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Sample records for acid decarboxylase antibody

  1. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positive neurological syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Tohid, Hassaan

    2016-01-01

    A rare kind of antibody, known as anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibody, is found in some patients. The antibody works against the GAD enzyme, which is essential in the formation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter found in the brain. Patients found with this antibody present with motor and cognitive problems due to low levels or lack of GABA, because in the absence or low levels of GABA patients exhibit motor and cognitive symptoms. The anti-GAD antibody is found in some neurological syndromes, including stiff-person syndrome, paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), limbic encephalopathy, cerebellar ataxia, eye movement disorders, and epilepsy. Previously, excluding MFS, these conditions were called ‘hyperexcitability disorders’. However, collectively, these syndromes should be known as “anti-GAD positive neurological syndromes.” An important limitation of this study is that the literature is lacking on the subject, and why patients with the above mentioned neurological problems present with different symptoms has not been studied in detail. Therefore, it is recommended that more research is conducted on this subject to obtain a better and deeper understanding of these anti-GAD antibody induced neurological syndromes. PMID:27356651

  2. Presentation of opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Hanul Srinivas

    2012-08-08

    In this rare case, the patient presented with opsoclonus, myoclonus and ataxia. Serological and imaging studies revealed high glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GAD-Ab) levels. High-dose corticosteroids were of no benefit and subsequent intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) administration proved resolution of the condition. Levetiracetam proved useful in symptomatically controlling the myoclonus. Follow-up GAD-Ab levels were within normal limits.

  3. Extralimbic autoimmune encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies: an underdiagnosed entity?

    PubMed

    Najjar, Souhel; Pearlman, Daniel; Najjar, Amanda; Ghiasian, Vahid; Zagzag, David; Devinsky, Orrin

    2011-07-01

    Nonparaneoplastic glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADAb)-related autoimmune encephalitis is a syndrome characterized by refractory seizures, progressive cognitive deficits, and psychiatric manifestations. The limbic subtype is well described, has characteristic affective and memory disturbances, and typical mesial temporal MRI abnormalities. We found only one single case report of the extralimbic subtype. We report clinical, radiological, and pathological findings of two additional cases with contrast-enhancing lesions. One of our cases presented as vasculitis, and the other imitated a tumor. Pathological evidence of both vasculitis and encephalitis has never been previously reported in any inflammatory condition affecting the brain. Our cases confirm prior reports that immune therapy can better control seizures associated with GADAb autoimmune encephalitis, and support the rationale for assaying for GADAb titers in patients with etiologically unclear extralimbic lesions and refractory epilepsy, independent of seizure types.

  4. Removal kinetics of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase by various plasmapheresis modalities in the treatment of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, Atsushi; Okado, Tomokazu; Kurashima, Naoki; Maeda, Takuma; Miyamoto, Satoko; Nakamura, Ayako; Seshima, Hiroshi; Iimori, Soichiro; Sohara, Eisei; Uchida, Shinichi; Rai, Tatemitsu

    2014-06-01

    Plasmapheresis is one of the acute treatment modalities for neurological disorders associated with antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD). However, there is little information about the removal kinetics of anti-GAD by various plasmapheresis modalities. Here, we investigated the removal rate of anti-GAD and fibrinogen (Fib) by immunoadsorption (IA), plasma exchange using a conventional plasma separator (OP-PE), and plasma exchange using a high cut-off selective membrane plasma separator (EC-PE) in two cases of anti-GAD-associated neurological diseases. In case 1, IA and OP-PE were used, and the percent reductions were as follows: anti-GAD: 38.2% and 69.1% and Fib: 67.7% and 68.2%, respectively. In case 2, OP-PE and EC-PE were used, and the percent reductions were as follows: anti-GAD: 65.8% and 48.5% and Fib: 68.5% and 19.8%, respectively. OP-PE could remove anti-GAD more efficiently than IA. Further, EC-PE could maintain coagulation factors such as Fib better than IA and OP-PE. It is important to select the appropriate plasmapheresis modality on the basis of the removal kinetics.

  5. Assessment of the effects of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies and trace elements on cognitive performance in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas S

    2015-01-01

    Background Homeostatic imbalance of trace elements such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) demonstrated adverse effects on brain function among older adults. Objective The present study aimed to investigate the effects of trace elements and the presence of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADAs) in human cognitive abilities among healthy older adults. Methods A total of 100 healthy subjects (65 males, 35 females; age range; 64–96 years) were recruited for this study. Based on Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) score, the participants were classified according to cognitive performance into normal (n=45), moderate (n=30), and severe (n=25). Cognitive functioning, leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), serum trace elements – Fe, Cu, Zn, Zn/Cu, and GADAs were assessed using LOTCA battery, pre-validated physical activity (PA) questionnaire, atomic absorption, and immunoassay techniques, respectively. Results Approximately 45% of the study population (n=45) had normal distribution of cognitive function and 55% of the study population (n=55) had abnormal cognitive function; they were classified into moderate (score 62–92) and severe (score 31–62). There was a significant reduction in the level of Zn and Zn/Cu ratio along with an increase in the level of Fe, Cu, and anti-GADAs in subjects of severe (P=0.01) and moderate (P=0.01) cognitive performance. LOTCA-cognitive scores correlated positively with sex, HbA1c, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Zn/Cu ratio, and negatively with age, PA, body mass index, and anti-GADAs. Significant inter-correlation was reported between serum trace element concentrations and anti-GADAs which suggest producing a cognitive decline via oxidative and neural damage mechanism. Conclusion This study found significant associations among trace elements, anti-GADAs, and cognitive function in older adults. The homeostatic balance of trace elements should be recommended among older adults for better cognitive

  6. Genetics Home Reference: aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  7. Loss of Autonoetic Awareness of Recent Autobiographical Episodes and Accelerated Long-Term Forgetting in a Patient with Previously Unrecognized Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibody Related Limbic Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Witt, Juri-Alexander; Vogt, Viola Lara; Widman, Guido; Langen, Karl-Josef; Elger, Christian Erich; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 35-year-old male patient presenting with depressed mood and emotional instability, who complained about severe anterograde and retrograde memory deficits characterized by accelerated long-term forgetting and loss of autonoetic awareness regarding autobiographical memories of the last 3 years. Months before he had experienced two breakdowns of unknown etiology giving rise to the differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures after various practitioners and clinics had suggested different etiologies such as a psychosomatic condition, burnout, depression, or dissociative amnesia. Neuropsychological assessment indicated selectively impaired figural memory performance. Extended diagnostics confirmed accelerated forgetting of previously learned and retrievable verbal material. Structural imaging showed bilateral swelling and signal alterations of temporomesial structures (left >right). Video-EEG monitoring revealed a left temporal epileptic focus and subclincal seizure, but no overt seizures. Antibody tests in serum and liquor were positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. These findings led to the diagnosis of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody related limbic encephalitis. Monthly steroid pulses over 6 months led to recovery of subjective memory and to intermediate improvement but subsequent worsening of objective memory performance. During the course of treatment, the patient reported de novo paroxysmal non-responsive states. Thus, antiepileptic treatment was started and the patient finally became seizure free. At the last visit, vocational reintegration was successfully in progress. In conclusion, amygdala swelling, retrograde biographic memory impairment, accelerated long-term forgetting, and emotional instability may serve as indicators of limbic encephalitis, even in the absence of overt epileptic seizures. The monitoring of such patients calls for a standardized and concerted multilevel diagnostic approach with repeated assessments.

  8. Zymographic detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Pastor, F I Javier; Diaz, Pilar

    2002-11-01

    The manuscript includes a concise description of a new, fast and simple method for detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity. The method is based on a color shift caused a by pH change and may be an excellent procedure for large screenings of samples from natural sources, as it involves no complex sample processing or purification. The method developed can be used in preliminary approaches to biotransformation processes involving detection of hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

  9. Evaluation of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibody Levels in Patients with Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy and Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Hippocampal Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    CEYHAN DİRİCAN, Ayten; ELİBİRLİK, Sevilay; KÖKSAL, Ayhan; ÖZTÜRK, Musa; ALTUNKAYNAK, Yavuz; BAYBAŞ, Sevim; DİRİCAN, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several clinical studies have been conducted to investigate the role of autoantibodies and immunological mechanisms in the etiology of treatment-resistant epilepsy in recent years. Some immunological treatments have been suggested as a result of these studies. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of autoimmunity in partial and idiopathic generalized epilepsy and determine the relationship between drug resistance and autoimmune antibodies. Methods Twenty-eight patients (24 treatment-responsive and 4 treatment-resistant) with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), 26 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLEHS) resistant to antiepileptic drug treatment, and 26 age-matched healthy control subjects were included in a two-year cross sectional study. Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADA) levels were measured with a radioimmunoassay method in the serum of the included subjects. Results High GADA titers were detected in 2 patients with JME (7.1%), 1 patient with MTLEHS (3.8%), and 1 healthy subject (3.8%). There was no statistically significant difference among the groups regarding the serum GADA level. Although a limited number of drug-resistant patients with JME our study did not show relationships among anti-GADAs, both epileptic syndromes and drug resistance. Conclusion Because we did not determine any significant relationship between GADA levels and JME or MTLEHS, we do not recommend analysis of serum GADA levels in routine examinations where there is no evidence to suggest risk factors for autoimmunity. PMID:28373803

  10. Mapping of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) genes

    SciTech Connect

    Edelhoff, S.; Adler, D.A.; Disteche, C.M.; Grubin, C.E.; Karlsen, A.E.; Lernmark, A.; Foster, D. )

    1993-07-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the synthesis of [gamma]-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which is known as a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS), but is also present outside the CNS. Recent studies showed that GAD is the major target of autoantibodies associated with the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and of the rare stiff man syndrome. Studies of GAD expression have demonstrated multiple transcripts, suggesting several isoforms of GAD. In this study, three different genes were mapped by in situ hybridization to both human and mouse chromosomes. The GAD1 gene was mapped to human chromosome 2q31 and to mouse chromosome 2D in a known region of conservation between human and mouse. GAD2, previously mapped to human chromosome 10p11.2-p12, was mapped to mouse chromosome 2A2-B, which identifies a new region of conservation between human and mouse chromosomes. A potential GAD3 transcript was mapped to human chromosome 22q13 and to mouse chromosome 15E in a known region of conservation between human and mouse. It is concluded that the GAD genes may form a family with as many as three related members. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Induction of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase by decarboxylase inhibitors in idiopathic parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, F; Meerwaldt, J D; Man in 't Veld, A J; Hovestadt, A; Schalekamp, M A

    1989-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of administration of L-dopa, alone or in combination with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor, on plasma levels of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase (ALAAD). After single-dose administration of L-dopa plus benserazide (Madopar) in healthy subjects and in chronically treated patients with parkinsonism, plasma ALAAD followed for 2 to 3 hours fell, but returned to predosing levels within 90 minutes. Four groups of patients with idiopathic parkinsonism were studied during chronic treatment: Group I, no L-dopa treatment (n = 31); Group II, L-dopa alone (n = 15); Group III, L-dopa plus benserazide (n = 28); and Group IV, L-dopa plus carbidopa (Sinemet, n = 30). Plasma ALAAD 2 hours after dosing was normal in Groups I and II. ALAAD was increased threefold in Groups III and IV, suggesting induction of ALAAD by the coadministration of a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor. In a study of 3 patients in whom L-dopa/benserazide was started, plasma ALAAD rose gradually over 3 to 4 weeks. Further detailed pharmacokinetic studies of L-dopa, dopamine, and ALAAD in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are required to determine if the apparent ALAAD induction by a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor may be related to the loss of clinical efficacy of combination therapy in some patients and how it is related to end-of-dose deterioration and on-off phenomena.

  12. Interaction of NAP-22 with brain glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD).

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Shohei; Kobayashi, Yuumi; Odagaki, Sin-Ichi; Makino, Midori; Kumanogoh, Haruko; Nakamura, Shun; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Hayashi, Fumio

    2013-03-14

    NAP-22 (also called BASP1 or CAP-23) is a neuron-enriched protein localized mainly in the synaptic vesicles and the synaptic plasma membrane. Biochemically, it is recovered in the lipid raft fraction. In order to understand the physiological function of the neuronal lipid raft, NAP-22 binding proteins were screened with a pull-down assay. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) was detected through LC-MS/MS, and Western blotting using a specific antibody confirmed the result. Two isoforms of GAD, GAD65 and GAD67, were expressed in bacteria as GST-fusion forms and the interaction with NAP-22 was confirmed in vitro. Partial co-localization of NAP-22 with GAD65 and GAD67 was also observed in cultured neurons. The binding showed no effect on the enzymatic activity of GAD65 and GAD67. These results hence suggest that NAP-22 could participate in the transport of GAD65 and GAD67 to the presynaptic termini and their retention on the synaptic vesicles as an anchoring protein.

  13. Apraxia in anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase-associated stiff person syndrome: link to corticobasal degeneration?

    PubMed

    Bowen, Lauren N; Subramony, S H; Heilman, Kenneth M

    2015-01-01

    Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is associated with asymmetrical rigidity as well as asymmetrical limb-kinetic and ideomotor apraxia. Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is characterized by muscle stiffness and gait difficulties. Whereas patients with CBS have several forms of pathology, many patients with SPS have glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-ab), but these 2 disorders have not been reported to coexist. We report 2 patients with GAD-ab-positive SPS who also had signs suggestive of CBS, including asymmetrical limb rigidity associated with both asymmetrical limb-kinetic and ideomotor apraxia. Future studies should evaluate patients with CBS for GAD-ab and people with SPS for signs of CBS.

  14. Glutamic acid decarboxylase autoimmunity in Batten disease and other disorders.

    PubMed

    Pearce, David A; Atkinson, Mark; Tagle, Danilo A

    2004-12-14

    Degenerative diseases of the CNS, such as stiff-person syndrome (SPS), progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Rasmussen encephalitis, have been characterized by the presence of autoantibodies. Recent findings in individuals with Batten disease and in animal models for the disorder indicate that this condition may be associated with autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that converts the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate to the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Anti-GAD autoantibodies could result in excess excitatory neurotransmitters, leading to the seizures and other symptoms observed in patients with Batten disease. The pathogenic potential of GAD autoantibodies is examined in light of what is known for other autoimmune disorders, such as multiple sclerosis, SPS, Rasmussen encephalitis, and type 1 diabetes, and may have radical implications for diagnosis and management of Batten disease.

  15. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  16. [Inhibitory effect of essential oils, food additives, peracetic acid and detergents on bacterial histidine decarboxylase].

    PubMed

    Kamii, Eri; Terada, Gaku; Akiyama, Jyunki; Isshiki, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine whether various essential oils, food additives, peracetic acid and detergents inhibit bacterial histidine decarboxylase. Crude extract of Morganella morganii NBRC3848 was prepared and incubated with various agents. Histidine decarboxylase activity was significantly inhibited (p<0.05) by 26 of 45 compounds tested. Among the 26 agents, sodium hypochlorite completely decomposed both histidine and histamine, while peracetic acid caused slight decomposition. Histidine and histamine were stable in the presence of the other 24 agents. These results indicated that 25 of the agents examined were inhibitors of histidine decarboxylase.

  17. Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome with autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Markakis, Ioannis; Alexiou, Eleni; Xifaras, Michael; Gekas, Georgios; Rombos, Antonios

    2008-06-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurological disorder of probably autoimmune origin. Most cases are associated with a remote neoplasm or a viral infection; however in some instances no underlying aetiology can be demonstrated. We report the presence of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (anti-GAD Abs) in the serum and CSF of a patient with idiopathic OMS. Treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin led to a remarkable clinical improvement with parallel reduction of anti-GAD titers. Anti-GAD Abs have been associated with several neurological syndromes. They could also be responsible for the clinical triad of OMS, by impairing GABAergic transmission in specific brainstem and cerebellar circuits. We propose that testing for anti-GAD Abs should be performed in OMS, especially when no other aetiological association can be demonstrated.

  18. Glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in transgenic mouse septum: an anti-GFP immunofluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Verimli, Ural; Sehirli, Umit S

    2016-09-01

    The septum is a basal forebrain region located between the lateral ventricles in rodents. It consists of lateral and medial divisions. Medial septal projections regulate hippocampal theta rhythm whereas lateral septal projections are involved in processes such as affective functions, memory formation, and behavioral responses. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons of the septal region possess the 65 and 67 isoforms of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. Although data on the glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in the septal region generally appears to indicate glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 dominance, different studies have given inconsistent results in this regard. The aim of this study was therefore to obtain information on the distributions of both of these glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms in the septal region in transgenic mice. Two animal groups of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice were utilized in the experiment. Brain sections from the region were taken for anti-green fluorescent protein immunohistochemistry in order to obtain estimated quantitative data on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons. Following the immunohistochemical procedures, the mean numbers of labeled cells in the lateral and medial septal nuclei were obtained for the two isoform groups. Statistical analysis yielded significant results which indicated that the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase predominates in both lateral and medial septal nuclei (unpaired two-tailed t-test p < 0.0001 for LS, p < 0.01 for MS). This study is the first to reveal the dominance of glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65 in the septal region in glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

  19. Arginine and lysine decarboxylases and the acid tolerance response of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Fernández, Ana; Bernardo, Ana; López, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium CECT 443 inactivation at pH 2.5 in Mineral Medium (MM) and MM supplemented with 0.01% (w/v) arginine, lysine or glutamic acid was studied using stationary-phase cells grown in buffered BHI pH 7.0 (non-acid adapted cells) and acidified BHI up to pH 4.5 with acetic, citric, lactic and hydrochloric acids (acid adapted cells). In all cases, acid adapted cells, with D-values ranging from 23.34 to 86.90 min, showed a significantly higher acid resistance than non-acid adapted cells, with D-values between 8.90 and 10.29 min. Whereas the conditions used for acid adaptation did not exert a significant effect on the acid resistance of the S. Typhimurium CECT 443 resulting cells, the inclusion of lysine and arginine in the challenge medium protected them against acid inactivation, reaching D-values of about 2 and 3 times higher, respectively, than those found in MM or MM supplemented with glutamic acid. None of these three amino acids significantly modified the acid resistance of non-acid adapted cells. The relative expression level of adiA (encoding the arginine decarboxylase), adiY (encoding the transcriptional activator of adiA), cadA (encoding the lysine decarboxylase) and cadB (encoding the lysine/cadaverine transport protein) was examined by quantitative PCR. Acid adapted cells showed higher relative expression levels for both systems, arginine decarboxylase and lysine decarboxylase, which demonstrates that the induction of specialized pH-homeostatic systems plays an important role in S. Typhimurium CECT 443 protection against acid stress. However, the increased acid resistance showed by acid adapted cells challenged in MM arginine or lysine free suggests the existence of other microbial survival strategies.

