.

    PubMed

    Shen, Caifei; Zhang, Haoxiang; Wang, Pu; Feng, Ji; Li, Jingwen; Xu, Yin; Zhang, Anran; Shao, Shunzi; Yu, Xiaona; Yan, Wu; Xia, Yiju; Hu, Jiali; Fang, Dianchun

    2016-06-02

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is essentially a metaplasia in which the normal stratified squamous epithelium is replaced by columnar epithelium. This study focuses on the involvement of OCT4 and SOX2, 2 key cell-reprogramming factors, in the deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced expression of the intestinal hallmarks Cdx2 and MUC2 using both in vivo and in vitro models. Up-regulated expression of OCT4 and down-regulated expression of SOX2 were observed in BE compared with normal esophagus and esophagitis. Consistent with the data in vivo, DCA induced time-dependent expression of OCT4 at both the mRNA and protein levels and decreased nuclear expression of SOX2 in Het-1A cells. Down-regulation of OCT4 expression by siRNA abrogated DCA-induced expression of Cdx2 and MUC2, whereas siRNA against SOX2 significantly upregulated the expression of both Cdx2 and MUC2. Our data indicate that both OCT4 and SOX2 play important roles in the development of BE triggered by bile acid reflux.

  5. Validation of urinary trichloroacetic acid as a biomarker of exposure to drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiping; Gabos, Stephan; Schopflocher, Donald; Li, Xing-Fang; Gati, Wendy P; Hrudey, Steve E

    2009-09-01

    Disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water represent a public health issue and a challenge for epidemiology to provide evidence towards the causation of various hypothesized health effects. Validation of a biomarker of exposure to DBPs is a strategy to achieve progress which has been advocated. The objective of this study was to validate urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) excretion as a biomarker of exposure to DBPs in an experimental exposure cohort. A total of 52 healthy women participated in the study. Participants consumed supplied tap water for 15 d and provided urine and blood samples for TCAA measurements. The findings revealed that (1) background levels of TCAA in urine and blood were readily detectable, (2) TCAA levels in blood and urine increased with increased amounts of TCAA ingested, (3) the correlations between measurements of TCAA ingestion and urinary excretion were modest (r=0.66, p<0.001) based on one days' sampling and high (r=0.77-0.83, p<0.001) based on two to four days' sampling, (4) the correlations between measurements of TCAA ingestion and blood TCAA concentration were high (r=0.80, p<0.001) and (5) multiple days' urinary TCAA measures improved the prediction of TCAA ingestion through urinary TCAA excretion. TCAA can be a valid biomarker of exposure for DBPs in drinking water.

  6. Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic trichloroacetic acid sensor utilizing layer of silver nanoparticles and chitosan doped hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Semwal, Vivek; Shrivastav, Anand M; Gupta, Banshi D

    2017-02-10

    In this study, we report a silver nanoparticles/chitosan doped hydrogel-based fiber optic sensor for the detection of trichloroacetic acid (TCA). The sensor is based on the combined phenomenon of localized and propagating surface plasmons. The sensing relies on the interaction of TCA with silver nanoparticles (AgNP) which results in the electron transfer between the negative group of TCA and positive amino group of AgNP stabilizer (chitosan). This alters the mechanical properties/refractive index of the AgNP embedded hydrogel matrix as well as the refractive index of the AgNP. The change in refractive index of both in turn changes the effective refractive index of the nanocomposite hydrogel layer which can be determined using the Maxwell-Garnet Theory. Four stage optimization of the probe fabrication parameters is performed to obtain the best performance of the sensing probe. The sensor operates in the TCA concentration range 0-120 μm which is harmful for the humans and environment. The shift in peak extinction wavelength observed for the same TCA concentration range is 42 nm. The sensor has the linearity range for the TCA concentration range of 40-100 μm. The sensor possesses high sensitivity, selectivity and numerous other advantages such as ease of handling, quick response, modest cost and capability of online monitoring and remote sensing.

  7. Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic trichloroacetic acid sensor utilizing layer of silver nanoparticles and chitosan doped hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semwal, Vivek; Shrivastav, Anand M.; Gupta, Banshi D.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we report a silver nanoparticles/chitosan doped hydrogel-based fiber optic sensor for the detection of trichloroacetic acid (TCA). The sensor is based on the combined phenomenon of localized and propagating surface plasmons. The sensing relies on the interaction of TCA with silver nanoparticles (AgNP) which results in the electron transfer between the negative group of TCA and positive amino group of AgNP stabilizer (chitosan). This alters the mechanical properties/refractive index of the AgNP embedded hydrogel matrix as well as the refractive index of the AgNP. The change in refractive index of both in turn changes the effective refractive index of the nanocomposite hydrogel layer which can be determined using the Maxwell-Garnet Theory. Four stage optimization of the probe fabrication parameters is performed to obtain the best performance of the sensing probe. The sensor operates in the TCA concentration range 0-120 μm which is harmful for the humans and environment. The shift in peak extinction wavelength observed for the same TCA concentration range is 42 nm. The sensor has the linearity range for the TCA concentration range of 40-100 μm. The sensor possesses high sensitivity, selectivity and numerous other advantages such as ease of handling, quick response, modest cost and capability of online monitoring and remote sensing.

  8. [Comparison of usefulness of lipopolysaccharides extracted by phenol and trichloroacetic acid from Salmonella Typhimurium and Enteritidis for serodiagnosis of salmonelosis].

    PubMed

    Rastawicki, Waldemar; Rokosz, Natalia; Jagielski, Marek

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis are the two predominant serogroups, responsible for about 80% of all human cases of salmonelosis in Poland. Therefore we compared the usefulness of lipopolysaccharides antigens extracted by phenol (Westphal method) and trichloroacetic acid (Boivine method) from Salmonella Typhimurium and Enteritidis in ELISA method for the determination of antibodies. We used one home - made LPS antigen and two others commercially available antigens from SIGMA - Aldrich. Our study showed that the presence of antibodies was found in 35 (74.5%) sera from 47 samples from patients with suspected salmonelosis. There was no significant statistical differences of frequency of appearance of antibodies to all three Salmonella antigens in sera from patients with salmonelosis and in sera from control group. This study showed that all three antigens are useful for determination of IgA, IgG, IgM antibodies for Salmonella serogroup B and D in routine serological diagnosis of salmonelosis. However, it should be considered possibility of cross-reaction between LPS antigen of Salmonella and antibodies to Yersinia enterocolitica which could be correlated with similarity between somatic antigens of these two pathogens.

  9. Optimal Concentration of 2,2,2-Trichloroacetic Acid for Protein Precipitation Based on Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Albert N; Ezoulin, Miezan JM; Youm, Ibrahima; Youan, Bi-Botti C

    2014-01-01

    For low protein concentrations containing biological samples (in proteomics) and for non proteinaceous compound assays (in bioanalysis), there is a critical need for a simple, fast, and cost-effective protein enrichment or precipitation method. However, 2,2,2-trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is traditionally used for protein precipitation at ineffective concentrations for very low protein containing samples. It is hypothesized that response surface methodology, can be used to systematically identify the optimal TCA concentration for protein precipitation in a wider concentration range. To test this hypothesis, a central composite design is used to assess the effects of two factors (X1 = volume of aqueous solution of protein, and X2 = volume of TCA solution 6.1N) on the optical absorbance of the supernatant (Y1), and the percentage of protein precipitated (Y2). Using either bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein or human urine (with 20 ppm protein content), 4% w/v (a saddle point) is the optimal concentration of the TCA solution for protein precipitation that is visualized by SDS-PAGE analysis. At this optimal concentration, the Y2-values range from 76.26 to 92.67% w/w for 0.016 to 2 mg/mL of BSA solution. It is also useful for protein enrichment and xenobiotic analysis in protein-free supernatant as applied to tenofovir (a model HIV microbicide). In these conditions, the limit of detection and limit of quantitation of tenofovir are respectively 0.0014 mg/mL and 0.0042 mg/mL. This optimal concentration of TCA provides optimal condition for protein purification and analysis of any xenobiotic compound like tenofovir. PMID:25750762

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Topical 10% Potassium Hydroxide and 30% Trichloroacetic Acid in the Treatment of Plane Warts

    PubMed Central

    Jayaprasad, Sandhaya; Subramaniyan, Radhakrishnan; Devgan, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Background: Warts are benign proliferations of skin and mucosa caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Plane warts are caused by HPV types 3, 10, 28, and 41, occurring mostly in children and young adults. Among the treatment modalities, topical application of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is age old. Potassium hydroxide (KOH) has a keratolytic effect on virus-infected cells. It is less irritating, less painful, less scar forming, and can be safely used in children too. Hence, it could be a better topical agent in the treatment of plane warts. Aims and Objectives: To compare the safety and efficacy of topical 10% KOH with 30% TCA in the treatment of plane warts. Materials and Methods: Sixty consecutive patients with plane warts were randomly assigned into two arms of thirty patients each; arm A received topical 10% KOH and arm B received topical 30% TCA as a once weekly application until the complete clearance of warts or a maximum period of 12 weeks. Results: Statistically no significant difference (P = 0.07) was found between the objective therapeutic response to 10% KOH and 30% TCA at the end of study (12 weeks). However, subjective response to 10% KOH was better and statistically significant (P = 0.03). There was no recurrence of warts seen on follow-up for 3 months of complete responders in both the arms. Conclusion: 10% KOH is found to be equally effective in the treatment of plane warts compared to 30% TCA with the advantage of faster onset of action and tendency of completely clearing warts with fewer side effects. PMID:27904181

  11. Monooxygenase-mediated 1,2-dichloroethane degradation by Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hage, J.C.; Hartmans, S.

    1999-06-01

    A bacterial strain, designated Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1, was isolated from a 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA)-degrading biofilm. Strain DCA1 utilizes DCA as the sole carbon and energy source and does not require additional organic nutrients, such as vitamins, for optimal growth. The affinity of strain DCA1 for DCA is very high, with a K{sub m} value below the detection limit of 0.5 {micro}M. Instead of a hydrolytic dehalogenation, as in other DCA utilizers, the first step in DCA degradation in strain DCA1 is an oxidation reaction. Oxygen and NAD(P)H are required for this initial step. Propene was converted to 1,2-epoxypropane by DCA-grown cells and competitively inhibited DCA degradation. The authors concluded that a monooxygenase is responsible for the first step in DCA degradation in strain DCA1. Oxidation of DCA probably results in the formation of the unstable intermediate 1,2-dichloroethanol, which spontaneously releases chloride, yielding chloroacetaldehyde. The DCA degradation pathway is strain DCA1 proceeds from chloroacetaldehyde via chloroacetic acid and presumably glycolic acid, which is similar to degradation routes observed in other DCA-utilizing bacteria.

  12. Direct analysis for urinary protein with biuret reagent, with use of urine ultrafiltrate blanking: comparison with a manual biuret method involving trichloroacetic acid precipitation.

    PubMed

    Eckfeldt, J H; Kershaw, M J; Dahl, I I

    1984-03-01

    We describe a method for measuring urinary protein with a centrifugal analyzer. Biuret reagent is used, and blanking with an ultrafiltrate of urine eliminates interferences from the nonprotein, biuret-positive chromogens in urine. We compare results by this new method with those by a manual method in which trichloroacetic acid precipitation and biuret reagent are used. The new method shows good precision and excellent correlation (r = 0.997) with the manual method. The ease and convenience of this assay should make this a useful method for the routine clinical laboratory.

  13. Lack of formic acid production in rat hepatocytes and human renal proximal tubule cells exposed to chloral hydrate or trichloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Lock, Edward A; Reed, Celia J; McMillan, Joellyn M; Oatis, John E; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2007-02-12

    The industrial solvent trichloroethylene (TCE) and its major metabolites have been shown to cause formic aciduria in male rats. We have examined whether chloral hydrate (CH) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA), known metabolites of TCE, produce an increase in formic acid in vitro in cultures of rat hepatocytes or human renal proximal tubule cells (HRPTC). The metabolism and cytotoxicity of CH was also examined to establish that the cells were metabolically active and not compromised by toxicity. Rat hepatocytes and HRPTC were cultured in serum-free medium and then treated with 0.3-3mM CH for 3 days or 0.03-3mM CH for 10 days, respectively and formic acid production, metabolism to trichloroethanol (TCE-OH) and TCA and cytotoxicity determined. No increase in formic acid production in rat hepatocytes or HRPTC exposed to CH was observed over and above that due to chemical degradation, neither was formic acid production observed in rat hepatocytes exposed to TCA. HRPTC metabolized CH to TCE-OH and TCA with a 12-fold greater capacity to form TCE-OH versus TCA. Rat hepatocytes exhibited a 1.6-fold and three-fold greater capacity than HRPTC to form TCE-OH and TCA, respectively. CH and TCA were not cytotoxic to rat hepatocytes at concentrations up to 3mM/day for 3 days. With HRPTC, one sample showed no cytotoxicity to CH at concentrations up to 3mM/day for 10 days, while in another cytotoxicity was seen at 1mM/day for 3 days. In summary, increased formic acid production was not observed in rat hepatocytes or HRPTC exposed to TCE metabolites, suggesting that the in vivo response cannot be modelled in vitro. CH was toxic to HRPTC at millimolar concentrations/day over 10 days, while glutathione derived metabolites of TCE were toxic at micromolar concentrations/day over 10 days [Lock, E.A., Reed, C.J., 2006. Trichloroethylene: mechanisms of renal toxicity and renal cancer and relevance to risk assessment. Toxicol. Sci. 19, 313-331] supporting the view that glutathione derived

  14. Effect of chloroacetic acids on the kidneys

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.E.

    1986-11-01

    The effects of dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) administered in drinking water were studied. At high concentrations of either compound, weight loss, or failure to gain weight, was observed. Food consumption was also decreased; both effects were attributed to decreased water consumption. Renal phosphate-dependent glutaminase activity was increased at the highest concentration, and urinary ammonia was also increased. These changes indicated renal adaptation to an acid load. DCA, in pharmacological doses, impairs glucoenogenesis from lactate in part by decreasing lactate availability. Similar tendencies were observed in the present studies; however, female rats showed a biphasic response. At lower DCA concentrations, tissue lactate and plasma glucose concentrations were increased, whereas at higher concentrations of DCA, the expected decreases were observed.

  15. Effect of chloroacetic acids on the kidneys.

    PubMed

    Davis, M E

    1986-11-01

    The effects of dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) administered in drinking water were studied. At high concentrations of either compound, weight loss, or failure to gain weight, was observed. Food consumption was also decreased; both effects were attributed to decreased water consumption. Renal phosphate-dependent glutaminase activity was increased at the highest concentration, and urinary ammonia was also increased. These changes indicated renal adaptation to an acid load. DCA, in pharmacological doses, impairs glucoenogenesis from lactate in part by decreasing lactate availability. Similar tendencies were observed in the present studies; however, female rats showed a biphasic response. At lower DCA concentrations, tissue lactate and plasma glucose concentrations were increased, whereas at higher concentrations of DCA, the expected decreases were observed.

  16. Metabolomics reveals trichloroacetate as a major contributor to trichloroethylene-induced metabolic alterations in mouse urine and serum.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Krausz, Kristopher W; Tanaka, Naoki; Li, Fei; Qu, Aijuan; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2013-11-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE)-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis is believed to be mediated in part by activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). However, the contribution of the two TCE metabolites, dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) to the toxicity of TCE, remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the metabolite profiles in serum and urine upon exposure of mice to TCE, to aid in determining the metabolic response to TCE exposure and the contribution of DCA and TCA to TCE toxicity. C57BL/6 mice were administered TCE, TCA, or DCA, and urine and serum subjected to ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOFMS)-based global metabolomics analysis. The ions were identified through searching metabolomics databases and by comparison with authentic standards, and quantitated using multiple reactions monitoring. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction of mRNA, biochemical analysis, and liver histology were also performed. TCE exposure resulted in a decrease in urine of metabolites involved in fatty acid metabolism, resulting from altered expression of PPARα target genes. TCE treatment also induced altered phospholipid homeostasis in serum, as revealed by increased serum lysophosphatidylcholine 18:0 and 18:1, and phosphatidylcholine metabolites. TCA administration revealed similar metabolite profiles in urine and serum upon TCE exposure, which correlated with a more robust induction of PPARα target gene expression associated with TCA than DCA treatment. These data show the metabolic response to TCE exposure and demonstrate that TCA is the major contributor to TCE-induced metabolite alterations observed in urine and serum.

  17. Severe ulceration with impaired induction of growth factors and cytokines in keratinocytes after trichloroacetic acid application on TRPV1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-jin; Kanazawa, Nobuo; Kimura, Ayako; Kaminaka, Chikako; Yonei, Nozomi; Yamamoto, Yuki; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a highly polymodal TRP channel activated by various stimuli, including capsaicin, heat and acids. TRPV1 expression can be detected widely but is highest in sensory neurons and its activation alerts the body to noxious signals via neurogenic pain. Although TRPV1 is reportedly localized in the epidermis, it remains unclear how TRPV1 is involved in the chemical peeling processes with cytotoxic acids. Therefore, in this study, the role of TRPV1 on the effects of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peeling was assessed using TRPV1-deficient mice. Following the confirmation of TRPV1 expression in murine keratinocytes with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry, the effects of TCA on TRPV1-deficient mouse skin were compared with those on wild-type mouse skin. Our results indicated that TRPV1 expression was not required for TCA-induced DNA damage, as shown by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling, but was indispensable for the TCA-induced production of distinct growth factors and cytokines by keratinocytes. Ulceration after TCA peeling was actually more severe in the absence of TRPV1, suggesting that the TRPV1-mediated epidermal production of growth factors and cytokines affected the damaging and healing processes of TCA-peeled skin to induce rejuvenation.

  18. Dechlorination of Trichloroacetic Acid Using a Noble Metal-Free Graphene-Cu Foam Electrode via Direct Cathodic Reduction and Atomic H.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ran; Li, Ning; Lan, Huachun; Zhao, Xu; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui; Sun, Meng

    2016-04-05

    A three-dimensional graphene-copper (3D GR-Cu) foam electrode prepared by chemical vapor deposition method exhibited superior electrocatalytic activity toward the dechlorination of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) as compared to the Cu foam electrode. The cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectra analysis confirmed that GR accelerated the electron transfer from the cathode surface to TCAA. With the applied cathode potential of -1.2 V (vs SCE), 95.3% of TCAA (500 μg/L) was removed within 20 min at pH 6.8. TCAA dechlorination at the Cu foam electrode was enhanced at acidic pH, while a slight pH effect was observed at the GR-Cu foam electrode with a significant inhibition for Cu leaching. The electrocatalytic dechlorination of TCAA was accomplished via a combined stepwise and concerted pathway on both electrodes, whereas the concerted pathway was efficiently promoted on the GR-Cu foam electrode. The direct reduction by electrons was responsible for TCAA dechlorination at Cu foam electrode, while at GR-Cu foam electrode, the surface-adsorbed atomic H* also contributed to TCAA dechlorination owing to the chemical storage of hydrogen in the GR structure. Finally, the potential applicability of GR-Cu foam was revealed by its stability in the electrocatalytic dechlorination over 25 cycles.

  19. Urinary trichloroacetic acid levels and semen quality: A hospital-based cross-sectional study in Wuhan, China

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shao-Hua; Li, Yu-Feng; Tan, Yin-Feng; Zheng, Dan; Liu, Ai-Lin; Xie, Hong; and others

    2011-02-15

    Toxicological studies indicate an association between exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) and impaired male reproductive health in animals. However, epidemiological evidence in humans is still limited. We conducted a hospital-based cross-sectional study to investigate the effect of exposure to DBPs on semen quality in humans. Between May 2008 and July 2008, we recruited 418 male partners in sub-fertile couples seeking infertility medical instruction or assisted reproduction services from the Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China. Major semen parameters analyzed included sperm concentration, motility, and morphology. Exposure to DBPs was estimated by their urinary creatinine-adjusted trichloroacetic (TCAA) concentrations that were measured with the gas chromatography/electron capture detection method. We used linear regression to assess the relationship between exposure to DBPs and semen quality. According to the World Health Organization criteria (<20 million/mL for sperm concentration and <50% motile for sperm motility) and threshold value recommended by Guzick (<9% for sperm morphology), there were 265 men with all parameters at or above the reference values, 33 men below the reference sperm concentration, 151 men below the reference sperm motility, and 6 men below the reference sperm morphology. The mean (median) urinary creatinine-adjusted TCAA concentration was 9.2 (5.1) {mu}g/g creatinine. Linear regression analyses indicated no significant association of sperm concentration, sperm count, and sperm morphology with urinary TCAA levels. Compared with those in the lowest quartile of creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentrations, subjects in the second and third quartiles had a decrease of 5.1% (95% CI: 0.6%, 9.7%) and 4.7% (95% CI: 0.2%, 9.2%) in percent motility, respectively. However, these associations were not significant after adjustment for age, abstinence time, and smoking status. The present study provides suggestive but inconclusive evidence of the

  20. Highly sensitive amperometric sensor for micromolar detection of trichloroacetic acid based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes and Fe(II)-phtalocyanine modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Kurd, Masoumeh; Salimi, Abdollah; Hallaj, Rahman

    2013-04-01

    A highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the detection of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is developed by subsequent immobilization of phthalocyanine (Pc) and Fe(II) onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The GC/MWCNTs/Pc/Fe(II) electrode showed a pair of well-defined and nearly reversible redox couple correspondent to (Fe(III)Pc/Fe(II)Pc) with surface-confined characteristics. The surface coverage (Γ) and heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (ks) of immobilized Fe(II)-Pc were calculated as 1.26×10(-10) mol cm(-2) and 28.13 s(-1), respectively. Excellent electrocatalytic activity of the proposed GC/MWCNTs/Pc/Fe(II) system toward TCA reduction has been indicated and the three consequent irreversible peaks for electroreduction of CCl3COOH to CH3COOH have been clearly seen. The observed chronoamperometric currents are linearly increased with the concentration of TCA at concentration range up to 20mM. Detection limit and sensitivity of the modified electrode were 2.0 μM and 0.10 μA μM(-1) cm(-2), respectively. The applicability of the sensor for TCA detection in real samples was tested. The obtained results suggest that the proposed system can serve as a promising electrochemical platform for TCA detection.

  1. Activation and attenuation of apoptosis of CD4+ T cells following in vivo exposure to two common environmental toxicants, trichloroacetaldehyde hydrate and trichloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Blossom, Sarah J; Pumford, Neil R; Gilbert, Kathleen M

    2004-11-01

    Exposure to occupationally relevant concentrations of the environmental pollutant, trichloroethylene (TCE), in the drinking water of autoimmune-prone MRL+/+ mice has been shown to promote the generation of lupus and autoimmune hepatitis in association with the activation of Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-producing CD4+ T cells. Since blocking TCE metabolism suppressed the TCE-induced alteration in immune function, the present study was initiated to determine whether the major metabolites of TCE, trichloroacetaldehyde hydrate (TCAH) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) could also mediate these immunoregulatory affects in vivo. TCAH and TCA were administered to the drinking water of MRL+/+ mice for 4 weeks. CD4+ T cells from TCAH and TCA-treated MRL+/+ mice, unlike CD4+ T cells from control mice, demonstrated functional and phenotypic signs of activation, as evidenced by increased IFN-gamma production in association with the increased percentage of CD62L(lo) CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, it was also found that the CD4+ T cells from the TCAH and TCA-treated mice showed a decreased susceptibility to the activation-induced cell death (AICD) form of apoptosis following re-stimulation in vitro. By demonstrating that TCAH and TCA can activate CD4+ T cells and inhibit their apoptosis following in vivo exposure represents a mechanism by which environmental toxicants may induce or accelerate the development of autoimmune disease.

  2. Split-face comparative study of 1550 nm fractional photothermolysis and trichloroacetic acid 15% chemical peeling for facial melasma in Asian skin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung-Phil; Han, Seung-Seog; Choi, Seok-Joo; Kim, Myoung-Shin; Won, Chong-Hyun; Lee, Mi-Woo; Choi, Jee-Ho; Moon, Kee-Chan; Kim, Youn Jin; Chang, Sung-Eun

    2012-04-01

    Fractional photothermolysis (FP) therapy and chemical peels have been reported to be effective in patients with recalcitrant melasma. However, there is little information to compare the efficacy of single treatment session in Asian women. The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy, long-lasting outcomes and safety of a single session of 1550-nm erbium-doped FP in Asian patients, compared with trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peel with a medium depth. Eighteen Korean women (Fitzpatrick skin type III or IV) with moderate-to-severe bilateral melasma were randomly treated with a single session of 1550-nm FP on one cheek, and with a 15% TCA peel on the other cheek. Outcome measures included an objective melasma area severity index and subjective patient-rated overall improvement at 4 and 12 weeks after treatment. Melasma lesions were significantly improved 4 weeks after either treatment, but melasma recurred at 12 weeks. Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation developed in 28% of patients at 4 weeks but resolved in all but one patient by 12 weeks. There was no difference between FP treatment and TCA peeling with respect to any outcome measure. FP laser and TCA peel treatments were equally effective and safe when used to treat moderate-to-severe melasma, but neither treatment was long-lasting. We suggest that multiple or periodic maintenance treatments and/or supplemental procedures may be required for the successful treatment of melasma in Asian women.

  3. Synthesis and application of reduced graphene oxide and molecularly imprinted polymers composite in chemo sensor for trichloroacetic acid detection in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibechu, Rose W.; Mamo, Messai A.; Msagati, Titus A. M.; Sampath, S.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    This work presents the fabrication of a simple, cheap and fast thin film chemo sensor for detection of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in aqueous solutions. Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) based molecular imprinted polymers (MIP) chemo-sensor has been developed. The recognition of TCAA was achieved by imprinted polymers synthesized by copolymerization of 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) and a crosslinking monomer ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDGMA) in acetonitrile using bulk polymerization method. Adsorption studies to determine the rebinding properties of the MIP with the template were conducted using UV Visible spectrophotometer. The fabricated sensor exhibited high recognition ability and affinity for HAA in comparison with the non-imprinted one which was employed as a control, this indicated that the MIP could selectively rebind with TCAA. Reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was used to improve conductivity of the sensor; RGO was obtained from reduction of graphene oxide (GO) synthesized using modified Stauddmer and Hummers method. Polysulphone was used in solution blending of MIP and RGO to form a hybrid which was deposited between two gold plated electrodes by spin coating to form a thin film. The performance of the imprinted sensor was studied using a homemade circuit. The results demonstrate that the sensor based on TCAA-imprinted polymer is fast, cheap and sensitive screening method of TCAA in drinking water.

  4. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes with water-insoluble porphyrin in ionic liquid: direct electrochemistry and highly sensitive amperometric biosensing for trichloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenwen; Lei, Jianping; Ju, Huangxian

    2009-01-01

    A functional composite of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with hematin, a water-insoluble porphyrin, was first prepared in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF(6)]) ionic liquid. The novel composite in ionic liquid was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and showed a pair of direct redox peaks of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple. The composite-[BMIM][PF(6)]-modified glassy carbon electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in neutral media due to the synergic effect among SWNTs, [BMIM][PF(6)], and porphyrin, which led to a highly sensitive and stable amperometric biosensor for TCA with a linear range from 9.0x10(-7) to 1.4x10(-4) M. The detection limit was 3.8x10(-7) M at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The TCA biosensor had good analytical performance, such as rapid response, good reproducibility, and acceptable accuracy, and could be successfully used for the detection of residual TCA in polluted water. The functional composite in ionic liquid provides a facile way to not only obtain the direct electrochemistry of water-insoluble porphyrin, but also construct novel biosensors for monitoring analytes in real environmental samples.

  5. Mode of action of liver tumor induction by trichloroethylene and its metabolites, trichloroacetate and dichloroacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, R J

    2000-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) induces liver cancer in mice but not in rats. Three metabolites of TCE may contribute--chloral hydrate (CH), dichloroacetate (DCA), and trichloroacetate (TCA). CH and TCA appear capable of only inducing liver tumors in mice, but DCA is active in rats as well. The concentrations of TCA in blood required to induce liver cancer approach the mM range. Concentrations of DCA in blood associated with carcinogenesis are in the sub-microM range. The carcinogenic activity of CH is largely dependent on its conversion to TCA and/or DCA. TCA is a peroxisome proliferator in the same dose range that induces liver cancer. Mice with targeted disruptions of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-alpha) are insensitive to the liver cancer-inducing properties of other peroxisome proliferators. Human cells do not display the responses associated with PPAR-alpha that are observed in rodents. This may be attributed to lower levels of expressed PPAR-alpha in human liver. DCA treatment produces liver tumors with a different phenotype than TCA. Its tumorigenic effects are closely associated with differential effects on cell replication rates in tumors, normal hepatocytes, and suppression of apoptosis. Growth of DCA-induced tumors has been shown to arrest after cessation of treatment. The DCA and TCA adequately account for the hepatocarcinogenic responses to TCE. Low-level exposure to TCE is not likely to induce liver cancer in humans. Higher exposures to TCE could affect sensitive populations. Sensitivity could be based on different metabolic capacities for TCE or its metabolites or result from certain chronic diseases that have a genetic basis. PMID:10807555

  6. The use of trichloroacetic acid imprinted polymer coated quartz crystal microbalance as a screening method for determination of haloacetic acids in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Suedee, Roongnapa; Intakong, Wimon; Dickert, Franz L

    2006-08-15

    An alternative screening method for haloacetic acids (HAAs) disinfection by-products in drinking water is described. The method is based on the use of piezoelectric quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) transducing system, where the electrode is coated with a trichloacetic acid-molecularly imprinted polymer (TCAA-MIP). This MIP comprises a crosslinked poly(ethyleneglycoldimethacrylate-co-4-vinylpyridine). The coated QCM is able to specifically detect the analytes in water samples in terms of the mass change in relation to acid-base interactions of the analytes with the MIP. The TCAA-MIP coated QCM showed high specificity for the determination of TCAA in aqueous solutions containing inorganic anions, but its sensitivity reduced in water samples containing hydrochloric acid due to a mass loss at the sensor surface. Cross-reactivity studies with HAA analogs (dichloro-, monochloro-, tribromo-, dibromo-, and monobromo-acetic acids) and non-structurally related TCAA molecules (acetic acid and malonic acid) indicated that recognition of the structurally related TCAA compounds by the TCAA-MIP-based QCM is due to a carboxylic acid functional group, and probably involves a combination of both size and shape selectivity. The total response time of sensor is in the order of 10min. The achieved limits of detection for HAAs (20-50mugl(-1)) are at present higher than the actual concentrations found in real-life samples, but below the guidelines for the maximum permissible levels (60mugl(-1) for mixed HAAs). Recovery studies with drinking water samples spiked with TCAA or spiked with mixtures of HAAs revealed the reproducibility and precision of the method. The present work has demonstrated that the proposed assay can be a fast, reliable and inexpensive screening method for HAA contaminants in water samples, but further refinement is required to improve the limits of detection.

  7. Species and strain sensitivity to the induction of peroxisome proliferation by chloroacetic acids.

    PubMed

    DeAngelo, A B; Daniel, F B; McMillan, L; Wernsing, P; Savage, R E

    1989-11-01

    B6C3F1 mice and Sprague-Dawley rats were provided drinking water containing 6-31 mM (1-5 g/liter) trichloroacetic acid (TCA), 8-39 mM (1-5 g/liter) dichloroacetic acid (DCA), or 11-32 mM (1-3 g/liter) monochloroacetic acid (MCA) for 14 days. TCA and DCA, but not MCA, increased the mouse relative liver weight in a dose-dependent manner. Rat liver weights were not altered by TCA or DCA treatment, but were depressed by MCA. Hepatic peroxisome proliferation was demonstrated by (1) increased palmitoyl-CoA oxidase and carnitine acetyl transferase activities, (2) appearance of a peroxisome proliferation-associated protein, and (3) morphometric analysis of electron micrographs. Mouse peroxisome proliferation was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner by both TCA and DCA, but only the high DCA concentration (39 mM) increased rat liver peroxisome proliferation. MCA was ineffective in both species. Three other mouse strains (Swiss-Webster, C3H, and C57BL/6) and two strains of rat (F344 and Osborne-Mendel) were examined for sensitivity to TCA. TCA (12 and 31 mM) effectively enhanced peroxisome proliferation in all mouse strains, especially the C57BL/6. A more modest enhancement in the Osborne-Mendel (288%) and F344 rat (167%) was seen. Dosing F344 rats with 200 mg/kg TCA in water or corn oil for 10 days increased peroxisome proliferation 179 and 278%, respectively, above the vehicle controls. These studies demonstrate that the mouse is more sensitive than the rat with respect to the enhancement of liver peroxisome proliferation by TCA and DCA and suggest that if peroxisome proliferation is critical for the induction of hepatic cancer by TCA and DCA, then the rat should be less sensitive or refractory to tumor induction.

  8. Vitamin E Restriction in the Diet Enhances Phagocytic Activation by Dichloroacetate and Trichloroacetate in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Ezdihar A.; Al-Dieri, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The effects of a Vitamin E-restricted diet on the induction of phagocytic activation by dichloro-acetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) was investigated. Groups of B6C3F1 male mice were either kept on standard diet (Std diet group) or diet that had the vitamin provided only by its natural ingredients (Low-E diet group). The animals in each diet group were administered 77 mg of DCA or TCA/ kg/day, or 5 ml/kg water (controls), by gavage, for 13 weeks. Thereafter, peritoneal lavage cells (PLC) were assayed for superoxide anion (SA), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and myeloperoxidase (MPO), as well as for the activities of the anti-oxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). SA and TNFα production, as well as MPO, SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities were significantly increased in the cells from the Low-E diet group treated with the compounds as compared with cells from hosts in the Std-diet group that received the corresponding treatments. The results indicate that consumption of a Vitamin E-restricted diet enhances the induction of phagocytic activation by DCA and TCA, a mechanism that was previously suggested to be an initial adaptive/protective response against the compounds long-term effects. PMID:22178223

  9. Do Antioxidant Enzymes and Glutathione Play Roles in the Induction of Hepatic Oxidative Stress in Mice upon Subchronic Exposure to Mixtures of Dichloroacetate and Trichloroacetate?

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Ezdihar; Cearfoss, Jacquelyn

    2014-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) are water chlorination byproducts, and their mixtures were previously found to induce additive to greater than additive effects on hepatic oxidative stress (OS) induction in mice after subchronic exposure. To investigate the roles of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione (GSH) in those effects, livers of B6C3F1 mice treated by gavage with 7.5, 15, or 30 mg DCA/kg/day, 12.5, 25, or 50 mg TCA/kg/day, and mixtures (Mix I, Mix II and Mix III) at DCA:TCA ratios corresponding to 7.5:12.5, 15:25 and 25:50 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 13 weeks. Livers were assayed for superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), as well as for GSH levels. In general, DCA suppressed SOD and GSH-Px activities and GSH levels but caused no changes in CAT activity; TCA increased SOD and CAT activities, suppressed GSH-Px activity, but did not change GSH levels; mixtures of DCA and TCA increased SOD and CAT activities and suppressed GSH-Px activity and GSH levels. In conclusion, antioxidant enzymes contribute to DCA-, TCA- and mixtures-induced OS, but not to changes from additive to greater than additive effects produced by different mixture compositions of the compounds. GSH on the hand may contribute to these changes. PMID:25530655

  10. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling of the Lactating Rat and Nursing Pup: a Multiroute Exposure Model for Trichloroethylene and its Metabolite, Trichloroacetic Acid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    metabolite tri- for TCA. Lactating rats were anesthetized with a 0.6 mg/kg ip injection of ketamine (42 mg/kg) and xylazine (3.6 chloroacetic acid ...Trlchloroacetic Acid . 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) J.W. Fisher, T.A. Whittaker, D.H. Taylor, H.J. Clewell Ill, and M.E. Andersen 13s. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME...497-513 (1990) 17. COSATI CODES )-,,UBJECT TERM1 IC xWB~ZVfLe NJIIfIIV8n atnth~W-fU FIELD GROUP ISUB-GROUP Tdhloroethylene, Trlchloroacetic Acid

  11. Application of talcum powder, trichloroacetic acid and silver nitrate in female rats for non-surgical sterilization: evaluation of the apoptotic pathway mRNA and miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Yumrutas, Onder; Kara, Murat; Atilgan, Remzi; Kavak, Salih Burcin; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2015-01-01

    There are several methods used for non-surgical sterilization in birth control including quinacrine, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), erythromycin, tetracycline, silver nitrate and talcum powder. Among these, talcum powder, TCA and silver nitrate are the most commonly used. However, the toxic and carcinogenic activities of these chemicals in ovarian tissue have been poorly elucidated. This study demonstrates the expression levels of antioxidant, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes after administration of talc powder, TCA and silver nitrate for non-surgical sterilization in female rat models. The expression changes of some microRNAs (miR-15b, miR-21, miR-34a and miR-98) that play key roles in the apoptosis pathway were also included. All expression analyses were evaluated with real-time PCR. The expression levels of all genes appeared to be upregulated in the talcum powder group, but the results were not statistically significant. Increased expression of Gsr and Sod1 genes was statistically significant in the talcum powder group. In TCA and silver nitrate group, expression of all genes was appeared to be elevated but only the Gsr expression was statistically significant in the TCA-administrated group; there were no statistically significant changes in the silver nitrate group. miRNA expression levels were increased in talcum powder and TCA-administrated groups, but these results were not significant. Expression levels of miR-15b, miR-21 and miR-98 in the silver nitrate group were significantly increased. Consequently, these chemicals appear to be non-carcinogenic agents for rat ovarian tissue which do not induce apoptosis. However, talcum powder and TCA can be considered as agents that are toxic to ovarian tissue. PMID:25885949

  12. Application of talcum powder, trichloroacetic acid and silver nitrate in female rats for non-surgical sterilization: evaluation of the apoptotic pathway mRNA and miRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Yumrutas, Onder; Kara, Murat; Atilgan, Remzi; Kavak, Salih Burcin; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2015-04-01

    There are several methods used for non-surgical sterilization in birth control including quinacrine, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), erythromycin, tetracycline, silver nitrate and talcum powder. Among these, talcum powder, TCA and silver nitrate are the most commonly used. However, the toxic and carcinogenic activities of these chemicals in ovarian tissue have been poorly elucidated. This study demonstrates the expression levels of antioxidant, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes after administration of talc powder, TCA and silver nitrate for non-surgical sterilization in female rat models. The expression changes of some microRNAs (miR-15b, miR-21, miR-34a and miR-98) that play key roles in the apoptosis pathway were also included. All expression analyses were evaluated with real-time PCR. The expression levels of all genes appeared to be upregulated in the talcum powder group, but the results were not statistically significant. Increased expression of Gsr and Sod1 genes was statistically significant in the talcum powder group. In TCA and silver nitrate group, expression of all genes was appeared to be elevated but only the Gsr expression was statistically significant in the TCA-administrated group; there were no statistically significant changes in the silver nitrate group. miRNA expression levels were increased in talcum powder and TCA-administrated groups, but these results were not significant. Expression levels of miR-15b, miR-21 and miR-98 in the silver nitrate group were significantly increased. Consequently, these chemicals appear to be non-carcinogenic agents for rat ovarian tissue which do not induce apoptosis. However, talcum powder and TCA can be considered as agents that are toxic to ovarian tissue.

  13. Chloroacetic acids in European soils and vegetation.

    PubMed

    Peters, Ruud J B

    2003-04-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA) are possible minor atmospheric degradation products of perchloroethylene and trichloroethylene, respectively. These acids may be wet- or dry-deposited from the atmosphere to land surfaces and hence possibly affect plant growth. However, the existing database on TCA levels in soil is limited to a few studies carried out in the late 1980's and the early to mid-1990's and it was concluded that there is a need for further measurements of concentrations of TCA and DCA in soils. In this study soil samples from 10 locations in 5 European countries, as well as vegetation samples, and a limited number of rainwater and air samples were collected and analysed for DCA and TCA to determine the concentrations of these compounds. An isotope dilution method using GC-MS was used for the determination of these acids in the samples. The method was briefly validated and the performance characteristics are presented. The results of the analysis of the soil samples show that the DCA and TCA concentrations in soil from different sites in Europe are more or less comparable, with the exception of Germany, especially Freudenstadt, where significantly higher TCA concentrations (up to 12 microg kg(-1) dw) were found. The average DCA and TCA concentrations in soil in this study were 0.25 +/- 0.12 and 0.64 +/- 1.40 microg kg(-1) dw, respectively. Generally, the concentration in soils from forest areas are about twice those from open-land areas. The DCA and TCA concentrations in vegetation samples ranged from 2.1 to 73 microg kg(-1) dw for DCA and from 4.7 to 17 microg kg(-1) dw for TCA. Thus, the concentrations in vegetation samples are 10-20 times higher than the soil concentrations. DCA and TCA concentrations in wet deposition samples and air samples collected in The Netherlands were 0.14 and 0.15 microg l(-1) for wet deposition samples and <0.5 and 0.7 ng m(-3) for air samples respectively. For these samples taken in The Netherlands

  14. Ninety day toxicity study of chloroacetic acids in rats.

    PubMed

    Bhat, H K; Kanz, M F; Campbell, G A; Ansari, G A

    1991-08-01

    Chloroacetic acids are produced in drinking water as a result of disinfection processes. Chloroacetic acids are also metabolites of widely used and toxic halogenated hydrocarbons. Thus, chronic human exposure to these chemicals is likely to occur. The objective of the present study was to examine the toxic effects of monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in a 90-day subchronic study in rats via oral exposure by drinking water. Chloroacetic acid solutions were prepared at concentrations which provided an approximate intake of 1/4 the LD50 dose per day: MCA, 1.9 mM; DCA, 80.5 mM; TCA, 45.8 mM. Control rats received distilled water only. After 90 days, major organs were removed, fixed, paraffin embedded, and stained. Light microscopic examination of the major organs revealed variable degrees of alterations in the lung and liver of all three treated groups. In the liver, morphological changes were predominantly localized to the portal triads, which were mildly to moderately enlarged with random bile duct proliferation, extension of portal veins, fibrosis, edema, and occasional foci of inflammation. In the lungs, minimal alterations were observed as foci of perivascular inflammation on small pulmonary veins. Morphological changes in the testes and brain were seen only in the DCA treated group. Testes were atrophic with few spermatocytes and no mature spermatozoa. Focal vacuolation and gliosis were present in the forebrain and brainstem. The results of these studies indicate that, relative to their respective LD50 values, DCA given at 80.5 mM is more toxic than TCA given at 45.8 mM and MCA at 1.9 mM is least toxic.

  15. Dichloroacetate- and Trichloroacetate-Induced Modulation of Superoxide Dismutase, Catalase, and Glutathione Peroxidase Activities and Glutathione Level in the livers of Mice after Subacute and Subchronic exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Ezdihar A.; Cearfoss, Jacquelyn

    2010-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) were previously found to induce various levels of oxidative stress in the hepatic tissues of mice after subacute and subchronic exposure. The cells are known to have several protective mechansims against production of oxidative stress by different xenobiotics. To assess the roles of the antioxidant enzymes and glutathione (GSH) in DCA- and TCA-induced oxidative stress, groups of B6C3F1 mice were administered either DCA or TCA at doses of 7.7, 77, 154 and 410 mg/kg/day, by gavage for 4 weeks (4-W) and 13 weeks (13-W), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, as well as GSH were determined in the hepatic tissues. DCA at doses ranging between 7.7-410, and 7.7-77 mg/kg/day, given for 4-W and 13-W, respectively, resulted in either suppression or no change in SOD, CAT and GSH-Px activities, but doses of 154-410 mg DCA/kg/day administered for 13-W were found to result in significant induction of the three enzyme activities. TCA administration on the other hand, resulted in increases in SOD and CAT activities, and suppression of GSH-Px activity in both periods. Except for the DCA doses of 77-154 mg/kg/day administered for 13-W that resulted in significant reduction in GSH levels, all other DCA, as well as TCA treatments produced no changes in GSH. Since these enzymes are involved in the detoxification of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide anion (SA) and H2O2, it is concluded that SA is the main contributor to DCA-induced oxidative stress while both ROS contribute to that of TCA. The increases in the enzyme activities associated with 154-410 mg DCA/kg/day in the 13-W period suggest their role as protective mechanisms contributing to the survival of cells modified in response to those treatments. PMID:21170174

  16. Ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cyanamide (bmim [dca]) as a solvent and catalyst for acylation of maltodextrin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have found a novel method to prepare maltodextrin stearate with DS upto 0.60 in 90% yields from maltodextrin in IL bmim[dca] reacted with vinyl stearate or stearic acid. In this work we have demonstrated that IL could simultaneously act as a solvent and as a catalyst for reaction of maltodextrin...

  17. Formation of chloroacetic acids from soil, humic acid and phenolic moieties.

    PubMed

    Fahimi, I J; Keppler, F; Schöler, H F

    2003-07-01

    The mechanism of formation of chloroacetates, which are important toxic environmental substances, has been controversial. Whereas the anthropogenic production has been well established, a natural formation has also been suggested. In this study the natural formation of chloroacetic acids from soil, as well as from humic material which is present in soil and from phenolic model substances has been investigated. It is shown that chloroacetates are formed from humic material with a linear relationship between the amount of humic acid used and chloroacetates found. More dichloroacetate (DCA) than trichloroacetate (TCA) is produced. The addition of Fe(2+), Fe(3+) and H(2)O(2) leads to an increased yield. NaCl was added as a source of chloride. We further examined the relationship between the structure and reactivity of phenolic substances, which can be considered as monomeric units of humic acids. Ethoxyphenol with built-in ethyl groups forms large amounts of DCA and TCA. The experiments with phenoxyacetic acid yielded large amounts of monochloroacetate (MCA). With other phenolic substances a ring cleavage was observed. Our investigations indicate that chloroacetates are formed abiotically from humic material and soils in addition to their known biotic mode of formation.

  18. Assessment of the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of haloacetic acids using microplate-based cytotoxicity test and CHO/HGPRT gene mutation assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Hui; Miao, Dong-Yue; Liu, Ai-Lin; Zhang, Li; Wei, Wei; Xie, Hong; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2010-12-21

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are the second most prevalent class of disinfection byproducts found in drinking water. The implications of HAAs presence in drinking water are a public health concern due to their potential mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. In the present study, we examined the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of six common HAAs using a microplate-based cytotoxicity test and a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) gene mutation assay in Chinese hamster ovary K1 (CHO-K1) cells. We found that their chronic cytotoxicities (72h exposure) to CHO-K1 cells varied, and we ranked their levels of toxicity in the following descending order: iodoacetic acid (IA)>bromoacetic acid (BA)>dibromoacetic acid (DBA)>chloroacetic acid (CA)>dichloroacetic acid (DCA)>trichloroacetic acid (TCA). The toxicity of IA is 1040-fold of that of TCA. All HAAs except TCA were shown to be mutagenic to CHO-K1 cells in the HGPRT gene mutation assay. The mutagenic potency was compared and ranked as follows: IA>DBA>BA>CA>DCA>TCA. There was a statistically significant correlation between cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of the HAAs in CHO-K1 cells. The microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and HGPRT gene mutation assay were suitable methods to monitor the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of HAAs, particularly for comparing the toxic intensities quantitatively.

  19. Characterization of the metabolic interaction between trihalomethanes and chloroacetic acids using rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Annie; Krishnan, Kannan; Tardif, Robert

    2005-02-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro metabolism of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the presence of trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloracetic acid (DCA), monochloroacetic acid (MCA), and 4-methylpyrazole (4-MP) using liver microsomes from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Using the vial equilibration technique, initial experiments were carried out with starting concentrations of approximately 40 ppm THMs and 12-22 mM chloroacetic acids. The results indicated a mutual metabolic inhibition between THMs present as binary or quaternary mixtures. Although DCA and MCA had no influence on THMs, TCA produced a marked inhibition of the metabolism of all THMs: chloroform (CHCl3) (55%), bromodichloromethane (BDCM) (34%), dibromochloromethane (DBCM) (30%), and bromoform (TBM) (23%). The presence of 4-MP also reduced THM metabolism, the importance of which decreased in the following order: CHCl3 > BDCM > DBCM = TBM. In further vial equilibration experiments, using 9-140 ppm as starting concentrations of THMs, enzyme kinetic parameters (i.e., Michaelis constant, K(m), and maximum velocity, V(max)) were determined both in the absence and in the presence of TCA (12.2 mM). Results are consistent with a competitive inhibition between TCA and CHCl3, whereas the metabolic inhibition of BDCM and TMB by TCA was non-competitive. As for DBCM, results suggest a more complex pattern of inhibition. These results suggest that CYP2E1 is involved in the metabolism of THMs as well as in the metabolic interaction between THMs and TCA.

  20. Efficient Nonnegative Matrix Factorization by DC Programming and DCA.

    PubMed

    Le Thi, Hoai An; Vo, Xuan Thanh; Dinh, Tao Pham

    2016-06-01

    In this letter, we consider the nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) problem and several NMF variants. Two approaches based on DC (difference of convex functions) programming and DCA (DC algorithm) are developed. The first approach follows the alternating framework that requires solving, at each iteration, two nonnegativity-constrained least squares subproblems for which DCA-based schemes are investigated. The convergence property of the proposed algorithm is carefully studied. We show that with suitable DC decompositions, our algorithm generates most of the standard methods for the NMF problem. The second approach directly applies DCA on the whole NMF problem. Two algorithms-one computing all variables and one deploying a variable selection strategy-are proposed. The proposed methods are then adapted to solve various NMF variants, including the nonnegative factorization, the smooth regularization NMF, the sparse regularization NMF, the multilayer NMF, the convex/convex-hull NMF, and the symmetric NMF. We also show that our algorithms include several existing methods for these NMF variants as special versions. The efficiency of the proposed approaches is empirically demonstrated on both real-world and synthetic data sets. It turns out that our algorithms compete favorably with five state-of-the-art alternating nonnegative least squares algorithms.

  1. Comparison of haloacetic acids in the environment of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Scott, B F; Spencer, C; Martin, J W; Barra, R; Bootsma, H A; Jones, K C; Johnston, A E; Muir, D C G

    2005-11-15

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are a family of compounds whose environmental concentrations have been extensively studied, primarily in Europe. Depending on the compound, their sources are believed to be both natural and anthropogenic. To better understand possible sources and contribute to the knowledge of the global distribution of these compounds, especially between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, samples of precipitation, soils, and conifer needles were collected from Canada, Malawi, Chile, and the U.K. Precipitation samples exhibited highest HAA concentrations in collections from Canada, and lowest in those from Malawi. Malawi samples contained measurable levels of monobromoacetic acid (MBA) (56 ng/ L) unlike those from most other locations (< 9 ng/L). Soil HAA concentration levels were highest in the U.K. (e.g., 7.3 ng/g average TCA) and lowest in Malawi (0.8 ng/g average TCA), with Chile having higher levels (4.8 ng/g average TCA) than Canada (3 ng/g average TCA). Malawi soils contained small amounts of MBA (2 ng/g), in common with the two most southern of the 11 Chilean sites. Analysis of soil cores (10-cm depth sliced at 1 cm) from sites in Malawi and Chile showed that trichloroacetic acid (TCA) generally declined with depth while mono- and dichloroacetic acid (MCA and DCA) showed no trend. MCA, DCA, and TCA concentrations in archived U.K. soil samples increased by factors of 2, 4, and 5-fold over 75 years while TFA showed no consistent trend. Monochloroacetic acid (MCA) was detected in pine needles collected from Malawi. U.K. needle samples had the highest concentrations of all chloroacetic acids (CAAs): MCA, 2-18 ng/g; dichloroacetic acid (DCA), 2-38 ng/g; and trichloroacetic acid (TCA), 28-190 ng/g. Conifer needles from Canada and Chile contained CAAs at levels ranging from < 2 to 16 ng/g wet wt. Trifluoroacetic acid concentrations generally declined with increasing elevation in the samples from the Rocky Mountains in western Canada. The results

  2. Report of tests of a compressor configuration of DCA blading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himes, S. J.

    1983-06-01

    Results of an experimental program to measure the performance of a compressor stator cascade consisting of 20 double-circular-arc (DCA) blades of chord 5.01 inches, aspect ratio 2.0 and solidity 1.67 under conditions of varying incidence angle and Reynolds number are reported. Flow quality and blade performance data were obtained using pneumatic probe surveys and surface pressure measurements. Changes in Reynolds numbers in the range of 500,000 to 770,000 did not measurably affect either flow quality or blade performance. Changes in incidence angle over the range -15 to 10 degrees produced generally well behaved blade performance parameters.

  3. Tumorigenic effects of dichloroacetic acid in female F344 rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a halogenated organic acid produced during oxidant disinfection of drinking water. Prior studies indicate that DCA may increase liver tumors in mice. Here we evaluated the hepatic tumorigenicity of DCA in female rats when given alone ...

