Science.gov

Sample records for acid dca trichloroacetic

  1. Trichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Trichloroacetic acid ( TCA ) ; CASRN 76 - 03 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonca

  2. TERATOGENIC ACTIVITY OF TRICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA)is a by-product of the chlorine disinfection of water containing natural organic material. It is detectable finished drinking water at levels comparable to the trihalomethanes (30-60). TCA is also formed in vivo after ingestion of hypochlorite and has be...

  3. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY DOCUMENTS FOR TRICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetic acid is a crystalline solid with sharp, pungent odor. It is used as a soil sterilizer; and as a laboratory intermediate or reagent in the synthesis of a variety of medicinal products and organic chemicals. Trichloroacetic acid is also used industrially as an etc...

  4. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  5. Using isotope dilution mass spectrometry to determine aqueous trichloroacetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, D.L.; Christman, R.F.; Johnson, J.D.; Hass, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The development, verification, and application of a method based on isotope-dilution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine aqueous trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) at the micrograms per litre level are described. The simultaneous determination of aqueous chloroform is also demonstrated. Trichloroacetic acid is shown to be a significant by-product of the chlorination of raw waters in the laboratory and to constitute a large fraction of the total organic halide (TOX) formed. Analysis of finished-water samples indicated that TCAA, like trihalomethanes is ubiquitous. Positive correlations exist between the levels of TCAA in laboratory-chlorinated raw waters and in finished waters and measured TOX.

  6. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  7. DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) INHIBITS PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS IN NORMAL HEPATOCYTES OF MALE F344 RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA} inhibits proliferation and apoptosis in nonnal hepatocytes of
    male F344 rats.

    Large segments of the population are chronically exposed to dichloroacetic acid (DCA}: DCA is a by product of the chlorine disinfection of drinking water, a metab...

  8. APOPTOSIS AND PROLIFERATION DURING DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) INDUCED HEPTACELLULAR CARCINOGENESIS IN THE F344 MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis and Proliferation During DicWoroacetic Acid (DCA) Induced Hepatocellular
    Carcinogenesis in the F344 Male Rat

    Chlorine, introduced into public drinking \\\\'ater supplies for disinfection, can react with organic compounds in surface waters to form toxic by-prod...

  9. Differential regulation of EGFR-MAPK signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Centuori, Sara M.; Martinez, Jesse D.

    2014-01-01

    A high fat diet coincides with elevated levels of bile acids. This elevation of bile acids, particularly deoxycholic acid (DCA), has been strongly associated with the development of colon cancer. Conversely, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) may have chemopreventive properties. Although structurally similar, DCA and UDCA present different biological and pathological effects in colon cancer progression. The differential regulation of cancer by these two bile acids is not yet fully understood. However, one possible explanation for their diverging effects is their ability to differentially regulate signaling pathways involved in the multistep progression of colon cancer, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. This review will examine the biological effects of DCA and UDCA on colon cancer development, as well as the diverging effects of these bile acids on the oncogenic signaling pathways that play a role in colon cancer development, with a particular emphasis on bile acid regulation of the EGFR-MAPK pathway. PMID:25027205

  10. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA), that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment Development ...

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On September 24, 2009, the Toxicological Review of Trichloroacetic Acid (TCA) and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies an...

  12. A MULTISTAGE BIOLOGICALLY BASED MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR MOUSE LIVER TUMORS INDUCED BY DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) - EXPLORATION OF THE MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A biologically based mathematical model for the induction of liver tumors in mice by dichloroacetic acid (DCA) has been developed from histopathologic analysis of the livers of exposed mice. This analysis suggests that following chronic exposure to DCA, carcinomas can arise dire...

  13. EFFECT OF PRETREATMENT WITH DICHLOROACETIC OR TRICHLOROACETIC ACID IN DRINKING WATER ON THE PHARMACOKINETICS OF A SUBSEQUENT CHALLENGE DOSE IN B6C3F1 MICE. (R825954)

    EPA Science Inventory

    h2>Abstract

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) are prominent by-products of chlorination of drinking water. Both chemicals have been shown to be hepatic carcinogens in mice. Prior work has demonstrated that DCA inhibits its own metabolism in rats and humans. ...

  14. Pharmacokinetic analysis of trichloroethylene metabolism in male B6C3F1 mice: Formation and disposition of trichloroacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sungkyoon; Kim, David; Pollack, Gary M.; Collins, Leonard B.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2009-07-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a well-known carcinogen in rodents and concerns exist regarding its potential carcinogenicity in humans. Oxidative metabolites of TCE, such as dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA), are thought to be hepatotoxic and carcinogenic in mice. The reactive products of glutathione conjugation, such as S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl) glutathione (DCVG), are associated with renal toxicity in rats. Recently, we developed a new analytical method for simultaneous assessment of these TCE metabolites in small-volume biological samples. Since important gaps remain in our understanding of the pharmacokinetics of TCE and its metabolites, we studied a time-course of DCA, TCA, DCVG and DCVG formation and elimination after a single oral dose of 2100 mg/kg TCE in male B6C3F1 mice. Based on systemic concentration-time data, we constructed multi-compartment models to explore the kinetic properties of the formation and disposition of TCE metabolites, as well as the source of DCA formation. We conclude that TCE-oxide is the most likely source of DCA. According to the best-fit model, bioavailability of oral TCE was {approx} 74%, and the half-life and clearance of each metabolite in the mouse were as follows: DCA: 0.6 h, 0.081 ml/h; TCA: 12 h, 3.80 ml/h; DCVG: 1.4 h, 16.8 ml/h; DCVC: 1.2 h, 176 ml/h. In B6C3F1 mice, oxidative metabolites are formed in much greater quantities ({approx} 3600 fold difference) than glutathione-conjugative metabolites. In addition, DCA is produced to a very limited extent relative to TCA, while most of DCVG is converted into DCVC. These pharmacokinetic studies provide insight into the kinetic properties of four key biomarkers of TCE toxicity in the mouse, representing novel information that can be used in risk assessment.

  15. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA)-INDUCED HEPATOCARCINOGENESIS IN MALE FISCHER (F344) RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of male B6C3F1 mice with DCA induced hepatoproliferative lesions (HP) including; hyperplastic nodules (HN), adenomas (HA), and carcinomas (HC). ur previous studies have suggested that HN are the putative preneoplastic lesions. ere, we studied DCA-induced liver tumors in...

  16. Electrochemical degradation of trichloroacetic acid in aqueous media: influence of the electrode material.

    PubMed

    Esclapez, M D; Díez-García, M I; Sàez, V; Bonete, P; González-García, José

    2013-01-01

    The electrochemical degradation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) in water has been analysed through voltammetric studies with a rotating disc electrode and controlled-potential bulk electrolyses. The influence of the mass-transport conditions and initial concentration of TCAA for titanium, stainless steel and carbon electrodes has been studied. It is shown that the electrochemical reduction of TCAA takes place prior to the massive hydrogen evolution in the potential window for all electrode materials studied. The current efficiency is high (> 18%) compared with those normally reported in the literature, and the fractional conversion is above 50% for all the electrodes studied. Only dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and chloride anions were routinely detected as reduction products for any of the electrodes, and reasonable values of mass balance error were obtained. Of the three materials studied, the titanium cathode gave the best results. PMID:23530352

  17. SPECIES AND STRAIN SENSITIVITY TO THE INDUCTION OF PEROXISOME PROLIFERATION BY CHLOROACETIC ACIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    B6C3F1 mice and Sprague-Dawley rats were provided drinking water containing 6 - 31 mM trichloroacetic acid (TCA), 8 - 39 mM dichloroacetic acid (DCA) or 11 - 33 mM monochloroacetic acid (MCA) for 14 days. CA and DCA, but not MCA, increased the mouse relative liver weight in a dos...

  18. Preparation and Ion Recognition Characteristics of a Trichloroacetic Acid Surface-Imprinted Material.

    PubMed

    Gao, Baojiao; Zhang, Tintin; Chen, Tao

    2015-05-01

    In this work, a trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) surface-imprinted material with high performance was prepared. In an aqueous solution, the molecules of the cationic monomer acryloyloxyethyl-trimethyl ammonium chloride (DAC) arranged around the template TCAA anion via electrostatic interaction. By initiating of the surface-initiating system of -NH2/S2O8(2-), the graft/cross-linking polymerization of DAC and the crosslinker N,N'-Methylenebisacrylamide and the TCAA surface-imprinting were simultaneously carried out on SiO2 particles, forming TCAA anion surface-imprinted material IIP-PDAC/ SiO2. With monochloroacetic acid (MCAA) and phenylacetic acid (PAA) as two contrast acids, the recognition character of the imprinted material IIP-PDAC/SiO2 was investigated. This imprinted material possesses special recognition selectivity and excellent binding affinity for TCAA anion. The binding amount of IIP-PDAC/SiO2 particles for TCAA reaches 0.93 mmol/g, whereas their binding amounts for MCAA and PAA are only 0.48 mmol/g and 0.15 mmol/g, respectively. The selectivity coefficients of IIP-PDAC/SiO2 for TCAA relative to MCAA and PAA anions are 3.61 and 9.12, respectively. PMID:26460460

  19. Efficacy of 15% Trichloroacetic Acid and 50% Glycolic Acid Peel in the Treatment of Frictional Melanosis: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sacchidanand, S; Shetty, Ashvith B; Leelavathy, B

    2015-01-01

    Background: Frictional dermal melanosis is aesthetically displeasing. Various modalities ranging from depigmenting agents to lasers have been tried but it continues to be a difficult problem to treat. Objective: To study and compare the efficacy of 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and 50% glycolic acid in the treatment of frictional melanosis of the forearm. Materials and Methods: 40 patients of frictional melanosis of the forearm were included in the study. Patients were randomly divided into two equal groups A and B. Pre-peel priming was carried out with 12% glycolic acid and sunscreen for 2 weeks. Group A was treated with trichloroacetic acid (TCA-15%) peel and Group B with glycolic acid (GA-50%) peel. Four peels were done one every 15 days. Clinical photographs were taken to assess the response. Response to therapy was evaluated by both objective and subjective methods. The patients were followed up for 3 months after the last peel to note any relapse. Results: Both TCA and glycolic acid peels were effective in frictional melanosis. TCA showed better response compared to glycolic acid at the end of the treatment, both by subjective and objective methods. However, this difference was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). No permanent side effects were seen in any of the treated patients and the improvement was sustained without any relapse at 3 months. Conclusion: Chemical peeling with both tricholoroacetic acid (15%) and glycolic acid (50%) is safe and effective for the treatment of frictional dermal melanosis. Tricholoroacetic acid was found to be marginally superior to glycolic acid. PMID:25949021

  20. GENOTOXICITY STUDIES OF SODIUM DICHLOROACETATE AND SODIUM TRICHLOROACETATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The genotoxic properties of sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) and sodium trichloroacetate (TCA)were evaluated in several short-term in vitro and in vivo assays. Neither compound was mutagenic in tester strain TA102 in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay. Both DCA and TCA were weak induc...

  1. Input of trichloroacetic acid into the vegetation of various climate zones--measurements on several continents.

    PubMed

    Weissflog, Ludwig; Krüger, Gert; Elansky, Nikolai; Putz, Erich; Pfennigsdorff, Andrea; Seyfarth, Klaus Ullrich; Nüchter, Matthias; Lange, Christian; Kotte, Karsten

    2003-07-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA, CCl(3)COOH) is a phytotoxic chemical. Although TCA salts and derivates were once used as herbicides to combat perennial grasses and weeds, they have since been banned because of their indiscriminate herbicidal effects on woody plant species. However, TCA can also be formed in the atmosphere. For instance, the high-volatile C(2)-chlorohydrocarbons tetrachloroethene (TECE, C(2)Cl(4)) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE, CCl(3)CH(3)) can react under oxidative conditions in the atmosphere to form TCA and other substances. The ongoing industrialisation of Southeast Asia, South Africa and South America means that use of TECE as solvents in the metal and textile industries of these regions in the southern hemisphere can be expected to rise. The increasing emissions of this substance--together with the rise in the atmospheric oxidation potential caused by urban activities, slash and burn agriculture and forest fires in the southern hemisphere--could lead to a greater input/formation of TCA in the vegetation located in the lee of these emission sources. By means of biomonitoring studies, the input/formation of TCA in vegetation was detected at various locations in South America, North America, Africa, and Europe. PMID:12738268

  2. Predictors of Third Trimester Blood Trihalomethanes and Urinary Trichloroacetic Acid Concentrations among Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Cao, Wen-Cheng; Zhou, Bin; Yang, Pan; Wang, Yi-Xin; Huang, Zhen; Li, Jin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-05-17

    Prenatal exposure to disinfection byproducts (DBPs) has been associated with a variety of adverse birth outcomes. However, little is known about predictors of prenatal biomarkers of exposure to DBPs among pregnant women. We aimed to identify predictors of third trimester blood trihalomethanes (THMs) and urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) concentrations, two biomarkers of exposure to DBPs, among pregnant women. Blood samples, urine samples, and questionnaires on individual characteristics and water-use activities were collected from 893 pregnant women in a Chinese cohort study. Maternal blood THM [chloroform (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and bromoform (TBM)] and urinary TCAA concentrations were measured. We used multivariable linear regression to identify the predictors of third trimester blood THM and creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentrations. The geometric mean of blood TTHM (sum of TCM, BDCM, DBCM, and TBM) and creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentrations were 51.90 ng/L and 9.66 μg/g creatinine, respectively. Study city was the strongest significant predictors of blood THM and creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentrations. Prenatal body mass index (BMI) was associated with decreased blood THM and decreased creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentrations. Age was associated with increased blood Br-THM (sum of BDCM, DBCM, and TBM) concentrations. Intake of boiled water and passive smoking were associated with lower blood THM concentrations. The predictors of blood THM and urinary TCAA concentrations identified in this study provide potential health implications on how to reduce DBP exposure during pregnancy. PMID:27095243

  3. Improved Proteomic Analysis Following Trichloroacetic Acid Extraction of Bacillus anthracis Spore Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, Brooke LD; Wunschel, David S.; Sydor, Michael A.; Warner, Marvin G.; Wahl, Karen L.; Hutchison, Janine R.

    2015-08-07

    Proteomic analysis of bacterial samples provides valuable information about cellular responses and functions under different environmental pressures. Proteomic analysis is dependent upon efficient extraction of proteins from bacterial samples without introducing bias toward extraction of particular protein classes. While no single method can recover 100% of the bacterial proteins, selected protocols can improve overall protein isolation, peptide recovery, or enrich for certain classes of proteins. The method presented here is technically simple and does not require specialized equipment such as a mechanical disrupter. Our data reveal that for particularly challenging samples, such as B. anthracis Sterne spores, trichloroacetic acid extraction improved the number of proteins identified within a sample compared to bead beating (714 vs 660, respectively). Further, TCA extraction enriched for 103 known spore specific proteins whereas bead beating resulted in 49 unique proteins. Analysis of C. botulinum samples grown to 5 days, composed of vegetative biomass and spores, showed a similar trend with improved protein yields and identification using our method compared to bead beating. Interestingly, easily lysed samples, such as B. anthracis vegetative cells, were equally as effectively processed via TCA and bead beating, but TCA extraction remains the easiest and most cost effective option. As with all assays, supplemental methods such as implementation of an alternative preparation method may provide additional insight to the protein biology of the bacteria being studied.

  4. Trichloroacetic acid in urine as biological exposure equivalent for low exposure concentrations of trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Csanády, György A; Göen, Thomas; Klein, Dominik; Drexler, Hans; Filser, Johannes G

    2010-11-01

    A urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCA) concentration of 100 mg/l at the end of the last work shift (8 h/day, 5 days/week) of the week has been established in workers as exposure equivalent for the carcinogenic substance trichloroethene (EKA for TRI) at an exposure concentration of 50 ppm TRI. Due to the continuous reduction of atmospheric TRI concentrations during the last years, the quantitative relation given by the EKA for TRI is revised for exposures to low TRI concentrations. A physiological two-compartment model is presented by which the urinary TCA concentrations are calculated that result from inhaled TRI in humans. The model contains one compartment for trichloroethanol (TCE) and one for TCA. Inhaled TRI is metabolized to TCA and to TCE. The latter is in part further oxidized to TCA. Urinary elimination of TCA is modeled to obey first order kinetics. All required model parameters were taken form the literature. In order to evaluate the model performance on the urinary TCA excretion at low exposure concentrations, predicted urinary TCA concentrations were compared with data obtained in two volunteer studies and in one field study. The model was evaluated at exposure concentrations as low as 12.5 ppm TRI. It is demonstrated that the correlation described by the hitherto used EKA for TRI is also valid at low TRI concentrations. For TRI exposure concentrations of 0.6 and 6 ppm, the resulting urinary TCA concentrations at the end of the last work shift of a week are predicted to be 1.2 and 12 mg/l, respectively. PMID:20414643

  5. Trichloroacetic acid cycling in Sitka spruce saplings and effects on sapling health following long term exposure.

    PubMed

    Dickey, C A; Heal, K V; Stidson, R T; Koren, R; Schröder, P; Cape, J N; Heal, M R

    2004-07-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA, CCl(3)COOH) has been associated with forest damage but the source of TCA to trees is poorly characterised. To investigate the routes and effects of TCA uptake in conifers, 120 Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr) saplings were exposed to control, 10 or 100 microg l(-1) solutions of TCA applied twice weekly to foliage only or soil only over two consecutive 5-month growing seasons. At the end of each growing season similar elevated TCA concentrations (approximate range 200-300 ng g(-1) dwt) were detected in both foliage and soil-dosed saplings exposed to 100 microg l(-1) TCA solutions showing that TCA uptake can occur from both exposure routes. Higher TCA concentrations in branchwood of foliage-dosed saplings suggest that atmospheric TCA in solution is taken up indirectly into conifer needles via branch and stemwood. TCA concentrations in needles declined slowly by only 25-30% over 6 months of winter without dosing. No effect of TCA exposure on sapling growth was measured during the experiment. However at the end of the first growing season needles of saplings exposed to 10 or 100 microg l(-1) foliage-applied TCA showed significantly more visible damage, higher activities of some detoxifying enzymes, lower protein contents and poorer water control than needles of saplings dosed with the same TCA concentrations to the soil. At the end of each growing season the combined TCA storage in needles, stemwood, branchwood and soil of each sapling was <6% of TCA applied. Even with an estimated half-life of tens of days for within-sapling elimination of TCA during the growing season, this indicates that TCA is eliminated rapidly before uptake or accumulates in another compartment. Although TCA stored in sapling needles accounted for only a small proportion of TCA stored in the sapling/soil system it appears to significantly affect some measures of sapling health. PMID:15158031

  6. [Evaluation of the stability of biological specimens used for monitoring of occupational exposure. Studies of the stability of phenol and trichloroacetic acid in urine].

    PubMed

    Antczak, K

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies on phenol and trichloroacetic acid concentration in urine samples stored for 30 days at + 5 degrees C and + 20 degrees C. It has been checked whether the addition of sulphuric acid as a conservant to urine can affect changes in phenol concentration in the samples stored. The results obtained did not indicate any significant changes in concentrations of phenol or trichloroacetic acid in the urine samples. It has been recommended that due to bacterial processes the material studied should be kept in refrigerator (+ 5 degrees C). PMID:2630884

  7. Comparison of trichloroacetic acid with other protein-precipitating agents in enriching abnormal prion protein for Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    LeBrun, Matthew; Huang, Hongsheng; He, Runtao; Booth, Stephanie; Balachandran, Aru; Li, Xuguang

    2008-06-01

    Detection of the abnormal or the pathogenic form of prion protein (PrP(Sc)) by Western blot (WB) is challenging, especially, for samples derived from cell cultures that contain low levels of PrP(Sc). A variety of PrP(Sc) concentration methods have been reported with various PrP(Sc) recovery efficiencies. Ultracentrifugation is one of the methods used frequently to enrich the pathogenic form of PrP(Sc) prior to WB analyses. The resulting PrP(Sc) pellet is extremely insoluble and often requires sonication to be dissolved, potentially generating aerosols. We modified the common protein-precipitating protocol using trichloroacetic acid to concentrate PrP(Sc) by slow-speed centrifugation, followed by solubilization of the pellets with 6 mol/L urea prior to sodium dodecyl sulphate -- polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and WB analyses. Comparative studies suggest this simple trichloroacetic acid protocol was more effective in enriching PrP(Sc) presented in cell cultures and brain homogenates than other reported protein-precipitating methods. Furthermore, incorporation of the urea treatment step to dissolve the precipitated PrP(Sc) pellets helped to reduce the infectivity of PrP(Sc). PMID:18535632

  8. Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) mixture toxicity to the macrophytes Myriophyllum spicatum and Myriophyllum sibiricum in aquatic microcosms.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Mark L; Sibley, Paul K; Mabury, Scott A; Solomon, Keith R; Muir, Derek C G

    2002-02-21

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) have been detected together in environmental water samples throughout the world. TCA may enter into aquatic systems via rainout as the degradation product of chlorinated solvents, herbicide use, as a by-product of water disinfection and from emissions of spent bleach liquor of kraft pulp mills. Sources of TFA include degradation of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) refrigerants and pesticides. These substances are phytotoxic and widely distributed in aquatic environments. A study to assess the risk of a binary mixture of TCA and TFA to macrophytes in aquatic microcosms was conducted as part of a larger study on haloacetic acids. M. spicatum and M. sibiricum were exposed to 0.1, 1, 3 and 10 mg/l of both TCA and TFA (neutralized with sodium hydroxide) in replicate (n = 3) 12000 l aquatic microcosms for 49 days in an one-way analysis of variance design. Each microcosm was stocked with 14 individual apical shoots per species. The plants were sampled at regular intervals and assessed for the somatic endpoints of plant length, root growth, number of nodes and wet and dry mass and the biochemical endpoints of chlorophyll-a, chlorophyll-b, carotenoid content and citric acid levels. Results indicate that there were statistically significant effects of the TCA/TFA mixture on certain pigment concentrations immediately after the start of exposure (2-7 days), but the plants showed no signs of stress thereafter. These data suggest that TCA/TFA mixtures at environmentally relevant concentrations do not pose a significant risk to these aquatic macrophytes. PMID:11878273

  9. Enhancing cosmetic outcomes by combining superficial glycolic acid (alpha-hydroxy acid) peels with nonablative lasers, intense pulsed light, and trichloroacetic acid peels.

    PubMed

    Effron, Cheryl; Briden, M Elizabeth; Green, Barbara A

    2007-01-01

    Nonablative lasers, intense pulsed light (IPL), and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peels are cosmetic rejuvenation techniques used to remodel skin and provide improved skin texture, firmness, and even pigmentation. Glycolic acid is an alpha-hydroxy acid that can be used as a topical skin peel to provide important complementary benefits to nonablative lasers, IPL, and TCA peels. Superficial glycolic acid peels provide both epidermal and dermal antiaging benefits, can be used to smooth the stratum corneum to reduce light scattering, and can enable the use of lower concentrations of TCA during a peel procedure. When used with these procedures, glycolic acid peels can enhance skin benefits and perceived patient outcomes. Methods of combining nonablative lasers, IPL, and TCA peels with glycolic acid peels were discussed at a dermatologist roundtable event and are summarized in this article. PMID:17455887

  10. Comparison of efficacy of chemical peeling with 25% trichloroacetic acid and 0.1% retinoic acid for facial rejuvenation

    PubMed Central

    Gurel, Mehmet Salih; Gungor, Sule; Tekeli, Omur; Canat, Dilek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Skin aging is a problem which negatively affects the psyche of the person, social relations, as well as work life and health and which compels the patients to find appropriate treatment methods. Numerous treatment methods have been developed in order to delay aging and to reduce the aging effects in addition to having a younger, healthier and more beautiful facial appearance. Aim To compare the efficiency, cosmetic results and possible adverse effects of the peeling treatment with 25% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and 0.1% retinoic acid for facial rejuvenation in patients presenting with skin aging. Material and methods Fifty female patients in total presenting with medium and advanced degree skin aging were subject to this study. Two separate treatment groups were formed; the first group underwent chemical skin treatment with 25% TCA while the other group was applied with 0.1% retinoic acid treatment. Following the 4 months’ treatment the patients were controlled three times in total for post lesional hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentation, scars, skin irritation and other possible changes per month. The pretreatment and first follow-up visit, and final control images were comparatively evaluated by three observers via specific software. Results The healing rates of the group subject to retinoic acid were statistically higher (p < 0.05) compared to patients in the TCA group in the final follow-up visit following the treatment according to the first and second observers. On the other hand, according to the third observer, patients applied with retinoic acid presented with higher healing rates compared to those treated with TCA, however; this rate was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The frequency of TCA- and retinoic acid-associated adverse effects was similar in both groups (p > 0.05). As a result of both treatments, a reduction in the quality of life scores as well as a pronounced recovery (p = 0.001) in the quality of life of those patients

  11. THE INDUCTION OF HEPATOCELLULAR NEOPLASIA BY TRICHLOROACETIC ACID ADMINISTERED IN THE DRINKING WATER OF THE MALE B6C3F1 MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Summary What is the study? The study is a chronic bioassay (2 years) of trichloroacetic acid, a drinking water disinfection by-product, in the male B6C3F1 mouse.
    What is the impact to the field and the Agency?
    The impact of this study will derive from the use of...

  12. Application of Carbon-Microsphere-Modified Electrodes for Electrochemistry of Hemoglobin and Electrocatalytic Sensing of Trichloroacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Cheng; Yan, Li-Jun; Shi, Fan; Niu, Xue-Liang; Huang, Guo-Lei; Zheng, Cai-Juan; Sun, Wei

    2015-01-01

    By using the hydrothermal method, carbon microspheres (CMS) were fabricated and used for electrode modification. The characteristics of CMS were investigated using various techniques. The biocompatible sensing platform was built by immobilizing hemoglobin (Hb) on the micrometer-sized CMS-modified electrode with a layer of chitosan membrane. On the cyclic voltammogram, a couple of quasi-reversible cathodic and anodic peaks appeared, showing that direct electrochemistry of Hb with the working electrode was achieved. The catalytic reduction peak currents of the bioelectrode to trichloroacetic acid was established in the linear range of 2.0~70.0 mmol·L−1 accompanied by a detection limit of 0.30 mmol·L−1 (3σ). The modified electrode displayed favorable sensitivity, good reproducibility and stability, which suggests that CMS is promising for fabricating third-generation bioelectrochemical sensors. PMID:26703621

  13. Temporal variability in urinary levels of drinking water disinfection byproducts dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid among men

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Xin; Zeng, Qiang; Wang, Le; Huang, Yue-Hui; Lu, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Peng; He, Meng-Jie; Huang, Xin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2014-11-15

    Urinary haloacetic acids (HAAs), such as dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), have been suggested as potential biomarkers of exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs). However, variable exposure to and the short elimination half-lives of these biomarkers can result in considerable variability in urinary measurements, leading to exposure misclassification. Here we examined the variability of DCAA and TCAA levels in the urine among eleven men who provided urine samples on 8 days over 3 months. The urinary concentrations of DCAA and TCAA were measured by gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detection. We calculated the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) to characterize the within-person and between-person variances and computed the sensitivity and specificity to assess how well single or multiple urine collections accurately determined personal 3-month average DCAA and TCAA levels. The within-person variance was much higher than the between-person variance for all three sample types (spot, first morning, and 24-h urine samples) for DCAA (ICC=0.08–0.37) and TCAA (ICC=0.09–0.23), regardless of the sampling interval. A single-spot urinary sample predicted high (top 33%) 3-month average DCAA and TCAA levels with high specificity (0.79 and 0.78, respectively) but relatively low sensitivity (0.47 and 0.50, respectively). Collecting two or three urine samples from each participant improved the classification. The poor reproducibility of the measured urinary DCAA and TCAA concentrations indicate that a single measurement may not accurately reflect individual long-term exposure. Collection of multiple urine samples from one person is an option for reducing exposure classification errors in studies exploring the effects of DBP exposure on reproductive health. - Highlights: • We evaluated the variability of DCAA and TCAA levels in the urine among men. • Urinary DCAA and TCAA levels varied greatly over a 3-month

  14. THE COMPARISON BETWEEN TRICHLOROACETIC ACID 50% AND CO2 LASER IN THE TREATMENT OF CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS SCAR

    PubMed Central

    Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Jaffary, Fariba; Ansari, Nazli; Moradi, Shahram; Siadat, Amir Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Background: The scars of the cutaneous leishmaniasis and psychological problems of this disease need different interventions for its correction. Aim: Our objective in this study was to compare the efficacy of 50% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) solution and CO2 laser for treatment of the atrophic scars due to leishmaniasis. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized clinical trial performed in 92 patients. Patients were randomized into two groups: the first group was treated with 50% TCA solution, once monthly and for a maximum of 5 months, and the second group was treated with CO2 laser which was performed for only one time. Patients were followed-up at 3 and 6 months after starting the treatment. The improvement of scar was graded by a 6-point scale using digital camera and the collected data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: In this study, 74 females and 18 males were enrolled. The improvement of scar was 48.13% in the TCA group and 44.87% in the CO2 laser group. This difference was not statically significant (P = 0.55). There was also no significant difference regarding side effects between these two groups. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that efficacy of focal with 50% TCA solution is compared with CO2 laser in treatment of leishmaniasis scar. Because of the low cost and simple application of TCA solution in comparison with CO2 laser, we suggest use of this treatment for correction of leishmaniasis scar or the atrophic scars. PMID:21716542

  15. The routes and kinetics of trichloroacetic acid uptake and elimination in Sitka spruce ( Picea sitchensis) saplings via atmospheric deposition pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heal, M. R.; Dickey, C. A.; Cape, J. N.; Heal, K. V.

    A major flux of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) to forests is via wet deposition, but the transfer of TCA into tree foliage may occur by an above- or below-ground pathway. To investigate the routes and kinetics of TCA uptake, two groups of 10 Sitka spruce saplings (with an equivalent number of controls) were exposed to a single application of 200 μg TCA in solution, either to the soil only, or sprayed as a mist to the foliage only. The needle foliage was subsequently analysed regularly for TCA for 3 months during the growing season. Significant uptake into current year ( C) needles was observed from both routes just a few days after application, providing direct evidence of an above-ground uptake route. Uptake of TCA was also observed in the previous year needle class ( C+1). Kinetic modelling of the data indicated that the half-life for within-needle elimination (during the growing season) was ˜50±30 days. Most of the applied TCA appeared to be degraded before uptake, either in the soil, or externally on the sapling foliage.

  16. Joint effects of trihalomethanes and trichloroacetic acid on semen quality: A population-based cross-sectional study in China.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Zhou, Bin; He, Dong-Liang; Wang, Yi-Xin; Wang, Mu; Yang, Pan; Huang, Zhen; Li, Jin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) has been individually associated with adverse male reproductive effects; however, their joint male reproductive toxicity is largely unknown. This study aimed to explore the joint effects of THMs and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) on semen quality in a Chinese population. A total of 337 men presenting to the Reproductive Center of Tongjing Hospital, in Wuhan, China to seek semen analysis were included this study. Baseline blood THMs [chloroform (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and bromoform (TBM)] and urinary TCAA were analyzed and dichotomized at their median levels. The joint effects of THMs and TCAA on below-reference semen quality parameters were evaluated by calculating the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI). After adjusting for potential confounders, we found a suggestive synergistic effect between Br-THMs (sum of BDCM, DBCM, and TBM) and TCAA for below-reference sperm count (RERI = 2.14, 95% CI: -0.37, 4.91) (P = 0.076); men with high Br-THMs and TCAA levels (above the median) had 3.31 times (95% CI: 1.21, 9.07) elevated risk of having below-reference sperm count than men with low Br-THMs and TCAA levels (below the median). No apparent joint effects were observed between THMs and TCAA for other semen quality parameters. Our results suggest that co-exposure to Br-THMs and TCAA is associated with additive effects on decreased semen quality. However, further studies in a larger sample size and mechanistic studies are needed to confirm the findings. PMID:26975004

  17. Use of urinary trichloroacetic acid as an exposure biomarker of disinfection by-products in cancer studies.

    PubMed

    Salas, Lucas A; Gracia-Lavedan, Esther; Goñi, Fernando; Moreno, Victor; Villanueva, Cristina M

    2014-11-01

    Urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) has been proposed as a valid exposure biomarker for ingested disinfection by-products (DBP) for reproductive studies. However, it has never been used in epidemiologic studies on cancer. We investigate the performance of urinary TCAA as a biomarker of DBP exposure in the framework of an epidemiologic study on cancer. We conducted home visits to collect tap water, first morning void urine, and a 48h fluid intake diary among 120 controls from a case-control study of colorectal cancer in Barcelona, Spain. We measured urine TCAA and creatinine, and 9 haloacetic acids and 4 trihalomethanes (THM) in tap water. Lifetime THM exposure was estimated based on residential history since age 18 plus routine monitoring data. Robust linear regressions were used to estimate mean change in urinary TCAA adjusted by covariates. Among the studied group, mean age was 74 years (range 63-85) and 41 (34%) were females. Mean total tap water consumption was 2.2l/48h (standard error, 0.1l/48h). Geometric mean urine TCAA excretion rate was 17.3pmol/min [95%CI: 14.0-21.3], which increased 2% for a 10% increase in TCAA ingestion and decreased with total tap water consumption (-17%/l), water intake outside home (-32%), plasmatic volume (-64%/l), in smokers (-79%), and in users of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (-50%). Urinary TCAA levels were not associated with lifetime THM exposure. In conclusion, our findings support that urine TCAA is not a valid biomarker in case-control studies of adult cancer given that advanced age, comorbidites and medication use are prevalent and are determinants of urine TCAA levels, apart from ingested TCAA levels. In addition, low TCAA concentrations in drinking water limit the validity of urine TCAA as an exposure biomarker. PMID:25462676

  18. SUBCHRONIC 90-DAY TOXICITY OF DICHLOROACETIC AND TRICHLORACETIC ACID IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either dichloroacetic acid (DCA) or trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in the drinking water at levels of 0, 50, 500 and 5000 ppm for a period of 90 days to determine the toxicities associated with subchronic exposure. ll animals were sacrificed...

  19. Optimal Concentration of 2,2,2-Trichloroacetic Acid for Protein Precipitation Based on Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Albert N; Ezoulin, Miezan JM; Youm, Ibrahima; Youan, Bi-Botti C

    2014-01-01

    For low protein concentrations containing biological samples (in proteomics) and for non proteinaceous compound assays (in bioanalysis), there is a critical need for a simple, fast, and cost-effective protein enrichment or precipitation method. However, 2,2,2-trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is traditionally used for protein precipitation at ineffective concentrations for very low protein containing samples. It is hypothesized that response surface methodology, can be used to systematically identify the optimal TCA concentration for protein precipitation in a wider concentration range. To test this hypothesis, a central composite design is used to assess the effects of two factors (X1 = volume of aqueous solution of protein, and X2 = volume of TCA solution 6.1N) on the optical absorbance of the supernatant (Y1), and the percentage of protein precipitated (Y2). Using either bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein or human urine (with 20 ppm protein content), 4% w/v (a saddle point) is the optimal concentration of the TCA solution for protein precipitation that is visualized by SDS-PAGE analysis. At this optimal concentration, the Y2-values range from 76.26 to 92.67% w/w for 0.016 to 2 mg/mL of BSA solution. It is also useful for protein enrichment and xenobiotic analysis in protein-free supernatant as applied to tenofovir (a model HIV microbicide). In these conditions, the limit of detection and limit of quantitation of tenofovir are respectively 0.0014 mg/mL and 0.0042 mg/mL. This optimal concentration of TCA provides optimal condition for protein purification and analysis of any xenobiotic compound like tenofovir. PMID:25750762

  20. Trichloroacetic acid in the vegetation of polluted and remote areas of both hemispheres—Part II: salt lakes as novel sources of natural chlorohydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissflog, Ludwig; Elansky, Nikolai; Putz, Erich; Krueger, Gert; Lange, Christian A.; Lisitzina, Lida; Pfennigsdorff, Andrea

    One of the issues provided for by the 1993 existing substances regulation (793/93/EEC) is the assessment of the environmental risk emanating from waste materials. One such material is the highly volatile substance perchloroethene (PER; TECE). PER is produced in large quantities all over the world by the chemical industry. There are many industrial processes in which PER escapes into the environment, especially the atmosphere. It has since been proven that after entering plants via the air/leaf pathway, airborne PER can be metabolised into the phytotoxic substance trichloroacetic acid. However our own studies detected relatively high levels of TCA in environmental compartments in regions far away from industry which cannot be explained by the anthropogenic input of airborne substances into the relevant ecosystems. This indicates that natural PER emittents also exist and must be identified, in order to find out more about the global spread of PER. This paper reports on the findings of related fieldwork in the Kalmykian Steppe. This area of steppe in southern Russia spans an area extending west-to-east from the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea and north-to-south between the Greater Caucasus and Volgograd. The main aim of the experiments in the Kalmykian Steppe was to study water from lakes, rivers and springs with differing levels of salinity. The concentrations of the chlorinated hydrocarbons (VCHCs) chloroform (CHCl 3), tetrachloromethane (CCl 4), 1,1,1-trichloroethane (1,1,1-C 2H 3Cl 3), trichloroethene (TRI; C 2HCl 3), tetrachloroethene (PER; C 2Cl 4) and TCA in these waters were measured, along with the levels of cations and anions and the pH-value of the waters. The measurements indicate that in particular water from salt lakes located in semiarid/arid areas of the study region must be considered as new types of natural emittents of PER and other chlorinated hydrocarbons as well as trichloroacetic acid. Furthermore, attention is drawn to ecological impacts

  1. An Optimized Trichloroacetic Acid/Acetone Precipitation Method for Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Analysis of Qinchuan Cattle Longissimus Dorsi Muscle Containing High Proportion of Marbling

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ruijie; Adoligbe, Camus; Jiang, Bijie; Zhao, Xianlin; Gui, Linsheng; Qu, Kaixing; Wu, Sen; Zan, Linsen

    2015-01-01

    Longissimus dorsi muscle (LD) proteomics provides a novel opportunity to reveal the molecular mechanism behind intramuscular fat deposition. Unfortunately, the vast amounts of lipids and nucleic acids in this tissue hampered LD proteomics analysis. Trichloroacetic acid (TCA)/acetone precipitation is a widely used method to remove contaminants from protein samples. However, the high speed centrifugation employed in this method produces hard precipitates, which restrict contaminant elimination and protein re-dissolution. To address the problem, the centrifugation precipitates were first grinded with a glass tissue grinder and then washed with 90% acetone (TCA/acetone-G-W) in the present study. According to our result, the treatment for solid precipitate facilitated non-protein contaminant removal and protein re-dissolution, ultimately improving two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis. Additionally, we also evaluated the effect of sample drying on 2-DE profile as well as protein yield. It was found that 30 min air-drying did not result in significant protein loss, but reduced horizontal streaking and smearing on 2-DE gel compared to 10 min. In summary, we developed an optimized TCA/acetone precipitation method for protein extraction of LD, in which the modifications improved the effectiveness of TCA/acetone method. PMID:25893432

  2. Urinary trichloroacetic acid levels and semen quality: A hospital-based cross-sectional study in Wuhan, China

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shao-Hua; Li, Yu-Feng; Tan, Yin-Feng; Zheng, Dan; Liu, Ai-Lin; Xie, Hong; and others

    2011-02-15

    Toxicological studies indicate an association between exposure to disinfection by-products (DBPs) and impaired male reproductive health in animals. However, epidemiological evidence in humans is still limited. We conducted a hospital-based cross-sectional study to investigate the effect of exposure to DBPs on semen quality in humans. Between May 2008 and July 2008, we recruited 418 male partners in sub-fertile couples seeking infertility medical instruction or assisted reproduction services from the Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China. Major semen parameters analyzed included sperm concentration, motility, and morphology. Exposure to DBPs was estimated by their urinary creatinine-adjusted trichloroacetic (TCAA) concentrations that were measured with the gas chromatography/electron capture detection method. We used linear regression to assess the relationship between exposure to DBPs and semen quality. According to the World Health Organization criteria (<20 million/mL for sperm concentration and <50% motile for sperm motility) and threshold value recommended by Guzick (<9% for sperm morphology), there were 265 men with all parameters at or above the reference values, 33 men below the reference sperm concentration, 151 men below the reference sperm motility, and 6 men below the reference sperm morphology. The mean (median) urinary creatinine-adjusted TCAA concentration was 9.2 (5.1) {mu}g/g creatinine. Linear regression analyses indicated no significant association of sperm concentration, sperm count, and sperm morphology with urinary TCAA levels. Compared with those in the lowest quartile of creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentrations, subjects in the second and third quartiles had a decrease of 5.1% (95% CI: 0.6%, 9.7%) and 4.7% (95% CI: 0.2%, 9.2%) in percent motility, respectively. However, these associations were not significant after adjustment for age, abstinence time, and smoking status. The present study provides suggestive but inconclusive evidence of the

  3. The very short hydrogen bond in the pyridine N-oxide - trichloroacetic Acid complex: an inelastic neutron scattering and computational study.

    PubMed

    Stare, Jernej; Hartl, Monika; Daemen, Luke; Eckert, Juergen

    2011-09-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of the very short hydrogen bond (RO...O = 2.430 Å) of the pyridine N-oxide trichloroacetic acid complex in the solid state by combining vibrational spectroscopy using inelastic neutron scattering with extensive computational studies and analysis of the vibrational spectra. The Density Functional Theory (DFT) computational models used ranged from the isolated gas phase cluster to three approaches with periodic boundary conditions, namely CRYSTAL, CPMD and VASP, all of which, however calculate frequencies in the harmonic approximation. While all but the gas phase calculation yield structural parameters for the hydrogen bond in reasonable agreement with experiment, only the periodic VASP and CPMD approaches resulted in INS spectra (calculated with the program a-climax) that adequately reproduced some of the key features of the experimental spectrum related to the in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes of the H-bond. No clear indication was found either in experiment or computational studies for OH stretching. More sophisticated and time-consuming calculations are therefore indicated to elaborate on the hydrogen bond dynamics including molecular dynamics simulations or the use of quantum dynamics on multidimensional potential energy surfaces. PMID:24062112

  4. A Comparison between the Effects of Glucantime, Topical Trichloroacetic Acid 50% plus Glucantime, and Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser plus Glucantime on Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jaffary, Fariba; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Siadat, Amirhossein; Haftbaradaran, Elaheh; Ansari, Nazli; Ahmadi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an endemic disease in Iran. Pentavalent antimonial drugs have been the first line of therapy in cutaneous leishmaniasis for many years. However, the cure rate of these agents is still not favorable. This study was carried out to compare the efficacies of intralesional glucantime with topical trichloroacetic acid 50% (TCA 50%) + glucantime and fractional carbon dioxide laser + glucantime in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Methods. A total of 90 patients were randomly divided into three groups of 30 to be treated with intralesional injection of glucantime, a combination of topical TCA 50% and glucantime, or a combination of fractional laser and glucantime. The overall clinical improvement and changes in sizes of lesions and scars were assessed and compared among three groups. Results. The mean duration of treatment was 6.1 ± 2.1 weeks in all patients (range: 2–12 weeks) and 6.8 ± 1.7, 5.2 ± 1.0, and 6.3 ± 3.0 weeks in glucantime, topical TCA plus glucantime, and fractional laser plus glucantime groups, respectively (P = 0.011). Complete improvement was observed in 10 (38.5%), 27 (90%), and 20 (87%) patients of glucantime, glucantime + TCA, and glucantime + laser groups, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion. Compared to glucantime alone, the combination of intralesional glucantime and TCA 50% or fractional CO2 laser had significantly higher and faster cure rate in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis. PMID:27148363

  5. Trichloroacetic acid in the vegetation of polluted and remote areas of both hemispheres—Part I. Its formation, uptake and geographical distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissflog, Ludwig; Pfennigsdorff, Andrea; Martinez-Pastur, Guillermo; Puliafito, Enrique; Figueroa, Dante; Elansky, Nikolai; Nikonov, Vyasheslav; Putz, Erich; Krüger, Gert; Kellner, Klaus

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA; CCl 3COOH) is a phytotoxic chemical. Although TCA salts and derivatives were once deployed as herbicides against perennial grasses and weeds, their use has since been banned because of their indiscriminate herbicidal effects on woody plant species. However, TCA can also be formed in the atmosphere. For instance, high-volatile C 2-chlorohydrocarbons tetrachloroethene (TECE, C 2Cl 4) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCE, CCl 3CH 3) can react to TCA and other substances under oxidative conditions here. Owing to further industrialisation of Southeast Asia, South Africa and South America, a rise can be expected in the use of TECE as solvents in the metal and textile industries of these regions in the southern hemisphere (SH). The increasing emissions of this substance—together with the rise in the atmospheric oxidation potential caused by urban activities, slash and burn agriculture and forest fires in the SH—will result in the increased input/formation of TCA in the vegetation located on the lee side of these emission sources. By means of biomonitoring studies, inputs/formation of TCA related to the climatic conditions were detected at various locations in South America, Africa, and Europe.

  6. Mode of action of liver tumor induction by trichloroethylene and its metabolites, trichloroacetate and dichloroacetate.

    PubMed Central

    Bull, R J

    2000-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) induces liver cancer in mice but not in rats. Three metabolites of TCE may contribute--chloral hydrate (CH), dichloroacetate (DCA), and trichloroacetate (TCA). CH and TCA appear capable of only inducing liver tumors in mice, but DCA is active in rats as well. The concentrations of TCA in blood required to induce liver cancer approach the mM range. Concentrations of DCA in blood associated with carcinogenesis are in the sub-microM range. The carcinogenic activity of CH is largely dependent on its conversion to TCA and/or DCA. TCA is a peroxisome proliferator in the same dose range that induces liver cancer. Mice with targeted disruptions of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-alpha) are insensitive to the liver cancer-inducing properties of other peroxisome proliferators. Human cells do not display the responses associated with PPAR-alpha that are observed in rodents. This may be attributed to lower levels of expressed PPAR-alpha in human liver. DCA treatment produces liver tumors with a different phenotype than TCA. Its tumorigenic effects are closely associated with differential effects on cell replication rates in tumors, normal hepatocytes, and suppression of apoptosis. Growth of DCA-induced tumors has been shown to arrest after cessation of treatment. The DCA and TCA adequately account for the hepatocarcinogenic responses to TCE. Low-level exposure to TCE is not likely to induce liver cancer in humans. Higher exposures to TCE could affect sensitive populations. Sensitivity could be based on different metabolic capacities for TCE or its metabolites or result from certain chronic diseases that have a genetic basis. PMID:10807555

  7. Application of talcum powder, trichloroacetic acid and silver nitrate in female rats for non-surgical sterilization: evaluation of the apoptotic pathway mRNA and miRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Yumrutas, Onder; Kara, Murat; Atilgan, Remzi; Kavak, Salih Burcin; Bozgeyik, Ibrahim; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2015-04-01

    There are several methods used for non-surgical sterilization in birth control including quinacrine, trichloroacetic acid (TCA), erythromycin, tetracycline, silver nitrate and talcum powder. Among these, talcum powder, TCA and silver nitrate are the most commonly used. However, the toxic and carcinogenic activities of these chemicals in ovarian tissue have been poorly elucidated. This study demonstrates the expression levels of antioxidant, apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes after administration of talc powder, TCA and silver nitrate for non-surgical sterilization in female rat models. The expression changes of some microRNAs (miR-15b, miR-21, miR-34a and miR-98) that play key roles in the apoptosis pathway were also included. All expression analyses were evaluated with real-time PCR. The expression levels of all genes appeared to be upregulated in the talcum powder group, but the results were not statistically significant. Increased expression of Gsr and Sod1 genes was statistically significant in the talcum powder group. In TCA and silver nitrate group, expression of all genes was appeared to be elevated but only the Gsr expression was statistically significant in the TCA-administrated group; there were no statistically significant changes in the silver nitrate group. miRNA expression levels were increased in talcum powder and TCA-administrated groups, but these results were not significant. Expression levels of miR-15b, miR-21 and miR-98 in the silver nitrate group were significantly increased. Consequently, these chemicals appear to be non-carcinogenic agents for rat ovarian tissue which do not induce apoptosis. However, talcum powder and TCA can be considered as agents that are toxic to ovarian tissue. PMID:25885949

  8. DCA promotes progression of neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Feuerecker, Benedikt; Seidl, Christof; Pirsig, Sabine; Bruchelt, Gernot; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard

    2015-01-01

    Even in the presence of oxygen most cancer cells convert glucose to lactate via pyruvate instead of performing oxidative phosphorylation (aerobic glycolysis-Warburg effect). Thus, it has been considered to shift pyruvate - the metabolite of aerobic glycolysis - to acetylCoA by activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). AcetylCoA will then be metabolized by oxidative phosphorylation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to shift tumor cells from aerobic glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation using dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of PDH-kinase. The effects of DCA were assayed in vitro in Neuro-2a (murine neuroblastoma), Kelly and SK-N-SH (human neuroblastoma) as well as SkBr3 (human breast carcinoma) cell lines. The effects of DCA on tumor development were investigated in vivo using NMRI nu/nu mice bearing subcutaneous Neuro-2a xenografts. For that purpose animals were treated continuously with DCA in the drinking water. Tumor volumes were monitored using caliper measurements and via [18F]-FDG-positron emission tomography. DCA treatment increased viability/proliferation in Neuro-2a and SkBr3 cells, but did not cause significant alterations of PDH activity. However, no significant effects of DCA could be observed in Kelly and SK-N-SH cells. Accordingly, in mice bearing Neuro-2a xenografts, DCA significantly increased tumor proliferation compared to mock-treated mice. Thus, we could demonstrate that DCA - an indicated inhibitor of tumor growth - efficiently promotes tumor growth in Neuro-2a cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25973318

  9. Transport and activity of Desulfitobacterium dichloroeliminans strain DCA1 during bioaugmentation of 1,2-DCA-contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Maes, Ann; Van Raemdonck, Hilde; Smith, Katherine; Ossieur, Wendy; Lebbe, Luc; Verstraete, Willy

    2006-09-01

    The transport and activity of Desulfitobacterium dichloroeliminans strain DCA1 in 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA)-contaminated groundwater have been evaluated through an in situ bioaugmentation test at an industrial site (Belgium). The migration of strain DCA1 was monitored from an injection well toward a monitoring well, and the effect of the imposed groundwater flow on its distribution was assessed by means of transport model MOCDENS3D. The results of the real-time PCR (16S rRNA gene) quantification downstream from the injection point were used to evaluate the bacterial distribution pattern simulated by MOCDENS3D. In the injection well, the 1,2-DCA concentration in the groundwater decreased from 939.8 to 0.9 microM in a 35 day time interval and in the presence of a sodium lactate solution. Moreover, analyses from the monitoring well showed that the cells were still active after transport through the aquifer, although biodegradation occurred to a lesser extent. This study showed that strain DCA1 can be successfully applied for the removal of 1,2-DCA under field conditions and that its limited retardation offers perspectives for large-scale cleanup processes of industrial sites. PMID:16999138

  10. Ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium cyanamide (bmim [dca]) as a solvent and catalyst for acylation of maltodextrin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have found a novel method to prepare maltodextrin stearate with DS upto 0.60 in 90% yields from maltodextrin in IL bmim[dca] reacted with vinyl stearate or stearic acid. In this work we have demonstrated that IL could simultaneously act as a solvent and as a catalyst for reaction of maltodextrin...