  20. Pathogenic Roles of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 Autoantibodies in Cerebellar Ataxias

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, Christiane S.

    2017-01-01

    Reports suggesting a pathogenic role of autoantibodies directed against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65Abs) in cerebellar ataxias (CAs) are reviewed, and debatable issues such as internalization of antibodies by neurons and roles of epitopes are discussed. GAD65 is one of two enzymes that catalyze the conversion of glutamate to the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). A pathogenic role of GAD65Ab in CAs is suggested by in vivo and in vitro studies. (1) Intracerebellar administration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunoglobulins (IgGs) obtained from GAD65Ab-positive CA patients impairs cerebellar modulation of motor control in rats. (2) CSF IgGs act on terminals of GABAergic neurons and decrease the release of GABA in cerebellar slices from rats and mice. (3) Absorption of GAD65Ab by recombinant GAD65 diminishes the above effects, and monoclonal human GAD65Ab (b78) mimic the effects of CSF IgGs in vivo and in vitro. Studies using GAD65-KO mice confirm that the target molecule is GAD65. (4) Notably, the effects of GAD65Ab depend on the epitope specificity of the monoclonal GAD65Ab. Taken together, these results indicate that epitope-specific GAD65Ab-induced impairment of GABA release is involved in the pathogenesis of GAD65Ab-positive CA and support the early detection of GAD65Ab-associated CA to initiate immunotherapy before irreversible neuronal death in the cerebellum. PMID:28386570

  1. Disease-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting glutamate decarboxylase impair GABAergic neurotransmission and affect motor learning and behavioral functions

    PubMed Central

    Manto, Mario; Honnorat, Jérôme; Hampe, Christiane S.; Guerra-Narbona, Rafael; López-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Delgado-García, José María; Saitow, Fumihito; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can be found in patients with type 1 diabetes and a number of neurological disorders, including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and limbic encephalitis. The detection of disease-specific autoantibody epitopes led to the hypothesis that distinct GAD autoantibodies may elicit specific neurological phenotypes. We explored the in vitro/in vivo effects of well-characterized monoclonal GAD antibodies. We found that GAD autoantibodies present in patients with stiff person syndrome (n = 7) and cerebellar ataxia (n = 15) recognized an epitope distinct from that recognized by GAD autoantibodies present in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 10) or limbic encephalitis (n = 4). We demonstrated that the administration of a monoclonal GAD antibody representing this epitope specificity; (1) disrupted in vitro the association of GAD with γ-Aminobutyric acid containing synaptic vesicles; (2) depressed the inhibitory synaptic transmission in cerebellar slices with a gradual time course and a lasting suppressive effect; (3) significantly decreased conditioned eyelid responses evoked in mice, with no modification of learning curves in the classical eyeblink-conditioning task; (4) markedly impaired the facilitatory effect exerted by the premotor cortex over the motor cortex in a paired-pulse stimulation paradigm; and (5) induced decreased exploratory behavior and impaired locomotor function in rats. These findings support the specific targeting of GAD by its autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of stiff-person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia. Therapies of these disorders based on selective removal of such GAD antibodies could be envisioned. PMID:25870548

  2. Substrate specificity of thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Luttik, Marijke A H; Kötter, Peter; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2012-11-01

    Fusel alcohols are precursors and contributors to flavor and aroma compounds in fermented beverages, and some are under investigation as biofuels. The decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids is a key step in the Ehrlich pathway for fusel alcohol production. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, five genes share sequence similarity with genes encoding thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases (2ODCs). PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6 encode differentially regulated pyruvate decarboxylase isoenzymes; ARO10 encodes a 2-oxo-acid decarboxylase with broad substrate specificity, and THI3 has not yet been shown to encode an active decarboxylase. Despite the importance of fusel alcohol production in S. cerevisiae, the substrate specificities of these five 2ODCs have not been systematically compared. When the five 2ODCs were individually overexpressed in a pdc1Δ pdc5Δ pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ strain, only Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the linear-chain 2-oxo acids pyruvate, 2-oxo-butanoate, and 2-oxo-pentanoate in cell extracts. The presence of a Pdc isoenzyme was also required for the production of n-propanol and n-butanol in cultures grown on threonine and norvaline, respectively, as nitrogen sources. These results demonstrate the importance of pyruvate decarboxylases in the natural production of n-propanol and n-butanol by S. cerevisiae. No decarboxylation activity was found for Thi3 with any of the substrates tested. Only Aro10 and Pdc5 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the aromatic substrate phenylpyruvate, with Aro10 showing superior kinetic properties. Aro10, Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 exhibited activity with all branched-chain and sulfur-containing 2-oxo acids tested but with markedly different decarboxylation kinetics. The high affinity of Aro10 identified it as a key contributor to the production of branched-chain and sulfur-containing fusel alcohols.

  3. Substrate Specificity of Thiamine Pyrophosphate-Dependent 2-Oxo-Acid Decarboxylases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; Kötter, Peter; Pronk, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    Fusel alcohols are precursors and contributors to flavor and aroma compounds in fermented beverages, and some are under investigation as biofuels. The decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids is a key step in the Ehrlich pathway for fusel alcohol production. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, five genes share sequence similarity with genes encoding thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases (2ODCs). PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6 encode differentially regulated pyruvate decarboxylase isoenzymes; ARO10 encodes a 2-oxo-acid decarboxylase with broad substrate specificity, and THI3 has not yet been shown to encode an active decarboxylase. Despite the importance of fusel alcohol production in S. cerevisiae, the substrate specificities of these five 2ODCs have not been systematically compared. When the five 2ODCs were individually overexpressed in a pdc1Δ pdc5Δ pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ strain, only Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the linear-chain 2-oxo acids pyruvate, 2-oxo-butanoate, and 2-oxo-pentanoate in cell extracts. The presence of a Pdc isoenzyme was also required for the production of n-propanol and n-butanol in cultures grown on threonine and norvaline, respectively, as nitrogen sources. These results demonstrate the importance of pyruvate decarboxylases in the natural production of n-propanol and n-butanol by S. cerevisiae. No decarboxylation activity was found for Thi3 with any of the substrates tested. Only Aro10 and Pdc5 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the aromatic substrate phenylpyruvate, with Aro10 showing superior kinetic properties. Aro10, Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 exhibited activity with all branched-chain and sulfur-containing 2-oxo acids tested but with markedly different decarboxylation kinetics. The high affinity of Aro10 identified it as a key contributor to the production of branched-chain and sulfur-containing fusel alcohols. PMID:22904058

  4. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  5. Expression of Ornithine Decarboxylase Is Transiently Increased by Pollination, 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid, and Gibberellic Acid in Tomato Ovaries1

    PubMed Central

    Alabadí, David; Carbonell, Juan

    1998-01-01

    A cDNA encoding for a functional ornithine decarboxylase has been isolated from a cDNA library of carpels of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Ornithine decarboxylase in tomato is represented by a single-copy gene that we show to be up-regulated during early fruit growth induced by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and gibberellic acid. PMID:9733552

  6. The enzymatic activities of the Escherichia coli basic aliphatic amino acid decarboxylases exhibit a pH zone of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kanjee, Usheer; Gutsche, Irina; Ramachandran, Shaliny; Houry, Walid A

    2011-11-01

    The stringent response regulator ppGpp has recently been shown by our group to inhibit the Escherichia coli inducible lysine decarboxylase, LdcI. As a follow-up to this observation, we examined the mechanisms that regulate the activities of the other four E. coli enzymes paralogous to LdcI: the constitutive lysine decarboxylase LdcC, the inducible arginine decarboxylase AdiA, the inducible ornithine decarboxylase SpeF, and the constitutive ornithine decarboxylase SpeC. LdcC and SpeC are involved in cellular polyamine biosynthesis, while LdcI, AdiA, and SpeF are involved in the acid stress response. Multiple mechanisms of regulation were found for these enzymes. In addition to LdcI, LdcC and SpeC were found to be inhibited by ppGpp; AdiA activity was found to be regulated by changes in oligomerization, while SpeF and SpeC activities were regulated by GTP. These findings indicate the presence of multiple mechanisms regulating the activity of this important family of decarboxylases. When the enzyme inhibition profiles are analyzed in parallel, a "zone of inhibition" between pH 6 and pH 8 is observed. Hence, the data suggest that E. coli utilizes multiple mechanisms to ensure that these decarboxylases remain inactive around neutral pH possibly to reduce the consumption of amino acids at this pH.

  7. Anti glutamate-decarboxylase antibodies: a liaison between localisation related epilepsy, stiff-person syndrome and type-1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Szűcs, Anna; Barcs, Gábor; Winkler, Gábor; Soós, Zsuzsanna; Folyovich, András; Kelemen, Anna; Várallyay, Péter; Kamondi, Anita

    2014-07-30

    We present two patients with partial epilepsy, type-1 diabetes and stiff person syndrome associated with high serum auto-antibody levels to glutamate-decarboxylase (anti-GAD). Both patients were or have suffered from additional autoimmune conditions. The presence of stiff person syndrome and elevated anti-GAD levels have to make clinicians look for additional autoimmune conditions including type-1 diabetes. On the other hand, the co-morbidity of partial epilepsy with autoimmune conditions in patients with elevated serum anti-GAD suggests an autoimmune mechanism of partial epilepsy in these cases.

  8. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary structural studies of p-coumaric acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Rivas, Blanca de las; Muñoz, Rosario; Mancheño, José M.

    2007-04-01

    The enzyme p-coumaric acid decarboxylase (PDC) from L. plantarum has been recombinantly expressed, purified and crystallized. The structure has been solved at 2.04 Å resolution by the molecular-replacement method. The substrate-inducible p-coumaric acid decarboxylase (PDC) from Lactobacillus plantarum has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and confirmed to possess decarboxylase activity. The recombinant His{sub 6}-tagged enzyme was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method from a solution containing 20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 12%(w/v) 2-propanol, 0.2 M sodium acetate, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.0 with 0.1 M barium chloride as an additive. Diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.04 Å resolution. Crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 43.15, c = 231.86 Å. The estimated Matthews coefficient was 2.36 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, corresponding to 48% solvent content, which is consistent with the presence of two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure of PDC has been determined by the molecular-replacement method. Currently, the structure of PDC complexed with substrate analogues is in progress, with the aim of elucidating the structural basis of the catalytic mechanism.

  9. Biochemical Evaluation of the Decarboxylation and Decarboxylation-Deamination Activities of Plant Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylases*

    PubMed Central

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P.; Liu, Pingyang; Ding, Haizhen; Harich, Kim; Gillaspy, Glenda; Li, Jianyong

    2013-01-01

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) enzymes are capable of catalyzing either decarboxylation or decarboxylation-deamination on various combinations of aromatic amino acid substrates. These two different activities result in the production of arylalkylamines and the formation of aromatic acetaldehydes, respectively. Variations in product formation enable individual enzymes to play different physiological functions. Despite these catalytic variations, arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs are indistinguishable without protein expression and characterization. In this study, extensive biochemical characterization of plant AAADs was performed to identify residues responsible for differentiating decarboxylation AAADs from aldehyde synthase AAADs. Results demonstrated that a tyrosine residue located on a catalytic loop proximal to the active site of plant AAADs is primarily responsible for dictating typical decarboxylase activity, whereas a phenylalanine at the same position is primarily liable for aldehyde synthase activity. Mutagenesis of the active site phenylalanine to tyrosine in Arabidopsis thaliana and Petroselinum crispum aromatic acetaldehyde synthases primarily converts the enzymes activity from decarboxylation-deamination to decarboxylation. The mutation of the active site tyrosine to phenylalanine in the Catharanthus roseus and Papaver somniferum aromatic amino acid decarboxylases changes the enzymes decarboxylation activity to a primarily decarboxylation-deamination activity. Generation of these mutant enzymes enables the production of unusual AAAD enzyme products including indole-3-acetaldehyde, 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, and phenylethylamine. Our data indicates that the tyrosine and phenylalanine in the catalytic loop region could serve as a signature residue to reliably distinguish plant arylalkylamine and aldehyde synthesizing AAADs. Additionally, the resulting data enables further insights into the mechanistic roles of active site

  10. Regioselective Enzymatic β-Carboxylation of para-Hydroxy- styrene Derivatives Catalyzed by Phenolic Acid Decarboxylases

    PubMed Central

    Wuensch, Christiane; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Steinkellner, Georg; Gross, Johannes; Fuchs, Michael; Hromic, Altijana; Lyskowski, Andrzej; Fauland, Kerstin; Gruber, Karl; Glueck, Silvia M; Faber, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    We report on a ‘green’ method for the utilization of carbon dioxide as C1 unit for the regioselective synthesis of (E)-cinnamic acids via regioselective enzymatic carboxylation of para-hydroxystyrenes. Phenolic acid decarboxylases from bacterial sources catalyzed the β-carboxylation of para-hydroxystyrene derivatives with excellent regio- and (E/Z)-stereoselectivity by exclusively acting at the β-carbon atom of the C=C side chain to furnish the corresponding (E)-cinnamic acid derivatives in up to 40% conversion at the expense of bicarbonate as carbon dioxide source. Studies on the substrate scope of this strategy are presented and a catalytic mechanism is proposed based on molecular modelling studies supported by mutagenesis of amino acid residues in the active site. PMID:26190963

  11. Enhancing muconic acid production from glucose and lignin-derived aromatic compounds via increased protocatechuate decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Salvachua, Davinia; Khanna, Payal; Smith, Holly; Peterson, Darren J.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-04-22

    The conversion of biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules to cis,cis-muconic acid (referred to hereafter as muconic acid or muconate) has been of recent interest owing to its facile conversion to adipic acid, an important commodity chemical. Metabolic routes to produce muconate from both sugars and many lignin-derived aromatic compounds require the use of a decarboxylase to convert protocatechuate (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), two central aromatic intermediates in this pathway. Several studies have identified the PCA decarboxylase as a metabolic bottleneck, causing an accumulation of PCA that subsequently reduces muconate production. A recent study showed that activity of the PCA decarboxylase is enhanced by co-expression of two genetically associated proteins, one of which likely produces a flavin-derived cofactor utilized by the decarboxylase. Using entirely genome-integrated gene expression, we have engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440-derived strains to produce muconate from either aromatic molecules or sugars and demonstrate in both cases that co-expression of these decarboxylase associated proteins reduces PCA accumulation and enhances muconate production relative to strains expressing the PCA decarboxylase alone. In bioreactor experiments, co-expression increased the specific productivity (mg/g cells/h) of muconate from the aromatic lignin monomer p-coumarate by 50% and resulted in a titer of >15 g/L. In strains engineered to produce muconate from glucose, co-expression more than tripled the titer, yield, productivity, and specific productivity, with the best strain producing 4.92+/-0.48 g/L muconate. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that overcoming the PCA decarboxylase bottleneck can increase muconate yields from biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules in industrially relevant strains and cultivation conditions.

  12. Enhancing muconic acid production from glucose and lignin-derived aromatic compounds via increased protocatechuate decarboxylase activity

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Salvachua, Davinia; Khanna, Payal; ...

    2016-04-22

    The conversion of biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules to cis,cis-muconic acid (referred to hereafter as muconic acid or muconate) has been of recent interest owing to its facile conversion to adipic acid, an important commodity chemical. Metabolic routes to produce muconate from both sugars and many lignin-derived aromatic compounds require the use of a decarboxylase to convert protocatechuate (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), two central aromatic intermediates in this pathway. Several studies have identified the PCA decarboxylase as a metabolic bottleneck, causing an accumulation of PCA that subsequently reduces muconate production. A recent study showed that activity of the PCAmore » decarboxylase is enhanced by co-expression of two genetically associated proteins, one of which likely produces a flavin-derived cofactor utilized by the decarboxylase. Using entirely genome-integrated gene expression, we have engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440-derived strains to produce muconate from either aromatic molecules or sugars and demonstrate in both cases that co-expression of these decarboxylase associated proteins reduces PCA accumulation and enhances muconate production relative to strains expressing the PCA decarboxylase alone. In bioreactor experiments, co-expression increased the specific productivity (mg/g cells/h) of muconate from the aromatic lignin monomer p-coumarate by 50% and resulted in a titer of >15 g/L. In strains engineered to produce muconate from glucose, co-expression more than tripled the titer, yield, productivity, and specific productivity, with the best strain producing 4.92+/-0.48 g/L muconate. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that overcoming the PCA decarboxylase bottleneck can increase muconate yields from biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules in industrially relevant strains and cultivation conditions.« less

  13. Induction of an oxalate decarboxylase in the filamentous fungus Trametes versicolor by addition of inorganic acids.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cui Xia; Hong, Feng

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve yields and to reduce the cost of oxalate decarboxylase (OxDC, EC 4.1.1.2), the induction of OxDC in the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor was studied in this work. OxDC was induced by addition of inorganic acids including hydrochloric acid, sulfuric acid, and phosphoric acid to culture media. The results showed that all the acids could enhance OxDC expression. The activity of the acid-induced OxDC rose continuously. All of the OxDC volumetric activities induced by the inorganic acids were higher than 20.0 U/L and were two times higher than that obtained with oxalic acid. OxDC productivity was around 4.0 U*L(-1)*day(-1). The highest specific activity against total protein was 3.2 U/mg protein at day 8 after induction of sulfuric acid, and the specific activity against mycelial dry weight was 10.6 U/g at day 9 after induction of hydrochloric acid. The growth of mycelia was inhibited slightly when the pH values in culture media was around 2.5-3.0, while the growth was inhibited heavily when the pH was lower than 2.5.