  4. Mito-DCA: a mitochondria targeted molecular scaffold for efficacious delivery of metabolic modulator dichloroacetate.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rakesh K; Marrache, Sean; Harn, Donald A; Dhar, Shanta

    2014-05-16

    Tumor growth is fueled by the use of glycolysis, which normal cells use only in the scarcity of oxygen. Glycolysis makes tumor cells resistant to normal death processes. Targeting this unique tumor metabolism can provide an alternative strategy to selectively destroy the tumor, leaving normal tissue unharmed. The orphan drug dichloroacetate (DCA) is a mitochondrial kinase inhibitor that has the ability to show such characteristics. However, its molecular form shows poor uptake and bioavailability and limited ability to reach its target mitochondria. Here, we describe a targeted molecular scaffold for construction of a multiple DCA loaded compound, Mito-DCA, with three orders of magnitude enhanced potency and cancer cell specificity compared to DCA. Incorporation of a lipophilic triphenylphosphonium cation through a biodegradable linker in Mito-DCA allowed for mitochondria targeting. Mito-DCA did not show any significant metabolic effects toward normal cells but tumor cells with dysfunctional mitochondria were affected by Mito-DCA, which caused a switch from glycolysis to glucose oxidation and subsequent cell death via apoptosis. Effective delivery of DCA to the mitochondria resulted in significant reduction in lactate levels and played important roles in modulating dendritic cell (DC) phenotype evidenced by secretion of interleukin-12 from DCs upon activation with tumor antigens from Mito-DCA treated cancer cells. Targeting mitochondrial metabolic inhibitors to the mitochondria could lead to induction of an efficient antitumor immune response, thus introducing the concept of combining glycolysis inhibition with immune system to destroy tumor.

  5. Discovery and Synthesis of Amino Acids Modified Deoxycholic Acid Derivatives and in Vitro Antiproliferative Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunhui; Zhao, Peizhe; Feng, Bin; Hou, Xiyan; Zhao, Longxuan

    2017-03-01

    A series of deoxycholic acid (DCA) derivatives bearing amino acid moiety has been synthesized and investigated for their potential antiproliferative activities. DCA derivative compounds were synthesized by a two or three step synthetic approach. Their bioactivities were evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method and Western blotting analysis on three tumor cell lines A549 (human lung cancer cell line), MCF-7 (human breast cancer cell line) and HeLa (human cervical carcinoma cell). The novel derivatives DCA3d, DCA5a, DCA5b, DCA5c, and DCA5d were found to be promising antiproliferative agents. Furthermore, DCA5b showed the greatest cytotoxic activity by induction of apoptosis. These compounds show potentiality for further optimization as antitumor drugs.

  6. Removal of EDB and 1,2-DCA by Abiotic Reaction with Iron(II) Sulfide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethylene Dibromide (EDB) and 1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) were used as lead scavengers in leaded motor gasoline in the USA until the late 1980s. Leaded gasoline in contact with ground water should produce concentrations of EDB near 1900 µg/L, and concentrations of 1,2-DCA near 3...

  7. Using 80% trichloroacetic acid in the treatment of ingrown toenails*

    PubMed Central

    Barreiros, Hugo; Matos, Diogo; Goulão, João; Serrano, Pedro; João, Alexandre; Brandão, Francisco Menezes

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ingrown nails are a very common problem. There are different stages of disease and diverse therapeutic options. Phenol and sodium hydroxide are commonly used agents for chemical matricectomy but both frequently entail excessive healing times. OBJECTIVE This prospective study aimed mainly to evaluate the efficacy of partial nail avulsion and selective chemical cauterization of the matrix using 80% TCA in the treatment of the ingrowing nail. METHODS One-hundred-and-thirty-three patients with 197 ingrown toenails were included in this study. Preoperatively, we tried to find predisposing factors to the disease. In the postoperative period, patients were evaluated for potential complications at days 3, 30, 180, 270 and 360. Pain was measured before surgery, as well as 24 hours and 72 hours after surgery. RESULTS There were only 3 cases (out of 197) of ingrown nail recurrence. Preoperatively, we found the presence of drainage in 82% of patients, which, following the first visit after surgery, was reduced to 19%. Persistent granulation tissue was found in 3% of the patients (versus 75% prior to surgery). The most frequent predisposing factors for the ingrown nail were excessive trimming of the lateral nail plate (63%), plantar hyperhidrosis (58%) and heavy nail folds (39%). Pain was substantially reduced after surgery. CONCLUSION It is assumed that chemical procedures for the ingrown toenail are associated with delayed healing times but our results demonstrated quick recovery. Using 80% TCA for selective matricectomy in the ingrown toenail is an effective, quick and easy method. PMID:24474095

  8. Haloacetic acids in the aquatic environment. Part I: macrophyte toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mark L; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-08-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are contaminants of aquatic ecosystems with numerous sources, both anthropogenic and natural. The toxicity of HAAs to aquatic plants is generally uncharacterized. Laboratory tests were conducted with three macrophytes (Lemna gibba, Myriophyllum sibiricum and Myriophyllum spicatum) to assess the toxicity of five HAAs. Myriophyllum spp. has been proposed as required test species for pesticide registration in North America, but few studies have been conducted under standard test conditions. The HAAs in the present experiments were monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and chlorodifluoroacetic acid (CDFA). MCA was the most toxic to Myriophyllum spp. with EC50 values ranging from 8 to 12.4 mg/l depending on the endpoint, followed by DCA (EC50 range 62-722.5 mg/l), TCA (EC50 range 49.5-1702.6 mg/l), CDFA (EC50 range 105.3 to >10,000 mg/l) and with TFA (EC50 range 222.1 to 10,000 mg/l) the least toxic. Generally, L. gibba was less sensitive to HAA toxicity than Myriophyllum spp., with the difference in toxicity between them approximately threefold. The range of toxicity within Myriophyllum spp. was normally less than twofold. Statistically, plant length and node number were the most sensitive endpoints as they had the lowest observed coefficients of variation, but they were not the most sensitive to HAA toxicity. Toxicological sensitivity of endpoints varied depending on the measure of effect chosen and the HAA, with morphological endpoints usually an order of magnitude more sensitive than pigments for all plant species. Overall, mass and root measures tended to be the most sensitive indicators of HAA toxicity. The data from this paper were subsequently used in an ecological risk assessment for HAAs and aquatic plants. The assessment found HAAs to be of low risk to aquatic macrophytes and the results are described in the second manuscript of this series.

  9. ALTERED GENE EXPRESSION IN MOUSE LIVERS AFTER DICHLOROACETIC ACID EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated that DCA exhibits hepatocarcinogenic effects in rodents when administered in drinking water. The mechanism(s) involved in DCA induction of cancer are not clear...

  10. Evaluation of the influence of chloroacetic acids on the pharmacokinetics of trihalomethanes in the rat.

    PubMed

    St-Pierre, Annie; Krishnan, Kannan; Tardif, Robert

    2003-12-12

    Chloroacetic acids (monochloroacetic acid [MCA], dichloroacetic acid [DCA], and trichloroacetic acid [TCA]) and trihalomethanes (THMs: chloroform [CHCl(3)], bromodichloromethane [BDCM], dibromochloromethane [DBCM], and bromoform [TBM]) are common by-products of the chlorination of drinking water. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of chloroacetic acids on the pharmacokinetics of trihalomethanes in the male Sprague-Dawley rat. In the first series of studies, groups of 5 animals were given, by intravenous injections, a single dose of 0.125 mmol/kg of one of the four THMs. Additional groups received a binary mixture containing 0.125 mmol/kg of a THM plus 0.125 mmol/kg of a chloroacetic acid. The venous blood concentrations of unchanged THMs were measured by headspace gas chromatography from 5 min to 6 h postadministration. The areas under the blood concentration versus time curves (AUCs) of CHCl(3), BDCM, and DBCM were increased by a factor of 3.5, 1.6, and 2, respectively, by coadministration of TCA. DCA coadministration resulted in an increase in the AUC of DBCM (x2.5) and TBM (x1.3), whereas MCA modified the Cmax (x1.5) and AUC (x1.8) of BDCM and the AUC of DBCM (x2.5). In the second series of experiments, animals received either a single dose of 0.03125 mmol/kg of one of the four THMs, a mixture containing 0.03125 mmol/kg of each of the four THMs (total dose = 0.125 mmol/kg), or a mixture containing 0.03125 mmol/kg of each of the four THMs plus 0.125 mmol/kg of either TCA or DCA. Results indicated that the AUCs of CHCl(3), BDCM, DBCM, and TBM were increased during coadministration compared to single administrations (+2.5-fold). Combined administration of the four THMs with TCA, and not DCA, resulted in an increase of the AUCs of THMs (CHCl(3): x11.7; BDCM, DBCM, and TBM: x3.9) and an increase in the Cmax of CHCl(3) (x1.9). Overall, these results indicate that, at the dose levels tested in this study, TCA alters the blood concentration profiles

  11. Detecting phase-transitions in electronic lattice-models with DCA+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staar, Peter; Maier, Thomas; Schulthess, Thomas; Computational Material Science Team

    2014-03-01

    The DCA+ algortihm was recently introduced to extend the dynamic cluster approximation (DCA) by introducing a self-energy with continuous momentum dependence. This removes artificial long-range correlations and thereby reduces the fermion sign problem as well as cluster shape dependencies. Here, we extend the DCA+ algorithm to the calculation of two-particle quantities by introducing irreducible vertex functions with continuous momentum dependence compatible with the DCA+ self-energy. This enables the study of phase transitions within the DCA+ framework in a much more controlled fashion than with the DCA. We validate the new method using a calculation of the superconducting transition temperature Tc in the attractive Hubbard model by reproducing previous high-precision finite size quantum Monte Carlo results. We then calculate Tc in the doped repulsive Hubbard model, for which previous DCA calculations could only access the weak-coupling (U = 4 t) regime for large clusters. We show that the new algorithm provides access to much larger clusters and thus asymptotic converged results for Tc for both the weak (U = 4 t) and intermediate (U = 7 t) coupling regimes, and thereby enables the accurate determination of the exact infinite cluster size result.

  12. Fate and effects of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) in marine plankton communities in experimental enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, J.; Hanstveit, A.O.

    1984-02-01

    The fate and effects of single doses of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA) on North Sea coastal plankton communities enclosed by large plastic bags (contents 1.5 m3) were studied in two experiments lasting 5 and 6 weeks, respectively. The biodegradation of DCA was also studied in laboratory experiments, which were carried out simultaneously, using water from the enclosed model ecosystems. DCA was not degraded in the laboratory tests and probably also not degraded in the enclosed plankton communities, although concentrations in the water decreased during the experiments. This decrease appeared to be partly caused by diffusion of DCA through the walls of the enclosures. After the addition of single doses of 2, 10, and 25 microgram liter-1 DCA no effects on the enclosed plankton community could be detected. The addition of 0.1 mg liter-1 DCA had a clear influence on the species composition and the biomass development of the phytoplankton, changed the relative species composition of the zooplankton, and resulted in lower numbers of bacteria. In addition to these effects 1 mg liter-1 DCA limited the phytoplankton growth and resulted in mortality and inhibition of growth of the copepods.

  13. THE ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF TRICHLORACETIC ACID (TCAA) IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) is a member of the family of compounds known as chloroacetic acids, which includes mono-, di- and trichloroacetic acid. The significant property these compounds share is that they are all phytotoxic. TCAA once was widely used as a potent herbicide. ...

  14. Phase 1 trial of dichloroacetate (DCA) in adults with recurrent malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, E. M.; Coats, B. S.; Shroads, A. L.; Langaee, T.; Lew, A.; Forder, J. R.; Shuster, J. J.; Wagner, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Recurrent malignant brain tumors (RMBTs) carry a poor prognosis. Dichloroacetate (DCA) activates mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and has shown activity against several human cancers. Design We conducted an open-label study of oral DCA in 15 adults with recurrent WHO grade III – IV gliomas or metastases from a primary cancer outside the central nervous system. The primary objective was detection of a dose limiting toxicity for RMBTs at 4 weeks of treatment, defined as any grade 4 or 5 toxicity, or grade 3 toxicity directly attributable to DCA, based on the National Cancer Institute’s Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Secondary objectives involved safety, tolerability and hypothesis-generating data on disease status. Dosing was based on haplotype variation in glutathione transferase zeta 1/maleylacetoacetate isomerase (GSTZ1/MAAI), which participates in DCA and tyrosine catabolism. Results Eight patients completed at least 1 four week cycle. During this time, no dose-limiting toxicities occurred. No patient withdrew because of lack of tolerance to DCA, although 2 subjects experienced grade 0–1 distal parasthesias that led to elective withdrawal and/or dose-adjustment. All subjects completing at least 1 four week cycle remained clinically stable during this time and remained on DCA for an average of 75.5 days (range 26–312). Conclusions Chronic, oral DCA is feasible and well-tolerated in patients with recurrent malignant gliomas and other tumors metastatic to the brain using the dose range established for metabolic diseases. The importance of genetic-based dosing is confirmed and should be incorporated into future trials of chronic DCA administration. PMID:24297161

  15. Crystal growth and characterization of L-phenylalaninium trichloroacetate-A new organic nonlinear optical material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, M.; Geetha, D.; Lydia Caroline, M.

    2011-07-01

    Amino acid based crystals exhibit excellent nonlinear and electro-optical properties. A new nonlinear optical single crystal L-phenylalaninium trichloroacetate (LPTCA) belonging to the amino acid group was grown by the slow evaporation solution growth method. The grown crystals have been subjected to powder X-ray diffraction studies to identify the crystalline nature. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study showed that LPTCA belongs to monoclinic crystal system. Fourier transform infrared study is used to confirm the presence of various functional groups in the grown crystal. Optical transparency of the grown crystals was investigated by UV-vis-NIR spectrum. The lower optical cutoff wavelength for this crystal is observed at 254 nm and energy band gap is 4.89 eV. Thermal properties of the LPTCA crystal were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques, which indicate that the material does not decompose before melting. The melting point of grown crystal was observed to be 136 °C in a melting point apparatus. The existence of nonlinear optical (NLO) property of LPTCA was confirmed by second harmonic generation test using Nd:YAG laser fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm.

  16. Haloacetic acids in the aquatic environment. Part II: ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mark L; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-08-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are environmental contaminants found in aquatic ecosystems throughout the world as a result of both anthropogenic and natural production. The ecological risk posed by these compounds to organisms in freshwater environments, with a specific focus on aquatic macrophytes, was characterized. The plants evaluated were Lemna gibba, Myriophyllum spicatum and M. sibiricum and the HAAs screened were monochloroacetic acid (MCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) and chlorodifluoroacetic acid (CDFA). Laboratory toxicity data formed the basis of the risk assessment, but field studies were also utilized. The estimated risk was calculated using hazard quotients (HQ), as well as effect measure distributions (EMD) in a modified probabilistic ecological risk assessment. EMDs were used to estimate HAA thresholds of toxicity for use in HQ assessments. This threshold was found to be a more sensitive measure of low toxicity than the no observed effect concentrations (NOEC) or the effective concentration (EC10). Using both deterministic and probabilistic methods, it was found that HAAs do not pose a significant risk to freshwater macrophytes at current environmental concentrations in Canada, Europe or Africa for both single compound and mixture exposures. Still, HAAs are generally found as mixtures and their potential interactions are not fully understood, rendering this phase of the assessment uncertain and justifying further effects characterization. TCA in some environments poses a slight risk to phytoplankton and future concentrations of TFA and CDFA are likely to increase due to their recalcitrant nature, warranting continued environmental surveillance of HAAs.

  17. Deoxycholic acid transformations catalyzed by selected filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Kollerov, V V; Lobastova, T G; Monti, D; Deshcherevskaya, N O; Ferrandi, E E; Fronza, G; Riva, S; Donova, M V

    2016-03-01

    More than 100 filamentous fungi strains, mostly ascomycetes and zygomycetes from different phyla, were screened for the ability to convert deoxycholic acid (DCA) to valuable bile acid derivatives. Along with 11 molds which fully degraded DCA, several strains were revealed capable of producing cholic acid, ursocholic acid, 12-keto-lithocholic acid (12-keto-LCA), 3-keto-DCA, 15β-hydroxy-DCA and 15β-hydroxy-12-oxo-LCA as major products from DCA. The last metabolite was found to be a new compound. The ability to catalyze the introduction of a hydroxyl group at the 7(α/β)-positions of the DCA molecule was shown for 32 strains with the highest 7β-hydroxylase activity level for Fusarium merismoides VKM F-2310. Curvularia lunata VKM F-644 exhibited 12α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity and formed 12-keto-LCA from DCA. Acremonium rutilum VKM F-2853 and Neurospora crassa VKM F-875 produced 15β-hydroxy-DCA and 15β-hydroxy-12-oxo-LCA, respectively, as major products from DCA, as confirmed by MS and NMR analyses. For most of the positive strains, the described DCA-transforming activity was unreported to date. The presented results expand the knowledge on bile acid metabolism by filamentous fungi, and might be suitable for preparative-scale exploitation aimed at the production of marketed bile acids.

  18. Structural analysis, spectroscopic, and magnetic properties of the 1D triple-bridged compounds [M(dca)2(bpa)] (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Zn; dca = dicyanamide; bpa = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane) and the 3D [Ni(dca)(bpa)2]dca·6H2O.

    PubMed

    de la Pinta, Noelia; Martín, Susana; Urtiaga, M Karmele; Barandika, M Gotzone; Arriortua, M Isabel; Lezama, Luis; Madariaga, Gotzon; Cortés, Roberto

    2010-11-15

    The family of compounds [Mn(dca)(2)(bpa)] (1), [Fe(dca)(2)(bpa)] (2), [Co(dca)(2)(bpa)] (3), [Zn(dca)(2)(bpa)] (4), and [Ni(dca)(bpa)(2)]dca·6H(2)O (5), with dca = dicyanamide and bpa = 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethane, has been synthesized. These compounds have been characterized by single crystal (1, 2, 4, and 5) and powder X-ray diffraction (3), by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), UV-vis, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, and by magnetic measurements. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic C2/c space group, Z = 4, with a = 16.757(6), b = 9.692(3), and c = 13.073(4) Å, and β = 123.02(2)°; Compound 2 crystallizes in the monoclinic C2/c space group, Z = 4, with a = 16.588(5), b = 9.661(3), c = 12.970(5) Å, and β = 123.16(3)°; Compound 4 crystallizes in the monoclinic C2/c space group, Z = 4, with a = 16.519(2), b = 9.643(2), c = 12.943(2) Å, and β = 123.15(1)°; Compound 5 crystallizes in the monoclinic C2/c space group, Z = 4, with a = 18.504(4), b = 19.802(3), and c = 8.6570(18) Å, and β = 99.74(2)°. The compounds 1-4 are isostructural and show a one dimensional (1D) disposition, with the metal(II) ions bridged by double μ(1,5) dca ligands and unusually by a third bridge consisting of the bpa ligand, which adopts a very low torsion angle to accommodate in the structure. This kind of structure is unusual, even considering the voluminous bpa bridge. The compound 5 shows a 3D structure with layers of Ni-bpa joined by single dca bridges. Magnetic susceptibility measurements show antiferromagnetic couplings, increasing for 1-3. Compound 5 shows very slight antiferromagnetic interactions.

  19. Metabolism, microflora effects, and genotoxicity in haloacetic acid-treated cultures of rat cecal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G M; Swank, A E; Brooks, L R; Bailey, K C; George, S E

    2001-04-01

    Haloacetic acids are by-products of drinking water disinfection. Several compounds in this class are genotoxic and have been identified as rodent hepatocarcinogens. Enzymes produced by the normal intestinal bacteria can transform some promutagens and procarcinogens to their biologically active forms. The present study was designed to investigate the influence of the cecal microbiota on the mutagenicity of haloacetic acids, and to look at changes in the microbiota populations and enzyme activities associated with exposure to haloacetic acids. PYG medium containing 1 mg/ml of monochloroacetic (MCA), monobromoacetic (MBA), dichloroacetic (DCA), dibromoacetic (DBA), trichloroacetic (TCA), tribromoacetic (TBA), or bromochloroacetic (BCA) acid was inoculated with rat cecal homogenate and incubated anaerobically at 37 degrees C. Growth curves were performed with enumeration of the microflora populations on selective media. Mutagenicity in a Salmonella microsuspension bioassay was determined after incubation for various lengths of time, with or without the cecal microbiota. At 15 h of incubation, enzyme assays determined the activities for beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-glucosidase, azoreductase, nitroreductase, dechlorinase, and dehydrochlorinase. The haloacetic acids, with the exception of BCA, were toxic to the cecal microbiota, and especially to the enterococci. DBA, TBA, and BCA were mutagenic in the microsuspension assay, but the presence of the intestinal flora did not significantly alter the mutagenicity. BCA increased the activities of several enzymes, and therefore has the potential to affect the biotransformation of co-exposed compounds.

  20. DETECTION OF EARLY GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES BY DIFFERENTIAL DISPLAY IN THE LIVERS OF MICE EXPOSED TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in mice when administered in drinking water. The mechanism of DCA carcinogenicity is not clear and we speculate that changes...

  1. Removal of EDB and 1,2-DCA by Abiotic Reaction with Iron (II) Sulfide

    EPA Science Inventory

    To properly evaluate the risk associated with exposure to EDB and 1,2-DCA in ground water from old spills of leaded gasoline, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms that may attenuate concentrations of these compounds in ground water. TCE reacts rapidly with iron (II) sulf...

  2. Reactive modelling of 1,2-DCA and DOC near the shoreline.

    PubMed

    Colombani, N; Pantano, A; Mastrocicco, M; Petitta, M

    2014-11-15

    1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) was found to be the most abundant compound among chlorinated hydrocarbons detected in a petrochemical plant in southern Italy. This site is located near the coastline, and it is set above an unconfined coastal aquifer, where seawater intrusion is present. The presence of organic and inorganic contaminants at this site has required the implementation of remediation strategies, consisting of pumping wells (hydraulic barrier) and a horizontal flow barrier. The purpose of this work was to assess the influence of salt water intrusion on the degradation rate of 1,2-DCA. This was done on a three-dimensional domain relative to a limited portion of a well characterized field site, accounting for density-dependent flow and reactive transport modelling of 1,2-DCA and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC). The modelling procedure was performed employing SEAWAT-4.0 and PHT3D, to reproduce the complex three-dimensional flow and transport domain. In order to determine the fate of 1,2-DCA, detailed field investigations provided intensive depth profile information. Different, kinetically controlled degradation rates were simulated to explain the observed, selective degradation of pollutants in groundwater. Calibration of the model was accomplished by comparison with the two different sets of measurements obtained from the MLS devices and from pumping wells. With the calibrated model, it was possible to distinguish between dispersive non-reactive processes and bacterially mediated reactions. In the non-reactive model, 1,2-DCA sorption was simulated using linear sorption coefficient determined with field data and 1,2-DCA degradation was simulated using a first order decay coefficient using literature data as initial guess. Finally, on the reactive transport model, where a two-step approach with partial equilibrium approach was implemented, the effects of neglecting the cation exchange capacity, omitting density-dependent flow, and refining the vertical

  3. Deoxycholic acid mediates non-canonical EGFR-MAPK activation through the induction of calcium signaling in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Centuori, Sara M; Gomes, Cecil J; Trujillo, Jesse; Borg, Jamie; Brownlee, Joshua; Putnam, Charles W; Martinez, Jesse D

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and a western diet have been linked to high levels of bile acids and the development of colon cancer. Specifically, increased levels of the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), an established tumor promoter, has been shown to correlate with increased development of colorectal adenomas and progression to carcinoma. Herein we investigate the mechanism by which DCA leads to EGFR-MAPK activation, a candidate mechanism by which DCA may promote colorectal tumorigenesis. DCA treated colon cancer cells exhibited strong and prolonged activation of ERK1/2 when compared to EGF treatment alone. We also showed that DCA treatment prevents EGFR degradation as opposed to the canonical EGFR recycling observed with EGF treatment. Moreover, the combination of DCA and EGF treatment displayed synergistic activity, suggesting DCA activates MAPK signaling in a non-canonical manner. Further evaluation showed that DCA treatment increased intracellular calcium levels and CAMKII phosphorylation, and that blocking calcium with BAPTA-AM abrogated MAPK activation induced by DCA, but not by EGF. Finally we showed that DCA-induced CAMKII leads to MAPK activation through the recruitment of c-Src. Taken together, we demonstrated that DCA regulates MAPK activation through calcium signaling, an alternative mechanism not previously recognized in human colon cancer cells. Importantly, this mechanism allows for EGFR to escape degradation and thus achieve a constitutively active state, which may explain its tumor promoting effects.

  4. DCA1 Acts as a Transcriptional Co-activator of DST and Contributes to Drought and Salt Tolerance in Rice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Long-Gang; Shan, Jun-Xiang; Shi, Min; Gao, Ji-Ping; Lin, Hong-Xuan

    2015-10-01

    Natural disasters, including drought and salt stress, seriously threaten food security. In previous work we cloned a key zinc finger transcription factor gene, Drought and Salt Tolerance (DST), a negative regulator of drought and salt tolerance that controls stomatal aperture in rice. However, the exact mechanism by which DST regulates the expression of target genes remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that DST Co-activator 1 (DCA1), a previously unknown CHY zinc finger protein, acts as an interacting co-activator of DST. DST was found to physically interact with itself and to form a heterologous tetramer with DCA1. This transcriptional complex appears to regulate the expression of peroxidase 24 precursor (Prx 24), a gene encoding an H2O2 scavenger that is more highly expressed in guard cells. Downregulation of DCA1 significantly enhanced drought and salt tolerance in rice, and overexpression of DCA1 increased sensitivity to stress treatment. These phenotypes were mainly influenced by DCA1 and negatively regulated stomatal closure through the direct modulation of genes associated with H2O2 homeostasis. Our findings establish a framework for plant drought and salt stress tolerance through the DCA1-DST-Prx24 pathway. Moreover, due to the evolutionary and functional conservation of DCA1 and DST in plants, engineering of this pathway has the potential to improve tolerance to abiotic stress in other important crop species.

  5. Loss of organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 increases deoxycholic acid absorption in mice by increasing intestinal permeability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youcai; Csanaky, Iván L; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2011-12-01

    Deoxycholic acid (DCA) is a known hepatotoxicant, a tissue tumor promoter, and has been implicated in colorectal cancer. Male mice are more susceptible to DCA toxicity than female mice. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 (Oatp1a1), which is known to transport bile acids (BAs) in vitro, is predominantly expressed in livers of male mice. In addition, the concentrations of DCA and its taurine conjugate (TDCA) are increased in serum of Oatp1a1-null mice. To investigate whether Oatp1a1 contributes to the gender difference in DCA toxicity in mice, wild-type (WT) and Oatp1a1-null mice were fed a 0.3% DCA diet for 7 days. After feeding DCA, Oatp1a1-null mice had 30-fold higher concentrations of DCA in both serum and livers than WT mice. Feeding DCA caused more hepatotoxcity in Oatp1a1-null mice than WT mice. After feeding DCA, Oatp1a1-null mice expressed higher BA efflux-transporters (bile salt-export pump, organic solute transporter (Ost)α/β, and multidrug resistance-associated protein [Mrp]2) and lower BA-synthetic enzymes (cytochrome P450 [Cyp]7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1) in livers than WT mice. Intravenous administration of DCA and TDCA showed that lack of Oatp1a1 does not decrease the plasma elimination of DCA or TDCA. After feeding DCA, the concentrations of DCA in ileum and colon tissues are higher in Oatp1a1-null than in WT mice. In addition, Oatp1a1-null mice have enhanced intestinal permeability. Taken together, the current data suggest that Oatp1a1 does not mediate the hepatic uptake of DCA or TDCA, but lack of Oatp1a1 increases intestinal permeability and thus enhances the absorption of DCA in mice.

  6. Loss of Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 1a1 Increases Deoxycholic Acid Absorption in Mice by Increasing Intestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youcai; Csanaky, Iván L.; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2011-01-01

    Deoxycholic acid (DCA) is a known hepatotoxicant, a tissue tumor promoter, and has been implicated in colorectal cancer. Male mice are more susceptible to DCA toxicity than female mice. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1a1 (Oatp1a1), which is known to transport bile acids (BAs) in vitro, is predominantly expressed in livers of male mice. In addition, the concentrations of DCA and its taurine conjugate (TDCA) are increased in serum of Oatp1a1-null mice. To investigate whether Oatp1a1 contributes to the gender difference in DCA toxicity in mice, wild-type (WT) and Oatp1a1-null mice were fed a 0.3% DCA diet for 7 days. After feeding DCA, Oatp1a1-null mice had 30-fold higher concentrations of DCA in both serum and livers than WT mice. Feeding DCA caused more hepatotoxcity in Oatp1a1-null mice than WT mice. After feeding DCA, Oatp1a1-null mice expressed higher BA efflux-transporters (bile salt-export pump, organic solute transporter (Ost)α/β, and multidrug resistance-associated protein [Mrp]2) and lower BA-synthetic enzymes (cytochrome P450 [Cyp]7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1) in livers than WT mice. Intravenous administration of DCA and TDCA showed that lack of Oatp1a1 does not decrease the plasma elimination of DCA or TDCA. After feeding DCA, the concentrations of DCA in ileum and colon tissues are higher in Oatp1a1-null than in WT mice. In addition, Oatp1a1-null mice have enhanced intestinal permeability. Taken together, the current data suggest that Oatp1a1 does not mediate the hepatic uptake of DCA or TDCA, but lack of Oatp1a1 increases intestinal permeability and thus enhances the absorption of DCA in mice. PMID:21914718

  7. Crystal structure of 3β,12α-dihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid (iso-deoxycholic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jover, A.; Meijide, F.; Rodríguez Núñez, E.; Vázquez Tato, J.; Castiñeiras, A.; Hofmann, A. F.; Ton-nu, H.-T.

    2000-05-01

    Iso-deoxycholic acid (3β,12α-dihydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid, iso-DCA), the 3β hydroxy epimer of deoxycholic acid (DCA), was synthesized from deoxycholic acid. The crystals, obtained by recrystallization from p-xylene, are orthorhombic, space group P2 12 12 1, with a=7.3232(6), b=10.5938(16) and c=28.2957(18) Å. The crystals contained no inclusion molecules, and thus differed from those of DCA when recrystallized from o-, m- and p-xylene. This absence of solvate molecules could explain the reduction of ≈3 Å in the b-axis length in iso-DCA when compared with that of DCA with xylene guests.

  8. The Role of Biotransformation and Oxidative Stress in 3,5-Dichloroaniline (3,5-DCA) Induced Nephrotoxicity in Isolated Renal Cortical Cells from Male Fischer 344 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Christopher R.; Ferguson, Travis; Preston, Debbie; Ward, Dakota; Ball, John; Anestis, Dianne; Valentovic, Monica; Rankin, Gary O.

    2016-01-01

    Among the mono- and dichloroanilines, 3,5-Dichloroaniline (3,5-DCA) is the most potent nephrotoxicant in vivo and in vitro. However, the role of renal biotransformation in 3,5-DCA induced nephrotoxicity is unknown. The current study was designed to determine the in vitro nephrotoxic potential of 3,5-DCA in isolated renal cortical cells (IRCC) obtained from male Fischer 344 rats, and the role of renal bioactivation and oxidative stress in 3,5-DCA nephrotoxicity. IRCC (~4 million cells/ml) from male rats were exposed to 3,5-DCA (0-1.0 mM) for up to 120 min. In IRCC, 3,5-DCA was cytotoxic at 1.0 mM by 60 min as evidenced by the increased release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), but 120 min was required for 3,5-DCA 0.5 mM to increase LDH release. In subsequent studies, IRCC were exposed to a pretreatment (antioxidant or enzyme inhibitor) prior to exposure to 3,5-DCA (1.0 mM) for 90 min. Cytotoxicity induced by 3,5-DCA was attenuated by pretreatment with inhibitors of flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO; methimazole, N-octylamine), cytochrome P450 (CYP; piperonyl butoxide, metyrapone), or peroxidase (indomethacin, mercaptosuccinate) enzymes. Use of more selective CYP inhibitors suggested that the CYP 2C family contributed to 3,5-DCA bioactivation. Antioxidants (glutathione, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, pyruvate) also attenuated 3,5-DCA nephrotoxicity, but oxidized glutathione levels and the oxidized/reduced glutathione ratios were not increased. These results indicate that 3,5-DCA may be activated via several renal enzyme systems to toxic metabolites, and that free radicals, but not oxidative stress, contribute to 3,5-DCA induced nephrotoxicity in vitro. PMID:26808022

  9. Protein adsorption on surfaces: dynamic contact-angle (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements.

    PubMed

    Stadler, H; Mondon, M; Ziegler, C

    2003-01-01

    Adsorption of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) on gold has been tested at various concentrations in aqueous solution by dynamic contact-angle analysis (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. With the Wilhelmy plate technique advancing and receding contact angles and the corresponding hysteresis were measured and correlated with the hydrophilicity and the homogeneity of the surface. With electrical admittance measurements of a gold-coated piezoelectrical quartz crystal, layer mass and viscoelastic contributions to the resonator's frequency shift during adsorption could be separated. A correlation was found between the adsorbed mass and the homogeneity and hydrophilicity of the adsorbed film.

  10. Specific bile acids inhibit hepatic fatty acid uptake

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Biao; Park, Hyo Min; Kazantzis, Melissa; Lin, Min; Henkin, Amy; Ng, Stephanie; Song, Sujin; Chen, Yuli; Tran, Heather; Lai, Robin; Her, Chris; Maher, Jacquelyn J.; Forman, Barry M.; Stahl, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Bile acids are known to play important roles as detergents in the absorption of hydrophobic nutrients and as signaling molecules in the regulation of metabolism. Here we tested the novel hypothesis that naturally occurring bile acids interfere with protein-mediated hepatic long chain free fatty acid (LCFA) uptake. To this end stable cell lines expressing fatty acid transporters as well as primary hepatocytes from mouse and human livers were incubated with primary and secondary bile acids to determine their effects on LCFA uptake rates. We identified ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) as the two most potent inhibitors of the liver-specific fatty acid transport protein 5 (FATP5). Both UDCA and DCA were able to inhibit LCFA uptake by primary hepatocytes in a FATP5-dependent manner. Subsequently, mice were treated with these secondary bile acids in vivo to assess their ability to inhibit diet-induced hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Administration of DCA in vivo via injection or as part of a high-fat diet significantly inhibited hepatic fatty acid uptake and reduced liver triglycerides by more than 50%. In summary, the data demonstrate a novel role for specific bile acids, and the secondary bile acid DCA in particular, in the regulation of hepatic LCFA uptake. The results illuminate a previously unappreciated means by which specific bile acids, such as UDCA and DCA, can impact hepatic triglyceride metabolism and may lead to novel approaches to combat obesity-associated fatty liver disease. PMID:22531947

  11. Carryover effects of dichloroacetic acid on hepatic tumorigenesis in mice.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of drinking water chlorination. Chronic DCA exposure has been shown to increase liver tumors in mice, although carryover effects and interactions with other promotional agents are not known. Here we evaluated effects...

  12. Vapor intrusion risk of lead scavengers 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA).

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Li, Haiyan; Spiese, Richard; Wilson, John; Yan, Guangxu; Guo, Shaohui

    2016-06-01

    Vapor intrusion of synthetic fuel additives represented a critical yet still neglected problem at sites impacted by petroleum fuel releases. This study used an advanced numerical model to simulate the vapor intrusion risk of lead scavengers 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide, EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) under different site conditions. We found that simulated EDB and DCA indoor air concentrations can exceed USEPA screening level (4.7 × 10(-3) μg/m(3) for EDB and 1.1 × 10(-1) μg/m(3) for DCA) if the source concentration is high enough (is still within the concentration range found at leaking UST site). To evaluate the chance that vapor intrusion of EDB might exceed the USEPA screening levels for indoor air, the simulation results were compared to the distribution of EDB at leaking UST sites in the US. If there is no degradation of EDB or only abiotic degradation of EDB, from 15% to 37% of leaking UST sites might exceed the USEPA screening level. This study supports the statements made by USEPA in the Petroleum Vapor Intrusion (PVI) Guidance that the screening criteria for petroleum hydrocarbon may not provide sufficient protectiveness for fuel releases containing EDB and DCA. Based on a thorough literature review, we also compiled previous published data on the EDB and DCA groundwater source concentrations and their degradation rates. These data are valuable in evaluating EDB and DCA vapor intrusion risk. In addition, a set of refined attenuation factors based on site-specific information (e.g., soil types, source depths, and degradation rates) were provided for establishing site-specific screening criteria for EDB and DCA. Overall, this study points out that lead scavengers EDB and DCA may cause vapor intrusion problems. As more field data of EDB and DCA become available, we recommend that USEPA consider including these data in the existing PVI database and possibly revising the PVI Guidance as necessary.

  13. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and...

  14. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  15. EARLY GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN THE LIVERS OF MICE EXPOSED TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    EARLY GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN THE LIVERS OF MICE EXPOSED TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have shown that DCA induces liver tumors in rodents when administered in drinking wate...

  16. A Quantitative Description of Suicide Inhibition of Dichloroacetic Acid in Rats and Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Keys, Deborah A.; Schultz, Irv R.; Mahle, Deirdre A.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2004-09-16

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA), a minor metabolite of trichloroethylene (TCE) and water disinfection byproduct, remains an important risk assessment issue because of its carcinogenic potency. DCA has been shown to inhibit its own metabolism by irreversibly inactivating glutathione transferase zeta (GSTzeta). To better predict internal dosimetry of DCA, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of DCA was developed. Suicide inhibition was described dynamically by varying the rate of maximal GSTzeta mediated metabolism of DCA (Vmax) over time. Resynthesis (zero-order) and degradation (first-order) of metabolic activity were described. Published iv pharmacokinetic studies in native rats were used to estimate an initial Vmax value, with Km set to an in vitro determined value. Degradation and resynthesis rates were set to estimated values from a published immunoreactive GSTzeta protein time course. The first-order inhibition rate, kd, was estimated to this same time course. A secondary, linear non-GSTzeta-mediated metabolic pathway is proposed to fit DCA time courses following treatment with DCA in drinking water. The PBPK model predictions were validated by comparing predicted DCA concentrations to measured concentrations in published studies of rats pretreated with DCA following iv exposure to 0.05 to 20 mg/kg DCA. The same model structure was parameterized to simulate DCA time courses following iv exposure in native and pretreated mice. Blood and liver concentrations during and postexposure to DCA in drinking water were predicted. Comparisons of PBPK model predicted to measured values were favorable, lending support for the further development of this model for application to DCA or TCE human health risk assessment.

  17. Enantiomeric deoxycholic acid: total synthesis, characterization, and preliminary toxicity toward colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Katona, Bryson W; Rath, Nigam P; Anant, Shrikant; Stenson, William F; Covey, Douglas F

    2007-11-23

    Deoxycholic acid (DCA) is an endogenous secondary bile acid implicated in numerous pathological conditions including colon cancer formation and progression and cholestatic liver disease. DCA involvement in these disease processes results partly from its ability to modulate signaling cascades within the cell, presumably through both direct receptor activation and general detergent mediated membrane changes. To further explore DCA induced changes in cell signaling, we completed a total synthesis of enantiomeric deoxycholic acid (ent-DCA) from achiral 2-methyl-1,3-cyclopentanedione. Using a modified method of the synthesis of ent-testosterone that proceeds through the (R)-(-)-Hajos-Parrish ketone, we have completed the successful synthesis of ent-DCA in 25 steps with a yield of 0.3% with all stereochemical assignments of the product confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Our studies toward this synthesis also uncovered the methodology for the development of a novel A,B-cis steroidal skeleton system containing a C3-C9 single bond as well as conditions to selectively ketalize the typically less reactive 12-carbonyl in poly-keto A,B-cis androgens. The critical micelle concentration (cmc) of ent-DCA, determined by a dye solubilization method, was identical to the cmc of natural DCA. Toxicity studies toward HT-29 and HCT-116 human colon cancer cell lines demonstrated that ent-DCA had similar effects on proliferation, yet showed a markedly decreased ability to induce apoptosis as compared to natural DCA.

  18. ASSESSING THE EFFECTS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) USING A MULTI-ENDPOINT MEDAKA ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In regulating the safety of water, EPA makes decisions on what chemical contaminants to regulate and at what levels. To make these decisions, the EPA needs hazard identification and dose-response information. Current rodent methods for generating required information have limita...

  19. DCA++: A case for science driven application development for leadership computing platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Michael S.; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Meredith, Jeremy; Maier, Thomas A.; Schulthess, Thomas C.

    2009-07-01

    The DCA++ code was one of the early science applications that ran on jaguar at the National Center for Computational Sciences, and the first application code to sustain a petaflop/s under production conditions on a general-purpose supercomputer. The code implements a quantum cluster method with a Quantum Monte Carlo kernel to solve the 2D Hubbard model for high-temperature superconductivity. It is implemented in C++, making heavy use of the generic programming model. In this paper, we discuss how this code was developed, reaching scalability and high efficiency on the world's fastest supercomputer in only a few years. We show how the use of generic concepts combined with systematic refactoring of codes is a better strategy for computational sciences than a comprehensive upfront design.

  20. DCA++: A case for science driven application development for leadership computing platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Michael Stuart; Schulthess, Thomas C; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Meredith, Jeremy S; Maier, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. The DCA++ code was one of the early science applications that ran on jaguar at the National Center for Computational Sciences, and the rst application code to sustain a peta op/s under production conditions on a general-purpose supercomputer. The code implements a quantum cluster method with a Quantum Monte Carlo kernel to solve the 2D Hubbard model for high-temperature superconductivity. It is implemented in C++, making heavy use of the generic programming model. In this paper, we discuss how this code was developed, reaching scalability and high ef ciency on the world s fastest supercomputer in only a few years. We show how the use of generic concepts combined with systematic refactoring of codes is a better strategy for computational sciences than a comprehensive upfront design.

  1. Different effects of bile acids, ursodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid, on cell growth and cell death in human colonic adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shiraki, Katsuya; Ito, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Fuke, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Tomoko; Miyashita, Kazumi; Yamanaka, Takenari; Suzuki, Masahiro; Nabeshima, Kazuo; Nakano, Takeshi; Takase, Koujiro

    2005-10-01

    Secondary bile acids have been implicated as an important etiological factor in colorectal cancer. We investigated the effects of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) on the growth and cytotoxicity in HT29 human colonic adenocarcinoma cells. Proliferation assay, cell cycle analysis and cell death characterization by bile acids were performed. Both UDCA and DCA reduced their proliferation rate of HT29 over 48 h in a concentration- and time-dependent manner compared with control cultures. In terms of cell cycle effects, however, UDCA induced G2/M arrest, while DCA induced G1 arrest in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. As for the effects of each bile acid on cell toxicity, UDCA induced early apoptosis and DCA induced both early apoptosis and necrosis. Bile acids play an important role in regulating cell survival and cell death in colon adenocarcinoma cells.

  2. A New Perspective on an Old Problem, Natural Attenuation of the Lead Scavengers EDB and DCA in Ground Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetra-ethyl lead was widely used in leaded automobile gasoline from 1923 until 1987. To prevent lead deposits from fouling the engine, 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) were added to the gasoline to act as lead scavengers. If leaded gasoline is spilled to...

  3. Vacancy ion-exclusion chromatography of haloacetic acids on a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Helaleh, Murad I H; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Mori, Masanobu; Xu, Qun; Taoda, Hiroshi; Ding, Ming-Yu; Hu, Wenzhi; Hasebe, Kiyoshi; Haddad, Paul R

    2003-05-16

    A new and simple approach is described for the determination of the haloacetic acids (such as mono-, di- and trichloroacetic acids) usually found in drinking water as chlorination by-products after disinfection processes and acetic acid. The new approach, termed vacancy ion-exclusion chromatography, is based on an ion-exclusion mechanism but using the sample solution as the mobile phase, pure water as the injected sample, and a weakly acidic cation-exchange resin column (TSKgel OApak-A) as the stationary phase. The addition of sulfuric acid to the mobile phase results in highly sensitive conductivity detection with sharp and well-shaped peaks, leading to excellent and efficient separations. The elution order was sulfuric acid, dichloroacetic acid, monochloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, and acetic acid. The separation of these acids depends on their pKa values. Acids with lower pKa values were eluted earlier than those with higher pKa, except for trichloroacetic acid due to a hydrophobic-adsorption effect occurring as a side-effect of vacancy ion-exclusion chromatography. The detection limits of these acids in the present study with conductivity detection were 3.4 microM for monochloroacetic acid, 0.86 microM for dichloroacetic acid and 0.15 microM for trichloroacetic acid.

  4. Selective synthesis of alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones by dibutyltin dimethoxide-catalyzed condensation of aldehydes with alkenyl trichloroacetates.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Akira; Goudu, Riku; Arai, Takayoshi

    2004-11-11

    Various alpha,beta-unsaturated ketones were stereoselectively synthesized in high yields up to 94% by a condensation reaction between alkenyl trichloroacetates and aldehydes using dibutyltin dimethoxide as a catalyst in the presence of methanol. This process is superior to the classical Claisen-Schmidt condensation with respect to mildness of the base catalyst and product selectivity.

  5. Deoxycholic Acid and Selenium Metabolite Methylselenol Exert Common and Distinct Effects on Cell Cycle, Apoptosis, and MAP Kinase Pathway in HCT116 Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) is a known tumor promoter in colon tumor development. The cell growth inhibition induced by DCA may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells and provide selection for subpopulations of cells resistant to DCA’s inhibitory effect. These survivi...

  6. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation in the presence of chloroacetic acids over Pt/TiO2.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuexiang; Xie, Yanzhao; Peng, Shaoqin; Lu, Gongxuan; Li, Shuben

    2006-05-01

    In the presence of chloroacetic acids, the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and decomposition of the pollutants over Pt/TiO2 have been investigated. The Pt/TiO2 was prepared by photodeposition. Monochloroacetic acid and dichloroacetic acid enhance photocatalytic hydrogen generation, whereas trichloroacetic acid does not. The photocatalytic oxidation of monochloroacetic acid and dichloroacetic acid mainly produces CO2, HCl and formaldehyde, whereas the photocatalytic oxidation of trichloroacetic acid mainly produces CO2 and HCl. The effect of the concentration of monochloroacetic acid and dichloroacetic acid on the hydrogen generation rate is consistent with a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model. A possible reaction mechanism was discussed.

  7. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Claycombe, Kate J; Reindl, Katie M

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of a high-fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk, while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer-preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and butyrate (two major metabolites in colon lumen), we examined the effects of physiologically relevant doses of butyrate (0.5-2 mmol/l) and DCA (0.05-0.3 mmol/l) on colon cell proliferation. We hypothesize that butyrate and DCA each modulates the cell cycle and apoptosis via common and distinct cellular signaling targets. In this study, we demonstrated that both butyrate and DCA inhibited cell proliferation by up to 89% and 92% and increased cell apoptosis rate by up to 3.1- and 4.5-fold, respectively. Cell cycle analyses revealed that butyrate led to an increase in G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction, but DCA induced an increase in only G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in the S-phase fraction when compared with the untreated cells. The examination of early cellular signaling revealed that DCA but not butyrate increased intracellular reactive oxygen species, genomic DNA breakage, the activation of ERK1/2, caspase-3 and PARP. In contrast, DCA decreased activated Rb protein level, and butyrate but not DCA increased p21 expression. Collectively, although both butyrate and DCA inhibit colonic cell proliferation, butyrate increases tumor suppressor gene expression, whereas DCA decreases tumor suppressor activation in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways.

  8. Deoxycholic acid differentially regulates focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation: role of tyrosine phosphatase ShP2.

    PubMed

    Khare, Sharad; Holgren, Cory; Samarel, Allen M

    2006-12-01

    Environmental factors, including dietary fats, are implicated in colonic carcinogenesis. Dietary fats modulate secondary bile acids including deoxycholic acid (DCA) concentrations in the colon, which are thought to contribute to the nutritional-related component of colon cancer risk. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that DCA differentially regulated the site-specific phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK). DCA decreased adhesion of HCA-7 cells to the substratum and induced dephosphorylation of FAK at tyrosine-576/577 (Tyr-576/577) and Tyr-925. Tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-397 remained unaffected by DCA stimulation. Interestingly, we found that c-Src was constitutively associated with FAK and DCA actually activated Src, despite no change in FAK-397 and an inhibition of FAK-576 phosphorylation. DCA concomitantly and significantly increased association of tyrosine phosphatase ShP2 with FAK. Incubation of immunoprecipitated FAK, in vitro, with glutathione-S-transferase-ShP2 fusion protein resulted in tyrosine dephosphorylation of FAK in a concentration-dependent manner. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides directed against ShP2 decreased ShP2 protein levels and attenuated DCA-induced FAK dephosphorylation. Inhibition of FAK by adenoviral-mediated overexpression of FAK-related nonkinase and gene silencing of Shp2 both abolished DCA's effect on cell adhesion, thus providing a possible mechanism for inside-out signaling by DCA in colon cancer cells. Our results suggest that DCA differentially regulates focal adhesion complexes and that tyrosine phosphatase ShP2 has a role in DCA signaling.

  9. TRAPPING AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DICHLOROACETATE RADICAL FROM THE REDUCTIVE DEHALOGENATION OF TRICHLOROACETATE BY MOUSE AND RAT LIVER MICROSOMES. (R825954)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A key question in the risk assessment of trichloroethylene (TRI) is the extent to which its carcinogenic effects might depend on the formation of dichloroacetate (DCA) as a metabolite. One of the metabolic pathways proposed for the formation of DCA from TRI is by the reductive...

  10. Toxicologic Evaluation of Trichloroacetic Acid: Effects on Rat Liver Peroxisomes and Enzyme Altered Foci.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY Program in Pharmacology/Toxicology May...United States Air Force for offering me the chance and affording me the support to complete my doctoral education. i must aiso thank the Environmental...lesions of acne, warts, lichenified eczema , tinea versicoior, chloasma, and molluscum contagiosum (19,20). It is also used, as an astringent drug to

  11. Simulation of the effect of remediation on EDB and 1,2-DCA plumes at sites contaminated by leaded gasoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, James K.; Falta, Ronald W.; Freedman, David L.

    2009-08-01

    An analytical model is used to simulate the effects of partial source removal and plume remediation on ethylene dibromide (EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) plumes at contaminated underground storage tank (UST) sites. The risk posed by EDB, 1,2-DCA, and commingled gasoline hydrocarbons varies throughout the plume over time. Dissolution from the light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) determines the concentration of each contaminant near the source, but biological decay in the plume has a greater influence as distance downgradient from the source increases. For this reason, compounds that exceed regulatory standards near the source may not in downgradient plume zones. At UST sites, partial removal of a residual LNAPL source mass may serve as a stand alone remedial technique if dissolved concentrations in the source zone are within several orders of magnitude of the applicable government or remedial standards. This may be the case with 1,2-DCA; however, EDB is likely to be found at concentrations that are orders of magnitude higher than its low Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 0.05 μg/L (micrograms per liter). For sites with significant EDB contamination, even when plume remediation is combined with source depletion, significant timeframes may be required to mitigate the impact of this compound. Benzene and MTBE are commonly the focus of remedial efforts at UST sites, but simulations presented here suggest that EDB, and to a lesser extent 1,2-DCA, could be the critical contaminants to consider in the remediation design process at many sites.

  12. Quantitative Assessment of Peroxisome Proliferation in B6C3F1 Mouse Liver after Subchronic Exposure to Trichloroethylene by Gavage.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-07-01

    trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and dichloroacetic acid (DCA) (Herren-Freund, et al., 1987; Daniel, et al., 1992; DeAngelo, et al., 1991). Only CH has been found to...independent of peroxisome proliferation (Parrish, et al., 2 1996 and Nelson, et al., 1989). Both TCA and DCA increased the formation of thiobarbituric acid ...reactive substances (TBARS) in a dose-responsive manner, suggesting that each chloroacetate was capable of yielding a radical species that could

  13. Perfect polar stacking of parallel beloamphiphile layers. Synthesis, structure and solid-state optical properties of the unsymmetrical acetophenone azine DCA.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Rainer; Knotts, Nathan; Yu, Ping; Li, Linghui; Chandrasekhar, Meera; Martin, Christopher; Barnes, Charles L

    2006-06-21

    Extraordinary high degrees of polar order can be achieved by a rational design that involves the polar stacking of parallel beloamphiphile monolayers (PBAM). This strategy is exemplified by the acetophenone azines MCA (4-methoxy-4'-chloroacetophenone azine) and DCA (4-decoxy-4'-chloroacetophenone azine). The beloamphiphile design aims to achieve strong lateral interactions by way of arene-arene, azine-azine, arene-azine and halogen-bonding interactions. Dipole-induced interactions and halogen bonding dominate interlayer interactions and halogen bonding is shown to effect the layer stacking. Crystals of DCA contain PBAMs with perfect polar order and perfect polar layer stacking, while crystals of MCA features perfect polar order only in one of two layers and layer stacking is polar but not entirely perfect. We report the synthesis of the beloamphiphile DCA, its crystal structure, and we present a comparative discussion of the structures and intermolecular interactions of MCA and DCA. Absorbance and photoluminescence measurements have been carried out for solutions of DCA and for DCA crystals. DCA exhibits a broad emission centered at 2.5 eV when excited with UV radiation. The nonlinear optical response was studied by measuring second harmonic generation (SHG). Strong SHG signals have been observed due to the polar alignment and the DCA crystal's NLO response is 34 times larger than that of urea. Optimization of the beloamphiphile and systematic SAR studies of the polar organic crystals, which are now possible for the very first time, will further improve the performance of this new class of functional organic materials. The materials are organic semiconductors and show promise as blue emitters, as nonlinear optical materials and as OLED materials.