  11. Efficient Nonnegative Matrix Factorization by DC Programming and DCA.

    PubMed

    Le Thi, Hoai An; Vo, Xuan Thanh; Dinh, Tao Pham

    2016-06-01

    In this letter, we consider the nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) problem and several NMF variants. Two approaches based on DC (difference of convex functions) programming and DCA (DC algorithm) are developed. The first approach follows the alternating framework that requires solving, at each iteration, two nonnegativity-constrained least squares subproblems for which DCA-based schemes are investigated. The convergence property of the proposed algorithm is carefully studied. We show that with suitable DC decompositions, our algorithm generates most of the standard methods for the NMF problem. The second approach directly applies DCA on the whole NMF problem. Two algorithms-one computing all variables and one deploying a variable selection strategy-are proposed. The proposed methods are then adapted to solve various NMF variants, including the nonnegative factorization, the smooth regularization NMF, the sparse regularization NMF, the multilayer NMF, the convex/convex-hull NMF, and the symmetric NMF. We also show that our algorithms include several existing methods for these NMF variants as special versions. The efficiency of the proposed approaches is empirically demonstrated on both real-world and synthetic data sets. It turns out that our algorithms compete favorably with five state-of-the-art alternating nonnegative least squares algorithms. PMID:27136704

  12. Report of tests of a compressor configuration of DCA blading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himes, S. J.

    1983-06-01

    Results of an experimental program to measure the performance of a compressor stator cascade consisting of 20 double-circular-arc (DCA) blades of chord 5.01 inches, aspect ratio 2.0 and solidity 1.67 under conditions of varying incidence angle and Reynolds number are reported. Flow quality and blade performance data were obtained using pneumatic probe surveys and surface pressure measurements. Changes in Reynolds numbers in the range of 500,000 to 770,000 did not measurably affect either flow quality or blade performance. Changes in incidence angle over the range -15 to 10 degrees produced generally well behaved blade performance parameters.

  13. Tumorigenic effects of dichloroacetic acid in female F344 rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a halogenated organic acid produced during oxidant disinfection of drinking water. Prior studies indicate that DCA may increase liver tumors in mice. Here we evaluated the hepatic tumorigenicity of DCA in female rats when given alone ...

  14. Removal of EDB and 1,2-DCA by Abiotic Reaction with Iron(II) Sulfide

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ethylene Dibromide (EDB) and 1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) were used as lead scavengers in leaded motor gasoline in the USA until the late 1980s. Leaded gasoline in contact with ground water should produce concentrations of EDB near 1900 µg/L, and concentrations of 1,2-DCA near 3...

  15. ALTERED GENE EXPRESSION IN MOUSE LIVERS AFTER DICHLOROACETIC ACID EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated that DCA exhibits hepatocarcinogenic effects in rodents when administered in drinking water. The mechanism(s) involved in DCA induction of cancer are not clear...

  16. THE ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF TRICHLORACETIC ACID (TCAA) IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) is a member of the family of compounds known as chloroacetic acids, which includes mono-, di- and trichloroacetic acid. The significant property these compounds share is that they are all phytotoxic. TCAA once was widely used as a potent herbicide. ...

  17. PHARMACOKINETIC AND MECHANISTIC RESEARCH TO IMPROVE CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorination of water containing organic material (humic, fulvic acids) results in the generation of many organic compounds, including DCA. DCA is commonly found in finished drinking water at concentrations ranging from 10-50 micrograms/liter. Several studies indicate that DCA is...

  18. Deoxycholic acid transformations catalyzed by selected filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Kollerov, V V; Lobastova, T G; Monti, D; Deshcherevskaya, N O; Ferrandi, E E; Fronza, G; Riva, S; Donova, M V

    2016-03-01

    More than 100 filamentous fungi strains, mostly ascomycetes and zygomycetes from different phyla, were screened for the ability to convert deoxycholic acid (DCA) to valuable bile acid derivatives. Along with 11 molds which fully degraded DCA, several strains were revealed capable of producing cholic acid, ursocholic acid, 12-keto-lithocholic acid (12-keto-LCA), 3-keto-DCA, 15β-hydroxy-DCA and 15β-hydroxy-12-oxo-LCA as major products from DCA. The last metabolite was found to be a new compound. The ability to catalyze the introduction of a hydroxyl group at the 7(α/β)-positions of the DCA molecule was shown for 32 strains with the highest 7β-hydroxylase activity level for Fusarium merismoides VKM F-2310. Curvularia lunata VKM F-644 exhibited 12α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity and formed 12-keto-LCA from DCA. Acremonium rutilum VKM F-2853 and Neurospora crassa VKM F-875 produced 15β-hydroxy-DCA and 15β-hydroxy-12-oxo-LCA, respectively, as major products from DCA, as confirmed by MS and NMR analyses. For most of the positive strains, the described DCA-transforming activity was unreported to date. The presented results expand the knowledge on bile acid metabolism by filamentous fungi, and might be suitable for preparative-scale exploitation aimed at the production of marketed bile acids. PMID:26718089

  19. Honokiol bis-dichloroacetate (Honokiol DCA) demonstrates activity in vemurafenib-resistant melanoma in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, Michael Y.; Karlsson, Isabella; Rodolfo, Monica; Arnold, Rebecca S.; Vergani, Elisabetta; Arbiser, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of human melanomas bears BRAF mutations and thus is treated with inhibitors of BRAF, such as vemurafenib. While patients with BRAF mutations often demonstrate an initial dramatic response to vemurafenib, relapse is extremely common. Thus, novel agents are needed for the treatment of these aggressive melanomas. Honokiol is a small molecule compound derived from Magnolia grandiflora that has activity against solid tumors and hematopoietic neoplasms. In order to increase the lipophilicity of honokiol, we have synthesized honokiol DCA, the dichloroacetate ester of honokiol. In addition, we synthesized a novel fluorinated honokiol analog, bis-trifluoromethyl-bis-(4-hydroxy-3-allylphenyl) methane (hexafluoro). Both compounds exhibited activity against A375 melanoma in vivo, but honokiol DCA was more active. Gene arrays comparing treated with vehicle control tumors demonstrated induction of the respiratory enzyme succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) by treatment, suggesting that our honokiol analogs induce respiration in vivo. We then examined its effect against a pair of melanomas, LM36 and LM36R, in which LM36R differs from LM36 in that LM36R has acquired vemurafenib resistance. Honokiol DCA demonstrated in vivo activity against LM36R (vemurafenib resistant) but not against parental LM36. Honokiol DCA and hexafluoro inhibited the phosphorylation of DRP1, thus stimulating a phenotype suggestive of respiration through mitochondrial normalization. Honokiol DCA may act in vemurafenib resistant melanomas to increase both respiration and reactive oxygen generation, leading to activity against aggressive melanoma in vivo. PMID:26871475

  20. DETECTION OF EARLY GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES BY DIFFERENTIAL DISPLAY IN THE LIVERS OF MICE EXPOSED TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in mice when administered in drinking water. The mechanism of DCA carcinogenicity is not clear and we speculate that changes...

  1. Targeting HIF-1α is a prerequisite for cell sensitivity to dichloroacetate (DCA) and metformin.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Eun; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Kim, Hyun-Ah; Seong, Min-Ki; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Choe, Tae-Boo; Lee, Jin Kyung; Kim, Jong-Il; Park, In-Chul; Noh, Woo Chul

    2016-01-01

    Recently, targeting deregulated energy metabolism is an emerging strategy for cancer therapy. In the present study, combination of DCA and metformin markedly induced cell death, compared with each drug alone. Furthermore, the expression levels of glycolytic enzymes including HK2, LDHA and ENO1 were downregulated by two drugs. Interestingly, HIF-1α activation markedly suppressed DCA/metformin-induced cell death and recovered the expressions of glycolytic enzymes that were decreased by two drugs. Based on these findings, we propose that targeting HIF-1α is necessary for cancer metabolism targeted therapy. PMID:26616058

  2. Removal of EDB and 1,2-DCA by Abiotic Reaction with Iron (II) Sulfide

    EPA Science Inventory

    To properly evaluate the risk associated with exposure to EDB and 1,2-DCA in ground water from old spills of leaded gasoline, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms that may attenuate concentrations of these compounds in ground water. TCE reacts rapidly with iron (II) sulf...

  3. Reactive modelling of 1,2-DCA and DOC near the shoreline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombani, N.; Pantano, A.; Mastrocicco, M.; Petitta, M.

    2014-11-01

    1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) was found to be the most abundant compound among chlorinated hydrocarbons detected in a petrochemical plant in southern Italy. This site is located near the coastline, and it is set above an unconfined coastal aquifer, where seawater intrusion is present. The presence of organic and inorganic contaminants at this site has required the implementation of remediation strategies, consisting of pumping wells (hydraulic barrier) and a horizontal flow barrier. The purpose of this work was to assess the influence of salt water intrusion on the degradation rate of 1,2-DCA. This was done on a three-dimensional domain relative to a limited portion of a well characterized field site, accounting for density-dependent flow and reactive transport modelling of 1,2-DCA and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC). The modelling procedure was performed employing SEAWAT-4.0 and PHT3D, to reproduce the complex three-dimensional flow and transport domain. In order to determine the fate of 1,2-DCA, detailed field investigations provided intensive depth profile information. Different, kinetically controlled degradation rates were simulated to explain the observed, selective degradation of pollutants in groundwater. Calibration of the model was accomplished by comparison with the two different sets of measurements obtained from the MLS devices and from pumping wells. With the calibrated model, it was possible to distinguish between dispersive non-reactive processes and bacterially mediated reactions. In the non-reactive model, 1,2-DCA sorption was simulated using linear sorption coefficient determined with field data and 1,2-DCA degradation was simulated using a first order decay coefficient using literature data as initial guess. Finally, on the reactive transport model, where a two-step approach with partial equilibrium approach was implemented, the effects of neglecting the cation exchange capacity, omitting density-dependent flow, and refining the vertical

  4. Reactive modelling of 1,2-DCA and DOC near the shoreline.

    PubMed

    Colombani, N; Pantano, A; Mastrocicco, M; Petitta, M

    2014-11-15

    1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) was found to be the most abundant compound among chlorinated hydrocarbons detected in a petrochemical plant in southern Italy. This site is located near the coastline, and it is set above an unconfined coastal aquifer, where seawater intrusion is present. The presence of organic and inorganic contaminants at this site has required the implementation of remediation strategies, consisting of pumping wells (hydraulic barrier) and a horizontal flow barrier. The purpose of this work was to assess the influence of salt water intrusion on the degradation rate of 1,2-DCA. This was done on a three-dimensional domain relative to a limited portion of a well characterized field site, accounting for density-dependent flow and reactive transport modelling of 1,2-DCA and Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC). The modelling procedure was performed employing SEAWAT-4.0 and PHT3D, to reproduce the complex three-dimensional flow and transport domain. In order to determine the fate of 1,2-DCA, detailed field investigations provided intensive depth profile information. Different, kinetically controlled degradation rates were simulated to explain the observed, selective degradation of pollutants in groundwater. Calibration of the model was accomplished by comparison with the two different sets of measurements obtained from the MLS devices and from pumping wells. With the calibrated model, it was possible to distinguish between dispersive non-reactive processes and bacterially mediated reactions. In the non-reactive model, 1,2-DCA sorption was simulated using linear sorption coefficient determined with field data and 1,2-DCA degradation was simulated using a first order decay coefficient using literature data as initial guess. Finally, on the reactive transport model, where a two-step approach with partial equilibrium approach was implemented, the effects of neglecting the cation exchange capacity, omitting density-dependent flow, and refining the vertical

  5. DCA1 Acts as a Transcriptional Co-activator of DST and Contributes to Drought and Salt Tolerance in Rice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Long-Gang; Shan, Jun-Xiang; Shi, Min; Gao, Ji-Ping; Lin, Hong-Xuan

    2015-10-01

    Natural disasters, including drought and salt stress, seriously threaten food security. In previous work we cloned a key zinc finger transcription factor gene, Drought and Salt Tolerance (DST), a negative regulator of drought and salt tolerance that controls stomatal aperture in rice. However, the exact mechanism by which DST regulates the expression of target genes remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that DST Co-activator 1 (DCA1), a previously unknown CHY zinc finger protein, acts as an interacting co-activator of DST. DST was found to physically interact with itself and to form a heterologous tetramer with DCA1. This transcriptional complex appears to regulate the expression of peroxidase 24 precursor (Prx 24), a gene encoding an H2O2 scavenger that is more highly expressed in guard cells. Downregulation of DCA1 significantly enhanced drought and salt tolerance in rice, and overexpression of DCA1 increased sensitivity to stress treatment. These phenotypes were mainly influenced by DCA1 and negatively regulated stomatal closure through the direct modulation of genes associated with H2O2 homeostasis. Our findings establish a framework for plant drought and salt stress tolerance through the DCA1-DST-Prx24 pathway. Moreover, due to the evolutionary and functional conservation of DCA1 and DST in plants, engineering of this pathway has the potential to improve tolerance to abiotic stress in other important crop species. PMID:26496194

  6. DCA1 Acts as a Transcriptional Co-activator of DST and Contributes to Drought and Salt Tolerance in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Long-Gang; Shan, Jun-Xiang; Shi, Min; Gao, Ji-Ping; Lin, Hong-Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Natural disasters, including drought and salt stress, seriously threaten food security. In previous work we cloned a key zinc finger transcription factor gene, Drought and Salt Tolerance (DST), a negative regulator of drought and salt tolerance that controls stomatal aperture in rice. However, the exact mechanism by which DST regulates the expression of target genes remains unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that DST Co-activator 1 (DCA1), a previously unknown CHY zinc finger protein, acts as an interacting co-activator of DST. DST was found to physically interact with itself and to form a heterologous tetramer with DCA1. This transcriptional complex appears to regulate the expression of peroxidase 24 precursor (Prx 24), a gene encoding an H2O2 scavenger that is more highly expressed in guard cells. Downregulation of DCA1 significantly enhanced drought and salt tolerance in rice, and overexpression of DCA1 increased sensitivity to stress treatment. These phenotypes were mainly influenced by DCA1 and negatively regulated stomatal closure through the direct modulation of genes associated with H2O2 homeostasis. Our findings establish a framework for plant drought and salt stress tolerance through the DCA1-DST-Prx24 pathway. Moreover, due to the evolutionary and functional conservation of DCA1 and DST in plants, engineering of this pathway has the potential to improve tolerance to abiotic stress in other important crop species. PMID:26496194

  7. Deoxycholic acid mediates non-canonical EGFR-MAPK activation through the induction of calcium signaling in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Centuori, Sara M; Gomes, Cecil J; Trujillo, Jesse; Borg, Jamie; Brownlee, Joshua; Putnam, Charles W; Martinez, Jesse D

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and a western diet have been linked to high levels of bile acids and the development of colon cancer. Specifically, increased levels of the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), an established tumor promoter, has been shown to correlate with increased development of colorectal adenomas and progression to carcinoma. Herein we investigate the mechanism by which DCA leads to EGFR-MAPK activation, a candidate mechanism by which DCA may promote colorectal tumorigenesis. DCA treated colon cancer cells exhibited strong and prolonged activation of ERK1/2 when compared to EGF treatment alone. We also showed that DCA treatment prevents EGFR degradation as opposed to the canonical EGFR recycling observed with EGF treatment. Moreover, the combination of DCA and EGF treatment displayed synergistic activity, suggesting DCA activates MAPK signaling in a non-canonical manner. Further evaluation showed that DCA treatment increased intracellular calcium levels and CAMKII phosphorylation, and that blocking calcium with BAPTA-AM abrogated MAPK activation induced by DCA, but not by EGF. Finally we showed that DCA-induced CAMKII leads to MAPK activation through the recruitment of c-Src. Taken together, we demonstrated that DCA regulates MAPK activation through calcium signaling, an alternative mechanism not previously recognized in human colon cancer cells. Importantly, this mechanism allows for EGFR to escape degradation and thus achieve a constitutively active state, which may explain its tumor promoting effects. PMID:27086143

  8. The Dca gene involved in cold adaptation in Drosophila melanogaster arose by duplication of the ancestral regucalcin gene.

    PubMed

    Arboleda-Bustos, Carlos E; Segarra, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    The Drosophila cold acclimation gene (Dca) is involved in the adaptive response to low temperatures. This gene is upregulated at the transcriptional level when D. melanogaster flies are exposed 1 day to 15 °C. Dca (or smp-30) is a member of the SMP-30/Gluconolactonase/LRE-like family. In the current study, we characterized the members of this gene family in the 12 Drosophila species with available complete genomes sequences. Two paralogous genes, Dca and regucalcin, were identified in all the Sophophora subgenus species (9 of the 12 species), and their presence was further confirmed in three other species of the subgenus (D. subobscura, D. madeirensis, and D. guanche). However, only regucalcin was present in the species of the Drosophila subgenus (D. grimshawi, D. virilis, and D. mojavensis). The phylogenetic analysis and the molecular organization of Dca that is a nested intronic gene support that Dca arose by a duplication event from the ancestral regucalcin gene after the split of the Sophophora and Drosophila subgenera but before the Sophophora radiation. After the duplication event, the nonsynonymous fixation rate increased in the branch leading to Dca (but not to regucalcin), suggesting the neofunctionalization of the former duplicate. Thus, regucalcin would have maintained the ancestral gene function, and Dca would have acquired a new function likely related to Ca²⁺ homeostasis and cold acclimation. Molecular evolution of Dca has been affected by its implication in the adaptive response to cold temperatures. Indeed, the gene has evolved under stronger purifying selection in the temperate than in the tropical Sophophora species, as reflected by the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions. This result is consistent with functional constraints acting on the DCA protein to keep species adaptation to temperate climates. Dca and regucalcin also differ in their expression patterns. The expression profile of regucalcin is similar to that of the

  9. The role of biotransformation and oxidative stress in 3,5-dichloroaniline (3,5-DCA) induced nephrotoxicity in isolated renal cortical cells from male Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Racine, Christopher R; Ferguson, Travis; Preston, Debbie; Ward, Dakota; Ball, John; Anestis, Dianne; Valentovic, Monica; Rankin, Gary O

    2016-02-01

    Among the mono- and dichloroanilines, 3,5-dichloroaniline (3,5-DCA) is the most potent nephrotoxicant in vivo and in vitro. However, the role of renal biotransformation in 3,5-DCA induced nephrotoxicity is unknown. The current study was designed to determine the in vitro nephrotoxic potential of 3,5-DCA in isolated renal cortical cells (IRCC) obtained from male Fischer 344 rats, and the role of renal bioactivation and oxidative stress in 3,5-DCA nephrotoxicity. IRCC (∼ 4 million cells/ml) from male rats were exposed to 3,5-DCA (0-1.0mM) for up to 120 min. In IRCC, 3,5-DCA was cytotoxic at 1.0mM by 60 min as evidenced by the increased release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), but 120 min was required for 3,5-DCA 0.5mM to increase LDH release. In subsequent studies, IRCC were exposed to a pretreatment (antioxidant or enzyme inhibitor) prior to exposure to 3,5-DCA (1.0mM) for 90 min. Cytotoxicity induced by 3,5-DCA was attenuated by pretreatment with inhibitors of flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO; methimazole, N-octylamine), cytochrome P450 (CYP; piperonyl butoxide, metyrapone), or peroxidase (indomethacin, mercaptosuccinate) enzymes. Use of more selective CYP inhibitors suggested that the CYP 2C family contributed to 3,5-DCA bioactivation. Antioxidants (glutathione, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, α-tocopherol, ascorbate, pyruvate) also attenuated 3,5-DCA nephrotoxicity, but oxidized glutathione levels and the oxidized/reduced glutathione ratios were not increased. These results indicate that 3,5-DCA may be activated via several renal enzyme systems to toxic metabolites, and that free radicals, but not oxidative stress, contribute to 3,5-DCA induced nephrotoxicity in vitro. PMID:26808022

  10. Protein adsorption on surfaces: dynamic contact-angle (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements.

    PubMed

    Stadler, H; Mondon, M; Ziegler, C

    2003-01-01

    Adsorption of the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) on gold has been tested at various concentrations in aqueous solution by dynamic contact-angle analysis (DCA) and quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements. With the Wilhelmy plate technique advancing and receding contact angles and the corresponding hysteresis were measured and correlated with the hydrophilicity and the homogeneity of the surface. With electrical admittance measurements of a gold-coated piezoelectrical quartz crystal, layer mass and viscoelastic contributions to the resonator's frequency shift during adsorption could be separated. A correlation was found between the adsorbed mass and the homogeneity and hydrophilicity of the adsorbed film. PMID:12520439

  11. Carryover effects of dichloroacetic acid on hepatic tumorigenesis in mice.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of drinking water chlorination. Chronic DCA exposure has been shown to increase liver tumors in mice, although carryover effects and interactions with other promotional agents are not known. Here we evaluated effects...

  12. Vapor intrusion risk of lead scavengers 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA).

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Li, Haiyan; Spiese, Richard; Wilson, John; Yan, Guangxu; Guo, Shaohui

    2016-06-01

    Vapor intrusion of synthetic fuel additives represented a critical yet still neglected problem at sites impacted by petroleum fuel releases. This study used an advanced numerical model to simulate the vapor intrusion risk of lead scavengers 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide, EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA) under different site conditions. We found that simulated EDB and DCA indoor air concentrations can exceed USEPA screening level (4.7 × 10(-3) μg/m(3) for EDB and 1.1 × 10(-1) μg/m(3) for DCA) if the source concentration is high enough (is still within the concentration range found at leaking UST site). To evaluate the chance that vapor intrusion of EDB might exceed the USEPA screening levels for indoor air, the simulation results were compared to the distribution of EDB at leaking UST sites in the US. If there is no degradation of EDB or only abiotic degradation of EDB, from 15% to 37% of leaking UST sites might exceed the USEPA screening level. This study supports the statements made by USEPA in the Petroleum Vapor Intrusion (PVI) Guidance that the screening criteria for petroleum hydrocarbon may not provide sufficient protectiveness for fuel releases containing EDB and DCA. Based on a thorough literature review, we also compiled previous published data on the EDB and DCA groundwater source concentrations and their degradation rates. These data are valuable in evaluating EDB and DCA vapor intrusion risk. In addition, a set of refined attenuation factors based on site-specific information (e.g., soil types, source depths, and degradation rates) were provided for establishing site-specific screening criteria for EDB and DCA. Overall, this study points out that lead scavengers EDB and DCA may cause vapor intrusion problems. As more field data of EDB and DCA become available, we recommend that USEPA consider including these data in the existing PVI database and possibly revising the PVI Guidance as necessary. PMID:27038569

  13. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  14. EARLY GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN THE LIVERS OF MICE EXPOSED TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    EARLY GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN THE LIVERS OF MICE EXPOSED TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have shown that DCA induces liver tumors in rodents when administered in drinking wate...

  15. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of DCA and...

  16. A Quantitative Description of Suicide Inhibition of Dichloroacetic Acid in Rats and Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Keys, Deborah A.; Schultz, Irv R.; Mahle, Deirdre A.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2004-09-16

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA), a minor metabolite of trichloroethylene (TCE) and water disinfection byproduct, remains an important risk assessment issue because of its carcinogenic potency. DCA has been shown to inhibit its own metabolism by irreversibly inactivating glutathione transferase zeta (GSTzeta). To better predict internal dosimetry of DCA, a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of DCA was developed. Suicide inhibition was described dynamically by varying the rate of maximal GSTzeta mediated metabolism of DCA (Vmax) over time. Resynthesis (zero-order) and degradation (first-order) of metabolic activity were described. Published iv pharmacokinetic studies in native rats were used to estimate an initial Vmax value, with Km set to an in vitro determined value. Degradation and resynthesis rates were set to estimated values from a published immunoreactive GSTzeta protein time course. The first-order inhibition rate, kd, was estimated to this same time course. A secondary, linear non-GSTzeta-mediated metabolic pathway is proposed to fit DCA time courses following treatment with DCA in drinking water. The PBPK model predictions were validated by comparing predicted DCA concentrations to measured concentrations in published studies of rats pretreated with DCA following iv exposure to 0.05 to 20 mg/kg DCA. The same model structure was parameterized to simulate DCA time courses following iv exposure in native and pretreated mice. Blood and liver concentrations during and postexposure to DCA in drinking water were predicted. Comparisons of PBPK model predicted to measured values were favorable, lending support for the further development of this model for application to DCA or TCE human health risk assessment.

  17. ASSESSING THE EFFECTS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) USING A MULTI-ENDPOINT MEDAKA ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    In regulating the safety of water, EPA makes decisions on what chemical contaminants to regulate and at what levels. To make these decisions, the EPA needs hazard identification and dose-response information. Current rodent methods for generating required information have limita...

  18. Synthesis, growth, spectral and thermal properties of a new organic crystal: 2-Carboxypyridin-1-ium trichloroacetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowri, S.; Anitha, K.; Suresh, A.; Uma Devi, T.; Selvanayagam, S.; Sajan, D.; Chandramohan, A.; Lawrence, N.

    2012-09-01

    A novel organic optical material complex of 2-carboxypyridin-1-ium trichloroacetate has been synthesized and crystals were grown from aqueous solution employing the technique of controlled evaporation. The crystal structure has been determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The single crystals were successfully grown by the slow evaporation method with dimensions 12 × 8 × 3 mm3. FT IR spectral investigation has been carried out to identify the various functional groups present in the grown crystal. Molecular structure was confirmed by NMR spectral analysis. Melting point was found using thermal measurements.

  19. Synthesis, growth, spectral and thermal properties of a new organic crystal: 2-carboxypyridin-1-ium trichloroacetate.

    PubMed

    Gowri, S; Anitha, K; Suresh, A; Uma Devi, T; Selvanayagam, S; Sajan, D; Chandramohan, A; Lawrence, N

    2012-09-01

    A novel organic optical material complex of 2-carboxypyridin-1-ium trichloroacetate has been synthesized and crystals were grown from aqueous solution employing the technique of controlled evaporation. The crystal structure has been determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The single crystals were successfully grown by the slow evaporation method with dimensions 12 × 8 × 3 mm(3). FT IR spectral investigation has been carried out to identify the various functional groups present in the grown crystal. Molecular structure was confirmed by NMR spectral analysis. Melting point was found using thermal measurements. PMID:22613126

  20. DCA++: A case for science driven application development for leadership computing platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Michael S.; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Meredith, Jeremy; Maier, Thomas A.; Schulthess, Thomas C.

    2009-07-01

    The DCA++ code was one of the early science applications that ran on jaguar at the National Center for Computational Sciences, and the first application code to sustain a petaflop/s under production conditions on a general-purpose supercomputer. The code implements a quantum cluster method with a Quantum Monte Carlo kernel to solve the 2D Hubbard model for high-temperature superconductivity. It is implemented in C++, making heavy use of the generic programming model. In this paper, we discuss how this code was developed, reaching scalability and high efficiency on the world's fastest supercomputer in only a few years. We show how the use of generic concepts combined with systematic refactoring of codes is a better strategy for computational sciences than a comprehensive upfront design.

  1. DCA++: A case for science driven application development for leadership computing platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Michael Stuart; Schulthess, Thomas C; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Meredith, Jeremy S; Maier, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. The DCA++ code was one of the early science applications that ran on jaguar at the National Center for Computational Sciences, and the rst application code to sustain a peta op/s under production conditions on a general-purpose supercomputer. The code implements a quantum cluster method with a Quantum Monte Carlo kernel to solve the 2D Hubbard model for high-temperature superconductivity. It is implemented in C++, making heavy use of the generic programming model. In this paper, we discuss how this code was developed, reaching scalability and high ef ciency on the world s fastest supercomputer in only a few years. We show how the use of generic concepts combined with systematic refactoring of codes is a better strategy for computational sciences than a comprehensive upfront design.

  2. A New Perspective on an Old Problem, Natural Attenuation of the Lead Scavengers EDB and DCA in Ground Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetra-ethyl lead was widely used in leaded automobile gasoline from 1923 until 1987. To prevent lead deposits from fouling the engine, 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) were added to the gasoline to act as lead scavengers. If leaded gasoline is spilled to...

  3. Deoxycholic Acid and Selenium Metabolite Methylselenol Exert Common and Distinct Effects on Cell Cycle, Apoptosis, and MAP Kinase Pathway in HCT116 Human Colon Cancer Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) is a known tumor promoter in colon tumor development. The cell growth inhibition induced by DCA may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells and provide selection for subpopulations of cells resistant to DCA’s inhibitory effect. These survivi...

  4. Structural, optical, mechanical and dielectric studies of pure and doped L-Prolinium Trichloroacetate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, N.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Vijayan, N.; Vasanthakumar, Geetha; Krishna, Anuj; Ramamurthi, K.

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, pure and metal substituted L-Prolinium trichloroacetate (LPTCA) single crystals were grown by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-Visible-NIR, hardness, photoluminescence and dielectric studies. The dopant concentration in the crystals was measured by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of the pure and metal substituted LPTCA revealed that the grown crystals belong to the trigonal system. Ni2+ and Co2+ doping slightly altered the lattice parameters of LPTCA without affecting the basic structure of the crystal. FTIR spectral analysis confirms the presence of various functional groups in the grown crystals. The mechanical behavior of pure and doped crystals was analyzed by Vickers's microhardness test. The optical transmittance, dielectric and photoluminescence properties of the pure and doped crystals were analyzed.

  5. ROLE OF HYPERPLASTIC NODULES IN DICHLOROACETIC ACID INDUCED HEPATOCARCINOGENESIS IN B6C3F1 MALE MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a hepatocarcinogen in the male B6C3FI mouse. t induces primarily hyperplastic nodules (HN) prior to the appearance of hepatocellular adenoma (HA) or carcinoma (HC). his study was undertaken to determine the role of HN in the progression of DCA-induced...

  6. Simulation of the effect of remediation on EDB and 1,2-DCA plumes at sites contaminated by leaded gasoline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, James K.; Falta, Ronald W.; Freedman, David L.

    2009-08-01

    An analytical model is used to simulate the effects of partial source removal and plume remediation on ethylene dibromide (EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) plumes at contaminated underground storage tank (UST) sites. The risk posed by EDB, 1,2-DCA, and commingled gasoline hydrocarbons varies throughout the plume over time. Dissolution from the light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) determines the concentration of each contaminant near the source, but biological decay in the plume has a greater influence as distance downgradient from the source increases. For this reason, compounds that exceed regulatory standards near the source may not in downgradient plume zones. At UST sites, partial removal of a residual LNAPL source mass may serve as a stand alone remedial technique if dissolved concentrations in the source zone are within several orders of magnitude of the applicable government or remedial standards. This may be the case with 1,2-DCA; however, EDB is likely to be found at concentrations that are orders of magnitude higher than its low Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 0.05 μg/L (micrograms per liter). For sites with significant EDB contamination, even when plume remediation is combined with source depletion, significant timeframes may be required to mitigate the impact of this compound. Benzene and MTBE are commonly the focus of remedial efforts at UST sites, but simulations presented here suggest that EDB, and to a lesser extent 1,2-DCA, could be the critical contaminants to consider in the remediation design process at many sites.

  7. TRAPPING AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE DICHLOROACETATE RADICAL FROM THE REDUCTIVE DEHALOGENATION OF TRICHLOROACETATE BY MOUSE AND RAT LIVER MICROSOMES. (R825954)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A key question in the risk assessment of trichloroethylene (TRI) is the extent to which its carcinogenic effects might depend on the formation of dichloroacetate (DCA) as a metabolite. One of the metabolic pathways proposed for the formation of DCA from TRI is by the reductive...

  8. Time-programmed DCA and oxaliplatin release by multilayered nanofiber mats in prevention of local cancer recurrence following surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyun; Liu, Shi; Qi, Yanxin; Zhou, Dongfang; Xie, Zhigang; Jing, Xiabin; Chen, Xuesi; Huang, Yubin

    2016-08-10

    Local recurrence following surgery in cancer treatment remains a major clinical challenge. To increase antitumor activity but maintain toxicity in an acceptable level in prevention of local cancer recurrence, we demonstrated a dual drug-loaded multilayered fiber mats strategy, in which DCA and oxaliplatin were co-electrospun into the distinct layer of resultant fabrics and the oxaliplatin-loaded fibers layer was sealed between the basement film layer and other two fibers layers. The dual drug-loaded multilayered fiber mats exhibit time-programmed dual release behavior and synergistic effect upon cancer cells. Nontoxic DCA selectively promotes apoptosis of cancer cells through modulating cellular metabolism, and oxaliplatin subsequently kills the remained cancer cells in a low concentration. After implantation on the resection margin of cervical carcinoma on a murine model, the dual drug-loaded multilayered fiber mats displayed enhanced anti-recurrence efficacy and decreased side toxic effects over 30days compared with drug-loaded monolayered fiber mats. The time-programmed combination of DCA and oxaliplatin within multilayered nanofiber mats appears to be a promising strategy for local cancer treatment following resection. PMID:27221069

  9. Bile acids modulate the Golgi membrane fission process via a protein kinase Ceta and protein kinase D-dependent pathway in colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Anne-Marie; Foran, Eilis; Sharma, Ruchika; Davies, Anthony; Mahon, Ciara; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid; Kelleher, Dermot; Long, Aideen

    2010-04-01

    Deoxycholic acid (DCA) is a secondary bile acid that modulates signalling pathways in epithelial cells. DCA has been implicated in pathogenesis of colon carcinoma, particularly by activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a tertiary bile acid, has been observed to have chemopreventive effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of DCA and UDCA on the subcellular localization and activity of PKCeta and its downstream effects on Golgi structure in a colon cancer cell model. PKCeta expression was localized to the Golgi in HCT116 colon cancer cells. DCA induced fragmentation of the Golgi in these cells following activation of PKCeta and its downstream effector protein kinase D (PKD). Pretreatment of cells with UDCA or a glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, inhibited DCA-induced PKCeta/PKD activation and Golgi fragmentation. Knockdown of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression using small interfering RNA or inhibition using the GR antagonist mifepristone attenuated the inhibitory effect of UDCA on Golgi fragmentation. Elevated serum and faecal levels of DCA have been previously reported in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and colon cancer. Analysis of Golgi architecture in vivo using tissue microarrays revealed Golgi fragmentation in UC and colorectal cancer tissue. We have demonstrated that DCA can disrupt the structure of the Golgi, an organelle critical for normal cell function. Inhibition of this DCA-induced Golgi fragmentation by UDCA was mediated via the GR. This represents a potential mechanism of observed chemopreventive effects of UDCA in benign and malignant disease of the colon. PMID:20093383

  10. Effects of cholecystectomy on the kinetics of primary and secondary bile acids.

    PubMed Central

    Berr, F; Stellaard, F; Pratschke, E; Paumgartner, G

    1989-01-01

    Removal of the gallbladder is thought to increase formation and pool size of secondary bile acids, mainly deoxycholic acid (DCA), by increased exposure of primary bile acids (cholic acid [CA], chenodeoxycholic acid [CDCA]) to bacterial dehydroxylation in the intestine. We have tested this hypothesis by simultaneous determination of pool size and turnover of DCA, CA, and CDCA in nine women before and at various intervals after removal of a functioning gallbladder. An isotope dilution technique using marker bile acids labeled with stable isotopes (2H4-DCA, 13C-CA, 13C-CDCA) was used. After cholecystectomy, concentration and output of bile acids relative to bilirubin increased (P less than 0.02) in fasting duodenal bile and cholesterol saturation decreased by 27% (P less than 0.05) consistent with enhanced enterohepatic cycling of bile acids. Three months after removal of the gallbladder bile acid kinetics were in a new steady state: pool size and turnover of CDCA were unchanged. Synthesis of CA, the precursor of DCA, was diminished by 37% (P = 0.05), probably resulting from feedback inhibition by continuous transhepatic flux of bile acids. The fraction of CA transferred after 7 alpha-dehydroxylation to the DCA pool increased from 46 +/- 16 to 66 +/- 32% (P less than 0.05). However, this enhanced transfer did not lead to increased input or size of the DCA pool, because synthesis of the precursor CA had decreased. PMID:2708522

  11. Spermatotoxicity of dichloroacetic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    The testicular toxicity of dichloroacetic acid (DCA), a disinfection byproduct of drinking water, was evaluated in adult male rats given both single and multiple (up to 14 d) oral doses. Delayed spermiation and altered resorption of residual bodies were observed in rats given sin...

  12. Structural, spectral, linear and nonlinear optical properties of new nonlinear optical L-histidinium trichloroacetate crystals.

    PubMed

    Raj, S Gokul; Kumar, G Ramesh; Raghavalu, Thenneti; Kumar, P; Mohan, R; Jayavel, R

    2006-12-01

    Single crystals of a new histidinium salt: L-histidinium trichloroacetate {abbreviated as LHTCA; [(C(3)N(2)H(4))CH(2)CH(NH(3))(CO(2))](+)CCl(3)COO(-)} were grown by slow evaporation of an aqueous solution at room temperature. The compound crystallizes in a non-centrosymmetric space group P2(1) of monoclinic system with cell parameters a=5.4505(18) A, b=25.769(8) A, c=9.210(2) A and beta=99.98(2) degrees. The vibrational structure of the compound confirms the presence of various functional groups in the molecule. The UV-vis-NIR spectrum shows a good transparency in the whole of the region from ultraviolet to near IR. The Kurtz powder SHG measurement confirms the frequency doubling of the crystal. Thermal behaviour of the crystals has been investigated by DSC analysis. These preliminary results suggest that LHTCA crystal can act as a potential and promising candidate for frequency doubling applications even from the near UV region to the near IR. PMID:16716647

  13. Kinetics and effects of dichloroacetic acid in rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, Patrick N; Hoffman, Alex D; Lien, Gregory J; Hammermeister, Dean E; Nichols, John W

    2009-09-14

    Halogenated acetic acids (HAAs) produced by chlorine disinfection of municipal drinking water represent a potentially important class of environmental contaminants. Little is known, however, about their potential to adversely impact fish and other aquatic life. In this study we examined the kinetics and effects of dichloroacetic acid (DCA) in rainbow trout. Branchial uptake was measured in fish confined to respirometer-metabolism chambers. Branchial uptake efficiency was <5%, suggesting passive diffusion through aqueous channels in the gill epithelium. DCA concentrations in tissues following prolonged (72, 168, or 336 h) waterborne exposures were expressed as tissue:plasma concentration ratios. Concentration ratios for the kidney and muscle at 168 and 336 h were consistent with the suggestion that DCA distributes primarily to tissue water. Reduced concentration ratios for the liver, particularly at 72 h, indicated that DCA was highly metabolized by this tissue. Routes and rates of elimination were characterized by injecting chambered animals with a high (5.0mg/kg) or low (50 microg/kg) bolus dose. DCA was rapidly cleared by naïve animals resulting in elimination half-lives (t(1/2)) of less than 4h. Waterborne pre-treatment of fish with DCA increased the persistence of a subsequently injected dose. In high dose animals, pre-treatment caused a 4-fold decrease in whole-body clearance (CL(B)) and corresponding increases in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (extrapolated to infinity; AUC(0-->infinity)) and t(1/2). Qualitatively similar results were obtained in low dose fish, although the magnitude of the pre-treatment effect ( approximately 2.5-fold) was reduced. Renal and branchial clearance contributed little (combined, <3% of CL(B)) to the elimination of DCA. Biliary elimination of DCA was also negligible. The steady-state volume of distribution (V(SS)) did not vary among treatment groups and was consistent with results of the tissue distribution

  14. Significance of Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) in palaeoecology and biostratigraphy: A case study from the Upper Cretaceous of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub-Hannaa, W.; Huntley, J. W.; Fürsich, F. T.

    2013-04-01

    The Cenomanian-Turonian macrofauna from the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt offers an excellent opportunity to test the applicability of gradient analysis in palaeoecology and biostratigraphy. Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) is a simple multivariate technique for arranging species and samples along environmental gradients. In order to reconstruct palaeoecological patterns and biostratigraphy, 42 samples, 4564 individuals, and 132 species from three sections of eastern Sinai were subjected to DCA. Compared with other multivariate techniques such as cluster analysis, the macrobenthic associations (obtained by DCA) fall fully within or deviate only slightly from associations obtained by cluster analysis. However, DCA makes it possible to arrange these associations from completely random distribution (as tested by cluster analysis) to a temporal gradient. Therefore, it is possible to use this multivariate technique also as a useful tool in biostratigraphy. The first detrended correspondence axis (DC1) reflects a water-depth gradient from onshore to offshore, higher scores being typical of onshore samples from the southernmost section and lower scores being typical of offshore samples from the northern section. Overprinted on the DC1 axis is also a gradient of life and feeding modes, as samples with low scores are dominated by epifaunal species and samples with high scores display a higher proportion of shallow-infaunal taxa. With respect to the second detrended correspondence axis (DC2), substrate composition and water energy are overprinted on this axis as samples with low scores predominantly are coarse-grained carbonates (e.g., reefal rudstone), while samples with high scores primarily are mixed-siliciclastics/carbonates (e.g., marl), which are dominated by low-energy taxa. Because the substrate conditions are closely related to the water energy, the coarse-grained substrates were deposited under high water energy, while the marly facies was deposited under low

  15. CYP3A Specifically Catalyzes 1β-Hydroxylation of Deoxycholic Acid: Characterization and Enzymatic Synthesis of a Potential Novel Urinary Biomarker for CYP3A Activity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Martin A; Li, Xue-Qing; Grönberg, Gunnar; Diczfalusy, Ulf; Andersson, Tommy B

    2016-09-01

    The endogenous bile acid metabolite 1β-hydroxy-deoxycholic acid (1β-OH-DCA) excreted in human urine may be used as a sensitive CYP3A biomarker in drug development reflecting in vivo CYP3A activity. An efficient and stereospecific enzymatic synthesis of 1β-OH-DCA was developed using a Bacillus megaterium (BM3) cytochrome P450 (P450) mutant, and its structure was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A [(2)H4]-labeled analog of 1β-OH-DCA was also prepared. The major hydroxylated metabolite of deoxycholic acid (DCA) in human liver microsomal incubations was identified as 1β-OH-DCA by comparison with the synthesized reference analyzed by UPLC-HRMS. Its formation was strongly inhibited by CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole. Screening of 21 recombinant human cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes showed that, with the exception of extrahepatic CYP46A1, the most abundant liver P450 subfamily CYP3A, including CYP3A4, 3A5, and 3A7, specifically catalyzed 1β-OH-DCA formation. This indicated that 1β-hydroxylation of DCA may be a useful marker reaction for CYP3A activity in vitro. The metabolic pathways of DCA and 1β-OH-DCA in human hepatocytes were predominantly via glycine and, to a lesser extent, via taurine and sulfate conjugation. The potential utility of 1β-hydroxylation of DCA as a urinary CYP3A biomarker was illustrated by comparing the ratio of 1β-OH-DCA:DCA in a pooled spot urine sample from six healthy control subjects to a sample from one patient treated with carbamazepine, a potent CYP3A inducer; 1β-OH-DCA:DCA was considerably higher in the patient versus controls (ratio 2.8 vs. 0.4). Our results highlight the potential of 1β-OH-DCA as a urinary biomarker in clinical CYP3A DDI studies. PMID:27402728

  16. The trichloroethylene metabolite S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine but not trichloroacetate inhibits pathogen-stimulated TNF-α in human extraplacental membranes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Boldenow, Erica; Hassan, Iman; Chames, Mark C; Xi, Chuanwu; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2015-04-01

    Extraplacental membranes define the gestational compartment and provide a barrier to infectious microorganisms ascending the gravid female reproductive tract. We tested the hypothesis that bioactive metabolites of trichloroethylene (TCE) decrease pathogen-stimulated innate immune response of extraplacental membranes. Extraplacental membranes were cultured for 4, 8, and 24h with the TCE metabolites trichloroacetate (TCA) or S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (DCVC) in the absence or presence of lipoteichoic acid (LTA) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to simulate infection. In addition, membranes were cocultured with DCVC and Group B Streptococcus (GBS). DCVC (5-50μM) significantly inhibited LTA-, LPS-, and GBS-stimulated cytokine release from tissue cultures as early as 4h (P≤0.05). In contrast, TCA (up to 500μM) did not inhibit LTA-stimulated cytokine release from tissue punches. Because cytokines are important mediators for host response to infectious microorganisms these findings suggest that TCE exposure could potentially modify susceptibility to infection during pregnancy. PMID:25653212

  17. Investigation on growth, structural, optical, thermal, dielectric and mechanical properties of organic L-prolinium trichloroacetate single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Boopathi, K.; Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2012-09-15

    Graphical abstract: L-Prolinium trichloroacetate is an organic nonlinear optical crystal has been grown from the aqueous solution by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that L-PTCA crystallizes in trigonal crystal system. The optical band gab is found to be 4.26 eV. Second harmonic conversion efficiency of L-PTCA has been found to be half that of KDP. Highlights: ► It deals with the synthesis, growth and characterization of L-PTCA an organic NLO crystal. ► Wide optical transparency window between 260 nm and 1100 nm. ► Thermal study reveals that the grown crystal is stable up to 127 °C. ► L-PTCA crystal exhibits the second order nonlinear optical properties. -- Abstract: A new organic nonlinear optical material L-prolinium trichloroacetate (L-PTCA) single crystal has been synthesized and grown by slow solvent evaporation technique at room temperature using water as solvent. Single-crystal X-ray diffractometer was utilized to measure unit cell parameters and to confirm lattice parameter. The powder X-ray diffraction pattern of the grown L-PTCA has been indexed. The modes of vibration of different molecular groups present in the sample were identified by the FTIR spectral analysis. The optical transmittance window and the lower cutoff wavelength of the L-PTCA have been identified by UV–vis–NIR studies. Thermal stability of the L-prolinium trichloroacetate was determined by TGA/DTA measurements. Dielectric measurements were carried out at various temperatures at frequency range 10–1 MHz. The mechanical properties of the grown crystals have been analyzed by Vickers microhardness method. The chemical etching studies were carried out on the grown crystals. Its SHG efficiency has been tested by Kurtz powder method.

  18. Improvement of myocardial ischemic dysfunction with dichloroacetic acid: experimental study by repeated ischemia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Okuda, K; Nohara, R; Fujita, M; Tamaki, N; Konishi, J; Sasayama, S

    1995-12-01

    We investigated metabolic factors related to the recovery of myocardial function during ischemia and after reperfusion using dichloroacetic acid (DCA) in canine models with repeated 10-min regional ischemia and reperfusion. Administration of 100 mg/kg DCA, which activates pyruvate dehydrogenase, improved regional wall motion significantly as compared with the nontreated controls (p < 0.05). The mechanism was studied by determining changes in myocardial levels of pH, glucose, lactate, and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA). Glucose extraction was increased significantly during ischemia and reperfusion by the pretreatment of DCA (p < 0.01). the calculated contribution of glucose to myocardial oxidative metabolism during ischemia and reperfusion was greater than that of NEFA and lactate in case of DCA treatment. The uptake of [99mTc]pyrophosphate (PYP), which reflects myocardial injury, was also significantly suppressed by DCA (p < 0.01). pH was not affected by an infusion of DCA. These findings suggest that the activation of glucose metabolism by DCA, which is impaired and reduced during ischemia and reperfusion, may be responsible for the improved myocardial function after reperfusion. PMID:8606539

  19. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:26378497

  20. Effect of dichloroacetate on plasma lactic acid in exercising dogs.

    PubMed

    Merrill, G F; Zambraski, E J; Grassl, S M

    1980-03-01

    Dichloroacetate sodium (DCA) has been shown to reduce circulating levels of lactic acid (LA) under a variety of experimental and clinical conditions. We have examined the effect of DCA on the lactacidemia of exercise in treadmill-exercised dogs. One group of animals (n = 8) was tested at light, moderate, and heavy exercise work loads. Plasma LA, 19 +/- 2mg/dl at rest, increased to 26 +/- 4, 38 +/- 5, and 52 +/- 6 mg/dl during the three workloads, respectively. In the same animals, when identical treadmill tests were conducted after DCA (100 mg/kg, iv), the rise in LA was significantly attenuated. Lactic acid values were 11 +/- 2 mg/dl at rest after DCA and 15 +/- 2, 20 +/- 4, and 23 +/- 3 mg/dl for the light, moderate, and heavy workloads, respectively. Another group of dogs (n = 6) performed prolonged moderate exercise. Under untreated conditions, LA increased from 24 +/- 1 mg/dl at rest, to 41 +/- 6 mg/dl at 10 min, and 50 +/- 5 mg/dl at 50 min. During repeat tests, DCA was given at 12 min when LA was 30 +/- 6 mg/dl. At 50 min, LA was 18 +/- 3 mg/dl or 60% lower than that observed during the untreated run. Because DCA has been shown to increase pyruvate dehydrogenase enzyme activity, these data suggest that this enzyme may be an important factor in LA metabolism during exercise. PMID:7372512

  1. TH-C-12A-05: Dynamic Couch Motion for Improvement of Radiation Therapy Trajectories in DCA and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, L; Thomas, Christopher

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the potential improvement in dosimetric external beam radiation therapy plan quality using an optimized dynamic gantry and couch motion trajectory which minimizes exposure to the organs at risk. Methods: Patient-specific anatomical information of head-and-neck and cranial cancer patients was used to quantify the geometric overlap between target volumes and organs-at-risk (OARs) based on their two-dimensional projection from source to a plane at isocentre as a function of gantry and couch angle. QUANTEC dose constraints were then used as weighting factors for the OARs to generate a map of couch-gantry coordinate space indicating degree of overlap at each point in space. A couch-gantry collision space was generated by direct measurement on a Varian Truebeam linac using an anthropomorphic solid-water phantom. A dynamic, fully customizable algorithm was written to generate a navigable ideal trajectory for the patient specific couch-gantry space. The advanced algorithm includes weighting factors which can be used to balance the implementation of absolute minimum values of overlap, with the clinical practicality of largescale couch motion and delivery time. Optimized trajectories were calculated for cranial DCA treatments and for head-and-neck VMAT treatments and compared to conventional DCA and VMAT treatment trajectories. Results: Comparison of optimized treatment trajectories with conventional treatment trajectories indicates a decrease in dose to the organs-at-risk between 4.64% and 6.82% (2.39 and 3.52 Gy) of the prescription dose per patient per organ at risk. Conclusion: Using simultaneous couch and gantry motion during radiation therapy to minimize the geometrical overlap in the beams-eye-view target volumes and the organs-at-risk can have an appreciable dose reduction to organs-at-risk.