  14. Maternal immune activation alters glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 expression in the brains of adult rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Cassella, Sarah N.; Hemmerle, Ann M.; Lundgren, Kerstin H.; Kyser, Tara L.; Ahlbrand, Rebecca; Bronson, Stefanie L.; Richtand, Neil M.; Seroogy, Kim B.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the maternal innate immune system, termed “maternal immune activation” (MIA), represents a common environmental risk factor for schizophrenia. Whereas evidence suggests dysregulation of GABA systems may underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, a role for MIA in alteration of GABAergic systems is less clear. Here, pregnant rats received either the viral mimetic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid or vehicle injection on gestational day 14. Glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67) mRNA expression was examined in male offspring at postnatal day (P)14, P30 and P60. At P60, GAD67 mRNA was elevated in hippocampus and thalamus and decreased in prefrontal cortex of MIA offspring. MIA-induced alterations in GAD expression could contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:26830319

  15. Aromatic L-Amino Acid Decarboxylase (AADC) Is Crucial for Brain Development and Motor Functions

    PubMed Central

    Shih, De-Fen; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Min, Ming-Yuan; Lai, Wen-Sung; Yang, Chianne-Wen; Lee, Wang-Tso; Lee, Shyh-Jye

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is a rare pediatric neuro-metabolic disease in children. Due to the lack of an animal model, its pathogenetic mechanism is poorly understood. To study the role of AADC in brain development, a zebrafish model of AADC deficiency was generated. We identified an aadc gene homolog, dopa decarboxylase (ddc), in the zebrafish genome. Whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis showed that the ddc gene is expressed in the epiphysis, locus caeruleus, diencephalic catecholaminergic clusters, and raphe nuclei of 36-h post-fertilization (hpf) zebrafish embryos. Inhibition of Ddc by AADC inhibitor NSD-1015 or anti-sense morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) reduced brain volume and body length. We observed increased brain cell apoptosis and loss of dipencephalic catecholaminergic cluster neurons in ddc morphants (ddc MO-injected embryos). Seizure-like activity was also detected in ddc morphants in a dose-dependent manner. ddc morphants had less sensitive touch response and impaired swimming activity that could be rescued by injection of ddc plasmids. In addition, eye movement was also significantly impaired in ddc morphants. Collectively, loss of Ddc appears to result in similar phenotypes as that of ADCC deficiency, thus zebrafish could be a good model for investigating pathogenetic mechanisms of AADC deficiency in children. PMID:23940784

  16. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary structural studies of p-coumaric acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Héctor; de las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario; Mancheño, José M.

    2007-01-01

    The substrate-inducible p-coumaric acid decarboxylase (PDC) from Lactobacillus plantarum has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and confirmed to possess decarboxylase activity. The recombinant His6-tagged enzyme was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method from a solution containing 20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 12%(w/v) 2-propanol, 0.2 M sodium acetate, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.0 with 0.1 M barium chloride as an additive. Diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.04 Å resolution. Crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P43, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 43.15, c = 231.86 Å. The estimated Matthews coefficient was 2.36 Å3 Da−1, corresponding to 48% solvent content, which is consistent with the presence of two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure of PDC has been determined by the molecular-replacement method. Currently, the structure of PDC complexed with substrate analogues is in progress, with the aim of elucidating the structural basis of the catalytic mechanism. PMID:17401200

  17. Characterization of the p-coumaric acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum CECT 748(T).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Landete, José María; Curiel, José Antonio; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Mancheño, José Miguel; Muñoz, Rosario

    2008-05-14

    It was previously reported that cell cultures from Lactobacillus plantarum CECT 748 (T) were able to decarboxylate phenolic acids, such as p-coumaric, m-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic, gallic, and protocatechuic acid. The p-coumaric acid decarboxylase (PDC) from this strain has been overexpressed and purified. This PDC differs at its C-terminal end when compared to the previously reported PDC from L. plantarum LPCHL2. Because the C-terminal region of PDC is involved in enzymatic activity, especially in substrate activity, it was decided to biochemically characterize the PDC from L. plantarum CECT 748 (T). Contrarily to L. plantarum LPCHL2 PDC, the recombinant PDC from L. plantarum CECT 748 (T) is a heat-labile enzyme, showing optimal activity at 22 degrees C. This PDC is able to decarboxylate exclusively the hydroxycinnamic acids p-coumaric, caffeic, and ferulic acids. Kinetic analysis showed that the enzyme has a 14-fold higher K(M) value for p-coumaric and caffeic acids than for ferulic acid. PDC catalyzes the formation of the corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives (vinylphenol and vinylguaiacol) from p-coumaric and ferulic acids, respectively, which are valuable food additives that have been approved as flavoring agents. The biochemical characteristics showed by L. plantarum PDC should be taken into account for its potential use in the food-processing industry.

  18. Amino acids allosterically regulate the thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Werther, Tobias; Spinka, Michael; Tittmann, Kai; Schütz, Anja; Golbik, Ralph; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Hübner, Gerhard; König, Stephan

    2008-02-29

    The gene rv0853c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain H37Rv codes for a thiamine diphosphate-dependent alpha-keto acid decarboxylase (MtKDC), an enzyme involved in the amino acid degradation via the Ehrlich pathway. Steady state kinetic experiments were performed to determine the substrate specificity of MtKDC. The mycobacterial enzyme was found to convert a broad spectrum of branched-chain and aromatic alpha-keto acids. Stopped-flow kinetics showed that MtKDC is allosterically activated by alpha-keto acids. Even more, we demonstrate that also amino acids are potent activators of this thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme. Thus, metabolic flow through the Ehrlich pathway can be directly regulated at the decarboxylation step. The influence of amino acids on MtKDC catalysis was investigated, and implications for other thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes are discussed.

  19. Distribution of messenger RNAs encoding the enzymes glutaminase, aspartate aminotransferase and glutamic acid decarboxylase in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Najlerahim, A; Harrison, P J; Barton, A J; Heffernan, J; Pearson, R C

    1990-05-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry (ISHH) using synthetic oligonucleotide probes has been used to identify cells containing the mRNAs coding for glutaminase (GluT), aspartate aminotransferase (AspT) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). The distribution of GAD mRNA confirms previous descriptions and matches the distribution of GAD detected using specific antibodies. AspT mRNA is widely distributed in the brain, but is present at high levels in GABAergic neuronal populations, some that may be glutamatergic, and in a subset of neurons which do not contain significant levels of either GAD or GluT mRNA. Particularly prominent are the neurons of the magnocellular division of the red nucleus, the large cells in the deep cerebellar nuclei and the vestibular nuclei and neurons of the lateral superior olivary nucleus. GluT mRNA does not appear to be present at high levels in all GAD-containing neurons, but is seen prominently in many neuronal populations that may use glutamate as a neurotransmitter, such as neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal cells, the granule cells of the cerebellum and neurons of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The heaviest labelling of GluT mRNA is seen in the lateral reticular nucleus of the medulla. ISHH using probes directed against the mRNAs encoding these enzymes may be an important technique for identifying glutamate and aspartate using neuronal populations and for examining their regulation in a variety of experimental and pathological circumstances.

  20. Newly-diagnosed pediatric epilepsy is associated with elevated autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase but not cardiolipin.

    PubMed

    Veri, Kadi; Uibo, Oivi; Talvik, Tiina; Talvik, Inga; Metsküla, Kaja; Napa, Aita; Vaher, Ulvi; Õiglane-Šlik, Eve; Rein, Reet; Kolk, Anneli; Traat, Aili; Uibo, Raivo

    2013-07-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibodies (GADA) and anti-cardiolipin autoantibodies (ACA) have been detected in adult subjects with epilepsy, though the functional implications of these findings are a matter of debate. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of GADA and ACA and to investigate their clinical significance in pediatric subjects with newly-diagnosed epilepsy. For this purpose GADA and ACA were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 208 pediatric patients with newly-diagnosed epilepsy and 128 controls. The clinical data (results of electroencephalography, magnetic resonance imaging, 6-month outcome etc.) was compared to antibody test results. Our study revealed GADA in 14 (6.7%) patients with epilepsy and in 1 (0.8%) control, which was a statistically significant difference (P=0.010; Chi-square test). The GADA-positive and -negative patients had similar clinical characteristics. The prevalence of ACA in patients with epilepsy (6.3%) was not significantly different than controls (2.6%). These results suggest that GADA is associated with epilepsy in a subgroup of newly-diagnosed pediatric patients. Further studies are required to determine the prognostic significance and pathogenic role of GADA among pediatric subjects with epilepsy.

  1. Identification of a dominant epitope of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-65) recognized by autoantibodies in stiff-man syndrome

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is the enzyme that synthesizes the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in neurons and in pancreatic beta cells. It is a major target of autoimmunity in Stiff- Man syndrome (SMS), a rare neurological disease, and in insulin- dependent diabetes mellitus. The two GAD isoforms, GAD-65 and GAD-67, are the products of two different genes. GAD-67 and GAD-65 are very similar to each other in amino acid sequence and differ substantially only at their NH2-terminal region. We have investigated the reactivity of autoantibodies of 30 Stiff-Man syndrome patients to GAD. All patient sera contained antibodies that recognize strongly GAD-65, but also GAD- 67, when tested by immunoprecipitation on brain extracts and by immunoprecipitation or immunocytochemistry on cells transfected with either the GAD-65 or the GAD-67 gene. When tested by Western blotting, all patient sera selectively recognized GAD-65. Western blot analysis of deletion mutants of GAD-65 demonstrated that autoantibodies are directed predominantly against two regions of the GAD-65 molecule. All SMS sera strongly recognized a fragment contained between amino acid 475 and the COOH terminus (amino acid 585). Within this region, amino acids 475-484 and 571-585 were required for reactivity. The requirement of these two discontinuous segments implies that the epitope is influenced by conformation. This reactivity is similar to that displayed by the monoclonal antibody GAD 6, suggesting the presence of a single immunodominant epitope (SMS-E1) in this region of GAD-65. In addition, most SMS sera recognized at least one epitope (SMS-E2) in the NH2-terminal domain of GAD-65 (amino acids 1-95). The demonstration in SMS patients of a strikingly homogeneous humoral autoimmune response against GAD and the identification of dominant autoreactive target regions may help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of GAD processing and presentation involved in GAD autoimmunity. Moreover, the

  2. Glutamate alteration of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in GABAergic neurons: the role of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Monnerie, Hubert; Le Roux, Peter D

    2008-09-01

    Brain cell vulnerability to neurologic insults varies greatly, depending on their neuronal subpopulation. Among cells that survive a pathological insult such as ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that could compromise brain function. We previously reported that surviving cortical GABAergic neurons exposed to glutamate in vitro displayed an NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated alteration in the levels of the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67) [Monnerie, H., Le Roux, P., 2007. Reduced dendrite growth and altered glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65- and 67-kDa isoform protein expression from mouse cortical GABAergic neurons following excitotoxic injury in vitro. Exp. Neurol. 205, 367-382]. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which glutamate excitotoxicity caused a change in cortical GABAergic neurons' GAD protein levels. Removing extracellular calcium prevented the NMDAR-mediated decrease in GAD protein levels, measured using Western blot techniques, whereas inhibiting calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels had no effect. Glutamate's effect on GAD protein isoforms was significantly attenuated by preincubation with the cysteine protease inhibitor N-Acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-norleucinal (ALLN). Using class-specific protease inhibitors, we observed that ALLN's effect resulted from the blockade of calpain and cathepsin protease activities. Cell-free proteolysis assay confirmed that both proteases were involved in glutamate-induced alteration in GAD protein levels. Together these results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic stimulation of NMDAR in cultured cortical neurons leads to altered GAD protein levels from GABAergic neurons through intracellular calcium increase and protease activation including calpain and cathepsin. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered balance between excitation

  3. Gene cloning, expression, and characterization of phenolic acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis RM84.

    PubMed

    Landete, José María; Rodríguez, Héctor; Curiel, José Antonio; de las Rivas, Blanca; Mancheño, José Miguel; Muñoz, Rosario

    2010-06-01

    Phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) catalyzes the synthesis of vinyl phenols from hydroxycinnamic acids. The gene encoding PAD from Lactobacillus brevis was cloned and expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant PAD enzyme is a heat-labile enzyme that functions optimally at 22 degrees C and pH 6.0. The purified enzyme did not show thermostability at temperatures above 22 degrees C. L. brevis PAD is able to decarboxylate exclusively the hydroxycinnamic acids, such as p-coumaric, caffeic, and ferulic acids, with K (m) values of 0.98, 0.96, and 0.78 mM, respectively. The substrate specificity exhibited by L. brevis PAD is similar to the PAD isolated from Bacillus subtilis and B. pumilus, but different from that of L. plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus. As the C-terminal region may be involved in determining PAD substrate specificity and catalytic capacity, amino acid differences among these proteins could explain the differences observed. The substrate specificity shown by L. brevis PAD shows promise for the synthesis of high-added value products from plant wastes.

  4. Cloning and primary structure of a human islet isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase from chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsen, A.E.; Hagopian, W.A.; Grubin, C.E.; Dube, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Adler, D.A.; Baermeier, H.; Lernmark, A. ); Mathewes, S.; Grant, F.J.; Foster, D. )

    1991-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase which catalyzes formation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamic acid, is detectable in different isoforms with distinct electrophoretic and kinetic characteristics. GAD has also been implicated as an autoantigen in the vastly differing autoimmune disease stiff-man syndrome and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Despite the differing GAD isoforms, only one type of GAD cDNA (GAD-1), localized to a syntenic region of chromosome 2, has been isolated from rat, mouse, and cat. Using sequence information from GAD-1 to screen a human pancreatic islet cDNA library, the authors describe the isolation of an additional GAD cDNA (GAD-2), which was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 10. Genomic Southern blotting with GAD-2 demonstrated a hybridization pattern different form that detected by GAD-1. GAD-2 recognizes a 5.6-kilobase transcript in both islets and brain, in contrast to GAD-1, which detects a 3.7-kilobase transcript in brain only. The deduced 585-amino acid sequence coded for by GAD-2 shows < 65% identify to previously published, highly conserved GAD-1 brain sequences, which show > 96% deduced amino acid sequence homology among the three species.

  5. Structural analysis of Bacillus pumilus phenolic acid decarboxylase, a lipocalin-fold enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Matte, Allan; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Abokitse, Kofi; Lau, Peter C.K.

    2012-04-30

    The decarboxylation of phenolic acids, including ferulic and p-coumaric acids, to their corresponding vinyl derivatives is of importance in the flavoring and polymer industries. Here, the crystal structure of phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) from Bacillus pumilus strain UI-670 is reported. The enzyme is a 161-residue polypeptide that forms dimers both in the crystal and in solution. The structure of PAD as determined by X-ray crystallography revealed a -barrel structure and two -helices, with a cleft formed at one edge of the barrel. The PAD structure resembles those of the lipocalin-fold proteins, which often bind hydrophobic ligands. Superposition of structurally related proteins bound to their cognate ligands shows that they and PAD bind their ligands in a conserved location within the -barrel. Analysis of the residue-conservation pattern for PAD-related sequences mapped onto the PAD structure reveals that the conservation mainly includes residues found within the hydrophobic core of the protein, defining a common lipocalin-like fold for this enzyme family. A narrow cleft containing several conserved amino acids was observed as a structural feature and a potential ligand-binding site.

  6. Molecular and functional analyses of amino acid decarboxylases involved in cuticle tanning in Tribolium castaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC) and dopa decarboxylase (DDC) provide b–alanine and dopamine used in insect cuticle tanning. Beta-alanine is conjugated with dopamine to yield N-b-alanyldopamine (NBAD), a substrate for the phenoloxidase laccase that catalyzes the synthesis of cuticle protein cross-li...

  7. Identification and measurement of acid (specific) histidine decarboxylase activity in rabbit gastric mucosa: ending an old controversy?

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, E; Lorenz, W

    1985-04-01

    One of the main obstacles in assigning any distinct function to histamine in health and disease was the longlasting controversy on the existence of any physiological, endogenous histamine formation in man and most of the other mammals except the rat. Using a modification of Schayer's isotope dilution method, a renewed attempt was made to identify the very low activities of an acid (specific) histidine decarboxylase in rabbit gastric mucosa capable of producing endogenous histamine in physiological conditions, to develop tests for its identification in crude enzyme extracts and to demonstrate the specificity of the enzymatic assay by excluding any relevant Dopa decarboxylase activity and also nonenzymatic decarboxylation interfering with the determination of acid (specific) histidine decarboxylase. To achieve this aim five tests were developed: In the pH profile (test 1), a pH optimum was found at 7.0 in the presence of a low substrate concentration (1.6 X 10(-6)M L-[ring-2-14C]-histidine). The apparent Michaelis concentration at the pH optimum (test 2) was 1.8 X 10(-4)M, the maximum rate 12.5pmol [14C]histamine formed X min-1. To increase the specificity of inhibition experiments with alpha-methylhistidine and alpha-methyl-L-Dopa a pH profile was determined in the presence of these two enzymatic inhibitors (test 3 and 4). alpha-Methylhistidine was used for a reliable diagnostic confirmation test, alpha-methyl-L-Dopa for a reliable exclusion test. Benzene showed no influence on either blanks or recovery rates, but inhibited the enzymic activity at pH 7.0, not however that of unspecific histidine decarboxylase and hence was very valuable as an additional diagnostic exclusion test (test 5). Although these new tests identifying acid (specific) histidine decarboxylase and demonstrating the specificity of its determination were tedious, despite the use of the modified isotope dilution method, they excluded the presence of any Dopa decarboxylase activity in mixtures with

  8. Distribution and development of glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactivity in the spinal cord of the dogfish Scyliorhinus canicula (elasmobranchs).