  14. Bile acids modulate the Golgi membrane fission process via a protein kinase Ceta and protein kinase D-dependent pathway in colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Anne-Marie; Foran, Eilis; Sharma, Ruchika; Davies, Anthony; Mahon, Ciara; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid; Kelleher, Dermot; Long, Aideen

    2010-04-01

    Deoxycholic acid (DCA) is a secondary bile acid that modulates signalling pathways in epithelial cells. DCA has been implicated in pathogenesis of colon carcinoma, particularly by activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a tertiary bile acid, has been observed to have chemopreventive effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of DCA and UDCA on the subcellular localization and activity of PKCeta and its downstream effects on Golgi structure in a colon cancer cell model. PKCeta expression was localized to the Golgi in HCT116 colon cancer cells. DCA induced fragmentation of the Golgi in these cells following activation of PKCeta and its downstream effector protein kinase D (PKD). Pretreatment of cells with UDCA or a glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, inhibited DCA-induced PKCeta/PKD activation and Golgi fragmentation. Knockdown of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression using small interfering RNA or inhibition using the GR antagonist mifepristone attenuated the inhibitory effect of UDCA on Golgi fragmentation. Elevated serum and faecal levels of DCA have been previously reported in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and colon cancer. Analysis of Golgi architecture in vivo using tissue microarrays revealed Golgi fragmentation in UC and colorectal cancer tissue. We have demonstrated that DCA can disrupt the structure of the Golgi, an organelle critical for normal cell function. Inhibition of this DCA-induced Golgi fragmentation by UDCA was mediated via the GR. This represents a potential mechanism of observed chemopreventive effects of UDCA in benign and malignant disease of the colon.

  15. Deoxycholic Acid Triggers NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and Aggravates DSS-Induced Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shengnan; Gong, Zizhen; Zhou, Jiefei; Tian, Chunyan; Gao, Yanhong; Xu, Congfeng; Chen, Yingwei; Cai, Wei; Wu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    A westernized high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). High-level fecal deoxycholic acid (DCA) caused by HFD contributes to the colonic inflammatory injury of IBD; however, the mechanism concerning the initiation of inflammatory response by DCA remains unclear. In this study, we sought to investigate the role and mechanism of DCA in the induction of inflammation via promoting NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Here, we, for the first time, showed that DCA dose-dependently induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and highly pro-inflammatory cytokine-IL-1β production in macrophages. Mechanistically, DCA-triggered NLRP3 inflammasome activation by promoting cathepsin B release at least partially through sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2. Colorectal instillation of DCA significantly increased mature IL-1β level in colonic tissue and exacerbated DSS-induced colitis, while in vivo blockage of NLRP3 inflammasome or macrophage depletion dramatically reduced the mature IL-1β production and ameliorated the aggravated inflammatory injury imposed by DCA. Thus, our findings show that high-level fecal DCA may serve as an endogenous danger signal to activate NLRP3 inflammasome and contribute to HFD-related colonic inflammation. NLRP3 inflammasome may represent a new potential therapeutical target for treatment of IBD. PMID:27965665

  16. Spermatotoxicity of dichloroacetic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The testicular toxicity of dichloroacetic acid (DCA), a disinfection byproduct of drinking water, was evaluated in adult male rats given both single and multiple (up to 14 d) oral doses. Delayed spermiation and altered resorption of residual bodies were observed in rats given sin...

  17. CYP3A Specifically Catalyzes 1β-Hydroxylation of Deoxycholic Acid: Characterization and Enzymatic Synthesis of a Potential Novel Urinary Biomarker for CYP3A Activity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Martin A; Li, Xue-Qing; Grönberg, Gunnar; Diczfalusy, Ulf; Andersson, Tommy B

    2016-09-01

    The endogenous bile acid metabolite 1β-hydroxy-deoxycholic acid (1β-OH-DCA) excreted in human urine may be used as a sensitive CYP3A biomarker in drug development reflecting in vivo CYP3A activity. An efficient and stereospecific enzymatic synthesis of 1β-OH-DCA was developed using a Bacillus megaterium (BM3) cytochrome P450 (P450) mutant, and its structure was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A [(2)H4]-labeled analog of 1β-OH-DCA was also prepared. The major hydroxylated metabolite of deoxycholic acid (DCA) in human liver microsomal incubations was identified as 1β-OH-DCA by comparison with the synthesized reference analyzed by UPLC-HRMS. Its formation was strongly inhibited by CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole. Screening of 21 recombinant human cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes showed that, with the exception of extrahepatic CYP46A1, the most abundant liver P450 subfamily CYP3A, including CYP3A4, 3A5, and 3A7, specifically catalyzed 1β-OH-DCA formation. This indicated that 1β-hydroxylation of DCA may be a useful marker reaction for CYP3A activity in vitro. The metabolic pathways of DCA and 1β-OH-DCA in human hepatocytes were predominantly via glycine and, to a lesser extent, via taurine and sulfate conjugation. The potential utility of 1β-hydroxylation of DCA as a urinary CYP3A biomarker was illustrated by comparing the ratio of 1β-OH-DCA:DCA in a pooled spot urine sample from six healthy control subjects to a sample from one patient treated with carbamazepine, a potent CYP3A inducer; 1β-OH-DCA:DCA was considerably higher in the patient versus controls (ratio 2.8 vs. 0.4). Our results highlight the potential of 1β-OH-DCA as a urinary biomarker in clinical CYP3A DDI studies.

  18. The trichloroethylene metabolite S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine but not trichloroacetate inhibits pathogen-stimulated TNF-α in human extraplacental membranes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boldenow, Erica; Hassan, Iman; Chames, Mark C; Xi, Chuanwu; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2015-04-01

    Extraplacental membranes define the gestational compartment and provide a barrier to infectious microorganisms ascending the gravid female reproductive tract. We tested the hypothesis that bioactive metabolites of trichloroethylene (TCE) decrease pathogen-stimulated innate immune response of extraplacental membranes. Extraplacental membranes were cultured for 4, 8, and 24h with the TCE metabolites trichloroacetate (TCA) or S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (DCVC) in the absence or presence of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to simulate infection. In addition, membranes were cocultured with DCVC and Group B Streptococcus (GBS). DCVC (5-50μM) significantly inhibited LTA-, LPS-, and GBS-stimulated cytokine release from tissue cultures as early as 4h (P≤0.05). In contrast, TCA (up to 500μM) did not inhibit LTA-stimulated cytokine release from tissue punches. Because cytokines are important mediators for host response to infectious microorganisms these findings suggest that TCE exposure could potentially modify susceptibility to infection during pregnancy.

  19. The Trichloroethylene Metabolite S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine but not Trichloroacetate Inhibits Pathogen-Stimulated TNF-α in Human Extraplacental Membranes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Boldenow, Erica; Hassan, Iman; Chamesb, Mark C.; Xi, Chuanwu; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Extraplacental membranes define the gestational compartment and provide a barrier to infectious microorganisms ascending the gravid female reproductive tract. We tested the hypothesis that bioactive metabolites of trichloroethylene (TCE) decrease pathogen-stimulated innate immune response of extraplacental membranes. Extraplacental membranes were cultured for 4, 8, and 24 h with the TCE metabolites trichloroacetate (TCA) or S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) in the absence or presence of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to simulate infection. In addition, membranes were cocultured with DCVC and Group B Streptococcus (GBS). DCVC (5-50 μM) significantly inhibited LTA-, LPS-, and GBS-stimulated cytokine release from tissue punch cultures as early as 4 h (p ≤ 0.05). In contrast, TCA (up to 500 μM) did not inhibit LTA-stimulated cytokine release from tissue punches. Because cytokines are important mediators for host response to infectious microorganisms these findings suggest that TCE exposure could potentially modify susceptibility to infection during pregnancy. PMID:25653212

  20. Examination of age-related epigenetic changes following early-life exposure to dichloroacetic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies have shown that transient early-life exposure to dichloroacetic acid (DCA), a pyruvate analog and metabolic reprogramming agent, increases liver cancer incidence in older mice. This carcinogenic effect is not associated with direct mutagenicity, persistent cytotoxi...

  1. Classical and biochemical endpoints in the evaluation of phytotoxic effects caused by the herbicide trichloroacetate.

    PubMed

    Radetski; Cotelle; Férard

    2000-11-01

    Three terrestrial plant species, oat (Avena sativa ), Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris cv. chinensis) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa), were exposed to different concentrations of herbicide TCA (sodium trichloroacetate) in a growth test according to guideline OECD # 208. Classical (i.e. germination and biomass) and biochemical (i.e., antioxydant enzyme activities) endpoints were investigated. Germination rate decreased significantly at 3.9 mg TCA kg dry soil(-1) (for oat and lettuce) and 62.5 mg TCA kg dry soil(-1) (for Chinese cabbage). Biomass decreased significantly only at 1.9 mg TCA kg dry soil(-1) (for oat and lettuce) and 15.6 mg TCA kg dry soil(-1) (for Chinese cabbage). The activities of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7) and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) increased significantly at the lowest concentration of TCA tested, i.e. 0.03 mg TCA kg dry soil(-1) (for oat and lettuce) and 0.48 mg TCA kg dry soil(-1) (for Chinese cabbage). Our results showed a ranking of sensitivity among the different endpoints for the three plant species: enzyme activities>biomass>germination rate. The increase in antioxidant enzyme activities observed in this study ensured the detoxification of increased levels of active oxygen species, and presumably prevented the plants from undergoing oxidative stress damage. Thus, the use of enzyme activities will permit the detection of early injury in plant growth testing.

  2. Sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography method for the simultaneous determination of low levels of dichloroacetic acid and its metabolites in blood and urine.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, L; Moghaddam, A P; Taylor, A G; Sudberry, G L; Fisher, J W

    1999-06-11

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a contaminant found in treated drinking water due to chlorination. DCA has been shown to be a complete hepatocarcinogen in both mice and rats. In this study we developed a rapid and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method to simultaneously detect DCA and its metabolites, oxalic acid, glyoxylic acid and glycolic acid in blood and urine samples of animals sub-chronically administered with DCA (2 g/l) in drinking water. Both urine and plasma samples were treated minimally before HPLC analysis. Separation and detection of DCA and its metabolites were achieved using an anion-exchange column and a conductivity detector. The mobile phase consisted of an initial concentration of 0.01 mM sodium hydroxide in 40% methanol followed by a linear gradient from 0.01 mM to 60 mM sodium hydroxide in 40% methanol for 30 min. The lower detection limit for DCA and each of its three major metabolites was 0.05 microg/ml. DCA and its metabolites gave a linear response range from 0.05 to 100 microg/ml. Plasma DCA was also analyzed by gas chromatography (GC), and the results obtained correlated with those from the HPLC method (correlation coefficient=0.999). While available HPLC techniques offer sensitive procedures to detect either glycolic acid or oxalic acid, the described HPLC method has the unique advantage of determining simultaneously the parent compound (DCA) and its three major metabolites (oxalic acid, glyoxylic acid and glycolic acid) in biological samples, without complex sample preparation.

  3. Organization and expression of the Co1D-CA23 plasmid genes associated with colicin synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pshennikova, E.S.; Lipasova, V.A.; Kolot, M.N.; Khmel', I.A.

    1986-11-01

    The authors have investigated the organization and regulation of the functioning of colicin genes, the immunity protein, and lysis protein of the colicinogenic plasmid Co1D-CA23. In addition they have analyzed the polypeptides synthesized in minicells carrying plasmid Co1D, its Th5 mutants, and the recombinant plasmids obtained on cloning of the EcoRV fragments of Co1D on vector BR325. They have determined the position of the promoter of the colicin gene and the direction of its transcription. Furthermore they were able to show that the gene determining cell immunity to colicin D is transcribed independently of the colicin gene from its own SOS-independent promoter. Treatment of the cells carrying plasmid Co1D with mitomycin C leads to the induction of synthesis of not only colicin but also of a protein with a molecular weight of 10 kdalton, causing under these conditions the death and lysis of the cells. Together with colicin, this protein is detected in the culture liquid on lysis of the cells. Plasmid mutations impairing the synthesis of the lysis protein inhibit the release of colicin into the medium. They have shown that the genes of colicin and the lysis protein are arranged into one operon, the lysis gene being transcribed after the colicin gene. They have proposed a genetic map for plasmid Co1D-CA23.

  4. A putatively phase variable gene (dca) required for natural competence in Neisseria gonorrhoeae but not Neisseria meningitidis is located within the division cell wall (dcw) gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Snyder, L A; Saunders, N J; Shafer, W M

    2001-02-01

    A cluster of 18 open reading frames (ORFs), 15 of which are homologous to genes involved in division and cell wall synthesis, has been identified in Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis. The three additional ORFs, internal to the dcw cluster, are not homologous to dcw-related genes present in other bacterial species. Analysis of the N. meningitidis strain MC58 genome for foreign DNA suggests that these additional ORFs have not been acquired by recent horizontal exchange, indicating that they are a long-standing, integral part of the neisserial dcw gene cluster. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis of RNA extracted from N. gonorrhoeae strain FA19 confirmed that all three ORFs are transcribed in gonococci. One of these ORFs (dca, for division cluster competence associated), located between murE and murF, was studied in detail and found to be essential for competence in the gonococcal but not in the meningococcal strains tested. Computer analysis predicts that dca encodes an inner membrane protein similar to hypothetical proteins produced by other gram-negative bacteria. In some meningococcal strains dca is prematurely terminated following a homopolymeric tract of G's, the length of which differs between isolates of N. meningitidis, suggesting that dca is phase variable in this species. A deletion and insertional mutation was made in the dca gene of N. gonorrhoeae strain FA19 and N. meningitidis strain NMB. This mutation abrogated the ability of the gonococci to be transformed with chromosomal DNA. Thus, we conclude that the dca-encoded gene product is an essential competence factor for gonococci.

  5. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis.

  6. Inhibition of NF-κB by deoxycholic acid induces miR-21/PDCD4-dependent hepatocelular apoptosis.

    PubMed

    M Rodrigues, Pedro; B Afonso, Marta; L Simão, André; M Borralho, Pedro; M P Rodrigues, Cecília; E Castro, Rui

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs/miRs) are key regulators of liver metabolism, while toxic bile acids participate in the development of several liver diseases. We previously demonstrated that deoxycholic acid (DCA), a cytotoxic bile acid implicated in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, inhibits miR-21 expression in hepatocytes. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which DCA modulates miR-21 and whether miR-21 contributes for DCA-induced cytotoxicity. DCA inhibited miR-21 expression in primary rat hepatocytes in a dose-dependent manner, and increased miR-21 pro-apoptotic target programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) and apoptosis. Both miR-21 overexpression and PDCD4 silencing hampered DCA-induced cell death. Further, DCA decreased NF-κB activity, shown to represent an upstream mechanism leading to modulation of the miR-21/PDCD4 pathway. In fact, NF-κB overexpression or constitutive activation halted miR-21-dependent apoptosis by DCA while opposite results were observed upon NF-κB inhibition. In turn, DCA-induced oxidative stress resulted in caspase-2 activation and NF-κB/miR-21 inhibition, in a PIDD-dependent manner. Finally, modulation of the NF-κB/miR-21/PDCD4 pro-apoptotic pathway by DCA was also shown to occur in the rat liver in vivo. These signalling circuits may constitute appealing targets for bile acid-associated liver pathologies.

  7. Electrode kinetics at a platinum anode in chloroacetic acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lotvin, B.M.; Vasil'ev, Yu.B.

    1987-02-01

    It was shown by direct comparison of kinetic and adsorption data that at platinum in solutions of mono- and trichloroacetic acid, the anodic processes are entirely analogous in character to the processes occurring in acetate solutions. The lack of Kolbe electrosynthesis products in the electrolysis of chloroacetic acids is to the special reaction features of the secondary chloroalkyl radicals.

  8. TH-C-12A-05: Dynamic Couch Motion for Improvement of Radiation Therapy Trajectories in DCA and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, L; Thomas, Christopher

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential improvement in dosimetric external beam radiation therapy plan quality using an optimized dynamic gantry and couch motion trajectory which minimizes exposure to the organs at risk. Methods: Patient-specific anatomical information of head-and-neck and cranial cancer patients was used to quantify the geometric overlap between target volumes and organs-at-risk (OARs) based on their two-dimensional projection from source to a plane at isocentre as a function of gantry and couch angle. QUANTEC dose constraints were then used as weighting factors for the OARs to generate a map of couch-gantry coordinate space indicating degree of overlap at each point in space. A couch-gantry collision space was generated by direct measurement on a Varian Truebeam linac using an anthropomorphic solid-water phantom. A dynamic, fully customizable algorithm was written to generate a navigable ideal trajectory for the patient specific couch-gantry space. The advanced algorithm includes weighting factors which can be used to balance the implementation of absolute minimum values of overlap, with the clinical practicality of largescale couch motion and delivery time. Optimized trajectories were calculated for cranial DCA treatments and for head-and-neck VMAT treatments and compared to conventional DCA and VMAT treatment trajectories. Results: Comparison of optimized treatment trajectories with conventional treatment trajectories indicates a decrease in dose to the organs-at-risk between 4.64% and 6.82% (2.39 and 3.52 Gy) of the prescription dose per patient per organ at risk. Conclusion: Using simultaneous couch and gantry motion during radiation therapy to minimize the geometrical overlap in the beams-eye-view target volumes and the organs-at-risk can have an appreciable dose reduction to organs-at-risk.

  9. Importance of Dichloroacetate and Trichloroacetate to the Hepatocarcinogenic Response to Trichloroeylene in B6C3F1 Mice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-15

    Baker Co., polysorbate ( Tween 80 ), beta- glucuronidase (Type VII), N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), clofibrate, phenobllbital, DCA, TCA...these studies. Control rats received either 1.52, 4.56, or 22.8 mmol/kg body weight of TCE in a 1% aqueous suspension of Tween 80 by stomach tube. Rats...0.4 a Male Spraque-Dawley rats and male 86C3Fl mice were given single oral doses of TCE suspended in it Tween 80 in distilled water. Control animals

  10. The Na+/H+ exchanger controls deoxycholic acid-induced apoptosis by a H+-activated, Na+-dependent ionic shift in esophageal cells.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Aaron; Chen, HwuDauRw; Khan, Mohammad R; Roesly, Heather; Hill, Kimberly A; Shahidullah, Mohammad; Mandal, Amritlal; Delamere, Nicholas A; Dvorak, Katerina

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis resistance is a hallmark of cancer cells. Typically, bile acids induce apoptosis. However during gastrointestinal (GI) tumorigenesis the cancer cells develop resistance to bile acid-induced cell death. To understand how bile acids induce apoptosis resistance we first need to identify the molecular pathways that initiate apoptosis in response to bile acid exposure. In this study we examined the mechanism of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced apoptosis, specifically the role of Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE) and Na(+) influx in esophageal cells. In vitro studies revealed that the exposure of esophageal cells (JH-EsoAd1, CP-A) to DCA (0.2 mM-0.5 mM) caused lysosomal membrane perturbation and transient cytoplasmic acidification. Fluorescence microscopy in conjunction with atomic absorption spectrophotometry demonstrated that this effect on lysosomes correlated with influx of Na(+), subsequent loss of intracellular K(+), an increase of Ca(2+) and apoptosis. However, ethylisopropyl-amiloride (EIPA), a selective inhibitor of NHE, prevented Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) changes and caspase 3/7 activation induced by DCA. Ouabain and amphotericin B, two drugs that increase intracellular Na(+) levels, induced similar changes as DCA (ion imbalance, caspase3/7 activation). On the contrary, DCA-induced cell death was inhibited by medium with low a Na(+) concentrations. In the same experiments, we exposed rat ileum ex-vivo to DCA with or without EIPA. Severe tissue damage and caspase-3 activation was observed after DCA treatment, but EIPA almost fully prevented this response. In summary, NHE-mediated Na(+) influx is a critical step leading to DCA-induced apoptosis. Cells tolerate acidification but evade DCA-induced apoptosis if NHE is inhibited. Our data suggests that suppression of NHE by endogenous or exogenous inhibitors may lead to apoptosis resistance during GI tumorigenesis.

  11. The Effect of Trihalomethane and Haloacetic Acid Exposure on Fetal Growth in a Maryland County

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-29

    the four trihalomethanes (bromoform, chloro- form, bromodichloromethane, and dibromochloromethane) and five of the haloacetic acids ( chloroacetic acid ...correlation in the second trimester (bro- moacetic acid and chloroacetic acid : r ¼ 0.66, bromoacetic acid and dibromochloromethane: r ¼ 0.60, and... chloroacetic acid and dibromochloromethane: r ¼ 0.67) and a strong correlation in the third trimester (dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid : r

  12. High abundances of oxalic, azelaic, and glyoxylic acids and methylglyoxal in the open ocean with high biological activity: Implication for secondary OA formation from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Yuzo; Fu, Pingqing

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric dicarboxylic acids (DCA) are a ubiquitous water-soluble component of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), affecting the Earth's climate. Despite the high abundances of oxalic acid and related compounds in the marine aerosols, there is no consensus on what controls their distributions over the open ocean. Marine biological productivity could play a role in the production of DCA, but there is no substantial evidence to support this hypothesis. Here we present latitudinal distributions of DCA, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls in the marine aerosols from the remote Pacific. Their concentrations were found several times higher in more biologically influenced aerosols (MBA) than less biologically influenced aerosols. We propose isoprene and unsaturated fatty acids as sources of DCA as inferred from significantly higher abundances of isoprene-SOA tracers and azelaic acid in MBA. These results have implications toward the reassessment of climate forcing feedbacks of marine-derived SOA.

  13. Interaction of Cytotoxic and Cytoprotective Bile Acids with Model Membranes: Influence of the Membrane Composition.

    PubMed

    Esteves, M; Ferreira, M J; Kozica, A; Fernandes, A C; Gonçalves da Silva, A; Saramago, B

    2015-08-18

    To understand the role of bile acids (BAs) in cell function, many authors have investigated their effect on biomembrane models which are less complex systems, but there are still many open questions. The present study aims to contribute for the deepening of the knowledge of the interaction between BAs and model membranes, in particular, focusing on the effect of BA mixtures. The cytotoxic deoxycholic acid (DCA), the cytoprotective ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and the equimolar mixture (DCA + UDCA) were investigated. Monolayers and liposomes were taken as model membranes with two lipid compositions: an equimolar mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol)) traditionally associated with the formation of lipid rafts and an equimolar POPC/SM binary mixture. The obtained results showed that DCA causes the fluidization of monolayers and bilayers, leading to the eventual rupture of POPC/SM liposomes at high concentration. UDCA may provide a stabilization of POPC/SM membranes but has a negligible effect on the Chol-containing liposomes. In the case of equimolar mixture DCA/UDCA, the interactions depend not only on the lipid composition but also on the design of the experiment. The BA mixture has a greater impact on the monolayers than do pure BAs, suggesting a cooperative DCA-UDCA interaction that enhances the penetration of UDCA in both POPC/SM and POPC/SM/Chol monolayers. For the bilayers, the presence of UDCA in the mixture decreases the disturbing effect of DCA.

  14. Deoxycholic acid impairs glycosylation and fucosylation processes in esophageal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Anne-Marie; Sharma, Ruchika; Duggan, Gina; Kelleher, Dermot; Long, Aideen

    2012-05-01

    It is generally accepted that esophageal adenocarcinoma arises from a Barrett's metaplastic lesion. Altered glycoprotein expression has been demonstrated in tissue from patients with Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer but the mechanisms regarding such changes are unknown. The bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) alters many cell signaling pathways and is implicated in esophageal cancer progression. We have demonstrated that DCA disrupts Golgi structure and affects protein secretion and glycosylation processes in cell lines derived from normal squamous epithelium (HET-1A) and Barrett's metaplastic epithelium (QH). Cell surface expression of glycans was identified using carbohydrate-specific probes (wheat germ agglutinate, conconavalin A, peanut agglutinin, lithocholic acid and Ulex europaeus agglutinin) that monitored N-glycosylation, O-glycosylation and core fucosylation in resting and DCA-treated cells. DCA altered intracellular localization and reduced cell surface expression of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, α-methyl-mannopyranoside (Man/Glc) and fucose in both cell lines. Furthermore, DCA reduced the expression of epithelial growth factor receptor and E-cadherin in a manner analogous to treatment of cells with the N-glycan biosynthesis inhibitor tunicamycin. This is the first study to identify an altered Golgi structure and glycomic profile in response to DCA in esophageal epithelial cells, a process which could potentially contribute to metaplasia, dysplasia and cancer of the esophagus.

  15. An optimized probucol microencapsulated formulation integrating a secondary bile acid (deoxycholic acid) as a permeation enhancer.

    PubMed

    Mooranian, Armin; Negrulj, Rebecca; Chen-Tan, Nigel; Watts, Gerald F; Arfuso, Frank; Al-Salami, Hani

    2014-01-01

    The authors have previously designed, developed, and characterized a novel microencapsulated formulation as a platform for the targeted delivery of therapeutics in an animal model of type 2 diabetes, using the drug probucol (PB). The aim of this study was to optimize PB microcapsules by incorporating the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), which has good permeation-enhancing properties, and to examine its effect on microcapsules' morphology, rheology, structural and surface characteristics, and excipients' chemical and thermal compatibilities. Microencapsulation was carried out using a BÜCHI-based microencapsulating system established in the authors' laboratory. Using the polymer sodium alginate (SA), two microencapsulated formulations were prepared: PB-SA (control) and PB-DCA-SA (test) at a constant ratio (1:30 and 1:3:30, respectively). Complete characterization of the microcapsules was carried out. The incorporation of DCA resulted in better structural and surface characteristics, uniform morphology, and stable chemical and thermal profiles, while size and rheological parameters remained similar to control. In addition, PB-DCA-SA microcapsules showed good excipients' compatibilities, which were supported by data from differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray studies, suggesting microcapsule stability. Hence, PB-DCA-SA microcapsules have good rheological and compatibility characteristics and may be suitable for the oral delivery of PB in type 2 diabetes.

  16. Deoxycholic acid causes DNA damage while inducing apoptotic resistance through NF-κB activation in benign Barrett's epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiaofang; Juergens, Stefanie; Zhang, Xi; Rezaei, Davood; Yu, Chunhua; Strauch, Eric D; Wang, Jian-Ying; Cheng, Edaire; Meyer, Frank; Wang, David H; Zhang, Qiuyang; Spechler, Stuart J; Souza, Rhonda F

    2011-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is associated with adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus, but the incidence of this tumor is rising, despite widespread use of acid-suppressing medications. This suggests that refluxed material other than acid might contribute to carcinogenesis. We looked for potentially carcinogenetic effects of two bile acids, deoxycholic acid (DCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), on Barrett's epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. We exposed Barrett's (BAR-T) cells to DCA or UDCA and studied the generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS); expression of phosphorylated H2AX (a marker of DNA damage), phosphorylated IkBα, and phosphorylated p65 (activated NF-κB pathway proteins); and apoptosis. During endoscopy in patients, we took biopsy specimens of Barrett's mucosa before and after esophageal perfusion with DCA or UDCA and assessed DNA damage and NF-κB activation. Exposure to DCA, but not UDCA, resulted in ROS/RNS production, DNA damage, and NF-κB activation but did not increase the rate of apoptosis in BAR-T cells. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (a ROS scavenger) prevented DNA damage after DCA exposure, and DCA did induce apoptosis in cells treated with NF-κB inhibitors (BAY 11-7085 or AdIκB superrepressor). DNA damage and NF-κB activation were detected in biopsy specimens of Barrett's mucosa taken after esophageal perfusion with DCA, but not UDCA. These data show that, in Barrett's epithelial cells, DCA induces ROS/RNS production, which causes genotoxic injury, and simultaneously induces activation of the NF-κB pathway, which enables cells with DNA damage to resist apoptosis. We have demonstrated molecular mechanisms whereby bile reflux might contribute to carcinogenesis in Barrett's esophagus.

  17. In vitro drug release and biological evaluation of biomimetic polymeric micelles self-assembled from amphiphilic deoxycholic acid-phosphorylcholine-chitosan conjugate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minming; Guo, Kai; Dong, Hongwei; Zeng, Rong; Tu, Mei; Zhao, Jianhao

    2014-12-01

    Novel biomimetic amphiphilic chitosan derivative, deoxycholic acid-phosphorylcholine-chitosan conjugate (DCA-PCCs) was synthesized based on the combination of Atherton-Todd reaction for coupling phosphorylcholine (PC) and carbodiimide coupling reaction for linking deoxycholic acid (DCA) to chitosan. The chemical structure of DCA-PCCs was characterized by (1)H and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The self-assembly of DCA-PCCs in water was analyzed by fluorescence measurements, dynamic laser light-scattering (DLS), zeta potential and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) technologies. The results confirmed that the amphiphilic DCA-PCCs can self-assemble to form nanosized spherical micelles with biomimetic PC shell. In vitro biological evaluation revealed that DCA-PCCs micelles had low toxicity against NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts as well as good hemocompatibility. Using quercetin as a hydrophobic model drug, drug loading and release study suggested that biomimetic DCA-PCCs micelles could be used as a promising nanocarrier avoiding unfavorable biological response for hydrophobic drug delivery applications.

  18. Flow cytometric evaluation of the effects of 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) and dichloracetate (DCA) on THP-1 cells: a multiparameter analysis.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Harrie A; van Griensven, Leo J L D

    2012-02-01

    Two human leukemia cells K562 and THP-1, the breast cancer lines MCF-7 and ZR-75-1, and the melanoma line MDA-MB-435S were compared by flowcytometry for their behaviour at increasing levels of 3BP. K562 and THP-1 responded to 3BP by membrane depolarization and increased ROS; MCF-7 and ZR-75-1 showed decreased polarization and low ROS increase; MDA-MB-435S had limited depolarization and no ROS increase. THP-1 cells exposed to a range of 3BP concentrations in combination with DCA showed increase of polarization, slight ROS increase, and weakened nuclear integrity. 3BP and DCA show no synergism, but have complementary destructive effects on THP-1 cells. The data led to the conclusion that the THP-1 cells do not carry a functional membrane monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) or that 3BP circumvents MCT binding and can enter these cells independently.

  19. Number of free hydroxyl groups on bile acid phospholipids determines the fluidity and hydration of model membranes.

    PubMed

    Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Bajaj, Avinash

    2013-10-10

    Interactions of synthetic phospholipids with model membranes determines the drug release capabilities of phospholipid vesicles at diseased sites. We performed 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH)-based fluorescence anisotropy, Laurdan-based membrane hydration, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies to cognize the interactions of three bile acid phospholipids, lithocholic acid-phosphocholine (LCA-PC), deoxycholic acid-phosphocholine (DCA-PC), and cholic acid-phosphocholine (CA-PC) with model membranes. These studies revealed that bile acid phospholipids increases membrane fluidity in DCA-PC > CA-PC > LCA-PC order, indicating that induction of membrane fluidity is contingent on the number and positioning of free hydroxyl groups on bile acids. Similarly, DCA-PC causes maximum membrane perturbations due to the presence of a free hydroxyl group, whereas LCA-PC induces gel phase in membranes due to hydrophobic bile acid acyl chain interactions. These DCA-PC-induced membrane perturbations induce a drastic decrease in phase transition temperature (Tm) as determined by calorimetric studies, whereas doping of LCA-PC causes phase transition broadening without change in Tm. Doping of CA-PC induces membrane perturbations and membrane hydration like DCA-PC but sharpening of phase transition at higher doping suggests self-association of CA-PC molecules. Therefore these differential mode of interactions between bile acid phospholipids and model membranes would help in the future for their use in drug delivery.

  20. Nanoparticles of deoxycholic acid, polyethylene glycol and folic acid-modified chitosan for targeted delivery of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhonggen; Guo, Rui; Li, Weichang; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Tang, Yu; Zhang, Yuanming

    2014-03-01

    Chitosan (CS) was first modified hydrophobically with deoxycholic acid (DCA) and then with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to obtain a novel amphiphilic polymer (CS-DCA-PEG). This was covalently bound to folic acid (FA) to develop nanoparticles (CS-DCA-PEG-FA) with tumor cell targeting property. The structure of the conjugates was characterised using Fourier transform infrared and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Based on self-aggregation, the conjugates formed nanoparticles with a low critical aggregation concentration of 0.035 mg/ml. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was encapsulated into the nanoparticles with a drug-loading capacity of 30.2 wt%. The mean diameter of the DOX-loaded nanoparticles was about 200 nm, with a narrow size distribution. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the DOX-loaded nanoparticles were spherical. The drug release was studied under different conditions. Furthermore, the cytotoxic activities of DOX in CS-DCA-PEG-FA nanoparticles against folate receptor (FR)-positive HeLa cells and FR-negative fibroblast 3T3 cells were evaluated. These results suggested that the CS-DCA-PEG-FA nanoparticles may be a promising vehicle for the targeting anticancer drug to tumor cells.

  1. Deoxycholic acid inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis and necrosis by regulating the activity of transcription factors in rat pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guixin; Zhang, Jingwen; Shang, Dong; Qi, Bing; Chen, Hailong

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of deoxycholic acid (DCA) on rat pancreatic acinar cell line AR42J and the functional mechanisms of DCA on AR42J cells. AR42J cells were treated with various concentrations of DCA for 24 h and also treated with 0.4 mmol/L DCA for multiple times, and then, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was performed to detect the AR42J cell survival rate. Flow cytometric was used to detect the cell apoptosis and necrosis in AR42J cells treated with 0.4 mmol/L and 0.8 mmol/L DCA. The cells treated with phosphate buffer saline (PBS) were served as control. In addition, the DNA-binding activity assays of transcription factors (TFs) in nuclear proteins of cells treated with DCA were determined using Panomics Procarta Transcription Factor Assay Kit. The relative survival rates were markedly decreased (P < 0.05) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared with control group, the cell apoptosis and necrosis ratio were both significantly elevated in 0.4 mmol/L DCA and 0.8 mmol/L DCA groups (P < 0.01). A significant increase (P < 0.05) in the activity of transcription factor 2 (ATF2), interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE), NKX-2.5, androgen receptor (AR), p53, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) was observed, and the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), activator protein 1 (AP1), and E2F1 was reduced (P < 0.05). In conclusion, DCA inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis and necrosis in AR42J cells. The expression changes of related genes regulated by TFs might be the molecular mechanism of AR42J cell injury.

  2. Directional coronary atherectomy (DCA)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... arteries, the doctor injects dye and takes an x-ray. If a treatable blockage is noted, the first ... the doctor injects contrast media and takes an x-ray to check for any change in the arteries. ...

  3. Diagnostic accuracy of the urinary albumin: creatinine ratio determined by the CLINITEK Microalbumin and DCA 2000+ for the rule-out of albuminuria in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Guy, Mark; Newall, Ronald; Borzomato, Joanna; Kalra, Philip A; Price, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    An increased urinary albumin excretion (albuminuria) is an established test for the early detection of renal disease and is also recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality in a number of clinical settings. There is an established body of data which shows that a random urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR) based on a random urine sample correlates well with 24-hour urinary albumin excretion measurement. However, there is little data to show whether specific point-of-care testing devices can be used to rule-in or rule-out increased urinary albumin excretion in comparison to a 24-hour urinary albumin excretion measurement. This study evaluated the ability to rule-in or rule-out albuminuria in a cohort of patients attending a renal outpatient clinic, using the urinary ACR determined by the CLINITEK Microalbumin (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., Deerfield, US) a semi-quantitative strip test, and by the DCA 2000+ (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc.) a quantitative cassette based test using 3 random urine samples collected within a 24-hour period compared to 24-hour urinary albumin measurement. The CLINITEK system was shown to be a reliable test for ruling out increased urinary albumin excretion with negative likelihood ratios less than 0.05 above the 24-hour urinary albumin excretion rate of 30 mg/24 h (threshold for microalbuminuria), and less than 0.01 above the albumin excretion rate of 100 mg/24 h. The DCA 2000+ system demonstrated similar performance as a rule-out test, with likelihood ratios of less than 0.02 at 24-hour albumin excretion rates above 30 mg/24 h. Both the CLINITEK and DCA 2000+ systems could be used to rule-out increased urinary albumin excretion at the albumin excretion cut-off rate of 30 mg/24 h in this cohort of patients.

  4. Treatment-plan evaluation using the dose quality factor (DQF) for dynamic conformal arc (DCA)-based radiosurgery on patients presenting with an intracranial tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Seung Hoon; Min, Byung Jun; Kim, Kum Bae; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Park, Jeong Hoon; Jung, Won-Gyun; Kim, Geun Beom; Ko, Seung Young; Shin, Hyun Soo; Chang, Sei Kyung; Jeong, Ho Jin; Shin, Dongho; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to find the optimum dynamic conformal arc (DCA)-based radiosurgery conditions for treatment of patients with intracranial tumors. DCA plans were generated on a commercial treatment-planning system (BrainSCAN v.5.31) for various beam-number and gantry-angle combinations by using computed tomography (CT) scans to delineate the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OARs). To evaluate planning quality related to the various planning conditions, we analyzed the dose quality factors (DQFs) for 22 patients as a function of the number and the total angle of arcs related to the target volume, which were determined on the basis of patient-specific features. When the total angle of arcs was less than 250°, the DQF values were under 0.98 (worst group). When the total angle of arcs was more than 350 degrees, the DQF values were maximized, and the highest DQF values (best group, DQF > 0.995) occurred in the range between 50 and 120°/cm3 for the total angle/target volume condition. In this optimal range of angle/volume, the asymmetric distribution of the arcs resulted in decreased DQF values. For a relatively large target volume (more than 10 cm3), the DQF values were lower than these for a relatively small target volume (less than 10 cm3). Re-planning results showed that the planning quality could be improved using optimized planning conditions. We expect that this study will provide a basis for the evaluation of various DCA conditions prior to actual planning and treatment.

  5. Differential effects of deoxycholic acid versus selenium metabolite methylselenol on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A typical part of the Western diet is a high fat intake that leads to increased levels of fecal bile acids, and these bile acids, primarily deoxycholic acid (DCA) in humans, have been believed to be tumor promoters of colon cancer. The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxyc...

  6. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-08-31

    COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  7. Novel artificial cell microencapsulation of a complex gliclazide-deoxycholic bile acid formulation: a characterization study.

    PubMed

    Mooranian, Armin; Negrulj, Rebecca; Chen-Tan, Nigel; Al-Sallami, Hesham S; Fang, Zhongxiang; Mukkur, Trilochan; Mikov, Momir; Golocorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Fakhoury, Marc; Arfuso, Frank; Al-Salami, Hani

    2014-01-01

    Gliclazide (G) is an antidiabetic drug commonly used in type 2 diabetes. It has extrapancreatic hypoglycemic effects, which makes it a good candidate in type 1 diabetes (T1D). In previous studies, we have shown that a gliclazide-bile acid mixture exerted a hypoglycemic effect in a rat model of T1D. We have also shown that a gliclazide-deoxycholic acid (G-DCA) mixture resulted in better G permeation in vivo, but did not produce a hypoglycemic effect. In this study, we aimed to develop a novel microencapsulated formulation of G-DCA with uniform structure, which has the potential to enhance G pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in our rat model of T1D. We also aimed to examine the effect that DCA will have when formulated with our new G microcapsules, in terms of morphology, structure, and excipients' compatibility. Microencapsulation was carried out using the Büchi-based microencapsulating system developed in our laboratory. Using sodium alginate (SA) polymer, both formulations were prepared: G-SA (control) at a ratio of 1:30, and G-DCA-SA (test) at a ratio of 1:3:30. Complete characterization of microcapsules was carried out. The new G-DCA-SA formulation was further optimized by the addition of DCA, exhibiting pseudoplastic-thixotropic rheological characteristics. The size of microcapsules remained similar after DCA addition, and these microcapsules showed no chemical interactions between the excipients. This was supported further by the spectral and microscopy studies, suggesting microcapsule stability. The new microencapsulated formulation has good structural properties and may be useful for the oral delivery of G in T1D.

  8. UPTAKE AND ELIMINATION OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID BY RAINBOW TROUT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a by-product of drinking water chlorination and is a hepatocarcinogen in rodents. Preliminary results of a chronic testing effort with Japanese medaka suggest the possibility of similar effects is fish. Adult rainbow trout were cannulated from the dor...

  9. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of D...

  10. EARLY GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN THE LIVERS OF MICE EXPOSED TO DICHOLORACETC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    EARLY GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN THE LIVERS OF MICE EXPOSED TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    Dichloroacetic acid COCA) is a major by-product ofwater disinfection by cWorination. Several
    studies have shown that DCA induces liver tumors in rodents when administered in drinkmg wate...

  11. A MULTISTAGE BIOLOGICALLY BASED MODEL FOR MOUSE LIVER TUMORS RESULTING FROM EXPOSURE TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic Acid (DCA) is a major byproduct of the chlorine disinfection of humic acid containing drinking water sources. It is a hepatocarcinogen in mice and rats at exposure concentrations in drinking water that are at least 4 orders of magnitude above the concentrations in ...

  12. Concentration dependence of 4-methylbenzophenone choleic acid crystal phosphorescence: Evidence for a percolation driven structural transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kook, S.-K.; Kim, D.-Y.; Hanson, D. M.

    1989-12-01

    Steady state phosphorescence spectra at 4.2 K were obtained for different concentrations of 4-methylbenzophenone (MBP) doped into deoxycholic acid (DCA) crystals. The spectra indicate that at concentrations of 14% and below, the sample consists of choleic acid crystals partially filled with MBP and as the concentration increases to 16%, enough guest sites are filled with MBP to cause the local structure to change to that of the stoichiometric crystal. The stoichiometric ratio of DCA to MBP was determined to be 2:1. Spectral shifts characteristic of energy transfer processes are not observed over the concentration range of 4% to 33% MBP.

  13. The carcinogenicity of dichloroacetic acid in the male B6C3F1 mouse

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelo, A.B.; Daniel, F.B.; Stober, J.A.; Olson, G.R. )

    1991-02-01

    Groups of male B6C3F1 mice (N = 50) were provided drinking water containing 2 g/liter sodium chloride (control) and 0.05, 0.5, and 5 g/liter dichloroacetic acid (DCA). Treatment of 30 animals in each group was carried out to 60 or 75 weeks. In a separate experiment, mice exposed to 3.5 g/liter DCA and the corresponding acetic acid control group were killed at 60 weeks. Groups of 5 mice were killed at 4, 15, 30, and 45 weeks. Time-weighted mean daily doses of 7.6, 77, 410, and 486 mg/kg/day were calculated for 0.05, 0.5, 3.5, and 5 g/liter DCA treatments. Animals exposed to 3.5 and 5 g/liter DCA had final body weights that were 87 and 83%, respectively, of the control value. Relative liver weights of 136, 230, and 351% of the control value were measured for 0.5, 3.5, and 5 g/liter, respectively. At 60 weeks mice receiving 5.0 g/liter DCA had a 90% prevalence of liver neoplasia with a mean multiplicity of 4.50 tumors/animal. Exposure to 3.5 g/liter DCA for 60 weeks resulted in a 100% tumor prevalence with an average of 4.0 tumors/animal. The prevalence of liver neoplasia and tumor multiplicity at 60 and 75 weeks in the 0.05 g/liter DCA (24.1%; 0.31 tumors/animal) and in the 0.5 g/liter group (11.1%; 0.11 tumors/animal) did not differ significantly from the control value (7.1% and 0.07 tumors/animal). No liver tumors were found in the group treated with acetic acid. Hyperplastic nodules were seen in the 3.5 (58%; 0.92/animal) and 5 g/liter DCA groups (83%; 1.27/animal). There was a significant positive dose-related trend in the age-adjusted prevalence of liver tumors. These data confirm the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA administered in the drinking water to male B6C3F1 mice for 60 weeks.

  14. Effects of cigarette smoke and ethanol intake on mouse oesophageal mucosa changes induced by dietary zinc deficiency and deoxycholic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Zapaterini, Joyce R; de Moura, Nelci A; Ribeiro, Daniel A; Rodrigues, Maria A M; Barbisan, Luis F

    2012-08-01

    The noxious effects of dietary zinc deficiency (ZD) and deoxycholic bile acid (DCA) supplementation in the oesophagus were investigated. The additional influence of cigarette smoke and ethanol intake on the changes in the oesophageal mucosa induced by dietary ZD plus DCA was also assessed. Male C57BL/6 mice were allocated into four groups: Group 1 was fed control diet and groups 2-4 were fed ZD plus DCA diet. After 5 weeks, groups 3 and 4 were exposed to 10% ethanol intake or cigarette smoke for 15 weeks, respectively. All animals were euthanized at the end of week 20, and the oesophagus, lung, liver and colon were collected and analysed by conventional morphology. Cell proliferation was assessed in the oesophageal mucosa by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) protein by Western blotting. Dietary ZD plus DCA treatment induced mild hyperkeratosis and hyperplasia, increased cell proliferation index and COX-2 protein expression in the oesophagus, and intranuclear inclusion, karyocytomegaly and microvesicular fatty change in the liver. Cigarette smoke increased COX-2 protein expression in oesophageal mucosa and irregular enlargement of alveolus and alveolar ductal air spaces, while ethanol enhanced liver damage induced by ZD plus DCA diet. These findings indicate that dietary ZD plus DCA treatment during 20 weeks induces a pattern of chemical oesophageal injury but not Barrett's-like lesions.

  15. Physicochemical characterization of amphiphilic nanoparticles based on the novel starch-deoxycholic acid conjugates and self-aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinlong; Gao, Chunmei; Lü, Shaoyu; Zhang, Xinjie; Yu, Chuanming; Liu, Mingzhu

    2014-02-15

    Novel amphiphilic polymers (starch-deoxycholic acid, St-DCA) were firstly synthesized on the basis of starch (St) as a hydrophilic segment and deoxycholic acid (DCA) as a hydrophobic segment. Hydrophobically modified starch contained 5.4-8.9 deoxycholic acid groups per 100 anhydroglucose units of starch. Self-aggregates of St-DCA conjugates were formed in the PBS media. Physicochemical characterizations of St-DCA conjugates were investigated. The mean sizes of self-aggregates decreased with the degree of substitution (DS) and pH increasing. Zeta potential indicated that nanoparticles were covered with negatively charged starch shells from -5.4 to -23 mV. TEM images demonstrated that nanoparticles were of spherical shape. The critical aggregation concentrations (cac) were dependent on the DS and pH in the range of 0.0185-0.0441 mg/mL. Thus, the study suggested that self-aggregated nanoparticles of St-DCA conjugates could have good pH-responsive and potential application in pharmaceutical and biomedical fields as the delivery of anti-tumor drugs.

  16. Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes and Ion-Jelly® Membranes with [BMIM][DCA]: Comparison of Its Performance for CO2 Separation

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Ricardo; Neves, Luísa; Simões, Pedro; Coelhoso, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) was prepared by impregnating a PVDF membrane with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([BMIM][DCA]) ionic liquid. This membrane was tested for its permeability to pure gases (CO2, N2 and O2) and ideal selectivities were calculated. The SILM performance was also compared to that of Ion-Jelly® membranes, a new type of gelled membranes developed recently. It was found that the PVDF membrane presents permeabilities for pure gases similar or lower to those presented by the Ion-Jelly® membranes, but with increased ideal selectivities. This membrane presents also the highest ideal selectivity (73) for the separation of CO2 from N2 when compared with SILMs using the same PVDF support but with different ionic liquids. PMID:25594165

  17. Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes and Ion-Jelly® Membranes with [BMIM][DCA]: Comparison of Its Performance for CO2 Separation.

    PubMed

    Couto, Ricardo; Neves, Luísa; Simões, Pedro; Coelhoso, Isabel

    2015-01-14

    In this work, a supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) was prepared by impregnating a PVDF membrane with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([BMIM][DCA]) ionic liquid. This membrane was tested for its permeability to pure gases (CO2, N2 and O2) and ideal selectivities were calculated. The SILM performance was also compared to that of Ion-Jelly® membranes, a new type of gelled membranes developed recently. It was found that the PVDF membrane presents permeabilities for pure gases similar or lower to those presented by the Ion-Jelly® membranes, but with increased ideal selectivities. This membrane presents also the highest ideal selectivity (73) for the separation of CO2 from N2 when compared with SILMs using the same PVDF support but with different ionic liquids.

  18. One-, Two-, and Three-Dimensional Heterospin Complexes Consisting of 4-(N-tert-Butyloxylamino)pyridine (4NOpy), Dicyanamide Ion (DCA), and 3d Metal Ions: Crystal Structures and Magnetic Properties of [M(II)(4NOpy)x(DCA)y(CH3CN)z]n (M = Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn).

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Hiraku; Mori, Koya; Murashima, Kensuke; Karasawa, Satoru; Koga, Noboru

    2016-01-19

    Solutions of 3d metal ion salts, M(NO3)2, 4-(N-tert-butyloxylamino)pyridine (4NOpy), and dicyanamide (DCA) in CH3CN were mixed to afford single crystals of the polymeric complexes [M(II)(4NOpy)x(DCA)y(CH3CN)z]n (M(II) = Mn (1), Co (2), Ni (3), Cu (4a and 4b), Zn (5)). X-ray crystallography revealed that the crystal structures are a three-dimensional (3-D) network for 1, 2-D networks for 2, 3, 4a, and 5, and a 1-D chain for 4b. Crystals of 2, 3, 4a, and 5 contained CH3CN molecules as crystal solvents, which were readily desorbed in the ambient atmosphere. After desorption of the CH3CN molecules, the crystal structures of 2 and 3 were confirmed to be slightly shrunk without destruction of the crystal lattice. Crystals of 2, 3, 4a, and 5 after desorption of crystal solvents were used for investigations of the magnetic properties. Complex 1 showed antiferromagnetic interactions to form a ferrimagnetic chain and exhibited the magnetic behavior of a 2-D (or 3-D) spin-canted antiferromagnet with TN = 12 K. Complex 2 containing anisotropic Co(II) ions also showed the behavior of a 1-D (or 2-D) spin-canted antiferromagnet with TN = 6 K. In 3, 4a, and 4b, the aminoxyl of 4NOpy ferromagnetically interacted with the metal ion with coupling constants of JM-NO/kB = 45, 45, and 43 K, respectively. In 5, the magnetic couplings between the aminoxyls in 4NOpy through the diamagnetic Zn(II) ion were weakly antiferromagntic (JNO-NO = -1.2 K). DCA might be a weak antiferromagnetic connector for the metal chains.

  19. Developmental toxicity of mixtures: the water disinfection by-products dichloro-, dibromo- and bromochloro acetic acid in rat embryo culture

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chlorination of drinking water results in production of numerous disinfection by-products (DBPs). One of the important classes of DBPs is the haloacetic acids. We have previously shown that the haloacetic acids (HAs), dichloro (DCA), dibromo (DBA) and bromochloro (BCA) acetic...

  20. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Peizhen Rockwell, Cheryl E. Cui, Julia Yue Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  1. A weakly acidic solution containing deoxycholic acid induces esophageal epithelial apoptosis and impairs integrity in an in vivo perfusion rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Pardon, Nicolas A.; Vicario, Maria; Vanheel, Hanne; Vanuytsel, Tim; Ceulemans, Laurens J.; Vieth, Michael; Jimenez, Marcel; Tack, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Impaired esophageal mucosal integrity may be an important contributor in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Nevertheless, the effect of potentially harmful agents on epithelial integrity is mainly evaluated in vitro for a short period of time and the possible induction of epithelial apoptosis has been neglected. Our objective was to assess the effect of an acidic and weakly acidic solution containing deoxycholic acid (DCA) on the esophageal epithelium in an in vivo rabbit model of esophageal perfusion and to evaluate the role of the epithelial apoptosis. The esophagus of 55 anesthetized rabbits was perfused for 30 min with different solutions at pH 7.2, pH 5.0, pH 1.0, and pH 5.0 containing 200 and 500 μM DCA. Thereafter, animals were euthanized immediately or at 24 or 48 h after the perfusion. Transepithelial electrical resistance, epithelial dilated intercellular spaces, and apoptosis were assessed in Ussing chambers, by transmission electron microscopy, and by TUNEL staining, respectively. No macroscopic or major microscopic alterations were observed after the esophageal perfusions. The acidic and weakly acidic solution containing DCA induced similar long-lasting functional impairment of the epithelial integrity but different ultrastructural morphological changes. Only the solution containing DCA induced epithelial apoptosis in vivo and in vitro in rabbit and human tissue. In contrast to acid, a weakly acidic solution containing DCA induces epithelial apoptosis and a long-lasting impaired mucosal integrity. The presence of apoptotic cells in the esophageal epithelium may be used as a marker of impaired integrity and/or bile reflux exposure. PMID:26797397

  2. New fluorescent bile acids: synthesis, chemical characterization, and disastereoselective uptake by Caco-2 cells of 3-deoxy 3-NBD-amino deoxycholic and ursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Májer, Ferenc; Salomon, Johanna J; Sharma, Ruchika; Etzbach, Simona V; Najib, Mohd Nadzri Mohd; Keaveny, Ray; Long, Aideen; Wang, Jun; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Gilmer, John F

    2012-03-01

    Deoxycholic acid (DCA), a secondary bile acid (BA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a tertiary BA, cause opposing effects in vivo and in cell suspensions. Fluorescent analogues of DCA and UDCA could help investigate important questions about their cellular interactions and distribution. We have prepared a set of isomeric 3α- and 3β-amino analogues of UDCA and DCA and derivatised these with the discrete fluorophore, 4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazol (NBD), forming the corresponding four fluorescent adducts. These absorb in the range 465-470 nm and fluoresce at approx. 535 nm. In order to determine the ability of the new fluorescent bile acids to mimic the parents, their uptake was studied using monolayers of Caco-2 cells, which are known to express multiple proteins of the organic anion-transporting peptide (OATP) subfamily of transporters. Cellular uptake was monitored over time at 4 and 37°C to distinguish between passive and active transport. All four BA analogues were taken up but in a strikingly stereo- and structure-specific manner, suggesting highly discriminatory interactions with transporter protein(s). The α-analogues of DCA and to a lesser extent UDCA were actively transported, whereas the β-analogues were not. The active transport process was saturable, with Michaelis-Menten constants for 3α-NBD DCA (5) being K(m)=42.27±12.98 μM and V(max)=2.8 ± 0.4 nmol/(mg protein*min) and for 3α-NBD UDCA (3) K(m)=28.20 ± 7.45 μM and V(max)=1.8 ± 0.2 nmol/(mg protein*min). These fluorescent bile acids are promising agents for investigating questions of bile acid biology and for detection of bile acids and related organic anion transport processes.