  2. Screening for cholesterol-lowering probiotic based on deoxycholic acid removal pathway and studying its functional mechanisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chun-Feng; Zhang, Lan-Wei; Han, Xue; Yi, Hua-Xi; Li, Jing-Yan; Tuo, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Du, Ming; Shan, Yu-Juan; Yang, Lin

    2012-10-01

    Elevated serum cholesterol in humans is generally a risk factor correlated with the development of coronary heart disease (CHD). Reducing deoxycholic acid (DCA) content in the intestine can reduce serum cholesterol levels, which reduce the incidence of CHD. A total of 150 strains of lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria were isolated from human fecal samples. The DCA removal ability of these strains was evaluated. Results showed that 9 strains displayed above 10% DCA removal rate. The probiotic potentials of the 9 strains were evaluated. The strain Lactobacillus casei F0822 was screened out due to the stronger adhesion to HT-29 cells and tolerance to bile and acid. DCA removal for this strain resulted from that the S-layer protein locating the cell surface bound DCA. The FTIR spectra showed that the carboxyl group in DCA was the principal group by which DCA was bound to the S-layer protein of L. casei F0822. These findings suggested that L. casei F0822 is a better candidate probiotic strain, which has the potential to reduce human serum cholesterol levels. PMID:22926345

  3. Physiological concentrations of bile acids down-regulate agonist induced secretion in colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Keating, Niamh; Mroz, Magdalena S; Scharl, Michael M; Marsh, Christine; Ferguson, Gail; Hofmann, Alan F; Keely, Stephen J

    2009-08-01

    In patients with bile acid malabsorption, high concentrations of bile acids enter the colon and stimulate Cl(-) and fluid secretion, thereby causing diarrhoea. However, deoxycholic acid (DCA), the predominant colonic bile acid, is normally present at lower concentrations where its role in regulating transport is unclear. Thus, the current study set out to investigate the effects of physiologically relevant DCA concentrations on colonic epithelial secretory function. Cl(-) secretion was measured as changes in short-circuit current across voltage-clamped T(84) cell monolayers. At high concentrations (0.5-1 mM), DCA acutely stimulated Cl(-) secretion but this effect was associated with cell injury, as evidenced by decreased transepithelial resistance (TER) and increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. In contrast, chronic (24 hrs) exposure to lower DCA concentrations (10-200 microM) inhibited responses to Ca(2+) and cAMP-dependent secretagogues without altering TER, LDH release, or secretagogue-induced increases in intracellular second messengers. Other bile acids - taurodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid - had similar antisecretory effects. DCA (50 microM) rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) and both ERK and p38 MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases). The EGFr inhibitor, AG1478, and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, reversed the antisecretory effects of DCA, while the MAPK inhibitors, PD98059 and SB203580, did not. In summary, our studies suggest that, in contrast to its acute prosecretory effects at pathophysiological concentrations, lower, physiologically relevant, levels of DCA chronically down-regulate colonic epithelial secretory function. On the basis of these data, we propose a novel role for bile acids as physiological regulators of colonic secretory capacity. PMID:19583809

  4. Physiological concentrations of bile acids down‐regulate agonist induced secretion in colonic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Niamh; Mroz, Magdalena S.; Scharl, Michael M.; Marsh, Christine; Ferguson, Gail; Hofmann, Alan F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In patients with bile acid malabsorption, high concentrations of bile acids enter the colon and stimulate Cl− and fluid secretion, thereby causing diarrhoea. However, deoxycholic acid (DCA), the predominant colonic bile acid, is normally present at lower concentrations where its role in regulating transport is unclear. Thus, the current study set out to investigate the effects of physiologically relevant DCA concentrations on colonic epithelial secretory function. Cl− secretion was measured as changes in short‐circuit current across voltage‐clamped T84 cell monolayers. At high concentrations (0.5–1 mM), DCA acutely stimulated Cl− secretion but this effect was associated with cell injury, as evidenced by decreased transepithelial resistance (TER) and increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. In contrast, chronic (24 hrs) exposure to lower DCA concentrations (10–200 μM) inhibited responses to Ca2+ and cAMP‐dependent secretagogues without altering TER, LDH release, or secretagogue‐induced increases in intracellular second messengers. Other bile acids – taurodeoxycholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and cholic acid – had similar antisecretory effects. DCA (50 μM) rapidly stimulated phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFr) and both ERK and p38 MAPKs (mitogen‐activated protein kinases). The EGFr inhibitor, AG1478, and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, reversed the antisecretory effects of DCA, while the MAPK inhibitors, PD98059 and SB203580, did not. In summary, our studies suggest that, in contrast to its acute prosecretory effects at pathophysiological concentrations, lower, physiologically relevant, levels of DCA chronically down‐regulate colonic epithelial secretory function. On the basis of these data, we propose a novel role for bile acids as physiological regulators of colonic secretory capacity. PMID:19583809

  5. High abundances of oxalic, azelaic, and glyoxylic acids and methylglyoxal in the open ocean with high biological activity: Implication for secondary OA formation from isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikkina, Srinivas; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Miyazaki, Yuzo; Fu, Pingqing

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric dicarboxylic acids (DCA) are a ubiquitous water-soluble component of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which can act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), affecting the Earth's climate. Despite the high abundances of oxalic acid and related compounds in the marine aerosols, there is no consensus on what controls their distributions over the open ocean. Marine biological productivity could play a role in the production of DCA, but there is no substantial evidence to support this hypothesis. Here we present latitudinal distributions of DCA, oxoacids and α-dicarbonyls in the marine aerosols from the remote Pacific. Their concentrations were found several times higher in more biologically influenced aerosols (MBA) than less biologically influenced aerosols. We propose isoprene and unsaturated fatty acids as sources of DCA as inferred from significantly higher abundances of isoprene-SOA tracers and azelaic acid in MBA. These results have implications toward the reassessment of climate forcing feedbacks of marine-derived SOA.

  6. An optimized probucol microencapsulated formulation integrating a secondary bile acid (deoxycholic acid) as a permeation enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Mooranian, Armin; Negrulj, Rebecca; Chen-Tan, Nigel; Watts, Gerald F; Arfuso, Frank; Al-Salami, Hani

    2014-01-01

    The authors have previously designed, developed, and characterized a novel microencapsulated formulation as a platform for the targeted delivery of therapeutics in an animal model of type 2 diabetes, using the drug probucol (PB). The aim of this study was to optimize PB microcapsules by incorporating the bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA), which has good permeation-enhancing properties, and to examine its effect on microcapsules’ morphology, rheology, structural and surface characteristics, and excipients’ chemical and thermal compatibilities. Microencapsulation was carried out using a BÜCHI-based microencapsulating system established in the authors’ laboratory. Using the polymer sodium alginate (SA), two microencapsulated formulations were prepared: PB-SA (control) and PB-DCA-SA (test) at a constant ratio (1:30 and 1:3:30, respectively). Complete characterization of the microcapsules was carried out. The incorporation of DCA resulted in better structural and surface characteristics, uniform morphology, and stable chemical and thermal profiles, while size and rheological parameters remained similar to control. In addition, PB-DCA-SA microcapsules showed good excipients’ compatibilities, which were supported by data from differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray studies, suggesting microcapsule stability. Hence, PB-DCA-SA microcapsules have good rheological and compatibility characteristics and may be suitable for the oral delivery of PB in type 2 diabetes. PMID:25302020

  7. TREATOGENIC ACTIVITY OF TRICHOLORACETIC ACID IN THE RATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) is a by-product of the chlorine disinfection of water containing natural organic material. t is detectable in finished drinking water at levels comparable to the trihalomethanes (930-160 ug/L). CA is also formed in vivo after ingestion of hypochelorite ...

  8. Flow cytometric evaluation of the effects of 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) and dichloracetate (DCA) on THP-1 cells: a multiparameter analysis.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Harrie A; van Griensven, Leo J L D

    2012-02-01

    Two human leukemia cells K562 and THP-1, the breast cancer lines MCF-7 and ZR-75-1, and the melanoma line MDA-MB-435S were compared by flowcytometry for their behaviour at increasing levels of 3BP. K562 and THP-1 responded to 3BP by membrane depolarization and increased ROS; MCF-7 and ZR-75-1 showed decreased polarization and low ROS increase; MDA-MB-435S had limited depolarization and no ROS increase. THP-1 cells exposed to a range of 3BP concentrations in combination with DCA showed increase of polarization, slight ROS increase, and weakened nuclear integrity. 3BP and DCA show no synergism, but have complementary destructive effects on THP-1 cells. The data led to the conclusion that the THP-1 cells do not carry a functional membrane monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) or that 3BP circumvents MCT binding and can enter these cells independently. PMID:22318358

  9. Swelling, mechanical strength, and release properties of probucol microcapsules with and without a bile acid, and their potential oral delivery in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Negrulj, Rebecca; Mooranian, Armin; Chen-Tan, Nigel; Al-Sallami, Hesham S; Mikov, Momir; Golocorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Fakhoury, Marc; Watts, Gerald F; Arfuso, Frank; Al-Salami, Hani

    2016-08-01

    We have demonstrated a permeation-enhancing effect of deoxycholic acid (DCA), the bile acid, in diabetic rats. In this study, we designed DCA-based microcapsules for the oral delivery of the antilipidemic drug probucol (PB), which has potential antidiabetic effects. We aimed to further characterize these microcapsules and examine their pH-dependent release properties, as well as the effects of DCA on their stability and mechanical strength at various pH and temperature values. Using the polymer sodium alginate (SA), we prepared PB-SA (control) and PB-DCA-SA (test) microcapsules. The microcapsules were examined for drug content, size, surface composition, release, Micro-CT cross-sectional imaging, stability, Zeta potential, mechanical strength, and swelling characteristics at different pH and temperature values. The microencapsulation efficiency and production yield were also examined. The addition of DCA resulted in microcapsules with a greater density and with reduced swelling at a pH of 7.8 and at temperatures of 25°C and 37°C (p < 0.01). The size, surface composition, production yield, and microencapsulation efficiency of the microcapsules remained similar after DCA addition. PB-SA microcapsules produced multiphasic PB release, while PB-DCA-SA microcapsules produced monophasic PB release, suggesting more controlled PB release in the presence of DCA. The PB-DCA-SA microcapsules showed good stability and a pH-sensitive uniphasic release pattern, which may suggest potential applications in the oral delivery of PB in diabetes. PMID:25811999

  10. Number of free hydroxyl groups on bile acid phospholipids determines the fluidity and hydration of model membranes.

    PubMed

    Sreekanth, Vedagopuram; Bajaj, Avinash

    2013-10-10

    Interactions of synthetic phospholipids with model membranes determines the drug release capabilities of phospholipid vesicles at diseased sites. We performed 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH)-based fluorescence anisotropy, Laurdan-based membrane hydration, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies to cognize the interactions of three bile acid phospholipids, lithocholic acid-phosphocholine (LCA-PC), deoxycholic acid-phosphocholine (DCA-PC), and cholic acid-phosphocholine (CA-PC) with model membranes. These studies revealed that bile acid phospholipids increases membrane fluidity in DCA-PC > CA-PC > LCA-PC order, indicating that induction of membrane fluidity is contingent on the number and positioning of free hydroxyl groups on bile acids. Similarly, DCA-PC causes maximum membrane perturbations due to the presence of a free hydroxyl group, whereas LCA-PC induces gel phase in membranes due to hydrophobic bile acid acyl chain interactions. These DCA-PC-induced membrane perturbations induce a drastic decrease in phase transition temperature (Tm) as determined by calorimetric studies, whereas doping of LCA-PC causes phase transition broadening without change in Tm. Doping of CA-PC induces membrane perturbations and membrane hydration like DCA-PC but sharpening of phase transition at higher doping suggests self-association of CA-PC molecules. Therefore these differential mode of interactions between bile acid phospholipids and model membranes would help in the future for their use in drug delivery. PMID:24079709

  11. Nephroprotective effect of date fruit extract against dichloroacetic acid exposure in adult rats.

    PubMed

    El Arem, Amira; Thouri, Amira; Zekri, Mouna; Saafi, Emna Behija; Ghrairi, Fatma; Zakhama, Abdelfattah; Achour, Lotfi

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of aqueous date extract (ADE) on dichloroacetic acid (DCA)-induced nephrotoxicity. In vitro, total phenolic content estimated in the ADE were 417.71mg gallic acid equivalents/100g fresh weights (FW), while total flavonoid and tannins contents were 285.23 and 73.65mg catechin equivalents/100g FW, respectively. The ADE has strong scavenging activity. Ferulic, caffeic and p-coumaric acids are the major's compounds. Nephrotoxicity was induced in male Wistar rats by the administration of 0.5 and 2g/L DCA as drinking water. Some of these rats received also by gavage ADE (4mL/kg) before the administration of DCA. After two months of experiment, DCA administration caused elevated levels of renal MDA, significant depletion of GSH levels, altered the antioxidant enzyme activities and deteriorated the renal functions as assessed by the increased plasma urea, uric acid and creatinine levels compared to control rats. The treatment with the ADE significantly normalized the increased plasma levels of creatinine, urea and uric acid, reduced the elevated MDA levels, significantly normalized the antioxidant enzyme activities and GSH level and restored the altered kidney histology in rats treated with DCA. Therefore, it was speculated that ADE protects rats from kidney damage through its antioxidant capacity. PMID:24394489

  12. Directional coronary atherectomy (DCA)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... arteries, the doctor injects dye and takes an x-ray. If a treatable blockage is noted, the first ... the doctor injects contrast media and takes an x-ray to check for any change in the arteries. ...

  13. Directional coronary atherectomy (DCA)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... caused by blockages. The procedure begins with the doctor injecting some local anesthesia into the groin area ... ostium of one of the coronary arteries, the doctor injects dye and takes an x-ray. If ...

  14. Release and swelling studies of an innovative antidiabetic-bile acid microencapsulated formulation, as a novel targeted therapy for diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Mooranian, Armin; Negrulj, Rebecca; Al-Sallami, Hesham S; Fang, Zhongxiang; Mikov, Momir; Golocorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Fakhoury, Marc; Arfuso, Frank; Aruso, Frank; Al-Salami, Hani

    2015-01-01

    In previous studies carried out in our laboratory, a bile acid formulation exerted a hypoglycaemic effect in a rat model of type 1 diabetes (T1D). When the antidiabetic drug gliclazide was added to the bile acid, it augmented the hypoglycaemic effect. In a recent study, we designed a new formulation of gliclazide-deoxycholic acid (G-DCA), with good structural properties, excipient compatibility and which exhibited pseudoplastic-thixotropic characteristics. The aim of this study is to test the slow release and pH controlled properties of this new formulation. The aim is also to examine the effect of DCA on G release kinetics at various pH values and different temperatures. Microencapsulation was carried out using our Buchi-based microencapsulating system developed in our laboratory. Using sodium alginate (SA) polymer, both formulations were prepared including: G-SA (control) and G-DCA-SA (test) at a constant ratio (1:3:30), respectively. Microcapsules were examined for efficiency, size, release kinetics, stability and swelling studies at pH 1.5, 3, 7.4 and 7.8 and temperatures of 25 °C and 37 °C. The new formulation is further optimised by the addition of DCA. DCA reduced bead-swelling of the microcapsules at pH 7.8 and 3 at 25 °C and 37 °C, and even though bead size remains similar after DCA addition, the percentage of G release was enhanced at high pH values (pH 7.4 and 7.8, p < 0.01). The new formulation exhibits colon-targeted delivery and the addition of DCA prolonged G release suggesting its suitability for the sustained and targeted delivery of G and DCA to the lower intestine. PMID:25265061

  15. The metabolite 3,4,3',4'-tetrachloroazobenzene (TCAB) exerts a higher ecotoxicity than the parent compounds 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) and propanil.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hongxia; Kuckelkorn, Jochen; Nüßer, Leonie Katharina; Floehr, Tilman; Hennig, Michael Patrick; Roß-Nickoll, Martina; Schäffer, Andreas; Hollert, Henner

    2016-05-01

    3,4,3',4'-tetrachloroazobenzene (TCAB) is not commercially manufactured but formed as an unwanted by-product in the manufacturing of 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) or metabolized from the degradation of chloranilide herbicides, like propanil. While a considerable amount of research has been done concerning the toxicological and ecotoxicological effects of propanil and 3,4-DCA, limited information is available on TCAB. Our study examined the toxicity of TCAB in comparison to its parent compounds propanil and 3,4-DCA, using a battery of bioassays including in vitro with aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated activity by the 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay and micro-EROD, endocrine-disrupting activity with chemically activated luciferase gene expression (CALUX) as well as in vivo with fish embryo toxicity (FET) assays with Danio rerio. Moreover, the quantitative structure activity response (QSAR) concepts were applied to simulate the binding affinity of TCAB to certain human receptors. It was shown that TCAB has a strong binding affinity to the AhR in EROD and micro-EROD induction assay, with the toxic equivalency factor (TEF) of 8.7×10(-4) and 1.2×10(-5), respectively. TCAB presented to be a weak endocrine disrupting compound with a value of estradiol equivalence factor (EEF) of 6.4×10(-9) and dihydrotestosterone equivalency factor (DEF) of 1.1×10(-10). No acute lethal effects of TCAB were discovered in FET test after 96h of exposure. Major sub-lethal effects detected were heart oedema, yolk malformation, as well as absence of blood flow and tail deformation. QSAR modelling suggested an elevated risk to environment, particularly with respect to binding to the AhR. An adverse effect potentially triggering ERβ, mineralocorticoid, glucocorticoid and progesterone receptor activities might be expected. Altogether, the results obtained suggest that TCAB exerts a higher toxicity than both propanil and 3,4-DCA. This should be considered when assessing the

  16. Differential effects of deoxycholic acid versus selenium metabolite methylselenol on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A typical part of the Western diet is a high fat intake that leads to increased levels of fecal bile acids, and these bile acids, primarily deoxycholic acid (DCA) in humans, have been believed to be tumor promoters of colon cancer. The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxyc...

  17. Effects of feeding bile acids and a bile acid sequestrant on hepatic bile acid composition in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2010-11-01

    An improved ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) method was established for the simultaneous analysis of various bile acids (BA) and applied to investigate liver BA content in C57BL/6 mice fed 1% cholic acid (CA), 0.3% deoxycholic acid (DCA), 0.3% chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), 0.3% lithocholic acid (LCA), 3% ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), or 2% cholestyramine (resin). Results indicate that mice have a remarkable ability to maintain liver BA concentrations. The BA profiles in mouse livers were similar between CA and DCA feedings, as well as between CDCA and LCA feedings. The mRNA expression of Cytochrome P450 7a1 (Cyp7a1) was suppressed by all BA feedings, whereas Cyp7b1 was suppressed only by CA and UDCA feedings. Gender differences in liver BA composition were observed after feeding CA, DCA, CDCA, and LCA, but they were not prominent after feeding UDCA. Sulfation of CA and CDCA was found at the 7-OH position, and it was increased by feeding CA or CDCA more in male than female mice. In contrast, sulfation of LCA and taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) was female-predominant, and it was increased by feeding UDCA and LCA. In summary, the present systematic study on BA metabolism in mice will aid in interpreting BA-mediated gene regulation and hepatotoxicity. PMID:20671298

  18. Effects of feeding bile acids and a bile acid sequestrant on hepatic bile acid composition in mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2010-01-01

    An improved ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) method was established for the simultaneous analysis of various bile acids (BA) and applied to investigate liver BA content in C57BL/6 mice fed 1% cholic acid (CA), 0.3% deoxycholic acid (DCA), 0.3% chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), 0.3% lithocholic acid (LCA), 3% ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), or 2% cholestyramine (resin). Results indicate that mice have a remarkable ability to maintain liver BA concentrations. The BA profiles in mouse livers were similar between CA and DCA feedings, as well as between CDCA and LCA feedings. The mRNA expression of Cytochrome P450 7a1 (Cyp7a1) was suppressed by all BA feedings, whereas Cyp7b1 was suppressed only by CA and UDCA feedings. Gender differences in liver BA composition were observed after feeding CA, DCA, CDCA, and LCA, but they were not prominent after feeding UDCA. Sulfation of CA and CDCA was found at the 7-OH position, and it was increased by feeding CA or CDCA more in male than female mice. In contrast, sulfation of LCA and taurolithocholic acid (TLCA) was female-predominant, and it was increased by feeding UDCA and LCA. In summary, the present systematic study on BA metabolism in mice will aid in interpreting BA-mediated gene regulation and hepatotoxicity. PMID:20671298

  19. Apoptosis and modulation of cell cycle control by bile acids in human leukemia T cells.

    PubMed

    Fimognari, Carmela; Lenzi, Monia; Cantelli-Forti, Giorgio; Hrelia, Patrizia

    2009-08-01

    Depending on the nature of chemical structures, different bile acids exhibit distinct biological effects. Their therapeutic efficacy has been widely demonstrated in various liver diseases, suggesting that they might protect hepatocytes against common mechanisms of liver damage. Although it has been shown to prevent apoptotic cell death in certain cell lines, bile acids significantly inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in cancer cells. To better understand the pharmacological potential of bile acids in cancer cells, we investigated and compared the effects of deoxycholic acid (DCA), ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and their taurine-derivatives [taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) and tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), respectively] on the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation of a human T leukemia cell line (Jurkat cells). All the bile acids tested induced a delay in cell cycle progression. Moreover, DCA markedly increased the fraction of apoptotic cells. The effects of TDCA, UDCA, and TUDCA were different from those observed for DCA. Their primary effect was the induction of necrosis. These distinctive features suggest that the hydrophobic properties of DCA play a role in its cytotoxic potential and indicate that it is possible to create new drugs useful for cancer therapy from bile acid derivatives as lead compounds. PMID:19723064

  20. Novel artificial cell microencapsulation of a complex gliclazide-deoxycholic bile acid formulation: a characterization study

    PubMed Central

    Mooranian, Armin; Negrulj, Rebecca; Chen-Tan, Nigel; Al-Sallami, Hesham S; Fang, Zhongxiang; Mukkur, Trilochan; Mikov, Momir; Golocorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Fakhoury, Marc; Arfuso, Frank; Al-Salami, Hani

    2014-01-01

    Gliclazide (G) is an antidiabetic drug commonly used in type 2 diabetes. It has extrapancreatic hypoglycemic effects, which makes it a good candidate in type 1 diabetes (T1D). In previous studies, we have shown that a gliclazide-bile acid mixture exerted a hypoglycemic effect in a rat model of T1D. We have also shown that a gliclazide-deoxycholic acid (G-DCA) mixture resulted in better G permeation in vivo, but did not produce a hypoglycemic effect. In this study, we aimed to develop a novel microencapsulated formulation of G-DCA with uniform structure, which has the potential to enhance G pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in our rat model of T1D. We also aimed to examine the effect that DCA will have when formulated with our new G microcapsules, in terms of morphology, structure, and excipients’ compatibility. Microencapsulation was carried out using the Büchi-based microencapsulating system developed in our laboratory. Using sodium alginate (SA) polymer, both formulations were prepared: G-SA (control) at a ratio of 1:30, and G-DCA-SA (test) at a ratio of 1:3:30. Complete characterization of microcapsules was carried out. The new G-DCA-SA formulation was further optimized by the addition of DCA, exhibiting pseudoplastic-thixotropic rheological characteristics. The size of microcapsules remained similar after DCA addition, and these microcapsules showed no chemical interactions between the excipients. This was supported further by the spectral and microscopy studies, suggesting microcapsule stability. The new microencapsulated formulation has good structural properties and may be useful for the oral delivery of G in T1D. PMID:25114507

  1. Novel artificial cell microencapsulation of a complex gliclazide-deoxycholic bile acid formulation: a characterization study.

    PubMed

    Mooranian, Armin; Negrulj, Rebecca; Chen-Tan, Nigel; Al-Sallami, Hesham S; Fang, Zhongxiang; Mukkur, Trilochan; Mikov, Momir; Golocorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Fakhoury, Marc; Arfuso, Frank; Al-Salami, Hani

    2014-01-01

    Gliclazide (G) is an antidiabetic drug commonly used in type 2 diabetes. It has extrapancreatic hypoglycemic effects, which makes it a good candidate in type 1 diabetes (T1D). In previous studies, we have shown that a gliclazide-bile acid mixture exerted a hypoglycemic effect in a rat model of T1D. We have also shown that a gliclazide-deoxycholic acid (G-DCA) mixture resulted in better G permeation in vivo, but did not produce a hypoglycemic effect. In this study, we aimed to develop a novel microencapsulated formulation of G-DCA with uniform structure, which has the potential to enhance G pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in our rat model of T1D. We also aimed to examine the effect that DCA will have when formulated with our new G microcapsules, in terms of morphology, structure, and excipients' compatibility. Microencapsulation was carried out using the Büchi-based microencapsulating system developed in our laboratory. Using sodium alginate (SA) polymer, both formulations were prepared: G-SA (control) at a ratio of 1:30, and G-DCA-SA (test) at a ratio of 1:3:30. Complete characterization of microcapsules was carried out. The new G-DCA-SA formulation was further optimized by the addition of DCA, exhibiting pseudoplastic-thixotropic rheological characteristics. The size of microcapsules remained similar after DCA addition, and these microcapsules showed no chemical interactions between the excipients. This was supported further by the spectral and microscopy studies, suggesting microcapsule stability. The new microencapsulated formulation has good structural properties and may be useful for the oral delivery of G in T1D. PMID:25114507

  2. A MULTISTAGE BIOLOGICALLY BASED MODEL FOR MOUSE LIVER TUMORS RESULTING FROM EXPOSURE TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloroacetic Acid (DCA) is a major byproduct of the chlorine disinfection of humic acid containing drinking water sources. It is a hepatocarcinogen in mice and rats at exposure concentrations in drinking water that are at least 4 orders of magnitude above the concentrations in ...

  3. EARLY GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN THE LIVERS OF MICE EXPOSED TO DICHOLORACETC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    EARLY GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN THE LIVERS OF MICE EXPOSED TO DICHLOROACETIC ACID

    Dichloroacetic acid COCA) is a major by-product ofwater disinfection by cWorination. Several
    studies have shown that DCA induces liver tumors in rodents when administered in drinkmg wate...

  4. Butyrate and deoxycholic acid play common and distinct roles in HCT116 human colon cell proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of a high fat diet causes an increase in bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) in colon lumen and colon cancer risk while butyrate, an intestinal microbiota metabolite of dietary fiber, has been shown to exhibit colon cancer preventive effects. To distinguish these opposing effects of D...

  5. Renal and systemic acid-base effects of chronic dichloroacetate administration in dogs.

    PubMed

    Hulter, H N; Glynn, R D; Sebastian, A

    1980-10-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) increases metabolic disposal of lactic acid secondary to activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase and consequent acceleration of pyruvate oxidation. DCA has thus been proposed as a therapeutic agent for clinical states of lactic acidosis. Yet, DCA has a potential metabolic acidosis-producing effect by virtue of reported effects of (A) increasing blood ketoacid concentration, (B) decreasing tubular reabsorption of filtered ketoacid anions, and (C) decreasing renal NH3 production. In the present study chronic administration of DCA, 50 mg/kg p.o. daily for 6-8 days, resulted in a cumulative increase in renal net acid excretion (NAE) (sigma delta NAE, +61 meq, p < 0.05). The increase in NAE was accounted for entirely by increased NH4+ excretion. Production of ammonia by the kidney appeared to be increased since the increased excretion of NH4+ was accompanied by an increase in urine pH (delta UpH, +0.18 +/- 0.07, p < 0.05). The increase in NAE was accompanied by a nearly identical increase in urinary anion gap (UAG) (UAG = [NH4+ + Na+ + K+] - [Cl- + HCO3- + HPO4(2-) + H2PO4-]). The increase in UAG was caused by increased urinary total organic anions, accounted for at least in part by a significant increase in urinary acetoacetate. No significant increase in urinary potassium or sodium excretion occurred. A change in plasma acid-base composition occurred that was consistent with a mild respiratory acidosis without associated primary metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. These findings indicate that chronic DCA administration results in (1) increased steady state endogenous noncarbonic organic acid production, and (2) retention of carbonic acid. Further investigation of the potential metabolic and respiratory acidosis-producing effects of DCA is required to determine its clinical efficacy in the treatment of clinical lactic acidosis. PMID:7421587

  6. Elevated Deoxycholic Acid and Idiopathic Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report With 48 Months of Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent pancreatitis is a potentially life-threatening condition with a well-established differential diagnosis. In a significant number of cases, no explanation exists. This case report documents one patient with a clear pattern of recurrent acute pancreatitis and no identifiable cause despite great effort. After 7 years of recurrent symptoms, she was found to have marked elevation of fecal deoxycholic acid (DCA), a secondary bile acid used to precipitate pancreatitis in animal models. This report documents cessation of symptoms/hospitalizations with normalization of her fecal DCA levels. This secondary bile acid is easily measured in stool. Needed now is an observational study of fecal DCA levels in patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis. PMID:24891995

  7. Latent carcinogenicity of early-life exposure to dichloroacetic acid in mice.

    PubMed

    Wood, Charles E; Hester, Susan D; Chorley, Brian N; Carswell, Gleta; George, Michael H; Ward, William; Vallanat, Beena; Ren, Hongzu; Fisher, Anna; Lake, April D; Okerberg, Carlin V; Gaillard, Elias T; Moore, Tanya M; Deangelo, Anthony B

    2015-07-01

    Environmental exposures occurring early in life may have an important influence on cancer risk later in life. Here, we investigated carryover effects of dichloroacetic acid (DCA), a small molecule analog of pyruvate with metabolic programming properties, on age-related incidence of liver cancer. The study followed a stop-exposure/promotion design in which 4-week-old male and female B6C3F1 mice received the following treatments: deionized water alone (dH2O, control); dH2O with 0.06% phenobarbital (PB), a mouse liver tumor promoter; or DCA (1.0, 2.0 or 3.5g/l) for 10 weeks followed by dH2O or PB (n = 20-30/group/sex). Pathology and molecular assessments were performed at 98 weeks of age. In the absence of PB, early-life exposure to DCA increased the incidence and number of hepatocellular tumors in male and female mice compared with controls. Significant dose trends were observed in both sexes. At the high dose level, 10 weeks of prior DCA treatment induced comparable effects (≥85% tumor incidence and number) to those seen after continuous lifetime exposure. Prior DCA treatment did not enhance or inhibit the carcinogenic effects of PB, induce persistent liver cytotoxicity or preneoplastic changes on histopathology or alter DNA sequence variant profiles within liver tumors compared with controls. Distinct changes in liver messenger RNA and micro RNA profiles associated with prior DCA treatment were not apparent at 98 weeks. Our findings demonstrate that early-life exposure to DCA may be as carcinogenic as life-long exposures, potentially via epigenetic-mediated effects related to cellular metabolism. PMID:25913432

  8. Effects of cigarette smoke and ethanol intake on mouse oesophageal mucosa changes induced by dietary zinc deficiency and deoxycholic acid supplementation.

    PubMed

    Zapaterini, Joyce R; de Moura, Nelci A; Ribeiro, Daniel A; Rodrigues, Maria A M; Barbisan, Luis F

    2012-08-01

    The noxious effects of dietary zinc deficiency (ZD) and deoxycholic bile acid (DCA) supplementation in the oesophagus were investigated. The additional influence of cigarette smoke and ethanol intake on the changes in the oesophageal mucosa induced by dietary ZD plus DCA was also assessed. Male C57BL/6 mice were allocated into four groups: Group 1 was fed control diet and groups 2-4 were fed ZD plus DCA diet. After 5 weeks, groups 3 and 4 were exposed to 10% ethanol intake or cigarette smoke for 15 weeks, respectively. All animals were euthanized at the end of week 20, and the oesophagus, lung, liver and colon were collected and analysed by conventional morphology. Cell proliferation was assessed in the oesophageal mucosa by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) protein by Western blotting. Dietary ZD plus DCA treatment induced mild hyperkeratosis and hyperplasia, increased cell proliferation index and COX-2 protein expression in the oesophagus, and intranuclear inclusion, karyocytomegaly and microvesicular fatty change in the liver. Cigarette smoke increased COX-2 protein expression in oesophageal mucosa and irregular enlargement of alveolus and alveolar ductal air spaces, while ethanol enhanced liver damage induced by ZD plus DCA diet. These findings indicate that dietary ZD plus DCA treatment during 20 weeks induces a pattern of chemical oesophageal injury but not Barrett's-like lesions. PMID:22380924

  9. Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes and Ion-Jelly® Membranes with [BMIM][DCA]: Comparison of Its Performance for CO2 Separation

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Ricardo; Neves, Luísa; Simões, Pedro; Coelhoso, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a supported ionic liquid membrane (SILM) was prepared by impregnating a PVDF membrane with 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([BMIM][DCA]) ionic liquid. This membrane was tested for its permeability to pure gases (CO2, N2 and O2) and ideal selectivities were calculated. The SILM performance was also compared to that of Ion-Jelly® membranes, a new type of gelled membranes developed recently. It was found that the PVDF membrane presents permeabilities for pure gases similar or lower to those presented by the Ion-Jelly® membranes, but with increased ideal selectivities. This membrane presents also the highest ideal selectivity (73) for the separation of CO2 from N2 when compared with SILMs using the same PVDF support but with different ionic liquids. PMID:25594165

  10. Individual bile acids have differential effects on bile acid signaling in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Peizhen Rockwell, Cheryl E. Cui, Julia Yue Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2015-02-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate BA synthesis and transport by the farnesoid X receptor in the liver (FXR-SHP) and intestine (FXR-Fgf15). However, the relative importance of individual BAs in regulating these processes is not known. Therefore, mice were fed various doses of five individual BAs, including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxoycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in their diets at various concentrations for one week to increase the concentration of one BA in the enterohepatic circulation. The mRNA of BA synthesis and transporting genes in liver and ileum were quantified. In the liver, the mRNA of SHP, which is the prototypical target gene of FXR, increased in mice fed all concentrations of BAs. In the ileum, the mRNA of the intestinal FXR target gene Fgf15 was increased at lower doses and to a higher extent by CA and DCA than by CDCA and LCA. Cyp7a1, the rate-limiting enzyme in BA synthesis, was decreased more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Cyp8b1, the enzyme that 12-hydroxylates BAs and is thus responsible for the synthesis of CA, was decreased much more by CA and DCA than CDCA and LCA. Surprisingly, neither a decrease in the conjugated BA uptake transporter (Ntcp) nor increase in BA efflux transporter (Bsep) was observed by FXR activation, but an increase in the cholesterol efflux transporter (Abcg5/Abcg8) was observed with FXR activation. Thus in conclusion, CA and DCA are more potent FXR activators than CDCA and LCA when fed to mice, and thus they are more effective in decreasing the expression of the rate limiting gene in BA synthesis Cyp7a1 and the 12-hydroxylation of BAs Cyp8b1, and are also more effective in increasing the expression of Abcg5/Abcg8, which is responsible for biliary cholesterol excretion. However, feeding BAs do not alter the mRNA or protein levels of Ntcp or Bsep, suggesting that the uptake or efflux of BAs is not regulated by FXR at physiological and

  11. Developmental toxicity of mixtures: the water disinfection by-products dichloro-, dibromo- and bromochloro acetic acid in rat embryo culture

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chlorination of drinking water results in production of numerous disinfection by-products (DBPs). One of the important classes of DBPs is the haloacetic acids. We have previously shown that the haloacetic acids (HAs), dichloro (DCA), dibromo (DBA) and bromochloro (BCA) acetic...

  12. A weakly acidic solution containing deoxycholic acid induces esophageal epithelial apoptosis and impairs integrity in an in vivo perfusion rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Pardon, Nicolas A; Vicario, Maria; Vanheel, Hanne; Vanuytsel, Tim; Ceulemans, Laurens J; Vieth, Michael; Jimenez, Marcel; Tack, Jan; Farré, Ricard

    2016-04-01

    Impaired esophageal mucosal integrity may be an important contributor in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Nevertheless, the effect of potentially harmful agents on epithelial integrity is mainly evaluated in vitro for a short period of time and the possible induction of epithelial apoptosis has been neglected. Our objective was to assess the effect of an acidic and weakly acidic solution containing deoxycholic acid (DCA) on the esophageal epithelium in an in vivo rabbit model of esophageal perfusion and to evaluate the role of the epithelial apoptosis. The esophagus of 55 anesthetized rabbits was perfused for 30 min with different solutions at pH 7.2, pH 5.0, pH 1.0, and pH 5.0 containing 200 and 500 μM DCA. Thereafter, animals were euthanized immediately or at 24 or 48 h after the perfusion. Transepithelial electrical resistance, epithelial dilated intercellular spaces, and apoptosis were assessed in Ussing chambers, by transmission electron microscopy, and by TUNEL staining, respectively. No macroscopic or major microscopic alterations were observed after the esophageal perfusions. The acidic and weakly acidic solution containing DCA induced similar long-lasting functional impairment of the epithelial integrity but different ultrastructural morphological changes. Only the solution containing DCA induced epithelial apoptosis in vivo and in vitro in rabbit and human tissue. In contrast to acid, a weakly acidic solution containing DCA induces epithelial apoptosis and a long-lasting impaired mucosal integrity. The presence of apoptotic cells in the esophageal epithelium may be used as a marker of impaired integrity and/or bile reflux exposure. PMID:26797397

  13. Biliary bile acids in primary biliary cirrhosis: effect of ursodeoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Combes, B; Carithers, R L; Maddrey, W C; Munoz, S; Garcia-Tsao, G; Bonner, G F; Boyer, J L; Luketic, V A; Shiffman, M L; Peters, M G; White, H; Zetterman, R K; Risser, R; Rossi, S S; Hofmann, A F

    1999-06-01

    Bile acid composition in fasting duodenal bile was assessed at entry and at 2 years in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) (10-12 mg/kg/d) taken as a single bedtime dose. Specimens were analyzed by a high-pressure liquid chromatography method that had been validated against gas chromatography. Percent composition in bile (mean +/- SD) for 98 patients at entry for cholic (CA), chenodeoxycholic (CDCA), deoxycholic (DCA), lithocholic (LCA), and ursodeoxycholic (UDCA) acids, respectively, were 57.4 +/- 18.6, 31.5 +/- 15.5, 8.0 +/- 9.3, 0.3 +/- 1.0, and 0.6 +/- 0.9. Values for CA were increased, whereas those for CDCA, DCA, LCA, and UDCA were decreased when compared with values in normal persons. Bile acid composition of the major bile acids did not change after 2 years on placebo medication. By contrast, in patients receiving UDCA for 2 years, bile became enriched with UDCA on average to 40.1%, and significant decreases were noted for CA (to 32.2%) and CDCA (to 19.5%). No change in percent composition was observed for DCA and LCA. Percent composition at entry and changes in composition after 2 years on UDCA were similar in patients with varying severity of PBC. In patients whose bile was not enriched in UDCA (entry and placebo-treated specimens), CA, CDCA, DCA, and the small amount of UDCA found in some of these specimens were conjugated to a greater extent with glycine (52%-64%) than with taurine (36%-48%). Treatment with UDCA caused the proportion of all endogenous bile acids conjugated with glycine to increase to 69% to 78%, while the proportion conjugated with taurine (22%-31%) fell (P <.05). Administered UDCA was also conjugated predominantly with glycine (87%). PMID:10347103

  14. Natural Attenuation of the Lead Scavengers 1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB) and 1.2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) at Motor Fuel Release Sites and Implications for Risk Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    The lead scavengers 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) were included along with lead in conventional leaded gasoline used for automobiles in the US prior to 1988. Old spills of leaded gasoline from underground storage tank systems (USTs) at gasoline service...

  15. Summary of Salient Findings of "Natural Attenuation of the Lead Scavengers 1,2-Dibromoethane (EDB) and 1,2-Dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) at Motor Fuel Release Sites and Implications for Risk Management"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetra-ethyl lead was widely used in leaded automobile gasoline from 1923 until 1987 (See Figure 1). To prevent lead deposits from fouling the engine, 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA) were added to the gasoline to act as lead scavengers. These compounds r...

  16. EFFECT OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID AND TRICHLOROACETIC ACID ON DNA METHYLATION IN LIVER AND TUMORS OF FEMALE B6C3F1 MICE. (R825384)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  17. Production of Long-Chain α,ω-Dicarboxylic Acids by Engineered Escherichia coli from Renewable Fatty Acids and Plant Oils.

    PubMed

    Sathesh-Prabu, Chandran; Lee, Sung Kuk

    2015-09-23

    Long-chain α,ω-dicarboxylic acids (LDCAs, ≥ C12) are widely used as a raw material for preparing various commodities and polymers. In this study, a CYP450-monooxygenase-mediated ω-oxidation pathway system with high ω-regioselectivity was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli to produce DCAs from fatty acids. The resulting engineered E. coli produced a maximum of 41 mg/L of C12 DCA and 163 mg/L of C14 DCA from fatty acids (1 g/L), following 20 h of whole cell biotransformation. Addition of a heme precursor and the hydroxyl radical scavenger, thiourea, increased product concentration (159 mg/L of C12 DCA and 410 mg/L of C14 DCA) in a shorter culture duration than that of the corresponding controls. DCAs of various chain lengths were synthesized from coconut oil hydrolysate using the engineered E. coli. This novel synthetic biocatalytic system could be applied to produce high value DCAs in a cost-effective manner from renewable plant oils. PMID:26359801

  18. Deoxycholic acid and selenium metabolite methylselenol exert common and distinct effects on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells, and consequently increase colon cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium (Se) as anticancer ...

  19. Microbial Transformation of Dicarboxylic Acids by Airborne Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, V.; Ariya, P.

    2004-05-01

    Organic aerosols are assumed to be key players in driving climatic changes and can cause health problems for human. Dicarboxylic acids (DCA) include a large fraction of identified important class of organic aerosols. In addition to direct sources, DCA are partly formed as the result of ozonolysis of terpenes and cyclic alkenes. Previous works in our laboratory show that airborne fungi collected from urban and suburban air play an important role in the transformation of severals organic aerosols such as DCA. Our present study focuses on understanding the potential chemical transformation induced by airborne bacteria and on identification of the transformation products. Airborne bacteria have been collected using a biosampler and cultivated on a solid media. Each bacterial colony is being tested by HPLC for their ability to transform DCA in liquid cultures. Also, GC-MS, SPME and NMR are being used to identify the metabolites generated from the transformation. We will present our preliminary results and we will discuss the application of bacterial activities on the chemical transformation of organics in atmosphere.

  20. A phase I safety and pharmacokinetic study of ATX-101: injectable, synthetic deoxycholic acid for submental contouring.

    PubMed

    Walker, Patricia; Fellmann, Jere; Lizzul, Paul F

    2015-03-01

    ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid [DCA] injection) is a proprietary formulation of pure synthetic DCA. When injected into subcutaneous fat, ATX-101 results in focal adipocytolysis, the targeted destruction of fat cells. ATX-101 is undergoing investigation as an injectable drug for contouring the submental area by reducing submental fat (SMF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics (PK) of the maximal therapeutic dose of ATX-101 (100 mg total dose). Following PK evaluation of endogenous DCA, subjects (N=24) received subcutaneous injections of ATX-101 (2 mg/cm2, with or without 0.9% benzyl alcohol) into SMF; PK evaluation was repeated periodically over 24 hours. Endogenous DCA plasma concentrations measured prior to injection were highly variable within and between subjects. Similarly, following ATX-101 injection, DCA plasma concentrations were highly variable, peaked rapidly, and returned to the range observed for endogenous values by 24 hours postdose. All subjects experienced at least 1 adverse event (AE). No death, serious AE, or AE-related discontinuations occurred. The majority of AEs were transient, associated with the area treated, and of mild or moderate severity. No clinically significant changes were reported for laboratory test results, vital signs, or Holter electrocardiograms postdosing. These data support the favorable safety and efficacy observations of ATX-101 as an injectable drug to reduce SMF. PMID:25738850

  1. Bile acids regulate intestinal cell proliferation by modulating EGFR and FXR signaling.

    PubMed

    Dossa, Avafia Y; Escobar, Oswaldo; Golden, Jamie; Frey, Mark R; Ford, Henri R; Gayer, Christopher P

    2016-01-15

    Bile acids (BAs) are synthesized in the liver and secreted into the intestine. In the lumen, enteric bacteria metabolize BAs from conjugated, primary forms into more toxic unconjugated, secondary metabolites. Secondary BAs can be injurious to the intestine and may contribute to disease. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR) are known to interact with BAs. In this study we examined the effects of BAs on intestinal epithelial cell proliferation and investigated the possible roles for EGFR and FXR in these effects. We report that taurine-conjugated cholic acid (TCA) induced proliferation, while its unconjugated secondary counterpart deoxycholic acid (DCA) inhibited proliferation. TCA stimulated phosphorylation of Src, EGFR, and ERK 1/2. Pharmacological blockade of any of these pathways or genetic ablation of EGFR abrogated TCA-stimulated proliferation. Interestingly, Src or EGFR inhibitors eliminated TCA-induced phosphorylation of both molecules, suggesting that their activation is interdependent. In contrast to TCA, DCA exposure diminished EGFR phosphorylation, and pharmacological or siRNA blockade of FXR abolished DCA-induced inhibition of proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest that TCA induces intestinal cell proliferation via Src, EGFR, and ERK activation. In contrast, DCA inhibits proliferation via an FXR-dependent mechanism that may include downstream inactivation of the EGFR/Src/ERK pathway. Since elevated secondary BA levels are the result of specific bacterial modification, this may provide a mechanism through which an altered microbiota contributes to normal or abnormal intestinal epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:26608185

  2. Study of the resistance of SAMs on aluminium to acidic and basic solutions using dynamic contact angle measurement.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Newman, Roger C; McAlpine, Eoghan; Alexander, Morgan R

    2007-01-30

    We report the development of a method to determine the aqueous stability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) using the Wilhelmy plate dynamic contact angle (DCA) experiment. The DCA is measured in solutions over a range of pH values for alkyl carboxylic and alkyl phosphonic acid SAMs formed on magnetron-sputtered aluminum. The change in DCA on repeated immersion is used as a measure of the degradation of the SAMs by hydrolytic attack. The short and intermediate chain length alkyl acids are not stable in water of neutral pH, whereas molecules with the longest alkyl chains show considerably greater stability in neutral and both high and low pH solutions. The packing density inferred from the DCA and the contact angle hysteresis suggests the C18CO2H monolayer to be slightly less well packed than that of the C18P(=O)(OH)2; this is consistent with related friction force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy findings published elsewhere (Foster, T. T.; Alexander, M. R.; Leggett, G. J.; McAlpine, E. Langmuir 2006, 22, 9254-9259). The resistance of the SAMs to acid and alkaline environments is discussed in the context of aluminum oxide solubility, SAM packing density, and the resistance of the interfacial phosphate and carboxylate functionalities to different aqueous conditions. PMID:17241003

  3. Determination of free bile acids in pharmaceuticals by thin layer chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Novaković, J; Tvrzická, E; Razić, S

    1998-11-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection (HPLC-ELSD) and thin layer chromatography with flame ionization detection (TLC-FID) have been applied to the separation of five main free bile acids present in humans: cholic (CA), chenodeoxycholic (CDCA), deoxycholic (DCA), lithocholic (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic (UDCA) acid. HPLC separation was performed on Biospher Si 100 column using a mixture of n-heptane, isopropanol, ethylacetate, methanol and glacial acetic acid as a mobile phase. All the compounds were separated in less than 12 minutes by using a gradient elution mode. TLC-FID separation was performed on S-II Chromarods with a mixture of isooctane, ethylacetate and glacial acetic acid as a mobile phase. HPLC-ELSD method was applied to the determination of CDCA and UDCA in pharmaceuticals and their purity control when LCA, DCA and CA were considered as impurities. PMID:9880946

  4. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yingting; Tissue Tech Inc., Miami, FL 33173 ; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  5. ANALYSIS OF DNA STRAND BREAKS INDUCED IN RODENT LIVER IN VIVO, HEPATOCYTES IN VITRO, AND A HUMAN CELL LINE BY CHLORINATED ACETIC ACIDS AND ALDEHYDES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An alkaline unwinding assay was used to quantitate DNA strand breaks (DNA SB) in the livers of rats and mice, in rodent hepatocytes, and in CCRF-CEM cells following treatment with tri- (TCA), di- (DCA) and mono-(MCA) chloroacetic acid and tri-(CH), di)(DCAA) and mono- (CAA) chlor...