    PubMed

    Sueiro, Catalina; Carrera, Iván; Molist, Pilar; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel; Anadón, Ramón

    2004-10-11

    The adult distribution and development of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-synthesizing cells and fibers in the spinal cord of the lesser spotted dogfish (Scyliorhinus canicula L.) was studied by means of immunohistochemistry using antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Complementary immunostaining with antibodies against GABA, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and HuC/HuD (members of the Hu/Elav family of RNA-associated proteins) and staining with a reduced silver procedure ("en bloc" Bielschowski method), Nissl, and hematoxylin were also used. In adults, GAD-immunoreactive (GAD-ir) cells were observed in the ventral horns, in the spinal nucleus of the dorsal horn, at the base of the dorsal horns, and around the central canal, where some GAD-ir cells were cerebrospinal fluid-contacting (CSF-c). In addition, a few GAD-ir cells were observed in the lateral funiculus between the ventral horn and the marginal nucleus. The adult spinal cord was richly innervated by GAD-ir fibers. Large numbers of GAD-ir fibers and boutons were observed in the dorsal and ventral horns and also interstitially in the dorsal, lateral, and ventral funiculi. In addition, a rich GAD-ir innervation was observed in the marginal nucleus of the spinal cord. In the embryonic spinal cord, GAD-ir cells develop very early: The earliest cells were observed in the very thin mantle/marginal layer of stage 22 embryos in a short length of the spinal cord. At stages 25 and 26, several types of GAD-ir cells (commissural and noncommissural) were distinguished, and two of these cells were of CSF-c type. At stages 28, 30, and 31, the GAD-ir populations exhibited a marked longitudinal columnar organization. Double-immunolabeling experiments in embryos showed the presence of two different GAD-ir CSF-c cell populations, one ventral that is simultaneously TH-ir and other more dorsal that is TH-negative. By stage 33 (prehatching), GAD-expressing cells are present in virtually all loci, as in adults

  9. Cloning and characterization of a locus encoding an indolepyruvate decarboxylase involved in indole-3-acetic acid synthesis in Erwinia herbicola.

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, M T; Lindow, S E

    1996-01-01

    Erwinia herbicola 299R synthesizes indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) primarily by the indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway. A gene involved in the biosynthesis of IAA was cloned from strain 299R. This gene (ipdC) conferred the synthesis of indole-3-acetaldehyde and tryptophol upon Escherichia coli DH5 alpha in cultures supplemented with L-tryptophan. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene product has high similarity to that of the indolepyruvate decarboxylase of Enterobacter cloacae. Regions within pyruvate decarboxylases of various fungal and plant species also exhibited considerable homology to portions of this gene. This gene therefore presumably encodes an indolepyruvate decarboxylase (IpdC) which catalyzes the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid to indole-3-acetaldehyde. Insertions of Tn3-spice within ipdC abolished the ability of strain 299R to synthesize indole-3-acetaldehyde and tryptophol and reduced its IAA production in tryptophan-supplemented minimal medium by approximately 10-fold, thus providing genetic evidence for the role of the indolepyruvate pathway in IAA synthesis in this strain. An ipdC probe hybridized strongly with the genomic DNA of all E. herbicola strains tested in Southern hybridization studies, suggesting that the indolepyruvate pathway is common in this species. Maximum parsimony analysis revealed that the ipdC gene is highly conserved within this group and that strains of diverse geographic origin were very similar with respect to ipdC. PMID:8900003

  10. Respective implications of glutamate decarboxylase antibodies in stiff person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate whether Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) and cerebellar ataxia (CA) are associated with distinct GAD65-Ab epitope specificities and neuronal effects. Methods Purified GAD65-Ab from neurological patients and monoclonal GAD65-Ab with distinct epitope specificities (b78 and b96.11) were administered in vivo to rat cerebellum. Effects of intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab were determined using neurophysiological and neurochemical methods. Results Intra-cerebellar administration of GAD65-Ab from a SPS patient (Ab SPS) impaired the NMDA-mediated turnover of glutamate, but had no effect on NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. By contrast, GAD65-Ab from a patient with cerebellar ataxia (Ab CA) markedly decreased the NMDA-mediated turnover of glycerol. Both GAD65-Ab increased the excitability of the spinal cord, as assessed by the F wave/M wave ratios. The administration of BFA, an inhibitor of the recycling of vesicles, followed by high-frequency stimulation of the cerebellum, severely impaired the cerebello-cortical inhibition only when Ab CA was used. Moreover, administration of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the motor cortex revealed a strong disinhibition of the motor cortex with Ab CA. Monoclonal antibodies b78 and b96.11 showed distinct effects, with greater effects of b78 in terms of increase of glutamate concentrations, impairment of the adaptation of the motor cortex to repetitive peripheral stimulation, disinhibition of the motor cortex following tDCS, and increase of the F/M ratios. Ab SPS shared antibody characteristics with b78, both in epitope recognition and ability to inhibit enzyme activity, while Ab CA had no effect on GAD65 enzyme activity. Conclusions These results suggest that, in vivo, neurological impairments caused by GAD65-Ab could vary according to epitope specificities. These results could explain the different neurological syndromes observed in patients with GAD65-Ab. PMID:21294897

  11. Evaluation of the Substrate Scope of Benzoic Acid (De)carboxylases According to Chemical and Biochemical Parameters.

    PubMed

    Pesci, Lorenzo; Kara, Selin; Liese, Andreas

    2016-10-04

    The enzymatic carboxylation of phenolic compounds has been attracting increasing interest in recent years, owing to its regioselectivity and technical potential as a biocatalytic equivalent for the Kolbe-Schmitt reaction. Mechanistically the reaction was demonstrated to occur through electrophilic aromatic substitution/water elimination with bicarbonate as a cosubstrate. The effects of the substituents on the phenolic ring have not yet been elucidated in detail, but this would give detailed insight into the substrate-activity relationship and would provide predictability for the acceptance of future substrates. In this report we show how the kinetic and (apparent) thermodynamic behavior can be explained through the evaluation of linear free energy relationships based on electronic, steric, and geometric parameters and through the consideration of enzyme-ligand interactions. Moreover, the similarity between the benzoic acid decarboxylases and the amidohydrolases superfamily is investigated, and promiscuous hydrolytic activity of the decarboxylase in the context of the hydrolysis of an activated ester bond has been established.

  12. Enhanced succinic acid production under acidic conditions by introduction of glutamate decarboxylase system in E. coli AFP111.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mingke; Li, Xiaozhan; Guo, Shunfeng; Lemma, Wubliker Dessie; Zhang, Wenming; Ma, Jiangfeng; Jia, Honghua; Wu, Hao; Jiang, Min; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2017-04-01

    Biological synthesis of succinic acid at low pH values was favored since it not only decreased investment cost but also simplified downstream purification process. In this study, the feasibility of using glutamate decarboxylase system to improve succinic acid production of Escherichia coli AFP111, a succinate-producing candidate with mutations in pfl, ldhA, and ptsG, under acidic conditions was investigated. By overexpressing gadBC operon in AFP111, a recombinant named as BA201 (AFP111/pMD19T-gadBC) was constructed. Fermentation at pH 5.6 showed that 30 g L(-1) glucose was consumed and 26.58 g L(-1) succinic acid was produced by BA201, which was 1.22- and 1.32-fold higher than that by the control BA200 (AFP111/pMD19T) containing the empty vector. Analysis of intracellular enzymes activities and ATP concentrations revealed that the activities of key enzymes involved in glucose uptake and products synthesis and intracellular ATP levels were all increased after overexpression of gadBC which were benefit for cell metabolism under weak acidic conditions. To further improve the succinic acid titer by recombinant BA201 at pH 5.6, the extracellular glutamate concentration was optimized and the final succinic acid titer increased 20.4% to 32.01 g L(-1). Besides, the fermentation time was prolonged by repetitive fermentation and additional 15.78 g L(-1) succinic acid was produced by recovering cells into fresh medium. The results here demonstrated a potential strategy of overexpressing gadBC for increased succinic acid production of E. coli AFP111 under weak acidic conditions.

  13. Developmental PCB Exposure Increases Audiogenic Seizures and Decreases Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in the Inferior Colliculus

    PubMed Central

    Bandara, Suren B.; Eubig, Paul A.; Sadowski, Renee N.; Schantz, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we observed that developmental polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure resulted in an increase in audiogenic seizures (AGSs) in rats. However, the rats were exposed to loud noise in adulthood, and were not tested for AGS until after 1 year of age, either of which could have interacted with early PCB exposure to increase AGS susceptibility. This study assessed susceptibility to AGS in young adult rats following developmental PCB exposure alone (without loud noise exposure) and investigated whether there was a decrease in GABA inhibitory neurotransmission in the inferior colliculus (IC) that could potentially explain this effect. Female Long-Evans rats were dosed orally with 0 or 6 mg/kg/day of an environmentally relevant PCB mixture from 28 days prior to breeding until the pups were weaned at postnatal day 21. One male-female pair from each litter was retained for the AGS study whilst another was retained for Western blot analysis of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GABAAα1 receptor in the IC, the site in the auditory midbrain where AGS are initiated. There was a significant increase in the number and severity of AGSs in the PCB groups, with females somewhat more affected than males. GAD65 was decreased but there was no change in GAD67 or GABAAα1 in the IC indicating decreased inhibitory regulation in the PCB group. These results confirm that developmental PCB exposure alone is sufficient to increase susceptibility to AGS, and provide the first evidence for a possible mechanism of action at the level of the IC. PMID:26543103

  14. Hippocampal interneurons expressing glutamic acid decarboxylase and calcium-binding proteins decrease with aging in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Shetty, A K; Turner, D A

    1998-05-04

    Aging leads to alterations in the function and plasticity of hippocampal circuitry in addition to behavioral changes. To identify critical alterations in the substrate for inhibitory circuitry as a function of aging, we evaluated the numbers of hippocampal interneurons that were positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase and those that expressed calcium-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin, and calretinin) in young adult (4-5 months old) and aged (23-25 months old) male Fischer 344 rats. Both the overall interneuron population and specific subpopulations of interneurons demonstrated a commensurate decline in numbers throughout the hippocampus with aging. Interneurons positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase were significantly depleted in the stratum radiatum of CA1, the strata oriens, radiatum and pyramidale of CA3, the dentate molecular layer, and the dentate hilus. Parvalbumin interneurons showed significant reductions in the strata oriens and pyramidale of CA1, the stratum pyramidale of CA3, and the dentate hilus. The reductions in calbindin interneurons were more pronounced than other calcium-binding protein-positive interneurons and were highly significant in the strata oriens and radiatum of both CA1 and CA3 subfields and in the dentate hilus. Calretinin interneurons were decreased significantly in the strata oriens and radiatum of CA3, in the dentate granule cell and molecular layers, and in the dentate hilus. However, the relative ratio of parvalbumin-, calbindin-, and calretinin-positive interneurons compared with glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive interneurons remained constant with aging, suggesting actual loss of interneurons expressing calcium-binding proteins with age. This loss contrasts with the reported preservation of pyramidal neurons with aging in the hippocampus. Functional decreases in inhibitory drive throughout the hippocampus may occur due to this loss, particularly alterations in the processing of feed-forward information through the

  15. Functional Characterization of a Novel Member of the Amidohydrolase 2 Protein Family, 2-Hydroxy-1-Naphthoic Acid Nonoxidative Decarboxylase from Burkholderia sp. Strain BC1

    PubMed Central

    Pal Chowdhury, Piyali; Basu, Soumik; Dutta, Arindam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The gene encoding a nonoxidative decarboxylase capable of catalyzing the transformation of 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid (2H1NA) to 2-naphthol was identified, recombinantly expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The putative gene sequence of the decarboxylase (hndA) encodes a 316-amino-acid protein (HndA) with a predicted molecular mass of 34 kDa. HndA exhibited high identity with uncharacterized amidohydrolase 2 proteins of various Burkholderia species, whereas it showed a modest 27% identity with γ-resorcylate decarboxylase, a well-characterized nonoxidative decarboxylase belonging to the amidohydrolase superfamily. Biochemically characterized HndA demonstrated strict substrate specificity toward 2H1NA, whereas inhibition studies with HndA indicated the presence of zinc as the transition metal center, as confirmed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A three-dimensional structural model of HndA, followed by docking analysis, identified the conserved metal-coordinating and substrate-binding residues, while their importance in catalysis was validated by site-directed mutagenesis. IMPORTANCE Microbial nonoxidative decarboxylases play a crucial role in the metabolism of a large array of carboxy aromatic chemicals released into the environment from a variety of natural and anthropogenic sources. Among these, hydroxynaphthoic acids are usually encountered as pathway intermediates in the bacterial degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The present study reveals biochemical and molecular characterization of a 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid nonoxidative decarboxylase involved in an alternative metabolic pathway which can be classified as a member of the small repertoire of nonoxidative decarboxylases belonging to the amidohydrolase 2 family of proteins. The strict substrate specificity and sequence uniqueness make it a novel member of the metallo-dependent hydrolase superfamily. PMID:27068590

  16. Two UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylases involved in the biosynthesis of a bacterial exopolysaccharide in Paenibacillus elgii.

    PubMed

    Li, Ou; Qian, Chao-Dong; Zheng, Dao-Qiong; Wang, Pin-Mei; Liu, Yu; Jiang, Xin-Hang; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2015-04-01

    Xylose is described as a component of bacterial exopolysaccharides in only a limited number of bacterial strains. A bacterial strain, Paenibacillus elgii, B69 was shown to be efficient in producing a xylose-containing exopolysaccharide. Sequence analysis was performed to identify the genes encoding the uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronic acid decarboxylase required for the synthesis of UDP-xylose, the precursor of the exopolysaccharide. Two sequences, designated as Peuxs1 and Peuxs2, were found as the candidate genes for such enzymes. The activities of the UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylases were proven by heterologous expression and real-time nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The intracellular activity and effect of these genes on the synthesis of exopolysaccharide were further investigated by developing a thymidylate synthase based knockout system. This system was used to substitute the conventional antibiotic resistance gene system in P. elgii, a natural multi-antibiotic resistant strain. Results of intracellular nucleotide sugar analysis showed that the intracellular UDP-xylose and UDP-glucuronic acid levels were affected in Peuxs1 or Peuxs2 knockout strains. The knockout of either Peuxs1 or Peuxs2 reduced the polysaccharide production and changed the monosaccharide ratio. No polysaccharide was found in the Peuxs1/Peuxs2 double knockout strain. Our results show that P. elgii can be efficient in forming UDP-xylose, which is then used for the synthesis of xylose-containing exopolysaccharide.

  17. Cholera Toxin B Subunit Linked to Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Suppresses Dendritic Cell Maturation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Odumosu, Oludare; Nicholas, Dequina; Payne, Kimberly; Langridge, William

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells are the largest population of antigen presenting cells in the body. One of their main functions is to regulate the delicate balance between immunity and tolerance responsible for maintenance of immunological homeostasis. Disruption of this delicate balance often results in chronic inflammation responsible for initiation of organ specific autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. The cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) is a weak mucosal adjuvant known for its ability to stimulate immunity to antigenic proteins. However, conjugation of CTB to many autoantigens can induce immunological tolerance resulting in suppression of autoimmunity. In this study, we examined whether linkage of CTB to a 5 kDa C-terminal protein fragment of the major diabetes autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD35), can block dendritic cell (DC) functions such as biosynthesis of co-stimulatory factor proteins CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 and secretion of inflammatory cytokines. The results of human umbilical cord blood monocyte-derived DC - GAD35 autoantigen incubation experiments showed that inoculation of immature DCs (iDCs), with CTB-GAD35 protein dramatically suppressed levels of CD86, CD83, CD80 and CD40 co-stimulatory factor protein biosynthesis in comparison with GAD35 alone inoculated iDCs. Surprisingly, incubation of iDCs in the presence of the CTB-autoantigen and the strong immunostimulatory molecules PMA and Ionomycin revealed that CTB-GAD35 was capable of arresting PMA + Ionomycin induced DC maturation. Consistant with this finding, CTB-GAD35 mediated suppression of DC maturation was accompanied by a dramatic decrease in the secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12/23p40 and IL-6 and a significant increase in secretion of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Taken together, our experimental data suggest that linkage of the weak adjuvant CTB to the dominant type 1 diabetes autoantigen GAD strongly inhibits DC

  18. Glutamate decarboxylase-dependent acid resistance in Brucella spp.: distribution and contribution to fitness under extremely acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Maria Alessandra; Bastianelli, Daniela; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Köhler, Stephan; Cloeckaert, Axel; De Biase, Daniela; Occhialini, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Brucella is an expanding genus of major zoonotic pathogens, including at least 10 genetically very close species occupying a wide range of niches from soil to wildlife, livestock, and humans. Recently, we have shown that in the new species Brucella microti, the glutamate decarboxylase (Gad)-dependent system (GAD system) contributes to survival at a pH of 2.5 and also to infection in mice by the oral route. In order to study the functionality of the GAD system in the genus Brucella, 47 isolates, representative of all known species and strains of this genus, and 16 strains of the closest neighbor genus, Ochrobactrum, were studied using microbiological, biochemical, and genetic approaches. In agreement with the genome sequences, the GAD system of classical species was not functional, unlike that of most strains of Brucella ceti, Brucella pinnipedialis, and newly described species (B. microti, Brucella inopinata BO1, B. inopinata-like BO2, and Brucella sp. isolated from bullfrogs). In the presence of glutamate, these species were more acid resistant in vitro than classical terrestrial brucellae. Expression in trans of the gad locus from representative Brucella species in the Escherichia coli MG1655 mutant strain lacking the GAD system restored the acid-resistant phenotype. The highly conserved GAD system of the newly described or atypical Brucella species may play an important role in their adaptation to acidic external and host environments. Furthermore, the GAD phenotype was shown to be a useful diagnostic tool to distinguish these latter Brucella strains from Ochrobactrum and from classical terrestrial pathogenic Brucella species, which are GAD negative.

