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Sample records for acid deaminase activity

  1. Nucleic acid determinants for selective deamination of DNA over RNA by activation-induced deaminase.

    PubMed

    Nabel, Christopher S; Lee, Jae W; Wang, Laura C; Kohli, Rahul M

    2013-08-27

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID), a member of the larger AID/APOBEC family, is the key catalyst in initiating antibody somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination. The DNA deamination model accounting for AID's functional role posits that AID deaminates genomic deoxycytosine bases within the immunoglobulin locus, activating downstream repair pathways that result in antibody maturation. Although this model is well supported, the molecular basis for AID's selectivity for DNA over RNA remains an open and pressing question, reflecting a broader need to elucidate how AID/APOBEC enzymes engage their substrates. To address these questions, we have synthesized a series of chimeric nucleic acid substrates and characterized their reactivity with AID. These chimeric substrates feature targeted variations at the 2'-position of nucleotide sugars, allowing us to interrogate the steric and conformational basis for nucleic acid selectivity. We demonstrate that modifications to the target nucleotide can significantly alter AID's reactivity. Strikingly, within a substrate that is otherwise DNA, a single RNA-like 2'-hydroxyl substitution at the target cytosine is sufficient to compromise deamination. Alternatively, modifications that favor a DNA-like conformation (or sugar pucker) are compatible with deamination. AID's closely related homolog APOBEC1 is similarly sensitive to RNA-like substitutions at the target cytosine. Inversely, with unreactive 2'-fluoro-RNA substrates, AID's deaminase activity was rescued by introducing a trinucleotide DNA patch spanning the target cytosine and two nucleotides upstream. These data suggest a role for nucleotide sugar pucker in explaining the molecular basis for AID's DNA selectivity and, more generally, suggest how other nucleic acid-modifying enzymes may distinguish DNA from RNA.

  2. Adenosine deaminase deficiency with normal immune function. An acidic enzyme mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Daddona, P E; Mitchell, B S; Meuwissen, H J; Davidson, B L; Wilson, J M; Koller, C A

    1983-01-01

    In most instances, marked deficiency of the purine catabolic enzyme adenosine deaminase results in lymphopenia and severe combined immunodeficiency disease. Over a 2-yr period, we studied a white male child with markedly deficient erythrocyte and lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity and normal immune function. We have documented that (a) adenosine deaminase activity and immunoreactive protein are undetectable in erythrocytes, 0.9% of normal in lymphocytes, 4% in cultured lymphoblasts, and 14% in skin fibroblasts; (b) plasma adenosine and deoxyadenosine levels are undetectable and deoxy ATP levels are only slightly elevated in lymphocytes and in erythrocytes; (c) no defect in deoxyadenosine metabolism is present in the proband's cultured lymphoblasts; (d) lymphoblast adenosine deaminase has normal enzyme kinetics, absolute specific activity, S20,w, pH optimum, and heat stability; and (e) the proband's adenosine deaminase exhibits a normal apparent subunit molecular weight but an abnormal isoelectric pH. In contrast to the three other adenosine deaminase-deficient healthy subjects who have been described, the proband is unique in demonstrating an acidic, heat-stable protein mutation of the enzyme that is associated with less than 1% lymphocyte adenosine deaminase activity. Residual adenosine deaminase activity in tissues other than lymphocytes may suffice to metabolize the otherwise lymphotoxic enzyme substrate(s) and account for the preservation of normal immune function. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 PMID:6603477

  3. Role of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on mitomycin C induced clastogenesis: analysis of chromosome aberrations, micronucleus, mitotic index and adenosine deaminase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Ghassan Mohammad

    2012-05-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to determine whether the caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) in combination with mitomycine-C (MMC) can ameliorate MMC-induced clastogenesis in the bone marrow cells of mice. The scoring of chromosomal aberrations, mitotic activity and micronuclei were undertaken in the current study as markers of clastogenicity. The action of CAPE in adenosine deaminase enzyme (ADA) activities of serum, thymus and spleen were also investigated. The animals were orally administered CAPE alone at the doses 5 or 10 mg kg b.wt.(-1) for 5 days then sacrificed 24 hours after the CAPE administration. MMC was administered to mice either alone at a single dose (2 mg kg b.wt.(-1)) by intraperitoneal injection, before or after CAPE treatment. Pre or post - treatment with two doses of CAPE significantly decreased the number of chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and adapted the mitotic activity reduction in the bone marrow cells of mice induced by MMC when compared with only MMC given group. In addition, combination treatment with MMC caused a significant decrease in the activities of ADA in serum, thymus and spleen. The results of this study showed that ADA activity probably related to high levels of reactive oxygen species. This study concluded that the protective effect of CAPE against MMC clastogenesis resides at least in part, in its antioxidant effects.

  4. Expression and characterization of a second L-amino acid deaminase isolated from Proteus mirabilis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jin-Oh; Seo, Jeong-Woo; Kwon, Ohsuk; Seong, Su-Il; Kim, Ik-Hwan; Kim, Chul Ho

    2011-04-01

    L-amino acid deaminases catalyze the deamination of natural L-amino acids. Two types of L-amino acid deaminase have been identified in Proteus species. One exhibits high levels of activity toward a wide range of aliphatic and aromatic L-amino acids, typically L-phenylalanine, whereas the other acts on a relatively narrow range of basic L-amino acids, typically L-histidine. In this study, we cloned, expressed, and characterized a second amino acid deaminase, termed Pm1, from P. mirabilis KCTC 2566. Homology alignment of the deduced amino acid sequence of Pm1 demonstrated that the greatest similarity (96%) was with the L-amino acid deaminase (LAD) of P. vulgaris, and that homology with Pma was relatively low (72%). Also, similar to LAD, Pm1 was most active on L-histidine, indicating that Pm1 belongs to the second type of amino acid deaminase. In agreement with this conclusion, the V(max) and K(m) values of Pm1 were 119.7 (μg phenylpyruvic acid/mg/min) and 31.55 mM phenylalanine, respectively, values lower than those of Pma. The Pml deaminase will be very useful industrially in the preparation of commercially valuable materials including urocanic acid and α-oxoglutarate.

  5. The catalase activity of diiron adenine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat S. S.; Swaminathan S.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Tichy, S. E.; Gheyi, T.; Zheng, X.; Bain, K.; Groshong, C.; Emtage, S.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-12-01

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) from the amidohydrolase superfamily (AHS) of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. Enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli was largely inactive toward the deamination of adenine. Molecular weight determinations by mass spectrometry provided evidence that multiple histidine and methionine residues were oxygenated. When iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} before induction, the post-translational modifications disappeared. Enzyme expressed and purified under these conditions was substantially more active for adenine deamination. Apo-enzyme was prepared and reconstituted with two equivalents of FeSO{sub 4}. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and Moessbauer spectroscopy demonstrated that this protein contained two high-spin ferrous ions per monomer of ADE. In addition to the adenine deaminase activity, [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE catalyzed the conversion of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The values of k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the catalase activity are 200 s{sup -1} and 2.4 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE underwent more than 100 turnovers with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} before the enzyme was inactivated due to oxygenation of histidine residues critical for metal binding. The iron in the inactive enzyme was high-spin ferric with g{sub ave} = 4.3 EPR signal and no evidence of anti-ferromagnetic spin-coupling. A model is proposed for the disproportionation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE that involves the cycling of the binuclear metal center between the di-ferric and di-ferrous oxidation states. Oxygenation of active site residues occurs via release of hydroxyl radicals. These findings represent the first report of redox reaction catalysis by any member of the AHS.

  6. Altered AMP deaminase activity may extend postmortem glycolysis.

    PubMed

    England, E M; Matarneh, S K; Scheffler, T L; Wachet, C; Gerrard, D E

    2015-04-01

    Postmortem energy metabolism drives hydrogen accumulation in muscle and results in a fairly constant ultimate pH. Extended glycolysis results in adverse pork quality and may be possible with greater adenonucleotide availability postmortem. We hypothesized that slowing adenonucleotide removal by reducing AMP deaminase activity would extend glycolysis and lower the ultimate pH of muscle. Longissimus muscle samples were incorporated into an in vitro system that mimics postmortem glycolysis with or without pentostatin, an AMP deaminase inhibitor. Pentostatin lowered ultimate pH and increased lactate and glucose 6-phosphate with time. Based on these results and that AMPK γ3(R200Q) mutated pigs (RN⁻) produce low ultimate pH pork, we hypothesized AMP deaminase abundance and activity would be lower in RN⁻ muscle than wild-type. RN⁻ muscle contained lower AMP deaminase abundance and activity. These data show that altering adenonucleotide availability postmortem can extend postmortem pH decline and suggest that AMP deaminase activity may, in part, contribute to the low ultimate pH observed in RN⁻ pork.

  7. L-Serine deaminase activity is induced by exposure of Escherichia coli K-12 to DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, E B; Ahmad, D; Walker, C

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis of L-serine deaminase in Escherichia coli K-12 was induced after exposure of cells to a variety of DNA-damaging agents, including UV irradiation, nalidixic acid, and mitomycin C. Synthesis was also induced during growth at high temperature. A mutant constitutive for SOS functions showed an elevated level of L-serine deaminase activity. The response to DNA-damaging agents thus may be mediated via the SOS system. PMID:6813312

  8. ACTIVATION OF A CRYPTIC D-SERINE DEAMINASE (DSD) GENE FROM PSEUDOMONAS CEPACIA 17616

    EPA Science Inventory

    D-serine inhibits growth of P. cepacia 17616; however, resistant mutants able to express an ordinarily cryptic D-serine deaminase (dsd) gene were isolated readily. The resistant strains formed high levels of a D-serine deaminase active on D-threonine as well as D-serine. IS eleme...

  9. Bacterial Ammeline Metabolism via Guanine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Seffernick, Jennifer L.; Dodge, Anthony G.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Bumpus, John A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2010-01-01

    Melamine toxicity in mammals has been attributed to the blockage of kidney tubules by insoluble complexes of melamine with cyanuric acid or uric acid. Bacteria metabolize melamine via three consecutive deamination reactions to generate cyanuric acid. The second deamination reaction, in which ammeline is the substrate, is common to many bacteria, but the genes and enzymes responsible have not been previously identified. Here, we combined bioinformatics and experimental data to identify guanine deaminase as the enzyme responsible for this biotransformation. The ammeline degradation phenotype was demonstrated in wild-type Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas strains, including E. coli K12 and Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Bioinformatics analysis of these and other genomes led to the hypothesis that the ammeline deaminating enzyme was guanine deaminase. An E. coli guanine deaminase deletion mutant was deficient in ammeline deaminase activity, supporting the role of guanine deaminase in this reaction. Two guanine deaminases from disparate sources (Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA 110 and Homo sapiens) that had available X-ray structures were purified to homogeneity and shown to catalyze ammeline deamination at rates sufficient to support bacterial growth on ammeline as a sole nitrogen source. In silico models of guanine deaminase active sites showed that ammeline could bind to guanine deaminase in a similar orientation to guanine, with a favorable docking score. Other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily that are not guanine deaminases were assayed in vitro, and none had substantial ammeline deaminase activity. The present study indicated that widespread guanine deaminases have a promiscuous activity allowing them to catalyze a key reaction in the bacterial transformation of melamine to cyanuric acid and potentially contribute to the toxicity of melamine. PMID:20023034

  10. Increased 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity enhances Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated gene delivery into plant cells.

    PubMed

    Someya, Tatsuhiko; Nonaka, Satoko; Nakamura, Kouji; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2013-10-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is a useful tool for the genetic modification in plants, although its efficiency is low for several plant species. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation has three major steps in laboratory-controlled experiments: the delivery of T-DNA into plant cells, the selection of transformed plant cells, and the regeneration of whole plants from the selected cells. Each of these steps must be optimized to improve the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation. It has been reported that increasing the number of cells transformed by T-DNA delivery can improve the frequency of stable transformation. Previously, we demonstrated that a reduction in ethylene production by plant cells during cocultivation with A. tumefaciens-expressing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase resulted in increased T-DNA delivery into the plant cells. In this study, to further improve T-DNA delivery by A. tumefaciens, we modified the expression cassette of the ACC deaminase gene using vir gene promoter sequences. The ACC deaminase gene driven by the virD1 promoter was expressed at a higher level, resulting in a higher ACC deaminase activity in this A. tumefaciens strain than in the strain with the lac promoter used in a previous study. The newly developed A. tumefaciens strain improves the delivery of T-DNA into Solanum lycopersicum (tomato) and Erianthus ravennae plants and thus may be a powerful tool for the Agrobacterium-mediated genetic engineering of plants.

  11. Demonstration of adenosine deaminase activity in human fibroblast lysosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Lindley, E R; Pisoni, R L

    1993-01-01

    Human fibroblast lysosomes, purified on Percoll density gradients, contain an adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity that accounts for approximately 10% of the total ADA activity in GM0010A human fibroblasts. In assays of lysosomal ADA, the conversion of [3H]adenosine into [3H]inosine was proportional to incubation time and the amount of lysosomal material added to reaction mixtures. Maximal activity was observed between pH 7 and 8, and lysosomal ADA displayed a Km of 37 microM for adenosine at 25 degrees C and pH 5.5. Lysosomal ADA was completely inhibited by 2.5 mM Cu2+ or Hg2+ salts, but not by other bivalent cations (Ba2+, Cd2+, Ca2+, Fe2+, Mg2+, Mn2+ and Zn2+). Coformycin (2.5 mM), deoxycoformycin (0.02 mM), 2'-deoxyadenosine (2.5 mM), 6-methylaminopurine riboside (2.5 mM), 2'-3'-isopropylidene-adenosine (2.5 mM) and erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (0.2 mM) inhibited lysosomal ADA by > 97%. In contrast, 2.5 mM S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine and cytosine were poor inhibitors. Nearly all lysosomal ADA activity is eluted as a high-molecular-mass protein (> 200 kDa) just after the void volume on a Sephacryl S-200 column, and is very heat-stable, retaining 70% of its activity after incubation at 65 degrees C for 80 min. We speculate that compartmentalization of ADA within lysosomes would allow deamination of adenosine to occur without competition by adenosine kinase, which could assist in maintaining cellular energy requirements under conditions of nutritional deprivation. PMID:8452534

  12. Enhancement of growth and salt tolerance of red pepper seedlings (Capsicum annuum L.) by regulating stress ethylene synthesis with halotolerant bacteria containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Siddikee, Md Ashaduzzaman; Glick, Bernard R; Chauhan, Puneet S; Yim, Woo jong; Sa, Tongmin

    2011-04-01

    Three 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-producing halotolerant bacteria were isolated from West Coast soil of Yellow Sea, Incheon, South Korea and evaluated for their efficiency in improving red pepper plant growth under salt stress. The strains RS16, RS656 and RS111 were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Brevibacterium iodinum, Bacillus licheniformis and Zhihengliuela alba, respectively. Two hour exposure of 100, 150 and 200 mM NaCl stress on 8 day old red pepper seedlings caused 44, 64 and 74% increase ethylene production, while at 150 mM NaCl stress, inoculation of B. licheniformis RS656, Z. alba RS111, and Br. iodinum RS16 reduces ethylene production by 44, 53 and 57%, respectively. Similarly, 3 week old red pepper plants were subjected to salt stress for two weeks and approximately ∼50% reduction in growth recorded at 150 mM NaCl stress compared to negative control whereas bacteria inoculation significantly increase the growth compared to positive control. Salt stress also caused 1.3-fold reduction in the root/shoot dry weight ratio compared to the absence of salt while bacteria inoculation retained the biomass allocation similar to control plants. The salt tolerance index (ratio of biomass of salt stressed to non-stressed plant) was also significantly increased in inoculated plants compared to non-inoculated. Increase nutrient uptakes under salt stress by red pepper further evident that bacteria inoculation ameliorates salt stress effect. In summary, this study indicates that the use of ACC deaminase-producing halotolerant bacteria mitigates the salt stress by reducing salt stress-induced ethylene production on growth of red pepper plants.

  13. Studies of 1-Amino-2,2-difluorocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid: Mechanism of Decomposition and Inhibition of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid Deaminase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Hao; Wang, Shao-An; Ruszczycky, Mark W; Chen, Huawei; Li, Keqiang; Murakami, Kazuo; Liu, Hung-wen

    2015-07-02

    1-Amino-2,2-difluorocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (DFACC) is of interest in the study of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase due to the increased reactivity of its cyclopropyl functionality. It is shown that DFACC is unstable under near-physiological conditions where it primarily decomposes via specific-base catalysis to 3-fluoro-2-oxobut-3-enoic acid with a rate constant of 0.18 ± 0.01 min(-1). Upon incubation with ACC deaminase, DFACC is found to be a slow-dissociating inhibitor of ACC deaminase with submicromolar affinity.

  14. Cloning of L-amino acid deaminase gene from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, E; Ito, K; Yoshimoto, T

    1999-12-01

    The L-amino acid degrading enzyme gene from Proteus vulgaris was cloned and the nucleotide sequence of the enzyme gene was clarified. An open reading frame of 1,413 bp starting at an ATG methionine codon was found, which encodes a protein of 471 amino acid residues, the calculated molecular weight of which is 51,518. The amino acid sequence of P. vulgaris was 58.6% identical with the L-amino acid deaminase of P. mirabilis. A significantly conserved sequence was found around the FAD-binding sequence of flavo-proteins. The partially purified wild and recombinant enzymes had the same substrate specificity for L-amino acids to form the respective keto-acids, however not for D-amino acids.

  15. Inversion of the allosteric response of Escherichia coli glucosamine-6-P deaminase to N-acetylglucosamine 6-P, by single amino acid replacements.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, David A; Montero-Morán, Gabriela M; Lara-González, Samuel; Calcagno, Mario L

    2004-01-01

    Amino acid replacements in the active site of glucosamine-6-P deaminase from Escherichia coli (GlcN6P deaminase, EC 3.5.99.6) involving the residues D141 and E148 produce atypical allosteric kinetics. These residues are located in the chain segment 139-156 which is part of the active site and which also forms several intersubunit contacts close to the allosteric site. In the D141N and E148Q mutant forms of this deaminase, there is an inversion of the effect of its physiological allosteric effector, N-acetylglucosamine 6-P, which becomes an inhibitor at substrate concentrations above a critical value. For both mutants, this particular point appears at low substrate concentration and the inhibition by the allosteric activator is the dominant effect in velocity versus substrate curves. These effects are analyzed as a particular case of the concerted allosteric model, assuming that the R state, the conformer displaying the higher affinity for the substrate, is the less catalytic state, thus producing an inverted allosteric response.

  16. DNA Mutagenic Activity and Capacity for HIV-1 Restriction of the Cytidine Deaminase APOBEC3G Depends on Whether DNA or RNA Binds to Tyrosine 315.

    PubMed

    Polevoda, Bogdan; Joseph, Rebecca; Friedman, Alan E; Bennett, Ryan P; Greiner, Rebecca; De Zoysa, Thareendra; Stewart, Ryan A; Smith, Harold C

    2017-04-05

    APOBEC3G (A3G) belongs to the AID/APOBEC protein family of cytidine deaminases (CDA) that bind to nucleic acids. A3G mutates the HIV genome by deamination of dC to dU, leading to accumulation of virus-inactivating mutations. Binding to cellular RNAs inhibits A3G binding to substrate single-stranded (ss) DNA and CDA activity. RNA and ssDNA bind to the same three A3G tryptic peptides (amino acids 181-194, 314-320, and 345-374) that form parts of a continuously exposed protein surface extending from the catalytic domain in the C-terminus of A3G to its N-terminus. We show here that the A3G tyrosines 181 and 315 directly cross-link ssDNA. Binding experiments showed that a Y315A mutation alone significantly reduced A3G binding to both ssDNA and RNA, whereas Y181A and Y182A mutations only moderately affected A3G nucleic acid binding. Consistent with these findings, the Y315A mutant exhibited little to no deaminase activity in an E. coli DNA mutator reporter, while Y181A and Y182A mutants retained ~50% of wild-type A3G activity. The Y315A mutant also showed a markedly reduced ability to assemble into viral particles and had reduced antiviral activity. In uninfected cells, the impaired RNA-binding capacity of Y315A was evident by a shift of A3G from high-molecular-mass ribonucleoprotein complexes to low-molecular-mass complexes. We conclude that Y315 is essential for coordinating ssDNA interaction with or entry to the deaminase domain and hypothesize that RNA bound to Y315 may be sufficient to competitively inhibit ssDNA deaminase-dependent antiviral activity.

  17. Opposing activity changes in AMP deaminase and AMP-activated protein kinase in the hibernating ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Lanaspa, Miguel A; Epperson, L Elaine; Li, Nanxing; Cicerchi, Christina; Garcia, Gabriela E; Roncal-Jimenez, Carlos A; Trostel, Jessica; Jain, Swati; Mant, Colin T; Rivard, Christopher J; Ishimoto, Takuji; Shimada, Michiko; Sanchez-Lozada, Laura Gabriela; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Jani, Alkesh; Stenvinkel, Peter; Martin, Sandra L; Johnson, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Hibernating animals develop fatty liver when active in summertime and undergo a switch to a fat oxidation state in the winter. We hypothesized that this switch might be determined by AMP and the dominance of opposing effects: metabolism through AMP deaminase (AMPD2) (summer) and activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) (winter). Liver samples were obtained from 13-lined ground squirrels at different times during the year, including summer and multiples stages of winter hibernation, and fat synthesis and β-fatty acid oxidation were evaluated. Changes in fat metabolism were correlated with changes in AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid (downstream product of AMPD2), as well as changes in AMPK and intrahepatic β-hydroxybutyrate (a marker of fat oxidation). Hepatic fat accumulation occurred during the summer with relatively increased enzymes associated with fat synthesis (FAS, ACL and ACC) and decreased enoyl CoA hydratase (ECH1) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A), rate limiting enzymes of fat oxidation. In summer, AMPD2 activity and intrahepatic uric acid levels were high and hepatic AMPK activity was low. In contrast, the active phosphorylated form of AMPK and β-hydroxybutyrate both increased during winter hibernation. Therefore, changes in AMPD2 and AMPK activity were paralleled with changes in fat synthesis and fat oxidation rates during the summer-winter cycle. These data illuminate the opposing forces of metabolism of AMP by AMPD2 and its availability to activate AMPK as a switch that governs fat metabolism in the liver of hibernating ground squirrel.

  18. Transcriptional pausing and stalling causes multiple clustered mutations by human activation-induced deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Samaranayake, Mala; Bhagwat, Ashok S.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription of the rearranged immunoglobulin gene and expression of the enzyme activation-induced deaminase (AID) are essential for somatic hypermutations of this gene during antibody maturation. While AID acts as a single-strand DNA-cytosine deaminase creating U · G mispairs that lead to mutations, the role played by transcription in this process is less clear. We have used in vitro transcription of the kan gene by the T7 RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the presence of AID and a genetic reversion assay for kanamycin-resistance to investigate the causes of multiple clustered mutations (MCMs) during somatic hypermutations. We find that, depending on transcription conditions, AID can cause single-base substitutions or MCMs. When wild-type RNAP is used for transcription at physiologically relevant concentrations of ribonucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), few MCMs are found. In contrast, slowing the rate of elongation by reducing the NTP concentration or using a mutant RNAP increases several-fold the percent of revertants containing MCMs. Arresting the elongation complexes by a quick removal of NTPs leads to formation of RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops). Treatment of these structures with AID results in a high percentage of KanR revertants with MCMs. Furthermore, selecting for transcription elongation complexes stalled near the codon that suffers mutations during acquisition of kanamycin-resistance results in an overwhelming majority of revertants with MCMs. These results show that if RNAP II pauses or stalls during transcription of immunoglobulin gene, AID is likely to promote MCMs. As changes in physiological conditions such as occurrence of certain DNA primary or secondary structures or DNA adducts are known to cause transcriptional pausing and stalling in mammalian cells, this process may cause MCMs during somatic hypermutation.—Canugovi, C., Samaranayake, M., Bhagwat, A. S. Transcriptional pausing and stalling causes multiple clustered mutations by human activation

  19. Bioconversion of l-glutamic acid to α-ketoglutaric acid by an immobilized whole-cell biocatalyst expressing l-amino acid deaminase from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop an immobilized whole-cell biocatalytic process for the environment-friendly synthesis of α-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) from l-glutamic acid. We compared the suitability of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis strains overexpressing Proteus mirabilisl-amino acid deaminase (l-AAD) as potential biocatalysts. Although both recombinant strains were biocatalytically active, the performance of B. subtilis was superior to that of E. coli. With l-glutamic acid as the substrate, α-KG production levels by membranes isolated from B. subtilis and E. coli were 55.3±1.73 and 21.7±0.39μg/mg protein/min, respectively. The maximal conversion ratio of l-glutamic acid to α-KG was 31% (w/w) under the following optimal conditions: 15g/L l-glutamic acid, 20g/L whole-cell biocatalyst, 5mM MgCl2, 40°C, pH 8.0, and 24-h incubation. Immobilization of whole cells with alginate increased the recyclability by an average of 23.33% per cycle. This work established an efficient one-step biotransformation process for the production of α-KG using immobilized whole B. subtilis overexpressing P. mirabilisl-AAD. Compared with traditional multistep chemical synthesis, the biocatalytic process described here has the advantage of reducing environmental pollution and thus has great potential for the large-scale production of α-KG.

  20. Crystal structure of a membrane-bound l-amino acid deaminase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yingchen; Tong, Shuilong; Gao, Yongxiang; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Qi; Gu, Qiong; Xu, Jun; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Zhou, Huihao

    2016-09-01

    l-amino acid oxidases/deaminases (LAAOs/LAADs) are a class of oxidoreductases catalyzing the oxidative deamination of l-amino acids to α-keto acids. They are widely distributed in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and exhibit diverse substrate specificity, post-translational modifications and cellular localization. While LAAOs isolated from snake venom have been extensively characterized, the structures and functions of LAAOs from other species are largely unknown. Here, we reported crystal structure of a bacterial membrane-bound LAAD from Proteus vulgaris (pvLAAD) in complex with flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). We found that the overall fold of pvLAAD does not resemble typical LAAOs. Instead it, is similar to d-amino acid oxidases (DAAOs) with an additional hydrophobic insertion module on protein surface. Structural analysis and liposome-binding assays suggested that the hydrophobic module serves as an extra membrane-binding site for LAADs. Bacteria from genera Proteus and Providencia were found to encode two classes of membrane-bound LAADs. Based on our structure, the key roles of residues Q278 and L317 in substrate selectivity were proposed and biochemically analyzed. While LAADs on the membrane were proposed to transfer electrons to respiratory chain for FAD re-oxidization, we observed that the purified pvLAAD could generate a significant amount of hydrogen peroxide in vitro, suggesting it could use dioxygen to directly re-oxidize FADH2 as what typical LAAOs usually do. These findings provide a novel insights for a better understanding this class of enzymes and will help developing biocatalysts for industrial applications.

  1. N-terminal amino acid sequences of D-serine deaminases of wild-type and operator-constitutive strains of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Heincz, M C; McFall, E

    1975-01-01

    The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the D-serine deaminases from strains of Escherichia coli K-12 that harbor wild-type and high-level constitutive catabolite-insensitive operator-initiator regions are identical: Met-Ser-GluNH2-Ser-Gly-Arg-His-Cys. This result indicates that the operator-initiator region is probably distinct from the D-serine deaminase structural gene. Images PMID:1099073

  2. One-step production of α-ketoglutaric acid from glutamic acid with an engineered L-amino acid deaminase from Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Long; Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Shin, Hyun-dong; Li, Jianghua; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-03-10

    Currently, α-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) is industrially produced by multi-step chemical synthesis, which can cause heavy environmental pollution. Here we reported a simple one-step approach for the production of α-KG by transforming l-glutamic acid with an engineered l-amino acid deaminase (l-AAD) from Proteus mirabilis. First, to facilitate the purification of membrane-bound l-AAD, one N-terminal transmembrane region (from 21 to 87th nucleotide) was removed from l-AAD to block the binding of l-AAD with membrane, and the relatively low-usage codons were replaced by high-usage codons in Escherichia coli to improve the expression level. However, inclusion bodies formed when expressing the ΔN-LAAD in E. coli BL 21, and then the soluble and active ΔN-LAAD was obtained by the solubilization and renaturation of ΔN-LAAD. Furthermore, the biochemical properties of the refolded ΔN-LAAD were characterized and compared with those of full-length l-AAD. Finally, the ΔN-LAAD was used to synthesize α-KG and the maximal formation rate of α-KG reached 12.6% (w/w) at 6h under the following conditions: 12g/L l-glutamic acid, 0.1g/L ΔN-LAAD, 5mM MgCl2, temperature 45°C and pH 8.0. Compared with the multi-step chemical synthesis, the transformation approach has less environmental pollution and has a great potential for α-KG production.

  3. Expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase decreases throughout the life.

    PubMed

    Radu, D L; Kodera, T; Bona, C

    2003-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is an RNA editing enzyme, which contributes to generation of new functional genes from a restricted number of genes of plant and animal genome. This enzyme was involved in the process of somatic mutation and class switching in vertebrate. Since the rate of somatic mutations is variable throughout ontogeny, we have studied the transcription of AID in 3 to 24 month-old Balb/c mice. Our results demonstrate a significant decrease of the transcription of the AID gene with aging. The decreased AID activity is not related to variation of phenotypic and functional properties of B cells throughout the life. This observation can explain the low rate of somatic mutation in aged animals.

  4. Induction of homologous recombination between sequence repeats by the activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) protein.

    PubMed

    Buerstedde, Jean-Marie; Lowndes, Noel; Schatz, David G

    2014-07-08

    The activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID) protein is known to initiate somatic hypermutation, gene conversion or switch recombination by cytidine deamination within the immunoglobulin loci. Using chromosomally integrated fluorescence reporter transgenes, we demonstrate a new recombinogenic activity of AID leading to intra- and intergenic deletions via homologous recombination of sequence repeats. Repeat recombination occurs at high frequencies even when the homologous sequences are hundreds of bases away from the positions of AID-mediated cytidine deamination, suggesting DNA end resection before strand invasion. Analysis of recombinants between homeologous repeats yielded evidence for heteroduplex formation and preferential migration of the Holliday junctions to the boundaries of sequence homology. These findings broaden the target and off-target mutagenic potential of AID and establish a novel system to study induced homologous recombination in vertebrate cells.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03110.001.

  5. Does adenosine deaminase activity play a role in the early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Turkmen, G G; Karçaaltıncaba, D; Isık, H; Fidancı, V; Kaayalp, D; Tımur, H; Batıoglu, S

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of ectopic pregnancy (EP) is important due to life-threatening consequences in the first trimester of pregnancy. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity in the prediction of EP. Forty-one patients with unruptured ectopic pregnancy comprised the case group and forty-two first trimester pregnant women with shown foetal heart beating in ultrasound comprised the control group. The mean ADA level in EP (10.9 ± 3.0 IU/L) was higher than that in control group (9.2 ± 3.6 IU/L) (p = 0.018). Receiver operating characteristics or ROC curve identified ADA value of 10.95 IU/L as optimal threshold for the prediction of EP with 56% sensitivity and 67% specificity. High ADA levels are valuable in the early diagnosis of EP. However more comprehensive studies are required.

  6. Syzygium cumini extract decrease adenosine deaminase, 5'nucleotidase activities and oxidative damage in platelets of diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    De Bona, Karine S; Bellé, Luziane P; Sari, Marcel H; Thomé, Gustavo; Schetinger, Maria R C; Morsch, Vera M; Boligon, Aline; Athayde, Margareth L; Pigatto, Aline S; Moretto, Maria B

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus, a chronic metabolic disorder, has assumed epidemic proportions and its long-term complications can have devastating consequences. The oxidative stress in diabetes was greatly increased due to prolonged exposure to hyperglycemia and impairment of oxidant/antioxidant equilibrium. Syzygium cumini is being widely used to treat diabetes by the traditional practitioners over many centuries. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) and 5'-Nucleotidase (5'NT) are enzymes of purine nucleoside metabolism that play an important role in the regulation of adenosine (Ado) levels. In this study, we investigated the effect of Syzygium cumini aqueous leaves extract (ASc) on ADA and 5'NT activities and on parameters of oxidative stress under in vitro conditions, using platelets of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) was assayed by ADA, 5'NT, Catalase (CAT), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD) activities and Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels. We observed that ADA, 5'NT activities and TBARS levels were significantly higher when compared to the control group, and ASc (100 and 200 μg/mL) prevented these effects. Our study demonstrates that ASc was able to remove oxidant species generated in diabetic conditions and modulates in the Ado levels. Then, ASc may promote a compensatory response in platelet function, improving the susceptibility-induced by the diabetes mellitus.

  7. Syzygium cumini inhibits adenosine deaminase activity and reduces glucose levels in hyperglycemic patients.

    PubMed

    Bopp, A; De Bona, K S; Bellé, L P; Moresco, R N; Moretto, M B

    2009-08-01

    Syzigium cumini (L.) Skeels from the Myrtaceae family is among the most common medicinal plants used to treat diabetes in Brazil. Leaves, fruits, and barks of S. cumini have been used for their hypoglycemic activity. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is an important enzyme that plays a relevant role in purine and DNA metabolism, immune responses, and peptidase activity. ADA is suggested to be an important enzyme for modulating the bioactivity of insulin, but its clinical significance in diabetes mellitus (DM) has not yet been proven. In this study, we examined the effect of aqueous leaf extracts of S. cumini (L.) (ASC) on ADA activity of hyperglycemic subjects and the activity of total ADA, and its isoenzymes in serum and erythrocytes. The present study indicates that: (i) the ADA activity in hyperglycemic serum was higher than normoglycemic serum and ADA activity was higher when the blood glucose level was more elevated; (ii) ASC (60-1000 microg/mL) in vitro caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of total ADA activity and a decrease in the blood glucose level in serum; (iii) ADA1 and 2 were reduced both in erythrocytes and in hyperglycemic serum. These results suggest that the decrease of ADA activity provoked by ASC may contribute to control adenosine levels and the antioxidant defense system of red cells and could be related to the complex ADA/DPP-IV-CD26 and the properties of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV) inhibitors which serve as important regulators of blood glucose.

  8. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is localized to subnuclear domains enriched in splicing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yi Ericsson, Ida Doseth, Berit Liabakk, Nina B. Krokan, Hans E. Kavli, Bodil

    2014-03-10

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the mutator enzyme in adaptive immunity. AID initiates the antibody diversification processes in activated B cells by deaminating cytosine to uracil in immunoglobulin genes. To some extent other genes are also targeted, which may lead to genome instability and B cell malignancy. Thus, it is crucial to understand its targeting and regulation mechanisms. AID is regulated at several levels including subcellular compartmentalization. However, the complex nuclear distribution and trafficking of AID has not been studied in detail previously. In this work, we examined the subnuclear localization of AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 and found that they associate with spliceosome-associated structures including Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. Moreover, protein kinase A (PKA), which activates AID by phosphorylation at Ser38, is present together with AID in nuclear speckles. Importantly, we demonstrate that AID physically associates with the major spliceosome subunits (small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, snRNPs), as well as other essential splicing components, in addition to the transcription machinery. Based on our findings and the literature, we suggest a transcription-coupled splicing-associated model for AID targeting and activation. - Highlights: • AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 localize to Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. • AID associates with its activating kinase PKA in nuclear speckles. • AID is linked to the splicing machinery in switching B-cells. • Our findings suggest a transcription-coupled splicing associated mechanism for AID targeting and activation.

  9. Elevated erythrocyte adenosine deaminase activity in a patient with primary acquired sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kanno, H; Fujii, H; Tani, K; Morisaki, T; Takahashi, K; Horiuchi, N; Kizaki, M; Ogawa, T; Miwa, S

    1988-03-01

    We report a case of primary acquired sideroblastic anemia (PASA) associated with elevated erythrocyte adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity. The patient was an 85-year-old Japanese male. Analysis of the peripheral blood revealed pancytopenia, and the bone marrow findings showed marked ringed sideroblasts and chromosomal deletion (46XY, 11q-). The erythrocyte ADA activity was 17 times higher than that of normal control, the leukocyte ADA activity was within the normal range, and the plasma ADA activity was 2 times higher than the normal mean. The adenine nucleotides in the patient's erythrocytes were within normal range. According to starch gel electrophoresis, ADA isozyme of the patient was ADA 1. Western blotting showed an increased amount of ADA protein in the patient's erythrocytes. Southern blotting revealed no gene amplification or large structural change. Dot blot analysis of the reticulocyte mRNA showed no increase in the amount of ADA mRNA in the patient's reticulocytes compared with those of reticulocyte-rich controls. We considered that the mechanism of elevated ADA activity in this acquired defect was similar to that found in hereditary hemolytic anemia associated with ADA overproduction.

  10. Platelet aggregation and serum adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity in pregnancy associated with diabetes, hypertension and HIV.

    PubMed

    Leal, Claudio A M; Leal, Daniela B R; Adefegha, Stephen A; Morsch, Vera M; da Silva, José E P; Rezer, João F P; Schrekker, Clarissa M L; Abdalla, Faida H; Schetinger, Maria R C

    2016-07-01

    Platelet aggregation and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity were evaluated in pregnant women living with some disease conditions including hypertension, diabetes mellitus and human immunodeficiency virus infection. The subject population is consisted of 15 non-pregnant healthy women [control group (CG)], 15 women with normal pregnancy (NP), 7 women with hypertensive pregnancy (HP), 10 women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and 12 women with human immunodeficiency virus-infected pregnancy (HIP) groups. The aggregation of platelets was checked using an optical aggregometer, and serum ADA activity was determined using the colorimetric method. After the addition of 5 µM of agonist adenosine diphosphate, the percentage of platelet aggregation was significantly (p < 0·05) increased in NP, HP, GDM and HIP groups when compared with the CG, while the addition of 10 µM of the same agonist caused significant (p < 0·05) elevations in HP, GDM and HIP groups when compared with CG. Furthermore, ADA activity was significantly (p < 0·05) enhanced in NP, HP, GDM and HIP groups when compared with CG. In this study, the increased platelet aggregation and ADA activity in pregnancy and pregnancy-associated diseases suggest that platelet aggregation and ADA activity could serve as peripheral markers for the development of effective therapy in the maintenance of homeostasis and some inflammatory process in these pathophysiological conditions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Melamine Deaminase and Atrazine Chlorohydrolase: 98 Percent Identical but Functionally Different

    PubMed Central

    Seffernick, Jennifer L.; de Souza, Mervyn L.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2001-01-01

    The gene encoding melamine deaminase (TriA) from Pseudomonas sp. strain NRRL B-12227 was identified, cloned into Escherichia coli, sequenced, and expressed for in vitro study of enzyme activity. Melamine deaminase displaced two of the three amino groups from melamine, producing ammeline and ammelide as sequential products. The first deamination reaction occurred more than 10 times faster than the second. Ammelide did not inhibit the first or second deamination reaction, suggesting that the lower rate of ammeline hydrolysis was due to differential substrate turnover rather than product inhibition. Remarkably, melamine deaminase is 98% identical to the enzyme atrazine chlorohydrolase (AtzA) from Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP. Each enzyme consists of 475 amino acids and differs by only 9 amino acids. AtzA was shown to exclusively catalyze dehalogenation of halo-substituted triazine ring compounds and had no activity with melamine and ammeline. Similarly, melamine deaminase had no detectable activity with the halo-triazine substrates. Melamine deaminase was active in deamination of a substrate that was structurally identical to atrazine, except for the substitution of an amino group for the chlorine atom. Moreover, melamine deaminase and AtzA are found in bacteria that grow on melamine and atrazine compounds, respectively. These data strongly suggest that the 9 amino acid differences between melamine deaminase and AtzA represent a short evolutionary pathway connecting enzymes catalyzing physiologically relevant deamination and dehalogenation reactions, respectively. PMID:11274097

  12. miR-181b negatively regulates activation-induced cytidine deaminase in B cells.

    PubMed

    de Yébenes, Virginia G; Belver, Laura; Pisano, David G; González, Susana; Villasante, Aranzazu; Croce, Carlo; He, Lin; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2008-09-29

    Activated B cells reshape their primary antibody repertoire after antigen encounter by two molecular mechanisms: somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR are initiated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) through the deamination of cytosine residues on the immunoglobulin loci, which leads to the generation of DNA mutations or double-strand break intermediates. As a bystander effect, endogenous AID levels can also promote the generation of chromosome translocations, suggesting that the fine tuning of AID expression may be critical to restrict B cell lymphomagenesis. To determine whether microRNAs (miRNAs) play a role in the regulation of AID expression, we performed a functional screening of an miRNA library and identified miRNAs that regulate CSR. One such miRNA, miR-181b, impairs CSR when expressed in activated B cells, and results in the down-regulation of AID mRNA and protein levels. We found that the AID 3' untranslated region contains multiple putative binding sequences for miR-181b and that these sequences can be directly targeted by miR-181b. Overall, our results provide evidence for a new regulatory mechanism that restricts AID activity and can therefore be relevant to prevent B cell malignant transformation.

  13. Activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) on undernourished and renourished rats' thymus.

    PubMed

    Feliu, M S.; Slobodianik, N H.

    2001-02-01

    We studied the effect of administration of a low quality dietary protein, from weaning onwards, on the thymus of undernourished rats and the posterior effect of refeeding with a high quality dietary protein. Changes in thymus weight and the activity of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) and Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP) on thymus, were determined. Wistar rats were suckled in groups of 14-16 per dam since birth to weaning (23 days) to obtain undernutrition. At weaning, a group of 14-16 rats received pre-cooked maize flour (Protein content: 6.5%) for 18 days. One group was sacrificed (M) and the other rats were refed with the casein diet (Protein content: 20%) during 20 days (R). The age-matched control groups were fed stock diet since 40 (C40) and 60 (C60) days of age, respectively. At the end of the experimental period, body (Bw) and thymus weight were determined. ADA and PNP activities were determined in thymocyte suspensions. Highly significant differences in thymus weight-expressed as mg or mg/Bw(0.75)-and the activity of ADA and PNP were observed in rats fed the experimental diet containing maize flour, when compared to the respective age-matched control. No statistical differences were observed between R and C60.The administration of a high quality dietary protein to undernourished weanling rats is capable to reverse the damage produced by the low quality dietary protein on thymus weight and ADA and PNP thymus activities.

  14. Assessment of adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity and oxidative stress in patients with chronic tonsillitis.

    PubMed

    Garca, Mehmet Fatih; Demir, Halit; Turan, Mahfuz; Bozan, Nazım; Kozan, Ahmet; Belli, Şeyda Bayel; Arslan, Ayşe; Cankaya, Hakan

    2014-06-01

    To emphasize the effectiveness of adenosine deaminase (ADA) enzyme, which has important roles in the differentiation of lymphoid cells, and oxidative stress in patients with chronic tonsillitis. Serum and tissue samples were obtained from 25 patients who underwent tonsillectomy due to recurrent episodes of acute tonsillitis. In the control group, which also had 25 subjects, only serum samples were taken as obtaining tissue samples would not have been ethically appropriate. ADA enzyme activity, catalase (CAT), carbonic anhydrase (CA), nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in the serum and tissue samples of patients and control group subjects. The serum values of both groups were compared. In addition, the tissue and serum values of patients were compared. Serum ADA activity and the oxidant enzymes MDA and NO values of the patient group were significantly higher than those of the control group (p < 0.001), the antioxidant enzymes CA and CAT values of the patient group were significantly lower than those of the control group (p < 0.001). In addition, while CA, CAT and NO enzyme levels were found to be significantly higher in the tonsil tissue of the patient group when compared to serum levels (p < 0.05), there was no difference between tissue and serum MDA and ADA activity (p > 0.05). Elevated ADA activity may be effective in the pathogenesis of chronic tonsillitis both by impairing tissue structure and contributing to SOR formation.

  15. Adenosine deaminase activity in serum, erythrocytes and lymphocytes of rats infected with Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae.

    PubMed

    Tonin, Alexandre A; Pimentel, Victor C; da Silva, Aleksandro S; de Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Souza, Viviane C G; Wolkmer, Patrícia; Rezer, João F P; Badke, Manoel R T; Leal, Daniela B R; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Monteiro, Silvia G; Lopes, Sonia T A

    2012-04-01

    Leptospirosis is a systemic disease of humans and domestic animals, mainly dogs, cattle and swine. The course of human leptospirosis varies from mild to severe fatal forms and the most severe form of human leptospirosis is principally caused by Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae (L. icterohaemorrhagiae). The enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays an important role in the production and differentiation of blood cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the activity of ADA in serum, erythrocytes and lymphocytes of rats infected with L. icterohaemorrhagiae, as compared with non-infected rats. Twenty-four adult rats, divided into two uniform groups (A and B) were used for the enzymatic assays. The animals in Group B were inoculated intraperitoneally with 2×10(8) leptospires/rat, and the rodents in Group A (control) were not-inoculated. Blood collection was performed on days 5 and 15 post-infection (PI) and the blood used to assess the ADA activity. The infection by L.icterohaemorrhagiae altered erythrocyte count, hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit, causing a decrease in all these parameters on day 15 PI. Lymphocytes decreased significantly on day 15 PI, and ADA activity in serum was inhibited in infected rats on days 5 and 15 PI and its activity in erythrocytes were increased on day 5 PI. On day 5 PI, we found an increase in ADA activity in erythrocytes of infected rats. No correlation was observed between hematocrit and erythrocyte ADA activity on days 5 and 15 PI. The ADA activity was inhibited in rats infected on day 15 PI. A positive correlation (r(2)=60) was also observed between the number of lymphocytes and ADA activity in lymphocytes on day 15 PI (P<0.05). In conclusion, our results showed that the ADA activity is altered in serum, lymphocytes and erythrocytes in experimental infection by L.icterohaemorrhagiae in rats, concomitantly with hematological parameters.

  16. A role for host activation-induced cytidine deaminase in innate immune defense against KSHV.

    PubMed

    Bekerman, Elena; Jeon, Diana; Ardolino, Michele; Coscoy, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is specifically induced in germinal center B cells to carry out somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination, two processes responsible for antibody diversification. Because of its mutagenic potential, AID expression and activity are tightly regulated to minimize unwanted DNA damage. Surprisingly, AID expression has been observed ectopically during pathogenic infections. However, the function of AID outside of the germinal centers remains largely uncharacterized. In this study, we demonstrate that infection of human primary naïve B cells with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) rapidly induces AID expression in a cell intrinsic manner. We find that infected cells are marked for elimination by Natural Killer cells through upregulation of NKG2D ligands via the DNA damage pathway, a pathway triggered by AID. Moreover, without having a measurable effect on KSHV latency, AID impinges directly on the viral fitness by inhibiting lytic reactivation and reducing infectivity of KSHV virions. Importantly, we uncover two KSHV-encoded microRNAs that directly regulate AID abundance, further reinforcing the role for AID in the antiviral response. Together our findings reveal additional functions for AID in innate immune defense against KSHV with implications for a broader involvement in innate immunity to other pathogens.

  17. Enhancing VSV oncolytic activity with an improved cytosine deaminase suicide gene strategy.

    PubMed

    Leveille, S; Samuel, S; Goulet, M-L; Hiscott, J

    2011-06-01

    Oncolytic viruses (OVs) are promising therapeutic agents for cancer treatment, with recent studies emphasizing the combined use of chemotherapeutic compounds and prodrug suicide gene strategies to improve OV efficacy. In the present study, the synergistic activity of recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-MΔ51 virus expressing the cytosine deaminase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD::UPRT) suicide gene and 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) prodrug was investigated in triggering tumor cell oncolysis. In a panel of VSV-sensitive and -resistant cells-prostate PC3, breast MCF7 and TSA, B-lymphoma Karpas and melanoma B16-F10-the combination treatment increased killing of non-infected bystander cells in vitro via the release of 5FC toxic derivatives. In addition, we showed a synergistic effect on cancer cell killing with VSV-MΔ51 and the active form of the drug 5-fluorouracil. Furthermore, by monitoring VSV replication at the tumor site and maximizing 5FC bioavailability, we optimized the treatment regimen and improved survival of animals bearing TSA mammary adenocarcinoma. Altogether, this study emphasizes the potency of the VSV-CD::UPRT and 5FC combination, and demonstrates the necessity of optimizing each step of a multicomponent therapy to design efficient treatment.

  18. Modulatory effect of iron chelators on adenosine deaminase activity and gene expression in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Primon-Barros, Muriel; Rigo, Graziela Vargas; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Santos, Odelta dos; Smiderle, Lisiane; Almeida, Silvana; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-11-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan that parasitises the urogenital human tract and causes trichomoniasis. During the infection, the acquisition of nutrients, such as iron and purine and pyrimidine nucleosides, is essential for the survival of the parasite. The enzymes for purinergic signalling, including adenosine deaminase (ADA), which degrades adenosine to inosine, have been characterised in T. vaginalis. In the evaluation of the ADA profile in different T. vaginalis isolates treated with different iron sources or with limited iron availability, a decrease in activity and an increase in ADA gene expression after iron limitation by 2,2-bipyridyl and ferrozine chelators were observed. This supported the hypothesis that iron can modulate the activity of the enzymes involved in purinergic signalling. Under bovine serum limitation conditions, no significant differences were observed. The results obtained in this study allow for the assessment of important aspects of ADA and contribute to a better understanding of the purinergic system in T. vaginalis and the role of iron in establishing infection and parasite survival.

  19. Isolation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain deficient in deoxycytidylate deaminase activity and partial characterization of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, E M; Haynes, R H

    1984-01-01

    Deoxycytidylate deaminase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been partially characterized. The yeast enzyme was found to exhibit properties similar to those of dCMP deaminases isolated from higher eucaryotes. A mutant strain completely deficient in dCMP deaminase activity was isolated by selection for resistance to 5-fluoro-2'-deoxycytidylate followed by screening for cross sensitivity to 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridylate, a potent inhibitor of the yeast thymidylate synthetase. We have designated this new allele dcd1 . A strain exhibiting an auxotrophic requirement for dUMP was isolated after mutagenesis of a dcd1 tup7 haploid. Genetic analysis revealed that this auxotrophic phenotype resulted from a combination of the dcd1 allele and a second, unlinked, nuclear mutation that we designated dmp1 . This allele, which by itself conveys no readily discernible phenotype, presumably impairs efficient synthesis of dUMP from UDP. The auxotrophic requirement of dcd1 dmp1 tup7 strains also can be satisfied by exogenous dTMP but not deoxyuridine. PMID:6373725

  20. Bacterial community compositions of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) seeds and plant growth promoting activity of ACC deaminase producing Bacillus subtilis (HYT-12-1) on tomato seedlings.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingshuang; Sheng, Jiping; Chen, Lin; Men, Yejun; Gan, Lin; Guo, Shuntang; Shen, Lin

    2014-03-01

    Study of endophytic bacteria within plant seeds is very essential and meaningful on account of their heritability and versatility. This study investigated Bacillus bacterial communities within the seeds of four commercial tomato varieties, by 16S rRNA gene PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the 22 representative isolates belonged to five species of genus Bacillus and the bacterial compositions showed remarkable differences among tomato varieties. Isolates exhibited multiple plant growth promoting (PGP) traits: 37 % of indole-3-acetic acid production; 37 % of phosphate solubilization; 24 % of siderophores production; 85 % of potential nitrogen fixation and 6 % of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity. Isolate HYT-12-1 was shown to have highest ACC deaminase activity (112.02 nmol α-ketobutyrate mg⁻¹ protein h⁻¹) among the five ACC deamiase producing strains. 16S rRNA gene sequencing indicated that the isolate HYT-12-1 shared the highest sequence similarity (100 %) with B. subtilis. PGP experiments under gnotobiotic and greenhouse conditions revealed the ability of strain HYT-12-1 to enhance the growth of tomato seedlings. This is the first study to describe endophytic Bacillus communities within tomato seeds, and the results suggest that B. subtilis strain HYT-12-1 would have a great potential for industrial application as biofertilizer in the future.

  1. Adenosine deaminase activity level as a tool for diagnosing tuberculous pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Khow-Ean, Nathapol; Booraphun, Suchart; Aekphachaisawat, Noppadol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2013-07-04

    The yield for using a pleural fluid culture to diagnose tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) is low. Adenosine deaminase activity (ADA) has been shown to have good diagnostic value for TPE. The ADA cutoff point for the diagnosis of TPE is unclear. We attempted to determine the ADA level cutoff point for diagnosing of TPE in Thailand, where tuberculosis is endemic. We reviewed the medical records of patients with newly diagnosed pleural effusion aged >15 years who had a pleural fluid ADAlevel and who underwent a pleural biopsy. The study period was from March 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011. The diagnoses of TPE and malignant pleural effusion (MPE) were based on pathological findings. The diagnostic cutoff level for using ADA to diagnose TPE was determined. Forty-eight patients met study criteria. Of those, 18 patients (37.5%) were diagnosed with TPE. The mean ADA level was significantly higher among patients in the TPE group than in the MPE group (38.2 vs 14.8 U/l, p < 0.001). The cutoff level of 17.5 U/l gave sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio of 88.9%, 73.3%, 3.33, and 0.15, respectively. An ADA level >17.5 U/l had good diagnostic values among TPE patients in our study.

  2. Involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase in skin cancer development.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Taichiro; Toda, Yoshinobu; Hiai, Hiroshi; Uemura, Munehiro; Nakamura, Motonobu; Yamamoto, Norio; Asato, Ryo; Hattori, Yukari; Bessho, Kazuhisa; Minato, Nagahiro; Kinoshita, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    Most skin cancers develop as the result of UV light-induced DNA damage; however, a substantial number of cases appear to occur independently of UV damage. A causal link between UV-independent skin cancers and chronic inflammation has been suspected, although the precise mechanism underlying this association is unclear. Here, we have proposed that activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, encoded by AICDA) links chronic inflammation and skin cancer. We demonstrated that Tg mice expressing AID in the skin spontaneously developed skin squamous cell carcinoma with Hras and Trp53 mutations. Furthermore, genetic deletion of Aicda reduced tumor incidence in a murine model of chemical-induced skin carcinogenesis. AID was expressed in human primary keratinocytes in an inflammatory stimulus-dependent manner and was detectable in human skin cancers. Together, the results of this study indicate that inflammation-induced AID expression promotes skin cancer development independently of UV damage and suggest AID as a potential target for skin cancer therapeutics.

  3. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  4. Adenosine deaminase activity in serum and lymphocytes of rats infected with Sporothrix schenckii.

    PubMed

    Castro, Verônica S P; Pimentel, Victor C; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Thomé, Gustavo R; Wolkmer, Patrícia; Castro, Jorge L C; Costa, Márcio M; da Silva, Cássia B; Oliveira, Daniele C; Alves, Sydney H; Schetinger, Maria R C; Lopes, Sonia T A; Mazzanti, Cinthia M

    2012-07-01

    Sporotrichosis is a fungal infection of subcutaneous or chronic evolution, inflammatory lesions characterized by their pyogranulomatous aspect, caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a "key" enzyme in the purine metabolism, promoting the deamination of adenosine, an important anti-inflammatory molecule. The increase in ADA activity has been demonstrated in several inflammatory conditions; however, there are no data in the literature associated with this fungal infection. The objective of this study was to evaluate the activity of serum ADA (S-ADA) and lymphocytes (L-ADA) of rats infected with S. schenckii. We used seventy-eight rats divided into two groups. In the first experiment, rats were infected subcutaneously and in the second experiment, infected intraperitoneally. Blood samples for hematologic evaluation and activities of S-ADA and L-ADA were performed at days 15, 30, and 40 post-infection (PI) to assess disease progression. In the second experiment, it was observed an acute decrease in activity of S-ADA and L-ADA (P < 0.05), suggesting a compensatory mechanism in an attempt to protect the host from excessive tissue damage. With chronicity of disease the rats in the first and second experiment at 30 days PI showed an increased activity of L-ADA (P < 0.05), promoting an inflammatory response in an attempt to combat the spread of the agent. Thus, it is suggested that infection with S. schenckii alters the activities of S-ADA in experimentally infected rats, demonstrating the involvement of this enzyme in the pathogenesis of sporotrichosis.

  5. Active RNAP pre-initiation sites are highly mutated by cytidine deaminases in yeast, with AID targeting small RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Benjamin JM; Wu, Yee Ling; Rada, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Cytidine deaminases are single stranded DNA mutators diversifying antibodies and restricting viral infection. Improper access to the genome leads to translocations and mutations in B cells and contributes to the mutation landscape in cancer, such as kataegis. It remains unclear how deaminases access double stranded genomes and whether off-target mutations favor certain loci, although transcription and opportunistic access during DNA repair are thought to play a role. In yeast, AID and the catalytic domain of APOBEC3G preferentially mutate transcriptionally active genes within narrow regions, 110 base pairs in width, fixed at RNA polymerase initiation sites. Unlike APOBEC3G, AID shows enhanced mutational preference for small RNA genes (tRNAs, snoRNAs and snRNAs) suggesting a putative role for RNA in its recruitment. We uncover the high affinity of the deaminases for the single stranded DNA exposed by initiating RNA polymerases (a DNA configuration reproduced at stalled polymerases) without a requirement for specific cofactors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03553.001 PMID:25237741

  6. Production of phenylpyruvic acid from L-phenylalanine using an L-amino acid deaminase from Proteus mirabilis: comparison of enzymatic and whole-cell biotransformation approaches.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Liu, Long; Du, Guocheng

    2015-10-01

    Phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) is an important organic acid that has a wide range of applications. In this study, the membrane-bound L-amino acid deaminase (L-AAD) gene from Proteus mirabilis KCTC 2566 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and then the L-AAD was purified. After that, we used the purified enzyme and the recombinant E. coli whole-cell biocatalyst to produce PPA via a one-step biotransformation from L-phenylalanine. L-AAD was solubilized from the membrane and purified 52-fold with an overall yield of 13 %, which corresponded to a specific activity of 0.94 ± 0.01 μmol PPA min(-1)·mg(-1). Then, the biotransformation conditions for the pure enzyme and the whole-cell biocatalyst were optimized. The maximal production was 2.6 ± 0.1 g·L(-1) (specific activity of 1.02 ± 0.02 μmol PPA min(-1)·mg(-1) protein, 86.7 ± 5 % mass conversion rate, and 1.04 g·L(-1)·h(-1) productivity) and 3.3 ± 0.2 g L(-1) (specific activity of 0.013 ± 0.003 μmol PPA min(-1)·mg(-1) protein, 82.5 ± 4 % mass conversion rate, and 0.55 g·L(-1)·h(-1) productivity) for the pure enzyme and whole-cell biocatalyst, respectively. Comparative studies of the enzymatic and whole-cell biotransformation were performed in terms of specific activity, production, conversion, productivity, stability, need of external cofactors, and recycling. We have developed two eco-friendly and efficient approaches for PPA production. The strategy described herein may aid the biotransformational synthesis of other α-keto acids from their corresponding amino acids.

  7. An Insight into the Environmental Effects of the Pocket of the Active Site of the Enzyme. Ab initio ONIOM-Molecular Dynamics (MD) Study on Cytosine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2008-02-01

    We applied the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method to cytosine deaminase to examine the environmental effects of the amino acid residues in the pocket of the active site on the substrate taking account of their thermal motion. The ab initio ONIOM-MD simulations show that the substrate uracil is strongly perturbed by the amino acid residue Ile33, which sandwiches the uracil with His62, through the steric contact due to the thermal motion. As a result, the magnitude of the thermal oscillation of the potential energy and structure of the substrate uracil significantly increases. TM and MA were partly supported by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  8. Effects of surfactant, salt and solvent on the structure and activity of adenosine deaminase: molecular dynamic and spectrophotometric studies.

    PubMed

    Ajloo, Davood; Taghizadeh, Elias; Saboury, Ali A; Bazyari, Elahe; Mahnam, Karim

    2008-08-15

    Effects of sodium dodecyl sulfate, dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, sodium chloride, sodium sulfate, methanol and ethanol, on the structure and activity of adenosine deaminase (ADA) were investigated by UV-Vis, circular dichroism spectrophotometry and molecular dynamics (MDs) studies. Relative activity, experimental and computational helix content, total accessible surface area (ASA) and exposed charged surface area (ECSA) were obtained. The relative activity of ADA in the absence and the presence of denaturants were compared with structural results. It was shown that an increase in the surface area and a decrease in the amount of helicity are associated with a decrease in the activity of ADA.

  9. Antigenicity of UV radiation-induced murine tumors correlates positively with the level of adenosine deaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, S L; Fidler, I J

    1987-01-01

    The specific activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA) in 16 murine tumor cell lines derived from seven UV light-induced neoplasms (melanoma and fibrosarcoma) were determined. In each case, the specific activity of ADA correlated positively with the antigenicity of the tumor cells. Highly antigenic cell lines that regress upon introduction into syngeneic hosts had on average 4- to 6-fold higher ADA specific activities than cell lines of low antigenicity that grow progressively in syngeneic hosts. The antigenic differences are probably not related to intracellular cAMP levels, as the level of cAMP differed only 2-fold between the two groups of cell lines.

  10. The Effect of Acute Exercise upon Adenosin Deaminase Oxidant and Antioxidant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kafkas, M. Emin; Karabulut, Aysun Bay; Sahin, Armagan; Otlu, Onder; Savas, Seyfi; Aytac, Aylin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the changes of MDA, glutation (GSH), Adenozine deaminase (ADA) and superoxidase dismutaze (SOD) levels with exercise training in obese middle-aged women (body mass index, MMI [greater than or equal to] 30.0). Twelve obese middle-aged women participated in this study. The descriptive statistics of some of…

  11. Multivalent Induction of Biodegradative Threonine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Yui, Yoshiki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Ito, Seiji; Shizuta, Yutaka; Hayaishi, Osamu

    1977-01-01

    To determine the inducer(s) of the biodegradative threonine deaminase in Escherichia coli, the effects of various amino acids on the synthesis of this enzyme were investigated. The complex medium used hitherto for the enzyme induction can be completely replaced by a synthetic medium composed of 18 natural amino acids. In this synthetic medium, the omission of each of the seven amino acids threonine, serine, aspartic acid, methionine, valine, leucine, and arginine resulted in the greatest loss of enzyme formation. These seven amino acids did not significantly influence the uptake of other amino acids into the cells. Furthermore, they did not stimulate the conversion of inactive enzyme into an active form, since they did not affect the enzyme level in cells in which protein synthesis was inhibited by chloramphenicol. Threonine, serine, aspartic acid, and methionine failed to stimulate enzyme production in cells in which messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis was arrested by rifampin, whereas valine, leucine, and arginine stimulated enzyme synthesis under the same conditions. Therefore, the first four amino acids appear to act as inducers of the biodegradative threonine deaminase in E. coli and the last three amino acids appear to be amplifiers of enzyme production. The term “multivalent induction” has been proposed for this type of induction, i.e., enzyme induction only by the simultaneous presence of several amino acids. PMID:334736

  12. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-containing rhizobacteria protect Ocimum sanctum plants during waterlogging stress via reduced ethylene generation.

    PubMed

    Barnawal, Deepti; Bharti, Nidhi; Maji, Deepamala; Chanotiya, Chandan Singh; Kalra, Alok

    2012-09-01

    Ocimum sanctum grown as rain-fed crop, is known to be poorly adapted to waterlogged conditions. Many a times the crop suffers extreme damages because of anoxia and excessive ethylene generation due to waterlogging conditions present under heavy rain. The usefulness of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-containing plant growth promoting rhizobacteria was investigated under waterlogging stress. The comparison of herb yield and stress induced biochemical changes of waterlogged and non-waterlogged plants with and without ACC deaminase-containing microbiological treatments were monitored in this study. Ten plant growth promoting rhizobacteria strains containing ACC-deaminase were isolated and characterized. Four selected isolates Fd2 (Achromobacter xylosoxidans), Bac5 (Serratia ureilytica), Oci9 (Herbaspirillum seropedicae) and Oci13 (Ochrobactrum rhizosphaerae) had the potential to protect Ocimum plants from flood induced damage under waterlogged glass house conditions. Pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential of these ACC deaminase-containing selected strains for reducing the yield losses caused by waterlogging conditions. Bacterial treatments protected plants from waterlogging induced detrimental changes like stress ethylene production, reduced chlorophyll concentration, higher lipid peroxidation, proline concentration and reduced foliar nutrient uptake. Fd2 (A. xylosoxidans) induced maximum waterlogging tolerance as treated waterlogged plants recorded maximum growth and herb yield (46.5% higher than uninoculated waterlogged plants) with minimum stress ethylene levels (53% lower ACC concentration as compared to waterlogged plants without bacterial inoculation) whereas under normal non-waterlogged conditions O. rhizosphaerae was most effective in plant growth promotion.

  13. Role of glutamate 64 in the activation of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jifeng; Sklenak, Stepan; Liu, Aizhuo; Felczak, Krzysztof; Wu, Yan; Li, Yue; Yan, Honggao

    2012-01-10

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) catalyzes the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine to uracil as well as the deamination of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to the anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. In this study, the role of Glu64 in the activation of the prodrug 5FC was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and computational studies. Steady-state kinetics studies showed that the mutation of Glu64 causes a dramatic decrease in k(cat) and a dramatic increase in K(m), indicating Glu64 is important for both binding and catalysis in the activation of 5FC. (19)F NMR experiments showed that binding of the inhibitor 5-fluoro-1H-pyrimidin-2-one (5FPy) to the wild-type yCD causes an upfield shift, indicating that the bound inhibitor is in the hydrated form, mimicking the transition state or the tetrahedral intermediate in the activation of 5FC. However, binding of 5FPy to the E64A mutant enzyme causes a downfield shift, indicating that the bound 5FPy remains in an unhydrated form in the complex with the mutant enzyme. (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis revealed trans-hydrogen bond D/H isotope effects on the hydrogen of the amide of Glu64, indicating that the carboxylate of Glu64 forms two hydrogen bonds with the hydrated 5FPy. ONIOM calculations showed that the wild-type yCD complex with the hydrated form of the inhibitor 1H-pyrimidin-2-one is more stable than the initial binding complex, and in contrast, with the E64A mutant enzyme, the hydrated inhibitor is no longer favored and the conversion has a higher activation energy, as well. The hydrated inhibitor is stabilized in the wild-type yCD by two hydrogen bonds between it and the carboxylate of Glu64 as revealed by (1)H and (15)N NMR analysis. To explore the functional role of Glu64 in catalysis, we investigated the deamination of cytosine catalyzed by the E64A mutant by ONIOM calculations. The results showed that without the assistance of Glu64, both proton transfers before and

  14. Activation induced deaminase mutational signature overlaps with CpG methylation sites in follicular lymphoma and other cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rogozin, Igor B.; Lada, Artem G.; Goncearenco, Alexander; Green, Michael R.; De, Subhajyoti; Nudelman, German; Panchenko, Anna R.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2016-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an uncurable cancer characterized by progressive severity of relapses. We analyzed sequence context specificity of mutations in the B cells from a large cohort of FL patients. We revealed substantial excess of mutations within a novel hybrid nucleotide motif: the signature of somatic hypermutation (SHM) enzyme, Activation Induced Deaminase (AID), which overlaps the CpG methylation site. This finding implies that in FL the SHM machinery acts at genomic sites containing methylated cytosine. We identified the prevalence of this hybrid mutational signature in many other types of human cancer, suggesting that AID-mediated, CpG-methylation dependent mutagenesis is a common feature of tumorigenesis. PMID:27924834

  15. Antitumor activity of mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase gene for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Long-Ying; Wang, Jian-Ping; Gui, Zhi-Fu; Shen, Li-Zong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) mutant D314A and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) for treatment of colon cancer in a mouse model. METHODS: Recombinant lentivirus vectors that contained wild-type bCD gene (bCDwt), and bCD mutant D314A gene (bCD-D314A) with green fluorescence protein gene were constructed and used to infect human colon carcinoma LoVo cells, to generate stable transfected cells, LoVo/null, LoVo/bCDwt or LoVo/bCD-D314A. These were injected subcutaneously into Balb/c nude mice to establish xenograft models. Two weeks post-LoVo cell inoculation, PBS or 5-FC (500 mg/kg) was administered by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection once daily for 14 d. On the day after LoVo cell injection, mice were monitored daily for tumor volume and survival. RESULTS: Sequence analyses confirmed the construction of recombinant lentiviral plasmids that contained bCDwt or bCD-D314A. The lentiviral vector had high efficacy for gene delivery, and RT-PCR showed that bCDwt or bCD-D314A gene was transferred to LoVo cells. Among these treatment groups, gene delivery or 5-FC administration alone had no effect on tumor growth. However, bCDwt/5-FC or bCD-D314A/5-FC treatment inhibited tumor growth and prolonged survival of mice significantly (P < 0.05). Importantly, the tumor volume in the bCD-D314A/5-FC-treated group was lower than that in the bCDwt/5-FC group (P < 0.05), and bCD-D314A plus 5-FC significantly prolonged survival of mice in comparison with bCDwt plus 5-FC (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The bCD mutant D314A enhanced significantly antitumor activity in human colon cancer xenograft models, which provides a promising approach for human colon carcinoma therapy. PMID:21734808

  16. A novel activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mutation in Brazilian patients with hyper-IgM type 2 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Caratão, Nadine; Cortesão, Catarina S; Reis, Pedro H; Freitas, Raquel F; Jacob, Cristina M A; Pastorino, Antonio C; Carneiro-Sampaio, Magda; Barreto, Vasco M

    2013-08-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a DNA editing protein that plays an essential role in three major events of immunoglobulin (Ig) diversification: somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and Ig gene conversion. Mutations in the AID gene (AICDA) have been found in patients with autosomal recessive Hyper-IgM (HIGM) syndrome type 2. Here, two 9- and 14-year-old Brazilian sisters, from a consanguineous family, were diagnosed with HIGM2 syndrome. Sequencing analysis of the exons from AICDA revealed that both patients are homozygous for a single C to G transversion in the third position of codon 15, which replaces a conserved Phenylalanine with a Leucine. To our knowledge, this is a new AICDA mutation found in HIGM2 patients. Functional studies confirm that the homologous murine mutation leads to a dysfunctional protein with diminished intrinsic cytidine deaminase activity and is unable to rescue CSR when introduced in Aicda(-/-)stimulated murine B cells. We briefly discuss the relevance of AICDA mutations found in patients for the biology of this molecule.