  6. HYPOMETHYLATION OF DNA AND THE INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR-II GENE IN DICHLOROACETIC AND TRICHLOROACETIC ACID-PROMOTED MOUSE LIVER TUMORS. (R828083)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  7. ACTIVATION AND APOPTOSIS OF CD4+ T CELLS FOLLOWING IN VIVO EXPOSURE TO TWO COMMON ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANTS, TRICHLOROACETALDEHYDE HYDRATE AND TRICHLOROACETIC ACID. (R829417E02)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. Farnesoid X receptor signal is involved in deoxycholic acid-induced intestinal metaplasia of normal human gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2015-11-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) signaling pathway is known to be involved in the metabolism of bile acid, glucose and lipid. In the present study, we demonstrated that 400 µmol/l deoxycholic acid (DCA) stimulation promotes the proliferation of normal human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). In addition, DCA activated FXR and increased the expression of intestinal metaplasia genes, including caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2 (Cdx2) and mucin 2 (MUC2). The treatment of FXR agonist GW4064/antagonist guggulsterone (Gug.) significantly increased/decreased the expression levels of FXR, Cdx2 and MUC2 protein in DCA-induced GES-1 cells. GW4064/Gug. also enhanced/reduced the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activity and binding of the Cdx2 promoter region and NF-κB, the most common subunit p50 protein. Taken together, the results indicated that DCA is capable of modulating the expression of Cdx2 and the downstream MUC2 via the nuclear receptor FXR-NF-κB activity in normal gastric epithelial cells. FXR signaling pathway may therefore be involved in the intestinal metaplasia of human gastric mucosa. PMID:26324224

  9. Ca2+- and PKC-dependent stimulation of PGE2 synthesis by deoxycholic acid in human colonic fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingting; Hua, Ping; Rafiq, Shazia; Waffner, Eric J; Duffey, Michael E; Lance, Peter

    2002-09-01

    We investigated prostanoid biogenesis by human colonic fibroblasts (CCD-18Co cells and nine primary fibroblast cultures) exposed to a primary (cholic, CA) or a secondary (deoxycholic, DCA) bile acid. Basal PGE2 levels in CCD-18Co cultures and fibroblast strains initiated from normal and adenocarcinomatous colon, respectively, were 1.7 +/- 0.3, 4.0 +/- 2.0, and 15.0 +/- 4.8 ng/mg protein. Peak levels 24 h after exposure to DCA (300 microM) rose, respectively, seven-, six- and sevenfold, but CA elicited no such responses. Increases in PGE2 synthesis were preceded by sequential increases in PGH synthase-2 mRNA and protein expression and were fully prevented by a nonselective (indomethacin) or a selective (celecoxib) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. DCA, but not CA, caused abrupt, transient increases in fibroblast intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) approximately 1 min after exposure. Increased [Ca2+]i was required for DCA-mediated induction of PGE2 synthesis, and protein kinase C was a further essential component of this signaling pathway. Colonic fibroblasts may be a major target for prostanoid biogenesis induced by fecal bile acids and, potentially, other noxious actions of these agents. PMID:12181161

  10. ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulations of intermediate species in dicyanamide anion and nitric acid hypergolic combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismiller, Michael R.; Junkermeier, Chad E.; Russo, Michael F., Jr.; Salazar, Michael R.; Bedrov, Dmitry; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2015-10-01

    Ionic liquids based on the dicyanamide anion (DCA) are of interest as replacements for current hypergolic fuels, which are highly toxic. To better understand the reaction dynamics of these ionic liquid fuels, this study reports the results of molecular dynamics simulations performed for two predicted intermediate compounds in DCA-based ionic liquids/nitric acid (HNO3) combustion, i.e. protonated DCA (DCAH) and nitro-dicyanamide-carbonyl (NDC). Calculations were performed using a ReaxFF reactive force field. Single component simulations show that neat NDC undergo exothermic decomposition and ignition. Simulations with HNO3 were performed at both a low (0.25 g ml-1) and high (1.00 g ml-1) densities, to investigate the reaction in a dense vapor and liquid phase, respectively. Both DCAH and NDC react hypergolically with HNO3, and increased density led to shorter times for the onset of thermal runaway. Contrary to a proposed mechanism for DCA combustion, neither DCAH nor NDC are converted to 1,5-Dinitrobiuret (DNB) before thermal runaway. Details of reaction pathways for these processes are discussed.

  11. Toxicity and intracellular accumulation of bile acids in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes: role of glycine conjugates.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sagnik; Bijsmans, Ingrid T G W; van Mil, Saskia W C; Augustijns, Patrick; Annaert, Pieter

    2014-03-01

    Excessive intrahepatic accumulation of bile acids (BAs) is a key mechanism underlying cholestasis. The aim of this study was to quantitatively explore the relationship between cytotoxicity of BAs and their intracellular accumulation in sandwich-cultured rat hepatocytes (SCRH). Following exposure of SCRH (on day-1 after seeding) to various BAs for 24h, glycine-conjugated BAs were most potent in exerting toxicity. Moreover, unconjugated BAs showed significantly higher toxicity in day-1 compared to day-3 SCRH. When day-1/-3 SCRH were exposed (0.5-4h) to 5-100μM (C)DCA, intracellular levels of unconjugated (C)DCA were similar, while intracellular levels of glycine conjugates were up to 4-fold lower in day-3 compared to day-1 SCRH. Sinusoidal efflux was by far the predominant efflux pathway of conjugated BAs both in day-1 and day-3 SCRH, while canalicular BA efflux showed substantial interbatch variability. After 4h exposure to (C)DCA, intracellular glycine conjugate levels were at least 10-fold higher than taurine conjugate levels. Taken together, reduced BA conjugate formation in day-3 SCRH results in lower intracellular glycine conjugate concentrations, explaining decreased toxicity of (C)DCA in day-3 versus day-1 SCRH. Our data provide for the first time a direct link between BA toxicity and glycine conjugate exposure in SCRH. PMID:24211540

  12. Analysis of duodenal bile acids by high performance liquid chromatography in infants with cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, H Y; Tang, S Y; Chang, M H

    1991-05-01

    Non-sulfated bile acid levels including cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), five taurine conjugates, and five glycine conjugates in duodenal juice were measured in 50 Chinese infants with cholestasis to test their diagnostic value. All 17 with biliary atresia (BA) cases, 11 out of 26 neonatal hepatitis (NH) cases and one case with paucity of the interlobular bile duct were without detectable bile acids. In those NH patients with detectable bile acids, the major components were conjugated forms of CA and CDCA, which was similar to all 6 cases of the comparison group with other diseases. The minor bile acid components identified in them were glycine conjugated UDCA, free CDCA, free CA, and free and conjugated DCA. Only one patient with NH had taurine conjugated LCA. The mean total duodenal bile acid level in 15 patients with NH was significantly lower than that in the 6 patients of the comparison group. Most patients with NH had a CDCA/CA ratio of less than one, indicating that cholic acid is the predominant form in their bile. Glycine conjugated bile acids were the predominant bile acids present in 11 out of 15 patients with NH and 4 out of 6 of the comparison group patients. The results suggest that the detection of duodenal bile acids by a sensitive HPLC method is of limited value in making a differential diagnosis between BA and NH.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1680988

  13. Dose-response of five bile acids on serum and liver bile Acid concentrations and hepatotoxicty in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Peizhen; Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2011-10-01

    Feeding bile acids (BAs) to rodents has been used to study BA signaling and toxicity in vivo. However, little is known about the effect of feeding BAs on the concentrations of BAs in serum and liver as well as the dose of the fed BAs that causes liver toxicity. The present study was designed to investigate the relative hepatotoxicity of individual BAs by feeding mice cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) at concentrations of 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, or 3% in their diet for 7 days. The data demonstrate that (1) the ability of the fed BAs to produce hepatotoxicity is UDCADCADCA at 0.1%, and LCA at 0.03%; (3) BA feeding results in a dose-dependent increase in the total serum BA concentrations but had little effect on liver total BA concentrations; (4) hepatotoxicity of the fed BAs does not simply depend on the concentration or hydrophobicity of total BAs in the liver; and (5) liver BA-conjugation enzymes are saturated by feeding UDCA at concentrations higher than 0.3%. In conclusion, the findings of the present study provide guidance for choosing the feeding concentrations of BAs in mice and will aid in interpreting BA hepatotoxicity as well as BA-mediated gene regulation. PMID:21747115

  14. Downregulation of p63 upon exposure to bile salts and acid in normal and cancer esophageal cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Roman, Sabine; Pétré, Aurélia; Thépot, Amélie; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Mion, François; Hainaut, Pierre

    2007-07-01

    p63 is a member of the p53 protein family that regulates differentiation and morphogenesis in epithelial tissues and is required for the formation of squamous epithelia. Barrett's mucosa is a glandular metaplasia of the squamous epithelium that develops in the lower esophagus in the context of chronic, gastroesophageal reflux and is considered as a precursor for adenocarcinoma. Normal or squamous cancer esophageal cells were exposed to deoxycholic acid (DCA, 50, 100, or 200 microM) and chenodeoxycholic and taurochenodeoxycholic acid at pH 5. p63 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expressions were studied by Western blot and RT-PCR. DCA exposure at pH 5 led to a spectacular decrease in the levels of all isoforms of the p63 proteins. This decrease was observed within minutes of exposure, with a synergistic effect between DCA and acid. Within the same time frame, levels of p63 mRNA were relatively unaffected, whereas levels of COX-2, a marker of stress responses often induced in Barrett's mucosa, were increased. Similar results were obtained with chenodeoxycholic acid but not its taurine conjugate at pH 5. Proteasome inhibition by lactacystin or MG-132 partially blocked the decrease in p63, suggesting a posttranslational degradation mechanism. These results show that combined exposure to bile salt and acid downregulates a critical regulator of squamous differentiation, providing a mechanism to explain the replacement of squamous epithelium by a glandular metaplasia upon exposure of the lower esophagus to gastric reflux. PMID:17615180

  15. Determination of bile acids in pharmaceutical formulations using micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, V G; Lucangioli, S E; Fernández Otero, G C; Carducci, C N

    2000-08-15

    A micellar electrokinetic chromatography method (MEKC) has been developed and validated for the determination of bile acids (BA) such as ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), dehydrocholic acid (DHCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) in pharmaceuticals for quality control purpose. The background electrolyte consisted of 20 mM borate-phosphate buffer containing 50 mM sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), and acetonitrile as additive. UV detection was set at 185 nm. Selectivity, linearity, range, repeatability, intermediate precision and accuracy showed good results. Comparison of the values obtained by MEKC and HPLC methods were in close agreement. PMID:10933529

  16. Bile acids are toxic for isolated cardiac mitochondria: a possible cause for hepatic-derived cardiomyopathies?

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Manuela; Coxito, Pedro M; Sardão, Vilma A; Palmeira, Carlos M; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2005-01-01

    Cholestasis and other liver diseases may affect the heart through the toxic effects of the retained bile acids on cardiac mitochondria, which could explain the origin of hepatic-derived cardiomyopathies. The objective of this work was to test the hypothesis that bile acids are toxic to heart mitochondria for concentrations that are relevant for cholestasis. Heart mitochondria were isolated from rat and subjected to incubation with selected bile acids (litocholic acid [LCA], deoxycholic acid [DCA], chenodeoxycholic acid [CDCA], glycochenodeoxycholic acid [GCDC], taurodeoxycholic acid [TDCA], and glycoursodeoxycholic acid [GUDC]). We observed that the most toxic bile acids were also the most lipophilic ones (LCA, DCA, and CDCA), inducing a decrease on state 3 respiration, respiratory control ratio, and membrane potential and causing the induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition. GUDC was the bile acid with lower indexes of toxicity on isolated heart mitochondria. The results of this research indicate that at toxicologically relevant concentrations, most bile acids (mainly the most lipophilic) alter mitochondrial bioenergetics. The impairment of cardiac mitochondrial function may be an important cause for the observed cardiac alterations during cholestasis. PMID:15738586

  17. Chloral hydrate, through biotransformation to dichloroacetate, inhibits maleylacetoacetate isomerase and tyrosine catabolism in humans

    PubMed Central

    Shroads, Albert L.; Coats, Bonnie S.; Langaee, Taimour; Shuster, Jonathan J.; Stacpoole, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chloral hydrate (CH), a sedative and metabolite of the environmental contaminant trichloroethylene, is metabolized to trichloroacetic acid, trichloroethanol, and possibly dichloroacetate (DCA). DCA is further metabolized by glutathione transferase zeta 1 (GSTZ1), which is identical to maleylacetoacetate isomerase (MAAI), the penultimate enzyme in tyrosine catabolism. DCA inhibits its own metabolism through depletion/inactivation of GSTZ1/ MAAI with repeated exposure, resulting in lower plasma clearance of the drug and the accumulation of the urinary biomarker maleylacetone (MA), a metabolite of tyrosine. It is unknown if GSTZ1/MAAI may participate in the metabolism of CH or any of its metabolites and, therefore, affect tyrosine catabolism. Stable isotopes were utilized to determine the biotransformation of CH, the kinetics of its major metabolites, and the influence, if any, of GSTZ1/MAAI. Methods Eight healthy volunteers (ages 21 – 40 years) received a dose of 1 g of CH (clinical dose) or 1.5 μg/kg (environmental) for five consecutive days. Plasma and urinary samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results Plasma DCA (1.2 – 2.4 μg/mL), metabolized from CH, was measured on the fifth day of the 1 g/day CH dosage but was undetectable in plasma at environmentally relevant doses. Pharmacokinetic measurements from CH metabolites did not differ between slow and fast GSTZ1 haplotypes. Urinary MA levels increased from undetectable to 0.2 – 0.7 μg/g creatinine with repeated CH clinical dose exposure. Kinetic modeling of a clinical dose of 25 mg/kg DCA administered after 5 days of 1 g/day CH closely resembled DCA kinetics obtained in previously naïve individuals. Conclusions These data indicate that the amount of DCA produced from clinically relevant doses of CH, although insufficient to alter DCA kinetics, is sufficient to inhibit MAAI and tyrosine catabolism, as evidenced by the accumulation of urinary MA. PMID:25283137

  18. Selective removal of monoterpenes from bergamot oil by inclusion in deoxycholic acid.

    PubMed

    Fantin, Giancarlo; Fogagnolo, Marco; Maietti, Silvia; Rossetti, Stefano

    2010-05-12

    A new approach for removing monoterpenes (MTs) from bergamot oil by selective inclusion in deoxycholic acid (DCA) is proposed. The inclusion process is very efficient, the included fraction being composed mainly of limonene (71.7%) and gamma-terpinene (19.8%). On the other hand, the deterpenated bergamot oil fraction showed for the linalool and linalyl acetate derivatives significant increases from 16.6 and 21.4% to 18.3 and 42.2%, respectively. The major advantages of this methodology are its simplicity, the mild conditions employed, and the quantitative recovery of both host (DCA) and guest (monoterpenes) compounds. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetry (TG), powder X-ray diffractometry (XRPD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and proton magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) analysis were used to investigate and characterize the inclusion compounds. PMID:20392042

  19. Solid state parameters, structure elucidation, High Resolution X-Ray Diffraction (HRXRD), phase matching, thermal and impedance analysis on L-Proline trichloroacetate (L-PTCA) NLO single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaiselvi, P.; Raj, S. Alfred Cecil; Jagannathan, K.; Vijayan, N.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Kalainathan, S.

    2014-11-01

    Nonlinear optical single crystal of L-Proline trichloroacetate (L-PTCA) was successfully grown by Slow Evaporation Solution Technique (SEST). The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis to confirm the structure. From the single crystal XRD data, solid state parameters were determined for the grown crystal. The crystalline perfection has been evaluated using high resolution X-ray diffractometer. The frequencies of various functional groups were identified from FTIR spectral analysis. The percentage of transmittance was obtained from UV Visible spectral analysis. TGA-DSC measurements indicate the thermal stability of the crystal. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and ac conductivity were measured by the impedance analyzer. The DC conductivity was calculated by the cole-cole plot method.

  20. Oxidative stress markers, secondary bile acids and sulfated bile acids classify the clinical liver injury type: Promising diagnostic biomarkers for cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, Noriko; Sugihara, Masahiro; Sugita, Tomonori; Amano, Katsushi; Nakano, Masanori; Matsuura, Tomokazu

    2016-08-01

    Clinicians sometimes encounter difficulty in choosing a therapeutic strategy due to the uncertainty regarding the type of liver injury. In particular, cholestasis is difficult to diagnose by conventional markers at an early stage of disease. The aim of this study was to identify promising biomarkers for distinguishing the symptom-based types of liver injury (e.g. hepatocellular injury, cholestasis), which was derived from a rigorously statistical perspective. The associations between diagnostic biomarkers (e.g. bile acid components, oxidative stress markers and liver fibrosis markers) and the liver injury types were assessed by a multiple logistic regression analysis using 304 blood samples from patients with liver disease. As a result, reductions in the lithocholic acid (LCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA) levels, and elevation of the serum sulfated bile acid (SSBA), liver fibrosis marker IV collagen (type IV collagen), hyaluronic acid (HA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were all significantly associated with cholestasis. On the other hand, elevations in the LCA and type IV collagen levels, and a reduction in the ursodeoxy cholic acid (UDCA) level, were significantly associated with hepatocellular injury. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses showed that the largest area under the ROC curve (AUC) was found for ROS, followed by DCA, HA, LCA, SSBA and type IV collagen in the cholestatic-type cases. These results indicated that ROS, the secondary bile acid levels such as DCA and LCA, and SSBA are promising biomarkers for cholestasis and for classifying the type of liver injuries. This comprehensive approach will allow for an accurate diagnosis, which will facilitate the selection of an appropriate therapy at the onset of disease. PMID:26325587

  1. Evaluation of the Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in Mouse Liver Tumor Induction by Trichloroethylene and Metabolites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial solvent and a widespread environmental contaminant. Induction of liver cancer in mice by TCE is thought to be mediated by two metabolites, dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA), both of which are themselves mouse liver carcinoge...

  2. Method of analysis at the U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center, Sacramento Laboratory - determination of haloacetic acid formation potential, method validation, and quality-control practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zazzi, Barbara C.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.; Fram, Miranda S.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    An analytical method for the determination of haloacetic acid formation potential of water samples has been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey California Water Science Center Sacramento Laboratory. The haloacetic acid formation potential is measured by dosing water samples with chlorine under specified conditions of pH, temperature, incubation time, darkness, and residual-free chlorine. The haloacetic acids formed are bromochloroacetic acid, bromodichloroacetic acid, dibromochloroacetic acid, dibromoacetic acid, dichloroacetic acid, monobromoacetic acid, monochloroacetic acid, tribromoacetic acid, and trichloroacetic acid. They are extracted, methylated, and then analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector. Method validation experiments were performed to determine the method accuracy, precision, and detection limit for each of the compounds. Method detection limits for these nine haloacetic acids ranged from 0.11 to 0.45 microgram per liter. Quality-control practices include the use of blanks, quality-control samples, calibration verification standards, surrogate recovery, internal standard, matrix spikes, and duplicates.

  3. Method for the separation of the unconjugates and conjugates of chenodeoxycholic acid and deoxycholic acid by two-dimensional reversed-phase thin layer chromatography with methyl beta-cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Momose, T; Mure, M; Iida, T; Goto, J; Nambara, T

    1998-06-19

    A simple and efficient method for the separation of individual unconjugated bile acids and their glycine- and taurine-amidated, 3-sulfated, 3-glucosylated and 3-glucuronidated conjugates is described. The method involves the use of a two-dimensional (2D) reversed-phase (RP) high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) technique with methyl beta-cyclodextrin (Me-beta-CD). Five major unconjugated bile acids, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), ursodeoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid, and their conjugates were examined as the solutes. A high degree of separation of individual bile acids in each homologous series was achieved on a RP-HPTLC plate by developing with aqueous methanol in the first dimension and the same solvent system containing Me-beta-CD in the second dimension. In particular, all of the six 'difficult-to-separate' pairs, unconjugated CDCA and DCA and their conjugated forms with glycine, taurine, sulfuric acid, D-glucose and D-glucuronic acid, were effectively resolved by adding Me-beta-CD in the aqueous mobile phases with the formers having larger mobilities than the latter. The application of this 2D inclusion RP-HPLC method to the separation of glycine-conjugated bile acids in human bile is also described. The present method would be useful for separating and characterizing these bile acids present in biological materials. PMID:9691303

  4. Synthesis and biological activity of novel deoxycholic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Popadyuk, Irina I; Markov, Andrey V; Salomatina, Oksana V; Logashenko, Evgeniya B; Shernyukov, Andrey V; Zenkova, Marina A; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F

    2015-08-01

    We report the synthesis and biological activity of new semi-synthetic derivatives of naturally occurring deoxycholic acid (DCA) bearing 2-cyano-3-oxo-1-ene, 3-oxo-1(2)-ene or 3-oxo-4(5)-ene moieties in ring A and 12-oxo or 12-oxo-9(11)-ene moieties in ring C. Bioassays using murine macrophage-like cells and tumour cells show that the presence of the 9(11)-double bond associated with the increased polarity of ring A or with isoxazole ring joined to ring A, improves the ability of the compounds to inhibit cancer cell growth. PMID:26037611

  5. Transcription of exogenous and endogenous deoxyribonucleic acid templates in cold-shocked Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, S J; Brown, L R

    1980-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis was examined in cold-shocked Bacillus subtilis cells. The cells were grown to mid-log stage, harvested, and cold shocked. RNA synthesis was monitored by the incorporation of [3H]uridine triphosphate or [alpha 32P]adenosine triphosphate into trichloroacetic acid-precipitable material in the presence of all four nucleoside triphosphates. The inhibition of RNA synthesis in cold-shocked cells by lipiarmycin, ethidium bromide, rifampin. or streptolydigin was analyzed using mutant or wild-type cells. Also examined were the effects of temperature, salt concentration, and the addition of polyamines or highly phosphorylated nucleotides. In ultraviolet-irradiated and cold-shocked cells, RNA wynthesis decreased to low levels. The addition of exogenous phi 29 or TSP-1 template to these cells caused a 13- to 20-fold increase in RNA synthesis, as monitored by trichloroacetic acid-precipitable counts. RNA synthesized in the presence of phi 29 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridizes mainly to EcoRI fragments A and C of phi 29 DBA, These two fragments direct transcription by purified RNA polymerase in vitro and hybridize to early phi 29 DNA produced in vivo. Our results with TSP-1 DNA in this system indicated that the RNA produced hybridizes to the same fragments as early RNA produced in vivo. Plasmic pUB110 DNA was not transcribed in this system. Images PMID:6157674

  6. Behavioral evaluation of the neurotoxicity produced by dichloroacetic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Moser, V C; Phillips, P M; McDaniel, K L; MacPhail, R C

    1999-01-01

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is commonly found in drinking water as a by-product of chlorination disinfection. It is a known neurotoxicant in rats, dogs, and humans. We have characterized DCA neurotoxicity in rats using a neurobehavioral screening battery under varying exposure durations (acute, subchronic, and chronic) and routes of administration (oral gavage and drinking water). Studies were conducted in both weanling and adult rats, and comparisons were made between Long-Evans and Fischer-344 rats. DCA produced neuromuscular toxicity comprised of limb weakness and deficits in gait and righting reflex; altered gait and decreased hindlimb grip strength were the earliest indicators of toxicity. Other effects included mild tremors, ocular abnormalities, and a unique chest-clasping response (seen in Fischer-344 rats only). Neurotoxicity was permanent (i.e., through 2 years) following a 6-month exposure to high dose levels, whereas the effects of intermediate dose levels with exposures of 3 months or less were slowly reversible. The severity, specificity, and recovery of neurological changes were route, duration, and strain dependent. Fischer-344 rats were more sensitive than Long-Evans rats, and weanling rats may be somewhat more sensitive than adults. Oral gavage produced significantly less toxicity compared to the same intake level received in drinking water. Neurotoxicity was progressive with continued exposure, and was observed at exposure levels as low as 16 mg/kg/day (lowest dose level tested) when administered via drinking water in subchronic studies. The data from these studies characterize the neurotoxicity produced by DCA, and show it to be more pronounced, persistent, and occurring at lower exposures than has been previously reported. Further research should take into account these marked route, age, and strain differences. PMID:10560779

  7. EFFECT OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE AND ITS METABOLITES, DICHLOROACETIC ACID AND TRICHLOROACETIC ACID, ON THE METHYLATION AND EXPRESSION OF C-JUN AND C-MYC PROTOONCOGENES IN MOUSE LIVER: PREVENTION BY METHIONINE. (R825384)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. EFFECT OF CHLOROFORM ON DICHLOROACETIC ACID AND TRICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED HYPOMETHYLATION AND EXPRESSION OF THE C-MYC GENE AND ON THEIR PROMOTION OF LIVER AND KIDNEY TUMORS IN MICE. (R828083)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  9. EFFECT OF CHLOROFORM ON DICHLOROACETIC ACID AND TRICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED HYPOMETHYLATION AND EXPRESSION OF THE C-MYC GENE AND ON THEIR PROMOTION OF LIVER AND KIDNEY TUMORS IN MICE. (R825384)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  10. Haloacetic acids content of fruit juices and soft drinks.

    PubMed

    Cardador, María José; Gallego, Mercedes

    2015-04-15

    Water used in a food factory is frequently disinfected with chlorine, which originates disinfection by-products: haloacetic acids (HAAs) make up the second most prevalent class of these products. In this paper we propose the first static HS-GC-MS method developed for direct HAA determination in beverages; the method has higher sensitivity, simplicity and reliability than the only alternative available in the literature. From 150 beverages analysed, it is possible to conclude that at least 2 HAAs (dichloro- and trichloroacetic acids, DCAA and TCAA) are always present in beverages prepared with treated water, which remains constant for 2 or 3 months in the beverages. Moreover, beverages of 100% fruit juices and soft drinks prepared with mineral water (free of HAAs) do not contain any HAA at significant values. Therefore, DCAA and TCAA may indicate of the presence of treated water in beverages. PMID:25466077

  11. Increased bile acids in enterohepatic circulation by short-term calorie restriction in male mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2013-12-15

    Previous studies showed glucose and insulin signaling can regulate bile acid (BA) metabolism during fasting or feeding. However, limited knowledge is available on the effect of calorie restriction (CR), a well-known anti-aging intervention, on BA homeostasis. To address this, the present study utilized a "dose-response" model of CR, where male C57BL/6 mice were fed 0, 15, 30, or 40% CR diets for one month, followed by BA profiling in various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation by UPLC-MS/MS technique. This study showed that 40% CR increased the BA pool size (162%) as well as total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestinal contents. In addition, CR "dose-dependently" increased the concentrations of tauro-cholic acid (TCA) and many secondary BAs (produced by intestinal bacteria) in serum, such as tauro-deoxycholic acid (TDCA), DCA, lithocholic acid, ω-muricholic acid (ωMCA), and hyodeoxycholic acid. Notably, 40% CR increased TDCA by over 1000% (serum, liver, and gallbladder). Interestingly, 40% CR increased the proportion of 12α-hydroxylated BAs (CA and DCA), which correlated with improved glucose tolerance and lipid parameters. The CR-induced increase in BAs correlated with increased expression of BA-synthetic (Cyp7a1) and conjugating enzymes (BAL), and the ileal BA-binding protein (Ibabp). These results suggest that CR increases BAs in male mice possibly through orchestrated increases in BA synthesis and conjugation in liver as well as intracellular transport in ileum. PMID:24183703

  12. Kinetics of acid-induced degradation of tetra- and dihydrobiopterin in relation to their relevance as biomarkers of endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Alan; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2013-02-01

    The ratio of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) to its oxidized form dihydrobiopterin (BH(2)) has been suggested as an index of endothelial dysfunction. Consequently, much effort has been put into preserving the in vivo equilibrium between these labile analytes. In the present study, we conducted a series of stability experiments in aqueous solutions and blood to identify the most appropriate way of stabilizing BH(4) and BH(2). Based on our results, we are able to recommend that blood samples are immediately stabilized with dithioerythriol and protein precipitation conducted using trichloroacetic acid (TCA). PMID:23066920

  13. Potency of individual bile acids to regulate bile acid synthesis and transport genes in primary human hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Hong; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Lei, Xiaohong; Cui, Julia Yue; Ellis, Ewa; Strom, Stephen C; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2014-10-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are known to regulate their own homeostasis, but the potency of individual bile acids is not known. This study examined the effects of cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on expression of BA synthesis and transport genes in human primary hepatocyte cultures. Hepatocytes were treated with the individual BAs at 10, 30, and 100μM for 48 h, and RNA was extracted for real-time PCR analysis. For the classic pathway of BA synthesis, BAs except for UDCA markedly suppressed CYP7A1 (70-95%), the rate-limiting enzyme of bile acid synthesis, but only moderately (35%) down-regulated CYP8B1 at a high concentration of 100μM. BAs had minimal effects on mRNA of two enzymes of the alternative pathway of BA synthesis, namely CYP27A1 and CYP7B1. BAs increased the two major target genes of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), namely the small heterodimer partner (SHP) by fourfold, and markedly induced fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) over 100-fold. The BA uptake transporter Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide was unaffected, whereas the efflux transporter bile salt export pump was increased 15-fold and OSTα/β were increased 10-100-fold by BAs. The expression of the organic anion transporting polypeptide 1B3 (OATP1B3; sixfold), ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter G5 (ABCG5; sixfold), multidrug associated protein-2 (MRP2; twofold), and MRP3 (threefold) were also increased, albeit to lesser degrees. In general, CDCA was the most potent and effective BA in regulating these genes important for BA homeostasis, whereas DCA and CA were intermediate, LCA the least, and UDCA ineffective. PMID:25055961

  14. Comparative plasma pharmacokinetics of ceftiofur sodium and ceftiofur crystalline-free acid in neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Woodrow, J S; Caldwell, M; Cox, S; Hines, M; Credille, B C

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the plasma pharmacokinetic profile of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA) and ceftiofur sodium in neonatal calves between 4 and 6 days of age. In one group (n = 7), a single dose of CCFA was administered subcutaneously (SQ) at the base of the ear at a dose of 6.6 mg/kg of body weight. In a second group (n = 7), a single dose of ceftiofur sodium was administered SQ in the neck at a dose of 2.2 mg/kg of body weight. Concentrations of desfuroylceftiofur acetamide (DCA) in plasma were determined by HPLC. Median time to maximum DCA concentration was 12 h (range 12-48 h) for CCFA and 1 h (range 1-2 h) for ceftiofur sodium. Median maximum plasma DCA concentration was significantly higher for calves given ceftiofur sodium (5.62 μg/mL; range 4.10-6.91 μg/mL) than for calves given CCFA (3.23 μg/mL; range 2.15-4.13 μg/mL). AUC0-∞ and Vd/F were significantly greater for calves given CCFA than for calves given ceftiofur sodium. The median terminal half-life of DCA in plasma was significantly longer for calves given CCFA (60.6 h; range 43.5-83.4 h) than for calves given ceftiofur sodium (18.1 h; range 16.7-39.7 h). Cl/F was not significantly different between groups. The duration of time median plasma DCA concentrations remained above 2.0 μg/mL was significantly longer in calves that received CCFA (84.6 h; range 48-103 h) as compared to calves that received ceftiofur sodium (21.7 h; range 12.6-33.6 h). Based on the results of this study, CCFA administered SQ at a dose of 6.6 mg/kg in neonatal calves provided plasma concentrations above the therapeutic target of 2 μg/mL for at least 3 days following a single dose. It is important to note that the use of ceftiofur-containing products is restricted by the FDA and the use of CCFA in veal calves is strictly prohibited. PMID:26542633

  15. Ascorbic acid contents of Pakistani fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M Perwaiz; Kazim, Syed Faraz; Mehboobali, Naseema

    2006-10-01

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are good sources of vitamin C which is known for its antioxidant and immune-enhancing effects. The objective of this study was to determine ascorbic acid (vitamin C) contents of regularly consumed fruits and vegetables available in Pakistani markets. Most commonly used fresh fruits and vegetables were homogenized in 5% trichloroacetic acid, and ascorbic acid contents in the extracts were determined using a spectrophotometric method. Banana, custard apple, orange, lemon, guava and papaya were found to be very rich in ascorbic acid. Among vegetables, capsicum (green sweet pepper), cauliflower, bittergourd, roundgourd, beetroot, spinach, cabbage and radish contained high concentrations of ascorbic acid. Chikoo, grapes, pear, apricot, peach, carrot, cucumber, lettuce and "kakri" were found to be poor sources of ascorbic acid. Several Pakistani fruits and vegetables (pear, melon, onion, sweet green pepper, spinach, cucumber) had ascorbic acid values similar to those reported by US Department of Agriculture in these fruits and vegetables in USA. However, wide differences in vitamin C contents were also observed in certain other fruits and vegetables from these two countries. This indicates that regional varieties of fruits and vegetables could vary in their ascorbic acid contents. Since subclinical deficiency of vitamin C appears to be quite common in developing countries like Pakistan, there is a need to develop awareness among masses to consume fresh fruits and vegetables with high contents of vitamin C. PMID:17105704

  16. Engineering Escherichia coli for Conversion of Glucose to Medium-Chain ω-Hydroxy Fatty Acids and α,ω-Dicarboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Christopher H; Bonin, Jeff; Kogler, Anna; Barba-Ostria, Carlos; Zhang, Fuzhong

    2016-03-18

    In search of sustainable approaches to plastics production, many efforts have been made to engineer microbial conversions of renewable feedstock to short-chain (C2-C8) bifunctional polymer precursors (e.g., succinic acid, cadaverine, 1,4-butanediol). Less attention has been given to medium-chain (C12-C14) monomers such as ω-hydroxy fatty acids (ω-OHFAs) and α,ω-dicarboxylic acids (α,ω-DCAs), which are precursors to high performance polyesters and polyamides. Here we engineer a complete microbial conversion of glucose to C12 and C14 ω-OHFAs and α,ω-DCAs, with precise control of product chain length. Using an expanded bioinformatics approach, we screen a wide range of enzymes across phyla to identify combinations that yield complete conversion of intermediates to product α,ω-DCAs. Finally, through optimization of culture conditions, we enhance production titer of C12 α,ω-DCA to nearly 600 mg/L. Our results indicate potential for this microbial factory to enable commercially relevant, renewable production of C12 α,ω-DCA-a valuable precursor to the high-performance plastic, nylon-6,12. PMID:26669968

  17. A potent tumoricidal co-drug ‘Bet-CA' - an ester derivative of betulinic acid and dichloroacetate selectively and synergistically kills cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suchandrima; Ghosh, Monisankar; Dutta, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Selective targeting of cancer cells employing multiple combinations as co-drug holds promise for new generation therapeutics. Betulinic acid (BA), a plant secondary metabolite kills cancer cells and Dichloroacetate (DCA) is capable of reversing the Warburg phenotype by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). Here, we report synthesis, characterization and tumoricidal potential of a co-drug Bet-CA, where a DCA molecule has been appended on C-3 hydroxyl group of BA to generate an ester derivative for increased solubility and subsequent cleavage by internal esterase(s) to release one unit each of BA and DCA. In vitro studies revealed pronounced synergistic cytotoxicity of Bet-CA against a broad spectrum of cancer cells and it selectively killed them when co-cultured with human fibroblasts. Bet-CA treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, significantly altered mitochondrial membrane potential gradient (ΔΨm); followed by the release of cytochrome c (Cyt c) which prompted cells to undergo mitochondria mediated apoptosis. In vivo experimentation expectedly exhibited tumor inhibitory potential of Bet-CA and clinically achievable doses did not produce any apparent toxicity. Taken together, results suggestively raise an important corollary hypothesis stating that Bet-CA selectively and synergistically combats cancer without producing toxic manifestations and emerges to be the prospect for the new generation therapeutics. PMID:25585916

  18. Extraction of Nucleic Acids from Lyophilized Plant Material

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Gene

    1966-01-01

    Four methods for extracting nucleic acids from lyophilized cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv. Stoneville 62) leaves and roots were compared. They were based on the use of: (I) HC104; (II) KOH; (III) a mixture of 90% phenol, Tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane buffer, and sodium lauryl sulfate; and (IV) NaCl. (I) extracted large amounts of RNA but little DNA and extracted much carbohydrate and protein contaminants. (II) gave a good yield of both RNA and DNA but extracted such large amounts of contaminating material that purification of RNA on an anion exchange column was necessary. (III) extracted only part of the RNA and practically no DNA, but extracted contaminating materials. (IV) resulted in high yields of both RNA and DNA when modified to omit preliminary acid extraction of impurities. The use of cold trichloroacetic acid instead of ethanol, to precipitate NaCl-extracted nucleic acids, separated the nucleic acids from most of the carbohydrate and acid-soluble phosphate contaminants and resulted in good agreement among results by ultraviolet absorbance, pentose tests, and phosphate analysis. This method also resulted in lower protein contents and better ultraviolet absorption spectra than the other methods tested. Nucleic acids were extracted from leaves of 14 other species of plants, in addition to cotton, by this modified NaCl procedure. PMID:16656306

  19. Quantitative analysis of glycerol in dicarboxylic acid-rich cutins provides insights into Arabidopsis cutin structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Pollard, Mike; Li-Beisson, Yonghua; Ohlrogge, John

    2016-10-01

    Cutin is an extracellular lipid polymer that contributes to protective cuticle barrier functions against biotic and abiotic stresses in land plants. Glycerol has been reported as a component of cutin, contributing up to 14% by weight of total released monomers. Previous studies using partial hydrolysis of cuticle-enriched preparations established the presence of oligomers with glycerol-aliphatic ester links. Furthermore, glycerol-3-phosphate 2-O-acyltransferases (sn-2-GPATs) are essential for cutin biosynthesis. However, precise roles of glycerol in cutin assembly and structure remain uncertain. Here, a stable isotope-dilution assay was developed for the quantitative analysis of glycerol by GC/MS of triacetin with simultaneous determination of aliphatic monomers. To provide clues about the role of glycerol in dicarboxylic acid (DCA)-rich cutins, this methodology was applied to compare wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis cutin with a series of mutants that are defective in cutin synthesis. The molar ratio of glycerol to total DCAs in WT cutins was 2:1. Even when allowing for a small additional contribution from hydroxy fatty acids, this is a substantially higher glycerol to aliphatic monomer ratio than previously reported for any cutin. Glycerol content was strongly reduced in both stem and leaf cutin from all Arabidopsis mutants analyzed (gpat4/gpat8, att1-2 and lacs2-3). In addition, the molar reduction of glycerol was proportional to the molar reduction of total DCAs. These results suggest "glycerol-DCA-glycerol" may be the dominant motif in DCA-rich cutins. The ramifications and caveats for this hypothesis are presented. PMID:27211345

  20. Matrix Isolation IR Spectroscopy of 1:1 Complexes of Acetic Acid and Trihaloacetic Acids with Water and Benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Pujarini; Chakraborty, Tapas

    2015-06-01

    A comparative study of infrared spectral effects for 1:1 complex formation of acetic acid (AA), trifluoroacetic acid (TFAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TFAA) with water and benzene has been carried out under a matrix isolation environment. Despite the large difference in aqueous phase acidities of the three acids, the measured νb{OH}stretching frequencies of the monomers of the three molecules are found to be almost same, and in agreement with gas phase electronic structure calculations. Intrinsic acidities are expressed only in the presence of the proton acceptors, water or benzene. Although electronic structure calculations predict distinct νb{OH} red-shifts for all three acids, the measured spectral features for TCAA and TFAA in this range do not allow unambiguous assignments for the 1:1 complex. On the other hand, the spectral changes in the νb{C=O} region are more systematic, and the observed changes are consistent with predictions of theory. Components of overall binding energy of each complex have been obtained from energy decomposition analysis, which allows determination of the relative contributions of various physical forces towards overall stability of the complexes, and the details will be discussed in the talk.

  1. Taurocholic acid metabolism by gut microbes and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Ridlon, Jason M; Wolf, Patricia G; Gaskins, H Rex

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most frequent causes of cancer death worldwide and is associated with adoption of a diet high in animal protein and saturated fat. Saturated fat induces increased bile secretion into the intestine. Increased bile secretion selects for populations of gut microbes capable of altering the bile acid pool, generating tumor-promoting secondary bile acids such as deoxycholic acid and lithocholic acid. Epidemiological evidence suggests CRC is associated with increased levels of DCA in serum, bile, and stool. Mechanisms by which secondary bile acids promote CRC are explored. Furthermore, in humans bile acid conjugation can vary by diet. Vegetarian diets favor glycine conjugation while diets high in animal protein favor taurine conjugation. Metabolism of taurine conjugated bile acids by gut microbes generates hydrogen sulfide, a genotoxic compound. Thus, taurocholic acid has the potential to stimulate intestinal bacteria capable of converting taurine and cholic acid to hydrogen sulfide and deoxycholic acid, a genotoxin and tumor-promoter, respectively. PMID:27003186

  2. Structure and functional characterization of a bile acid 7α dehydratase BaiE in secondary bile acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Shiva; Chiu, Hsien-Po; Jones, David H; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Miller, Mitchell D; Xu, Qingping; Farr, Carol L; Ridlon, Jason M; Wells, James E; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A; Hylemon, Phillip B; Lesley, Scott A

    2016-03-01

    Conversion of the primary bile acids cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) to the secondary bile acids deoxycholic acid (DCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA) is performed by a few species of intestinal bacteria in the genus Clostridium through a multistep biochemical pathway that removes a 7α-hydroxyl group. The rate-determining enzyme in this pathway is bile acid 7α-dehydratase (baiE). In this study, crystal structures of apo-BaiE and its putative product-bound [3-oxo-Δ(4,6) -lithocholyl-Coenzyme A (CoA)] complex are reported. BaiE is a trimer with a twisted α + β barrel fold with similarity to the Nuclear Transport Factor 2 (NTF2) superfamily. Tyr30, Asp35, and His83 form a catalytic triad that is conserved across this family. Site-directed mutagenesis of BaiE from Clostridium scindens VPI 12708 confirm that these residues are essential for catalysis and also the importance of other conserved residues, Tyr54 and Arg146, which are involved in substrate binding and affect catalytic turnover. Steady-state kinetic studies reveal that the BaiE homologs are able to turn over 3-oxo-Δ(4) -bile acid and CoA-conjugated 3-oxo-Δ(4) -bile acid substrates with comparable efficiency questioning the role of CoA-conjugation in the bile acid metabolism pathway. PMID:26650892

  3. Bile acid structure-activity relationship: evaluation of bile acid lipophilicity using 1-octanol/water partition coefficient and reverse phase HPLC.

    PubMed

    Roda, A; Minutello, A; Angellotti, M A; Fini, A

    1990-08-01

    Two independent methods have been developed and compared to determine the lipophilicity of a representative series of naturally occurring bile acids (BA) in relation to their structure. The BA included cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA), ursocholic acid (UCA), hyocholic acid (HCA), as well as their glycine and taurine amidates. Lipophilicity was determined using a 1-octanol/water shake-flask procedure and the experiments were performed at different pH and ionic strengths and at initial BA concentrations below their critical micellar concentrations (CMC) and the water solubility of the protonated form. The experimental data show that both the protonated (HA) and ionized (A-) forms of BA can distribute in 1-octanol, and consequently a partition coefficient for HA (logP' HA) and for A- (logP' A-) must be defined. An equation to predict a weighted apparent distribution coefficient (D) value as a function of pH and pKa has been developed and fits well with the experimental data. Differences between logP for protonated and ionized species for unconjugated BA were in the order of 1 log unit, which increased to 2 for glycine-amidate BA. The partition coefficient of the A- form increased with Na+ concentration and total ionic strength, suggesting an ion-pair mechanism for its partition into 1-octanol. Lipophilicity was also assessed using reverse phase chromatography (C-18-HPLC), and a capacity factor (K') for ionized species was determined. Despite a broad correlation with the logP data, some BA behaved differently. The logP values showed that the order of lipophilicity was DCA greater than CDCA greater than UDCA greater than HDCA greater than HCA greater than CA greater than UCA for both the protonated and ionized unconjugated and glycine-amidate BA, while the K' data showed an inversion for some BA, i.e., DCA greater than CDCA greater than CA greater than HCA greater than UDCA

  4. Simulation of the current distribution in lead-acid batteries to investigate the dynamic charge acceptance in flooded SLI batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowal, Julia; Schulte, Dominik; Sauer, Dirk Uwe; Karden, Eckhard

    Measurements show that the dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) of flooded SLI lead-acid batteries during micro-cycling in conventional and micro-hybrid vehicles is strongly dependent on the short-term history, such as previous charge or discharge, current rate, lowest state of charge in the last 24 h and more. Factors of 10 have been reported. Inhomogeneous current distribution, especially as a result of acid stratification, has been suggested to explain the DCA variability. This hypothesis was investigated by simulation of a two-dimensional macrohomogeneous model. It provides a spatial resolution of three elements in horizontal direction in each electrode and three elements in vertical direction. For an existing set of parameters, different current profiles were analyzed with regard to the current distribution during charging and discharging. In these simulations, a strong impact of the short-term history on current, charge and acid density distribution was found as well as a strong influence of micro-cycles on both charge distribution and acid stratification.

  5. Toxicity of haloacetic acids to freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jayne F; van Egmond, Roger; Price, Oliver R

    2010-01-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAA), such as trichloroacetic acid (TCA), are commonly occurring by-products from disinfection and bleaching processes using sodium hypochlorite. Currently, the lowest no observed effect concentration (NOEC) for TCA is reported to be 8.7microgL(-1), which was derived from a toxicity study conducted in 1981 on Chlorella pyrenoidosa. The purity of the test material was not documented and it is unknown if other halogenated impurities or co-formulants were present. However, this NOEC is used to derive a predicted no effect concentration, which is used in various regulatory risk assessments. We present a range of algal toxicity studies conducted on five different algal species and two HAAs and observed no toxicity of TCA to C. pyrenoidosa at 115mgL(-1). The most sensitive species to TCA (NOEC, 3mgL(-1)) were Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Scenedesmus subspicatus, demonstrating that the toxicity of TCA to algae is over two orders of magnitude less sensitive than previously reported. PMID:19828197

  6. [Use of organic acids in acne and skin discolorations therapy].

    PubMed

    Kapuścińska, Alicja; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Acne is one of the most frequent skin disorders that occurs in puberty, but often adults also have acne. The most important factors responsible for acne are elevated production of sebum by hyperactive sebaceous glands and blockage of the follicle because of hyperkeratosis [14]. The third etiopathogenic factor of acne is excessive microflora reproduction [8]. The most significant bacterium that is responsible for formation of skin lesions is Propionibacterium acnes, a rod-shaped Gram-positive and aerotolerant anaerobic bacterium. It is estimated that P. acnes is responsible for acne in approximately 80% of people aged 11 to 30 [27,40]. Even healed skin lesions can often cause skin discolorations and scar formation [51]. Exfoliating chemical substances that are commonly used in dermatology and cosmetology are organic acids. Exfoliating treatment using organic acids is called "chemical peeling" and consists of controlled application of those substances on the skin [38]. The depth of exfoliation depends on organic acid concentration, type of substance and contact time with the skin [41]. Using exfoliating agents seems to be helpful in excessive keratinization - one of several factors responsible for acne. Moreover, epidermis exfoliation is a popular method of removing skin discoloration [22]. Considering chemical structure, exfoliating substances that are most often used in cosmetology contain alpha-hydroxyacids (glycolic acid, lactic acid, mandelic acid and citric acid), beta-hydroxyacids (salicylic acid) and other organic acids, such as trichloroacetic acid and pyruvic acid [47]. In this article, a literature review of use of organic acids in acne and skin discoloration therapy is presented. PMID:25811473

  7. Comparative cytotoxic and genotoxic potential of 13 drinking water disinfection by-products using a microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and a developed SOS/umu assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Hui; Miao, Dong-Yue; Tan, Li; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-01-01

    The implications of disinfection by-products (DBPs) present in drinking water are of public health concern because of their potential mutagenic, carcinogenic and other toxic effects on humans. In this study, we selected 13 main DBPs found in drinking water to quantitatively analyse their cytotoxicity and genotoxicity using a microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and a developed SOS/umu assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002. With the developed SOS/umu test, eight DBPs: 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2[5H]-fura3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2-[5H]-furanone (MX), dibromoacetonitrile (DBN), iodoacetic acid (IA), bromochloroacetonitrile (BCN), bromoacetic acid (BA), trichloroacetonitrile (TCN), dibromoacetic acid (DBA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA) were significantly genotoxic to S. typhimurium. Three DBPs: chloroacetic acid (CA), trichloroacetic acid (TCA) and dichloroacetonitrile (DCN) were weakly genotoxic, whereas the remaining DBPs: chloroacetonitrile (CN) and chloral hydrate (CH) were negative. The rank order in decreasing genotoxicity was as follows: MX > DBN > IA > BCN > BA > TCN > DBA > DCA > CA, TCA, DCN > CN, CH. MX was approximately 370 000 times more genotoxic than DCA. In the microplate-based cytotoxicity assay, cytotoxic potencies of the 13 DBPs were compared and ranked in decreasing order as follows: MX > IA > DBN > BCN > BA > TCN > DCN > CA > DCA > DBA > CN > TCA > CH. MX was approximately 19 200 times more cytotoxic than CH. A statistically significant correlation was found between cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of the 13 DBPs in S. typhimurium. Results suggest that microplate-based cytotoxicity assay and the developed SOS/umu assay are feasible tools for analysing the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of DBPs, particularly for comparing their toxic intensities quantitatively. PMID:26188195

  8. Development of a physiologically based pharmacokinetic model of trichloroethylene and its metabolites for use in risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Clewell, H J; Gentry, P R; Covington, T R; Gearhart, J M

    2000-01-01

    A physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was developed that provides a comprehensive description of the kinetics of trichloroethylene (TCE) and its metabolites, trichloroethanol (TCOH), trichloroacetic acid (TCA), and dichloroacetic acid (DCA), in the mouse, rat, and human for both oral and inhalation exposure. The model includes descriptions of the three principal target tissues for cancer identified in animal bioassays: liver, lung, and kidney. Cancer dose metrics provided in the model include the area under the concentration curve (AUC) for TCA and DCA in the plasma, the peak concentration and AUC for chloral in the tracheobronchial region of the lung, and the production of a thioacetylating intermediate from dichlorovinylcysteine in the kidney. Additional dose metrics provided for noncancer risk assessment include the peak concentrations and AUCs for TCE and TCOH in the blood, as well as the total metabolism of TCE divided by the body weight. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses were performed on the model to evaluate its suitability for use in a pharmacokinetic risk assessment for TCE. Model predictions of TCE, TCA, DCA, and TCOH concentrations in rodents and humans are in good agreement with a variety of experimental data, suggesting that the model should provide a useful basis for evaluating cross-species differences in pharmacokinetics for these chemicals. In the case of the lung and kidney target tissues, however, only limited data are available for establishing cross-species pharmacokinetics. As a result, PBPK model calculations of target tissue dose for lung and kidney should be used with caution. PMID:10807559

  9. Retinoic acid stimulation of human dermal fibroblast proliferation is dependent on suboptimal extracellular Ca2+ concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Varani, J.; Shayevitz, J.; Perry, D.; Mitra, R.S.; Nickoloff, B.J.; Voorhees, J.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Human dermal fibroblasts failed to proliferate when cultured in medium containing 0.15 mmol/l (millimolar) Ca2+ (keratinocyte growth medium (KGM)) but did when the external Ca2+ concentration was raised to 1.4 mmol/l. All-trans retinoic acid (retinoic acid) stimulated proliferation in KGM but did not further stimulate growth in Ca2(+)-supplemented KGM. The ability of retinoic acid to stimulate proliferation was inhibited in KGM prepared without Ca2+ or prepared with 0.03 mmol/l Ca2+ and in KGM treated with 1 mmol/l ethylene-glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetra acetic acid. Using 45Ca2+ to measure Ca2+ influx and efflux, it was found that retinoic acid minimally increased Ca2+ uptake into fibroblasts. In contrast, retinoic acid treatment of fibroblasts that had been pre-equilibrated for 1 day with 45Ca2+ inhibited release of intracellular Ca2+ into the extracellular fluid. Retinoic acid also stimulated 35S-methionine incorporation into trichloroacetic acid-precipitable material but in contrast to its effect on proliferation, stimulation of 35S-methionine incorporation occurred in both high-Ca2+ and low-Ca2+ medium. These data indicate that retinoic acid stimulation of proliferation, but not protein synthesis, is dependent on the concentration of Ca2+ in the extracellular environment.