  19. The role of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase in bacillamide C biosynthesis by Bacillus atrophaeus C89.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Lei; Zhang, Feng-Li; Chen, Qi-Hua; Lin, Shuang-Jun; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-01-01

    For biosynthesis of bacillamide C by Bacillus atrophaeus C89 associated with South China sea sponge Dysidea avara, it is hypothesized that decarboxylation from L-tryptophan to tryptamine could be performed before amidation by the downstream aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) to the non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) gene cluster for biosynthesizing bacillamide C. The structural analysis of decarboxylases' known substrates in KEGG database and alignment analysis of amino acid sequence of AADC have suggested that L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine are the potential substrates of AADC. The enzymatic kinetic experiment of the recombinant AADC proved that L-tryptophan is a more reactive substrate of AADC than L-phenylalanine. Meanwhile, the AADC-catalyzed conversion of L-tryptophan into tryptamine was confirmed by means of HPLC and LC/MS. Thus during bacillamide C biosynthesis, the decarboxylation of L-tryptophan to tryptamine is likely conducted first under AADC catalysis, followed by the amidation of tryptamine with the carboxylic product of NRPS gene cluster.

  20. An organic solvent-tolerant phenolic acid decarboxylase from Bacillus licheniformis for the efficient bioconversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to vinyl phenol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongfei; Li, Lulu; Ding, Shaojun

    2015-06-01

    A new phenolic acid decarboxylase gene (blpad) from Bacillus licheniformis was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The full-length blpad encodes a 166-amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass and pI of 19,521 Da and 5.02, respectively. The recombinant BLPAD displayed maximum activity at 37 °C and pH 6.0. This enzyme possesses a broad substrate specificity and is able to decarboxylate p-coumaric, ferulic, caffeic, and sinapic acids at the relative ratios of specific activities 100:74.59:34.41:0.29. Kinetic constant K m values toward p-coumaric, ferulic, caffeic, and sinapic acids were 1.64, 1.55, 1.93, and 2.45 mM, and V max values were 268.43, 216.80, 119.07, and 0.78 U mg(-1), respectively. In comparison with other phenolic acid decarboxylases, BLPAD exhibited remarkable organic solvent tolerance and good thermal stability. BLPAD showed excellent catalytic performance in biphasic organic/aqueous systems and efficiently converted p-coumaric and ferulic acids into 4-vinylphenol and 4-vinylguaiacol. At 500 mM of p-coumaric and ferulic acids, the recombinant BLPAD produced a total 60.63 g l(-1) 4-vinylphenol and 58.30 g l(-1) 4-vinylguaiacol with the conversion yields 97.02 and 70.96 %, respectively. The low yield and product concentration are the crucial drawbacks to the practical bioproduction of vinyl phenol derivatives using phenolic acid decarboxylases. These unusual properties make BLPAD a desirable biocatalyst for commercial use in the bioconversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to vinyl phenol derivatives via enzymatic decarboxylation in a biphasic organic/aqueous reaction system.

  1. Enzymatic Kolbe-Schmitt reaction to form salicylic acid from phenol: enzymatic characterization and gene identification of a novel enzyme, Trichosporon moniliiforme salicylic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Gunji, Hiroaki; Wakayama, Rumiko; Hattori, Takasumi; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-04-02

    Salicylic acid decarboxylase (Sdc) can produce salicylic acid from phenol; it was found in the yeast Trichosporon moniliiforme WU-0401 and was for the first time enzymatically characterized, with the sdc gene heterologously expressed. Sdc catalyzed both reactions: decarboxylation of salicylic acid to phenol and the carboxylation of phenol to form salicylic acid without any byproducts. Both reactions were detected without the addition of any cofactors and occurred even in the presence of oxygen, suggesting that this Sdc is reversible, nonoxidative, and oxygen insensitive. Therefore, it is readily applicable in the selective production of salicylic acid from phenol, the enzymatic Kolbe-Schmitt reaction. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene, sdc, encoding Sdc comprises 350 amino acid residues corresponding to a 40-kDa protein. The recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) expressing sdc converted phenol to salicylic acid with a 27% (mol/mol) yield at 30 degrees C for 9h.

  2. Ornithine decarboxylase, polyamines and CD11b expression in HL-60 cells during differentiation induced by retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Stabellini, Giordano; Brugnoli, F; Calastrini, C; Vizzotto, L; Vertemati, M; Baroni, T; Caramelli, E; Marinucci, L; Pellati, A; Bertagnolo, V

    2004-01-01

    Polyamines (PA) and retinoic acid affect mammalian cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Retinoic acid induces granulocytic differentiation of mieloid cell lines and, during this process, is responsible for the expression of CD11b, a surface antigen. In this study we investigate the effects of retinoic acid on HL-60 cells, monitoring ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity (enzyme rate of PA), putrescine (PUT), spermidine (SPD), spermine (SPM) levels, CD11b myeloid surface marker differentiation, cell cycle, and apoptosis. ODC activity and PUT levels are correlated with mieloid cell differentiation induced by retinoic acid treatment. Only the ODC/PUT ratio is connected with retinoic acid treated HL-60 cells. Treated cultures show a decrease of proliferation and a cell block in the G0/G1 phase, with consequent diminished S phase. The G0/G1 and S phases are significantly related to ODC activity and to PUT and SPD behavior, whereas in differentiating condition only the decrease of PUT is related to the S phase. CD11b expression, stimulated by retinoic acid treatment, is associated with the SPM trend. Total PA behavior agrees with apoptotic cell increase after 96 h of stimulation. Our data show that retinoic acid treatment modifies ODC activity and the turnover of PA. PUT, SPD and SPM, therefore, have a different role, and may be involved in the differentiative/apoptotic program of retinoic acid treated HL-60 cells.

  3. Pyruvate Decarboxylase Catalyzes Decarboxylation of Branched-Chain 2-Oxo Acids but Is Not Essential for Fusel Alcohol Production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    ter Schure, Eelko G.; Flikweert, Marcel T.; van Dijken, Johannes P.; Pronk, Jack T.; Verrips, C. Theo

    1998-01-01

    The fusel alcohols 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and 2-methyl-propanol are important flavor compounds in yeast-derived food products and beverages. The formation of these compounds from branched-chain amino acids is generally assumed to occur via the Ehrlich pathway, which involves the concerted action of a branched-chain transaminase, a decarboxylase, and an alcohol dehydrogenase. Partially purified preparations of pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1) have been reported to catalyze the decarboxylation of the branched-chain 2-oxo acids formed upon transamination of leucine, isoleucine, and valine. Indeed, in a coupled enzymatic assay with horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, cell extracts of a wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain exhibited significant decarboxylation rates with these branched-chain 2-oxo acids. Decarboxylation of branched-chain 2-oxo acids was not detectable in cell extracts of an isogenic strain in which all three PDC genes had been disrupted. Experiments with cell extracts from S. cerevisiae mutants expressing a single PDC gene demonstrated that both PDC1- and PDC5-encoded isoenzymes can decarboxylate branched-chain 2-oxo acids. To investigate whether pyruvate decarboxylase is essential for fusel alcohol production by whole cells, wild-type S. cerevisiae and an isogenic pyruvate decarboxylase-negative strain were grown on ethanol with a mixture of leucine, isoleucine, and valine as the nitrogen source. Surprisingly, the three corresponding fusel alcohols were produced in both strains. This result proves that decarboxylation of branched-chain 2-oxo acids via pyruvate decarboxylase is not an essential step in fusel alcohol production. PMID:9546164

  4. Dynamic changes in gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate decarboxylase activity in oats (Avena nuda L.) during steeping and germination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian Guo; Hu, Qing Ping; Duan, Jiang Lian; Tian, Cheng Rui

    2010-09-08

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and provides beneficial effects for human and other animals health. To accumulate GABA, samples from two different naked oat cultivars, Baiyan II and Bayou I, were steeped and germinated in an incubator. The content of GABA and glutamic acid as well as the activity of the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) in oats during steeping and germination were investigated with an amino acid automatic analyzer. Compared with raw groats, an increase in GABA content of oat groats during steeping and germination was continuously observed for two oat cultivars. The activity of GAD increased greatly at the end of steeping and the second stage of germination for Baiyan II and Bayou I, respectively. Glutamic acid content of treated oat groats was significantly lower than that in raw groats until the later period of germination. GABA was correlated (p<0.01) significantly and positively with the glutamic acid rather than GAD activity in the current study. The results indicates that steeping and germination process under highly controlled conditions can effectively accumulate the GABA in oat groats for Baiyan II and Bayou I, which would greatly facilitate production of nutraceuticals or food ingredients that enable consumers to gain greater access to the health benefits of oats. However, more assays need to be further performed with more oat cultivars.

  5. Buffer-free production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using an engineered glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taek Jin; Ho, Ngoc Anh Thu; Pack, Seung Pil

    2013-08-15

    Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) converts glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) through decarboxylation using proton as a co-substrate. Since GAD is active only at acidic conditions even though pH increases as the reaction proceeds, the conventional practice of using this enzyme involved the use of relatively high concentration of buffers, which might complicate the downstream purification steps. Here we show by simulation and experiments that the free acid substrate, glutamic acid, rather than its monosodium salt can act as a substrate and buffer at the same time. This yielded the buffer- and salt-free synthesis of GABA conveniently in a batch mode. Furthermore, we engineered GAD to hyper active ones by extending or reducing the length of the enzyme by just one residue at its C-terminus. Through the buffer-free reaction with engineered GAD, we could synthesize 1M GABA in 3h, which can be translated into a space-time yield of 34.3g/L/h.

  6. p-Coumaric acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum: structural insights into the active site and decarboxylation catalytic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Angulo, Iván; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Campillo, Nuria; Páez, Juan A; Muñoz, Rosario; Mancheño, José M

    2010-05-15

    p-Coumaric acid decarboxylases (PDCs) catalyze the nonoxidative decarboxylation of hydroxycinnamic acids to generate the corresponding vinyl derivatives. Despite the biotechnological relevance of PDCs in food industry, their catalytic mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we report insights into the structural basis of catalysis for the homodimeric PDC from Lactobacillus plantarum (LpPDC). The global fold of LpPDC is based on a flattened beta-barrel surrounding an internal cavity. Crystallographic and functional analyses of single-point mutants of residues located within this cavity have permitted identifying a potential substrate-binding pocket and also to provide structural evidences for rearrangements of surface loops so that they can modulate the accessibility to the active site. Finally, combination of the structural and functional data with in silico results enables us to propose a two-step catalytic mechanism for decarboxylation of p-coumaric acid by PDCs where Glu71 is involved in proton transfer, and Tyr18 and Tyr20 are involved in the proper substrate orientation and in the release of the CO(2) product.

  7. Biochemical and spectroscopic properties of Brucella microti glutamate decarboxylase, a key component of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system

    PubMed Central

    Grassini, Gaia; Pennacchietti, Eugenia; Cappadocio, Francesca; Occhialini, Alessandra; De Biase, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    In orally acquired bacteria, the ability to counteract extreme acid stress (pH ⩽ 2.5) ensures survival during transit through the animal host stomach. In several neutralophilic bacteria, the glutamate-dependent acid resistance system (GDAR) is the most efficient molecular system in conferring protection from acid stress. In Escherichia coli its structural components are either of the two glutamate decarboxylase isoforms (GadA, GadB) and the antiporter, GadC, which imports glutamate and exports γ-aminobutyrate, the decarboxylation product. The system works by consuming protons intracellularly, as part of the decarboxylation reaction, and exporting positive charges via the antiporter. Herein, biochemical and spectroscopic properties of GadB from Brucella microti (BmGadB), a Brucella species which possesses GDAR, are described. B. microti belongs to a group of lately described and atypical brucellae that possess functional gadB and gadC genes, unlike the most well-known “classical” Brucella species, which include important human pathogens. BmGadB is hexameric at acidic pH. The pH-dependent spectroscopic properties and activity profile, combined with in silico sequence comparison with E. coli GadB (EcGadB), suggest that BmGadB has the necessary structural requirements for the binding of activating chloride ions at acidic pH and for the closure of its active site at neutral pH. On the contrary, cellular localization analysis, corroborated by sequence inspection, suggests that BmGadB does not undergo membrane recruitment at acidic pH, which was observed in EcGadB. The comparison of GadB from evolutionary distant microorganisms suggests that for this enzyme to be functional in GDAR some structural features must be preserved. PMID:25853037

  8. Hydrogen peroxide-independent production of α-alkenes by OleTJE P450 fatty acid decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 OleTJE from Jeotgalicoccus sp. ATCC 8456, a new member of the CYP152 peroxygenase family, was recently found to catalyze the unusual decarboxylation of long-chain fatty acids to form α-alkenes using H2O2 as the sole electron and oxygen donor. Because aliphatic α-alkenes are important chemicals that can be used as biofuels to replace fossil fuels, or for making lubricants, polymers and detergents, studies on OleTJE fatty acid decarboxylase are significant and may lead to commercial production of biogenic α-alkenes in the future, which are renewable and more environmentally friendly than petroleum-derived equivalents. Results We report the H2O2-independent activity of OleTJE for the first time. In the presence of NADPH and O2, this P450 enzyme efficiently decarboxylates long-chain fatty acids (C12 to C20) in vitro when partnering with either the fused P450 reductase domain RhFRED from Rhodococcus sp. or the separate flavodoxin/flavodoxin reductase from Escherichia coli. In vivo, expression of OleTJE or OleTJE-RhFRED in different E. coli strains overproducing free fatty acids resulted in production of variant levels of multiple α-alkenes, with a highest total hydrocarbon titer of 97.6 mg·l-1. Conclusions The discovery of the H2O2-independent activity of OleTJE not only raises a number of fundamental questions on the monooxygenase-like mechanism of this peroxygenase, but also will direct the future metabolic engineering work toward improvement of O2/redox partner(s)/NADPH for overproduction of α-alkenes by OleTJE. PMID:24565055

  9. Overexpression and optimization of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 for high gamma-aminobutyric acid production

    PubMed Central

    Tajabadi, Naser; Baradaran, Ali; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Rahim, Raha A; Bakar, Fatimah A; Manap, Mohd Yazid A; Mohammed, Abdulkarim S; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bioactive compound biosynthesized by microorganisms through decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In this study, a full-length GAD gene was obtained by cloning the template deoxyribonucleic acid to pTZ57R/T vector. The open reading frame of the GAD gene showed the cloned gene was composed of 1410 nucleotides and encoded a 469 amino acids protein. To improve the GABA-production, the GAD gene was cloned into pMG36e-LbGAD, and then expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 cells. The overexpression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and GAD activity, showing a 53 KDa protein with the enzyme activity increased by sevenfold compared with the original GAD activity. The optimal fermentation conditions for GABA production established using response surface methodology were at glutamic acid concentration of 497.973 mM, temperature 36°C, pH 5.31 and time 60 h. Under the conditions, maximum GABA concentration obtained (11.09 mM) was comparable with the predicted value by the model at 11.23 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful cloning (clone-back) and overexpression of the LbGAD gene from L. plantarum to L. plantarum cells. The recombinant Lactobacillus could be used as a starter culture for direct incorporation into a food system during fermentation for production of GABA-rich products. PMID:25757029

  10. The selective conversion of glutamic acid in amino acid mixtures using glutamate decarboxylase--a means of separating amino acids for synthesizing biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yinglai; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids (AAs) derived from hydrolysis of protein rest streams are interesting feedstocks for the chemical industry due to their functionality. However, separation of AAs is required before they can be used for further applications. Electrodialysis may be applied to separate AAs, but its efficiency is limited when separating AAs with similar isoelectric points. To aid the separation, specific conversion of an AA to a useful product with different charge behavior to the remaining compounds is desired. Here the separation of L-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-glutamic acid (Glu) was studied. L-Glutamate α-decarboxylase (GAD, Type I, EC 4.1.1.15) was applied to specifically convert Glu into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA has a different charge behavior from Asp therefore allowing a potential separation by electrodialysis. Competitive inhibition and reduced operational stability caused by Asp could be eliminated by maintaining a sufficiently high concentration of Glu. Immobilization of GAD does not reduce the enzyme's initial activity. However, the operational stability was slightly reduced. An initial study on the reaction operating in a continuous mode was performed using a column reactor packed with immobilized GAD. As the reaction mixture was only passed once through the reactor, the conversion of Glu was lower than expected. To complete the conversion of Glu, the stream containing Asp and unreacted Glu might be recirculated back to the reactor after GABA has been removed. Overall, the reaction by GAD is specific to Glu and can be applied to aid the electrodialysis separation of Asp and Glu.