  17. Guanine Deaminase Functions as Dihydropterin Deaminase in the Biosynthesis of Aurodrosopterin, a Minor Red Eye Pigment of Drosophila*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaekwang; Park, Sang Ick; Ahn, Chiyoung; Kim, Heuijong; Yim, Jeongbin

    2009-01-01

    Dihydropterin deaminase, which catalyzes the conversion of 7,8-dihydropterin to 7,8-dihydrolumazine, was purified 5850-fold to apparent homogeneity from Drosophila melanogaster. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 48 kDa by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, indicating that it is a monomer under native conditions. The pI value, temperature, and optimal pH of the enzyme were 5.5, 40 °C, and 7.5, respectively. Interestingly the enzyme had much higher activity for guanine than for 7,8-dihydropterin. The specificity constant (kcat/Km) for guanine (8.6 × 106 m−1·s−1) was 860-fold higher than that for 7,8-dihydropterin (1.0 × 104 m−1·s−1). The structural gene of the enzyme was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis as CG18143, located at region 82A1 on chromosome 3R. The cloned and expressed CG18143 exhibited both 7,8-dihydropterin and guanine deaminase activities. Flies with mutations in CG18143, SUPor-P/Df(3R)A321R1 transheterozygotes, had severely decreased activities in both deaminases compared with the wild type. Among several red eye pigments, the level of aurodrosopterin was specifically decreased in the mutant, and the amount of xanthine and uric acid also decreased considerably to 76 and 59% of the amounts in the wild type, respectively. In conclusion, dihydropterin deaminase encoded by CG18143 plays a role in the biosynthesis of aurodrosopterin by providing one of its precursors, 7,8-dihydrolumazine, from 7,8-dihydropterin. Dihydropterin deaminase also functions as guanine deaminase, an important enzyme for purine metabolism. PMID:19567870

  18. Strong enhancement of recombinant cytosine deaminase activity in Bifidobacterium longum for tumor-targeting enzyme/prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Yoshinori; Fujimori, Minoru; Sasaki, Takayuki; Matsuhashi, Hitomi; Matsui-Seki, Keiichi; Shimatani-Shibata, Yuko; Kano, Yasunobu; Amano, Jun; Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro

    2007-04-01

    In our previous studies, a strain of the nonpathogenic, anaerobic, intestinal bacterium, Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum), was found to be localized selectively and to proliferate within solid tumors after systemic administration. In addition, B. longum transformed with the shuttle-plasmid encoding the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene expressed active CD, which deaminated the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We also reported antitumor efficacy with the same plasmid in several animal experiments. In this study, we constructed a novel shuttle-plasmid, pAV001-HU-eCD-M968, which included the mutant CD gene with a mutation at the active site to increase the enzymatic activity. In addition, the plasmid-transformed B. longum produces mutant CD and strongly increased (by 10-fold) its 5-FC to 5-FU enzymatic activity. The use of B. longum harboring the new shuttle-plasmid increases the effectiveness of our enzyme/prodrug strategy.

  19. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression in Human B Cell Precursors Is Essential for Central B Cell Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-11-17

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme-mediating class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells.

  20. Non-linear quantitative structure-activity relationship for adenine derivatives as competitive inhibitors of adenosine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Sadat Hayatshahi, Sayyed Hamed; Khajeh, Khosro

    2005-12-16

    Logistic regression and artificial neural networks have been developed as two non-linear models to establish quantitative structure-activity relationships between structural descriptors and biochemical activity of adenosine based competitive inhibitors, toward adenosine deaminase. The training set included 24 compounds with known k {sub i} values. The models were trained to solve two-class problems. Unlike the previous work in which multiple linear regression was used, the highest of positive charge on the molecules was recognized to be in close relation with their inhibition activity, while the electric charge on atom N1 of adenosine was found to be a poor descriptor. Consequently, the previously developed equation was improved and the newly formed one could predict the class of 91.66% of compounds correctly. Also optimized 2-3-1 and 3-4-1 neural networks could increase this rate to 95.83%.

  1. Piracetam prevents scopolamine-induced memory impairment and decrease of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities.

    PubMed

    Marisco, Patricia C; Carvalho, Fabiano B; Rosa, Michelle M; Girardi, Bruna A; Gutierres, Jessié M; Jaques, Jeandre A S; Salla, Ana P S; Pimentel, Víctor C; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela B R; Mello, Carlos F; Rubin, Maribel A

    2013-08-01

    Piracetam improves cognitive function in animals and in human beings, but its mechanism of action is still not completely known. In the present study, we investigated whether enzymes involved in extracellular adenine nucleotide metabolism, adenosine triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) are affected by piracetam in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of animals subjected to scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Piracetam (0.02 μmol/5 μL, intracerebroventricular, 60 min pre-training) prevented memory impairment induced by scopolamine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, immediately post-training) in the inhibitory avoidance learning and in the object recognition task. Scopolamine reduced the activity of NTPDase in hippocampus (53 % for ATP and 53 % for ADP hydrolysis) and cerebral cortex (28 % for ATP hydrolysis). Scopolamine also decreased the activity of 5'-nucleotidase (43 %) and ADA (91 %) in hippocampus. The same effect was observed in the cerebral cortex for 5'-nucleotidase (38 %) and ADA (68 %) activities. Piracetam fully prevented scopolamine-induced memory impairment and decrease of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities in synaptosomes from cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In vitro experiments show that piracetam and scopolamine did not alter enzymatic activity in cerebral cortex synaptosomes. Moreover, piracetam prevented scopolamine-induced increase of TBARS levels in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. These results suggest that piracetam-induced improvement of memory is associated with protection against oxidative stress and maintenance of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and ADA activities, and suggest the purinergic system as a putative target of piracetam.

  2. Adenosine deaminase from Streptomyces coelicolor: recombinant expression, purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Pornbanlualap, Somchai; Chalopagorn, Pornchanok

    2011-08-01

    The sequencing of the genome of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) identified seven putative adenine/adenosine deaminases and adenosine deaminase-like proteins, none of which have been biochemically characterized. This report describes recombinant expression, purification and characterization of SCO4901 which had been annotated in data bases as a putative adenosine deaminase. The purified putative adenosine deaminase gives a subunit Mr=48,400 on denaturing gel electrophoresis and an oligomer molecular weight of approximately 182,000 by comparative gel filtration. These values are consistent with the active enzyme being composed of four subunits with identical molecular weights. The turnover rate of adenosine is 11.5 s⁻¹ at 30 °C. Since adenine is deaminated ∼10³ slower by the enzyme when compared to that of adenosine, these data strongly show that the purified enzyme is an adenosine deaminase (ADA) and not an adenine deaminase (ADE). Other adenine nucleosides/nucleotides, including 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-adenine (ara-A), 5'-AMP, 5'-ADP and 5'-ATP, are not substrates for the enzyme. Coformycin and 2'-deoxycoformycin are potent competitive inhibitors of the enzyme with inhibition constants of 0.25 and 3.4 nM, respectively. Amino acid sequence alignment of ScADA with ADAs from other organisms reveals that eight of the nine highly conserved catalytic site residues in other ADAs are also conserved in ScADA. The only non-conserved residue is Asn317, which replaces Asp296 in the murine enzyme. Based on these data, it is suggested here that ADA and ADE proteins are divergently related enzymes that have evolved from a common α/β barrel scaffold to catalyze the deamination of different substrates, using a similar catalytic mechanism.

  3. Crystal structure of the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3F: the catalytically active and HIV-1 Vif-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Albin, John S; Kouno, Takahide; Anderson, Brett D; McDougle, Rebecca M; Carpenter, Michael A; Rathore, Anurag; Evans, Leah; Davis, Ahkillah N; Zhang, Jingying; Lu, Yongjian; Somasundaran, Mohan; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S; Schiffer, Celia A

    2013-06-04

    Human APOBEC3F is an antiretroviral single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase, susceptible to degradation by the HIV-1 protein Vif. In this study the crystal structure of the HIV Vif binding, catalytically active, C-terminal domain of APOBEC3F (A3F-CTD) was determined. The A3F-CTD shares structural motifs with portions of APOBEC3G-CTD, APOBEC3C, and APOBEC2. Residues identified to be critical for Vif-dependent degradation of APOBEC3F all fit within a predominantly negatively charged contiguous region on the surface of A3F-CTD. Specific sequence motifs, previously shown to play a role in Vif susceptibility and virion encapsidation, are conserved across APOBEC3s and between APOBEC3s and HIV-1 Vif. In this structure these motifs pack against each other at intermolecular interfaces, providing potential insights both into APOBEC3 oligomerization and Vif interactions.

  4. The effect of therapeutic drugs and other pharmacologic agents on activity of porphobilinogen deaminase, the enzyme that is deficient in intermittent acute porphyria.

    PubMed

    Tishler, P V

    1999-01-01

    Drugs and toxins precipitate life-threatening acute attacks in patients with intermittent acute porphyria. These materials may act by directly inhibiting enzyme activity, thus further reducing porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase activity below the ca. 50% level that results from the gene defect. To test this, we studied the effects of drugs that precipitate acute attacks (lead, phenobarbital, griseofulvin, phenytoin, sulfanilamide, sulfisoxazole, 17alpha-ethinyl estradiol, 5beta-pregnan-3alpha-ol-20-one), drugs that are safe (lithium, magnesium, chlorpromazine, promethazine), and those with uncertain effects (ethyl alcohol, imipramine, diazepam, haloperidol) on activity of PBG deaminase in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro studies, of PBG deaminase from human erythrocytes from normals and individuals with IAP, only lead (> or = .01 mM) inhibited enzyme activity. Chlorpromazine (> or = .01 mM), promethazine (> or = .01 mM) and imipramine (1 mM) seemed to increase enzyme activity. In most in vivo experiments, male rats were injected intraperitoneally with test material twice daily for 3 days and once on day four; and erythrocyte and hepatic PBG deaminase activity was assayed thereafter. Effects on enzyme activity were observed only with 17alpha-ethinyl estradiol (0.05 microg/kg/day; reduction of 11% in erythrocyte enzyme [NS], and of 20% in liver enzyme [P=.02]), and imipramine (12.5 mg/kg/day; reduction in erythrocyte enzyme activity of 13% [P<.001]). Rats given lead acetate in their drinking water (10 mg/ml) for the first 60 days of life, resulting in high blood and liver lead levels, had increased erythrocyte PBG deaminase (167% of control; P=.004). Thus, enzyme inhibition by lead in vitro was not reflected in a similar in vivo inhibition. The only inhibitory effects in vivo, with ethinyl estradiol and imipramine, appear to be mild and biologically inconsequential. We conclude that inhibition of PBG deaminase activity by materials that precipitate acute attacks is an

  5. A genome-wide identification and analysis of the DYW-deaminase genes in the pentatricopeptide repeat gene family in cotton (Gossypium spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoyuan; Li, Xue; Guo, Liping; Zhang, Xuexian; Qi, Tingxiang; Wang, Hailin; Tang, Huini; Qiao, Xiuqin; Zhang, Jinfa; Xing, Chaozhu; Wu, Jianyong

    2017-01-01

    The RNA editing occurring in plant organellar genomes mainly involves the change of cytidine to uridine. This process involves a deamination reaction, with cytidine deaminase as the catalyst. Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins with a C-terminal DYW domain are reportedly associated with cytidine deamination, similar to members of the deaminase superfamily. PPR genes are involved in many cellular functions and biological processes including fertility restoration to cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in plants. In this study, we identified 227 and 211 DYW deaminase-coding PPR genes for the cultivated tetraploid cotton species G. hirsutum and G. barbadense (2n = 4x = 52), respectively, as well as 126 and 97 DYW deaminase-coding PPR genes in the ancestral diploid species G. raimondii and G. arboreum (2n = 26), respectively. The 227 G. hirsutum PPR genes were predicted to encode 52–2016 amino acids, 203 of which were mapped onto 26 chromosomes. Most DYW deaminase genes lacked introns, and their proteins were predicted to target the mitochondria or chloroplasts. Additionally, the DYW domain differed from the complete DYW deaminase domain, which contained part of the E domain and the entire E+ domain. The types and number of DYW tripeptides may have been influenced by evolutionary processes, with some tripeptides being lost. Furthermore, a gene ontology analysis revealed that DYW deaminase functions were mainly related to binding as well as hydrolase and transferase activities. The G. hirsutum DYW deaminase expression profiles varied among different cotton tissues and developmental stages, and no differentially expressed DYW deaminase-coding PPRs were directly associated with the male sterility and restoration in the CMS-D2 system. Our current study provides an important piece of information regarding the structural and evolutionary characteristics of Gossypium DYW-containing PPR genes coding for deaminases and will be useful for characterizing the DYW deaminase gene

  6. Glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from beef kidney is an allosteric system of the V-type.

    PubMed

    Lara-Lemus, R; Calcagno, M L

    1998-10-14

    The enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from beef kidney has been purified to homogeneity by allosteric-site affinity chromatography. Its amino acid composition and the N-terminal sequence (1-42), were obtained. The amino acid sequence of this segment is essentially identical to the corresponding regions of the human and hamster glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminases. The beef enzyme is a hexamer of 32.5 kDa subunits; this is nearly 2.5 kDa higher than the molecular mass of the homologous enzyme from Escherichia coli. Beef kidney deaminase exhibits a notable difference from the bacterial enzyme in its allosteric activation by N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate This metabolite, which is also is the allosteric activator of the bacterial glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase, activates the enzyme by increasing its kcat without any change in the Km values for glucosamine 6-phosphate, over a wide range of activator concentration. This observation places beef kidney deaminase in the class of V-type allosteric systems.

  7. AMP deaminase histochemical activity and immunofluorescent isozyme localization in rat skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. L.; Sabina, R. L.; Ogasawara, N.; Riley, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The cellular distribution of AMP deaminase (AMPda) isozymes was documented for rat soleus and plantaris muscles, utilizing immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoprecipitation methods. AMPda is a ubiquitous enzyme existing as three distinct isozymes, A, B and C, which were initially purified from skeletal muscle, liver (and kidney), and heart, respectively. AMPda-A is primarily concentrated subsarcolemmally and intermyofibrillarly within muscle cells, while isozymes B and C are concentrated within non-myofiber elements of muscle tissue. AMPda-B is principally associated with connective tissues surrounding neural elements and the muscle spindle capsule, and AMPda-C is predominantly associated with circulatory elements, such as arterial and venous walls, capillary endothelium, and red blood cells. These specific localizations, combined with documented differences in kinetic properties, suggest multiple functional roles for the AMPda isozymes or temporal segregation of similar AMPda functions. Linkage of the AMPda substrate with adenosine production pathways at the AMP level and the localization of isozyme-C in vascular tissue suggest a regulatory role in the microcirculation.

  8. Activity of cholinesterases and adenosine deaminase in blood and serum of rats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    DA SILVA, A S; PIMENTEL, V C; FIORENZA, A M; FRANÇA, R T; TONIN, A A; JAQUES, J A; LEAL, C A M; DA SILVA, C B; MORSCH, V; SCHETINGER, M R C; LOPES, S T A; MONTEIRO, S G

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the activity of cholinesterases and adenosine deaminase (ADA) in blood and serum of rats infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Twelve adult rats were used in the experiment divided into two uniform groups. Rodents from group A (control group) were non-infected and animals from group B served as infected, receiving intraperitoneally 3.3×107 trypomastigotes/each. Blood collection was performed at days 60 and 120 post-infection (PI) in order to evaluate the hemogram, blood activity of acetylcholinesterase, and serum butyrylcholinesterase and ADA activities. Hematological parameters did not differ between groups. A significant increase (P<0.05) of acetylcholinesterase activity was observed in blood while butyrylcholinesterase had a significant reduction (P<0.01) in serum of infected rats at days 60 and 120 PI. ADA activity in serum showed an inhibition in infected animals when compared to non-infected at day 120 PI. Based on these results, it is possible to conclude that the activity of cholinesterases and ADA were changed in animals infected with T. cruzi. The possible causes of these alterations will be discussed in this paper. PMID:21929880

  9. Effects of aqueous soybean, mistletoe and red clover extracts on activities of adenosine deaminase and xanthine oxidase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Namuslu, M; Kocaoglu, H; Celik, H T; Avci, A; Devrim, E; Genc, Y; Gocmen, E; Erguder, I B; Durak, I

    2014-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max), mistletoe (Viscum album) and red clover (Trifolium pratence) have been argued to have anti-cancer effects. In the present study it was aimed to investigate possible effects of these plant extracts on the activities of DNA turn-over enzymes, namely adenosine deaminase (ADA) and xanthine oxidase (XO) in cancerous and non-cancerous gastric and colon tissues. For this aim, 6 cancerous and 6 non-cancerous adjacent human gastric tissues, and 7 cancerous and 7 non-cancerous adjacent colon tissues were obtained by surgical operations. Our results suggest that aqueous soybean, mistletoe and red clover extracts may exhibit anti-tumoral activity by depleting hypoxanthine concentration in the cancer cells through XO activation, which may lead to lowered salvage pathway activity necessary for the cancer cells to proliferate in the cancerous colon tissue. Some foods like soybean, mistletoe and red clover may provide nutritional support to medical cancer therapy through inhibiting and/or activating key enzymes in cancer metabolism (Tab. 4, Ref. 33).

  10. Dietary Supplementation of Ginger and Turmeric Rhizomes Modulates Platelets Ectonucleotidase and Adenosine Deaminase Activities in Normotensive and Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Ayodele Jacob; Thomé, Gustavo Roberto; Morsch, Vera Maria; Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; de Oliveira, Lizielle Souza; Goularte, Jeferson Ferraz; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Oboh, Ganiyu; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is associated with platelet alterations that could contribute to the development of cardiovascular complications. Several studies have reported antiplatelet aggregation properties of ginger (Zingiber officinale) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) with limited scientific basis. Hence, this study assessed the effect of dietary supplementation of these rhizomes on platelet ectonucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities in Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) induced hypertensive rats. Animals were divided into seven groups (n = 10): normotensive control rats; induced (l-NAME hypertensive) rats; hypertensive rats treated with atenolol (10 mg/kg/day); normotensive and hypertensive rats treated with 4% supplementation of turmeric or ginger, respectively. After 14 days of pre-treatment, the animals were induced with hypertension by oral administration of l-NAME (40 mg/kg/day). The results revealed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in platelet ADA activity and ATP hydrolysis with a concomitant decrease in ADP and AMP hydrolysis of l-NAME hypertensive rats when compared with the control. However, dietary supplementation with turmeric or ginger efficiently prevented these alterations by modulating the hydrolysis of ATP, ADP and AMP with a concomitant decrease in ADA activity. Thus, these activities could suggest some possible mechanism of the rhizomes against hypertension-derived complications associated to platelet hyperactivity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Rescue of the Orphan Enzyme Isoguanine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Hitchcock, Daniel S.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Dangott, Lawrence J.; Almo, Steven C.; Raushel, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from Escherichia coli was shown to catalyze the deamination of isoguanine (2-oxoadenine) to xanthine. Isoguanine is an oxidation product of adenine in DNA that is mutagenic to the cell. The isoguanine deaminase activity in E. coli was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The active protein was identified by peptide mass fingerprint analysis as cytosine deaminase. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoguanine at pH 7.7 are kcat = 49 s-1, Km = 72 μM, and kcat/Km = 6.7 × 105 M-1 s-1. The kinetic constant for the deamination of cytosine are kcat = 45 s-1, Km = 302 μM, and kcat/Km = 1.5 × 105 M-1 s-1. Under these reaction conditions isoguanine is the better substrate for cytosine deaminase. The three dimensional structure of CDA was determined with isoguanine in the active site. PMID:21604715

  12. Possible Role of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Activity of Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 on Symbiosis with Mung Bean and Determinate Nodule Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Sripakdi, Sudarat; Boonkerd, Nantakorn; Tanthanuch, Waraporn; Minamisawa, Kiwamu; Teaumroong, Neung

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 forms symbiotic interactions with mung bean (Vigna radiata) and contains lrpL-acdS genes, which encode the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase enzyme that cleaves ACC, a precursor of plant ethylene synthesis. Since ethylene interferes with nodule formation in some legumes and plays a role in senescence in plant cells, BL3-enhancing ACC deaminase activity (BL3+) and defective mutant (BL3−) strains were constructed in order to investigate the effects of this enzyme on symbiosis and nodule senescence. Nodulation competitiveness was weaker in BL3− than in the wild-type, but was stronger in BL3+. The inoculation of BL3− into mung bean resulted in less plant growth, a lower nodule dry weight, and smaller nodule number than those in the wild-type, whereas the inoculation of BL3+ had no marked effects. However, similar nitrogenase activity was observed with all treatments; it was strongly detected 3 weeks after the inoculation and gradually declined with time, indicating senescence. The rate of plant nodulation by BL3+ increased in a time-dependent manner. Nodules occupied by BL3− formed smaller symbiosomes, and bacteroid degradation was more prominent than that in the wild-type 7 weeks after the inoculation. Changes in biochemical molecules during nodulation were tracked by Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and the results obtained confirmed that aging processes differed in nodules occupied by BL3 and BL3−. This is the first study to show the possible role of ACC deaminase activity in senescence in determinate nodules. Our results suggest that an increase in ACC deaminase activity in this strain does not extend the lifespan of nodules, whereas the lack of this activity may accelerate nodule senescence. PMID:26657304

  13. Bacteroides induce higher IgA production than Lactobacillus by increasing activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression in B cells in murine Peyer's patches.

    PubMed

    Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Hosono, Akira; Oyama, Akihito; Tsuda, Masato; Hachimura, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Itoh, Kikuji; Hirayama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kyoko; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2009-02-01

    The gut mucosal immune system is crucial in host defense against infection by pathogenic microbacteria and viruses via the production of IgA. Previous studies have shown that intestinal commensal bacteria enhance mucosal IgA production. However, it is poorly understood how these bacteria induce IgA production and which genera of intestinal commensal bacteria induce IgA production effectively. In this study, we compared the immunomodulatory effects of Bacteroides and Lactobacillus on IgA production by Peyer's patches lymphocytes. IgA production by Peyer's patches lymphocytes co-cultured with Bacteroides was higher than with Lactobacillus. In addition, the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase increased in co-culture with Bacteroides but not with Lactobacillus. We found that intestinal commensal bacteria elicited IgA production. In particular, Bacteroides induced the differentiation of Peyer's patches B cell into IgA(+) B cells by increasing activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression.

  14. Optimal functional levels of activation-induced deaminase specifically require the Hsp40 DnaJa1

    PubMed Central

    Orthwein, Alexandre; Zahn, Astrid; Methot, Stephen P; Godin, David; Conticello, Silvestro G; Terada, Kazutoyo; Di Noia, Javier M

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme activation-induced deaminase (AID) deaminates deoxycytidine at the immunoglobulin genes, thereby initiating antibody affinity maturation and isotype class switching during immune responses. In contrast, off-target DNA damage caused by AID is oncogenic. Central to balancing immunity and cancer is AID regulation, including the mechanisms determining AID protein levels. We describe a specific functional interaction between AID and the Hsp40 DnaJa1, which provides insight into the function of both proteins. Although both major cytoplasmic type I Hsp40s, DnaJa1 and DnaJa2, are induced upon B-cell activation and interact with AID in vitro, only DnaJa1 overexpression increases AID levels and biological activity in cell lines. Conversely, DnaJa1, but not DnaJa2, depletion reduces AID levels, stability and isotype switching. In vivo, DnaJa1-deficient mice display compromised response to immunization, AID protein and isotype switching levels being reduced by half. Moreover, DnaJa1 farnesylation is required to maintain, and farnesyltransferase inhibition reduces, AID protein levels in B cells. Thus, DnaJa1 is a limiting factor that plays a non-redundant role in the functional stabilization of AID. PMID:22085931

  15. Effects of iron supplementation on blood adenine deaminase activity and oxidative stress in Trypanosoma evansi infection of rats.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Tonin, Alexandre A; França, Raqueli T; Zanini, Danieli; Leal, Marta L R; Lopes, Sonia T A; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Morsch, Vera M; Monteiro, Silvia G; Guarda, Naiara S; Moresco, Rafael N; Aires, Adelina R; Stefani, Lenita M; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of iron supplementation on oxidative stress and on the activity of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) in rats experimentally infected by Trypanosoma evansi. For this purpose, 20 rats were divided into four experimental groups with five animals each as follows: groups A and B were composed by healthy animals, while animals from groups C and D were infected by T. evansi. Additionally, groups B and D received two subcutaneous doses of iron (60 mg kg(-1)) within an interval of 5 days. Blood samples were drawn on day 8 post infection in order to assess hematological and biochemical variables. Among the main results are: (1) animals from group C showed reduced erythrogram (with tendency to anemia); however the same results were not observed for group D; this might be a direct effect of free iron on trypanosomes which helped to reduce the parasitemia and the damage to erythrocytes caused by the infection; (2) iron supplementation was able to reduce NOx levels by inhibiting iNOS, and thus, providing an antioxidant action and, indirectly, reducing the ALT levels in groups Band D; (3) increase FRAP levels in group D; (4) reduce ADA activity in serum and erythrocytes in group C; however, this supplementation (5) increased the protein oxidation in groups B and D, as well as group C (positive control). Therefore, iron showed antioxidant and oxidant effects on animals that received supplementation; and it maintained the activity of E-ADA stable in infected/supplemented animals.

  16. Equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 genotype, cytidine deaminase activity and age predict gemcitabine plasma clearance in patients with solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Gusella, Milena; Pasini, Felice; Bolzonella, Caterina; Meneghetti, Silvia; Barile, Carmen; Bononi, Antonio; Toso, Silvia; Menon, Daniela; Crepaldi, Giorgio; Modena, Yasmina; Stievano, Laura; Padrini, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    AIM Gemcitabine (GEM) enters normal and tumour cells via concentrative (CNT) and equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENT) and is subsequently deaminated to the inactive difluorodeoxyurine (dFdU) by cytidine deaminase (CDA). The aim of our study was to ascertain whether the nucleoside transporter genotype and the CDA activity phenotype can predict total GEM plasma clearance. METHODS Forty-seven patients received GEM 1000–1250 mg m−2 i.v. over 30 min. Plasma concentrations of GEM and dFdU were measured and individual pharmacokinetic profiles were determined. CDA activity was measured ex vivo in plasma samples. The two most common hENT1 and hCNT1 polymorphisms were determined from genomic DNA. RESULTS Multivariate analysis revealed that GEM plasma clearance (CL) was positively correlated with the end of infusion dFdU : GEM ratio (P < 0.0001), which is a marker of in vivo CDA activity. The ENT1 genotype characterized by high transport capacity (G/G) and age were inversely correlated with CL (P= 0.027 and 0.048, respectively). A strong correlation was found between end of infusion GEM concentration and area under the concentration–time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC(0,∞)) (r2= 0.77). CONCLUSIONS Our results confirm the role of CDA and age on the interindividual variability of GEM CL and show the contribution of the hENT1 genotype for the first time. PMID:21284703

  17. Assessing the effects of heavy metals in ACC deaminase and IAA production on plant growth-promoting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Mendoza-Hernández José; Stefani, Perea-Vélez Yazmin; Janette, Arriola-Morales; Melani, Martínez-Simón Sara; Gabriela, Pérez-Osorio

    2016-01-01

    This study poses a methodology in order to simultaneously quantify ACC deaminase and IAA levels in the same culture medium. Ten bacterial strains isolated from plant rhizosphere naturally settled in mining residues were chosen. These bacterial strains were characterized as PGPB, and all of them showed at least three characteristics (indole-3 acetic acid and siderophore production, ACC deaminase enzyme activity, and inorganic phosphate solubilization). Taxonomic identification showed that the strains belong to Enterobacter, Serratia, Klebsiella, and Escherichia genera. Similarly, both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA synthesis in the presence of Cu, As, Pb, Ni, Cd, and Mn were measured. The results showed that both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA synthesis were higher with the Pb, As, and Cu treatments than with the Escherichia N16, Enterobacter K131, Enterobacter N9, and Serratia K120 control treatments. On the other hand, Ni, Cd, and Mn negatively affected both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA production on every bacterium except on the Klebsiella Mc173 strain. Serratia K120 bacterium got a positive correlation between ACC deaminase and IAA in the presence of every heavy metal, and it also promoted Helianthus annuus plant growth, showing a potential use in phytoremediation systems.

  18. Decrease in topoisomerase I is responsible for activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-dependent somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Maki; Sabouri, Zahra; Sabouri, Somayeh; Kitawaki, Yoko; Pommier, Yves; Abe, Takaya; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Honjo, Tasuku

    2011-11-29

    Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of the Ig gene require both the transcription of the locus and the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). During CSR, AID decreases the amount of topoisomerase I (Top1); this decrease alters the DNA structure and induces cleavage in the S region. Similarly, Top1 is involved in transcription-associated mutation at dinucleotide repeats in yeast and in triplet-repeat contraction in mammals. Here, we report that the AID-induced decrease in Top1 is critical for SHM. Top1 knockdown or haploinsufficiency enhanced SHM, whereas Top1 overexpression down-regulated it. A specific Top1 inhibitor, camptothecin, suppressed SHM, indicating that Top1's activity is required for DNA cleavage. Nonetheless, suppression of transcription abolished SHM, even in cells with Top1 knockdown, suggesting that transcription is critical. These results are consistent with a model proposed for CSR and triplet instability, in which transcription-induced non-B structure formation is enhanced by Top1 reduction and provides the target for irreversible cleavage by Top1. We speculate that the mechanism for transcription-coupled genome instability was adopted to generate immune diversity when AID evolved.

  19. A Study on the Serum Adenosine Deaminase Activity in Patients with Typhoid Fever and Other Febrile Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Ketavarapu, Sameera; Ramani G., Uma; Modi, Prabhavathi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) has been suggested to be an important enzyme which is associated with the cell mediated immunity, but its clinical significance in typhoid fever has not yet been characterized. The present study was taken up to evaluate the serum ADA activity in patients of typhoid fever. The levels of ADA were also measured in the patients who were suffering from other febrile illnesses. Material and Method: This was a case control study. The subjects who were included in this study were divided into 3 groups. Group A consisted of 50 normal healthy individuals who served as the controls. Group B consisted of 50 patients, both males and females of all age groups, who were suffering from culture positive typhoid fever. Group C consisted of 50 patients who were suffering from febrile illnesses other than typhoid fever like viral fever, gastro enteritis, malaria, tonsillitis, upper respiratory tract infections, etc. The serum levels of ADA were estimated in all the subjects who were under study. Results: The serum ADA level was found to be increased in the patients of typhoid fever as compared to that in those with other febrile illnesses and in the controls. Conclusion: From the present study, it can be concluded that there was a statistically significant increase in the serum ADA levels in the patients with typhoid. PMID:23730630

  20. SU-C-303-01: Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Confers Cancer Resistance to Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, S; La Count, S; Liu, J; Bai, X; Lu, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in malignant cell resistance to radiation therapy. Methods: We first developed several small devices that could be used to adopt radiation beams from clinical high dose rate brachy therapy (HDR) or linac-based megavoltage machines to perform pre-clinical cell and mouse experiments. Then we used these devices to deliver radiation to AID-positive and AID-silenced cancer cells or tumors formed by these cells in mice. Cells and mice bearing tumors received the same dose under the same experimental conditions. For cells, we observed the apoptosis and the cell survival rate over time. For mice bearing tumors, we measured and recorded the tumor sizes every other day for 4 weeks. Results: For cell experiments, we found that the AID-positive cells underwent much less apoptosis compared with AID-silenced cells upon radiation. And for mouse experiments, we found that AID-positive tumors grew significantly faster than the AID-silenced tumors despite of receiving the same doses of radiation. Conclusion: Our study suggests that AID may confer cancer resistance to radiation therapy, and AID may be a significant biomarker predicting cancer resistance to radiation therapy for certain cancer types.

  1. Targeting of the activation-induced cytosine deaminase is strongly influenced by the sequence and structure of the targeted DNA.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong Ming; Ratnam, Sarayu; Storb, Ursula

    2005-12-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin somatic hypermutation (SHM). Since in vitro AID was shown to deaminate cytosines on single-stranded DNA or the nontranscribed strand, it remained a puzzle how in vivo AID targets both DNA strands equally. Here we investigate the roles of transcription and DNA sequence in cytosine deamination. Strikingly different results are found with different substrates. Depending on the target sequence, the transcribed DNA strand is targeted as well as or better than the nontranscribed strand. The preferential targeting is not related to the frequency of AID hot spots. Comparison of cytosine deamination by AID and bisulfite shows different targeting patterns suggesting that AID may locally unwind the DNA. We conclude that somatic hypermutation on both DNA strands is the natural outcome of AID action on a transcribed gene; furthermore, the DNA sequence or structure and topology play major roles in targeting AID in vitro and in vivo. On the other hand, the lack of mutations in the first approximately 100 nucleotides and beyond about 1 to 2 kb from the promoter of immunoglobulin genes during SHM must be due to special conditions of transcription and chromatin in vivo.

  2. Combination of phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) pathway engineering and molecular engineering of L-amino acid deaminase improves PPA production with an Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ying; Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long

    2016-03-01

    In our previous study, we produced phenylpyruvic acid (PPA) in one step from L-phenylalanine by using an Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst expressing an L-amino acid deaminase (L-AAD) from Proteus mirabilis KCTC2566. However, the PPA titer was low due to the degradation of PPA and low substrate specificity of L-AAD. In this study, metabolic engineering of the L-phenylalanine degradation pathway in E. coli and protein engineering of L-AAD from P. mirabilis were performed to improve the PPA titer. First, three aminotransferase genes were knocked out to block PPA degradation, which increased the PPA titer from 3.3 ± 0.2 to 3.9 ± 0.1 g/L and the substrate conversion ratio to 97.5 %. Next, L-AAD was engineered via error-prone polymerase chain reaction, followed by site-saturation mutation to improve its catalytic performance. The triple mutant D165K/F263M/L336M produced the highest PPA titer of 10.0 ± 0.4 g/L, with a substrate conversion ratio of 100 %, which was 3.0 times that of wild-type L-AAD. Comparative kinetics analysis showed that compared with wild-type L-AAD, the triple mutant had higher substrate-binding affinity and catalytic efficiency. Finally, an optimal fed-batch biotransformation process was developed to achieve a maximal PPA titer of 21 ± 1.8 g/L within 8 h. This study developed a robust whole-cell E. coli biocatalyst for PPA production by integrating metabolic and protein engineering, strategies that may be useful for the construction of other biotransformation biocatalysts.

  3. On the multiple functional roles of the active site histidine in catalysis and allosteric regulation of Escherichia coli glucosamine 6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Montero-Morán, G M; Lara-González, S; Alvarez-Añorve, L I; Plumbridge, J A; Calcagno, M L

    2001-08-28

    The active site of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase (EC 3.5.99.6, formerly 5.3.1.10) from Escherichia coli was first characterized on the basis of the crystallographic structure of the enzyme bound to the competitive inhibitor 2-amino-2-deoxy-glucitol 6-phosphate. The structure corresponds to the R allosteric state of the enzyme; it shows the side-chain of His143 in close proximity to the O5 atom of the inhibitor. This arrangement suggests that His143 could have a role in the catalysis of the ring-opening step of glucosamine 6-phosphate whose alpha-anomer is the true substrate. The imidazole group of this active-site histidine contacts the carboxy groups from Glu148 and Asp141, via its Ndelta1 atom [Oliva et al. (1995) Structure 3, 1323-1332]. These interactions change in the T state because the side chain of Glu148 moves toward the allosteric site, leaving at the active site the dyad Asp141-His143 [Horjales et al. (1999) Structure 7, 527-536]. In this research, a dual approach using site-directed mutagenesis and controlled chemical modification of histidine residues has been used to investigate the role of the active-site histidine. Our results support a multifunctional role of His143; in the forward reaction, it is involved in the catalysis of the ring-opening step of the substrate, glucosamine 6-P. In the reverse reaction, the substrate fructose 6-P binds in its open chain, carbonylic form. The role of His143 in the binding of both glucosamine 6-P and reaction intermediates in their extended-chain forms was demonstrated by binding experiments using the reaction intermediate analogue, 2-amino-2-deoxy-D-glucitol 6-phosphate. His143 was also shown to be a critical residue for the conformational coupling between active and allosteric sites. From the pH dependence of the reactivity of the active site histidine to diethyl dicarbonate, we observed a pK(a) change of 1.2 units to the acid side when the enzyme undergoes the allosteric T to R transition during which the

  4. On the role of the conformational flexibility of the active-site lid on the allosteric kinetics of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Jaimes, Ismael; Sosa-Peinado, Alejandro; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Horjales, Eduardo; Calcagno, Mario L

    2002-05-24

    The active site of glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli (GlcN6P deaminase, EC 3.5.99.6) has a complex lid formed by two antiparallel beta-strands connected by a helix-loop segment (158-187). This motif contains Arg172, which is a residue involved in binding the substrate in the active-site, and three residues that are part of the allosteric site, Arg158, Lys160 and Thr161. This dual binding role of the motif forming the lid suggests that it plays a key role in the functional coupling between active and allosteric sites. Previous crystallographic work showed that the temperature coefficients of the active-site lid are very large when the enzyme is in its T allosteric state. These coefficients decrease in the R state, thus suggesting that this motif changes its conformational flexibility as a consequence of the allosteric transition. In order to explore the possible connection between the conformational flexibility of the lid and the function of the deaminase, we constructed the site-directed mutant Phe174-Ala. Phe174 is located at the C-end of the lid helix and its side-chain establishes hydrophobic interactions with the remainder of the enzyme. The crystallographic structure of the T state of Phe174-Ala deaminase, determined at 2.02 A resolution, shows no density for the segment 162-181, which is part of the active-site lid (PDB 1JT9). This mutant form of the enzyme is essentially inactive in the absence of the allosteric activator, N-acetylglucosamine-6-P although it recovers its activity up to the wild-type level in the presence of this ligand. Spectrometric and binding studies show that inactivity is due to the inability of the active-site to bind ligands when the allosteric site is empty. These data indicate that the conformational flexibility of the active-site lid critically alters the binding properties of the active site, and that the occupation of the allosteric site restores the lid conformational flexibility to a functional state.

  5. Enhancement of anti-tumor activity of Newcastle disease virus by the synergistic effect of cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Lv, Zheng; Zhang, Tian-Yuan; Yin, Jie-Chao; Wang, Hui; Sun, Tian; Chen, Li-Qun; Bai, Fu-Liang; Wu, Wei; Ren, Gui-Ping; Li, De-Shan

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate enhancement of anti-tumor effects of the lentogenic Newcastle disease virus Clone30 strain (NDV rClone30) expressing cytosine deaminase (CD) gene against tumor cells and in murine groin tumor-bearing models. Cytotoxic effects of the rClone30-CD/5-FC on the HepG2 cell line were examined by an MTT method. Anti-tumor activity of rClone30-CD/5-FC was examined in H22 tumor-bearing mice. Compared to the rClone30-CD virus treatment alone, NDV rClone30-CD/5-FC at 0.1 and 1 MOIs exerted significant cytotoxic effects (P<0.05) on HepG2 cells. For treatment of H22 tumor-bearing mice, recombinant NDV was injected together with 5-FC given by either intra-tumor injection or tail vein injection. When 5-FC was administered by intra-tumor injection, survival for the rClone30-CD/5-FC-treated mice was 4/6 for 80 days period vs 1/6 , 0/6 and 0/6 for the mice treated with rClone30-CD, 5-FC and saline alone, respectively. When 5-FC was given by tail vein injection, survival for the rClone30-CD/5-FC-treated mice was 3/6 vs 2/6 , 0/6 and 0/6 for the mice treated with rClone30-CD, 5-FC or saline alone, respectively. In this study, NDV was used for the first time to deliver the suicide gene for cancer therapy. Incorporation of the CD gene in the lentogenic NDV genome together with 5-FC significantly enhances cell death of HepG2 tumor cells in vitro, decreases tumor volume and increases survival of H22 tumor-bearing mice in vivo.

  6. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase is dispensable for virus-mediated liver and skin tumor development in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tung; Xu, Jianliang; Chikuma, Shunsuke; Hiai, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Pfister, Herbert; Honjo, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Maki

    2014-07-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) not only promotes immune diversity by initiating somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in immunoglobulin genes but also provokes genomic instability by introducing translocations and mutations into non-immunoglobulin genes. To test whether AID is essential for virus-induced tumor development, we used two transgenic tumor models: mice expressing hepatitis C virus (HCV) core proteins (HCV-Tg), driven by the hepatitis B virus promoter, and mice expressing human papillomavirus type 8 proteins (HPV8-Tg), driven by the Keratin 14 promoter. Both strains were analyzed in the absence and presence of AID by crossing each with AID (-/-) mice. There was no difference in the liver tumor frequency between the HCV-Tg/AID (+/+) and HCV-Tg/AID (-/-) mice at 20 months of age although the AID (+/+) mice showed more severe histological findings and increased cytokine expression. Furthermore, a low level of AID transcript was detected in the HCV-Tg/AID (+/+) liver tissue that was not derived from hepatocytes themselves but from intra-hepatic immune cells. Although AID may not be the direct cause of HCV-induced oncogenesis, AID expressed in B cells, not in hepatocytes, may prolong steatosis and cause increased lymphocyte infiltration into HCV core protein-induced liver lesions. Similarly, there was no difference in the time course of skin tumor development between the HPV8-Tg/AID (-/-) and HPV8-Tg/AID (+/+) groups. In conclusion, AID does not appear to be required for tumor development in the two virus-induced tumor mouse models tested although AID expressed in infiltrating B cells may promote inflammatory reactions in HCV core protein-induced liver pathogenesis.

  7. Radioimmunochemical quantitation of human adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed Central

    Daddona, P E; Frohman, M A; Kelley, W N

    1979-01-01

    Markedly reduced or absent adenosine deaminase activity in man is associated with an autosomal recesive form of severe conbined immunodeficiency disease. To further define the genetic nature of this enzyme defect, we have quantitated immunologically active adenosine deaminase (CRM) in the hemolysate of homozygous deficient patients and their heterozygous parents. A highly specific radioimmunoassay was developed capable of detecting 0.05% of normal erythrocyte adenosine deaminase. Hemolysates from nine heterozygotes (five families) showed a wide range in CRM (32--100% of normal) and variable absolute specific activities with several being at least 1 SD BELOW THE NORMAL MEAN. Hemolysates from four unrelated patients showed less than 0.09% adenosine deaminase activity with CRM ranging from less than 0.06 to 5.6% of the normal mean. In conclusion, heterozygote and homozygote hemolysates from five of the eight families analyzed revealed variable levels of CRM suggesting heterogeneous genetic alteration or expression of the silent or defective allele(s) of adenosine deaminase. PMID:468994

  8. Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA, RNA Editing, and Interferon Action

    PubMed Central

    George, Cyril X.; Gan, Zhenji; Liu, Yong

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine (A) to inosine (I) editing of RNA that possesses double-stranded (ds) structure. A-to-I RNA editing results in nucleotide substitution, because I is recognized as G instead of A both by ribosomes and by RNA polymerases. A-to-I substitution can also cause dsRNA destabilization, as I:U mismatch base pairs are less stable than A:U base pairs. Three mammalian ADAR genes are known, of which two encode active deaminases (ADAR1 and ADAR2). Alternative promoters together with alternative splicing give rise to two protein size forms of ADAR1: an interferon-inducible ADAR1-p150 deaminase that binds dsRNA and Z-DNA, and a constitutively expressed ADAR1-p110 deaminase. ADAR2, like ADAR1-p110, is constitutively expressed and binds dsRNA. A-to-I editing occurs with both viral and cellular RNAs, and affects a broad range of biological processes. These include virus growth and persistence, apoptosis and embryogenesis, neurotransmitter receptor and ion channel function, pancreatic cell function, and post-transcriptional gene regulation by microRNAs. Biochemical processes that provide a framework for understanding the physiologic changes following ADAR-catalyzed A-to-I ( = G) editing events include mRNA translation by changing codons and hence the amino acid sequence of proteins; pre-mRNA splicing by altering splice site recognition sequences; RNA stability by changing sequences involved in nuclease recognition; genetic stability in the case of RNA virus genomes by changing sequences during viral RNA replication; and RNA-structure-dependent activities such as microRNA production or targeting or protein–RNA interactions. PMID:21182352

  9. One-step biosynthesis of α-keto-γ-methylthiobutyric acid from L-methionine by an Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst expressing an engineered L-amino acid deaminase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Du, Guocheng; Wang, Miao; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    α-Keto-γ-methylthiobutyric acid (KMTB), a keto derivative of l-methionine, has great potential for use as an alternative to l-methionine in the poultry industry and as an anti-cancer drug. This study developed an environment friendly process for KMTB production from l-methionine by an Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst expressing an engineered l-amino acid deaminase (l-AAD) from Proteus vulgaris. We first overexpressed the P. vulgaris l-AAD in E. coli BL21 (DE3) and further optimized the whole-cell transformation process. The maximal molar conversion ratio of l-methionine to KMTB was 71.2% (mol/mol) under the optimal conditions (70 g/L l-methionine, 20 g/L whole-cell biocatalyst, 5 mM CaCl2, 40°C, 50 mM Tris-HCl [pH 8.0]). Then, error-prone polymerase chain reaction was used to construct P. vulgaris l-AAD mutant libraries. Among approximately 104 mutants, two mutants bearing lysine 104 to arginine and alanine 337 to serine substitutions showed 82.2% and 80.8% molar conversion ratios, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of these mutations enhanced the catalytic activity and molar conversion ratio by 1.3-fold and up to 91.4% with a KMTB concentration of 63.6 g/L. Finally, the effect of immobilization on whole-cell transformation was examined, and the immobilized whole-cell biocatalyst with Ca2+ alginate increased reusability by 41.3% compared to that of free cell production. Compared with the traditional multi-step chemical synthesis, our one-step biocatalytic production of KMTB has an advantage in terms of environmental pollution and thus has great potential for industrial KMTB production.

  10. Biochemical basis of immunological and retroviral responses to DNA-targeted cytosine deamination by activation-induced cytidine deaminase and APOBEC3G.

    PubMed

    Chelico, Linda; Pham, Phuong; Petruska, John; Goodman, Myron F

    2009-10-09

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and APOBEC3G catalyze deamination of cytosine to uracil on single-stranded DNA, thereby setting in motion a regulated hypermutagenic process essential for human well-being. However, if regulation fails, havoc ensues. AID plays a central role in the synthesis of high affinity antibodies, and APOBEC3G inactivates human immunodeficiency virus-1. This minireview highlights biochemical and structural properties of AID and APOBEC3G, showing how studies using the purified enzymes provide valuable insight into the considerably more complex biology governing antibody generation and human immunodeficiency virus inactivation.

  11. Autosomal recessive hyper IgM syndrome associated with activation-induced cytidine deaminase gene in three Turkish siblings presented with tuberculosis lymphadenitis - Case report.

    PubMed

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Akar, H Haluk; van der Burg, Mirjam; Unal, Ekrem

    2015-09-01

    The hyper-immunoglobulin M (HIGM) syndrome is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders characterized by recurrent infections, decreased serum levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA, and normal/increased serum levels of IgM. Herein, we describe three Turkish siblings with HIGM syndrome who had a homozygous missense mutation (c.70C>T, p.Arg24Trp) in the activation-induced cytidine deaminase gene which results in autosomal recessive HIGM syndrome. Two of the siblings, sibling 1 and sibling 3, presented with cervical deep abscess and cervical tuberculosis lymphadenitis, respectively.

  12. Human adenosine deaminase. Distribution and properties.

    PubMed

    Van der Weyden, M B; Kelley, W N

    1976-09-25

    Adenosine deaminase exists in multiple molecular forms in human tissue. One form of the enzyme appears to be "particulate". Three forms of the enzyme are soluble and interconvertible with apparent molecular weights of approximately 36,000, 114,000, and 298,000 (designated small, intermediate, and large, respectively). The small form of adenosine deaminase is convertible to the large form only in the presence of a protein, which has an apparent molecular weight of 200,000 and has no adenosine deaminase activity. This conversion of the small form of the enzyme to the large form occurs at 4 degrees, exhibits a pH optimum of 5.0 to 8.0, and is associated with a loss of conversion activity. The small form of the enzyme predominates in tissue preparations exhibiting the higher enzyme-specific activities and no detectable conversion activity. The large form of adenosine deaminase predominates in tissue extracts exhibiting the lower enzyme specific activities and abundant conversion activity. The small form of adenosine deaminase shows several electrophoretic variants by isoelectric focusing. The electrophoretic heterogeneity observed with the large form of the enzyme is similar to that observed with the small form, with the exception that several additional electrophoretic variants are uniformly identified. No organ specificity is demonstrable for the different electrophoretic forms. The kinetic characteristics of the three soluble molecular species of adenosine deaminase are identical except for pH optimum, which is 5.5 for the intermediate species and 7.0 to 7.4 for the large and small forms.

  13. Ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (E-NPP) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities in prostate cancer patients: influence of Gleason score, treatment and bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Vanessa; Maders, Liési D K; Bagatini, Margarete D; Battisti, Iara E; Bellé, Luziane P; Santos, Karen F; Maldonado, Paula A; Thomé, Gustavo R; Schetinger, Maria R C; Morsch, Vera M

    2013-04-01

    The relation between adenine nucleotides and cancer has already been described in literature. Considering that the enzymes ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (E-NPP) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) act together to control nucleotide levels, we aimed to investigate the role of these enzymes in prostate cancer (PCa). E-NPP and ADA activities were determined in serum and platelets of PCa patients and controls. We also verified the influence of the Gleason score, bone metastasis and treatment in the enzyme activities. Platelets and serum E-NPP activity increased, whereas ADA activity in serum decreased in PCa patients. In addition, Gleason score, metastasis and treatment influenced E-NPP and ADA activities. We may propose that E-NPP and ADA are involved in the development of PCa. Moreover, E-NPP and ADA activities are modified in PCa patients with distinct Gleason score, with bone metastasis, as well as in patients under treatment.

  14. Alternative splicing regulates activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID): implications for suppression of AID mutagenic activity in normal and malignant B cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaosheng; Darce, Jaime R.; Chang, Sook Kyung; Nowakowski, Grzegorz S.

    2008-01-01

    The mutagenic enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in germinal center (GC) B cells. Deregulated expression of AID is associated with various B-cell malignancies and, currently, it remains unclear how AID activity is extinguished to avoid illegitimate mutations. AID has also been shown to be alternatively spliced in malignant B cells, and there is limited evidence that this also occurs in normal blood B cells. The functional significance of these splice variants remains unknown. Here we show that normal GC human B cells and blood memory B cells similarly express AID splice variants and show for the first time that AID splicing variants are singly expressed in individual normal B cells as well as malignant B cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients. We further demonstrate that the alternative AID splice variants display different activities ranging from inactivation of CSR to inactivation or heightened SHM activity. Our data therefore suggest that CSR and SHM are differentially switched off by varying the expression of splicing products of AID at the individual cell level. Most importantly, our findings suggest a novel tumor suppression mechanism by which unnecessary AID mutagenic activities are promptly contained for GC B cells. PMID:18684869

  15. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) expression in human B-cell precursors is essential for central B-cell tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M.; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D.; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme mediating class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B-cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B-cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B-cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells. PMID:26546282

  16. In silico structural and functional analysis of Mesorhizobium ACC deaminase.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Krishnendu; Soren, Tithi; Mitra, Soumik; Maiti, Tushar Kanti

    2017-02-11

    Nodulation is one of the very important processes of legume plants as it is the initiating event of fixing nitrogen. Although ethylene has essential role in normal plant metabolism but it has also negative impact on plants particularly in nodule formation in legume plants. It is also produced due to a variety of biotic or abiotic stresses. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase is a rhizobial enzyme which cleaves ACC (immediate precursor of ethylene) into α-ketobutyrate and ammonia. As a result, the level of ethylene from the plant cells is decreased and the negative impact of ethylene on nodule formation is reduced. ACC deaminase is widely studied in several plant growth promoting rhizobacterial (PGPR) strains including many legume nodulating bacteria like Mesorhizobium sp. It is an important symbiotic nitrogen fixer belonging to the class - alphaproteobacteria under the order Rhizobiales. ACC deaminase has positive role in Legume-rhizobium symbiosis. Rhizobial ACC deaminase has the potentiality to reduce the adverse effects of ethylene, thereby triggering the nodulation process. The present study describes an in silico comparative structural (secondary structure prediction, homology modeling) and functional analysis of ACC deaminase from Mesorhizobium spp. to explore physico-chemical properties using a number of bio-computational tools. M. loti was selected as a representative species of Mesorhizobium genera for 3D modelling of ACC deaminase protein. Correlation by the phylogenetic relatedness on the basis of both ACC deaminase enzymes and respective acdS genes of different strains of Mesorhizobium has also studied.

  17. Rescue of the Orphan Enzyme Isoguanine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    D Hitchcock; A Fedorov; E Fedorov; L Dangott; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from Escherichia coli was shown to catalyze the deamination of isoguanine (2-oxoadenine) to xanthine. Isoguanine is an oxidation product of adenine in DNA that is mutagenic to the cell. The isoguanine deaminase activity in E. coli was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration, and anion exchange chromatography. The active protein was identified by peptide mass fingerprint analysis as cytosine deaminase. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoguanine at pH 7.7 are as follows: k{sub cat} = 49 s{sup -1}, K{sub m} = 72 {micro}M, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 6.7 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. The kinetic constants for the deamination of cytosine are as follows: k{sub cat} = 45 s{sup -1}, K{sub m} = 302 {micro}M, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 1.5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Under these reaction conditions, isoguanine is the better substrate for cytosine deaminase. The three-dimensional structure of CDA was determined with isoguanine in the active site.

  18. Rescue of the orphan enzyme isoguanine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Hitchcock, Daniel S; Fedorov, Alexander A; Fedorov, Elena V; Dangott, Lawrence J; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-06-28

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from Escherichia coli was shown to catalyze the deamination of isoguanine (2-oxoadenine) to xanthine. Isoguanine is an oxidation product of adenine in DNA that is mutagenic to the cell. The isoguanine deaminase activity in E. coli was partially purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration, and anion exchange chromatography. The active protein was identified by peptide mass fingerprint analysis as cytosine deaminase. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoguanine at pH 7.7 are as follows: k(cat) = 49 s(-1), K(m) = 72 μM, and k(cat)/K(m) = 6.7 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). The kinetic constants for the deamination of cytosine are as follows: k(cat) = 45 s(-1), K(m) = 302 μM, and k(cat)/K(m) = 1.5 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1). Under these reaction conditions, isoguanine is the better substrate for cytosine deaminase. The three-dimensional structure of CDA was determined with isoguanine in the active site.

  19. T-cell lines from 2 patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency showed the restoration of ADA activity resulted from the reversion of an inherited mutation.

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Oda, N; Yamaguchi, K; Kawamura, N; Kikuta, H; Taniuchi, S; Kobayashi, Y; Terada, K; Ikeda, H; Hershfield, M S; Kobayashi, K; Sakiyama, Y

    2001-05-01

    Inherited deficiency of adenosine deaminase (ADA) results in one of the autosomal recessive forms of severe combined immunodeficiency. This report discusses 2 patients with ADA deficiency from different families, in whom a possible reverse mutation had occurred. The novel mutations were identified in the ADA gene from the patients, and both their parents were revealed to be carriers. Unexpectedly, established patient T-cell lines, not B-cell lines, showed half-normal levels of ADA enzyme activity. Reevaluation of the mutations in these T-cell lines indicated that one of the inherited ADA gene mutations was reverted in both patients. At least one of the patients seemed to possess the revertant cells in vivo; however, the mutant cells might have overcome the revertant after receiving ADA enzyme replacement therapy. These findings may have significant implications regarding the prospects for stem cell gene therapy for ADA deficiency.

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Reactivation Activates B Cells Polyclonally and Induces Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression: A Mechanism Underlying Autoimmunity and Its Contribution to Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Keiko; Kumata, Keisuke; Nakayama, Yuji; Satoh, Yukio; Sugihara, Hirotsugu; Hara, Sayuri; Matsushita, Michiko; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Kato, Masako; Murakami, Ichiro; Hayashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-04-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease that results in and is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism, and the reactivation of persisting Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in B lymphocytes induces the differentiation of host B cells into plasma cells. We previously reported that some EBV-infected B cells had thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAbs) as surface immunoglobulins (Igs), and EBV reactivation induced these TRAb+EBV+ cells to produce TRAbs. EBV reactivation induces Ig production from host B cells. The purpose of the present study was to examine total Ig productions from B cell culture fluids and to detect activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and EBV latent membrane protein (LMP) 1 in culture B cells during EBV reactivation induction and then we discussed the mechanisms of EBV reactivation-induced Ig production in relation to autoimmunity. We showed that the EBV reactivation induces the production of every isotype of Ig and suggested that the Ig production was catalyzed by AID through LMP1 and NF-κB. The results that the amount of IgM was significantly larger compared with IgG suggested the polyclonal B cell activation due to LMP1. We proposed the pathway of EBV reactivation induced Ig production; B cells newly infected with EBV are activated by polyclonal B cell activation and produce Igs through plasma cell differentiation induced by EBV reactivation. LMP1-induced AID enabled B cells to undergo class-switch recombination to produce every isotype of Ig. According to this mechanism, EBV rescues autoreactive B cells to produce autoantibodies, which contribute to the development and exacerbation of autoimmune diseases.

  1. Purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Mills, G C; Schmalstieg, F C; Trimmer, K B; Goldman, A S; Goldblum, R M

    1976-01-01

    Purine and pyrimidine metabolites were measured in erythrocytes, plasma, and urine of a 5-month-old infant with adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase, EC 3.5.4.4) deficiency. Adenosine and adenine were measured using newly devised ion exchange separation techniques and a sensitive fluorescence assay. Plasma adenosine levels were increased, whereas adenosine was normal in erythrocytes and not detectable in urine. Increased amounts of adenine were found in erythrocytes and urine as well as in the plasma. Erythrocyte adenosine 5'-monophosphate and adenosine diphosphate concentrations were normal, but adenosine triphosphate content was greatly elevated. Because of the possibility of pyrimidine starvation, pyrimidine nucleotides (pyrimidine coenzymes) in erythrocytes and orotic acid in urine were measured. Pyrimidine nucleotide concentrations were normal, while orotic acid was not detected. These studies suggest that the immune deficiency associated with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be related to increased amounts of adenine, adenosine, or adenine nucleotides. PMID:1066699

  2. Adenosine deaminase, 5'-nucleotidase, xanthine oxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities in gastric juices from patients with gastric cancer, ulcer, and atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Durak, I; Ormeci, N; Akyol, O; Canbolat, O; Kavutçu, M; Bülbül, M

    1994-04-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA), 5'-Nucleotidase (5NT), Xanthine oxidase (XO), Cu-Zn Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and Catalase (CAT) activities were determined in gastric juices from patients with gastric cancer, ulcer, gastritis and from healthy subjects. Enzyme activities were given as units per ml gastric juice and units per mg protein in gastric juice. ADA, 5NT and XO activities were found lower and protein concentrations were found higher in the cancer group than controls. There was however no significant difference between Cu-Zn SOD activities of the cancer and control groups. In all groups including control one, we could not find catalase activities in most of the samples. On the other hand, ADA, 5NT activities and protein concentrations in the gastric juice were lower in the gastritis group than control group. In the ulcer group, we found higher Cu-Zn SOD and XO activities and lower 5NT activity and protein concentrations compared with control values. In an attempt to establish statistical correlations between mean enzyme activities, pH and protein concentrations in the gastric juices of the groups, we found noticeable intra and inter-correlations, which indicated possible relations between DNA and free radical metabolizing enzymes.

  3. Molecular basis for paradoxical carriers of adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency that show extremely low levels of ADA activity in peripheral blood cells without immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Oda, N; Sanstisteban, I; Arredondo-Vega, F X; Shioda, M; Ueno, H; Terada, K; Kobayashi, K; Hershfield, M S; Sakiyama, Y

    2001-02-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency causes an autosomal recessive form of severe combined immunodeficiency and also less severe phenotypes, depending to a large degree on genotype. In general, ADA activity in cells of carriers is approximately half-normal. Unexpectedly, healthy first-degree relatives of two unrelated ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficient patients (mother and brother in family I; mother in family II) had only 1-2% of normal ADA activity in PBMC, lower than has previously been found in PBMC of healthy individuals with so-called "partial ADA deficiency." The level of deoxyadenosine nucleotides in erythrocytes of these paradoxical carriers was slightly elevated, but much lower than levels found in immunodeficient patients with ADA deficiency. ADA activity in EBV-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and T cell lines established from these carriers was 10-20% of normal. Each of these carriers possessed two mutated ADA alleles. Expression of cloned mutant ADA cDNAs in an ADA-deletion strain of Escherichia coli indicated that the novel mutations G239S and M310T were responsible for the residual ADA activity. ADA activity in EBV-LCL extracts of the paradoxical carriers was much more labile than ADA from normal EBV-LCL. Immunoblotting suggested that this lability was due to denaturation rather than to degradation of the mutant protein. These results further define the threshold level of ADA activity necessary for sustaining immune function.

  4. Activity of cholinesterases, pyruvate kinase and adenosine deaminase in rats experimentally infected by Fasciola hepatica: Influences of these enzymes on inflammatory response and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Bottari, Nathieli B; Mendes, Ricardo E; Schwertz, Claiton I; Lucca, Neuber J; Dalenogare, Diessica; Bochi, Guilherme V; Moresco, Rafael N; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria R C; Rech, Virginia C; Jaques, Jeandre A; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in total blood and liver tissue; butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) in serum and liver tissue; adenosine deaminase (ADA) in serum and liver tissue; and pyruvate kinase (PK) in liver tissue of rats experimentally infected by Fasciola hepatica. Animals were divided into two groups with 12 animals each, as follows: group A (uninfected) and group B (infected). Samples were collected at 20 (A1 and B1;n=6 each) and 150 (A2 and B2; n=6 each) days post-infection (PI). Infected animals showed an increase in AChE activity in whole blood and a decrease in AChE activity in liver homogenates (P<0.05) at 20 and 150 days PI. BChE and PK activities were decreased (P<0.05) in serum and liver homogenates of infected animals at 150 days PI. ADA activity was decreased in serum at 20 and 150 days PI, while in liver homogenates it was only decreased at 150 days PI (P<0.05). Aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities in serum were increased (P<0.05), while concentrations of total protein and albumin were decreased (P<0.05) when compared to control. The histological analysis revealed fibrous perihepatitis and necrosis. Therefore, we conclude that the liver fluke is associated with cholinergic and purinergic dysfunctions, which in turn may influence the pathogenesis of the disease.

  5. Aqueous seed extract of Syzygium cumini inhibits the dipeptidyl peptidase IV and adenosine deaminase activities, but it does not change the CD26 expression in lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bellé, Luziane Potrich; Bitencourt, Paula Eliete Rodrigues; Abdalla, Faida Husein; Bona, Karine Santos de; Peres, Alessandra; Maders, Liési Diones Konzen; Moretto, Maria Beatriz

    2013-03-01

    Syzygium cumini (Sc) have been intensively studied in the last years due its beneficial effects including anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory potential. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of aqueous seed extract of Sc (ASc) in the activity of enzymes involved in lymphocyte functions. To perform this study, we isolated lymphocytes from healthy donors. Lymphocytes were exposed to 10, 30, and 100 mg/mL of ASc during 4 and 6 h and adenosine deaminase (ADA), dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities as well as CD26 expression and cellular viability were evaluated. ASc inhibited the ADA and DPP-IV activities without alteration in the CD26 expression (DPP-IV protein). No alterations were observed in the AChE activity or in the cell viability. These results indicate that the inhibition of the DPP-IV and ADA activities was dependent on the time of exposition to ASc. We suggest that ASc exhibits immunomodulatory properties probably via the pathway of DPP-IV-ADA complex, contributing to the understanding of these proceedings in the purinergic signaling.

  6. Studies on guanine deaminase and its inhibitors in rat tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S.; Josan, V.; Sanger, K. C. S.; Tewari, K. K.; Krishnan, P. S.

    1967-01-01

    1. In kidney, but not in rat whole brain and liver, guanine-deaminase activity was localized almost exclusively in the 15000g supernatant fraction of iso-osmotic sucrose homogenates. However, as in brain and liver, the enzymic activity recovered in the supernatant was higher than that in the whole homogenate. The particulate fractions of kidney, especially the heavy mitochondria, brought about powerful inhibition of the supernatant guanine-deaminase activity. 2. In spleen, as in kidney, guanine-deaminase activity was localized in the 15000g supernatant fraction of iso-osmotic sucrose homogenates. However, the particulate fractions did not inhibit the activity of the supernatant. 3. Guanine-deaminase activity in rat brain was absent from the cerebellum and present only in the cerebral hemispheres. The inhibitor of guanine deaminase was located exclusively in the cerebellum, where it was associated with the particles sedimenting at 5000g from sucrose homogenates. 4. Homogenates of cerebral hemispheres, the separated cortex or the remaining portion of the hemispheres had significantly higher guanine-deaminase activity than homogenates of whole brain. The enzymic activity of the subcellular particulate fractions was nearly the same. 5. Guanine deaminase was purified from the 15000g supernatant of sucrose homogenates of whole brain. The enzyme separated as two distinct fractions, A and B, on DEAE-cellulose columns. 6. The guanine-deaminase activity of the light-mitochondrial fraction of whole brain was fully exposed and solubilized by treatment with Triton X-100, and partially purified. 7. Tested in the form of crude preparations, the inhibitor from kidney did not act on the brain and liver supernatant enzymes and the inhibitor from cerebellum did not act on kidney enzyme, but the inhibitor from liver acted on both brain and kidney enzyme. 8. The inhibitor of guanine deaminase was purified from the heavy mitochondria of whole brain and liver and the 5000g residue of

  7. Chicken embryo fibroblasts exposed to weak, time-varying magnetic fields share cell proliferation, adenosine deaminase activity, and membrane characteristics of transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parola, A.H.; Porat, N.; Kiesow, L.A. )

    1993-01-01

    Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) exposed to a sinusoidally varying magnetic field (SVMF) (100 Hz, 700 microT, for 24 h) showed a remarkable rise of segmental rotational relaxation rate of adenosine deaminase (ADA, EC 3.5.4.4) as determined by multifrequency phase fluorometry. Pyrene-labeled, small subunit ADA was applied to cultured (normal) CEF, which have available and abundant ADA complexing protein (ADCP) on their plasma membranes. Sine-wave-modulated fluorometry of the pyrene yielded a profile of phase angle vs. modulation frequency. In SVMF-treated cells and in Rous-sarcoma-virus (RSV) transformed cells the differential phase values at low modulation frequencies of the excitation are remarkably reduced. This effect is magnetic rather than thermal, because the temperature was carefully controlled and monitored; nevertheless to further check this matter we studied CEF, infected by the RSV-Ts68 temperature-sensitive mutant (36 degrees C transformed, 41 degrees C revertant). When grown at 36 degrees C in the SVMF, cells did not show the slightest trend towards reversion, as would be expected had there been local heating. Concomitant with the increased segmental rotational relaxation rate of ADA, there was a decrease in fluorescence lifetime and a slight, yet significant, increase in membrane lipid microfluidity. These biophysical observations prompted us to examine the effect of SVMF on cell proliferation and ADA activity (a malignancy marker): higher rates of cell proliferation and reduced specific activity of ADA were observed.