  10. [Studies on pruritus in obstructive jaundice cases with special references to serum bile acid fractions].

    PubMed

    Mashima, H

    1991-08-01

    About, 22 cases with pruritus and 18 cases without pruritus of obstructive jaundice, serum bile acids were analysed quantitatively by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) before and after biliary decompression for the study on the relationship between pruritus and non-pruritus group. Analysis was also carried out on 11 cases with normal liver function as the control group. And 15 kinds of bile acids were as followed: unconjugates (ursodeoxycholic: UDCA, cholic: CA, chenodeoxycholic: CDCA, deoxycholic: DCA, lithocholic acid: LCA), glycine conjugates (Gly-UDCA, Gly-CA, Gly-CDCA, Gly-DCA, Gly-LCA) and taurine conjugates (Tau-UDCA, Tau-CA, Tau-CDCA, Tau-DCA, Tau-LCA). Data was analysed by t-test statistically. [I] Before biliary decompression (1) No significant difference was observed between the pruritus group and non-pruritus group about total bile acid level, total unconjugates level and CA/CDCA ratio. (2) On total glycine-conjugates level the pruritus group was significantly lower than the non-pruritus group, that level was about 3/5. Similarly on Gly-CA level was about 2/3, on Gly-CDCA level was about 1/2. (3) By contraries on total taurine-conjugates level the pruritus group was significantly high as compared with the non-pruritus group, that level was about two times. Similarly on Tau-CA and Tau-CDCA levels were about two times. (4) From there results on glycine/taurine ratio (G/T) of total bile acids pruritus group was significantly low as compared with the non-pruritus group, that level was about 1/3. Similarly on G/T ratio of CA level was about 2/5 and on G/T ratio of CDCA was about 1/3. (5) As for various unconjugates, UDCA level was significantly high in pruritus group as compared with non-pruritus group. [II] After biliary decompression No significant difference was shown in the composition of serum bile acids between the pruritus group and the non-pruritus group. These studies showed that the pruritus in the obstructive jaundice cases stood in a

  11. Increased bile acids in enterohepatic circulation by short-term calorie restriction in male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Zidong Donna; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2013-12-15

    Previous studies showed glucose and insulin signaling can regulate bile acid (BA) metabolism during fasting or feeding. However, limited knowledge is available on the effect of calorie restriction (CR), a well-known anti-aging intervention, on BA homeostasis. To address this, the present study utilized a “dose–response” model of CR, where male C57BL/6 mice were fed 0, 15, 30, or 40% CR diets for one month, followed by BA profiling in various compartments of the enterohepatic circulation by UPLC-MS/MS technique. This study showed that 40% CR increased the BA pool size (162%) as well as total BAs in serum, gallbladder, and small intestinal contents. In addition, CR “dose-dependently” increased the concentrations of tauro-cholic acid (TCA) and many secondary BAs (produced by intestinal bacteria) in serum, such as tauro-deoxycholic acid (TDCA), DCA, lithocholic acid, ω-muricholic acid (ωMCA), and hyodeoxycholic acid. Notably, 40% CR increased TDCA by over 1000% (serum, liver, and gallbladder). Interestingly, 40% CR increased the proportion of 12α-hydroxylated BAs (CA and DCA), which correlated with improved glucose tolerance and lipid parameters. The CR-induced increase in BAs correlated with increased expression of BA-synthetic (Cyp7a1) and conjugating enzymes (BAL), and the ileal BA-binding protein (Ibabp). These results suggest that CR increases BAs in male mice possibly through orchestrated increases in BA synthesis and conjugation in liver as well as intracellular transport in ileum. - Highlights: • Dose response effects of short-term CR on BA homeostasis in male mice. • CR increased the BA pool size and many individual BAs. • CR altered BA composition (increased proportion of 12α-hydroxylated BAs). • Increased mRNAs of BA enzymes in liver (Cyp7a1 and BAL) and ileal BA binding protein.

  12. Upregulation of early growth response factor-1 by bile acids requires mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Katryn; Kim, Nam Deuk; Moon, Jeon-OK; Copple, Bryan L.

    2010-02-15

    Cholestasis results when excretion of bile acids from the liver is interrupted. Liver injury occurs during cholestasis, and recent studies showed that inflammation is required for injury. Our previous studies demonstrated that early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1) is required for development of inflammation in liver during cholestasis, and that bile acids upregulate Egr-1 in hepatocytes. What remains unclear is the mechanism by which bile acids upregulate Egr-1. Bile acids modulate gene expression in hepatocytes by activating the farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and through activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Accordingly, the hypothesis was tested that bile acids upregulate Egr-1 in hepatocytes by FXR and/or MAPK-dependent mechanisms. Deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) stimulated upregulation of Egr-1 to the same extent in hepatocytes isolated from wild-type mice and FXR knockout mice. Similarly, upregulation of Egr-1 in the livers of bile duct-ligated (BDL) wild-type and FXR knockout mice was not different. Upregulation of Egr-1 in hepatocytes by DCA and CDCA was prevented by the MEK inhibitors U0126 and SL-327. Furthermore, pretreatment of mice with U0126 prevented upregulation of Egr-1 in the liver after BDL. Results from these studies demonstrate that activation of MAPK signaling is required for upregulation of Egr-1 by bile acids in hepatocytes and for upregulation of Egr-1 in the liver during cholestasis. These studies suggest that inhibition of MAPK signaling may be a novel therapy to prevent upregulation of Egr-1 in liver during cholestasis.

  13. Analysis of the Serum Bile Acid Composition for Differential Diagnosis in Patients with Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugita, Tomonori; Amano, Katsushi; Nakano, Masanori; Masubuchi, Noriko; Sugihara, Masahiro; Matsuura, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the serum bile acid (BA) composition in patients with liver diseases and healthy volunteers to investigate the relationship between the etiologies of liver disease and BA metabolism. Material and Methods. Sera from 150 patients with liver diseases and 46 healthy volunteers were obtained. The serum concentrations of the 16 different BAs were determined according to the LC-MS/MS method and were compared between the different liver diseases. Results. A total of 150 subjects, including patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) (n = 44), hepatitis B virus (HBV) (n = 23), alcoholic liver disease (ALD) (n = 21), biliary tract disease (n = 20), nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n = 13), and other liver diseases (n = 29), were recruited. The levels of UDCA and GUDCA were significantly higher in the ALD group, and the levels of DCA and UDCA were significantly lower in the biliary tract diseases group than in viral hepatitis group. In the UDCA therapy (−) subgroup, a significantly lower level of TLCA was observed in the ALD group, with lower levels of CDCA, DCA, and GLCA noted in biliary tract diseases group compared to viral hepatitis group. Conclusions. Analysis of the BA composition may be useful for differential diagnosis in liver disease. PMID:25821461

  14. Kinetic analysis of bile acid sulfation by stably expressed human sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1).

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Bathena, S P; Tong, J; Roth, M; Hagenbuch, B; Alnouti, Y

    2010-03-01

    Human sulfotransferase 2A1 (SULT2A1) is a member of the hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase (SULT2) family that mediates sulfo-conjugation of a variety of endogenous molecules including dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and bile acids. In this study, we have constructed a stable cell line expressing SULT2A1 by transfection into HEK293 cells. The expression system was used to characterize and compare the sulfation kinetics of DHEA and 15 human bile acids by SULT2A1. Formation of DHEA sulfate demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics with apparent K(m) and V(max) values of 3.8 muM and 130.8 pmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, respectively. Sulfation kinetics of bile acids also demonstrated Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a marked variation in apparent K(m) and V(max) values between individual bile acids. Sulfation affinity was inversely proportional to the number of hydroxyl groups of bile acids. The monohydroxy- and most toxic bile acid (lithocholic acid) had the highest affinity, whereas the trihydroxy- and least toxic bile acid (cholic acid) had the lowest affinity to sulfation by SULT2A1. Intrinsic clearance (CL(int)) of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was approximately 1.5- and 9.0-fold higher than that of deoxycholic acid (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), respectively, despite the fact that all three are dihydroxy bile acids. PMID:20102295

  15. Determination of ten haloacetic acids in drinking water using high-performance and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yang; Chang, Shueh-Ni; Wang, Gen-Shuh

    2009-01-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are a class of byproducts resulting from the reaction of chlorinated disinfectants with natural organic matter. These chemicals have been found in animal studies to possibly influence hepatic, reproductive, and developmental functions, and they may be mutagenic and carcinogenic. Because HAAs are hydrophilic and strongly acidic, it is a challenge to measure them at low levels. In this study, nine traditional HAAs and monoiodoacetic acid, an emerging disinfection byproduct, are analyzed in water directly. HAAs were separated on a BetaMax Acid column or a HILIC UPLC column, and they were detected by negative electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Although the on-column limits of detection of HAAs were lower when using an HILIC UPLC column (0.08-2.73 microg/L) than when using a BetaMax Acid column (0.18 to 71.5 microg/L), to use an HILIC UPLC column, it was required to dissolve water samples in 90% acetonitrile before injection and result in sample dilution. BetaMax Acid column was found to be more suitable for the analysis of HAAs in drinking water because there was no need of sample preparation. Major species of HAAs, such as dichloroacetic acid and trichloroacetic acid, and other primary species (e.g., dibromoacetic acid, bromochloroacetic acid and bromodichloroacetic acid) can be detected using the BetaMax Acid column at concentrations higher than 1-3 microg/L. PMID:19161659

  16. The glycerol teichoic acid from the cell wall of Bacillus stearothermophilus B65

    PubMed Central

    Wicken, A. J.

    1966-01-01

    1. A glycerol teichoic acid has been extracted from cell walls of Bacillus stearothermophilus B65 and its structure examined. 2. Trichloroacetic acid-extractable teichoic acid accounted for 68% of the total cell-wall phosphorus and residual material could be hydrolysed to a mixture of products including those characteristic of glycerol teichoic acids. 3. The extracted polymer is composed of glycerol, phosphoric acid, d-glucose and d-alanine. 4. Hydrolysis of the polymer with alkali gave glycerol, 1-O-α-d-glucopyranosylglycerol and its monophosphates, glycerol mono- and di-phosphate, as well as traces of a glucosyldiglycerol triphosphate and a glucosylglycerol diphosphate. 5. The teichoic acid is a polymer of 18 or 19 glycerol phosphate units having α-d-glucopyranosyl residues attached to position 1 of 14 or 15 of the glycerol residues. 6. The glycerol residues are joined by phosphodiester linkages involving positions 2 and 3 in each glycerol. 7. d-Alanine is in ester linkage to the hydroxyl group at position 6 of approximately half of the glucose residues. 8. One in every 13 or 12 polymer molecules bears a phosphomonoester group on position 3 of a glucose residue, the possible significance of which in linkage of the polymer to other wall constituents is discussed. PMID:4290549

  17. Bile acid profiles by capillary electrophoresis in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Gustavo; Lucangioli, Silvia; Sookoian, Silvia; Mesquida, Marcelo; Lemberg, Abraham; Di Scala, Mirta; Franchi, Paula; Carducci, Clyde; Tripodi, Valeria

    2006-04-01

    ICP (intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy) is characterized by pruritus and biochemical cholestasis, including raised SBAs (serum bile acids) and, usually, elevated aminotransferases levels. However, AHP (asymptomatic hypercholanaemia of pregnancy) is defined as the presence of total SBA levels above the cut-off value (11 microM) in healthy pregnant women, thus elevation of total SBAs do not necessarily reflect an ICP condition. The aim of the present study was to describe clinical, obstetric, perinatal and biochemical findings, as well as the SBA profile, in pregnant women studied in the third trimester of pregnancy in order to define characteristic patterns of individual bile acids that enable women with ICP to be distinguished from AHP and healthy pregnancies. Free and conjugated ursodeoxycholic (UDCA), cholic (CA), lithocholic (LCA), deoxycholic (DCA) and chenodeoxycholic (CDCA) acids were evaluated by CE (capillary electrophoresis) in 41 patients (15 of them simultaneously by HPLC), in 30 healthy pregnant women and in 10 non-pregnant women. A highly significant correlation between CE and HPLC for total SBAs (r=0.990) and for individual SBAs was found. Normal pregnant women had higher total SBA levels than non-pregnant women (due to an increase in taurine-conjugated dihydroxy SBAs). Women with ICP had higher levels of total SBAs, the free/conjugated ratio, LCA, CA, CDCA and DCA than normal pregnant women. Newborns from women with ICP had lower birth weight and gestational age. Women with AHP had higher levels of conjugated dihydroxy SBAs than normocholanaemic patients, without any evidence of a clinical difference. In conclusion, the present study has shown a clear difference in SBA profiles between ICP and normal pregnancies (including AHP), involving a shift towards a characteristic hydrophobic composition in women with ICP. PMID:16356162

  18. 1-[(4-Chloro­phen­yl)(phen­yl)meth­yl]piperazine-1,4-diium bis­(trichloro­acetate)–trichloro­acetic acid (1/1)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yanxi; Chidan Kumar, C. S.; Akkurt, Mehmet; Chandraju, S.; Li, Hongqi

    2012-01-01

    In the title salt adduct, C17H21ClN2 2+·2C2Cl3O2 −·C2HCl3O2, the Cl atom of the dication is disordered over two positions in a 0.915 (3):0.085 (3) ratio. The Cl atoms in the trichloroacetate anions and trichloroacetic acid molecule are also disordered, with refined site-occupation factors of 0.59 (3):0.41 (3), 0.503 (12):0.417 (12) and 0.653 (12):0.347 (12). The piperazine ring adopts a chair conformation, with puckering parameters Q T = 0.587 (3) Å, θ = 2.6 (2) and Φ 334 (6)°. In the crystal, neighbouring mol­ecules are linked by N—H⋯O, O—H⋯O, N—H⋯Cl, C—H⋯O and C—H⋯Cl hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network. PMID:22969587

  19. Case report: Sodium dichloroacetate (DCA) inhibition of the "Warburg Effect" in a human cancer patient: complete response in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after disease progression with rituximab-CHOP.

    PubMed

    Strum, Stephen B; Adalsteinsson, Orn; Black, Richard R; Segal, Dmitri; Peress, Nancy L; Waldenfels, James

    2013-06-01

    The uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography in the tumors of various cancer types demonstrates the key role of glucose in the proliferation of cancer. Dichloroacetate is a 2-carbon molecule having crucial biologic activity in altering the metabolic breakdown of glucose to lactic acid. Human cell line studies show that dichloroacetate switches alter the metabolomics of the cancer cell from one of glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, and in doing so restore mitochondrial functions that trigger apoptosis of the cancer cell. Reports of dichloroacetate in human subjects are rare. The authors contacted individuals from Internet forums who had reported outstanding anti-cancer responses to self-medication with dichloroacetate. With informed consent, complete medical records were requested to document response to dichloroacetate, emphasizing the context of monotherapy with dichloroacetate. Of ten patients agreeing to such an evaluation, only one met the criteria of having comprehensive clinic records as well as pathology, imaging and laboratory reports, along with single agent therapy with dichloroacetate. That individual is the focus of this report. In this case report of a man with documented relapse after state-of-the-art chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a significant response to dichloroacetate is documented with a complete remission, which remains ongoing after 4 years. Dichloroacetate appears to be a novel therapy warranting further investigation in the treatment of cancer. PMID:23263938

  20. Determination of bile acids in human serum by on-line restricted access material-ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bentayeb, K; Batlle, R; Sánchez, C; Nerín, C; Domeño, C

    2008-06-15

    This paper describes a new, fully automated on-line method combining restricted access material (RAM) extraction and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with mass spectrometric (MS) detection for determining congeners of bile acids (BAs) in human serum. In this method, low-pressure RAM and high-pressure UHPLC-MS are hyphenated by using a 2.5-mL loop-type interface. The compatibility problem between the large volume (1.2mL) of strong solvent (methanol) used for RAM elution and the need for a weak solvent in UHPLC injection has been addressed by using an auxiliary pre-column cross-flow of 0.1% aqueous formic acid. In this way, the complete 2.5mL loop volume can be injected into the UHPLC system, thereby maximizing sensitivity while maintaining good chromatographic performance. The optimised method allows the simultaneous analysis of 13 bile acids in a single run, including glycine- and taurine-conjugated bile acids, cholic acid (CA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and litocholic acid. The complete analysis of a 100-microL single serum sample is performed in 30 min, providing detection limits in the pg range (corresponding with clinically relevant concentration levels) for all of the analytes except lithocholic acid, intra-day precision values (%R.S.D.) below 4% (except ursodeoxycholic acid) and inter-day precision lower than 15% (except ursodeoxycholic, glycoursodeoxycholic acid (GUDCA) and lithocholic acid). PMID:18514045

  1. Lead-acid batteries in micro-hybrid applications. Part II. Test proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A. O.; Albers, J.; Weirather-Koestner, D.; Kabza, H.

    In the first part of this work [1] selected key parameters for applying lead-acid (LA) batteries in micro-hybrid power systems (MHPS) were investigated. Main results are integrated in an accelerated, comprehensive test proposal presented here. The test proposal aims at a realistic representation of the pSoC operation regime, which is described in Refs. [1,6]. The test is designed to be sensitive with respect to dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) at partially discharged state (critical for regenerative braking) and the internal resistance at high-rate discharge (critical for idling stop applications). First results are presented for up-to-date valve-regulated LA batteries with absorbent glass mat (AGM) separators. The batteries are close to the limits of the first proposal of pass/fail-criteria. Also flooded batteries were tested; the first out of ten units failed already.

  2. Key Role for the 12-Hydroxy Group in the Negative Ion Fragmentation of Unconjugated C24 Bile Acids.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ke; Su, Mingming; Xie, Guoxiang; Ferslew, Brian C; Brouwer, Kim L R; Rajani, Cynthia; Liu, Changxiao; Jia, Wei

    2016-07-19

    Host-gut microbial interactions contribute to human health and disease states and an important manifestation resulting from this cometabolism is a vast diversity of bile acids (BAs). There is increasing interest in using BAs as biomarkers to assess the health status of individuals and, therefore, an increased need for their accurate separation and identification. In this study, the negative ion fragmentation behaviors of C24 BAs were investigated by UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS. The step-by-step fragmentation analysis revealed a distinct fragmentation mechanism for the unconjugated BAs containing a 12-hydroxyl group. The unconjugated BAs lacking 12-hydroxylation fragmented via dehydration and dehydrogenation. In contrast, the 12-hydroxylated ones, such as deoxycholic acid (DCA) and cholic acid (CA), employed dissociation routes including dehydration, loss of carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide, and dehydrogenation. All fragmentations of the 12-hydroxylated unconjugated BAs, characterized by means of stable isotope labeled standards, were associated with the rotation of the carboxylate side chain and the subsequent rearrangements accompanied by proton transfer between 12-hydroxyl and 24-carboxyl groups. Compared to DCA, CA underwent further cleavages of the steroid skeleton. Accordingly, the effects of stereochemistry on the fragmentation pattern of CA were investigated using its stereoisomers. Based on the knowledge gained from the fragmentation analysis, a novel BA, 3β,7β,12α-trihydroxy-5β-cholanic acid, was identified in the postprandial urine samples of patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. The analyses used in this study may contribute to a better understanding of the chemical diversity of BAs and the molecular basis of human liver diseases that involve BA synthesis, transport, and metabolism. PMID:27322813

  3. Sensitive assay, based on hydroxy fatty acids from lipopolysaccharide lipid A, for Gram-negative bacteria in sediments.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, J H; Smith, G A; Fredrickson, H L; Vestal, J R; White, D C

    1982-01-01

    Biochemical measures have provided insight into the biomass and community structure of sedimentary microbiota without the requirement of selection by growth or quantitative removal from the sediment grains. This study used the assay of the hydroxy fatty acids released from the lipid A of the lipopolysaccharide in sediments to provide an estimate of the gram-negative bacteria. The method was sensitive to picomolar amounts of hydroxy fatty acids. The recovery of lipopolysaccharide hydroxy fatty acids from organisms added to sediments was quantitative. The lipids were extracted from the sediments with single-phase chloroform-methanol extraction. The lipid-extraction residue was hydrolyzed in 1 N HCl, and the hydroxy fatty acids of the lipopolysaccharide were recovered in chloroform for analysis by gas-liquid chromatography. This method proved to be about fivefold more sensitive than the classical phenol-water or trichloroacetic acid methods when applied to marine sediments. By examination of the patterns of hydroxy fatty acids, it was also possible to help define the community structure of the sedimentary gram-negative bacteria. PMID:6817712

  4. Lead-acid batteries in micro-hybrid applications. Part I. Selected key parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeck, S.; Stoermer, A. O.; Kaiser, F.; Koehler, L.; Albers, J.; Kabza, H.

    Micro-hybrid electric vehicles were launched by BMW in March 2007. These are equipped with brake energy regeneration (BER) and the automatic start and stop function (ASSF) of the internal combustion engine. These functions are based on common 14 V series components and lead-acid (LA) batteries. The novelty is given by the intelligent onboard energy management, which upgrades the conventional electric system to the micro-hybrid power system (MHPS). In part I of this publication the key factors for the operation of LA batteries in the MHPS are discussed. Especially for BER one is high dynamic charge acceptance (DCA) for effective boost charging. Vehicle rest time is identified as a particular negative parameter for DCA. It can be refreshed by regular fully charging at elevated charge voltage. Thus, the batteries have to be outstandingly robust against overcharge and water loss. This can be accomplished for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries at least if they are mounted in the trunk. ASSF goes along with frequent high-rate loads for warm cranking. The internal resistance determines the drop of the power net voltage during cranking and is preferably low for reasons of power net stability even after years of operation. Investigations have to be done with aged 90 Ah VRLA-absorbent glass mat (AGM) batteries. Battery operation at partial state-of-charge gives a higher risk of deep discharging (overdischarging). Subsequent re-charging then is likely to lead to the formation of micro-short circuits in the absorbent glass mat separator.

  5. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  6. On the abundance and source contributions of dicarboxylic acids in size-resolved aerosol particles at continental sites in Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, D.; Neusüß, C.; Herrmann, H.

    2013-12-01

    Dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) are among the most abundant organic compounds observed in atmospheric aerosol particles and have been extensively studied at many places around the world. The importance of the various primary sources and secondary formation pathways discussed in the literature is often difficult to assess from field studies, though. In the present study, a large dataset of size-resolved DCA concentrations from several inland sites in Germany is combined with results from a recently developed approach of statistical back-trajectory analysis and additional data. Principal component analysis is then used to reveal the most important factors governing the abundance of DCAs in different particle size ranges. The two most important sources revealed are (i) photochemical formation in polluted air masses, likely occurring in the gas phase on short timescales (gasSOA), and (ii) secondary reactions in anthropogenically influenced air masses, likely occurring in the aqueous phase on longer timescales (aqSOA). While the first source strongly impacts DCA concentrations mainly in small and large particles, the second one enhances accumulation mode DCAs and is responsible for the bulk of the observed concentrations. Primary sources were found to be minor (sea salt, soil resuspension) or non-existent (biomass burning, traffic). The results can be regarded representative for typical central-european continental conditions.

  7. On the abundance and source contributions of dicarboxylic acids in size-resolved aerosol particles at continental sites in central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Pinxteren, D.; Neusüß, C.; Herrmann, H.

    2014-04-01

    Dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) are among the most abundant organic compounds observed in atmospheric aerosol particles and have been extensively studied at many places around the world. The importance of the various primary sources and secondary formation pathways discussed in the literature is often difficult to assess from field studies, though. In the present study, a large data set of size-resolved DCA concentrations from several inland sites in Germany is combined with results from a recently developed approach of statistical back-trajectory analysis and additional data. Principal component analysis is then used to reveal the most important factors governing the abundance of DCAs in different particle size ranges. The two most important sources revealed are (i) photochemical formation during intense radiation days in polluted air masses, likely occurring in the gas phase on short timescales (gasSOA), and (ii) secondary reactions in anthropogenically influenced air masses, likely occurring in the aqueous phase on longer timescales (aqSOA). While the first source strongly impacts DCA concentrations mainly in small and large particles, the second one enhances accumulation mode DCAs and is responsible for the bulk of the observed concentrations. Primary sources were found to be minor (sea salt, soil resuspension) or non-existent (biomass burning, traffic). The results can be regarded as representative for typical central European continental conditions.

  8. Gut microbiota, cirrhosis and alcohol regulate bile acid metabolism in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Ridlon, Jason M.; Kang, Dae-Joong; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of the complex role of the bile acid-gut microbiome axis in health and disease processes is evolving rapidly. Our focus revolves around the interaction of the gut microbiota with liver diseases, especially cirrhosis. The bile acid pool size has recently been shown to be a function of microbial metabolism of bile acid and regulation of the microbiota by bile acids is important in the development and progression of several liver diseases. Humans produce a large, conjugated hydrophilic bile acid pool, maintained through positive-feedback antagonism of FXR in intestine and liver. Microbes use bile acids, and via FXR signaling this results in a smaller, unconjugated hydrophobic bile acid pool. This equilibrium is critical to maintain health. The challenge is to examine the manifold functions of gut bile acids as modulators of antibiotic, probiotic and disease progression in cirrhosis, metabolic syndrome and alcohol use. Recent studies have shown potential mechanisms explaining how perturbations in the microbiome affect bile acid pool size and composition. With advancing liver disease and cirrhosis, there is dysbiosis in the fecal, ileal and colonic mucosa, in addition to a decrease in bile acid concentration in the intestine due to the liver problems. This results in a dramatic shift toward the Firmicutes, particularly Clostridium cluster XIVa and increasing production of deoxycholic acid (DCA). Alcohol intake speeds up these processes in the subjects with and without cirrhosis without significant FXR feedback. Taken together, these pathways can impact intestinal and systemic inflammation while worsening dysbiosis. The interaction between bile acids, alcohol, cirrhosis and dysbiosis is an important relationship that influences intestinal and systemic inflammation, which in turn determines progression of the overall disease process. These interactions and the impact of commonly used therapies for liver disease can provide insight into the pathogenesis

  9. Changes in the Amino Acid Composition of Bogue (Boops boops) Fish during Storage at Different Temperatures by 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ciampa, Alessandra; Picone, Gianfranco; Laghi, Luca; Nikzad, Homa; Capozzi, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to obtain information about the changes occurring in Bogue (Boops boops) fish during storage. For this purpose, 1H-NMR spectra were recorded at 600 MHz on trichloroacetic acid extracts of fish flesh stored over a 15 days period both at 4 °C and on ice. Such spectra allowed the identification and quantification of amino acids, together with the main organic acids and alcohols. The concentration of acidic and basic free amino acids was generally found to increase and decrease during storage, respectively. These concentration changes were slow during the first days, as a consequence of protein autolysis, and at higher rates afterward, resulting from microbial development. Two of the amino acids that showed the greatest concentration change were alanine and glycine, known to have a key role in determining the individual taste of different fish species. The concentration of serine decreased during storage, as highlighted in the literature for frozen fish samples. Differences in the amino acids concentration trends were found to be related to the different storage temperatures from day 4 onwards. PMID:22822452

  10. Proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins induced by salicylic acid in suspension-cultured ginseng cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiaman; Fu, Junfan; Zhou, Rujun

    2013-01-01

    In this study, optimized 2-DE sample preparation methodologies were established for suspension-cultured ginseng cells. Three commonly used protein extraction methods (Trichloroacetic acid-acetone, urea/thiourea and phenol extraction method) were evaluated for proteomic analysis of suspension cultures of ginseng. A comparative analysis of suspension-cultured ginseng cells proteome induced by salicylic acid (SA) was reported. The results demonstrated that phenol extraction method was the best method based on protein extraction efficiency and the good quality of 2-DE patterns for suspension-cultured ginseng cells. Fifteen differentially expressed proteins induced by salicylic acid in suspension-cultured ginseng cells were identified by MALDI-TOF-MS. These identified proteins were involved in defense and stress response, energy metabolism, signal transduction/transcription, protein synthesis and metabolism, and photosynthesis. Chaperonin 60, related to defense responses, was more abundant in suspension-cultured ginseng cells after application of SA. Vacuolar ATPase subunit B was newly induced in SA treatment. PMID:24600313

  11. Biologically active carbon filtration for haloacetic acid removal from swimming pool water.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao L; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2016-01-15

    A biologically activate carbon (BAC) filter was continuously operated on site for the treatment of haloacetic acids (HAAs) in an outdoor swimming pool at an average empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 5.8 min. Results showed that BAC filtration was a viable technology for direct removal of HAAs from the pool water with a nominal efficiency of 57.7% by the filter while the chlorine residuals were 1.71 ± 0.90 mg/L during the study. THMs and TOC were not removed and thus were not considered as indicators of the effectiveness of BAC filtration. Increased EBCT in the range of 4.5 and 6.4 min led to improved HAA removal performance, which could be best fit by a logarithmic regression model. BAC filtration also affected the HAA speciation by removing more dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) than trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), resulting in a lower ratio of DCAA/TCAA in the filtered effluent. However, the observation of an overall constant ratio could be attributable to a complex formation and degradation mechanism occurring in swimming pools. PMID:26398451

  12. Bile Acid Metabolome after an Oral Lipid Tolerance Test by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas; Neumann, Hannah; Karrasch, Thomas; Liebisch, Gerhard; Schäffler, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Context Besides their role in intestinal resorption of lipids, bile acids are regarded as endocrine and metabolic signaling molecules. The detailed profile of bile acid species in peripheral blood after an oral lipid tolerance test (OLTT) is unknown. Objective We quantified the regulation of 18 bile acids after OLTT in healthy individuals. Material and methods 100 volunteers were characterized by anthropometric and laboratory parameters and underwent OLTT. Venous blood was drawn in the fasted state (0 h) and at 2h, 4h, and 6 h after OLTT. Serum concentrations of 18 bile acids were measured by LC-MS/MS. Results All of the 6 taurine-conjugated bile acids (TUDCA, THDCA, TCA, TCDCA, TDCA, TLCA) and all of the 6 glycine-conjugated bile acids (GUDCA, GHDCA, GCA, GCDCA, GDCA, GLCA) rose significantly at 2h and remained elevated during OLTT. Of the primary bile acids, CA remained unchanged, whereas CDCA significantly decreased at 4h. Of the secondary bile acids, DCA, UDCA and HDCA were not altered, whereas LCA decreased. There was a significant positive correlation between the intestinal feed-back regulator of bile acid synthesis FGF-19 and bile acids. This correlation seems to depend on all of the six taurine-conjugated bile acids and on GCA, GDCA, and GCDCA. Females and users of hormonal contraception displayed higher levels of taurine-conjugated bile acids. Conclusions The novelty of the study is based on the identification of single bile acids during OLTT. LC-MS/MS-based quantification of bile acids in serum provides a reliable tool for future investigation of endocrine and metabolic effects of bile acids. PMID:26863103

  13. Thermodynamic and solution state NMR characterization of the binding of secondary and conjugated bile acids to STARD5.

    PubMed

    Létourneau, Danny; Lorin, Aurélien; Lefebvre, Andrée; Cabana, Jérôme; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2013-11-01

    STARD5 is a member of the STARD4 sub-family of START domain containing proteins specialized in the non-vesicular transport of lipids and sterols. We recently reported that STARD5 binds primary bile acids. Herein, we report on the biophysical and structural characterization of the binding of secondary and conjugated bile acids by STARD5 at physiological concentrations. We found that the absence of the 7α-OH group and its epimerization increase the affinity of secondary bile acids for STARD5. According to NMR titration and molecular modeling, the affinity depends mainly on the number and positions of the steroid ring hydroxyl groups and to a lesser extent on the presence or type of bile acid side-chain conjugation. Primary and secondary bile acids have different binding modes and display different positioning within the STARD5 binding pocket. The relative STARD5 affinity for the different bile acids studied is: DCA>LCA>CDCA>GDCA>TDCA>CA>UDCA. TCA and GCA do not bind significantly to STARD5. The impact of the ligand chemical structure on the thermodynamics of binding is discussed. The discovery of these new ligands suggests that STARD5 is involved in the cellular response elicited by bile acids and offers many entry points to decipher its physiological role. PMID:23872533

  14. Differentiated quantification of human bile acids in serum by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Burkard, Ines; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Rentsch, Katharina M

    2005-11-01

    Determination of quantitative changes in the pattern of serum bile acids is important for the monitoring of diseases affecting bile acid metabolism. A sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-MS/MS method was developed for the differentiated quantification of unconjugated as well as glycine- and taurine-conjugated cholic, chenodeoxycholic (CDCA), deoxycholic (DCA), ursodeoxycholic (UDCA) and lithocholic acid (LCA) in serum samples. After solid-phase extraction and reversed-phase HPLC separation, detection of the conjugated bile acids was performed using electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS/MS and selected reaction monitoring mode, whereas unconjugated bile acids were determined by ESI-MS and selected ion monitoring mode. The within-day and between-day coefficients of variation were below 7% for all bile acids and the recovery rates of the extraction procedure were between 84.9 and 105%. The developed method was applied to a group of 21 healthy volunteers and preliminary reference intervals in serum were established. In patients with drug-induced cholestasis, an elevation of primary bile acids has been shown. PMID:16182619

  15. Profiling of bile acids in bovine follicular fluid by fused-core-LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guijo, A; Blaschka, C; Hartmann, M F; Wrenzycki, C; Wudy, S A

    2016-09-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are present in follicular fluid (FF) from humans and cattle. This fact has triggered an interest on the role BAs might play in folliculogenesis and their possible association with fertility. To achieve a better understanding about this subject, new methods are needed to provide reliable information about concentrations of the most important BAs in FF. In this context, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) offers high specificity with a relatively simple sample workup. We developed and validated a new assay for the quick profiling of the 9 most abundant BAs in follicular fluid from cattle. The method uses 200μl of FF and can quantify cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA) and their glycine (G) and taurine (T) conjugates. Lithocholic acid (LCA), its conjugates GLCA and TLCA, and sulfated forms, were present in some samples, but their concentration was low compared to other BAs (in average, below 60ng/ml for LCA, GLCA or TLCA and below 20ng/ml for their corresponding sulfates). Method performance was studied at three quality controls for each compound in consonance with their physiological concentration. Excellent linearity and recovery were found for all compounds at every control level. Intra-day and between-day precisions (%CV) and accuracies (relative errors) were below 15% for all the compounds. Matrix effects were negligible for most of the analytes. Samples undergoing freeze-thaw showed no degradation of their BAs. The method makes use of a fused-core phenyl column coupled to a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer to achieve chromatographic separation within 5min. We quantified BAs grouped in four different follicle sizes (3-5mm, 6-8mm, 9-14mm, >15mm), obtaining a similar relative BA profile for all the sizes, with CA always in higher concentration, ranging between 1600 and 18000ng/ml, approximately, followed by its conjugate glycocholic acid, GCA, which ranged between 800 and 9000ng

  16. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  17. Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is used to treat or prevent folic acid deficiency. It is a B-complex vitamin needed by ... Folic acid comes in tablets. It usually is taken once a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label ...

  18. Aspartic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... also called asparaginic acid. Aspartic acid helps every cell in the body work. It plays a role in: Hormone production and release Normal nervous system function Plant sources of aspartic acid include: Legumes such as ...

  19. Acid- and base-catalysis in the mononuclear rearrangement of some (Z)-arylhydrazones of 5-amino-3-benzoyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole in toluene: effect of substituents on the course of reaction.

    PubMed

    D'Anna, Francesca; Frenna, Vincenzo; Ghelfi, Franco; Marullo, Salvatore; Spinelli, Domenico

    2011-04-15

    The reaction rates for the rearrangement of eleven (Z)-arylhydrazones of 5-amino-3-benzoyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole 3a-k into the relevant (2-aryl-5-phenyl-2H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)ureas 4a-k in the presence of trichloroacetic acid or of piperidine have been determined in toluene at 313.1 K. The results have been related to the effect of the aryl substituent by using Hammett and/or Ingold-Yukawa-Tsuno correlations and have been compared with those previously collected in a protic polar solvent (dioxane/water) as well as with those on the analogous rearrangement of the corresponding (Z)-arylhydrazones of 3-benzoyl-5-phenyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole 1a-k in benzene. Some light can thus be shed on the general differences of chemical reactivity between protic polar (or dipolar aprotic) and apolar solvents. PMID:21405092

  20. Effect of dissolved oxygen concentration on iron efficiency: Removal of three chloroacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shun; Wang, Xiao-mao; Mao, Yu-qin; Zhao, Yu; Yang, Hong-wei; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2015-04-15

    The monochloroacetic, dichloroacetic and trichloroacetic acid (MCAA, DCAA and TCAA) removed by metallic iron under controlled dissolved oxygen conditions (0, 0.75, 1.52, 2.59, 3.47 or 7.09 mg/L DO) was investigated in well-mixed batch systems. The removal of CAAs increased first and then decreased with increasing DO concentration. Compared with anoxic condition, the reduction of MCAA and DCAA was substantially enhanced in the presence of O2, while TCAA reduction was significantly inhibited above 2.59 mg/L. The 1.52 mg/L DO was optimum for the formation of final product, acetic acid. Chlorine mass balances were 69-102%, and carbon mass balances were 92-105%. With sufficient mass transfer from bulk to the particle surface, the degradation of CAAs was limited by their reduction or migration rate within iron particles, which were dependent on the change of reducing agents and corrosion coatings. Under anoxic conditions, the reduction of CAAs was mainly inhibited by the available reducing agents in the conductive layer. Under low oxic conditions, the increasing reducing agents and thin lepidocrocite layer were favorable for CAA dechlorination. Under high oxic conditions, the redundant oxygen competing for reducing agents and significant lepidocrocite growth became the major restricting factors. Various CAA removal mechanisms could be potentially applied to explaining the effect of DO concentration on iron efficiency for contaminant reduction in water and wastewater treatment. PMID:25697696

  1. Bioprocess monitoring: minimizing sample matrix effects for total protein quantification with bicinchoninic acid assay.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Wieland N; Waldschitz, Daniel; Herwig, Christoph; Neutsch, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    Determining total protein content is a routine operation in many laboratories. Despite substantial work on assay optimization interferences, the widely used bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay remains widely recognized for its robustness. Especially in the field of bioprocess engineering the inaccuracy caused by interfering substances remains hardly predictable and not well understood. Since the introduction of the assay, sample pre-treatment by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation has been indicated as necessary and sufficient to minimize interferences. However, the sample matrix in cultivation media is not only highly complex but also dynamically changing over process time in terms of qualitative and quantitative composition. A significant misestimation of the total protein concentration of bioprocess samples is often observed when following standard work-up schemes such as TCA precipitation, indicating that this step alone is not an adequate means to avoid measurement bias. Here, we propose a modification of the BCA assay, which is less influenced by sample complexity. The dynamically changing sample matrix composition of bioprocessing samples impairs the conventional approach of compensating for interfering substances via a static offset. Hence, we evaluated the use of a correction factor based on an internal spike measurement for the respective samples. Using protein spikes, the accuracy of the BCA protein quantification could be improved fivefold, taking the BCA protein quantification to a level of accuracy comparable to other, more expensive methods. This will allow reducing expensive iterations in bioprocess development to due inaccurate total protein analytics. PMID:27314233

  2. Analysis of DNA strand breaks induced in rodent liver in vivo, hepatocytes in primary culture, and a human cell line by chlorinated acetic acids and chlorinated acetaldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, L.W.; Daniel, F.B. ); DeAngelo, A.B. )

    1992-01-01

    An alkaline unwinding assay was used to quantitate the induction of DNA strand breaks (DNA SB) in the livers of rats and mice treated in vivo, in rodent hepatocytes in primary culture, and in CCRF-CEM cells, a human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, following treatment with tri-(TCA), di-(CA), and mono-(MCA) chloroacetic acid and their corresponding aldehydes, tri-(chloralhydrate, CH), di(DCAA) and mono-(CAA) chloroacetaldehyde. None of the chloracetic acids induced DNA SB in the livers of rats at 4 hr following a single administration of 1-10 mmole/kg. TCA (10 mmole/kg) and DCA (5 and 10 mmole/kg) did produce a small amount of strand breakage in mice (7% at 4hr) but not at 1 hr. N-nitrosodiethylamine (DENA), an established alkylating agent and a rodent hepatocarcinogen, produced DNA SB in the livers of both species. TCA, DCA, and MCA also failed to induce DNA strand breaks in splenocytes and epithelial cells derived from the stomach and duodenum of mice treated in vivo. None of the three chloroacetaldehydes induced DNA SB in either mouse or rat liver. These studies provide further evidence that the chloroacetic acids lack genotoxic activity not only in rodent liver, a tissue in that they induce tumors, but in a variety of other rodent tissues and cultured cell types. Two of the chloroacetaldehydes, DCAA and CAA, are direct acting DNA damaging agents in CCRF-CEM cells, but not in liver or splenocytes in vivo or in cultured hepatocytes. CH showed no activity in any system investigated. 58 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  4. Dysregulated hepatic bile acids collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Xiaoning; Huang, Fengjie; Zhao, Aihua; Chen, Wenlian; Yan, Jingyu; Zhang, Yunjing; Lei, Sha; Ge, Kun; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Liu, Jiajian; Su, Mingming; Liu, Ping; Jia, Wei

    2016-10-15

    Dysregulated bile acids (BAs) are closely associated with liver diseases and attributed to altered gut microbiota. Here, we show that the intrahepatic retention of hydrophobic BAs including deoxycholate (DCA), taurocholate (TCA), taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDCA), and taurolithocholate (TLCA) were substantially increased in a streptozotocin and high fat diet (HFD) induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-hepatocellular carcinoma (NASH-HCC) mouse model. Additionally chronic HFD-fed mice spontaneously developed liver tumors with significantly increased hepatic BA levels. Enhancing intestinal excretion of hydrophobic BAs in the NASH-HCC model mice by a 2% cholestyramine feeding significantly prevented HCC development. The gut microbiota alterations were closely correlated with altered BA levels in liver and feces. HFD-induced inflammation inhibited key BA transporters, resulting in sustained increases in intrahepatic BA concentrations. Our study also showed a significantly increased cell proliferation in BA treated normal human hepatic cell lines and a down-regulated expression of tumor suppressor gene CEBPα in TCDCA treated HepG2 cell line, suggesting that several hydrophobic BAs may collaboratively promote liver carcinogenesis. PMID:27273788

  5. High performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of bile acid concentrations in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xiaoqiang; Han, Yi; Neuvonen, Mikko; Laitila, Jouko; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Niemi, Mikko

    2010-01-01

    We report a sensitive and robust method to determine cholic acid (CA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA), ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), and their taurine- and glycine-conjugate concentrations in human plasma using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Activated charcoal was utilized to prepare bile acid-free plasma, which served as the biological matrix for the preparation of standard and quality control samples. Plasma sample preparation involved solid-phase extraction. A total of 16 bile acids and 5 internal standards were separated on a reverse column by gradient elution and detected by tandem mass spectrometry in negative ion mode. The calibration curve was linear for all the bile acids over a range of 0.005-5micromol/L. The extraction recoveries for all the analytes fell in the range of 88-101%. Intra-day and inter-day coefficients of variation were all below 10%. A stability test showed that all the bile acids were stable in plasma for at least 6h at room temperature, at least three freeze-thaw cycles, in the -70 degrees C or -20 degrees C freezer for 2 months, and also in the reconstitution solution at 8 degrees C for 48h. Comparison of the matrix effect of bile acid-free plasma with that of real plasma indicated that the charcoal purification procedure did not affect the properties of charcoal-purified plasma as calibration matrix. This method has been used to determine the bile acid concentrations in more than 300 plasma samples from healthy individuals. In conclusion, this method is suitable for the simultaneous quantification of individual bile acids in human plasma. PMID:19945922

  6. Deciphering the role of charge, hydration, and hydrophobicity for cytotoxic activities and membrane interactions of bile acid based facial amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manish; Singh, Ashima; Kundu, Somanath; Bansal, Sandhya; Bajaj, Avinash

    2013-08-01

    We synthesized four cationic bile acid based facial amphiphiles featuring trimethyl ammonium head groups. We evaluated the role of these amphiphiles for cytotoxic activities against colon cancer cells and their membrane interactions by varying charge, hydration and hydrophobicity. The singly charged cationic Lithocholic acid based amphiphile (LCA-TMA1) is most cytotoxic, whereas the triply charged cationic Cholic acid based amphiphile (CA-TMA3) is least cytotoxic. Light microscopy and Annexin-FITC assay revealed that these facial amphiphiles caused late apoptosis. In addition, we studied the interactions of these amphiphiles with model membrane systems by Prodan-based hydration, DPH-based anisotropy, and differential scanning calorimetry. LCA-TMA1 is most hydrophobic with a hard charge causing efficient dehydration and maximum perturbations of membranes thereby facilitating translocation and high cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In contrast, the highly hydrated and multiple charged CA-TMA3 caused least membrane perturbations leading to low translocation and less cytotoxicity. As expected, Chenodeoxycholic acid and Deoxycholic acid based amphiphiles (CDCA-TMA2, DCA-TMA2) featuring two charged head groups showed intermediate behavior. Thus, we deciphered that charge, hydration, and hydrophobicity of these amphiphiles govern membrane interactions, translocation, and resulting cytoxicity against colon cancer cells. PMID:23590996

  7. Flow injection analysis of cholic acids in pharmaceutical preparations using a polymeric membrane ISE as detector.

    PubMed

    Arias De Fuentes, O; Campanella, L; Crescentini, G; Falcioni, A; Sammartino, M P; Tomassetti, M

    2000-08-01

    The results reported in this paper regard the setting up of a polymeric membrane ISE that is selective for cholic acids (CA) and able to work in a flow system, especially in flow injection analysis (FIA), based on the exchanger (tetrakisdecylammoniumcholate, TDACh), which has proved effective, is of very simple but suitable structure and is above all easy to synthesise starting from commercially available chemicals. A complete analytical characterisation of the sensor was performed working both in batch conditions and in FIA, using in the latter case a 'wall jet' type of flow cell. The response toward different bile acid sodium salts such as the CA, deoxycholic (DCA), chenodeoxycholic (CDCA), ursodeoxycholic (UDCA), taurocholic (TCA) sodium salts was checked. The application to the analysis of different commercial drugs by FIA was also performed to determine the UDCA or CDCA acid content of several pharmaceutical formulations. Lastly, a preliminary study is presented concerning the use of the investigated electrochemical sensor as high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) detector. PMID:10898158

  8. Upregulation of bile acid receptor TGR5 and nNOS in gastric myenteric plexus is responsible for delayed gastric emptying after chronic high-fat feeding in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Shiyi; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Guanpo; Lu, Yuanxu; Owyang, Chung

    2015-05-15

    Chronic high-fat feeding is associated with functional dyspepsia and delayed gastric emptying. We hypothesize that high-fat feeding upregulates gastric neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) expression, resulting in delayed gastric emptying. We propose this is mediated by increased bile acid action on bile acid receptor 1 (TGR5) located on nNOS gastric neurons. To test this hypothesis, rats were fed regular chow or a high-fat diet for 2 wk. Rats fed the high-fat diet were subjected to concurrent feeding with oral cholestyramine or terminal ileum resection. TGR5 and nNOS expression in gastric tissue was measured by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and Western blot. Gastric motility was assessed by organ bath and solid-phase gastric emptying studies. The 2-wk high-fat diet caused a significant increase in neurons coexpressing nNOS and TGR5 in the gastric myenteric plexus and an increase in nNOS and TGR5 gene expression, 67 and 111%, respectively. Enhanced nonadrenergic, noncholinergic (NANC) relaxation, deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced inhibition in fundic tissue, and a 26% delay in gastric emptying accompanied these changes. A 24-h incubation of whole-mount gastric fundus with DCA resulted in increased nNOS and TGR5 protein expression, 41 and 37%, respectively. Oral cholestyramine and terminal ileum resection restored the enhanced gastric relaxation, as well as the elevated nNOS and TGR5 expression evoked by high-fat feeding. Cholestyramine also prevented the delay in gastric emptying. We conclude that increased levels of circulatory bile acids induced by high-fat feeding upregulate nNOS and TGR5 expression in the gastric myenteric plexus, resulting in enhanced NANC relaxation and delayed gastric emptying. PMID:25540233

  9. Amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002222.htm Amino acids To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . ...