  11. Estradiol decreases taurine level by reducing cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase via the estrogen receptor-α in female mice liver.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiwang; Zhao, Jianjun; Cao, Wei; Liu, Jiali; Cui, Sheng

    2015-02-15

    Cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD) and cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) are two rate-limiting enzymes in taurine de novo synthesis, and their expressions are associated with estrogen concentration. The present study was designed to determine the relationship between 17β-estradiol (E₂) and taurine in female mice liver. We initially observed the mice had lower levels of CSAD, CDO, and taurine during estrus than diestrus. We then, respectively, treated the ovariectomized mice, the cultured hepatocytes, and Hep G2 cells with different doses of E₂, and the CSAD and CDO expressions and taurine levels were analyzed. The results showed that E₂ decreased taurine level in the serum and the cultured cells by inhibiting CSAD and CDO expressions. Furthermore, we identified the molecular receptor types through which E₂ plays its role in regulating taurine synthesis, and our results showed that estrogen receptor-α (ERα) expression was much higher than estrogen receptor-β (ERβ) in the liver and hepatocytes, and the inhibiting effects of E₂ on CSAD, CDO, and taurine level were partially abrogated in the ICI-182,780-pretreated liver and hepatocytes, and in ERα knockout mice. These results indicate that estradiol decreases taurine content by reducing taurine biosynthetic enzyme expression in mice liver.

  12. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  13. Genetic basis of stage-specific melanism: a putative role for a cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase in insect pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Saenko, S V; Jerónimo, M A; Beldade, P

    2012-06-01

    Melanism, the overall darkening of the body, is a widespread form of animal adaptation to particular environments, and includes bookcase examples of evolution by natural selection, such as industrial melanism in the peppered moth. The major components of the melanin biosynthesis pathway have been characterized in model insects, but little is known about the genetic basis of life-stage specific melanism such as cases described in some lepidopteran species. Here, we investigate two melanic mutations of Bicyclus anynana butterflies, called Chocolate and melanine, that exclusively affect pigmentation of the larval and adult stages, respectively. Our analysis of Mendelian segregation patterns reveals that the larval and adult melanic phenotypes are due to alleles at different, independently segregating loci. Our linkage mapping analysis excludes the pigmentation candidate gene black as the melanine locus, and implicates a gene encoding a putative pyridoxal phosphate-dependant cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase as the Chocolate locus. We show variation in coding sequence and in expression levels for this candidate larval melanism locus. This is the first study that suggests a biological function for this gene in insects. Our findings open up exciting opportunities to study the role of this locus in the evolution of adaptive variation in pigmentation, and the uncoupling of regulation of pigment biosynthesis across developmental stages with different ecologies and pressures on body coloration.

  14. Genetic basis of stage-specific melanism: a putative role for a cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase in insect pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Saenko, S V; Jerónimo, M A; Beldade, P

    2012-01-01

    Melanism, the overall darkening of the body, is a widespread form of animal adaptation to particular environments, and includes bookcase examples of evolution by natural selection, such as industrial melanism in the peppered moth. The major components of the melanin biosynthesis pathway have been characterized in model insects, but little is known about the genetic basis of life-stage specific melanism such as cases described in some lepidopteran species. Here, we investigate two melanic mutations of Bicyclus anynana butterflies, called Chocolate and melanine, that exclusively affect pigmentation of the larval and adult stages, respectively. Our analysis of Mendelian segregation patterns reveals that the larval and adult melanic phenotypes are due to alleles at different, independently segregating loci. Our linkage mapping analysis excludes the pigmentation candidate gene black as the melanine locus, and implicates a gene encoding a putative pyridoxal phosphate-dependant cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase as the Chocolate locus. We show variation in coding sequence and in expression levels for this candidate larval melanism locus. This is the first study that suggests a biological function for this gene in insects. Our findings open up exciting opportunities to study the role of this locus in the evolution of adaptive variation in pigmentation, and the uncoupling of regulation of pigment biosynthesis across developmental stages with different ecologies and pressures on body coloration. PMID:22234245

  15. Chronic social subordination stress modulates glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 mRNA expression in central stress circuits

    PubMed Central

    Makinson, Ryan; Lundgren, Kerstin H.; Seroogy, Kim B.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic social subordination is a well-known precipitant of numerous psychiatric and physiological health concerns. In this study, we examine the effects of chronic social stress in the visible burrow system (VBS) on the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) mRNA in forebrain stress circuitry. Male rats in the VBS system form a dominance hierarchy, whereby subordinate males exhibit neuroendocrine and physiological profiles characteristic of chronic exposure to stress. We found that social subordination decreases GAD67 mRNA in the peri-paraventricular nucleus region of the hypothalamus and the interfascicular nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), and increases in GAD67 mRNA in the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and dorsal medial hypothalamus. Expression of BDNF mRNA increased in the dorsal region of the BNST, but remained unchanged in all other regions examined. Results from this study indicate that social subordination is associated with several region-specific alterations in GAD67 mRNA expression in central stress circuits, whereas changes in the expression of BDNF mRNA are limited to the BNST. PMID:26066725

  16. MDMA decreases glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus and increases seizure susceptibility: Role for glutamate.

    PubMed

    Huff, Courtney L; Morano, Rachel L; Herman, James P; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2016-12-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) is a unique psychostimulant that continues to be a popular drug of abuse. It has been well documented that MDMA reduces markers of 5-HT axon terminals in rodents, as well as humans. A loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons in the hippocampus following MDMA treatment has only been documented recently. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that MDMA reduces glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67-IR, another biochemical marker of GABA neurons, in the hippocampus and that this reduction in GAD67-IR neurons and an accompanying increase in seizure susceptibility involve glutamate receptor activation. Repeated exposure to MDMA (3×10mg/kg, ip) resulted in a reduction of 37-58% of GAD67-IR cells in the dentate gyrus (DG), CA1, and CA3 regions, as well as an increased susceptibility to kainic acid-induced seizures, both of which persisted for at least 30days following MDMA treatment. Administration of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 or the glutamate transporter type 1 (GLT-1) inducer ceftriaxone prevented both the MDMA-induced loss of GAD67-IR neurons and the increased vulnerability to kainic acid-induced seizures. The MDMA-induced increase in the extracellular concentration of glutamate in the hippocampus was significantly diminished in rats treated with ceftriaxone, thereby implicating a glutamatergic mechanism in the neuroprotective effects of ceftriaxone. In summary, the present findings support a role for increased extracellular glutamate and NMDA receptor activation in the MDMA-induced loss of hippocampal GAD67-IR neurons and the subsequent increased susceptibility to evoked seizures.

  17. The YvrI Alternative σ Factor Is Essential for Acid Stress Induction of Oxalate Decarboxylase in Bacillus subtilis▿ †

    PubMed Central

    MacLellan, Shawn R.; Helmann, John D.; Antelmann, Haike

    2009-01-01

    YvrI is a recently identified alternative σ factor in Bacillus subtilis that requires the coactivator YvrHa to activate transcription. Previously, a strain engineered to overproduce YvrI was found to overproduce oxalate decarboxylase (OxdC), and further analysis identified three YvrI-activated promoters preceding the yvrI-yvrHa, yvrJ, and oxdC-yvrL operons. Independently, proteome analyses identified OxdC as a highly abundant, cell wall-associated protein that accumulated under acidic growth conditions. We show here that the accumulation of OxdC in the cell wall proteome under acidic growth conditions is absolutely dependent on YvrI and is correlated with enhanced transcription of both the yvrI-yvrHa and the oxdC-yvrL operons. Conversely, OxdC accumulates to a high level even under nonacidic growth conditions in cells lacking YvrL, a negative regulator of YvrI/YvrHa-dependent transcription. These results indicate that YvrI and its associated coregulators YvrHa and YvrL are required for the regulation of OxdC expression by acid stress. The high-level accumulation of OxdC depends, in part, on a strong oxdC promoter. A regulatory sequence with similarity to an upstream promoter element (UP) was identified upstream of the oxdC promoter and is required for high-level promoter activity. Conservation of the YvrI/YvrHa/YvrL regulatory system among related species allowed us to deduce an expanded consensus sequence for the compositionally unusual promoters recognized by this new σ factor. PMID:19047353

  18. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65: a link between GABAergic synaptic plasticity in the lateral amygdala and conditioned fear generalization.

    PubMed

    Lange, Maren D; Jüngling, Kay; Paulukat, Linda; Vieler, Marc; Gaburro, Stefano; Sosulina, Ludmila; Blaesse, Peter; Sreepathi, Hari K; Ferraguti, Francesco; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2014-08-01

    An imbalance of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system is considered a major neurobiological pathomechanism of anxiety, and the amygdala is a key brain region involved. Reduced GABA levels have been found in anxiety patients, and genetic variations of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme of GABA synthesis, have been associated with anxiety phenotypes in both humans and mice. These findings prompted us to hypothesize that a deficiency of GAD65, the GAD isoform controlling the availability of GABA as a transmitter, affects synaptic transmission and plasticity in the lateral amygdala (LA), and thereby interferes with fear responsiveness. Results indicate that genetically determined GAD65 deficiency in mice is associated with (1) increased synaptic length and release at GABAergic connections, (2) impaired efficacy of GABAergic synaptic transmission and plasticity, and (3) reduced spillover of GABA to presynaptic GABAB receptors, resulting in a loss of the associative nature of long-term synaptic plasticity at cortical inputs to LA principal neurons. (4) In addition, training with high shock intensities in wild-type mice mimicked the phenotype of GAD65 deficiency at both the behavioral and synaptic level, indicated by generalization of conditioned fear and a loss of the associative nature of synaptic plasticity in the LA. In conclusion, GAD65 is required for efficient GABAergic synaptic transmission and plasticity, and for maintaining extracellular GABA at a level needed for associative plasticity at cortical inputs in the LA, which, if disturbed, results in an impairment of the cue specificity of conditioned fear responses typifying anxiety disorders.

  19. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass.

  20. Mutagenesis and redox partners analysis of the P450 fatty acid decarboxylase OleTJE

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bo; Xu, Huifang; Liu, Yi; Qi, Fengxia; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Hui; Wang, Cong; Wang, Yilin; Yang, Wenxia; Li, Shengying

    2017-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 enzyme OleTJE from Jeotgalicoccus sp. ATCC 8456 is capable of converting free long-chain fatty acids into α-alkenes via one-step oxidative decarboxylation in presence of H2O2 as cofactor or using redox partner systems. This enzyme has attracted much attention due to its intriguing but unclear catalytic mechanism and potential application in biofuel production. Here, we investigated the functionality of a select group of residues (Arg245, Cys365, His85, and Ile170) in the active site of OleTJE through extensive mutagenesis analysis. The key roles of these residues for catalytic activity and reaction type selectivity were identified. In addition, a range of heterologous redox partners were found to be able to efficiently support the decarboxylation activity of OleTJE. The best combination turned out to be SeFdx-6 (ferredoxin) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 and CgFdR-2 (ferredoxin reductase) from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032, which gave the highest myristic acid conversion rate of 94.4%. Moreover, Michaelis-Menton kinetic parameters of OleTJE towards myristic acid were determined. PMID:28276499

  1. Mutagenesis and redox partners analysis of the P450 fatty acid decarboxylase OleTJE.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bo; Xu, Huifang; Liu, Yi; Qi, Fengxia; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Hui; Wang, Cong; Wang, Yilin; Yang, Wenxia; Li, Shengying

    2017-03-09

    The cytochrome P450 enzyme OleTJE from Jeotgalicoccus sp. ATCC 8456 is capable of converting free long-chain fatty acids into α-alkenes via one-step oxidative decarboxylation in presence of H2O2 as cofactor or using redox partner systems. This enzyme has attracted much attention due to its intriguing but unclear catalytic mechanism and potential application in biofuel production. Here, we investigated the functionality of a select group of residues (Arg245, Cys365, His85, and Ile170) in the active site of OleTJE through extensive mutagenesis analysis. The key roles of these residues for catalytic activity and reaction type selectivity were identified. In addition, a range of heterologous redox partners were found to be able to efficiently support the decarboxylation activity of OleTJE. The best combination turned out to be SeFdx-6 (ferredoxin) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 and CgFdR-2 (ferredoxin reductase) from Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032, which gave the highest myristic acid conversion rate of 94.4%. Moreover, Michaelis-Menton kinetic parameters of OleTJE towards myristic acid were determined.

  2. Crystal Structures of Apo and Liganded 4-Oxalocrotonate Decarboxylase Uncover a Structural Basis for the Metal-Assisted Decarboxylation of a Vinylogous β-Keto Acid.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Samuel L; Coitinho, Juliana B; Costa, Débora M A; Araújo, Simara S; Whitman, Christian P; Nagem, Ronaldo A P

    2016-05-10

    The enzymes in the catechol meta-fission pathway have been studied for more than 50 years in several species of bacteria capable of degrading a number of aromatic compounds. In a related pathway, naphthalene, a toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is fully degraded to intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle by the soil bacteria Pseudomonas putida G7. In this organism, the 83 kb NAH7 plasmid carries several genes involved in this biotransformation process. One enzyme in this route, NahK, a 4-oxalocrotonate decarboxylase (4-OD), converts 2-oxo-3-hexenedioate to 2-hydroxy-2,4-pentadienoate using Mg(2+) as a cofactor. Efforts to study how 4-OD catalyzes this decarboxylation have been hampered because 4-OD is present in a complex with vinylpyruvate hydratase (VPH), which is the next enzyme in the same pathway. For the first time, a monomeric, stable, and active 4-OD has been expressed and purified in the absence of VPH. Crystal structures for NahK in the apo form and bonded with five substrate analogues were obtained using two distinct crystallization conditions. Analysis of the crystal structures implicates a lid domain in substrate binding and suggests roles for specific residues in a proposed reaction mechanism. In addition, we assign a possible function for the NahK N-terminal domain, which differs from most of the other members of the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase superfamily. Although the structural basis for metal-dependent β-keto acid decarboxylases has been reported, this is the first structural report for that of a vinylogous β-keto acid decarboxylase and the first crystal structure of a 4-OD.

  3. HosA, a MarR Family Transcriptional Regulator, Represses Nonoxidative Hydroxyarylic Acid Decarboxylase Operon and Is Modulated by 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ajit; Ranjan, Akash

    2016-02-23

    Members of the Multiple antibiotic resistance Regulator (MarR) family of DNA binding proteins regulate transcription of a wide array of genes required for virulence and pathogenicity of bacteria. The present study reports the molecular characterization of HosA (Homologue of SlyA), a MarR protein, with respect to its target gene, DNA recognition motif, and nature of its ligand. Through a comparative genomics approach, we demonstrate that hosA is in synteny with nonoxidative hydroxyarylic acid decarboxylase (HAD) operon and is present exclusively within the mutS-rpoS polymorphic region in nine different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. Using molecular biology and biochemical approach, we demonstrate that HosA binds to a palindromic sequence downstream to the transcription start site of divergently transcribed nonoxidative HAD operon and represses its expression. Furthermore, in silico analysis showed that the recognition motif for HosA is highly conserved in the upstream region of divergently transcribed operon in different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. A systematic chemical search for the physiological ligand revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA) interacts with HosA and derepresses HosA mediated repression of the nonoxidative HAD operon. Based on our study, we propose a model for molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of nonoxidative HAD operon by HosA in Enterobacteriaceae family.

  4. Bioconversion of p-coumaric acid to p-hydroxystyrene using phenolic acid decarboxylase from B. amyloliquefaciens in biphasic reaction system.

    PubMed

    Jung, Da-Hye; Choi, Wonji; Choi, Kwon-Young; Jung, Eunok; Yun, Hyungdon; Kazlauskas, Romas J; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2013-02-01

    Phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) catalyzes the non-oxidative decarboxylation of p-coumaric acid (pCA) to p-hydroxystyrene (pHS). PAD from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (BAPAD), which showed k (cat)/K (m) value for pCA (9.3 × 10³ mM⁻¹ s⁻¹), was found as the most active one using the "Subgrouping Automata" program and by comparing enzyme activity. However, the production of pHS of recombinant Escherichia coli harboring BAPAD showed only a 22.7 % conversion yield due to product inhibition. Based on the partition coefficient of pHS and biocompatibility of the cell, 1-octanol was selected for the biphasic reaction. The conversion yield increased up to 98.0 % and 0.83 g/h/g DCW productivity was achieved at 100 mM pCA using equal volume of 1-octanol as an organic solvent. In the optimized biphasic reactor, using a three volume ratio of 1-octanol to phosphate buffer phase (50 mM, pH 7.0), the recombinant E. coli produced pHS with a 88.7 % conversion yield and 1.34 g/h/g DCW productivity at 300 mM pCA.

  5. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and glutamine synthetase (GS) in the area postrema of the cat. Light and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, Fernando E.; Mehler, William R.; Gibbs, Michael A.; Eng, Lawrence F.; Wu, Jang-Yen

    1987-01-01

    Morphological evidence is presented of the existence of the putative neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in axon terminals and of glutamine synthetase (GS) in ependymoglial cells and astroglial components of the area postrema (AP) of the cat. Purified antiserum directed against the GABA biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GS antiserum were used. The results showed that punctate structures of variable size corresponding to axon terminals exhibited GAD-immunoreactivity and were distributed in varying densities. The greatest accumulation occurred in the caudal and middle segment of the AP and particularly in the area subpostrema, where the aggregation of terminals was extremely dense. The presence of both GAD-immunoreactive profiles and GS-immunostained ependymoglial cells and astrocytes in the AP provide further evidence of the functional correlation between the two enzymes.

  6. Peripheral Aromatic L-Amino Acids Decarboxylase Inhibitor in Parkinsonism. I. EFFECT ON O-METHYLATED METABOLITES OF L-DOPA-2-14C

    PubMed Central

    Messiha, F. S.; Hsu, T. H.; Bianchine, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of MK-486, an inhibitor of peripheral aromatic L-amino acids decarboxylase, on the urinary metabolites derived from orally administered L-Dopa-2-14C were studied in three Parkinsonian patients. Treatment with MK-486 before L-Dopa-2-14C markedly reduced radioactivity found in catecholamines fraction by 70-80% during 48 hr, but increased 3-O-methyldopa fraction by threefold, as compared with a nonpretreated base line value. Pretreatment with MK-486 for a period of 1 wk resulted in less inhibition of O-methylated amine and acid metabolite fractions than that measured after a single dose of the inhibitor. PMID:5009125

  7. Impact of Cell-free Supernatant of Lactic Acid Bacteria on Putrescine and Other Polyamine Formation by Foodborne Pathogens in Ornithine Decarboxylase Broth.