  8. Unique properties of Plasmodium falciparum porphobilinogen deaminase.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Viswanathan Arun; Arumugam, Rajavel; Gopalakrishnan, Bulusu; Jyothsna, Yeleswarapu Sri; Rangarajan, Pundi N; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2008-01-04

    The hybrid pathway for heme biosynthesis in the malarial parasite proposes the involvement of parasite genome-coded enzymes of the pathway localized in different compartments such as apicoplast, mitochondria, and cytosol. However, knowledge on the functionality and localization of many of these enzymes is not available. In this study, we demonstrate that porphobilinogen deaminase encoded by the Plasmodium falciparum genome (PfPBGD) has several unique biochemical properties. Studies carried out with PfPBGD partially purified from parasite membrane fraction, as well as recombinant PfPBGD lacking N-terminal 64 amino acids expressed and purified from Escherichia coli cells (DeltaPfPBGD), indicate that both the proteins are catalytically active. Surprisingly, PfPBGD catalyzes the conversion of porphobilinogen to uroporphyrinogen III (UROGEN III), indicating that it also possesses uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) activity, catalyzing the next step. This obviates the necessity to have a separate gene for UROS that has not been so far annotated in the parasite genome. Interestingly, DeltaPfP-BGD gives rise to UROGEN III even after heat treatment, although UROS from other sources is known to be heat-sensitive. Based on the analysis of active site residues, a DeltaPfPBGDL116K mutant enzyme was created and the specific activity of this recombinant mutant enzyme is 5-fold higher than DeltaPfPBGD. More interestingly, DeltaPfPBGDL116K catalyzes the formation of uroporphyrinogen I (UROGEN I) in addition to UROGEN III, indicating that with increased PBGD activity the UROS activity of PBGD may perhaps become rate-limiting, thus leading to non-enzymatic cyclization of preuroporphyrinogen to UROGEN I. PfPBGD is localized to the apicoplast and is catalytically very inefficient compared with the host red cell enzyme.

  9. Mixed inhibition of adenosine deaminase activity by 1,3-dinitrobenzene: a model for understanding cell-selective neurotoxicity in chemically-induced energy deprivation syndromes in brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yipei; Liu, Xin; Schneider, Brandon; Zverina, Elaina A; Russ, Kristen; Wijeyesakere, Sanjeeva J; Fierke, Carol A; Richardson, Rudy J; Philbert, Martin A

    2012-02-01

    Astrocytes are acutely sensitive to 1,3-dinitrobenzene (1,3-DNB) while adjacent neurons are relatively unaffected, consistent with other chemically-induced energy deprivation syndromes. Previous studies have investigated the role of astrocytes in protecting neurons from hypoxia and chemical injury via adenosine release. Adenosine is considered neuroprotective, but it is rapidly removed by extracellular deaminases such as adenosine deaminase (ADA). The present study tested the hypothesis that ADA is inhibited by 1,3-DNB as a substrate mimic, thereby preventing adenosine catabolism. ADA was inhibited by 1,3-DNB with an IC(50) of 284 μM, Hill slope, n = 4.8 ± 0.4. Native gel electrophoresis showed that 1,3-DNB did not denature ADA. Furthermore, adding Triton X-100 (0.01-0.05%, wt/vol), Nonidet P-40 (0.0015-0.0036%, wt/vol), or bovine serum albumin (0.05 mg/ml or changing [ADA] (0.2 and 2 nM) did not substantially alter the 1,3-DNB IC(50) value. Likewise, dynamic light scattering showed no particle formation over a (1,3-DNB) range of 149-1043 μM. Kinetics revealed mixed inhibition with 1,3-DNB binding to ADA (K(I) = 520 ± 100 μM, n = 1 ± 0.6) and the ADA-adenosine complex (K(IS) = 262 ± 7 μM, n = 6 ± 0.6, indicating positive cooperativity). In accord with the kinetics, docking predicted binding of 1,3-DNB to the active site and three peripheral sites. In addition, exposure of DI TNC-1 astrocytes to 10-500 μM 1,3-DNB produced concentration-dependent increases in extracellular adenosine at 24 h. Overall, the results demonstrate that 1,3-DNB is a mixed inhibitor of ADA and may thus lead to increases in extracellular adenosine. The finding may provide insights to guide future work on chemically-induced energy deprivation.

  10. [Adenosine deaminase in experimental trypanosomiasis: future implications].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguilar, Mary Carmen; Rondón-Mercado, Rocío

    2015-09-01

    The adenosine deaminase represents a control point in the regulation of extracellular adenosine levels, thus playing a critical role in the modulation of purinergic responses to certain pathophysiological events. Several studies have shown that serum and plasma enzyme levels are elevated in some diseases caused by microorganisms, which may represent a compensatory mechanism due to the elevated levels of adenosine and the release of inflammatory mediators. Recent research indicates that adenosine deaminase activity decreases and affects hematological parameters of infected animals with Trypanosoma evansi, so that such alterations could have implications in the pathogenesis of the disease. In addition, the enzyme has been detected in this parasite; allowing the inference that it could be associated with the vital functions of the same, similar to what occurs in mammals. This knowledge may be useful in the association of chemotherapy with specific inhibitors of the enzyme in future studies.

  11. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis reveals a cytosine deaminase mutant with altered substrate preference.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Sheri D; Ireton, Greg C; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2004-07-20

    Suicide gene therapy of cancer is a method whereby cancerous tumors can be selectively eradicated while sparing damage to normal tissue. This is accomplished by delivering a gene, encoding an enzyme capable of specifically converting a nontoxic prodrug into a cytotoxin, to cancer cells followed by prodrug administration. The Escherichia coli gene, codA, encodes cytosine deaminase and is introduced into cancer cells followed by administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Cytosine deaminase converts 5-FC into cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil, which leads to tumor-cell eradication. One limitation of this enzyme/prodrug combination is that 5-FC is a poor substrate for bacterial cytosine deaminase. The crystal structure of bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) reveals that a loop structure in the active site pocket of wild-type bCD comprising residues 310-320 undergoes a conformational change upon cytosine binding, making several contacts to the pyrimidine ring. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was used to investigate the structure-function relationship of amino acid residues within this region, especially with regard to substrate specificity. Using an E. coli genetic complementation system, seven active mutants were identified (F310A, G311A, H312A, D314A, V315A, F316A, and P318A). Further characterization of these mutants reveals that mutant F316A is 14-fold more efficient than the wild-type at deaminating cytosine to uracil. The mutant D314A enzyme demonstrates a dramatic decrease in cytosine activity (17-fold) as well as a slight increase in activity toward 5-FC (2-fold), indicating that mutant D314A prefers the prodrug over cytosine by almost 20-fold, suggesting that it may be a superior suicide gene.

  12. Expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase enhances the clearance of pneumococcal pneumonia: evidence of a subpopulation of protective anti-pneumococcal B1a cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Natsuo; Kerfoot, Steven M; Hutchinson, Andrew T; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Nakazawa, Naomi; Szczepanik, Marian; Majewska-Szczepanik, Monika; Nazimek, Katarzyna; Ohana, Noboru; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Mori, Tsutomu; Muramatsu, Masamichi; Kanemitsu, Keiji; Askenase, Philip W

    2016-01-01

    We describe a protective early acquired immune response to pneumococcal pneumonia that is mediated by a subset of B1a cells. Mice deficient in B1 cells (xid), or activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID(-/-) ), or invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells (Jα18(-/-) ), or interleukin-13 (IL-13(-/-) ) had impaired early clearance of pneumococci in the lung, compared with wild-type mice. In contrast, AID(-/-) mice adoptively transferred with AID(+/+) B1a cells, significantly cleared bacteria from the lungs as early as 3 days post infection. We show that this early bacterial clearance corresponds to an allergic contact sensitivity-like cutaneous response, probably due to a subpopulation of initiating B1a cells. In the pneumonia model, these B1a cells were found to secrete higher affinity antigen-specific IgM. In addition, as in contact sensitivity, iNKT cells were required for the anti-pneumococcal B1a cell initiating response, probably through early production of IL-13, given that IL-13(-/-) mice also failed to clear infection. Our study is the first to demonstrate the importance of AID in generating an appropriate B1a cell response to pathogenic bacteria. Given the antibody affinity and pneumonia resistance data, natural IgM produced by conventional B1a cells are not responsible for pneumonia clearance compared with the AID-dependent subset.

  13. IGHV-unmutated and IGHV-mutated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells produce activation-induced deaminase protein with a full range of biologic functions.

    PubMed

    Patten, Piers E M; Chu, Charles C; Albesiano, Emilia; Damle, Rajendra N; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Kim, Dorothy; Zhang, Lu; Magli, Amanda R; Barrientos, Jacqueline; Kolitz, Jonathan E; Allen, Steven L; Rai, Kanti R; Roa, Sergio; Mongini, Patricia K; MacCarthy, Thomas; Scharff, Matthew D; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2012-12-06

    Clonal evolution occurs during the course of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and activation-induced deaminase (AID) could influence this process. However, this possibility has been questioned in CLL because the number of circulating AID mRNA(+) cells is exceedingly low; synthesis of AID protein by blood CLL cells has not been demonstrated; the full range of AID functions is lacking in unmutated CLL (U-CLL), and no prospective analysis linking AID expression and disease severity has been reported. The results of the present study show that circulating CLL cells and those within secondary lymphoid tissues can make AID mRNA and protein. This production is related to cell division because more AID mRNA was detected in recently divided cells and AID protein was limited to the dividing fraction and was up-regulated on induction of cell division. AID protein was functional because AID(+) dividing cells exhibited more double-stranded DNA breaks, IGH class switching, and new IGHV-D-J mutations. Each of these actions was documented in U-CLL and mutated CLL (M-CLL). Furthermore, AID protein was associated with worse patient outcome and adverse cytogenetics. We conclude that the production of fully functional AID protein by U-CLL and M-CLL cells could be involved in clonal evolution of the disease.

  14. The Multifaceted Roles of RNA Binding in APOBEC Cytidine Deaminase Functions

    PubMed Central

    Prohaska, Kimberly M.; Bennett, Ryan P.; Salter, Jason D.; Smith, Harold C.

    2014-01-01

    Cytidine deaminases have important roles in the regulation of nucleoside/deoxynucleoside pools for DNA and RNA synthesis. The APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases (named after the first member of the family that was described, Apolipoprotein B mRNA Editing Catalytic Subunit 1, a.k.a. APOBEC1 or A1) is a fascinating group of mutagenic proteins that use RNA and single stranded DNA (ssDNA) as substrates for their cytidine or deoxycytidine deaminase activities. APOBEC proteins and base-modification nucleic acid editing have been the subject of numerous publications, reviews and speculation. These proteins play diverse roles in host cell defense, protecting cells from invading genetic material, enabling the acquired immune response to antigens and changing protein expression at the level of the genetic code in mRNA or DNA. The amazing power these proteins have for interphase cell functions relies on structural and biochemical properties that are beginning to be understood. At the same time, the substrate selectivity of each member in the family and their regulation remains to be elucidated. This review of the APOBEC family will focus on an open question in regulation, namely what role the interactions of these proteins with RNA have in editing substrate recognition or allosteric regulation of DNA mutagenic and host defense activities. PMID:24664896

  15. Improved production of α-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) by a Bacillus subtilis whole-cell biocatalyst via engineering of L-amino acid deaminase and deletion of the α-KG utilization pathway.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Gazi Sakir; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Liu, Long; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2014-10-10

    We previously developed a novel one-step biotransformation process for the production of α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) from L-glutamic acid by a Bacillus subtilis whole-cell biocatalyst expressing an L-amino acid deaminase (pm1) of Proteus mirabilis. However, the biotransformation efficiency of this process was low owing to low substrate specificity and high α-KG degradation. In this study, we further improved α-KG production by protein engineering P. mirabilis pm1 and deleting the B. subtilis α-KG degradation pathway. We first performed three rounds of error-prone polymerase chain reaction and identified mutations at six sites (F110, A255, E349, R228, T249, and I352) that influence catalytic efficiency. We then performed site-saturation mutagenesis at these sites, and the mutant F110I/A255T/E349D/R228C/T249S/I352A increased the biotransformation ratio of L-glutamic acid from 31% to 83.25% and the α-KG titer from 4.65 g/L to 10.08 g/L. Next, the reaction kinetics and biochemical properties of the mutant were analyzed. The Michaelis constant for L-glutamic acid decreased from 49.21 mM to 23.58 mM, and the maximum rate of α-KG production increased from 22.82 μM min(-1) to 56.7 μM min(-1). Finally, the sucA gene, encoding α-ketodehydrogenase, was deleted to reduce α-KG degradation, increasing the α-KG titer from 10.08 g/L to 12.21 g/L. Protein engineering of P. mirabilis pm1 and deletion of the α-KG degradation pathway in B. subtilis improved α-KG production over that of previously developed processes.

  16. Curcumin improves episodic memory in cadmium induced memory impairment through inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and adenosine deaminase activities in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Ayodele Jacob; Okonkwo, Princess Kamsy; Faboya, Opeyemi Ayodeji; Onikanni, Sunday Amos; Fadaka, Adewale; Olayide, Israel; Akinyemi, Elizabeth Olufisayo; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2017-02-01

    Curcumin, the main polyphenolic component of turmeric (Curcuma longa) rhizomes has been reported to exert cognitive enhancing potential with limited scientific basis. Hence, this study sought to evaluate the effect of curcumin on cerebral cortex acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities in cadmium (Cd)-induced memory impairment in rats. Animals were divided into six groups (n = 6): saline/vehicle, saline/curcumin 12.5 mg/kg, saline/curcumin 25 mg/kg, Cd/vehicle, Cd/curcumin 12.5 mg/kg, and Cd/curcumin 25 mg/kg. Rats received Cd (2.5 mg/kg) and curcumin (12.5 and 25 mg/kg, respectively) by gavage for 7 days. The results of this study revealed that cerebral cortex AChE and ADA activities were increased in Cd-poisoned rats, and curcumin co-treatment reversed these activities to the control levels. Furthermore, Cd intoxication increased the level of lipid peroxidation in cerebral cortex with a concomitant decreased in functional sulfuhydryl (-SH) group and nitric oxide (NO), a potent neurotransmitter and neuromodulatory agent. However, the co-treatment with curcumin at 12.5 and 25 mg/kg, respectively increased the non-enzymatic antioxidant status and NO in cerebral cortex with a decreased in malondialdehyde (MDA) level. Therefore, inhibition of AChE and ADA activities as well as increased antioxidant status by curcumin in Cd-induced memory dysfunction could suggest some possible mechanism of action for their cognitive enhancing properties.

  17. Why Does Escherichia coli Grow More Slowly on Glucosamine than on N-Acetylglucosamine? Effects of Enzyme Levels and Allosteric Activation of GlcN6P Deaminase (NagB) on Growth Rates

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Añorve, Laura I.; Calcagno, Mario L.; Plumbridge, Jacqueline

    2005-01-01

    Wild-type Escherichia coli grows more slowly on glucosamine (GlcN) than on N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) as a sole source of carbon. Both sugars are transported by the phosphotransferase system, and their 6-phospho derivatives are produced. The subsequent catabolism of the sugars requires the allosteric enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) deaminase, which is encoded by nagB, and degradation of GlcNAc also requires the nagA-encoded enzyme, N-acetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc6P) deacetylase. We investigated various factors which could affect growth on GlcN and GlcNAc, including the rate of GlcN uptake, the level of induction of the nag operon, and differential allosteric activation of GlcN6P deaminase. We found that for strains carrying a wild-type deaminase (nagB) gene, increasing the level of the NagB protein or the rate of GlcN uptake increased the growth rate, which showed that both enzyme induction and sugar transport were limiting. A set of point mutations in nagB that are known to affect the allosteric behavior of GlcN6P deaminase in vitro were transferred to the nagB gene on the Escherichia coli chromosome, and their effects on the growth rates were measured. Mutants in which the substrate-induced positive cooperativity of NagB was reduced or abolished grew even more slowly on GlcN than on GlcNAc or did not grow at all on GlcN. Increasing the amount of the deaminase by using a nagC or nagA mutation to derepress the nag operon improved growth. For some mutants, a nagA mutation, which caused the accumulation of the allosteric activator GlcNAc6P and permitted allosteric activation, had a stronger effect than nagC. The effects of the mutations on growth in vivo are discussed in light of their in vitro kinetics. PMID:15838023

  18. Studies on Plant Growth Promoting Properties of Fruit-Associated Bacteria from Elettaria cardamomum and Molecular Analysis of ACC Deaminase Gene.

    PubMed

    Jasim, B; Anish, Mathew Chacko; Shimil, Vellakudiyan; Jyothis, Mathew; Radhakrishnan, E K

    2015-09-01

    Endophytic microorganisms have been reported to have diverse plant growth promoting mechanisms including phosphate solubilization, N2 fixation, production of phyto-hormones and ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) deaminase and antiphyto-pathogenic properties. Among these, ACC deaminase production is very important because of its regulatory effect on ethylene which is a stress hormone with precise role in the control of fruit development and ripening. However, distribution of these properties among various endophytic bacteria associated with fruit tissue and its genetic basis is least investigated. In the current study, 11 endophytic bacteria were isolated and identified from the fruit tissue of Elettaria cardamomum and were studied in detail for various plant growth promoting properties especially ACC deaminase activity using both culture-based and PCR-based methods. PCR-based screening identified the isolates EcB 2 (Pantoea sp.), EcB 7 (Polaromonas sp.), EcB 9 (Pseudomonas sp.), EcB 10 (Pseudomonas sp.) and EcB 11 (Ralstonia sp.) as positive for ACC deaminase. The PCR products were further subjected to sequence analysis which proved the similarity of the sequences identified in the study with ACC deaminase sequences reported from other sources. The detailed bioinformatic analysis of the sequence including homology-based modelling and molecular docking confirmed the sequences to have ACC deaminase activity. The docking of the modelled proteins was done using patch dock, and the detailed scrutiny of the protein ligand interaction revealed conservation of key amino acids like Lys51, Ser78, Tyr268 and Tyr294 which play important role in the enzyme activity. These suggest the possible regulatory effect of these isolates on fruit physiology.

  19. Relation of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression with antibody response to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients.

    PubMed

    Cagigi, Alberto; Pensieroso, Simone; Ruffin, Nicolas; Sammicheli, Stefano; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Hejdeman, Bo; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-04-26

    The relevance of CD4+T-cells, viral load and age in the immunological response to influenza infection and vaccination in HIV-1 infected individuals has previously been pointed out. Our study aimed at assessing, in the setting of 2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccination, whether quantification of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression in blood B-cells may provide additional indications for predicting antibody response to vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients with similar CD4+T-cell counts and age. Forty-seven healthy controls, 37 ART-treated and 17 treatment-naïve HIV-1 infected patients were enrolled in the study. Blood was collected prior to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and at 1, 3 and 6 months after vaccination. Antibody titers to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine were measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay while the mRNA expression levels of AID were measured by quantitative real time PCR. Upon B-cell activation in vitro, AID increase correlated to antibody response to the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 1 month after vaccination in all individuals. In addition, the maximum expression levels of AID were significantly higher in those individuals who still carried protective levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies after 6 months from vaccination. No correlation was found between CD4+T-cell counts or age at vaccination or HIV-1 viral load and levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies. Assessing AID expression before vaccination may be an additional useful tool for defining a vaccination strategy in immune-compromised individuals at risk of immunization failure.

  20. Repetitive systemic morphine alters activity-dependent plasticity of Schaffer-collateral-CA1 pyramidal cell synapses: involvement of adenosine A1 receptors and adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Sadegh, Mehdi; Fathollahi, Yaghoub

    2014-10-01

    The effectiveness of O-pulse stimulation (TPS) for the reversal of O-pattern primed bursts (PB)-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) were examined at the Schaffer-collateral-CA1 pyramidal cell synapses of hippocampal slices derived from rats chronically treated with morphine (M-T). The results showed that slices derived from both control and M-T rats had normal field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP)-LTP, whereas PS-LTP in slices from M-T rats was significantly greater than that from control slices. When morphine was applied in vitro to slices derived from rats chronically treated with morphine, the augmentation of PS-LTP was not seen. TPS given 30 min after LTP induction failed to reverse the fEPSP- or PS-LTP in both groups of slices. However, TPS delivered in the presence of long-term in vitro morphine caused the PS-LTP reversal. This effect was blocked by the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist CPX (200 nM) and furthermore was enhanced by the adenosine deaminase (ADA) inhibitor EHNA (10 μM). Interestingly, TPS given 30 min after LTP induction in the presence of EHNA (10 μM) can reverse LTP in morphine-exposed control slices in vitro. These results suggest adaptive changes in the hippocampus area CA1 in particular in adenosine system following repetitive systemic morphine. Chronic in vivo morphine increases A1R and reduces ADA activity in the hippocampus. Consequently, adenosine can accumulate because of a stimulus train-induced activity pattern in CA1 area and takes the opportunity to work as an inhibitory neuromodulator and also to enable CA1 to cope with chronic morphine. In addition, adaptive mechanisms are differentially working in the dendrite layer rather than the somatic layer of hippocampal CA1.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... that can affect the muscles used for movement ( skeletal muscles ). In many affected individuals, AMP deaminase deficiency does ... called AMP deaminase. This enzyme is found in skeletal muscles , where it plays a role in producing energy. ...

  2. Allosteric Activation of Escherichia coli Glucosamine-6-Phosphate Deaminase (NagB) In Vivo Justified by Intracellular Amino Sugar Metabolite Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Añorve, Laura I.; Gaugué, Isabelle; Link, Hannes; Marcos-Viquez, Jorge; Díaz-Jiménez, Dana M.; Zonszein, Sergio; Bustos-Jaimes, Ismael; Schmitz-Afonso, Isabelle; Calcagno, Mario L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have investigated the impact of growth on glucosamine (GlcN) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) on cellular metabolism by quantifying glycolytic metabolites in Escherichia coli. Growth on GlcNAc increased intracellular pools of both GlcNAc6P and GlcN6P 10- to 20-fold compared to growth on glucose. Growth on GlcN produced a 100-fold increase in GlcN6P but only a slight increase in GlcNAc6P. Changes to the amounts of downstream glycolytic intermediates were minor compared to growth on glucose. The enzyme glucosamine-6P deaminase (NagB) is required for growth on both GlcN and GlcNAc. It is an allosteric enzyme in E. coli, displaying sigmoid kinetics with respect to its substrate, GlcN6P, and is allosterically activated by GlcNAc6P. The high concentration of GlcN6P, accompanied by the small increase in GlcNAc6P, drives E. coli NagB (NagBEc) into its high activity state, as observed during growth on GlcN (L. I. Álvarez-Añorve, I. Bustos-Jaimes, M. L. Calcagno, and J. Plumbridge, J Bacteriol 191:6401–6407, 2009, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00633-09). The slight increase in GlcNAc6P during growth on GlcN is insufficient to displace NagC, the GlcNAc6P-responsive repressor of the nag genes, from its binding sites, so there is only a small increase in nagB expression. We replaced the gene for the allosteric NagBEc enzyme with that of the nonallosteric, B. subtilis homologue, NagBBs. We detected no effects on growth rates or competitive fitness on glucose or the amino sugars, nor did we detect any effect on the concentrations of central metabolites, thus demonstrating the robustness of amino sugar metabolism and leaving open the question of the role of allostery in the regulation of NagB. IMPORTANCE Chitin, the polymer of N-acetylglucosamine, is an abundant biomaterial, and both glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine are valuable nutrients for bacteria. The amino sugars are components of numerous essential macromolecules, including bacterial peptidoglycan and

  3. Effect of zinc supplementation on ecto-adenosine deaminase activity in lambs infected by Haemonchus contortus: highlights on acute phase of disease.

    PubMed

    Baldissera, Matheus D; Pivoto, Felipe L; Bottari, Nathieli B; Tonin, Alexandre A; Machado, Gustavo; Aires, Adelina R; Rocha, José F X; Pelinson, Luana P; Dalenogare, Diéssica P; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Morsch, Vera M; Leal, Marta L R; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2015-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus (order Strongylida) is a common parasitic nematode infecting small ruminants and causing significant economic losses worldwide. It induces innate and adaptive immune responses, which are essential for the clearance of this nematode from the host. Ecto-adenosine deaminase (E-ADA) is an enzyme that plays an important role in the immune system, while Zinc (Zn) has been found playing a critical role in E-ADA catalysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of Zn supplementation on E-ADA activity in serum of lambs experimentally infected with H.contortus. To reach this purpose 28 male lambs (in average 25 kg) were used. The animals were divided into four groups: A and B composed of healthy animals (uninfected); C and D, infected with H.contortus. Groups B and D were supplemented with Zn Edetate, subcutaneously with 3 mg kg of live weight, on days 11 and 25 post-infection (PI). Blood and fecal samples were collected on the days 11, 25 and 39 PI, in order to assess hematocrit, seric E-ADA, and eggs per gram (EPG) counting, respectively. The animals of groups C and D showed severe hematocrit reduction (days 25 and 39 PI) and were EPG positive (days 11, 25 and 39 PI). On day 41 PI, three animals each group were subjected to necropsy. This procedure showed that animals of groups A and B did not have helminths in abomasum and intestines, while H.contortus were observed in groups C (5782.5 ± 810.9) and D (6185.0 ± 150.0). Infected and untreated animals (group C) showed a reduction in E-ADA activity, but this was not observed when the animals were supplemented with Zn (Group D). Therefore, based on our results, it was possible to observe that Zn supplementation exercised a positive effect on E-ADA activity in lambs infected with H.contortus, and did not allow a reduction in E-ADA activity, as occurred in the group infected and without supplementation. However, Zn supplementation was not able to prevent the worm burden.

  4. B cell Rab7 mediates induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and class-switching in T-dependent and T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Lou, Zheng; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yuhui; Liu, Dongfang; Edinger, Aimee L; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the maturation of the Ab response because it diversifies Ab effector functions. Like somatic hypermutation, CSR requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), whose expression is restricted to B cells, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR-BCR engagement (primary CSR-inducing stimuli). By constructing conditional knockout Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice, we identified a B cell-intrinsic role for Rab7, a small GTPase involved in intracellular membrane functions, in mediating AID induction and CSR. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice displayed normal B and T cell development and were deficient in Rab7 only in B cells undergoing Igh(C)γ(1-cre) Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1-cre transcription, as induced--like Igh germline Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1 and Iε-Sε-Cε transcription--by IL-4 in conjunction with a primary CSR-inducing stimulus. These mice could not mount T-independent or T-dependent class-switched IgG1 or IgE responses while maintaining normal IgM levels. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells showed, in vivo and in vitro, normal proliferation and survival, normal Blimp-1 expression and plasma cell differentiation, as well as intact activation of the noncanonical NF-κB, p38 kinase, and ERK1/2 kinase pathways. They, however, were defective in AID expression and CSR in vivo and in vitro, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR1/2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, or TLR9-BCR engagement. In Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells, CSR was rescued by enforced AID expression. These findings, together with our demonstration that Rab7-mediated canonical NF-κB activation, as critical to AID induction, outline a novel role of Rab7 in signaling pathways that lead to AID expression and CSR, likely by promoting assembly of signaling complexes along intracellular membranes.

  5. Characterization of ACC deaminase-producing endophytic bacteria isolated from copper-tolerant plants and their potential in promoting the growth and copper accumulation of Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Feng; He, Lin-Yan; Chen, Zhao-Jin; Wang, Qing-Ya; Qian, Meng; Sheng, Xia-Fang

    2011-03-01

    One hundred Cu-resistant-endophytic bacteria were isolated from Cu-tolerant plants grown on Cu mine wasteland, of which, eight Cu-resistant and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase-producing endophytic bacteria were obtained based on the ACC deaminase activity of the bacteria and characterized with respect to metal resistance, production of ACC deaminase, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) as well as siderophores and mineral phosphate solubilization. Ralstonia sp. J1-22-2, Pantoea agglomerans Jp3-3, and Pseudomonas thivervalensis Y1-3-9 with higher ACC deaminase activity (ranging from 213 to 370 μM α-ketobutyrate mg(-1)h(-1)) were evaluated for promoting plant growth and Cu uptake of rape grown in quartz sand containing 0, 2.5, and 5 mg kg(-1) of Cu in pot experiments. The eight bacteria were found to exhibit different multiple heavy metal resistance characteristics, to show different levels of ACC deaminase activity and to produce indole acetic acid. Seven bacteria produced siderophores and solubilized inorganic phosphate. Pot experiments showed that inoculation with the strains (J1-22-2, Jp3-3, and Y1-3-9) was found to increase the biomass of rape. Increases in above-ground tissue Cu contents of rape cultivated in 2.5 and 5 mg kg(-1) of Cu-contaminated substrates varied from 9% to 31% and from 3 to 4-fold respectively in inoculated-rape plants compared to the uninoculated control. The maximum Cu uptake of rape was observed after inoculation with P. agglomerans Jp3-3. The results show that metal-resistant and plant growth promoting endophytic bacteria play an important role in plant growth and Cu uptake which may provide a new endophytic bacterial-assisted phytoremediation of Cu-contaminated environment.

  6. New Insights into 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate (ACC) Deaminase Phylogeny, Evolution and Ecological Significance

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Francisco X.; Rossi, Márcio J.; Soares, Cláudio R. F. S.; McConkey, Brendan J.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this work is the study of the phylogeny, evolution and ecological importance of the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, the activity of which represents one of the most important and studied mechanisms used by plant growth–promoting microorganisms. The ACC deaminase gene and its regulatory elements presence in completely sequenced organisms was verified by multiple searches in diverse databases, and based on the data obtained a comprehensive analysis was conducted. Strain habitat, origin and ACC deaminase activity were taken into account when analyzing the results. In order to unveil ACC deaminase origin, evolution and relationships with other closely related pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes a phylogenetic analysis was also performed. The data obtained show that ACC deaminase is mostly prevalent in some Bacteria, Fungi and members of Stramenopiles. Contrary to previous reports, we show that ACC deaminase genes are predominantly vertically inherited in various bacterial and fungal classes. Still, results suggest a considerable degree of horizontal gene transfer events, including interkingdom transfer events. A model for ACC deaminase origin and evolution is also proposed. This study also confirms the previous reports suggesting that the Lrp-like regulatory protein AcdR is a common mechanism regulating ACC deaminase expression in Proteobacteria, however, we also show that other regulatory mechanisms may be present in some Proteobacteria and other bacterial phyla. In this study we provide a more complete view of the role for ACC deaminase than was previously available. The results show that ACC deaminase may not only be related to plant growth promotion abilities, but may also play multiple roles in microorganism's developmental processes. Hence, exploring the origin and functioning of this enzyme may be the key in a variety of important agricultural and biotechnological applications. PMID:24905353

  7. An efficient approach to identify ilvA mutations reveals an amino-terminal catalytic domain in biosynthetic threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, K E; Eisenstein, E

    1993-01-01

    High-level expression of the regulatory enzyme threonine deaminase in Escherichia coli strains grown on minimal medium that are deficient in the activities of enzymes needed for branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis result in growth inhibition, possibly because of the accumulation of toxic levels of alpha-ketobutyrate, the product of the committed step in isoleucine biosynthesis. This condition affords a means for selecting genetic variants of threonine deaminase that are deficient in catalysis by suppression of growth inhibition. Strains harboring mutations in ilvA that decreased the catalytic activity of threonine deaminase were found to grow more rapidly than isogenic strains containing wild-type ilvA. Modification of the ilvA gene to introduce additional unique, evenly spaced restriction enzyme sites facilitated the identification of suppressor mutations by enabling small DNA fragments to be subcloned for sequencing. The 10 mutations identified in ilvA code for enzymes with significantly reduced activity relative to that of wild-type threonine deaminase. Values for their specific activities range from 40% of that displayed by wild-type enzyme to complete inactivation as evidenced by failure to complement an ilvA deletion strain to isoleucine prototrophy. Moreover, some mutant enzymes showed altered allosteric properties with respect to valine activation and isoleucine inhibition. The location of the 10 mutations in the 5' two-thirds of the ilvA gene is consistent with suggestions that threonine deaminase is organized functionally with an amino-terminal domain that is involved in catalysis and a carboxy-terminal domain that is important for regulation. Images PMID:8407838

  8. Quantitative changes in adenosine deaminase isoenzymes in human colorectal adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    ten Kate, J; Wijnen, J T; van der Goes, R G; Quadt, R; Griffioen, G; Bosman, F T; Khan, P M

    1984-10-01

    Several reports have suggested that a decrease or absence of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) is consistently associated with cancer. However, in other studies, decreased as well as increased ADCP levels were found. In the present study, we investigated ADCP levels in 37 colorectal adenocarcinomas and correlated the results with clinicopathological characteristics in individual carcinomas. The levels of adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4) and soluble ADCP were determined in tissue samples by, respectively, a spectrophotometric assay and an ADCP specific radioimmunoassay. The values in the individual tumors were compared with their histological characteristics, such as degree of differentiation, nuclear grading, and the preoperative plasma carcinoembryonic antigen levels in the patients. It was found that ADCP was decreased in about a third of the tumors but unaltered or even increased in others. However, there was an overall 40% increase of the adenosine deaminase activity in the tumors compared to normal tissue. There seems to be no simple correlation between any of the clinicopathological parameters and the ADCP or adenosine deaminase levels. Methods detecting ADCP at single cell level might be helpful in exploring its potential use as a cancer-associated marker.

  9. One-step biosynthesis of α-ketoisocaproate from L-leucine by an Escherichia coli whole-cell biocatalyst expressing an L-amino acid deaminase from Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-dong; Du, Guocheng; Liu, Long; Chen, Jian

    2015-07-28

    This work aimed to develop a whole-cell biotransformation process for the production of α-ketoisocaproate from L-leucine. A recombinant Escherichia coli strain was constructed by expressing an L-amino acid deaminase from Proteus vulgaris. To enhance α-ketoisocaproate production, the reaction conditions were optimized as follows: whole-cell biocatalyst 0.8 g/L, leucine concentration 13.1 g/L, temperature 35 °C, pH 7.5, and reaction time 20 h. Under the above conditions, the α-ketoisocaproate titer reached 12.7 g/L with a leucine conversion rate of 97.8%. In addition, different leucine feeding strategies were examined to increase the α-ketoisocaproate titer. When 13.1 g/L leucine was added at 2-h intervals (from 0 to 22 h, 12 addition times), the α-ketoisocaproate titer reached 69.1 g/L, while the leucine conversion rate decreased to 50.3%. We have developed an effective process for the biotechnological production of α-ketoisocaproate that is more environmentally friendly than the traditional petrochemical synthesis approach.

  10. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    S Kamat; A Bagaria; D Kumaran; G Holmes-Hampton; H Fan; A Sali; J Sauder; S Burley; P Lindahl; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction

  11. Catalytic Mechanism and Three-Dimensional Structure of Adenine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Kamat, S.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Bagaria, A.; Kumaran, D.; Holmes-Hampton, G. P.; Fan, H.; Sali, A.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Lindahl, P. A.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-03-22

    Adenine deaminase (ADE) catalyzes the conversion of adenine to hypoxanthine and ammonia. The enzyme isolated from Escherichia coli using standard expression conditions was low for the deamination of adenine (k{sub cat} = 2.0 s{sup -1}; k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 2.5 x 10{sup 3} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). However, when iron was sequestered with a metal chelator and the growth medium was supplemented with Mn{sup 2+} prior to induction, the purified enzyme was substantially more active for the deamination of adenine with kcat and kcat/Km values of 200 s{sup -1} and 5 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The apoenzyme was prepared and reconstituted with Fe{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, or Mn{sup 2+}. In each case, two enzyme equivalents of metal were necessary for reconstitution of the deaminase activity. This work provides the first example of any member of the deaminase subfamily of the amidohydrolase superfamily to utilize a binuclear metal center for the catalysis of a deamination reaction. [Fe{sup II}/Fe{sup II}]-ADE was oxidized to [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with ferricyanide with inactivation of the deaminase activity. Reducing [Fe{sup III}/Fe{sup III}]-ADE with dithionite restored the deaminase activity, and thus, the diferrous form of the enzyme is essential for catalytic activity. No evidence of spin coupling between metal ions was evident by electron paramagnetic resonance or Moessbauer spectroscopy. The three-dimensional structure of adenine deaminase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Atu4426) was determined by X-ray crystallography at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution, and adenine was modeled into the active site on the basis of homology to other members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. On the basis of the model of the adenine-ADE complex and subsequent mutagenesis experiments, the roles for each of the highly conserved residues were proposed. Solvent isotope effects, pH-rate profiles, and solvent viscosity were utilized to propose a chemical reaction mechanism and the

  12. Ab Initio ONIOM-Molecular Dynamics (MD) Study on the Deamination Reaction by Cytidine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2007-08-23

    We applied the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method to the hydrolytic deamination of cytidine by cytidine deaminase, which is an essential step of the activation process of the anticancer drug inside the human body. The direct MD simulations were performed for the realistic model of cytidine deaminase calculating the energy and its gradient by the ab initio ONIOM method on the fly. The ONIOM-MD calculations including the thermal motion show that the neighboring amino acid residue is an important factor of the environmental effects and significantly affects not only the geometry and energy of the substrate trapped in the pocket of the active site but also the elementary step of the catalytic reaction. We successfully simulate the second half of the catalytic cycle, which has been considered to involve the rate-determining step, and reveal that the rate-determing step is the release of the NH3 molecule. TM and MA were supported in part by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  13. Der f 34, a Novel Major House Dust Mite Allergen Belonging to a Highly Conserved Rid/YjgF/YER057c/UK114 Family of Imine Deaminases.

    PubMed

    ElRamlawy, Kareem Gamal; Fujimura, Takashi; Baba, Koji; Kim, Ji Won; Kawamoto, Chika; Isobe, Toshihide; Abe, Takuya; Hodge-Hanson, Kelsey; Downs, Diana M; Refaat, Inas Hussein; Beshr Al-Azhary, Diaa; Aki, Tsunehiro; Asaoku, Yoshiko; Hayashi, Takaharu; Katsutani, Takashi; Tsuboi, Shinji; Ono, Kazuhisa; Kawamoto, Seiji

    2016-10-07

    The high prevalence of house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a growing health problem worldwide, and the characterization of clinically important HDM allergens is a prerequisite for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. Here, we report a novel HDM allergen that belongs structurally to the highly conserved Rid/YjgF/YER057c/UK114 family (Rid family) with imine deaminase activity. Isolated HDM cDNA, named der f 34, encodes 128 amino acids homologous to Rid-like proteins. This new protein belongs to the Rid family and has seven conserved residues involved in enamine/imine deaminase activity. Indeed, we demonstrated that purified Der f 34 had imine deaminase activity that preferentially acted on leucine and methionine. Native Der f 34 showed a high IgE binding frequency as revealed by two-dimensional immunoblotting (62.5%) or ELISA (68%), which was comparable with those of a major HDM allergen Der f 2 (77.5 and 79%, respectively). We also found that Der f 34 showed cross-reactivity with another prominent indoor allergen source, Aspergillus fumigatus This is the first report showing that the Rid family imine deaminase represents an additional important pan-allergen that is conserved across organisms.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine deaminase 2 deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... This Page Bras J, Guerreiro R, Santo GC. Mutant ADA2 in vasculopathies. N Engl J Med. 2014 ... M, Anikster Y, King MC, Levy-Lahad E. Mutant adenosine deaminase 2 in a polyarteritis nodosa vasculopathy. ...

  15. Efficient, low-cost protein factories: expression of human adenosine deaminase in baculovirus-infected insect larvae.

    PubMed Central

    Medin, J A; Hunt, L; Gathy, K; Evans, R K; Coleman, M S

    1990-01-01

    Human adenosine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.4), a key purine salvage enzyme essential for immune competence, has been overproduced in Spodoptera frugiperda cells and in Trichoplusia ni (cabbage looper) larvae infected with recombinant baculovirus. The coding sequence of human adenosine deaminase was recombined into a baculovirus immediately downstream from the strong polyhedrin gene promoter. Approximately 60 hr after infection of insect cells with the recombinant virus, maximal levels of intracellular adenosine deaminase mRNA, protein, and enzymatic activity were detected. The recombinant human adenosine deaminase represented 10% of the total cellular protein and exhibited a specific activity of 70 units/mg of protein in crude homogenate. This specific activity is 70-350 times greater than that exhibited by the enzyme in homogenates of the two most abundant natural sources of human adenosine deaminase, thymus and leukemic cells. When the recombinant virus was injected into insect larvae, the maximum recombinant enzyme was produced 4 days postinfection and represented about 2% of the total insect protein with a specific activity of 10-25 units/mg of protein. The recombinant human adenosine deaminase was purified to homogeneity from both insect cells and larvae and demonstrated to be identical to native adenosine deaminase purified from human cells with respect to molecular weight, interaction with polyclonal anti-adenosine deaminase antibody, and enzymatic properties. A pilot purification yielded 8-9 mg of homogeneous enzyme from 22 larvae. The production of large quantities of recombinant human adenosine deaminase in insect larvae is inexpensive and rapid and eliminates the need for specialized facilities for tissue culture. This method should be applicable to large-scale production of many recombinant proteins. Images PMID:2181448

  16. Adenosine deaminase production by an endophytic bacterium (Lysinibacillus sp.) from Avicennia marina.

    PubMed

    Kathiresan, Kandasamy; Saravanakumar, Kandasamy; Sahu, Sunil Kumar; Sivasankaran, Muthu

    2014-06-01

    The present study was carried out with the following objectives: (1) to isolate the endophytic bacilli strains from the leaves of mangrove plant Avicennia marina, (2) to screen the potential strains for the production of adenosine deaminase, (3) to statistically optimize the factors that influence the enzyme activity in the potent strain, and (4) to identify the potent strain using 16S rRNA sequence and construct its phylogenetic tree. The bacterial strains isolated from the fresh leaves of a mangrove A. marina were assessed for adenosine deaminase activity by plating method. Optimization of reaction process was carried out using response surface methodology of central composite design. The potent strain was identified based on 16S rRNA sequencing and phylogeny. Of five endophytic strains, EMLK1 showed a significant deaminase activity over other four strains. The conditions for maximum activity of the isolated adenosine deaminase are described. The potent strain EMLK1 was identified as Lysinibacillus sp. (JQ710723) being the first report as a mangrove endophyte. Mangrove-derived endophytic bacillus strain Lysinibacillus sp. EMLK1 is proved to be a promising source for the production of adenosine deaminase and this enzyme deserves further studies for purification and its application in disease diagnosis.

  17. Maintaining Genome Stability: The Role of Helicases and Deaminases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    of Helicases and Deaminases PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: XiaoJiang Chen CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Southern...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Maintaining Genome Stability: The Role of Helicases and Deaminases 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0391 5c... deaminases . We will focus on AID and APOBEC3G to obtain purified deaminase proteins for the in vitro biochemical, functional, and structural

  18. Maintaining Genome Stability: The Role of Helicases and Deaminases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    W81XWH-05-1-0391 TITLE: Maintaining Genome Stability: The Role of Helicases and Deaminases PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Xiaojiang Chen...Helicases and Deaminases 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0391 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Xiaojiang Chen 5e...crystallize the proteins of deaminases . We will focus on AID and APOBEC3G to obtain purified deaminase proteins for the in vitro biochemical

  19. [Gene therapy for adenosine deaminase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Sakiyama, Yukio; Ariga, Tadashi; Ohtsu, Makoto

    2005-03-01

    A four year-old boy with adenosine deaminase (ADA-) deficient severe combined immunodeficiency(SCID) receiving PEG-ADA was treated under a gene therapy protocol targeting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) in 1995. After eleven infusions of autologous PBLs transduced with retroviral vector LASN encoding ADAcDNA, he exhibited increased levels of the CD8+ T lymphocytes, serum immunoglobulin, specific antibodies and delayed type hypersensitivity skin tests. Follow-up studies also provided evidence of long-term persistence and function of transduced PBLs with improvement in the immune function. However, the therapeutic effect of this gene therapy has been difficult to assess because of the concomitant treatment of PEG-ADA. Two ADA-SCID patients have been currently treated with autologous bone marrow CD34+ cells engineered with a retroviral vector GCsapM-ADA after discontinuation of PEG-ADA. The restoration of intracellular ADA enzymatic activity in lymphocytes and granulocytes resulted in correction of the systemic toxicity and liver function in the absence of PEG-ADA treatment. Both patients are at home where they are clinically well, and they do not experience adversed effect, with follow up being 12 months after CD34+ cells gene therapy.

  20. Perspective of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) containing ACC deaminase in stress agriculture.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muhammad; Arshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Sarfraz; Bhatti, Ahmad Saeed

    2007-10-01

    Ethylene is a gaseous plant growth hormone produced endogenously by almost all plants. It is also produced in soil through a variety of biotic and abiotic mechanisms, and plays a key role in inducing multifarious physiological changes in plants at molecular level. Apart from being a plant growth regulator, ethylene has also been established as a stress hormone. Under stress conditions like those generated by salinity, drought, waterlogging, heavy metals and pathogenicity, the endogenous production of ethylene is accelerated substantially which adversely affects the root growth and consequently the growth of the plant as a whole. Certain plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) contain a vital enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, which regulates ethylene production by metabolizing ACC (an immediate precursor of ethylene biosynthesis in higher plants) into alpha-ketobutyrate and ammonia. Inoculation with PGPR containing ACC deaminase activity could be helpful in sustaining plant growth and development under stress conditions by reducing stress-induced ethylene production. Lately, efforts have been made to introduce ACC deaminase genes into plants to regulate ethylene level in the plants for optimum growth, particularly under stressed conditions. In this review, the primary focus is on giving account of all aspects of PGPR containing ACC deaminase regarding alleviation of impact of both biotic and abiotic stresses onto plants and of recent trends in terms of introduction of ACC deaminase genes into plant and microbial species.

  1. Characterization of a novel resistance-related deoxycytidine deaminase from Brassica oleracea var. capitata.

    PubMed

    Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Yang, Hsueh-Hui; Lo, Chaur-Tsuen; Lin, Hong-Shin; Liu, Shu-Ying; Peng, Kou-Cheng

    2014-02-26

    Brassica oleracea deoxycytidine deaminase (BoDCD), a deoxycytidine deaminase (DCD, EC 3.5.4.14) enzyme, is known to play an important role in the Trichoderma harzianum ETS 323 mediated resistance mechanism in young leaves of B. oleracea var. capitata during Rhizoctonia solani infection. BoDCD potentially neutralizes cytotoxic products of host lipoxygenase activity, and thereby BoDCD restricts the hypersensitivity-related programmed cell death induced in plants during the initial stages of infection. To determine the biochemical characteristics and to partially elucidate the designated functional properties of BoDCD, the enzyme was cloned into an Escherichia coli expression system, and its potential to neutralize the toxic analogues of 2'-deoxycytidine (dC) was examined. BoDCD transformants of E. coli cells were found to be resistant to 2'-deoxycytidine analogues at all of the concentrations tested. The BoDCD enzyme was also overexpressed as a histidine-tagged protein and purified using nickel chelating affinity chromatography. The molecular weight of BoDCD was determined to be 20.8 kDa as visualized by SDS-PAGE. The substrate specificity and other kinetic properties show that BoDCD is more active in neutralizing cytotoxic cytosine β-d-arabinofuranoside than in deaminating 2'-deoxycytinde to 2'-deoxyuridine in nucleic acids or in metabolizing cytidine to uridine. The optimal temperature and pH of the enzyme were 27 °C and 7.5. The Km and Vmax values of BoDCD were, respectively, 91.3 μM and 1.475 mM for its natural substrate 2'-deoxycytidine and 63 μM and 2.072 mM for cytosine β-d-arabinofuranoside. The phenomenon of neutralization of cytotoxic dC analogues by BoDCD is discussed in detail on the basis of enzyme biochemical properties.

  2. Identification of two pentatricopeptide repeat genes required for RNA editing and zinc binding by C-terminal cytidine deaminase-like domains.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Michael L; Giang, Karolyn; Berhane, Beniam; Mulligan, R Michael

    2013-12-20

    Many transcripts expressed from plant organelle genomes are modified by C-to-U RNA editing. Nuclear encoded pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are required as RNA binding specificity determinants in the RNA editing mechanism. Bioinformatic analysis has shown that most of the Arabidopsis PPR proteins necessary for RNA editing events include a C-terminal portion that shares structural characteristics with a superfamily of deaminases. The DYW deaminase domain includes a highly conserved zinc binding motif that shares characteristics with cytidine deaminases. The Arabidopsis PPR genes, ELI1 and DOT4, both have DYW deaminase domains and are required for single RNA editing events in chloroplasts. The ELI1 DYW deaminase domain was expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and was shown to bind two zinc atoms per polypeptide. Thus, the DYW deaminase domain binds a zinc metal ion, as expected for a cytidine deaminase, and is potentially the catalytic component of an editing complex. Genetic complementation experiments demonstrate that large portions of the DYW deaminase domain of ELI1 may be eliminated, but the truncated genes retain the ability to restore editing site conversion in a mutant plant. These results suggest that the catalytic activity can be supplied in trans by uncharacterized protein(s) of the editosome.

  3. Amelioration of high salinity stress damage by plant growth-promoting bacterial endophytes that contain ACC deaminase.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shimaila; Charles, Trevor C; Glick, Bernard R

    2014-07-01

    Plant growth and productivity is negatively affected by soil salinity. However, it is predicted that plant growth-promoting bacterial (PGPB) endophytes that contain 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase (E.C. 4.1.99.4) can facilitate plant growth and development in the presence of a number of different stresses. In present study, the ability of ACC deaminase containing PGPB endophytes Pseudomonas fluorescens YsS6, Pseudomonas migulae 8R6, and their ACC deaminase deficient mutants to promote tomato plant growth in the absence of salt and under two different levels of salt stress (165 mM and 185 mM) was assessed. It was evidence that wild-type bacterial endophytes (P. fluorescens YsS6 and P. migulae 8R6) promoted tomato plant growth significantly even in the absence of stress (salinity). Plants pretreated with wild-type ACC deaminase containing endophytic strains were healthier and grew to a much larger size under high salinity stress compared to plants pretreated with the ACC deaminase deficient mutants or no bacterial treatment (control). The plants pretreated with ACC deaminase containing bacterial endophytes exhibit higher fresh and dry biomass, higher chlorophyll contents, and a greater number of flowers and buds than the other treatments. Since the only difference between wild-type and mutant bacterial endophytes was ACC deaminase activity, it is concluded that this enzyme is directly responsible for the different behavior of tomato plants in response to salt stress. The use of PGPB endophytes with ACC deaminase activity has the potential to facilitate plant growth on land that is not normally suitable for the majority of crops due to their high salt contents.

  4. Antiprotozoal activity of betulinic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Carmona, D B; Escalante-Erosa, F; García-Sosa, K; Ruiz-Pinell, G; Gutierrez-Yapu, D; Chan-Bacab, M J; Giménez-Turba, A; Peña-Rodríguez, L M

    2010-04-01

    Betulinic acid (1), isolated from the crude extract of the leaves of Pentalinon andrieuxii (Apocynaceae), together with betulinic acid acetate (2), betulonic acid (3), betulinic acid methyl ester (4), and betulin (5) were evaluated for their antiprotozoal activity. The results showed that modifying the C-3 position increases leishmanicidal activity while modification of the C-3 and C-28 positions decreases trypanocidal activity.

  5. Characterization of ACC deaminase gene in Pseudomonas entomophila strain PS-PJH isolated from the rhizosphere soil.

    PubMed

    Kamala-Kannan, Seralathan; Lee, Kui-Jae; Park, Seung-Moon; Chae, Jong-Chan; Yun, Bong-Sik; Lee, Yong Hoon; Park, Yool-Jin; Oh, Byung-Taek

    2010-04-01

    The enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase cleaves the ethylene precursor ACC into alpha-ketobutyrate and ammonia. The decreased level of ethylene allows the plant to be more resistant to a wide environmental stress including plant pathogens. In the present study, we characterized the ACC deaminase activity of a Pseudomonas entomophila strain PS-PJH isolated from the red pepper rhizosphere region of red pepper grown at Jinan, Korea. The isolate produced 23.8 +/- 0.4 micromol of alpha-ketobutyrate/mg of protein/h during ACC deamination under in vitro conditions. Polymerase chain reaction for acdS gene showed that the isolated P. entomophila strain PS-PJH carry sequences similar to the known acdS genes. Results of the multiple sequence alignment revealed >99% identity (nucleotide and amino acid) with acdS gene of Pseudomonas putida strains AM15 and UW4. The isolated bacteria promoted 43.3 and 34.1% of growth in Raphanus sativus and Lactuca sativa plants, respectively. Based on the 16S-23S internal transcribed spacer region sequences, the isolate was identified as P. entomophila. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study to report the acdS gene in P. entomophila.

  6. Intracellular localization of human cytidine deaminase. Identification of a functional nuclear localization signal.

    PubMed

    Somasekaram, A; Jarmuz, A; How, A; Scott, J; Navaratnam, N

    1999-10-01

    The cytidine deaminases belong to the family of multisubunit enzymes that catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of their substrate to a corresponding uracil product. They play a major role in pyrimidine nucleoside and nucleotide salvage. The intracellular distribution of cytidine deaminase and related enzymes has previously been considered to be cytosolic. Here we show that human cytidine deaminase (HCDA) is present in the nucleus. A highly specific, affinity purified polyclonal antibody against HCDA was used to analyze the intracellular localization of native HCDA in a variety of mammalian cells by in situ immunochemistry. Native HCDA was found to be present in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm in several cell types. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy indicated a predominantly nuclear localization of FLAG-tagged HCDA overexpressed in these cells. We have identified an amino-terminal bipartite nuclear localization signal that is both necessary and sufficient to direct HCDA and a non-nuclear reporter protein to the nucleus. We also show HCDA binding to the nuclear import receptor, importin alpha. Similar putative bipartite nuclear localization sequences are found in other cytidine/deoxycytidylate deaminases. The results presented here suggest that the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway may operate in the nucleus. This localization may have implications in the regulation of nucleoside and nucleotide metabolism and nucleic acid biosynthesis.

  7. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase from Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 Facilitates the Growth of Rice in the Presence of Salt or Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunlei; Wang, Rui; Yang, Zhirong; Zhan, Yuhua; Ma, Yao; Ping, Shuzhen; Zhang, Liwen; Lin, Min; Yan, Yongliang

    2015-07-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, which is encoded by some bacteria, can reduce the amount of ethylene, a root elongation inhibitor, and stimulate the growth of plants under various environmental stresses. The presence of ACC deaminase activity and the regulation of ACC in several rhizospheric bacteria have been reported. The nitrogen-fixing Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 is capable of endophytic association with rice plants and promotes the growth of rice. However, the functional identification of ACC deaminase has not been performed. In this study, the proposed effect of ACC deaminase in P. stutzeri A1501 was investigated. Genome mining showed that P. stutzeri A1501 carries a single gene encoding ACC deaminase, designated acdS. The acdS mutant was devoid of ACC deaminase activity and was less resistant to NaCl and NiCl2 compared with the wild-type. Furthermore, inactivation of acdS greatly impaired its nitrogenase activity under salt stress conditions. It was also observed that mutation of the acdS gene led to loss of the ability to promote the growth of rice under salt or heavy metal stress. Taken together, this study illustrates the essential role of ACC deaminase, not only in enhancing the salt or heavy metal tolerance of bacteria but also in improving the growth of plants, and provides a theoretical basis for studying the interaction between plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria and plants.

  8. Increased expression with differential subcellular location of cytidine deaminase APOBEC3G in human CD4(+) T-cell activation and dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Harold; Pacheco, Rodrigo; Martinez-Navio, José M; Rodríguez-García, Marta; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Climent, Núria; Prado, Carolina; Gil, Cristina; Plana, Montserrat; García, Felipe; Miró, José M; Franco, Rafael; Borras, Francesc E; Navaratnam, Naveenan; Gatell, José M; Gallart, Teresa

    2016-08-01

    APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3G; A3G) is an innate defense protein showing activity against retroviruses and retrotransposons. Activated CD4(+) T cells are highly permissive for HIV-1 replication, whereas resting CD4(+) T cells are refractory. Dendritic cells (DCs), especially mature DCs, are also refractory. We investigated whether these differences could be related to a differential A3G expression and/or subcellular distribution. We found that A3G mRNA and protein expression is very low in resting CD4(+) T cells and immature DCs, but increases strongly following T-cell activation and DC maturation. The Apo-7 anti-A3G monoclonal antibody (mAb), which was specifically developed, confirmed these differences at the protein level and disclosed that A3G is mainly cytoplasmic in resting CD4(+) T cells and immature DCs. Nevertheless, A3G translocates to the nucleus in activated-proliferating CD4(+) T cells, yet remaining cytoplasmic in matured DCs, a finding confirmed by immunoblotting analysis of cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Apo-7 mAb was able to immunoprecipitate endogenous A3G allowing to detect complexes with numerous proteins in activated-proliferating but not in resting CD4(+) T cells. The results show for the first time the nuclear translocation of A3G in activated-proliferating CD4(+) T cells.

  9. Laser photobleaching leads to a fluorescence grade adenosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Parola, A H; Caiolfa, V R; Bar, I; Rosenwaks, S

    1989-09-01

    The enzyme adenosine deaminase (adenosine aminohydrolase EC 3.5.4.4) from calf intestinal mucosa is commercially available at high purity grade yet, at the sensitivity at which fluorescence studies may be undertaken, a nonpeptidic fluorescence is detectable at lambda exmax = 350 nm and lambda emmax = 420 nm. A sevenfold decrease of this nonpeptidic fluorescence was obtained upon irradiation by the third harmonic (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser for 16 min, at 5 mJ/pulse, with a pulse width of 6 ns at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The decline of fluorescence was accompanied by a negligible loss of enzymatic activity. Moreover, the integrity of the protein was ascertained by (i) its fluorescence (lambda exmax = 305 nm, lambda emmax = 335 nm) and lifetime distribution and (ii) its kinetics in the presence of the substrate adenosine and two inhibitors, all of which remained essentially unaltered. Laser photobleaching is a simple way to achieve a fluorescence grade adenosine deaminase.

  10. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures.

  11. Isolation and characterization of ACC deaminase-producing fluorescent pseudomonads, to alleviate salinity stress on canola (Brassica napus L.) growth.

    PubMed

    Jalili, Farzad; Khavazi, Kazem; Pazira, Ebrahim; Nejati, Alireza; Rahmani, Hadi Asadi; Sadaghiani, Hasan Rasuli; Miransari, Mohammad

    2009-04-01

    Salinity stress is of great importance in arid and semi-arid areas of the world due to its impact in reducing crop yield. Under salinity stress, the amount of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC), a precursor for ethylene production in plants, increases. Here, we conducted research under the hypothesis that isolated ACC deaminase-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida can alleviate the stressful effects of salinity on canola (Brassica napus L.) growth. The experiments were conducted in the Soil and Water Research Institute, Tehran, Iran. Seven experimental stages were conducted to isolate and characterize ACC deaminase-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens strains and to determine factors enhancing their growth and, consequently, their effects on the germination of canola seeds. Under salinity stress, in 14% of the isolates, ACC deaminase activity was observed, indicating that they were able to utilize ACC as the sole N-source. Bacterial strains differed in their ability to synthesize auxin and hydrogen cyanide compounds, as well as in their ACC deaminase activity. Under salinity stress, the rate of germinating seeds inoculated with the strains of ACC deaminase-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida, and seedling growth was significantly higher. These results indicate the significance of soil biological activities, including the activities of plant growth-promoting bacteria, in the alleviation of soil stresses such as salinity on plant growth.

  12. Photodynamic therapy-driven induction of suicide cytosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed

    Bil, Jacek; Wlodarski, Pawel; Winiarska, Magdalena; Kurzaj, Zuzanna; Issat, Tadeusz; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Wegiel, Barbara; Dulak, Jozef; Golab, Jakub

    2010-04-28

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of tumors is associated with induction of hypoxia that results in activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). Several observations indicate that increased HIFs transcriptional activity in tumor cells is associated with cytoprotective responses that limit cytotoxic effectiveness of PDT. Therefore, we decided to examine whether this cytoprotective mechanism could be intentionally used for designing more efficient tumor cell cytotoxicity. To this end we transfected tumor cells with a plasmid vector carrying a suicide cytosine deaminase gene driven by a promoter containing hypoxia response elements (HRE). The presence of such a genetic molecular beacon rendered tumor cells sensitive to cytotoxic effects of a non-toxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). The results of this study provides a proof of concept that inducible cytoprotective mechanisms can be exploited to render tumor cells more susceptible to cytotoxic effects of prodrugs activated by products of suicide genes.

  13. Vesicles protect activated acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Todd, Zoe R; House, Christopher H

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Methyl thioacetate, or activated acetic acid, has been proposed to be central to the origin of life and an important energy currency molecule in early cellular evolution. We have investigated the hydrolysis of methyl thioacetate under various conditions. Its uncatalyzed rate of hydrolysis is about 3 orders of magnitude faster (K=0.00663 s(-1); 100°C, pH 7.5, concentration=0.33 mM) than published rates for its catalyzed production, making it unlikely to accumulate under prebiotic conditions. However, our experiments showed that methyl thioacetate was protected from hydrolysis when inside its own hydrophobic droplets. Further, we found that methyl thioacetate protection from hydrolysis was also possible in droplets of hexane and in the membranes of nonanoic acid vesicles. Thus, the hydrophobic regions of prebiotic vesicles and early cell membranes could have offered a refuge for this energetic molecule, increasing its lifetime in close proximity to the reactions for which it would be needed. This model of early energy storage evokes an additional critical function for the earliest cell membranes.

  14. Acid Rain: Activities for Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Seven complete secondary/college level acid rain activities are provided. Activities include overview; background information and societal implications; major concepts; student objectives; vocabulary/material lists; procedures; instructional strategies; and questions/discussion and extension suggestions. Activities consider effects of acid rain on…

  15. Engineering and optimising deaminase fusions for genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Luhan; Briggs, Adrian W.; Chew, Wei Leong; Mali, Prashant; Guell, Marc; Aach, John; Goodman, Daniel Bryan; Cox, David; Kan, Yinan; Lesha, Emal; Soundararajan, Venkataramanan; Zhang, Feng; Church, George

    2016-01-01

    Precise editing is essential for biomedical research and gene therapy. Yet, homology-directed genome modification is limited by the requirements for genomic lesions, homology donors and the endogenous DNA repair machinery. Here we engineered programmable cytidine deaminases and test if we could introduce site-specific cytidine to thymidine transitions in the absence of targeted genomic lesions. Our programmable deaminases effectively convert specific cytidines to thymidines with 13% efficiency in Escherichia coli and 2.5% in human cells. However, off-target deaminations were detected more than 150 bp away from the target site. Moreover, whole genome sequencing revealed that edited bacterial cells did not harbour chromosomal abnormalities but demonstrated elevated global cytidine deamination at deaminase intrinsic binding sites. Therefore programmable deaminases represent a promising genome editing tool in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Future engineering is required to overcome the processivity and the intrinsic DNA binding affinity of deaminases for safer therapeutic applications. PMID:27804970

  16. AMP-deaminase from thymus of patients with myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Rybakowska, I; Szydłowska, M; Szrok, S; Bakuła, S; Kaletha, K

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized clinically by skeletal muscle fatigue following the excessive exercise. Interestingly most of MG patients manifest parallely also some abnormalities of the thymus.AMP-deaminase (AMPD) from human thymus was not a subject of studies up to now. In this paper, mRNA expression and some physico-chemical and immunological properties of AMPD purified from the thymus of MG patients were described. Experiments performed identified the liver isozyme (AMPD2) as the main isoform of AMPD expressed in this organ. The activity of AMPD found in this organ was higher than in other human non-(skeletal) muscle tissues indicating on role the enzyme may play in supplying of guanylates required for the intensive multiplication of thymocytes.

  17. Differentiation of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase from its homologs is the key for identifying bacteria containing ACC deaminase.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengyi; Chang, Siping; Ye, Shuting; Chen, Mingyue; Lin, Li; Li, Yuanyuan; Li, Shuying; An, Qianli

    2015-10-01

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase-mediated reduction of ethylene generation in plants under abiotic stresses is a key mechanism by which bacteria can promote plant growth. Misidentification of ACC deaminase and the ACC deaminase structure gene (acdS) can lead to overestimation of the number of bacteria containing ACC deaminase and their function in ecosystems. Previous non-specific amplification of acdS homologs has led to an overestimation of the horizontal transfer of acdS genes. Here, we designed consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primers (acdSf3, acdSr3 and acdSr4) based on differentiating the key residues in ACC deaminases from those of homologs for specific amplification of partial acdS genes. PCR amplification, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis identified acdS genes from a wide range of proteobacteria and actinobacteria. PCR amplification and a genomic search did not find the acdS gene in bacteria belonging to Pseudomonas stutzeri or in the genera Enterobacter, Klebsiella or Bacillus. We showed that differentiating the acdS gene and ACC deaminase from their homologs was crucial for the molecular identification of bacteria containing ACC deaminase and for understanding the evolution of the acdS gene. We provide an effective method for screening and identifying bacteria containing ACC deaminase.

  18. Streptomyces lividans Blasticidin S Deaminase and Its Application in Engineering a Blasticidin S-Producing Strain for Ease of Genetic Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Wu, Jun; Deng, Zixin; Zabriskie, T. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Blasticidin S is a peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic produced by Streptomyces griseochromogenes that exhibits strong fungicidal activity. To circumvent an effective DNA uptake barrier system in the native producer and investigate its biosynthesis in vivo, the blasticidin S biosynthetic gene cluster (bls) was engrafted to the chromosome of Streptomyces lividans. However, the resulting mutant, LL2, produced the inactive deaminohydroxyblasticidin S instead of blasticidin S. Subsequently, a blasticidin S deaminase (SLBSD, for S. lividans blasticidin S deaminase) was identified in S. lividans and shown to govern this in vivo conversion. Purified SLBSD was found to be capable of transforming blasticidin S to deaminohydroxyblasticidin S in vitro. It also catalyzed deamination of the cytosine moiety of cytosylglucuronic acid, an intermediate in blasticidin S biosynthesis. Disruption of the SLBSD gene in S. lividans LL2 led to successful production of active blasticidin S in the resultant mutant, S. lividans WJ2. To demonstrate the easy manipulation of the blasticidin S biosynthetic gene cluster, blsE, blsF, and blsL, encoding a predicted radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) protein, an unknown protein, and a guanidino methyltransferase, were individually inactivated to access their role in blasticidin S biosynthesis. PMID:23377931

  19. Ectopic Epithelial Deaminase in IBD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). We initially hypothesized the deleterious role of AID in colitis , but our new data rather...disease (IBD) including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic intestinal disorder that is caused by dysregulated host/microbial...after exposure to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) that induces acute colitis . During the first budget year, we have successfully collected DNA from

  20. Differential activation of pregnane X receptor by carnosic acid, carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid.

    PubMed

    Seow, Chun Ling; Lau, Aik Jiang

    2017-03-10

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulates the expression of many genes, including those involved in drug metabolism and transport, and has been linked to various diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease. In the present study, we determined whether carnosic acid and other chemicals in rosemary extract (carnosol, ursolic acid, and rosmarinic acid) are PXR activators. As assessed in dual-luciferase reporter gene assays, carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, activated human PXR (hPXR) and mouse PXR (mPXR), whereas carnosol and ursolic acid, but not carnosic acid or rosmarinic acid, activated rat PXR (rPXR). Dose-response experiments indicated that carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid activated hPXR with EC50 values of 0.79, 2.22, and 10.77μM, respectively. Carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, transactivated the ligand-binding domain of hPXR and recruited steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1), SRC-2, and SRC-3 to the ligand-binding domain of hPXR. Carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, increased hPXR target gene expression, as shown by an increase in CYP3A4, UGT1A3, and ABCB1 mRNA expression in LS180 human colon adenocarcinoma cells. Rosmarinic acid did not attenuate the extent of hPXR activation by rifampicin, suggesting it is not an antagonist of hPXR. Overall, carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid, but not rosmarinic acid, are hPXR agonists, and carnosic acid shows species-dependent activation of hPXR and mPXR, but not rPXR. The findings provide new mechanistic insight on the effects of carnosic acid, carnosol, and ursolic acid on PXR-mediated biological effects.