  10. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  11. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  12. Ascorbic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  13. Acid mucopolysaccharides

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003368.htm Acid mucopolysaccharides To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acid mucopolysaccharides is a test that measures the amount ...

  14. Ethacrynic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  15. Valproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Valproic acid is used alone or with other medications to treat certain types of seizures. Valproic acid is also used to treat mania (episodes of ... to relieve headaches that have already begun. Valproic acid is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. ...

  16. Fatty acids - trans fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The data supporting a negative effect of dietary trans fatty acids on cardiovascular disease risk is consistent. The primary dietary sources of trans fatty acids include partially hydrogenated fat and rudiment fat. The adverse effect of trans fatty acids on plasma lipoprotein profiles is consisten...

  17. Direct estimation of sialic acid in milk and milk products by fluorimetry and its application in detection of sweet whey adulteration in milk.

    PubMed

    Neelima; Rao, Priyanka Singh; Sharma, Rajan; Rajput, Yudhishthir S

    2012-11-01

    Sialic acid, being a biologically active compound, is recognised as an important component of milk and milk products. Almost all the sialic acid estimation protocols in milk require prior hydrolysis step to release the bound sialic acid followed by its estimation. The objective of this work was to estimate sialic acid in milk and milk products by fluorimetric assay which does not require a prior hydrolysis step thus decreasing the estimation time. The recovery of added sialic acid in milk was 91·6 to 95·8%. Sialic acid in milk was found to be dependent on cattle breed and was in the range of 1·68-3·93 g/kg (dry matter basis). The assay was further extended to detect adulteration of milk with sweet whey which is based on the detection of glycomacropeptide (GMP) bound sialic acid in adulterated milk. GMP is the C-terminal part of κ-casein which is released into the whey during cheese making. For detection of adulteration, selective precipitation of GMP was done using trichloroacetic acid (TCA). TCA concentration in milk was first raised to 5% to precipitate milk proteins, especially κ-casein, followed by raising the TCA concentration to 14% to precipitate out GMP. In the precipitates GMP bound sialic acid was estimated using fluorimetric method and the fluorescence intensity was found to be directly proportional to the level of sweet whey in adulterated milk samples. The method was found to detect the presence of 5% sweet whey in milk. PMID:23089266

  18. In vitro bioacessibility and transport across Caco-2 monolayers of haloacetic acids in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Melo, A; Faria, M A; Pinto, E; Mansilha, C; Ferreira, I M P L V O

    2016-10-01

    Water disinfection plays a crucial role in water safety but it is also a matter of concern as the use of disinfectants promotes the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs). Haloacetic acids (HAAs) are one of the major classes of DBPs since they are frequently found in treated water, are ubiquitous, pervasive and have high water solubility, so a great concern emerged about their formation, occurrence and toxicity. Exposure to HAAs is influenced by consumption patterns and diet of individuals thus their bioavailability is an important parameter to the overall toxicity. In the current study the bioacessibility of the most representative HAAs (chloroacetic acid - MCAA, bromoacetic acid - MBAA, dichloroacetic acid - DCAA, dibromoacetic acid - DBAA, and trichloroacetic acid - TCAA) after simulated in vitro digestion (SIVD) in tap water and transport across Caco-2 monolayers was evaluated. Compounds were monitored in 8 points throughout the digestion phases by an optimized LC-MS/MS methodology. MCAA and MBAA were not bioaccessible after SIVD whereas DCAA, DBAA and TCAA are highly bioaccessible (85 ± 4%, 97 ± 4% and 106 ± 7% respectively). Concerning transport assays, DCAA and DBAA were highly permeable throughout the Caco-2 monolayer (apparent permeability and calculated fraction absorbed of 13.62 × 10(-6) cm/s and 90% for DCAA; and 8.82 × 10(-6) cm/s and 84% for DBAA), whereas TCAA showed no relevant permeability. The present results may contribute to efficient risk analysis studies concerning HAAs oral exposure from tap water taking into account the different biological behaviour of these chemically similar substances. PMID:27411032

  19. MECHANISM OF DICHLOR0ACETATE-INDUCED HYPOLACTATEMIA IN HUMANS WITH OR WITHOUT CIRRHOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) has been used as an experimental treatment for lactic acidosis because it lowers plasma lactic acid concentration. Three potential mechanisms could underlie the hypolactatemic action of DCA, but the dominant mechanism in vivo remains unclear. This study tested whether DCA-induc...

  20. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of dibromoacetic acid in F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Jessica L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Easterling, Michael R.; Melnick, Ronald L.

    2010-04-15

    A novel physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model structure, which includes submodels for the common metabolites (glyoxylate (GXA) and oxalate (OXA)) that may be involved in the toxicity or carcinogenicity of dibromoacetic acid (DBA), has been developed. Particular attention is paid to the representation of hepatic metabolism, which is the primary elimination mechanism. DBA-induced suicide inhibition is modeled by irreversible covalent binding of the intermediate metabolite alpha-halocarboxymethylglutathione (alphaH1) to the glutathione-S-transferase zeta (GSTzeta) enzyme. We also present data illustrating the presence of a secondary non-GSTzeta metabolic pathway for DBA, but not dichloroacetic acid (DCA), that produces GXA. The model is calibrated with plasma and urine concentration data from DBA exposures in female F344 rats through intravenous (IV), oral gavage, and drinking water routes. Sensitivity analysis is performed to confirm identifiability of estimated parameters. Finally, model validation is performed with data sets not used during calibration. Given the structural similarity of dihaloacetates (DHAs), we hypothesize that the PBPK model presented here has the capacity to describe the kinetics of any member or mixture of members of this class in any species with the alteration of chemical-and species-specific parameters.

  1. Detection of chlorodifluoroacetic acid in precipitation: A possible product of fluorocarbon degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, J.W.; Franklin, J.; Hanson, M.L.; Solomon, K.R.; Mabury, S.A.; Ellis, D.A.; Scott, B.F.; Muri, D.C.G.

    2000-01-15

    Chlorodiffluoroacetic acid (CDFA) was detected in rain and snow samples from various regions of Canada. Routine quantitative analysis was performed using an in-situ derivatization technique that allowed for the determination of CDFA by GC-MS of the anilide derivative. Validation of environmental CDFA was provided by strong anionic exchange chromatography and detection by {sup 19}F NMR. CDFA concentrations ranges from <7.1 to 170 ng L{sup {minus}1} among all samples analyzed. Monthly volume-weighted CDFA concentrations ranged from <7.1 to 170 ng L{sup {minus}1} among all samples analyzed. Monthly volume-weighted CDFA concentrations in rain event samples showed a seasonal trend between June and November 1998, peaking in late summer and decreasing in the fall for Guelph and Toronto sites. Preliminary toxicity tests with the aquatic macrophytes Myriophyllum sibiricum and Myriophyllum spicatum suggest that CDFA does not represent a risk of acute toxicity to these aquatic macrophytes at current environmental concentrations. A degradation study suggests that CDFA is recalcitrant to biotic and abiotic degradation relative to dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and may accumulate in the aquatic environment. On the basis of existing experimental data, the authors postulate that CDFA is a degradation product of CFC-113 and, to a lesser extent, HCFC-142b. If CFC-113 is a source, its ozone depletion potential may be lower than previously assumed. Further work is required to identify alternative atmospheric and terrestrial sources of CDFA.

  2. Rapid Sensitive Assay for Interferons Based on the Inhibition of MM Virus Nucleic Acid Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Patton T.; Giron, David J.

    1970-01-01

    A method for assaying mouse interferon based on the inhibition of viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) synthesis was devised. The amount of MM virus and RNA synthesized in interferon-treated L-cell cultures was determined by measuring the amount of 3H-uridine converted into a trichloroacetic acid-insoluble form after treatment of the infected cultures with 2.5 μg of actinomycin D per ml. The amount of RNA synthesized was inversely related to the concentration of interferon used for treatment. A linear dose-response regression curve was obtained by plotting the log of the amount of RNA made, expressed as a percentage of the control, versus the log of the reciprocal of the interferon dilution. A unit of interferon was defined as that concentration which inhibited nucleic acid synthesis by 50% (INAS50). The concentration of mouse interferon could be determined within 24 hr. This assay method, on the average, was approximately half as sensitive as the method which measured the 50% reduction of MM virus plaque number (PDD50-MM method), but was, on the average, almost 1.7 times as sensitive as the PDD50-VSV method. It averaged approximately 20 times the sensitivity of the methods which used as end points the 70% reduction in yield of MM virus or the complete inhibition of cytopathic effect by MM virus. The reproducibility of the INAS50 technique was tested in two ways. (i) Four independent assays of an interferon specimen were performed with replicate cultures. The standard deviation was 11.2% of the mean titer. (ii) On different dates, one interferon specimen was assayed seven times and another was assayed four times. The standard deviations were 21.5 and 26.6% of the respective mean titers. PMID:4320919

  3. Proteomic Retrieval from Nucleic Acid Depleted Space-Flown Human Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, D. K.; Elliott, T. F.; Holubec, K.; Baker, T. L.; Allen, P. L.; Hammond, T. G.; Love, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    Compared to experiments utilizing humans in microgravity, cell-based approaches to questions about subsystems of the human system afford multiple advantages, such as crew safety and the ability to achieve statistical significance. To maximize the science return from flight samples, an optimized method was developed to recover protein from samples depleted of nucleic acid. This technique allows multiple analyses on a single cellular sample and when applied to future cellular investigations could accelerate solutions to significant biomedical barriers to human space exploration. Cell cultures grown in American Fluoroseal bags were treated with an RNA stabilizing agent (RNAlater - Ambion), which enabled both RNA and immunoreactive protein analyses. RNA was purified using an RNAqueous(registered TradeMark) kit (Ambion) and the remaining RNA free supernatant was precipitated with 5% trichloroacetic acid. The precipitate was dissolved in SDS running buffer and tested for protein content using a bicinchoninic acid assay (1) (Sigma). Equal loads of protein were placed on SDS-PAGE gels and either stained with CyproOrange (Amersham) or transferred using Western Blotting techniques (2,3,4). Protein recovered from RNAlater-treated cells and stained with protein stain, was measured using Imagequant volume measurements for rectangles of equal size. BSA treated in this way gave quantitative data over the protein range used (Fig 1). Human renal cortical epithelial (HRCE) cells (5,6,7) grown onboard the International Space Station (ISS) during Increment 3 and in ground control cultures exhibited similar immunoreactivity profiles for antibodies to the Vitamin D receptor (VDR) (Fig 2), the beta isoform of protein kinase C (PKC ) (Fig 3), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) (Fig 4). Parallel immunohistochemical studies on formalin-fixed flight and ground control cultures also showed positive immunostaining for VDR and other biomarkers (Fig 5). These results are

  4. Acid Deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents acid deposition trends in the contiguous U.S. from 1989 to 2007. Data are broken down by wet and dry deposition and deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds. Acid deposition is particularly damaging to lakes, streams, and forests and the plants and a...

  5. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.C. )

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the third annual conference sponsored by the Acid Rain Information Clearinghouse (ARIC). Topics covered include: Legal aspects of the source-receptor relationship: an energy perspective; Scientific uncertainty, agency inaction, and the courts; and Acid rain: the emerging legal framework.

  6. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Elsworth, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book was written in a concise and readable style for the lay public. It's purpose was to make the public aware of the damage caused by acid rain and to mobilize public opinion to favor the elimination of the causes of acid rain.

  7. New method for the determination of bile acids in human plasma by liquid-phase microextraction using liquid chromatography-ion-trap-time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Paiva, Maria José Nunes; Menezes, Helvécio Costa; da Silva, Júlio César Cardoso; Resende, Rodrigo Ribeiro; Cardeal, Zenilda de Lourdes

    2015-04-01

    Bile acids (BAs) are derived from cholesterol and produced in the liver. The most abundant bile acids in humans are usually conjugated with glycine and taurine and are divided into primary BAs such as cholic acid (CA) and chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) and secondary BAs like deoxycholic acid (DCA), lithocholic acid (LCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). The differences amongst individual bile acids (BAs) are significant in order to distinguish different pathological processes and exposure to chemical compounds. Hollow fiber based liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) is a technique that combines sample cleansing, extraction and the concentration of analytes, where a hydrophobic porous capillary membrane is impregnated with an organic extraction solvent and the lumen is filled with microliters of a phase acceptor both organic by nature. The aim of this study was to develop a new method to extract bile acids from plasma through HF-LPME of two phases (octanol as the acceptor phase) using LCMS-IT-TOF. The optimized two-phased LPME procedure for the extraction of bile acids showed limits of detection 1.0 μg L(-1) and limits of quantification of 5.0 μg L(-1). The intra-assay precision ranged from 2.1 to 11.9%. The method developed was linear over the range of 5.0-200.0 μg L(-1) for all analytes. The hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction method was applied to human plasma from workers exposed to organic and halogenated solvents and also to unexposed volunteers. The method is simple, low cost and it does not require large amounts of organic solvents, therefore it is quite suitable for the analysis of bile acids exposed to hepatotoxic compounds. PMID:25721909

  8. Association of SSR markers with contents of fatty acids in olive oil and genetic diversity analysis of an olive core collection.

    PubMed

    Ipek, M; Ipek, A; Seker, M; Gul, M K

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to characterize an olive core collection using some agronomic characters and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and to determine SSR markers associated with the content of fatty acids in olive oil. SSR marker analysis demonstrated the presence of a high amount of genetic variation between the olive cultivars analyzed. A UPGMA dendrogram demonstrated that olive cultivars did not cluster on the basis of their geographic origin. Fatty acid components of olive oil in these cultivars were determined. The results also showed that there was a great amount of variation between the olive cultivars in terms of fatty acid composition. For example, oleic acid content ranged from 57.76 to 76.9% with standard deviation of 5.10%. Significant correlations between fatty acids of olive oil were observed. For instance, a very high negative correlation (-0.812) between oleic and linoleic acids was detected. A structured association analysis between the content of fatty acids in olive oil and SSR markers was performed. STRUCTURE analysis assigned olive cultivars to two gene pools (K = 2). Assignment of olive cultivars to these gene pools was not based on geographical origin. Association between fatty acid traits and SSR markers was evaluated using the general linear model of TASSEL. Significant associations were determined between five SSR markers and stearic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids of olive oil. Very high associations (P < 0.001) between ssrOeUA-DCA14 and stearic acid and between GAPU71B and oleic acid indicated that these markers could be used for marker-assisted selection in olive. PMID:25867371

  9. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1980-06-20

    Acid precipitation includes not only rain but also acidified snow, hail and frost, as well as sulfur and nitrogen dust. The principal source of acid precipitation is pollution emitted by power plants and smelters. Sulfur and nitrogen compounds contained in the emissions combine with moisture to form droplets with a high acid content - sometimes as acidic as vinegar. When sufficiently concentrated, these acids can kill fish and damage material structures. Under certain circumstances they may reduce crop and forest yields and cause or aggravate respiratory diseases in humans. During the summer, especially, pollutants tend to collect over the Great Lakes in high pressure systems. Since winds typically are westerly and rotate clockwise around high pressure systems, the pollutants gradually are dispersed throughout the eastern part of the continent.

  10. Asparagusic acid.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2014-01-01

    Asparagusic acid (1,2-dithiolane-4-carboxylic acid) is a simple sulphur-containing 5-membered heterocyclic compound that appears unique to asparagus, though other dithiolane derivatives have been identified in non-food species. This molecule, apparently innocuous toxicologically to man, is the most probable culprit responsible for the curious excretion of odorous urine following asparagus ingestion. The presence of the two adjacent sulphur atoms leads to an enhanced chemical reactivity, endowing it with biological properties including the ability to substitute potentially for α-lipoic acid in α-keto-acid oxidation systems. This brief review collects the scattered data available in the literature concerning asparagusic acid and highlights its properties, intermediary metabolism and exploratory applications. PMID:24099657

  11. [Gastric Acid].

    PubMed

    Ruíz Chávez, R

    1996-01-01

    Gastric acid, a product of parietal cells secretion, full fills multiple biological roles which are absolutely necessary to keep corporal homeostasis. The production of the acid depends upon an effector cellular process represented in the first step by histamine, acetilcholine and gastrin, first messengers of the process. These interact with specific receptors than in sequence activate second messengers -cAMP and the calcium-calmodulin system- which afterwards activate a kinase. An specific protein is then phosphorilated by this enzyme, being the crucial factor that starts the production of acid. Finally, a proton bomb, extrudes the acid towards the gastric lumen. The secretion process mentioned above, is progressive lyactivated in three steps, two of which are stimulators -cephalic and gastric phases- and the other one inhibitor or intestinal phase. These stages are started by mental and neurological phenomena -thought, sight, smell or memory-; by food, drugs or other ingested substances; and by products of digestion. Changes in regulation of acid secretion, in the structure of gastro-duodenal mucosal barrier by a wide spectrum of factors and agents including food, drugs and H. pylori, are the basis of acid-peptic disease, entity in which gastric acid plays a fundamental role. From the therapeutic point of view, so at the theoretical as at the practical levels, t is possible to interfere with the secretion of acid by neutralization of some of the steps of the effector cellular process. An adequate knowledge of the basics related to gastric acid, allows to create strategies for the clinical handling of associated pathology, specifically in relation to peptic acid disease in all of the known clinical forms. PMID:12165790

  12. HPLC/ELSD analysis of amidated bile acids: an effective and rapid way to assist continuous flow chemistry processes.

    PubMed

    Sardella, Roccaldo; Gioiello, Antimo; Ianni, Federica; Venturoni, Francesco; Natalini, Benedetto

    2012-10-15

    The employment of the flow N-acyl amidation of natural bile acids (BAs) required the in-line connection with suitable analytical tools enabling the determination of reaction yields as well as of the purity grade of the synthesized glyco- and tauro-conjugated derivatives. In this framework, a unique HPLC method was successfully established and validated for ursodeoxycholic (UDCA), chenodeoxycholic (CDCA), deoxycholic (DCA) and cholic (CA) acids, as well as the corresponding glyco- and tauro-conjugated forms. Because of the shared absence of relevant chromophoric moieties in the sample structure, an evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) was profitably utilized for the analysis of such steroidal species. For each of the investigated compounds, all the runs were contemporarily carried out on the acidic free and the two relative conjugated variants. The different ELSD response of the free and the corresponding conjugated BAs, imposed to build-up separate calibration curves. In all the cases, very good precision (RSD% values ranging from 1.04 to 6.40% in the long-period) and accuracy (Recovery% values ranging from 96.03 to 111.14% in the long-period) values along with appreciably low LOD and LOQ values (the former being within the range 1-27 ng mL(-1) and the latter within the range 2-44 ng mL(-1)) turned out. PMID:23141350

  13. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of novel cross-linked saccharide based polymers as bile acid sequestrants.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Jaramillo, Francisco Javier; Giron-Gonzalez, Maria Dolores; Salto-Gonzalez, Rafael; Hernandez-Mateo, Fernando; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Bile acid sequestrants (BAS) represent a therapeutic approach for the management of hypercholesterolemia that relies on the cationic polymeric nature of BAS to selectively bind negatively charged bile acids. We hypothesized that the cross-linking of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and saccharides such as starch or dextrin with divinyl sulfone (DVS) yields homo- and hetero-polymeric materials with the ability to trap sterols. Our hypothesis was put to test by synthesizing a library of 22 polymers that were screened to evaluate their capability to sequester both cholesterol (CHOL) and cholic and deoxycholic acids (CA and DCA). Three polymers synthesized in high yield were identified as promising. Two were neutral hetero-polymers of β-CD and starch or dextrin and the third was a weakly cationic homo-polymer of starch, highlighting the importance of the cavity effect. They were tested in hypercholesterolemic male Wistar rats and their ability to regulate hypercholesterolemia was similar to that for the reference BAS cholestyramine, but with two additional advantages: (i) they normalized the TG level and (ii) they did not increase the creatinine level. Neither hepatotoxicity nor kidney injury was detected, further supporting them as therapeutical candidates to manage hypercholesterolemia. PMID:25719741

  14. Acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Hileman, B.

    1983-03-01

    Fog in areas of southern California previously thought to be pollution-free has been shown to have a pH as low as 1.69. It has been found to be most acidic after smoggy days, suggesting that it forms on the aerosol associated with the previously exiting smog. Studies on Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks show that fog water is often 10 times as acidic as rainwater. As a result of their studies, California plans to spend $4 million on acid deposition research in the coming year. (JMT)

  15. Oral administration of oleanolic acid, isolated from Swertia mussotii Franch, attenuates liver injury, inflammation, and cholestasis in bile duct-ligated rats

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jin; Du, Xiaohuang; Chen, Sheng; Feng, XinChan; Cheng, Ying; Zhang, Liangjun; Gao, Yu; Li, Shaoxue; He, Xiaochong; Wang, Rongquan; Zhou, Xiangdong; Yang, Yong; Luo, Weizao; Chen, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    Background & aims: Oleanolic acid is abundantly distributed in Swertia mussotii Franch, a Chinese traditional herb for the treatment of jaundice. However, the hepatoprotective role of oleanolic acid in obstructive cholestasis and its underlying molecular mechanism are unclear. Methods: Normal rats and bile duct-ligated (BDL) rats were given oleanolic acid and serum biochemistry, bile salts, and pro-inflammatory factors were measured, as well as the expression levels of liver bile acid synthesis and detoxification enzymes, membrane transporters, nuclear receptors, and transcriptional factors. Results: Oral administration of oleanolic acid at 100 mg/kg did not cause rat liver injury. However, it significantly reduced the serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) on days 7 and 14, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and TNF-α on day 14, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and IL-1β on days 3, 7, and 14 in the BDL rats. Furthermore, the serum levels of total bile acid (TBA) and bile acids, including CDCA, CA, DCA, and Tα/βMCA were significantly reduced by oleanolic acid on day 3 in the BDL rats. In addition, the expression levels of detoxification enzymes Cyp3a, Ugt2b, Sult2a1, Gsta1-2, and Gstm1-3, membrane transporters Mrp3, Mrp4, Ostβ, Mdr1, Mdr2, and Bsep, nuclear receptors Pxr, Vdr, Hnf4α, Rxrα, Rarα, Lxr, and Lrh-1, and transcriptional factors Nrf2, Hnf3β, and Ahr were significantly increased in oleanolic acid-treated rats. Conclusion: We demonstrated that the oral administration of oleanolic acid attenuates liver injury, inflammation, and cholestasis in BDL rats. The anti-cholestatic effect may be associated with the induction of hepatic detoxification enzymes and efflux transporters mediated by nuclear receptors and transcriptional factors. PMID:25932098

  16. Folic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the blood vessel to keep it open. Bipolar disorder. Taking folic acid does not appear to improve the antidepressant effects of lithium in people with bipolar disorder. However, taking folate with the medication valproate improves ...

  17. Mefenamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... as mefenamic acid may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may ... like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.Keep all appointments with your ...

  18. ACID RAIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid precipitation has become one of the major environmental problems of this decade. It is a challenge to scientists throughout the world. Researchers from such diverse disciplines as plant pathology, soil science, bacteriology, meteorology and engineering are investigating diff...

  19. Acid Precipitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the fact that the acidity of rain and snow falling on parts of the U.S. and Europe has been rising. The reasons are still not entirely clear and the consequences have yet to be well evaluated. (MLH)

  20. Carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Birtić, Simona; Dussort, Pierre; Pierre, François-Xavier; Bily, Antoine C; Roller, Marc

    2015-07-01

    Carnosic acid (salvin), which possesses antioxidative and antimicrobial properties, is increasingly exploited within the food, nutritional health and cosmetics industries. Since its first extraction from a Salvia species (∼70 years ago) and its identification (∼50 years ago), numerous articles and patents (∼400) have been published on specific food and medicinal applications of Rosmarinus and Salvia plant extracts abundant in carnosic acid. In contrast, relevant biochemical, physiological or molecular studies in planta have remained rare. In this overview, recent advances in understanding of carnosic acid distribution, biosynthesis, accumulation and role in planta, and its applications are summarised. We also discuss the deficiencies in our understanding of the relevant biochemical processes, and suggest the molecular targets of carnosic acid. Finally, future perspectives and studies related to its potential roles are highlighted. PMID:25639596

  1. Aminocaproic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    Amicar® Oral Solution ... Aminocaproic acid comes as a tablet and a solution (liquid) to take by mouth. It is usually ... it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away ...

  2. Tranexamic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat heavy bleeding during the menstrual cycle (monthly periods) in women. Tranexamic acid is in ... tablets for more than 5 days in a menstrual cycle or take more than 6 tablets in a ...

  3. Acidic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    At the International Symposium on Acidic Precipitation, over 400 papers were presented, and nearly 200 of them are included here. They provide an overview of the present state of the art of acid rain research. The Conference focused on atmospheric science (monitoring, source-receptor relationships), aquatic effects (marine eutrophication, lake acidification, impacts on plant and fish populations), and terrestrial effects (forest decline, soil acidification, etc.).

  4. Comprehensive screening of acidic and neutral drugs in equine plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nola H; Ho, Emmie N M; Tang, Francis P W; Wan, Terence S M; Wong, April S Y

    2008-05-01

    A multi-target high-throughput liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) method for the detection of low ppt to low ppb levels of anabolic steroids, corticosteroids, anti-diabetics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in equine plasma was developed for the purpose of doping control. Plasma samples were first deproteinated by addition of trichloroacetic acid. Drugs were then extracted by solid-phase extraction (SPE) using Bond Elut Certify cartridges, and the extracts were analysed by a triple-quadrupole/linear ion trap LC-MS-MS instrument in positive electrospray ionization (+ESI) mode with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) scan function. Chromatographic separation of the targeted drugs was achieved using a reverse phase 3.3 cm L x 2.1 mm ID, 3 microm particle size LC column with gradient elution. Plasma samples fortified with 66 targeted drugs including betamethasone, boldione, capsaicin, flunisolide, gestrinone, gliclazide, 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone hexanoate, isoflupredone and triamcinolone acetonide, etc. at low ppt to low ppb levels could be consistently detected. No significant matrix interference was observed at the retention time of the targeted ion transitions when blank plasma samples were analysed. The method has been validated for its extraction recoveries, precision and sensitivity, and is used regularly in the authors' laboratory to screen for the presence of these drugs in plasma samples from racehorses. PMID:18054785

  5. The Marine-Derived Fungus Clonostachys rosea, Source of a Rare Conjugated 4-Me-6E,8E-hexadecadienoic Acid Reducing Viability of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells and Gene Expression of Lipogenic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dias, Ana Camila Dos Santos; Ruiz, Nicolas; Couzinet-Mossion, Aurélie; Bertrand, Samuel; Duflos, Muriel; Pouchus, Yves-François; Barnathan, Gilles; Nazih, Hassan; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaetane

    2015-08-01

    A marine-derived strain of Clonostachys rosea isolated from sediments of the river Loire estuary (France) was investigated for its high lipid production. The fungal strain was grown on six different culture media to explore lipid production changes. An original branched conjugated fatty acid, mainly present in triglycerides and mostly produced when grown on DCA (23% of total fatty acid composition). It was identified as 4-Me-6E,8E-hexadecadienoic on the basis of spectroscopic analyses. This fatty acid reduced viability of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in a dose dependent manner (up to 63%) at physiological free fatty acid human plasma concentration (100 μM). Reduction of gene expression of two lipogenic enzymes, the acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the fatty acid synthase (FAS) was evaluated to explore the mechanisms of action of 4-Me-6E,8E-16:2 acid. At 50 μM, 50% and 35% of mRNA gene expression inhibition were observed for ACC and FAS, respectively. PMID:26258780

  6. The Marine-Derived Fungus Clonostachys rosea, Source of a Rare Conjugated 4-Me-6E,8E-hexadecadienoic Acid Reducing Viability of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells and Gene Expression of Lipogenic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Dos Santos Dias, Ana Camila; Ruiz, Nicolas; Couzinet-Mossion, Aurélie; Bertrand, Samuel; Duflos, Muriel; Pouchus, Yves-François; Barnathan, Gilles; Nazih, Hassan; Wielgosz-Collin, Gaetane

    2015-01-01

    A marine-derived strain of Clonostachys rosea isolated from sediments of the river Loire estuary (France) was investigated for its high lipid production. The fungal strain was grown on six different culture media to explore lipid production changes. An original branched conjugated fatty acid, mainly present in triglycerides and mostly produced when grown on DCA (23% of total fatty acid composition). It was identified as 4-Me-6E,8E-hexadecadienoic on the basis of spectroscopic analyses. This fatty acid reduced viability of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in a dose dependent manner (up to 63%) at physiological free fatty acid human plasma concentration (100 μM). Reduction of gene expression of two lipogenic enzymes, the acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC) and the fatty acid synthase (FAS) was evaluated to explore the mechanisms of action of 4-Me-6E,8E-16:2 acid. At 50 μM, 50% and 35% of mRNA gene expression inhibition were observed for ACC and FAS, respectively. PMID:26258780

  7. Identification of albumin-bound fatty acids as the major factor in serum-induced lipid accumulation by cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, C G; Mackenzie, J B; Reiss, O K; Wisneski, J A

    1970-11-01

    Factors responsible for the high lipogenic activity of rabbit serum were investigated using an assay procedure based on the gravimetric determination of the 24 hr increase in cell lipid. Cellular synthesis of fatty acids was inhibited by the presence of serum in the assay medium. Approximately 90% of the increase in cell lipid produced by serum fractions was due to triglyceride accumulation. Fractionation of rabbit serum by precipitation with ammonium sulfate or by ultracentrifugation in high density medium, both indicated that three-quarters of its lipogenic activity was associated with albumin. The lipoproteins prepared by ultracentrifugation also exhibited about one-half the activity of whole serum. The lipogenic activity of albumin was confirmed by the high potency of the albumin isolated in a nearly pure form from proteins of d>1.21 by precipitation with trichloroacetic acid and extraction with ethanol. As judged from chemical and isotopic analysis, neither the lipid content nor the lipid composition of the albumin was appreciably altered during its isolation. Of the albumin-bound lipids, only the free fatty acids, as determined by DEAE column chromatography, were present in an amount sufficient to account for the observed increase in cell triglycerides. In control experiments with horse serum of low lipogenic activity, the proteins of d>1.21 also possessed low activity in conjunction with a low content of free fatty acid. However, the albumin isolated from the latter preparation exhibited the high lipogenic activity of rabbit serum albumin. Chemical and isotopic analysis of the recovered horse serum albumin revealed that its free fatty acid content was the same as that of rabbit serum albumin. These results indicated that the isolation of horse serum albumin was attended by a substantial increase in its free fatty acid content. When the rabbit serum and horse serum content of media were adjusted to provide equivalent concentrations of albumin-bound fatty

  8. Colonic inflammation and secondary bile acids in alcoholic cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Kakiyama, Genta; Hylemon, Phillip B.; Zhou, Huiping; Pandak, William M.; Heuman, Douglas M.; Kang, Dae Joong; Takei, Hajime; Nittono, Hiroshi; Ridlon, Jason M.; Fuchs, Michael; Gurley, Emily C.; Wang, Yun; Liu, Runping; Sanyal, Arun J.; Gillevet, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse with/without cirrhosis is associated with an impaired gut barrier and inflammation. Gut microbiota can transform primary bile acids (BA) to secondary BAs, which can adversely impact the gut barrier. The purpose of this study was to define the effect of active alcohol intake on fecal BA levels and ileal and colonic inflammation in cirrhosis. Five age-matched groups {two noncirrhotic (control and drinkers) and three cirrhotic [nondrinkers/nonalcoholics (NAlc), abstinent alcoholic for >3 mo (AbsAlc), currently drinking (CurrAlc)]} were included. Fecal and serum BA analysis, serum endotoxin, and stool microbiota using pyrosequencing were performed. A subgroup of controls, NAlc, and CurrAlc underwent ileal and sigmoid colonic biopsies on which mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) were performed. One hundred three patients (19 healthy, 6 noncirrhotic drinkers, 10 CurrAlc, 38 AbsAlc, and 30 NAlc, age 56 yr, median MELD: 10.5) were included. Five each of healthy, CurrAlc, and NAlc underwent ileal/colonic biopsies. Endotoxin, serum-conjugated DCA and stool total BAs, and secondary-to-primary BA ratios were highest in current drinkers. On biopsies, a significantly higher mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and Cox-2 in colon but not ileum was seen in CurrAlc compared with NAlc and controls. Active alcohol use in cirrhosis is associated with a significant increase in the secondary BA formation compared with abstinent alcoholic cirrhotics and nonalcoholic cirrhotics. This increase in secondary BAs is associated with a significant increase in expression of inflammatory cytokines in colonic mucosa but not ileal mucosa, which may contribute to alcohol-induced gut barrier injury. PMID:24699327

  9. Salicylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Shamsul; Irfan, Mohd; Wani, Arif; Nasser, Alyemeni; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid is well known phytohormone, emerging recently as a new paradigm of an array of manifestations of growth regulators. The area unleashed yet encompassed the applied agriculture sector to find the roles to strengthen the crops against plethora of abiotic and biotic stresses. The skipped part of integrated picture, however, was the evolutionary insight of salicylic acid to either allow or discard the microbial invasion depending upon various internal factors of two interactants under the prevailing external conditions. The metabolic status that allows the host invasion either as pathogenesis or symbiosis with possible intermediary stages in close systems has been tried to underpin here. PMID:22301975

  10. Comparative Analysis of the Relationship between Trichloroethylene Metabolism and Tissue-Specific Toxicity among Inbred Mouse Strains: Liver Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Uehara, Takeki; Collins, Leonard B.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Ball, Louise M.; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent. Although TCE is classified as carcinogenic to humans, substantial gaps remain in our understanding of inter-individual variability in TCE metabolism and toxicity, especially in the liver. We tested a hypothesis that amounts of oxidative metabolites of TCE in mouse liver are associated with liver-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in sub-acute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 days; 7 inbred mouse strains) and sub-chronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 weeks; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation [trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroethanol] and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione] in serum and liver, and various liver toxicity phenotypes. In sub-acute study, inter-strain variability in TCE metabolite amounts was observed in serum and liver. No induction of Cyp2e1 protein levels in liver was detected. Serum and liver levels of TCA and DCA were correlated with increased transcription of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1, but not with degree of induction in hepatocellular proliferation. In sub-chronic study, serum and liver levels of oxidative metabolites gradually decreased over time despite continuous dosing. Liver protein levels of Cyp2e1, Adh and Aldh2 were unaffected by treatment with TCE. While the magnitude of induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes also declined, hepatocellular proliferation increased. This study offers a unique opportunity to provide a scientific data-driven rationale for some of the major assumptions in human health assessment of TCE. PMID:25424544

  11. Folic acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease called vitiligo, and an inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome. It is also used for reducing harmful side ... to blood clots (ischemic stroke). Inherited disease called Fragile-X syndrome.Taking folic acid by mouth does not improve ...

  12. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    An overview is presented of acid rain and the problems it causes to the environment worldwide. The acidification of lakes and streams is having a dramatic effect on aquatic life. Aluminum, present in virtually all forest soils, leaches out readily under acid conditions and interferes with the gills of all fish, some more seriously than others. There is evidence of major damage to forests in European countries. In the US, the most severe forest damage appears to be in New England, New York's Adirondacks, and the central Appalachians. This small region is part of a larger area of the Northeast and Canada that appears to have more acid rainfall than the rest of the country. It is downwind from major coal burning states, which produce about one quarter of US SO/sub 2/ emissions and one sixth of nitrogen oxide emissions. Uncertainties exist over the causes of forest damage and more research is needed before advocating expensive programs to reduce rain acidity. The President's current budget seeks an expansion of research funds from the current $30 million per year to $120 million.

  13. Formic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formic acid ; CASRN 64 - 18 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  14. Selenious acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Selenious acid ; CASRN 7783 - 00 - 8 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic E

  15. Benzoic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Benzoic acid ; CASRN 65 - 85 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  16. Dichloroacetic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Dichloroacetic acid ; CASRN 79 - 43 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  17. Acrylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Acrylic acid ( CASRN 79 - 10 - 7 ) Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  18. Cacodylic acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Cacodylic acid ; CASRN 75 - 60 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Eff

  19. Phosphoric acid

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Phosphoric acid ; CASRN 7664 - 38 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  20. Stearic Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) is presented for the chemical, stearic acid. The profile lists the chemical's physical and harmful characteristics, exposure limits, and symptoms of major exposure, for the benefit of teachers and students, who use the chemical in the laboratory.

  1. Radioautographic visualization of differences in the pattern of (/sup 3/H)uridine and (/sup 3/H)orotic acid incorporation into the RNA of migrating columnar cells in the rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Uddin, M.; Altmann, G.G.; Leblond, C.P.

    1984-05-01

    The epithelium of rat small intestine was radioautographed to examine whether RNA is synthesized by the salvage pathway as shown after (/sup 3/H)uridine injection or by the de novo pathway as shown after (/sup 3/H)orotic acid injection. The two modes of RNA synthesis were thus investigated during the migration of columnar cells from crypt base to villus top, and the rate of synthesis was assessed by counting silver grains over the nucleolus and nucleoplasm at six levels along the duodenal epithelium - that is, in the base, mid, and top regions of the crypts and in the base, mid, and top regions of the villi. Concomitant biochemical analyses established that, after injection of either (5-/sup 3/H)uridine or (5-/sup 3/H)orotic acid: (a) buffered glutaraldehyde fixative was as effective as perchloric acid or trichloroacetic acid in insolubilizing the nucleic acids of rat small intestine; (b) a major fraction of the nucleic acid label was in RNA, that is, 91% after (/sup 3/H)uridine and 72% after (/sup 3/H)orotic acid, with the rest in DNA; and (c) a substantial fraction of the RNA label was in poly A/sup +/ RNA (presumed to be messenger RNA). In radioautographs of duodenum prepared after (/sup 3/H)uridine injection, the count of silver grains was high over nucleolus and nucleoplasm in crypt base cells and gradually decreased at the upper levels up to the villus base. In the rest of the villus, the grain count over the nucleolus was negligible, while over the nucleoplasm it was low but significant.

  2. Hydroxycarboxylic acids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Kiely, Donald E; Hash, Kirk R; Kramer-Presta, Kylie; Smith, Tyler N

    2015-02-24

    Compositions which inhibit corrosion and alter the physical properties of concrete (admixtures) are prepared from salt mixtures of hydroxycarboxylic acids, carboxylic acids, and nitric acid. The salt mixtures are prepared by neutralizing acid product mixtures from the oxidation of polyols using nitric acid and oxygen as the oxidizing agents. Nitric acid is removed from the hydroxycarboxylic acids by evaporation and diffusion dialysis.

  3. Cystathionine γ-lyase, a H2S-generating enzyme, is a GPBAR1-regulated gene and contributes to vasodilation caused by secondary bile acids.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Cipriani, Sabrina; Carino, Adriana; Monti, Maria Chiara; Zampella, Angela; Gargiulo, Antonella; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    GPBAR1 is a bile acid-activated receptor (BAR) for secondary bile acids, lithocholic (LCA) and deoxycholic acid (DCA), expressed in the enterohepatic tissues and in the vasculature by endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Despite that bile acids cause vasodilation, it is unclear why these effects involve GPBAR1, and the vascular phenotype of GPBAR1 deficient mice remains poorly defined. Previous studies have suggested a role for nitric oxide (NO) in regulatory activity exerted by GPBAR1 in liver endothelial cells. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a vasodilatory agent generated in endothelial cells by cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE). Here we demonstrate that GPBAR1 null mice had increased levels of primary and secondary bile acids and impaired vasoconstriction to phenylephrine. In aortic ring preparations, vasodilation caused by chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a weak GPBAR1 ligand and farnesoid-x-receptor agonist (FXR), was iberiotoxin-dependent and GPBAR1-independent. In contrast, vasodilation caused by LCA was GPBAR1 dependent and abrogated by propargyl-glycine, a CSE inhibitor, and by 5β-cholanic acid, a GPBAR1 antagonist, but not by N(5)-(1-iminoethyl)-l-ornithine (l-NIO), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor, or iberiotoxin, a large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels antagonist. In venular and aortic endothelial (HUVEC and HAEC) cells GPBAR1 activation increases CSE expression/activity and H2S production. Two cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) sites (CREs) were identified in the CSE promoter. In addition, TLCA stimulates CSE phosphorylation on serine residues. In conclusion we demonstrate that GPBAR1 mediates the vasodilatory activity of LCA and regulates the expression/activity of CSE. Vasodilation caused by CDCA involves BKCa channels. The GPBAR1/CSE pathway might contribute to endothelial dysfunction and hyperdynamic circulation in liver cirrhosis. PMID:25934094

  4. Functionalised carboxylic acids in atmospheric particles: An annual cycle revealing seasonal trends and possible sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teich, Monique; van Pinxteren, Dominik; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2013-04-01

    Carboxylic acids represent a major fraction of the water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in atmospheric particles. Among the particle phase carboxylic acids, straight-chain monocarboxylic acids (MCA) and dicarboxylic acids (DCA) with 2-10 carbon atoms have extensively been studied in the past. However, only a few studies exist dealing with functionalised carboxylic acids, i.e. having additional hydroxyl-, oxo- or nitro-groups. Regarding atmospheric chemistry, these functionalised carboxylic acids are of particular interest as they are supposed to be formed during atmospheric oxidation processes, e.g. through radical reactions. Therefore they can provide insights into the tropospheric multiphase chemistry. During this work 28 carboxylic acids (4 functionalised aliphatic MCAs, 5 aromatic MCAs, 3 nitroaromatic MCAs, 6 aliphatic DCAs, 6 functionalised aliphatic DCAs, 4 aromatic DCAs) were quantitatively determined in 256 filter samples taken at the rural research station Melpitz (Saxony, Germany) with a PM10 Digitel DHA-80 filter sampler. All samples were taken in 2010 covering a whole annual cycle. The resulting dataset was examined for a possible seasonal dependency of the acid concentrations. Furthermore the influence of the air mass origin on the acid concentrations was studied based on a simple two-sector classification (western or eastern sector) using a back trajectory analysis. Regarding the annual average, adipic acid was found to be the most abundant compound with a mean concentration of 7.8 ng m-3 followed by 4-oxopimelic acid with 6.1 ng m-3. The sum of all acid concentrations showed two maxima during the seasonal cycle; one in summer and one in winter, whereas the highest overall acid concentrations were found in summer. In general the target acids could be divided into two different groups, where one group has its maximum concentration in summer and the other group during winter. The first group contains all investigated aliphatic mono- and dicarboxylic

  5. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ... Cederbaum S, Berry GT. Inborn errors of carbohydrate, ammonia, amino acid, and organic acid metabolism. In: Gleason CA, Devaskar ...

  6. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    Folic acid is a type of B vitamin. This article discusses the test to measure the amount of folic acid in the blood. ... that may interfere with test results, including folic acid supplements. Drugs that can decrease folic acid measurements ...

  7. Uric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid in urine. Uric acid level can also be checked using a blood ... help determine the cause of a high uric acid level in the blood. It may also be ...

  8. Methylmalonic acid blood test

    MedlinePlus

    The methylmalonic acid blood test measures the amount of methylmalonic acid in the blood. ... Methylmalonic acid is a substance produced when proteins, called amino acids, in the body break down. The health care ...

  9. Folic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Folic Acid and Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Folic Acid and ... before conception and during early pregnancy . About Folic Acid Folic acid, sometimes called folate, is a B ...

  10. Degradation of aqueous 3,4-dichloroaniline by a novel dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jingwei; Liu, Runlong; Chen, Pei; Yuan, Shoujun; Zhao, Dayong; Zhang, Jibiao; Zheng, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Degradation of aqueous 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) was conducted in a novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor. The factors affecting the degradation efficiency of 3,4-DCA and the degradation mechanism of 3,4-DCA were investigated. The experimental results indicated that the degradation efficiency of 3,4-DCA increased with increasing input power intensity, and the degradation of 3,4-DCA by the novel DBD plasma reactor fitted pseudo-first-order kinetics. Higher degradation efficiency of 3,4-DCA was observed in acidic conditions. The degradation efficiency of 3,4-DCA, the removal rate of total organic carbon (TOC), and the detected Cl(-) increased dramatically with adding Fe(2+) or Fe(3+). Degradation of 3,4-DCA could be accelerated or inhibited in the presence of H2O2 depending on the dosage. Several degradation intermediates of 3,4-DCA such as 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 2-chloro-1,4-benzoquinone, 3,4-dichlorophenyl isocyanate, 2-chlorohydroquinone, 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene, and 3,4-dichlorophenol were identified by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Based on the identification of aromatic intermediates, acetic acid, formic acid, oxalic acid, and Cl(-) released, a possible mineralization pathway of 3,4-DCA was proposed. PMID:25315933

  11. Apolar versus polar solvents: a comparison of the strength of some organic acids against different bases in toluene and in water.

    PubMed

    D'Anna, Francesca; Frenna, Vincenzo; Ghelfi, Franco; Macaluso, Gabriella; Marullo, Salvatore; Spinelli, Domenico

    2010-10-21

    The constants of ion-pair formation with 3-nitroaniline (3NO(2)A) for eight halogenoacetic acids (HAAs, 3a-h: TFA, TCA, TBA, DFA, DCA, DBA, MCA, and MBA), and five 2,2-dichloroalkanoic acids containing 3-8 carbon atoms (HAs, 5a-e: DCPA, DCBA, DCMBA, DCVA, and DCOA) have been determined in TOL at 298.1 K. The results obtained brought to evidence for HAAs the formation of ion-pairs with two different stoichiometries (base-acid, 1:1 or 1:2), while in contrast the HAs furnish only the 1:1 pairs. The different steric and electronic requirements of HAAs and HAs seem to be responsible for such an unlikely behavior. At the same time, the acid-catalyzed MRH of the (Z)-phenylhydrazone of 5-amino-3-benzoyl-1,2,4-oxadiazole (1) into (2,5-diphenyl-2H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)urea (2) in the presence of the five HAs above has been investigated in TOL at 313.1 K. Thus, in contrast with previous results in the presence of several HAAs, a unique pathway for the rearrangement has been observed, again pointing out the importance of the above effects on the initial acid/base interactions. Finally the acidic strength of TFA against seven nitroanilines (NA, 4a-g: 4NO(2)A, 3NO(2)A, 3Me4NO(2)A, 4Me3NO(2)A, 2Me3NO(2)A, 2NO(2)A, and 3,5diNO(2)A) characterized by a very different basicity has been measured in TOL at 298.1 K. PMID:20873823

  12. Quantification of organic acids in particulate matter by coupling of thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation with thermodesorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Beiner, K; Plewka, A; Haferkorn, S; Iinuma, Y; Engewald, W; Herrmann, H

    2009-09-18

    A quantitative method for the determination of organic acids in atmospheric particles is developed. The method couples a derivatisation step (thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation) and a Curie point pyrolyser as a thermal desorption technique and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (CPP-GC-MS). Among the reagents tested (tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH), tetramethylammonium acetate (TMAAc) and phenyltrimethylammonium hydroxide (TMPAH)), the best performance was found using TMAAc as a derivatisation reagent for the reaction time of 4s at 510 degrees C as heating temperature. Calibration was performed for a series of fatty acids (FA), dicarboxylic acids (DCA) and terpenoic acids (TA) under these conditions. Coefficients of determination (R(2)) were between 0.94 and 0.98. Limits of detection (LOD) were in the nanogram-range between 0.1 and 3.6 ng. The method is applied on atmospheric particle samples to obtain the quantification reproducibility and quantification limits. Reproducibility was determined in terms of relative standard deviations (RSD) for ambient aerosol samples collected by a high-volume-sampler (HVS, RSD=6-45%, n=10) and a Berner impactor (BI, RSD=5-34%, n=10). Based on 24h sampling time the developed method enables quantification of all three classes of acids for both sampling techniques. Calibration data and presented volume concentrations are compared with literature data. A comparison with an off-line methylation-GC-MS using BF(3) as a derivatisation reagent and capillary electrophoresis coupled mass spectrometry (CE-MS) showed a good agreement. Minimal sample preparation is the main advantage of the developed method. Depending on the sensitivity requirements the present method can be a fast and simple alternative to GC-MS techniques with conventional sample preparation steps for semi-volatile organic acids. PMID:19679312

  13. Understanding Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The term acid rain describes rain, snow, or fog that is more acidic than normal precipitation. To understand what acid rain is, it is first necessary to know what an acid is. Acids can be defined as substances that produce hydrogen ions (H+), when dissolved in water. Scientists indicate how acidic a substance is by a set of numbers called the pH…

  14. New bioactive fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to the new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octad...

  15. New Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many oxygenated fatty acids are bioactive compounds. Nocardia cholesterolicum and Flavobacterium DS5 convert oleic acid to 10 hydroxy stearic acid and linoleic acid to 10-hydroxy-12(Z)-octadecanoic acid. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PR3 converts oleic acid to new compounds, 7,10-dihydroxy-8(E)-octadecen...