  3. Summary of Salient Findings of "Natural Attenuation of the Lead Scavengers 1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB) and 1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) at Motor Fuel Release Sites and Implications for Risk Management"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetra-ethyl lead was widely used in leaded automobile gasoline from 1923 until 1987 (See Figure 1). To prevent lead deposits from fouling the engine, 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) were added to the gasoline to act as lead scavengers. These compounds r...

  4. Natural Attenuation of the Lead Scavengers 1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB) and 1.2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) at Motor Fuel Release Sites and Implications for Risk Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lead scavengers 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) were included along with lead in conventional leaded gasoline used for automobiles in the US prior to 1988. Old spills of leaded gasoline from underground storage tank systems (USTs) at gasoline service...

  5. Deoxycholic acid modulates cell death signaling through changes in mitochondrial membrane properties[S

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Tânia; Castro, Rui E.; Pinto, Sandra N.; Coutinho, Ana; Lucas, Susana D.; Moreira, Rui; Rodrigues, Cecília M. P.; Prieto, Manuel; Fernandes, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic bile acids, such as deoxycholic acid (DCA), are responsible for hepatocyte cell death during intrahepatic cholestasis. The mechanisms responsible for this effect are unclear, and recent studies conflict, pointing to either a modulation of plasma membrane structure or mitochondrial-mediated toxicity through perturbation of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) properties. We conducted a comprehensive comparative study of the impact of cytotoxic and cytoprotective bile acids on the membrane structure of different cellular compartments. We show that DCA increases the plasma membrane fluidity of hepatocytes to a minor extent, and that this effect is not correlated with the incidence of apoptosis. Additionally, plasma membrane fluidity recovers to normal values over time suggesting the presence of cellular compensatory mechanisms for this perturbation. Colocalization experiments in living cells confirmed the presence of bile acids within mitochondrial membranes. Experiments with active isolated mitochondria revealed that physiologically active concentrations of DCA change MOM order in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and that these changes preceded the mitochondrial permeability transition. Importantly, these effects are not observed on liposomes mimicking MOM lipid composition, suggesting that DCA apoptotic activity depends on features of mitochondrial membranes that are absent in protein-free mimetic liposomes, such as the double-membrane structure, lipid asymmetry, or mitochondrial protein environment. In contrast, the mechanism of action of cytoprotective bile acids is likely not associated with changes in cellular membrane structure. PMID:26351365

  6. Deoxycholic acid modulates cell death signaling through changes in mitochondrial membrane properties.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Tânia; Castro, Rui E; Pinto, Sandra N; Coutinho, Ana; Lucas, Susana D; Moreira, Rui; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Prieto, Manuel; Fernandes, Fábio

    2015-11-01

    Cytotoxic bile acids, such as deoxycholic acid (DCA), are responsible for hepatocyte cell death during intrahepatic cholestasis. The mechanisms responsible for this effect are unclear, and recent studies conflict, pointing to either a modulation of plasma membrane structure or mitochondrial-mediated toxicity through perturbation of mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) properties. We conducted a comprehensive comparative study of the impact of cytotoxic and cytoprotective bile acids on the membrane structure of different cellular compartments. We show that DCA increases the plasma membrane fluidity of hepatocytes to a minor extent, and that this effect is not correlated with the incidence of apoptosis. Additionally, plasma membrane fluidity recovers to normal values over time suggesting the presence of cellular compensatory mechanisms for this perturbation. Colocalization experiments in living cells confirmed the presence of bile acids within mitochondrial membranes. Experiments with active isolated mitochondria revealed that physiologically active concentrations of DCA change MOM order in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and that these changes preceded the mitochondrial permeability transition. Importantly, these effects are not observed on liposomes mimicking MOM lipid composition, suggesting that DCA apoptotic activity depends on features of mitochondrial membranes that are absent in protein-free mimetic liposomes, such as the double-membrane structure, lipid asymmetry, or mitochondrial protein environment. In contrast, the mechanism of action of cytoprotective bile acids is likely not associated with changes in cellular membrane structure.

  7. Dichloroacetate improves immune dysfunction caused by tumor-secreted lactic acid and increases antitumor immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Toshimitsu; Akazawa, Takashi; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Kuze, Bunya; Mizuta, Keisuke; Ito, Yatsuji; Inoue, Norimitsu

    2013-09-01

    The activation of oncogenic signaling pathways induces the reprogramming of glucose metabolism in tumor cells and increases lactic acid secretion into the tumor microenvironment. This is a well-known characteristic of tumor cells, termed the Warburg effect, and is a candidate target for antitumor therapy. Previous reports show that lactic acid secreted by tumor cells is a proinflammatory mediator that activates the IL-23/IL-17 pathway, thereby inducing inflammation, angiogenesis and tissue remodeling. Here, we show that lactic acid, or more specifically the acidification it causes, increases arginase I (ARG1) expression in macrophages to inhibit T-cell proliferation and activation. Accordingly, we hypothesized that counteraction of the immune effects by lactic acid might suppress tumor development. We show that dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinases, targets macrophages to suppress activation of the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and the expression of ARG1 by lactic acid. Furthermore, lactic acid-pretreated macrophages inhibited CD8+ T-cell proliferation, but CD8+ T-cell proliferation was restored when macrophages were pretreated with lactic acid and DCA. DCA treatment decreased ARG1 expression in tumor-infiltrating immune cells and increased the number of IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells and NK cells in tumor-bearing mouse spleen. Although DCA treatment alone did not suppress tumor growth, it increased antitumor immunotherapeutic activity of Poly(IC) in both CD8+ T cell- and NK cell-sensitive tumor models. Therefore, DCA acts not only on tumor cells to suppress glycolysis but also on immune cells to improve the immune status modulated by lactic acid and to increase the effectiveness of antitumor immunotherapy.

  8. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/c-Jun activation of the p53/microRNA 34a/sirtuin 1 pathway contributes to apoptosis induced by deoxycholic acid in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Duarte M S; Afonso, Marta B; Rodrigues, Pedro M; Simão, André L; Pereira, Diane M; Borralho, Pedro M; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Castro, Rui E

    2014-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are increasingly associated with metabolic liver diseases. We have shown that ursodeoxycholic acid, a hydrophilic bile acid, counteracts the miR-34a/sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)/p53 pathway, activated in the liver of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) patients. In contrast, hydrophobic bile acids, particularly deoxycholic acid (DCA), activate apoptosis and are increased in NASH. We evaluated whether DCA-induced apoptosis of rat hepatocytes occurs via miR-34a-dependent pathways and whether they connect with c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) induction. DCA enhanced miR-34a/SIRT1/p53 proapoptotic signaling in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In turn, miR-34a inhibition and SIRT1 overexpression significantly rescued targeting of the miR-34a pathway and apoptosis by DCA. In addition, p53 overexpression activated the miR-34a/SIRT1/p53 pathway, further induced by DCA. DCA increased p53 expression as well as p53 transcriptional activation of PUMA and miR-34a itself, providing a functional mechanism for miR-34a activation. JNK1 and c-Jun were shown to be major targets of DCA, upstream of p53, in engaging the miR-34a pathway and apoptosis. Finally, activation of this JNK1/miR-34a proapoptotic circuit was also shown to occur in vivo in the rat liver. These results suggest that the JNK1/p53/miR-34a/SIRT1 pathway may represent an attractive pharmacological target for the development of new drugs to arrest metabolism- and apoptosis-related liver pathologies.

  9. Laboratory simulations of the interaction between ozone and chloroacetic acids in the conditions close to stratospheric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strokova, N. E.; Savilov, S. V.; Morozov, I. I.; Yagodovskaya, T. V.; Lunin, V. V.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between ozone and mono-, di-, and trichloroacetic acids are studied using a flow vacuum gas discharge setup in a regime close to stratospheric conditions (in the temperature range of 77 to 250 K, at pressures of 10-3 to 0 Torr, and in the presence of ice). The interaction between ozone and trichloroacetic acid starts at 77 K, while interaction with monochloroacetic acid begins when the temperature is raised to 200 K. The reactions are assumed to proceed via different mechanisms: chlorine oxides of different composition are the reaction products, as is shown using low-temperature IR spectroscopy. Preliminary adsorption of the acids on a surface of ice raises the temperature of interaction to 190 K.

  10. Electrodeposition of lustrous tin-lead alloys in acidic electrolytes with organic additives

    SciTech Connect

    Selivanova, G.A.; Maksimenko, S.A.; Tyutina, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    Galvanic coatings based on tin-lead alloys are mainly used in radio-engineering and electronic industries to prepare certain products, including printed-circuit boards, for soldering. To improve ecological safety of the proces, the authors studied a new electrolyte for depositing a tin-lead alloy based on nontoxic and abundant perchloric acid, as well as electrolytes based on mono- and trichloroacetic acids.

  11. Bile acid induced colonic irritation stimulates intracolonic nitric oxide release in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, F; Mourelle, M; Papo, M; Guarner, F; Antolin, M; Armengol, J R; Malagelada, J R

    1996-01-01

    AIM--To measure the intracolonic release of nitric oxide end products (nitrates plus nitrites) and eicosanoids in response to intraluminal irritation with deoxycholic acid (DCA). PATIENTS--Seven patients with irritable bowel syndrome. METHODS--The left colon was perfused with a solution with or without 3 mM deoxycholic acid. Aspirates were assayed for eicosanoids by specific radioimmuno-assay, and for nitrates plus nitrites by the Griess reaction. To confirm that stimulated colonic mucosa can produce nitric oxide (NO), ancillary studies were performed in vitro using samples of normal mucosa obtained from five surgically resected colons. Samples were incubated for 30 minutes in Kreb's solution, 3 mM DCA or DCA with 1 mM L-nitro-arginine-methyl-ester (L-NAME) to inhibit the NO synthase. Finally, NO synthase activity was measured in five samples of human colonic mucosa. RESULTS--Intracolonic release of nitrates plus nitrites was basally undetectable in six of seven patients. Bile acid considerably increased the release of prostaglandin E2 and nitrates plus nitrites (p < 0.01). By contrast, no increase in thromboxane and leukotriene was seen. In vitro mucosal incubation with DCA increased the production of NO synthase products, which was blocked by L-NAME. Activity of Ca+2 independent NO synthase was detectable in four of five samples of human colonic mucosa. CONCLUSION--The human colonic mucosa responds to bile acid induced irritation by a surge in NO generation via NO synthase. PMID:8707118

  12. Deoxycholic acid and selenium metabolite methylselenol exert common and distinct effects on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells, and consequently increase colon cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium (Se) as anticancer ...

  13. A phase I safety and pharmacokinetic study of ATX-101: injectable, synthetic deoxycholic acid for submental contouring.

    PubMed

    Walker, Patricia; Fellmann, Jere; Lizzul, Paul F

    2015-03-01

    ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid [DCA] injection) is a proprietary formulation of pure synthetic DCA. When injected into subcutaneous fat, ATX-101 results in focal adipocytolysis, the targeted destruction of fat cells. ATX-101 is undergoing investigation as an injectable drug for contouring the submental area by reducing submental fat (SMF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of the maximal therapeutic dose of ATX-101 (100 mg total dose). Following PK evaluation of endogenous DCA, subjects (N=24) received subcutaneous injections of ATX-101 (2 mg/cm2, with or without 0.9% benzyl alcohol) into SMF; PK evaluation was repeated periodically over 24 hours. Endogenous DCA plasma concentrations measured prior to injection were highly variable within and between subjects. Similarly, following ATX-101 injection, DCA plasma concentrations were highly variable, peaked rapidly, and returned to the range observed for endogenous values by 24 hours postdose. All subjects experienced at least 1 adverse event (AE). No death, serious AE, or AE-related discontinuations occurred. The majority of AEs were transient, associated with the area treated, and of mild or moderate severity. No clinically significant changes were reported for laboratory test results, vital signs, or Holter electrocardiograms postdosing. These data support the favorable safety and efficacy observations of ATX-101 as an injectable drug to reduce SMF.

  14. Deoxycholic acid inhibits the growth of BGC-823 gastric carcinoma cells via a p53‑mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Bo; Song, Wei; Cheng, Mei-Die; Fan, Hai-Fang; Gu, Xu; Qiao, Ying; Lu, Xin; Yu, Rui-He; Chen, Lan-Ying

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of deoxycholic acid (DCA) on BGC‑823 human gastric carcinoma cells and to explore the possible mechanisms underlying any such effects. Cell proliferation was detected using a 3‑(4,5‑Dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay, cell morphology was observed by inverted microscopy, and cell cycle progression and the mitochondrial membrane potential were analyzed using flow cytometry. The expression of Bcl‑2, Bax, p53, Cyclin D1 and cyclin‑dependent kinase (CDK)2 proteins in BGC‑823 cells was analyzed with western blotting. The results demonstrated that DCA significantly inhibited cell growth, and that the cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase. DCA was also shown to induce BGC‑823 cell apoptosis, which was associated with the collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The mitochondria‑dependent pathway was activated via an increase in the ratio of Bax:Bcl‑2 in BGC‑823 cells. In addition, the expression of p53, cyclin D1 and CDK2 was altered following DCA treatment. These results suggest that DCA induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells through activation of an intrinsic mitochondrial‑dependent pathway, in which p53 is involved.

  15. Determination of mono- and dichloroacetic acids in betaine media by liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ghassempour, Alireza; Chalavi, Soheila; Abdollahpour, Assem; Mirkhani, Seyed Amir

    2006-02-15

    A simple and sensitive method has been developed for the analysis of residue amounts of chloroacetic acids in betaine samples based on derivatization by 1-naphthylamine (NA). The derivatized compounds are analyzed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography using methanol and water as mobile phase in the ratio of 32/68 (v/v) and phenyl column and PDA detection at 222nm. The detection limits (LOD) of monochloroacetic acid (MCA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA) are 0.1 and 0.15mugmL(-1), respectively. The limits of quantification (LOQ) and the linear dynamic ranges (LDR) of MCA are found to be 1 and 1-400mugmL(-1), respectively, and for DCA are found to be 3 and 3-400mugmL(-1), respectively. The precision at the 5ppm level for MCA and DCA are about 3% and 2%, (n=5), respectively. The average recovery for MCA and DCA spiked to betaine samples are 98% and 97%, respectively.

  16. Bile acids regulate intestinal cell proliferation by modulating EGFR and FXR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dossa, Avafia Y.; Escobar, Oswaldo; Golden, Jamie; Frey, Mark R.; Ford, Henri R.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are synthesized in the liver and secreted into the intestine. In the lumen, enteric bacteria metabolize BAs from conjugated, primary forms into more toxic unconjugated, secondary metabolites. Secondary BAs can be injurious to the intestine and may contribute to disease. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are known to interact with BAs. In this study we examined the effects of BAs on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and investigated the possible roles for EGFR and FXR in these effects. We report that taurine-conjugated cholic acid (TCA) induced proliferation, while its unconjugated secondary counterpart deoxycholic acid (DCA) inhibited proliferation. TCA stimulated phosphorylation of Src, EGFR, and ERK 1/2. Pharmacological blockade of any of these pathways or genetic ablation of EGFR abrogated TCA-stimulated proliferation. Interestingly, Src or EGFR inhibitors eliminated TCA-induced phosphorylation of both molecules, suggesting that their activation is interdependent. In contrast to TCA, DCA exposure diminished EGFR phosphorylation, and pharmacological or siRNA blockade of FXR abolished DCA-induced inhibition of proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that TCA induces intestinal cell proliferation via Src, EGFR, and ERK activation. In contrast, DCA inhibits proliferation via an FXR-dependent mechanism that may include downstream inactivation of the EGFR/Src/ERK pathway. Since elevated secondary BA levels are the result of specific bacterial modification, this may provide a mechanism through which an altered microbiota contributes to normal or abnormal intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:26608185

  17. New highly toxic bile acids derived from deoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid.

    PubMed

    Májer, Ferenc; Sharma, Ruchika; Mullins, Claire; Keogh, Luke; Phipps, Sinead; Duggan, Shane; Kelleher, Dermot; Keely, Stephen; Long, Aideen; Radics, Gábor; Wang, Jun; Gilmer, John F

    2014-01-01

    We have prepared a new panel of 23 BA derivatives of DCA, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA) in order to study the effect of dual substitution with 3-azido and 24-amidation, features individually associated with cytotoxicity in our previous work. The effect of the compounds on cell viability of HT-1080 and Caco-2 was studied using the 3-[4,5-dimethylthizol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Compounds with high potency towards reduction of cell viability were further studied using flow cytometry in order to understand the mechanism of cell death. Several compounds were identified with low micromolar IC₅₀ values for reducing cell viability in the Caco-2 and HT1080 cell lines, making them among the most potent BA apoptotic agents reported to date. There was no evidence of relationship between overall hydrophobicity and cytotoxicity supporting the idea that cell death induction by BAs may be structure-specific. Compounds derived from DCA caused cell death through apoptosis. There was some evidence of selectivity between the two cell lines studied which may be due to differing expression of CD95/FAS. The more toxic compounds increased ROS production in Caco-2 cells, and co-incubation with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine blunted pro-apoptotic effects. The properties these compounds suggest that there may be specific mechanism(s) mediating BA induced cell death. Compound 8 could be useful for investigating this phenomenon.

  18. Bile acids potentiate proton-activated currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing human acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC1a).

    PubMed

    Ilyaskin, Alexandr V; Diakov, Alexei; Korbmacher, Christoph; Haerteis, Silke

    2017-02-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are nonvoltage-gated sodium channels transiently activated by extracellular protons and belong to the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)/Degenerin (DEG) family of ion channels. Bile acids have been shown to activate two members of this family, the bile acid-sensitive ion channel (BASIC) and ENaC. To investigate whether bile acids also modulate ASIC function, human ASIC1a was heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Exposing oocytes to tauro-conjugated cholic (t-CA), deoxycholic (t-DCA), and chenodeoxycholic (t-CDCA) acid at pH 7.4 did not activate ASIC1a-mediated whole-cell currents. However, in ASIC1a expressing oocytes the whole-cell currents elicited by pH 5.5 were significantly increased in the presence of these bile acids. Single-channel recordings in outside-out patches confirmed that t-DCA enhanced the stimulatory effect of pH 5.5 on ASIC1a channel activity. Interestingly, t-DCA reduced single-channel current amplitude by ~15% which suggests an interaction of t-DCA with a region close to the channel pore. Molecular docking predicted binding of bile acids to the pore region near the degenerin site (G433) in the open conformation of the channel. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the amino acid residue G433 is critically involved in the potentiating effect of bile acids on ASIC1a activation by protons.

  19. Study of the resistance of SAMs on aluminium to acidic and basic solutions using dynamic contact angle measurement.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Newman, Roger C; McAlpine, Eoghan; Alexander, Morgan R

    2007-01-30

    We report the development of a method to determine the aqueous stability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) using the Wilhelmy plate dynamic contact angle (DCA) experiment. The DCA is measured in solutions over a range of pH values for alkyl carboxylic and alkyl phosphonic acid SAMs formed on magnetron-sputtered aluminum. The change in DCA on repeated immersion is used as a measure of the degradation of the SAMs by hydrolytic attack. The short and intermediate chain length alkyl acids are not stable in water of neutral pH, whereas molecules with the longest alkyl chains show considerably greater stability in neutral and both high and low pH solutions. The packing density inferred from the DCA and the contact angle hysteresis suggests the C18CO2H monolayer to be slightly less well packed than that of the C18P(=O)(OH)2; this is consistent with related friction force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy findings published elsewhere (Foster, T. T.; Alexander, M. R.; Leggett, G. J.; McAlpine, E. Langmuir 2006, 22, 9254-9259). The resistance of the SAMs to acid and alkaline environments is discussed in the context of aluminum oxide solubility, SAM packing density, and the resistance of the interfacial phosphate and carboxylate functionalities to different aqueous conditions.

  20. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  1. The Synthetic Elicitor 3,5-Dichloroanthranilic Acid Induces NPR1-Dependent and NPR1-Independent Mechanisms of Disease Resistance in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Knoth, Colleen; Salus, Melinda S.; Girke, Thomas; Eulgem, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Immune responses of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are at least partially mediated by coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of plant defense genes, such as the Late/sustained Up-regulation in Response to Hyaloperonospora parasitica (LURP) cluster. We found a defined region in the promoter of the LURP member CaBP22 to be important for this response. Using a CaBP22 promoter-reporter fusion, we have established a robust and specific high-throughput screening system for synthetic defense elicitors that can be used to trigger defined subsets of plant immune responses. Screening a collection of 42,000 diversity-oriented molecules, we identified 114 candidate LURP inducers. One representative, 3,5-dichloroanthranilic acid (DCA), efficiently induced defense reactions to the phytopathogens H. parasitica and Pseudomonas syringae. In contrast to known salicylic acid analogs, such as 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA), which exhibit a long-lasting defense-inducing activity and are fully dependent on the transcriptional cofactor NPR1 (for Nonexpresser of Pathogenesis-Related genes1), DCA acts transiently and is only partially dependent on NPR1. Microarray analyses revealed a cluster of 142 DCA- and INA-responsive genes that show a pattern of differential expression coinciding with the kinetics of DCA-mediated disease resistance. These ACID genes (for Associated with Chemically Induced Defense) constitute a core gene set associated with chemically induced disease resistance, many of which appear to encode components of the natural immune system of Arabidopsis. PMID:19304930

  2. The synthetic elicitor 3,5-dichloroanthranilic acid induces NPR1-dependent and NPR1-independent mechanisms of disease resistance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Knoth, Colleen; Salus, Melinda S; Girke, Thomas; Eulgem, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    Immune responses of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) are at least partially mediated by coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of plant defense genes, such as the Late/sustained Up-regulation in Response to Hyaloperonospora parasitica (LURP) cluster. We found a defined region in the promoter of the LURP member CaBP22 to be important for this response. Using a CaBP22 promoter-reporter fusion, we have established a robust and specific high-throughput screening system for synthetic defense elicitors that can be used to trigger defined subsets of plant immune responses. Screening a collection of 42,000 diversity-oriented molecules, we identified 114 candidate LURP inducers. One representative, 3,5-dichloroanthranilic acid (DCA), efficiently induced defense reactions to the phytopathogens H. parasitica and Pseudomonas syringae. In contrast to known salicylic acid analogs, such as 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid (INA), which exhibit a long-lasting defense-inducing activity and are fully dependent on the transcriptional cofactor NPR1 (for Nonexpresser of Pathogenesis-Related genes1), DCA acts transiently and is only partially dependent on NPR1. Microarray analyses revealed a cluster of 142 DCA- and INA-responsive genes that show a pattern of differential expression coinciding with the kinetics of DCA-mediated disease resistance. These ACID genes (for Associated with Chemically Induced Defense) constitute a core gene set associated with chemically induced disease resistance, many of which appear to encode components of the natural immune system of Arabidopsis.

  3. Re-evaluation of turbidimetry of proteins by use of aromatic sulfonic acids and chloroacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Ebina, S; Nagai, Y

    1979-02-01

    From studies on 11 different proteins (including native albumin and albumin with reduced disulfide-bridges) treated with sulfosalicylic, 2-naphthalenesulfonic, toluenesulfonic, dichloroacetic, or trichloroacetic acids, we elucidate the interactions determining the resulting turbidities and other factors affecting turbidities, and we discuss the clinical utility of such turbidimetry. At least three interactions are important in determining turbidity: reduction of positive charges on the protein, hydrogen bonding of the non-ionized chloroacetic acids with the protein, and hydrophobic interaction of the aromatic sulfonic acids with albumin. Turbidity varies appreciably with the species of acid and protein, concentrations of acid, temperature, and standing time after acid is added. We conclude that this technique should be restricted to confirming proteinuria.

  4. Farnesoid X receptor signal is involved in deoxycholic acid-induced intestinal metaplasia of normal human gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling pathway is known to be involved in the metabolism of bile acid, glucose and lipid. In the present study, we demonstrated that 400 µmol/l deoxycholic acid (DCA) stimulation promotes the proliferation of normal human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). In addition, DCA activated FXR and increased the expression of intestinal metaplasia genes, including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (Cdx2) and mucin 2 (MUC2). The treatment of FXR agonist GW4064/antagonist guggulsterone (Gug.) significantly increased/decreased the expression levels of FXR, Cdx2 and MUC2 protein in DCA-induced GES-1 cells. GW4064/Gug. also enhanced/reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and binding of the Cdx2 promoter region and NF-κB, the most common subunit p50 protein. Taken together, the results indicated that DCA is capable of modulating the expression of Cdx2 and the downstream MUC2 via the nuclear receptor FXR-NF-κB activity in normal gastric epithelial cells. FXR signaling pathway may therefore be involved in the intestinal metaplasia of human gastric mucosa.

  5. Physical-chemical parameters and validation of a colorimetric method for deoxycholic and ursodeoxycholic acids: kit reagent and optical sensor.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Pabyton G; Araújo, Alberto N; Montenegro, Maria C B S M; Pimentel, Maria C B; Filho, José L Lima; Silva, Valdinete L

    2011-02-01

    The simple and low cost β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-phenolphthalein (PHP) inclusion complex was used for both the study of physical-chemical parameters and validation of analytical procedures for deoxycholic acid (DCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) determinations in different formulations. The usefulness of this inclusion complex is proposed either in the form of kit reagent and as an original optical sensor for DCA and UDCA. The results showed that temperature had a negative effect on the equilibrium constant resulting in high negative values of enthalpy and positive values of entropy. The half-life values for DCA and UDCA measurements were 68.71 and 294.71 days, respectively. The method was validated showing limits of detection and quantification of 4.92×10(-5) mol L(-1) and 1.64×10(-4) mol L(-1) for DCA, 1.14×10(-5) mol L(-1) and 3.79×10(-5) mol L(-1) for UDCA, respectively. The developed optical sensor also showed response linearity, ease of implementation and potential application in fast screening tasks even out of the laboratory.

  6. Ca2+- and PKC-dependent stimulation of PGE2 synthesis by deoxycholic acid in human colonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingting; Hua, Ping; Rafiq, Shazia; Waffner, Eric J; Duffey, Michael E; Lance, Peter

    2002-09-01

    We investigated prostanoid biogenesis by human colonic fibroblasts (CCD-18Co cells and nine primary fibroblast cultures) exposed to a primary (cholic, CA) or a secondary (deoxycholic, DCA) bile acid. Basal PGE2 levels in CCD-18Co cultures and fibroblast strains initiated from normal and adenocarcinomatous colon, respectively, were 1.7 +/- 0.3, 4.0 +/- 2.0, and 15.0 +/- 4.8 ng/mg protein. Peak levels 24 h after exposure to DCA (300 microM) rose, respectively, seven-, six- and sevenfold, but CA elicited no such responses. Increases in PGE2 synthesis were preceded by sequential increases in PGH synthase-2 mRNA and protein expression and were fully prevented by a nonselective (indomethacin) or a selective (celecoxib) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. DCA, but not CA, caused abrupt, transient increases in fibroblast intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) approximately 1 min after exposure. Increased [Ca2+]i was required for DCA-mediated induction of PGE2 synthesis, and protein kinase C was a further essential component of this signaling pathway. Colonic fibroblasts may be a major target for prostanoid biogenesis induced by fecal bile acids and, potentially, other noxious actions of these agents.

  7. ACTIVATION AND APOPTOSIS OF CD4+ T CELLS FOLLOWING IN VIVO EXPOSURE TO TWO COMMON ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANTS, TRICHLOROACETALDEHYDE HYDRATE AND TRICHLOROACETIC ACID. (R829417E02)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. Degradation of dichloroacetic acid in homogeneous aqueous media employing ozone and UVC radiation.

    PubMed

    Lovato, María Eugenia; Martín, Carlos A; Cassano, Alberto E

    2011-03-02

    A tentative workable mechanism for dichloroacetic acid decomposition (DCA) in aqueous media employing ozone and UVC radiation has been developed. All experiments were made in a homogeneous medium under assured kinetic control regime. Under no circumstances did a headspace exist in the reactor volume. The starting point of the reaction with UVC radiation was always under the prerequisite of a confirmed state of initial equilibrium conditions for the mixture water-ozone-oxygen at 20 °C. The explored variables were: (i) DCA initial concentration, (ii) ozone concentration and (iii) fluence rate at the reactor window. The model comprises three parallel reactions: (1) direct photolysis, (2) direct ozonation and (3) ozone + UVC degradation. Complete DCA removal was achieved, and the mass balance, considering DCA disappearance and chloride ion formation, closed within very small error. The combination of ozone and UVC radiation produces a significant amount of hydrogen peroxide as an important reaction by-product. The direct photolysis can be well represented with a six step reaction sequence. The direct ozonation mechanism comprises 22 steps and, with the entire set of kinetic constants completed in this work, it is independent of the reaction pH in the range from 3 to 6.3. Lastly, the associated use of ozone and UVC radiation becomes necessary to consider the existence of radiation absorption by three species, namely DCA, ozone and hydrogen peroxide. The developed system, including the three parallel reactions, led to the proposal of a 37 step reaction mechanism. Finally the reaction kinetics, the mass balances and the radiation field corresponding to this complex system were rigorously modeled and the most significant features of the mathematical representation are briefly described. The simulation results rendered from this model agree very well with the measured experimental data. This outcome will be essential for deriving a complete reactor model that must be

  9. Determination of the non protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine in estuarine cyanobacteria by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Mafalda S; Cianca, Rosa C C; Lopes, Viviana R; Almeida, C Marisa R; Vasconcelos, Vitor M

    2011-10-01

    A capillary electrophoretic method for the determination of the amino acid β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (BMAA) was achieved using a fused-silica capillary column (50 cm × 75 μm I.D.) filled with 5 mM sodium tetraborate solution (pH 9), with an applied voltage of 25 kV, at 25 °C. The method was then applied in quantifying BMAA in eighteen strains of lyophilized estuarine cyanobacteria, following amino acid extraction using 0.1 M trichloroacetic acid and 6 M hydrochloric acid, sequentially.

  10. Isolation and characterization of monochloroacetic acid-degrading bacteria.

    PubMed

    Horisaki, Tadafumi; Yoshida, Eiko; Sumiya, Kaori; Takemura, Tetsuo; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Five Burkholderia strains (CL-1, CL-2, CL-3, CL-4, and CL-5) capable of degrading monochloroacetic acid (MCA) were isolated from activated sludge or soil samples gathered from several parts of Japan. All five isolates were able to grow on MCA as the sole source of carbon and energy, and argentometry and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analyses showed that these five strains consumed MCA completely and released chloride ions stoichiometrically within 25 h. The five isolates also grew on monobromoacetic acid, monoiodoacetic acid, and L-2-monochloropropionic acid as sole sources of carbon and energy. In addition, the five isolates could not grow with DCA but dehalogenate single chlorine from DCA. Because PCR analyses revealed that all five isolates have an identical group II dehalogenase gene fragment and no group I deh gene, only strain CL-1 was analyzed further. The partial amino acid sequence of the group II dehalogenase of strain CL-1, named DehCL1, showed 74.6% and 65.2% identities to corresponding regions of the two MCA dehalogenases, DehCI from Pseudomonas sp. strain CBS-3 and Hdl IVa from Burkholderia cepacia strain MBA4, respectively. The secondary-structure motifs of the haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) superfamily and the amino acid residues involved in substrate binding, catalysis, and hydrophobic pocket formation were conserved in the partial amino acid sequence of DehCL1.

  11. Viral entry as the primary target for the anti-HIV activity of chicoric acid and its tetra-acetyl esters.

    PubMed

    Pluymers, W; Neamati, N; Pannecouque, C; Fikkert, V; Marchand, C; Burke, T R; Pommier, Y; Schols, D; De Clercq, E; Debyser, Z; Witvrouw, M

    2000-09-01

    The antiviral activity of L-chicoric acid against HIV-1 has been attributed previously to the inhibition of HIV-1 integration. This conclusion was based on the inhibition of integrase activity in enzymatic assays and the isolation of a resistant HIV strain with a mutation (G140S) in the integrase gene. Here we show that the primary antiviral target of L-CA and its analogs in cell culture is viral entry. L- and D-chicoric acid (L-CA and D-CA) and their respective tetra-acetyl esters inhibit the replication of HIV-1 (III(B) and NL4.3) and HIV-2 (ROD) in MT-4 cells at a 50% effective concentration (EC(50)) ranging from 1.7 to 70.6 microM. In a time-of-addition experiment, L-CA, D-CA, L-CATA, and D-CATA were found to interfere with an early event in the viral replication cycle. Moreover, L-CA, D-CA, and their analogs did not inhibit the replication of virus strains that were resistant toward polyanionic and polycationic compounds at subtoxic concentrations. Furthermore, HIV-1 strains resistant to L-CA and D-CA were selected in the presence of L-CA and D-CA, respectively. Mutations were found in the V2, V3, and V4 loop region of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 of the L-CA and D-CA-resistant NL4.3 strains that were not present in the wild-type NL4.3 strain. Recombination of the gp120 gene of the L-CA and D-CA resistant strain in a NL4.3 wild-type molecular clone fully rescued the phenotypic resistance toward L-CA and D-CA. No significant mutations were detected in the integrase gene of the drug-resistant virus strains. Although inhibition of HIV integrase activity by L-CA and its derivatives was confirmed in an oligonucleotide-driven assay, integrase carrying the G140S mutation was inhibited to the same extent as the wild-type integrase.

  12. Selective removal of monoterpenes from bergamot oil by inclusion in deoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Fantin, Giancarlo; Fogagnolo, Marco; Maietti, Silvia; Rossetti, Stefano

    2010-05-12

    A new approach for removing monoterpenes (MTs) from bergamot oil by selective inclusion in deoxycholic acid (DCA) is proposed. The inclusion process is very efficient, the included fraction being composed mainly of limonene (71.7%) and gamma-terpinene (19.8%). On the other hand, the deterpenated bergamot oil fraction showed for the linalool and linalyl acetate derivatives significant increases from 16.6 and 21.4% to 18.3 and 42.2%, respectively. The major advantages of this methodology are its simplicity, the mild conditions employed, and the quantitative recovery of both host (DCA) and guest (monoterpenes) compounds. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetry (TG), powder X-ray diffractometry (XRPD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and proton magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) analysis were used to investigate and characterize the inclusion compounds.

  13. Evaluation of the Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in Mouse Liver Tumor Induction by Trichloroethylene and Metabolites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial solvent and a widespread environmental contaminant. Induction of liver cancer in mice by TCE is thought to be mediated by two metabolites, dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA), both of which are themselves mouse liver carcinoge...

  14. Rapid in vitro production of cloned plants of Uraria picta (Jacq.) DC-A rare medicinal herb in long-term culture.

    PubMed

    Rai, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Meena; Jain, Madhu; Awasthi, Abhishek; Purshottam, Dharmendra Kumar; Nair, Narayanan Kuttanpillai; Sharma, Ashok Kumar

    2010-11-01

    An efficient in vitro process for rapid production of cloned plants of Uraria picta has been developed employing nodal stem segments taken from field-grown plants. Explants showed bud-break followed by regeneration of shoots with restricted growth within 12 days on modified Murashige and Skoog's medium supplemented with 0.25 mg l(-1) each of 6-benzylaminopurine and indole-3-acetic acid and 25 mg l(-1) adenine sulfate. Normal growth of shoots with good proliferation rate was achieved by reducing the concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine and indole-3-acetic acid to 0.1 mg l(-1) each and incorporating 0.5 mg l(-1) gibberellic acid in the medium in which, on an average, 19.6 shoots per explant were produced. Further, during successive subcultures, increased concentrations of adenine sulfate (50 mg l(-l)) and gibberellic acid (2 mg l(-l)) along with the addition of 20 mg l(-l)  DL: -tryptophan were found conducive to control the problem of necrosis of shoots. In this treatment, several "crops" of shoots were obtained from single culture by repeated subculturing of basal portion of stalk in long-term. Isolated shoots rooted 100% in 0.25 mg l(-1) indole-3-butyric acid. In vitro-raised plants after hardening in inorganic salt solution grew normally in soil and came to flowering. Genetic fidelity of in vitro-raised plants was ascertained by rapid amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Also, quantitative estimation of two isoflavonones in their root extracts further confirmed true-to-type nature of plantlets.

  15. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of beta-alanine, beta-aminoisobutyric acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid in tissue extracts and urine of normal and (aminooxy)acetate-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Abe, T; Kurozumi, Y; Yao, W B; Ubuka, T

    1998-08-07

    A method is described for the simultaneous determination of beta-alanine, beta-aminoisobutyric acid and gamma-aminobutyric acid in biological materials. Amino acids including these beta- and gamma-amino acids were derivatized with 4-dimethylaminoazobenzene-4'-sulfonyl (dabsyl) chloride and dabsyl amino acids formed were separated by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Dabsyl derivatives of these beta- and gamma-amino acids were well separated from other dabsyl-amino acids. The method was applied to the determination of these beta- and gamma-amino acids in trichloroacetic acid extracts of various tissues and to the urine of normal rats and those injected with (aminooxy)acetate (AOA). AOA injection (15 mg per kg of body mass) produced remarkable increase in beta-alanine contents in liver, kidney and urine (10.2, 4.6 and 25.7 times, respectively).

  16. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates accumulate at the onset of intense exercise in man but are not essential for the increase in muscle oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Bangsbo, Jens; Gibala, Martin J; Howarth, Krista R; Krustrup, Peter

    2006-09-01

    It was proposed that a contraction-induced increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates (TCAI) is obligatory for the increase in muscle oxygen uptake at the start of exercise. To test this hypothesis, we measured changes in muscle TCAI during the initial seconds of intense exercise and used dichloroacetate (DCA) in an attempt to alter the level of TCAI. Five men performed strenuous leg kicking exercise (64+/-8 W) under noninfused control (CON) and DCA-supplemented conditions; biopsies (vastus lateralis) were obtained at rest and after 5, 15, and 180 s of exercise. In CON, the total concentration of three measured TCAI (SigmaTCAI: citrate, malate, and fumarate) increased (p<0.05) by 71% during the first 15 s of exercise. The SigmaTCAI was lower (p<0.05) in DCA than in CON at rest [0.18+/-0.02 vs 0.64+/-0.09 mmol kg(-1) dry weight (d.w.)], after 5 s (0.30+/-0.07 vs 0.85+/-0.14 mmol kg(-1) d.w.), and 15 s of exercise (0.60+/-0.07 vs 1.09+/-0.16 mmol kg(-1) d.w.), but not different after 3 min (3.12+/-0.53 vs 3.23+/-0.55 mmol kg(-1) d.w.). Despite differences in the level of muscle TCAI, muscle phosphocreatine degradation was similar in DCA and CON during the first 15 s of exercise (17.5+/-3.3 vs 25.6+/-4.1 mmol kg(-1) d.w.). Taken together with our previous observation that DCA does not alter muscle oxygen uptake during the initial phase of intense leg kicking exercise (Bangsbo et al. Am J Physiol 282:R273-R280, 2002), the present data suggest that muscle TCAI accumulate during the initial seconds of exercise; however, this increase is not essential for the contraction-induced increase in mitochondrial respiration.

  17. Method of analysis at the U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center, Sacramento Laboratory - determination of haloacetic acid formation potential, method validation, and quality-control practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zazzi, Barbara C.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of haloacetic acid formation potential of water samples has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center Sacramento Laboratory. The haloacetic acid formation potential is measured by dosing water samples with chlorine under specified conditions of pH, temperature, incubation time, darkness, and residual-free chlorine. The haloacetic acids formed are bromochloroacetic acid, bromodichloroacetic acid, dibromochloroacetic acid, dibromoacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, monobromoacetic acid, monochloroacetic acid, tribromoacetic acid, and trichloroacetic acid. They are extracted, methylated, and then analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector. Method validation experiments were performed to determine the method accuracy, precision, and detection limit for each of the compounds. Method detection limits for these nine haloacetic acids ranged from 0.11 to 0.45 microgram per liter. Quality-control practices include the use of blanks, quality-control samples, calibration verification standards, surrogate recovery, internal standard, matrix spikes, and duplicates.

  18. Synthesis and biological activity of novel deoxycholic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Popadyuk, Irina I; Markov, Andrey V; Salomatina, Oksana V; Logashenko, Evgeniya B; Shernyukov, Andrey V; Zenkova, Marina A; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F

    2015-08-01

    We report the synthesis and biological activity of new semi-synthetic derivatives of naturally occurring deoxycholic acid (DCA) bearing 2-cyano-3-oxo-1-ene, 3-oxo-1(2)-ene or 3-oxo-4(5)-ene moieties in ring A and 12-oxo or 12-oxo-9(11)-ene moieties in ring C. Bioassays using murine macrophage-like cells and tumour cells show that the presence of the 9(11)-double bond associated with the increased polarity of ring A or with isoxazole ring joined to ring A, improves the ability of the compounds to inhibit cancer cell growth.

  19. The alpha-glycosidic bonds of poly(ADP-ribose) are acid-labile.

    PubMed

    Panzeter, P L; Zweifel, B; Althaus, F R

    1992-04-15

    The poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation system of higher eukaryotes produces multiple ADP-ribose polymers of distinct sizes which exhibit different binding affinities for histones. Although precipitation with trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is the standard procedure for isolation of poly(ADP-ribose) from biological material, we show here that poly(ADP-ribose) is not stable under acidic conditions. Storage of poly(ADP-ribose) as TCA pellets results in acid hydrolysis of polymers, the extent of which is dependent on storage time and temperature. The alpha-glycosidic, inter-residue bonds are the preferred sites of attack, thus reducing polymer sizes by integral numbers of ADP-ribose to yield artefactually more and smaller polymers than originally present. Therefore, poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation studies involving TCA precipitation, histone extraction with acids, or acidic incubations of ADP-ribose polymers must account for the impact of acids on resulting polymer populations.

  20. Transcription of exogenous and endogenous deoxyribonucleic acid templates in cold-shocked Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, S J; Brown, L R

    1980-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis was examined in cold-shocked Bacillus subtilis cells. The cells were grown to mid-log stage, harvested, and cold shocked. RNA synthesis was monitored by the incorporation of [3H]uridine triphosphate or [alpha 32P]adenosine triphosphate into trichloroacetic acid-precipitable material in the presence of all four nucleoside triphosphates. The inhibition of RNA synthesis in cold-shocked cells by lipiarmycin, ethidium bromide, rifampin. or streptolydigin was analyzed using mutant or wild-type cells. Also examined were the effects of temperature, salt concentration, and the addition of polyamines or highly phosphorylated nucleotides. In ultraviolet-irradiated and cold-shocked cells, RNA wynthesis decreased to low levels. The addition of exogenous phi 29 or TSP-1 template to these cells caused a 13- to 20-fold increase in RNA synthesis, as monitored by trichloroacetic acid-precipitable counts. RNA synthesized in the presence of phi 29 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridizes mainly to EcoRI fragments A and C of phi 29 DBA, These two fragments direct transcription by purified RNA polymerase in vitro and hybridize to early phi 29 DNA produced in vivo. Our results with TSP-1 DNA in this system indicated that the RNA produced hybridizes to the same fragments as early RNA produced in vivo. Plasmic pUB110 DNA was not transcribed in this system. Images PMID:6157674

  1. Behavioral evaluation of the neurotoxicity produced by dichloroacetic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Moser, V C; Phillips, P M; McDaniel, K L; MacPhail, R C

    1999-01-01

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is commonly found in drinking water as a by-product of chlorination disinfection. It is a known neurotoxicant in rats, dogs, and humans. We have characterized DCA neurotoxicity in rats using a neurobehavioral screening battery under varying exposure durations (acute, subchronic, and chronic) and routes of administration (oral gavage and drinking water). Studies were conducted in both weanling and adult rats, and comparisons were made between Long-Evans and Fischer-344 rats. DCA produced neuromuscular toxicity comprised of limb weakness and deficits in gait and righting reflex; altered gait and decreased hindlimb grip strength were the earliest indicators of toxicity. Other effects included mild tremors, ocular abnormalities, and a unique chest-clasping response (seen in Fischer-344 rats only). Neurotoxicity was permanent (i.e., through 2 years) following a 6-month exposure to high dose levels, whereas the effects of intermediate dose levels with exposures of 3 months or less were slowly reversible. The severity, specificity, and recovery of neurological changes were route, duration, and strain dependent. Fischer-344 rats were more sensitive than Long-Evans rats, and weanling rats may be somewhat more sensitive than adults. Oral gavage produced significantly less toxicity compared to the same intake level received in drinking water. Neurotoxicity was progressive with continued exposure, and was observed at exposure levels as low as 16 mg/kg/day (lowest dose level tested) when administered via drinking water in subchronic studies. The data from these studies characterize the neurotoxicity produced by DCA, and show it to be more pronounced, persistent, and occurring at lower exposures than has been previously reported. Further research should take into account these marked route, age, and strain differences.

  2. Pharmacophore model for bile acids recognition by the FPR receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Cristina; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Costantino, Gabriele; Pellicciari, Roberto

    2006-05-01

    Formyl-peptide receptors (FPRs) belong to the family A of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily and include three subtypes: FPR, FPR-like-1 and FPR-like-2. They have been involved in the control of␣many inflammatory processes promoting the recruitment and infiltration of leukocytes in regions of inflammation through the molecular recognition of chemotactic factors. A large number of structurally diverse chemotypes modulate the activity of FPRs. Newly identified antagonists include bile acids deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). The molecular recognition of these compounds at FPR receptor was computationally investigated using both ligand- and structure-based approaches. Our findings suggest that all antagonists bind at the first third of the seven helical bundles. A closer inspection of bile acid interaction reveals a number of unexploited anchor points in the binding site that may be used to aid the design of new potent and selective bile acids derivatives at FPR.

  3. pH-responsive mechanism of a deoxycholic acid and folate comodified chitosan micelle under cancerous environment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Daiqin; Song, Peng; Jiang, Feng; Meng, Xiangyue; Sui, Weiping; Shu, Chunying; Wan, Li-Jun

    2013-02-07

    Smart pH-responsive polymeric micelles have attracted much attention as one of the most promising drug delivery candidates. In this paper, a different substitution of deoxycholic acid (DCA) and folic acid (FA) comodified hydroxypropyl chitosans (HPCHS) were synthesized for doxorubicin (DOX) targeted delivery and controllable release. The results indicate that the DOX-release behavior is pH-responsive and closely related with the grafting proportions of the two hydrophobic ingredients. The pH-responsive mechanism for the optimized (6%DCA)-HPCHS-(0.1%FA) was suggested, resulting from a synergistic effect of gradual hydrolysis of the amido bond and electrostatic repulsion between the subsequently protonated DOX and the amino residue of the chitosan backbone under a cancerous microenvironment. Moreover, the DOX/(6%DCA)-HPCHS-(0.1%FA) micelle as a promising targeted drug delivery system in cancer therapy was evaluated by cell growth inhibition assays and confocal laser microscopy in vitro. The results clearly demonstrate a controlled release of its cargo and promoted curative efficacy of DOX.

  4. Trichloroethylene and Its Oxidative Metabolites Enhance the Activated State and Th1 Cytokine Gene Expression in Jurkat Cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yao; Wei, Xuetao; Hao, Weidong

    2015-08-28

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an occupational and ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and TCE exposure will increase the risk of autoimmune diseases and allergic diseases. T cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of TCE-related immune disorders, but the effect of TCE and its oxidative metabolites, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA), on the activation of human T cells is still unknown. In this study, Jurkat cells were pre-treated with TCE, TCA and DCA overnight and then stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin for another 4, 8 and 24 hours. IL-2 secretion was detected by ELISA; the expressions of CD25 and CD69 were tested by flow cytometry; and IFN-γ and IL-2 mRNA expression levels were investigated by real-time PCR. The results showed that TCE and its oxidative metabolites, TCA and DCA, significantly enhanced IL-2 releasing and the expression of T cell activation markers, CD25 and CD69. Consistent with this result, these compounds markedly up-regulated the expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 mRNA. Collectively, these findings suggest that TCE and its metabolites, TCA and DCA, might enhance the activation of T cells and disrupt various activities of peripheral T cells.

  5. Trichloroethylene and Its Oxidative Metabolites Enhance the Activated State and Th1 Cytokine Gene Expression inJurkat Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yao; Wei, Xuetao; Hao, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an occupational and ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and TCE exposure will increase the risk of autoimmune diseases and allergic diseases. T cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of TCE-related immune disorders, but the effect of TCE and its oxidative metabolites, trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA), on the activation of human T cells is still unknown. In this study, Jurkat cells were pre-treated with TCE, TCA and DCA overnight and then stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and ionomycin for another 4, 8 and 24 hours. IL-2 secretion was detected by ELISA; the expressions of CD25 and CD69 were tested by flow cytometry; and IFN-γ and IL-2 mRNA expression levels were investigated by real-time PCR. The results showed that TCE and its oxidative metabolites, TCA and DCA, significantly enhanced IL-2 releasing and the expression of T cell activation markers, CD25 and CD69. Consistent with this result, these compounds markedly up-regulated the expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 mRNA. Collectively, these findings suggest that TCE and its metabolites, TCA and DCA, might enhance the activation of T cells and disrupt various activities of peripheral T cells. PMID:26343699

  6. Unconjugated secondary bile acids activate the unfolded protein response and induce golgi fragmentation via a src-kinase-dependant mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ruchika; Quilty, Francis; Gilmer, John F.; Long, Aideen; Byrne, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Bile acids are components of gastro-duodenal refluxate and regarded as causative agents in oesophageal disease but the precise mechanisms are unknown. Here we demonstrate that a specific subset of physiological bile acids affect the protein secretory pathway by inducing ER stress, activating the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) and causing disassembly of the Golgi apparatus in oesophageal cells. Deoxycholic acid (DCA), Chemodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and Lithocholic acid (LCA) activated the PERK arm of the UPR, via phosphorylation of eIF2α and up-regulation of ATF3, CHOP and BiP/GRP78. UPR activation by these bile acids is mechanistically linked with Golgi fragmentation, as modulating the UPR using a PERK inhibitor (GSK2606414) or salubrinal attenuated bile acid-induced effects on Golgi structure. Furthermore we demonstrate that DCA, CDCA and LA activate Src kinase and that inhibition of this kinase attenuated both bile acid-induced BiP/GRP78 expression and Golgi fragmentation. This study highlights a novel mechanism whereby environmental factors (bile acids) impact important cellular processes regulating cell homeostasis, including the UPR and Golgi structure, which may contribute to cancer progression in the oesophagus. PMID:27888615

  7. EFFECT OF CHLOROFORM ON DICHLOROACETIC ACID AND TRICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED HYPOMETHYLATION AND EXPRESSION OF THE C-MYC GENE AND ON THEIR PROMOTION OF LIVER AND KIDNEY TUMORS IN MICE. (R825384)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. EFFECT OF CHLOROFORM ON DICHLOROACETIC ACID AND TRICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED HYPOMETHYLATION AND EXPRESSION OF THE C-MYC GENE AND ON THEIR PROMOTION OF LIVER AND KIDNEY TUMORS IN MICE. (R828083)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  9. Haloacetic acids content of fruit juices and soft drinks.