  1. Activation of carboxylic acids in asymmetric organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Mattia Riccardo; Poladura, Belén; Diaz de Los Bernardos, Miriam; Leutzsch, Markus; Goddard, Richard; List, Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    Organocatalysis, catalysis using small organic molecules, has recently evolved into a general approach for asymmetric synthesis, complementing both metal catalysis and biocatalysis. Its success relies to a large extent upon the introduction of novel and generic activation modes. Remarkably though, while carboxylic acids have been used as catalyst directing groups in supramolecular transition-metal catalysis, a general and well-defined activation mode for this useful and abundant substance class is still lacking. Herein we propose the heterodimeric association of carboxylic acids with chiral phosphoric acid catalysts as a new activation principle for organocatalysis. This self-assembly increases both the acidity of the phosphoric acid catalyst and the reactivity of the carboxylic acid. To illustrate this principle, we apply our concept in a general and highly enantioselective catalytic aziridine-opening reaction with carboxylic acids as nucleophiles.

  2. Long-term expression of human adenosine deaminase in vascular smooth muscle cells of rats: A model for gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, C.M.; Miller, A.D. ); Clowes, M.M.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Clowes, A.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of adenosine deaminase in the striatum

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Risa; Satoh, Yasushi; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Nibuya, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is a ubiquitous enzyme that catabolizes adenosine and deoxyadenosine. During cerebral ischemia, extracellular adenosine levels increase acutely and adenosine deaminase catabolizes the increased levels of adenosine. Since adenosine is a known neuroprotective agent, adenosine deaminase was thought to have a negative effect during ischemia. In this study, however, we demonstrate that adenosine deaminase has substantial neuroprotective effects in the striatum, which is especially vulnerable during cerebral ischemia. We used temporary oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) to simulate ischemia in rat corticostriatal brain slices. We used field potentials as the primary measure of neuronal damage. For stable and efficient electrophysiological assessment, we used transgenic rats expressing channelrhodopsin-2, which depolarizes neurons in response to blue light. Time courses of electrically evoked striatal field potential (eFP) and optogenetically evoked striatal field potential (optFP) were recorded during and after oxygen/glucose deprivation. The levels of both eFP and optFP decreased after 10 min of oxygen/glucose deprivation. Bath-application of 10 µg/ml adenosine deaminase during oxygen/glucose deprivation significantly attenuated the oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced reduction in levels of eFP and optFP. The number of injured cells decreased significantly, and western blot analysis indicated a significant decrease of autophagic signaling in the adenosine deaminase-treated oxygen/glucose deprivation slices. These results indicate that adenosine deaminase has protective effects in the striatum. PMID:26746865

  4. An expanded two-state model accounts for homotropic cooperativity in biosynthetic threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Eisenstein, E; Yu, H D; Fisher, K E; Iacuzio, D A; Ducote, K R; Schwarz, F P

    1995-07-25

    The linkage between substrate and regulatory effector binding to separate sites on allosteric enzymes results in shifts in their sigmoidal kinetics to regulate metabolism. Control of branched chain amino acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli occurs in part through shifts in the sigmoidal dependence of alpha-ketobutyrate production promoted by isoleucine and valine binding to biosynthetic threonine deaminase. The structural similarity of threonine, valine, and isoleucine have given rise to suggestions that there may be competition among different ligands for the same sites on this tetrameric enzyme, resulting in a complex pattern of regulation. In an effort to provide a coherent interpretation of the cooperative association of ligands to the active sites and to the effector sites of threonine deaminase, binding studies using single amino acid variants were undertaken. A previously-isolated, feedback-resistant mutant identified in Salmonella typhimurium, ilvA219, has been cloned and sequenced. The phenotype is attributable to a single amino acid substitution in the regulatory domain of the enzyme in which leucine at position 447 is substituted with phenylalanine. The mutant exhibits hyperbolic saturation curves in both ligand binding and steady-state kinetics. These results, in addition to calorimetric and spectroscopic measurements of isoleucine and valine binding, indicate that the low affinity (T) state is destabilized in the mutant and that it exists predominantly in the high affinity (R) conformation in the absence of ligands, providing an explanation for its resistance to isoleucine. Chemical and spectroscopic analyses of another mutant, in which alanine has replaced an essential lysine at position 62 that forms a Schiff base with pyridoxal phosphate, indicate that the cofactor is complexed to exogenous threonine and is therefore unable to bind additional amino acids at the active sites. Isoleucine and valine binding to this inactive, active site

  5. Rhizosphere bacteria containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase increase yield of plants grown in drying soil via both local and systemic hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Belimov, Andrey A; Dodd, Ian C; Hontzeas, Nikos; Theobald, Julian C; Safronova, Vera I; Davies, William J

    2009-01-01

    Decreased soil water availability can stimulate production of the plant hormone ethylene and inhibit plant growth. Strategies aimed at decreasing stress ethylene evolution might attenuate its negative effects. An environmentally benign (nonchemical) method of modifying crop ethylene relations - soil inoculation with a natural root-associated bacterium Variovorax paradoxus 5C-2 (containing the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase that degrades the ethylene precursor ACC), was assessed with pea (Pisum sativum) plants grown in drying soil. Inoculation with V. paradoxus 5C-2, but not with a transposome mutant with massively decreased ACC deaminase activity, improved growth, yield and water-use efficiency of droughted peas. Systemic effects of V. paradoxus 5C-2 included an amplified soil drying-induced increase of xylem abscisic acid (ABA) concentration, but an attenuated soil drying-induced increase of xylem ACC concentration. A local bacterial effect was increased nodulation by symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria, which prevented a drought-induced decrease in nodulation and seed nitrogen content. Successfully deploying a single bacterial gene in the rhizosphere increased yield and nutritive value of plants grown in drying soil, via both local and systemic hormone signalling. Such bacteria may provide an easily realized, economic means of sustaining crop yields and using irrigation water more efficiently in dryland agriculture.

  6. Targeted base editing in rice and tomato using a CRISPR-Cas9 cytidine deaminase fusion.

    PubMed

    Shimatani, Zenpei; Kashojiya, Sachiko; Takayama, Mariko; Terada, Rie; Arazoe, Takayuki; Ishii, Hisaki; Teramura, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Komatsu, Hiroki; Miura, Kenji; Ezura, Hiroshi; Nishida, Keiji; Ariizumi, Tohru; Kondo, Akihiko

    2017-03-27

    We applied a fusion of CRISPR-Cas9 and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Target-AID) for point mutagenesis at genomic regions specified by single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) in two crop plants. In rice, we induced multiple herbicide-resistance point mutations by multiplexed editing using herbicide selection, while in tomato we generated marker-free plants with homozygous heritable DNA substitutions, demonstrating the feasibility of base editing for crop improvement.

  7. Identification of function and mechanistic insights of guanine deaminase from Nitrosomonas europaea: role of the C-terminal loop in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Bitra, Aruna; Hussain, Bhukya; Tanwar, Ajay Singh; Anand, Ruchi

    2013-05-21

    NE0047 from Nitrosomonas europaea has been annotated as a zinc-dependent deaminase; however, the substrate specificity is unknown because of the low level of structural similarity and sequence identity compared to other family members. In this study, the function of NE0047 was established as a guanine deaminase (catalytic efficiency of 1.2 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1)), exhibiting secondary activity towards ammeline. The structure of NE0047 in the presence of the substrate analogue 8-azaguanine was also determined to a resolution of 1.9 Å. NE0047 crystallized as a homodimer in an asymmetric unit. It was found that the extreme nine-amino acid C-terminal loop forms an active site flap; in one monomer, the flap is in the closed conformation and in the other in the open conformation with this loop region exposed to the solvent. Calorimetric data obtained using the full-length version of the enzyme fit to a sequential binding model, thus supporting a cooperative mode of ligand occupancy. In contrast, the mutant form of the enzyme (ΔC) with the deletion of the extreme nine amino acids follows an independent model of ligand occupancy. In addition, the ΔC mutant also does not exhibit any enzyme activity. Therefore, we propose that the progress of the reaction is communicated via changes in the conformation of the C-terminal flap and the closed form of the enzyme is the catalytically active form, while the open form allows for product release. The catalytic mechanism of deamination was also investigated, and we found that the mutagenesis of the highly conserved active site residues Glu79 and Glu143 resulted in a complete loss of activity and concluded that they facilitate the reaction by serving as proton shuttles.

  8. Bacteria with ACC deaminase can promote plant growth and help to feed the world.

    PubMed

    Glick, Bernard R

    2014-01-20

    To feed all of the world's people, it is necessary to sustainably increase agricultural productivity. One way to do this is through the increased use of plant growth-promoting bacteria; recently, scientists have developed a more profound understanding of the mechanisms employed by these bacteria to facilitate plant growth. Here, it is argued that the ability of plant growth-promoting bacteria that produce 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase to lower plant ethylene levels, often a result of various stresses, is a key component in the efficacious functioning of these bacteria. The optimal functioning of these bacteria includes the synergistic interaction between ACC deaminase and both plant and bacterial auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). These bacteria not only directly promote plant growth, they also protect plants against flooding, drought, salt, flower wilting, metals, organic contaminants, and both bacterial and fungal pathogens. While a considerable amount of both basic and applied work remains to be done before ACC deaminase-producing plant growth-promoting bacteria become a mainstay of plant agriculture, the evidence indicates that with the expected shift from chemicals to soil bacteria, the world is on the verge of a major paradigm shift in plant agriculture.

  9. Three-dimensional structure and catalytic mechanism of cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard S; Fedorov, Alexander A; Xu, Chengfu; Fedorov, Elena V; Almo, Steven C; Raushel, Frank M

    2011-06-07

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K(i) of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pK(a) of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pK(a) of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m), consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  10. Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    R Hall; A Fedorov; C Xu; E Fedorov; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K{sub i} of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  11. Significance of the D-serine-deaminase and D-serine metabolism of Staphylococcus saprophyticus for virulence.

    PubMed

    Korte-Berwanger, Miriam; Sakinc, Türkan; Kline, Kimberly; Nielsen, Hailyn V; Hultgren, Scott; Gatermann, Sören G

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is the only species of Staphylococcus that is typically uropathogenic and possesses a gene coding for a D-serine-deaminase (DsdA). As D-serine is prevalent in urine and toxic or bacteriostatic to many bacteria, it is not surprising that the D-serine-deaminase gene is found in the genome of uropathogens. It has been suggested that D-serine-deaminase or the ability to respond to or to metabolize D-serine is important for virulence. For uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), a high intracellular D-serine concentration affects expression of virulence factors. S. saprophyticus is able to grow in the presence of high D-serine concentrations; however, its D-serine metabolism has not been described. The activity of the D-serine-deaminase was verified by analyzing the formation of pyruvate from D-serine in different strains with and without D-serine-deaminase. Cocultivation experiments were performed to show that D-serine-deaminase confers a growth advantage to S. saprophyticus in the presence of D-serine. Furthermore, in vivo coinfection experiments showed a disadvantage for the ΔdsdA mutant during urinary tract infection. Expression analysis of known virulence factors by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed that the surface-associated lipase Ssp is upregulated in the presence of D-serine. In addition, we show that S. saprophyticus is able to use D-serine as the sole carbon source, but interestingly, D-serine had a negative effect on growth when glucose was also present. Taken together, D-serine metabolism is associated with virulence in S. saprophyticus, as at least one known virulence factor is upregulated in the presence of D-serine and a ΔdsdA mutant was attenuated in virulence murine model of urinary tract infection.

  12. Yeast Cytosine Deaminase Mutants with Increased Thermostability Impart Sensitivity to 5-Fluorocytosine

    PubMed Central

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S.; Korkegian, Aaron M.; Willmon, Candice L.; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L.; Black, Margaret E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of cytosine deaminase-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of cytosine deaminase are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated Tm values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in the temperature that induces protein unfolding and aggregation in thermal denaturation experiments measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy, and an increase in the half-life of enzyme activity at physiological temperature, as well as more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models. PMID:18291415

  13. A Cytidine Deaminase Edits C to U in Transfer RNAs in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Randau, Lennart; Stanley, Bradford J.; Kohlway, Andrew; Mechta, Sarah; Xiong, Yong; Söll, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    All canonical transfer RNAs (tRNAs) have a uridine at position 8, involved in maintaining tRNA tertiary structure. However, the hyperthermophilic archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri harbors 30 (out of 34) tRNA genes with cytidine at position 8. Here, we demonstrate C-to-U editing at this location in the tRNA’s tertiary core, and present the crystal structure of a tRNA-specific cytidine deaminase, CDAT8, which has the cytidine deaminase domain linked to a tRNA-binding THUMP domain. CDAT8 is specific for C deamination at position 8, requires only the acceptor stem hairpin for activity, and belongs to a unique family within the “cytidine deaminase–like” superfamily. The presence of this C-to-U editing enzyme guarantees the proper folding and functionality of all M. kandleri tRNAs. PMID:19407206

  14. Discovery and Structure Determination of the Orphan Enzyme Isoxanthopterin Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Agarwal, R.; Hitchcock, D.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2010-05-25

    Two previously uncharacterized proteins have been identified that efficiently catalyze the deamination of isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The genes encoding these two enzymes, NYSGXRC-9339a (gi|44585104) and NYSGXRC-9236b (gi|44611670), were first identified from DNA isolated from the Sargasso Sea as part of the Global Ocean Sampling Project. The genes were synthesized, and the proteins were subsequently expressed and purified. The X-ray structure of Sgx9339a was determined at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution (Protein Data Bank entry 2PAJ). This protein folds as a distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrel and contains a single zinc ion in the active site. These enzymes are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and belong to cog0402 within the clusters of orthologous groups (COG). Enzymes in cog0402 have previously been shown to catalyze the deamination of guanine, cytosine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, and 8-oxoguanine. A small compound library of pteridines, purines, and pyrimidines was used to probe catalytic activity. The only substrates identified in this search were isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoxanthopterin with Sgx9339a were determined to be 1.0 s{sup -1}, 8.0 {micro}M, and 1.3 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} (k{sub cat}, K{sub m}, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, respectively). The active site of Sgx9339a most closely resembles the active site for 8-oxoguanine deaminase (Protein Data Bank entry 2UZ9). A model for substrate recognition of isoxanthopterin by Sgx9339a was proposed on the basis of the binding of guanine and xanthine in the active site of guanine deaminase. Residues critical for substrate binding appear to be conserved glutamine and tyrosine residues that form hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen at C4, a conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with N5, and another conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl group at C7. These conserved active site

  15. Evaluation of adenosine deaminase assay for analyzing T-lymphocyte density in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kainthla, Rani Poonam; Kashyap, Rajpal Singh; Prasad, Sweta; Purohit, Hemant J; Taori, Giridhar M; Daginawala, Hatim F

    2006-01-01

    The proliferative capacity of T cells in response to various stimuli is commonly determined by radioactive assay based on incorporation of [3H]thymidine ([3H]TdR) into newly synthesized DNA. In order to assess techniques for application in laboratories where radioactive facilities are not present, an alternative method was tested. As an alternative, T-cell proliferation was measured by spectrophotometrically analyzing the presence of an enzyme adenosine deaminase in lymphocytes and also using a standard XTT assay. Jurkat (human) T-cell line (clone E6.1) was used for lymphocyte population. The Jurkat cell concentration was adjusted according to different cell densities and enzyme activity was determined. Cells were also seeded in complete medium up to 72 h and harvested for estimation of enzyme activity. A significant correlation between the standard cell-proliferation assay and adenosine deaminase assay was observed. The present study indicates that the assay of adenosine deaminase is a reliable and accurate method for measuring proliferation of T lymphocytes.

  16. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia induced cytosine deaminase expression in microencapsulated E. coli for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Ennis, Riley C; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-06-10

    Engineered bacterial cells that are designed to express therapeutic enzymes under the transcriptional control of remotely inducible promoters can mediate the de novo conversion of non-toxic prodrugs to their cytotoxic forms. In situ cellular expression of enzymes provides increased stability and control of enzyme activity as compared to isolated enzymes. We have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli), designed to express cytosine deaminase at elevated temperatures, under the transcriptional control of thermo-regulatory λpL-cI857 promoter cassette which provides a thermal switch to trigger enzyme synthesis. Enhanced cytosine deaminase expression was observed in cultures incubated at 42°C as compared to 30°C, and enzyme expression was further substantiated by spectrophotometric assays indicating enhanced conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil. The engineered cells were subsequently co-encapsulated with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in immunoprotective alginate microcapsules, and cytosine deaminase expression was triggered remotely by alternating magnetic field-induced hyperthermia. The combination of 5-fluorocytosine with AMF-activated microcapsules demonstrated tumor cell cytotoxicity comparable to direct treatment with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Such enzyme-prodrug therapy, based on engineered and immunoisolated E. coli, may ultimately yield an improved therapeutic index relative to monotherapy, as AMF mediated hyperthermia might be expected to pre-sensitize tumors to chemotherapy under appropriate conditions.

  17. Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA (ADARs) are both Antiviral and Proviral Dependent upon the Virus

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    A-to-I RNA editing, the deamination of adenosine (A) to inosine (I) that occurs in regions of RNA with double-stranded character, is catalyzed by a family of Adenosine Deaminases Acting on RNA (ADARs). In mammals there are three ADAR genes. Two encode proteins that possess demonstrated deaminase activity: ADAR1, which is interferon-inducible, and ADAR2 which is constitutively expressed. ADAR3, by contrast, has not yet been shown to bean active enzyme. The specificity of the ADAR1 and ADAR2 deaminases ranges from highly site-selective to non-selective, dependent on the duplex structure of the substrate RNA. A-to-I editing is a form of nucleotide substitution editing, because I is decoded as guanosine (G) instead of A by ribosomes during translation and by polymerases during RNA-dependent RNA replication. Additionally, A-to-I editing can alter RNA structure stability as I:U mismatches are less stable than A:U base pairs. Both viral and cellular RNAs are edited by ADARs. A-to-I editing is of broad physiologic significance. Among the outcomes of A-to-I editing are biochemical changes that affect how viruses interact with their hosts, changes that can lead to either enhanced or reduced virus growth and persistence dependent upon the specific virus. PMID:21211811

  18. Beyond SHM and CSR: AID and related cytidine deaminases in the host response to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Brad R; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2007-01-01

    As the primary effector of immunoglobulin somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR), activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) serves an important function in the adaptive immune response. Recent advances have demonstrated that AID and a group of closely related cytidine deaminases, the APOBEC3 proteins, also act in the innate host response to viral infection. Antiviral activity was first attributed to APOBEC3G as a potent inhibitor of HIV. It is now apparent that the targets of the APOBEC3 proteins extend beyond HIV, with family members acting against a wide variety of viruses as well as host-encoded retrotransposable genetic elements. Although it appears to function through a different mechanism, AID also possesses antiviral properties. Independent of its antibody diversification functions, AID protects against transformation by Abelson murine leukemia virus (Ab-MLV), an oncogenic retrovirus. Additionally, AID has been implicated in the host response to other pathogenic viruses. These emerging roles for the AID/APOBEC cytidine deaminases in viral infection suggest an intriguing evolutionary connection of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms.

  19. Building biologically active nucleic acid nanocomplexes.

    PubMed

    Smith, C I Edvard; Lundin, Karin E; Simonson, Oscar E; Moreno, Pedro M D; Svahn, Mathias G; Wenska, Malgorzata; Strömberg, Roger

    2008-01-01

    The Bioplex technology allows the hybridization of functional entities to various forms of nucleic acids by the use of synthetic nucleic acid analogs. Such supramolecular assemblies can be made in a predetermined fashion and can confer new properties. The Zorro technology is based on a novel construct generated to simultaneously bind to both DNA strands. Such compounds may have gene silencing activity.

  20. Purification and characterization of a human RNA adenosine deaminase for glutamate receptor B pre-mRNA editing.

    PubMed

    Yang, J H; Sklar, P; Axel, R; Maniatis, T

    1997-04-29

    The glutamate receptor subunit B (GluR-B) pre-mRNA is edited at two adenosine residues, resulting in amino acid changes that alter the electrophysiologic properties of the glutamate receptor. Previous studies showed that these amino acid changes are due to adenosine to inosine conversions in two codons resulting from adenosine deamination. Here, we describe the purification and characterization of an activity from human HeLa cells that efficiently and accurately edits GluR-B pre-mRNA at both of these sites. The purified activity contains a human homolog of the recently reported rat RED1 (rRED1) protein, a member of the family of double-stranded RNA-dependent deaminase proteins. Recombinant human RED1 (hRED1), but not recombinant dsRAD, another member of the family, efficiently edits both the Q/R and R/G sites of GluR-B RNA. We conclude that the GluR-B editing activity present in HeLa cell extracts and the recombinant hRED1 protein are indistinguishable.

  1. Isolation, characterization, and use for plant growth promotion under salt stress, of ACC deaminase-producing halotolerant bacteria derived from coastal soil.

    PubMed

    Siddikee, Md Ashaduzzaman; Chauhan, Puneet S; Anandham, R; Han, Gwang-Hyun; Sa, Tongmin

    2010-11-01

    In total, 140 halotolerant bacterial strains were isolated from both the soil of barren fields and the rhizosphere of six naturally growing halophytic plants in the vicinity of the Yellow Sea, near the city of Incheon in the Republic of Korea. All of these strains were characterized for multiple plant growth promoting traits, such as the production of indole acetic acid (IAA), nitrogen fixation, phosphorus (P) and zinc (Zn) solubilization, thiosulfate (S2O3) oxidation, the production of ammonia (NH3), and the production of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes such as protease, chitinase, pectinase, cellulase, and lipase under in vitro conditions. From the original 140 strains tested, on the basis of the latter tests for plant growth promotional activity, 36 were selected for further examination. These 36 halotolerant bacterial strains were then tested for 1- aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase activity. Twenty-five of these were found to be positive, and to be exhibiting significantly varying levels of activity. 16S rRNA gene sequencing analyses of the 36 halotolerant strains showed that they belong to 10 different bacterial genera: Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Planococcus, Zhihengliuella, Halomonas, Exiguobacterium, Oceanimonas, Corynebacterium, Arthrobacter, and Micrococcus. Inoculation of the 14 halotolerant bacterial strains to ameliorate salt stress (150 mM NaCl) in canola plants produced an increase in root length of between 5.2% and 47.8%, and dry weight of between 16.2% and 43%, in comparison with the uninoculated positive controls. In particular, three of the bacteria, Brevibacterium epidermidis RS15, Micrococcus yunnanensis RS222, and Bacillus aryabhattai RS341, all showed more than 40% increase in root elongation and dry weight when compared with uninoculated saltstressed canola seedlings. These results indicate that certain halotolerant bacteria, isolated from coastal soils, have a real potential to enhance plant growth under saline stress

  2. Zymographic detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Pastor, F I Javier; Diaz, Pilar

    2002-11-01

    The manuscript includes a concise description of a new, fast and simple method for detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity. The method is based on a color shift caused a by pH change and may be an excellent procedure for large screenings of samples from natural sources, as it involves no complex sample processing or purification. The method developed can be used in preliminary approaches to biotransformation processes involving detection of hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

  3. Cytosine deaminase MX cassettes as positive/negative selectable markers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hartzog, Phillip E; Nicholson, Bradly P; McCusker, John H

    2005-07-30

    We describe positive/negative selectable cytosine deaminase MX cassettes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The basis of positive selection for cytosine deaminase (Fcy1) activity is that (a) fcy1 strains are unable to grow on medium containing cytosine as a sole nitrogen source and (b) fcy1 ura3 strains are unable to grow on medium containing cytosine as the sole pyrimidine source. Conversely, as 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) is toxic to cytosine deaminase-producing cells, fcy1 strains are resistant to 5FC. FCY1MX and FCA1MX cassettes, containing open reading frames (ORFs) of S. cerevisiae FCY1 and Candida albicans FCA1, respectively, were constructed and used to disrupt targeted genes in S. cerevisiae fcy1 strains. In addition, new direct repeat cassettes, kanPR, FCA1PR, FCY1PR and CaURA3PR, were developed to allow efficient deletion of target genes in cells containing MX3 repeats. Finally, the FCY1- and FCA1MX3 or PR direct repeat cassettes can be readily recycled after 5FC counter-selection on both synthetic and rich media.

  4. Genome-wide target specificities of CRISPR RNA-guided programmable deaminases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daesik; Lim, Kayeong; Kim, Sang-Tae; Yoon, Sun-Heui; Kim, Kyoungmi; Ryu, Seuk-Min; Kim, Jin-Soo

    2017-04-10

    Cas9-linked deaminases, also called base editors, enable targeted mutation of single nucleotides in eukaryotic genomes. However, their off-target activity is largely unknown. Here we modify digested-genome sequencing (Digenome-seq) to assess the specificity of a programmable deaminase composed of a Cas9 nickase (nCas9) and the deaminase APOBEC1 in the human genome. Genomic DNA is treated with the base editor and a mixture of DNA-modifying enzymes in vitro to produce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at uracil-containing sites. Off-target sites are then computationally identified from whole genome sequencing data. Testing seven different single guide RNAs (sgRNAs), we find that the rAPOBEC1-nCas9 base editor is highly specific, inducing cytosine-to-uracil conversions at only 18 ± 9 sites in the human genome for each sgRNA. Digenome-seq is sensitive enough to capture off-target sites with a substitution frequency of 0.1%. Notably, off-target sites of the base editors are often different from those of Cas9 alone, calling for independent assessment of their genome-wide specificities.

  5. Various effects of fluorescent bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas containing ACC deaminase on wheat seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Magnucka, Elżbieta G; Pietr, Stanisław J

    2015-12-01

    The study evaluates the effect of rhizobacteria having 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCd) on the development of wheat seedlings. This enzyme has been proposed to play a key role in microbe-plant association. Three fluorescent pseudomonads containing this deaminase were selected from 70 strains of pseudomonads isolated from rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rape (Brassica napus L.). These bacteria, varied significantly in the ability to both biosynthesize auxins and hydrolyze ACC. Among them, Pseudomonas brassicacearum subsp. brassicacearum strain RZ310 presented the highest activities of ACC deaminase during 96h of growth in liquid Dworkin and Foster (DF) salt medium. Additionally, this rape rhizosphere strain did not produce indoles. Two other isolates, Pseudomonas sp. PO283 and Pseudomonas sp. PO366, secreted auxins only in the presence of their precursor. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene and four other protein-encoding genes indicated that these wheat rhizosphere isolates belonged to the fluorescent Pseudomonas group. Moreover, the effects of these strains on wheat seedling growth under in vitro conditions were markedly dependent on both their cell suspensions used to grain inoculation and nutrient conditions. Strains tested had beneficial influence on wheat seedlings mainly at low cell densities. In addition, access to nutrients markedly changed bacteria action on cereal growth. Their presence generally favored the positive effects of pseudomonads on length and the estimated biomasses of wheat coleoptiles. Despite these general rules, impacts of each isolate on the growth parameters of cereal seedlings were unique.

  6. The cytotoxic activity of ursolic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao-Mei; Cai, Shao-Qing; Cui, Jing-Rong; Wang, Rui-Qing; Tu, Peng-Fei; Hattori, Masao; Daneshtalab, Mohsen

    2005-06-01

    Ursolic acid and 2alpha-hydroxyursolic acid isolated from apple peels were found to show growth inhibitory activity against four tumor cell lines, HL-60, BGC, Bel-7402 and Hela. Structural modifications were performed on the C-3, C-28 and C-11 positions of ursolic acid and the cytotoxicity of the derivatives was evaluated. The SAR revealed that the triterpenes possessing two hydrogen-bond forming groups (an H-donor and a carbonyl group) at positions 3 and 28 exhibit cytotoxic activity. The configuration at C-3 was found to be important for the activity. Introduction of an amino group increased the cytotoxicity greatly. A 3beta-amino derivative was 20 times more potent than the parent ursolic acid. The 28-aminoalkyl dimer compounds showed selective cytotoxicity.

  7. Isolation and properties of AMP deaminase from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle muscle from the Gulf of California, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Marquez-Rios, E; Pacheco-Aguilar, R; Castillo-Yañez, F J; Figueroa-Soto, C G; Ezquerra-Brauer, J M; Gollas-Galvan, T

    2008-09-01

    Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) deaminase was purified from jumbo squid mantle muscle by chromatography in cellulose phosphate, Q-Fast and 5'-AMP sepharose. Specific activity of 2.5U/mg protein, 4.5% recovery and 133.68 purification fold were obtained at the end of the experiment. SDS-PAGE showed a single band with 87kDa molecular mass, native PAGE proved a band of 178kDa, whereas gel filtration detected a 180kDa protein, suggesting the homodimeric nature of this enzyme, in which subunits are not linked by covalent forces. Isoelectric focusing of this enzyme showed a pI of 5.76, which agrees with pI values of AMP deaminase from other invertebrate organisms. AMP deaminase presented a kinetic sigmoidal plot with Vmax of 1.16μM/min/mg, Km of 13mM, Kcat of 3.48μM.s(-1) and a Kcat/Km of 267 (mol/L)(-1).s(-1). The apparent relative low catalytic activity of jumbo squid muscle AMP deaminase in the absence of positive effectors is similar to that reported for homologous enzymes in other invertebrate organisms.

  8. 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminases from Methylobacterium radiotolerans and Methylobacterium nodulans with higher specificity for ACC.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Dmitry N; Ekimova, Galina A; Doronina, Nina V; Trotsenko, Yuri A

    2013-06-01

    The 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminases (EC 3.4.99.7), the key enzymes of degradation of the precursor of the phytohormone ethylene, have not been well studied despite their great importance for plant-bacterial interactions. Using blast, the open reading frames encoding ACC deaminases were found in the genomes of epiphytic methylotroph Methylobacterium radiotolerans JCM2831 and nodule-forming endosymbiont Methylobacterium nodulans ORS2060. These genes were named acdS and cloned; recombinant proteins were expressed and purified from Escherichia coli. The enzyme from M. nodulans displayed the highest substrate specificity among all of the characterized ACC deaminases (Km 0.80 ± 0.04 mM), whereas the enzyme from M. radiotolerans had Km 1.8 ± 0.3 mM. The kcat values were 111.8 ± 0.2 and 65.8 ± 2.8 min(-1) for the enzymes of M. nodulans and M. radiotolerans, respectively. Both enzymes are homotetramers with a molecular mass of 144 kDa, as was demonstrated by size exclusion chromatography and native PAGE. The purified enzymes displayed the maximum activity at 45-50 °C and pH 8.0. Thus, the priority data have been obtained, extending the knowledge of biochemical properties of bacterial ACC deaminases.

  9. The ONIOM molecular dynamics method for biochemical applications: cytidine deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Matsubara, Toshiaki; Dupuis, Michel; Aida, Misako

    2007-03-22

    Abstract We derived and implemented the ONIOM-molecular dynamics (MD) method for biochemical applications. The implementation allows the characterization of the functions of the real enzymes taking account of their thermal motion. In this method, the direct MD is performed by calculating the ONIOM energy and gradients of the system on the fly. We describe the first application of this ONOM-MD method to cytidine deaminase. The environmental effects on the substrate in the active site are examined. The ONIOM-MD simulations show that the product uridine is strongly perturbed by the thermal motion of the environment and dissociates easily from the active site. TM and MA were supported in part by grants from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. MD was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, and by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy DOE. Battelle operates Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE.

  10. Adenosine deaminase in cell transformation. Biophysical manifestation of membrane dynamics.

    PubMed

    Porat, N; Gill, D; Parola, A H

    1988-10-15

    Cell transformation is associated with a dramatic collapse of a graphic fingerprint characteristic of normal cells, as measured by phase fluorimetry. This is demonstrated on adenosine deaminase (ADA, EC 3.5.4.4), an established malignancy marker. ADA activity is known to decrease markedly in chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF) transformed by Rous sarcoma virus. The high affinity between the catalytic small subunit ADA (SS-ADA) and its membranal complexing protein (ADCP) (which abounds on the plasma membrane of CEF) allowed the hybridization of fluorescent labeled SS-ADA with native ADCP on CEF. Multifrequency differential phase fluorimetry responded remarkably to the state of this hybrid membrane protein. The transformation process is shown to have led to increased membrane fluidity and rotational mobility of ADCP as well as to its reduced availability to SS-ADA binding. The hypothesis of protein vertical sinking into the lipid core of the membrane is now given support by our spectroscopic data. Additional models are considered. A regulatory role is thus suggested for the complexing protein, which may also account for (a) reduced ADA activity in transformed cells and (b) detachment, exclusive to normal cells, upon addition of SS-ADA in excess.

  11. Methane activation and oxidation in sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Goeppert, Alain; Dinér, Peter; Ahlberg, Per; Sommer, Jean

    2002-07-15

    The H/D exchange observed when methane is contacted with D(2)SO(4) at 270-330 degrees C shows that the alkane behaves as a sigma base and undergoes rapid and reversible protonation at this temperature. DFT studies of the hydrogen exchange between a monomer and a dimer of sulfuric acid and methane show that the transition states involved in the exchange are bifunctional, that is one hydrogen atom is transferred from a hydroxy group in sulfuric acid to methane, while one hydrogen atom is abstracted from methane by a non-hydroxy oxygen atom in sulfuric acid. All the transition states include a CH(5) moiety, which shows similarities to the methanium ion CH(5) (+). The calculated potential activation energy of the hydrogen exchange for the monomer is 174 kJ mol(-1), which is close to the experimental value (176 kJ mol(-1)). Solvation of the monomer and the transition state of the monomer with an extra sulfuric acid molecule, decrease the potential activation energy by 6 kJ mol(-1). The acid-base process is in competition, however, with an oxidative process involving methane and sulfuric acid which leads to CO(2), SO(2), and water, and thus to a decrease of acidity and loss of reactivity of the medium.

  12. Threonine deaminase from extremely halophilic bacteria - Cooperative substrate kinetics and salt dependence.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, M. M.; Lanyi, J. K.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of salt on the activity, stability, and allosteric properties of catabolic threonine deaminase from Halobacterium cutirubrum was studied. The enzyme exhibits sigmoidal kinetics with the substrate, threonine. The Hill slope is 1.55 at pH 10. The enzyme is activated by ADP at low substrate concentrations. In the presence of this effector, sigmoidal kinetics are no longer observed. At pH 10, in the absence of ADP, enzyme activity increases with increasing NaCl concentration from 0 to 4 M.

  13. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Modulates Trichomonas vaginalis Activity.

    PubMed

    Korosh, Travis; Jordan, Kelsey D; Wu, Ja-Shin; Yarlett, Nigel; Upmacis, Rita K

    2016-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a sexually transmitted parasite and, while it is often asymptomatic in males, the parasite is associated with disease in both sexes. Metronidazole is an effective treatment for trichomoniasis, but resistant strains have evolved and, thus, it has become necessary to investigate other possible therapies. In this study, we examined the effects of native and oxidized forms of the sodium salts of eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic, and arachidonic acids on T. vaginalis activity. Eicosapentaenoic acid was the most toxic with 190 and 380 μM causing approximately 90% cell death in Casu2 and ATCC 50142 strains, respectively. In contrast, oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid was the least toxic, requiring > 3 mM to inhibit activity, while low levels (10 μM) were associated with increased parasite density. Mass spectrometric analysis of oxidized eicosapentaenoic acid revealed C20 products containing one to six additional oxygen atoms and various degrees of bond saturation. These results indicate that eicosapentaenoic acid has different effects on T. vaginalis survival, depending on whether it is present in the native or oxidized form. A better understanding of lipid metabolism in T. vaginalis may facilitate the design of synthetic fatty acids that are effective for the treatment of metronidazole-resistant T. vaginalis.

  14. Identification, expression, and characterization of Escherichia coli guanine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Maynes, J T; Yuan, R G; Snyder, F F

    2000-08-01

    Using the human cDNA sequence corresponding to guanine deaminase, the Escherichia coli genome was scanned using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), and a corresponding 439-residue open reading frame of unknown function was identified as having 36% identity to the human protein. The putative gene was amplified, subcloned into the pMAL-c2 vector, expressed, purified, and characterized enzymatically. The 50.2-kDa protein catalyzed the conversion of guanine to xanthine, having a K(m) of 15 microM with guanine and a k(cat) of 3.2 s(-1). The bacterial enzyme shares a nine-residue heavy metal binding site with human guanine deaminase, PG[FL]VDTHIH, and was found to contain approximately 1 mol of zinc per mol of subunit of protein. The E. coli guanine deaminase locus is 3' from an open reading frame which shows homology to a bacterial purine base permease.

  15. Identification, Expression, and Characterization of Escherichia coli Guanine Deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Maynes, Jason T.; Yuan, Richard G.; Snyder, Floyd F.

    2000-01-01

    Using the human cDNA sequence corresponding to guanine deaminase, the Escherichia coli genome was scanned using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST), and a corresponding 439-residue open reading frame of unknown function was identified as having 36% identity to the human protein. The putative gene was amplified, subcloned into the pMAL-c2 vector, expressed, purified, and characterized enzymatically. The 50.2-kDa protein catalyzed the conversion of guanine to xanthine, having a Km of 15 μM with guanine and a kcat of 3.2 s−1. The bacterial enzyme shares a nine-residue heavy metal binding site with human guanine deaminase, PG[FL]VDTHIH, and was found to contain approximately 1 mol of zinc per mol of subunit of protein. The E. coli guanine deaminase locus is 3′ from an open reading frame which shows homology to a bacterial purine base permease. PMID:10913105

  16. Mechanistic studies of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase: characterization of an unusual pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent reaction.

    PubMed

    Thibodeaux, Christopher J; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2011-03-22

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase (ACCD) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme that cleaves the cyclopropane ring of ACC, to give α-ketobutyric acid and ammonia as products. The cleavage of the C(α)-C(β) bond of an amino acid substrate is a rare event in PLP-dependent enzyme catalysis. Potential chemical mechanisms involving nucleophile- or acid-catalyzed cyclopropane ring opening have been proposed for the unusual transformation catalyzed by ACCD, but the actual mode of cyclopropane ring cleavage remains obscure. In this report, we aim to elucidate the mechanistic features of ACCD catalysis by investigating the kinetic properties of ACCD from Pseudomonas sp. ACP and several of its mutant enzymes. Our studies suggest that the pK(a) of the conserved active site residue, Tyr294, is lowered by a hydrogen bonding interaction with a second conserved residue, Tyr268. This allows Tyr294 to deprotonate the incoming amino group of ACC to initiate the aldimine exchange reaction between ACC and the PLP coenzyme and also likely helps to activate Tyr294 for a role as a nucleophile to attack and cleave the cyclopropane ring of the substrate. In addition, solvent kinetic isotope effect (KIE), proton inventory, and (13)C KIE studies of the wild type enzyme suggest that the C(α)-C(β) bond cleavage step in the chemical mechanism is at least partially rate-limiting under k(cat)/K(m) conditions and is likely preceded in the mechanism by a partially rate-limiting step involving the conversion of a stable gem-diamine intermediate into a reactive external aldimine intermediate that is poised for cyclopropane ring cleavage. When viewed within the context of previous mechanistic and structural studies of ACCD enzymes, our studies are most consistent with a mode of cyclopropane ring cleavage involving nucleophilic catalysis by Tyr294.

  17. Microbial killing activity of peracetic acid.

    PubMed

    Thamlikitkul, V; Trakulsomboon, S; Louisirirotchanakul, S; Chaiprasert, A; Foongladda, S; Thipsuvan, K; Arjratanakool, W; Kunyok, R; Wasi, C; Santiprasitkul, S; Danchaivijitr, S

    2001-10-01

    In vitro killing activity of peracetic acid (Perasafe) at a concentration of 0.26 per cent w/v was tested against Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella paratyphi A, Acinetobacter baumannii, Sternotrophomonas maltophilia, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus faecalis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Bacillus subtilis spore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immuno-deficiency virus type I. Exposure to Peracetic acid (0.26% w/v) for 10 minutes resulted in massive killing of all the aforementioned organisms and spore.

  18. Diagnostic Value of Adenosine Deaminase and Its Isoforms in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Larijani, Bagher; Heshmat, Ramin; Ebrahimi-Rad, Mina; Khatami, Shohreh; Valadbeigi, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. In the present study, we have investigated the activity of adenosine deaminase (ADA) as a diagnostic marker in type 2 (or II) diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Design and Methods. The deaminase activity of ADA1 and ADA2 was determined in serum from 33 patients with type 2 (or II) diabetes mellitus and 35 healthy controls. We also determined the proportion of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Results. Our results showed significant differences between total serum ADA (tADA) and ADA2 activities in the diabetic groups with HbA1c < 8 (%) and HbA1c ≥ 8 (%) with respect to the values in healthy individuals (p < 0.001). ADA2 activity in patients with high HbA1c was found to be much higher than that in patients with low HbA1c (p = 0.0001). In addition, total ADA activity showed a significant correlation with HbA1c (r = 0.6, p < 0.0001). Conclusions. Total serum ADA activity, specially that due to ADA2, could be useful test for the diagnosis of type 2 (or II) diabetes mellitus. PMID:28050278

  19. Editing of glutamate receptor B subunit ion channel RNAs by four alternatively spliced DRADA2 double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminases.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, F; Chen, C X; Carter, K C; Nishikura, K

    1997-01-01

    Double-stranded (ds) RNA-specific adenosine deaminase converts adenosine residues into inosines in dsRNA and edits transcripts of certain cellular and viral genes such as glutamate receptor (GluR) subunits and hepatitis delta antigen. The first member of this type of deaminase, DRADA1, has been recently cloned based on the amino acid sequence information derived from biochemically purified proteins. Our search for DRADA1-like genes through expressed sequence tag databases led to the cloning of the second member of this class of enzyme, DRADA2, which has a high degree of sequence homology to DRADA1 yet exhibits a distinctive RNA editing site selectivity. There are four differentially spliced isoforms of human DRADA2. These different isoforms of recombinant DRADA2 proteins, including one which is a human homolog of the recently reported rat RED1, were analyzed in vitro for their GluR B subunit (GluR-B) RNA editing site selectivity. As originally reported for rat RED1, the DRADA2a and -2b isoforms edit GluR-B RNA efficiently at the so-called Q/R site, whereas DRADA1 barely edits this site. In contrast, the R/G site of GluR-B RNA was edited efficiently by the DRADA2a and -2b isoforms as well as DRADA1. Isoforms DRADA2c and -2d, which have a distinctive truncated shorter C-terminal structure, displayed weak adenosine-to-inosine conversion activity but no editing activity tested at three known sites of GluR-B RNA. The possible role of these DRADA2c and -2d isoforms in the regulatory mechanism of RNA editing is discussed. PMID:9111310

  20. Annexin V-targeted enzyme prodrug therapy using cytosine deaminase in combination with 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Van Rite, Brent D; Harrison, Roger G

    2011-08-01

    A fusion protein, consisting of cytosine deaminase (CD) linked to human annexin V, was created for use in an enzyme prodrug therapy targeted to the tumor vasculature and associated cancer cells in the primary tumor and distant metastases. The major finding of this study is that the CD-annexin V fusion protein in combination with the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine has significant cytotoxic activity against endothelial cells and two breast cancer cells lines in vitro that expose phosphatidylserine on their surface. The cytotoxicity experiments verified this novel enzyme prodrug system has the ability to produce therapeutic levels of 5-fluorouracil and thus appears promising.

  1. Antidiabetic Activity from Gallic Acid Encapsulated Nanochitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purbowatiningrum; Ngadiwiyana; Ismiyarto; Fachriyah, E.; Eviana, I.; Eldiana, O.; Amaliyah, N.; Sektianingrum, A. N.

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has become a health problem in the world because it causes death. One of the phenolic compounds that have antidiabetic activity is gallic acid. However, the use of this compound still provides unsatisfactory results due to its degradation during the absorption process. The solution offered to solve the problem is by encapsulated it within chitosan nanoparticles that serve to protect the bioactive compound from degradation, increases of solubility and delivery of a bioactive compound to the target site by using freeze-drying technique. The result of chitosan nanoparticle’s Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed that chitosan nanoparticle’s size is uniform and it is smaller than chitosan. The value of encapsulation efficiency (EE) of gallic acid which encapsulated within chitosan nanoparticles is about 50.76%. Inhibition test result showed that gallic acid-chitosan nanoparticles at 50 ppm could inhibite α-glucosidase activity in 28.87% with 54.94 in IC50. So it can be concluded that gallic acid can be encapsulated in nanoparticles of chitosan and proved that it could inhibit α-glucosidase.

  2. Biochemistry and genetics of ACC deaminase: a weapon to “stress ethylene” produced in plants

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajnish P.; Shelke, Ganesh M.; Kumar, Anil; Jha, Prabhat N.

    2015-01-01

    1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCD), a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme, is widespread in diverse bacterial and fungal species. Owing to ACCD activity, certain plant associated bacteria help plant to grow under biotic and abiotic stresses by decreasing the level of “stress ethylene” which is inhibitory to plant growth. ACCD breaks down ACC, an immediate precursor of ethylene, to ammonia and α-ketobutyrate, which can be further metabolized by bacteria for their growth. ACC deaminase is an inducible enzyme whose synthesis is induced in the presence of its substrate ACC. This enzyme encoded by gene AcdS is under tight regulation and regulated differentially under different environmental conditions. Regulatory elements of gene AcdS are comprised of the regulatory gene encoding LRP protein and other regulatory elements which are activated differentially under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The role of some additional regulatory genes such as AcdB or LysR may also be required for expression of AcdS. Phylogenetic analysis of AcdS has revealed that distribution of this gene among different bacteria might have resulted from vertical gene transfer with occasional horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Application of bacterial AcdS gene has been extended by developing transgenic plants with ACCD gene which showed increased tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plants. Moreover, distribution of ACCD gene or its homolog's in a wide range of species belonging to all three domains indicate an alternative role of ACCD in the physiology of an organism. Therefore, this review is an attempt to explore current knowledge of bacterial ACC deaminase mediated physiological effects in plants, mode of enzyme action, genetics, distribution among different species, ecological role of ACCD and, future research avenues to develop transgenic plants expressing foreign AcdS gene to cope with biotic and abiotic stressors. Systemic identification of regulatory circuits

  3. Inhibition of AMP deaminase as therapeutic target in cardiovascular pathology.

    PubMed

    Zabielska, Magdalena A; Borkowski, Tomasz; Slominska, Ewa M; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2015-08-01

    AMP deaminase (AMPD; EC 3.5.4.6) catalyzes hydrolysis of the amino group from the adenine ring of AMP resulting in production of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. This reaction helps to maintain healthy cellular energetics by removing excess AMP that accumulates in energy depleted cells. Furthermore, AMPD permits the synthesis of guanine nucleotides from the larger adenylate pool. This enzyme competes with cytosolic 5'-nucleotidases (c5NT) for AMP. Adenosine, a product of c5NT is a vasodilator, antagonizes inotropic effects of catecholamines and exerts anti-platelet, anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive activities. The ratio of AMPD/c5NT defines the amount of adenosine produced in adenine nucleotide catabolic pathway. Inhibition of AMPD could alter this ratio resulting in increased adenosine production. Besides the potential effect on adenosine production, elevation of AMP due to inhibition of AMPD could also lead to activation of AMP regulated protein kinase (AMPK) with myriad of downstream events including enhanced energetic metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and cytoprotection. While the benefits of these processes are well appreciated in cells such as skeletal or cardiac myocytes its role in protection of endothelium could be even more important. Therapeutic use of AMPD inhibition has been limited due to difficulties with obtaining compounds with adequate characteristics. However, endothelium seems to be the easiest target as effective inhibition of AMPD could be achieved at much lower concentration than in the other types of cells. New generation of AMPD inhibitors has recently been established and its testing in context of endothelial and organ protection could provide important basic knowledge and potential therapeutic tools.

  4. Crystal Structure of Staphylococcus aureus tRNA Adenosine Deaminase TadA in Complex with RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Losey,H.; Ruthenburg, A.; Verdine, G.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial tRNA adenosine deaminases (TadAs) catalyze the hydrolytic deamination of adenosine to inosine at the wobble position of tRNA(Arg2), a process that enables this single tRNA to recognize three different arginine codons in mRNA. In addition, inosine is also introduced at the wobble position of multiple eukaryotic tRNAs. The genes encoding these deaminases are essential in bacteria and yeast, demonstrating the importance of their biological activity. Here we report the crystallization and structure determination to 2.0 A of Staphylococcus aureus TadA bound to the anticodon stem-loop of tRNA(Arg2) bearing nebularine, a non-hydrolyzable adenosine analog, at the wobble position. The cocrystal structure reveals the basis for both sequence and structure specificity in the interactions of TadA with RNA, and it additionally provides insight into the active site architecture that promotes efficient hydrolytic deamination.

  5. N-terminal and C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain of APOBEC3G inhibit hepatitis B virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yan-Chang; Tian, Yong-Jun; Ding, Hong-Hui; Wang, Bao-Ju; Yang, Yan; Hao, You-Hua; Zhao, Xi-Ping; Lu, Meng-Ji; Gong, Fei-Li; Yang, Dong-Liang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of human apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic-polypeptide 3G (APOBEC3G) and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain-mediated antiviral activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: The mammalian hepatoma cells HepG2 and HuH7 were cotransfected with APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain expression vector and 1.3-fold-overlength HBV DNA as well as the linear monomeric HBV of genotype B and C. For in vivo study, an HBV vector-based mouse model was used in which APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain expression vectors were co-delivered with 1.3-fold-overlength HBV DNA via high-volume tail vein injection. Levels of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) in the media of the transfected cells and in the sera of mice were determined by ELISA. The expression of hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) in the transfected cells was determined by Western blot analysis. Core-associated HBV DNA was examined by Southern blot analysis. Levels of HBV DNA in the sera of mice as well as HBV core-associated RNA in the liver of mice were determined by quantitative PCR and quantitative RT-PCR analysis, respectively. RESULTS: Human APOBEC3G exerted an anti-HBV activity in a dose-dependent manner in HepG2 cells, and comparable suppressive effects were observed on genotype B and C as that of genotype A. Interestingly, the N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain alone could also inhibit HBV replication in HepG2 cells as well as Huh7 cells. Consistent with in vitro results, the levels of HBsAg in the sera of mice were dramatically decreased, with more than 50 times decrease in the levels of serum HBV DNA and core-associated RNA in the liver of mice treated with APOBEC3G and its N-terminal or C-terminal cytosine deaminase domain as compared to the controls. CONCLUSION: Our findings provide probably the

  6. Antineoplastic activity of zoledronic acid and denosumab.

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Pawel; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z

    2013-08-01

    Cancer patients suffer from cancer-induced bone pain, hypercalcemia, and reduced quality of life caused by pathological fractures. Many of these complications related to cancer can be treated, or at least controlled, using new anticancer agents. Recently, two agents used initially to treat osteoporosis demonstrated direct and indirect anticancer activity. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about direct and indirect anticancer activity of zoledronic acid (a third-generation bisphosphonate), and denosumab antibody against RANKL. Zoledronic acid influences the proliferation and viability of tumor cells in vitro, and effectively reduces tumor burden, tumor-induced pain, and tumor growth in vivo. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody preventing the binding of RANKL to its receptor on osteoclasts' membrane, and through this mechanism inhibits the resorption of the bone. Furthermore, this agent demonstrates direct anticancer activity through the RANKL signaling pathway. Because of these features both drugs may gain broader application for the treatment of cancer patients. However, further pre-clinical and clinical evaluation is needed for both agents to fully assess the antineoplastic mechanisms of activity of both agents.

  7. Expression of a functional human adenosine deaminase in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Singhabahu, Sanjeewa; George, John; Bringloe, David

    2013-06-01

    An inherited disorder, adenosine deaminase deficiency is a form of severe combined immunodeficiency, which is ultimately caused by an absence of adenosine deaminase (ADA), a key enzyme of the purine salvage pathway. The absence of ADA-activity in sufferers eventually results in a dysfunctional immune system due to the build-up of toxic metabolites. To date, this has been treated with mixed success, using PEG-ADA, made from purified bovine ADA coupled to polyethylene glycol. It is likely, however, that an enzyme replacement therapy protocol based on recombinant human ADA would be a more effective treatment for this disease. Therefore, as a preliminary step to produce biologically active human ADA in transgenic tobacco plants a human ADA cDNA has been inserted into a plant expression vector under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter and both human and TMV 5' UTR control regions. Plant vector expression constructs have been used to transform tobacco plants via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Genomic DNA, RNA and protein blot analyses have demonstrated the integration of the cDNA construct into the plant nuclear genome and the expression of recombinant ADA mRNA and protein in transgenic tobacco leaves. Western blot analysis has also revealed that human and recombinant ADA have a similar size of approximately 41 kDa. ADA-specific activities of between 0.001 and 0.003 units per mg total soluble protein were measured in crude extracts isolated from transformed tobacco plant leaves.

  8. Improved method for effective screening of ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate) deaminase producing microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Patil, Chandrashekhar; Suryawanshi, Rahul; Koli, Sunil; Patil, Satish

    2016-12-01

    Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACCD) producing microorganisms support plant growth under a variety of biotic and abiotic stress conditions such as drought, soil salinity, flooding, heavy metal pollution and phyto-pathogen attack. Available screening methods for ACCD give idea only about its primary microbial ACCD activity than the actual potential. In the present investigation, we have simply improved screening method by incorporating pH indicator dyes (phenol red and bromothymol blue) in ACC containing medium. This modification is based on the basic principle that ACCD action releases ammonia which can be detected by color change and zone around the bacterial colony. High color intensity and zone around the colony indicates most potent producer, colony showing only a color change indicates moderate potential and no change in colony color indicates least efficiency. Enzymatic bioassays as well as root elongation studies revealed that ACC-deaminase activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Bacillus subtilis clearly corresponds to their growth on dye incorporated ACC medium. This method could be used to complement the existing screening methods and to speed up the targeted isolation of agriculturally important microorganisms.

  9. Attenuation of exercise vasodilatation by adenosine deaminase in anaesthetized dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Goonewardene, I P; Karim, F

    1991-01-01

    1. In dogs anaesthetized with sodium pentobarbitone and artificially ventilated, the gracilis muscles were vascularly isolated and perfused at a constant flow of 28.4 +/- 4.6 ml min-1 (100 g muscle tissue)-1 (99.8 +/- 4.5% of maximum free flow, means +/- standard error of the mean (S.E.M.), n = 9). 2. Three to five minutes of electrical stimulation of the cut peripheral end of the obturator nerve (4 Hz, 6 V, 0.2 ms) resulted in muscle contraction (0.61 +/- 0.14 kg (100 g)-1 during solvent infusion and 0.56 +/- 0.10 kg (100 g)-1 during intra-arterial adenosine deaminase infusion (50 U min-1) and an immediate decrease in arterial perfusion pressure from 184.5 +/- 8.1 mmHg to 148.2 +/- 5.7 mmHg (18.7 +/- 3.4% decrease) during solvent infusion, and from 193.5 +/- 7.16 to 142.0 +/- 10.2 mmHg (25.4 +/- 6.1% decrease) during adenosine deaminase infusion 10 s after the commencement of muscle stimulation. After about 5 min of muscle contractions, the arterial perfusion pressure decreased to 120.8 +/- 7.8 mmHg (32.9 +/- 5.8% decrease) during solvent infusion, and to 152.8 +/- 11.2 mmHg (20.9 +/- 5.3% decrease) during adenosine deaminase infusion (i.e. 37.9 +/- 6.2% attenuation of the fall in arterial perfusion pressure). The time taken for 90% recovery of the arterial perfusion pressure was 72.1 +/- 10.9 s during solvent infusion, and 51.5 +/- 9.3 s during adenosine deaminase infusion (P less than 0.05). 3. Adenosine (2 x 10(-3) mol l-1) infusion in the resting muscle during solvent infusion (final concentration in arterial blood 1.3 x 10(-4) +/- 6.0 x 10(-5) mol l-1) resulted in a 34.8 +/- 7.2% fall in arterial perfusion pressure but a fall of only 7.2 +/- 1.8% during adenosine deaminase infusion (50 U min-1; P less than 0.05; n = 5) indicating that adenosine deaminase infused at 50 U min-1 was more than adequate to metabolize endogenous adenosine produced during muscle contractions. 4. These data suggest that adenosine contributes about 40% to the sustained

  10. The Hunt for 8-Oxoguanine Deaminase

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, R.; Fedorov, A; Marti-Arbona, R; Fedorov, E; Kolb, P; Sauder, J; Burley, S; Shoichet, B; Almo, S; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    An enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pa0142 (gi|9945972), that is able to catalyze the deamination of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) to uric acid has been identified for the first time. 8-Oxoguanine is formed by the oxidation of guanine residues within DNA by reactive oxygen species, and this lesion results in G:C to T:A transversions. The value of k{sub cat}/K{sub m} for the deamination of 8-oxoG by Pa0142 at pH 8.0 and 30 C is 2.0 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. This enzyme can also catalyze the deamination of isocystosine and guanine at rates that are approximately an order of magnitude lower. The three-dimensional structure of a homologous enzyme (gi|44264246) from the Sargasso Sea has been determined by X-ray diffraction methods to a resolution of 2.2 {angstrom} (PDB entry ). The enzyme folds as a ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrel and is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily with a single zinc in the active site. This enzyme catalyzes the deamination of 8-oxoG with a k{sub cat}/K{sub m} value of 2.7 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Computational docking of potential high-energy intermediates for the deamination reaction to the X-ray crystal structure suggests that active-site binding of 8-oxoG is facilitated by hydrogen-bond interactions from a conserved glutamine that follows {beta}-strand 1 with the carbonyl group at C6, a conserved tyrosine that follows {beta}-strand 2 with N7, and a conserved cysteine residue that follows {beta}-strand 4 with the carbonyl group at C8. A bioinformatic analysis of available protein sequences suggests that {approx}200 other bacteria possess an enzyme capable of catalyzing the deamination of 8-oxoG.

  11. Triboelectrification of active pharmaceutical ingredients: week acids and their salts.

    PubMed

    Fujinuma, Kenta; Ishii, Yuji; Yashihashi, Yasuo; Yonemochi, Estuo; Sugano, Kiyohiko; Tarada, Katsuhide

    2015-09-30

    The effect of salt formulation on the electrostatic property of active pharmaceutical ingredients was investigated. The electrostatic property of weak acids (carboxylic acids and amide-enole type acid) and their sodium salts was evaluated by a suction-type Faraday cage meter. Free carboxylic acids showed negative chargeability, whereas their sodium salts showed more positive chargeability than the free acids. However, no such trend was observed for amide-enole type acids.

  12. The Role of Cytidine Deaminases on Innate Immune Responses against Human Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Valdimara C.; Soares, Marcelo A.

    2013-01-01

    The APOBEC family of proteins comprises deaminase enzymes that edit DNA and/or RNA sequences. The APOBEC3 subgroup plays an important role on the innate immune system, acting on host defense against exogenous viruses and endogenous retroelements. The role of APOBEC3 proteins in the inhibition of viral infection was firstly described for HIV-1. However, in the past few years many studies have also shown evidence of APOBEC3 action on other viruses associated with human diseases, including HTLV, HCV, HBV, HPV, HSV-1, and EBV. APOBEC3 inhibits these viruses through a series of editing-dependent and independent mechanisms. Many viruses have evolved mechanisms to counteract APOBEC effects, and strategies that enhance APOBEC3 activity constitute a new approach for antiviral drug development. On the other hand, novel evidence that editing by APOBEC3 constitutes a source for viral genetic diversification and evolution has emerged. Furthermore, a possible role in cancer development has been shown for these host enzymes. Therefore, understanding the role of deaminases on the immune response against infectious agents, as well as their role in human disease, has become pivotal. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art knowledge of the impact of APOBEC enzymes on human viruses of distinct families and harboring disparate replication strategies. PMID:23865062

  13. Molecular cloning of cDNA for double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase, a candidate enzyme for nuclear RNA editing.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, U; Wang, Y; Sanford, T; Zeng, Y; Nishikura, K

    1994-01-01

    We have cloned human cDNA encoding double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase (DRADA). DRADA is a ubiquitous nuclear enzyme that converts multiple adenosines to inosines in double-helical RNA substrates without apparent sequence specificity. The A --> I conversion activity of the protein encoded by the cloned cDNA was confirmed by recombinant expression in insect cells. Use of the cloned DNA as a molecular probe documented sequence conservation across mammals and detected a single transcript of 7 kb in RNA of all human tissues analyzed. The deduced primary structure of human DRADA revealed a bipartite nuclear localization signal, three repeats of a double-stranded RNA binding motif, and the presence of sequences conserved in the catalytic center of other deaminases, including a cytidine deaminase involved in the RNA editing of apolipoprotein B. These structural properties are consistent with the enzymatic signature of DRADA, and strengthen the hypothesis that DRADA carries out the RNA editing of transcripts encoding glutamate-gated ion channels in brain. Images PMID:7972084

  14. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in murine hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Belmont, J W; MacGregor, G R; Wager-Smith, K; Fletcher, F A; Moore, K A; Hawkins, D; Villalon, D; Chang, S M; Caskey, C T

    1988-01-01

    Multiple replication-defective retrovirus vectors were tested for their ability to transfer and express human adenosine deaminase in vitro and in vivo in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model. High-titer virus production was obtained from vectors by using both a retrovirus long terminal repeat promoter and internal transcriptional units with human c-fos and herpes virus thymidine kinase promoters. After infection of primary murine bone marrow with one of these vectors, human adenosine deaminase was detected in 60 to 85% of spleen colony-forming units and in the blood of 14 of 14 syngeneic marrow transplant recipients. This system offers the opportunity to assess methods for increasing efficiency of gene transfer, for regulation of expression of foreign genes in hematopoietic progenitors, and for long-term measurement of the stability of expression in these cells. Images PMID:3072474

  15. Stabilization of Aspergillus parasiticus cytosine deaminase by immobilization on calcium alginate beads improved enzyme operational stability.

    PubMed

    Zanna, H; Nok, A J; Ibrahim, S; Inuwa, H M

    2013-12-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CD) from Aspergillus parasiticus, which has half-life of 1.10 h at 37°C, was stabilized by immobilization on calcium alginate beads. The immobilized CD had pH and temperature optimum of 5 and 50°C respectively. The immobilized enzyme also stoichiometrically deaminated Cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) with the apparent K(M) values of 0.60 mM and 0.65 mM respectively, displaying activation energy of 10.72 KJ/mol. The immobilization of native CD on calcium alginate beads gave the highest yield of apparent enzymatic activity of 51.60% of the original activity and the enzymatic activity was lost exponentially at 37°C over 12 h with a half-life of 5.80 h. Hence, the operational stability of native CD can be improved by immobilization on calcium alginate beads.

  16. The cloned 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase gene from Sinorhizobium sp. strain BL3 in Rhizobium sp. strain TAL1145 promotes nodulation and growth of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Tittabutr, Panlada; Awaya, Jonathan D; Li, Qing X; Borthakur, Dulal

    2008-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the role of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase of symbionts in nodulation and growth of Leucaena leucocephala. The acdS genes encoding ACC deaminase were cloned from Rhizobium sp. strain TAL1145 and Sinorhizobium sp. BL3 in multicopy plasmids, and transferred to TAL1145. The BL3-acdS gene greatly enhanced ACC deaminase activity in TAL1145 compared to the native acdS gene. The transconjugants of TAL1145 containing the native or BL3 acdS gene could grow in minimal media containing 1.5mM ACC, whereas BL3 could tolerate up to 3mM ACC. The TAL1145 acdS gene was inducible by mimosine and not by ACC, while the BL3 acdS gene was highly inducible by ACC and not by mimosine. The transconjugants of TAL1145 containing the native- and BL3-acdS genes formed nodules with greater number and sizes, and produced higher root mass on L. leucocephala than by TAL1145. This study shows that the introduction of multiple copies of the acdS gene increased ACC deaminase activities of TAL1145 and enhanced its symbiotic efficiency on L. leucocephala.

  17. Severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Waqar; Batool, Asma; Ahmed, Tahir Aziz; Bashir, Muhammad Mukarram

    2012-03-01

    Severe Combined Immunodeficiency is the term applied to a group of rare genetic disorders characterised by defective or absent T and B cell functions. Patients usually present in first 6 months of life with respiratory/gastrointestinal tract infections and failure to thrive. Among the various types of severe combined immunodeficiency, enzyme deficiencies are relatively less common. We report the case of a 6 years old girl having severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

  18. Polymorphous crystallization and diffraction of threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, D T; Eisenstein, E; Fisher, K E; Zondlo, J; Chinchilla, D; Yu, H D; Dill, J; Winborne, E; Ducote, K; Xiao, G; Gilliland, G L

    1998-05-01

    The biosynthetic threonine deaminase from Escherichia coli, an allosteric tetramer with key regulatory functions, has been crystallized in several crystal forms. Two distinct forms, both belonging to either space group P3121 or P3221, with different sized asymmetric units that both contain a tetramer, grow under identical conditions. Diffraction data sets to 2.8 A resolution (native) and 2. 9 A resolution (isomorphous uranyl derivative) have been collected from a third crystal form in space group I222.

  19. Micelles Protect and Concentrate Activated Acetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Zoe; House, C.

    2014-01-01

    As more and more exoplanets are discovered and the habitability of such planets is considered, one can turn to searching for the origin of life on Earth in order to better understand what makes a habitable planet. Activated acetic acid, or methyl thioacetate, has been proposed to be central to the origin of life on Earth, and also as an important energy currency molecule in early cellular evolution. We have investigated the hydrolysis of methyl thioacetate under various conditions. Its uncatalyzed rate of hydrolysis is about three orders of magnitude faster (K = 0.00663 s^-1; 100°C, pH 7.5, concentration = 0.33mM) than published rates for its catalyzed production making it unlikely to accumulate under prebiotic conditions. However, we also observed that methyl thioacetate was protected from hydrolysis when inside its own hydrophobic droplets. We found that methyl thioacetate protection from hydrolysis was also possible in droplets of hexane and in the membranes of nonanoic acid micelles. Thus, the hydrophobic regions of prebiotic micelles and early cell membranes could have offered a refuge for this energetic molecule increasing its lifetime in close proximity to the reactions for which it would be needed. Methyl thioacetate could thus be important for the origin of life on Earth and perhaps for better understanding the potential habitability of other planets.

  20. "JCE" Classroom Activity #109: My Acid Can Beat Up Your Acid!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putti, Alice

    2011-01-01

    In this guided-inquiry activity, students investigate the ionization of strong and weak acids. Bead models are used to study acid ionization on a particulate level. Students analyze seven strong and weak acid models and make generalizations about the relationship between acid strength and dissociation. (Contains 1 table and 2 figures.)

  1. Acid phosphatase and protease activities in immobilized rat skeletal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witzmann, F. A.; Troup, J. P.; Fitts, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hind-limb immobilization on selected Iysosomal enzyme activities was studied in rat hing-limb muscles composed primarily of type 1. 2A, or 2B fibers. Following immobilization, acid protease and acid phosphatase both exhibited signifcant increases in their activity per unit weight in all three fiber types. Acid phosphatase activity increased at day 14 of immobilization in the three muscles and returned to control levels by day 21. Acid protease activity also changed biphasically, displaying a higher and earlier rise than acid phosphatase. The pattern of change in acid protease, but not acid phosphatase, closely parallels observed muscle wasting. The present data therefore demonstrate enhanced proteolytic capacity of all three fiber types early during muscular atrophy. In addition, the data suggest a dependence of basal hydrolytic and proteolytic activities and their adaptive response to immobilization on muscle fiber composition.

  2. Acaricidal activity of usnic acid and sodium usnic acid against Psoroptes cuniculi in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shang, Xiaofei; Miao, Xiaolou; Lv, Huiping; Wang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Jiqin; He, Hua; Yang, Zhiqiang; Pan, Hu

    2014-06-01

    Usnic acid, a major active compound in lichens, was first isolated in 1884. Since then, usnic acid and its sodium salt (sodium usnic acid) have been used in medicine, perfumery, cosmetics, and other industries due to its extensive biological activities. However, its acaricidal activity has not been studied. In this paper, we investigated the acaricidal activity of usnic acid and sodium usnic acid against Psoroptes cuniculi in vitro. After evaluating the acaricidal activity and toxicity of usnic acid and sodium usnic acid in vitro, the results showed that at doses of 250, 125, and 62.5 mg/ml, usnic acid and sodium usnic acid can kill mites with 91.67, 85.00, and 55.00% and 100, 100, and 60.00% mortality after treatment 24 h. The LT50 values were 4.208, 8.249, and 16.950 h and 3.712, 7.339, and 15.773 h for usnic acid and sodium usnic acid, respectively. Sodium usnic acid has a higher acaricidal activity than usnic acid, which may be related to the difference in their structures.