  16. Genome-scale metabolic modeling and in silico analysis of lipid accumulating yeast Candida tropicalis for dicarboxylic acid production.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Pranjul; Park, Gyu-Yeon; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Lee, Hee-Seok; Lee, Hongweon; Chang, Matthew Wook; Ching, Chi Bun; Ahn, Jungoh; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the bio-production of α,ω-dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) has gained significant attention, which potentially leads to the replacement of the conventional petroleum-based products. In this regard, the lipid accumulating yeast Candida tropicalis, has been recognized as a promising microbial host for DCA biosynthesis: it possess the unique ω-oxidation pathway where the terminal carbon of α-fatty acids is oxidized to form DCAs with varying chain lengths. However, despite such industrial importance, its cellular physiology and lipid accumulation capability remain largely uncharacterized. Thus, it is imperative to better understand the metabolic behavior of this lipogenic yeast, which could be achieved by a systems biological approach. To this end, herein, we reconstructed the genome-scale metabolic model of C. tropicalis, iCT646, accounting for 646 unique genes, 945 metabolic reactions, and 712 metabolites. Initially, the comparative network analysis of iCT646 with other yeasts revealed several distinctive metabolic reactions, mainly within the amino acid and lipid metabolism including the ω-oxidation pathway. Constraints-based flux analysis was, then, employed to predict the in silico growth rates of C. tropicalis which are highly consistent with the cellular phenotype observed in glucose and xylose minimal media chemostat cultures. Subsequently, the lipid accumulation capability of C. tropicalis was explored in comparison with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, indicating that the formation of "citrate pyruvate cycle" is essential to the lipid accumulation in oleaginous yeasts. The in silico flux analysis also highlighted the enhanced ability of pentose phosphate pathway as NADPH source rather than malic enzyme during lipogenesis. Finally, iCT646 was successfully utilized to highlight the key directions of C. tropicalis strain design for the whole cell biotransformation application to produce long-chain DCAs from alkanes. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1993-2004.

  17. Bioactive Fatty Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxygenated fatty acids are useful as specialty chemicals, plasticizers, and biomedicals. Microbial enzymes convert fatty acids to mono-, di-, and trihydroxy fatty acid products. Among them, Bacillus megaterium ALA2 converted n-6 and n-3 PUFAs to many new oxygenated fatty acids. Linoleic acid was ...

  18. Comparative metabolic effects of acetate and dichloroacetate infusion in the anesthetized dog.

    PubMed

    Ward, R A; Wathen, R L; Harding, G B; Thompson, L C

    1985-07-01

    The comparative effects of acetate (10 mmol/h/kg) and dichloroacetate (DCA) (1 mmol/h/kg and 10 mmol/h/kg) on acid-base and intermediary metabolism were assessed using the fasted anesthetized dog, undergoing controlled ventilation, as a metabolic model. Infusion of acetate resulted in a marked metabolic alkalemia and a decline in PaO2, while DCA had minimal effects on acid-base state and oxygen consumption. Serum glucose decreased with both DCA and acetate infusion, although only significantly with the latter. At infusion rates of 10 mmol/h/kg, acetate caused marked decreases, while DCA caused marked increases, in serum potassium and phosphorus. Acetate and DCA also had opposing effects on lactate and citrate levels, the former caused increases and the latter decreases in both metabolites. Pyruvate levels decreased similarly in response to both infusates. Acetoacetate and beta-hydroxybutyrate levels increased significantly with both acetate and DCA infusions; however, the increases were much greater with acetate than with DCA infusion. Blood alanine levels decreased significantly during the infusion of both acetate and DCA, whereas, free fatty acids tended to increase with acetate infusion, remained unchanged with low dose DCA and fell significantly with high dose DCA. Plasma insulin levels were sustained during acetate infusion, but fell abruptly with termination of infusion. In contrast, insulin levels fell markedly with DCA infusion and remained depressed throughout the infusion and recovery periods. Blood levels of acetate and DCA rose markedly during infusion; however, while acetate levels decreased nearly to control values during the recovery period, DCA levels remained elevated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3925292

  19. Uric acid test (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid urine test is performed to check for the amount of uric acid in urine. Urine is collected over a 24 ... testing. The most common reason for measuring uric acid levels is in the diagnosis or treatment of ...

  20. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects & other health conditions > Amino acid metabolism disorders Amino acid metabolism disorders E-mail to a friend Please ... baby’s newborn screening may include testing for certain amino acid metabolism disorders. These are rare health conditions that ...

  1. Plasma amino acids

    MedlinePlus

    Amino acids blood test ... types of methods used to determine the individual amino acid levels in the blood. ... test is done to measure the level of amino acids in the blood. An increased level of a ...

  2. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... of the cells in the stomach to release acid. The stomach contents are then removed and analyzed. ... 3.5). These numbers are converted to actual acid production in units of milliequivalents per hour in ...

  3. Azelaic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Azelaic acid gel is used to clear the bumps, lesions, and swelling caused by rosacea (a skin disease that ... redness, flushing, and pimples on the face). Azelaic acid cream is used to treat acne. Azelaic acid ...

  4. Facts about Folic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Facts About Folic Acid Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... of the baby's brain and spine. About folic acid Folic acid is a B vitamin. Our bodies ...

  5. Acid Lipase Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Acid Lipase Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Cholesterol Ester Storage ... Trials Related NINDS Publications and Information What is Acid Lipase Disease ? Acid lipase disease or deficiency occurs ...

  6. Folic acid - test

    MedlinePlus

    ... folic acid measurements include: Alcohol Aminosalicylic acid Birth control pills Estrogens Tetracyclines Ampicillin Chloramphenicol Erythromycin Methotrexate Penicillin Aminopterin Phenobarbital Phenytoin Drugs to treat malaria

  7. Oxalic acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms of oxalic acid poisoning include: Abdominal pain Burns and blisters where the acid contacted the skin Collapse Convulsions Mouth pain Shock Throat pain Tremors (unintentional trembling) Vomiting

  8. Acid distribution in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okae, I.; Seya, A.; Umemoto, M.

    1996-12-31

    Electrolyte acid distribution among each component of a cell is determined by capillary force when the cell is not in operation, but the distribution under the current load conditions had not been clear so far. Since the loss of electrolyte acid during operation is inevitable, it is necessary to store enough amount of acid in every cell. But it must be under the level of which the acid disturbs the diffusion of reactive gases. Accordingly to know the actual acid distribution during operation in a cell is very important. In this report, we carried out experiments to clarify the distribution using small single cells.

  9. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  10. Toxicity of adipic acid.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gerald L

    2002-05-01

    Adipic acid has very low acute toxicity in rats with an LD50 > 5000 mg/kg. Adipic acid produced mild to no skin irritation on intact guinea pig skin as a 50% concentration in propylene glycol; it was not a skin sensitizer. Adipic acid caused mild conjunctival irritation in washed rabbit eyes; in unwashed rabbit eyes, there was mild conjunctival irritation, minimal iritis, but no corneal effects. Adipic acid dust may irritate the mucous membranes of the lungs and nose. In a 2-year feeding study, rats fed adipic acid at concentrations up to 5% in the diet exhibited only weight loss. Adipic acid is not genetically active in a wide variety of assay systems. Adipic acid caused no developmental toxicity in mice, rats, rabbits, or hamsters when administered orally. Adipic acid is partially metabolized in humans; the balance is eliminated unchanged in the urine. Adipic acid is slightly to moderately toxic to fish, daphnia, and algae in acute tests. PMID:12024802

  11. Updates on the EPA Study of Lead Scavengers (EDB and DCA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to continued concerns about the concentrations of 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) in ground water from spills of leaded gasoline, OUST formed a Lead Scavengers Team with assistance from ASTSWMO. ASTSWMO and EPA Regions solicited participation from state agencies. Analysis w...

  12. An Update on the EPA Study of Lead Scavengers (EDB and DCA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to continued concerns about the concentrations of 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) in ground water from spills of leaded gasoline, OUST formed a Lead Scavengers Team with assistance from ASTSWMO. ASTSWMO and EPA Regions solicited participation from state agencies. Analysis w...

  13. THE DISTRIBUTION OF EDB, BENZENE, AND 1,2-DCA AT GASOLINE SPILL SITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    With assistance from the Association of State and Territorial Air and Solid Waste Management Officials (ASTSWMO), the U.S. EPA Office of Underground Storage Tanks (OUST) and the U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development (ORD) conducted a survey to determine the distribution of ...

  14. Acid Thunder: Acid Rain and Ancient Mesoamerica

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Jonathan D. W.; Berg, Craig A.

    2006-01-01

    Much of Mesoamerica's rich cultural heritage is slowly eroding because of acid rain. Just as water dissolves an Alka-Seltzer tablet, acid rain erodes the limestone surfaces of Mexican archaeological sites at a rate of about one-half millimeter per century (Bravo et al. 2003). A half-millimeter may not seem like much, but at this pace, a few…

  15. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    This communication notes the actual magnitude of the acidity in acidic fog particles and suggests a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air.

  16. [Amino acids in saliva].

    PubMed

    Klinger, G; Gruhn, K

    1984-01-01

    Total amino acids in saliva and free and peptide-bound amino acids from 21 saliva samples were determined. The contents of amino acids was 25 mmol/1; total nitrogen content was 78-80 mmol/1. Amino acids consist of Prolin in 25%. Some patients were examined before and after application of the depot estrogen ethinyl estradiosulfonat, which stimulates the assimilation of protein. After application, amino acids increased and the authors found a shift between the single amino acids. Estrogen medication induced an increase in proteins with the character of collagens. Clinical effects are discussed. (author's modified) PMID:6240853

  17. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, ... discusses poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount ... the blood in people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications ...

  19. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-6 fatty acids are types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean oils. Other types of omega-6 fatty acids are found in black currant seed, borage seed, ...

  20. Zoledronic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is used to prevent or treat osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become thin and weak ... of life,' end of regular menstrual periods). Zoledronic acid (Reclast) is also used to treat osteoporosis in ...

  1. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Aminolevulinic acid is used in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty ... skin cancer) of the face or scalp. Aminolevulinic acid is in a class of medications called photosensitizing ...

  2. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines if a sample of tissue, blood, or other body ... dye. The slide is then washed with an acid solution and a different stain is applied. Bacteria ...

  3. Uric acid - blood

    MedlinePlus

    Uric acid is a chemical created when the body breaks down substances called purines. Purines are found in some ... dried beans and peas, and beer. Most uric acid dissolves in blood and travels to the kidneys. ...

  4. Hydrochloric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrochloric acid is a clear, poisonous liquid. It is highly corrosive, which means it immediately causes severe damage, such ... poisoning due to swallowing or breathing in hydrochloric acid. This article is for information only. Do NOT ...

  5. Omega-6 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of fats. Some types are found in vegetable oils, including corn, evening primrose seed, safflower, and soybean ... from studying specific omega-6 fatty acids or plant oils containing omega-6 fatty acids. See the separate ...

  6. Uric Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Uric Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Serum Urate; UA Formal name: Uric Acid Related tests: Synovial Fluid Analysis , Kidney Stone Analysis , ...

  7. Acid-fast stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003766.htm Acid-fast stain To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid-fast stain is a laboratory test that determines ...

  8. Aminocaproic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Aminocaproic acid injection is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid injection is also used to control bleeding in ...

  9. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Deoxycholic acid injection is used to improve the appearance and profile of moderate to severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a class of medications called ...

  10. Methylmalonic Acid Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Methylmalonic Acid Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: MMA Formal name: Methylmalonic Acid Related tests: Vitamin B12 and Folate , Homocysteine , Intrinsic ...

  11. Fatty acid analogs

    DOEpatents

    Elmaleh, David R.; Livni, Eli

    1985-01-01

    In one aspect, a radioactively labeled analog of a fatty acid which is capable of being taken up by mammalian tissue and which exhibits an in vivo beta-oxidation rate below that with a corresponding radioactively labeled fatty acid.

  12. Boric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... boric acid poisoning usually occurs when someone swallows powdered roach-killing products that contain the chemical. Chronic ... vein (IV) Medicines to treat symptoms Note: Activated charcoal does not effectively treat (absorb) boric acid. For ...

  13. Lactic acid test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003507.htm Lactic acid test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lactic acid is mainly produced in muscle cells and red ...

  14. PRODUCTION OF TRIFLUOROACETIC ACID

    DOEpatents

    Haworth, W.N.; Stacey, M.

    1949-07-19

    A method is given for the production of improved yields of trifluoroacetic acid. The compound is prepared by oxidizing m-aminobenzotrifluoride with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal permanganate at a temperature in the range of 80 deg C to 100 deg C while dissolved ln a mixture of water with glacial acetic acid and/or trifluoroacetic acid. Preferably a mixture of water and trifluoroacetic acid ls used as the solvent.

  15. Plant fatty acid hydroxylases

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  16. Quantity of acid in acid fog

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, W.J.

    1983-07-01

    The chemical composition of fog particles has become of considerable interest, because of both the possibility of interpreting atmospheric- chemistry processes in fog particles in terms of the principles of aqueous chemistry and the potential health effects of species present in fog particles. The acidity of fog particles has received wide attention. This communication noted the actual magnitude of the excess acidity in acidic fog particles and suggested a possible line of inquiry into the health effects of such fog so that it can be determined whether a typical fog is detrimental or beneficial relative to dry air. (DP)

  17. The Acid Rain Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Harriett S.; And Others

    A topic which is often not sufficiently dealt with in elementary school textbooks is acid rain. This student text is designed to supplement classroom materials on the topic. Discussed are: (1) "Rain"; (2) "Water Cycle"; (3) "Fossil Fuels"; (4) "Air Pollution"; (5) "Superstacks"; (6) "Acid/Neutral/Bases"; (7) "pH Scale"; (8) "Acid Rain"; (9)…

  18. What Is Acid Rain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likens, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    Acid rain is the collective term for any type of acidified precipitation: rain, snow, sleet, and hail, as well as the presence of acidifying gases, particles, cloud water, and fog in the atmosphere. The increased acidity, primarily from sulfuric and nitric acids, is generated as a by-product of the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and oil.…

  19. Acid Rain Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunger, Carolyn; And Others

    Acid rain is a complex, worldwide environmental problem. This study guide is intended to aid teachers of grades 4-12 to help their students understand what acid rain is, why it is a problem, and what possible solutions exist. The document contains specific sections on: (1) the various terms used in conjunction with acid rain (such as acid…

  20. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  1. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor L.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  2. Amino acid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winitz, M.; Graff, J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The process and apparatus for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the amino acid content of a biological sample are presented. The sample is deposited on a cation exchange resin and then is washed with suitable solvents. The amino acids and various cations and organic material with a basic function remain on the resin. The resin is eluted with an acid eluant, and the eluate containing the amino acids is transferred to a reaction vessel where the eluant is removed. Final analysis of the purified acylated amino acid esters is accomplished by gas-liquid chromatographic techniques.

  3. Editorial: Acid precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This editorial focuses on acid rain and the history of public and governmental response to acid rain. Comments on a book by Gwineth Howell `Acid Rain and Acid Waters` are included. The editor feels that Howells has provide a service to the environmental scientific community, with a textbook useful to a range of people, as well as a call for decision makers to learn from the acid rain issue and use it as a model for more sweeping global environmental issues. A balance is needed among several parameters such as level of evidence, probability that the evidence will lead to a specific direction and the cost to the global community. 1 tab.

  4. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow; Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  5. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  6. Nucleic acid detection assays

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James E.

    2005-04-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  7. Nucleic acid detection compositions

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann; Dahlberg, James L.

    2008-08-05

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  8. Acidic Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Amarasekara, Ananda S

    2016-05-25

    Ionic liquid with acidic properties is an important branch in the wide ionic liquid field and the aim of this article is to cover all aspects of these acidic ionic liquids, especially focusing on the developments in the last four years. The structural diversity and synthesis of acidic ionic liquids are discussed in the introduction sections of this review. In addition, an unambiguous classification system for various types of acidic ionic liquids is presented in the introduction. The physical properties including acidity, thermo-physical properties, ionic conductivity, spectroscopy, and computational studies on acidic ionic liquids are covered in the next sections. The final section provides a comprehensive review on applications of acidic ionic liquids in a wide array of fields including catalysis, CO2 fixation, ionogel, electrolyte, fuel-cell, membrane, biomass processing, biodiesel synthesis, desulfurization of gasoline/diesel, metal processing, and metal electrodeposition. PMID:27175515

  9. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  10. Demospongic Acids Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kornprobst, Jean-Michel; Barnathan, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    The well-known fatty acids with a Δ5,9 unsaturation system were designated for a long period as demospongic acids, taking into account that they originally occurred in marine Demospongia sponges. However, such acids have also been observed in various marine sources with a large range of chain-lengths (C16–C32) and from some terrestrial plants with short acyl chains (C18–C19). Finally, the Δ5,9 fatty acids appear to be a particular type of non-methylene-interrupted fatty acids (NMA FAs). This article reviews the occurrence of these particular fatty acids in marine and terrestrial organisms and shows the biosynthetic connections between Δ5,9 fatty acids and other NMI FAs. PMID:21116406

  11. Process for the preparation of lactic acid and glyceric acid

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, James E [Haslett, MI; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI; Marincean, Simona [Dewitt, MI

    2008-12-02

    Hexose and pentose monosaccharides are degraded to lactic acid and glyceric acid in an aqueous solution in the presence of an excess of a strongly anionic exchange resin, such as AMBERLITE IRN78 and AMBERLITE IRA400. The glyceric acid and lactic acid can be separated from the aqueous solution. Lactic acid and glyceric acid are staple articles of commerce.

  12. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  13. Acid-Base Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S.

    2015-01-01

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3− and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3− is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys. PMID:26597304

  14. Self-assemblied nanocomplexes based on biomimetic amphiphilic chitosan derivatives for protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minming; Dong, Hongwei; Guo, Kai; Zeng, Rong; Tu, Mei; Zhao, Jianhao

    2015-05-01

    A bio-inspired nanocarrier was developed for protein delivery based on biodegradable amphiphilic chitosan derivative (DCA-PCCs) with hydrophilic cell membrane mimic phosphorylcholine (PC) and hydrophobic deoxycholic acid (DCA) moieties, which was synthesized via the combination of Atherton-Todd reaction and carbodiimide coupling reaction. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as model protein, it was found that DCA-PCCs with suitable degree of substitution of PC and DCA moieties can load proteins by forming nanocomplexes via a solvent evaporation method. The physicochemical characteristics of BSA/DCA-PCCs nanocomplexes were investigated by Zetasizer, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In vitro biological evaluation revealed BSA/DCA-PCCs nanocomplexes as blank DCA-PCCs nanoparticles had excellent cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility mainly due to the presence of cell membrane mimic phosphorylcholine. BSA release results suggested BSA/DCA-PCCs nanocomplexes showed a sustained release behavior following first order exponential decay kinetics. The results indicated DCA-PCCs provided a promising approach for effectively delivering therapeutic proteins. PMID:25659679

  15. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  16. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  17. Recovery of organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2009-10-13

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  18. Recovery of organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Verser, Dan W.; Eggeman, Timothy J.

    2011-11-01

    A method is disclosed for the recovery of an organic acid from a dilute salt solution in which the cation of the salt forms an insoluble carbonate salt. A tertiary amine and CO.sub.2 are introduced to the solution to form the insoluble carbonate salt and a complex between the acid and an amine. A water immiscible solvent, such as an alcohol, is added to extract the acid/amine complex from the dilute salt solution to a reaction phase. The reaction phase is continuously dried and a product between the acid and the solvent, such as an ester, is formed.

  19. THIN-LAYER SEPARATION OF CITRIC ACID CYCLE INTERMEDIATES, LACTIC ACID, AND THE AMINO ACID TAURINE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a two-dimensional mixed-layer method for separating citric acid cycle intermediates, lactic acid and the amino acid taurine. The method cleanly separates all citric acid cycle intermediates tested, excepting citric acid and isocitric acid. The solvents are in...

  20. Effective protein extraction protocol for proteomics studies of Jerusalem artichoke leaves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meide; Shen, Shihua

    2013-07-01

    Protein extraction is a crucial step for proteomics studies. To establish an effective protein extraction protocol suitable for two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) analysis in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.), three different protein extraction methods-trichloroacetic acid/acetone, Mg/NP-40, and phenol/ammonium acetate-were evaluated using Jerusalem artichoke leaves as source materials. Of the three methods, trichloroacetic acid/acetone yielded the best protein separation pattern and highest number of protein spots in 2DE analysis. Proteins highly abundant in leaves, such as Rubisco, are typically problematic during leaf 2DE analysis, however, and this disadvantage was evident using trichloroacetic acid/acetone. To reduce the influence of abundant proteins on the detection of low-abundance proteins, we optimized the trichloroacetic acid/acetone method by incorporating a PEG fractionation approach. After optimization, 363 additional (36.2%) protein spots were detected on the 2DE gel. Our results suggest that trichloroacetic acid/acetone method is a better protein extraction technique than Mg/NP-40 and phenol/ammonium acetate in Jerusalem artichoke leaf 2DE analysis, and that trichloroacetic acid/acetone method combined with PEG fractionation procedure is the most effective approach for leaf 2DE analysis of Jerusalem artichoke. PMID:23630184

  1. Metabolism and Excretion of Trichloroethylene after Inhalation by Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bartoníček, V.

    1962-01-01

    Eight volunteers were exposed to trichloroethylene vapour (1,042 μg./l.) for five hours; 51 to 64% of the inhaled trichloroethylene was retained. The concentration of trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid in the urine was studied daily for a three-week period; on the third day both metabolites were determined in faeces, sweat, and saliva. The concentration of trichloroacetic acid in plasma and red blood cells was studied on alternate days. Of the trichloroethylene retained, 38·0 to 49·7% was excreted in the urine as trichloroethanol and 27·4 to 35·7% as trichloroacetic acid. Of both metabolites 8·4% was excreted in the faeces. Sweat collected on the third day of the experiment contained 0·10 to 1·92 mg./100 ml. trichloroethanol and 0·15 to 0·35 mg./100 ml. trichloroacetic acid. In saliva the concentrations were 0·09 to 0·32 mg./100 ml. trichloroethanol and 0·10 to 0·15 mg./100 ml. trichloroacetic acid. The value of the expression trichloroethanol/trichloroacetic acid calculated in the urine within 22 days was within the range 1·15 to 1·81. PMID:13865497

  2. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl acids

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Perfluoroalkyl acids(PFAAs) area a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perflurinated carbon backbone (4-12in length) and a acidic functional moiety (Carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds have excellent surface-tension reducing properties and have numerous industr...

  3. Toxicology of Perfluoroalkyl Acids*

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are a family of organic chemicals consisting of a perfluorinated carbon backbone (4-12 in length) and an acidic functional moiety (carboxylate or sulfonate). These compounds are chemically stable, have excellent surface-tension reducing properties...

  4. Lead-acid cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hradcovsky, R.J.; Kozak, O.R.

    1980-12-09

    A lead-acid storage battery is described that has a lead negative electrode, a lead dioxide positive electrode and a sulfuric acid electrolyte having an organic catalyst dissolved therein which prevents dissolution of the electrodes into lead sulfate whereby in the course of discharge, the lead dioxide is reduced to lead oxide and the lead is oxidized.

  5. Proteins and Amino Acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteins are the most abundant substances in living organisms and cells. All proteins are constructed from the same twenty amino acids that are linked together by covalent bonds. Shorter chains of two or more amino acids can be linked by covalent bonds to form polypeptides. There are twenty amino...

  6. EFFECTS OF ACID PRECIPITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent reviews of available data indicate that precipitation in a large region of North America is highly acidic when its pH is compared with the expected pH value of 5.65 for pure rain water in equilibrium with CO2. A growing body of evidence suggests that acid rain is responsib...

  7. Bile acid transporters

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lan, Tian; Rao, Anuradha

    2009-01-01

    In liver and intestine, transporters play a critical role in maintaining the enterohepatic circulation and bile acid homeostasis. Over the past two decades, there has been significant progress toward identifying the individual membrane transporters and unraveling their complex regulation. In the liver, bile acids are efficiently transported across the sinusoidal membrane by the Na+ taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide with assistance by members of the organic anion transporting polypeptide family. The bile acids are then secreted in an ATP-dependent fashion across the canalicular membrane by the bile salt export pump. Following their movement with bile into the lumen of the small intestine, bile acids are almost quantitatively reclaimed in the ileum by the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter. The bile acids are shuttled across the enterocyte to the basolateral membrane and effluxed into the portal circulation by the recently indentified heteromeric organic solute transporter, OSTα-OSTβ. In addition to the hepatocyte and enterocyte, subgroups of these bile acid transporters are expressed by the biliary, renal, and colonic epithelium where they contribute to maintaining bile acid homeostasis and play important cytoprotective roles. This article will review our current understanding of the physiological role and regulation of these important carriers. PMID:19498215

  8. Fats and fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The absolute fat requirement of the human species is the amount of essential fatty acids needed to maintain optimal fatty acid composition of all tissues and normal eicosanoid synthesis. At most, this requirement is no more than about 5% of an adequate energy intake. However, fat accounts for appro...

  9. Analysis of Organic Acids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griswold, John R.; Rauner, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are the procedures and a discussion of the results for an experiment in which students select unknown carboxylic acids, determine their melting points, and investigate their solubility behavior in water and ethanol. A table of selected carboxylic acids is included. (CW)

  10. EXPOSURES TO ACIDIC AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient monitoring of acid aerosol in four U.S. cities and in a rural region of southern Ontario clearly show distinct periods of strong acidity. easurements made in Kingston, TN, and Stuebenville, OH, resulted in 24-hr H+ ion concentrations exceeding 100 nmole/m3 more than 10 ti...

  11. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  12. Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are used together with lifestyle changes (diet, weight-loss, exercise) to reduce the amount of triglycerides (a fat-like ... people with very high triglycerides. Omega-3 fatty acids are in a class of medications called antilipemic ...

  13. Salicylic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    Propa pH® Peel-Off Acne Mask ... pimples and skin blemishes in people who have acne. Topical salicylic acid is also used to treat ... medications called keratolytic agents. Topical salicylic acid treats acne by reducing swelling and redness and unplugging blocked ...

  14. Amino Acid Crossword Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Learning the 20 standard amino acids is an essential component of an introductory course in biochemistry. Later in the course, the students study metabolism and learn about various catabolic and anabolic pathways involving amino acids. Learning new material or concepts often is easier if one can connect the new material to what one already knows;…

  15. Comparison of Urinary Total Proteins by Four Different Methods.

    PubMed

    Yalamati, Padma; Karra, Madhu Latha; Bhongir, Aparna V

    2016-10-01

    The total proteins in human urine have been compared by sulfosalicylic acid, sulfosalicylic acid with sodium sulphate and trichloroacetic acid methods with pyrogallol red molybdate method as there are no studies found quantifying imprecision and bias components. Fresh urine of 36 patients was analyzed by four methods. Imprecision and inaccuracy were determined by repeated analysis and method comparison studies using correlation plots, Bland and Altman, and Passing and Bablok regression analyses respectively. The coefficient of variation was 5.07 % for pyrogallol red molybdate; 6.84 % for sulfosalicylic acid; 3.97 % for sulfosalicylic acid with sodium sulphate and 5.93 % for trichloroacetic acid methods. Bland and Altman analysis showed a bias of 5.8, 1.7 and -5.4 for pyrogallol red molybdate versus sulfosalicylic acid, sulfosalicylic acid with sodium sulphate and trichloroacetic acid methods respectively. Passing and Bablok regression revealed a constant bias for pyrogallol red molybdate versus all turbidimetric methods but a proportional bias only with trichloroacetic acid method. Sulfosalicylic acid with sodium sulphate method is preferred to sulfosalicylic acid and trichloroacetic acid methods. PMID:27605745

  16. Mechanisms by which dichloroacetate lowers lactic acid levels: the kinetic interrelationships between lactate, pyruvate, alanine, and glucose.

    PubMed

    Jahoor, F; Zhang, X J; Frazer, E

    1994-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) is gaining use as an alternative to bicarbonate therapy in the treatment of lactic acidosis. To determine the mechanism(s) by which DCA lowers blood lactate levels, we studied its effect on the kinetic interrelationships between pyruvate, lactate, alanine, and glucose in the hindlimb of dogs during hormonal stimulation of pyruvate production (Ra) and its conversion to lactate. Three groups of dogs (n = 6) were infused with 1-13C-pyruvate to measure whole body pyruvate Ra, and pyruvate Ra and utilization (Rd) across the hindlimb during either a 4-hr infusion of saline (controls), or somatostatin, glucagon, and epinephrine (SGE), or SGE plus dichloroacetate (SGE + DCA). Pyruvate Ra was used as an index of rate of glycolysis and Rd as an index of pyruvate oxidation. In the controls, all kinetic parameters were constant during the saline infusion. Hindlimb pyruvate Ra and Rd were almost equal, and lactate release negligible. Compared to controls, SGE administration significantly increased (P < 0.05) wholebody pyruvate Ra (48.5 +/- 6.2 vs 33.6 +/- 2.4 mumol/kg/min) and blood lactate levels (P < 0.05). Hindlimb pyruvate Ra increased by approximately 150%, but Rd remained unchanged resulting in marked increases in lactate and alanine effluxes. Adding DCA to the SGE infusion significantly reduced wholebody pyruvate Ra (P < 0.05) and blood lactate levels (P < 0.01). In the hindlimb, however, there was no decrease in lactate output, despite a 91% increase in pyruvate utilization because pyruvate Ra also increased. These results suggest that during stimulation of rate of glycolysis, DCA lowers lactate levels by reducing the overall availability of pyruvate for lactate synthesis. This is accomplished by suppressing the rate of glycolysis in tissues other than skeletal muscle and stimulating pyruvate oxidation. PMID:7906882

  17. Trans Fatty Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Ellin

    1997-09-01

    Fats and their various fatty acid components seem to be a perennial concern of nutritionists and persons concerned with healthful diets. Advice on the consumption of saturated, polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, and total fat bombards us from magazines and newspapers. One of the newer players in this field is the group of trans fatty acids found predominantly in partially hydrogenated fats such as margarines and cooking fats. The controversy concerning dietary trans fatty acids was recently addressed in an American Heart Association (AHA) science advisory (1) and in a position paper from the American Society of Clinical Nutrition/American Institute of Nutrition (ASCN/AIN) (2). Both reports emphasize that the best preventive strategy for reducing risk for cardiovascular disease and some types of cancer is a reduction in total and saturated fats in the diet, but a reduction in the intake of trans fatty acids was also recommended. Although the actual health effects of trans fatty acids remain uncertain, experimental evidence indicates that consumption of trans fatty acids adversely affects serum lipid levels. Since elevated levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, it follows that intake of trans fatty acids should be minimized.

  18. Sulfuric Acid on Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Frozen sulfuric acid on Jupiter's moon Europa is depicted in this image produced from data gathered by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The brightest areas, where the yellow is most intense, represent regions of high frozen sulfuric acid concentration. Sulfuric acid is found in battery acid and in Earth's acid rain.

    This image is based on data gathered by Galileo's near infrared mapping spectrometer.

    Europa's leading hemisphere is toward the bottom right, and there are enhanced concentrations of sulfuric acid in the trailing side of Europa (the upper left side of the image). This is the face of Europa that is struck by sulfur ions coming from Jupiter's innermost moon, Io. The long, narrow features that crisscross Europa also show sulfuric acid that may be from sulfurous material extruded in cracks.

    Galileo, launched in 1989, has been orbiting Jupiter and its moons since December 1995. JPL manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  19. Strongly Acidic Auxin Indole-3-Methanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Bialek, Krystyna

    1985-01-01

    A radiochemical synthesis is described for [14C]indole-3-methanesulfonic acid (IMS), a strongly acidic auxin analog. Techniques were developed for fractionation and purification of IMS using normal and reverse phase chromatography. In addition, the utility of both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for analysis of IMS has been demonstrated. IMS was shown to be an active auxin, stimulating soybean hypocotyl elongation, bean first internode curvature, and ethylene production. IMS uptake by thin sections of soybean hypocotyl was essentially independent of solution pH and, when applied at a 100 micromolar concentration, IMS exhibited a basipetal polarity in its transport in both corn coleoptile and soybean hypocotyl sections. [14C]IMS should, therefore, be a useful compound to study fundamental processes related to the movement of auxins in plant tissues and organelles. PMID:16664007

  20. Comparative Analysis of the Relationship between Trichloroethylene Metabolism and Tissue-Specific Toxicity among Inbred Mouse Strains: Kidney Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Uehara, Takeki; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Collins, Leonard B.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Ball, Louise M.; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a well-known environmental and occupational toxicant that is classified as carcinogenic to humans based on the epidemiological evidence of an association with higher risk of renal cell carcinoma. A number of scientific issues critical for assessing human health risks from TCE remain unresolved, such as the amount of kidney-toxic glutathione conjugation metabolites formed, inter-species and -individual differences, and the mode of action for kidney carcinogenicity. We hypothesized that TCE metabolite levels in the kidney are associated with kidney-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in sub-acute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 days; 7 inbred mouse strains) and sub-chronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 weeks; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation [trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroethanol] and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione], and various kidney toxicity phenotypes. In sub-acute study, we observed inter-strain differences in TCE metabolite levels in the kidney. In addition, we found that in several strains kidney-specific effects of TCE included induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1, increased cell proliferation, and expression of KIM-1, a marker of tubular damage and regeneration. In sub-chronic study, peroxisome proliferator-marker gene induction and kidney toxicity diminished while cell proliferative response was elevated in a dose-dependent manner in NZW/LacJ, but not C57BL/6J mice. Overall, we show that TCE metabolite levels in the kidney are associated with kidney-specific toxicity and that these effects are strain-dependent. PMID:25424545

  1. Understanding acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Budiansky, S.

    1981-06-01

    The complexities of the phenomenon of acid rain are described. Many factors, including meteorology, geology, chemistry, and biology, all play parts. Varying weather, varying soils, the presence of other pollutants and species differences all act to blur the connections between industrial emissions, acid rain, and environmental damage. Some experts believe that the greatest pH shock to lakes occurs during snow melt and runoff in the spring; others believe that much of the plant damage ascribed to acid rain is actually due to the effects of ozone. Much work needs to be done in the area of sampling. Historical data are lacking and sampling methods are not sufficiently accurate. (JMT)

  2. WASTE ACID DETOXIFICATION AND RECLAMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) project demonstrated the Waste Acid Detoxification and Reclamation (WADR) systems ability to recover waste electropolish acid solutions generated during the manufacturing of gun-tubes, and reuse the clean acid. ...

  3. Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aspiration Syndrome Additional Content Medical News Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism By Lee M. Sanders, MD, MPH NOTE: ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Amino acids are ...

  4. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in soldering fluxes are called hydrocarbons. They include: Ammonium chloride Rosin Hydrochloric acid Zinc ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  5. Aminolevulinic Acid Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... in combination with photodynamic therapy (PDT; special blue light) to treat actinic keratoses (small crusty or scaly ... photosensitizing agents. When aminolevulinic acid is activated by light, it damages the cells of actinic keratosis lesions.

  6. Difficult Decisions: Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John A.; Slesnick, Irwin L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses some of the contributing factors and chemical reactions involved in the production of acid rain, its effects, and political issues pertaining to who should pay for the clean up. Supplies questions for consideration and discussion. (RT)

  7. Uric acid - urine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to filter fluids and waste normally (chronic glomerulonephritis ) Lead poisoning Long-term (chronic) alcohol use Risks There are ... Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 28. Read More Gout Lead poisoning Liver disease Polycythemia vera Uric acid - blood Update ...

  8. Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria, including infections of the ears, lungs, sinus, skin, ... antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth of bacteria. Clavulanic acid is in a class of medications ...

  9. Hydrofluoric acid poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Chemical Emergencies: Case Definition: Hydrofluoric Acid . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services; 2005. Goldfrank LR, ed. Goldfrank's Toxicologic Emergencies . 8th ed. New ...

  10. Lead/acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Kathryn R.

    Lead/acid batteries are produced in sizes from less than 1 to 3000 Ah for a wide variety of portable, industrial and automotive applications. Designs include Planté, Fauré or pasted, and tubular electrodes. In addition to the traditional designs which are flooded with sulfuric acid, newer 'valve-regulated" designs have the acid immolibized in a silica gel or absorbed in a porous glass separator. Development is ongoing worldwide to increase the specific power, energy and deep discharge cycle life of this commercially successful system to meet the needs of new applications such as electric vehicles, load leveling, and solar energy storage. The operating principles, current status, technical challenges and commercial impact of the lead/acid battery are reviewed.

  11. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. ... tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. The following may decrease urine citric acid levels: ...

  12. Pantothenic acid and biotin

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. Pantothenic acid and biotin are types of B vitamins. They are water-soluble, which means that the ... found in foods that are good sources of B vitamins, including the following: Animal proteins Avocado Broccoli, kale, ...

  13. (Acid rain workshop)

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.S.

    1990-12-05

    The traveler presented a paper entitled Susceptibility of Asian Ecosystems to Soil-Mediated Acid Rain Damage'' at the Second Workshop on Acid Rain in Asia. The workshop was organized by the Asian Institute of Technology (Bangkok, Thailand), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois), and Resource Management Associates (Madison, Wisconsin) and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the United Nations Environment Program, the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, and the World Bank. Papers presented on the first day discussed how the experience gained with acid rain in North America and Europe might be applied to the Asian situation. Papers describing energy use projections, sulfur emissions, and effects of acid rain in several Asian countries were presented on the second day. The remaining time was allotted to discussion, planning, and writing plans for a future research program.

  14. Stomach acid test

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric acid secretion test ... The test is done after you have not eaten for a while so fluid is all that remains in ... injected into your body. This is done to test the ability of the cells in the stomach ...

  15. Deoxycholic Acid Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... severe submental fat ('double chin'; fatty tissue located under the chin). Deoxycholic acid injection is in a ... as a liquid to be injected subcutaneously (just under the skin) by a doctor. Your doctor will ...

  16. Amino Acids and Chirality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Jamie E.

    2012-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most heavily studied organic compound class in carbonaceous chondrites. The abundance, distributions, enantiomeric compositions, and stable isotopic ratios of amino acids have been determined in carbonaceous chondrites fi'om a range of classes and petrographic types, with interesting correlations observed between these properties and the class and typc of the chondritcs. In particular, isomeric distributions appear to correlate with parent bodies (chondrite class). In addition, certain chiral amino acids are found in enantiomeric excess in some chondrites. The delivery of these enantiomeric excesses to the early Earth may have contributed to the origin of the homochirality that is central to life on Earth today. This talk will explore the amino acids in carbonaceous chondritcs and their relevance to the origin of life.

  17. Valproic Acid and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the treatment of epilepsy, and to treat bipolar disorder and migraines. I have been taking valproic acid ... that women with seizure disorders and women with bipolar disorder might have menstrual problems and difficulty getting pregnant. ...

  18. Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... One group of these disorders is amino acid metabolism disorders. They include phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup ...

  19. Uric acid - blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... High levels of uric acid can sometimes cause gout or kidney disease. You may have this test ... Alcoholism Chemotherapy-related side effects Diabetes Excessive exercise Gout Hypoparathyroidism Lead poisoning Leukemia Medullary cystic kidney disease ...

  20. Citric acid urine test

    MedlinePlus

    ... The test is used to diagnose renal tubular acidosis and evaluate kidney stone disease. Normal Results The ... level of citric acid may mean renal tubular acidosis and a tendency to form calcium kidney stones. ...

  1. Folic Acid Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... more easily than natural food folate. Close × Answer: D CORRECT: Folic acid reduces the risk for spina ... g., orange juice and green vegetables). Close × Answer: D CORRECT: Spina bifida and anencephaly are neural tube ...

  2. Folic acid in diet

    MedlinePlus

    ... green leafy vegetables Dried beans and peas (legumes) Citrus fruits and juices Fortified means that vitamins have ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Folic Acid Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  3. Amoxicillin and Clavulanic Acid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Amoxicillin is in a class of medications called penicillin-like antibiotics. It works by stopping the growth ... allergic to amoxicillin (Amoxil, Trimox, Wymox), clavulanic acid, penicillin, cephalosporins, or any other medications.tell your doctor ...

  4. Boric Acid Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Wong, L. C.; Heimbach, M. D.; Truscott, D. R.; Duncan, B. D.

    1964-01-01

    Boric acid poisoning in 11 infants, occurring in the newborn nursery as a result of the accidental and inadvertent use of 2.5% boric acid in the preparation of the formulae, is reported. Five of the infants died. All except two exhibited the classical symptomatology of acute boric acid poisoning, namely, diarrhea, vomiting, erythema, exfoliation, desquamation of the skin, and marked central nervous system irritation. Early manifestations of poisoning were nonspecific, and one patient died before skin manifestations were noted. Peritoneal dialysis, instituted in nine cases, was found to be the most effective method of treatment. It is recommended that boric acid, which is of doubtful therapeutic value, should be completely removed from hospitals, dispensaries and pharmacopoeias. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:14166459

  5. Polymers for acid thickening

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, K.W.

    1980-09-30

    Acids, thickened with branched emulsion or suspension polymers of diallyldimethylammonium chloride are useful as oil well drilling and fracturing fluids for stimulating well production and in other applications, such as thickeners for cosmetics, paints, adhesives, textiles and printing inks.

  6. Acid-base chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, C.W.; Blewit, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    The book is not a research compendium and there are no references to the literature. It is a teaching text covering the entire range of undergraduate subject matter dealing with acid-base chemistry (some of it remotely) as taught in inorganic, analytical, and organic chemistry courses. The excellent chapters VII through IX deal in detail with the quantitative aspects of aqueous acid-base equilibria (salt hydrolysis and buffer, titrations, polyprotic and amphoteric substances).

  7. Utilization of acid tars

    SciTech Connect

    Frolov, A.F.; Denisova, T.L.; Aminov, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    Freshly produced acid tar (FPAT), obtained as refinery waste in treating petroleum oils with sulfuric acid and oleum, contains 80% or more sulfuric acid. Of such tars, pond acid tars, which contain up to 80% neutral petroleum products and sulfonated resins, are more stable, and have found applications in the production of binders for paving materials. In this article the authors are presenting results obtained in a study of the composition and reactivity of FPAT and its stability in storage in blends with asphalts obtained in deasphalting operations, and the possibility of using the FPAT in road construction has been examined. In this work, wastes were used which were obtained in treating the oils T-750, KhF-12, I-8A, and MS-14. Data on the change in group chemical composition of FPAT are shown, and the acidity, viscosity, needle penetration, and softening point of acid tars obtained from different grades of oils are plotted as functions of the storage time. It is also shown that the fresh and hardened FPATs differ in their solubilities in various solvents.

  8. Mammalian Fatty Acid Elongases

    PubMed Central

    Jump, Donald B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Very long chain fatty acids confer functional diversity on cells by variations in their chain length and degree of unsaturation. Microsomal fatty acid elongation represents the major pathway for determining the chain length of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fatty acids in cellular lipids. The overall reaction for fatty acid elongation involves four enzymes and utilizes malonyl CoA, NADPH, and fatty acyl CoA as substrates. While the fundamental pathway and its requirements have been known for many years, recent advances have revealed a family of enzymes involved in the first step of the reaction, i.e., the condensation reaction. Seven fatty acid elongase subtypes (Elovl #1–7) have been identified in the mouse, rat, and human genomes. These enzymes determine the rate of overall fatty acid elongation. Moreover, these enzymes also display differential substrate specificity, tissue distribution, and regulation, making them important regulators of cellular lipid composition as well as specific cellular functions. Herein, methods are described to measure elongase activity, analyze elongation products, and alter cellular elongase expression. PMID:19763486

  9. Neutron Nucleic Acid Crystallography.

    PubMed

    Chatake, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The hydration shells surrounding nucleic acids and hydrogen-bonding networks involving water molecules and nucleic acids are essential interactions for the structural stability and function of nucleic acids. Water molecules in the hydration shells influence various conformations of DNA and RNA by specific hydrogen-bonding networks, which often contribute to the chemical reactivity and molecular recognition of nucleic acids. However, X-ray crystallography could not provide a complete description of structural information with respect to hydrogen bonds. Indeed, X-ray crystallography is a powerful tool for determining the locations of water molecules, i.e., the location of the oxygen atom of H2O; however, it is very difficult to determine the orientation of the water molecules, i.e., the orientation of the two hydrogen atoms of H2O, because X-ray scattering from the hydrogen atom is very small.Neutron crystallography is a specialized tool for determining the positions of hydrogen atoms. Neutrons are not diffracted by electrons, but are diffracted by atomic nuclei; accordingly, neutron scattering lengths of hydrogen and its isotopes are comparable to those of non-hydrogen atoms. Therefore, neutron crystallography can determine both of the locations and orientations of water molecules. This chapter describes the current status of neutron nucleic acid crystallographic research as well as the basic principles of neutron diffraction experiments performed on nucleic acid crystals: materials, crystallization, diffraction experiments, and structure determination. PMID:26227050

  10. Autophagy on acid.

    PubMed

    Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Gillies, Robert J

    2012-11-01

    The microenvironment of solid tumors tends to be more acidic (6.5-7.0) than surrounding normal (7.2-7.4) tissue. Chaotic vasculature, oxygen limitation and major metabolic changes all contribute to the acidic microenvironment. We have previously proposed that low extracellular pH (pHe) plays a critical role in the development and progression of solid tumors. While extracellular acidosis is toxic to most normal cells, cancer cells can adapt and survive under this harsh condition. In this study, we focused on identifying survival strategies employed by cancer cells when challenged with an acidic pHe (6.6-6.7) either acutely or for many generations. While acutely acidic cells did not grow, those acclimated over many generations grew at the same rate as control cells. We observed that these cells induce autophagy in response to acidosis both acutely and chronically, and that this adaptation appears to be necessary for survival. Inhibition of autophagy in low pH cultured cells results in cell death. Histological analysis of tumor xenografts reveals a strong correlation of LC3 protein expression in regions projected to be acidic. Furthermore, in vivo buffering experiments using sodium bicarbonate, previously shown to raise extracellular tumor pH, decreases LC3 protein expression in tumor xenografts. These data imply that autophagy can be induced by extracellular acidosis and appears to be chronically employed as a survival adaptation to acidic microenvironments. PMID:22874557

  11. Method for isolating nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2015-09-29

    The current disclosure provides methods and kits for isolating nucleic acid from an environmental sample. The current methods and compositions further provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by reducing adsorption of nucleic acids by charged ions and particles within an environmental sample. The methods of the current disclosure provide methods for isolating nucleic acids by releasing adsorbed nucleic acids from charged particles during the nucleic acid isolation process. The current disclosure facilitates the isolation of nucleic acids of sufficient quality and quantity to enable one of ordinary skill in the art to utilize or analyze the isolated nucleic acids for a wide variety of applications including, sequencing or species population analysis.

  12. Acidification and Acid Rain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, S. A.; Veselã½, J.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution by acids has been known as a problem for centuries (Ducros, 1845; Smith, 1872; Camuffo, 1992; Brimblecombe, 1992). Only in the mid-1900s did it become clear that it was a problem for more than just industrially developed areas, and that precipitation quality can affect aquatic resources ( Gorham, 1955). The last three decades of the twentieth century saw tremendous progress in the documentation of the chemistry of the atmosphere, precipitation, and the systems impacted by acid atmospheric deposition. Chronic acidification of ecosystems results in chemical changes to soil and to surface waters and groundwater as a result of reduction of base cation supply or an increase in acid (H+) supply, or both. The most fundamental changes during chronic acidification are an increase in exchangeable H+ or Al3+ (aluminum) in soils, an increase in H+ activity (˜concentration) in water in contact with soil, and a decrease in alkalinity in waters draining watersheds. Water draining from the soil is acidified and has a lower pH (=-log [H+]). As systems acidify, their biotic community changes.Acidic surface waters occur in many parts of the world as a consequence of natural processes and also due to atmospheric deposition of strong acid (e.g., Canada, Jeffries et al. (1986); the United Kingdom, Evans and Monteith (2001); Sweden, Swedish Environmental Protection Board (1986); Finland, Forsius et al. (1990); Norway, Henriksen et al. (1988a); and the United States (USA), Brakke et al. (1988)). Concern over acidification in the temperate regions of the northern hemisphere has been driven by the potential for accelerating natural acidification by pollution of the atmosphere with acidic or acidifying compounds. Atmospheric pollution ( Figure 1) has resulted in an increased flux of acid to and through ecosystems. Depending on the ability of an ecosystem to neutralize the increased flux of acidity, acidification may increase only imperceptibly or be accelerated at a rate that

  13. Discovery of essential fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Arthur A.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fat was recognized as a good source of energy and fat-soluble vitamins by the first part of the 20th century, but fatty acids were not considered to be essential nutrients because they could be synthesized from dietary carbohydrate. This well-established view was challenged in 1929 by George and Mildred Burr who reported that dietary fatty acid was required to prevent a deficiency disease that occurred in rats fed a fat-free diet. They concluded that fatty acids were essential nutrients and showed that linoleic acid prevented the disease and is an essential fatty acid. The Burrs surmised that other unsaturated fatty acids were essential and subsequently demonstrated that linolenic acid, the omega-3 fatty acid analog of linoleic acid, is also an essential fatty acid. The discovery of essential fatty acids was a paradigm-changing finding, and it is now considered to be one of the landmark discoveries in lipid research. PMID:25339684

  14. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  15. Nitric acid-formic acid compatibility in DWPF

    SciTech Connect

    Eibling, R.E.

    1992-10-20

    The addition of the Nitric Acid Flowsheet to the DWPF feed preparation process introduces nitric acid into a vessel which will subsequently receive a formic acid solution. The combination of these two acids suggests that a denitration reaction might occur. This memorandum reviews the conditions under which a denitration reaction is possible and compares these conditions to DWPF operating conditions.

  16. Amino-acid contamination of aqueous hydrochloric acid.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolman, Y.; Miller, S. L.

    1971-01-01

    Considerable amino-acid contamination in commercially available analytical grade hydrochloric acid (37% HCl) was found. One bottle contained 8,300 nmol of amino-acids per liter. A bottle from another supplier contained 6,700 nmol per liter. The contaminants were mostly protein amino-acids and several unknowns. Data on the volatility of the amino-acids during HCl distillation were also obtained.

  17. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1997-07-22

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

  18. Domoic Acid Epileptic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramsdell, John S.; Gulland, Frances M.

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  19. Domoic acid epileptic disease.