    PubMed

    Ozogul, Fatih; Tabanelli, Giulia; Toy, Nurten; Gardini, Fausto

    2015-06-24

    Conversion of ornithine to putrescine by Salmonella Paratyphi A, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli was investigated in ornithine decarboxylase broth (ODB) using cell-free supernatants (CFSs) obtained from Leuconostoc mesenterodies subsp. cremoris, Pediococcus acidilactici, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Streptococcus thermophilus. Two groups of cell-free supernatants (25 or 50%) and control (only ODB) were prepared to investigate putrescine (PUT) and other polyamine formation by foodborne pathogens (FBPs). Significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed among the species for each amine. All of the CFSs reduced the formation of PUT by ≥65%. The production of cadaverine (CAD) was scarcely affected by the presence of CFSs, with the exception of the samples inoculated with L. monocytogenes. The variation in polyamine was found with respect to the control samples. Spermidine (SPD) was produced in lower amount in many samples, especially in Gram-negative FBPs, whereas spermine (SPN) increased drastically in the major part of the samples concerning the control. Histamine (HIS) was characterized by a marked concentration decrease in all of the samples, and tyramine (TYR) was accumulated in very low concentrations in the controls. Therefore, the ability of bacteria to produce certain biogenic amines such as HIS, TYR, PUT, and CAD has been studied to assess their risk and prevent their formation in food products. The results obtained from this study concluded that the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains with non-decarboxylase activity are capable of avoiding or limiting biogenic amine formation by FBP.

  8. Dual mechanisms regulating glutamate decarboxylases and accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves exposed to multiple stresses

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Xin; Chen, Yiyong; Zhang, Lingyun; Fu, Xiumin; Wei, Qing; Grierson, Don; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Yahui; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. It has multiple positive effects on mammalian physiology and is an important bioactive component of tea (Camellia sinensis). GABA generally occurs at a very low level in plants but GABA content increases substantially after exposure to a range of stresses, especially oxygen-deficiency. During processing of tea leaves, a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage are essential for the high accumulation of GABA. This is believed to be initiated by a change in glutamate decarboxylase activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the present study we characterized factors regulating the expression and activity of three tea glutamate decarboxylase genes (CsGAD1, 2, and 3), and their encoded enzymes. The results suggests that, unlike the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there are dual mechanisms regulating the accumulation of GABA in tea leaves exposed to multiple stresses, including activation of CsGAD1 enzymatic activity by calmodulin upon the onset of the stress and accumulation of high levels of CsGAD2 mRNA induced by a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage. PMID:27021285

  9. Glutamic acid decarboxylase-67-positive hippocampal interneurons undergo a permanent reduction in number following kainic acid-induced degeneration of ca3 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Shetty, A K; Turner, D A

    2001-06-01

    Kainic acid (KA)-induced degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons leads to synaptic reorganization and hyperexcitability in both dentate gyrus and CA1 region of the hippocampus. We hypothesize that the substrate for hippocampal inhibitory circuitry incurs significant and permanent alterations following degeneration of CA3 pyramidal neurons. We quantified changes in interneuron density (N(v)) in all strata of the dentate gyrus and the CA1 and CA3 subfields of adult rats at 1, 4, and 6 months following intracerebroventricular (icv) KA administration, using glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD-67) immunocytochemistry. At 1 month postlesion, GAD-67-positive interneuron density was significantly reduced in all strata of every hippocampal region except stratum pyramidale of CA1. The reduction in GAD-67-positive interneuron density either persisted or exacerbated at 4 and 6 months postlesion in every stratum of all hippocampal regions. Further, the soma of remaining GAD-67-positive interneurons in dentate gyrus and CA3 subfield showed significant hypertrophy. Thus, both permanent reductions in the density of GAD-67-positive interneurons in all hippocampal regions and somatic hypertrophy of remaining GAD-67-positive interneurons in dentate gyrus and CA3 subfield occur following icv KA. In contrast, the density of interneurons visualized with Nissl in CA1 and CA3 regions was nearly equivalent to that in the intact hippocampus at all postlesion time points. Collectively, these results suggest that persistent reductions in GAD-67-positive interneuron density observed throughout the hippocampus following CA3 lesion are largely due to a permanent loss of GAD-67 expression in a significant fraction of interneurons, rather than widespread degeneration of interneurons. Nevertheless, a persistent decrease in interneuron activity, as evidenced by permanent down-regulation of GAD-67 in a major fraction of interneurons, would likely enhance the degree of hyperexcitability in the CA3

  10. Comparative analysis of acid resistance in Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica strains before and after exposure to poultry decontaminants. Role of the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) system.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Hernando, Alicia; Alonso-Calleja, Carlos; Capita, Rosa

    2009-12-01

    Data on the ability of chemical poultry decontaminants to induce an acid stress response in pathogenic bacteria are lacking. This study was undertaken in order to compare the survival rates in acid broths of Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica strains, both exposed to and not exposed to decontaminants. The contribution of the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) acid resistance system to the survival of bacteria in acid media was also examined. Four strains (L. monocytogenes serovar 1/2, L. monocytogenes serovar 4b, S. enterica serotype Typhymurium and S. enterica serotype Enteritidis) were tested before (control) and after exposure to trisodium phosphate, acidified sodium chlorite, citric acid, chlorine dioxide and peroxyacids (strains were repeatedly passed through media containing increasing concentrations of a compound). Stationary-phase cells (10(8) cfu/ml) were inoculated into tryptic soy broth (TSB) acidified with citric acid (pH 2.7 and 5.0) with or without glutamate (10 mM) added, and incubated at 37 degrees C for 15 min. Survival percentages (calculated from viable colonies) varied from 2.47 +/- 0.67% to 91.93 +/- 5.83%. L. monocytogenes cells previously exposed to acid decontaminants (citric acid and peroxyacids) showed, when placed in acid TSB, a higher (P < 0.05) percentage of survival (average 38.80 +/- 30.52%) than control and pre-exposed to non-acidic decontaminants strains (22.82 +/- 23.80%). Similar (P > 0.05) survival percentages were observed in previously exposed to different decontaminants and control Salmonella strains. The GAD acid resistance system did not apparently play any role in the survival of L. monocytogenes or S. enterica at a low pH. This study demonstrates for the first time that prior exposure to acidic poultry decontaminants increases the percentage of survival of L. monocytogenes exposed to severe acid stress. These results have important implications for the meat industry when considering which decontaminant treatment to

  11. Efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using Escherichia coli by co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter.

    PubMed

    Dung Pham, Van; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bio-product, which is used in pharmaceutical formulations, nutritional supplements, and biopolymer monomer. The traditional GABA process involves the decarboxylation of glutamate. However, the direct production of GABA from glucose is a more efficient process. To construct the recombinant strains of Escherichia coli, a novel synthetic scaffold was introduced. By carrying out the co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter, we redirected the TCA cycle flux to GABA pathway. The genetically engineered E. coli strain produced 1.08 g/L of GABA from 10 g/L of initial glucose. Thus, with the introduction of a synthetic scaffold, we increased GABA production by 2.2-fold. The final GABA concentration was increased by 21.8% by inactivating competing pathways.

  12. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  13. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) affects pollen tube growth via modulating putative Ca2+-permeable membrane channels and is coupled to negative regulation on glutamate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guang-Hui; Zou, Jie; Feng, Jing; Peng, Xiong-Bo; Wu, Ju-You; Wu, Ying-Liang; Palanivelu, Ravishankar; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in pollen tube growth, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms that it mediates are largely unknown. Here, it is shown that exogenous GABA modulates putative Ca2+-permeable channels on the plasma membranes of tobacco pollen grains and pollen tubes. Whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments and non-invasive micromeasurement technology (NMT) revealed that the influx of Ca2+ increases in pollen tubes in response to exogenous GABA. It is also demonstrated that glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme of GABA biosynthesis, is involved in feedback controls of Ca2+-permeable channels to fluctuate intracellular GABA levels and thus modulate pollen tube growth. The findings suggest that GAD activity linked with Ca2+-permeable channels relays an extracellular GABA signal and integrates multiple signal pathways to modulate tobacco pollen tube growth. Thus, the data explain how GABA mediates the communication between the style and the growing pollen tubes. PMID:24799560

  14. Biosynthesis of UDP-xylose. Cloning and characterization of a novel Arabidopsis gene family, UXS, encoding soluble and putative membrane-bound UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Harper, April D; Bar-Peled, Maor

    2002-12-01

    UDP-xylose (Xyl) is an important sugar donor for the synthesis of glycoproteins, polysaccharides, various metabolites, and oligosaccharides in animals, plants, fungi, and bacteria. UDP-Xyl also feedback inhibits upstream enzymes (UDP-glucose [Glc] dehydrogenase, UDP-Glc pyrophosphorylase, and UDP-GlcA decarboxylase) and is involved in its own synthesis and the synthesis of UDP-arabinose. In plants, biosynthesis of UDP-Xyl is catalyzed by different membrane-bound and soluble UDP-GlcA decarboxylase (UDP-GlcA-DC) isozymes, all of which convert UDP-GlcA to UDP-Xyl. Because synthesis of UDP-Xyl occurs both in the cytosol and in membranes, it is not known which source of UDP-Xyl the different Golgi-localized xylosyltransferases are utilizing. Here, we describe the identification of several distinct Arabidopsis genes (named AtUXS for UDP-Xyl synthase) that encode functional UDP-GlcA-DC isoforms. The Arabidopsis genome contains five UXS genes and their protein products can be subdivided into three isozyme classes (A-C), one soluble and two distinct putative membrane bound. AtUxs from each class, when expressed in Escherichia coli, generate active UDP-GlcA-DC that converts UDP-GlcA to UDP-Xyl. Members of this gene family have a large conserved C-terminal catalytic domain (approximately 300 amino acids long) and an N-terminal variable domain differing in sequence and size (30-120 amino acids long). Isoforms of class A and B appear to encode putative type II membrane proteins with their catalytic domains facing the lumen (like Golgi-glycosyltransferases) and their N-terminal variable domain facing the cytosol. Uxs class C is likely a cytosolic isoform. The characteristics of the plant Uxs support the hypothesis that unique UDP-GlcA-DCs with distinct subcellular localizations are required for specific xylosylation events.

  15. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure Suppresses T-independent Antibody Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to  3.75mg/kg of perfluoroocatnoic acid (PFOA) for 15d suppresses T-dependent antibody responses (TDAR), suggesting that T helper cells and/or B cells/plasma cells may be impacted. This study evaluated effects of PFOA exposure on the T cell-independent antibody response...

  16. Tomato aromatic amino acid decarboxylases participate in synthesis of the flavor volatiles 2-phenylethanol and 2-phenylacetaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Tieman, Denise; Taylor, Mark; Schauer, Nicolas; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Hanson, Andrew D.; Klee, Harry J.

    2006-01-01

    An important phenylalanine-derived volatile compound produced by plants is 2-phenylethanol. It is a major contributor to flavor in many foods, including fresh fruits, such as tomato, and an insect-attracting scent in roses and many other flowers. Despite the centrality of 2-phenylethanol to flavor and fragrance, the plant genes responsible for its synthesis have not been identified. Here, we describe a biosynthetic pathway for 2-phenylethanol and other phenylalanine-derived volatiles in tomato fruits and a small family of decarboxylases (LeAADC1A, LeAADC1B, and LeAADC2) that can mediate that pathway's first step. These enzymes each catalyze conversion of phenylalanine to phenethylamine and tyrosine to tyramine. Although tyrosine is the preferred substrate in vitro, phenylalanine levels in tomato fruits far exceed those of tyrosine, indicating that phenylalanine is a physiological substrate. Consistent with this view, overexpression of either LeAADC1A or LeAADC2 in transgenic tomato plants resulted in fruits with up to 10-fold increased emissions of the products of the pathway, including 2-phenylacetaldehyde, 2-phenylethanol, and 1-nitro-2-phenylethane. Further, antisense reduction of LeAADC2 significantly reduced emissions of these volatiles. Besides establishing a biosynthetic route, these results show that it is possible to change phenylalanine-based flavor and aroma volatiles in plants by manipulating expression of a single gene. PMID:16698923

  17. Styrene production from a biomass-derived carbon source using a coculture system of phenylalanine ammonia lyase and phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase-expressing Streptomyces lividans transformants.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Ryosuke; Noda, Shuhei; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-12-01

    To produce styrene from a biomass-derived carbon source, Streptomyces lividans was adopted as a host strain. The gene encoding ferulic acid decarboxylase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (FDC1) was introduced into S. lividans, and the resulting S. lividans transformant successfully expressed FDC1 and converted trans-cinnamic acid (CA) to styrene. A key factor in styrene production using microbes is the recovery of volatile styrene. In the present study, we selected polystyrene resin beads XRD-4 as the absorbent agent to recover styrene produced using S. lividans transformants, which enabled recovery of styrene from the culture broth. For styrene production from biomass-derived carbon sources, S. lividans/FDC1 was cultured together with S. lividans/p-encP, which we previously reported as a CA-producing S. lividans strain. This coculture system combined with the recovery of styrene using XAD-4 allowed the production of styrene from glucose, cellobiose, or xylo-oligosaccharide, respectively.

  18. Age-Dependent Loss of Tolerance to an Immunodominant Epitope of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase in Diabetic prone RIP-B7/DR4 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gebe, John A.; Unrath, Kellee A; Falk, Ben A.; Ito, Kouichi; Wen, Li; Daniels, Terri L.; Lernmark, Åke; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2007-01-01

    We have identified for the first time an age-dependent spontaneous loss of tolerance to two self-antigenic epitopes derived from putative diabetes associated antigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in RIP-B7/DRB1*0404 HLA transgenic mice. Diabetic and older non-diabetic mice exhibited a proliferative response to an immunodominant epitope from GAD65 (555-567) and also from GFAP (240-252) but not from an immunogenic epitope from diabetes associated islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein. The response to both of these self-antigens is not observed in young mice but is observed in older non-diabetic mice, and is accompanied by histological evidence of insulitis in the absence of overt diabetes. Islet infiltrates in older non-diabetic mice and diabetic mice contain CD4+/FoxP3+ cells and suggest the presence of a regulatory mechanism prior and during diabetic disease. Diabetes penetrance in RIP-B7/DR0404 mice is 23% with a mean onset age of 40 weeks and is similar to that reported for RIP-B7/DR0401 mice. A gender preference is observed in that 38% of female mice become diabetic compared to 8% of male mice. PMID:16979383

  19. Age-dependent loss of tolerance to an immunodominant epitope of glutamic acid decarboxylase in diabetic-prone RIP-B7/DR4 mice.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Unrath, Kellee A; Falk, Ben A; Ito, Kouichi; Wen, Li; Daniels, Terri L; Lernmark, Ake; Nepom, Gerald T

    2006-12-01

    We have identified for the first time an age-dependent spontaneous loss of tolerance to two self-antigenic epitopes derived from putative diabetes-associated antigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in RIP-B7/DRB1*0404 HLA transgenic mice. Diabetic and older non-diabetic mice exhibited a proliferative response to an immunodominant epitope from GAD65 (555-567) and also from GFAP (240-252) but not from an immunogenic epitope from diabetes-associated islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein. The response to both of these self-antigens is not observed in young mice but is observed in older non-diabetic mice and is accompanied by histological evidence of insulitis in the absence of overt diabetes. Islet infiltrates in older non-diabetic mice and diabetic mice contain CD4(+)/FoxP3(+) cells and suggest the presence of a regulatory mechanism prior and during diabetic disease. Diabetes penetrance in RIP-B7/DR0404 mice is 23% with a mean onset age of 40 weeks and is similar to that reported for RIP-B7/DR0401 mice. A gender preference is observed in that 38% of female mice become diabetic compared to 8% of male mice.

  20. Localization of arginine decarboxylase in tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Cristina; Cordeiro, Alexandra; Alcázar, Rubén; Borrell, Antoni; Culiañez-Macià, Francisco A.; Tiburcio, Antonio F.; Altabella, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    The lack of knowledge about the tissue and subcellular distribution of polyamines (PAs) and the enzymes involved in their metabolism remains one of the main obstacles in our understanding of the biological role of PAs in plants. Arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis in plants. We have characterized a cDNA coding for ADC from Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1. The deduced ADC polypeptide had 721 amino acids and a molecular mass of 77 kDa. The ADC cDNA was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the ADC fusion protein obtained was used to produce polyclonal antibodies. Using immunological methods, we demonstrate the presence of the ADC protein in all plant organs analysed: flowers, seeds, stems, leaves and roots. Moreover, depending on the tissue, the protein is localized in two different subcellular compartments, the nucleus and the chloroplast. In photosynthetic tissues, ADC is located mainly in chloroplasts, whereas in non-photosynthetic tissues the protein appears to be located in nuclei. The different compartmentation of ADC may be related to distinct functions of the protein in different cell types.