  3. Acute intermittent porphyria: expression of mutant and wild-type porphobilinogen deaminase in COS-1 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mustajoki, S.; Laine, M.; Lahtela, M.; Mustajoki, P.; Peltonen, L.; Kauppinen, R.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that results from the partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Patients with AIP can experience acute attacks consisting of abdominal pain and various neuropsychiatric symptoms. Although molecular biological studies on the porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) gene have revealed several mutations responsible for AIP, the properties of mutant PBGD in eukaryotic expression systems have not been studied previously. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seven mutations were analyzed using transient expression of the mutated polypeptides in COS-1 cells. The properties of mutated polypeptides were studied by enzyme activity measurement, Western blot analysis, pulse-chase experiments, and immunofluorescence staining. RESULTS: Of the mutants studied, R26C, R167W, R173W, R173Q, and R225X resulted in a decreased enzyme activity (0-5%), but R225G and 1073delA (elongated protein) displayed a significant residual activity of 16% and 50%, respectively. In Western blot analysis, the polyclonal PBGD antibody detected all mutant polypeptides except R225X, which was predicted to result in a truncated protein. In the pulse-chase experiment, the mutant polypeptides were as stable as the wild-type enzyme. In the immunofluorescence staining both wild-type and mutant polypeptides were diffusely dispersed in the cytoplasm and, thus, no accumulation of mutated proteins in the cellular compartments could be observed. CONCLUSIONS: The results confirm the causality of mutations for the half normal enzyme activity measured in the patients' erythrocytes. In contrast to the decreased enzyme activity, the majority of the mutations produced a detectable polypeptide, and the stability and the intracellular processing of the mutated polypeptides were both comparable to that of the wild-type PBGD and independent of the cross-reacting immunological material (CRIM) class. PMID:11055586

  4. Reaction mechanism of zinc-dependent cytosine deaminase from Escherichia coli: a quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Manta, Bianca; Raushel, Frank M; Himo, Fahmi

    2014-05-29

    The reaction mechanism of cytosine deaminase from Escherichia coli is studied using density functional theory. This zinc-dependent enzyme catalyzes the deamination of cytosine to form uracil and ammonia. The calculations give a detailed description of the catalytic mechanism and establish the role of important active-site residues. It is shown that Glu217 is essential for the initial deprotonation of the metal-bound water nucleophile and the subsequent protonation of the substrate. It is also demonstrated that His246 is unlikely to function as a proton shuttle in the nucleophile activation step, as previously proposed. The steps that follow are nucleophilic attack by the metal-bound hydroxide, protonation of the leaving group assisted by Asp313, and C-N bond cleavage. The calculated overall barrier is in good agreement with the experimental findings. Finally, the calculations reproduce the experimentally determined inverse solvent deuterium isotope effect, which further corroborates the suggested reaction mechanism.

  5. Mycoplasma hyorhinis-encoded cytidine deaminase efficiently inactivates cytosine-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Vande Voorde, Johan; Vervaeke, Peter; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasmas may colonize tumor tissue in patients. The cytostatic activity of gemcitabine was dramatically decreased in Mycoplasma hyorhinis-infected tumor cell cultures compared with non-infected tumor cell cultures. This mycoplasma-driven drug deamination could be prevented by exogenous administration of the cytidine deaminase (CDA) inhibitor tetrahydrouridine, but also by the natural nucleosides or by a purine nucleoside phosphorylase inhibitor. The M. hyorhinis-encoded CDAHyor gene was cloned, expressed as a recombinant protein and purified. CDAHyor was found to be more catalytically active than its human equivalent and efficiently deaminates (inactivates) cytosine-based anticancer drugs. CDAHyor expression at the tumor site may result in selective drug inactivation and suboptimal therapeutic efficiency.

  6. Novel deletion and a new missense mutation (Glu 217 Lys) at the catalytic site in two adenosine deaminase alleles of a patient with neonatal onset adenosine deaminase severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, R.; Nicknam, M.N.; Eng, F.; Yang, D.R.; Borkowsky, W. )

    1992-11-01

    Mutations at the adenosine deaminase (ADA) locus result in a spectrum of disorders, encompassing a fulminant neonatal onset severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and childhood onset immunodeficiency, as well as apparently normal immune function. The extent of accumulation of the toxic metabolite, deoxyATP, correlates directly with severity of disease. The authors have now determined the mutations on both alleles of a child with fulminant, neonatal onset ADA SCID and accumulation of extremely high concentrations of deoxyATP. The genotype was consistent with the severely affected phenotype. One allele carried a large deletion that arose by non-homologous recombination and included the first five exons and promoter region. The second allele carried a missense mutation (G[sup 649]A) resulting in replacement of Glu[sup 217], an amino acid involved in the catalytic site, by Lys and predicting a major alteration in charge. Expression of the mutant cDNA on Cos cells confirmed that the mutation abolished enzyme activity. The authors have previously reported that a missense mutation at the preceding codon is similarly associated with neonatal onset ADA SCID and accumulation of extremely high deoxyATP. These findings suggest that genotype-phenotype correlations may be apparent for ADA SCID, despite the role that random variation in exposure to environmental pathogens may play in the initial phenotype. Such genotype-phenotype correlations may be important to consider in evaluating results of ongoing trials of [open quotes]gene[close quotes] and enzyme replacement therapy. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Dispersed sites of HIV Vif-dependent polyubiquitination in the DNA deaminase APOBEC3F

    PubMed Central

    Albin, John S.; Anderson, John S.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Harjes, Elena; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Krogan, Nevan J.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2013-01-01

    APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G are DNA cytosine deaminases that potently restrict Human Immunodeficiency Virus-type 1 replication when the virus is deprived of its accessory protein Vif. Vif counteracts these restriction factors by recruiting APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G to an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that mediates their polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. While previous efforts have identified single amino acid residues in APOBEC3 proteins required for Vif recognition, less is known about the downstream ubiquitin acceptor sites that are targeted. One prior report identified a cluster of polyubiquitinated residues in APOBEC3G and proposed an antiparallel model of APOBEC3G interaction with the Vif-E3 ubiquitin ligase complex wherein Vif binding at one terminus of APOBEC3G orients the opposite terminus for polyubiquitination [Iwatani Y, et al. (2009) PNAS 106(46):19539–19544]. To test the generalizability of this model, we carried out a complete mutagenesis of the lysine residues in APOBEC3F and used a complementary, unbiased proteomic approach to identify ubiquitin acceptor sites targeted by Vif. Our data indicate that internal lysines are the dominant ubiquitin acceptor sites in both APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G. In contrast with the proposed antiparallel model, however, we find that the Vif-dependent polyubiquitination of APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G can occur at multiple acceptor sites dispersed along predicted lysine-enriched surfaces of both the N- and C-terminal deaminase domains. These data suggest an alternative model for binding of APOBEC3 proteins to the Vif-E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and diminish enthusiasm for the amenability of APOBEC3 ubiquitin acceptor sites to therapeutic intervention. PMID:23318957

  8. Motualevic Acids and Analogs: Synthesis and Antimicrobial Structure Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Cheruku, Pradeep; Keffer, Jessica L.; Dogo-Isonagie, Cajetan; Bewley, Carole A.

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of the marine natural products motualevic acids A, E, and analogs in which modifications have been made to the ω-brominated lipid (E)-14,14-dibromotetra-deca-2,13-dienoic acid or amino acid unit are reported, together with antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Enterococcus faecium, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. PMID:20538459

  9. Physiological activities of hydroxyl fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the search of value-added products from surplus soybean oil, we produced many new hydroxy fatty acids through microbial bioconversion. Hydroxy fatty acids are used in a wide range of industrial products, such as resins, waxes, nylons plastics, lubricants, cosmetics, and additives in coatings and...

  10. Transport and biological activities of bile acids.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, Brittnee L; Agellon, Luis B

    2013-07-01

    Bile acids have emerged as important biological molecules that support the solubilization of various lipids and lipid-soluble compounds in the gut, and the regulation of gene expression and cellular function. Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and eventually released into the small intestine. The majority of bile acids are recovered in the distal end of the small intestine and then returned to the liver for reuse. The components of the mechanism responsible for the recycling of bile acids within the enterohepatic circulation have been identified whereas the mechanism for intracellular transport is less understood. Recently, the ileal lipid binding protein (ILBP; human gene symbol FABP6) was shown to be needed for the efficient transport of bile acids from the apical side to the basolateral side of enterocytes in the distal intestine. This review presents an overview of the transport of bile acids between the liver and the gut as well as within hepatocytes and enterocytes. A variety of pathologies is associated with the malfunction of the bile acid transport system.

  11. Extensive mutagenesis of a transcriptional activation domain identifies single hydrophobic and acidic amino acids important for activation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, M B; Goff, S A; Chandler, V L

    1997-01-01

    C1 is a transcriptional activator of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes of the maize anthocyanin pigment pathway. C1 has an amino terminus homologous to Myb DNA-binding domains and an acidic carboxyl terminus that is a transcriptional activation domain in maize and yeast cells. To identify amino acids critical for transcriptional activation, an extensive random mutagenesis of the C1 carboxyl terminus was done. The C1 activation domain is remarkably tolerant of amino acid substitutions, as changes at 34 residues had little or no effect on transcriptional activity. These changes include introduction of helix-incompatible amino acids throughout the C1 activation domain and alteration of most single acidic amino acids, suggesting that a previously postulated amphipathic alpha-helix is not required for activation. Substitutions at two positions revealed amino acids important for transcriptional activation. Replacement of leucine 253 with a proline or glutamine resulted in approximately 10% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Leucine 253 is in a region of C1 in which several hydrophobic residues align with residues important for transcriptional activation by the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. However, changes at all other hydrophobic residues in C1 indicate that none are critical for C1 transcriptional activation. The other important amino acid in C1 is aspartate 262, as a change to valine resulted in only 24% of wild-type transcriptional activation. Comparison of our C1 results with those from VP16 reveal substantial differences in which amino acids are required for transcriptional activation in vivo by these two acidic activation domains. PMID:8972191

  12. Antifeedant activity of anticopalic acid isolated from Vitex hemsleyi.

    PubMed

    Villegas Gómez, Clarisa; Martínez-Vázquez, Mariano; Esquivel, Baldomero

    2009-01-01

    The known labdane-type diterpenoids anticopalic acid (1) and 3 beta-hydroxyanticopalic acid (2) were isolated from extracts of the aerial parts of Vitex hemsleyi Briq. (Labiatae). The acid 1 showed an antifeedant, dose-dependent activity against Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). To our knowledge this is the first report on the antifeedant activity of a labdane-type diterpene against S. frugiperda.

  13. Acid activated montmorillonite as catalysts in methyl esterification reactions of lauric acid.

    PubMed

    Zatta, Leandro; Ramos, Luiz Pereira; Wypych, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activity of acid activated montmorillonite in the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) is reported. Standard Montmorillonite (MMT) type STx-1 provided by the Clay Mineral Society repository was activated using phosphoric, nitric and sulphuric acids under different conditions and the resulting materials were characterized and evaluated as catalysts in the methyl esterification of lauric acid. Blank reactions carried out in the absence of any added catalyst presented conversions of 32.64, 69.79 and 79.23%, for alcohol:lauric acid molar ratios of 60:1, 12:1 and 6:1, respectively. In the presence of the untreated clay and using molar ratios of 12:1 and 6:1 with 12% of catalyst, conversions of 70.92 and 82.30% were obtained, respectively. For the acid activated clays, conversions up to 93.08% of lauric acid to methyl laurate were obtained, much higher than those observed for the thermal conversion or using untreated montmorillonite. Relative good correlations were observed between the catalytic activity and the development of acid sites and textural properties of the resulting materials. Therefore, a simple acid activation was able to improve the catalytic activity and produce clay catalysts that are environmental friendly, cost effective, noncorrosive and reusable.

  14. Natural cinnamic acids, synthetic derivatives and hybrids with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Juan David

    2014-11-25

    Antimicrobial natural preparations involving cinnamon, storax and propolis have been long used topically for treating infections. Cinnamic acids and related molecules are partly responsible for the therapeutic effects observed in these preparations. Most of the cinnamic acids, their esters, amides, aldehydes and alcohols, show significant growth inhibition against one or several bacterial and fungal species. Of particular interest is the potent antitubercular activity observed for some of these cinnamic derivatives, which may be amenable as future drugs for treating tuberculosis. This review intends to summarize the literature data on the antimicrobial activity of the natural cinnamic acids and related derivatives. In addition, selected hybrids between cinnamic acids and biologically active scaffolds with antimicrobial activity were also included. A comprehensive literature search was performed collating the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of each cinnamic acid or derivative against the reported microorganisms. The MIC data allows the relative comparison between series of molecules and the derivation of structure-activity relationships.

  15. Dissecting the Contingent Interactions of Protein Complexes with the Optimized Yeast Cytosine Deaminase Protein-Fragment Complementation Assay.

    PubMed

    Ear, Po Hien; Kowarzyk, Jacqueline; Michnick, Stephen W

    2016-11-01

    Here, we present a detailed protocol for studying in yeast cells the contingent interaction between a substrate and its multisubunit enzyme complex by using a death selection technique known as the optimized yeast cytosine deaminase protein-fragment complementation assay (OyCD PCA). In yeast, the enzyme cytosine deaminase (encoded by FCY1) is involved in pyrimidine metabolism. The PCA is based on an engineered form of yeast cytosine deaminase optimized by directed evolution for maximum activity (OyCD), which acts as a reporter converting the pro-drug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), a toxic compound that kills the cell. Cells that have OyCD PCA activity convert 5-FC to 5-FU and die. Using this assay, it is possible to assess how regulatory subunits of an enzyme contribute to the overall interaction between the catalytic subunit and the potential substrates. Furthermore, OyCD PCA can be used to dissect different functions of mutant forms of a protein as a mutant can disrupt interaction with one partner, while retaining interaction with others. As it is scalable to a medium- or high-throughput format, OyCD PCA can be used to study hundreds to thousands of pairwise protein-protein interactions in different deletion strains. In addition, OyCD PCA vectors (pAG413GAL1-ccdB-OyCD-F[1] and pAG415GAL1-ccdB-OyCD-F[2]) have been designed to be compatible with the proprietary Gateway technology. It is therefore easy to generate fusion genes with the OyCD reporter fragments. As an example, we will focus on the yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase 1 (Cdk1, encoded by CDC28), its regulatory cyclin subunits, and its substrates or binding partners.

  16. Southern blight disease of tomato control by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase producing Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Ritu; Agrawal, Lalit; Gupta, Swati; Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, Sumit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Tomato cultivation is highly susceptible for soil born diseases and among them southern blight disease caused by Scelerotium rolfsii is very common. For its management use of chemical fungicides is not very successful as their spores are able to survive for many years in the soil. As an alternative eco-friendly approach to control the disease antagonistic microbes are being characterized.Among them plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488 (B-30488) with antagonistic properties, multiple PGP attributes stress tolerance and ACC deaminase enzyme activity is characterized to decipher its mode of action against S. rolfsii under in vitro and in vivo conditions. In vitro results obtained from this study clearly demonstrate that B-30488 has ability to show antagonistic properties under different abiotic stresses against S. rolfsii. Similar results were also obtained from in vivo experiments where B-30488 inoculation has efficiently controlled the disease caused by S. rolfsii and improve the plant growth. Deleterious enhanced ethylene level in S. rolfsii infected plants was also ameliorated by inoculation of ACC deaminase producing B-30488. The ACC accumulation, ACO and ACS activities were also modulated in S. rolfsii infected plants. Results from defense enzymes and other biochemical attributes were also support the role of B-30488 inoculation in ameliorating the biotic stress caused by S. rolfsii in tomato plants. These results were further validated by pathogen related gene expression analysis by real time PCR. Overall results from the present study may be concluded that ACC deaminase producing B-30488 has ability to control the southern blight disease caused by S. rolfsii and commercial bioinoculant package may be developed.

  17. Southern blight disease of tomato control by 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase producing Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Ritu; Agrawal, Lalit; Gupta, Swati; Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, Sumit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    abstract Tomato cultivation is highly susceptible for soil born diseases and among them southern blight disease caused by Scelerotium rolfsii is very common. For its management use of chemical fungicides is not very successful as their spores are able to survive for many years in the soil. As an alternative eco-friendly approach to control the disease antagonistic microbes are being characterized.Among them plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488 (B-30488) with antagonistic properties, multiple PGP attributes stress tolerance and ACC deaminase enzyme activity is characterized to decipher its mode of action against S. rolfsii under in vitro and in vivo conditions. In vitro results obtained from this study clearly demonstrate that B-30488 has ability to show antagonistic properties under different abiotic stresses against S. rolfsii. Similar results were also obtained from in vivo experiments where B-30488 inoculation has efficiently controlled the disease caused by S. rolfsii and improve the plant growth. Deleterious enhanced ethylene level in S. rolfsii infected plants was also ameliorated by inoculation of ACC deaminase producing B-30488. The ACC accumulation, ACO and ACS activities were also modulated in S. rolfsii infected plants. Results from defense enzymes and other biochemical attributes were also support the role of B-30488 inoculation in ameliorating the biotic stress caused by S. rolfsii in tomato plants. These results were further validated by pathogen related gene expression analysis by real time PCR. Overall results from the present study may be concluded that ACC deaminase producing B-30488 has ability to control the southern blight disease caused by S. rolfsii and commercial bioinoculant package may be developed. PMID:26825539

  18. Method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    John, George; Nagarajan, Subbiah; Chapman, Kent; Faure, Lionel; Koulen, Peter

    2016-10-25

    A method for enhancing amidohydrolase activity of Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) is disclosed. The method comprising administering a phenoxyacylethanolamide that causes the enhanced activity. The enhanced activity can have numerous effects on biological organisms including, for example, enhancing the growth of certain seedlings. The subject matter disclosed herein relates to enhancers of amidohydrolase activity.

  19. Adenosine Deaminase-2–Induced Hyperpermeability in Human Retinal Vascular Endothelial Cells Is Suppressed by MicroRNA-146b-3p

    PubMed Central

    Samra, Yara A.; Saleh, Heba M.; Hussein, Khaled A.; Elsherbiny, Nehal M.; Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; Elmasry, Khaled; Fulzele, Sadanand; El-Shishtawy, Mamdouh M.; Eissa, Laila A.; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Liou, Gregory I.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We recently demonstrated that adenosine deaminase-2 (ADA2) contributes to diabetic retinopathy (DR) via up-regulating the production of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. Also, microRNA (miR)-146b-3p has the ability to inhibit ADA2. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential role of ADA2 and therapeutic benefit of miR-146b-3p in retinal inflammation and endothelial barrier dysfunction during diabetes. Methods Adenosine deaminase-2 activity was determined by colorimetric method in diabetic human vitreous. Human monocyte cell line U937 was differentiated into macrophages and then treated with amadori glycated albumin (AGA), and conditioned medium (CM) was used to assess the changes in ADA2 activity and TNF-α and IL-6 levels by ELISA. Also, macrophages were transfected with miR-146b-3p before treatment with AGA. Permeability of human retinal endothelial cells (hRECs) was assessed by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) after treatment with macrophage CM. Zonula occludens (ZO)-1 was examined by immuno-fluorescence in hRECs. Leukocyte adhesion was assessed in hRECs by measuring myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression. Results Adenosine deaminase-2 activity was significantly increased in diabetic human vitreous. ADA2 activity and TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly increased in human macrophages by AGA treatment. Amadori glycated albumin–treated macrophage CM significantly increased hREC permeability, disrupted ZO-1 pattern, and increased leukocyte adhesion to hRECs through up-regulating ICAM-1. All these changes were reversed by miR-146b-3p. Conclusions Adenosine deaminase-2 is implicated in breakdown of the blood–retinal barrier (BRB) in DR through macrophages-derived cytokines. Therefore, inhibition of ADA2 by miR-146b-3p might be a useful tool to preserve BRB function in DR. PMID:28170537

  20. Allosteric inhibition of human lymphoblast and purified porphobilinogen deaminase by protoporphyrinogen and coproporphyrinogen. A possible mechanism for the acute attack of variegate porphyria.

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, P; Adams, P; Kirsch, R

    1993-01-01

    Variegate porphyria (VP) is characterized by photocutaneous lesions and acute neuropsychiatric attacks. Decreased protoporphyrinogen oxidase activity results in accumulation of protoporphyrin (ogen) IX and coproporphyrin (ogen) III. During acute attacks delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen also increase, suggesting that porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) may be rate limiting. We have examined the effects of porphyrinogens accumulating in VP on PBG-D activity in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblast sonicates from 12 VP and 12 control subjects. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase activity was decreased and protoporphyrin increased in VP lymphoblasts. PBG-D in control lymphoblasts obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Vmax 28.7 +/- 1.8 pmol/mg per h, Hill coefficient 0.83 +/- 0.07). VP sonicates yielded sigmoidal substrate-velocity curves that did not obey Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Vmax was decreased (21.2 +/- 2.0 pmol/mg per h) and the Hill coefficient was 1.78 +/- 0.17. Addition of protoporphyrinogen IX and coproporphyrinogen III to control sonicates yielded sigmoidal PBG-D substrate-velocity curves and decreased PBG-D Vmax. Addition of porphyrins or uroporphyrinogen III did not affect PBG-D activity. Removal of endogenous porphyrin (ogens) from VP sonicates restored normal PBG-D kinetics. Purified human erythrocyte PBG-D obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Vmax 249 +/- 36 nmol/mg per h, Km 8.9 +/- 1.5 microM, Hill coefficient 0.93 +/- 0.14). Addition of protoporphyrinogen yielded a sigmoidal curve with decreased Vmax. The Hill coefficient approached 4. These findings provide a rational explanation for the increased delta-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen during acute attacks of VP. PMID:7682572

  1. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-01-01

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. 20/34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access substrate DNA cytosines. PMID:22181350

  2. First-in-class small molecule inhibitors of the single-strand DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3G.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M D; Carpenter, Michael A; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L; Perkins, Angela L; Harki, Daniel A; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J; Pandey, Krishan K; Parniak, Michael A; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Krogan, Nevan J; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A; Harris, Reuben S

    2012-03-16

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.

  3. First-In-Class Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Single-Strand DNA Cytosine Deaminase APOBEC3G

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Rathore, Anurag; Brown, William L.; Perkins, Angela L.; Harki, Daniel A.; Solberg, Jonathan; Hook, Derek J.; Pandey, Krishan K.; Parniak, Michael A.; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2012-04-04

    APOBEC3G is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that comprises part of the innate immune response to viruses and transposons. Although APOBEC3G is the prototype for understanding the larger mammalian polynucleotide deaminase family, no specific chemical inhibitors exist to modulate its activity. High-throughput screening identified 34 compounds that inhibit APOBEC3G catalytic activity. Twenty of 34 small molecules contained catechol moieties, which are known to be sulfhydryl reactive following oxidation to the orthoquinone. Located proximal to the active site, C321 was identified as the binding site for the inhibitors by a combination of mutational screening, structural analysis, and mass spectrometry. Bulkier substitutions C321-to-L, F, Y, or W mimicked chemical inhibition. A strong specificity for APOBEC3G was evident, as most compounds failed to inhibit the related APOBEC3A enzyme or the unrelated enzymes E. coli uracil DNA glycosylase, HIV-1 RNase H, or HIV-1 integrase. Partial, but not complete, sensitivity could be conferred to APOBEC3A by introducing the entire C321 loop from APOBEC3G. Thus, a structural model is presented in which the mechanism of inhibition is both specific and competitive, by binding a pocket adjacent to the APOBEC3G active site, reacting with C321, and blocking access to substrate DNA cytosines.

  4. On the functional role of Arg172 in substrate binding and allosteric transition in Escherichia coli glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Lucumí-Moreno, Armando; Calcagno, Mario L

    2005-10-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli (EC 3.5.99.6) is an allosteric enzyme, activated by N-acetylglucosamine 6-phosphate, which converts glucosamine-6-phosphate into fructose 6-phosphate and ammonia. X-ray crystallographic structural models have showed that Arg172 and Lys208, together with the segment 41-44 of the main chain backbone, are involved in binding the substrate phospho group when the enzyme is in the R activated state. A set of mutants of the enzyme involving the targeted residues were constructed to analyze the role of Arg172 and Lys208 in deaminase allosteric function. The mutant enzymes were characterized by kinetic, chemical, and spectrometric methods, revealing conspicuous changes in their allosteric properties. The study of these mutants indicated that Arg172 which is located in the highly flexible motif 158-187 forming the active site lid has a specific role in binding the substrate to the enzyme in the T state. The possible role of this interaction in the conformational coupling of the active and the allosteric sites is discussed.

  5. Adenine arabinoside inhibition of adenovirus replication enhanced by an adenosine deaminase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wigand, R

    1979-01-01

    The inhibition of adenovirus multiplication by adenine arabinoside was determined by yield reduction in one-step multiplication cycle. Inhibition was greatly enhanced by an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (2-deoxycoformycin) in concentrations down to 10 ng/ml. Adenovirus types from four subgroups showed similar results. However, the enhancing effect of adenosine deaminase inhibitor was great in HeLa cells, moderate in human fibroblasts, and negligible in Vero cells. This difference could be explained by different concentrations of adenosine deaminase found in cell homogenates.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB) from Salmonella typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Simanshu, Dhirendra K.; Chittori, Sagar; Savithri, H. S.; Murthy, M. R. N.

    2006-03-01

    S. typhimurium biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB), a member of the β-family of PLP-dependent enzymes, has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized in three different crystal forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Biodegradative threonine deaminase (TdcB) catalyzes the deamination of l-threonine to α-ketobutyrate, the first reaction in the anaerobic breakdown of l-threonine to propionate. Unlike the biosynthetic threonine deaminase, TdcB is insensitive to l-isoleucine and is activated by AMP. Here, the cloning of TdcB (molecular weight 36 kDa) from Salmonella typhimurium with an N-terminal hexahistidine affinity tag and its overexpression in Escherichia coli is reported. TdcB was purified to homogeneity using Ni–NTA affinity column chromatography and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique in three different crystal forms. Crystal forms I (unit-cell parameters a = 46.32, b = 55.30, c = 67.24 Å, α = 103.09, β = 94.70, γ = 112.94°) and II (a = 56.68, b = 76.83, c = 78.50 Å, α = 66.12, β = 89.16, γ = 77.08°) belong to space group P1 and contain two and four molecules of TdcB, respectively, in the asymmetric unit. Poorly diffracting form III crystals were obtained in space group C2 and based on the unit-cell volume are most likely to contain one molecule per asymmetric unit. Two complete data sets of resolutions 2.2 Å (crystal form I) and 1.7 Å (crystal form II) were collected at 100 K using an in-house X-ray source.

  7. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  8. Surface-active properties of humic and sulfochlorohumic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, I.N.; Mustafina, G.A.; Akkulova, Z.G.; Satymbaeva, A.S.

    2009-10-15

    The surface tension of alkaline solutions of humic acids and their sulfochloroderivatives, which are synthesized by sulfonation of chlorohumic acids isolated from coal chlorinated by the electrochemical method, is investigated. It is established that humic compounds possess weak surface activity. Basic adsorption parameters are calculated.

  9. Effect of alginate microencapsulation on the catalytic efficiency and in vitro enzyme-prodrug therapeutic efficacy of cytosine deaminase and of recombinant E. coli expressing cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Funaro, Michael G; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Chen, Zhihang; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CD) catalyses the enzymatic conversion of the non-toxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the potent chemotherapeutic form, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Intratumoral delivery of CD localises chemotherapy dose while reducing systemic toxicity. Encapsulation in biocompatible microcapsules immunoisolates CD and protects it from degradation. We report on the effect of alginate encapsulation on the catalytic and functional activity of isolated CD and recombinant E. coli engineered to express CD (E. coli(CD)). Alginate microcapsules containing either CD or Escherichia coli(CD) were prepared using ionotropic gelation. Conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU was quantitated in unencapsulated and encapsulated CD/E. coli(CD) using spectrophotometry, with a slower rate of conversion observed following encapsulation. Both encapsulated CD/5-FC and E. coli(CD)/5-FC resulted in cell kill and reduced proliferation of 9 L rat glioma cells, which was comparable to direct 5-FU treatment. Our results show that encapsulation preserves the therapeutic potential of CD and E. coli(CD) is equally effective for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

  10. Late-onset adenosine deaminase deficiency presenting with Heck's disease.

    PubMed

    Artac, Hasibe; Göktürk, Bahar; Bozdemir, Sefika Elmas; Toy, Hatice; van der Burg, Mirjam; Santisteban, Ines; Hershfield, Michael; Reisli, Ismail

    2010-08-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia, also known as Heck's disease, is a rare but distinctive entity of viral etiology with characteristic clinical and histopathological features. It is a benign, asymptomatic disease of the oral mucosa caused by human papilloma viruses (HPV). Previous studies postulated an association between these lesions and immunodeficiency. Genetic deficiency of adenosine deaminase (ADA) results in varying degrees of immunodeficiency, including neonatal onset severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID), and milder, later onset immunodeficiency. We report a 12-year-old girl with the late onset-ADA deficiency presenting with Heck's disease. Our case report should draw attention to the possibility of immunodeficiency in patients with HPV-induced focal epithelial hyperplasia.

  11. Evidence for two different mechanisms triggering the change in quaternary structure of the allosteric enzyme, glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Jaimes, Ismael; Ramírez-Costa, Montserrat; De Anda-Aguilar, Lorena; Hinojosa-Ocaña, Pilar; Calcagno, Mario L

    2005-02-01

    The generation and propagation of conformational changes associated with ligand binding in the allosteric enzyme glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase (GlcN6P deaminase, EC 3.5.99.6) from Escherichia coli were analyzed by fluorescence measurements. Single-tryptophan mutant forms of the enzyme were constructed on the basis of previous structural and functional evidence and used as structural-change probes. The reporter residues were placed in the active-site lid (position 174) and in the allosteric site (254 and 234); in addition, signals from the natural Trp residues (15 and 224) were also studied as structural probes. The structural changes produced by the occupation of either the allosteric or the active site by site-specific ligands were monitored through changes in the spectral center of mass (SCM) of their steady-state emission fluorescence spectra. Binding of the allosteric activator produces only minimal signals in titration experiments. In contrast, measurable spectral signals were found when the active site was occupied by a dead-end inhibitor. The results reveal that the two binary complexes, enzyme-activator (R(A)) and enzyme-inhibitor (R(S)) complexes, have structural differences and that they also differ from the ternary complex (R(AS)). The mobility of the active-site lid motif is shown to be independent of the allosteric transition. The active-site ligand induces cooperative SCM changes even in the enzyme-activator complex, indicating that the propagation pathway of the conformational relaxation triggered from the active site is different from that involved in the heterotropic activation. Analysis of the complete set of mutants shows that the occupation of the active site generates structural perturbations, which are propagated to the whole of the monomer and extend to the other subunits. The accumulative effect of these propagated changes should be responsible for the change in the sign of the DeltaG degrees ' of the T to R transition associated with

  12. Synthesis and biological activity of glutamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Receveur, J M; Guiramand, J; Récasens, M; Roumestant, M L; Viallefont, P; Martinez, J

    1998-01-20

    In order to develop new specific glutamate analogues at metabotropic glutamate receptors, Diels-Alder, 1-4 ionic and radical reactions were performed starting from (2S)-4-methyleneglutamic acid. Preliminary pharmacological evaluation by measuring IP accumulation using rat forebrain synaptoneurosomes has shown that (2S)-4-(2-phthalimidoethyl)glutamic acid (3a), (2S)-4-(4-phthalimidobutyl)glutamic acid (3b) and 1-[(S)-2-amino-2-carboxyethyl]-3,4-dimethylcyclohex-3-ene-1-carbox ylic acid (8) presented moderate antagonist activities.

  13. Allosteric transition and substrate binding are entropy-driven in glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bustos-Jaimes, I; Calcagno, M L

    2001-10-15

    Glucosamine-6P-deaminase (EC 3.5.99.6, formerly glucosamine-6-phosphate isomerase, EC 5.3.1.10) from Escherichia coli is an attractive experimental model for the study of allosteric transitions because it is both kinetically and structurally well-known, and follows rapid equilibrium random kinetics, so that the kinetic K(m) values are true thermodynamic equilibrium constants. The enzyme is a typical allosteric K-system activated by N-acetylglucosamine 6-P and displays an allosteric behavior that can be well described by the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model. This thermodynamic study based on the temperature dependence of allosteric parameters derived from this model shows that substrate binding and allosteric transition are both entropy-driven processes in E. coli GlcN6P deaminase. The analysis of this result in the light of the crystallographic structure of the enzyme implicates the active-site lid as the structural motif that could contribute significantly to this entropic component of the allosteric transition because of the remarkable change in its crystallographic B factors.

  14. Synthesis and biological activity of alkynoic acids derivatives against mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Vilchèze, Catherine; Leung, Lawrence W.; Bittman, Robert; Jacobs, William R.

    2015-01-01

    2-alkynoic acids have bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis but their activity fall sharply as the length of the carbon chain increased. In this study, derivatives of 2- alkynoic acids were synthesized and tested against fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria. Their activity was first evaluated in M. smegmatis against their parental 2-alkynoic acids, as well as isoniazid, a first-line antituberculosis drug. The introduction of additional unsaturation or heteroatoms into the carbon chain enhanced the antimycobacterial activity of longer chain alkynoic acids (more than 19 carbons long). In contrast, although the modification of the carboxylic group did not improve the antimycobacterial activity, it significantly reduced the toxicity of the compounds against eukaryotic cells. Importantly, 4-(alkylthio)but-2-ynoic acids, had better bactericidal activity than the parental 2-alkynoic acids and on a par with isoniazid against the slow-grower Mycobacterium bovis BCG. These compounds had also low toxicity against eukaryotic cells, suggesting that they could be potential therapeutic agents against other types of topical mycobacterial infections causing skin diseases including Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium ulcerans, and Mycobacterium leprae. Moreover, they provide a possible scaffold for future drug development. PMID:26256431

  15. Antiproliferative activity of synthetic fatty acid amides from renewable resources.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daiane S; Piovesan, Luciana A; D'Oca, Caroline R Montes; Hack, Carolina R Lopes; Treptow, Tamara G M; Rodrigues, Marieli O; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T G; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; D'Oca, Marcelo G Montes

    2015-01-15

    In the work, the in vitro antiproliferative activity of a series of synthetic fatty acid amides were investigated in seven cancer cell lines. The study revealed that most of the compounds showed antiproliferative activity against tested tumor cell lines, mainly on human glioma cells (U251) and human ovarian cancer cells with a multiple drug-resistant phenotype (NCI-ADR/RES). In addition, the fatty methyl benzylamide derived from ricinoleic acid (with the fatty acid obtained from castor oil, a renewable resource) showed a high selectivity with potent growth inhibition and cell death for the glioma cell line-the most aggressive CNS cancer.

  16. A molecular dynamics study of the ligand release path in yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lishan; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2007-04-01

    Yeast cytosine deaminase, a zinc metalloenzyme, catalyzes the deamination of cytosine to uracil. Experimental and computational evidence indicates that the rate-limiting step is product release, instead of the chemical reaction step. In this work, we use molecular dynamics to suggest ligand exit paths. Simulation at 300 K shows that the active site is well protected by the C-terminal helix (residues 150-158) and F-114 loop (residues 111-117) and that on the molecular dynamics timescale water does not flow in or out of the active site. In contrast, simulation at 320 K shows a significant increase in flexibility of the C-terminal helix and F-114 loop. The motions of these two regions at 320 K open the active site and permit water molecules to diffuse into and out of the active site through two paths with one much more favored than the other. Cytosine is pushed out of the active site by a restraint method in two directions specified by these two paths. In path 1 the required motion of the protein is local-involving only the C-terminal helix and F-114 loop-and two residues, F-114 and I-156, are identified that have to be moved away to let cytosine out; whereas in path 2, the protein has to rearrange itself much more extensively, and the changes are also much larger compared to the path 1 simulation.

  17. Antiprotozoal Activity of Triazole Derivatives of Dehydroabietic Acid and Oleanolic Acid.

    PubMed

    Pertino, Mariano Walter; Vega, Celeste; Rolón, Miriam; Coronel, Cathia; Rojas de Arias, Antonieta; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo

    2017-02-28

    Tropical parasitic diseases such as Chagas disease and leishmaniasis are considered a major public health problem affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. As the drugs currently used to treat these diseases have several disadvantages and side effects, there is an urgent need for new drugs with better selectivity and less toxicity. Structural modifications of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds using click chemistry have enabled access to derivatives with promising antiparasitic activity. The antiprotozoal activity of the terpenes dehydroabietic acid, dehydroabietinol, oleanolic acid, and 34 synthetic derivatives were evaluated against epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi and promastigotes of Leishmaniabraziliensis and Leishmania infantum. The cytotoxicity of the compounds was assessed on NCTC-Clone 929 cells. The activity of the compounds was moderate and the antiparasitic effect was associated with the linker length between the diterpene and the triazole in dehydroabietinol derivatives. For the oleanolic acid derivatives, a free carboxylic acid function led to better antiparasitic activity.

  18. Biological Activities of Oleanolic Acid Derivatives from Calendula officinalis Seeds.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Ahmed; Ashour, Ahmed; Mira, Amira; Kishikawa, Asuka; Nakagawa, Toshinori; Zhu, Qinchang; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Phytochemical examination of butanol fraction of Calendula officinalis seeds led to the isolation of two compounds identified as 28-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS1) and oleanolic acid 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl (1→3)-β-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (CS2). Biological evaluation was carried out for these two compounds such as melanin biosynthesis inhibitory, hyaluronic acid production activities, anti obesity using lipase inhibition and adipocyte differentiation as well as evaluation of the protective effect against hydrogen peroxide induced neurotoxicity in neuro-2A cells. The results showed that, compound CS2 has a melanin biosynthesis stimulatory activity; however, compound CS1 has a potent stimulatory effect for the production of hyaluronic acid on normal human dermal fibroblast from adult (NHDF-Ad). Both compounds did not show any inhibitory effect on both lipase and adipocyte differentiation. Compound CS2 could protect neuro-2A cells and increased cell viability against H2 O2 . These activities (melanin biosynthesis stimulatory and protective effect against H2 O2 of CS2 and hyaluronic acid productive activities of these triterpene derivatives) have been reported for the first time. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Fatty acid alcohol ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, T; Sumiyoshi, M; Okuda, H

    1999-12-01

    The fatty acid alcohol ester-synthesizing activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) was characterized using bovine milk LPL. Synthesizing activities were determined in an aqueous medium using oleic acid or trioleylglycerol as the acyl donor and equimolar amounts of long-chain alcohols as the acyl acceptor. When oleic acid and hexadecanol emulsified with gum arabic were incubated with LPL, palmityl oleate was synthesized, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Apo-very low density lipoprotein (apoVLDL) stimulated LPL-catalyzed palmityl oleate synthesis. The apparent equilibrium ratio of fatty acid alcohol ester/oleic acid was estimated using a high concentration of LPL and a long (20 h) incubation period. The equilibrium ratio was affected by the incubation pH and the alcohol chain length. When the incubation pH was below pH 7.0 and long chain fatty acyl alcohols were used as substrates, the fatty acid alcohol ester/free fatty acid equilibrium ratio favored ester formation, with an apparent equilibrium ratio of fatty acid alcohol ester/fatty acid of about 0.9/0.1. The equilibrium ratio decreased sharply at alkaline pH (above pH 8.0). The ratio also decreased when fatty alcohols with acyl chains shorter than dodecanol were used. When a trioleoylglycerol/fatty acyl alcohol emulsion was incubated with LPL, fatty acid alcohol esters were synthesized in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Fatty acid alcohol esters were easily synthesized from trioleoylglycerol when fatty alcohols with acyl chains longer than dodecanol were used, but synthesis was decreased with fatty alcohols with acyl chain lengths shorter than decanol, and little synthesizing activity was detected with shorter-chain fatty alcohols such as butanol or ethanol.

  20. Nanoencapsulation improves the in vitro antioxidant activity of lipoic acid.

    PubMed

    Külkamp, Irene C; Rabelo, Bruna D; Berlitz, Simone J; Isoppo, Mateus; Bianchin, Mariana D; Schaffazick, Scheila R; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Guterres, Sílvia S

    2011-08-01

    Lipoic acid is a widely studied substance, whose therapeutic effects are related to its antioxidant activity. Our objective was to develop lipoic acid-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules and evaluate their in vitro antioxidant effect against lipid peroxidation induced by ascorbyl free radicals, using soybean lecithin liposomes as the substrate. The nanocapsule suspensions were prepared by interfacial deposition of poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and characterized by particle size and polydispersion index (photon correlation spectroscopy), zeta potencial (eletrophoretic mobility), drug content and encapsulation efficiency (HPLC). The extent of lipid peroxidation was determined (TBARS). The nanostrucutures presented mean diameters of between 191 and 349 nm, zeta potential values from -14.1 +/- 4.5 to -10.4 +/- 0.6, and high lipoic acid encapsulation. A significant increase in the antioxidant activity of lipoic acid was achieved through nanoencapsulation or by increasing its concentration in the formulation. The protection results ranged from 48.9 +/- 3.4 to 57.4 +/- 9.1% for lipoic acid-loaded lipid-core nanocapsules. The lipoic acid release from nanostrucutures significantly decreased with increasing polymer concentration. Also, it was observed an increasing in the antioxidant activity as the lipoic acid release time decreased. The co-encapsulation of lipoic acid with melatonin in lipid-core nanocapsules did not improve the protection against lipid peroxidation. The results obtained demonstrate the optimal concentrations of polymer and lipoic acid in the formulations in terms of enhancing the antioxidant activity. Furthermore, by the strategy applied, it was verified that nanoencapsulation is an efficient alternative to increase the antioxidant effect of lipoic acid, representing a potential approach for therapeutic applications.

  1. Activity of earthworm in Latosol under simulated acid rain stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia-En; Yu, Jiayu; Ouyang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Acid rain is still an issue of environmental concerns. This study investigated the impacts of simulated acid rain (SAR) upon earthworm activity from the Latosol (acidic red soil). Laboratory experiment was performed by leaching the soil columns grown with earthworms (Eisenia fetida) at the SAR pH levels ranged from 2.0 to 6.5 over a 34-day period. Results showed that earthworms tended to escape from the soil and eventually died for the SAR at pH = 2.0 as a result of acid toxicity. The catalase activity in the earthworms decreased with the SAR pH levels, whereas the superoxide dismutases activity in the earthworms showed a fluctuate pattern: decreasing from pH 6.5 to 5.0 and increasing from pH 5.0 to 4.0. Results implied that the growth of earthworms was retarded at the SAR pH ≤ 3.0.

  2. Thyroid peroxidase activity is inhibited by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, D P; Ferreira, A C; Coelho, S M; Moraes, J M; Camacho, M A; Rosenthal, D

    2000-03-01

    Normal in vitro thyroid peroxidase (TPO) iodide oxidation activity was completely inhibited by a hydrolyzed TPO preparation (0.15 mg/ml) or hydrolyzed bovine serum albumin (BSA, 0.2 mg/ml). A pancreatic hydrolysate of casein (trypticase peptone, 0.1 mg/ml) and some amino acids (cysteine, tryptophan and methionine, 50 microM each) also inhibited the TPO iodide oxidation reaction completely, whereas casamino acids (0.1 mg/ml), and tyrosine, phenylalanine and histidine (50 microM each) inhibited the TPO reaction by 54% or less. A pancreatic digest of gelatin (0.1 mg/ml) or any other amino acid (50 microM) tested did not significantly decrease TPO activity. The amino acids that impair iodide oxidation also inhibit the TPO albumin iodination activity. The inhibitory amino acids contain side chains with either sulfur atoms (cysteine and methionine) or aromatic rings (tyrosine, tryptophan, histidine and phenylalanine). Among the amino acids tested, only cysteine affected the TPO guaiacol oxidation reaction, producing a transient inhibition at 25 or 50 microM. The iodide oxidation inhibitory activity of cysteine, methionine and tryptophan was reversed by increasing iodide concentrations from 12 to 18 mM, while no such effect was observed when the cofactor (H2O2) concentration was increased. The inhibitory substances might interfere with the enzyme activity by competing with its normal substrates for their binding sites, binding to the free substrates or reducing their oxidized form.

  3. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of ellagic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim; Bayrak, Yüksel

    2014-09-01

    Ellagic acid (EA, C14H6O8) is a natural dietary polyphenol whose benefits in a variety of diseases shown in epidemiological and experimental studies involve anti-inflammation, anti-proliferation, anti-angiogenesis, anticarcinogenesis and anti-oxidation properties. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of EA were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. EA inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 69.8%, 66.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, EA had an effective DPPH• scavenging, ABTSrad + scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that EA can be used in the pharmacological, food industry and medicine because of these properties.

  4. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of ellagic acid.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim; Bayrak, Yüksel

    2014-09-15

    Ellagic acid (EA, C14H6O8) is a natural dietary polyphenol whose benefits in a variety of diseases shown in epidemiological and experimental studies involve anti-inflammation, anti-proliferation, anti-angiogenesis, anticarcinogenesis and anti-oxidation properties. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of EA were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. EA inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 69.8%, 66.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, EA had an effective DPPH• scavenging, ABTS+ scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that EA can be used in the pharmacological, food industry and medicine because of these properties.

  5. LAT1 activity of carboxylic acid bioisosteres: Evaluation of hydroxamic acids as substrates.

    PubMed

    Zur, Arik A; Chien, Huan-Chieh; Augustyn, Evan; Flint, Andrew; Heeren, Nathan; Finke, Karissa; Hernandez, Christopher; Hansen, Logan; Miller, Sydney; Lin, Lawrence; Giacomini, Kathleen M; Colas, Claire; Schlessinger, Avner; Thomas, Allen A

    2016-10-15

    Large neutral amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is a solute carrier protein located primarily in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that offers the potential to deliver drugs to the brain. It is also up-regulated in cancer cells, as part of a tumor's increased metabolic demands. Previously, amino acid prodrugs have been shown to be transported by LAT1. Carboxylic acid bioisosteres may afford prodrugs with an altered physicochemical and pharmacokinetic profile than those derived from natural amino acids, allowing for higher brain or tumor levels of drug and/or lower toxicity. The effect of replacing phenylalanine's carboxylic acid with a tetrazole, acylsulfonamide and hydroxamic acid (HA) bioisostere was examined. Compounds were tested for their ability to be LAT1 substrates using both cis-inhibition and trans-stimulation cell assays. As HA-Phe demonstrated weak substrate activity, its structure-activity relationship (SAR) was further explored by synthesis and testing of HA derivatives of other LAT1 amino acid substrates (i.e., Tyr, Leu, Ile, and Met). The potential for a false positive in the trans-stimulation assay caused by parent amino acid was evaluated by conducting compound stability experiments for both HA-Leu and the corresponding methyl ester derivative. We concluded that HA's are transported by LAT1. In addition, our results lend support to a recent account that amino acid esters are LAT1 substrates, and that hydrogen bonding may be as important as charge for interaction with the transporter binding site.

  6. Amino acid composition predicts prion activity.

    PubMed

    Afsar Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir; Ross, Eric D; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2017-04-10

    Many prion-forming proteins contain glutamine/asparagine (Q/N) rich domains, and there are conflicting opinions as to the role of primary sequence in their conversion to the prion form: is this phenomenon driven primarily by amino acid composition, or, as a recent computational analysis suggested, dependent on the presence of short sequence elements with high amyloid-forming potential. The argument for the importance of short sequence elements hinged on the relatively-high accuracy obtained using a method that utilizes a collection of length-six sequence elements with known amyloid-forming potential. We weigh in on this question and demonstrate that when those sequence elements are permuted, even higher accuracy is obtained; we also propose a novel multiple-instance machine learning method that uses sequence composition alone, and achieves better accuracy than all existing prion prediction approaches. While we expect there to be elements of primary sequence that affect the process, our experiments suggest that sequence composition alone is sufficient for predicting protein sequences that are likely to form prions. A web-server for the proposed method is available at http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/prank.html, and the code for reproducing our experiments is available at http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.167136.

  7. Novel Rhizosphere Soil Alleles for the Enzyme 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase Queried for Function with an In Vivo Competition Assay.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhao; Di Rienzi, Sara C; Janzon, Anders; Werner, Jeff J; Angenent, Largus T; Dangl, Jeffrey L; Fowler, Douglas M; Ley, Ruth E

    2015-12-04

    Metagenomes derived from environmental microbiota encode a vast diversity of protein homologs. How this diversity impacts protein function can be explored through selection assays aimed to optimize function. While artificially generated gene sequence pools are typically used in selection assays, their usage may be limited because of technical or ethical reasons. Here, we investigate an alternative strategy, the use of soil microbial DNA as a starting point. We demonstrate this approach by optimizing the function of a widely occurring soil bacterial enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. We identified a specific ACC deaminase domain region (ACCD-DR) that, when PCR amplified from the soil, produced a variant pool that we could swap into functional plasmids carrying ACC deaminase-encoding genes. Functional clones of ACC deaminase were selected for in a competition assay based on their capacity to provide nitrogen to Escherichia coli in vitro. The most successful ACCD-DR variants were identified after multiple rounds of selection by sequence analysis. We observed that previously identified essential active-site residues were fixed in the original unselected library and that additional residues went to fixation after selection. We identified a divergent essential residue whose presence hints at the possible use of alternative substrates and a cluster of neutral residues that did not influence ACCD performance. Using an artificial ACCD-DR variant library generated by DNA oligomer synthesis, we validated the same fixation patterns. Our study demonstrates that soil metagenomes are useful starting pools of protein-coding-gene diversity that can be utilized for protein optimization and functional characterization when synthetic libraries are not appropriate.

  8. Novel Rhizosphere Soil Alleles for the Enzyme 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Deaminase Queried for Function with an In Vivo Competition Assay

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhao; Di Rienzi, Sara C.; Janzon, Anders; Werner, Jeff J.; Angenent, Largus T.; Dangl, Jeffrey L.; Fowler, Douglas M.

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomes derived from environmental microbiota encode a vast diversity of protein homologs. How this diversity impacts protein function can be explored through selection assays aimed to optimize function. While artificially generated gene sequence pools are typically used in selection assays, their usage may be limited because of technical or ethical reasons. Here, we investigate an alternative strategy, the use of soil microbial DNA as a starting point. We demonstrate this approach by optimizing the function of a widely occurring soil bacterial enzyme, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase. We identified a specific ACC deaminase domain region (ACCD-DR) that, when PCR amplified from the soil, produced a variant pool that we could swap into functional plasmids carrying ACC deaminase-encoding genes. Functional clones of ACC deaminase were selected for in a competition assay based on their capacity to provide nitrogen to Escherichia coli in vitro. The most successful ACCD-DR variants were identified after multiple rounds of selection by sequence analysis. We observed that previously identified essential active-site residues were fixed in the original unselected library and that additional residues went to fixation after selection. We identified a divergent essential residue whose presence hints at the possible use of alternative substrates and a cluster of neutral residues that did not influence ACCD performance. Using an artificial ACCD-DR variant library generated by DNA oligomer synthesis, we validated the same fixation patterns. Our study demonstrates that soil metagenomes are useful starting pools of protein-coding-gene diversity that can be utilized for protein optimization and functional characterization when synthetic libraries are not appropriate. PMID:26637602

  9. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Ji-Min; Kim, Ji-Won; Song, Ji-Won; Blank, Lars M.; Park, Jin-Byung

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid)-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3). Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1)) into n-heptanoic acid (5) and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4). This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass. PMID:27681369

  10. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ji-Min; Kim, Ji-Won; Song, Ji-Won; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid)-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3). Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1)) into n-heptanoic acid (5) and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4). This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass.

  11. The antimicrobial activities of the cinnamaldehyde adducts with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qing-Yi; Xiong, Jia-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Chao; Wen Ye

    2011-11-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a well-established natural antimicrobial compound. It is probable for cinnamaldehyde to react with amino acid forming Schiff base adduct in real food system. In this paper, 9 such kind of adducts were prepared by the direct reaction of amino acids with cinnamaldehyde at room temperature. Their antimicrobial activities against Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were evaluated with benzoic acid as a reference. The adducts showed a dose-dependent activities against the three microbial strains. Both cinnamaldehyde and their adducts were more active against B. subtilis than on E. coli, and their antimicrobial activities were higher at lower pH. Both cinnamaldehyde and its adducts were more active than benzoic acid at the same conditions. The adduct compound A was non-toxic by primary oral acute toxicity study in mice. However, in situ effect of the adduct compound A against E. coli was a little lower than cinnamaldehyde in fish meat. This paper for the first time showed that the cinnamaldehyde adducts with amino acids had similar strong antimicrobial activities as cinnamaldehyde, which may provide alternatives to cinnamaldehyde in food to avoid the strong unacceptable odor of cinnamaldehyde.

  12. Retroviral Replicating Vectors Deliver Cytosine Deaminase Leading to Targeted 5-Fluorouracil-Mediated Cytotoxicity in Multiple Human Cancer Types

    PubMed Central

    Twitty, Chris G.; Diago, Oscar R.; Hogan, Daniel J.; Burrascano, Cindy; Ibanez, Carlos E.; Jolly, Douglas J.; Ostertag, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Toca 511 is a modified retroviral replicating vector based on Moloney γ-retrovirus with an amphotropic envelope. As an investigational cancer treatment, Toca 511 preferentially infects cancer cells without direct cell lysis and encodes an enhanced yeast cytosine deaminase that converts the antifungal drug 5-fluorocytosine to the anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil. A panel of established human cancer cell lines, derived from glioblastoma, colon, and breast cancer tissue, was used to evaluate parameters critical for effective anticancer activity. Gene transfer, cytosine deaminase production, conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil, and subsequent cell killing occurred in all lines tested. We observed >50% infection within 25 days in all lines and 5-fluorocytosine LD50 values between 0.02 and 6 μg/ml. Although we did not identify a small number of key criteria, these studies do provide a straightforward approach to rapidly gauge the probability of a Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine treatment effect in various cancer indications: a single MTS assay of maximally infected cancer cell lines to determine 5-fluorocytosine LD50. The data suggest that, although there can be variation in susceptibility to Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine because of multiple mechanistic factors, this therapy may be applicable to a broad range of cancer types and individuals. PMID:26467507

  13. Retroviral Replicating Vectors Deliver Cytosine Deaminase Leading to Targeted 5-Fluorouracil-Mediated Cytotoxicity in Multiple Human Cancer Types.

    PubMed

    Twitty, Chris G; Diago, Oscar R; Hogan, Daniel J; Burrascano, Cindy; Ibanez, Carlos E; Jolly, Douglas J; Ostertag, Derek

    2016-02-01

    Toca 511 is a modified retroviral replicating vector based on Moloney γ-retrovirus with an amphotropic envelope. As an investigational cancer treatment, Toca 511 preferentially infects cancer cells without direct cell lysis and encodes an enhanced yeast cytosine deaminase that converts the antifungal drug 5-fluorocytosine to the anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil. A panel of established human cancer cell lines, derived from glioblastoma, colon, and breast cancer tissue, was used to evaluate parameters critical for effective anticancer activity. Gene transfer, cytosine deaminase production, conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil, and subsequent cell killing occurred in all lines tested. We observed >50% infection within 25 days in all lines and 5-fluorocytosine LD50 values between 0.02 and 6 μg/ml. Although we did not identify a small number of key criteria, these studies do provide a straightforward approach to rapidly gauge the probability of a Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine treatment effect in various cancer indications: a single MTS assay of maximally infected cancer cell lines to determine 5-fluorocytosine LD50. The data suggest that, although there can be variation in susceptibility to Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine because of multiple mechanistic factors, this therapy may be applicable to a broad range of cancer types and individuals.

  14. Acid phosphatase activities during the germination of Glycine max seeds.

    PubMed

    dos Prazeres, Janaina Nicanuzia; Ferreira, Carmen Veríssima; Aoyama, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a study concerning the determination of some characteristics of soybean seedlings and the detection of acid phosphatase activities towards different substrates during the germination. Enzyme activities with p-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP) and inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) as substrates were detected from the 5th and 7th days after germination, respectively. Acid phosphatase activities with tyrosine phosphate (TyrP), glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and phosphoenol pyruvate (PEP) were also observed but to a lesser extent. Under the same conditions, no enzyme activity was detected with phytic acid (PhyAc) as substrate. The appearance of phosphatase activity was coincident with the decrease of inorganic phosphate content during germination; over the same period, the protein content increased up to the 5th day, decreased until the 8th day, and remained constant after this period. Relative to phosphatase activity in the cotyledons, the activities detected in the hypocotyl and roots were 82% and 38%, respectively. During storage the enzyme maintained about 63% of its activity for 3 months at 5 degrees C. The specificity constant (Vmax/Km) values for pNPP and PPi were 212 and 64 mu kat mM-1 mg-1, respectively. Amongst the substrates tested, PPi could be a potential physiological substrate for acid phosphatase during the germination of soybean seeds.

  15. Antileishmanial activity of diterpene acids in copaiba oil

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Adriana Oliveira; Izumi, Erika; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Dias-Filho, Benedito Prado; da Veiga-Júnior, Valdir Florêncio; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease. According to the World Health Organization, there are approximately 1.5-two million new cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis each year worldwide. Chemotherapy against leishmaniasis is based on pentavalent antimonials, which were developed more than a century ago. The goals of this study were to investigate the antileishmanial activity of diterpene acids in copaiba oil, as well as some possible targets of their action against Leishmania amazonensis. Methyl copalate and agathic, hydroxycopalic, kaurenoic, pinifolic and polyaltic acids isolated from Copaifera officinales oleoresins were utilised. Ultrastructural changes and the specific organelle targets of diterpenes were investigated with electron microscopy and flow cytometry, respectively. All compounds had some level of activity against L. amazonensis. Hydroxycopalic acid and methyl copalate demonstrated the most activity against promastigotes and had 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 2.5 and 6.0 µg/mL, respectively. However, pinifolic and kaurenoic acid demonstrated the most activity against axenic amastigote and had IC50 values of 3.5 and 4.0 µg/mL, respectively. Agathic, kaurenoic and pinifolic acid caused significant increases in plasma membrane permeability and mitochondrial membrane depolarisation of the protozoan. In conclusion, copaiba oil and its diterpene acids should be explored for the development of new antileishmanial drugs. PMID:23440116

  16. Urease inhibitory activities of β-boswellic acid derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Boswellia carterii have been used in traditional medicine for many years for management different gastrointestinal disorders. In this study, we wish to report urease inhibitory activity of four isolated compound of boswellic acid derivative. Methods 4 pentacyclic triterpenoid acids were isolated from Boswellia carterii and identified by NMR and Mass spectroscopic analysis (compounds 1, 3-O-acetyl-9,11-dehydro-β-boswellic acid; 2, 3-O-acetyl-11-hydroxy-β-boswellic acid; 3. 3-O- acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid and 4, 11-keto-β-boswellic acid. Their inhibitory activity on Jack bean urease were evaluated. Docking and pharmacophore analysis using AutoDock 4.2 and Ligandscout 3.03 programs were also performed to explain possible mechanism of interaction between isolated compounds and urease enzyme. Results It was found that compound 1 has the strongest inhibitory activity against Jack bean urease (IC50 = 6.27 ± 0.03 μM), compared with thiourea as a standard inhibitor (IC50 = 21.1 ± 0.3 μM). Conclusion The inhibition potency is probably due to the formation of appropriate hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions between the investigated compounds and urease enzyme active site and confirms its traditional usage. PMID:23351363

  17. The Antimicrobial Activity of Liposomal Lauric Acids Against Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Darren; Pornpattananangkul, Dissaya; Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Chan, Michael; Carson, Dennis; Huang, Chun-Ming; Zhang, Liangfang

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of lauric acid (LA) and its liposomal derivatives against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), the bacterium that promotes inflammatory acne. First, the antimicrobial study of three free fatty acids (lauric acid, palmitic acid and oleic acid) demonstrated that LA gives the strongest bactericidal activity against P. acnes. However, a setback of using LA as a potential treatment for inflammatory acne is its poor water solubility. Then the LA was incorporated into a liposome formulation to aid its delivery to P. acnes. It's demonstrated that the antimicrobial activity of LA was not only well maintained in its liposomal derivatives but also enhanced at low LA concentration. In addition, the antimicrobial activity of LA-loaded liposomes (LipoLA) mainly depended on the LA loading concentration per single liposomes. Further study found that the LipoLA could fuse with the membranes of P. acnes and release the carried LA directly into the bacterial membranes, thereby killing the bacteria effectively. Since LA is a natural compound that is the main acid in coconut oil and also resides in human breast milk and liposomes have been successfully and widely applied as a drug delivery vehicle in the clinic, the LipoLA developed in this work holds great potential of becoming an innate, safe and effective therapeutic medication for acne vulgaris and other P. acnes associated diseases. PMID:19665786

  18. Synthesis and antimicrobial activities of new higher amino acid Schiff base derivatives of 6-aminopenicillanic acid and 7-aminocephalosporanic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir (nee Güngör), Özlem; Gürkan, Perihan; Özçelik, Berrin; Oyardı, Özlem

    2016-02-01

    Novel β-lactam derivatives (1c-3c) (1d-3d) were produced by using 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA), 7-aminocephalosporanic acid (7-ACA) and the higher amino acid Schiff bases. The synthesized compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H/13C NMR and UV-vis spectra. Antibacterial activities of all the higher amino acid Schiff bases (1a-3a) (1b-3b) and β-lactam derivatives were screened against three gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Acinetobacter baumannii RSKK 02026), three gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 07005, Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633) and their drug-resistant isolates by using broth microdilution method. Two fungi (Candida albicans and Candida krusei) were used for antifungal activity.

  19. [Sorption of amino acids from aqueous solutions on activated charcoal].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Tsibanov, V V

    1985-03-01

    Various methods for quantitative description of amino acid sorption from solutions for parenteral nutrition on activated charcoal were studied under dynamic and static conditions. With the use of the well-known Freindlich and Langmuir absorption isotherms it was shown to be possible to describe in a simplified way the complex multicomponent process of sorption of the amino acids and to estimate their loss at the filtration stage.

  20. Retinal pigment epithelial acid lipase activity and lipoprotein receptors: effects of dietary omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed Central

    Elner, Victor M

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To show that fish oil-derived omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, delivered to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) by circulating low-density lipoproteins (LDL), enhance already considerable RPE lysosomal acid lipase activity, providing for more efficient hydrolysis of intralysosomal RPE lipids, an effect that may help prevent development of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). METHODS: Colorimetric biochemical and histochemical techniques were used to demonstrate RPE acid lipase in situ, in vitro, and after challenge with phagocytic stimuli. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of fluorescently labeled native, aceto-acetylated, and oxidized LDL was studied in vitro and in vivo. LDL effects on RPE lysosomal enzymes were assessed. Lysosomal enzyme activity was compared in RPE cells from monkeys fed diets rich in fish oil to those from control animals and in cultured RPE cells exposed to sera from these monkeys. RESULTS: RPE acid lipase activity was substantial and comparable to that of mononuclear phagocytes. Acid lipase activity increased significantly following phagocytic challenge with photoreceptor outer segment (POS) membranes. Receptor-mediated RPE uptake of labeled lipoproteins was determined in vitro. Distinctive uptake of labeled lipoproteins occurred in RPE cells and mononuclear phagocytes in vivo. Native LDL enhanced RPE lysosomal enzyme activity. RPE lysosomal enzymes increased significantly in RPE cells from monkeys fed fish oil-rich diets and in cultured RPE cells exposed to their sera. CONCLUSIONS: RPE cells contain substantial acid lipase for efficient metabolism of lipids imbibed by POS phagocytosis and LDL uptake. Diets rich in fish oil-derived omega-3 fatty acids, by enhancing acid lipase, may reduce RPE lipofuscin accumulation, RPE oxidative damage, and the development of ARMD. PMID:12545699

  1. Recovery of rhenium from sulfuric acid solutions with activated coals

    SciTech Connect

    Troshkina, I.D.; Naing, K.Z.; Ushanova, O.N.; P'o, V.; Abdusalomov, A.A.

    2006-09-15

    Equilibrium and kinetic characteristics of rhenium sorption from sulfuric acid solutions (pH 2) by activated coals produced from coal raw materials (China) were studied. Constants of the Henry equation describing isotherms of rhenium sorption by activated coals were calculated. The effective diffusion coefficients of rhenium in the coals were determined. The dynamic characteristics of rhenium sorption and desorption were determined for the activated coal with the best capacity and kinetic characteristics.

  2. Pyrazinoic acid esters with broad spectrum in vitro antimycobacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Cynamon, M H; Gimi, R; Gyenes, F; Sharpe, C A; Bergmann, K E; Han, H J; Gregor, L B; Rapolu, R; Luciano, G; Welch, J T

    1995-09-29

    A series of substituted pyrazinoic acid esters has been prepared and examined for their in vitro activity against Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium kansasii as well as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Modification of both the pyrazine nucleus and the ester functionality have been very successful in expanding the activity of pyrazinamide to include M. avium and M. kansasii, organisms normally not susceptible to pyrazinamide. Several of these compounds have activities 100-1000-fold greater than that of pyrazinamide against M. tuberculosis.

  3. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; Park, Si-Bum; Kishino, Shigenobu; Ogawa, Jun; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism.

  4. Effect of vanadium compounds on acid phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Vescina, C M; Sálice, V C; Cortizo, A M; Etcheverry, S B

    1996-01-01

    The direct effect of different vanadium compounds on acid phosphatase (ACP) activity was investigated. Vanadate and vanadyl but not pervanadate inhibited the wheat germ ACP activity. These vanadium derivatives did not alter the fibroblast Swiss 3T3 soluble fraction ACP activity. Using inhibitors of tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases), the wheat germ ACP was partially characterized as a PTPase. This study suggests that the inhibitory ability of different vanadium derivatives to modulate ACP activity seems to depend on the geometry around the vanadium atom more than on the oxidation state. Our results indicate a correlation between the PTPase activity and the sensitivity to vanadate and vanadyl cation.

  5. Glucose metabolism during fasting is altered in experimental porphobilinogen deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Collantes, María; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Benito, Marina; Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Delgado, Mercedes; Vinaixa, María; Sampedro, Ana; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Prieto, Elena; Pozo, Miguel A; Peñuelas, Iván; Corrales, Fernando J; Barajas, Miguel; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) haploinsufficiency (acute intermittent porphyria, AIP) is characterized by neurovisceral attacks when hepatic heme synthesis is activated by endogenous or environmental factors including fasting. While the molecular mechanisms underlying the nutritional regulation of hepatic heme synthesis have been described, glucose homeostasis during fasting is poorly understood in porphyria. Our study aimed to analyse glucose homeostasis and hepatic carbohydrate metabolism during fasting in PBGD-deficient mice. To determine the contribution of hepatic PBGD deficiency to carbohydrate metabolism, AIP mice injected with a PBGD-liver gene delivery vector were included. After a 14 h fasting period, serum and liver metabolomics analyses showed that wild-type mice stimulated hepatic glycogen degradation to maintain glucose homeostasis while AIP livers activated gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis due to their inability to use stored glycogen. The serum of fasted AIP mice showed increased concentrations of insulin and reduced glucagon levels. Specific over-expression of the PBGD protein in the liver tended to normalize circulating insulin and glucagon levels, stimulated hepatic glycogen catabolism and blocked ketone body production. Reduced glucose uptake was observed in the primary somatosensorial brain cortex of fasted AIP mice, which could be reversed by PBGD-liver gene delivery. In conclusion, AIP mice showed a different response to fasting as measured by altered carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and modified glucose consumption in the brain cortex. Glucose homeostasis in fasted AIP mice was efficiently normalized after restoration of PBGD gene expression in the liver.

  6. Yeast cytosine deaminase mutants with increased thermostability impart sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine.

    PubMed

    Stolworthy, Tiffany S; Korkegian, Aaron M; Willmon, Candice L; Ardiani, Andressa; Cundiff, Jennifer; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2008-03-28

    Prodrug gene therapy (PGT) is a treatment strategy in which tumor cells are transfected with a 'suicide' gene that encodes a metabolic enzyme capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into a potent cytotoxin. One of the most promising PGT enzymes is cytosine deaminase (CD), a microbial salvage enzyme that converts cytosine to uracil. CD also converts 5-fluorocytosine (5FC) to 5-fluorouracil, an inhibitor of DNA synthesis and RNA function. Over 150 studies of CD-mediated PGT applications have been reported since 2000, all using wild-type enzymes. However, various forms of CD are limited by inefficient turnover of 5FC and/or limited thermostability. In a previous study, we stabilized and extended the half-life of yeast CD (yCD) by repacking of its hydrophobic core at several positions distant from the active site. Here we report that random mutagenesis of residues selected based on alignment with similar enzymes, followed by selection for enhanced sensitization to 5FC, also produces an enzyme variant (yCD-D92E) with elevated T(m) values and increased activity half-life. The new mutation is located at the enzyme's dimer interface, indicating that independent mutational pathways can lead to an increase in stability, as well as a more subtle effect on enzyme kinetics. Each independently derived set of mutations significantly improves the enzyme's performance in PGT assays both in cell culture and in animal models.