    PubMed

    Cardador, María José; Gallego, Mercedes

    2015-04-15

    Water used in a food factory is frequently disinfected with chlorine, which originates disinfection by-products: haloacetic acids (HAAs) make up the second most prevalent class of these products. In this paper we propose the first static HS-GC-MS method developed for direct HAA determination in beverages; the method has higher sensitivity, simplicity and reliability than the only alternative available in the literature. From 150 beverages analysed, it is possible to conclude that at least 2 HAAs (dichloro- and trichloroacetic acids, DCAA and TCAA) are always present in beverages prepared with treated water, which remains constant for 2 or 3 months in the beverages. Moreover, beverages of 100% fruit juices and soft drinks prepared with mineral water (free of HAAs) do not contain any HAA at significant values. Therefore, DCAA and TCAA may indicate of the presence of treated water in beverages.

  10. Isolation and nature of intracellular alpha-aminoadipic acid-containing peptides from Paecilomyces persicinus P-10.

    PubMed Central

    Eriquez, L A; Pisano, M A

    1979-01-01

    Small intracellular peptides containing alpha-aminoadipic acid, cysteine, and a valine moiety were obtained from mycelia of Paecilomyces persicinus P-10 by ethanol or trichloroacetic acid extraction. After performic acid oxidation and ion-exchange chromatography, analysis of the peptide fractions by two-dimensional thin-layer electrophoresis and chromatography revealed the presence of three related peptides, as sulfonic acid derivatives, each containing alpha-aminoadipic acid. Each peptide was isolated in chromatographically pure form by semipreparative thin-layer electrophoresis and chromatography. The purified peptides were subjected to differential hydrolysis, dansylation, and combined dansylation-phenylisothiocyanate sequence analysis. Based on these studies, the structures of the isolated peptides were determined to be (i) glycl-delta-(alpha-aminoadipyl)-cysteinyl-beta-hydroxyvaline, (ii) glycyl-delta-(alpha-aminoadipyl)-cysteinylvaline, and (iii) delta-(alpha-aminoadipyl)-cysteinylvaline. The peptides isolated from Paecilomyces are similar to the alpha-aminoadipic acid-cysteine-valine moiety complex peptides isolated from Cephalosporium. PMID:574371

  11. Survey of several methods deproteinizing human plasma before and within the chloroformate-mediated treatment of amino/carboxylic acids quantitated by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hušek, Petr; Svagera, Zdeněk; Hanzlíková, Dagmar; Simek, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Trichloroacetic acid, perchloric acid, phosphotungstic acid, acetonitrile, methanol and some other organic solvents were evaluated for their ability to provide protein and lipid-free plasma supernatants. The residual proteins, total cholesterol and triacylglycerols were assayed in the supernatant on a Beckman Analyzer instrument. The free cholesterol and the neutral lipids were further analyzed by means of high-temperature GC analysis. The conditions for the deproteinizing step were optimized for minimal lipoprotein disruption. A substantial difference regarding contamination by the lipids was found if the plasma supernatant or the whole serum were treated with an alkyl chloroformate reagent. Three plasma sulfur amino acids and the aromatic ones were chosen as model compounds to evaluate compatibility of the precipitation methods with a subsequent methyl chloroformate-mediated derivatization and GC-MS analysis. The results of the total homocysteine assay matched well with that obtained using a commercial immunoassay. Precipitation with trichloroacetic acid has proven to be a method of choice for the analysis of the acido-basic analytes by GC-MS via chloroformates.

  12. Binding of bile acids by pastry products containing bioactive substances during in vitro digestion.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Górecka, Danuta; Szwengiel, Artur; Smoczyńska, Paulina; Czaczyk, Katarzyna; Komolka, Patrycja

    2015-03-01

    The modern day consumer tends to choose products with health enhancing properties, enriched in bioactive substances. One such bioactive food component is dietary fibre, which shows a number of physiological properties including the binding of bile acids. Dietary fibre should be contained in everyday, easily accessible food products. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine sorption capacities of primary bile acid (cholic acid - CA) and secondary bile acids (deoxycholic - DCA and lithocholic acids - LCA) by muffins (BM) and cookies (BC) with bioactive substances and control muffins (CM) and cookies (CC) in two sections of the in vitro gastrointestinal tract. Variations in gut flora were also analysed in the process of in vitro digestion of pastry products in a bioreactor. Enzymes: pepsin, pancreatin and bile salts: cholic acid, deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid were added to the culture. Faecal bacteria, isolated from human large intestine, were added in the section of large intestine. The influence of dietary fibre content in cookies and concentration of bile acids in two stages of digestion were analysed. Generally, pastry goods with bioactive substances were characterized by a higher content of total fibre compared with the control samples. These products also differ in the profile of dietary fibre fractions. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed that the bile acid profile after two stages of digestion depends on the quality and quantity of fibre. The bile acid profile after digestion of BM and BC forms one cluster, and with the CM and CC forms a separate cluster. High concentration of H (hemicellulose) is positively correlated with LCA (low binding effect) and negatively correlated with CA and DCA contents. The relative content of bile acids in the second stage of digestion was in some cases above the content in the control sample, particularly LCA. This means that the bacteria introduced in the 2nd stage of digestion synthesize the LCA.

  13. Engineering Escherichia coli for Conversion of Glucose to Medium-Chain ω-Hydroxy Fatty Acids and α,ω-Dicarboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Christopher H; Bonin, Jeff; Kogler, Anna; Barba-Ostria, Carlos; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2016-03-18

    In search of sustainable approaches to plastics production, many efforts have been made to engineer microbial conversions of renewable feedstock to short-chain (C2-C8) bifunctional polymer precursors (e.g., succinic acid, cadaverine, 1,4-butanediol). Less attention has been given to medium-chain (C12-C14) monomers such as ω-hydroxy fatty acids (ω-OHFAs) and α,ω-dicarboxylic acids (α,ω-DCAs), which are precursors to high performance polyesters and polyamides. Here we engineer a complete microbial conversion of glucose to C12 and C14 ω-OHFAs and α,ω-DCAs, with precise control of product chain length. Using an expanded bioinformatics approach, we screen a wide range of enzymes across phyla to identify combinations that yield complete conversion of intermediates to product α,ω-DCAs. Finally, through optimization of culture conditions, we enhance production titer of C12 α,ω-DCA to nearly 600 mg/L. Our results indicate potential for this microbial factory to enable commercially relevant, renewable production of C12 α,ω-DCA-a valuable precursor to the high-performance plastic, nylon-6,12.

  14. A potent tumoricidal co-drug ‘Bet-CA' - an ester derivative of betulinic acid and dichloroacetate selectively and synergistically kills cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suchandrima; Ghosh, Monisankar; Dutta, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Selective targeting of cancer cells employing multiple combinations as co-drug holds promise for new generation therapeutics. Betulinic acid (BA), a plant secondary metabolite kills cancer cells and Dichloroacetate (DCA) is capable of reversing the Warburg phenotype by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). Here, we report synthesis, characterization and tumoricidal potential of a co-drug Bet-CA, where a DCA molecule has been appended on C-3 hydroxyl group of BA to generate an ester derivative for increased solubility and subsequent cleavage by internal esterase(s) to release one unit each of BA and DCA. In vitro studies revealed pronounced synergistic cytotoxicity of Bet-CA against a broad spectrum of cancer cells and it selectively killed them when co-cultured with human fibroblasts. Bet-CA treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, significantly altered mitochondrial membrane potential gradient (ΔΨm); followed by the release of cytochrome c (Cyt c) which prompted cells to undergo mitochondria mediated apoptosis. In vivo experimentation expectedly exhibited tumor inhibitory potential of Bet-CA and clinically achievable doses did not produce any apparent toxicity. Taken together, results suggestively raise an important corollary hypothesis stating that Bet-CA selectively and synergistically combats cancer without producing toxic manifestations and emerges to be the prospect for the new generation therapeutics. PMID:25585916

  15. The decreased expression of Beclin-1 correlates with progression to esophageal adenocarcinoma: the role of deoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Roesly, Heather B; Khan, Mohammad R; Chen, Hwu Dau Rw; Hill, Kimberly A; Narendran, Nirushan; Watts, George S; Chen, Xiaoxin; Dvorak, Katerina

    2012-04-15

    Beclin-1 has a central role in the regulation of autophagy. Barrett's esophagus (BE) is associated with a significantly increased risk for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). In the current study, we evaluated the role of Beclin-1 and autophagy in the EAC. Biopsies obtained from patients with BE and EAC, tissues from a rat model of BE and EAC, and esophageal cell lines were evaluated for the expression of Beclin-1 by immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, or RT-PCR. Since reflux of bile acids is important in EAC, we also evaluated the effect of exposure to deoxycholic acid (DCA) on autophagy and Beclin-1 expression. Beclin-1 expression was high in squamous epithelium and nondysplastic BE, whereas its expression was low in dysplastic BE and EAC. The same pattern of expression was observed in rat tissues and in esophageal cell lines. Normal esophageal epithelium and HET-1A cells (derived from normal squamous epithelium) show high levels of Beclin-1, but lower levels of Beclin-1 were found in BE and EAC cell lines (CP-A, CP-C, and OE33). Acute exposure to DCA led to increased Beclin-1 expression and increased autophagy as evaluated by electron microscopy and counting percentage of GFP-LC3-positive BE cells with punctate pattern. In contrast, chronic exposure to DCA did not result in the alteration of Beclin-1 levels or autophagy. In summary, these data suggest that autophagy is initially activated in response to bile acids, but chronic exposure to bile acids leads to decreased Beclin-1 expression and autophagy resistance.

  16. Quantitative analysis of glycerol in dicarboxylic acid-rich cutins provides insights into Arabidopsis cutin structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Pollard, Mike; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Ohlrogge, John

    2016-10-01

    Cutin is an extracellular lipid polymer that contributes to protective cuticle barrier functions against biotic and abiotic stresses in land plants. Glycerol has been reported as a component of cutin, contributing up to 14% by weight of total released monomers. Previous studies using partial hydrolysis of cuticle-enriched preparations established the presence of oligomers with glycerol-aliphatic ester links. Furthermore, glycerol-3-phosphate 2-O-acyltransferases (sn-2-GPATs) are essential for cutin biosynthesis. However, precise roles of glycerol in cutin assembly and structure remain uncertain. Here, a stable isotope-dilution assay was developed for the quantitative analysis of glycerol by GC/MS of triacetin with simultaneous determination of aliphatic monomers. To provide clues about the role of glycerol in dicarboxylic acid (DCA)-rich cutins, this methodology was applied to compare wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis cutin with a series of mutants that are defective in cutin synthesis. The molar ratio of glycerol to total DCAs in WT cutins was 2:1. Even when allowing for a small additional contribution from hydroxy fatty acids, this is a substantially higher glycerol to aliphatic monomer ratio than previously reported for any cutin. Glycerol content was strongly reduced in both stem and leaf cutin from all Arabidopsis mutants analyzed (gpat4/gpat8, att1-2 and lacs2-3). In addition, the molar reduction of glycerol was proportional to the molar reduction of total DCAs. These results suggest "glycerol-DCA-glycerol" may be the dominant motif in DCA-rich cutins. The ramifications and caveats for this hypothesis are presented.

  17. Structure and Functional Characterization of a Bile Acid 7α Dehydratase BaiE in Secondary Bile Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmik, Shiva; Chiu, Hsien-Po; Jones, David H.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Miller, Mitchell D.; Xu, Qingping; Farr, Carol L.; Ridlon, Jason M.; Wells, James E.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Lesley, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of the primary bile acids cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) to the secondary bile acids deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA) is performed by a few species of intestinal bacteria in the genus Clostridium through a multistep biochemical pathway that removes a 7α-hydroxyl group. The rate-determining enzyme in this pathway is bile acid 7α-dehydratase (baiE). In this study, we report crystal structures of apo-BaiE and its putative product-bound (3-oxo-Δ4,6- lithocholyl-Coenzyme A (CoA)) complex. BaiE is a trimer with a twisted α+β barrel fold with similarity to the Nuclear Transport Factor 2 (NTF2) superfamily. Tyr30, Asp35 and His83 form a catalytic triad that is conserved across this family. Site-directed mutagenesis of BaiE from Clostridium scindens VPI 12708 confirmed that these residues are essential for catalysis and also confirmed the importance of other conserved residues, Tyr54 and Arg146, which are involved in substrate binding and affect catalytic turnover. Steady state kinetic studies revealed that the BaiE homologs are able to turn over 3-oxo-Δ4-bile acid and CoA-conjugated 3-oxo-Δ4-bile acid substrates with comparable efficiency questioning the role of CoA-conjugation in the bile acid metabolism pathway. PMID:26650892

  18. [Influencing factors and reaction mechanism of chloroacetic acid reduction by cast iron].

    PubMed

    Tang, Shun; Yang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Xie, Yue-Feng

    2014-03-01

    The chloroacetic acids are ubiquitous present as a class of trace chlorinated organic pollutants in surface and drinking water. Most of chloroacetic acids are known or suspected carcinogens and, when at high concentrations, are of great concern to human health. In order to economically remove chloroacetic acids, the degradation of chloroacetic acids by cast iron was investigated. Moreover, the effect of iron style, pretreatment process, shocking mode and dissolved oxygen on chloroacetic acids reduced by cast iron was discussed. Compared to iron source and acid pretreatment, mass transfer was more important to chloroacetic acid removal. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and monochloroacetic acid (MCAA) were the main products of anoxic and oxic degradation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) by cast iron during the researched reaction time, respectively. With longtitudinal shock, the reaction kinetics of chloroaectic acid removal by cast iron conformed well to the pseudo first order reaction. The anoxic reaction constants of TCAA, DCAA and MCAA were 0.46 h(-1), 0.03 h(-1) and 0, and their oxic constants were 1.24 h(-1), 0.79 h(-1) and 0.28 h(-1), respectively. The removal mechanisms of chloroacetic acids were different under various oxygen concentrations, including sequential hydrogenolysis for anoxic reaction and sequential hydrogenolysis and direct transformation possible for oxic reaction, respectively.

  19. MINIMAL ROLE FOR REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED DYSMORPHOLOGY IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Administration of dichloroacetate (DCA) to pregnant rats produces craniofacial, heart and other defects in their offspring. Exposure of zebrafish to DCA induces malformations and increases superoxide and nitric oxide production suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are as...

  20. A general method of protein purification for recombinant unstructured non-acidic proteins.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco; Guillén, Gabriel; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2011-11-01

    Typical late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate in response to water deficit imposed by the environment or by plant developmental programs. Because of their physicochemical properties, they can be considered as hydrophilins and as a paradigm of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUPs) in plants. To study their biophysical and biochemical characteristics large quantities of highly purified protein are required. In this work, we report a fast and simple purification method for non-acidic recombinant LEA proteins that does not need the addition of tags and that preserves their in vitro protective activity. The method is based on the enrichment of the protein of interest by boiling the bacterial protein extract, followed by a differential precipitation with trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Using this procedure we have obtained highly pure recombinant LEA proteins of groups 1, 3, and 4 and one recombinant bacterial hydrophilin. This protocol will facilitate the purification of this type of IUPs, and could be particularly useful in proteomic projects/analyses.

  1. A method for the identification of proteins secreted by lactic acid bacteria grown in complex media.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Borja; Chaignepain, Sthéphane; Schmitter, Jean-Marie; Urdaci, María C

    2009-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known for their special nutritional requirements, being usually cultured in complex media to achieve optimal growth. In this paper, a protocol based on trichloroacetic acid precipitation of peptides and proteins is presented. The method has been tested on four probiotic LAB strains grown in De Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) broth, a complex medium that is often used for the culture of such bacteria. This protocol allowed the detection of 19 proteins after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, 10 of them being successfully identified by tandem MS. Thereafter, the 10 were found to be secreted or surface associated by bioinformatic means. In conclusion, this work supplies a method for the identification of proteins secreted by LAB, allowing discrimination between the proteins present in the MRS and those produced by probiotic LAB.

  2. Comparative cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of 13 drinking water disinfection by-products using a microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and a developed SOS/umu assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Hui; Miao, Dong-Yue; Tan, Li; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The implications of disinfection by-products (DBPs) present in drinking water are of public health concern because of their potential mutagenic, carcinogenic and other toxic effects on humans. In this study, we selected 13 main DBPs found in drinking water to quantitatively analyse their cytotoxicity and genotoxicity using a microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and a developed SOS/umu assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. With the developed SOS/umu test, eight DBPs: 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-fura3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2-[5H]-furanone (MX), dibromoacetonitrile (DBN), iodoacetic acid (IA), bromochloroacetonitrile (BCN), bromoacetic acid (BA), trichloroacetonitrile (TCN), dibromoacetic acid (DBA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA) were significantly genotoxic to S. typhimurium. Three DBPs: chloroacetic acid (CA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and dichloroacetonitrile (DCN) were weakly genotoxic, whereas the remaining DBPs: chloroacetonitrile (CN) and chloral hydrate (CH) were negative. The rank order in decreasing genotoxicity was as follows: MX > DBN > IA > BCN > BA > TCN > DBA > DCA > CA, TCA, DCN > CN, CH. MX was approximately 370 000 times more genotoxic than DCA. In the microplate-based cytotoxicity assay, cytotoxic potencies of the 13 DBPs were compared and ranked in decreasing order as follows: MX > IA > DBN > BCN > BA > TCN > DCN > CA > DCA > DBA > CN > TCA > CH. MX was approximately 19 200 times more cytotoxic than CH. A statistically significant correlation was found between cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the 13 DBPs in S. typhimurium. Results suggest that microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and the developed SOS/umu assay are feasible tools for analysing the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of DBPs, particularly for comparing their toxic intensities quantitatively.

  3. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling of ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background: Quantitative estimation of toxicokinetic variability in the human population is a persistent challenge in risk assessment of environmental chemicals. Traditionally, inter-individual differences in the population are accounted for by default assumptions or, in rare cases, are based on human toxicokinetic data.Objectives: To evaluate the utility of genetically diverse mouse strains for estimating toxicokinetic population variability for risk assessment, using trichloroethylene (TCE) metabolism as a case study. Methods: We used data on oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolism of TCE in 16 inbred and one hybrid mouse strains to calibrate and extend existing physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. We added one-compartment models for glutathione metabolites and a two-compartment model for dichloroacetic acid (DCA). A Bayesian population analysis of inter-strain variability was used to quantify variability in TCE metabolism. Results: Concentration-time profiles for TCE metabolism to oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolites varied across strains. Median predictions for the metabolic flux through oxidation was less variable (5-fold range) than that through glutathione conjugation (10-fold range). For oxidative metabolites, median predictions of trichloroacetic acid production was less variable (2-fold range) than DCA production (5-fold range), although uncertainty bounds for DCA exceeded the predicted variability. Conclusions:

  4. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of trichloroethylene and its metabolites for use in risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Clewell, H J; Gentry, P R; Covington, T R; Gearhart, J M

    2000-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed that provides a comprehensive description of the kinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) and its metabolites, trichloroethanol (TCOH), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and dichloroacetic acid (DCA), in the mouse, rat, and human for both oral and inhalation exposure. The model includes descriptions of the three principal target tissues for cancer identified in animal bioassays: liver, lung, and kidney. Cancer dose metrics provided in the model include the area under the concentration curve (AUC) for TCA and DCA in the plasma, the peak concentration and AUC for chloral in the tracheobronchial region of the lung, and the production of a thioacetylating intermediate from dichlorovinylcysteine in the kidney. Additional dose metrics provided for noncancer risk assessment include the peak concentrations and AUCs for TCE and TCOH in the blood, as well as the total metabolism of TCE divided by the body weight. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were performed on the model to evaluate its suitability for use in a pharmacokinetic risk assessment for TCE. Model predictions of TCE, TCA, DCA, and TCOH concentrations in rodents and humans are in good agreement with a variety of experimental data, suggesting that the model should provide a useful basis for evaluating cross-species differences in pharmacokinetics for these chemicals. In the case of the lung and kidney target tissues, however, only limited data are available for establishing cross-species pharmacokinetics. As a result, PBPK model calculations of target tissue dose for lung and kidney should be used with caution. PMID:10807559

  5. Mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the haloacetic acids, a major class of drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Plewa, Michael J; Simmons, Jane Ellen; Richardson, Susan D; Wagner, Elizabeth D

    2010-01-01

    The haloacetic acids (HAAs) are disinfection by-products (DBPs) that are formed during the disinfection of drinking water, wastewaters and recreational pool waters. Currently, five HAAs [bromoacetic acid (BAA), dibromoacetic acid (DBAA), chloroacetic acid (CAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA); designated as HAA5] are regulated by the U.S. EPA, at a maximum contaminant level of 60 μg/L for the sum of BAA, DBAA, CAA, DCAA, and TCAA. We present a comparative systematic analysis of chronic cytotoxicity and acute genomic DNA damaging capacity of 12 individual HAAs in mammalian cells. In addition to the HAA5, we analyzed iodoacetic acid (IAA), diiodoacetic acid (DiAA), bromoiodoacetic acid (BIAA), tribromoacetic acid (TBAA), chlorodibromoacetic acid (CDBAA), bromodichloroacetic acid (BDCAA), and bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA). Their rank order of chronic cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells was IAA > BAA > TBAA > CDBAA > DIAA > DBAA > BDCAA > BCAA > CAA > BIAA > TCAA > DCAA. The rank order for genotoxicity was IAA > BAA > CAA > DBAA > DIAA > TBAA > BCAA > BIAA > CDBAA. DCAA, TCAA, and BDCAA were not genotoxic. The trend for both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity is iodinated HAAs > brominated HAAs > chlorinated HAAs. The use of alternative disinfectants other than chlorine generates new DBPs and alters their distribution. Systematic, comparative, in vitro toxicological data provides the water supply community with information to consider when employing alternatives to chlorine disinfection. In addition, these data aid in prioritizing DBPs and their related compounds for future in vivo toxicological studies and risk assessment.

  6. Organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1a4 (Oatp1a4) is important for secondary bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youcai; Csanaky, Iván L.; Selwyn, Felcy Pavithra; Lehman-McKeeman, Lois D.; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2013-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (human: OATPs; rodent: Oatps) were thought to have important functions in bile acid (BA) transport. Oatp1a1, 1a4, and 1b2 are the three major Oatp1 family members in rodent liver. Our previous studies have characterized the BA homeostasis in Oatp1a1-null and Oatp1b2-null mice. The present study investigated the physiological role of Oatp1a4 in BA homeostasis by using Oatp1a4-null mice. Oatp1a4 expression is female-predominant in livers of mice, and thereby it was expected that female Oatp1a4-null mice will have more prominent changes than males. Interestingly, the present study demonstrated that female Oatp1a4-null mice had no significant alterations in BA concentrations in serum or liver, though they had increased mRNA of hepatic BA efflux transporters (Mrp4 and Ostα/β) and ileal BA transporters (Asbt and Ostα/β). In contrast, male Oatp1a4-null mice showed significantly altered BA homeostasis, including increased concentrations of deoxycholic acid (DCA) in serum, liver and intestinal contents. After feeding a DCA-supplemented diet, male but not female Oatp1a4-null mice had higher concentrations of DCA in serum and livers than their WT controls. This suggested that Oatp1a4 is important for intestinal absorption of secondary BAs in male mice. Furthermore, loss of Oatp1a4 function did not decrease BA accumulation in serum or livers of bile-ductligated mice, suggesting that Oatp1a4 is not likely a BA uptake transporter. In summary, the present study for the first time demonstrates that Oatp1a4 does not appear to mediate the hepatic uptake of BAs, but plays an important male-predominant role in secondary BA metabolism in mice. PMID:23747753

  7. [Use of organic acids in acne and skin discolorations therapy].

    PubMed

    Kapuścińska, Alicja; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-03-22

    Acne is one of the most frequent skin disorders that occurs in puberty, but often adults also have acne. The most important factors responsible for acne are elevated production of sebum by hyperactive sebaceous glands and blockage of the follicle because of hyperkeratosis [14]. The third etiopathogenic factor of acne is excessive microflora reproduction [8]. The most significant bacterium that is responsible for formation of skin lesions is Propionibacterium acnes, a rod-shaped Gram-positive and aerotolerant anaerobic bacterium. It is estimated that P. acnes is responsible for acne in approximately 80% of people aged 11 to 30 [27,40]. Even healed skin lesions can often cause skin discolorations and scar formation [51]. Exfoliating chemical substances that are commonly used in dermatology and cosmetology are organic acids. Exfoliating treatment using organic acids is called "chemical peeling" and consists of controlled application of those substances on the skin [38]. The depth of exfoliation depends on organic acid concentration, type of substance and contact time with the skin [41]. Using exfoliating agents seems to be helpful in excessive keratinization - one of several factors responsible for acne. Moreover, epidermis exfoliation is a popular method of removing skin discoloration [22]. Considering chemical structure, exfoliating substances that are most often used in cosmetology contain alpha-hydroxyacids (glycolic acid, lactic acid, mandelic acid and citric acid), beta-hydroxyacids (salicylic acid) and other organic acids, such as trichloroacetic acid and pyruvic acid [47]. In this article, a literature review of use of organic acids in acne and skin discoloration therapy is presented.

  8. Steady-state kinetics of serum bile acids in healthy human subjects: single and dual isotope techniques using stable isotopes and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Everson, G.T.

    1987-03-01

    Techniques have been developed for the measurement of the complete steady-state kinetics of both chenodeoxycholic (CDCA) and cholic (CA) acid and the pool size of deoxycholic acid (DCA) from the serum of healthy subjects using stable isotopes and capillary gas-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (GLC-MS). Serum bile acids were purified by a method employing a C18 chromatographic cartridge, acid solvolysis, enzymic hydrolysis, methylation, a C8 chromatographic cartridge, and TMS-ether derivatization. Fifty mg each of (24-/sup 13/C)CDCA and (24-/sup 13/C)CA was given to five healthy subjects and kinetics were measured from serum and bile. In each case, the measurements from serum (S) equalled those from bile (B) (CDCA (S vs. B): fractional turnover rate (FTR) (d-1) 0.17 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.18 +/- 0.04; pool (g) 0.64 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.68 +/- 0.14, synthesis (g d-1) 0.12 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.1 +/- 0.03; CA (S vs. B): FTR (d-1) 0.28 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.29 +/- 0.07, pool (g) 0.84 +/- 0.29 vs. 0.82 +/- 0.29, synthesis (g d-1) 0.24 +/- 0.10 vs. 0.25 +/- 0.12). In addition, a dual isotope technique for measuring the steady-state kinetics of CDCA was developed using (11,12-2H)CDCA, (24-/sup 13/C)CDCA, and a single sample of serum. In ten subjects, the FTR, pool and synthesis of CDCA measured from serum was similar to that measured from bile. Finally, a technique for estimating the deoxycholic acid (DCA) pool from serum using the ratio of the 370 ion of DCA to that of CDCA was developed. In summary, these data demonstrate that the steady-state kinetics of CDCA and CA and the pool size of DCA can be measured from the serum of healthy subjects.

  9. Increased bile acids in enterohepatic circulation by short-term calorie restriction in male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2013-12-15

    Previous studies showed glucose and insulin signaling can regulate bile acid (BA) metabolism during fasting or feeding. However, limited knowledge is available on the effect of calorie restriction (CR), a well-known anti-aging intervention, on BA homeostasis. To address this, the present study utilized a “dose–response” model of CR, where male C57BL/6 mice were fed 0, 15, 30, or 40% CR diets for one month, followed by BA profiling in various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation by UPLC-MS/MS technique. This study showed that 40% CR increased the BA pool size (162%) as well as total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestinal contents. In addition, CR “dose-dependently” increased the concentrations of tauro-cholic acid (TCA) and many secondary BAs (produced by intestinal bacteria) in serum, such as tauro-deoxycholic acid (TDCA), DCA, lithocholic acid, ω-muricholic acid (ωMCA), and hyodeoxycholic acid. Notably, 40% CR increased TDCA by over 1000% (serum, liver, and gallbladder). Interestingly, 40% CR increased the proportion of 12α-hydroxylated BAs (CA and DCA), which correlated with improved glucose tolerance and lipid parameters. The CR-induced increase in BAs correlated with increased expression of BA-synthetic (Cyp7a1) and conjugating enzymes (BAL), and the ileal BA-binding protein (Ibabp). These results suggest that CR increases BAs in male mice possibly through orchestrated increases in BA synthesis and conjugation in liver as well as intracellular transport in ileum. - Highlights: • Dose response effects of short-term CR on BA homeostasis in male mice. • CR increased the BA pool size and many individual BAs. • CR altered BA composition (increased proportion of 12α-hydroxylated BAs). • Increased mRNAs of BA enzymes in liver (Cyp7a1 and BAL) and ileal BA binding protein.

  10. Acidic bile salts modulate the squamous epithelial barrier function by modulating tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Fukui, Hirokazu; Watari, Jiro; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Miwa, Hiroto

    2011-08-01

    Experimental models for esophageal epithelium in vitro either suffer from poor differentiation or complicated culture systems. An air-liquid interface system with normal human bronchial epithelial cells can serve as a model of esophageal-like squamous epithelial cell layers. Here, we explore the influence of bile acids on barrier function and tight junction (TJ) proteins. The cells were treated with taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), or deoxycholic acid (DCA) at different pH values, or with pepsin. Barrier function was measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the diffusion of paracellular tracers (permeability). The expression of TJ proteins, including claudin-1 and claudin-4, was examined by Western blotting of 1% Nonidet P-40-soluble and -insoluble fractions. TCA and GCA dose-dependently decreased TEER and increased paracellular permeability at pH 3 after 1 h. TCA (4 mM) or GCA (4 mM) did not change TEER and permeability at pH 7.4 or pH 4. The combination of TCA and GCA at pH 3 significantly decreased TEER and increased permeability at lower concentrations (2 mM). Pepsin (4 mg/ml, pH 3) did not have any effect on barrier function. DCA significantly decreased the TEER and increased permeability at pH 6, a weakly acidic condition. TCA (4 mM) and GCA (4 mM) significantly decreased the insoluble fractions of claudin-1 and claudin-4 at pH 3. In conclusion, acidic bile salts disrupted the squamous epithelial barrier function partly by modulating the amounts of claudin-1 and claudin-4. These results provide new insights for understanding the role of TJ proteins in esophagitis.

  11. Kinetics of haloacetic acid reactions with Fe(0).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Arnold, William A; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2004-12-15

    Detailed kinetic studies of the reactions of haloacetic acids (HAAs) with Fe(0) were performed in longitudinally mixed batch reactors. The reactions of tribromoacetic acid (TBAA), bromodichloroacetic acid, and chlorodibromoacetic acid were mass transfer limited, with corrected mass transfer coefficients of 3.7-3.9 x 10(-4) m/s. The reactions of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), chloroacetic acid (CAA), and bromoacetic acid (BAA) were reaction limited. Bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were partially reaction limited. For the reaction limited species and partially reaction limited species, intra- and interspecies competition effects were observed. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson kinetic model incorporating a mass transfer term was adopted to account for these effects. The lumped kinetic parameters for the HAAs ranged from 0.04 to 248 microM min(-1) for an iron loading of 0.3 g of Fe/125 mL and followed the trend DBAA > BCAA > TCAA > BAA > DCAA. The adsorption parameters ranged from 0.0007 to 0.0065 microM(-1). The effect of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the reaction of TBAA or BAA with Fe(0) was also investigated. No significant effect of DO on the reaction rate of TBAA, which is a mass transfer limited species, was observed. A lag phase, however, was observed for the reaction of BAA, which is a reaction limited species, until the DO was depleted. Simulations were performed to investigate the potential significance of the reactions of HAAs with Fe(0) in water distribution systems.

  12. Influence of acid and bile acid on ERK activity, PPARγ expression and cell proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi-Ru; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Zhen-Ni; Qiao, Zhe

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of acid and bile acid exposure on cell proliferation and the expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in normal human esophageal epithelial cells in vitro. METHODS: In vitro cultured normal human esophageal epithelial cells were exposed to acidic media (pH 4.0 - 6.5), media containing different bile acid (250 μmol/L), media containing acid and bile acid, respectively. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT and flow cytometry. The expressions of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and PPARγ protein were determined by the immunoblotting technique. RESULTS: Acid-exposed (3 min) esophageal cells exhibited a significant increase in proliferation ratio, S phase of the cell cycle (P < 0.05) and the level of phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein. When the acid-exposure period exceeded 6 min, we observed a decrease in proliferation ratio and S phase of the cell cycle, with an increased apoptosis ratio (P < 0.05). Bile acid exposure (3-12 min) also produced an increase in proliferation ratio, S phase of the cell cycle (P < 0.05) and phosphorylated ERK1/2 expression. On the contrary, deoxycholic acid (DCA) exposure (> 20 min) decreased proliferation ratio. Compared with bile acid exposure (pH 7.4), bile acid exposure (pH 6.5, 4) significantly decreased proliferation ratio (P < 0.05). There was no expression of PPARγ in normal human esophageal epithelial cells. CONCLUSION: The rapid stimuli of acid or bile acid increase proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells by activating the ERK pathway. PMID:16688842

  13. Comparison of DNA damage in human-derived hepatoma line (HepG2) exposed to the fifteen drinking water disinfection byproducts using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Xu, Liang; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Xie, Hong; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2012-01-24

    Disinfection of drinking water reduces pathogenic infection, but generates disinfection by-products (DBPs) in drinking water. In this study, the effect of fifteen DBPs on DNA damage in human-derived hepatoma line (HepG2) was investigated by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay. These fifteen DBPs are: four trihalomethanes (THMs), six haloacetic acides (HAAs), three haloacetonitriles (HANs), 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX), and chloral hydrate (CH). Based on the minimal effective concentration (MEC) at which DBPs induced significant increase in olive tail moment (OTM), the rank order of DNA-damaging potency is: bromodichloromethane (BDCM)>dibromochloromethane (DBCM)>tribromomethane (TBM)>trichloromethane (TCM) of the four THMs; iodoacetic acid (IA)>bromoacetic acid (BA)>dibromoacetic acid (DBA)>dichloracetic acid (DCA)>trichloroacetic acid (TCA) of the five HAAs; dibromoacetonitrile (DBN)approximately dichloroacetonitrile (DCN)>trichloroacetonitrile (TCN) of the three HANs. The DNA damaging potency of MX and CH is similar to TCA and DCA, respectively. IA is the most genotoxic DBP in the fifteen DBPs, followed by BA. Chloroacetic acid (CA) is not genotoxic in this assay. Our findings indicated that HepG2/SCGE is a sensitive tool to evaluate the genotoxicity of DBPs and iodinated DBPs are more genotoxic than brominated DBPs, but chlorinated DBPs are less genotoxic than brominated DBPs.

  14. Effect of zinc on the transformation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Lizhong

    2010-02-15

    Suspected carcinogen haloacetic acids (HAAs), as a major class of disinfection byproducts, are widespread in drinking water. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of zinc, a metal component of galvanized pipe in water distribution systems, on the fate of the HAAs. Results showed that zinc could induce sequential dehalogenation of HAAs. All brominated acetic acids were transformed to acetate ultimately, and chloroacetic acid (MCAA) was the final product for the dehalogenation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCAA). The concentrations of the parent compounds as a function of time were fitted pseudo-first-order kinetic model with R(2)>0.904. Brominated acetic acids were more activated than chlorinated acetic acids in the reaction with zinc and the activity of HAAs decreased with the number of substituents reduced. While flowing through galvanized pipe, brominated and chlorinated acetic acids except MCAA would decrease to 1% of their initial concentrations in 2.11-6.34h, and the rates would not be affected obviously by the hydrodynamic or duct conditions. The health risk due to TCAA, DCAA in drinking water tends to be magnified, and that due to TBAA, DBAA tends to be first increased and then decreased, also that due to MBAA tends to be decreased.

  15. Upregulation of early growth response factor-1 by bile acids requires mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Katryn; Kim, Nam Deuk; Moon, Jeon-OK; Copple, Bryan L.

    2010-02-15

    Cholestasis results when excretion of bile acids from the liver is interrupted. Liver injury occurs during cholestasis, and recent studies showed that inflammation is required for injury. Our previous studies demonstrated that early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1) is required for development of inflammation in liver during cholestasis, and that bile acids upregulate Egr-1 in hepatocytes. What remains unclear is the mechanism by which bile acids upregulate Egr-1. Bile acids modulate gene expression in hepatocytes by activating the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and through activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Accordingly, the hypothesis was tested that bile acids upregulate Egr-1 in hepatocytes by FXR and/or MAPK-dependent mechanisms. Deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) stimulated upregulation of Egr-1 to the same extent in hepatocytes isolated from wild-type mice and FXR knockout mice. Similarly, upregulation of Egr-1 in the livers of bile duct-ligated (BDL) wild-type and FXR knockout mice was not different. Upregulation of Egr-1 in hepatocytes by DCA and CDCA was prevented by the MEK inhibitors U0126 and SL-327. Furthermore, pretreatment of mice with U0126 prevented upregulation of Egr-1 in the liver after BDL. Results from these studies demonstrate that activation of MAPK signaling is required for upregulation of Egr-1 by bile acids in hepatocytes and for upregulation of Egr-1 in the liver during cholestasis. These studies suggest that inhibition of MAPK signaling may be a novel therapy to prevent upregulation of Egr-1 in liver during cholestasis.

  16. Comparison of H2O2/UV and heterogeneous photocatalytic processes for the degradation of dichloroacetic acid in water.

    PubMed

    Zalazar, C S; Satuf, M L; Alfano, O M; Cassano, A E

    2008-08-15

    A comparative study between two advanced oxidation technologies for pollutant degradation has been made. With the use of dichloroacetic acid (DCA) as the model pollutant, the reactions with hydrogen peroxide and UV radiation (H2O2/UV, 253.7 nm) and photocatalysis with titanium dioxide (TiO2/UV, 300-400 nm) are analyzed. Three criteria have been selected to compare the performances of both processes: (i) the percentage conversion of DCA and TOC (total organic carbon) at a fixed reaction time; (ii) the quantum efficiency, employing the true radiation absorption rates for both activated species (H2O2 and TiO2); (iii) the specific energy consumption to degrade 50% of the initial TOC. The optimal molar concentration ratio of H2O2/DCA and the optimal catalyst concentration have been employed in the experiments. The results indicate that, under the optimal operating conditions, the H2O2/UV process exhibits, by a large difference, the best performance taking into account the above-mentioned criteria. Nevertheless, both systems show similar values of specific energy consumption when a thinner reactor is employed. These results cannot be safely extrapolated to other contexts if (i) other compounds of different structure are degraded and (ii) a different catalyst is used. Moreover, they were obtained under optimized conditions, and typical, real-life situations may render quite different results due to the robustness of the titanium dioxide operation. They should serve as an indication that, under the studied conditions, a much-improved catalyst performance must be achieved to parallel, with a heterogeneous process, a yield similar to the one obtained with the homogeneous system.

  17. Functional human induced hepatocytes (hiHeps) with bile acid synthesis and transport capacities: A novel in vitro cholestatic model

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xuan; Gao, Yimeng; Wu, Zhitao; Ma, Leilei; Chen, Chen; Wang, Le; Lin, Yunfei; Hui, Lijian; Pan, Guoyu

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced cholestasis is a leading cause of drug withdrawal. However, the use of primary human hepatocytes (PHHs), the gold standard for predicting cholestasis in vitro, is limited by their high cost and batch-to-batch variability. Mature hepatocyte characteristics have been observed in human induced hepatocytes (hiHeps) derived from human fibroblast transdifferentiation. Here, we evaluated whether hiHeps could biosynthesize and excrete bile acids (BAs) and their potential as PHH alternatives for cholestasis investigations. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blotting indicated that hiHeps highly expressed BA synthases and functional transporters. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) showed that hiHeps produced normal intercellular unconjugated BAs but fewer conjugated BAs than human hepatocytes. When incubated with representative cholestatic agents, hiHeps exhibited sensitive drug-induced bile salt export pump (BSEP) dysfunction, and their response to cholestatic agent-mediated cytotoxicity correlated well with that of PHHs (r2 = 0.8032). Deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced hepatotoxicity in hiHeps was verified by elevated aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and γ-glutamyl-transferase (γ-GT) levels. Mitochondrial damage and cell death suggested DCA-induced toxicity in hiHeps, which were attenuated by hepatoprotective drugs, as in PHHs. For the first time, hiHeps were reported to biosynthesize and excrete BAs, which could facilitate predicting cholestatic hepatotoxicity and screening potential therapeutic drugs against cholestasis. PMID:27934920

  18. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular structures of eight organic salts based on 2,6-diaminopyridine, and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shouwen; Zhao, Ying; Liu, Bin; Jin, Xiunan; Zhang, Huan; Wen, Xianhong; Liu, Hui; Jin, Li; Wang, Daqi

    2015-11-01

    Here anhydrous and hydrated multi-component organic acid-base salts of 2,6-diaminopyridine have been prepared with the organic acids as trichloroacetic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 5-nitrosalicylic acid, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid, m-phthalic acid, naphthalene-1,5-disulfonic acid, and glutaric acid. The eight crystalline compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, infrared (IR), melting point (mp), and elemental analysis. Except salt 4, all structures adopted the hetero R22(8) supramolecular synthon. There were extensive N-H···O/O-H···O/N-H···N/N-H···S hydrogen bonds as well as CH···O, CH-N, CH-π, NH-π, π-π, C-π, Cl-O, and O-O interactions in the supramolecular architectures. The combination of these weak and strong hydrogen bonding associations in the crystal packing led to the formation of the 2D/3D structures.

  19. Chlorine Substituted Acetic Acids and Salts. Effect of Salification on Chlorine-35 NQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Serge; Gourdji, Michel; Guibé, Lucien; Péneau, Alain

    1996-06-01

    The NQR of a quadrupolar probe nucleus is often used to investigate the effect of substituent in molecules. The inductive effect, based on a partial charge migration along the molecular skeleton is the only one present in saturated aliphatics, the conjugative effect appearing in conjugated molecules, especially aromatics. As the stepwise charge migration mechanism, formerly used to explain the inductive effect, is now believed obsolete, we have wanted to reexamined the case of chlorine substituted acetic acids and salts. The data in literature was extended by observing reso-nances and determining NQR frequencies in several acids and salts. The present analysis of the salification of mono-, di-and tri-chloroacetic acids, which is equivalent to a deprotonation or the substitution of the acid hydrogen by a negative unit charge, shows that a model based on the polarization of the chlorine atom(s) by the carboxyle group is consistent with experimental results: the polarization energy appears to be proportional to the NQR frequency shifts; experimental data show a correlation between the NQR frequency shifts accompanying salification and the variations of the intrinsic acidity measured in the gas phase; this, in turn shows that there is a proportionality between the polarization energy and the variations in the acid free enthalpy of dissociation. From the comparison between fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine, it also appears that an alternative mechanism, the polarization of the carboxyl group by the halogen, would be important only in the case of the fluoroacetic acid.

  20. Reductive dehalogenation of haloacetic acids by hemoglobin-loaded carbon nanotube electrode.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ping; Cao, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2007-01-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) was immobilized on carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode to catalyze the dehalogenation of haloacetic acids (HAAs). FTIR and UV measurements were performed to investigate the activity-keep of Hb after immobilization on CNT. The electrocatalytic behaviors of the Hb-loaded electrode for the dehalogenation of HAAs were studied by cyclic voltammmetry and constant-potential electrolysis technique. An Hb-loaded packed-bed flow reactor was also constructed for bioelectrocatalytic dehalogenation of HAAs. The results showed that Hb retained its nature, the essential features of its native secondary structure, and its biocatalytic activity after immobilization on CNT. Chloroacetic acids and bromoacetic acids could be dehalogenated completely with Hb catalysis through a stepwise dehalogenation process at -0.400V (vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE)) and -0.200V (vs. SCE), respectively. The removal of 10.5mM trichloroacetic acid and dichloroacetic acid is ca. 97% and 63%, respectively, with electrolysis for 300min at -0.400V (vs. SCE) using the Hb-loaded packed-bed flow reactor, and almost 100% of tribromoacetic acid and dibromoacetic acid was removed with electrolysis for 40min at -0.200V (vs. SCE). The average current efficiency of Hb-catalytic dehalogenation almost reaches 100%.

  1. [Determination of trace haloacetic acids in drinking water using ion chromatography coupled with solid phase extraction].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingxue; Huang, Jianjun; Gu, Ping

    2006-05-01

    The combined solid phase extraction (SPE)-ion chromatography (IC) method was developed for the analysis of trace haloacetic acids (HAAs) in drinking water. The tested HAAs included monochloroacetic acid (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), monobromoacetic acid (MBAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA). For trace determination of HAAs in real drinking water samples, conditions of LiChrolut EN SPE cartridge were investigated for HAAs preconcentration and matrix elimination. Elution was carried out by 2 mL of sodium hydroxide (10 mmol/L) with the flow rate of 2 mL/min. The Dionex IonPac AS16 column (250 mm x 4 mm i. d.), a high capacity and hydroxide-selective anion-exchange column designed for the determination of polarizable anions, was chosen for chromatographic separation. HAAs were analyzed with a concentration gradient of NaOH with the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min and detected by suppressed conductivity. A 500 microL sample loop was used. The detection limits of this SPE-IC method for MCAA, DCAA, DBAA and TCAA were 0.38-1.69 microg/L and MBAA was 12.5 microg/L under 25-fold preconcentration. The results demonstrate that the method is suitable for the analysis of trace haloacetic acids in drinking water.

  2. Determination of ten haloacetic acids in drinking water using high-performance and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yang; Chang, Shueh-Ni; Wang, Gen-Shuh

    2009-01-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are a class of byproducts resulting from the reaction of chlorinated disinfectants with natural organic matter. These chemicals have been found in animal studies to possibly influence hepatic, reproductive, and developmental functions, and they may be mutagenic and carcinogenic. Because HAAs are hydrophilic and strongly acidic, it is a challenge to measure them at low levels. In this study, nine traditional HAAs and monoiodoacetic acid, an emerging disinfection byproduct, are analyzed in water directly. HAAs were separated on a BetaMax Acid column or a HILIC UPLC column, and they were detected by negative electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Although the on-column limits of detection of HAAs were lower when using an HILIC UPLC column (0.08-2.73 microg/L) than when using a BetaMax Acid column (0.18 to 71.5 microg/L), to use an HILIC UPLC column, it was required to dissolve water samples in 90% acetonitrile before injection and result in sample dilution. BetaMax Acid column was found to be more suitable for the analysis of HAAs in drinking water because there was no need of sample preparation. Major species of HAAs, such as dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid, and other primary species (e.g., dibromoacetic acid, bromochloroacetic acid and bromodichloroacetic acid) can be detected using the BetaMax Acid column at concentrations higher than 1-3 microg/L.

  3. The Human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase UGT2A1 and UGT2A2 enzymes are highly active in bile acid glucuronidation.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Martin; Gauthier-Landry, Louis; Trottier, Jocelyn; Verreault, Mélanie; Caron, Patrick; Finel, Moshe; Barbier, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    Bile acids (BA) are essential modulators of lipid, glucose, and cholesterol homeostasis, but they exert cytotoxic effects in the cholestatic liver. Glucuronidation, catalyzed by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes is a pharmacologically relevant BA detoxification process. The present study characterized the BA-conjugating activity of the little-studied human UGTs of subfamily 2A: UGT2A1, 2A2, and 2A3. Recombinant UGT2As, expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, were assayed for the glucuronidation of six major bile acids: chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), cholic acid (CA), lithocholic acid (LCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), hyocholic acid (HCA) and hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA). UGT2A3 exhibited detectable but very low activity with all the tested BA substrates. UGT2A1 was highly efficient in forming LCA-3 and LCA-24G, CDCA-24, DCA-24, HCA-24, and HDCA-24G, whereas UGT2A2 was the most active enzyme for CA-24G and CDCA-24G formation and also was able to generate HDCA-6G, HDCA-24G, LCA-24G, and HCA-24G. The Km values of UGT2A1 varied between 102.2 ± 14.3 µM and 2.4 ± 1.2 mM. With the exception of CA-24G, a low affinity substrate for UGT2A2, all the Km values for UGT2A2 were in the 100 to 400 µM range. We demonstrate the high reactivity of the human UGT2A1 and UGT2A2 for bile acid glucuronidation. The physiologic importance of these reactions to BA disposition remains, however, to be clarified in vivo.

  4. Ursodeoxycholic Acid Suppresses Lipogenesis in Mouse Liver: Possible Role of the Decrease in β-Muricholic Acid, a Farnesoid X Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kyosuke; Iguchi, Yusuke; Une, Mizuho; Watanabe, Shiro

    2017-03-17

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a major nuclear receptor of bile acids; its activation suppresses sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c)-mediated lipogenesis and decreases the lipid contents in the liver. There are many reports showing that the administration of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) suppresses lipogenesis and reduces the lipid contents in the liver of experimental animals. Since UDCA is not recognized as an FXR agonist, these effects of UDCA cannot be readily explained by its direct activation of FXR. We observed that the dietary administration of UDCA in mice decreased the expression levels of SREBP1c and its target lipogenic genes. Alpha- and β-muricholic acids (MCA) and cholic acid (CA) were the major bile acids in the mouse liver but their contents decreased upon UDCA administration. The hepatic contents of chenodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid (DCA) were relatively low but were not changed by UDCA. UDCA did not show FXR agonistic or antagonistic potency in in vitro FXR transactivation assay. Taking these together, we deduced that the above-mentioned change in hepatic bile acid composition induced upon UDCA administration might cause the relative increase in the FXR activity in the liver, mainly by the reduction in the content of β-MCA, a farnesoid X receptor antagonist, which suggests a mechanism by which UDCA suppresses lipogenesis and decreases the lipid contents in the mouse liver.

  5. Comparison of dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in aerosol samples collected in Xi'an, China during haze and clean periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chunlei; Wang, Gehui; Zhou, Bianhong; Meng, Jingjing; Li, Jianjun; Cao, Junji; Xiao, Shun

    2013-12-01

    PM10 aerosols from Xi'an, a mega city of China in winter and summer, 2009 were measured for secondary organic aerosols (SOA) (i.e., dicarboxylic acids (DCA), keto-carboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls), water-soluble organic (WSOC) and inorganic carbon (WSIC), elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC). Molecular compositions of SOA on haze and clean days in both seasons were compared to investigate their sources and formation mechanisms. DCA in the samples were 1843 ± 810 ng m-3 in winter and 1259 ± 781 ng m-3 in summer, respectively, which is similar and even higher than those measured in 2003. Oxalic acid (C2, 1162 ± 570 ng m-3 in winter and 1907 ± 707 ng m-3 in summer) is the predominant species of DCA, followed by t-phthalic (tPh) in winter and phthalic (Ph) in summer. Such a molecular composition is different from those in other Asian cities where succinic acid (C4) or malonic acid (C3) is the second highest species, which is mostly due to significant emissions from household combustion of coal and open burning of waste material in Xi'an. Mass ratios of C2/diacids, diacids/WSOC, WSOC/OC and individual diacid-C/WSOC are higher on the haze days than on the clean days in both seasons, suggesting an enhanced SOA production under the haze condition. We also found that the haze samples are acidic while the clean samples are almost neutral. Such a difference in particle acidity is consistent with the enhanced SOA production, because acid-catalysis is an important aqueous-phase formation pathway of SOA. Gly/mGly mass ratio showed higher values on haze days than on clean day in both seasons. We comprehensively investigated the ratio in literature and found a consistent pattern. Based on our observation results and those documented data we proposed for the first time that concentration ratio of Gly/mGly can be taken as an indicator of aerosol ageing.

  6. In vivo effects of naproxen, salicylic acid, and valproic acid on the pharmacokinetics of trichloroethylene and metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Rouhou, Mouna Cheikh; Charest-Tardif, Ginette; Haddad, Sami

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that some drugs modulate in vitro metabolism of trichloroethylene (TCE) in humans and rats. The objective was to assess in vivo interactions between TCE and three drugs: naproxen (NA), valproic acid (VA), and salicylic acid (SA). Animals were exposed to TCE by inhalation (50 ppm for 6 h) and administered a bolus dose of drug by gavage, equivalent to 10-fold greater than the recommended daily dose. Samples of blood, urine, and collected tissues were analyzed by headspace gas chromatography coupled to an electron capture detector for TCE and metabolites (trichloroethanol [TCOH] and trichloroacetate [TCA]) levels. Coexposure to NA and TCE significantly increased (up to 50%) total and free TCOH (TCOHtotal and TCOHfree, respectively) in blood. This modulation may be explained by an inhibition of glucuronidation. VA significantly elevated TCE levels in blood (up to 50%) with a marked effect on TCOHtotal excretion in urine but not in blood. In contrast, SA produced an increase in TCOHtotal levels in blood at 30, 60, and 90 min and urine after coexposure. Data confirm in vitro observations that NA, VA, and SA affect in vivo TCE kinetics. Future efforts need to be directed to evaluate whether populations chronically medicated with the considered drugs display greater health risks related to TCE exposure.