    PubMed

    Ramsdell, John S; Gulland, Frances M

    2014-03-01

    Domoic acid epileptic disease is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures weeks to months after domoic acid exposure. The potential for this disease was first recognized in a human case study of temporal lobe epilepsy after the 1987 amnesic shellfish-poisoning event in Quebec, and was characterized as a chronic epileptic syndrome in California sea lions through investigation of a series of domoic acid poisoning cases between 1998 and 2006. The sea lion study provided a breadth of insight into clinical presentations, unusual behaviors, brain pathology, and epidemiology. A rat model that replicates key observations of the chronic epileptic syndrome in sea lions has been applied to identify the progression of the epileptic disease state, its relationship to behavioral manifestations, and to define the neural systems involved in these behavioral disorders. Here, we present the concept of domoic acid epileptic disease as a delayed manifestation of domoic acid poisoning and review the state of knowledge for this disease state in affected humans and sea lions. We discuss causative mechanisms and neural underpinnings of disease maturation revealed by the rat model to present the concept for olfactory origin of an epileptic disease; triggered in dendodendritic synapases of the olfactory bulb and maturing in the olfactory cortex. We conclude with updated information on populations at risk, medical diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. PMID:24663110

  20. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Nekimken, Howard L.; Carey, W. Patrick; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and, a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber.

  1. A Demonstration of Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Man Wai

    2004-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain formation is described. Oxides of sulfur and nitrogen that result from the burning of fossil fuels are the major pollutants of acid rain. In this demonstration, SO[subscript 2] gas is produced by the burning of matches. An acid-base indicator will show that the dissolved gas turns an aqueous solution acidic.

  2. Oleanolic acid ethanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Froelich, Anna; Gzella, Andrzej K.

    2010-01-01

    Crystals of the title compound (systematic name: 3β-hy­droxy­olean-12-en-28-oic acid ethanol monosolvate), C30H48O3·C2H5OH, were obtained from unsuccessful co-crystallization trials. The asymmetric unit contains two symmetry-independent oleanolic acid mol­ecules, as well as two ethanol solvent mol­ecules. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bonds stabilize the crystal packing. In the oleanolic acid mol­ecules, ring C has a slightly distorted envelope conformation, while rings A, B, D and E adopt chair conformations and rings D and E are cis-fused. Both independent ethanol mol­ecules are orientationally disordered [occupancy ratios of 0.742 (8):0.258 (8) and 0.632 (12):0.368 (12). PMID:21588987

  3. Amino acid analysis.

    PubMed

    Crabb, J W; West, K A; Dodson, W S; Hulmes, J D

    2001-05-01

    Amino acid analysis (AAA) is one of the best methods to quantify peptides and proteins. Two general approaches to quantitative AAA exist, namely, classical postcolumn derivatization following ion-exchange chromatography and precolumn derivatization followed by reversed-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC). Excellent instrumentation and several specific methodologies are available for both approaches, and both have advantages and disadvantages. This unit focuses on picomole-level AAA of peptides and proteins using the most popular precolumn-derivatization method, namely, phenylthiocarbamyl amino acid analysis (PTC-AAA). It is directed primarily toward those interested in establishing the technology with a modest budget. PTC derivatization and analysis conditions are described, and support and alternate protocols describe additional techniques necessary or useful for most any AAA method--e.g., sample preparation, hydrolysis, instrument calibration, data interpretation, and analysis of difficult or unusual residues such as cysteine, tryptophan, phosphoamino acids, and hydroxyproline. PMID:18429107

  4. Acid rain: Controllable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machta, Lester

    Acid rain is one of a growing number of environmental issues in which impacts are far removed from the source o f the irritants. Those who suffer may differ in geographical area from those who benefit from the activity which releases pollution to the atmosphere. Like the issue concerning the depletion of ozone by manufactured chemicals, the acid rain issue further emphasizes the need for continuing atmospheric chemistry research, a science whose history dates back but a few decades. Examination of the acid rain issue also calls for intimate collaboration of atmospheric scientists with ecologists, biologists, and other scientists, who must advise the geophysicists regarding what chemicals in the environment produce damage, their mode of entry into an ecosystem, and the need to understand acute or chronic impacts.

  5. Acid rain in Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatti, Neeloo; Streets, David G.; Foell, Wesley K.

    1992-07-01

    Acid rain has been an issue of great concern in North America and Europe during the past several decades. However, due to the passage of a number of recent regulations, most notably the Clean Air Act in the United States in 1990, there is an emerging perception that the problem in these Western nations is nearing solution. The situation in the developing world, particularly in Asia, is much bleaker. Given the policies of many Asian nations to achieve levels of development comparable with the industrialized world—which necessitate a significant expansion of energy consumption (most derived from indigenous coal reserves)—the potential for the formation of, and damage from, acid deposition in these developing countries is very high. This article delineates and assesses the emissions patterns, meteorology, physical geology, and biological and cultural resources present in various Asian nations. Based on this analysis and the risk factors to acidification, it is concluded that a number of areas in Asia are currently vulnerable to acid rain. These regions include Japan, North and South Korea, southern China, and the mountainous portions of Southeast Asia and southwestern India. Furthermore, with accelerated development (and its attendant increase in energy use and production of emissions of acid deposition precursors) in many nations of Asia, it is likely that other regions will also be affected by acidification in the near future. Based on the results of this overview, it is clear that acid deposition has significant potential to impact the Asian region. However, empirical evidence is urgently needed to confirm this and to provide early warning of increases in the magnitude and spread of acid deposition and its effects throughout this part of the world.

  6. NITRIC ACID PICKLING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Boller, E.R.; Eubank, L.D.

    1958-08-19

    An improved process is described for the treatment of metallic uranium surfaces preparatory to being given hot dip coatings. The process consists in first pickling the uraniunn surInce with aqueous 50% to 70% nitric acid, at 60 to 70 deg C, for about 5 minutes, rinsing the acid solution from the uranium article, promptly drying and then passing it through a molten alkali-metal halide flux consisting of 42% LiCl, 53% KCla and 5% NaCl into a molten metal bath consisting of 85 parts by weight of zinc and 15 parts by weight of aluminum

  7. [Nicotinic acid and nicotinamide].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, M; Shimizu, S

    1999-10-01

    Nicotinic acid and nicotinamide are called niacin. They are the antipellagra vitamin essential to many animals for growth and health. In human being, niacin is believed necessary together with other vitamins for the prevention and cure of pellagra. Niacin is widely distributed in nature; appreciable amounts are found in liver, fish, yeast and cereal grains. Nicotinamide is a precursor of the coenzyme NAD and NADP. Some of the most understood metabolic processes that involve niacin are glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and respiration. Niacin is also related to the following diseases: Hartnup disease; blue diaper syndrome; tryptophanuria; hydroxykynureninuria; xanthurenic aciduria; Huntington's disease. PMID:10540864

  8. Fatty Acids of Thiobacillus thiooxidans

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Richard A.

    1971-01-01

    Fatty acid spectra were made on Thiobacillus thiooxidans cultures both in the presence and absence of organic compounds. Small additions of glucose or acetate had no significant effect either on growth or fatty acid content. The addition of biotin had no stimulatory effect but did result in slight quantitative changes in the fatty acid spectrum. The predominant fatty acid was a C19 cyclopropane acid. PMID:4945206

  9. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  10. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H3PO4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid.

  11. Alkyl phosphonic acids and sulfonic acids in the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, George W.; Onwo, Wilfred M.; Cronin, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Homologous series of alkyl phosphonic acids and alkyl sulfonic acids, along with inorganic orthophosphate and sulfate, are identified in water extracts of the Murchison meteorite after conversion to their t-butyl dimethylsilyl derivatives. The methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl compounds are observed in both series. Five of the eight possible alkyl phosphonic acids and seven of the eight possible alkyl sulfonic acids through C4 are identified. Abundances decrease with increasing carbon number as observed of other homologous series indigenous to Murchison. Concentrations range downward from approximately 380 nmol/gram in the alkyl sulfonic acid series, and from 9 nmol/gram in the alkyl phosphonic acid series.

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid and lactation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an important component of membrane phospholipids in the retina, and brain, and accumulates rapidly in these tissues during early infancy. DHA is present in human milk, but the amount varies considerably and is largely dependent on maternal diet. This article reviews dat...

  13. ACID AEROSOL MEASUREMENT WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the discussion and results of the U.S. EPA Acid Aerosol Measurement Workshop, conducted February 1-3, 1989, in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. t was held in response to recommendations by the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) regarding ...

  14. Acid Rain Classroom Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demchik, Michael J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a curriculum plan in which students learn about acid rain through instructional media, research and class presentations, lab activities, simulations, design, and design implementation. Describes the simulation activity in detail and includes materials, procedures, instructions, examples, results, and discussion sections. (SAH)

  15. Acid rain bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Sayers, C.S.

    1983-09-01

    This bibliography identifies 900 citations on various aspects of Acid Rain, covering published bibliographies, books, reports, conference and symposium proceedings, audio visual materials, pamphlets and newsletters. It includes five sections: citations index (complete record of author, title, source, order number); KWIC index; title index; author index; and source index. 900 references.

  16. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oates-Bockenstedt, Catherine

    1997-01-01

    Details an activity designed to motivate students by incorporating science-related issues into a classroom debate. Includes "The Acid Rain Bill" and "Position Guides" for student roles as committee members, consumers, governors, industry owners, tourism professionals, senators, and debate directors. (DKM)

  17. The Acid Rain Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an activity which provides opportunities for role-playing as industrialists, ecologists, and government officials. The activity involves forming an international commission on acid rain, taking testimony, and, based on the testimony, making recommendations to governments on specific ways to solve the problem. Includes suggestions for…

  18. The Acid Rain Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakow, Steven J.; Glenn, Allen

    1982-01-01

    Provides rationale for and description of an acid rain game (designed for two players), a problem-solving model for elementary students. Although complete instructions are provided, including a copy of the game board, the game is also available for Apple II microcomputers. Information for the computer program is available from the author.…

  19. Acid Rain Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hugo, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students investigate the formation of solid ammonium chloride aerosol particles to help students better understand the concept of acid rain. Provides activity objectives, procedures, sample data, clean-up instructions, and questions and answers to help interpret the data. (MDH)

  20. Brain amino acid sensing.

    PubMed

    Tsurugizawa, T; Uneyama, H; Torii, K

    2014-09-01

    The 20 different amino acids, in blood as well as in the brain, are strictly maintained at the same levels throughout the day, regardless of food intake. Gastric vagal afferents only respond to free glutamate and sugars, providing recognition of food intake and initiating digestion. Metabolic control of amino acid homeostasis and diet-induced thermogenesis is triggered by this glutamate signalling in the stomach through the gut-brain axis. Rats chronically fed high-sugar and high-fat diets do not develop obesity when a 1% (w/v) monosodium glutamate (MSG) solution is available in a choice paradigm. Deficiency of the essential amino acid lysine (Lys) induced a plasticity in rats in response to Lys. This result shows how the body is able to identify deficient nutrients to maintain homeostasis. This plastic effect is induced by activin A activity in the brain, particularly in certain neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) which is the centre for amino acid homeostasis and appetite. These neurons respond to glutamate signalling in the oral cavity by which umami taste is perceived. They play a quantitative role in regulating ingestion of deficient nutrients, thereby leading to a healthier life. After recovery from malnutrition, rats prefer MSG solutions, which serve as biomarkers for protein nutrition. PMID:25200295

  1. Targeting tumor acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Engelman, Donald M.; Andreev, Oleg A.

    2012-02-01

    One of the main features of solid tumors is extracellular acidity, which correlates with tumor aggressiveness and metastatic potential. We introduced novel approach in targeting of acidic tumors, and translocation of cell-impermeable cargo molecules across cellular membrane. Our approach is based on main principle of insertion and folding of a polypeptide in lipid bilayer of membrane. We have identified family of pH Low Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs), which are capable spontaneous insertion and folding in membrane at mild acidic conditions. The affinity of peptides of pHLIP family to membrane at low pH is several times higher than at neutral pH. The process of peptides folding occurs within milliseconds. The energy released in a result of folding (about 2 kcal/mol) could be used to move polar cargo across a membrane, which is a novel concept in drug delivery. pHLIP peptides could be considered as a pH-sensitive single peptide molecular transporters and conjugated with imaging probes for fluorescence, MR, PET and SPECT imaging, they represent a novel in vivo marker of acidity. The work is supported by NIH grants CA133890 and GM073857 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  2. Synthesis of (+)-Coronafacic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Taber, Douglass F.; Sheth, Ritesh B.; Tian, Weiwei

    2009-01-01

    An enantioselective synthesis of (+)-coronafacic acid has been achieved. Rhodium catalyzed cyclization of an α-diazoester provided the intermediate cyclopentanone in high enantiomeric purity. Subsequent Fe-mediated cyclocarbonylation of a derived alkenyl cyclopropane gave a bicyclic enone, that then was hydrogenated and carried on to the natural product. PMID:19231870

  3. Plant fatty acid hydroxylase

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Chris; van de Loo, Frank

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to the identification of nucleic acid sequences and constructs, and methods related thereto, and the use of these sequences and constructs to produce genetically modified plants for the purpose of altering the composition of plant oils, waxes and related compounds.

  4. A Direct, Biomass-Based Synthesis of Benzoic Acid: Formic Acid-Mediated Deoxygenation of the Glucose-Derived Materials Quinic Acid and Shikimic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Arceo, Elena; Ellman, Jonathan; Bergman, Robert

    2010-05-03

    An alternative biomass-based route to benzoic acid from the renewable starting materials quinic acid and shikimic acid is described. Benzoic acid is obtained selectively using a highly efficient, one-step formic acid-mediated deoxygenation method.

  5. Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters

    DOEpatents

    Moens, Luc

    2003-06-24

    A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

  6. Photostabilization of ascorbic acid with citric acid, tartaric acid and boric acid in cream formulations.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I; Ali Sheraz, M; Ahmed, S; Shad, Z; Vaid, F H M

    2012-06-01

    This study involves the evaluation of the effect of certain stabilizers, that is, citric acid (CT), tartaric acid (TA) and boric acid (BA) on the degradation of ascorbic acid (AH(2) ) in oil-in-water cream formulations exposed to the UV light and stored in the dark. The apparent first-order rate constants (0.34-0.95 × 10(-3) min(-1) in light, 0.38-1.24 × 10(-2) day(-1) in dark) for the degradation reactions in the presence of the stabilizers have been determined. These rate constants have been used to derive the second-order rate constants (0.26-1.45 × 10(-2) M(-1) min(-1) in light, 3.75-8.50 × 10(-3) M(-1) day(-1) in dark) for the interaction of AH(2) and the individual stabilizers. These stabilizers are effective in causing the inhibition of the rate of degradation of AH(2) both in the light and in the dark. The inhibitory effect of the stabilizers is in the order of CT > TA > BA. The rate of degradation of AH(2) in the presence of these stabilizers in the light is about 120 times higher than that in the dark. This could be explained on the basis of the deactivation of AH(2) -excited triplet state by CT and TA and by the inhibition of AH(2) degradation through complex formation with BA. AH(2) leads to the formation of dehydroascorbic acid (A) by chemical and photooxidation in cream formulations. PMID:22296174

  7. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  8. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis. PMID:27349116

  9. Using Mode of Action to Assess Health Risks from Mixtures of Chemical/Physical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Richard J.; Lei, Xingye C.; Sasser, Lyle B.

    2003-01-20

    Interactions between tumor promoters with differing mechanisms of action were examined in male B6C3F1 mice treated with mixtures of dichloroacetate (DCA), trichloroacetate (TCA), and tetrachloride (CT), each of which acts by a different mode of action. Mice were initiated by vinyl carbamate (VC), and then promoted by DCA, TCA, CT, or the pair-wised combinations of the three compounds. The effect of each treatment or treatment combination on tumor number/animal and tumor size was individually assessed at 18, 24, 30 or 36 weeks of treatment. Dose-related increases in tumor size were observed with 20 & 50 mg/kg CT, but each produced equal number of tumors at 36 weeks with the main distinction being a decrease in tumor latency at the higher dose. Overall TCA treatment produced dose-related increases in tumor number at 36 weeks of treatment. Thus, the lower doses of CT and TCA treatments apparently affected tumor size rather than number. Results with DCA were not as clear as a true maximum tumor number was not clearly observed within the experimental period. Treatment of mice receiving a high dose of TCA (2 g/L of drinking water) combined with varying doses of DCA (0.1, 0.5 and 2 g/L) produced increased numbers of tumors at 24 weeks and 36 weeks. However, at 36 weeks of treatment DCA produced a dose-related decrease in the size of tumors promoted by TCA. The low dose of TCA (0.1 g/L) decreased the number of tumors produced by a high dose of DCA, however, higher doses of TCA produced the same number as observed with DCA alone. Since these two chemicals produce lesions with differing phenotypes, the combination would have been expected to be additive with respect to number, but this was obviously not the case. These data suggest that the induction of liver cancer from mixtures of solvents may have predictable outcomes. The major conclusion is that these interactions are generally no more than additive. It was most interesting to note that additivity was only observed when

  10. Circulating folic acid in plasma: relation to folic acid fortification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The implementation of folic acid fortification in the United States has resulted in unprecedented amounts of this synthetic form of folate in the American diet. Folic acid in circulation may be a useful measure of physiologic exposure to synthetic folic acid, and there is a potential for elevated co...

  11. College Chemistry Students' Mental Models of Acids and Acid Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClary, LaKeisha; Talanquer, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    The central goal of this study was to characterize the mental models of acids and acid strength expressed by advanced college chemistry students when engaged in prediction, explanation, and justification tasks that asked them to rank chemical compounds based on their relative acid strength. For that purpose we completed a qualitative research…

  12. NAPAP (National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program) results on acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) was mandated by Congress in 1980 to study the effects of acid rain. The results of 10 years of research on the effect of acid deposition and ozone on forests, particularly high elevation spruce and fir, southern pines, eastern hardwoods and western conifers, will be published this year.

  13. Acid Earth--The Global Threat of Acid Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, John

    Acid pollution is a major international problem, but the debate it has elicited has often clouded the distinction between myth and facts. This publication attempts to concerning the acid pollution situation. This publication attempts to identify available facts. It is the first global review of the problem of acid pollution and the first to…

  14. Membrane-associated glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enzymes PhcC and PhcD are essential for enantioselective catabolism of dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hirose, Yusaku; Kamimura, Naofumi; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Hara, Hirofumi; Araki, Takuma; Kasai, Daisuke; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao; Masai, Eiji

    2015-12-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to degrade various lignin-derived biaryls, including a phenylcoumaran-type compound, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DCA). In SYK-6 cells, the alcohol group of the B-ring side chain of DCA is initially oxidized to the carboxyl group to generate 3-(2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl) acrylic acid (DCA-C). Next, the alcohol group of the A-ring side chain of DCA-C is oxidized to the carboxyl group, and then the resulting metabolite is catabolized through vanillin and 5-formylferulate. In this study, the genes involved in the conversion of DCA-C were identified and characterized. The DCA-C oxidation activities in SYK-6 were enhanced in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and an artificial electron acceptor and were induced ca. 1.6-fold when the cells were grown with DCA. Based on these observations, SLG_09480 (phcC) and SLG_09500 (phcD), encoding glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family proteins, were presumed to encode DCA-C oxidases. Analyses of phcC and phcD mutants indicated that PhcC and PhcD are essential for the conversion of (+)-DCA-C and (-)-DCA-C, respectively. When phcC and phcD were expressed in SYK-6 and Escherichia coli, the gene products were mainly observed in their membrane fractions. The membrane fractions of E. coli that expressed phcC and phcD catalyzed the specific conversion of DCA-C into the corresponding carboxyl derivatives. In the oxidation of DCA-C, PhcC and PhcD effectively utilized ubiquinone derivatives as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the transcription of a putative cytochrome c gene was significantly induced in SYK-6 grown with DCA. The DCA-C oxidation catalyzed by membrane-associated PhcC and PhcD appears to be coupled to the respiratory chain. PMID:26362985

  15. Membrane-Associated Glucose-Methanol-Choline Oxidoreductase Family Enzymes PhcC and PhcD Are Essential for Enantioselective Catabolism of Dehydrodiconiferyl Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kenji; Hirose, Yusaku; Kamimura, Naofumi; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Hara, Hirofumi; Araki, Takuma; Kasai, Daisuke; Kajita, Shinya; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6 is able to degrade various lignin-derived biaryls, including a phenylcoumaran-type compound, dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DCA). In SYK-6 cells, the alcohol group of the B-ring side chain of DCA is initially oxidized to the carboxyl group to generate 3-(2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-7-methoxy-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-5-yl) acrylic acid (DCA-C). Next, the alcohol group of the A-ring side chain of DCA-C is oxidized to the carboxyl group, and then the resulting metabolite is catabolized through vanillin and 5-formylferulate. In this study, the genes involved in the conversion of DCA-C were identified and characterized. The DCA-C oxidation activities in SYK-6 were enhanced in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide and an artificial electron acceptor and were induced ca. 1.6-fold when the cells were grown with DCA. Based on these observations, SLG_09480 (phcC) and SLG_09500 (phcD), encoding glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family proteins, were presumed to encode DCA-C oxidases. Analyses of phcC and phcD mutants indicated that PhcC and PhcD are essential for the conversion of (+)-DCA-C and (−)-DCA-C, respectively. When phcC and phcD were expressed in SYK-6 and Escherichia coli, the gene products were mainly observed in their membrane fractions. The membrane fractions of E. coli that expressed phcC and phcD catalyzed the specific conversion of DCA-C into the corresponding carboxyl derivatives. In the oxidation of DCA-C, PhcC and PhcD effectively utilized ubiquinone derivatives as electron acceptors. Furthermore, the transcription of a putative cytochrome c gene was significantly induced in SYK-6 grown with DCA. The DCA-C oxidation catalyzed by membrane-associated PhcC and PhcD appears to be coupled to the respiratory chain. PMID:26362985

  16. Industrial ecotoxicology "acid rain".

    PubMed

    Astolfi, E; Gotelli, C; Higa, J

    1986-01-01

    The acid rain phenomenon was studied in the province of Cordoba, Argentina. This study, based on a previously outlined framework, determined the anthropogenic origin of the low pH due to the presence of industrial hydrochloric acid wastage. This industrial ecotoxicological phenomenon seriously affected the forest wealth, causing a great defoliation of trees and shrubs, with a lower effect on crops. A survey on its effects on human beings has not been carried out, but considering the corrosion caused to different metals and its denouncing biocide effect on plants and animals, we should expect to find some kind of harm to the health of the workers involved or others engaged in farming, and even to those who are far away from the polluting agent. PMID:3758667

  17. [Progress in glucaric acid].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuying; Fang, Fang; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Glucaric acid (GA) is derived from glucose and commonly used in chemical industry. It is also considered as one of the "Top value-added chemicals from biomass" as carbohydrate monomers to produce various synthetic polymers and bioenergy. The demand for GA in food manufacture is increasing. GA has also attracted public attentions due to its therapeutic uses such as regulating hormones, increasing the immune function and reducing the risks of cancers. Currently GA is produced by chemical oxidation. Research on production of GA via microbial synthesis is still at preliminary stage. We reviewed the advances of glucaric acid applications, preparation and quantification methods. The prospects on production of GA by microbial fermentation were also discussed. PMID:26380405

  18. Acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, H.

    1980-12-01

    One of the alternatives to increase world production of etha nol is by the hydrolysis of cellulose content of agricultural residues. Studies have been made on the types of hydrolysis: enzimatic and acid. Data obtained from the sulphuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose showed that this process proceed in two steps, with a yield of approximately 95% glucose. Because of increases in cost of alternatives resources, the high demand of the product and the more economic production of ethanol from cellulose materials, it is certain that this technology will be implemented in the future. At the same time further studies on the disposal and reuse of the by-products of this production must be undertaken.

  19. Eucomic acid methanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Yao-Lan; Wang, Guo-Cai; Liang, Zhi-Hong; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound [systematic name: 2-hy­droxy-2-(4-hy­droxy­benz­yl)butane­dioic acid methanol monosolvate], C11H12O6·CH3OH, the dihedral angles between the planes of the carboxyl groups and the benzene ring are 51.23 (9) and 87.97 (9)°. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the hy­droxy and carb­oxy­lic acid groups and the methanol solvent mol­ecule give a three-dimensional structure. PMID:22091200

  20. (Radioiodinated free fatty acids)

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.

    1987-12-11

    The traveler participated in the Second International Workshop on Radioiodinated Free Fatty Acids in Amsterdam, The Netherlands where he presented an invited paper describing the pioneering work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving the design, development and testing of new radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids for evaluation of heart disease. He also chaired a technical session on the testing of new agents in various in vitro and in vivo systems. He also visited the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Nuclear Medicine in Bonn, West Germany, to review, discuss, plan and coordinate collaborative investigations with that institution. In addition, he visited the Cyclotron Research Center in Liege, Belgium, to discuss continuing collaborative studies with the Osmium-191/Iridium-191m radionuclide generator system, and to complete manuscripts and plan future studies.

  1. Tunnelling in carbonic acid.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J Philipp; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Hirvonen, Viivi; Wu, Chia-Hua; Tyberg, Joseph L; Allen, Wesley D; Schreiner, Peter R

    2016-06-14

    The cis,trans-conformer of carbonic acid (H2CO3), generated by near-infrared radiation, undergoes an unreported quantum mechanical tunnelling rotamerization with half-lives in cryogenic matrices of 4-20 h, depending on temperature and host material. First-principles quantum chemistry at high levels of theory gives a tunnelling half-life of about 1 h, quite near those measured for the fastest rotamerizations. PMID:27248671

  2. Optimize acid gas removal

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholas, D.M.; Wilkins, J.T.

    1983-09-01

    Innovative design of physical solvent plants for acid gas removal can materially reduce both installation and operating costs. A review of the design considerations for one physical solvent process (Selexol) points to numerous arrangements for potential improvement. These are evaluated for a specific case in four combinations that identify an optimum for the case in question but, more importantly, illustrate the mechanism for use for such optimization elsewhere.

  3. Studies on terreic acid.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Moriyama, K; Jinnouchi, H; Yagishita, K

    1980-03-01

    It was found that Aspergillus sp. No. Y-8980 which was isolated from a soil sample collected at Yoron Island in Kagoshima Prefecture belonged to Aspergillus terreus group by morphological observation. The active substance produced by the strain was obtained with a high yield in sucrose-yeast extract medium and extracted by chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol at pH 2.4 approximately 2.6 from the culture broth. The substance was crystallized from chloroform and ethyl acetate after charcoal treatment of the crude crystal. From various physico-chemical properties, it was found that the substance was identical to terreic acid. Terreic acid showed MICs of 25 approximately 100 mcg/ml, 12.5 mcg/ml and 50 mcg/ml against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Xanthomonas oryzae and Xanthomonas citri, respectively, but it did not control Pseudomonas, fungi and yeast. The LD50 was 75 mg/kg i.p. and i.v. in mice. With regards to the anti-tumor effect, the morphological degeneration on HeLa cells (human carcinoma cells) was observed in the concentrations of more than 6.25 mcg/ml of terreic acid. An increase of body weight of mice caused by Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells was not definitely observed by the daily administration of 150 mcg of terreic acid per mouse for 8 consecutive days. Above showed the enough survival effect in dd mice implanted with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells, and the effect also was demonstrated by anatomies of mice. PMID:7190624

  4. Perfluorooctanoic acid and environmental risks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a member of the perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAA) family of chemicals, which consist of a carbon backbone typically four to fourteen carbons in length and a charged functional moiety.

  5. Folic Acid Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... swallow large pills. How can I take a vitamin with folic acid? A : These days, multivitamins with folic acid come in chewable chocolate or fruit flavors, liquids, and large oval or smaller round ...

  6. Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5)

    MedlinePlus

    Pantothenic acid is a vitamin, also known as vitamin B5. It is widely found in both plants and animals ... Vitamin B5 is commercially available as D-pantothenic acid, as well as dexpanthenol and calcium pantothenate, which ...

  7. Bile acid sequestrants for cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    Bile acid sequestrants are medicines that help lower your LDL (bad) cholesterol . Too much cholesterol in your blood can ... block them. These medicines work by blocking bile acid in your stomach from being absorbed in your ...

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Omega-3 fatty acids are a form of polyunsaturated fat that the body derives from food. Omega-3s (and omega-6s) are known as essential fatty acids (EFAs) because they are important for good health. ...

  9. Pantothenic acid (Vitamin B5)

    MedlinePlus

    ... D-pantothenic acid, as well as dexpanthenol and calcium pantothenate, which are chemicals made in the lab from ... Early research suggests that pantothenic acid (given as calcium pantothenate) does not reduce symptoms of osteoarthritis. Recovery after ...

  10. Amino acid imbalance in cystinuria

    PubMed Central

    Asatoor, A. M.; Freedman, P. S.; Gabriel, J. R. T.; Milne, M. D.; Prosser, D. I.; Roberts, J. T.; Willoughby, C. P.

    1974-01-01

    After oral ingestion of a free amino acid mixture by three cystinuric patients, plasma increments of lysine and arginine were lower and those of many other amino acids were significantly higher than those found in control subjects. Similar results were obtained in control subjects after amino acid imbalance had been artificially induced by the omission of cystine, lysine, and arginine from the amino acid mixture. Especially high increments of alanine and proline provided the best evidence of amino acid imbalance caused by a temporary lysine and, to a lesser extent, arginine and cystine deficit. No such amino acid imbalance was found to occur in the cystinuric patients after ingestion of whole protein, indicating that absorption of oligopeptides produced by protein digestion provided a balanced physiological serum amino acid increment. This is considered to explain the lack of any unequivocal nutritional deficit in cystinuric patients despite poor absorption of the essential free amino acid, lysine. PMID:4411931

  11. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Chernyak, Natalia; Mader, Christopher C.; Nallagatla, Subbarao; Kang, Richard S.; Hao, Liangliang; Walker, David A.; Halo, Tiffany L.; Merkel, Timothy J.; Rische, Clayton H.; Anantatmula, Sagar; Burkhart, Merideth; Mirkin, Chad A.; Gryaznov, Sergei M.

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory nucleic acids have extraordinary promise for treating disease, yet clinical progress has been limited by a lack of tools to safely increase activity in patients. Immunomodulatory nucleic acids act by agonizing or antagonizing endosomal toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8, and TLR9), proteins involved in innate immune signaling. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) that stimulate (immunostimulatory, IS-SNA) or regulate (immunoregulatory, IR-SNA) immunity by engaging TLRs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Compared with free oligonucleotides, IS-SNAs exhibit up to 80-fold increases in potency, 700-fold higher antibody titers, 400-fold higher cellular responses to a model antigen, and improved treatment of mice with lymphomas. IR-SNAs exhibit up to eightfold increases in potency and 30% greater reduction in fibrosis score in mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Given the clinical potential of SNAs due to their potency, defined chemical nature, and good tolerability, SNAs are attractive new modalities for developing immunotherapies. PMID:25775582

  12. Cannabinoid acids analysis.

    PubMed

    Lercker, G; Bocci, F; Frega, N; Bortolomeazzi, R

    1992-03-01

    The cannabinoid pattern of vegetable preparations from Cannabis sativa (hashish, marijuana) allows to recognize the phenotype of the plants, to be used as drug or for fiber. Cannabinoid determination by analytical point of view has represented some problems caused by the complex composition of the hexane extract. Capillary gas chromatography of the hexane extracts of vegetable samples, shows the presence of rather polar constituents that eluted, with noticeable interactions, only on polar phase. The compounds can be methylated by diazomethane and silanized (TMS) by silylating reagents. The methyl and methyl-TMS derivatives are analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography (HRGC) and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The identification of the compounds shows their nature of cannabinoid acids, which the main by quantitative point of view results the cannabidiolic acid (CBDA). It is known that the cannabinoid acids are thermally unstable and are transformed in the corresponding cannabinoids by decarboxilation. This is of interest in forensic analysis with the aim to establish the total amount of THC in the Cannabis preparations, as the active component. PMID:1503600

  13. Acid rain: Reign of controversy

    SciTech Connect

    Kahan, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Acid Rain is a primer on the science and politics of acid rain. Several introductory chapters describe in simple terms the relevant principles of water chemistry, soil chemistry, and plant physiology and discuss the demonstrated or postulated effects of acid rain on fresh waters and forests as well as on statuary and other exposed objects. There follow discussions on the economic and social implications of acid rain (for example, possible health effects) and on the sources, transport, and distribution of air pollutants.

  14. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOEpatents

    King, C. Judson; Poole, Loree J.

    1995-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine.

  15. Carboxylic acid sorption regeneration process

    DOEpatents

    King, C.J.; Poole, L.J.

    1995-05-02

    Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks into an organic liquid phase or onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with aqueous alkylamine thus forming an alkylammonium carboxylate which is dewatered and decomposed to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine. 10 figs.

  16. An Umbrella for Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randal, Judith

    1979-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded several grants to study effects of and possible solutions to the problem of "acid rain"; pollution from atmospheric nitric and sulfuric acids. The research program is administered through North Carolina State University at Raleigh and will focus on biological effects of acid rain. (JMF)

  17. BACTERIAL OXIDATION OF DIPICOLINIC ACID

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Yasuo; Arima, Kei

    1962-01-01

    Kobayashi, Yasuo (University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan) and Kei Arima. Bacterial oxidation of dipicolinic acid. II. Identification of α-ketoglutaric acid and 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid and some properties of cell-free extracts. J. Bacteriol. 84:765–771. 1962—When a dipicolinic acid (DPA)-decomposing bacterium, Achromobacter strain 1–2, was incubated at 30 C with shaking in a DPA solution containing 10−3m arsenite, a keto acid was accumulated. The 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone of this acid was synthesized and identified as α-ketoglutaric acid by paper chromatography, visible absorption spectrum, infrared analysis, elemental analysis, and mixed melting point. During this incubation, oxalic acid equivalent to the consumed dipicolinic acid was produced. A fluorescent material was also isolated from culture fluid and identified as 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid by paper chromatography and the ultraviolet absorption spectrum. Further, cell-free extracts were prepared by sonic oscillation. Ferrous ion and a reduced di- or triphosphopyridine nucleotide-generating system were proven to be required for enzymic oxidation of DPA. And 3-hydroxydipicolinic acid was also oxidized by this preparation. From the results obtained, a possible metabolic pathway of dipicolinic acid was proposed. PMID:14033954

  18. Pantothenic acid biosynthesis in zymomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Luan; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Viitanen, Paul V.

    2014-07-01

    Zymomonas is unable to synthesize pantothenic acid and requires this essential vitamin in growth medium. Zymomonas strains transformed with an operon for expression of 2-dehydropantoate reductase and aspartate 1-decarboxylase were able to grow in medium lacking pantothenic acid. These strains may be used for ethanol production without pantothenic acid supplementation in seed culture and fermentation media.

  19. Scientists Puzzle Over Acid Rain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Reports on a growing concern over increased acidity in atmospheric percipitation. Explores possible causes of the increased acidity, identifies chemical components of precipitation in various parts of the world, and presents environmental changes that might be attributed to the acidity. (GS)

  20. Serum Uric Acid in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Bassam E.; Hamed, Jamal M.; Touhala, Luma M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate the possible effect of smoking on serum uric acid. Methods Subjects enrolled in study were divided into two groups; nonsmokers and smokers, each with 60 male volunteers of the same social class and dietary habit without history of alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, hyperuricemia and gout, renal, joint, lung or heart diseases. Fasting blood and random urine samples were obtained from both groups for measurement of uric acid and creatinine. Calculation of both urine uric acid/urine creatinine ratio and fraction excretion of uric acid were done. The results were statistically evaluated by standard statistical methods. Results No significant differences in the age, serum creatinine, spot urine uric acid/urine creatinine ratio and fraction excretion of uric acid between the two groups, serum uric acid was significantly lower in smokers. In smokers there was significant negative correlation of smoking status (average number of cigarette smoked/day, duration of smoking and cumulative amount of smoking) with serum uric acid. Conclusion After exclusion of other factors affecting uric acid level, the significant low serum uric acid level in smokers was attributed to reduce endogenous production as a result of chronic exposure to cigarette smoke that is a significant source of oxidative stress. As this reduction is proportionate with smoking status and predisposes to cardiovascular disease, it is, therefore, recommended for smokers to stop or reduce smoking and introduce serum uric acid estimation as routine test since its cheap and simple to reflect their antioxidant level. Keywords Smokers; Uric acid; CVD. PMID:22334840

  1. Experimental study of the hydrothermal reactivity of organic acids and acid anions: II. Acetic acid, acetate, and valeric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2003-10-01

    Organic acids and acid anions occur in substantial concentrations in many aqueous geologic fluids and are thought to take part in a variety of geochemical processes ranging from the transport of metals in ore-forming fluids to the formation of natural gas to serving as a metabolic energy source for microbes in subsurface habitats. The widespread occurrence of organic acids and their potential role in diverse geologic processes has led to numerous experimental studies of their thermal stability, yet there remain substantial gaps in our knowledge of the factors that control the rates and reaction pathways for the decomposition of these compounds under geologic conditions. In order to address some of these uncertainties, a series of laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the behavior of organic acids and acid anions under hydrothermal conditions in the presence of minerals. Reported here are results of experiments where aqueous solutions of acetic acid, sodium acetate, or valeric acid ( n-pentanoic acid) were heated at 325°C, 350 bars in the presence of the mineral assemblages hematite + magnetite + pyrite, pyrite + pyrrhotite + magnetite, and hematite + magnetite. The results indicate that aqueous acetic acid and acetate decompose by a combination of two reaction pathways: decarboxylation and oxidation. Both reactions are promoted by minerals, with hematite catalyzing the oxidation reaction while magnetite catalyzes decarboxylation. The oxidation reaction is much faster, so that oxidation dominates the decomposition of acetic acid and acetate when hematite is present. In contrast to previous reports that acetate decomposed more slowly than acetic acid, we found that acetate decomposed at slightly faster rates than the acid in the presence of minerals. Although longer-chain monocarboxylic acids are generally thought to decompose by decarboxylation, valeric acid appeared to decompose primarily by "deformylation" to 1-butene plus formic acid. Subsequent

  2. Role of acid diffusion in matrix acidizing of carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Hoefner, M.L.; Fogler, H.S.; Stenius, P.; Sjoblom, J.

    1987-02-01

    To increase the efficiency of matrix treatments in carbonates, a new type of retarded acid-in-oil microemulsion system has ben developed. The microemulsion is of low viscosity but can exhibit acid diffusion rates two orders of magnitude lower than aqueous HCl. Decreased acid diffusion delays spending and allows live acid to penetrate the rock matrix more uniformly and to greater distances. Coreflood results show that the microemulsion can stimulate cores in fewer PV's and under conditions of low injection rates where aqueous HCl fails completely. The microemulsion could also conceivably increase acid penetration along any natural fractures and fissures that may be present, thus increasing acidizing efficiency in this type of treatment. The relationship between the acid diffusion rate and the ability of the fluid to matrix-stimulate limestone is investigated.

  3. Composition for nucleic acid sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2008-08-26

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid, i.e. the activity of a nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme on the template nucleic acid molecule to be sequenced is followed in real time. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing complementary strand of the target nucleic acid by the catalytic activity of the nucleic acid polymerizing enzyme at each step in the sequence of base additions. A polymerase on the target nucleic acid molecule complex is provided in a position suitable to move along the target nucleic acid molecule and extend the oligonucleotide primer at an active site. A plurality of labelled types of nucleotide analogs are provided proximate to the active site, with each distinguishable type of nucleotide analog being complementary to a different nucleotide in the target nucleic acid sequence. The growing nucleic acid strand is extended by using the polymerase to add a nucleotide analog to the nucleic acid strand at the active site, where the nucleotide analog being added is complementary to the nucleotide of the target nucleic acid at the active site. The nucleotide analog added to the oligonucleotide primer as a result of the polymerizing step is identified. The steps of providing labelled nucleotide analogs, polymerizing the growing nucleic acid strand, and identifying the added nucleotide analog are repeated so that the nucleic acid strand is further extended and the sequence of the target nucleic acid is determined.

  4. Evolution of rosmarinic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Maike; Abdullah, Yana; Benner, Johannes; Eberle, David; Gehlen, Katja; Hücherig, Stephanie; Janiak, Verena; Kim, Kyung Hee; Sander, Marion; Weitzel, Corinna; Wolters, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid and chlorogenic acid are caffeic acid esters widely found in the plant kingdom and presumably accumulated as defense compounds. In a survey, more than 240 plant species have been screened for the presence of rosmarinic and chlorogenic acids. Several rosmarinic acid-containing species have been detected. The rosmarinic acid accumulation in species of the Marantaceae has not been known before. Rosmarinic acid is found in hornworts, in the fern family Blechnaceae and in species of several orders of mono- and dicotyledonous angiosperms. The biosyntheses of caffeoylshikimate, chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid use 4-coumaroyl-CoA from the general phenylpropanoid pathway as hydroxycinnamoyl donor. The hydroxycinnamoyl acceptor substrate comes from the shikimate pathway: shikimic acid, quinic acid and hydroxyphenyllactic acid derived from l-tyrosine. Similar steps are involved in the biosyntheses of rosmarinic, chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acids: the transfer of the 4-coumaroyl moiety to an acceptor molecule by a hydroxycinnamoyltransferase from the BAHD acyltransferase family and the meta-hydroxylation of the 4-coumaroyl moiety in the ester by a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase from the CYP98A family. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferases as well as the meta-hydroxylases show high sequence similarities and thus seem to be closely related. The hydroxycinnamoyltransferase and CYP98A14 from Coleus blumei (Lamiaceae) are nevertheless specific for substrates involved in RA biosynthesis showing an evolutionary diversification in phenolic ester metabolism. Our current view is that only a few enzymes had to be "invented" for rosmarinic acid biosynthesis probably on the basis of genes needed for the formation of chlorogenic and caffeoylshikimic acid while further biosynthetic steps might have been recruited from phenylpropanoid metabolism, tocopherol/plastoquinone biosynthesis and photorespiration. PMID:19560175

  5. The politics of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcher, M.E. )

    1989-01-01

    This work examines and compares the acid rain policies through the different political systems of Canada, Great Britain and the United States. Because the flow of acid rain can transcend national boundaries, acid rain has become a crucial international problem. According to the author, because of differences in governmental institutions and structure, the extent of governmental intervention in the industrial economy, the degree of reliance on coal for power generation, and the extent of acid rain damage, national responses to the acid rain problem have varied.

  6. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  7. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    DOEpatents

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  8. Tested Demonstrations: Color Oscillations in the Formic Acid-Nitric Acid-Sulfuric Acid System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raw, C. J. G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Presented are procedures for demonstrating the production of color oscillations when nitric acid is added to a formic acid/concentrated sulfuric acid mixture. Because of safety considerations, "Super-8" home movie of the color changes was found to be satisfactory for demonstration purposes. (JN)

  9. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-11-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids and quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (< 0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanic emissions.

  10. Amino acids in Arctic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, E.; Zangrando, R.; Barbaro, E.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Gabrieli, J.; Barbante, C.; Gambaro, A.

    2012-07-01

    Amino acids are significant components of atmospheric aerosols, affecting organic nitrogen input to marine ecosystems, atmospheric radiation balance, and the global water cycle. The wide range of amino acid reactivities suggest that amino acids may serve as markers of atmospheric transport and deposition of particles. Despite this potential, few measurements have been conducted in remote areas to assess amino acid concentrations and potential sources. Polar regions offer a unique opportunity to investigate atmospheric processes and to conduct source apportionment studies of such compounds. In order to better understand the importance of amino acid compounds in the global atmosphere, we determined free amino acids (FAAs) in seventeen size-segregated aerosol samples collected in a polar station in the Svalbard Islands from 19 April until 14 September 2010. We used an HPLC coupled with a tandem mass spectrometer (ESI-MS/MS) to analyze 20 amino acids to quantify compounds at fmol m-3 levels. Mean total FAA concentration was 1070 fmol m-3 where serine and glycine were the most abundant compounds in almost all samples and accounted for 45-60% of the total amino acid relative abundance. The other eighteen compounds had average concentrations between 0.3 and 98 fmol m-3. The higher amino acid concentrations were present in the ultrafine aerosol fraction (<0.49 μm) and accounted for the majority of the total amino acid content. Local marine sources dominate the boreal summer amino acid concentrations, with the exception of the regional input from Icelandic volcanics.

  11. Twinning of dodecanedicarboxylic acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, R.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1986-01-01

    Twinning of 1,10-dodecanedicarboxyl acid (DDA) was observed in 0.1 mm thick films with a polarizing microscope. Twins originated from polycrystalline regions which tended to nucleate on twin faces, and terminated by intersection gone another. Twinning increased dramatically with addition of organic compounds with a similar molecular size and shape. Increasing the freezing rate, increasing the temperature gradient, and addition of silica particles increased twinning. It is proposed that twins nucleate with polycrystals and sometimes anneal out before they become observable. The impurities may enhance twinning either by lowering the twin energy or by adsorbing on growing faces.

  12. Synthesis of amino acids

    DOEpatents

    Davis, J.W. Jr.

    1979-09-21

    A method is described for synthesizing amino acids preceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(OSOC1)CN, R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(C1)CN and (R/sub 1/R/sub 2/C(CN)O)/sub 2/SO wherein R/sub 1/ and R/sub 2/ are each selected from hydrogen and monovalent hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  13. Controlling acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines recent transfer of electric power among 48 states and present evidence of significant transfers of electric power from so-called ''perpetrator'' to ''victim'' states. The book compares the efforts of several midwestern and northeastern states during the 1970's to control the sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) emissions causing acid rain. The report includes utility and government data on electricity production and sales, on purchase of out-of-state electricity, and on coal use and sulfur dioxide emissions, state by state, for 48 states.

  14. Cryoprotection from lipoteichoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Charles V.; Middaugh, Amy; Wickham, Jason R.; Friedline, Anthony; Thomas, Kieth J.; Johnson, Karen; Zachariah, Malcolm; Garimella, Ravindranth

    2012-10-01

    Numerous chemical additives lower the freezing point of water, but life at sub-zero temperatures is sustained by a limited number of biological cryoprotectants. Antifreeze proteins in fish, plants, and insects provide protection to a few degrees below freezing. Microbes have been found to survive at even lower temperatures, and with a few exceptions, antifreeze proteins are missing. Survival has been attributed to external factors, such as the high salt concentration of brine veins and adhesion to particulates or ice crystal defects. We have discovered an endogenous cryoprotectant in the cell wall of bacteria, lipoteichoic acid biopolymers. Adding 1% LTA to bacteria cultures immediately prior to freezing provides 50% survival rate, similar to the results obtained with 1% glycerol. In the absence of an additive, bacterial survival is negligible as measured with the resazurin cell viability assay. The mode of action for LTA cryoprotection is unknown. With a molecular weight of 3-5 kDa, it is unlikely to enter the cell cytoplasm. Our observations suggest that teichoic acids could provide a shell of liquid water around biofilms and planktonic bacteria, removing the need for brine veins to prevent bacterial freezing.

  15. Nucleic acid detection methods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, C.L.; Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3{prime}-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated. 18 figs.

  16. Nucleic Acid Detection Methods

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Cassandra L.; Yaar, Ron; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Cantor, Charles R.

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3'-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated.

  17. Ribonucleic acid purification.

    PubMed

    Martins, R; Queiroz, J A; Sousa, F

    2014-08-15

    Research on RNA has led to many important biological discoveries and improvement of therapeutic technologies. From basic to applied research, many procedures employ pure and intact RNA molecules; however their isolation and purification are critical steps because of the easy degradability of RNA, which can impair chemical stability and biological functionality. The current techniques to isolate and purify RNA molecules still have several limitations and the requirement for new methods able to improve RNA quality to meet regulatory demands is growing. In fact, as basic research improves the understanding of biological roles of RNAs, the biopharmaceutical industry starts to focus on them as a biotherapeutic tools. Chromatographic bioseparation is a high selective unit operation and is the major option in the purification of biological compounds, requiring high purity degree. In addition, its application in biopharmaceutical manufacturing is well established. This paper discusses the importance and the progress of RNA isolation and purification, considering RNA applicability both in research and clinical fields. In particular and in view of the high specificity, affinity chromatography has been recently applied to RNA purification processes. Accordingly, recent chromatographic investigations based on biorecognition phenomena occurring between RNA and amino acids are focused. Histidine and arginine have been used as amino acid ligands, and their ability to isolate different RNA species demonstrated a multipurpose applicability in molecular biology analysis and RNA therapeutics preparation, highlighting the potential contribution of these methods to overcome the challenges of RNA purification. PMID:24951289

  18. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1-3 x 10(exp -4) Torr H2O and 1-2.5 x 10(exp -6) Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  19. Growth of nitric acid hydrates on thin sulfuric acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Wilson, Margaret A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-05-01

    Type I polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are thought to nucleate and grow on stratospheric sulfate aerosols (SSAs). To model this system, thin sulfuric acid films were exposed to water and nitric acid vapors (1 - 3 × 10-4 Torr H2O and 1 - 2.5 × 10-6 Torr HNO3) and subjected to cooling and heating cycles. FTIR spectroscopy was used to probe the phase of the sulfuric acid and to identify the HNO3/H2O films that condensed. Nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) was observed to grow on crystalline sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT) films. NAT also condensed in/on supercooled H2SO4 films without causing crystallization of the sulfuric acid. This growth is consistent with NAT nucleation from ternary solutions as the first step in PSC formation.

  20. Interaction of silicic acid with sulfurous acid scale inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gallup, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    The solubility of amorphous silica and the inhibition of silica polymerization in the presence of sulfurous acid and sulfite salts has been investigated to 260{degrees}C. Investigations of inhibition of silica scaling from geothermal brines by sulfurous acid have produced unusual results. Bisulfite/sulfite increases amorphous silica solubility by {open_quotes}salting in{close_quotes} effects resulting from apparent complexation. Silica-sulfite complexes are postulated to form via hydrogen bonding, and appear to be much stronger than silica-sulfate complexes. Treatment of brines with sulfurous acid inhibits silica scaling by (1) retarding the kinetics of silicic acid polymerization, and (2) forming soluble sulfito-silicate complexes. Sulfurous acid offers several advantages over sulfuric acid in controlling scale deposition-reduced corrosion potential, reduced by-product scale formation potential, oxygen scavenging and inhibition of certain metal silicate scales.