  7. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects. PMID:26629697

  8. The Immunomodulatory Activity of Jacaric Acid, a Conjugated Linolenic Acid Isomer, on Murine Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wai Nam; Leung, Kwok Nam

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at demonstrating the immunomodulatory property of jacaric acid, a conjugated linolenic acid (CLNA) isomer that is present in jacaranda seed oil, on murine peritoneal macrophages. Our results showed that jacaric acid exhibited no significant cytotoxicity on the thioglycollate-elicited murine peritoneal macrophages as revealed by the neutral red uptake assay, but markedly increased their cytostatic activity on the T-cell lymphoma MBL-2 cells as measured by the fluorometric CyQuant® NF Cell Proliferation Assay Kit. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that jacaric acid could enhance the endocytic activity of macrophages and elevated their intracellular production of superoxide anion. Moreover, jacaric acid-treated macrophages showed an increase in the production of nitric oxide which was accompanied by an increase in the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase protein. In addition, the secretion of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interferon-γ, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, was up-regulated. Collectively, our results indicated that the naturally-occurring CLNA isomer, jacaric acid, could exhibit immunomodulating activity on the murine peritoneal macrophages in vitro, suggesting that this CLNA isomer may act as an immunopotentiator which can be exploited for the treatment of some immunological disorders with minimal toxicity and fewer side effects.

  9. Acid activation of bentonites and polymer-clay nanocomposites.

    SciTech Connect

    Carrado, K. A.; Komadel, P.; Center for Nanoscale Materials; Slovak Academy of Sciences

    2009-04-01

    Modified bentonites are of widespread technological importance. Common modifications include acid activation and organic treatment. Acid activation has been used for decades to prepare bleaching earths for adsorbing impurities from edible and industrial oils. Organic treatment has sparked an explosive interest in a class of materials called polymer-clay nanocomposites (PCNs). The most commonly used clay mineral in PCNs is montmorillonite, which is the main constituent of bentonite. PCN materials are used for structural reinforcement and mechanical strength, for gas permeability barriers, as flame retardants, and to minimize surface erosion (ablation). Other specialty applications include use as conducting nanocomposites and bionanocomposites.

  10. ADA (adenosine deaminase) gene therapy enters the competition

    SciTech Connect

    Culliton, B.J.

    1990-08-31

    Around the world, some 70 children are members of a select and deadly club. Born with an immune deficiency so severe that they will die of infection unless their immune systems can be repaired, they have captured the attention of would-be gene therapists who believe that a handful of these kids--the 15 or 20 who lack functioning levels of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA)--could be saved by a healthy ADA gene. A team of gene therapists is ready to put the theory to the test. In April 1987, a team of NIH researchers headed by R. Michael Blaese and W. French Anderson came up with the first formal protocol to introduce a healthy ADA gene into an unhealthy human. After 3 years of line-by-line scrutiny by five review committees, they have permission to go ahead. Two or three children will be treated in the next year, and will be infused with T lymphocytes carrying the gene for ADA. If the experiment works, the ADA gene will begin producing normal amounts of ADA. An interesting feature of ADA deficiency, that makes it ideal for initial gene studies, is that the amount of ADA one needs for a healthy immune system is quite variable. Hence, once inside a patient's T cells, the new ADA gene needs only to express the enzyme in moderate amounts. No precise gene regulation is necessary.

  11. Functions and Regulation of RNA Editing by ADAR Deaminases

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2010-01-01

    One type of RNA editing converts adenosines to inosines (A→I editing) in double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. A→I RNA editing is mediated by adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes. A→I RNA editing of protein-coding sequences of a limited number of mammalian genes results in recoding and subsequent alterations of their functions. However, A→I RNA editing most frequently targets repetitive RNA sequences located within introns and 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs). Although the biological significance of noncoding RNA editing remains largely unknown, several possibilities, including its role in the control of endogenous short interfering RNAs (esiRNAs), have been proposed. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that the biogenesis and functions of certain microRNAs (miRNAs) are regulated by the editing of their precursors. Here, I review the recent findings that indicate new functions for A→I editing in the regulation of noncoding RNAs and for interactions between RNA editing and RNA interference mechanisms. PMID:20192758

  12. Adenosine Deaminase Deficiency – More Than Just an Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Kathryn V.; Gaspar, Hubert B.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is best known as a form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) that results from mutations in the gene encoding ADA. Affected patients present with clinical and immunological manifestations typical of a SCID. Therapies are currently available that can target these immunological disturbances and treated patients show varying degrees of clinical improvement. However, there is now a growing body of evidence that deficiency of ADA has significant impact on non-immunological organ systems. This review will outline the impact of ADA deficiency on various organ systems, starting with the well-understood immunological abnormalities. We will discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and also highlight ways in which current treatments could be improved. In doing so, we aim to present ADA deficiency as more than an immunodeficiency and suggest that it should be recognized as a systemic metabolic disorder that affects multiple organ systems. Only by fully understanding ADA deficiency and its manifestations in all organ systems can we aim to deliver therapies that will correct all the clinical consequences. PMID:27579027

  13. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) immunoreactivity in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    ten Kate, J; van den Ingh, H F; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1986-04-15

    Immunoreactive adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) was studied in 91 human colorectal adenocarcinomas. The expression of ADCP was correlated with that of secretory component (SC) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), with the histological grade and the Dukes' stage of the carcinomas. The histological grade was scored semi-quantitatively according to 5 structural and 4 cytological variables. ADCP expression was observed in 3 different staining patterns, namely: (1) diffuse cytoplasmic (77% of the carcinomas); (2) granular cytoplasmic (13%); and (3) membrane-associated (66%). These patterns were observed alone or in combination. Eleven percent of the carcinomas exhibited no ADCP immunoreactivity. Linear regression analysis showed that the expression of ADCP correlates with that of SC and CEA. However, no significant correlation emerged between the histological parameters or the Dukes' stage and any of the immunohistological parameters. Comparison of the histological characteristics of carcinomas exhibiting little or no ADCP immunoreactivity with those showing extensive immunoreactivity, showed that membranous ADCP immunoreactivity occurs more frequently in well-differentiated carcinomas. Structural parameters showed a better correlation with membranous ADCP expression than the cytological variables. It is concluded that membranous expression of ADCP and CEA are indicators of a high level of differentiation as reflected primarily in the structural characteristics of the tumor.

  14. Distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Dinjens, W N; ten Kate, J; van der Linden, E P; Wijnen, J T; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1989-12-01

    The normal distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human body was investigated quantitatively by ADCP-specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) and qualitatively by immunohistochemistry. In these studies we used a specific rabbit anti-human ADCP antiserum. In all 19 investigated tissues, except erythrocytes, ADCP was found by RIA in the soluble and membrane fractions. From all tissues the membrane fractions contained more ADCP (expressed per mg protein) than the soluble fractions. High membrane ADCP concentrations were found in skin, renal cortex, gastrointestinal tract, and prostate. Immunoperoxidase staining confirmed the predominant membrane-associated localization of the protein. In serous sweat glands, convoluted tubules of renal cortex, bile canaliculi, gastrointestinal tract, lung, pancreas, prostate gland, salivary gland, gallbladder, mammary gland, and uterus, ADCP immunoreactivity was found confined to the luminal membranes of the epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that ADCP is present predominantly in exocrine glands and absorptive epithelia. The localization of ADCP at the secretory or absorptive apex of the cells suggests that the function of ADCP is related to the secretory and/or absorptive process.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of poly(acrylic acid) block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Gratzl, Günther; Paulik, Christian; Hild, Sabine; Guggenbichler, Josef P; Lackner, Maximilian

    2014-05-01

    The increasing number of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has developed into a major health problem. In particular, biofilms are the main reason for hospital-acquired infections and diseases. Once formed, biofilms are difficult to remove as they have specific defense mechanisms against antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial surfaces must therefore kill or repel bacteria before they can settle to form a biofilm. In this study, we describe that poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) containing diblock copolymers can kill bacteria and prevent from biofilm formation. The PAA diblock copolymers with poly(styrene) and poly(methyl methacrylate) were synthesized via anionic polymerization of tert-butyl acrylate with styrene or methyl methacrylate and subsequent acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the tert-butyl ester. The copolymers were characterized via nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), elemental analysis, and acid-base titrations. Copolymer films with a variety of acrylic acid contents were produced by solvent casting, characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and tested for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The antimicrobial activity of the acidic diblock copolymers increased with increasing acrylic acid content, independent of the copolymer-partner, the chain length and the nanostructure.

  16. Potential anticancer activity of lichen secondary metabolite physodic acid.

    PubMed

    Cardile, V; Graziano, A C E; Avola, R; Piovano, M; Russo, A

    2017-02-01

    Secondary metabolites present in lichens, which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic and terpenic compounds, are unique with respect to those of higher plants and show interesting biological and pharmacological activities. However, only a few of these compounds, have been assessed for their effectiveness against various in vitro cancer models. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of three lichen secondary metabolites (atranorin, gyrophoric acid and physodic acid) on A375 melanoma cancer cell line. The tested compounds arise from different lichen species collected in different areas of Continental and Antarctic Chile. The obtained results confirm the major efficiency of depsidones. In fact, depsides atranorin and gyrophoric acid, showed a lower activity inhibiting the melanoma cancer cells only at more high concentrations. Whereas the depsidone physodic acid, showed a dose-response relationship in the range of 6.25-50 μM concentrations in A375 cells, activating an apoptotic process, that probably involves the reduction of Hsp70 expression. Although the molecular mechanism, by which apoptosis is induced by physodic acid remains unclear, and of course further studies are needed, the results here reported confirm the promising biological properties of depsidone compounds, and may offer a further impulse to the development of analogues with more powerful efficiency against melanoma cells.

  17. Assignment of the human cytidine deaminase (CDA) gene to chromosome 1 band p35-p36.2

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, S.; Andreozzi, L.; Della Valle, G.

    1994-08-01

    The enzyme cytidine deaminase (EC 3.5.4.12; CDA) catalyzes the hydrolytic deamination of cytidine or deoxycytidine to uridine or deoxyuridine, respectively. It can also catalyze the deamination of cytosine nucleoside analogues such as cytosine arabinoside and 5-azacytidine, which results in a loss of their cytotoxic and antitumor activity. Cytosine arabinoside is used in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia, and the antileukemic activity of the drug is dependent on phosphorylation by deoxycytidine kinase. The occurrence of clinical cytosine arabinoside resistance is one of the main problems in the successful treatment of acute myeloid leukemia. Resistance to the drug has been ascribed to functional deoxycytidine kinase deficiency and to increased expression of the CDA gene. In this study, we report on the isolation of a CDA genomic fragment and its use as a probe for the chromosomal localization of the human CDA gene by in situ hybridization. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  18. [Cytotoxicity of cytosine deaminase and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase genes in melanoma cells is independent on promoter strength].

    PubMed

    Alekseenko, I V; Kuz'min, D V; Pleshkan, V V; Zinov'eva, M V; Sverdlov, E D

    2013-01-01

    In preparation of the therapeutic genetic constructs aimed to the gene-programmed enzymatic transformation of the non-toxic prodrug into toxin within cancer cells the right choice of regulatory elements (promoters and enhancers) is essential. This is widely accepted that the efficiency of the gene therapy constructions is dependent, in particular, on the strength of promoters driving the expression of the therapeutic genes. In this work we demonstrated, using the melanoma-specific promoters and enhancers of human melanoma inhibitory activity and mouse tyrosinase gene, that for the development of cytotoxic effect the promoter strength is not of primary importance. In the case of HSVtk, coding for the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, and FCU1, coding for cytosine deaminase/uracil phosphoribosyltransferase hybrid protein genes, their cytotoxic activity was determined by the quantity of the added prodrug.

  19. Mutations in the human adenosine deaminase gene that affect protein structure and RNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Akeson, A.L.; Wiginton, D.A.; States, C.J.; Perme, C.M.; Dusing, M.R.; Hutton, J.J.

    1987-08-01

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is one cause of the genetic disease severe combined immunodeficiency. To identify mutations responsible for ADA deficiency, the authors synthesized cDNAs to ADA mRNAs from two cell lines, GM2756 and GM2825A, derived from ADA-deficient immunodeficient patients. Sequence analysis of GM2756 cDNA clones revealed a different point mutation in each allele that causes amino acid changes of alanine to valine and arginine to histidine. One allele of GM2825A also has a point mutation that causes an alanine to valine substitution. The other allele of GM2825A was found to produce an mRNA in which exon 4 had been spliced out but had no other detrimental mutations. S1 nuclease mapping of GM2825A mRNA showed equal abundance of the full-length ADA mRNA and the ADA mRNA that was missing exon 4. Several of the ADA cDNA clones extended 5' of the major initiation start site, indicating multiple start sites for ADA transcription. The point mutations in GM2756 and GM2825A and the absence of exon 4 in GM2825A appear to be directly responsible for the ADA deficiency. Comparison of a number of normal and mutant ADA cDNA sequences showed a number of changes in the third base of codons. These change do not affect the amino acid sequence. Analyses of ADA cDNAs from different cell lines detected aberrant RNA species that either included intron 7 or excluded exon 7. Their presence is a result of aberrant splicing of pre-mRNAs and is not related to mutations that cause ADA deficiency.

  20. Pyrophosphate-condensing activity linked to nucleic acid synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Volloch, V Z; Rits, S; Tumerman, L

    1979-01-01

    In some preparations of DNA dependent RNA polymerase a new enzymatic activity has been found which catalyzes the condensation of two pyrophosphate molecules, liberated in the process of RNA synthesis, to one molecule of orthophosphate and one molecule of Mg (or Mn) - chelate complex with trimetaphosphate. This activity can also cooperate with DNA-polymerase, on condition that both enzymes originate from the same cells. These results point to two general conclusions. First, energy is conserved in the overall process of nucleic acid synthesis and turnover, so that the process does not require an energy influx from the cell's general resources. Second, the synthesis of nucleic acids is catalyzed by a complex enzyme system which contains at least two separate enzymes, one responsible for nucleic acid polymerization and the other for energy conservation via pyrophosphate condensation. Images PMID:88040

  1. Oxygenation of Organoboronic Acids by a Nonheme Iron(II) Complex: Mimicking Boronic Acid Monooxygenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2015-10-19

    Phenolic compounds are important intermediates in the bacterial biodegradation of aromatic compounds in the soil. An Arthrobacter sp. strain has been shown to exhibit boronic acid monooxygenase activity through the conversion of different substituted phenylboronic acids to the corresponding phenols using dioxygen. While a number of methods have been reported to cleave the C-B bonds of organoboronic acids, there is no report on biomimetic iron complex exhibiting this activity using dioxygen as the oxidant. In that direction, we have investigated the reactivity of a nucleophilic iron-oxygen oxidant, generated upon oxidative decarboxylation of an iron(II)-benzilate complex [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(benzilate)] (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate), toward organoboronic acids. The oxidant converts different aryl/alkylboronic acids to the corresponding oxygenated products with the incorporation of one oxygen atom from dioxygen. This method represents an efficient protocol for the oxygenation of boronic acids with dioxygen as the terminal oxidant.

  2. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2016-08-09

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  3. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2014-09-30

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  4. Teacher's Resource Guide on Acidic Precipitation with Laboratory Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    The purpose of this teacher's resource guide is to help science teachers incorporate the topic of acidic precipitation into their curricula. A survey of recent junior high school science textbooks found a maximum of one paragraph devoted to the subject; in addition, none of these books had any related laboratory activities. It was on the basis of…

  5. Fungicidal Activities of Dihydroferulic Acid Alkyl Ester Analogues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural product dihydroferulic acid (DFA, 1) and the synthesized DFA methyl (4a), ethyl (4b), propyl (4c), hexyl (4d), octyl (4e), and decyl (4f) esters were examined for antifungal activity. Test fungi included Saccharomyces cerevisiae (wild type, and deletion mutants slt2delta and bck1delta), ...

  6. Fungicidal Activities of Dihydroferulic Acid Alkyl Ester Analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The natural product dihydroferulic acid (DFA, 1) and the synthesized DFA methyl (4a), ethyl (4b), propyl (4c), hexyl (4d), octyl (4e), and decyl (4f) esters were examined for antifungal activity. Test fungi included Saccharomyces cerevisiae (wild type, and deletion mutants slt2' and bck1'), Aspergil...

  7. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  8. Polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and nucleic acids encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Kimberly; Harris, Paul; Zaretsky, Elizabeth; Re, Edward; Vlasenko, Elena; McFarland, Keith; Lopez de Leon, Alfredo

    2010-06-22

    The present invention relates to isolated polypeptides having cellulolytic enhancing activity and isolated polynucleotides encoding the polypeptides. The invention also relates to nucleic acid constructs, vectors, and host cells comprising the polynucleotides as well as methods for producing and using the polypeptides.

  9. Heme-Biosynthetic Porphobilinogen Deaminase Protects Aspergillus nidulans from Nitrosative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shengmin; Narukami, Toshiaki; Nameki, Misuzu; Ozawa, Tomoko; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hoshino, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms have developed mechanisms to combat reactive nitrogen species (RNS); however, only a few of the fungal genes involved have been characterized. Here we screened RNS-resistant Aspergillus nidulans strains from fungal transformants obtained by introducing a genomic DNA library constructed in a multicopy vector. We found that the AN0121.3 gene (hemC) encodes a protein similar to the heme biosynthesis enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) and facilitates RNS-tolerant fungal growth. The overproduction of PBG-D in A. nidulans promoted RNS tolerance, whereas PBG-D repression caused growth that was hypersensitive to RNS. PBG-D levels were comparable to those of cellular protoheme synthesis as well as flavohemoglobin (FHb; encoded by fhbA and fhbB) and nitrite reductase (NiR; encoded by niiA) activities. Both FHb and NiR are hemoproteins that consume nitric oxide and nitrite, respectively, and we found that they are required for maximal growth in the presence of RNS. The transcription of hemC was upregulated by RNS. These results demonstrated that PBG-D is a novel NO-tolerant protein that modulates the reduction of environmental NO and nitrite levels by FHb and NiR. PMID:22038601

  10. Adenoviral-Mediated Imaging of Gene Transfer Using a Somatostatin Receptor-Cytosine Deaminase Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Parry, Jesse J.; Andrews, Rebecca; Nguyen, Kim; Wadas, Thaddeus J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2015-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy due to the enzyme’s ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that the both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays, and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies, and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy. PMID:25837665

  11. Increased proliferation and chemosensitivity of human mesenchymal stromal cells expressing fusion yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Kucerova, Lucia; Poturnajova, Martina; Tyciakova, Silvia; Matuskova, Miroslava

    2012-03-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered to be suitable vehicles for cellular therapy in various conditions. The expression of reporter and/or effector protein(s) enabled both the identification of MSCs within the organism and the exploitation in targeted tumor therapies. The aim of this study was to evaluate cellular changes induced by retrovirus-mediated transgene expression in MSCs in vitro. Human Adipose Tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs) were transduced to express (i) the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reporter transgene, (ii) the fusion yeast cytosine deaminase::uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CDy::UPRT) enzyme along with the expression of dominant positive selection gene NeoR or (iii) the selection marker NeoR alone (MOCK). CDy::UPRT expression resulted in increased proliferation of CDy::UPRT-MSCs versus naïve AT-MSCs, MOCK-MSCs or EGFP-MSCs. Furthermore, CDy::UPRT-MSCs were significantly more sensitive to 5-fluorouracil (5FU), cisplatin, cyclophosphamide and cytosine arabinoside as determined by increased Caspase 3/7 activation and/or decreased relative proliferation. CDy::UPRT-MSCs in direct cocultures with breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 increased tumor cell killing induced by low concentrations of 5FU. Our data demonstrated the changes in proliferation and chemoresistance in engineered MSCs expressing transgene with enzymatic function and suggested the possibilities for further augmentation of targeted MSC-mediated antitumor therapy.

  12. Adenoviral-mediated imaging of gene transfer using a somatostatin receptor-cytosine deaminase fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Lears, K A; Parry, J J; Andrews, R; Nguyen, K; Wadas, T J; Rogers, B E

    2015-03-01

    Suicide gene therapy is a process by which cells are administered a gene that encodes a protein capable of converting a nontoxic prodrug into an active toxin. Cytosine deaminase (CD) has been widely investigated as a means of suicide gene therapy owing to the enzyme's ability to convert the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the toxic compound 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). However, the extent of gene transfer is a limiting factor in predicting therapeutic outcome. The ability to monitor gene transfer, non-invasively, would strengthen the efficiency of therapy. In this regard, we have constructed and evaluated a replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) containing the human somatostatin receptor subtype 2 (SSTR2) fused with a C-terminal yeast CD gene for the non-invasive monitoring of gene transfer and therapy. The resulting Ad (AdSSTR2-yCD) was evaluated in vitro in breast cancer cells to determine the function of the fusion protein. These studies demonstrated that both the SSTR2 and yCD were functional in binding assays, conversion assays and cytotoxicity assays. In vivo studies similarly demonstrated the functionality using conversion assays, biodistribution studies and small animal positron-emission tomography (PET) imaging studies. In conclusion, the fusion protein has been validated as useful for the non-invasive imaging of yCD expression and will be evaluated in the future for monitoring yCD-based therapy.

  13. A molecular dynamics exploration of the catalytic mechanism of yeast cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lishan; Sklenak, Stepan; Yan, Honggao; Cukier, Robert I

    2005-04-21

    Yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD), a zinc metalloenzyme of significant biomedical interest, is investigated by a series of molecular dynamics simulations in its free form and complexed with its reactant (cytosine), product (uracil), several reaction intermediates, and an intermediate analogue. Quantum chemical calculations, used to construct a model for the catalytic Zn ion with its ligands (two cysteines, a histidine, and one water) show, by comparison with crystal structure data, that the cysteines are deprotonated and the histidine is monoprotonated. The simulations suggest that Glu64 plays a critical role in the catalysis by yCD. The rotation of the Glu64 side-chain carboxyl group that can be protonated or deprotonated permits it to act as a proton shuttle between the Zn-bound water and cytosine and subsequent reaction intermediates. Free energy methods are used to obtain the barriers for these rotations, and they are sufficiently small to permit rotation on a nanosecond time scale. In the course of the reaction, cytosine reorients to a geometry to favor nucleophilic attack by a Zn-bound hydroxide. A stable position for a reaction product, ammonia, was located in the active site, and the free energy of exchange with a water molecule was evaluated. The simulations also reveal small motions of the C-terminus and the loop that contains Phe114 that may be important for reactant binding and product release.

  14. Hereditary overexpression of adenosine deaminase in erythrocytes: Evidence for a cis-acting mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.H. ); Tartaglia, A.P. ); Mitchell, B.S. )

    1993-10-01

    Overexpression of adenosine deaminase (ADA) in red blood cells is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and causes hemolytic anemia. The increased ADA activity in erythrocytes is due to an increase in steady-state levels of ADA mRNA of normal sequence. Increased ADA mRNA may be due to a cis-acting mutation which results in increased transcription or a loss of down-regulation during erythroid differentiation. Alternatively, it is possible that the mutation is in a trans-acting factor which interacts with normal ADA transcriptional elements to cause overexpression in red blood cells. To discriminate between a cis-acting and a trans-acting mutation, the authors took advantage of a highly polymorphic TAAA repeat located at the tail end of an Alu repeat approximately 1.1 kb upstream of the ADA gene. Using PCR to amplify this region, the authors identified five different alleles in 19 members of the family. All 11 affected individuals had an ADA allele with 12 TAAA repeats, whereas none of the 8 normal individuals did. The authors conclude that this disorder results from a cis-acting mutation in the vicinity of the ADA gene. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Adaptive evolution of threonine deaminase in plant defense against insect herbivores

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales-Vigil, Eliana; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2011-11-07

    Gene duplication is a major source of plant chemical diversity that mediates plant-herbivore interactions. There is little direct evidence, however, that novel chemical traits arising from gene duplication reduce herbivory. Higher plants use threonine deaminase (TD) to catalyze the dehydration of threonine (Thr) to {alpha}-ketobutyrate and ammonia as the committed step in the biosynthesis of isoleucine (Ile). Cultivated tomato and related Solanum species contain a duplicated TD paralog (TD2) that is coexpressed with a suite of genes involved in herbivore resistance. Analysis of TD2-deficient tomato lines showed that TD2 has a defensive function related to Thr catabolism in the gut of lepidopteran herbivores. During herbivory, the regulatory domain of TD2 is removed by proteolysis to generate a truncated protein (pTD2) that efficiently degrades Thr without being inhibited by Ile. We show that this proteolytic activation step occurs in the gut of lepidopteran but not coleopteran herbivores, and is catalyzed by a chymotrypsin-like protease of insect origin. Analysis of purified recombinant enzymes showed that TD2 is remarkably more resistant to proteolysis and high temperature than the ancestral TD1 isoform. The crystal structure of pTD2 provided evidence that electrostatic interactions constitute a stabilizing feature associated with adaptation of TD2 to the extreme environment of the lepidopteran gut. These findings demonstrate a role for gene duplication in the evolution of a plant defense that targets and co-opts herbivore digestive physiology.

  16. Pentagastrin gastroprotection against acid is related to H2 receptor activation but not acid secretion

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, S; Akiba, Y; Kaunitz, J

    1998-01-01

    Background—Pentagastrin enhances gastric mucosal defence mechanisms against acid and protects the gastric mucosa from experimental injury. 
Aims—To investigate whether this gastroprotection is mediated by histamine receptors or occurs as a secondary effect of acid secretion stimulation. 
Methods—The effects of omeprazole (100 µmol/kg), ranitidine (20 mg/kg), and pyrilamine (10 mg/kg) on pentagastrin (80 µg/kg/h) induced gastroprotection against acidified aspirin injury were examined in a luminal pH controlled model. The effects of these compounds on pentagastrin enhanced gastroprotective mechanisms were investigated using intravital microscopy, in which intracellular pH of gastric surface cells (pHi), mucus gel thickness, gastric mucosal blood flow, and acid output were measured simultaneously. 
Results—Pentagastrin protected rat gastric mucosa from acidified aspirin injury. This gastroprotection was abolished by ranitidine, but not omeprazole or pyrilamine. Pentagastrin induced a hyperaemic response to luminal acid challenge, increased mucus gel thickness, and elevated pHi during acid challenge. Ranitidine reversed these enhanced defence mechanisms, whereas omeprazole and pyrilamine preserved these effects. 
Conclusions—These data indicate that pentagastrin associated gastroprotection and enhanced defence mechanisms against acid result mainly from activation of histamine H2 receptors, and not as an effect of the stimulation of acid secretion. 

 Keywords: gastric injury; gastric defence mechanisms; omeprazole; pyrilamine; ranitidine; intracellular pH PMID:9863477

  17. Saturated fatty acids activate TLR-mediated proinflammatory signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shurong; Rutkowsky, Jennifer M; Snodgrass, Ryan G; Ono-Moore, Kikumi D; Schneider, Dina A; Newman, John W; Adams, Sean H; Hwang, Daniel H

    2012-09-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR2 were shown to be activated by saturated fatty acids (SFAs) but inhibited by docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, one report suggested that SFA-induced TLR activation in cell culture systems is due to contaminants in BSA used for solubilizing fatty acids. This report raised doubt about proinflammatory effects of SFAs. Our studies herein demonstrate that sodium palmitate (C16:0) or laurate (C12:0) without BSA solubilization induced phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB α, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p44/42 mitogen-activated-kinase (ERK), and nuclear factor-κB subunit p65, and TLR target gene expression in THP1 monocytes or RAW264.7 macrophages, respectively, when cultured in low FBS (0.25%) medium. C12:0 induced NFκB activation through TLR2 dimerized with TLR1 or TLR6, and through TLR4. Because BSA was not used in these experiments, contaminants in BSA have no relevance. Unlike in suspension cells (THP-1), BSA-solubilized C16:0 instead of sodium C16:0 is required to induce TLR target gene expression in adherent cells (RAW264.7). C16:0-BSA transactivated TLR2 dimerized with TLR1 or TLR6 and through TLR4 as seen with C12:0. These results and additional studies with the LPS sequester polymixin B and in MyD88(-/-) macrophages indicated that SFA-induced activation of TLR2 or TLR4 is a fatty acid-specific effect, but not due to contaminants in BSA or fatty acid preparations.

  18. 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid, a linoleic acid metabolite produced by gut lactic acid bacteria, potently activates PPARγ and stimulates adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Kim, Young-Il; Furuzono, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Yamakuni, Kanae; Yang, Ha-Eun; Li, Yongjia; Ohue, Ryuji; Nomura, Wataru; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Yu, Rina; Kitamura, Nahoko; and others

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study has shown that gut lactic acid bacteria generate various kinds of fatty acids from polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid (LA). In this study, we investigated the effects of LA and LA-derived fatty acids on the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) which regulate whole-body energy metabolism. None of the fatty acids activated PPARδ, whereas almost all activated PPARα in luciferase assays. Two fatty acids potently activated PPARγ, a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, with 10-oxo-12(Z)-octadecenoic acid (KetoA) having the most potency. In 3T3-L1 cells, KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ, and increased adiponectin production and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. These findings suggest that fatty acids, including KetoA, generated in gut by lactic acid bacteria may be involved in the regulation of host energy metabolism. - Highlights: • Most LA-derived fatty acids from gut lactic acid bacteria potently activated PPARα. • Among tested fatty acids, KetoA and KetoC significantly activated PPARγ. • KetoA induced adipocyte differentiation via the activation of PPARγ. • KetoA enhanced adiponectin production and glucose uptake during adipogenesis.

  19. Soluble Uric Acid Activates the NLRP3 Inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Tarcio Teodoro; Forni, Maria Fernanda; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Ramos, Rodrigo Nalio; Barbuto, Jose Alexandre; Branco, Paola; Castoldi, Angela; Hiyane, Meire Ioshie; Davanso, Mariana Rodrigues; Latz, Eicke; Franklin, Bernardo S.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Camara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2017-01-01

    Uric acid is a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP), released from ischemic tissues and dying cells which, when crystalized, is able to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome. Soluble uric acid (sUA) is found in high concentrations in the serum of great apes, and even higher in some diseases, before the appearance of crystals. In the present study, we sought to investigate whether uric acid, in the soluble form, could also activate the NLRP3 inflammasome and induce the production of IL-1β. We monitored ROS, mitochondrial area and respiratory parameters from macrophages following sUA stimulus. We observed that sUA is released in a hypoxic environment and is able to induce IL-1β release. This process is followed by production of mitochondrial ROS, ASC speck formation and caspase-1 activation. Nlrp3−/− macrophages presented a protected redox state, increased maximum and reserve oxygen consumption ratio (OCR) and higher VDAC protein levels when compared to WT and Myd88−/− cells. Using a disease model characterized by increased sUA levels, we observed a correlation between sUA, inflammasome activation and fibrosis. These findings suggest sUA activates the NLRP3 inflammasome. We propose that future therapeutic strategies for renal fibrosis should include strategies that block sUA or inhibit its recognition by phagocytes. PMID:28084303

  20. Anti-cancer activities of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yi; Qian, Steven Y

    2014-01-01

    The ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are two major families of PUFAs present as essential cellular components which possess diverse bioactivities. The ω-3s, mainly found in seafood, are associated with many beneficial effects on human health, while the ω-6s are more abundant in our daily diet and could be implicated in many pathological processes including cancer development. Increasing evidence suggests that the adverse effects of ω-6s may be largely attributed to arachidonic acid (AA, a downstream ω-6) and the metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) that stems from its cyclooxygenase (COX)-catalyzed lipid peroxidation. On the other hand, two of AA's upstream ω-6s, γ-linolenic acid (GLA) and dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA), are shown to possess certain anti-cancer activities, including inducing cell apoptosis and inhibiting cell proliferation. In this paper, we review the documented anti-cancer activities of ω-6 PUFAs, including the recent findings regarding the anti-cancer effects of free radical-mediated DGLA peroxidation. The possible mechanisms and applications of DGLA (and other ω-6s) in inducing anti-cancer activity are also discussed. Considering the wide availability of ω-6s in our daily diet, the study of the potential beneficial effect of ω-6 PUFAs may guide us to develop an ω-6-based diet care strategy for cancer prevention and treatment.

  1. Fatty acid conjugation enhances the activities of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhining; Yuan, Penghui; Xing, Meng; He, Zhumei; Dong, Chuanfu; Cao, Yongchang; Liu, Qiuyun

    2013-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small molecules that play a crucial role in innate immunity in multi-cellular organisms, and usually expressed and secreted constantly at basal levels to prevent infection, but local production can be augmented upon an infection. The clock is ticking as rising antibiotic abuse has led to the emergence of many drug resistance bacteria. Due to their broad spectrum antibiotic and antifungal activities as well as anti-viral and anti-tumor activities, efforts are being made to develop antimicrobial peptides into future microbial agents. This article describes some of the recent patents on antimicrobial peptides with fatty acid conjugation. Potency and selectivity of antimicrobial peptide can be modulated with fatty acid tails of variable length. Interaction between membranes and antimicrobial peptides was affected by fatty acid conjugation. At concentrations above the critical miscelle concentration (CMC), propensity of solution selfassembly hampered binding of the peptide to cell membranes. Overall, fatty acid conjugation has enhanced the activities of antimicrobial peptides, and occasionally it rendered inactive antimicrobial peptides to be bioactive. Antimicrobial peptides can not only be used as medicine but also as food additives.

  2. Ribonucleic Acid Polymerase Activity in Sendai Virions and Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, William S.

    1971-01-01

    After dissociation of purified Sendai virus with the neutral detergent Nonidet P-40 and 2-mercaptoethanol, it catalyzed the incorporation of ribonucleoside triphosphates into an acid-insoluble product. The enzyme activity was associated with viral nucleocapsid as well as whole virions. The reaction product was ribonucleic acid (RNA) which annealed specifically with virion RNA. Sedimentation of the 3H-RNA reaction product revealed two components, a 45S component with properties of double-stranded RNA and 4 to 6S component which appeared to be mostly single-stranded RNA. PMID:4328418

  3. Synthesis and characterization of a novel chitosan based E. coli cytosine deaminase nanocomposite for potential application in prodrug enzyme therapy.

    PubMed

    Yata, Vinod Kumar; Ghosh, Siddhartha Sankar

    2011-01-01

    Cytosine deaminase is a non-mammalian enzyme of widespread interest for prodrug enzyme therapy due to its ability to convert prodrug 5-fluorocytosine into anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. Cytosine deaminase enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from E. coli K-12 MTCC 1302 strain. K(m) values for cytosine and 5-fluorocytosine were found to be 0.26 mM and 1.82 mM, respectively. We developed a chitosan-entrapped cytosine deaminase nanocomposite. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed an elongated sphere shape nanocomposite with an average size of 80 nm diameter. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results confirmed gel formation and entrapment of cytosine deaminase within the nanocomposite. Sustained release of cytosine deaminase from the nanocomposite up to one week depicted its potential implication in prodrug inducted enzyme therapy.

  4. Autoimmune dysregulation and purine metabolism in adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha Vanessa; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Genetic defects in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene are among the most common causes for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). ADA-SCID patients suffer from lymphopenia, severely impaired cellular and humoral immunity, failure to thrive, and recurrent infections. Currently available therapeutic options for this otherwise fatal disorder include bone marrow transplantation (BMT), enzyme replacement therapy with bovine ADA (PEG-ADA), or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy (HSC-GT). Although varying degrees of immune reconstitution can be achieved by these treatments, breakdown of tolerance is a major concern in ADA-SCID. Immune dysregulation such as autoimmune hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, hemolytic anemia, and immune thrombocytopenia are frequently observed in milder forms of the disease. However, several reports document similar complications also in patients on long-term PEG-ADA and after BMT or GT treatment. A skewed repertoire and decreased immune functions have been implicated in autoimmunity observed in certain B-cell and/or T-cell immunodeficiencies, but it remains unclear to what extent specific mechanisms of tolerance are affected in ADA deficiency. Herein we provide an overview about ADA-SCID and the autoimmune manifestations reported in these patients before and after treatment. We also assess the value of the ADA-deficient mouse model as a useful tool to study both immune and metabolic disease mechanisms. With focus on regulatory T- and B-cells we discuss the lymphocyte subpopulations particularly prone to contribute to the loss of self-tolerance and onset of autoimmunity in ADA deficiency. Moreover we address which aspects of immune dysregulation are specifically related to alterations in purine metabolism caused by the lack of ADA and the subsequent accumulation of metabolites with immunomodulatory properties.

  5. Structural and Metabolic Specificity of Methylthiocoformycin for Malarial Adenosine Deaminases

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, M.; Cassera, M; Madrid, D; Ting, L; Tyler, P; Kim, K; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum is a purine auxotroph requiring hypoxanthine as a key metabolic precursor. Erythrocyte adenine nucleotides are the source of the purine precursors, making adenosine deaminase (ADA) a key enzyme in the pathway of hypoxanthine formation. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a substrate for most malarial ADAs, but not for human ADA. The catalytic site specificity of malarial ADAs permits methylthiocoformycin (MT-coformycin) to act as a Plasmodium-specific transition state analogue with low affinity for human ADA. The structural basis for MTA and MT-coformycin specificity in malarial ADAs is the subject of speculation. Here, the crystal structure of ADA from Plasmodium vivax (PvADA) in a complex with MT-coformycin reveals an unprecedented binding geometry for 5?-methylthioribosyl groups in the malarial ADAs. Compared to malarial ADA complexes with adenosine or deoxycoformycin, 5?-methylthioribosyl groups are rotated 130 degrees. A hydrogen bonding network between Asp172 and the 3?-hydroxyl of MT-coformycin is essential for recognition of the 5?-methylthioribosyl group. Water occupies the 5?-hydroxyl binding site when MT-coformycin is bound. Mutagenesis of Asp172 destroys the substrate specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Kinetic, mutagenic, and structural analyses of PvADA and kinetic analysis of five other Plasmodium ADAs establish the unique structural basis for its specificity for MTA and MT-coformycin. Plasmodium gallinaceum ADA does not use MTA as a substrate, is not inhibited by MT-coformycin, and is missing Asp172. Treatment of P. falciparum cultures with coformycin or MT-coformycin in the presence of MTA is effective in inhibiting parasite growth.

  6. [Conformation of adenosine deaminase in complexes with inhibitors: application of selective quenching of fluorescence emission].

    PubMed

    Vermishian, I G; Sharoian, S G; Antonian, A A; Grigorian, N A; Mardanian, S S; Khoetsian, A V; Markarian, Sh A

    2008-01-01

    The effect of inhibitors, 1-deazaadenosine (1-dAdo) and erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA), on the conformation of adenosine deaminase was studied using the method of selective quenching of fluorescence emission by acrylamide, I- and Cs+. Both in free adenosine deaminase and in its complexes with the inhibitors, the wavelength maxima and half-width of the emission characterize the environment of fluorescing tryptophan residues in adenosine deaminase as weak polar with limited access to solvent. The formation of complexes with the ground state inhibitors used did not quench or change the main emission characteristics of tryptophan fluorescence in adenosine deaminase. Small blue shifts of emission maxima were observed upon quenching in all three samples. The Stern-Volmer parameters of tryptophan fluorescence quenching by acrylamide were not essentially influenced by complex formation of the enzyme with the inhibitors: in general, the folding of the enzyme molecule in the complexes is not perturbed. On the contrary, the emission quenching by charged heavy ions, I- and Cs+, in the complexes was hindered in comparison with free adenosine deaminase. In the complex with 1-deazaadenosine, the parameters for quenching by both ions evidence the essential worsening of their interaction with tryptophans. In the complex with erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine, along with the worse quenching by I-, complete prohibition of quenching by Cs+ was observed. These data indicate that the local environments of fluorescing tryptophan residues is substantially distorted compared with free adenosine deaminase, which leads to their screening from charged heavy ions.

  7. A potential plant-derived antifungal acetylenic acid mediates its activity by interfering with fatty acid homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    6-Nonadecynoic acid (6-NDA), a plant-derived acetylenic acid, exhibits strong inhibitory activity against the human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. In the present study, transcriptional profiling coupled with mutant and biochemical analyses...

  8. Correlation study of adenosine deaminase and its isoenzymes in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sapkota, Lokendra Bahadur; Thapa, Sangita; Subedi, Nuwadatta

    2017-01-01

    Objective Adenosine deaminase (ADA) plays an important role in cell-mediated immunity and modulation of insulin activity. Its clinical and diagnostic significance in Nepalese type 2 diabetes is not yet characterized. So, this study's objective was to determine the isoenzymatic activities of ADA (ADA1, ADA2, and total ADA) and show its correlation with demographic, anthropometric, and biochemical characteristics of type 2 Nepalese subjects with diabetes. Research design and methods This is a hospital-based cross-sectional study including 80 type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients and same number of age-matched and sex-matched healthy controls. Data were collected using preformed set of questionnaires and biochemical data were obtained from the laboratory analysis of the patient's blood samples. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS V.20. Results A significantly higher (p<0.001) mean values of body mass index (BMI), fasting blood sugar (FBS), postprandial blood sugar (PPBS), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and lipid profiles except high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were found in type 2 diabetic cases compared with controls. Serum ADA activities were significantly higher in cases compared with controls (p<0.001) showing significant positive correlation (p<0.05) with FBS, PPBS, HbA1c, and alcoholism; while no correlation was found with age, sex, ethnicity, BMI, waist–hip ratio, dietary habits, smoking, and duration of diabetes. Conclusions Serum ADA activities were significantly higher in type 2 diabetic patients compared with controls having significant positive correlation with glycemic parameters. Serum ADA and its isoenzymes could be used as biomarkers for assessing glycemic status in patients with type 2 DM. PMID:28321313

  9. The ketogenic diet; fatty acids, fatty acid-activated receptors and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Cullingford, Tim E

    2004-03-01

    This review outlines the molecular sensors that reprogram cellular metabolism in response to the ketogenic diet (KD). Special emphasis is placed on the fasting-, fatty acid- and drug-activated transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). The KD causes a switch to ketogenesis that is coordinated with an array of changes in cellular lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate and inflammatory pathways. The role of both liver and brain PPARalpha in mediating such changes will be examined, with special reference to the anti-epileptic effects not only of the KD but a range of synthetic anti-epileptic drugs such as valproate. Finally, the implications of the KD and activated brain PPARalpha will be discussed in the context of their potential involvement in a range of disorders of neuro-degeneration and neuro-inflammation.

  10. Polyunsaturated fatty acid inhibition of fatty acid synthase transcription is independent of PPAR activation.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S D; Turini, M; Jump, D B; Abraham, S; Reedy, M

    1998-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the (n-6) and (n-3) families inhibit the rate of gene transcription for a number of hepatic lipogenic and glycolytic genes, e.g., fatty acid synthase (FAS). In contrast, saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids have no inhibitory capability. The suppression of gene transcription resulting from the addition of PUFA to a high carbohydrate diet: occurs quickly (< 3 h) after its addition to a high glucose diet; can be recreated with hepatocytes cultured in a serum-free medium containing insulin and glucocorticoids; can be demonstrated in diabetic rats fed fructose; and is independent of glucagon. While the nature of the intracellular PUFA inhibitor is unclear, it appears that delta-6 desaturation is a required step in the process. Recently, the fatty acid activated nuclear factor, peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) was suggested to be the PUFA-response factor. However, the potent PPAR activators ETYA and Wy-14643 did not suppress hepatic expression of FAS, but did induce the PPAR-responsive gene, acyl-CoA oxidase (AOX). Similarly, treating rat hepatocytes with 20:4 (n-6) suppressed FAS expression but had no effect on AOX. Thus, it appears that the PUFA regulation of gene transcription involves a PUFA-response factor that is independent from PPAR.

  11. Jasmonic acid and salicylic acid activate a common defense system in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, Daisuke; Seo, Shigemi; Yamada, Shoko; Kano, Akihito; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Shishido, Hodaka; Miyoshi, Seika; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play important roles in plant defense systems. JA and SA signaling pathways interact antagonistically in dicotyledonous plants, but, the status of crosstalk between JA and SA signaling is unknown in monocots. Our rice microarray analysis showed that more than half of the genes upregulated by the SA analog BTH are also upregulated by JA, suggesting that a major portion of the SA-upregulated genes are regulated by JA-dependent signaling in rice. A common defense system that is activated by both JA and SA is thus proposed which plays an important role in pathogen defense responses in rice. PMID:23518581

  12. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anella, Fabrizio; Danelon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristoleic acid (MA) vesicles at varying concentrations of Mg2+. The ligation rate is significantly lower at low-Mg2+ conditions. However, the loss of activity is overcompensated by the increased stability of RNA leading to a larger amount of intact ligated substrate after long reaction periods. Combining RNA ligation assays with fatty acid vesicles we found that MA vesicles made of 5 mM amphiphile are stable and do not impair ligase ribozyme activity in the presence of approximately 2 mM Mg2+. These results provide a scenario in which catalytic RNA and primordial membrane assembly can coexist in the same environment. PMID:25513761

  13. Antiplatelet activity of a novel formula composed of malic acid, succinic acid and citric acid from Cornus officinalis fruit.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Chun; Zhao, Yue; Bian, Hui-Min

    2013-12-01

    The present study investigated the antiplatelet activity of a novel formula composed by malic acid, succinic acid and citric acid with a ratio of 3:2:2. The IC50 and inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by various agonists as well as platelet adhesion were evaluated in vitro. Of note, the IC50 for the formula inhibiting adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was 0.185 mg/mL. Meanwhile, the formula showed more potent inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP and thrombin than the single component at same concentration (0.37 mg/mL). Moreover, the formula could prevent platelet adhesion significantly without influence on platelet viability.

  14. Cytidine deaminase polymorphisms and worse treatment response in normal karyotype AML.

    PubMed

    Hyo Kim, Lyoung; Sub Cheong, Hyun; Koh, Youngil; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Lee, Chansu; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Doo Shin, Hyoung; Yoon, Sung-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The cytidine deaminase (CDA) catalyzes the irreversible hydrolytic deamination of the cytarabine (AraC) into a 1-β-D-arabinofuranosyluracil (AraU), an inactive metabolite that plays a crucial role in lowering the amount of AraC, a key chemotherapeutic drug, in the treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this study, we hypothesized that CDA polymorphisms were associated with the AraC metabolism for AML treatment and/or related clinical phenotypes. We analyzed 16 polymorphisms of CDA among 50 normal karyotype AML (NK-AML) patients, 45 abnormal karyotype AML (AK-AML) patients and 241 normal controls (NC). Several polymorphisms and haplotypes, rs532545, rs2072671, rs471760, rs4655226, rs818194 and CDA-ht3, were found to have a strong correlation with NK-AML compared with NC and these polymorphisms also revealed strong linkage disequilibrium with each other. Among them, rs2072671 (79A>C), which is located in a coding region and the resultant amino acid change K27Q, showed significant associations with NK-AML compared with NC (P=0.009 and odds ratio=2.44 in the dominant model). The AC and CC genotypes of rs2072671 (79A>C) were significantly correlated with shorter overall survival rates (P=0.03, hazard ratio=1.84) and first complete remission duration (P=0.007, hazard ratio=3.24) compared with the AA genotype in the NK-AML patients. Our results indicate that rs2072671 in CDA may be an important prognostic marker in NK-AML patients.

  15. Preparation and bactericide activity of gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Álvarez, S. A.; Martínez-Castañón, G. A.; Niño-Martínez, N.; Reyes-Macías, J. F.; Patiño-Marín, N.; Loyola-Rodríguez, J. P.; Ruiz, Facundo

    2010-10-01

    In this work, gold nanoparticles with three different sizes (13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm) were prepared using a simple aqueous method with gallic acid as the reducing and stabilizing agent, the different sizes were obtained varying some experimental parameters as the pH of the reaction and the amount of the gallic acid. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Samples were identified as elemental gold and present spherical morphology, a narrow size distribution and good stabilization according to TEM and DLS results. The antibacterial activity of this gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles against S. mutans (the etiologic agent of dental caries) was assessed using a microdilution method obtaining a minimum inhibitory concentration of 12.31, 12.31, and 49.25 μg/mL for 13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm gold nanoparticles, respectively. The antibacterial assay showed that gold nanoparticles prepared in this work present a bactericide activity by a synergistic action with gallic acid. The MIC found for this nanoparticles are much lower than those reported for mixtures of gold nanoparticles and antibiotics.

  16. Synthesis and antifungal activity of bile acid-derived oxazoles.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Lucía R; Svetaz, Laura; Butassi, Estefanía; Zacchino, Susana A; Palermo, Jorge A; Sánchez, Marianela

    2016-04-01

    Peracetylated bile acids (1a-g) were used as starting materials for the preparation of fourteen new derivatives bearing an oxazole moiety in their side chain (6a-g, 8a-g). The key step for the synthetic path was a Dakin-West reaction followed by a Robinson-Gabriel cyclodehydration. A simpler model oxazole (12) was also synthesized. The antifungal activity of the new compounds (6a-g) as well as their starting bile acids (1a-g) was tested against Candida albicans. Compounds 6e and 6g showed the highest percentages of inhibition (63.84% and 61.40% at 250 μg/mL respectively). Deacetylation of compounds 6a-g, led to compounds 8a-g which showed lower activities than the acetylated derivatives.

  17. In vivo antioxidant activity of deacetylasperulosidic Acid in noni.

    PubMed

    Ma, De-Lu; Chen, Mai; Su, Chen X; West, Brett J

    2013-01-01

    Deacetylasperulosidic acid (DAA) is a major phytochemical constituent of Morinda citrifolia (noni) fruit. Noni juice has demonstrated antioxidant activity in vivo and in human trials. To evaluate the role of DAA in this antioxidant activity, Wistar rats were fed 0 (control group), 15, 30, or 60 mg/kg body weight per day for 7 days. Afterwards, serum malondialdehyde concentration and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured and compared among groups. A dose-dependent reduction in malondialdehyde was evident as well as a dose-dependent increase in superoxide dismutase activity. DAA ingestion did not influence serum glutathione peroxidase activity. These results suggest that DAA contributes to the antioxidant activity of noni juice by increasing superoxide dismutase activity. The fact that malondialdehyde concentrations declined with increased DAA dose, despite the lack of glutathione peroxidase-inducing activity, suggests that DAA may also increase catalase activity. It has been previously reported that noni juice increases catalase activity in vivo but additional research is required to confirm the effect of DAA on catalase. Even so, the current findings do explain a possible mechanism of action for the antioxidant properties of noni juice that have been observed in human clinical trials.

  18. Adenosine deaminase in CSF and pleural fluid for diagnosis of tubercular meningitis and pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nepal, A K; Gyawali, N; Poudel, B; Mahato, R V; Lamsal, M; Gurung, R; Baral, N; Majhi, S

    2012-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most common infectious diseases in developing countries including Nepal. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis results in poor prognosis of the disease. This study was conducted to estimate diagnostic cut off values of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and pleural fluid and to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values ofADA in pleural fluid and CSF from patients with tuberculous and non-tuberculous disease. A total of 98 body fluid (CSF: 24, Pleural fluid: 74) specimens were received for the estimation of ADA. ADA activity was measured at 37 degrees C by spectrophotometric method of Guisti and Galanti, 1984 at 625nm wavelength. Among the patients enrolled for the study subjects for which CSF were received (n = 24) included 8 tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and 16 non-tubercular meningitis (NTM). Pleural fluid samples (n = 74) were received from 19 pulmonary TB with pleural effusion, 17 PTB without pleural effusion and 37 of non-tuberculous disease patients. CSF ADA activity were (11. 1 +/- 2.03 IU/L) and (5.3 +/- +1.89 IU/L) (p <00001) in TM and non-NTM groups and Pleural fluid ADA activity were (10 +/- 22.18 IU/L) and (23.79 +/- 11.62 IU/L) (p < 0.001) in PTB and non-TB groups respectively. ADA test in body fluids, which is simple, cost-effective and sensitive, specific for the tubercular disease is recommended to perform before forwarding the cumbersome and expensive procedures like culture and PCR for TB diagnosis.

  19. Adenosine potentiates the therapeutic effects of neural stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase against metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonyoung; Seol, Ho Jun; Seong, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jandi; Kim, Yonghyun; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2013-09-01

    Tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) provide a novel approach with which to deliver targeting therapeutic genes to brain tumors. Previously, we developed a therapeutic strategy against metastatic brain tumors using a human NSC line (F3) expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD). F3.CD converts systemically administered 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), a blood-brain barrier permeable nontoxic prodrug, into the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In this study, we potentiated a therapeutic strategy of treatment with nucleosides in order to chemically facilitate the endogenous conversion of 5-FU to its toxic metabolite 5-FU ribonucleoside (5-FUR). In vitro, 5-FUR showed superior cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-435 cancer cells when compared to 5-FU. Although adenosine had little cytotoxic activity, the addition of adenosine significantly potentiated the in vitro cytotoxicity of 5-FU. When MDA-MB‑435 cells were co-cultured with F3.CD cells, F3.CD cells and 5-FC inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-435 cells more significantly in the presence of adenosine. Facilitated 5-FUR production by F3.CD was confirmed by an HPLC analysis of the conditioned media derived from F3.CD cells treated with 5-FC and adenosine. In vivo systemic adenosine treatment also significantly potentiated the therapeutic effects of F3.CD cells and 5-FC in an MDA-MB-435 metastatic brain tumor model. Simple adenosine addition improved the antitumor activity of the NSCs carrying the therapeutic gene. Our results demonstrated an increased therapeutic potential, and thereby, clinical applicability of NSC-based gene therapy.

  20. Molecular chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer using novel mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase gene.

    PubMed

    Kaliberova, Lyudmila N; Della Manna, Debbie L; Krendelchtchikova, Valentina; Black, Margaret E; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Kaliberov, Sergey A

    2008-09-01

    The combination of molecular chemotherapy with radiation therapy has the potential to become a powerful approach for treatment of pancreatic cancer. We have developed an adenoviral vector (AdbCD-D314A) encoding a mutant bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) gene, which converts the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into the active drug 5-fluorouracil. The aim of this study was to investigate AdbCD-D314A/5-FC-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro and therapeutic efficacy in vivo alone and in combination with radiation against human pancreatic cancer cells and xenografts. AdbCD-D314A/5-FC-mediated cytotoxicity alone and in combination with radiation was analyzed using crystal violet inclusion and clonogenic survival assays. CD enzyme activity was determined by measuring conversion of [3H]5-FC to [3H]5-fluorouracil after adenoviral infection of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and pancreatic tumor xenografts by TLC. S.c. pancreatic tumor xenografts were used to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC molecular chemotherapy in combination with radiation therapy. AdbCD-D314A infection resulted in increased 5-FC-mediated pancreatic cancer cell killing that correlated with significantly enhanced CD enzyme activity compared with AdbCDwt encoding wild-type of bCD. Animal studies showed significant inhibition of growth of human pancreatic tumors treated with AdbCD-D314A/5-FC in comparison with AdbCDwt/5-FC. Also, a significantly greater inhibition of growth of Panc2.03 and MIA PaCA-2 tumor xenografts was produced by the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC with radiation compared with either agent alone. The results indicate that the combination of AdbCD-D314A/5-FC molecular chemotherapy with radiation therapy significantly enhanced cytotoxicity of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and increased therapeutic efficacy against human pancreatic tumor xenografts.

  1. Dual targeting of tumor angiogenesis and chemotherapy by endostatin-cytosine deaminase-uracil phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Te; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Lee, Hong-Jen; Du, Yi; Lee, Heng-Huan; Xia, Weiya; Yu, Wen-Hsuan; Hsu, Jennifer L; Yen, Chia-Jui; Sun, Hui-Lung; Wang, Yan; Yeh, Edward T H; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2011-08-01

    Several antiangiogenic drugs targeting VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR) that were approved by the Food and Drug Administration for many cancer types, including colorectal and lung cancer, can effectively reduce tumor growth. However, targeting the VEGF signaling pathway will probably influence the normal function of endothelial cells in maintaining homeostasis and can cause unwanted adverse effects. Indeed, emerging experimental evidence suggests that VEGF-targeting therapy induced less tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity, allowing residual cells to become more resistant and eventually develop a more malignant phenotype. We report an antitumor therapeutic EndoCD fusion protein developed by linking endostatin (Endo) to cytosine deaminase and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (CD). Specifically, Endo possesses tumor antiangiogenesis activity that targets tumor endothelial cells, followed by CD, which converts the nontoxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the cytotoxic antitumor drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in the local tumor area. Moreover, selective targeting of tumor sites allows an increasing local intratumoral concentration of 5-FU, thus providing high levels of cytotoxic activity. We showed that treatment with EndoCD plus 5-FC, compared with bevacizumab plus 5-FU treatment, significantly increased the 5-FU concentration around tumor sites and suppressed tumor growth and metastasis in human breast and colorectal orthotropic animal models. In addition, in contrast to treatment with bevacizumab/5-FU, EndoCD/5-FC did not induce cardiotoxicity leading to heart failure in mice after long-term treatment. Our results showed that, compared with currently used antiangiogenic drugs, EndoCD possesses potent anticancer activity with virtually no toxic effects and does not increase tumor invasion or metastasis. Together, these findings suggest that EndoCD/5-FC could become an alternative option for future antiangiogenesis therapy.

  2. Fatty acid transport and activation and the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Angel; Fraisl, Peter; Arias-Barrau, Elsa; Dirusso, Concetta C; Singer, Diane; Sealls, Whitney; Black, Paul N

    2008-09-15

    These studies defined the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid transport, activation and trafficking using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and established the kinetic constants of fatty acid transport in an effort to define whether vectorial acylation represents a common mechanism in different cell types (3T3-L1 fibroblasts and adipocytes, Caco-2 and HepG2 cells and three endothelial cell lines (b-END3, HAEC, and HMEC)). As expected, fatty acid transport protein (FATP)1 and long-chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl)1 were the predominant isoforms expressed in adipocytes consistent with their roles in the transport and activation of exogenous fatty acids destined for storage in the form of triglycerides. In cells involved in fatty acid processing including Caco-2 (intestinal-like) and HepG2 (liver-like), FATP2 was the predominant isoform. The patterns of Acsl expression were distinct between these two cell types with Acsl3 and Acsl5 being predominant in Caco-2 cells and Acsl4 in HepG2 cells. In the endothelial lines, FATP1 and FATP4 were the most highly expressed isoforms; the expression patterns for the different Acsl isoforms were highly variable between the different endothelial cell lines. The transport of the fluorescent long-chain fatty acid C(1)-BODIPY-C(12) in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 adipocytes followed typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics; the apparent efficiency (k(cat)/K(T)) of this process increases over 2-fold (2.1 x 10(6)-4.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)) upon adipocyte differentiation. The V(max) values for fatty acid transport in Caco-2 and HepG2 cells were essentially the same, yet the efficiency was 55% higher in Caco-2 cells (2.3 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1) versus 1.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)). The kinetic parameters for fatty acid transport in three endothelial cell types demonstrated they were the least efficient cell types for this process giving V(max) values that were nearly 4-fold lower than those defined form 3T3-L1 adipocytes, Caco-2 cells and HepG2 cells. The

  3. Tethered phytic acid as a probe for measuring phytase activity.

    PubMed

    Berry, Duane F; Berry, David A

    2005-06-15

    A novel approach for measuring phytase activity is presented. We have developed a new chromophoric substrate analog of phytic acid, 5-O-[6-(benzoylamino)hexyl]-d-myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,6-pentakisphosphate that permits direct measurement of the phosphate ester bond-cleavage reaction using HPLC. This compound, along with its dephosphorylated T-phosphatidylinositol intermediates, are quantified using reversed phase chromatography with UV detection.

  4. Role of lysine and acidic amino acid residues on the insecticidal activity of Jackbean urease.

    PubMed

    Real-Guerra, Rafael; Carlini, Célia Regina; Stanisçuaski, Fernanda

    2013-09-01

    Canavalia ensiformis has three isoforms of urease: Jackbean urease (JBU), Jackbean urease II and canatoxin. These isoforms present several biological activities, independent from the enzymatic property, such as entomotoxicity and antifungal properties. The entomotoxic activity is a property of the whole protein, as well as of a 10 kDa peptide released by insect digestive enzymes. Here we have used chemical modification to observe the influence of lysines and acidic residues on JBU enzymatic and insecticidal activities. Chemical modification of lysine residues was performed with dimethylamine-borane complex and formaldehyde, and acidic residues were modified by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and ethylenediamine. Derivatized ureases, called JBU-Lys (lysine-modified) and JBU-Ac (acidic residues-modified), were assayed for their biochemical and insecticidal properties. Neither modification altered significantly the kinetic parameters analyzed, indicating that no residue critical for the enzyme activity was affected and that the modifications did not incur in any significant structural alteration. On the other hand, both modifications reduced the toxic activity of the native protein fed to Dysdercus peruvianus. The changes observed in the entomotoxic property of the derivatized proteins reflect alterations in different steps of JBU's toxicity towards insects. JBU-Ac is not susceptible to hydrolysis by insect digestive enzymes, hence impairing the release of toxic peptide(s), while JBU-Lys is processed as the native protein. On the other hand, the antidiuretic effect of JBU on Rhodnius prolixus is altered in JBU-Lys, but not in JBU-Ac. Altogether, these data emphasize the role of lysine and acidic residues on the insecticidal properties of ureases.

  5. Intraluminal acid activates esophageal nodose C fibers after mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shizhong; Liu, Zhenyu; Heldsinger, Andrea; Owyang, Chung

    2013-01-01

    Acid reflux in the esophagus can induce esophageal painful sensations such as heartburn and noncardiac chest pain. The mechanisms underlying acid-induced esophageal nociception are not clearly understood. In our previous studies, we characterized esophageal vagal nociceptive afferents and defined their responses to noxious mechanical and chemical stimulation. In the present study, we aim to determine their responses to intraluminal acid infusion. Extracellular single-unit recordings were performed in nodose ganglion neurons with intact nerve endings in the esophagus using ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal intraluminal acid perfusion were compared in naive and ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged animals, followed by measurements of transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the expression of tight junction proteins (zona occludens-1 and occludin). In naive guinea pigs, intraluminal infusion with either acid (pH = 2–3) or capsaicin did not evoke an action potential discharge in esophageal nodose C fibers. In OVA-sensitized animals, following esophageal mast cell activation by in vivo OVA inhalation, intraluminal acid infusion for about 20 min started to evoke action potential discharges. This effect is further confirmed by selective mast cell activation using in vitro tissue OVA challenge in esophageal-vagal preparations. OVA inhalation leads to decreased TEER and zona occludens-1 expression, suggesting an impaired esophageal epithelial barrier function after mast cell activation. These data for the first time provide direct evidence of intraluminal acid-induced activation of esophageal nociceptive C fibers and suggest that mast cell activation may make esophageal epithelium more permeable to acid, which subsequently may increase esophageal vagal nociceptive C fiber activation. PMID:24264049

  6. Bactericidal activity of the human skin fatty acid cis-6-hexadecanoic acid on Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cartron, Michaël L; England, Simon R; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Josten, Michaele; Turner, Robert; Rauter, Yvonne; Hurd, Alexander; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Jones, Simon; Foster, Simon J

    2014-07-01

    Human skin fatty acids are a potent aspect of our innate defenses, giving surface protection against potentially invasive organisms. They provide an important parameter in determining the ecology of the skin microflora, and alterations can lead to increased colonization by pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. Harnessing skin fatty acids may also give a new avenue of exploration in the generation of control measures against drug-resistant organisms. Despite their importance, the mechanism(s) whereby skin fatty acids kill bacteria has remained largely elusive. Here, we describe an analysis of the bactericidal effects of the major human skin fatty acid cis-6-hexadecenoic acid (C6H) on the human commensal and pathogen S. aureus. Several C6H concentration-dependent mechanisms were found. At high concentrations, C6H swiftly kills cells associated with a general loss of membrane integrity. However, C6H still kills at lower concentrations, acting through disruption of the proton motive force, an increase in membrane fluidity, and its effects on electron transfer. The design of analogues with altered bactericidal effects has begun to determine the structural constraints on activity and paves the way for the rational design of new antistaphylococcal agents.

  7. Biological Activity of Aminophosphonic Acids and Their Short Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejczak, Barbara; Kafarski, Pawel

    The biological activity and natural occurrence of the aminophosphonic acids were described half a century ago. Since then the chemistry and biology of this class of compounds have developed into the separate field of phosphorus chemistry. Today it is well acknowledged that these compounds possess a wide variety of promising, and in some cases commercially useful, physiological activities. Thus, they have found applications ranging from agrochemical (with the herbicides glyphosate and bialaphos being the most prominent examples) to medicinal (with the potent antihypertensive fosinopril and antiosteoporetic bisphosphonates being examples).

  8. Synthesis and cytotoxic activity of new betulin and betulinic acid esters with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA).

    PubMed

    Tubek, Barbara; Mituła, Paweł; Niezgoda, Natalia; Kempińska, Katarzyna; Wietrzyk, Joanna; Wawrzeńczyk, Czesław

    2013-04-01

    The synthesis of new ester derivatives of betulin (3a-c) and betulinic acid (4) with conjugated linoleic acid isomers (CLA; in a mixture of 43.4% 9c, 11t; 49.5% 10t, 12c; 7.1% other isomers) is presented. Esterification was carried out with N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) as the coupling agent in the presence of 4-dimethylamino-pyridine (DMAP) in dichloromethane (or pyridine). The in vitro cytotoxic effect of betulin (1), betulinic acid (2), a mixture of CLA isomers and their derivatives (3a-c, 4) was examined using the MTT assay against four cancer cell lines (P388, CEM/C2, CCRF/CEM and HL-60) and the SRB assay on the HT-29 cell line. Ester 4 was the most active among the esters synthesized against the CEM/C2 cell line with an ID50 value 16.9 +/- 6.5 microg/mL. Betulin (1), betulinic acid (2) and CLA were the most active agents against the cancer cell lines studied.

  9. Activity of dehydroabietic acid derivatives against wood contaminant fungi.

    PubMed

    Savluchinske-Feio, Sonia; Nunes, Lina; Pereira, Pablo Tavares; Silva, Ana M; Roseiro, José C; Gigante, Bárbara; Marcelo Curto, Maria João

    2007-09-01

    The antifungal activity of 10 dehydroabietic acid derivatives with different configuration in A and B rings (cis/trans A/B junction) and different substituents and/or functionalities was evaluated in bioassays in vitro and in situ (pine wood blocks). The test compounds dissolved in acetone were assayed at several concentrations w/w (test compound/culture medium) against the fungi. The Relative Inhibition (RI) was determined by measuring the radial growth of colonies of the fungi treated with the test compounds by comparison with those of control cultures; the results are expressed as EC(50). The results of bioassays in vitro have shown that hydroxyl and aldehyde functions are required for antifungal activity in this group of compounds and deisopropylation can increase the activity. Our assay of antifungal activity in situ (in pine wood blocks) provides a means to investigate the preservative activities of these antifungal compounds under actual conditions of use. The dehydroabietic acid derivative cis-deisopropyldehydroabietanol (10) inhibited the growth of several of the fungi tested, in vitro and in situ. The results obtained in situ with the test compound (10) at 6% and 8% were not significantly different from the reference products and a good level of protection of the wood against the organisms tested was achieved. The results in wood bioassays present new possibilities in the search for natural new compounds in the wood protection, as an alternative to conventional fungicides.

  10. Sulfation mediates activity of zosteric acid against biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Caroline; Cavas, Levent; Pohnert, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Zosteric acid (ZA), a metabolite from the marine sea grass Zostera marina, has attracted much attention due to its attributed antifouling (AF) activity. However, recent results on dynamic transformations of aromatic sulfates in marine phototrophic organisms suggest potential enzymatic desulfation of metabolites like ZA. The activity of ZA was thus re-investigated using biofilm assays and simultaneous analytical monitoring by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Comparison of ZA and its non-sulfated form para-coumaric acid (CA) revealed that the active substance was in all cases the non-sulfated CA while ZA was virtually inactive. CA exhibited a strong biofilm inhibiting activity against Escherichia coli and Vibrio natriegens. The LC/MS data revealed that the apparent biofilm inhibiting effects of ZA on V. natriegens can be entirely attributed to CA released from ZA by sulfatase activity. In the light of various potential applications, the (a)biotic transformation of ZA to CA has thus to be considered in future AF formulations.