  7. Lipid metabolism during bacterial growth, sporulation, and germination: kinetics of fatty acid and macromolecular synthesis during spore germination and outgrowth of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, K W; De Pinto, J; Bulla, L A

    1975-01-01

    The timing and kinetics of fatty acid synthesis are delineated for Bacillus thuringiensis spore germination and outgrowth by analyzing [U-14C]acetate and [2-3H]glycerol incorporation into chloroform-methanol-extractable and trichloroacetic acid-precipitable lipids. In addition to measurement of pulsed and continuous labeling of fatty acids, monitoring the incorporation of radioactive phenylalanine, thymidine, and uridine from the onset of germination through first cell division provides a profile of biochemical activities related to membrane differentiation and cellular development. Upon germination, ribonucleic acid synthesis is initiated, immediately followed by rapid and extensive fatty acid synthesis that in turn precedes protein, deoxyribonucleic acid and triglyceride synthesis. Significantly, formation of fatty acids from acetate exhibits further developmental periodicity in which a large transient increase in fatty acid synthetic activity coincides with the approach of cell division. Radiorespirometric analyses indicates only slight oxidative decarboxylation of acetate and corroborates the extreme involvement of acetate in specific fatty acid biosynthetic reactions throughout cellular modification. These findings graphically demonstrate an intimate association of fatty acid metabolism with commitment to spore outgrowth and subsequent cell division.

  8. Electrochemical dechlorination of chloroacetic acids (CAAs) using hemoglobin-loaded carbon nanotube electrode.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ping; Cao, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Yi

    2006-04-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb) was immobilized on carbon nanotube (CNT) electrode to catalyze the dechlorination of chloroacetic acids (CAAs), and the electrocatalytic behaviors of the Hb-loaded electrode for the dechlorination of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) were studied by cyclic voltammetry and constant-potential electrolysis technique. An Hb-loaded packed-bed flow reactor was also constructed for bioelectrocatalytic dechloriantion of CAAs from drinking water. The results showed that the reduced heme of Hb immobilized on CNT electrode was easily regenerated, and Hb exhibited a stable and high activity for reductive dechlorination of CAAs with significant lowering of overpotential. TCAA could be reduced at -0.450 V (vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE)) with catalysis of Hb-loaded electrode and its dechlorination was stepwise, following the pathway of TCAA-->dichloroacetic acid (DCAA)-->monochloroacetic acid (MCAA)-->acetic acid. It was also found that all CAAs, e.g., TCAA, DCAA and MCAA, could be dechlorinated completely at -0.450 V. The removal of 30.0 mM TCAA and DCAA is ca. 40% and 31%, respectively, with electrolysis for 100 min at -0.600 V (vs. SCE) using the Hb-loaded packed-bed flow reactor. The dechlorination activities of CAAs follow the decreasing order: TCAA>DCAA>MCAA, and the average current efficiency is over 90%.

  9. Determination of trace levels of haloacetic acids and perchlorate in drinking water by ion chromatography with direct injection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongjian; Mou, Shifen

    2003-05-16

    Disinfection by products of haloacetic acids and perchlorate pose significant health risks, even at low microg/l levels in drinking water. A new method for the simultaneous determination of nine haloacetic acids (HAAs) and perchlorate as well as some common anions in one run with ion chromatography was developed. The HAAs tested included mono-, di-, trichloroacetic acids, mono, di-, tribromoacetic acids, bromochloroacetic acid, dibromochloroacetic acid, and bromodichloroacetic acid. Two high-capacity anion-exchange columns, a carbonate-selective column and a hydroxide-selective hydrophilic one, were used for the investigation. With the carbonate-selective column, the nine HAAs as well as fluoride, chloride, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate and sulfate could be well separated and determined in one run. With the very hydrophilic column and a gradient elution of sodium hydroxide, methanol and deionized water, the nine HAAs, fluoride, chloride, nitrite, nitrate as well as perchlorate could be simultaneously determined in one run within 34 min. The detection limits for HAAs were between 1.11 and 9.32 microg/l. For perchlorate, it was 0.60 microg/l.

  10. Lead-acid batteries in micro-hybrid applications. Part II. Test proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A. O.; Albers, J.; Weirather-Koestner, D.; Kabza, H.

    In the first part of this work [1] selected key parameters for applying lead-acid (LA) batteries in micro-hybrid power systems (MHPS) were investigated. Main results are integrated in an accelerated, comprehensive test proposal presented here. The test proposal aims at a realistic representation of the pSoC operation regime, which is described in Refs. [1,6]. The test is designed to be sensitive with respect to dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) at partially discharged state (critical for regenerative braking) and the internal resistance at high-rate discharge (critical for idling stop applications). First results are presented for up-to-date valve-regulated LA batteries with absorbent glass mat (AGM) separators. The batteries are close to the limits of the first proposal of pass/fail-criteria. Also flooded batteries were tested; the first out of ten units failed already.

  11. Lead-acid batteries in micro-hybrid applications. Part I. Selected key parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A. O.; Kaiser, F.; Koehler, L.; Albers, J.; Kabza, H.

    Micro-hybrid electric vehicles were launched by BMW in March 2007. These are equipped with brake energy regeneration (BER) and the automatic start and stop function (ASSF) of the internal combustion engine. These functions are based on common 14 V series components and lead-acid (LA) batteries. The novelty is given by the intelligent onboard energy management, which upgrades the conventional electric system to the micro-hybrid power system (MHPS). In part I of this publication the key factors for the operation of LA batteries in the MHPS are discussed. Especially for BER one is high dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) for effective boost charging. Vehicle rest time is identified as a particular negative parameter for DCA. It can be refreshed by regular fully charging at elevated charge voltage. Thus, the batteries have to be outstandingly robust against overcharge and water loss. This can be accomplished for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries at least if they are mounted in the trunk. ASSF goes along with frequent high-rate loads for warm cranking. The internal resistance determines the drop of the power net voltage during cranking and is preferably low for reasons of power net stability even after years of operation. Investigations have to be done with aged 90 Ah VRLA-absorbent glass mat (AGM) batteries. Battery operation at partial state-of-charge gives a higher risk of deep discharging (overdischarging). Subsequent re-charging then is likely to lead to the formation of micro-short circuits in the absorbent glass mat separator.

  12. A hydrophilic interaction chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for amino acid profiling in mussels.

    PubMed

    Tsochatzis, Emmanouil D; Begou, Olga; Gika, Helen G; Karayannakidis, Panayotis D; Kalogiannis, Stavros

    2017-03-15

    A UHPLC-HILIC-tandem MS method has been developed and validated for the quantification of 21 amino acids (20 protein amino acids and cystine) in their free form (FAA) and as protein constituents (total amino acids, TAA) in a rich protein food matrix such as lyophilized mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) samples. FAA were analyzed after suspending the samples in the presence of trichloroacetic acid in order to prevent dissolving the proteins, while TAA were determined after acid hydrolysis with 6M HCl in the presence of 4% v/v thioglycolic acid as a reducing agent. In hydrolysed samples 17 amino acids could be determined since tryptophan, cysteine, cystine and asparagine were degraded during acid hydrolysis. Linear regression coefficients (R(2)) were above 0.99 for all amino acids. Accuracy and precision, expressed as recovery (%) and relative standard deviation (RSD, %) were in acceptable levels, ranging from 78.2 to 123.3% and below 15%, respectively for both FAA and TAA. Uncertainty was also below 12% for FAA and below 22% for TAA. Sensitivity of the method was high with LOD values ranging from 0.003 to 0.034g/100g for FAA and 0.001 to 0.004g/100g for TAA, while LOQ ranged from 0.009 to 0.104g/100g for FAA and 0.002 to 0.011g/100g for TAA. The method proved to be a fast and reliable tool for acquiring information on free and total amino acids profile in high protein content foodstuffs such as mussels.

  13. Deoxycholic and chenodeoxycholic bile acids induce apoptosis via oxidative stress in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ignacio Barrasa, Juan; Olmo, Nieves; Pérez-Ramos, Pablo; Santiago-Gómez, Angélica; Lecona, Emilio; Turnay, Javier; Antonia Lizarbe, M

    2011-10-01

    The continuous exposure of the colonic epithelium to high concentrations of bile acids may exert cytotoxic effects and has been related to pathogenesis of colon cancer. A better knowledge of the mechanisms by which bile acids induce toxicity is still required and may be useful for the development of new therapeutic strategies. We have studied the effect of deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) treatments in BCS-TC2 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Both bile acids promote cell death, being this effect higher for CDCA. Apoptosis is detected after 30 min-2 h of treatment, as observed by cell detachment, loss of membrane asymmetry, internucleosomal DNA degradation, appearance of mitochondrial transition permeability (MPT), and caspase and Bax activation. At longer treatment times, apoptosis is followed in vitro by secondary necrosis due to impaired mitochondrial activity and ATP depletion. Bile acid-induced apoptosis is a result of oxidative stress with increased ROS generation mainly by activation of plasma membrane enzymes, such as NAD(P)H oxidases and, to a lower extent, PLA2. These effects lead to a loss of mitochondrial potential and release of pro-apoptotic factors to the cytosol, which is confirmed by activation of caspase-9 and -3, but not caspase-8. This initial apoptotic steps promote cleavage of Bcl-2, allowing Bax activation and formation of additional pores in the mitochondrial membrane that amplify the apoptotic signal.

  14. A novel 1:1 canal inclusion network formed by deoxycholic acid dimers (bislactones) with benzene molecules: an x-ray study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanković, S.; Kálmán, A.; Argay, Gy.; Miljković, D.; Kuhajda, K.; Vicković, I.; Bruwo, M.; Ori, O.

    1990-04-01

    A novel canal inclusion network formed by 3α-hydroxy-5β-cholano-12α-24-bislactone (C 48H 74O 6) with benzene molecule (1:1) in a triclinic crystal lattice has been revealed by X-ray diffraction and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Crystal symmetry P1 with a=15.036(4), b=13.269(4), c=7.196(4) Å, α=78.16(2), β=73.42(2), γ=66.42(2) °, Z=1 (one pair of deoxycholic acid (DCA) dimer and benzene in the unit cell) and Dc=1.091 g cm -3. The structure was refined to R 0.082 for 3083 reflections. The DCA dimers separated by unit translations form infinite canals along the shortest axis c. These hydrophobic canals accommodate the benzene molecules separated by a distance of 4.55(2) Å. In accordance with the vigorous thermal motion of the ring atoms the benzene molecules are bound by weak dispersion forces to the host molecules. However, atom—atom potential calculations indicate that the position and orientation of the benzene ring in the void represent the energy minimum.

  15. Quantitative Evaluation of Dichloroacetic Acid Kinetics in Human -- A Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Modeling Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    use include mild liver dysfunction, transient central neuropathy , peripheral neuropathy and hypocalcemia. The clinical effects are generally...metabolite of trichloroethylene. DCA liver carcinogenicity has been demonstrated in rodents but epidemiological evidence in humans is not available. High...probable minor metabolite of trichloroethylene. DCA liver carcinogenicity has been demonstrated in rodents but epidemiological evidence in humans is not

  16. Measurement of 13C/12C of chloroacetic acids by gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wong, Charles S; Muir, Derek C G; Mabury, Scott A

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a novel analytical methodology using gas chromatography/combustion/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) to measure the 13C/12C ratios of chloroacetic acids (CAAs). CAAs are a major class of environmental pollutants that are widely distributed throughout the world, often at relatively high concentrations, and are of concern due to their toxic effects, particularly on plants. The 13C/12C of CAA reagents was measured by IRMS subsequent to offline combustion. Aqueous solutions of these CAAs were derivatized to the corresponding methyl chloroacetates (MCAAs) with acidic methanol with a known isotopic composition, extracted into pentane, and analyzed by GC/C/IRMS. Measured 13C/12C ratios of derivatized MCAAs were in agreement with calculated values within 1 per thousand for monochloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid and within 2 per thousand for dichloroacetic acid, suggesting that methylation and other analytical methodology steps do not isotopically fractionate derivatized MCAAs. 13C/12C ratios of reagent CAAs from different sources had varying isotopic signatures suggesting differences in source carbon and/or production methods. Our results underscore the potential of stable isotopes to serve as tracers of environmental sources of CAAs.

  17. Gut microbiota, cirrhosis and alcohol regulate bile acid metabolism in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Kang, Dae-Joong; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the complex role of the bile acid-gut microbiome axis in health and disease processes is evolving rapidly. Our focus revolves around the interaction of the gut microbiota with liver diseases, especially cirrhosis. The bile acid pool size has recently been shown to be a function of microbial metabolism of bile acid and regulation of the microbiota by bile acids is important in the development and progression of several liver diseases. Humans produce a large, conjugated hydrophilic bile acid pool, maintained through positive-feedback antagonism of FXR in intestine and liver. Microbes use bile acids, and via FXR signaling this results in a smaller, unconjugated hydrophobic bile acid pool. This equilibrium is critical to maintain health. The challenge is to examine the manifold functions of gut bile acids as modulators of antibiotic, probiotic and disease progression in cirrhosis, metabolic syndrome and alcohol use. Recent studies have shown potential mechanisms explaining how perturbations in the microbiome affect bile acid pool size and composition. With advancing liver disease and cirrhosis, there is dysbiosis in the fecal, ileal and colonic mucosa, in addition to a decrease in bile acid concentration in the intestine due to the liver problems. This results in a dramatic shift toward the Firmicutes, particularly Clostridium cluster XIVa and increasing production of deoxycholic acid (DCA). Alcohol intake speeds up these processes in the subjects with and without cirrhosis without significant FXR feedback. Taken together, these pathways can impact intestinal and systemic inflammation while worsening dysbiosis. The interaction between bile acids, alcohol, cirrhosis and dysbiosis is an important relationship that influences intestinal and systemic inflammation, which in turn determines progression of the overall disease process. These interactions and the impact of commonly used therapies for liver disease can provide insight into the pathogenesis

  18. Changes in the Amino Acid Composition of Bogue (Boops boops) Fish during Storage at Different Temperatures by 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ciampa, Alessandra; Picone, Gianfranco; Laghi, Luca; Nikzad, Homa; Capozzi, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to obtain information about the changes occurring in Bogue (Boops boops) fish during storage. For this purpose, 1H-NMR spectra were recorded at 600 MHz on trichloroacetic acid extracts of fish flesh stored over a 15 days period both at 4 °C and on ice. Such spectra allowed the identification and quantification of amino acids, together with the main organic acids and alcohols. The concentration of acidic and basic free amino acids was generally found to increase and decrease during storage, respectively. These concentration changes were slow during the first days, as a consequence of protein autolysis, and at higher rates afterward, resulting from microbial development. Two of the amino acids that showed the greatest concentration change were alanine and glycine, known to have a key role in determining the individual taste of different fish species. The concentration of serine decreased during storage, as highlighted in the literature for frozen fish samples. Differences in the amino acids concentration trends were found to be related to the different storage temperatures from day 4 onwards. PMID:22822452

  19. Biologically active carbon filtration for haloacetic acid removal from swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao L; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2016-01-15

    A biologically activate carbon (BAC) filter was continuously operated on site for the treatment of haloacetic acids (HAAs) in an outdoor swimming pool at an average empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 5.8 min. Results showed that BAC filtration was a viable technology for direct removal of HAAs from the pool water with a nominal efficiency of 57.7% by the filter while the chlorine residuals were 1.71 ± 0.90 mg/L during the study. THMs and TOC were not removed and thus were not considered as indicators of the effectiveness of BAC filtration. Increased EBCT in the range of 4.5 and 6.4 min led to improved HAA removal performance, which could be best fit by a logarithmic regression model. BAC filtration also affected the HAA speciation by removing more dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) than trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), resulting in a lower ratio of DCAA/TCAA in the filtered effluent. However, the observation of an overall constant ratio could be attributable to a complex formation and degradation mechanism occurring in swimming pools.

  20. The non-protein amino acid β-N-methylamino-L-alanine in Portuguese cyanobacterial isolates.

    PubMed

    Cervantes Cianca, Rosa C; Baptista, Mafalda S; Lopes, Viviana R; Vasconcelos, Vitor M

    2012-06-01

    The tailor made amino acid β-N-methyl-amino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a neurotoxin produced by cyanobacteria. It has been associated with certain forms of progressive neurodegenerative disease, including sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Some different reports of BMAA in cyanobacterial blooms from lakes, reservoirs, and other water resources have been made by different investigators. We here report the detection of BMAA of both free and protein-bound produced by cyanobacteria, belonging to the Chroococcales, Oscillatoriales and Nostocales ordered. We use a rapid and sensitive HPLC-FD method that utilizes methanol elution and the Waters AQC Tag chemistry. On other hand, we have used three different assay procedures for BMAA extraction from cyanobacteria: Trichloroacetic acid (TCA), Methanol/Acetone and hydrochloric acid (HCl). All assays let successfully detect BMAA in all cyanobacteria samples analyzed. Nevertheless, with TCA and HCl extraction procedures the highest BMAA values, for free as well as protein-bound BMAA were detected. BMAA content could not be related to the taxonomy of the isolates or to their geographical origin, and no correlation between free and protein-bound BMAA concentrations were observed within or between taxonomic groups. These data offer confirmation of the taxonomic and geographic ubiquity of BMAA from naturally occurring populations of cyanobacteria, for the first time reported for estuaries.

  1. Report of Tests of a Compressor Configuration of DCA Blading.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    Bartocci [Ref. 4] and Moebius [Ref. 51 were supereded by those of McGuire [Ref. 6]. McGuire’s modification to the plenum is illustrated in Fig. 2...Thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Ca., 1966. 5. Moebius , Richard C., Analysis and Testing to Improve the Flow from the Plenum of a Subsonic

  2. Thermodynamic and solution state NMR characterization of the binding of secondary and conjugated bile acids to STARD5.

    PubMed

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Cabana, Jérôme; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2013-11-01

    STARD5 is a member of the STARD4 sub-family of START domain containing proteins specialized in the non-vesicular transport of lipids and sterols. We recently reported that STARD5 binds primary bile acids. Herein, we report on the biophysical and structural characterization of the binding of secondary and conjugated bile acids by STARD5 at physiological concentrations. We found that the absence of the 7α-OH group and its epimerization increase the affinity of secondary bile acids for STARD5. According to NMR titration and molecular modeling, the affinity depends mainly on the number and positions of the steroid ring hydroxyl groups and to a lesser extent on the presence or type of bile acid side-chain conjugation. Primary and secondary bile acids have different binding modes and display different positioning within the STARD5 binding pocket. The relative STARD5 affinity for the different bile acids studied is: DCA>LCA>CDCA>GDCA>TDCA>CA>UDCA. TCA and GCA do not bind significantly to STARD5. The impact of the ligand chemical structure on the thermodynamics of binding is discussed. The discovery of these new ligands suggests that STARD5 is involved in the cellular response elicited by bile acids and offers many entry points to decipher its physiological role.

  3. The human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase UGT2A1 and UGT2A2 enzymes are highly active in bile acid glucuronidation

    PubMed Central

    Perreault, Martin; Gauthier-Landry, Louis; Trottier, Jocelyn; Verreault, Mélanie; Caron, Patrick; Finel, Moshe; Barbier, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids (BA) are essential modulators of lipid, glucose and cholesterol homeostasis, but exert cytotoxic effects in the cholestatic liver. Glucuronidation, catalyzed by the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes is a pharmacologically-relevant BA detoxification process. The present study aimed at characterizing the BA-conjugating activity of the little-studied human UGTs of subfamily 2A, UGT2A1, 2A2 and 2A3. Recombinant UGT2As, expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells, were assayed for the glucuronidation of 6 major bile acids, chenodeoxycholic (CDCA), cholic (CA), lithocholic (LCA), deoxycholic (DCA), hyocholic (HCA) and hyodeoxycholic (HDCA) acids. UGT2A3 exhibited detectable, but very low, activity with all the tested BAs substrates. UGT2A1 was highly efficient in forming LCA-3 and -24G, CDCA-24, DCA-24, HCA-24 and HDCA-24G, while UGT2A2 was the most active enzyme for CA-24G and CDCA-24G formation, and was also able to generate HDCA-6G, HDCA-24G, LCA-24G and HCA-24G. The Km values of UGT2A1 varied between 102.2 ± 14.3 μM and 2.4 ± 1.2 mM. With the exception of CA-24G, a low affinity substrate for UGT2A2, all the Km values for UGT2A2 were in the 100 to 400 μM range. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates the high reactivity of the human UGT2A1 and UGT2A2 for bile acid glucuronidation. The physiological importance of these reactions to BA disposition remains, however, to be clarified in vivo. PMID:23756265

  4. Influence of Bacteriophage PBS1 and φW-14 Deoxyribonucleic Acids on Homologous Deoxyribonucleic Acid Uptake and Transformation in Competent Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    López, Paloma; Espinosa, Manuel; Piechowska, Mirosława; Shugar, David

    1980-01-01

    Both bacteriophage PBS1 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (in which all the thymine residues are replaced by uracil) and phage φW-14 DNA [in which half the thymine residues are replaced by 5-(aminobutylaminomethyl)uracil or 5-putrescinylthymine] exhibit comparable competing abilities for uptake of homologous DNA in a Bacillus subtilis competent system. But, whereas PBS1 DNA leads to a decrease in transformation frequencies compatible with its competing ability for DNA uptake, φW-14 DNA decreases transformation frequencies by a factor up to eightfold higher. The effect of φW-14 DNA on transformation frequencies is visible even at a concentration level that does not decrease transforming DNA uptake. No such effect was observed with heterologous DNA containing presumably ionically bound putrescine. Low concentrations of φW-14 DNA decreased the number of double (nonlinked) transformants more than single transformants. The influence on transformation was abolished when φW-14 DNA was added 20 min after addition of transforming DNA, i.e., when the recombination process was terminated. The putrescine-containing DNA also decreased retention of trichloroacetic acid-precipitable radioactivity of homologous DNA taken up. We conclude that φW-14 DNA inhibits some intracellular process(es) at the level of recombination. In addition, there is evidence that φW-14 DNA, but not heterologous DNA with ionically bound putrescine, binds also to site(s) on the cell surface other than receptors for homologous DNA. PMID:6772635

  5. Key Issues in the Modes of Action and Effects of Trichloroethylene Metabolites for Liver and Kidney Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Jane C.; Keshava, Nagalakshmi

    2006-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure has been associated with increased risk of liver and kidney cancer in both laboratory animal and epidemiologic studies. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 2001 draft TCE risk assessment concluded that it is difficult to determine which TCE metabolites may be responsible for these effects, the key events involved in their modes of action (MOAs), and the relevance of these MOAs to humans. In this article, which is part of a mini-monograph on key issues in the health risk assessment of TCE, we present a review of recently published scientific literature examining the effects of TCE metabolites in the context of the preceding questions. Studies of the TCE metabolites dichloroacetic acid (DCA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and chloral hydrate suggest that both DCA and TCA are involved in TCE-induced liver tumorigenesis and that many DCA effects are consistent with conditions that increase the risk of liver cancer in humans. Studies of S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine have revealed a number of different possible cell signaling effects that may be related to kidney tumorigenesis at lower concentrations than those leading to cytotoxicity. Recent studies of trichloroethanol exploring an alternative hypothesis for kidney tumorigenesis have failed to establish the formation of formate as a key event for TCE-induced kidney tumors. Overall, although MOAs and key events for TCE-induced liver and kidney tumors have yet to be definitively established, these results support the likelihood that toxicity is due to multiple metabolites through several MOAs, none of which appear to be irrelevant to humans. PMID:16966105

  6. Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) Modeling of Interstrain Variability in Trichloroethylene Metabolism in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jerry L.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Zhou, Yi-Hui; Wright, Fred A.; Guyton, Kathryn Z.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Quantitative estimation of toxicokinetic variability in the human population is a persistent challenge in risk assessment of environmental chemicals. Traditionally, interindividual differences in the population are accounted for by default assumptions or, in rare cases, are based on human toxicokinetic data. Objectives: We evaluated the utility of genetically diverse mouse strains for estimating toxicokinetic population variability for risk assessment, using trichloroethylene (TCE) metabolism as a case study. Methods: We used data on oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolism of TCE in 16 inbred and 1 hybrid mouse strains to calibrate and extend existing physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models. We added one-compartment models for glutathione metabolites and a two-compartment model for dichloroacetic acid (DCA). We used a Bayesian population analysis of interstrain variability to quantify variability in TCE metabolism. Results: Concentration–time profiles for TCE metabolism to oxidative and glutathione conjugation metabolites varied across strains. Median predictions for the metabolic flux through oxidation were less variable (5-fold range) than that through glutathione conjugation (10-fold range). For oxidative metabolites, median predictions of trichloroacetic acid production were less variable (2-fold range) than DCA production (5-fold range), although the uncertainty bounds for DCA exceeded the predicted variability. Conclusions: Population PBPK modeling of genetically diverse mouse strains can provide useful quantitative estimates of toxicokinetic population variability. When extrapolated to lower doses more relevant to environmental exposures, mouse population-derived variability estimates for TCE metabolism closely matched population variability estimates previously derived from human toxicokinetic studies with TCE, highlighting the utility of mouse interstrain metabolism studies for addressing toxicokinetic variability

  7. Chloro- and bromoacetates in natural archives of firn from Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Sydow, L.M. von; Nielsen, A.T.; Grimvall, A.B.; Boren, H.B.

    2000-01-15

    A firn core was drilled in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, to investigate the presence of haloacetates in snow that had accumulated over the past 200 years. By employing GC-MS detection of methyl esters of haloacetic acids, the authors were able to measure haloacetate concentrations down to one or a few nanograms per liter. Trichloroacetate (TCA) and dibromoacetate (DBA) were found in firn at concentrations that clearly exceeded the blank level of the applied analytical procedure, with mean concentrations estimated to 12 and 6 ng/L, respectively. There were also indications that mono- and dichloroacetate (MCA and DCA) were present in firn, whereas monobromoacetate (MBA) was found only in samples of surficial snow. The authors concluded that there is a significant natural background level of TCA and DBA in precipitation based on the following: (i) several of samples represented snow accumulated in the 19th century; (ii) haloacetates can be expected to be immobile in Antarctic firn; (iii) extensive measures were taken to prevent sample contamination; and (iv) blank levels of the analytical procedure used were low and stable. In addition, their results suggested that MCA and DCA also occur naturally in precipitation.

  8. A convenient and sensitive method for haloacetic acid analysis in tap water by on-line field-amplified sample-stacking CE-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Hung, Sih-Hua; Her, Guor-Rong

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we propose a simple strategy based on flow injection and field-amplified sample-stacking CE-ESI-MS/MS to analyze haloacetic acids (HAAs) in tap water. Tap water was passed through a desalination cartridge before field-amplified sample-stacking CE-ESI-MS/MS analysis to reduce sample salinity. With this treatment, the signals of the HAAs increased 300- to 1400-fold. The LODs for tap water analysis were in the range of 10 to 100 ng/L, except for the LOD of monochloroacetic acid (1 μg/L in selected-ion monitoring mode detection). The proposed method is fast, convenient, and sensitive enough to perform on-line analysis of five HAAs in the tap water of Taipei City. Four HAAs, including trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, dibromoacetic acid, and monobromoacetic acid, were detected at concentrations of approximately 1.74, 1.15, 0.16, and 0.15 ppb, respectively.

  9. N- Trichloro- and dichloroacetyl amino acids and compounds of amino acids with halogeno acetic acids: 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy; crystal structure of N- trichloroacetyl- glycine, - DL-alanine, and - L-alanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Shi-qi; Kehrer, Armin; Ofial, Armin R.; Weiss, Alarich

    1995-02-01

    The crystal structures of N- trichloroacetyl- glycine ( N- TCA- G), N-trichloroacetyl-dl-alanine ( N-TCA- dl-A ), and N-trichloroacetyl- l-alanine ( N-TCA- l-A ) were determined. In addition, the 35Cl NQR spectra of these N-trichloroacetyl amino acids, of N-trichloroacetyl- l-valine ( N-TCA- l-V ), and of N- dichloroacetyl- glycine and - L-alanine were measured, mostly as a function of temperature. Compounds of glycine and L-alanine with chlorodifluoroacetic acid, of glycine and L-leucine with monochloroacetic acid, of glycine and L-leucine with dichloroacetic acid, and of glycine and L-leucine with trichloroacetic acid were also studied using 35Cl NQR. The structures (in picometres and degrees) were found to be as follows. N- TCA- G: Pna2 1, Z = 8, a = 1641, b = 1002, c = 1018. N-TCA- dl-A : {C2}/{c}, Z = 8, a = 3280, b = 556, c = 1031, β = 96.68. N-TCA- l-A: P1 , Z = 2, a = 967, b = 949, c = 619, α = 74.97, β = 74.20, γ = 61.20. The 35Cl NQR frequencies (ν) were observed in the range 35-41 MHz, and decrease with increasing temperature. Some of the resonances bleach out at a temperature ( Tb) far below the melting temperature; this provides information about the crystal structures at 77 K. No phase transitions were observed by differential thermal analysis between 77 and 295 K. The crystal structures are discussed in connection with the NQR results, and conclusions are drawn about the structures of the compounds for which only 35Cl NQR data are available.

  10. Acid- and base-catalysis in the mononuclear rearrangement of some (Z)-arylhydrazones of 5-amino-3-benzoyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole in toluene: effect of substituents on the course of reaction.

    PubMed

    D'Anna, Francesca; Frenna, Vincenzo; Ghelfi, Franco; Marullo, Salvatore; Spinelli, Domenico

    2011-04-15

    The reaction rates for the rearrangement of eleven (Z)-arylhydrazones of 5-amino-3-benzoyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole 3a-k into the relevant (2-aryl-5-phenyl-2H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)ureas 4a-k in the presence of trichloroacetic acid or of piperidine have been determined in toluene at 313.1 K. The results have been related to the effect of the aryl substituent by using Hammett and/or Ingold-Yukawa-Tsuno correlations and have been compared with those previously collected in a protic polar solvent (dioxane/water) as well as with those on the analogous rearrangement of the corresponding (Z)-arylhydrazones of 3-benzoyl-5-phenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole 1a-k in benzene. Some light can thus be shed on the general differences of chemical reactivity between protic polar (or dipolar aprotic) and apolar solvents.

  11. Considerations concerning the murine hepatocarcinogenicity of selected chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Maronpot, R R; Anna, C H; Devereux, T R; Lucier, G W; Butterworth, B E; Anderson, M W

    1995-01-01

    Of the chlorinated hydrocarbons discussed above, all six are associated with induction of hepatocellular neoplasia in mice. None of the six is considered to be potent mutagen and most are without any significant genotoxic activity as assessed by conventional in vitro testing schemes. Although some of the agents have biological effects in common (see Figure 4), there is no single biological response (mode of action) that they all share to provide a mechanistic basis for the observed murine hepatocarcinogenicity. Based upon the information currently available for each of the chlorinated hydrocarbons discussed above, it is probable that some modes of action may be more contributory to the rodent carcinogenic response than others; however, no mode of action, pathway, or mechanism should be considered to be mutually exclusive. The murine hepatocarcinogenic effect of TriCE is most probably contingent upon its species-specific metabolism to trichloroacetic acid and DCA. There is fairly consistent evidence that cytotoxicity and reparative hyperplasia are associated with doses of TriCE that cause induction of liver neoplasms. The possibility that peroxisome proliferation is playing a role in the induction of mouse hepatocellular neoplasia remains a tempting explanation, since higher intracellular steady states of H2O2 production would be consistent with observed enhanced cellular proliferation as well as the possibility of in vivo DNA damage. The mouse hepatocarcinogenicity associated with TetCE most probably is associated with species-specific metabolic production of trichloroacetic acid. As with TriCE, cytotoxicity and reparative hyperplasia may represent a potential mode of action for the observed hepatocarcinogenicity. Once again, the potential for enhanced peroxisome proliferation is consistent with enhanced cell proliferation and oxygen radical damage would help explain the random point mutations in ras proto-oncogenes documented in DNA from TetCE-induced mouse liver

  12. Mechanism of activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase by dichloroacetate and other halogenated carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Sue; Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.

    1974-01-01

    1. Monochloroacetate, dichloroacetate, trichloroacetate, difluoroacetate, 2-chloropropionate, 2,2′-dichloropropionate and 3-chloropropionate were inhibitors of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. Dichloroacetate was also shown to inhibit rat heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. The inhibition was mainly non-competitive with respect to ATP. The concentration required for 50% inhibition was approx. 100μm for the three chloroacetates, difluoroacetate and 2-chloropropionate and 2,2′-dichloropropionate. Dichloroacetamide was not inhibitory. 2. Dichloroacetate had no significant effect on the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase when this was maximally activated by Ca2+ and Mg2+. 3. Dichloroacetate did not increase the catalytic activity of purified pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase. 4. Dichloroacetate, difluoroacetate, 2-chloropropionate and 2,2′-dichloropropionate increased the proportion of the active (dephosphorylated) form of pyruvate dehydrogenase in rat heart mitochondria with 2-oxoglutarate and malate as respiratory substrates. Similar effects of dichloroacetate were shown with kidney and fat-cell mitochondria. Glyoxylate, monochloroacetate and dichloroacetamide were inactive. 5. Dichloroacetate increased the proportion of active pyruvate dehydrogenase in the perfused rat heart, isolated rat diaphragm and rat epididymal fat-pads. Difluoroacetate and dichloroacetamide were also active in the perfused heart, but glyoxylate, monochloroacetate and trichloroacetate were inactive. 6. Injection of dichloroacetate into rats starved overnight led within 60 min to activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase in extracts from heart, psoas muscle, adipose tissue, kidney and liver. The blood concentration of lactate fell within 15 min to reach a minimum after 60 min. The blood concentration of glucose fell after 90 min and reached a minimum after 120 min. There was no significant change in plasma glycerol concentration. 7. In epididymal fatpads

  13. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on iron efficiency: Removal of three chloroacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shun; Wang, Xiao-mao; Mao, Yu-qin; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Hong-wei; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2015-04-15

    The monochloroacetic, dichloroacetic and trichloroacetic acid (MCAA, DCAA and TCAA) removed by metallic iron under controlled dissolved oxygen conditions (0, 0.75, 1.52, 2.59, 3.47 or 7.09 mg/L DO) was investigated in well-mixed batch systems. The removal of CAAs increased first and then decreased with increasing DO concentration. Compared with anoxic condition, the reduction of MCAA and DCAA was substantially enhanced in the presence of O2, while TCAA reduction was significantly inhibited above 2.59 mg/L. The 1.52 mg/L DO was optimum for the formation of final product, acetic acid. Chlorine mass balances were 69-102%, and carbon mass balances were 92-105%. With sufficient mass transfer from bulk to the particle surface, the degradation of CAAs was limited by their reduction or migration rate within iron particles, which were dependent on the change of reducing agents and corrosion coatings. Under anoxic conditions, the reduction of CAAs was mainly inhibited by the available reducing agents in the conductive layer. Under low oxic conditions, the increasing reducing agents and thin lepidocrocite layer were favorable for CAA dechlorination. Under high oxic conditions, the redundant oxygen competing for reducing agents and significant lepidocrocite growth became the major restricting factors. Various CAA removal mechanisms could be potentially applied to explaining the effect of DO concentration on iron efficiency for contaminant reduction in water and wastewater treatment.

  14. The determination of haloacetic acids in real world samples using IC-ESI-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Slingsby, Rosanne; Saini, Charanjit; Pohl, Christopher

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents the determination of nine haloacetic acids (HAAs) in high ionic strength, treated effluent waters using an ion chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (IC-ESI-MS-MS) method with internal standards and discussions of each of the method parameters. Data is also provided for these same samples using USEPA Method 552.2. The sample matrices contain up to 170 mg/L chloride and 243 mg/L sulfate. Matrix ions are separated from the analytes using a high capacity anion exchange analytical column and diverted to a waste stream during each analysis to avoid signal suppression and contamination of the detector. No derivatization, offline matrix elimination, or preconcentration is used. Four isotopically-labeled HAAs are used for quantification, and detection limits are in the range of 400-1000 microg/L with R(2) of at least 0.997 over two orders of magnitude for all analytes in matrix. A trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) internal standard with the label on the alpha carbon is found to be more stable than the TCAA-1-(13)C. Amounts found using IC-MS-MS are 65-130% of amounts found using Method 552.2 for all analytes in the real world treated effluent waters. Detection limits for all nine analytes in matrix are in the range of 100-700 ng/L.

  15. Bioprocess monitoring: minimizing sample matrix effects for total protein quantification with bicinchoninic acid assay.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Wieland N; Waldschitz, Daniel; Herwig, Christoph; Neutsch, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    Determining total protein content is a routine operation in many laboratories. Despite substantial work on assay optimization interferences, the widely used bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay remains widely recognized for its robustness. Especially in the field of bioprocess engineering the inaccuracy caused by interfering substances remains hardly predictable and not well understood. Since the introduction of the assay, sample pre-treatment by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation has been indicated as necessary and sufficient to minimize interferences. However, the sample matrix in cultivation media is not only highly complex but also dynamically changing over process time in terms of qualitative and quantitative composition. A significant misestimation of the total protein concentration of bioprocess samples is often observed when following standard work-up schemes such as TCA precipitation, indicating that this step alone is not an adequate means to avoid measurement bias. Here, we propose a modification of the BCA assay, which is less influenced by sample complexity. The dynamically changing sample matrix composition of bioprocessing samples impairs the conventional approach of compensating for interfering substances via a static offset. Hence, we evaluated the use of a correction factor based on an internal spike measurement for the respective samples. Using protein spikes, the accuracy of the BCA protein quantification could be improved fivefold, taking the BCA protein quantification to a level of accuracy comparable to other, more expensive methods. This will allow reducing expensive iterations in bioprocess development to due inaccurate total protein analytics.

  16. Analysis of DNA strand breaks induced in rodent liver in vivo, hepatocytes in primary culture, and a human cell line by chlorinated acetic acids and chlorinated acetaldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.W.; Daniel, F.B. ); DeAngelo, A.B. )

    1992-01-01

    An alkaline unwinding assay was used to quantitate the induction of DNA strand breaks (DNA SB) in the livers of rats and mice treated in vivo, in rodent hepatocytes in primary culture, and in CCRF-CEM cells, a human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, following treatment with tri-(TCA), di-(CA), and mono-(MCA) chloroacetic acid and their corresponding aldehydes, tri-(chloralhydrate, CH), di(DCAA) and mono-(CAA) chloroacetaldehyde. None of the chloracetic acids induced DNA SB in the livers of rats at 4 hr following a single administration of 1-10 mmole/kg. TCA (10 mmole/kg) and DCA (5 and 10 mmole/kg) did produce a small amount of strand breakage in mice (7% at 4hr) but not at 1 hr. N-nitrosodiethylamine (DENA), an established alkylating agent and a rodent hepatocarcinogen, produced DNA SB in the livers of both species. TCA, DCA, and MCA also failed to induce DNA strand breaks in splenocytes and epithelial cells derived from the stomach and duodenum of mice treated in vivo. None of the three chloroacetaldehydes induced DNA SB in either mouse or rat liver. These studies provide further evidence that the chloroacetic acids lack genotoxic activity not only in rodent liver, a tissue in that they induce tumors, but in a variety of other rodent tissues and cultured cell types. Two of the chloroacetaldehydes, DCAA and CAA, are direct acting DNA damaging agents in CCRF-CEM cells, but not in liver or splenocytes in vivo or in cultured hepatocytes. CH showed no activity in any system investigated. 58 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Rapid IC-ICP/MS method for simultaneous analysis of iodoacetic acids, bromoacetic acids, bromate, and other related halogenated compounds in water.

    PubMed

    Shi, Honglan; Adams, Craig

    2009-07-15

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) and bromate are toxic water disinfection by-products (DBPs) that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has regulated in drinking water. Iodoacetic acids (IAAs) are the emerging DBPs that have been recently found in disinfected drinking waters with higher toxicity than their corresponding chloro- and bromo-acetic acids. This study has developed a new rapid and sensitive method for simultaneous analysis of six brominated and four iodinated acetic acids, bromate, iodate, bromide, and iodide using ion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (IC-ICP-MS). Mono-, di- and tri-chloroacetic acids are not detected by this method because the sensitivity of ICP-MS analysis for chlorine is poor. Following IC separation, an Elan DRC-e ICP-MS was used for detection, with quantitation utilizing m/z of 79, 127, and 74 amu for Br, I, and Ge (optional internal standard) species, respectively. Although the primary method used was an external standard procedure, an internal standard method approach is discussed herein as well. Calibration and validation were done in a variety of natural and disinfection-treated water samples. The method detection limits (MDLs) in natural water ranged from 0.33 to 0.72 microg L(-1) for iodine species, and from 1.36 to 3.28 microg L(-1) for bromine species. Spiked recoveries were between 67% and 123%, while relative standard deviations ranged from 0.2% to 12.8% for replicate samples. This method was applied to detect the bromine and iodine species in drinking water, groundwater, surface water, and swimming pool water.

  18. Decomposition of two haloacetic acids in water using UV radiation, ozone and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kunping; Guo, Jinsong; Yang, Min; Junji, Hirotsuji; Deng, Rongsen

    2009-03-15

    The decomposition of two haloacetic acids (HAAs), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), from water was studied by means of single oxidants: ozone, UV radiation; and by the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) constituted by combinations of O(3)/UV radiation, H(2)O(2)/UV radiation, O(3)/H(2)O(2), O(3)/H(2)O(2)/UV radiation. The concentrations of HAAs were analyzed at specified time intervals to elucidate the decomposition of HAAs. Single O(3) or UV did not result in perceptible decomposition of HAAs within the applied reaction time. O(3)/UV showed to be more suitable for the decomposition of DCAA and TCAA in water among the six methods of oxidation. Decomposition of DCAA was easier than TCAA by AOPs. For O(3)/UV in the semi-continuous mode, the effective utilization rate of ozone for HAA decomposition decreased with ozone addition. The kinetics of HAAs decomposition by O(3)/UV and the influence of coexistent humic acids and HCO(3)(-) on the decomposition process were investigated. The decomposition of the HAAs by the O(3)/UV accorded with the pseudo-first-order mode under the constant initial dissolved O(3) concentration and fixed UV radiation. The pseudo-first-order rate constant for the decomposition of DCAA was more than four times that for TCAA. Humic acids can cause the H(2)O(2) accumulation and the decrease in rate constants of HAAs decomposition in the O(3)/UV process. The rate constants for the decomposition of DCAA and TCAA decreased by 41.1% and 23.8%, respectively, when humic acids were added at a concentration of 1.2mgTOC/L. The rate constants decreased by 43.5% and 25.9%, respectively, at an HCO(3)(-) concentration of 1.0mmol/L.

  19. Identification of cytosolic and microsomal bile acid-binding proteins in rat ileal enterocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.; Kramer, W.; Wilson, F.A. )

    1990-09-05

    Studies were performed to determine the subcellular fractions and proteins involved in the intracellular transport of bile acids in rat ileal cells. The photolabile derivative 7,7-azo-taurocholate inhibited the Na(+)-dependent uptake of taurocholate into rat ileal enterocytes reversibly in the dark and irreversibly following photolysis. When photolabeled cells were submitted to subcellular fractionation, greatest radioactivity was found in the soluble protein (SP) fraction with decreasing radioactivity in the brush-border-(BBM), basolateral-(BLM), mitochondria-(MT), microsome-(MC), and Golgi-(GO) enriched fractions. Following trichloroacetic acid precipitation, delipidation, and correction for loss of marker enzyme activity, protein bound radioactivity was in SP greater than BBM greater than MC greater than BLM greater than GO greater than MT. When photolabeled cells were first fractionated and then submitted to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, a 99-kDa polypeptide was associated with BBM, 54- and 59-kDa polypeptides with BLM, 14-, 35-, 43-, 59-, and 68-kDa polypeptides with SP and a 20-kDa polypeptide with MC fractions. Immunoprecipitation with known antisera identified the 68-kDa polypeptide as albumin and the 43-kDa polypeptide as actin. No precipitation on the 14-kDa polypeptide was noted with anti-hepatic and anti-intestinal fatty acid-binding proteins. No precipitation of the 35-kDa polypeptide occurred with antibody to the hepatic cytosolic bile acid-binding protein. These studies reveal a previously unrecognized 20-kDa microsomal, and 14- and 35-kDa cytosolic bile acid-binding polypeptides which may be involved in the transcellular movement of bile acids.

  20. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  1. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  2. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  3. Dysregulated hepatic bile acids collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaoning; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Chen, Wenlian; Yan, Jingyu; Zhang, Yunjing; Lei, Sha; Ge, Kun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Liu, Jiajian; Su, Mingming; Liu, Ping; Jia, Wei

    2016-10-15

    Dysregulated bile acids (BAs) are closely associated with liver diseases and attributed to altered gut microbiota. Here, we show that the intrahepatic retention of hydrophobic BAs including deoxycholate (DCA), taurocholate (TCA), taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDCA), and taurolithocholate (TLCA) were substantially increased in a streptozotocin and high fat diet (HFD) induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-hepatocellular carcinoma (NASH-HCC) mouse model. Additionally chronic HFD-fed mice spontaneously developed liver tumors with significantly increased hepatic BA levels. Enhancing intestinal excretion of hydrophobic BAs in the NASH-HCC model mice by a 2% cholestyramine feeding significantly prevented HCC development. The gut microbiota alterations were closely correlated with altered BA levels in liver and feces. HFD-induced inflammation inhibited key BA transporters, resulting in sustained increases in intrahepatic BA concentrations. Our study also showed a significantly increased cell proliferation in BA treated normal human hepatic cell lines and a down-regulated expression of tumor suppressor gene CEBPα in TCDCA treated HepG2 cell line, suggesting that several hydrophobic BAs may collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis.

  4. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1995-01-01

    Although acid rain is fading as a political issue in the United States and funds for research in this area have largely disappeared, the acidity of rain in the Eastern United States has not changed significantly over the last decade, and it continues to be a serious environmental problem. Acid deposition (commonly called acid rain) is a term applied to all forms of atmospheric deposition of acidic substances - rain, snow, fog, acidic dry particulates, aerosols, and acid-forming gases. Water in the atmosphere reacts with certain atmospheric gases to become acidic. For example, water reacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to produce a solution with a pH of about 5.6. Gases that produce acids in the presence of water in the atmosphere include carbon dioxide (which converts to carbonic acid), oxides of sulfur and nitrogen (which convert to sulfuric and nitric acids}, and hydrogen chloride (which converts to hydrochloric acid). These acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere through natural processes, such as volcanic emissions, lightning, forest fires, and decay of organic matter. Accordingly, precipitation is slightly acidic, with a pH of 5.0 to 5.7 even in undeveloped areas. In industrialized areas, most of the acid-producing gases are released to the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels. Major emitters of acid-producing gases include power plants, industrial operations, and motor vehicles. Acid-producing gases can be transported through the atmosphere for hundreds of miles before being converted to acids and deposited as acid rain. Because acids tend to build up in the atmosphere between storms, the most acidic rain falls at the beginning of a storm, and as the rain continues, the acids "wash out" of the atmosphere.

  5. Deciphering the role of charge, hydration, and hydrophobicity for cytotoxic activities and membrane interactions of bile acid based facial amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manish; Singh, Ashima; Kundu, Somanath; Bansal, Sandhya; Bajaj, Avinash

    2013-08-01

    We synthesized four cationic bile acid based facial amphiphiles featuring trimethyl ammonium head groups. We evaluated the role of these amphiphiles for cytotoxic activities against colon cancer cells and their membrane interactions by varying charge, hydration and hydrophobicity. The singly charged cationic Lithocholic acid based amphiphile (LCA-TMA1) is most cytotoxic, whereas the triply charged cationic Cholic acid based amphiphile (CA-TMA3) is least cytotoxic. Light microscopy and Annexin-FITC assay revealed that these facial amphiphiles caused late apoptosis. In addition, we studied the interactions of these amphiphiles with model membrane systems by Prodan-based hydration, DPH-based anisotropy, and differential scanning calorimetry. LCA-TMA1 is most hydrophobic with a hard charge causing efficient dehydration and maximum perturbations of membranes thereby facilitating translocation and high cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In contrast, the highly hydrated and multiple charged CA-TMA3 caused least membrane perturbations leading to low translocation and less cytotoxicity. As expected, Chenodeoxycholic acid and Deoxycholic acid based amphiphiles (CDCA-TMA2, DCA-TMA2) featuring two charged head groups showed intermediate behavior. Thus, we deciphered that charge, hydration, and hydrophobicity of these amphiphiles govern membrane interactions, translocation, and resulting cytoxicity against colon cancer cells.

  6. Upregulation of bile acid receptor TGR5 and nNOS in gastric myenteric plexus is responsible for delayed gastric emptying after chronic high-fat feeding in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Shiyi; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Guanpo; Lu, Yuanxu

    2014-01-01

    Chronic high-fat feeding is associated with functional dyspepsia and delayed gastric emptying. We hypothesize that high-fat feeding upregulates gastric neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expression, resulting in delayed gastric emptying. We propose this is mediated by increased bile acid action on bile acid receptor 1 (TGR5) located on nNOS gastric neurons. To test this hypothesis, rats were fed regular chow or a high-fat diet for 2 wk. Rats fed the high-fat diet were subjected to concurrent feeding with oral cholestyramine or terminal ileum resection. TGR5 and nNOS expression in gastric tissue was measured by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and Western blot. Gastric motility was assessed by organ bath and solid-phase gastric emptying studies. The 2-wk high-fat diet caused a significant increase in neurons coexpressing nNOS and TGR5 in the gastric myenteric plexus and an increase in nNOS and TGR5 gene expression, 67 and 111%, respectively. Enhanced nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) relaxation, deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced inhibition in fundic tissue, and a 26% delay in gastric emptying accompanied these changes. A 24-h incubation of whole-mount gastric fundus with DCA resulted in increased nNOS and TGR5 protein expression, 41 and 37%, respectively. Oral cholestyramine and terminal ileum resection restored the enhanced gastric relaxation, as well as the elevated nNOS and TGR5 expression evoked by high-fat feeding. Cholestyramine also prevented the delay in gastric emptying. We conclude that increased levels of circulatory bile acids induced by high-fat feeding upregulate nNOS and TGR5 expression in the gastric myenteric plexus, resulting in enhanced NANC relaxation and delayed gastric emptying. PMID:25540233

  7. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  8. Pentafluorobenzyl esterification of haloacetic acids in tap water for simple and sensitive analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Can; Fujii, Yukiko; Yan, Junxia; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine is the most widely used disinfectant for control of waterborne diseases in drinking water treatment. It can react with natural organic matter in water and form haloacetic acids (HAAs). For analysis of HAA levels, derivatization with diazomethane is commonly recommended as the standard methodology in Japan. However, diazomethane is a carcinogenic alkylating agent. Therefore, in this study, a safe, simple, and sensitive quantification method was developed to monitor HAAs in drinking water. Pentafluorobenzyl esterification was used for pretreatment. The pentafluorobenzyl-ester derivative was detected by gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry analysis with very high sensitivity for HAAs analysis. The method has low detection limits (8-94 ng L(-1)) and good recovery rates (89-99%) for HAAs. The method was applied to 30 tap water samples from 15 cities in the Kansai region of Japan. The levels of HAAs detected were in the range 0.54-7.83 μg L(-1). Dichloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, and bromochloroacetic acid were the major HAAs detected in most of the tap water, and accounted for 29%, 20% and 19% of the total HAAs, respectively. This method could be used for routine monitoring of HAAs in drinking water without exposure of workers to occupational hazards.

  9. Hydrogen bonding and proton localization in complexes of carboxybetaines with phenols and carboxylic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dega-Szafran, Zofia; Komasa, Anna; Grundwald-Wyspiańska, Monika; Szafran, Mirosław; Buczak, Grzegorz; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    1997-02-01

    Complexes of betaine (BET) with 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenol (DCNP), pentachlorophenol (PCP) and trifluoroacetic, trichloroacetic, dichloroacetic, chloroacetic and maleic acids and of pyridine betaine (PBET) with DCNP in solution and in the solid state were studied by UV and FTIR spectroscopies and X-ray analysis. The crystal of BET·DCNP is triclinic, space group P 1¯, a = 7.1770(10) Å, b = 10.001(2) Å, c = 11.241(2) Å, α = 108.81(3)°, β = 100.06(3)°, γ = 106.82(3)°, Z = 2; the final R value is 0.033 for 1871 observed reflections. Protonated betaine and 2,6-dichloro-4-nitrophenolate are linked by an O(2)Htctdot;O(1) hydrogen bond with an Otctdot;O distance of 2.424(3) Å and the O(2)Htctdot;O(1) angle is 159(3)°. The broad absorption in the solid state FTIR spectra of the investigated complexes varies with Δp Ka, and is typical of complexes with strong hydrogen bonds. The UV spectra of phenol complexes in acetonitrile show a typical absorption for Btctdot;HA and B +Htctdot;A - species. In less polar dichloromethane, only molecular complexes are present. An exception is PBET·DCNP, where B +Htctdot;A - species appear in both solvents. The agreement between the UV and IR data is good.

  10. Metabolic Engineering of Raoultella ornithinolytica BF60 for Production of 2,5-Furandicarboxylic Acid from 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Yuan, Haibo; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Liu, Long

    2017-01-01

    2,5-Furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) is an important renewable biotechnological building block because it serves as an environmentally friendly substitute for terephthalic acid in the production of polyesters. Currently, FDCA is produced mainly via chemical oxidation, which can cause severe environmental pollution. In this study, we developed an environmentally friendly process for the production of FDCA from 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF) using a newly isolated strain, Raoultella ornithinolytica BF60. First, R. ornithinolytica BF60 was identified by screening and was isolated. Its maximal FDCA titer was 7.9 g/liter, and the maximal molar conversion ratio of 5-HMF to FDCA was 51.0% (mol/mol) under optimal conditions (100 mM 5-HMF, 45 g/liter whole-cell biocatalyst, 30°C, and 50 mM phosphate buffer [pH 8.0]). Next, dcaD, encoding dicarboxylic acid decarboxylase, was mutated to block FDCA degradation to furoic acid, thus increasing FDCA production to 9.2 g/liter. Subsequently, aldR, encoding aldehyde reductase, was mutated to prevent the catabolism of 5-HMF to HMF alcohol, further increasing the FDCA titer, to 11.3 g/liter. Finally, the gene encoding aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 was overexpressed. The FDCA titer increased to 13.9 g/liter, 1.7 times that of the wild-type strain, and the molar conversion ratio increased to 89.0%.

  11. Cancer risk assessment on trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids in drinking water of China using disability-adjusted life years.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shenling; An, Wei; Li, Hongyan; Su, Ming; Zhang, Jinliang; Yang, Min

    2014-09-15

    The cancer risks from exposure to trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) through multiple pathways were assessed based on the result of a water quality survey in 35 major cities of China. To express the risks in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), the excess cancer incidence estimates were combined with a two-stage disease model for calculation. The median total cancer risk of THMs and HAAs was calculated as 7.34 × 10(-7) DALYs per person-year (ppy), lower than the reference level of risk (10(-6)DALYsppy) set by WHO. The risk from ingestion and inhalation exposures contributed 93.6% and 6.3% of the total risk respectively, while dermal contact made a negligible contribution. The median risk of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) (2.12 × 10(-7)DALYsppy) was highest among the disinfection by-products (DBPs) considered. The risk ratio of total HAAs (THAA) to total THMs (TTHM) was 1.12. The risk was highest in northeast China while lowest in northwest China. As for the 35 cities, Tianjin had the highest risk while Yinchuan had the lowest. This study attempted to use DALYs for the risk assessment of DBPs, which will provide useful information for risk comparison and prioritization of hazards in drinking water.

  12. Obeticholic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  13. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  14. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  15. Aristolochic Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sciences NIH-HHS www.niehs.nih.gov Aristolochic Acids Key Points Report on Carcinogens Status Known to be human carcinogens Aristolochia Clematitis Aristolochic Acids n Known human carcinogens n Found in certain ...

  16. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  17. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  18. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  19. Detection of genotoxic effects of drinking water disinfection by-products using Vicia faba bioassay.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu; Tan, Li; Zhang, Shao-Hui; Zuo, Yu-Ting; Han, Xue; Liu, Na; Lu, Wen-Qing; Liu, Ai-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Plant-based bioassays have gained wide use among the toxicological and/or ecotoxicological assessment procedures because of their simplicity, sensitivity, low cost, and reliability. The present study describes the use of Vicia faba (V. faba) micronucleus (MN) test and V. faba comet assay in the evaluation of the genotoxic potential of disinfection by-products (DBPs) commonly found in chlorine-disinfected drinking water. Five haloacetic acids and three halogenated acetonitriles were chosen as representatives of DBPs in this study because they are of potentially great public health risk. Results of the MN test indicated that monochloroacetic acid (MCA), monobromoacetic acid (MBA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), dibromoacetic acid (DBA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and trichloroacetonitrile (TCAN) caused a statistically significant increase in MN frequency in V. faba root tip cells. However, no genotoxic response was observed for dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN). Results of the comet assay showed that all tested DBPs induced a statistically significant increase in genomic DNA damage to V. faba root tip cells. On considering the capacity to detect genomic damage of a different nature, we suggest that a combination of V. faba MN test and V. faba comet assay is a useful tool for the detection of genotoxic effects of DBPs. It is worthy of assessing the feasibility of using V. faba comet assay combined with V. faba MN test to screen for the genotoxic activity of chlorinated drinking water in future work.

  20. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...

  1. In vitro bioacessibility and transport across Caco-2 monolayers of haloacetic acids in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Melo, A; Faria, M A; Pinto, E; Mansilha, C; Ferreira, I M P L V O

    2016-10-01

    Water disinfection plays a crucial role in water safety but it is also a matter of concern as the use of disinfectants promotes the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs). Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are one of the major classes of DBPs since they are frequently found in treated water, are ubiquitous, pervasive and have high water solubility, so a great concern emerged about their formation, occurrence and toxicity. Exposure to HAAs is influenced by consumption patterns and diet of individuals thus their bioavailability is an important parameter to the overall toxicity. In the current study the bioacessibility of the most representative HAAs (chloroacetic acid - MCAA, bromoacetic acid - MBAA, dichloroacetic acid - DCAA, dibromoacetic acid - DBAA, and trichloroacetic acid - TCAA) after simulated in vitro digestion (SIVD) in tap water and transport across Caco-2 monolayers was evaluated. Compounds were monitored in 8 points throughout the digestion phases by an optimized LC-MS/MS methodology. MCAA and MBAA were not bioaccessible after SIVD whereas DCAA, DBAA and TCAA are highly bioaccessible (85 ± 4%, 97 ± 4% and 106 ± 7% respectively). Concerning transport assays, DCAA and DBAA were highly permeable throughout the Caco-2 monolayer (apparent permeability and calculated fraction absorbed of 13.62 × 10(-6) cm/s and 90% for DCAA; and 8.82 × 10(-6) cm/s and 84% for DBAA), whereas TCAA showed no relevant permeability. The present results may contribute to efficient risk analysis studies concerning HAAs oral exposure from tap water taking into account the different biological behaviour of these chemically similar substances.

  2. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of dibromoacetic acid in F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Jessica L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Easterling, Michael R.; Melnick, Ronald L.

    2010-04-15

    A novel physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model structure, which includes submodels for the common metabolites (glyoxylate (GXA) and oxalate (OXA)) that may be involved in the toxicity or carcinogenicity of dibromoacetic acid (DBA), has been developed. Particular attention is paid to the representation of hepatic metabolism, which is the primary elimination mechanism. DBA-induced suicide inhibition is modeled by irreversible covalent binding of the intermediate metabolite alpha-halocarboxymethylglutathione (alphaH1) to the glutathione-S-transferase zeta (GSTzeta) enzyme. We also present data illustrating the presence of a secondary non-GSTzeta metabolic pathway for DBA, but not dichloroacetic acid (DCA), that produces GXA. The model is calibrated with plasma and urine concentration data from DBA exposures in female F344 rats through intravenous (IV), oral gavage, and drinking water routes. Sensitivity analysis is performed to confirm identifiability of estimated parameters. Finally, model validation is performed with data sets not used during calibration. Given the structural similarity of dihaloacetates (DHAs), we hypothesize that the PBPK model presented here has the capacity to describe the kinetics of any member or mixture of members of this class in any species with the alteration of chemical-and species-specific parameters.

  3. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  4. Association of SSR markers with contents of fatty acids in olive oil and genetic diversity analysis of an olive core collection.

    PubMed

    Ipek, M; Ipek, A; Seker, M; Gul, M K

    2015-03-27

    The purpose of this research was to characterize an olive core collection using some agronomic characters and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and to determine SSR markers associated with the content of fatty acids in olive oil. SSR marker analysis demonstrated the presence of a high amount of genetic variation between the olive cultivars analyzed. A UPGMA dendrogram demonstrated that olive cultivars did not cluster on the basis of their geographic origin. Fatty acid components of olive oil in these cultivars were determined. The results also showed that there was a great amount of variation between the olive cultivars in terms of fatty acid composition. For example, oleic acid content ranged from 57.76 to 76.9% with standard deviation of 5.10%. Significant correlations between fatty acids of olive oil were observed. For instance, a very high negative correlation (-0.812) between oleic and linoleic acids was detected. A structured association analysis between the content of fatty acids in olive oil and SSR markers was performed. STRUCTURE analysis assigned olive cultivars to two gene pools (K = 2). Assignment of olive cultivars to these gene pools was not based on geographical origin. Association between fatty acid traits and SSR markers was evaluated using the general linear model of TASSEL. Significant associations were determined between five SSR markers and stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids of olive oil. Very high associations (P < 0.001) between ssrOeUA-DCA14 and stearic acid and between GAPU71B and oleic acid indicated that these markers could be used for marker-assisted selection in olive.

  5. Effects of indoor drinking water handling on trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Levesque, Steven; Rodriguez, Manuel J; Serodes, Jean; Beaulieu, Christine; Proulx, François

    2006-08-01

    In this study, different tap water handling strategies were investigated to evaluate the effects on two principal chlorinated DBPs, trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs). Tap water samples collected in the Quebec City (Canada) distribution system on a spatio-temporal basis were subjected to diverse indoor handling scenarios: storing water in the refrigerator, boiling water followed by storage and, finally, filtering water with a point-of-use commercial pitcher also followed by storage. In the first two cases, the use of covered and uncovered pitchers was investigated separately, while in the last case, both the use of new and used filters was compared. In all cases, maximum storage time was 48h. Results demonstrated that in some cases, water handling scenarios have considerable effect, and in other cases, little or no effect. Removal of THM concentrations by simple storage was high (on average 30%) and very high by boiling and filtering with subsequent storage in the refrigerator (on average, 87% and 92%, respectively). In scenarios where water was stored in uncovered pitchers (with or without previous boiling and filtering), the THM decrease was higher for increased storage times. However, storage did not have any effect on HAAs, whereas boiling decreased levels of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) (on average 42%) and increased levels of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) (on average 35%), resulting in unchanged average levels of total HAAs. The use of the filtration pitcher decreased HAA levels dramatically (on average 66%). Percentages of change in chlorinated DBPs in the different scenarios varied according to initial concentrations in tap water (baseline water), that is, according to the spatio-temporal variations of these substances in the distribution system. On the basis of these results, the paper discusses implications regarding public health protection and exposure assessment for epidemiological studies.

  6. Simultaneous determination of three chloroacetic acids, three herbicides, and 12 anions in water by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ximing; Chen, Liang; Zhao, Yanqing

    2015-09-01

    An ion chromatography method was developed for the simultaneous detection of three soluble herbicides (glyphosate, bentazone and picloram), three chlorine disinfection byproducts (monochloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid) and 12 anions in water (Cl(-), Br(-), SO4(2-), CO3(2-), ClO3(-), ClO4(-), BrO3(-), PO4(3-), NO2(-), NO3(-), CH3COO(-) and COO(-)). High linearity (r(2) > 0.996) was observed for all target analytes for each respective concentration range. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were between 0.21-0.85 and 0.06-25.46 μg/L, respectively. However, the interference effect of Cl(-), NO3(-) , SO4 (2-) and CO3(2-) on some target analytes must be considered during the analysis. Sample pre-treatment by a hydrogen column (H-column) required to reduce the negative effect of CO3(2-). Additionally, sample pre-treatment by a sliver-hydrogen column (Ag-H-column) is required when Cl(-) > 100 mg/L and SO4(2-) < 50 mg/L, and pre-treatment by both a barium column (Ba-column) and an H-column is required when Cl(-) > 100 mg/L and SO4(2-) > 50 mg/L. When Cl(-) > 100 mg/L, SO4(2-) > 50 mg/L and CO3(2-) > 20 mg/L, the sample pre-treatment by either an Ag-H-Ba-column or an Ag-H-column and Ba-column is required to minimize interference.

  7. Proteomic Retrieval from Nucleic Acid Depleted Space-Flown Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, D. K.; Elliott, T. F.; Holubec, K.; Baker, T. L.; Allen, P. L.; Hammond, T. G.; Love, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    Compared to experiments utilizing humans in microgravity, cell-based approaches to questions about subsystems of the human system afford multiple advantages, such as crew safety and the ability to achieve statistical significance. To maximize the science return from flight samples, an optimized method was developed to recover protein from samples depleted of nucleic acid. This technique allows multiple analyses on a single cellular sample and when applied to future cellular investigations could accelerate solutions to significant biomedical barriers to human space exploration. Cell cultures grown in American Fluoroseal bags were treated with an RNA stabilizing agent (RNAlater - Ambion), which enabled both RNA and immunoreactive protein analyses. RNA was purified using an RNAqueous(registered TradeMark) kit (Ambion) and the remaining RNA free supernatant was precipitated with 5% trichloroacetic acid. The precipitate was dissolved in SDS running buffer and tested for protein content using a bicinchoninic acid assay (1) (Sigma). Equal loads of protein were placed on SDS-PAGE gels and either stained with CyproOrange (Amersham) or transferred using Western Blotting techniques (2,3,4). Protein recovered from RNAlater-treated cells and stained with protein stain, was measured using Imagequant volume measurements for rectangles of equal size. BSA treated in this way gave quantitative data over the protein range used (Fig 1). Human renal cortical epithelial (HRCE) cells (5,6,7) grown onboard the International Space Station (ISS) during Increment 3 and in ground control cultures exhibited similar immunoreactivity profiles for antibodies to the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) (Fig 2), the beta isoform of protein kinase C (PKC ) (Fig 3), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) (Fig 4). Parallel immunohistochemical studies on formalin-fixed flight and ground control cultures also showed positive immunostaining for VDR and other biomarkers (Fig 5). These results are

  8. Effect of tween series on growth and Cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid production of Lactobacillus acidophilus F0221 in the presence of bile salts.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing-Yan; Zhang, Lan-Wei; Du, Ming; Han, Xue; Yi, Hua-Xi; Guo, Chun-Feng; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Luo, Xue; Zhang, Yan-He; Shan, Yu-Juan; Hou, Ai-Ju

    2011-01-01

    Cis-9, trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid (c9, t11 CLA) producing bacteria have attracted much attention as novel probiotics which have shown beneficial effects on host health. However, bile salts are able to inhibit bacterial growth and c9, t11 CLA production. For recovering growth and c9, t11 CLA production of Lactobacillus acidophilus F0221 in the presence of bile salts, Tween series (Tween 20, Tween 40, Tween 60 and Tween 80) were added in growth culture containing 0.3% oxgall. Results showed that the viable counts were significantly (P < 0.05) recovered to 8.58-8.75 log CFU/mL in the presence of all Tween treatments. However, recovery of c9, t11 CLA production was only demonstrated in the presence of Tween 80 (72.89 μg/mL). Stepwise increasing oxgall in a concentrations range from 0.1% to 0.9% according to human intestinal physiological environments, Tween 80 still showed significant (P < 0.05) recovery ability on growth (8.91-8.04 log CFU/mL) and c9, t11 CLA (69.22-34.27 μg/mL) production. The effect of Tween 80 on growth and production was also investigated in the presence of different types of bile salts (sodium salts of cholic acid (CA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), chendeoxycholic acid (CDCA), glycocholic acid (GCA) and taurocholic acid (TCA)). Results showed that Tween 80 could significantly (P < 0.05) recover c9, t11 CLA production in the presence of all types of bile salts, but the Tween 80 could only significantly (P < 0.05) recover viable counts of the strain in the presence of CA, DCA and CDCA. This recovery ability could be attributed to the protection of leakage of intracellular material. Additionally, although bile salts inhibited growth and c9, t11 CLA production by the growing cell, it promoted the c9, t11 CLA production by the resting cell.

  9. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  10. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications.

  11. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  12. Comprehensive screening of acidic and neutral drugs in equine plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nola H; Ho, Emmie N M; Tang, Francis P W; Wan, Terence S M; Wong, April S Y

    2008-05-02

    A multi-target high-throughput liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method for the detection of low ppt to low ppb levels of anabolic steroids, corticosteroids, anti-diabetics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in equine plasma was developed for the purpose of doping control. Plasma samples were first deproteinated by addition of trichloroacetic acid. Drugs were then extracted by solid-phase extraction (SPE) using Bond Elut Certify cartridges, and the extracts were analysed by a triple-quadrupole/linear ion trap LC-MS-MS instrument in positive electrospray ionization (+ESI) mode with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) scan function. Chromatographic separation of the targeted drugs was achieved using a reverse phase 3.3 cm L x 2.1 mm ID, 3 microm particle size LC column with gradient elution. Plasma samples fortified with 66 targeted drugs including betamethasone, boldione, capsaicin, flunisolide, gestrinone, gliclazide, 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone hexanoate, isoflupredone and triamcinolone acetonide, etc. at low ppt to low ppb levels could be consistently detected. No significant matrix interference was observed at the retention time of the targeted ion transitions when blank plasma samples were analysed. The method has been validated for its extraction recoveries, precision and sensitivity, and is used regularly in the authors' laboratory to screen for the presence of these drugs in plasma samples from racehorses.

  13. Analysis of haloacetic acids in water and air (aerosols) from indoor swimming pools using HS-SPME/GC/ECD.

    PubMed

    Sá, Christopher S A; Boaventura, Rui A R; Pereira, Isabel B

    2012-01-01

    A solid phase microextraction method was used for the analysis of nine haloacetic acids (HAAs) in water and air (aerosols) from indoor swimming pools (ISPs). The analysis is characterized by derivatization of HAAs to their methyl-esters with dimethyl sulphate, headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with a Carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR-PDMS) fiber and gas chromatography - electron capture detector (GC/ECD). High correlation coefficients were obtained for esters mixture calibration lines and detection limits were found to be at the low ppb level. Repeatability was assessed and coefficients of variation varied from 10 to 20%. Reproducibility was also evaluated and coefficients of variation from 15 to 25% were obtained. Analytical results from four Portuguese ISPs showed that the mean concentration of total HAAs (THAAs) in water ranged from 10 ± 2 to 183 ± 28 μg/L in which 55 ± 20% corresponded to trichloroacetic and dichloroacetic acids (TCAA and DCAA). THAAs highest concentrations were directly related to higher ISPs' water organic matter content. In the lack of European specific regulation for water from ISPs and taking into consideration that ingestion is a form of exposure, THAAs concentration values were compared with drinking water maximum contamination level (MCL) of 60 μg/L proposed by the US EPA for the sum of five HAAs. In 35% of water sampling campaigns the sum of MBAA (monobromoacetic acid), MCAA (monochloroacetic acid), DCAA and TCAA exceeded that MCL value. The concentrations obtained for THAAs in the ISPs' atmosphere ranged from 5 ± 1 to 64 ± 10 μg/m(3) (T = 28°C at 5 cm above the water surface) and were proportional to the aerosols' quantity, which was deeply related to indoor air ventilation system.

  14. Pregnancy loss and eye malformations in offspring of F344 rats following gestational exposure to mixtures of regulated trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Narotsky, Michael G; Best, Deborah S; McDonald, Anthony; Godin, Elizabeth A; Hunter, E Sidney; Simmons, Jane Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Chlorination of drinking water yields hundreds of disinfection by-products (DBPs). Among the DBPs, four trihalomethanes (THMs; chloroform, bromodichloromethane, chlorodibromomethane, bromoform) and five haloacetic acids (HAAs; chloroacetic, dichloroacetic, trichloroacetic, bromoacetic, and dibromoacetic acid) are U.S. EPA regulated. We assessed the combined toxicity of these DBPs. F344 rats were treated with mixtures of the four THMs (THM4), the five HAAs (HAA5), or nine DBPs (DBP9; THM4+HAA5). Mixtures were administered in 10% Alkamuls(®) EL-620 daily by gavage on gestation days 6-20. Litters were examined postnatally. All three mixtures caused pregnancy loss at ≥ 613 μmol/kg/day. In surviving litters, resorption rates were increased in groups receiving HAA5 at 615 μmol/kg/day and DBP9 at 307 μmol/kg/day. HAA5 caused eye malformations (anophthalmia, microphthalmia) at ≥ 308 μmol/kg/day. Thus, both HAAs and THMs contributed to DBP9-induced pregnancy loss. The presence of THMs in the full mixture, however, appeared to reduce the incidence of HAA-induced eye defects.

  15. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  16. Comparative analysis of the relationship between trichloroethylene metabolism and tissue-specific toxicity among inbred mouse strains: liver effects.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U; Kosyk, Oksana; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Uehara, Takeki; Collins, Leonard B; Bodnar, Wanda M; Ball, Louise M; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent. Although TCE is classified as carcinogenic to humans, substantial gaps remain in our understanding of interindividual variability in TCE metabolism and toxicity, especially in the liver. A hypothesis was tested that amounts of oxidative metabolites of TCE in mouse liver are associated with hepatic-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in subacute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 d; 7 inbred mouse strains) and subchronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 wk; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. The quantitative relationship was evaluated between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P-450-mediated oxidation (trichloroacetic acid [TCA], dichloroacetic acid [DCA], and trichloroethanol) and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione] in serum and liver, and various hepatic toxicity phenotypes. In subacute study, interstrain variability in TCE metabolite amounts was observed in serum and liver. No marked induction of Cyp2e1 protein levels in liver was detected. Serum and hepatic levels of TCA and DCA were correlated with increased transcription of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1 but not with degree of induction in hepatocellular proliferation. In subchronic study, serum and liver levels of oxidative metabolites gradually decreased over time despite continuous dosing. Hepatic protein levels of CYP2E1, ADH, and ALDH2 were unaffected by treatment with TCE. While the magnitude of induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes also declined, hepatocellular proliferation increased. This study offers a unique opportunity to provide a scientific data-driven rationale for some of the major assumptions in human health assessment of TCE.

  17. Comparative Analysis of the Relationship between Trichloroethylene Metabolism and Tissue-Specific Toxicity among Inbred Mouse Strains: Liver Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Uehara, Takeki; Collins, Leonard B.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Ball, Louise M.; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent. Although TCE is classified as carcinogenic to humans, substantial gaps remain in our understanding of inter-individual variability in TCE metabolism and toxicity, especially in the liver. We tested a hypothesis that amounts of oxidative metabolites of TCE in mouse liver are associated with liver-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in sub-acute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 days; 7 inbred mouse strains) and sub-chronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 weeks; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation [trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroethanol] and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione] in serum and liver, and various liver toxicity phenotypes. In sub-acute study, inter-strain variability in TCE metabolite amounts was observed in serum and liver. No induction of Cyp2e1 protein levels in liver was detected. Serum and liver levels of TCA and DCA were correlated with increased transcription of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1, but not with degree of induction in hepatocellular proliferation. In sub-chronic study, serum and liver levels of oxidative metabolites gradually decreased over time despite continuous dosing. Liver protein levels of Cyp2e1, Adh and Aldh2 were unaffected by treatment with TCE. While the magnitude of induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes also declined, hepatocellular proliferation increased. This study offers a unique opportunity to provide a scientific data-driven rationale for some of the major assumptions in human health assessment of TCE. PMID:25424544

  18. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  19. Acid Rain

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA Is Doing Acid Rain Program Cross-State Air Pollution Rule Progress Reports Educational Resources Kid's Site for ... Monitoring National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Exit Interstate Air Pollution Transport Contact Us to ask a question, provide ...

  20. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid can hide signs that you lack vitamin B12, which can cause nerve damage. 10 Do I ... Rosenberg, I.H., et al. (2007). Folate and vitamin B12 status in relation to anemia, macrocytosis and cognitive ...

  1. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  2. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  3. Induction of anti-melanoma CTL response using DC transfected with mutated mRNA encoding full-length Melan-A/MART-1 antigen with an A27L amino acid substitution.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Wahab, Zeinab; Kalady, Matthew F; Emani, Sirisha; Onaitis, Mark W; Abdel-Wahab, Omar I; Cisco, Robin; Wheless, Lee; Cheng, Tsung-Yen; Tyler, Douglas S; Pruitt, Scott K

    2003-08-01

    Modification of the parental immunodominant Melan-A/MART-1 peptide (MART-1(26-35)) by replacing the alanine with leucine (A27L) enhances its immunogenicity. Because of the reported advantages of RNA over peptides in DC vaccines, we sought to mutate the MART-1 gene to encode a full-length MART-1 antigen with an A27L amino acid substitution. Human DC were transfected with A27L-mutated MART-1 RNA (A27L RNA) or native MART-1 RNA, and then used to stimulate autologous T cells from a series of 8 HLA-A2+ volunteers. After three stimulations, all CTL induced with DC/A27L RNA exhibited more tetramer+ cells, and demonstrated stronger antigen-specific IFNgamma-secreting activity compared to CTL induced with DC/native RNA. A potent MART-1-specific, and predominantly class-I-restricted lysis was detected in most CTL induced with DC/A27L RNA, while native RNA-induced CTL showed minimal and non-specific lysis. HLA-A2+ DC and MART-1 negative/A2+ melanoma cells transfected with the A27L RNA were recognized and killed by MART-1-specific CTL, suggesting that these APC efficiently processed the A27L RNA and presented correct MART-1-specific epitope(s). In summary, introducing an A27L mutation into the MART-1 full-length mRNA sequence enhanced the immunogenicity of the encoded MART-1 Ag. The ease with which such a mutation can be made in RNA presents another potential advantage of using RNA for immunotherapy. Our results support considering this strategy for enhancing the immunogenicity of DC-based RNA vaccines.

  4. Novel insights in Al-MCM-41 precursor as adsorbent for regulated haloacetic acids and nitrate from water.

    PubMed

    Bruzzoniti, Maria Concetta; De Carlo, Rosa Maria; Sarzanini, Corrado; Caldarola, Dario; Onida, Barbara

    2012-11-01

    High concentration of NO (3) (-) in groundwater has raised concern over possible contamination of drinking water supplies. In addition, the formation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) as by-products during disinfection with chlorine-based agents is still a relevant issue, since HAAs pose serious health hazard. In this work, we investigated the affinity of a precursor of Al-MCM-41 (a mesostructured hexagonal aluminosilicate containing the template surfactant) towards nitrate and HAAs, for its possible application in the removal of these pollutants from natural and drinking waters. Additionally, adsorption kinetics and isotherms were studied. The adsorbent was synthesized using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as surfactant and characterized by physico-chemical techniques. Simulated drinking water was spiked with the EPA-regulated HAAs (monochloroacetic (MCAA), monobromoacetic (MBAA), dichloroacetic (DCAA), dibromoacetic (DBAA), and trichloroacetic (TCAA) acids) and placed in contact with the adsorbent. The effect of matrix composition was studied. Adsorption kinetic studies were performed testing three kinetics models. For the adsorption studies, three adsorption isotherm approaches have been tested to experimental data. The pollutant recoveries were evaluated by suppressed ion chromatography. The affinity of the adsorbent was TCAA = DBAA = DCAA > MBAA > MCAA with DCAA, DBAA, and TCAA completely removed. A removal as high as 77 % was achieved for 13 mg/L nitrate. The adsorption isotherms of NO (3) (-) and monochloroacetic acid can be modeled by the Freundlich equation, while their adsorption kinetics follow a pseudo-second-order rate mechanism. The adsorbent exhibited high affinity towards HAAs in simulated drinking water even at relevant matrix concentrations, suggesting its potential application for water remediation technologies.

  5. Chloroacetic acid triggers apoptosis in neuronal cells via a reactive oxygen species-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tien-Hui; Su, Chin-Chuan; Tang, Feng-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Hung; Yen, Cheng-Chieh; Fang, Kai-Min; Lee, kuan-I; Hung, Dong-Zong; Chen, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-05

    Chloroacetic acid (CA), a chlorinated analog of acetic acid and an environmental toxin that is more toxic than acetic, dichloroacetic, or trichloroacetic acids, is widely used in chemical industries. Furthermore, CA has been found to be the major disinfection by-products (DBPs) of drinking water. CA has been reported to be highly corrosive and to induce severe tissue injuries (including nervous system) that lead to death in mammals. However, the effects and underlying mechanisms of CA-induced neurotoxicity remain unknown. In the present study, we found that CA (0.5-2.0 mM) significantly increased LDH release, decreased the number of viable cells (cytotoxicity) and induced apoptotic events (including: increases in the numbers of apoptotic cells, the membrane externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS), and caspase-3/-7 activity) in Neuro-2a cells. CA (1.5 mM; the approximate to LD50) also triggered ER stress, which was identified by monitoring several key molecules that are involved in the unfolded protein responses (including the increase in the expressions of p-PERK, p-IRE-1, p-eIF2α, ATF-4, ATF-6, CHOP, XBP-1, GRP 78, GRP 94, and caspase-12) and calpain activity. Transfection of GRP 78- and GRP 94-specific si-RNA effectively abrogated CA-induced cytotoxicity, caspase-3/-7 and caspase-12 activity, and GRP 78 and GRP 94 expression in Neuro-2a cells. Additionally, pretreatment with 2.5 mM N-acetylcysteine (NAC; a glutathione (GSH) precursor) dramatically suppressed the increase in lipid peroxidation, cytotoxicity, apoptotic events, calpain and caspase-12 activity, and ER stress-related molecules in CA-exposed cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the higher concentration of CA exerts its cytotoxic effects in neuronal cells by triggering apoptosis via a ROS-induced ER stress signaling pathway.

  6. Human liver class I alcohol dehydrogenase gammagamma isozyme: the sole cytosolic 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase of iso bile acids.

    PubMed

    Marschall, H U; Oppermann, U C; Svensson, S; Nordling, E; Persson, B; Höög, J O; Jörnvall, H

    2000-04-01

    3beta-Hydroxy (iso) bile acids are formed during enterohepatic circulation from 3alpha-hydroxy bile acids and constitute normal compounds in plasma but are virtually absent in bile. Isoursodeoxycholic acid (isoUDCA) is a major metabolite of UDCA. In a recent study it was found that after administration of isoUDCA, UDCA became the major acid in bile. Thus, epimerization of the 3beta-hydroxy to a 3alpha-hydroxy group, catalyzed by 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSD) and 3-oxo-reductases must occur. The present study aims to characterize the human liver bile acid 3beta-HSD. Human liver cytosol and recombinant alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) betabeta and gammagamma isozymes were subjected to native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and isoelectric focusing. Activity staining with oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) or oxidized nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) as cofactors and various iso bile acids as substrates was used to screen for 3beta-HSD activity. Reaction products were identified and quantified by gas chromotography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Computer-assisted substrate docking of isoUDCA to the active site of a 3-dimensional model of human class I gammagamma ADH was performed. ADH gammagamma isozyme was identified as the iso bile acid 3beta-HSD present in human liver cytosol, with NAD(+) as a cofactor. Values for k(cat)/K(m) were in the rank order isodeoxycholic acid (isoDCA), isochenodeoxycholic acid (isoCDCA), isoUDCA, and isolithocholic acid (isoLCA) (0.10, 0.09, 0.08, and 0. 05 min(-1) x micromol/L(-1), respectively). IsoUDCA fits as substrate to the 3-dimensional model of the active-site of ADH gammagamma. ADH gammagamma isozyme was defined as the only bile acid 3beta-HSD in human liver cytosol. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases are candidates for the binding and transport of 3alpha-hydroxy bile acids. We assume that ADH gammagamma isozyme is involved in cytosolic bile acid binding and transport processes as well.

  7. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.

    1993-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  8. Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, Owen P.; Rice, Karen C.; Dietrich, W.E.; Sposito, Garrison

    1997-01-01

    Acid deposition, or acid rain as it is more commonly referred to, has become a widely publicized environmental issue in the U.S. over the past decade. The term usually conjures up images of fish kills, dying forests, "dead" lakes, and damage to monuments and other historic artifacts. The primary cause of acid deposition is emission of S02 and NOx to the atmosphere during the combustion of fossil fuels. Oxidation of these compounds in the atmosphere forms strong acids - H2SO4 and HNO3 - which are returned to the Earth in rain, snow, fog, cloud water, and as dry deposition.Although acid deposition has only recently been recognized as an environmental problem in the U.S., it is not a new phenomenon (Cogbill & Likens 1974). As early as the middle of the 17th century in England, the deleterious effects of industrial emissions on plants, animals, and humans, and the atmospheric transport of pollutants between England and France had become issues of concern (Evelyn 1661, Graunt 1662). It is interesting that well over three hundred years ago in England, recommendations were made to move industry outside of towns and build higher chimneys to spread the pollution into "distant parts." Increasing the height of smokestacks has helped alleviate local problems, but has exacerbated others. In the U.S. the height of the tallest smokestack has more than doubled, and the average height of smokestacks has tripled since the 1950s (Patrick et al 1981). This trend occurred in most industrialized nations during the 20th century and has had the effect of transforming acid rain from a local urban problem into a problem of global scale.

  9. Toxicokinetics and Oral Bioavailability of Halogenated Acetic Acids Mixtures in Naive and GSTzeta-Depleted Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saghir, Shakil A.; Schultz, Irv R.

    2005-04-01

    Pharmacokinetics of halogenated acetic acid (HAA) mixtures in native and GSTzeta depleted rats was investigated. Rats were administered orally or i.v. to Mixture-1 (monobromo- dichloro-, chlorodibromo-, tribromo- acetic acids) or Mixture-2 (bromochloro-, dibromo-, trichloro- bromodichloro- acetic acids) at a dose of 25 ?mol/kg HAA and blood samples collected up to 36 h. GSTzeta depleted rats were also orally dosed with each mixture and euthanized at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 h to determine tissue distribution. In Mixture-1, GSTzeta depletion only affected the pharmacokinetics of DCAA, which increased the elimination t? from 9 min to 1.3 h. After oral administration, DCAA exhibited a complex time-course plasma profile with secondary peaks appearing long after completion of the initial absorption phase. This phenomenon coincided with elevated DCA levels in the lower portion of the GI tract compared to CDBAA and TBAA. For Mixture-2, all di-HAAs were eliminated extremely rapidly from plasma in both na?ve and GSTzeta depleted animals (t? was 4-11 min in na?ve and 11-24 min in GSTzeta depleted rats), t? of BDCAA and TCAA was 3.5 and 12 h in na?ve and 2.3 and 7.5 h in GSTzeta depleted rats. The primary difference in the pharmacokinetics among HAAs when administered as mixture was the total body clearance (Clb) which was reduced compared to after individual administration. These results suggest competitive interactions between tri- and di-HAAs beyond what would be predicted from individual HAA studies. For di-HAAs, the total dose is important as clearance is dose dependent due to competition for GSTzeta. When considering HAAs dosimetry, importance should be placed on both the components of the mixture and prior exposure history to di-HAAs.

  10. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  11. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  12. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA 635 / R - 03 / 007 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID ( CAS No . 79 - 43 - 6 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) August 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been revi

  13. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  14. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  15. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  16. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  17. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  18. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  19. Azelaic acid.

    PubMed

    Nazzaro-Porro, M

    1987-12-01

    This review is an update on the literature accumulated over the past 10 years following the original observation that azelaic acid, a naturally occurring and nontoxic C9 dicarboxylic acid, possesses significant biologic properties and a potential as a therapeutic agent. These studies have shown that azelaic acid is a reversible inhibitor of tyrosinase and other oxidoreductases in vitro and that it inhibits mitochondrial respiration. It can also inhibit anaerobic glycolysis. Both in vitro and in vivo it has an antimicrobial effect on both aerobic and anaerobic (Propionibacterium acnes) microorganisms. In tissue culture it exerts a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect on malignant melanocytes, associated with mitochondrial damage and inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis. Tumoral cell lines not containing tyrosinase are equally affected. Normal cells in culture exposed to the same concentrations of the diacid that are toxic for tumoral cells are in general not damaged. Radioactive azelaic acid has been shown to penetrate tumoral cells at a higher level than normal cells of the corresponding line. Topically applied (a 20% cream), it has been shown to be of therapeutic value in skin disorders of different etiologies. Its beneficial effect on various forms of acne (comedogenic, papulopustular, nodulocystic) has been clearly demonstrated. Particularly important is its action on abnormal melanocytes, which has led to the possibility of obtaining good results on melasma and highly durable therapeutic responses on lentigo maligna. It is also capable of causing regression of cutaneous malignant melanoma, but its role in melanoma therapy remains to be investigated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Cystathionine γ-lyase, a H2S-generating enzyme, is a GPBAR1-regulated gene and contributes to vasodilation caused by secondary bile acids.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Cipriani, Sabrina; Carino, Adriana; Monti, Maria Chiara; Zampella, Angela; Gargiulo, Antonella; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    GPBAR1 is a bile acid-activated receptor (BAR) for secondary bile acids, lithocholic (LCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA), expressed in the enterohepatic tissues and in the vasculature by endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Despite that bile acids cause vasodilation, it is unclear why these effects involve GPBAR1, and the vascular phenotype of GPBAR1 deficient mice remains poorly defined. Previous studies have suggested a role for nitric oxide (NO) in regulatory activity exerted by GPBAR1 in liver endothelial cells. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a vasodilatory agent generated in endothelial cells by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). Here we demonstrate that GPBAR1 null mice had increased levels of primary and secondary bile acids and impaired vasoconstriction to phenylephrine. In aortic ring preparations, vasodilation caused by chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a weak GPBAR1 ligand and farnesoid-x-receptor agonist (FXR), was iberiotoxin-dependent and GPBAR1-independent. In contrast, vasodilation caused by LCA was GPBAR1 dependent and abrogated by propargyl-glycine, a CSE inhibitor, and by 5β-cholanic acid, a GPBAR1 antagonist, but not by N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)-l-ornithine (l-NIO), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor, or iberiotoxin, a large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels antagonist. In venular and aortic endothelial (HUVEC and HAEC) cells GPBAR1 activation increases CSE expression/activity and H2S production. Two cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) sites (CREs) were identified in the CSE promoter. In addition, TLCA stimulates CSE phosphorylation on serine residues. In conclusion we demonstrate that GPBAR1 mediates the vasodilatory activity of LCA and regulates the expression/activity of CSE. Vasodilation caused by CDCA involves BKCa channels. The GPBAR1/CSE pathway might contribute to endothelial dysfunction and hyperdynamic circulation in liver cirrhosis.

  1. A novel, simple and inexpensive procedure for the simultaneous determination of iopamidol and p-aminohippuric acid for renal function assessment from plasma samples in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Romero, Violeta; González-Villalva, Karla I; Reyes, José L; Franco-Bourland, Rebecca E; Guízar-Sahagún, Gabriel; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Cruz-Antonio, Leticia

    2015-03-25

    The purpose of the current study was to design, validate and implement a novel analytical method for the simultaneous plasma measurement of iopamidol and p-aminohippuric acid (PAH) to estimate renal function in awake rats. A reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatographic (RP-HPLC) method for the simultaneous measurement of iopamidol (for glomerular filtration rate estimation, GFR) and PAH (for tubular secretion determination, TS) was designed and validated using a C-18 column, 0.1M acetic acid-10% acetonitrile (90:10, v/v) as mobile phase, at a flow rate of 0.3 ml/min, and UV detection at 270 nm. Iopamidol (244.8 mg/kg) was administered intravenously followed immediately by sodium PAH (100 mg/kg) to healthy female Sprague-Dawley rats. Plasma samples obtained at 2.5, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after drug administration were deproteinized with 2.5% trichloroacetic acid containing p-aminobenzoic acid as internal standard, and separated by the validated RP-HPLC method described above. The iopamidol and PAH chromatographic data were analyzed using a non-compartmental model. The results demonstrated that the RP-HPLC method was linear in ranges between 15-120 μg/ml and 2.5-120 μg/ml for iopamidol and PAH, respectively. Precision and accuracy were within 15% for both drugs. Recovery of iopamidol and PAH was 92% and 100%, respectively. Plasma iopamidol and PAH clearances in awake rats, estimates for GFR and TS, respectively, were 1.49±0.20 ml/min and 3.73±0.38 ml/min. In conclusion, the method here described is a simple and reliable procedure, for the simultaneous and time-saving determination of GFR and TS from plasma samples in the conscious rat.

  2. Functionalised carboxylic acids in atmospheric particles: An annual cycle revealing seasonal trends and possible sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Monique; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Carboxylic acids represent a major fraction of the water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in atmospheric particles. Among the particle phase carboxylic acids, straight-chain monocarboxylic acids (MCA) and dicarboxylic acids (DCA) with 2-10 carbon atoms have extensively been studied in the past. However, only a few studies exist dealing with functionalised carboxylic acids, i.e. having additional hydroxyl-, oxo- or nitro-groups. Regarding atmospheric chemistry, these functionalised carboxylic acids are of particular interest as they are supposed to be formed during atmospheric oxidation processes, e.g. through radical reactions. Therefore they can provide insights into the tropospheric multiphase chemistry. During this work 28 carboxylic acids (4 functionalised aliphatic MCAs, 5 aromatic MCAs, 3 nitroaromatic MCAs, 6 aliphatic DCAs, 6 functionalised aliphatic DCAs, 4 aromatic DCAs) were quantitatively determined in 256 filter samples taken at the rural research station Melpitz (Saxony, Germany) with a PM10 Digitel DHA-80 filter sampler. All samples were taken in 2010 covering a whole annual cycle. The resulting dataset was examined for a possible seasonal dependency of the acid concentrations. Furthermore the influence of the air mass origin on the acid concentrations was studied based on a simple two-sector classification (western or eastern sector) using a back trajectory analysis. Regarding the annual average, adipic acid was found to be the most abundant compound with a mean concentration of 7.8 ng m-3 followed by 4-oxopimelic acid with 6.1 ng m-3. The sum of all acid concentrations showed two maxima during the seasonal cycle; one in summer and one in winter, whereas the highest overall acid concentrations were found in summer. In general the target acids could be divided into two different groups, where one group has its maximum concentration in summer and the other group during winter. The first group contains all investigated aliphatic mono- and dicarboxylic

  3. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  4. Golgi phosphoprotein 2 (GOLPH2) is a novel bile acid-responsive modulator of oesophageal cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Anne-Marie; Bekiaris, Spiros; Duggan, Gina; Prichard, David; Kirca, Murat; Finn, Stephen; Reynolds, John V; Kelleher, Dermot; Long, Aideen

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aetiology of Barrett's oesophagus (BO) and oesophageal cancer is poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that Golgi structure and function is altered in oesophageal cancer cells. A Golgi-associated protein, GOLPH2, was previously established as a tissue biomarker for BO. Cellular functions for GOLPH2 are currently unknown, therefore in this study we sought to investigate functional roles for this Golgi-associated protein in oesophageal disease. Methods: Expression, intracellular localisation and secretion of GOLPH2 were identified by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and western blot. GOLPH2 expression constructs and siRNA were used to identify cellular functions for GOLPH2. Results: We demonstrate that the structure of the Golgi is fragmented and the intracellular localisation of GOLPH2 is altered in BO and oesophageal adenocarcinoma tissue. GOLPH2 is secreted by oesophageal cancer cells and GOLPH2 expression, cleavage and secretion facilitate cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, exposure of cells to DCA, a bile acid component of gastric refluxate and known tumour promoter for oesophageal cancer, causes disassembly of the Golgi structure into ministacks, resulting in cleavage and secretion of GOLPH2. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that GOLPH2 may be a useful tissue biomarker for oesophageal disease. We provide a novel mechanistic insight into the aetiology of oesophageal cancer and reveal novel functions for GOLPH2 in regulating tumour cell migration and invasion, important functions for the metastatic process in oesophageal cancer. PMID:26461057

  5. Acidic domains around nucleic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, G; Pack, G R

    1990-01-01

    The hydrogen ion concentration in the vicinity of DNA was mapped out within the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. Experimental conditions were modeled by assuming Na-DNA to be solvated in a buffer solution containing 45 mM Tris and 3 mM Mg cations at pH 7.5. Three regions of high H+ concentration (greater than 10 microM) are predicted: one throughout the minor groove of DNA and two localized in the major groove near N7 of guanine and C5 of cytosine for a G.C base pair. These acidic domains correlate well with the observed covalent binding sites of benzo[a]pyrene epoxide (N2 of guanine) and of aflatoxin B1 epoxide (N7 of guanine), chemical carcinogens that presumably undergo acid catalysis to form highly reactive carbocations that ultimately bind to DNA. It is suggested that these regions of high H+ concentration may also be of concern in understanding interactions involving proteins and noncarcinogenic molecules with or near nucleic acids. PMID:2123348

  6. Reaction conditions affecting the relationship between thiobarbituric acid reactivity and lipid peroxides in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Lapenna, D; Ciofani, G; Pierdomenico, S D; Giamberardino, M A; Cuccurullo, F

    2001-08-01

    The thiobarbituric acid (TBA) reactivity of human plasma was studied to evaluate its adequacy in quantifying lipid peroxidation as an index of systemic oxidative stress. Two spectrophotometric TBA tests based on the use of either phosphoric acid (pH 2.0, method A) or trichloroacetic plus hydrochloric acid (pH 0.9, method B) were employed with and without sodium sulfate (SS) to inhibit sialic acid (SA) reactivity with TBA. To correct for background absorption, the absorbance values at 572 nm were subtracted from those at 532 nm, which represent the absorption maximum of the TBA:MDA adduct. Method B gave values of TBA-reactive substances (TBARS) 2-fold higher than those detected with method A. SS lowered TBARS by about 50% with both methods, indicating a significant involvement of SA in plasma TBA reactivity. Standard SA, at a physiologically relevant concentration of 1.5 mM, reacted with TBA, creating interference problems, which were substantially eliminated by SS plus correction for background absorbance. When method B was carried out in the lipid and protein fraction of plasma, SS inhibited by 65% TBARS formation only in the latter. Protein TBARS may be largely ascribed to SA-containing glycoproteins and, to a minor extent, protein-bound MDA. Indeed, EDTA did not affect protein TBARS assessed in the presence of SS. TBA reactivity of whole plasma and of its lipid fraction was instead inhibited by EDTA, suggesting that lipoperoxides (and possibly monofunctional lipoperoxidation aldehydes) are involved as MDA precursors in the TBA test. Pretreatment of plasma with KI, a specific reductant of hydroperoxides, decreased TBARS by about 27%. Moreover, aspirin administration to humans to inhibit prostaglandin endoperoxide generation reduced plasma TBARS by 40%. In conclusion, reaction conditions affect the relationship between TBA reactivity and lipid peroxidation in human plasma. After correction for the interfering effects of SA in the TBA test, 40% of plasma TBARS

  7. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  8. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  9. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  10. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  11. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, R.H.; Boyle, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Acid rain, says Boyle is a chemical leprosy eating into the face of North America and Europe, perhaps the major ecological problem of our time. Boyle describes the causes and scope of the phenomenon; the effects on man, wildlife, water, and our cultural heritage. He probes the delays of politicians and the frequent self-serving arguments advanced by industry in the face of what scientists have proved. The solutions he offers are to strengthen the Clean Air Act and require emission reductions that can be accomplished by establishing emission standards on a regional or bubble basis, burn low-sulfur coal, install scrubbers at critical plants, and invest in alternative energy sources. 73 references, 1 figure.

  12. Mammalian cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis of drinking water disinfection by-products.

    PubMed

    Plewa, Michael J; Kargalioglu, Yahya; Vankerk, Danielle; Minear, Roger A; Wagner, Elizabeth D

    2002-01-01

    Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assays were used to analyze drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) AS52 cells. The DBPs were chosen because they are common in drinking water, resulting from conventional disinfection using chlorination and chloramination. Data were also available to compare these results with cytotoxicity and mutagenicity studies in Salmonella typhimurium. The rank order in decreasing chronic cytotoxicity measured in a microplate-based assay was bromoacetic acid (BA) > 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-furanone (MX) > dibromoacetic acid (DBA) > chloroacetic acid (CA) > KBrO(3) > tribromoacetic acid (TBA) > EMS (ethylmethanesulfonate, positive control) > dichloroacetic acid (DCA) > trichloroacetic acid (TCA). The induction of DNA strand breaks by these agents was measured by alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE, comet assay) and the rank order in decreasing genotoxicity was BA > MX > CA > DBA > TBA > EMS > KBrO(3), while DCA and TCA were refractory. BA was more cytotoxic (31x) and genotoxic (14x) than MX in CHO cells. BA was over 400x more genotoxic than potassium bromate. The brominated haloacetic acids (HAAs) were more cytotoxic and genotoxic than their chlorinated analogs. The HAAs expressed a statistically significant inverse relationship in CHO cell cytotoxicity and genotoxicity as a function of increased numbers of halogen atoms per molecule. A quantitative comparison was conducted with results from a previous study with cytotoxicity and mutagenicity in S. typhimurium. There was no correlation between chronic CHO cell and bacterial cell cytotoxicity. DBP-induced CHO cell cytotoxicity was not related to mutagenic potency in S. typhimurium. Cytotoxicity in CHO cells was statistically significant and highly correlated to CHO cell genotoxicity. Finally, we determined that the DBP genotoxic potency in CHO cells and the mutagenic potency in S. typhimurium were not related. This suggests that

  13. Functional Intestinal Bile Acid 7α-Dehydroxylation by Clostridium scindens Associated with Protection from Clostridium difficile Infection in a Gnotobiotic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Studer, Nicolas; Desharnais, Lyne; Beutler, Markus; Brugiroux, Sandrine; Terrazos, Miguel A.; Menin, Laure; Schürch, Christian M.; McCoy, Kathy D.; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Minton, Nigel P.; Stecher, Bärbel; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan; Hapfelmeier, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Bile acids, important mediators of lipid absorption, also act as hormone-like regulators and as antimicrobial molecules. In all these functions their potency is modulated by a variety of chemical modifications catalyzed by bacteria of the healthy gut microbiota, generating a complex variety of secondary bile acids. Intestinal commensal organisms are well-adapted to normal concentrations of bile acids in the gut. In contrast, physiological concentrations of the various intestinal bile acid species play an important role in the resistance to intestinal colonization by pathogens such as Clostridium difficile. Antibiotic therapy can perturb the gut microbiota and thereby impair the production of protective secondary bile acids. The most important bile acid transformation is 7α-dehydroxylation, producing deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA). The enzymatic pathway carrying out 7α-dehydroxylation is restricted to a narrow phylogenetic group of commensal bacteria, the best-characterized of which is Clostridium scindens. Like many other intestinal commensal species, 7-dehydroxylating bacteria are understudied in vivo. Conventional animals contain variable and uncharacterized indigenous 7α-dehydroxylating organisms that cannot be selectively removed, making controlled colonization with a specific strain in the context of an undisturbed microbiota unfeasible. In the present study, we used a recently established, standardized gnotobiotic mouse model that is stably associated with a simplified murine 12-species “oligo-mouse microbiota” (Oligo-MM12). It is representative of the major murine intestinal bacterial phyla, but is deficient for 7α-dehydroxylation. We find that the Oligo-MM12 consortium carries out bile acid deconjugation, a prerequisite for 7α-dehydroxylation, and confers no resistance to C. difficile infection (CDI). Amendment of Oligo-MM12 with C. scindens normalized the large intestinal bile acid composition by reconstituting 7

  14. Regulation of rat liver hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by a new class of noncompetitive inhibitors. Effects of dichloroacetate and related carboxylic acids on enzyme activity.

    PubMed Central

    Stacpoole, P W; Harwood, H J; Varnado, C E

    1983-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) markedly reduces circulating cholesterol levels in animals and in patients with combined hyperlipoproteinemia or homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). To investigate the mechanism of its cholesterol-lowering action, we studied the effects of DCA and its hepatic metabolites, glyoxylate and oxalate, on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) obtained from livers of healthy, reverse light-cycled rats. Oral administration of DCA for 4 d decreased HMG CoA reductase activity 46% at a dose of 50 mg/kg per d, and 82% at a dose of 100 mg/kg per d. A 24% decrease in reductase activity was observed as early as 1 h after a single dose of 50 mg/kg DCA. The inhibitory effect of the drug was due to a fall in both expressed enzyme activity and the total number of reductase molecules present. DCA also decreased reductase activity when added to suspensions of isolated hepatocytes. With chronic administration, DCA inhibited 3H2O incorporation into cholesterol by 38% and into triglycerides by 52%. When liver microsomes were incubated with DCA, the pattern of inhibition of reductase activity was noncompetitive for both HMG CoA (inhibition constant [Ki] 11.8 mM) and NADPH (Ki 11.6 mM). Inhibition by glyoxylate was also noncompetitive for both HMG CoA (Ki 1.2 mM) and NADPH (Ki 2.7 mM). Oxalate inhibited enzyme activity only at nonsaturating concentrations of NADPH (Ki 5.6 mM). Monochloroacetate, glycollate, and ethylene glycol, all of which can form glyoxylate, also inhibited reductase activity. Using solubilized and 60-fold purified HMG CoA reductase, we found that the inhibitory effect of glyoxylate was reversible. Furthermore, the inhibition by glyoxylate was an effect exerted on the reductase itself, rather than on its regulatory enzymes, reductase kinase and reductase phosphatase. We conclude that the cholesterol-lowering effect of DCA is mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of endogenous cholesterol

  15. Impacts of biomass burning smoke on the distributions and concentrations of C2-C5 dicarboxylic acids and dicarboxylates in a tropical urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liming; Nguyen, Duc Minh; Jia, Shiguo; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Yu, Liya E.