  11. Adenosine ecto-deaminase (ecto-ADA) from porcine cerebral cortex synaptic membrane.

    PubMed

    Romanowska, Małgorzata; Ostrowska, Marta; Komoszyński, Michał A

    2007-07-02

    We have purified and investigated the role of adenosine ecto-deaminase (ecto-ADA) in porcine brain synaptic membranes and found a low activity of ecto-ADA in synaptic preparations from the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and medulla oblongata in the presence of purine transport inhibitors (NBTI, dipyridamole and papaverine). The purification procedure with affinity chromatography on epoxy-Toyopearl gel/purine riboside column as a crucial step of purification allowed a 214-fold purification of synaptic ecto-ADA with a yield of 30%. Gel filtration chromatography revealed a molecular mass estimated at 42.4+/-3.9 kDa. The enzyme had a broad optimum pH and was not affected by mono- and divalent cations. Ecto-ADA revealed a low affinity to adenosine (Ado) and 2'-deoxyadenosine (2'-dAdo) (K(M)=286.30+/-40.38 microM and 287.14+/-46.50 microM, respectively). We compared the affinity of ecto-ADA to the substrates with the physiological and pathological concentrations of the extracellular Ado in brains that do not exceed a low micromolar range even during ischemia and hypoxia, and with the affinity of adenosine receptors to Ado not exceeding a low nanomolar (A(1) and A(2A) receptors) or low micromolar (A(2B) and A(3)) range. Taken together, our data suggest that the role of synaptic ecto-ADA in the regulation of the ecto-Ado level in the brain and in the termination of adenosine receptor signaling is questionable. The porcine brain synapses must have other mechanisms for the ecto-Ado removal from the synaptic cleft and synaptic ecto-ADA may also play an extra-enzymatic role in cell adhesion and non-enzymatic regulation of adenosine receptor activity.

  12. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} enhances fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Joo-Young; Hashizaki, Hikari; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Sakamoto, Tomoya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes and GPDH activity in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation also increased insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation did not affect lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. {yields} PPAR{alpha} activation increased fatty acid oxidation through induction of fatty acid oxidation-related genes in human adipocytes. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is a key regulator for maintaining whole-body energy balance. However, the physiological functions of PPAR{alpha} in adipocytes have been unclarified. We examined the functions of PPAR{alpha} using human multipotent adipose tissue-derived stem cells as a human adipocyte model. Activation of PPAR{alpha} by GW7647, a potent PPAR{alpha} agonist, increased the mRNA expression levels of adipocyte differentiation marker genes such as PPAR{gamma}, adipocyte-specific fatty acid-binding protein, and lipoprotein lipase and increased both GPDH activity and insulin-dependent glucose uptake level. The findings indicate that PPAR{alpha} activation stimulates adipocyte differentiation. However, lipid accumulation was not changed, which is usually observed when PPAR{gamma} is activated. On the other hand, PPAR{alpha} activation by GW7647 treatment induced the mRNA expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes such as CPT-1B and AOX in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Moreover, PPAR{alpha} activation increased the production of CO{sub 2} and acid soluble metabolites, which are products of fatty acid oxidation, and increased oxygen consumption rate in human adipocytes. The data indicate that activation of PPAR{alpha} stimulates both adipocyte differentiation and fatty acid oxidation in human adipocytes, suggesting that PPAR{alpha} agonists could improve insulin resistance without lipid accumulation in adipocytes. The expected

  13. Non-acidic activation of pain-related Acid-Sensing Ion Channel 3 by lipids.

    PubMed

    Marra, Sébastien; Ferru-Clément, Romain; Breuil, Véronique; Delaunay, Anne; Christin, Marine; Friend, Valérie; Sebille, Stéphane; Cognard, Christian; Ferreira, Thierry; Roux, Christian; Euller-Ziegler, Liana; Noel, Jacques; Lingueglia, Eric; Deval, Emmanuel

    2016-02-15

    Extracellular pH variations are seen as the principal endogenous signal that triggers activation of Acid-Sensing Ion Channels (ASICs), which are basically considered as proton sensors, and are involved in various processes associated with tissue acidification. Here, we show that human painful inflammatory exudates, displaying non-acidic pH, induce a slow constitutive activation of human ASIC3 channels. This effect is largely driven by lipids, and we identify lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and arachidonic acid (AA) as endogenous activators of ASIC3 in the absence of any extracellular acidification. The combination of LPC and AA evokes robust depolarizing current in DRG neurons at physiological pH 7.4, increases nociceptive C-fiber firing, and induces pain behavior in rats, effects that are all prevented by ASIC3 blockers. Lipid-induced pain is also significantly reduced in ASIC3 knockout mice. These findings open new perspectives on the roles of ASIC3 in the absence of tissue pH variation, as well as on the contribution of those channels to lipid-mediated signaling.

  14. Activation of Slo2.1 channels by niflumic acid

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Li; Garg, Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Slo2.1 channels conduct an outwardly rectifying K+ current when activated by high [Na+]i. Here, we show that gating of these channels can also be activated by fenamates such as niflumic acid (NFA), even in the absence of intracellular Na+. In Xenopus oocytes injected with <10 ng cRNA, heterologously expressed human Slo2.1 current was negligible, but rapidly activated by extracellular application of NFA (EC50 = 2.1 mM) or flufenamic acid (EC50 = 1.4 mM). Slo2.1 channels activated by 1 mM NFA exhibited weak voltage dependence. In high [K+]e, the conductance–voltage (G-V) relationship had a V1/2 of +95 mV and an effective valence, z, of 0.48 e. Higher concentrations of NFA shifted V1/2 to more negative potentials (EC50 = 2.1 mM) and increased the minimum value of G/Gmax (EC50 = 2.4 mM); at 6 mM NFA, Slo2.1 channel activation was voltage independent. In contrast, V1/2 of the G-V relationship was shifted to more positive potentials when [K+]e was elevated from 1 to 300 mM (EC50 = 21.2 mM). The slope conductance measured at the reversal potential exhibited the same [K+]e dependency (EC50 = 23.5 mM). Conductance was also [Na+]e dependent. Outward currents were reduced when Na+ was replaced with choline or mannitol, but unaffected by substitution with Rb+ or Li+. Neutralization of charged residues in the S1–S4 domains did not appreciably alter the voltage dependence of Slo2.1 activation. Thus, the weak voltage dependence of Slo2.1 channel activation is independent of charged residues in the S1–S4 segments. In contrast, mutation of R190 located in the adjacent S4–S5 linker to a neutral (Ala or Gln) or acidic (Glu) residue induced constitutive channel activity that was reduced by high [K+]e. Collectively, these findings indicate that Slo2.1 channel gating is modulated by [K+]e and [Na+]e, and that NFA uncouples channel activation from its modulation by transmembrane voltage and intracellular Na+. PMID:20176855

  15. Activation of Slo2.1 channels by niflumic acid.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li; Garg, Vivek; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    Slo2.1 channels conduct an outwardly rectifying K(+) current when activated by high [Na(+)](i). Here, we show that gating of these channels can also be activated by fenamates such as niflumic acid (NFA), even in the absence of intracellular Na(+). In Xenopus oocytes injected with <10 ng cRNA, heterologously expressed human Slo2.1 current was negligible, but rapidly activated by extracellular application of NFA (EC(50) = 2.1 mM) or flufenamic acid (EC(50) = 1.4 mM). Slo2.1 channels activated by 1 mM NFA exhibited weak voltage dependence. In high [K(+)](e), the conductance-voltage (G-V) relationship had a V(1/2) of +95 mV and an effective valence, z, of 0.48 e. Higher concentrations of NFA shifted V(1/2) to more negative potentials (EC(50) = 2.1 mM) and increased the minimum value of G/G(max) (EC(50) = 2.4 mM); at 6 mM NFA, Slo2.1 channel activation was voltage independent. In contrast, V(1/2) of the G-V relationship was shifted to more positive potentials when [K(+)](e) was elevated from 1 to 300 mM (EC(50) = 21.2 mM). The slope conductance measured at the reversal potential exhibited the same [K(+)](e) dependency (EC(50) = 23.5 mM). Conductance was also [Na(+)](e) dependent. Outward currents were reduced when Na(+) was replaced with choline or mannitol, but unaffected by substitution with Rb(+) or Li(+). Neutralization of charged residues in the S1-S4 domains did not appreciably alter the voltage dependence of Slo2.1 activation. Thus, the weak voltage dependence of Slo2.1 channel activation is independent of charged residues in the S1-S4 segments. In contrast, mutation of R190 located in the adjacent S4-S5 linker to a neutral (Ala or Gln) or acidic (Glu) residue induced constitutive channel activity that was reduced by high [K(+)](e). Collectively, these findings indicate that Slo2.1 channel gating is modulated by [K(+)](e) and [Na(+)](e), and that NFA uncouples channel activation from its modulation by transmembrane voltage and intracellular Na(+).

  16. Influence of ethylenediamine-n,n’-disuccinic acid (EDDS) concentration on the bactericidal activity of fatty acids in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The antibacterial activity of mixtures of ethylenediamine-N,N’-disuccinic acid (EDDS) and antibacterial fatty acids (FA) was examined using the agar diffusion assay. Solutions of caproic, caprylic, capric, and lauric acids dissolved in potassium hydroxide (KOH) were supplemented with 0, 5, or 10 mM ...

  17. Activated Persulfate Oxidation of Perfluorooctanoic Acid (PFOA) in Groundwater under Acidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Penghua; Hu, Zhihao; Song, Xin; Liu, Jianguo; Lin, Na

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is an emerging contaminant of concern due to its toxicity for human health and ecosystems. However, successful degradation of PFOA in aqueous solutions with a cost-effective method remains a challenge, especially for groundwater. In this study, the degradation of PFOA using activated persulfate under mild conditions was investigated. The impact of different factors on persulfate activity, including pH, temperature (25 °C–50 °C), persulfate dosage and reaction time, was evaluated under different experimental conditions. Contrary to the traditional alkaline-activated persulfate oxidation, it was found that PFOA can be effectively degraded using activated persulfate under acidic conditions, with the degradation kinetics following the pseudo-first-order decay model. Higher temperature, higher persulfate dosage and increased reaction time generally result in higher PFOA degradation efficiency. Experimental results show that a PFOA degradation efficiency of 89.9% can be achieved by activated persulfate at pH of 2.0, with the reaction temperature of 50 °C, molar ratio of PFOA to persulfate as 1:100, and a reaction time of 100 h. The corresponding defluorination ratio under these conditions was 23.9%, indicating that not all PFOA decomposed via fluorine removal. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometer analysis results indicate that both SO4−• and •OH contribute to the decomposition of PFOA. It is proposed that PFOA degradation occurs via a decarboxylation reaction triggered by SO4−•, followed by a HF elimination process aided by •OH, which produces one-CF2-unit-shortened perfluoroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCAs, Cn−1F2n−1COOH). The decarboxylation and HF elimination processes would repeat and eventually lead to the complete mineralization all PFCAs. PMID:27322298

  18. Activating frataxin expression by repeat-targeted nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liande; Matsui, Masayuki; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia is an incurable genetic disorder caused by a mutant expansion of the trinucleotide GAA within an intronic FXN RNA. This expansion leads to reduced expression of frataxin (FXN) protein and evidence suggests that transcriptional repression is caused by an R-loop that forms between the expanded repeat RNA and complementary genomic DNA. Synthetic agents that increase levels of FXN protein might alleviate the disease. We demonstrate that introducing anti-GAA duplex RNAs or single-stranded locked nucleic acids into patient-derived cells increases FXN protein expression to levels similar to analogous wild-type cells. Our data are significant because synthetic nucleic acids that target GAA repeats can be lead compounds for restoring curative FXN levels. More broadly, our results demonstrate that interfering with R-loop formation can trigger gene activation and reveal a new strategy for upregulating gene expression. PMID:26842135

  19. Antimicrobial Activity of Oleanolic and Ursolic Acids: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Jesus, Jéssica A.; Lago, João Henrique G.; Laurenti, Márcia D.; Yamamoto, Eduardo S.; Passero, Luiz Felipe D.

    2015-01-01

    Triterpenoids are the most representative group of phytochemicals, as they comprise more than 20,000 recognized molecules. These compounds are biosynthesized in plants via squalene cyclization, a C30 hydrocarbon that is considered to be the precursor of all steroids. Due to their low hydrophilicity, triterpenes were considered to be inactive for a long period of time; however, evidence regarding their wide range of pharmacological activities is emerging, and elegant studies have highlighted these activities. Several triterpenic skeletons have been described, including some that have presented with pentacyclic features, such as oleanolic and ursolic acids. These compounds have displayed incontestable biological activity, such as antibacterial, antiviral, and antiprotozoal effects, which were not included in a single review until now. Thus, the present review investigates the potential use of these triterpenes against human pathogens, including their mechanisms of action, via in vivo studies, and the future perspectives about the use of compounds for human or even animal health are also discussed. PMID:25793002

  20. Characterization of a gene coding for a putative adenosine deaminase-related growth factor by RNA interference in the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Shuichi; Yamada, Masato; Shibata, Kou; Okuhara, Toru; Yoshida, Masumi; Inatomi, Satoshi; Taguchi, Goro; Shimosaka, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    A full-length cDNA coding for a putative adenosine deaminase (Fv-ada) was isolated from the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes. Fv-ada encodes a polypeptide consisting of 537 amino acid residues, which has a consensus sequence conserved among adenosine deaminase-related growth factors (ADGF) found in several metazoa, including chordates and insects. Fv-ada transcript was detected at all stages of growth in dikaryotic F. velutipes cells, with a peak at the primordial stage. Heterologous expression of Fv-ada in the yeast Pichia pastoris produced recombinant Fv-ADA that catalyzed the conversion of adenosine to inosine. Dikaryotic mycelia from F. velutipes were transformed with the binary plasmid pFungiway-Fv-ada, which was designed to suppress the expression of Fv-ada through RNA interference. The growth rates of the resulting transformants were retarded in response to the degree of suppression, indicating that Fv-ada plays an important role in the mycelial growth of F. velutipes. These results suggested that ADGF could function as growth factors in fungi, as is seen in other eukaryotes.

  1. Inducing salt tolerance in mung bean through coinoculation with rhizobia and plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Maqshoof; Zahir, Zahir A; Asghar, H Naeem; Asghar, M

    2011-07-01

    Twenty-five strains of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase and 10 strains of rhizobia were isolated from rhizosphere soil samples and nodules of mung bean. They were screened in separate trials under salt-stressed axenic conditions. The three most effective strains of PGPR (Mk1, Pseudomonas syringae ; Mk20, Pseudomonas fluorescens ; and Mk25, Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype G) and Rhizobium phaseoli strains M1, M6, and M9 were evaluated in coinoculation for their growth-promoting activity at three salinity levels (original, 4 dS·m(-1), and 6 dS·m(-1)) under axenic conditions. The results showed that salinity stress significantly reduced plant growth but inoculation with PGPR containing ACC deaminase and rhizobia enhanced plant growth, thus reducing the inhibitory effect of salinity. However, their combined application was more effective under saline conditions, and the combination Mk20 × M6 was the most efficient for improving seedling growth and nodulation. The effect of high ethylene concentrations on plant growth and the performance of these strains for reducing the negative impact of saline stress was also evaluated by conducting a classical triple-response bioassay. The intensity of the classical triple response decreased owing to inoculation with these strains, with the root and shoot lengths of inoculated mung bean seedlings increasing and stem diameter decreasing, which is a typical response to the dilution in a classical triple response bioassay. Thus, coinoculation with PGPR containing ACC deaminase and Rhizobium spp. could be a useful approach for inducing salt tolerance and thus improving growth and nodulation in mung bean under salt-affected conditions.

  2. Inhibition of tumor growth by polyarginine-fused mutant cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenfei; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Zhang, Tong; Li, Deshan

    2015-02-01

    Gene-directed enzyme-prodrug therapy is a method whereby cancerous tumors are selectively eradicated with minimal impact to healthy tissue. Due to its thermostability, E. coli cytosine deaminase (bCD) is one of the most widely used enzyme-prodrug combinations. However, wild-type bCD (wtbCD) displays a relatively poor turnover of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and also has low permeability as a hexamer macromolecule (∼ 300 kDa), like many other therapeutic proteins. To improve these shortcomings, site-specific mutagenesis was performed by infusing the bCD with R9, a typical and highly effective cell-penetrating peptide. The results obtained by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that the R9 efficiently delivered the enhanced green fluorescent proteins (EGFP) into the human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells, and gathered at the nucleus, while EGFP alone did not have this ability. The penetrating efficiency of R9-EGPF was time and dose dependent. The results obtained by Western blot showed that R9-bCD, but not bCD proteins alone, could be uptaken into HepG2 cells. In vitro experiments showed that polyarginine enhanced the cytotoxicity of bCD, and R9-bCDmut had a stronger cytotoxicity than R9-bCD proteins. In vivo experiments also showed that R9-bCD and R9-bCDmut could prolong the survival time of tumor mice for 8-10 days. Future therapeutic applications of cell-permeable R9-bCDmut fusion proteins together with a systemic administration of 5-FC prodrug could result in profound anti-tumor activities.

  3. Restriction of Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus by Porcine APOBEC3 Cytidine Deaminases

    PubMed Central

    Dörrschuck, Eva; Fischer, Nicole; Bravo, Ignacio G.; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Kuiper, Heidi; Spötter, Andreas; Möller, Ronny; Cichutek, Klaus; Münk, Carsten; Tönjes, Ralf R.

    2011-01-01

    Xenotransplantation of porcine cells, tissues, and organs shows promise to surmount the shortage of human donor materials. Among the barriers to pig-to-human xenotransplantation are porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) since functional representatives of the two polytropic classes, PERV-A and PERV-B, are able to infect human embryonic kidney cells in vitro, suggesting that a xenozoonosis in vivo could occur. To assess the capacity of human and porcine cells to counteract PERV infections, we analyzed human and porcine APOBEC3 (A3) proteins. This multigene family of cytidine deaminases contributes to the cellular intrinsic immunity and act as potent inhibitors of retroviruses and retrotransposons. Our data show that the porcine A3 gene locus on chromosome 5 consists of the two single-domain genes A3Z2 and A3Z3. The evolutionary relationships of the A3Z3 genes reflect the evolutionary history of mammals. The two A3 genes encode at least four different mRNAs: A3Z2, A3Z3, A3Z2-Z3, and A3Z2-Z3 splice variant A (SVA). Porcine and human A3s have been tested toward their antiretroviral activity against PERV and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) using novel single-round reporter viruses. The porcine A3Z2, A3Z3 and A3Z2-Z3 were packaged into PERV particles and inhibited PERV replication in a dose-dependent manner. The antiretroviral effect correlated with editing by the porcine A3s with a trinucleotide preference for 5′ TGC for A3Z2 and A3Z2-Z3 and 5′ CAC for A3Z3. These results strongly imply that human and porcine A3s could inhibit PERV replication in vivo, thereby reducing the risk of infection of human cells by PERV in the context of pig-to-human xenotransplantation. PMID:21307203

  4. AMP deaminase deficiency is associated with lower sprint cycling performance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Heléne; Esbjörnsson, Mona; Sabina, Richard L; Strömberg, Anna; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; Norman, Barbara

    2007-07-01

    AMP deaminase (AMPD) deficiency is an inherited disorder of skeletal muscle found in approximately 2% of the Caucasian population. Although most AMPD-deficient individuals are asymptomatic, a small subset has exercise-related cramping and pain without any other identifiable neuromuscular complications. This heterogeneity has raised doubts about the physiological significance of AMPD in skeletal muscle, despite evidence for disrupted adenine nucleotide catabolism during exercise in deficient individuals. Previous studies have evaluated the effect of AMPD deficiency on exercise performance with mixed results. This study was designed to circumvent the perceived limitations in previous reports by measuring exercise performance during a 30-s Wingate test in 139 healthy, physically active subjects of both sexes, with different AMPD1 genotypes, including 12 AMPD-deficient subjects. Three of the deficient subjects were compound heterozygotes characterized by the common c.34C>T mutation in one allele and a newly discovered AMPD1 mutation, c.404delT, in the other. While there was no significant difference in peak power across AMPD1 genotypes, statistical analysis revealed a faster power decrease in the AMPD-deficient group and a difference in mean power across the genotypes (P = 0.0035). This divergence was most striking at 15 s of the 30-s cycling. Assessed by the fatigue index, the decrease in power output at 15 s of exercise was significantly greater in the deficient group compared with the other genotypes (P = 0.0006). The approximate 10% lower mean power in healthy AMPD-deficient subjects during a 30-s Wingate cycling test reveals a functional role for the AMPD1 enzyme in sprint exercise.

  5. Active site amino acid sequence of human factor D.

    PubMed

    Davis, A E

    1980-08-01

    Factor D was isolated from human plasma by chromatography on CM-Sephadex C50, Sephadex G-75, and hydroxylapatite. Digestion of reduced, S-carboxymethylated factor D with cyanogen bromide resulted in three peptides which were isolated by chromatography on Sephadex G-75 (superfine) equilibrated in 20% formic acid. NH2-Terminal sequences were determined by automated Edman degradation with a Beckman 890C sequencer using a 0.1 M Quadrol program. The smallest peptide (CNBr III) consisted of the NH2-terminal 14 amino acids. The other two peptides had molecular weights of 17,000 (CNBr I) and 7000 (CNBr II). Overlap of the NH2-terminal sequence of factor D with the NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr I established the order of the peptides. The NH2-terminal 53 residues of factor D are somewhat more homologous with the group-specific protease of rat intestine than with other serine proteases. The NH2-terminal sequence of CNBr II revealed the active site serine of factor D. The typical serine protease active site sequence (Gly-Asp-Ser-Gly-Gly-Pro was found at residues 12-17. The region surrounding the active site serine does not appear to be more highly homologous with any one of the other serine proteases. The structural data obtained point out the similarities between factor D and the other proteases. However, complete definition of the degree of relationship between factor D and other proteases will require determination of the remainder of the primary structure.

  6. Antiproliferative Activity of β-Hydroxy-β-Arylalkanoic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Dilber, Sanda P.; Žižak, Željko S.; Stanojković, Tatjana P.; Juranić, Zorica D.; Drakulić, Branko J.; Juranić, Ivan O.

    2007-01-01

    Article describes the synthesis of fifteen β-hydroxy-β-arylalkanoic acids by Reformatsky reaction using the 1-ethoxyethyl-2-bromoalkanoates, aromatic or cycloalkyl ketones or aromatic aldehydes. The short survey of previously reported synthetic procedures for title compounds, is given. The majority of obtained compounds exert antiproliferative activity in vitro toward human: HeLa, Fem-X cells, K562, and LS174 cells, having IC50 values from 62.20 to 205 μM. The most active compound is 3-OH-2,2-di-Me-3-(4- biphenylyl)-butanoic acid, having the IC50 value 62.20 μM toward HeLa cells. Seven examined compounds did not affect proliferation of healthy human blood peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC and PBMC+ PHA), IC50 > 300 μM. The preliminary QSAR results show that estimated lipophilicity of compounds influences their antiproliferative activity in the first place. The ability of dehydration, and the spatial arrangement of hydrophobic portion, HBD and HBA in molecules are has almost equal importance as lipophilicity.

  7. Anti-Trichomonas vaginalis activity of betulinic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Dariana Pimentel Gomes; de Brum Vieira, Patrícia; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Menezes, Camila Braz; Senger, Franciane Rios; Santos da Silva, Gloria Narjara; Baggio Gnoatto, Simone Cristina; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-12-01

    Caused by Trichomonas vaginalis, trichomoniasis is the most common non-viral STD worldwide. Currently, metronidazole and tinidazole are the only drugs approved for treatment of the condition. However, problems such as metronidazole-resistant T. vaginalis isolates and allergic reactions have been reported. Based on data previously published by our group, structural changes in betulinic acid (1) were performed, generating three new compounds that were tested for in vitro anti-T.vaginalis activity in this study. Whereas derivative 2 did not demonstrate anti-T. vaginalis activity, derivatives 3 and 4 reduced trophozoite viability by 100%, with MIC values of 50μM. The structural difference of two compounds was performed only on the C-28 position. Derivative 3 showed low cytotoxicity against Vero cells in 24h; however, derivative 4 was highly cytotoxic, but efficient when associated with metronidazole in the synergism assay. ROS production by neutrophils was reduced, and derivative 3 showed anti-inflammatory effect. Collectively, the results of this study provide in vitro evidence that betulinic acid derivatives 3 and 4 are potential compounds with anti-T. vaginalis activity.

  8. The biological activities of protein/oleic acid complexes reside in the fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Angelo; Spolaore, Barbara; Polverino de Laureto, Patrizia

    2013-06-01

    A complex formed by human α-lactalbumin (α-LA) and oleic acid (OA), named HAMLET, has been shown to have an apoptotic activity leading to the selective death of tumor cells. In numerous publications it has been reported that in the complex α-LA is monomeric and adopts a partly folded or "molten globule" state, leading to the idea that partly folded proteins can have "beneficial effects". The protein/OA molar ratio initially has been reported to be 1:1, while recent data have indicated that the OA-complex is given by an oligomeric protein capable of binding numerous OA molecules per protein monomer. Proteolytic fragments of α-LA, as well as other proteins unrelated to α-LA, can form OA-complexes with biological activities similar to those of HAMLET, thus indicating that a generic protein can form a cytotoxic complex under suitable experimental conditions. Moreover, even the selective tumoricidal activity of HAMLET-like complexes has been questioned. There is recent evidence that the biological activity of long chain unsaturated fatty acids, including OA, can be ascribed to their effect of perturbing the structure of biological membranes and consequently the function of membrane-bound proteins. In general, it has been observed that the cytotoxic effects exerted by HAMLET-like complexes are similar to those reported for OA alone. Overall, these findings can be interpreted by considering that the protein moiety does not have a toxic effect on its own, but merely acts as a solubilising agent for the inherently toxic fatty acid.

  9. Depressed phosphatidic acid-induced contractile activity of failing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Tappia, Paramjit S; Maddaford, Thane G; Hurtado, Cecilia; Panagia, Vincenzo; Pierce, Grant N

    2003-01-10

    The effects of phosphatidic acid (PA), a known inotropic agent, on Ca(2+) transients and contractile activity of cardiomyocytes in congestive heart failure (CHF) due to myocardial infarction were examined. In control cells, PA induced a significant increase (25%) in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. The phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor, 2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl N,N-diphenylcarbonate, blocked the positive inotropic action induced by PA, indicating that PA induces an increase in contractile activity and Ca(2+) transients through stimulation of PLC. Conversely, in failing cardiomyocytes there was a loss of PA-induced increase in active cell shortening and Ca(2+) transients. PA did not alter resting cell length. Both diastolic and systolic [Ca(2+)] were significantly elevated in the failing cardiomyocytes. In vitro assessment of the cardiac sarcolemmal (SL) PLC activity revealed that the impaired failing cardiomyocyte response to PA was associated with a diminished stimulation of SL PLC activity by PA. Our results identify an important defect in the PA-PLC signaling pathway in failing cardiomyocytes, which may have significant implications for the depressed contractile function during CHF.

  10. Synthesis and biological activity of novel deoxycholic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Popadyuk, Irina I; Markov, Andrey V; Salomatina, Oksana V; Logashenko, Evgeniya B; Shernyukov, Andrey V; Zenkova, Marina A; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F

    2015-08-01

    We report the synthesis and biological activity of new semi-synthetic derivatives of naturally occurring deoxycholic acid (DCA) bearing 2-cyano-3-oxo-1-ene, 3-oxo-1(2)-ene or 3-oxo-4(5)-ene moieties in ring A and 12-oxo or 12-oxo-9(11)-ene moieties in ring C. Bioassays using murine macrophage-like cells and tumour cells show that the presence of the 9(11)-double bond associated with the increased polarity of ring A or with isoxazole ring joined to ring A, improves the ability of the compounds to inhibit cancer cell growth.

  11. Synthesis and anticancer activity of novel fluorinated asiatic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Bruno M F; Salvador, Jorge A R; Marín, Silvia; Cascante, Marta

    2016-05-23

    A series of novel fluorinated Asiatic Acid (AA) derivatives were successfully synthesized, tested for their antiproliferative activity against HeLa and HT-29 cell lines, and their structure activity relationships were evaluated. The great majority of fluorinated derivatives showed stronger antiproliferative activity than AA in a concentration dependent manner. The most active compounds have a pentameric A-ring containing an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group. The compounds with better cytotoxic activity were then evaluated against MCF-7, Jurkat, PC-3, A375, MIA PaCa-2 and BJ cell lines. Derivative 14 proved to be the most active compound among all tested derivatives and its mechanism of action was further investigated in HeLa cell line. The results showed that compound 14 induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 stage as a consequence of up-regulation of p21(cip1/waf1) and p27(kip1) and down-regulation of cyclin D3 and Cyclin E. Furthermore, compound 14 was found to induce caspase driven-apoptosis with activation of caspases-8 and caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP. The cleavage of Bid into t-Bid, the up-regulation of Bax and the down-regulation of Bcl-2 were also observed after treatment of HeLa cells with compound 14. Taken together, these mechanistic studies revealed the involvement of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways in the apoptotic process induced by compound 14. Importantly, the antiproliferative activity of this compound on the non-tumor BJ human fibroblast cell line is weaker than in the tested cancer cell lines. The enhanced potency (between 45 and 90-fold more active than AA in a panel of cancer cell lines) and selectivity of this new AA derivative warrant further preclinical evaluation.

  12. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, Fiona Karen; Lusk, Jason Scott; Mohr, Breanna Michelle; Guzikowski, Anthony Peter; Batchelor, Robert Hardy; Jiang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson’s Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research, diagnostics and

  13. Short- and medium-chain fatty acids exhibit antimicrobial activity for oral microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chifu B.; Altimova, Yelena; Myers, Taylor M.; Ebersole, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the antibacterial activity of short-, medium-, and long-chain fatty acids against various oral microorganisms. Methods The short-chain fatty acids [formic acid (C1), acetic acid (C2), propionic acid (C3), butyric acid (C4), isobutyric acid (C4), isovaleric acid (C5), hexanoic acid (C6)], medium-chain fatty acids [octanoic acid (C8), capric acid (C10), lauric acid (12)], and long-chain fatty acids [myristic acid (C14), palmitic acid (C16)], were investigated for antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, S. gordonii, S. sanguis, Candida albicans, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Results The data demonstrated that the fatty acids exhibited patterns of inhibition against oral bacteria with some specificity that appeared related more to the bacterial species that the general structural characteristics of the microorganism. As a group the fatty acids were much less effective against C. albicans than the oral bacteria, with effectiveness limited to hexanoic, octanoic, and lauric acids. Formic acid, capric, and lauric acids were broadly inhibitory for the bacteria. Interestingly, fatty acids that are produced at metabolic end-products by a number of these bacteria, were specifically inactive against the producing species, while substantially inhibiting the growth of other oral microorganisms. Conclusions The results indicate that the antimicrobial activity of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), medium-chain fatty acids (MCFAs), long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) could influence the microbial ecology in the oral cavity via at least 2 potential pathways. First, the agents delivered exogenously as therapeutic adjuncts could be packaged to enhance a microbial-regulatory environment in the subgingival sulcus. Second, it would be the intrinsic nature of these fatty acid inhibitors in contributing to the characteristics of the microbial biofilms, their evolution, and emergence of

  14. The antiviral activity of tetrazole phosphonic acids and their analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, D W; Naylor, M

    1985-01-01

    5-(Phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and a number of related tetrazoles have been prepared and their effects on the replication of Herpes Simplex Viruses-1 and -2 have been investigated as well as their abilities to inhibit the DNA polymerases induced by these viruses and the RNA transcriptase activity of influenza virus A. Contrary to an earlier report, 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole was not an efficient inhibitor of the replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in tissue culture. Analogues of 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole were also devoid of significant antiviral activity. Only 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and 5-(thiophosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole inhibited the influenza virus transcriptase, and both were more effective as inhibitors than phosphonoacetic acid under the same conditions. The DNA polymerases induced by HSV-1 and HSV-2 were inhibited slightly by 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole and to a lesser extent by its N-ethyl analogue and 3-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole. None of these compounds were as effective as phosphonoacetic acid. 5-(Thiophosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole was a better inhibitor of the DNA polymerase induced by HSV-1 than 5-(phosphonomethyl)-1H-tetrazole. PMID:2417198

  15. Bacterial cytosine deaminase mutants created by molecular engineering show improved 5-fluorocytosine-mediated cell killing in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fuchita, Michi; Ardiani, Andressa; Zhao, Lei; Serve, Kinta; Stoddard, Barry L; Black, Margaret E

    2009-06-01

    Cytosine deaminase is used in combination with 5-fluorocytosine as an enzyme-prodrug combination for targeted genetic cancer treatment. This approach is limited by inefficient gene delivery and poor prodrug conversion activities. Previously, we reported individual point mutations within the substrate binding pocket of bacterial cytosine deaminase (bCD) that result in marginal improvements in the ability to sensitize cells to 5-fluorocytosine (5FC). Here, we describe an expanded random mutagenesis and selection experiment that yielded enzyme variants, which provide significant improvement in prodrug sensitization. Three of these mutants were evaluated using enzyme kinetic analyses and then assayed in three cancer cell lines for 5FC sensitization, bystander effects, and formation of 5-fluorouracil metabolites. All variants displayed 18- to 19-fold shifts in substrate preference toward 5FC, a significant reduction in IC(50) values and improved bystander effect compared with wild-type bCD. In a xenograft tumor model, the best enzyme mutant was shown to prevent tumor growth at much lower doses of 5FC than is observed when tumor cells express wild-type bCD. Crystallographic analyses of this construct show the basis for improved activity toward 5FC, and also how two different mutagenesis strategies yield closely related but mutually exclusive mutations that each result in a significant alteration of enzyme specificity.

  16. Small-molecule APOBEC3G DNA cytosine deaminase inhibitors based on a 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol scaffold.

    PubMed

    Olson, Margaret E; Li, Ming; Harris, Reuben S; Harki, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that functions in innate immunity against retroviruses and retrotransposons. Although A3G can potently restrict Vif-deficient HIV-1 replication by catalyzing excessive levels of G→A hypermutation, sublethal levels of A3G-catalyzed mutation may contribute to the high level of HIV-1 fitness and its incurable prognosis. To chemically modulate A3G catalytic activity with the goal of decreasing the HIV-1 genomic mutation rate, we synthesized and biochemically evaluated a class of 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol small-molecule inhibitors identified by high-throughput screening. This class of compounds exhibits low-micromolar (3.9-8.2 μM) inhibitory potency and remarkable specificity for A3G versus the related cytosine deaminase, APOBEC3A. Chemical modification of inhibitors, A3G mutational screening, and thiol reactivity studies implicate C321, a residue proximal to the active site, as the critical A3G target for this class of molecules.

  17. Possible Footprints of APOBEC3F and/or Other APOBEC3 Deaminases, but Not APOBEC3G, on HIV-1 from Patients with Acute/Early and Chronic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Andrew E.; Deforche, Koen; Welch, John J.; Van Laethem, Kristel; Camacho, Ricardo; Rambaut, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like-3 (APOBEC3) innate cellular cytidine deaminase family, particularly APOBEC3F and APOBEC3G, can cause extensive and lethal G-to-A mutations in HIV-1 plus-strand DNA (termed hypermutation). It is unclear if APOBEC3-induced mutations in vivo are always lethal or can occur at sublethal levels that increase HIV-1 diversification and viral adaptation to the host. The viral accessory protein Vif counteracts APOBEC3 activity by binding to APOBEC3 and promoting proteasome degradation; however, the efficiency of this interaction varies, since a range of hypermutation frequencies are observed in HIV-1 patient DNA. Therefore, we examined “footprints” of APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F activity in longitudinal HIV-1 RNA pol sequences from approximately 3,000 chronically infected patients by determining whether G-to-A mutations occurred in motifs that were favored or disfavored by these deaminases. G-to-A mutations were more frequent in APOBEC3G-disfavored than in APOBEC3G-favored contexts. In contrast, mutations in APOBEC3F-disfavored contexts were relatively rare, whereas mutations in contexts favoring APOBEC3F (and possibly other deaminases) occurred 16% more often than average G-to-A mutations. These results were supported by analyses of >500 HIV-1 env sequences from acute/early infection. IMPORTANCE Collectively, our results suggest that APOBEC3G-induced mutagenesis is lethal to HIV-1, whereas mutagenesis caused by APOBEC3F and/or other deaminases may result in sublethal mutations that might facilitate viral diversification. Therefore, Vif-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses and drugs that manipulate the interplay between Vif and APOBEC3 may have beneficial or detrimental clinical effects depending on how they affect the binding of Vif to various members of the APOBEC3 family. PMID:25165112

  18. Acidic Properties and Structure-Activity Correlations of Solid Acid Catalysts Revealed by Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Anmin; Li, Shenhui; Liu, Shang-Bin; Deng, Feng

    2016-04-19

    Solid acid materials with tunable structural and acidic properties are promising heterogeneous catalysts for manipulating and/or emulating the activity and selectivity of industrially important catalytic reactions. On the other hand, the performances of acid-catalyzed reactions are mostly dictated by the acidic features, namely, type (Brønsted vs Lewis acidity), amount, strength, and local environment of acid sites. The latter is relevant to their location (intra- vs extracrystalline), and possible confinement and Brønsted-Lewis acid synergy effects that may strongly affect the host-guest interactions, reaction mechanism, and shape selectivity of the catalytic system. This account aims to highlight some important applications of state-of-the-art solid-state NMR (SSNMR) techniques for exploring the structural and acidic properties of solid acid catalysts as well as their catalytic performances and relevant reaction pathway invoked. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations may be exploited in conjunction with experimental SSNMR studies to verify the structure-activity correlations of the catalytic system at a microscopic scale. We describe in this Account the developments and applications of advanced ex situ and/or in situ SSNMR techniques, such as two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum magic-angle spinning (DQ MAS) homonuclear correlation spectroscopy for structural investigation of solid acids as well as study of their acidic properties. Moreover, the energies and electronic structures of the catalysts and detailed catalytic reaction processes, including the identification of reaction species, elucidation of reaction mechanism, and verification of structure-activity correlations, made available by DFT theoretical calculations were also discussed. Relevant discussions will focus primarily on results obtained from our laboratories in the past decade, including (i) quantitative and qualitative acidity characterization utilizing assorted probe molecules

  19. Destabilization, oligomerization and inhibition of the mitogenic activity of acidic fibroblast-growth factor by aurintricarboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Lozano, R M; Rivas, G; Giménez-Gallego, G

    1997-08-15

    The triphenylmethane derivative aurintricarboxylic acid has been used to inhibit angiogenesis, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and cell transformation, an effect that has been attributed to its relatively nonspecific inhibitory activity of protein-nucleic acid interactions. Here, we show that this compound binds to acidic fibroblast growth factor, a prototypic member of a family of protein mitogens activated by heparin, altering its physicochemical properties and decreasing its mitogenic activity. Counteraction of the effects of aurintricarboxylic acid by heparin shows that the two compounds have opposite and reversible effects on acidic fibroblast growth factor structure and biological activity. The studies reported here may contribute to a deeper understanding of the inhibition of fibroblast-growth-factor-dependent mitogenesis of relevance to future pharmacologic developments.

  20. Caffeic acid treatment alters the extracellular adenine nucleotide hydrolysis in platelets and lymphocytes of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Javed; Spanevello, Roselia Maria; Pimentel, Victor Camera; Gutierres, Jessié; Thomé, Gustavo; Cardoso, Andreia; Zanini, Daniela; Martins, Caroline; Palma, Heloisa Einloft; Bagatini, Margarete Dulce; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Schmatz, Roberta; Leal, Cláudio Alberto Martins; da Costa, Pauline; Morsch, Vera Maria; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2013-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of caffeic acid on ectonucleotidase activities such as NTPDase (nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase), Ecto-NPP (nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) in platelets and lymphocytes of rats, as well as in the profile of platelet aggregation. Animals were divided into five groups: I (control); II (oil); III (caffeic acid 10 mg/kg); IV (caffeic acid 50 mg/kg); and V (caffeic acid 100 mg/kg). Animals were treated with caffeic acid diluted in oil for 30 days. In platelets, caffeic acid decreased the ATP hydrolysis and increased ADP hydrolysis in groups III, IV and V when compared to control (P<0.05). The 5'-nucleotidase activity was decreased, while E-NPP and ADA activities were increased in platelets of rats of groups III, IV and V (P<0.05). Caffeic acid reduced significantly the platelet aggregation in the animals of groups III, IV and V in relation to group I (P<0.05). In lymphocytes, the NTPDase and ADA activities were increased in all groups treated with caffeic acid when compared to control (P<0.05). These findings demonstrated that the enzymes were altered in tissues by caffeic acid and this compound decreased the platelet aggregation suggesting that caffeic acid should be considered a potentially therapeutic agent in disorders related to the purinergic system.

  1. Biologic activities of poly (2-azaadenylic acid) and poly (2-azainosinic acid).

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E; Huang, G F; Torrence, P F; Fukui, T; Kakiuchi, N; Ikehara, M

    1977-01-01

    Poly (2-azaadenylic acid) [(aza2A)n] and poly(2-azainosinic acid [(aza2I)n], two newly synthesized analogues of (A)n and (I)n, in which CH-2 of the purine ring is replaced by a nitrogen atom, have been evaluated in various biological assay systems. (Aza2A) n formed a complex with (U)n and (br5U)n, and (aza2I)n formed a complex with (C)n and (br5C)n, but these complexes were markedly destabilized relative to the corresponding (A)n or (I)n complexes. The (aza2A)n-and (aza2I)n-derived complexes failed to stimulate the production of interferon in primary rabbit kidney cells and human diploid fibroblasts, under conditions (A)n. (U)n, (I)n. (C)n and (I)n. (br5C)n induced high amounts of interferon. both (aza2A)n and (aza2I)n exerted a marked inhibitory effect on the endogenous RNA directed DNA polymerase (reverse transcriptase) activity associated with murine leukemia virus. They caused a relatively mild inhibition of complement activity in an hemolytic assay system. PMID:73166

  2. Influence of different forms of acidities on soil microbiological properties and enzyme activities at an acid mine drainage contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Prafulla Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Pradip; Tripathy, Subhasish; Equeenuddin, Sk Md; Panigrahi, M K

    2010-07-15

    Assessment of microbial parameters, viz. microbial biomass, fluorescence diacetate, microbial respiration, acid phosphatase, beta-glucosidase and urease with respect to acidity helps in evaluating the quality of soils. This study was conducted to investigate the effects of different forms of acidities on soil microbial parameters in an acid mine drainage contaminated site around coal deposits in Jainta Hills of India. Total potential and exchangeable acidity, extractable and exchangeable aluminium were significantly higher in contaminated soil compared to the baseline (p<0.01). Different forms of acidity were significantly and positively correlated with each other (p<0.05). Further, all microbial properties were positively and significantly correlated with organic carbon and clay (p<0.05). The ratios of microbial parameters with organic carbon were negatively correlated with different forms of acidity. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses showed that the microbial activities are not directly influenced by the total potential acidity and extractable aluminium. Though acid mine drainage affected soils had higher microbial biomass and activities due to higher organic matter content than those of the baseline soils, the ratios of microbial parameters/organic carbon indicated suppression of microbial growth and activities due to acidity stress.

  3. A novel nucleic acid analogue shows strong angiogenic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Sakakibara, Norikazu; Maruyama, Tokumi; Igarashi, Junsuke; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Kubota, Yasuo; Tokuda, Masaaki; Ashino, Hiromi; Hattori, Kenichi; Tanaka, Shinji; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Konishi, Ryoji

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} A novel nucleic acid analogue (2Cl-C.OXT-A, m.w. 284) showed angiogenic potency. {yields} It stimulated the tube formation, proliferation and migration of HUVEC in vitro. {yields} 2Cl-C.OXT-A induced the activation of ERK1/2 and MEK in HUVEC. {yields} Angiogenic potency in vivo was confirmed in CAM assay and rabbit cornea assay. {yields} A synthesized small angiogenic agent would have great clinical therapeutic value. -- Abstract: A novel nucleic acid analogue (2Cl-C.OXT-A) significantly stimulated tube formation of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). Its maximum potency at 100 {mu}M was stronger than that of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a positive control. At this concentration, 2Cl-C.OXT-A moderately stimulated proliferation as well as migration of HUVEC. To gain mechanistic insights how 2Cl-C.OXT-A promotes angiogenic responses in HUVEC, we performed immunoblot analyses using phospho-specific antibodies as probes. 2Cl-C.OXT-A induced robust phosphorylation/activation of MAP kinase ERK1/2 and an upstream MAP kinase kinase MEK. Conversely, a MEK inhibitor PD98059 abolished ERK1/2 activation and tube formation both enhanced by 2Cl-C.OXT-A. In contrast, MAP kinase responses elicited by 2Cl-C.OXT-A were not inhibited by SU5416, a specific inhibitor of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase. Collectively these results suggest that 2Cl-C.OXT-A-induces angiogenic responses in HUVEC mediated by a MAP kinase cascade comprising MEK and ERK1/2, but independently of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase. In vivo assay using chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and rabbit cornea also suggested the angiogenic potency of 2Cl-C.OXT-A.

  4. Acid Rain. Activities for Grades 4 to 12. A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, David; Bryant, Jeannette

    This teacher's guide on acid rain is divided into three study areas to explain: (1) what causes acid rain; (2) what problems acid rain has created; and (3) what teachers and students can do to help combat acid rain. Instructions for activities within the study areas include suggested grade levels, objectives, materials needed, and directions for…

  5. Acid Rain: A Teacher's Guide. Activities for Grades 4 to 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This guide on acid rain for elementary and secondary students is divided into three study areas: (1) What Causes Acid Rain; (2) What Problems Acid Rain Has Created; (3) How You and Your Students Can Help Combat Acid Rain. Each section presents background information and a series of lessons pertaining to the section topic. Activities include…

  6. Regulation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate deaminase in the freeze tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica

    PubMed Central

    Dieni, Christopher A; Storey, Kenneth B

    2008-01-01

    Background The wood frog, Rana sylvatica, is one of a few vertebrate species that have developed natural freeze tolerance, surviving days or weeks with 65–70% of its total body water frozen in extracellular ice masses. Frozen frogs exhibit no vital signs and their organs must endure multiple stresses, particularly long term anoxia and ischemia. Maintenance of cellular energy supply is critical to viability in the frozen state and in skeletal muscle, AMP deaminase (AMPD) plays a key role in stabilizing cellular energetics. The present study investigated AMPD control in wood frog muscle. Results Wood frog AMPD was subject to multiple regulatory controls: binding to subcellular structures, protein phosphorylation, and effects of allosteric effectors, cryoprotectants and temperature. The percentage of bound AMPD activity increased from 20 to 35% with the transition to the frozen state. Bound AMPD showed altered kinetic parameters compared with the free enzyme (S0.5 AMP was reduced, Hill coefficient fell to ~1.0) and the transition to the frozen state led to a 3-fold increase in S0.5 AMP of the bound enzyme. AMPD was a target of protein phosphorylation. Bound AMPD from control frogs proved to be a low phosphate form with a low S0.5 AMP and was phosphorylated in incubations that stimulated PKA, PKC, CaMK, or AMPK. Bound AMPD from frozen frogs was a high phosphate form with a high S0.5 AMP that was reduced under incubation conditions that stimulated protein phosphatases. Frog muscle AMPD was activated by Mg·ATP and Mg·ADP and inhibited by Mg·GTP, KCl, NaCl and NH4Cl. The enzyme product, IMP, uniquely inhibited only the bound (phosphorylated) enzyme from muscle of frozen frogs. Activators and inhibitors differentially affected the free versus bound enzyme. S0.5 AMP of bound AMPD was also differentially affected by high versus low assay temperature (25 vs 5°C) and by the presence/absence of the natural cryoprotectant (250 mM glucose) that accumulates during freezing

  7. Nanofiltration and granular activated carbon treatment of perfluoroalkyl acids.

    PubMed

    Appleman, Timothy D; Dickenson, Eric R V; Bellona, Christopher; Higgins, Christopher P

    2013-09-15

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are of concern because of their persistence in the environment and the potential toxicological effects on humans exposed to PFAAs through a variety of possible exposure routes, including contaminated drinking water. This study evaluated the efficacy of nanofiltration (NF) and granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption in removing a suite of PFAAs from water. Virgin flat-sheet NF membranes (NF270, Dow/Filmtec) were tested at permeate fluxes of 17-75 Lm(-2)h(-1) using deionized (DI) water and artificial groundwater. The effects of membrane fouling by humic acid on PFAA rejection were also tested under constant permeate flux conditions. Both virgin and fouled NF270 membranes demonstrated >93% removal for all PFAAs under all conditions tested. GAC efficacy was tested using rapid small-scale columns packed with Calgon Filtrasorb300 (F300) carbon and DI water with and without dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM effects were also evaluated with F600 and Siemens AquaCarb1240C. The F300 GAC had <20% breakthrough of all PFAAs in DI water for up to 125,000 bed volumes (BVs). When DOM was present, >20% breakthrough of all PFAAs by 10,000 BVs was observed for all carbons.

  8. Feed-Forward Inhibition of CD73 and Upregulation of Adenosine Deaminase Contribute to the Loss of Adenosine Neuromodulation in Postinflammatory Ileitis

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Dias, Ana Sofia; Pelletier, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic signalling is remarkably plastic during gastrointestinal inflammation. Thus, selective drugs targeting the “purinome” may be helpful for inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. The myenteric neuromuscular transmission of healthy individuals is fine-tuned and controlled by adenosine acting on A2A excitatory receptors. Here, we investigated the neuromodulatory role of adenosine in TNBS-inflamed longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus of the rat ileum. Seven-day postinflammation ileitis lacks adenosine neuromodulation, which may contribute to acceleration of gastrointestinal transit. The loss of adenosine neuromodulation results from deficient accumulation of the nucleoside at the myenteric synapse despite the fact that the increases in ATP release were observed. Disparity between ATP outflow and adenosine deficit in postinflammatory ileitis is ascribed to feed-forward inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 by high extracellular ATP and/or ADP. Redistribution of NTPDase2, but not of NTPDase3, from ganglion cell bodies to myenteric nerve terminals leads to preferential ADP accumulation from released ATP, thus contributing to the prolonged inhibition of muscle-bound ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and to the delay of adenosine formation at the inflamed neuromuscular synapse. On the other hand, depression of endogenous adenosine accumulation may also occur due to enhancement of adenosine deaminase activity. Both membrane-bound and soluble forms of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 and adenosine deaminase were detected in the inflamed myenteric plexus. These findings provide novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory gut motility disorders. PMID:25210228

  9. Biological activity of phenylpropionic acid isolated from a terrestrial Streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Narayana, Kolla J P; Prabhakar, Peddikotla; Vijayalakshmi, Muvva; Venkateswarlu, Yenamandra; Krishna, Palakodety S J

    2007-01-01

    The strain ANU 6277 was isolated from laterite soil and identified as Streptomyces sp. closely related to Streptomyces albidoflavus cluster by 16S rRNA analysis. The cultural, morphological and physiological characters of the strain were recorded. The strain exhibited resistance to chloramphenicol, penicillin and streptomycin. It had the ability to produce enzymes such as amylase and chitinase. A bioactive compound was isolated from the strain at stationary phase of culture and identified as 3-phenylpropionic acid (3-PPA) by FT-IR, EI-MS, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectral studies. It exhibited antimicrobial activity against different bacteria like Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. flourescens, Staphylococcus aureus and some fungi including Aspergillus flavus, A. niger, Candida albicans, Fusarium oxysporum, F. udum and Penicillium citrinum. The antifungal activity of 3-PPA of the strain was evaluated in in vivo and in vitro conditions against Fusarium udum causing wilt disease in pigeon pea. The compound 3-PPA is an effective antifungal agent when compared to tricyclozole (fungicide) to control wilt caused by F. udum, but it exhibited less antifungal activity than carbendazim.

  10. Macrophage Activation by Ursolic and Oleanolic Acids during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    López-García, Sonia; Castañeda-Sanchez, Jorge Ismael; Jiménez-Arellanes, Adelina; Domínguez-López, Lilia; Castro-Mussot, Maria Eugenia; Hernández-Sanchéz, Javier; Luna-Herrera, Julieta

    2015-08-06

    Oleanolic (OA) and ursolic acids (UA) are triterpenes that are abundant in vegetables, fruits and medicinal plants. They have been described as active moieties in medicinal plants used for the treatment of tuberculosis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of these triterpenes on macrophages infected in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). We evaluated production of nitric oxide (NO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cytokines (TNF-α and TGF-β) as well as expression of cell membrane receptors (TGR5 and CD36) in MTB-infected macrophages following treatment with OA and UA. Triterpenes caused reduced MTB growth in macrophages, stimulated production of NO and ROS in the early phase, stimulated TNF-α, suppressed TGF-β and caused over-expression of CD36 and TGR5 receptors. Thus, our data suggest immunomodulatory properties of OA and UA on MTB infected macrophages. In conclusion, antimycobacterial effects induced by these triterpenes may be attributable to the conversion of macrophages from stage M2 (alternatively activated) to M1 (classically activated).

  11. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role. PMID:27635169

  12. Pharmacological activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptors regulates erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Chiang, Jui-Chung; Li, Meng-Wei; Lin, Shi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Min; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Yu-Nung; Yang, Ya-Jan; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lu, Jenher; Huang, Chang-Jen; Tigyi, Gabor; Yao, Chao-Ling; Lee, Hsinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor-like phospholipid, regulates numerous physiological functions, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that LPA activates erythropoiesis by activating the LPA 3 receptor subtype (LPA3) under erythropoietin (EPO) induction. In the present study, we applied a pharmacological approach to further elucidate the functions of LPA receptors during red blood cell (RBC) differentiation. In K562 human erythroleukemia cells, knockdown of LPA2 enhanced erythropoiesis, whereas knockdown of LPA3 inhibited RBC differentiation. In CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) and K526 cells, the LPA3 agonist 1-oleoyl-2-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothionate (2S-OMPT) promoted erythropoiesis, whereas the LPA2 agonist dodecyl monophosphate (DMP) and the nonlipid specific agonist GRI977143 (GRI) suppressed this process. In zebrafish embryos, hemoglobin expression was significantly increased by 2S-OMPT treatment but was inhibited by GRI. Furthermore, GRI treatment decreased, whereas 2S-OMPT treatment increased RBC counts and amount of hemoglobin level in adult BALB/c mice. These results indicate that LPA2 and LPA3 play opposing roles during RBC differentiation. The pharmacological activation of LPA receptor subtypes represent a novel strategies for augmenting or inhibiting erythropoiesis. PMID:27244685

  13. Unraveling fatty acid transport and activation mechanisms in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Dulermo, Rémi; Gamboa-Meléndez, Heber; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Thévenieau, France; Nicaud, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    Fatty acid (FA) transport and activation have been extensively studied in the model yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae but have rarely been examined in oleaginous yeasts, such as Yarrowia lipolytica. Because the latter begins to be used in biodiesel production, understanding its FA transport and activation mechanisms is essential. We found that Y. lipolytica has FA transport and activation proteins similar to those of S. cerevisiae (Faa1p, Pxa1p, Pxa2p, Ant1p) but mechanism of FA peroxisomal transport and activation differs greatly with that of S. cerevisiae. While the ScPxa1p/ScPxa2p heterodimer is essential for growth on long-chain FAs, ΔYlpxa1 ΔYlpxa2 is not impaired for growth on FAs. Meanwhile, ScAnt1p and YlAnt1p are both essential for yeast growth on medium-chain FAs, suggesting they function similarly. Interestingly, we found that the ΔYlpxa1 ΔYlpxa2 ΔYlant1 mutant was unable to grow on short-, medium-, or long-chain FAs, suggesting that YlPxa1p, YlPxa2p, and YlAnt1p belong to two different FA degradation pathways. We also found that YlFaa1p is involved in FA storage in lipid bodies and that FA remobilization largely depended on YlFat1p, YlPxa1p and YlPxa2p. This study is the first to comprehensively examine FA intracellular transport and activation in oleaginous yeast.

  14. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP): a transformation sensitive protein with potentials of a cancer marker.

    PubMed

    Herbschleb-Voogt, E; Ten Kate, J; Meera Khan, P

    1983-01-01

    Several observations by independent investigators in the past have indicated that adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP), present in considerable quantities in certain human tissues, was absent or decreased in the cancers originated from them. During the present study, electrophoretic analysis of adenosine deaminase (ADA) isozymes and radioimmunoassay for ADCP in the primary fibroblasts and the transformed as well as certain tumor derived cell lines have demonstrated that ADCP present in large quantities in the primary cells was absent or nearly absent in the transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. Though the mechanisms involved are not yet clear, the above observations indicate that ADCP has the potentials of a useful marker in the studies on transformed cells and cancer tissues.

  15. Combined QM(DFT)/MM molecular dynamics simulations of the deamination of cytosine by yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yuan; Yan, Honggao; Cao, Zexing; Mo, Yirong

    2016-05-15

    Extensive combined quantum mechanical (B3LYP/6-31G*) and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to elucidate the hydrolytic deamination mechanism of cytosine to uracil catalyzed by the yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD). Though cytosine has no direct binding to the zinc center, it reacts with the water molecule coordinated to zinc, and the adjacent conserved Glu64 serves as a general acid/base to shuttle protons from water to cytosine. The overall reaction consists of several proton-transfer processes and nucleophilic attacks. A tetrahedral intermediate adduct of cytosine and water binding to zinc is identified and similar to the crystal structure of yCD with the inhibitor 2-pyrimidinone. The rate-determining step with the barrier of 18.0 kcal/mol in the whole catalytic cycle occurs in the process of uracil departure where the proton transfer from water to Glu64 and nucleophilic attack of the resulting hydroxide anion to C2 of the uracil ring occurs synchronously. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Acid-activated biochar increased sulfamethazine retention in soils.

    PubMed

    Vithanage, Meththika; Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Zhang, Ming; Thiele-Bruhn, Sören; Lee, Sang Soo; Ok, Yong Sik

    2015-02-01

    Sulfamethazine (SMZ) is an ionizable and highly mobile antibiotic which is frequently found in soil and water environments. We investigated the sorption of SMZ onto soils amended with biochars (BCs) at varying pH and contact time. Invasive plants were pyrolyzed at 700 °C and were further activated with 30 % sulfuric (SBBC) and oxalic (OBBC) acids. The sorption rate of SMZ onto SBBC and OBBC was pronouncedly pH dependent and was decreased significantly when the values of soil pH increased from 3 to 5. Modeled effective sorption coefficients (K D,eff) values indicated excellent sorption on SBBC-treated loamy sand and sandy loam soils for 229 and 183 L/kg, respectively. On the other hand, the low sorption values were determined for OBBC- and BBC700-treated loamy sand and sandy loam soils. Kinetic modeling demonstrated that the pseudo second order model was the best followed by intra-particle diffusion and the Elovich model, indicating that multiple processes govern SMZ sorption. These findings were also supported by sorption edge experiments based on BC characteristics. Chemisorption onto protonated and ligand containing functional groups of the BC surface, and diffusion in macro-, meso-, and micro-pores of the acid-activated BCs are the proposed mechanisms of SMZ retention in soils. Calculated and experimental q e (amount adsorbed per kg of the adsorbent at equilibrium) values were well fitted to the pseudo second order model, and the predicted maximum equilibrium concentration of SBBC for loamy sand soils was 182 mg/kg. Overall, SBBC represents a suitable soil amendment because of its high sorption rate of SMZ in soils.

  17. Influence of acid and bile acid on ERK activity, PPARγ expression and cell proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi-Ru; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Zhen-Ni; Qiao, Zhe

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of acid and bile acid exposure on cell proliferation and the expression of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in normal human esophageal epithelial cells in vitro. METHODS: In vitro cultured normal human esophageal epithelial cells were exposed to acidic media (pH 4.0 - 6.5), media containing different bile acid (250 μmol/L), media containing acid and bile acid, respectively. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT and flow cytometry. The expressions of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and PPARγ protein were determined by the immunoblotting technique. RESULTS: Acid-exposed (3 min) esophageal cells exhibited a significant increase in proliferation ratio, S phase of the cell cycle (P < 0.05) and the level of phosphorylated ERK1/2 protein. When the acid-exposure period exceeded 6 min, we observed a decrease in proliferation ratio and S phase of the cell cycle, with an increased apoptosis ratio (P < 0.05). Bile acid exposure (3-12 min) also produced an increase in proliferation ratio, S phase of the cell cycle (P < 0.05) and phosphorylated ERK1/2 expression. On the contrary, deoxycholic acid (DCA) exposure (> 20 min) decreased proliferation ratio. Compared with bile acid exposure (pH 7.4), bile acid exposure (pH 6.5, 4) significantly decreased proliferation ratio (P < 0.05). There was no expression of PPARγ in normal human esophageal epithelial cells. CONCLUSION: The rapid stimuli of acid or bile acid increase proliferation in normal human esophageal epithelial cells by activating the ERK pathway. PMID:16688842

  18. Production of activated carbon from a new precursor molasses by activation with sulphuric acid.

    PubMed

    Legrouri, K; Khouya, E; Ezzine, M; Hannache, H; Denoyel, R; Pallier, R; Naslain, R

    2005-02-14

    Activated carbon has been prepared from molasses, a natural precursor of vegetable origin resulting from the sugar industry in Morocco. The preparation of the activated carbon from the molasses has been carried out by impregnation of the precursor with sulphuric acid, followed by carbonisation at varying conditions (temperature and gas coverage) in order to optimize preparation parameters. The influence of activation conditions was investigated by determination of adsorption capacity of methylene blue and iodine, the BET surface area, and the pore volume of the activated carbon were determined while the micropore volume was determined by the Dubinin-Radushkevich (DR) equation. The activated materials are mainly microporous and reveal the type I isotherm of the Brunauer classification for nitrogen adsorption. The activated carbons properties in this study were found for activation of the mixture (molasses/sulphuric acid) in steam at 750 degrees C. The samples obtained in this condition were highly microporous, with high surface area (> or =1200 m2/g) and the maximum adsorption capacity of methylene blue and iodine were 435 and 1430 mg/g, respectively.

  19. Gene therapy for severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Equihua, Claudia A; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2012-02-01

    The severe combined immunodeficiency caused by the absence of adenosine deaminase (SCID-ADA) was the first monogenic disorder for which gene therapy was developed. Over 30 patients have been treated worldwide using the current protocols, and most of them have experienced clinical benefit; importantly, in the absence of any vector-related complications. In this document, we review the progress made so far in the development and establishment of gene therapy as an alternative form of treatment for ADA-SCID patients.

  20. Creation of zebularine-resistant human cytidine deaminase mutants to enhance the chemoprotection of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Hongmei; Qiu, Songbo; Beard, Brian C; Black, Margaret E

    2016-12-01

    Human cytidine deaminase (hCDA) is a biomedically important enzyme able to inactivate cytidine nucleoside analogs such as the antileukemic agent cytosine arabinoside (AraC) and thereby limit antineoplastic efficacy. Potent inhibitors of hCDA have been developed, e.g. zebularine, that when administered in combination with AraC enhance antineoplastic activity. Tandem hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation and combination chemotherapy (zebularine and AraC) could exhibit robust antineoplastic potency, but AraC-based chemotherapy regimens lead to pronounced myelosuppression due to relatively low hCDA activity in HSCs, and this approach could exacerbate this effect. To circumvent the pronounced myelosuppression of zebularine and AraC combination therapy while maintaining antineoplastic potency, zebularine-resistant hCDA variants could be used to gene-modify HSCs prior to transplantation. To achieve this, our approach was to isolate hCDA variants through random mutagenesis in conjunction with selection for hCDA activity and resistance to zebularine in an Escherichia coli genetic complementation system. Here, we report the identification of nine novel variants from a pool of 1.6 × 10(6) transformants that conferred significant zebularine resistance relative to wild-type hCDA2. Several variants revealed significantly higher Ki values toward zebularine when compared with wild-type hCDA values and, as such, are candidates for further exploration for gene-modified HSC transplantation approaches.

  1. Activity of flumequine against Escherichia coli: in vitro comparison with nalidixic and oxolinic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, D

    1978-01-01

    The in vitro activity of the new antibacterial agent, flumequine, against Escherichia coli was compared with those of oxolinic acid and nalidixic acid. As judged by turbidimetric criteria, flumequine was considerably more active than nalidixic acid and slightly less active than oxolinic acid against both nalidixic acid-susceptible and -resistant strains. Resistance to all three drugs could be easily induced in vitro. The comparative efficacy of flumequine, oxolinic acid, and nalidixic acid was also tested in an in vitro model of the treatment of bacterial cystitis. In this system, suppression of bacterial growth was obtained with markedly lower concentrations of flumequine and oxolinic acid than of nalidixic acid, but prevention of the emergence of bacterial populations that exhibited increased resistance to these compounds depended on the maintenance of adequate drug levels. PMID:400825

  2. In vivo analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ursolic acid and oleanoic acid from Miconia albicans (Melastomataceae).

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Maria Anita L; Royo, Vanessa A; Ferreira, Daniele S; Crotti, Antonio E Miller; Andrade e Silva, Márcio L; Carvalho, José Carlos T; Bastos, Jairo Kenupp; Cunha, Wilson R

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work was to use in vivo models to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ursolic acid (UA) and oleanoic acid (OA), the major compounds isolated as an isomeric mixture from the crude methylene chloride extract of Miconia albicans aerial parts in an attempt to clarify if these compounds are responsible for the analgesic properties displayed by this plant. Ursolic acid inhibited abdominal constriction in a dose-dependent manner, and the result obtained at a content of 40 mg kg(-1) was similar to that produced by administration of acetylsalicylic acid at a content of 100 mg kg(-1). Both acids reduced the number of paw licks in the second phase of the formalin test, and both of them displayed a significant anti-inflammatory effect at a content of 40 mg kg(-1). It is noteworthy that the administration of the isolated mixture, containing 65% ursolic acid/35% oleanolic acid, did not display significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. On the basis of the obtained results, considering that the mixture of UA and OA was poorly active, it is suggested that other compounds, rather than UA and OA, should be responsible for the evaluated activities in the crude extract, since the crude extract samples displayed good activities.

  3. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for the in vitro antimycobacterial activity of pyrazinoic acid esters.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, K E; Cynamon, M H; Welch, J T

    1996-08-16

    Substituted pyrazinoic acid esters have previously been reported to have in vitro activity against Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium kansasii as well as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Modification of both the pyrazine nucleus and the ester functionality was successful in expanding the antimycobacterial activity associated with pyrazinamide to include M. avium and M. kansasii, organisms usually not susceptible to pyrazinamide. In an attempt to understand the relationship between the activity of the esters with the needed biostability, a quantitative structure-activity relationship has been developed. This derived relationship is consistent with the observation that tert-butyl 5-chloropyrazinoate (13) and 2'-(2'-methyldecyl) 5-chloropyrazinoate (25), compounds which are both 100-fold more active than pyrazinamide against M. tuberculosis and possess a serum stability 900-1000 times greater than the lead compounds in the series.

  4. Antioxidant Activity and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activities of the Polycondensate of Catechin with Glyoxylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hanjun; Liu, Benguo

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate polymeric flavonoids, the polycondensate of catechin with glyoxylic acid (PCG) was prepared and its chemically antioxidant, cellular antioxidant (CAA) and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were evaluated. The DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities and antiproliferative effect of PCG were lower than those of catechin, while PCG had higher CAA activity than catechin. In addition, PCG had very high α-glucosidase inhibitory activities (IC50 value, 2.59 μg/mL) in comparison to catechin (IC50 value, 239.27 μg/mL). Inhibition kinetics suggested that both PCG and catechin demonstrated a mixture of noncompetitive and anticompetitive inhibition. The enhanced CAA and α-glucosidase inhibitor activities of PCG could be due to catechin polymerization enhancing the binding capacity to the cellular membrane and enzymes. PMID:26960205

  5. Antioxidant Activity and α-Glucosidase Inhibitory Activities of the Polycondensate of Catechin with Glyoxylic Acid.

    PubMed

    Geng, Sheng; Shan, Sharui; Ma, Hanjun; Liu, Benguo

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate polymeric flavonoids, the polycondensate of catechin with glyoxylic acid (PCG) was prepared and its chemically antioxidant, cellular antioxidant (CAA) and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were evaluated. The DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities and antiproliferative effect of PCG were lower than those of catechin, while PCG had higher CAA activity than catechin. In addition, PCG had very high α-glucosidase inhibitory activities (IC50 value, 2.59 μg/mL) in comparison to catechin (IC50 value, 239.27 μg/mL). Inhibition kinetics suggested that both PCG and catechin demonstrated a mixture of noncompetitive and anticompetitive inhibition. The enhanced CAA and α-glucosidase inhibitor activities of PCG could be due to catechin polymerization enhancing the binding capacity to the cellular membrane and enzymes.

  6. Stimulation of phosphatidylglycerolphosphate phosphatase activity by unsaturated fatty acids in rat heart.

    PubMed

    Cao, S G; Hatch, G M

    1994-07-01

    Phosphatidylglycerolphosphate (PGP) synthase and PGP phosphatase catalyze the sequential synthesis of phosphatidylglycerol from cytidine-5'-diphosphate 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol (CDP-DG) and glycerol-3-phosphate. PGP synthase and PGP phosphatase activities were characterized in rat heart mitochondrial fractions, and the effect of fatty acids on the activity of these enzymes was determined. PGP synthase was observed to be a heat labile enzyme that exhibited apparent Km values for CDP-PG and glycerol-3-phosphate of 46 and 20 microM, respectively. The addition of exogenous oleic acid to the assay mixture did not affect PGP synthase activity. PGP phosphatase was observed to be a heat labile enzyme, and addition of oleic acid to the assay mixture caused a concentration-dependent stimulation of PGP phosphatase activity. Maximum stimulation (1.9-fold) of enzyme activity was observed in the presence of 0.5 mM oleic acid, but the stimulation was slightly attenuated by the presence of albumin in the assay. The presence of oleic acid in the assay mixture caused the inactivation of PGP phosphatase activity to be retarded at 55 degrees C. Stimulation of PGP phosphatase activity was also observed with arachidonic acid, whereas taurocholic, stearic and palmitic acids did not significantly affect PGP phosphatase activity. The activity of mitochondrial phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase was not affected by inclusion of oleic acid in the incubation mixture. We postulate that unsaturated fatty acids stimulate PGP phosphatase activity in rat heart.

  7. Lipophilic pyrazinoic acid amide and ester prodrugs stability, activation and activity against M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Simões, Marta Filipa; Valente, Emília; Gómez, M José Rodríguez; Anes, Elsa; Constantino, Luís

    2009-06-28

    Pyrazinamide (PZA) is active against M. tuberculosis and is a first line agent for the treatment of human tuberculosis. PZA is itself a prodrug that requires activation by a pyrazinamidase to form its active metabolite pyrazinoic acid (POA). Since the specificity of cleavage is dependent on a single bacterial enzyme, resistance to PZA is often found in tuberculosis patients. Esters of POA have been proposed in the past as alternatives to PZA however the most promising compounds were rapidly degraded in the presence of serum. In order to obtain compounds that could survive during the transport phase, we synthesized lipophilic ester and amide POA derivatives, studied their activity against M. tuberculosis, their stability in plasma and rat liver homogenate and also their activation by a mycobacterial homogenate. The new lipophilic ester prodrugs were found to be active in concentrations 10-fold lower than those needed for PZA to kill sensitive M. tuberculosis and also have a suitable stability in the presence of plasma. Amides of POA although more stable in plasma have lower activity. The reason can probably be found in the rate of activation of both types of prodrugs; while esters are easily activated by mycobacterial esterases, amides are resistant to activation and are not transformed into POA at a suitable rate.

  8. [Activated Sludge Bacteria Transforming Cyanopyridines and Amides of Pyridinecarboxylic Acids].

    PubMed

    Demakov, V A; Vasil'ev, D M; Maksimova, Yu G; Pavlova, Yu A; Ovechkina, G V; Maksimov, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    Species diversity of bacteria from the activated sludge of Perm biological waste treatment facilities capable of transformation of cyanopyridines and amides of pyridinecarboxylic acids was investigated. Enrichment cultures in mineral media with 3-cyanopyridine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source were used to obtain 32 clones of gram-negative heterotrophic bacteria exhibiting moderate growth on solid and liquid media with 3- and 4-cyanopyridine. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene fragments revealed that the clones with homology of at least 99% belonged to the genera Acinetobacte, Alcaligenes, Delftia, Ochrobactrum, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas, and Xanthobacter. PCR analysis showed that 13 out of 32 isolates contained the sequences (-1070 bp) homologous to the nitrilase genes reported previously in Alcaligenes faecalis JM3 (GenBank, D13419.1). Nine clones were capable of nitrile and amide transformation in minimal salt medium. Acinetobacter sp. 11 h and Alcaligenes sp. osv transformed 3-cyanopyridine to nicotinamide, while most of the clones possessed amidase activity (0.5 to 46.3 mmol/(g h) for acetamide and 0.1 to 5.6 mmol/(g h) for nicotinamide). Nicotinamide utilization by strain A. faecalis 2 was shown to result in excretion of a secondary metabolite, which was identified as dodecyl acrylate at 91% probability.

  9. Mapping human brain fatty acid amide hydrolase activity with PET

    PubMed Central

    Rusjan, Pablo M; Wilson, Alan A; Mizrahi, Romina; Boileau, Isabelle; Chavez, Sofia E; Lobaugh, Nancy J; Kish, Stephen J; Houle, Sylvain; Tong, Junchao

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoid tone has recently been implicated in a number of prevalent neuropsychiatric conditions. [11C]CURB is the first available positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer for imaging fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the enzyme which metabolizes the prominent endocannabinoid anandamide. Here, we sought to determine the most suitable kinetic modeling approach for quantifying [11C]CURB that binds selectively to FAAH. Six healthy volunteers were scanned with arterial blood sampling for 90 minutes. Kinetic parameters were estimated regionally using a one-tissue compartment model (TCM), a 2-TCM with and without irreversible trapping, and an irreversible 3-TCM. The 2-TCM with irreversible trapping provided the best identifiability of PET outcome measures among the approaches studied (coefficient of variation (COV) of the net influx constant Ki and the composite parameter λk3 (λ=K1/k2) <5%, and COV(k3)<10%). Reducing scan time to 60 minutes did not compromise the identifiability of rate constants. Arterial spin labeling measures of regional cerebral blood flow were only slightly correlated with Ki, but not with k3 or λk3. Our data suggest that λk3 is sensitive to changes in FAAH activity, therefore, optimal for PET quantification of FAAH activities with [11C]CURB. Simulations showed that [11C]CURB binding in healthy subjects is far from a flow-limited uptake. PMID:23211960

  10. Chemical modifications of natural triterpenes - glycyrrhetinic and boswellic acids: evaluation of their biological activity

    PubMed Central

    Subba Rao, G. S. R.; Kondaiah, Paturu; Singh, Sanjay K.; Ravanan, Palaniyandi; Sporn, Michael B.

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic analogues of naturally occurring triterpenoids; glycyrrhetinic acid, arjunolic acid and boswellic acids, by modification of A-ring with a cyano- and enone- functionalities, have been reported. A novel method of synthesis of α-cyanoenones from isoxazoles is reported. Bio-assays using primary mouse macrophages and tumor cell lines indicate potent anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities associated with cyanoenones of boswellic acid and glycyrrhetinic acid. PMID:20622928

  11. Antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) against periodontopathic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mengjun; Zhou, Zichao; Dong, Jiachen; Zhang, Jichun; Xia, Yiru; Shu, Rong

    2016-10-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) are two major omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) with antimicrobial properties. In this study, we evaluated the potential antibacterial and antibiofilm activities of DHA and EPA against two periodontal pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum). MTT assay showed that DHA and EPA still exhibited no cytotoxicity to human oral tissue cells when the concentration came to 100 μM and 200 μM, respectively. Against P. gingivalis, DHA and EPA showed the same minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 12.5 μM, and a respective minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 12.5 μM and 25 μM. However, the MIC and MBC values of DHA or EPA against F. nucleatum were both greater than 100 μM. For early-stage bacteria, DHA or EPA displayed complete inhibition on the planktonic growth and biofilm formation of P. gingivalis from the lowest concentration of 12.5 μM. And the planktonic growth of F. nucleatum was slightly but not completely inhibited by DHA or EPA even at the concentration of 100 μM, however, the biofilm formation of F. nucleatum at 24 h was significantly restrained by 100 μM EPA. For exponential-phase bacteria, 100 μM DHA or EPA completely killed P. gingivalis and significantly decreased the viable counts of F. nucleatum. Meanwhile, the morphology of P. gingivalis was apparently damaged, and the virulence factor gene expression of P. gingivalis and F. nucleatum was strongly downregulated. Besides, the viability and the thickness of mature P. gingivalis biofilm, together with the viability of mature F. nucleatum biofilm were both significantly decreased in the presence of 100 μM DHA or EPA. In conclusion, DHA and EPA possessed antibacterial activities against planktonic and biofilm forms of periodontal pathogens, which suggested that DHA and EPA might be potentially supplementary therapeutic agents for prevention

  12. Tad1p, a yeast tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase, is related to the mammalian pre-mRNA editing enzymes ADAR1 and ADAR2.

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, A; Grosjean, H; Melcher, T; Keller, W

    1998-01-01

    We have identified an RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (termed Tad1p/scADAT1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that selectively converts adenosine at position 37 of eukaryotic tRNAAla to inosine. The activity of purified recombinant Tad1p depends on the conformation of its tRNA substrate and the enzyme was found to be inactive on all other types of RNA tested. Mutant strains in which the TAD1 gene is disrupted are viable but lack Tad1p enzyme activity and their tRNAAla is not modified at position A37. Transformation of the mutant cells with the TAD1 gene restored enzyme activity. Tad1p has significant sequence similarity with the mammalian editing enzymes which act on specific precursor-mRNAs and on long double-stranded RNA. These findings suggest an evolutionary link between pre-mRNA editing and tRNA modification. PMID:9707437

  13. Synthesis and biological activity of novel amino acid-(N'-benzoyl) hydrazide and amino acid-(N'-nicotinoyl) hydrazide derivatives.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Sherine N

    2005-09-30

    The coupling reaction of benzoic acid and nicotinic acid hydrazides with N- protected L-amino acids including valine, leucine, phenylalanine, glutamic acid and tyrosine is reported. The target compounds, N-Boc-amino acid-(N;-benzoyl)- and N- Boc-amino acid-(N;-nicotinoyl) hydrazides 5a-5e and 6a-6e were prepared in very high yields and purity using N-[(dimethylamino)-1H-1,2,3-triazolo[4,5-b]pyridin-1-yl- methylene]-N-methyl-methanaminium hexafluorophosphate N-oxide (HATU) as coupling reagent. The antimicrobial activity of the Cu and Cd complexes of the designed compounds was tested. The products were deprotected affording the corresponding amino acid-(N;-benzoyl) hydrazide hydrochloride salts (7a-7e) and amino acid-(N;- nicotinoyl) hydrazide hydrochloride salts (8a-8e). These compounds and their Cu and Cd complexes were also tested for their antimicrobial activity. Several compounds showed comparable activity to that of ampicillin against S. aureus and E. coli.

  14. Oleic acid and linoleic acid from Tenebrio molitor larvae inhibit BACE1 activity in vitro: molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Youn, Kumju; Yun, Eun-Young; Lee, Jinhyuk; Kim, Ji-Young; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Jeong, Woo-Sik; Jun, Mira

    2014-02-01

    In our ongoing research to find therapeutic compounds for Alzheimer's disease (AD) from natural resources, the inhibitory activity of the BACE1 enzyme by Tenebrio molitor larvae and its major compounds were evaluated. The T. molitor larvae extract and its fractions exhibited strong BACE1 suppression. The major components of hexane fraction possessing both high yield and strong BACE1 inhibition were determined by thin layer chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. A remarkable composition of unsaturated long chain fatty acids, including oleic acid and linoleic acid, were identified. Oleic acid, in particular, noncompetitively attenuated BACE1 activity with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) value of 61.31 μM and Ki value of 34.3 μM. Furthermore, the fatty acids were stably interacted with BACE1 at different allosteric sites of the enzyme bound with the OH of CYS319 and the NH₃ of TYR320 for oleic acid and with the C=O group of GLN304 for linoleic acid. Here, we first revealed novel pharmacophore features of oleic acids and linoleic acid to BACE1 by in silico docking studies. The present findings would clearly suggest potential guidelines for designing novel BACE1 selective inhibitors.

  15. Analgesic and antiinflammatory activity of kaur-16-en-19-oic acid from Annona reticulata L. bark.

    PubMed

    Chavan, Machindra J; Kolhe, Dinesh R; Wakte, Pravin S; Shinde, Devanand B

    2012-02-01

    Kaur-16-en-19-oic acid was isolated from the bark of Annona reticulata and studied for its analgesic and antiinflammatory activity. Analgesic activity was assessed using the hot plate test and acetic acid-induced writhing, and the antiinflammatory activity using the carrageenan induced rat paw oedema method. Kaur-16-en-19-oic acid, at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg, exhibited significant (p < 0.05) analgesic and antiinflammatory activity. These activities were comparable to the standard drugs used, and furthermore the analgesic effect of kaur-16-en-19-oic acid was blocked by naloxone (2 mg/kg) in both analgesic models.

  16. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of p-coumaric acid.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim

    2013-11-01

    p-coumaric acid (4-hydroxycinnamic acid), a phenolic acid, is a hydroxyl derivative of cinnamic acid. It decreases low density lipoprotein (LDL) peroxidation and reduces the risk of stomach cancer. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of p-coumaric acid were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe(3+)) reducing ability. p-Coumaric acid inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 66.8%, 69.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, p-coumaric acid had an effective DPPH scavenging, ABTS(+) scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe(3+)) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that p-coumaric acid can be used in the pharmacological and food industry because of these properties.

  17. Spectroscopic studies on the antioxidant activity of p-coumaric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliç, Ismail; Yeşiloğlu, Yeşim

    2013-11-01

    p-coumaric acid (4-hydroxycinnamic acid), a phenolic acid, is a hydroxyl derivative of cinnamic acid. It decreases low density lipoprotein (LDL) peroxidation and reduces the risk of stomach cancer. In vitro radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of p-coumaric acid were clarified using different analytical methodologies such as total antioxidant activity determination by ferric thiocyanate, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical (DPPH) scavenging, 2,2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging activity and superoxide anion radical scavenging, ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activity and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing ability. p-Coumaric acid inhibited 71.2% lipid peroxidation of a linoleic acid emulsion at 45 μg/mL concentration. On the other hand, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid displayed 66.8%, 69.8%, 64.5% and 59.7% inhibition on the peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, p-coumaric acid had an effective DPPHrad scavenging, ABTSrad + scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing power and ferrous ions (Fe2+) chelating activities. Also, those various antioxidant activities were compared to BHA, BHT, α-tocopherol and ascorbic acid as references antioxidant compounds. These results suggested that p-coumaric acid can be used in the pharmacological and food industry because of these properties.

  18. Thymidine kinase/ganciclovir and cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine suicide gene therapy-induced cell apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, H; Tao, L; Qi, K; Wang, Y; Li, Q; Du, J; Huang, Z

    2013-09-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the efficacy of suicide gene therapy with thymidine kinase (TK) in combination with cytosine deaminase (CD) for breast cancer. The expression of CD/TK was detected in the infected cells by RT-PCR. The killing effect on MCF-7 cells following treatment was analyzed by MTT assay. The morphological characteristics of the cells were observed by electron microscopy, and the distribution of the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Caspase‑3 and -8 activities were detected by absorption spectrometry. Cytotoxic assays showed that cells transfected with CD/TK became more sensitive to the prodrugs. Morphological features characteristic of apoptosis were noted in the MCF‑7 cells via electron microscopy. The experimental data showed that the proportion of MCF-7 cells during the different phases of the cell cycle varied significantly following treatment with the prodrugs. The activity of caspase‑3 gradually increased following treatment with increasing concentrations of the prodrugs. We conclude that the TK/ganciclovir and CD/5-fluorocytosine suicide gene system used here induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells, and provides a promising treatment modality for breast cancer.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of fatty acid methyl esters of some members of Chenopodiaceae.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Manivachagam; Kannathasan, Krishnan; Venkatesalu, Venugopalan

    2008-01-01

    Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) extracts of four halophytic plants, viz. Arthrocnemum indicum, Salicornia brachiata, Suaeda maritima and Suaeda monoica belonging to the family Chenopodiaceae, were prepared and their composition was analyzed by GC-MS. The FAME extracts were also screened for antibacterial and antifungal activities. The GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of more saturated fatty acids than unsaturated fatty acids. Among the fatty acids analyzed, the relative percentage of lauric acid was high in S. brachiata (61.85%). The FAME extract of S. brachiata showed the highest antibacterial and antifungal activities among the extracts tested. The other three extracts showed potent antibacterial and moderate anticandidal activities.

  20. Salicylic acid induces mitochondrial injury by inhibiting ferrochelatase heme biosynthesis activity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vipul; Liu, Shujie; Ando, Hideki; Ishii, Ryohei; Tateno, Shumpei; Kaneko, Yuki; Yugami, Masato; Sakamoto, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Nureki, Osamu; Handa, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Salicylic acid is a classic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Although salicylic acid also induces mitochondrial injury, the mechanism of its antimitochondrial activity is not well understood. In this study, by using a one-step affinity purification scheme with salicylic acid-immobilized beads, ferrochelatase (FECH), a homodimeric enzyme involved in heme biosynthesis in mitochondria, was identified as a new molecular target of salicylic acid. Moreover, the cocrystal structure of the FECH-salicylic acid complex was determined. Structural and biochemical studies showed that salicylic acid binds to the dimer interface of FECH in two possible orientations and inhibits its enzymatic activity. Mutational analysis confirmed that Trp301 and Leu311, hydrophobic amino acid residues located at the dimer interface, are directly involved in salicylic acid binding. On a gel filtration column, salicylic acid caused a shift in the elution profile of FECH, indicating that its conformational change is induced by salicylic acid binding. In cultured human cells, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis, whereas salicylic acid did not exert its inhibitory effect in FECH knockdown cells. Concordantly, salicylic acid treatment or FECH knockdown inhibited heme synthesis in zebrafish embryos. Strikingly, the salicylic acid-induced effect in zebrafish was partially rescued by FECH overexpression. Taken together, these findings illustrate that FECH is responsible for salicylic acid-induced inhibition of heme synthesis, which may contribute to its antimitochondrial and anti-inflammatory function. This study establishes a novel aspect of the complex pharmacological effects of salicylic acid.

  1. Effect of surface acidic oxides of activated carbon on adsorption of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen-Chia; Li, Hong-Song; Chen, Chien-Hung

    2008-11-30

    The influence of surface acidity of activated carbon (AC) was experimentally studied on adsorption of ammonia (NH(3)). Coconut shell-based AC was modified by various acids at different concentrations. There were five different acids employed to modified AC, which included nitric acid, sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid, and acetic acid. Acidic functional groups on the surface of ACs were determined by a Fourier transform infrared spectrograph (FTIR) and by the Boehm titration method. Specific surface area and pore volume of the ACs were measured by a nitrogen adsorption apparatus. Adsorption amounts of NH(3) onto the ACs were measured by a dynamic adsorption system at room temperature according to the principle of the ASTM standard test method. The concentration of NH(3) in the effluent stream was monitored by a gas-detecting tube technique. Experimental results showed that adsorption amounts of NH(3) on the modified ACs were all enhanced. The ammonia adsorption amounts on various activated carbons modified by different acids are in the following order: nitric acid>sulfuric acid>acetic acid approximately phosphoric acid>hydrochloric acid. It is worth to note that the breakthrough capacity of NH(3) is linearly proportional to the amount of acidic functional groups of the ACs.

  2. Protective role of caffeic acid phenethyl ester and erdosteine on activities of purine-catabolizing enzymes and level of nitric oxide in red blood cells of isoniazid-administered rats.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, H R; Uz, E; Gökalp, O; Ozçelik, N; Ciçek, E; Ozer, M K

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the possible role of nitric oxide (NO) and the activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and xanthine oxidase (XO) in the pathogenesis of isoniazid (INH)-induced oxidative damage in red blood cells (RBCs), and also to show the effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and erdosteine, antioxidants, in decreasing this toxicity. A total of 25 adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups as follows: control group (n = 7), INH-treated group (n = 6), INH + CAPE-treated group (n = 6), and INH + erdosteine-treated group (n = 6). INH, INH-CAPE, and INH-erdosteine-treated groups were treated orally with INH 50 mg/kg daily and with the tap water for 15 days. Control group was given only tap water. CAPE was intraperitoneally injected for 15 days at a dose of 10 micromol/kg. Erdosteine was treated orally for 15 days at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day. The injection of INH led to a significant increase in the activities of ADA, XO, and NO levels in RBCs of rats. Co-treatment with CAPE caused a significant decrease in the activities of ADA and XO and the levels of NO in RBCs. In addition, co-treatment with erdosteine caused a significant decrease in the activities of ADA and XO and the levels of NO in RBCs. The results of this study showed that ADA, XO, and NO may play an important role in the pathogenesis of INH-induced oxidative stress in RBCs. CAPE and erdosteine may have protective potential in this process and they may become a promising drug in the prevention of this undesired side effect of INH.

  3. Separation and recovery of nucleic acids with improved biological activity by acid-degradable polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Kyung; Kwon, Young Jik

    2010-05-01

    One of the fundamental challenges in studying biomacromolecules (e.g. nucleic acids and proteins) and their complexes in a biological system is isolating them in their structurally and functionally intact forms. Electrophoresis offers convenient and efficient separation and analysis of biomacromolecules but recovery of separated biomacromolecules is a significant challenge. In this study, DNAs of various sizes were separated by electrophoresis in an acid-degradable polyacrylamide gel. Almost 100% of the nucleic acids were recovered after the identified gel bands were hydrolyzed under a mildly acidic condition and purified using anion exchange resin. Further concentration by centrifugal filtration and a second purification using ion exchange column chromatography yielded 44-84% of DNA. The second conventional (non-degradable) gel electrophoresis confirmed that the nucleic acids recovered from acid-degradable gel bands preserved their electrophoretic properties through acidic gel hydrolysis, purification, and concentration processes. The plasmid DNA recovered from acid-degradable gel transfected cells significantly more efficiently than the starting plasmid DNA (i.e. improved biological activity via acid-degradable PAGE). Separation of other types of nucleic acids such as small interfering RNA using this convenient and efficient technique was also demonstrated.

  4. Activity of virgin coconut oil, lauric acid or monolaurin in combination with lactic acid against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tangwatcharin, Pussadee; Khopaibool, Prapaporn

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro activities of virgin coconut oil, lauric acid and monolaurin in combination with lactic acid against two strains of Staphylococcus aureus, ATCC 25923 and an isolate from a pig carcass, by determination of Fractional Bactericidal Concentration Index (FBCI), time-kill method, as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC) of lauric acid, monolaurin and lactic acid were 3.2 mg/ml, 0.1 mg/ml and 0.4% (v/v), respectively. The effects of lauric acid + lactic acid and monolaurin + lactic acid combinations were synergistic against both strains, exhibiting FBCIs of 0.25 and 0.63, respectively. In time-kill studies, lauric acid and monolaurin + lactic acid combinations added at their minimum inhibitory concentrations produced a bactericidal effect. The induction of stress in non-stressed cells was dependent on the type and concentration of antimicrobial. This resulted in a loss and change of the cytoplasm and membrane in cells of the bacterium. In contrast, virgin coconut oil (10%) was not active against S. aureus. The bacterial counts found in pork loin treated with lauric acid and monolaurin alone were significantly higher (p <0.05) than those treated with both lipids in combination with lactic acid at sub-inhibitory concentrations. The color, odor and overall acceptability of the pork loins were adversely affected by treatment with the three lipids and lactic acid alone but when combinations of the agents were used the sensory quality was acceptable.

  5. Lactobacillus plantarum phytase activity is due to non-specific acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Zamudio, M; González, A; Medina, J A

    2001-03-01

    Microbial phytases suitable for food fermentations could be obtained from lactic acid bacteria isolated from natural vegetable fermentations. Phytase activity was evaluated for six lactic acid bacteria cultures. Although the highest activity was found for Lactobacillus plantarum, the phytase activity was very low. Further characterization of the enzyme with phytate-degrading activity showed a molecular weight of 52 kDa and an optimum activity at pH 5.5 and 65 degrees C. Enzyme activity was due to a non-specific acid phosphatase which had a higher hydrolysis rate with monophosphorylated compounds such as acetyl phosphate that could explain the low phytase activity.

  6. Biological Activities of Toninia candida and Usnea barbata Together with Their Norstictic Acid and Usnic Acid Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Ranković, Branislav; Kosanić, Marijana; Stanojković, Tatjana; Vasiljević, Perica; Manojlović, Nedeljko

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the chemical composition of acetone extracts of the lichens Toninia candida and Usnea barbata and in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities of these extracts together with some of their major metabolites. The chemical composition of T. candida and U. barbata extracts was determined using HPLC-UV analysis. The major phenolic compounds in these extracts were norstictic acid (T. candida) and usnic acid (U. barbata). Antioxidant activity was evaluated by free radical scavenging, superoxide anion radical scavenging, reducing power and determination of total phenolic compounds. Results of the study proved that norstictic acid had the largest antioxidant activity. The total content of phenols in the extracts was determined as the pyrocatechol equivalent. The antimicrobial activity was estimated by determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration using the broth microdilution method. The most active was usnic acid with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 0.0008 to 0.5 mg/mL. Anticancer activity was tested against FemX (human melanoma) and LS174 (human colon carcinoma) cell lines using the microculture tetrazolium test. Usnic acid was found to have the strongest anticancer activity towards both cell lines with IC50 values of 12.72 and 15.66 μg/mL. PMID:23203090

  7. Metabolic engineering of acid resistance elements to improve acid resistance and propionic acid production of Propionibacterium jensenii.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ningzi; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Liu, Long

    2016-06-01

    Propionic acid (PA) and its salts are widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. Microbial production of PA by propionibacteria is a typical product-inhibited process, and acid resistance is crucial in the improvement of PA titers and productivity. We previously identified two key acid resistance elements-the arginine deaminase and glutamate decarboxylase systems-that protect propionibacteria against PA stress by maintaining intracellular pH homeostasis. In this study, we attempted to improve the acid resistance and PA production of Propionibacterium jensenii ATCC 4868 by engineering these elements. Specifically, five genes (arcA, arcC, gadB, gdh, and ybaS) encoding components of the arginine deaminase and glutamate decarboxylase systems were overexpressed in P. jensenii. The activities of the five enzymes in the engineered strains were 26.7-489.0% higher than those in wild-type P. jensenii. The growth rates of the engineered strains decreased, whereas specific PA production increased significantly compared with those of the wild-type strain. Among the overexpressed genes, gadB (encoding glutamate decarboxylase) increased PA resistance and yield most effectively; the PA resistance of P. jensenii-gadB was more than 10-fold higher than that of the wild-type strain, and the production titer, yield, and conversion ratio of PA reached 10.81 g/L, 5.92 g/g cells, and 0.56 g/g glycerol, representing increases of 22.0%, 23.8%, and 21.7%, respectively. We also investigated the effects of introducing these acid resistance elements on the transcript levels of related enzymes. The results showed that the expression of genes in the engineered pathways affected the expression of the other genes. Additionally, the intracellular pools of amino acids were altered as different genes were overexpressed, which may further contribute to the enhanced PA production. This study provides an effective strategy for improving PA production in propionibacteria; this

  8. Production of starch with antioxidative activity by baking starch with organic acids.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Shoji; Nakamura, Megumi; Okuno, Michiko; Miyazaki, Hisako; Watanabe, Jun; Ishikawa-Takano, Yuko; Miura, Makoto; Takase, Nao; Hayakawa, Sachio; Kobayashi, Shoichi

    2011-01-01

    A starch ingredient with antioxidative activity, as measured by the DPPH method, was produced by baking corn starch with an organic acid; it has been named ANOX sugar (antioxidative sugar). The baking temperature and time were fixed at 170 °C and 60 min, and the organic acid used was selected from preliminary trials of various kinds of acid. The phytic acid ANOX sugar preparation showed the highest antioxidative activity, but the color of the preparation was almost black; we therefore selected L-tartaric acid which had the second highest antioxidative activity. The antioxidative activity of the L-tartaric acid ANOX sugar preparation was stable against temperature, light, and enzyme treatments (α-amylase and glucoamylase). However, the activity was not stable against variations in water content and pH value. The antioxidative activity of ANOX sugar was stabilized by treating with boiled water or nitrogen gas, or by pH adjustment.

  9. Boron removal from aqueous solutions by activated carbon impregnated with salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Celik, Z Ceylan; Can, B Z; Kocakerim, M Muhtar

    2008-03-21

    In this study, the removal of boric acid from aqueous solution by activated carbon impregnated with salicylic acid was studied in batch system. pH, adsorbent amount, initial boron concentration, temperature, shaking rate and salicylic acid film thickness were chosen as parameters. Boron removal efficiencies increased with increasing adsorbent amount, temperature and pH, decreasing initial boron concentration. As thickness of salicylic acid film on activated carbon becomes thin up to 0.088nm, the efficiency increased, and then, the efficiency decreased with becoming thinner than 0.088nm of salicylic acid film. Shaking rate was no effect on removal efficiency. In result, it was determined that the use of salicylic acid as an impregnant for activated carbon led to the increase of the amount of boron adsorbed. A lactone ring, being the most appropriate conformation, forms between boric acid and -COOH and -OH groups of salicylic acid.

  10. [Degradation of Acid Orange 7 with Persulfate Activated by Silver Loaded Granular Activated Carbon].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-ming; Huang, Tian-yin; Chen, Jia-bin; Li, Wen-wei; Zhang, Li-ming

    2015-11-01

    Granular activated carbon with silver loaded as activator (Ag/GAC) was prepared using impregnation method. N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were adopted to characterize the Ag/GAC, showing that silver was successfully loaded on granular activated carbon. The oxidation degradation of acid orange 7 (AO7) by the Ag/GAC activated by persulfate (PS) was investigated at ambient temperature. The influences of factors such as Ag loading, PS or Ag/GAC dosages and initial pH on the degradation of AO7 were evaluated. The results demonstrated that the degradation rate of AO7 could reach more than 95.0% after 180 min when the Ag loading content, PS/AO7 molar ratio, the Ag/GAC dosage were 12.7 mg x g(-1), 120: 1, 1.0 g x L(-1), respectively. The initial pH had significant effect on the AO7 degradation, with pH 5.0 as the optimal pH for the degradation of AO7. The possible degradation pathway was proposed for the AO7 degradation by using UV-visible spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GG/MS). The azo bond and naphthalene ring in the AO7 were destroyed during the degradation, with phthalic acid and acetophenone as the main degradation products.

  11. Arundo donax cane as a precursor for activated carbons preparation by phosphoric acid activation.

    PubMed

    Vernersson, T; Bonelli, P R; Cerrella, E G; Cukierman, A L

    2002-06-01

    Canes from Arundo donax, a herbaceous rapid-growing plant, were used as precursor for activated carbon preparation by phosphoric acid activation under a self-generated atmosphere. The influence of the carbonization temperature in the range 400-550 degrees C and of the weight ratio phosphoric acid to precursor (R = 1.5-2.5) on the developed porous structure of the resulting carbons was studied for 1 h of carbonization time. Surface properties of the activated carbons were dependent on a combined effect of the conditions employed. Carbons developed either with R = 1.5 over the range 400-500 degrees C, or with R = 2 at 500 degrees C exhibited surface areas of around 1100 m2/g, the latter conditions promoting a larger pore volume and enhanced mesoporous character. For both ratios, temperature above 500 degrees C led to reduction in porosity development. A similar effect was found for the highest ratio (R = 2.5) and 500 degrees C. The influence of carrying out the carbonization either for times shorter than 1 h or under flowing N2 was also examined at selected conditions (R = 2, 500 degrees C). Shorter times induced increase in the surface area (approximately 1300 m2/g), yielding carbons with smaller mean pore radius. Activated carbons obtained under flowing N2 possessed predominant microporous structures and larger ash contents than the samples derived in the self-generated atmosphere.

  12. Antibacterial activity of triterpene acids and semi-synthetic derivatives against oral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Scalon Cunha, Luis C; Andrade e Silva, Márcio L; Cardoso Furtado, Niege A J; Vinhólis, Adriana H C; Gomes Martins, Carlos H; da Silva Filho, Ademar A; Cunha, Wilson R

    2007-01-01

    Triterpene acids (ursolic, oleanoic, gypsogenic, and sumaresinolic acids) isolated from Miconia species, along with a mixture of ursolic and oleanolic acids and a mixture of maslinic and 2-a-hydroxyursolic acids, as well as ursolic acid derivatives were evaluated against the following microorganisms: Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus salivarius, Streptococcus sobrinus, and Enterococcus faecalis, which are potentially responsible for the formation of dental caries in humans. The microdilution method was used for the determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) during the evaluation of the antibacterial activity. All the isolated compounds, mixtures, and semi-synthetic derivatives displayed activity against all the tested bacteria, showing that they are promising antiplaque and anticaries agents. Ursolic and oleanolic acids displayed the most intense antibacterial effect, with MIC values ranging from 30 microg/mL to 80 microg/mL. The MIC values of ursolic acid derivatives, as well as those obtained for the mixture of ursolic and oleanolic acids showed that these compounds do not have higher antibacterial activity when compared with the activity observed with either ursolic acid or oleanolic acid alone. With regard to the structure-activity relationship of triterpene acids and derivatives, it is suggested that both hydroxy and carboxy groups present in the triterpenes are important for their antibacterial activity against oral pathogens.

  13. Adsorption of organic acids from dilute aqueous solution onto activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.W.

    1980-06-01

    The radioisotope technique was used to study the removal of organic acid contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions onto activated carbon. Acetic acid, propionic acid, n-butyric acid, n-hexanoic acid and n-heptanoic acid were studied at 278, 298, and 313/sup 0/K. Three bi-solute acid mixtures (acetic and propionic acids, acetic and butanoic acids, and propionic and butanoic acids) were studied at 278 and 298/sup 0/K. Isotherms of the single-solute systems were obtained at three different temperatures in the very dilute concentration region (less than 1% by weight). These data are very important in the prediction of bi-solute equilibrium data. A Polanyi-based competitive adsorption potential theory was used to predict the bi-solute equilibrium uptakes. Average errors between calculated and experimental data ranges from 4% to 14%. It was found that the competitive adsorption potential theory gives slightly better results than the ideal adsorbed solution theory.

  14. Porous texture of activated carbons prepared by phosphoric acid activation of woods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Díez, M. A.; Gómez-Serrano, V.; Fernández González, C.; Cuerda-Correa, E. M.; Macías-García, A.

    2004-11-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) have been prepared using chestnut, cedar and walnut wood shavings from furniture industries located in the Comunidad Autónoma de Extremadura (SW Spain). Phosphoric acid (H3PO4) at different concentrations (i.e. 36 and 85 wt.%) has been used as activating agent. ACs have been characterized from the results obtained by N2 adsorption at 77 K. Moreover, the fractal dimension (D) has been calculated in order to determine the AC surface roughness degree. Optimal textural properties of ACs have been obtained by chemical activation with H3PO4 36 wt.%. This is corroborated by the slightly lower values of D for samples treated with H3PO4 85 wt.%.

  15. Influence of experimental canine ehrlichiosis on the E-ADA activity and purine levels in serum and possible functional correlations with pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Munhoz, Thiago D; Faria, Joice L M; Vargas-Hérnandez, Giovanni; Machado, Rosangela Z; Luz, Nathalia C; Moritz, Cesar E J; Casali, Emerson A; Bottari, Nathieli B; Stefani, Lenita M; Tinucci-Costa, Mirela

    2013-10-25

    The aim of this study was to evaluate adenosine deaminase activity and purines levels in serum of dogs experimentally infected by Ehrlichia canis. Banked serum samples of dogs divided into two groups with five animals each: healthy animals and animals infected by E. canis. The concentration of purines (adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine, inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid), and adenosine deaminase (E-ADA) activity in sera were evaluated. Samples were collected on days 12 and 30 post-infection (PI). The E-ADA activity showed a significant reduction on day 12 PI, and increased on day 30 PI in dogs infected with E. canis. On day 12, an increase in seric concentration of ATP, ADP and adenosine was verified, and different levels of hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid had a drastic reduction in infected compared healthy dogs (P<0.05). However, on day 30 PI, the levels of seric ADP and AMP decreased, unlike the concentration of xanthine and uric acid that increased significantly in infected dogs (P<0.05). Therefore, the activity of E-ADA and purine levels are altered in experimental canine ehrlichiosis, probably with the purpose of modulating the pathogenesis of the disease related to immune response, oxidative stress and coagulation disorders in acute phase.

  16. Efficient in vivo regulation of cytidine deaminase expression in the haematopoietic system using a doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vector system.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, N; Brennig, S; Pfaff, N; Schermeier, H; Dahlmann, J; Phaltane, R; Gruh, I; Modlich, U; Schambach, A; Baum, C; Moritz, T

    2013-03-01

    Regulated transgene expression may reduce transgene-specific and genotoxic risks associated with gene therapy. To prove this concept, we have investigated the suitability of doxycycline (Dox)-inducible human cytidine deaminase (hCDD) overexpression from lentiviral vectors to mediate effective myeloprotection while circumventing the lymphotoxicity observed with constitutive CDD activity. Rapid Dox-mediated transgene induction associated with a 6-17-fold increase in drug resistance was observed in 32D and primary murine bone marrow (BM) cells. Moreover, robust Dox-regulated transgene expression in the entire haematopoietic system was demonstrated for primary and secondary recipients of hCDD-transduced R26-M2rtTA transgenic BM cells. Furthermore, mice were significantly protected from myelosuppressive chemotherapy as evidenced by accelerated recovery of granulocytes (1.9±0.6 vs 1.3±0.3, P=0.034) and platelets (883±194 vs 584±160 10(3) per μl, P=0.011). Minimal transgene expression in the non-induced state and no overt cellular toxicities including lymphotoxicity were detected. Thus, using a relevant murine transplant model our data provide conclusive evidence that drug-resistance transgenes can be expressed in a regulated fashion in the lymphohaematopoietic system, and that Dox-inducible systems may be used to reduce myelotoxic side effect of anticancer chemotherapy or to avoid side effects of high constitutive transgene expression.

  17. High-yield production of apoplast-directed human adenosine deaminase in transgenic tobacco BY-2 cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Singhabahu, Sanjeewa; George, John; Bringloe, David

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, where a deleterious mutation in the ADA gene of patients results in a dysfunctional immune system, is ultimately caused by an absence of ADA. Over the last 25 years the disease has been treated with PEG-ADA, made from purified bovine ADA coupled with polyethylene glycol (PEG). However, it is thought that an enzyme replacement therapy protocol based on recombinant human ADA would probably be a more effective treatment. With this end in mind, a human ADA cDNA was inserted into plant expression vectors used to transform tobacco plant cell suspensions. Transgenic calli expressing constructs containing apoplast-directing signals showed significantly higher levels of recombinant ADA expression than calli transformed with cytosolic constructs. The most significant ADA activities, however, were measured in the media of transgenic cell suspensions prepared from high expressing transformed calli: where incorporation of a signal for arabinogalactan addition to ADA led to a recombinant protein yield of approximately 16 mg L(-1) , a 336-fold increase over ADA produced by cell suspensions transformed with a cytosolic construct.

  18. The DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3H haplotype I likely contributes to breast and lung cancer mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Starrett, Gabriel J; Luengas, Elizabeth M; McCann, Jennifer L; Ebrahimi, Diako; Temiz, Nuri A; Love, Robin P; Feng, Yuqing; Adolph, Madison B; Chelico, Linda; Law, Emily K; Carpenter, Michael A; Harris, Reuben S

    2016-09-21

    Cytosine mutations within TCA/T motifs are common in cancer. A likely cause is the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B). However, A3B-null breast tumours still have this mutational bias. Here we show that APOBEC3H haplotype I (A3H-I) provides a likely solution to this paradox. A3B-null tumours with this mutational bias have at least one copy of A3H-I despite little genetic linkage between these genes. Although deemed inactive previously, A3H-I has robust activity in biochemical and cellular assays, similar to A3H-II after compensation for lower protein expression levels. Gly105 in A3H-I (versus Arg105 in A3H-II) results in lower protein expression levels and increased nuclear localization, providing a mechanism for accessing genomic DNA. A3H-I also associates with clonal TCA/T-biased mutations in lung adenocarcinoma suggesting this enzyme makes broader contributions to cancer mutagenesis. These studies combine to suggest that A3B and A3H-I, together, explain the bulk of 'APOBEC signature' mutations in cancer.

  19. The growth of brain tumors can be suppressed by multiple transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase.

    PubMed

    Chang, Da-Young; Yoo, Seung-Wan; Hong, Youngtae; Kim, Sujeong; Kim, Se Joong; Yoon, Sung-Hwa; Cho, Kyung-Gi; Paek, Sun Ha; Lee, Young-Don; Kim, Sung-Soo; Suh-Kim, Haeyoung

    2010-10-15

    Suicide genes have recently emerged as an attractive alternative therapy for the treatment of various types of intractable cancers. The efficacy of suicide gene therapy relies on efficient gene delivery to target tissues and the localized concentration of final gene products. Here, we showed a potential ex vivo therapy that used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as cellular vehicles to deliver a bacterial suicide gene, cytosine deaminase (CD) to brain tumors. MSCs were engineered to produce CD enzymes at various levels using different promoters. When co-cultured, CD-expressing MSCs had a bystander, anti-cancer effect on neighboring C6 glioma cells in proportion to the levels of CD enzymes that could convert a nontoxic prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into cytotoxic 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in vitro. Consistent with the in vitro results, for early stage brain tumors induced by intracranial inoculation of C6 cells, transplantation of CD-expressing MSCs reduced tumor mass in proportion to 5-FC dosages. However, for later stage, established tumors, a single treatment was insufficient, but only multiple transplantations were able to successfully repress tumor growth. Our findings indicate that the level of total CD enzyme activity is a critical parameter that is likely to affect the clinical efficacy for CD gene therapy. Our results also highlight the potential advantages of autograftable MSCs compared with other types of allogeneic stem cells for the treatment of recurrent glioblastomas through repetitive treatments.

  20. Human neural stem cells transduced with IFN-beta and cytosine deaminase genes intensify bystander effect in experimental glioma.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Natsume, A; Shimato, S; Ohno, M; Kato, T; Chansakul, P; Wakabayashi, T; Kim, S U

    2010-05-01

    Previously, we have shown that the genetically modified human neural stem cells (NSCs) show remarkable migratory and tumor-tropic capability to track down brain tumor cells and deliver therapeutic agents with significant therapeutic benefit. Human NSCs that were retrovirally transduced with cytosine deaminase (CD) gene showed remarkable 'bystander killer effect' on the glioma cells after application of the prodrug, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). Interferon-beta (IFN-beta) is known for its antiproliferative effects in a variety of cancers. In our pilot clinical trial in glioma, the IFN-beta gene has shown potent antitumor activity in patients with malignant glioma. In the present study, we sought to examine whether human NSCs genetically modified to express both CD and IFN-beta genes intensified antitumor effect on experimental glioma. In vitro studies showed that CD/IFN-beta-expressing NSCs exerted a remarkable bystander effect on human glioma cells after the application of 5-FC, as compared with parental NSCs and CD-expressing NSCs. In animal models with human glioma orthotopic xenograft, intravenously infused CD/IFN-beta-expressing NSCs produced striking antitumor effect after administration of the prodrug 5-FC. Furthermore, the same gene therapy regimen prolonged survival periods significantly in the experimental animals. The results of the present study indicate that the multimodal NSC-based treatment strategy might have therapeutic potential against gliomas.

  1. The DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3H haplotype I likely contributes to breast and lung cancer mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Starrett, Gabriel J.; Luengas, Elizabeth M.; McCann, Jennifer L.; Ebrahimi, Diako; Temiz, Nuri A.; Love, Robin P.; Feng, Yuqing; Adolph, Madison B.; Chelico, Linda; Law, Emily K.; Carpenter, Michael A.; Harris, Reuben S

    2016-01-01

    Cytosine mutations within TCA/T motifs are common in cancer. A likely cause is the DNA cytosine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B). However, A3B-null breast tumours still have this mutational bias. Here we show that APOBEC3H haplotype I (A3H-I) provides a likely solution to this paradox. A3B-null tumours with this mutational bias have at least one copy of A3H-I despite little genetic linkage between these genes. Although deemed inactive previously, A3H-I has robust activity in biochemical and cellular assays, similar to A3H-II after compensation for lower protein expression levels. Gly105 in A3H-I (versus Arg105 in A3H-II) results in lower protein expression levels and increased nuclear localization, providing a mechanism for accessing genomic DNA. A3H-I also associates with clonal TCA/T-biased mutations in lung adenocarcinoma suggesting this enzyme makes broader contributions to cancer mutagenesis. These studies combine to suggest that A3B and A3H-I, together, explain the bulk of ‘APOBEC signature' mutations in cancer. PMID:27650891

  2. Antioxidant activity, anti-proliferative activity, and amino acid profiles of ethanolic extracts of edible mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Panthong, S; Boonsathorn, N; Chuchawankul, S

    2016-10-17

    Biological activities of various mushrooms have recently been discovered, particularly, immunomodulatory and antitumor activities. Herein, three edible mushrooms, Auricularia auricula-judae (AA), Pleurotus abalonus (PA) and Pleurotus sajor-caju (PS) extracted using Soxhlet ethanol extraction were evaluated for their antioxidative, anti-proliferative effects on leukemia cells. Using the Folin-Ciocalteau method and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay, phenolics and antioxidant activity were found in all sample mushrooms. Additionally, anti-proliferative activity of mushroom extracts against U937 leukemia cells was determined using a viability assay based on mitochondrial activity. PA (0.5 mg/mL) and AA (0.25-0.5 mg/mL) significantly reduced cell viability. Interestingly, PS caused a hormetic-like biphasic dose-response. Low doses (0-0.25 mg/L) of PS promoted cell proliferation up to 140% relative to control, whereas higher doses (0.50 mg/mL) inhibited cell proliferation. Against U937 cells, AA IC50 was 0.28 ± 0.04 mg/mL, which was lower than PS or PA IC50 (0.45 ± 0.01 and 0.49 ± 0.001 mg/mL, respectively). Furthermore, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage conferred cytotoxicity. PS and PA were not toxic to U937 cells at any tested concentration; AA (0.50 mg/mL) showed high LDH levels and caused 50% cytotoxicity. Additionally, UPLC-HRMS data indicated several phytochemicals known to support functional activities as either antioxidant or anti-proliferative. Glutamic acid was uniquely found in ethanolic extracts of AA, and was considered an anti-cancer amino acid with potent anti-proliferative effects on U937 cells. Collectively, all mushroom extracts exhibited antioxidant effects, but their anti-proliferative effects were dose-dependent. Nevertheless, the AA extract, with highest potency, is a promising candidate for future applications.

  3. [The comparative investigation of antihypoxia activity of glutamic and N-acetylglutamic acids].

    PubMed

    Makarova, L M; Pogorelyĭ, V E

    2013-01-01

    Comparative study of antihypoxic activity of glutamic and N-acetylglutamic acid in doses of 1, 10, 50 and 100 mg/kg was realized. It was experimentally ascertained that the most apparent antihypoxic action of study objects occurs in conditions of hypobaric hypoxia of acetylated derivative of glutamic acid considerably exceeds glutamic acid.

  4. Molecular mechanisms behind the antimicrobial activity of hop iso-α-acids in Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Schurr, Benjamin C; Hahne, Hannes; Kuster, Bernhard; Behr, Jürgen; Vogel, Rudi F

    2015-04-01

    The main bittering component in beer, hop iso-α-acids, have been characterised as weak acids, which act as ionophores impairing microbial cells' function under acidic conditions as present in beer. Besides medium pH, divalent cations play a central role regarding the efficacy of the antimicrobial effect. The iso-α-acids' non-bitter derivatives humulinic acids can be found in isomerised hop extracts and can be generated during hop storage. Therefore, they have been under investigation concerning their influence on beer sensory properties. This study sketches the molecular mechanism behind iso-α-acids' antimicrobial activity in Lactobacillus (L.) brevis regarding their ionophore activity versus the dependence of the inhibitory potential on manganese binding, and suggests humulinic acids as novel tasteless food preservatives. We designed and synthesised chemically modified iso-α-acids to enhance the basic understanding of the molecular mechanism of antimicrobial iso-α-acids. It could be observed that a manganese-binding dependent transmembrane redox reaction (oxidative stress) plays a crucial role in inhibition. Privation of an acidic hydroxyl group neither erased ionophore activity, nor did it entirely abolish antimicrobial activity. Humulinic acids proved to be highly inhibitory, even outperforming iso-α-acids.

  5. Infiltration of natural caries lesions in relation to their activity status and acid pretreatment in vitro.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, K W; Schlafer, S; Lussi, A; Nyvad, B

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at testing how active and inactive enamel caries lesions differ by their degree of resin infiltration, and whether the choice of acid pretreatment plays a crucial role. Four examiners assessed 104 human molars and premolars with noncavitated enamel lesions and classified them as 'active' or 'inactive' using the Nyvad criteria. Forty-five teeth were included in this study after independent unanimous lesion activity assessment. Lesions were cut perpendicularly into 2 halves. Each half lesion was pretreated with either 15% hydrochloric acid or 35% phosphoric acid. The lesions were infiltrated after staining with rhodamine isothiocyanate. Thin sections of 100 µm were prepared and the specimens were bleached with 30% hydrogen peroxide. The specimens were then counterstained with sodium fluorescein, subjected to confocal laser scanning microscopy and analyzed quantitatively. Outcome parameters were maximum and average infiltration depths as well as relative penetration depths and areas. In active lesions no significant difference of percentage maximum penetration depth and percentage average penetration depth between lesions pretreated with hydrochloric or phosphoric acid could be observed. In inactive lesions, however, phosphoric acid pretreatment resulted in significantly lower penetration compared to hydrochloric acid pretreatment. Surface conditioning with hydrochloric acid led to similar infiltration results in active and inactive lesions. Moreover, inactive lesions showed greater variability in all assessed infiltration parameters than did active lesions. In conclusion, caries lesion activity and acid pretreatment both influenced the infiltration. The use of phosphoric acid to increase permeability of the surface layer of active lesions should be further explored.

  6. Antiproliferative activity of aroylacrylic acids. Structure-activity study based on molecular interaction fields.

    PubMed

    Drakulić, Branko J; Stanojković, Tatjana P; Zižak, Zeljko S; Dabović, Milan M

    2011-08-01

    Antiproliferative activity of 27 phenyl-substituted 4-aryl-4-oxo-2-butenoic acids (aroylacrylic acids) toward Human cervix carcinoma (HeLa), Human chronic myelogenous leukemia (K562) and Human colon tumor (LS174) cell lines in vitro are reported. Compounds are active toward all examined cell lines. The most active compounds bear two or three branched alkyl or cycloalkyl substituents on phenyl moiety having potencies in low micromolar ranges. One of most potent derivatives arrests the cell cycle at S phase in HeLa cells. The 3D QSAR study, using molecular interaction fields (MIF) and derived alignment independent descriptors (GRIND-2), rationalize the structural characteristics correlated with potency of compounds. Covalent chemistry, most possibly involved in the mode of action of reported compounds, was quantitatively accounted using frontier molecular orbitals. Pharmacophoric pattern of most potent compounds are used as a template for virtual screening, to find similar ones in database of compounds screened against DTP-NCI 60 tumor cell lines. Potency of obtained hits is well predicted.

  7. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids induce plasminogen activator activity and DNA damage in rabbit spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kokoli, A N; Lavrentiadou, S N; Zervos, I A; Tsantarliotou, M P; Georgiadis, M P; Nikolaidis, E A; Botsoglou, N; Boscos, C M; Taitzoglou, I A

    2017-02-20

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect(s) of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) on rabbit semen. Adult rabbit bucks were assigned to two groups that were given two diets, a standard diet (control) and a diet supplemented with ω-3 PUFA. Sperm samples were collected from all bucks with the use of an artificial vagina in 20-day intervals, for a total period of 120 days. The enrichment of membranes in ω-3 PUFA was manifested by the elevation of the 22:5 ω-3 (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA]) levels within 40 days. This increase in DPA content did not affect semen characteristics (i.e., concentration, motility and viability). However, it was associated with the induction of lipid peroxidation in spermatozoa, as determined on the basis of the malondialdehyde content. Lipid peroxidation was associated with DNA fragmentation in ω-3 PUFA-enriched spermatozoa and a concomitant increase in plasminogen activator (PA) activity. The effects of ω-3 PUFA on sperm cells were evident within 40 days of ω-3 PUFA dietary intake and exhibited peack values on day 120. Our findings suggest that an ω-3 PUFA-rich diet may not affect semen characteristics; however, it may have a negative impact on the oxidative status and DNA integrity of the spermatozoa, which was associated with an induction of PAs activity.

  8. Serum Paraoxonase 1 Activity Is Associated with Fatty Acid Composition of High Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Boshtam, Maryam; Pourfarzam, Morteza; Ani, Mohsen; Naderi, Gholam Ali; Basati, Gholam; Mansourian, Marjan; Dinani, Narges Jafari; Asgary, Seddigheh; Abdi, Soheila

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Cardioprotective effect of high density lipoprotein (HDL) is, in part, dependent on its related enzyme, paraoxonase 1 (PON1). Fatty acid composition of HDL could affect its size and structure. On the other hand, PON1 activity is directly related to the structure of HDL. This study was designed to investigate the association between serum PON1 activity and fatty acid composition of HDL in healthy men. Methods. One hundred and forty healthy men participated in this research. HDL was separated by sequential ultracentrifugation, and its fatty acid composition was analyzed by gas chromatography. PON1 activity was measured spectrophotometrically using paraxon as substrate. Results. Serum PON1 activity was directly correlated with the amount of stearic acid and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA). PON1/HDL-C was directly correlated with the amount of miristic acid, stearic acid, and DGLA and was inversely correlated with total amount of ω6 fatty acids of HDL. Conclusion. The fatty acid composition of HDL could affect the activity of its associated enzyme, PON1. As dietary fats are the major determinants of serum lipids and lipoprotein composition, consuming some special dietary fatty acids may improve the activity of PON1 and thereby have beneficial effects on health. PMID:24167374

  9. Oxalic acid-induced modifications of postglycation activity of lysozyme and its glycoforms.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong Ying; Yaylayan, Varoujan A; Yeboah, Faustinus

    2010-05-26

    The role of selected carboxylic acids and their potential to influence the glycation pattern and the enzymatic activity of lysozyme using glucose and ribose were investigated independently of the pH of the reaction medium. The model systems were incubated with and without selected carboxylic acids (maleic, acetic, oxalic, and citraconic) at 50 degrees C for 12 or 24 and 48 h at constant pH of 6.5. The effect of carboxylic acids on the glycation of lysozyme was studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and by the measurement of the residual enzyme activity of lysozyme in the glycated samples. Of the carboxylic acids evaluated, oxalic acid showed the highest antiglycation activity. The residual lysozyme activity in both oxalic acid-glucose and oxalic acid-ribose systems was >80% compared with 46 and 36% activity in the controls of glucose and ribose systems, respectively. On the other hand, maleic, acetic, and citraconic acid containing systems with both sugars did not exhibit any enhanced enzyme activity relative to the controls. The results of this study show that oxalic acid was unique among the carboxylic acids evaluated with respect to its ability to interact with sugars and inhibit glycation.

  10. Fatty acids and retinoids control lipid metabolism through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-retinoid X receptor heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, H; Dreyer, C; Medin, J; Mahfoudi, A; Ozato, K; Wahli, W

    1993-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptors called PPARs (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors alpha, beta, and gamma) regulate the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of fatty acids by induction of the acyl-CoA oxidase gene that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme of the pathway. Gel retardation and cotransfection assays revealed that PPAR alpha heterodimerizes with retinoid X receptor beta (RXR beta; RXR is the receptor for 9-cis-retinoic acid) and that the two receptors cooperate for the activation of the acyl-CoA oxidase gene promoter. The strongest stimulation of this promoter was obtained when both receptors were exposed simultaneously to their cognate activators. Furthermore, we show that natural fatty acids, and especially polyunsaturated fatty acids, activate PPARs as potently as does the hypolipidemic drug Wy 14,643, the most effective activator known so far. Moreover, we discovered that the synthetic arachidonic acid analogue 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid is 100 times more effective than Wy 14,643 in the activation of PPAR alpha. In conclusion, our data demonstrate a convergence of the PPAR and RXR signaling pathways in the regulation of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation of fatty acids by fatty acids and retinoids. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8384714

  11. The relationship between the acidity and the hydrocarbon cracking activity of ultrastable H-Y zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehne, Mark Andrew

    Changes in the structural, acidic, and catalytic properties of H-USY (acidic ultrastable Y zeolite) that occur during steam dealumination were investigated. This study focused on three factors that previously have been suggested to cause the enhanced activity of H-USY: (1) increased Bronsted acid strength caused by nonframework Al; (2) increased Bronsted acid strength caused by decreased framework Al content; and (3) direct participation of Lewis acid sites in the cracking reaction. Acidity was characterized by microcalorimetry and FTIR of NH3 adsorption. The 2-methylpentane cracking activity of H-USY at 573 K was 35 times higher than that of H-Y that had not been steamed. With further steaming of H-USY, the cracking activity decreased, although the activity per strong Bronsted acid site remained essentially constant. H-USY, with both Bronsted and Lewis acid sites, had a heterogeneous acid strength and many acid sites with heat of NH3 adsorption >130 kJ/mol. In contrast, zeolites containing only Bronsted acid sites had a rather homogeneous acid strength. The heat of NH3 adsorption did not exceed 130 U/mol for (H,NH4)-USY, in which the strongly acidic Lewis acid sites were covered by NH3, but its activity was equal to that of H-USY. Thus, Lewis acid sites are inactive for hydrocarbon cracking. Dealumination by ammonium hexafluorosilicate, which produces very little nonframework Al, resulted in a zeolite with a low heat of NH3 adsorption equal to that of H-Y, and activity only three times higher than that of H-Y. The mechanism of coke deactivation in H-USY was studied. Coke caused a proportionally larger decrease in n-hexane cracking activity than in the number of acid sites, but did not cause pore blockage or reduced n-hexane diffusivity. The evidence is consistent with a site poisoning deactivation model for a diffusion-limited reaction. In conclusion, the enhanced cracking activity of USY is not caused by Lewis acid sites nor by Bronsted acid sites with a very

  12. Benzenepolycarboxylic acids with potential anti-hemorrhagic properties and structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Aung, Hnin Thanda; Nikai, Toshiaki; Niwa, Masatake; Takaya, Yoshiaki

    2011-12-01

    Previously, we reported the structural requirements of the cinnamic acid relatives for inhibition of snake venom hemorrhagic action. In the present study, we examined the effect of benzenepolycarboxylic acids and substituted benzoic acids against Protobothropsflavoviridis venom-induced hemorrhage. Pyromellitic acid (1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid) was found to be a potent inhibitor of hemorrhage, with an IC(50) value of 0.035 μM. In addition, most of the antihemorrhagic activity of compounds tested in this experiment showed good correlation to acidity.

  13. Ellagic acid derivatives from Syzygium cumini stem bark: investigation of their antiplasmodial activity.

    PubMed

    Simões-Pires, Claudia A; Vargas, Sandra; Marston, Andrew; Ioset, Jean-Robert; Paulo, Marçal Q; Matheeussen, An; Maes, Louis

    2009-10-01

    Bioguided fractionation of Syzygium cumini (Myrtaceae) bark decoction for antiplasmodial activity was performed, leading to the isolation of three known ellagic acid derivatives (ellagic acid, ellagic acid 4-O-alpha-L-2"-acetylrhamnopyranoside, 3-O-methylellagic acid 3'-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside), as well as the new derivative 3-O-methylellagic acid 3'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside. Activity investigation was based on the reduction of P. falciparum (PfK1) parasitaemia in vitro and the inhibition of beta-hematin formation, a known mechanism of action of some antimalarial drugs. Among the investigated ellagic acid derivatives, only ellagic acid was able to reduce P. falciparum parasitaemia in vitro and inhibit beta-hematin formation, suggesting that free hydroxyl groups are necessary for activity within this class of compounds.

  14. A 30-year-old female Behçet’s disease patient with recurrent pleural and pericardial effusion and elevated adenosine deaminase levels: case report

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kwok, Seung-Ki; Jung, Jung Im; Lee, Kyo-Young; Kim, Tae-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Behçet’s disease is a systemic disease which may involve various organs. We describe a case of a patient diagnosed as pleuropericardial involvement of Behçet’s disease. A 30-year-old woman visited our clinic presented with left pleuritic chest pain for s days. She had been diagnosed as Behçet’s disease and admitted to our clinic due to pericardial and pleural effusion repeatedly in past two years. In the previous studies, effusion analysis revealed to be lympho-dominant exudate with high adenosine deaminase level. Acid-fast bacilli (AFB) culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for mycobacterial tuberculosis (M.TB) were negative in the pericardial tissue, and pathologic finding showed mild endothelitis with micro-thrombi formation in the lumen. The patient had been treated with antituberculous medication for a year. In the current admission, chest computed tomography (CT) again showed left pleural effusion without other significant lesion. Pleural fluid analysis was similar with the previous study. Video-assisted thoracoscopic pleural biopsy was performed to obtain the definite diagnosis. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis as pleuropericardial involvement of Behçet’s disease, and we treated the patient with oral steroid in the out-patient department. Pleuropericardial involvement of Behçet’s disease may mimic TB pleurisy or pericarditis due to high adenosine deaminase (ADA) level in effusion analysis. Clinicians should keep in mind that Behçet’s disease may manifest as pleural or pericardial effusion, and pathologic confirmation could be helpful for the definite diagnosis. PMID:27499994

  15. Efficiency of membrane technology, activated charcoal, and a micelle-clay complex for removal of the acidic pharmaceutical mefenamic acid.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Samer; Al-Rimawi, Fuad; Khamis, Mustafa; Nir, Shlomo; Bufo, Sabino A; Scrano, Laura; Mecca, Gennaro; Karaman, Rafik

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of sequential advanced membrane technology wastewater treatment plant towards removal of a widely used non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) mefenamic acid was investigated. The sequential system included activated sludge, ultrafiltration by hollow fibre membranes with 100 kDa cutoff, and spiral wound membranes with 20 kDa cutoff, activated carbon and a reverse osmosis (RO) unit. The performance of the integrated plant showed complete removal of mefenamic acid from spiked wastewater samples. The activated carbon column was the most effective component in removing mefenamic acid with a removal efficiency of 97.2%. Stability study of mefenamic acid in pure water and Al-Quds activated sludge revealed that the anti-inflammatory drug was resistant to degradation in both environments. Batch adsorption of mefenamic acid by activated charcoal and a composite micelle (otadecyltrimethylammonium (ODTMA)-clay (montmorillonite) was determined at 25.0°C. Langmuir isotherm was found to fit the data with Qmax of 90.9 mg g(-1) and 100.0 mg g(-1) for activated carbon and micelle-clay complex, respectively. Filtration experiment by micelle-clay columns mixed with sand in the mg L(-1) range revealed complete removal of the drug with much larger capacity than activated carbon column. The combined results demonstrated that an integration of a micelle-clay column in the plant system has a good potential to improve the removal efficiency of the plant towards NSAID drugs such as mefenamic acid.

  16. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action.

  17. Discovery of a novel activator of 5-lipoxygenase from an anacardic acid derived compound collection

    PubMed Central

    Wisastra, Rosalina; Kok, Petra A.M; Eleftheriadis, Nikolaos; Baumgartner, Matthew P.; Camacho, Carlos J.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOXs) and cyclooxygenases (COXs) metabolize poly-unsaturated fatty acids into inflammatory signaling molecules. Modulation of the activity of these enzymes may provide new approaches for therapy of inflammatory diseases. In this study, we screened novel anacardic acid derivatives as modulators of human 5-LOX and COX-2 activity. Interestingly, a novel salicylate derivative 23a was identified as a surprisingly potent activator of human 5-LOX. This compound showed both non-competitive activation towards the human 5-LOX activator adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and non-essential mixed type activation against the substrate linoleic acid, while having no effect on the conversion of the substrate arachidonic acid. The kinetic analysis demonstrated a non-essential activation of the linoleic acid conversion with a KA of 8.65 μM, αKA of 0.38 μM and a β value of 1.76. It is also of interest that a comparable derivative 23d showed a mixed type inhibition for linoleic acid conversion. These observations indicate the presence of an allosteric binding site in human 5-LOX distinct from the ATP binding site. The activatory and inhibitory behavior of 23a and 23d on the conversion of linoleic compared to arachidonic acid are rationalized by docking studies, which suggest that the activator 23a stabilizes linoleic acid, whereas the larger inhibitor 23d blocks the enzyme active site. PMID:24231650

  18. Inhibitory Activity of (+)-Usnic Acid against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Jeong, Min-Hye; Crişan, Florin; Yu, Young Hyun; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Choi, Kyung Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2016-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms that produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. With the aim of screening new anti-cancer agents that inhibit cancer cell motility, we tested the inhibitory activity of seven lichen species collected from the Romanian Carpathian Mountains against migration and invasion of human lung cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-metastatic activity. Among them, Alectoria samentosa, Flavocetraria nivalis, Alectoria ochroleuca, and Usnea florida showed significant inhibitory activity against motility of human lung cancer cells. HPLC results showed that usnic acid is the main compound in these lichens, and (+)-usnic acid showed similar inhibitory activity that crude extract have. Mechanistically, β-catenin-mediated TOPFLASH activity and KITENIN-mediated AP-1 activity were decreased by (+)-usnic acid treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The quantitative real-time PCR data showed that (+)-usnic acid decreased the mRNA level of CD44, Cyclin D1 and c-myc, which are the downstream target genes of both β-catenin/LEF and c-jun/AP-1. Also, Rac1 and RhoA activities were decreased by treatment with (+)-usnic acid. Interestingly, higher inhibitory activity for cell invasion was observed when cells were treated with (+)-usnic acid and cetuximab. These results implied that (+)-usnic acid might have potential activity in inhibition of cancer cell metastasis, and (+)-usnic acid could be used for anti-cancer therapy with a distinct mechanisms of action. PMID:26751081

  19. Computer Aided Prediction of Biological Activity Spectra: Study of Correlation between Predicted and Observed Activities for Coumarin-4-Acetic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Basanagouda, M.; Jadhav, V. B.; Kulkarni, M. V.; Rao, R. Nagendra

    2011-01-01

    Coumarin-4-acetic acids have been synthesized from various phenols and citric acid under Pechmann cyclisation conditions. All the compounds have been evaluated for antiinflammatory and analgesic activity in acute models. Compounds have also been evaluated for their ulcerogenic potential. Using the computer program, prediction of activity spectra for substances, prediction results and their Pharma Expert software, we have found a correlation between the observed and predicted antiinflammatory activity. PMID:22131629

  20. Palmitoleic acid prevents palmitic acid-induced macrophage activation and consequent p38 MAPK-mediated skeletal muscle insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Nicola A; Wheeler-Jones, Caroline P; Cleasby, Mark E

    2014-08-05

    Obesity and saturated fatty acid (SFA) treatment are both associated with skeletal muscle insulin resistance (IR) and increased macrophage infiltration. However, the relative effects of SFA and unsaturated fatty acid (UFA)-activated macrophages on muscle are unknown. Here, macrophages were treated with palmitic acid, palmitoleic acid or both and the effects of the conditioned medium (CM) on C2C12 myotubes investigated. CM from palmitic acid-treated J774s (palm-mac-CM) impaired insulin signalling and insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis, reduced Inhibitor κBα and increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase in myotubes. p38 MAPK inhibition or siRNA partially ameliorated these defects, as did addition of tumour necrosis factor-α blocking antibody to the CM. Macrophages incubated with both FAs generated CM that did not induce IR, while palmitoleic acid-mac-CM alone was insulin sensitising. Thus UFAs may improve muscle insulin sensitivity and counteract SFA-mediated IR through an effect on macrophage activation.

  1. Aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid using activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Cheng, Ka Yu; Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid (SA) by an acclimatized activated sludge. The sludge was enriched for over three months with SA (>500 mg/L) as the sole carbon and energy source and dissolved oxygen (DO, >5mg/L) as the primary electron acceptor. Effects of aeration rate (0-1.74 L/min), DO concentration (0-7 mg/L) and initial SA concentration (104-1085 mg/L) on SA biodegradation were quantified. A modified Haldane substrate inhibition model was used to obtain kinetic parameters of SA biodegradation and oxygen uptake rate (OUR). Positive linear correlations were obtained between OUR and SA degradation rate (R(2)≥ 0.91). Over time, the culture consumed more oxygen per SA degraded, signifying a gradual improvement in SA mineralization (mass ratio of O(2): SA at day 30, 60 and 120 were 0.44, 0.51 and 0.78, respectively). The concomitant release of near stoichiometric quantity of sulphate (3.2 mmol SO(4)(2-) released from 3.3 mmol SA) and the high chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficacy (97.1%) indicated that the enriched microbial consortia could drive the overall SA oxidation close to a complete mineralization. In contrast to other pure-culture systems, the ammonium released from the SA oxidation was predominately converted into nitrate, revealing the presence of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the mixed culture. No apparent inhibitory effect of SA on the nitrification was noted. This work also indicates that aerobic SA biodegradation could be monitored by real-time DO measurement.