    2013-10-01

    Daily ambient PM2.5 was collected during 8 September to 5 October (Julian Days, JDs 252-279), 2008 in Singapore to investigate impacts of transboundary biomass burning smoke on distribution among C2-C5 dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) and corresponding dicarboxylate salts (DCS) in the tropical urban atmosphere. Quantification of DCAs and DCS were performed using solvent and water extraction followed by chromatography analyses via GC-MS and ion chromatography. The averaged PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations from September 19-30 (JDs 263-274) were concurrently elevated by ˜40% due to the transboundary smoke. During this same period, C2-C5 total dicarboxylates (TDCAS, summation of DCAs and DCS), on average, increased more than two times, with C2-TDCAS accounted for in average 80% of the C2-C5 TDCAS. This demonstrates that the transboundary smoke enriched C2-C5 TDCAS more than PM2.5 in the urban environment. In the presence of the transboundary smoke, the averaged concentration ratios of C2-C5 DCS to corresponding DCA were 13.4, 2.9, 1.0, and 1.4 with oxalate salts exhibiting the highest concentration (355.0 ng m-3). The transboundary smoke increased malic acid concentration more than 3.5 times, which is the largest relative increase among the quantified TDCAS. Considering that malic acid is mainly generated through ambient photooxidation, such significant increase in malic acid demonstrates more prominent photooxidation incurred by the smoke.

  16. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    PubMed

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  17. [Determination of dicyandiamide, melamine and cyanuric acid in milk and milk powder by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yun, Huan; Yan, Hua; Zhang, Zhaohui; Li, Jianhui; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xin

    2013-05-01

    A method for the determination of dicyandiamide (DCD), melamine (MEL) and cyanuric acid (CY) in milk and milk powder has been developed by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). After extracted by 5% (mass fraction) trichloroacetic acid, the samples were loaded onto an Acquity UPLC HSS T3 column (50 mm x 2.1 mm, 1.8 microm) and separated using acetonitrile and ammonium acetate as mobile phases in a gradient elution mode. The electrospray was operated in the positive mode and negative mode, and monitored by the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The calibration curves showed a good linearity in the range of 5.0 - 200.0 microg/L, and the correlation coefficients (r) were not less than 0.995. When the spiked levels were 0.02, 0.10 and 0.20 mg/kg, the recoveries of DCD, MEL and CY in milk ranged from 60.0%. to 105.8%, with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 4.2% - 13.6%; while the spiked levels were 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 mg/kg in milk powder, the recoveries ranged from 78.0% to 115.0% with the RSDs of 2.7% - 7.5%. The limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N = 10) were 0.02 mg/kg for milk samples and 0.05 mg/kg for milk powder samples. The results indicate that the method is simple, rapid, sensitive and suitable for the qualitative and quantitative analyses of DCD, MEL and CY in milk and dairy product samples.

  18. Organic acids tunably catalyze carbonic acid decomposition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Busch, Daryle H; Subramaniam, Bala; Thompson, Ward H

    2014-07-10

    Density functional theory calculations predict that the gas-phase decomposition of carbonic acid, a high-energy, 1,3-hydrogen atom transfer reaction, can be catalyzed by a monocarboxylic acid or a dicarboxylic acid, including carbonic acid itself. Carboxylic acids are found to be more effective catalysts than water. Among the carboxylic acids, the monocarboxylic acids outperform the dicarboxylic ones wherein the presence of an intramolecular hydrogen bond hampers the hydrogen transfer. Further, the calculations reveal a direct correlation between the catalytic activity of a monocarboxylic acid and its pKa, in contrast to prior assumptions about carboxylic-acid-catalyzed hydrogen-transfer reactions. The catalytic efficacy of a dicarboxylic acid, on the other hand, is significantly affected by the strength of an intramolecular hydrogen bond. Transition-state theory estimates indicate that effective rate constants for the acid-catalyzed decomposition are four orders-of-magnitude larger than those for the water-catalyzed reaction. These results offer new insights into the determinants of general acid catalysis with potentially broad implications.

  19. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  20. Uric acid - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003616.htm Uric acid urine test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid ...

  1. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  2. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  3. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003565.htm Methylmalonic acid blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid ...

  4. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  5. Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... other health conditions > Fatty acid oxidation disorders Fatty acid oxidation disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... these disorders, go to genetests.org . What fatty acid oxidation disorders are tested for in newborn screening? ...

  6. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  7. Subsonic Cascade Wind Tunnel Tests Using a Compressor Configuration of DCA Blades.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    1399 - .257 1 4 -I,. ’- 𔃾 1 4 4930 1432 -. 1653 15:;7 .5669 1412 -. 1295 - 7746407 13.3𔄃a 0 5-3,’ 175139 -. 8 , .. 7 4 * ,r I t - 7146 .1289 . 0833 ...EDoNa OF I NOV 61 IS OBSOLETE (Page 1 ) s’w4 0 10 2-014- 6601 r1NCT.AA.9T~’TE S SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE (She..n DotaEnter*ed) UNCLASSIFIED...6 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1 . Subsonic Cascade Facility ------------------------ 43 2. Photograph of Subsonic Cascade and Test Section -- 44 3

  8. An Update on the EPA Study of Lead Scavengers (EDB and DCA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to continued concerns about the concentrations of 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) in ground water from spills of leaded gasoline, OUST formed a Lead Scavengers Team with assistance from ASTSWMO. ASTSWMO and EPA Regions solicited participation from state agencies. Analysis w...

  9. THE DISTRIBUTION OF EDB, BENZENE, AND 1,2-DCA AT GASOLINE SPILL SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    With assistance from the Association of State and Territorial Air and Solid Waste Management Officials (ASTSWMO), the U.S. EPA Office of Underground Storage Tanks (OUST) and the U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) conducted a survey to determine the distribution of ...

  10. Updates on the EPA Study of Lead Scavengers (EDB and DCA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to continued concerns about the concentrations of 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) in ground water from spills of leaded gasoline, OUST formed a Lead Scavengers Team with assistance from ASTSWMO. ASTSWMO and EPA Regions solicited participation from state agencies. Analysis w...

  11. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  12. Gas-phase acidities of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and their amino acid amides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong; Matus, Myrna H.; Velazquez, Hector Adam; Dixon, David A.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2007-09-01

    Gas-phase acidities (GA or [Delta]Gacid) for the two most acidic common amino acids, aspartic acid and glutamic acid, have been determined for the first time. Because of the amide linkage's importance in peptides and as an aid in studying side chain versus main chain deprotonation, aspartic acid amide and glutamic acid amide were also studied. Experimental GA values were measured by proton transfer reactions in an electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Calculated GAs were obtained by density functional and molecular orbital theory approaches. The best agreement with experiment was found at the G3MP2 level; the MP2/CBS and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ results are 3-4 kcal/mol more acidic than the G3MP2 results. Experiment shows that aspartic acid is more acidic than glutamic acid by ca. 3 kcal/mol whereas the G3MP2 results show a smaller acidity difference of 0.2 kcal/mol. Similarly, aspartic acid amide is experimentally observed to be ca. 2 kcal/mol more acidic than glutamic acid amide whereas the G3MP2 results show a correspondingly smaller energy difference of 0.7 kcal/mol. The computational results clearly show that the anions are all ring-like structures with strong hydrogen bonds between the OH or NH2 groups and the CO2- group from which the proton is removed. The two amino acids are main-chain deprotonated. In addition, use of the COSMO model for the prediction of the free energy differences in aqueous solution gave values in excellent agreement with the most recent experimental values for pKa. Glutamic acid is predicted to be more acidic than aspartic acid in aqueous solution due to differential solvation effects.

  13. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests.

  14. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  15. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  16. USSR Report, Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    with aliphatic, fluorinated , a-functionally substituted alcohols, trifluoroacetic, trichloroacetic and hydrochloric acids. Acylphosphite (I) was selected...and the thiophosphoryl-derivatives are essentially inert in reactions with electrophilic reagents and fail to react even with arylisocyanates. The 2

  17. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Schwalfenberg, Gerry

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine evidence for the role of omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE PubMed was searched for articles on the role of omega-3 fatty acids in cardiovascular disease. Level I and II evidence indicates that omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial in improving cardiovascular outcomes. MAIN MESSAGE Dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids has declined by 80% during the last 100 years, while intake of omega-6 fatty acids has greatly increased. Omega-3 fatty acids are cardioprotective mainly due to beneficial effects on arrhythmias, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and thrombosis. There is also evidence that they improve endothelial function, lower blood pressure, and significantly lower triglycerides. CONCLUSION There is good evidence in the literature that increasing intake of omega-3 fatty acids improves cardiac outcomes. Physicians need to integrate dietary recommendations for consumption of omega-3 fatty acids into their usual cardiovascular care. PMID:16812965

  19. Sulfuric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Sulfuric acid is a very strong chemical that is corrosive. Corrosive means it can cause severe burns and ... or mucous membranes. This article discusses poisoning from sulfuric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  20. Lactic acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Lactate test ... test. Exercise can cause a temporary increase in lactic acid levels. ... not getting enough oxygen. Conditions that can increase lactic acid levels include: Heart failure Liver disease Lung disease ...

  1. Folic Acid Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Folic Acid Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... button beside the question. Good Luck! 1. Folic acid is: A a B vitamin B a form ...

  2. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  3. Azelaic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Azelaic acid gel and foam is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat the pimples and ...

  4. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  5. Alpha Hydroxy Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Home Cosmetics Products & Ingredients Ingredients Alpha Hydroxy Acids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... for Industry: Labeling for Cosmetics Containing Alpha Hydroxy Acids The following information is intended to answer questions ...

  6. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Uric Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , ...

  7. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... breaks the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this ... process. One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple ...

  8. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Valproic Acid and Pregnancy Wednesday, 01 July 2015 In every ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to valproic acid may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  9. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  10. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  11. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  12. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  13. Refining Lurgi tar acids

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, N.P.

    1984-04-17

    There is disclosed a process for removing tar bases and neutral oils from the Lurgi tar acids by treating the tar acids with aqueous sodium bisulfate to change the tar bases to salts and to hydrolyze the neutral oils to hydrolysis products and distilling the tar acids to obtain refined tar acid as the distillate while the tar base salts and neutral oil hydrolysis products remain as residue.

  14. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  15. 78 FR 20029 - Castor Oil, Polymer With Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and Ricinoleic Acid; Tolerance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Castor Oil, Polymer With Adipic Acid, Linoleic Acid, Oleic Acid and Ricinoleic..., polymer with adipic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid and ricinoleic acid (CAS Reg. No. 1357486-09- 9) when used as an inert ingredient in a pesticide formulation. Advance Polymer Technology submitted a...

  16. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    The chemical composition of fog particles has become of considerable interest, because of both the possibility of interpreting atmospheric- chemistry processes in fog particles in terms of the principles of aqueous chemistry and the potential health effects of species present in fog particles. The acidity of fog particles has received wide attention. This communication noted the actual magnitude of the excess acidity in acidic fog particles and suggested a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air. (DP)

  17. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  18. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  19. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  20. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Acid Lipase Disease Information Page What research is being ... research to understand lipid storage diseases such as acid lipase deficiency. Additional research studies hope to identify ...

  1. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  2. Variations and comparisons in medium-depth chemical peeling.

    PubMed

    Brody, H J

    1989-09-01

    Two effective methods in chemical peeling, solid carbon dioxide plus trichloroacetic acid and Jessner's solution plus trichloroacetic acid, were compared clinically with photographs and histologically with serial biopsies. Carbon dioxide produced a deeper wound than Jessner's solution, and CO2 + TCA was slightly deeper than Jessner's + TCA but was probably not significantly deeper from a clinical standpoint except in correcting scarring. Triple consecutive applications of TCA can substantially increase wound depth with both combination peels.

  3. Real-Time Investigation of Chemical Compositions and Hygroscopic Properties of Aerosols Generated from NaCl and Malonic Acid Mixture Solutions Using in Situ Raman Microspectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Lee, Jisoo; Park, Geonhee; Ro, Chul-Un

    2017-01-03

    Recently, ambient sea spray aerosols (SSAs) have been reported to undergo reactions with dicarboxylic acids (DCAs). Several studies have examined the hygroscopic behavior and chemical reactivity of aerosols generated from NaCl-DCA mixture solutions, but the results have varied, especially for the NaCl-malonic acid (NaCl-MA) mixture system. In this work, in situ Raman microspectrometry (RMS) was used to simultaneously monitor the change in chemical composition, size, and phase as a function of the relative humidity, for individual aerosols generated from NaCl-MA solutions, during two hygroscopic measurement cycles, which were performed first through the dehydration process, followed by a humidification process, in each cycle. In situ RMS analysis for the aerosols showed that the chemical reaction between NaCl and MA occurred rapidly in the time scale of 1 h and considerably in the aqueous phase, mostly during the first dehydration process, and the chemical reaction occurs more rapidly when MA is more enriched in the aerosols. For example, the reaction between NaCl and MA for aerosols generated from solutions of NaCl:MA = 2:1 and 1:2 occurred by 81% and 100% at RH = 42% and 45%, respectively, during the first dehydration process. The aerosols generated from the solution of NaCl:MA = 2:1 revealed single efflorescence and deliquescence transitions repeatedly during two hygroscopic cycles. The aerosols from NaCl:MA = 1:1 and 1:2 solutions showed just an efflorescence transition during the first dehydration process and no efflorescence and deliquescence transition during the hygroscopic cycles, respectively. The observed different hygroscopic behavior was due to the different contents of NaCl, MA, and monosodium malonate in the aerosols, which were monitored real-time by in situ RMS.

  4. Biologically based dose-response model for liver tumors induced by trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C W

    2000-01-01

    The existing extensive laboratory data on trichloroethylene (TCE) and its two metabolites, dichloroacetic (DCA) and trichloroacetic (TCA), are used to explore the relationship among these three compounds. Under the hypothesis that these compounds induce liver tumors in mice through promotion of preexisting initiated cells, it is demonstrated that DCA alone could be responsible for all the response of carcinomas in liver of B6CF(1) mice. The focus of this paper is on how a plausible biological assumption could impact on low-dose risk estimates, rather than on the risk estimate per se. The findings suggest that low-dose risk estimates to humans would be overestimated unless the different background rates between mice and humans are properly accounted for. PMID:10807563

  5. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  6. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  7. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  8. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  9. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  10. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  11. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  12. [Biosynthesis of adipic acid].

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Chen, Wujiu; Yuan, Fei; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2013-10-01

    Adipic acid is a six-carbon dicarboxylic acid, mainly for the production of polymers such as nylon, chemical fiber and engineering plastics. Its annual demand is close to 3 million tons worldwide. Currently, the industrial production of adipic acid is based on the oxidation of aromatics from non-renewable petroleum resources by chemo-catalytic processes. It is heavily polluted and unsustainable, and the possible alternative method for adipic acid production should be developed. In the past years, with the development of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, green and clean biotechnological methods for adipic acid production attracted more attention. In this study, the research advances of adipic acid and its precursor production are reviewed, followed by addressing the perspective of the possible new pathways for adipic acid production.

  13. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition.

  14. Boric acid and boronic acids inhibition of pigeonpea urease.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Ravi Charan; Kayastha, Arvind M

    2006-08-01

    Urease from the seeds of pigeonpea was competitively inhibited by boric acid, butylboronic acid, phenylboronic acid, and 4-bromophenylboronic acid; 4-bromophenylboronic acid being the strongest inhibitor, followed by boric acid > butylboronic acid > phenylboronic acid, respectively. Urease inhibition by boric acid is maximal at acidic pH (5.0) and minimal at alkaline pH (10.0), i.e., the trigonal planar B(OH)3 form is a more effective inhibitor than the tetrahedral B(OH)4 -anionic form. Similarly, the anionic form of phenylboronic acid was least inhibiting in nature.

  15. Biotransformation of cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid by plant cell cultures of Eucalyptus perriniana.

    PubMed

    Katsuragi, Hisashi; Shimoda, Kei; Kubota, Naoji; Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Hamada, Hatsuyuki; Hamada, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Biotransformations of phenylpropanoids such as cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid were investigated with plant-cultured cells of Eucalyptus perriniana. The plant-cultured cells of E. perriniana converted cinnamic acid into cinnamic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, p-coumaric acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid. p-Coumaric acid was converted into 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid, p-coumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcoumaric acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, a new compound, caffeic acid, and 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid. On the other hand, incubation of caffeic acid with cultured E. perriniana cells gave 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 3-O-(6-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, a new compound, 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid, 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylcaffeic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, ferulic acid, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid. 4-O-β-D-Glucopyranosylferulic acid, ferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester, and 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosylferulic acid β-D-glucopyranosyl ester were isolated from E. perriniana cells treated with ferulic acid.

  16. Effective protein extraction protocol for proteomics studies of Jerusalem artichoke leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meide; Shen, Shihua

    2013-07-01

    Protein extraction is a crucial step for proteomics studies. To establish an effective protein extraction protocol suitable for two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) analysis in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.), three different protein extraction methods-trichloroacetic acid/acetone, Mg/NP-40, and phenol/ammonium acetate-were evaluated using Jerusalem artichoke leaves as source materials. Of the three methods, trichloroacetic acid/acetone yielded the best protein separation pattern and highest number of protein spots in 2DE analysis. Proteins highly abundant in leaves, such as Rubisco, are typically problematic during leaf 2DE analysis, however, and this disadvantage was evident using trichloroacetic acid/acetone. To reduce the influence of abundant proteins on the detection of low-abundance proteins, we optimized the trichloroacetic acid/acetone method by incorporating a PEG fractionation approach. After optimization, 363 additional (36.2%) protein spots were detected on the 2DE gel. Our results suggest that trichloroacetic acid/acetone method is a better protein extraction technique than Mg/NP-40 and phenol/ammonium acetate in Jerusalem artichoke leaf 2DE analysis, and that trichloroacetic acid/acetone method combined with PEG fractionation procedure is the most effective approach for leaf 2DE analysis of Jerusalem artichoke.

  17. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  18. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  19. The early melting of closed duplex DNA: analysis by banding in buoyant neutral rubidium trichloroacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, R L; Bauer, W R

    1980-01-01

    Aqueous RbTCA permits the buoyant banding of both native and denatured DNA at room temperature and neutral pH. A unique property of this solvent is the bouyant resolution of closed circular, underwound DNA (I) from the corresponding nicked (II) species. Conditions are reported here in which PM-2 DNA I is physically resolved from native PM-2 DNA II, the buoyant separation being 1.27 mq/ml in 3.3 M RbTCA at 25 degrees C. The separation between nicked and closed DNAs increases with temperature up to 35.5 degrees C, at which PM-2 DNA II cooperatively melts and subsequently pellets. The isothermal buoyant density of a cloed DNA increases linearly as the linking number (Lk) of the closed DNA decreases. The early melting of closed DNA may be monitored with high precision by buoyant banding in RbTCA, it being possible to detect the disruption of as few as 40 base pairs in PM-2 DNA (10,000 base pairs). The constraint that the linking number be conserved in closed DNA requires that a change in duplex winding be accompanied by a compensating change in supercoiling. We estimate the linking number deficiency of PM-2 DNA I to be 0.094 turns per decibase pair. This result permits the estimation of the EtdBr unwinding angle, phi, by comparison with alternative determinations of the linking number deficiency which depend upom the value of phi. The result obtained here is that phi = 27.7 degrees +/- 0.5 degrees and is approximately independent of temperature over the range 15 degrees-35 degrees. PMID:7443544

  20. In matrix derivatization of trichloroethylene metabolites in human plasma with methyl chloroformate and their determination by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-electron capture detector.

    PubMed

    Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Jain, Rajeev; Varshney, Meenu; Ch, Ratnasekhar; Chauhan, Abhishek; Goyal, Sudhir Kumar; Khan, Haider A; Murthy, R C

    2013-04-15

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a common industrial chemical that has been widely used as metal degreaser and for many industrial purposes. In humans, TCE is metabolized into dichloroacetic acid (DCA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and trichloroethanol (TCOH). A simple and rapid method has been developed for the quantitative determination of TCE metabolites. The procedure involves the in situ derivatization of TCE metabolites with methyl chloroformate (MCF) directly in diluted plasma samples followed by extraction and analysis with solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-electron capture detector (GC-ECD). Factors which can influence the efficiency of derivatization such as amount of MCF and pyridine (PYR), ratio of water/methanol were optimized. The factors which can affect the extraction efficiencies of SPME were screened using 2(7-4) Placket-Burman Design (PBD). A central composite design (CCD) was then applied to further optimize the most significant factors for optimum SPME extraction. The optimum factors for the SPME extraction were found to be 562.5mg of NaCl, pH at 1 and an extraction time of 22 min. Recoveries and detection limits of all three analytes in plasma were found to be in the range of 92.69-97.55% and 0.036-0.068 μg mL(-1) of plasma, respectively. The correlation coefficients were found to be in the range of 0.990-0.995. The intra- and inter-day precisions for TCE metabolites were found to be in the range of 2.37-4.81% and 5.13-7.61%, respectively. The major advantage of this method is that MCF derivatization allows conversion of TCE metabolites into their methyl esters in very short time (≤30 s) at room temperature directly in the plasma samples, thus makes it a solventless analysis. The method developed was successfully applied to the plasma samples of humans exposed to TCE.

  1. Comparative analysis of the relationship between trichloroethylene metabolism and tissue-specific toxicity among inbred mouse strains: kidney effects.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U; Kosyk, Oksana; Uehara, Takeki; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Collins, Leonard B; Bodnar, Wanda M; Ball, Louise M; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a well-known environmental and occupational toxicant that is classified as carcinogenic to humans based on the epidemiological evidence of an association with higher risk of renal-cell carcinoma. A number of scientific issues critical for assessing human health risks from TCE remain unresolved, such as the amount of kidney-toxic glutathione conjugation metabolites formed, interspecies and interindividual differences, and the mode of action for kidney carcinogenicity. It was postulated that TCE renal metabolite levels are associated with kidney-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in subacute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 d; 7 inbred mouse strains) and subchronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 wk; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. The quantitative relationship was evaluated between strain-, dose, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P-450-mediated oxidation (trichloroacetic acid [TCA], dichloroacetic acid [DCA], and trichloroethanol) and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione], and various kidney toxicity phenotypes. In subacute study, interstrain differences in renal TCE metabolite levels were observed. In addition, data showed that in several strains kidney-specific effects of TCE included induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1, increased cell proliferation, and expression of KIM-1, a marker of tubular damage and regeneration. In subchronic study, peroxisome proliferator-marker gene induction and renal toxicity diminished while cell proliferative response was elevated in a dose-dependent manner in NZW/LacJ but not C57BL/6J mice. Overall, data demonstrated that renal TCE metabolite levels are associated with kidney-specific toxicity and that these effects are strain dependent.

  2. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  3. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  4. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W [Menlo Park, CA; Eggeman, Timothy J [Lakewood, CO

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  5. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  6. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-03-10

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness.

  7. Parenteral Nutrition: Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, Leonard John

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in nutrition therapies that deliver a generous amount of protein, but not a toxic amount of energy, to protein-catabolic critically ill patients. Parenteral amino acids can achieve this goal. This article summarizes the biochemical and nutritional principles that guide parenteral amino acid therapy, explains how parenteral amino acid solutions are formulated, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of different parenteral amino acid products with enterally-delivered whole protein products in the context of protein-catabolic critical illness. PMID:28287411

  8. Diterpenoid acids from Grindelia nana.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, A A; Ahmed, A A; Tanaka, T; Iinuma, M

    2000-03-01

    Two new norditerpenoid acids of the labdane-type (norgrindelic acids), 4,5-dehydro-6-oxo-18-norgrindelic acid (1) and 4beta-hydroxy-6-oxo-19-norgrindelic acid (2), as well as a new grindelic acid derivative, 18-hydroxy-6-oxogrindelic acid (3), were isolated from the aerial parts of Grindelia nana. In addition, the known compounds, 6-oxogrindelic acid, grindelic acid, methyl grindeloate, 7alpha,8alpha-epoxygrindelic acid, and 4alpha-carboxygrindelic acid were also isolated. The structures of the new compounds were characterized on the basis of spectroscopic analysis.

  9. Potentiation of decursinol angelate on pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors via the activation of GABAA-ergic systems in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jae Hoon; Ha, Tae-Woo; Kang, Jae-Seon; Hong, Jin Tae

    2017-01-01

    Angelicae Gigantis Radix (AGR, Angelica gigas) has been used for a long time as a traditional folk medicine in Korea and oriental countries. Decursinol angelate (DCA) is structurally isomeric decursin, one of the major components of AGR. This study was performed to confirm whether DCA augments pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors via the activation of GABAA-ergic systems in animals. Oral administration of DCA (10, 25 and 50 mg/kg) markedly suppressed spontaneous locomotor activity. DCA also prolonged sleeping time, and decreased the sleep latency by pentobarbital (42 mg/kg), in a dose-dependent manner, similar to muscimol, both at the hypnotic (42 mg/kg) and sub-hypnotic (28 mg/kg) dosages. Especially, DCA increased the number of sleeping animals in the sub-hypnotic dosage. DCA (50 mg/kg, p.o.) itself modulated sleep architectures; DCA reduced the counts of sleep/wake cycles. At the same time, DCA increased total sleep time, but not non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. In the molecular experiments. DCA (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1 µg/ml) increased intracellular Cl- influx level in hypothalamic primary cultured neuronal cells of rats. In addition, DCA increased the protein expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67) and GABAA receptors subtypes. Taken together, these results suggest that DCA potentiates pentobarbital-induced sleeping behaviors through the activation of GABAA-ergic systems, and can be useful in the treatment of insomnia. PMID:28066138

  10. Structure of Acid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Araujo, César L; Vihko, Pirkko T

    2013-01-01

    Acid phosphatases are enzymes that have been studied extensively due to the fact that their dysregulation is associated with pathophysiological conditions. This characteristic has been exploited for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. As an example, prostatic acid phosphatase was the first marker for metastatic prostate cancer diagnosis and the dysregulation of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase is associated with abnormal bone resorption linked to osteoporosis. The pioneering crystallization studies on prostatic acid phosphatase and mammalian tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase conformed significant milestones towards the elucidation of the mechanisms followed by these enzymes (Schneider et al., EMBO J 12:2609-2615, 1993). Acid phosphatases are also found in nonmammalian species such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and plants, and most of them share structural similarities with mammalian acid phosphatase enzymes. Acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphate monoesters following the general equation. Phosphate monoester + H2O -->/<-- alcohol + phosphate. The general classification "acid phosphatase" relies only on the optimum acidic pH for the enzymatic activity in assay conditions using non-physiological substrates. These enzymes accept a wide range of substrates in vitro, ranging from small organic molecules to phosphoproteins, constituting a heterogeneous group of enzymes from the structural point of view. These structural differences account for the divergence in cofactor dependences and behavior against substrates, inhibitors, and activators. In this group only the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase is a metallo-enzyme whereas the other members do not require metal-ion binding for their catalytic activity. In addition, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and erythrocytic acid phosphatase are not inhibited by L-(+)-tartrate ion while the prostatic acid phosphatase is tartrate-sensitive. This is an important

  11. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Folic Acid ... > For Parents > Folic Acid and Pregnancy A A A What's ...

  12. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  13. Analysis of Organic Acids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John R.; Rauner, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are the procedures and a discussion of the results for an experiment in which students select unknown carboxylic acids, determine their melting points, and investigate their solubility behavior in water and ethanol. A table of selected carboxylic acids is included. (CW)

  14. Salicylic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Propa pH® Peel-Off Acne Mask ... pimples and skin blemishes in people who have acne. Topical salicylic acid is also used to treat ... medications called keratolytic agents. Topical salicylic acid treats acne by reducing swelling and redness and unplugging blocked ...

  15. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl Acids*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perfluorinated carbon backbone (4-12 in length) and an acidic functional moiety (carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds are chemically stable, have excellent surface-tension reducing properties...

  16. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  17. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat-like ... people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  18. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  19. Production of shikimic acid.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saptarshi; Chisti, Yusuf; Banerjee, Uttam C

    2012-01-01

    Shikimic acid is a key intermediate for the synthesis of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu®). Shikimic acid can be produced via chemical synthesis, microbial fermentation and extraction from certain plants. An alternative production route is via biotransformation of the more readily available quinic acid. Much of the current supply of shikimic acid is sourced from the seeds of Chinese star anise (Illicium verum). Supply from star anise seeds has experienced difficulties and is susceptible to vagaries of weather. Star anise tree takes around six-years from planting to bear fruit, but remains productive for long. Extraction and purification from seeds are expensive. Production via fermentation is increasing. Other production methods are too expensive, or insufficiently developed. In the future, production in recombinant microorganisms via fermentation may become established as the preferred route. Methods for producing shikimic acid are reviewed.

  20. Fatty acid production from amino acids and alpha-keto acids by Brevibacterium linens BL2.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Balasubramanian; Seefeldt, Kimberly; Weimer, Bart C

    2004-11-01

    Low concentrations of branched-chain fatty acids, such as isobutyric and isovaleric acids, develop during the ripening of hard cheeses and contribute to the beneficial flavor profile. Catabolism of amino acids, such as branched-chain amino acids, by bacteria via aminotransferase reactions and alpha-keto acids is one mechanism to generate these flavorful compounds; however, metabolism of alpha-keto acids to flavor-associated compounds is controversial. The objective of this study was to determine the ability of Brevibacterium linens BL2 to produce fatty acids from amino acids and alpha-keto acids and determine the occurrence of the likely genes in the draft genome sequence. BL2 catabolized amino acids to fatty acids only under carbohydrate starvation conditions. The primary fatty acid end products from leucine were isovaleric acid, acetic acid, and propionic acid. In contrast, logarithmic-phase cells of BL2 produced fatty acids from alpha-keto acids only. BL2 also converted alpha-keto acids to branched-chain fatty acids after carbohydrate starvation was achieved. At least 100 genes are potentially involved in five different metabolic pathways. The genome of B. linens ATCC 9174 contained these genes for production and degradation of fatty acids. These data indicate that brevibacteria have the ability to produce fatty acids from amino and alpha-keto acids and that carbon metabolism is important in regulating this event.

  1. Total syntheses of cis-cyclopropane fatty acids: dihydromalvalic acid, dihydrosterculic acid, lactobacillic acid, and 9,10-methylenehexadecanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shah, Sayali; White, Jonathan M; Williams, Spencer J

    2014-12-14

    cis-Cyclopropane fatty acids (cis-CFAs) are widespread constituents of the seed oils of subtropical plants, membrane components of bacteria and protozoa, and the fats and phospholipids of animals. We describe a systematic approach to the synthesis of enantiomeric pairs of four cis-CFAs: cis-9,10-methylenehexadecanoic acid, lactobacillic acid, dihydromalvalic acid, and dihydrosterculic acid. The approach commences with Rh2(OAc)4-catalyzed cyclopropenation of 1-octyne and 1-decyne, and hinges on the preparative scale chromatographic resolution of racemic 2-alkylcycloprop-2-ene-1-carboxylic acids using a homochiral Evan's auxiliary. Saturation of the individual diastereomeric N-cycloprop-2-ene-1-carbonylacyloxazolidines, followed by elaboration to alkylcyclopropylmethylsulfones, allowed Julia-Kocienski olefination with various ω-aldehyde-esters. Finally, saponification and diimide reduction afforded the individual cis-CFA enantiomers.

  2. Mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon microfibers derived from Mg-biquinoline-dicarboxy compound for efficient oxygen electroreduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Aiguo; Fan, Xiaohong; Chen, Aoling; Zhang, Hengiang; Shan, Yongkui

    2017-02-01

    An in-situ MgO-templating synthesis route was introduced to obtain the mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon microfibers by thermal conversion of new Mg-2,2‧-biquinoline 4,4-dicarboxy acid coordination compound (Mg-DCA) microfibers. The investigated crystal structure of Mg-DCA testified that the assembling of Mg2+ and DCA through Mg-O coordination bond and hydrogen bond contributed to the formation of one-dimensional (1D) crystalline Mg-DCA microfibers. The nitrogen-doped carbons derived from the pyrolysis of Mg-DCA showed the well-defined microfiber morphology with high mesopore-surface area. Such mesoporous microfibers exhibited the efficient catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solutions with better stability and methanol-tolerance performance.

  3. Dichloroacetate treatment for mitochondrial cytopathy: long-term effects in MELAS.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masato; Yamagata, Takanori; Goto, Tamako; Saito, Shigeko; Momoi, Mariko Y

    2004-10-01

    The long-term effects of the sodium salt of dichloroacetic acid (DCA) were evaluated in four patients with mitochondrial encephalomyelopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) carrying A3243G mutation. Oral administration of DCA in MELAS patients was followed for an average of 5 years 4 months. Serum levels of lactate and pyruvate were maintained at around 10 and 0.6 mg/dl, respectively. Serum levels of DCA were 40-136 microg/ml. Symptoms responding to treatment included persistent headache, abdominal pain, muscle weakness, and stroke-like episodes. In contrast, no improvements in mental status, deafness, short stature, or neuroelectrophysiological findings were observed. Adverse effects included mild liver dysfunction in all patients, hypocalcemia in three and peripheral neuropathy in one. None of these adverse events was severe enough to require discontinuation of treatment. To determine suitable indications for DCA therapy, analysis of many more patients who have undergone DCA administration is required.

  4. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  5. Trans Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  6. Gluconic acid production.

    PubMed

    Anastassiadis, Savas; Morgunov, Igor G

    2007-01-01

    Gluconic acid, the oxidation product of glucose, is a mild neither caustic nor corrosive, non toxic and readily biodegradable organic acid of great interest for many applications. As a multifunctional carbonic acid belonging to the bulk chemicals and due to its physiological and chemical characteristics, gluconic acid itself, its salts (e.g. alkali metal salts, in especially sodium gluconate) and the gluconolactone form have found extensively versatile uses in the chemical, pharmaceutical, food, construction and other industries. Present review article presents the comprehensive information of patent bibliography for the production of gluconic acid and compares the advantages and disadvantages of known processes. Numerous manufacturing processes are described in the international bibliography and patent literature of the last 100 years for the production of gluconic acid from glucose, including chemical and electrochemical catalysis, enzymatic biocatalysis by free or immobilized enzymes in specialized enzyme bioreactors as well as discontinuous and continuous fermentation processes using free growing or immobilized cells of various microorganisms, including bacteria, yeast-like fungi and fungi. Alternatively, new superior fermentation processes have been developed and extensively described for the continuous and discontinuous production of gluconic acid by isolated strains of yeast-like mold Aureobasidium pullulans, offering numerous advantages over the traditional discontinuous fungi processes.

  7. Strongly Acidic Auxin Indole-3-Methanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Bialek, Krystyna

    1985-01-01

    A radiochemical synthesis is described for [14C]indole-3-methanesulfonic acid (IMS), a strongly acidic auxin analog. Techniques were developed for fractionation and purification of IMS using normal and reverse phase chromatography. In addition, the utility of both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for analysis of IMS has been demonstrated. IMS was shown to be an active auxin, stimulating soybean hypocotyl elongation, bean first internode curvature, and ethylene production. IMS uptake by thin sections of soybean hypocotyl was essentially independent of solution pH and, when applied at a 100 micromolar concentration, IMS exhibited a basipetal polarity in its transport in both corn coleoptile and soybean hypocotyl sections. [14C]IMS should, therefore, be a useful compound to study fundamental processes related to the movement of auxins in plant tissues and organelles. PMID:16664007

  8. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... under the skin that result from exposure to sunlight and can develop into skin cancer) of the ... acid will make your skin very sensitive to sunlight (likely to get sunburn). Avoid exposure of treated ...

  9. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  10. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid before and during pregnancy helps prevent neural tube defects, such as spina bifida. Women who ... take more if they have a history of neural tube defects in earlier pregnancies. Ask your provider ...

  11. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in soldering fluxes are called hydrocarbons. They include: Ammonium chloride Rosin Hydrochloric acid Zinc ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  12. Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amoxicillin is in a class of medications called penicillin-like antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth ... allergic to amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), clavulanic acid, penicillin, cephalosporins, or any other medications.tell your doctor ...

  13. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... acidemia? In ASA, the body can’t remove ammonia or a substance called argininosuccinic acid from the ... and children include: Breathing problems High levels of ammonia in the bloodIntense headache, especially after a high- ...

  14. [Hydrofluoric acid burns].

    PubMed

    Holla, Robin; Gorter, Ramon R; Tenhagen, Mark; Vloemans, A F P M Jos; Breederveld, Roelf S

    2016-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid is increasingly used as a rust remover and detergent. Dermal contact with hydrofluoric acid results in a chemical burn characterized by severe pain and deep tissue necrosis. It may cause electrolyte imbalances with lethal consequences. It is important to identify high-risk patients. 'High risk' is defined as a total affected body area > 3% or exposure to hydrofluoric acid in a concentration > 50%. We present the cases of three male patients (26, 31, and 39 years old) with hydrofluoric acid burns of varying severity and describe the subsequent treatments. The application of calcium gluconate 2.5% gel to the skin is the cornerstone of the treatment, reducing pain as well as improving wound healing. Nails should be thoroughly inspected and possibly removed if the nail is involved, to ensure proper healing. In high-risk patients, plasma calcium levels should be evaluated and cardiac monitoring is indicated.

  15. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. Normal Results The normal range is 320 ... tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. The following may decrease urine citric acid levels: ...

  16. Lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Lead/acid batteries are produced in sizes from less than 1 to 3000 Ah for a wide variety of portable, industrial and automotive applications. Designs include Planté, Fauré or pasted, and tubular electrodes. In addition to the traditional designs which are flooded with sulfuric acid, newer 'valve-regulated" designs have the acid immolibized in a silica gel or absorbed in a porous glass separator. Development is ongoing worldwide to increase the specific power, energy and deep discharge cycle life of this commercially successful system to meet the needs of new applications such as electric vehicles, load leveling, and solar energy storage. The operating principles, current status, technical challenges and commercial impact of the lead/acid battery are reviewed.

  17. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  18. The linoleic acid and trans fatty acids of margarines.

    PubMed

    Beare-Rogers, J L; Gray, L M; Hollywood, R

    1979-09-01

    Fifty brands of margarine were analysed for cis-polyunsaturated acids by lipoxidase, for trans fatty acid by infared spectroscopy, and for fatty acid composition by gas-liquid chromatography. High concentrations of trans fatty acids tended to be associated with low concentrations of linoleic acid. Later analyses on eight of the brands, respresenting various proportions of linoleic to trans fatty acids, indicated that two of them contained still higher levels of trans fatty acids (greater than 60%) and negligible amounts of linoleic acid. It is proposed that margarine could be a vehicle for the distribution of some dietary linoleic acid and that the level of linoleic acid and the summation of the saturated plus trans fatty acids be known to ascertain nutritional characteristics.

  19. Digestion of an exogenous protein by rat yolksac cultured in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K. E.; Lloyd, J. B.; Davies, M.; Beck, F.

    1971-01-01

    Yolk-sacs were removed from 17.5-day pregnant rats injected 2–5h previously with 125I-labelled bovine serum albumin. The specific activities of acid phosphatase and acid proteinase, and the specific radioactivities (trichloroacetic acid-insoluble and trichloroacetic acid-soluble) were measured in subcellular fractions prepared by homogenization and differential centrifugation. The conversion of acid-insoluble into acid-soluble radioactivity within cultured tissue was followed and the nature of the liberated products was investigated by gel chromatography. The results are consistent with the protein entering lysosomes and being digested there. The radiolabel was released chiefly as free iodotyrosine. PMID:5158915

  20. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  1. [Acids in coffee. XI. The proportion of individual acids in the total titratable acid].

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, U H; Maier, H G

    1985-07-01

    22 acids in ground roast coffees and instant coffees were determined by GLC of their silyl derivatives (after preseparation by gel electrophoresis) or isotachophoresis. The contribution to the total acidity (which was estimated by titration to pH 8 after cation exchange of the coffee solutions) was calculated for each individual acid. The mentioned acids contribute with 67% (roast coffee) and 72% (instant coffee) to the total acidity. In the first place citric acid (12.2% in roast coffee/10.7% in instant coffee), acetic acid (11.2%/8.8%) and the high molecular weight acids (8%/9%) contribute to the total acidity. Also to be mentioned are the shares of chlorogenic acids (9%/4.8%), formic acid (5.3%/4.6%), quinic acid (4.7%/5.9%), malic acid (3.9%/3%) and phosphoric acid (2.5%/5.2%). A notable difference in the contribution to total acidity between roast and instant coffee was found for phosphoric acid and pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid (0.7%/1.9%). It can be concluded that those two acids are formed or released from e.g. their esters in higher amounts than other acids during the production of instant coffee.

  2. Acidification and Acid Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  3. The second acidic constant of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Porto, Raffaella; De Tommaso, Gaetano; Furia, Emilia

    2005-01-01

    The second dissociation constant of salicylic acid (H2L) has been determined, at 25 degrees C, in NaCl ionic media by UV spectrophotometric measurements. The investigated ionic strength values were 0.16, 0.25, 0.50, 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 M. The protolysis constants calculated at the different ionic strengths yielded, with the Specific Interaction Theory, the infinite dilution constant, log beta1(0) = 13.62 +/- 0.03, for the equilibrium L2- + H+ <==> HL-. The interaction coefficient between Na+ and L2-, b(Na+, L2-) = 0.02 +/- 0.07, has been also calculated.

  4. Differential activation of pregnane X receptor by carnosic acid, carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid.

    PubMed

    Seow, Chun Ling; Lau, Aik Jiang

    2017-03-10

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulates the expression of many genes, including those involved in drug metabolism and transport, and has been linked to various diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease. In the present study, we determined whether carnosic acid and other chemicals in rosemary extract (carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid) are PXR activators. As assessed in dual-luciferase reporter gene assays, carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, activated human PXR (hPXR) and mouse PXR (mPXR), whereas carnosol and ursolic acid, but not carnosic acid or rosmarinic acid, activated rat PXR (rPXR). Dose-response experiments indicated that carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid activated hPXR with EC50 values of 0.79, 2.22, and 10.77μM, respectively. Carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, transactivated the ligand-binding domain of hPXR and recruited steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1), SRC-2, and SRC-3 to the ligand-binding domain of hPXR. Carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, increased hPXR target gene expression, as shown by an increase in CYP3A4, UGT1A3, and ABCB1 mRNA expression in LS180 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Rosmarinic acid did not attenuate the extent of hPXR activation by rifampicin, suggesting it is not an antagonist of hPXR. Overall, carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, are hPXR agonists, and carnosic acid shows species-dependent activation of hPXR and mPXR, but not rPXR. The findings provide new mechanistic insight on the effects of carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid on PXR-mediated biological effects.

  5. Discovery of essential fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Arthur A.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fat was recognized as a good source of energy and fat-soluble vitamins by the first part of the 20th century, but fatty acids were not considered to be essential nutrients because they could be synthesized from dietary carbohydrate. This well-established view was challenged in 1929 by George and Mildred Burr who reported that dietary fatty acid was required to prevent a deficiency disease that occurred in rats fed a fat-free diet. They concluded that fatty acids were essential nutrients and showed that linoleic acid prevented the disease and is an essential fatty acid. The Burrs surmised that other unsaturated fatty acids were essential and subsequently demonstrated that linolenic acid, the omega-3 fatty acid analog of linoleic acid, is also an essential fatty acid. The discovery of essential fatty acids was a paradigm-changing finding, and it is now considered to be one of the landmark discoveries in lipid research. PMID:25339684

  6. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  7. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis.

  8. Using Mode of Action to Assess Health Risks from Mixtures of Chemical/Physical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Richard J.; Lei, Xingye C.; Sasser, Lyle B.

    2003-01-20

    Interactions between tumor promoters with differing mechanisms of action were examined in male B6C3F1 mice treated with mixtures of dichloroacetate (DCA), trichloroacetate (TCA), and tetrachloride (CT), each of which acts by a different mode of action. Mice were initiated by vinyl carbamate (VC), and then promoted by DCA, TCA, CT, or the pair-wised combinations of the three compounds. The effect of each treatment or treatment combination on tumor number/animal and tumor size was individually assessed at 18, 24, 30 or 36 weeks of treatment. Dose-related increases in tumor size were observed with 20 & 50 mg/kg CT, but each produced equal number of tumors at 36 weeks with the main distinction being a decrease in tumor latency at the higher dose. Overall TCA treatment produced dose-related increases in tumor number at 36 weeks of treatment. Thus, the lower doses of CT and TCA treatments apparently affected tumor size rather than number. Results with DCA were not as clear as a true maximum tumor number was not clearly observed within the experimental period. Treatment of mice receiving a high dose of TCA (2 g/L of drinking water) combined with varying doses of DCA (0.1, 0.5 and 2 g/L) produced increased numbers of tumors at 24 weeks and 36 weeks. However, at 36 weeks of treatment DCA produced a dose-related decrease in the size of tumors promoted by TCA. The low dose of TCA (0.1 g/L) decreased the number of tumors produced by a high dose of DCA, however, higher doses of TCA produced the same number as observed with DCA alone. Since these two chemicals produce lesions with differing phenotypes, the combination would have been expected to be additive with respect to number, but this was obviously not the case. These data suggest that the induction of liver cancer from mixtures of solvents may have predictable outcomes. The major conclusion is that these interactions are generally no more than additive. It was most interesting to note that additivity was only observed when

  9. Amino-acid contamination of aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolman, Y.; Miller, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    Considerable amino-acid contamination in commercially available analytical grade hydrochloric acid (37% HCl) was found. One bottle contained 8,300 nmol of amino-acids per liter. A bottle from another supplier contained 6,700 nmol per liter. The contaminants were mostly protein amino-acids and several unknowns. Data on the volatility of the amino-acids during HCl distillation were also obtained.

  10. Membrane-Associated Glucose-Methanol-Choline Oxidoreductase Family Enzymes PhcC and PhcD Are Essential for Enantioselective Catabolism of Dehydrodiconiferyl Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hirose, Yusaku; Kamimura, Naofumi; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Hara, Hirofumi; Araki, Takuma; Kasai, Daisuke; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to degrade various lignin-derived biaryls, including a phenylcoumaran-type compound, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DCA). In SYK-6 cells, the alcohol group of the B-ring side chain of DCA is initially oxidized to the carboxyl group to generate 3-(2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl) acrylic acid (DCA-C). Next, the alcohol group of the A-ring side chain of DCA-C is oxidized to the carboxyl group, and then the resulting metabolite is catabolized through vanillin and 5-formylferulate. In this study, the genes involved in the conversion of DCA-C were identified and characterized. The DCA-C oxidation activities in SYK-6 were enhanced in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and an artificial electron acceptor and were induced ca. 1.6-fold when the cells were grown with DCA. Based on these observations, SLG_09480 (phcC) and SLG_09500 (phcD), encoding glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family proteins, were presumed to encode DCA-C oxidases. Analyses of phcC and phcD mutants indicated that PhcC and PhcD are essential for the conversion of (+)-DCA-C and (−)-DCA-C, respectively. When phcC and phcD were expressed in SYK-6 and Escherichia coli, the gene products were mainly observed in their membrane fractions. The membrane fractions of E. coli that expressed phcC and phcD catalyzed the specific conversion of DCA-C into the corresponding carboxyl derivatives. In the oxidation of DCA-C, PhcC and PhcD effectively utilized ubiquinone derivatives as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the transcription of a putative cytochrome c gene was significantly induced in SYK-6 grown with DCA. The DCA-C oxidation catalyzed by membrane-associated PhcC and PhcD appears to be coupled to the respiratory chain. PMID:26362985

  11. Recurrent uric acid stones.

    PubMed

    Kamel, K S; Cheema-Dhadli, S; Shafiee, M A; Davids, M R; Halperin, M L

    2005-01-01

    A 46-year-old female had a history of recurrent uric acid stone formation, but the reason why uric acid precipitated in her urine was not obvious, because the rate of urate excretion was not high, urine volume was not low, and the pH in her 24-h urine was not low enough. In his discussion of the case, Professor McCance provided new insights into the pathophysiology of uric acid stone formation. He illustrated that measuring the pH in a 24-h urine might obscure the fact that the urine pH was low enough to cause uric acid to precipitate during most of the day. Because he found a low rate of excretion of NH(4)(+) relative to that of sulphate anions, as well as a high rate of citrate excretion, he speculated that the low urine pH would be due to a more alkaline pH in proximal convoluted tubule cells. He went on to suspect that there was a problem in our understanding of the function of renal medullary NH(3) shunt pathway, and he suggested that its major function might be to ensure a urine pH close to 6.0 throughout the day, to minimize the likelihood of forming uric acid kidney stones.

  12. Hydrogen production by fermentation using acetic acid and lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Nishimura, Yasuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Microbial hydrogen production from sho-chu post-distillation slurry solution (slurry solution) containing large amounts of organic acids was investigated. The highest hydrogen producer, Clostridium diolis JPCC H-3, was isolated from natural environment and produced hydrogen at 6.03+/-0.15 ml from 5 ml slurry solution in 30 h. Interestingly, the concentration of acetic acid and lactic acid in the slurry solution decreased during hydrogen production. The substrates for hydrogen production by C. diolis JPCC H-3, in particular organic acids, were investigated in an artificial medium. No hydrogen was produced from acetic acid, propionic acid, succinic acid, or citric acid on their own. Hydrogen and butyric acid were produced from a mixture of acetic acid and lactic acid, showing that C. diolis. JPCC H-3 could produce hydrogen from acetic acid and lactic acid. Furthermore, calculation of the Gibbs free energy strongly suggests that this reaction would proceed. In this paper, we describe for the first time microbial hydrogen production from acetic acid and lactic acid by fermentation.

  13. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  14. Biodegradation of Cyanuric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Saldick, Jerome

    1974-01-01

    Cyanuric acid biodegrades readily under a wide variety of natural conditions, and particularly well in systems of either low or zero dissolved-oxygen level, such as anaerobic activated sludge and sewage, soils, muds, and muddy streams and river waters, as well as ordinary aerated activated sludge systems with typically low (1 to 3 ppm) dissolved-oxygen levels. Degradation also proceeds in 3.5% sodium chloride solution. Consequently, there are degradation pathways widely available for breaking down cyanuric acid discharged in domestic effluents. The overall degradation reaction is merely a hydrolysis; CO2 and ammonia are the initial hydrolytic breakdown products. Since no net oxidation occurs during this breakdown, biodegradation of cyanuric acid exerts no primary biological oxygen demand. However, eventual nitrification of the ammonia released will exert its usual biological oxygen demand. PMID:4451360

  15. [Aristolochic acid nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Witkowicz, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Aristolochic acid nephropathy is a chronic, fibrosing, interstitial nephritis caused by aristolochic acid (AA), which is a component of the plants of Aristolochiacae family. It was first reported in 1993, in Belgium as a Chinese herb nephropathy, in patients who received a slimming regimen containing AA. The term aristolochic acid nephropathy also includes Balcan endemic nephropathy and other endemic tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Moreover, AA is a human carcinogen which induces urothelial cancer. The AA-containing herbs are banned in many countries and FDA published the warnings concerning the safety of AA-containing botanical remedies in 2000. Regarding the increasing interest in herbal medicines, uncontrolled access to botanical remedies and replacement of one herb by another AA-containing compounds makes thousands of people all around the world at risk of this grave disease.

  16. Calorimetry of Nucleic Acids.

    PubMed

    Rozners, Eriks; Pilch, Daniel S; Egli, Martin

    2015-12-01

    This unit describes the application of calorimetry to characterize the thermodynamics of nucleic acids, specifically, the two major calorimetric methodologies that are currently employed: differential scanning (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). DSC is used to study thermally induced order-disorder transitions in nucleic acids. A DSC instrument measures, as a function of temperature (T), the excess heat capacity (C(p)(ex)) of a nucleic acid solution relative to the same amount of buffer solution. From a single curve of C(p)(ex) versus T, one can derive the following information: the transition enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS), free energy (ΔG), and heat capacity (ΔCp); the state of the transition (two-state versus multistate); and the average size of the molecule that melts as a single thermodynamic entity (e.g., the duplex). ITC is used to study the hybridization of nucleic acid molecules at constant temperature. In an ITC experiment, small aliquots of a titrant nucleic acid solution (strand 1) are added to an analyte nucleic acid solution (strand 2), and the released heat is monitored. ITC yields the stoichiometry of the association reaction (n), the enthalpy of association (ΔH), the equilibrium association constant (K), and thus the free energy of association (ΔG). Once ΔH and ΔG are known, ΔS can also be derived. Repetition of the ITC experiment at a number of different temperatures yields the ΔCp for the association reaction from the temperature dependence of ΔH.

  17. Acid rain in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  18. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in endodontics.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2013-09-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a chelating agent can bind to metals via four carboxylate and two amine groups. It is a polyamino carboxylic acid and a colorless, water-soluble solid, which is widely used to dissolve lime scale. It is produced as several salts, notably disodium EDTA and calcium disodium EDTA. EDTA reacts with the calcium ions in dentine and forms soluble calcium chelates. A review of the literature and a discussion of the different indications and considerations for its usage are presented.

  19. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid in endodontics

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is a chelating agent can bind to metals via four carboxylate and two amine groups. It is a polyamino carboxylic acid and a colorless, water-soluble solid, which is widely used to dissolve lime scale. It is produced as several salts, notably disodium EDTA and calcium disodium EDTA. EDTA reacts with the calcium ions in dentine and forms soluble calcium chelates. A review of the literature and a discussion of the different indications and considerations for its usage are presented. PMID:24966721

  20. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…