  1. Role of the NR2A/2B subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in glutamate-induced glutamic acid decarboxylase alteration in cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Monnerie, H; Hsu, F-C; Coulter, D A; Le Roux, P D

    2010-12-29

    The vulnerability of brain neuronal cell subpopulations to neurologic insults varies greatly. Among cells that survive a pathological insult, for example ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that may compromise brain function. The present study is a follow-up of our previous studies that investigated the effect of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity on the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67)'s expression in surviving DIV 11 cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro [Monnerie and Le Roux, (2007) Exp Neurol 205:367-382, (2008) Exp Neurol 213:145-153]. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated decrease in GAD expression was found following glutamate exposure. Here we examined which NMDAR subtype(s) mediated the glutamate-induced change in GAD protein levels. Western blotting techniques on cortical neuron cultures showed that glutamate's effect on GAD proteins was not altered by NR2B-containing diheteromeric (NR1/NR2B) receptor blockade. By contrast, blockade of triheteromeric (NR1/NR2A/NR2B) receptors fully protected against a decrease in GAD protein levels following glutamate exposure. When receptor location on the postsynaptic membrane was examined, extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was observed to be sufficient to decrease GAD protein levels similar to that observed after glutamate bath application. Blocking diheteromeric receptors prevented glutamate's effect on GAD proteins after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation. Finally, NR2B subunit examination with site-specific antibodies demonstrated a glutamate-induced, calpain-mediated alteration in NR2B expression. These results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic NMDAR stimulation in cultured GABAergic cortical neurons depends upon subunit composition and receptor location (synaptic vs. extrasynaptic) on the neuronal membrane. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered

  2. Synergistic and antagonistic effect of lactic acid bacteria on tyramine production by food-borne pathogenic bacteria in tyrosine decarboxylase broth.

    PubMed

    Kuley, Esmeray; Ozogul, Fatih

    2011-08-01

    The effect of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains on tyramine (TYR) and also other biogenic amines (BA) production by eight common food-borne pathogen (FBP) in tyrosine decarboxylase broth (TDB) was investigated by using a rapid HPLC method. Significant differences were observed among the FBP strains in ammonia (AMN) and BA production apart from tryptamine, histamine (HIS) and spermine formation (p<0.05). Salmonella paratyphi A was characterised as the main amine producer. LAB had an important synergetic role in some BA production by food-borne pathogenic bacteria, although the effect of some LAB strains on BA production was strain-dependent. Lactococcus spp. and Streptococcus spp. resulted in significantly higher TYR accumulation by Aeromonas hydrophila and Enterococcus faecalis in TDB. The presence of Lactococcus and/or Lactobacillus in TDB significantly increased HIS production by A. hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Ent. faecalis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, whereas HIS accumulation was significantly reduced by Staphylococcus aureus, S. paratyphi A and Listeria monocytogenes.

  3. Effects of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, polyamines, amino acids, and weak bases (amines and ammonia) on development and ribosomal RNA synthesis in Xenopus embryos.

    PubMed

    Shiokawa, Koichiro; Aso, Mai; Kondo, Takeshi; Takai, Jun-Ichi; Yoshida, Junki; Mishina, Takamichi; Fuchimukai, Kota; Ogasawara, Tsukasa; Kariya, Taro; Tashiro, Kosuke; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2010-02-01

    We have been studying control mechanisms of gene expression in early embryogenesis in a South African clawed toad Xenopus laevis, especially during the period of midblastula transition (MBT), or the transition from the phase of active cell division (cleavage stage) to the phase of extensive morphogenesis (post-blastular stages). We first found that ribosomal RNA synthesis is initiated shortly after MBT in Xenopus embryos and those weak bases, such as amines and ammonium ion, selectively inhibit the initiation and subsequent activation of rRNA synthesis. We then found that rapidly labeled heterogeneous mRNA-like RNA is synthesized in embryos at pre-MBT stage. We then performed cloning and expression studies of several genes, such as those for activin receptors, follistatin and aldolases, and then reached the studies of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), a key enzyme in polyamine metabolism. Here, we cloned a Xenopus SAMDC cDNA and performed experiments to overexpress the in vitro-synthesized SAMDC mRNA in Xenopus early embryos, and found that the maternally preset program of apoptosis occurs in cleavage stage embryos, which is executed when embryos reach the stage of MBT. In the present article, we first summarize results on SAMDC and the maternal program of apoptosis, and then describe our studies on small-molecular-weight substances like polyamines, amino acids, and amines in Xenopus embryos. Finally, we summarize our studies on weak bases, especially on ammonium ion, as the specific inhibitor of ribosomal RNA synthesis in Xenopus embryonic cells.

  4. Spinal Cord Hemisection Facilitates Aromatic L-Amino Acid Decarboxylase Cells to Produce Serotonin in the Subchronic but Not the Chronic Phase

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Bushra; Wienecke, Jacob; Jensen, Dennis Bo; Azam, Aleena; Zhang, Mengliang

    2015-01-01

    Neuromodulators, such as serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and noradrenalin, play an essential role in regulating the motor and sensory functions in the spinal cord. We have previously shown that in the rat spinal cord the activity of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) cells to produce 5-HT from its precursor (5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-HTP) is dramatically increased following complete spinal cord transection. In this study, we investigated whether a partial loss of 5-HT innervation could similarly increase AADC activity. Adult rats with spinal cord hemisected at thoracic level (T11/T12) were used with a postoperation interval at 5 days or 60 days. Using immunohistochemistry, first, we observed a significant reduction in the density of 5-HT-immunoreactive fibers in the spinal cord below the lesion on the injured side for both groups. Second, we found that the AADC cells were similarly expressed on both injured and uninjured sides in both groups. Third, increased production of 5-HT in AADC cells following 5-HTP was seen in 5-day but not in 60-day postinjury group. These results suggest that plastic changes of the 5-HT system might happen primarily in the subchronic phase and for longer period its function could be compensated by plastic changes of other intrinsic and/or supraspinal modulation systems. PMID:26504602

  5. Spinal Cord Hemisection Facilitates Aromatic L-Amino Acid Decarboxylase Cells to Produce Serotonin in the Subchronic but Not the Chronic Phase.

    PubMed

    Azam, Bushra; Wienecke, Jacob; Jensen, Dennis Bo; Azam, Aleena; Zhang, Mengliang

    2015-01-01

    Neuromodulators, such as serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) and noradrenalin, play an essential role in regulating the motor and sensory functions in the spinal cord. We have previously shown that in the rat spinal cord the activity of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) cells to produce 5-HT from its precursor (5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-HTP) is dramatically increased following complete spinal cord transection. In this study, we investigated whether a partial loss of 5-HT innervation could similarly increase AADC activity. Adult rats with spinal cord hemisected at thoracic level (T11/T12) were used with a postoperation interval at 5 days or 60 days. Using immunohistochemistry, first, we observed a significant reduction in the density of 5-HT-immunoreactive fibers in the spinal cord below the lesion on the injured side for both groups. Second, we found that the AADC cells were similarly expressed on both injured and uninjured sides in both groups. Third, increased production of 5-HT in AADC cells following 5-HTP was seen in 5-day but not in 60-day postinjury group. These results suggest that plastic changes of the 5-HT system might happen primarily in the subchronic phase and for longer period its function could be compensated by plastic changes of other intrinsic and/or supraspinal modulation systems.

  6. High-yield production of vanillin from ferulic acid by a coenzyme-independent decarboxylase/oxygenase two-stage process.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Miura, Misa; Kuroiwa, Mari; Kino, Kuniki

    2015-05-25

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor and fragrance compounds in foods and cosmetics. Recently, we demonstrated that vanillin could be produced from ferulic acid via 4-vinylguaiacol in a coenzyme-independent manner using the decarboxylase Fdc and the oxygenase Cso2. In this study, we investigated a new two-pot bioprocess for vanillin production using the whole-cell catalyst of Escherichia coli expressing Fdc in the first stage and that of E. coli expressing Cso2 in the second stage. We first optimized the second-step Cso2 reaction from 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin, a rate-determining step for the production of vanillin. Addition of FeCl2 to the cultivation medium enhanced the activity of the resulting E. coli cells expressing Cso2, an iron protein belonging to the carotenoid cleavage oxygenase family. Furthermore, a butyl acetate-water biphasic system was effective in improving the production of vanillin. Under the optimized conditions, we attempted to produce vanillin from ferulic acid by a two-pot bioprocess on a flask scale. In the first stage, E. coli cells expressing Fdc rapidly decarboxylated ferulic acid and completely converted 75 mM of this substrate to 4-vinylguaiacol within 2 h at pH 9.0. After the first-stage reaction, cells were removed from the reaction mixture by centrifugation, and the pH of the resulting supernatant was adjusted to 10.5, the optimal pH for Cso2. This solution was subjected to the second-stage reaction. In the second stage, E. coli cells expressing Cso2 efficiently oxidized 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin. The concentration of vanillin reached 52 mM (7.8 g L(-1)) in 24 h, which is the highest level attained to date for the biotechnological production of vanillin using recombinant cells.

  7. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and substance P in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis: Effects of vagal stimulation on GAD immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Gibbs, M. A.; Mehler, W. R.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of its biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the neuropeptide substance P in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), and gelatinous nucleus (GEL). In addition, electrical stimulation was applied to the night vagus nerve at the cervical level to assess the effects on GAD-immunoreactivity (GAR-IR). GAD-IR terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. They showed pronounced density at the level of the ASP and gradual decrease towards the solitary complex. Nerve cells were not labelled in our preparations. Ultrastructural studies showed symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contracts between labelled terminals and non-immunoreactive dendrites, axons, or neurons. Some of the labelled terminals contained both clear- and dense-core vesicles. Our preliminary findings, after electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, revealed a bilateral decrease of GAD-IR that was particularly evident at the level of the ASP. SP-immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed varying densities in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. In our preparations, the lateral sub-division of the NTS showed the greatest accumulation. The ASP showed medium density of immunoreactive varicosities and terminals and the AP and GEL displayed scattered varicose axon terminals. The electron microscopy revealed that all immunoreactive terminals contained clear-core vesicles which make symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contact with unlabelled dendrites. It is suggested that the GABAergic terminals might correspond to vagal afferent projections and that GAD/GABA and substance P might be co-localized in the same terminal allowing the possibility of a regulated release of the transmitters in relation to demands.

  8. The influence of the cell free solution of lactic acid bacteria on tyramine production by food borne-pathogens in tyrosine decarboxylase broth.

    PubMed

    Toy, Nurten; Özogul, Fatih; Özogul, Yesim

    2015-04-15

    The function of cell-free solutions (CFSs) of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on tyramine and other biogenic amine production by different food borne-pathogens (FBPs) was investigated in tyrosine decarboxylase broth (TDB) using HPLC. Cell free solutions were prepared from four LAB strains. Two different concentrations which were 50% (5 ml CFS+5 ml medium/1:1) and 25% (2.5 ml CFS+7.5 ml medium/1:3) CFS and the control without CFS were prepared. Both concentration of CFS of Streptococcus thermophilus and 50% CFS of Pediococcus acidophilus inhibited tyramine production up to 98% by Salmonella paratyphi A. Tyramine production by Escherichia coli was also inhibited by 50% CFS of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and 25% CFS of Leuconostoc lactis. subsp. cremoris. The inhibitor effect of 50% CFS of P. acidophilus was the highest on tyramine production (55%) by Listeria monocytogenes, following Lc. lactis subsp. lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris (20%) whilst 25% CFS of Leu. mes. subsp. cremoris and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis showed stimulator effects (160%). The stimulation effects of 50% CFS of S. thermophilus and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis were more than 70% by Staphylococcus aureus comparing to the control. CFS of LAB strains showed statistically inhibitor effect since lactic acid inhibited microbial growth, decreased pH quickly and reduced the formation of AMN and BAs. Consequently, in order to avoid the formation of high concentrations of biogenic amines in fermented food by bacteria, it is advisable to use CFS for food and food products.

  9. Enhancement of γ-aminobutyric acid production in recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum by co-expressing two glutamate decarboxylase genes from Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Jiang, Junjun; Li, Yongfu; Li, Youxin; Xie, Yilong

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), a non-protein amino acid, is a bioactive component in the food, feed and pharmaceutical fields. To establish an effective single-step production system for GABA, a recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum strain co-expressing two glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) genes (gadB1 and gadB2) derived from Lactobacillus brevis Lb85 was constructed. Compared with the GABA production of the gadB1 or gadB2 single-expressing strains, GABA production by the gadB1-gadB2 co-expressing strain increased more than twofold. By optimising urea supplementation, the total production of L-glutamate and GABA increased from 22.57 ± 1.24 to 30.18 ± 1.33 g L⁻¹, and GABA production increased from 4.02 ± 0.95 to 18.66 ± 2.11 g L⁻¹ after 84-h cultivation. Under optimal urea supplementation, L-glutamate continued to be consumed, GABA continued to accumulate after 36 h of fermentation, and the pH level fluctuated. GABA production increased to a maximum level of 27.13 ± 0.54 g L⁻¹ after 120-h flask cultivation and 26.32 g L⁻¹ after 60-h fed-batch fermentation. The conversion ratio of L-glutamate to GABA reached 0.60-0.74 mol mol⁻¹. By co-expressing gadB1 and gadB2 and optimising the urea addition method, C. glutamicum was genetically improved for de novo biosynthesis of GABA from its own accumulated L-glutamate.

  10. Environmental stress causes oxidative damage to plant mitochondria leading to inhibition of glycine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicolas L; Day, David A; Millar, A Harvey

    2002-11-08

    A cytotoxic product of lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), rapidly inhibited glycine, malate/pyruvate, and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent O2 consumption by pea leaf mitochondria. Dose- and time-dependence of inhibition showed that glycine oxidation was the most severely affected with a K(0.5) of 30 microm. Several mitochondrial proteins containing lipoic acid moieties differentially lost their reactivity to a lipoic acid antibody following HNE treatment. The most dramatic loss of antigenicity was seen with the 17-kDa glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) H-protein, which was correlated with the loss of glycine-dependent O2 consumption. Paraquat treatment of pea seedlings induced lipid peroxidation, which resulted in the rapid loss of glycine-dependent respiration and loss of H-protein reactivity with lipoic acid antibodies. Pea plants exposed to chilling and water deficit responded similarly. In contrast, the damage to other lipoic acid-containing mitochondrial enzymes was minor under these conditions. The implication of the acute sensitivity of glycine decarboxylase complex H-protein to lipid peroxidation products is discussed in the context of photorespiration and potential repair mechanisms in plant mitochondria.

  11. Progressive loss of glutamic acid decarboxylase, parvalbumin, and calbindin D28K immunoreactive neurons in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of adult rat with experimental hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Y; Chakrabortty, S; Drake, J M; Hattori, T

    1997-02-01

    The authors investigated functional neuronal changes in experimental hydrocephalus using immunohistochemical techniques for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and two neuronal calcium-binding proteins: parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin D28K (CaBP). Hydrocephalus was induced in 16 adult Wistar rats by intracisternal injection of a kaolin solution, which was confirmed microscopically via atlantooccipital dural puncture. Four control rats received the same volume of sterile saline. Immunohistochemical staining for GAD, PV, and CaBP, and Nissl staining were performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after the injection. Hydrocephalus occurred in 90% of kaolin-injected animals with various degrees of ventricular dilation. In the cerebral cortex, GAD-, PV-, and CaBP-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons initially lost their stained processes together with a concomitant loss of homogeneous neuropil staining, followed by the reduction of their total number. With progressive ventricular dilation, GAD- and PV-IR axon terminals on the cortical pyramidal cells disappeared, whereas the number of CaBP-IR pyramidal cells decreased, and ultimately in the most severe cases of hydrocephalus, GAD, PV, and CaBP immunoreactivity were almost entirely diminished. In the hippocampus, GAD-, PV-, and CaBP-IR interneurons demonstrated a reduction of their processes and terminals surrounding the pyramidal cells, with secondary reduction of CaBP-IR pyramidal and granular cells. On the other hand, Nissl staining revealed almost no morphological changes induced by ischemia or neuronal degeneration even in the most severe cases of hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus results in the progressive functional impairment of GAD-, PV-, and CaBP-IR neuronal systems in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, often before there is evidence of morphological injury. The initial injury of cortical and hippocampal interneurons suggests that the functional deafferentation from intrinsic projection fibers may be the initial neuronal event

  12. Tomato Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes SlGAD2 and SlGAD3 Play Key Roles in Regulating γ-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Takayama, Mariko; Koike, Satoshi; Kusano, Miyako; Matsukura, Chiaki; Saito, Kazuki; Ariizumi, Tohru; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) can accumulate relatively high levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during fruit development. However, the molecular mechanism underlying GABA accumulation and its physiological function in tomato fruits remain elusive. We previously identified three tomato genes (SlGAD1, SlGAD2 and SlGAD3) encoding glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), likely the key enzyme for GABA biosynthesis in tomato fruits. In this study, we generated transgenic tomato plants in which each SlGAD was suppressed and those in which all three SlGADs were simultaneously suppressed. A significant decrease in GABA levels, i.e. 50-81% compared with wild-type (WT) levels, was observed in mature green (MG) fruits of the SlGAD2-suppressed lines, while a more drastic reduction (up to <10% of WT levels) was observed in the SlGAD3- and triple SlGAD-suppressed lines. These findings suggest that both SlGAD2 and SlGAD3 expression are crucial for GABA biosynthesis in tomato fruits. The importance of SlGAD3 expression was also confirmed by generating transgenic tomato plants that over-expressed SlGAD3. The MG and red fruits of the over-expressing transgenic lines contained higher levels of GABA (2.7- to 5.2-fold) than those of the WT. We also determined that strong down-regulation of the SlGADs had little effect on overall plant growth, fruit development or primary fruit metabolism under normal growth conditions.

  13. In Vivo-Selected Pyrazinoic Acid-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains Harbor Missense Mutations in the Aspartate Decarboxylase PanD and the Unfoldase ClpC1.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Pooja; Tasneen, Rokeya; Yee, Michelle; Lanoix, Jean-Philippe; Sarathy, Jansy; Rasic, George; Li, Liping; Dartois, Véronique; Nuermberger, Eric; Dick, Thomas

    2017-03-16

    Through mutant selection on agar containing pyrazinoic acid (POA), the bioactive form of the prodrug pyrazinamide (PZA), we recently showed that missense mutations in the aspartate decarboxylase PanD and the unfoldase ClpC1, and loss-of-function mutation of polyketide synthases Mas and PpsA-E involved in phthiocerol dimycocerosate synthesis, cause resistance to POA and PZA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Here we first asked whether these in vitro-selected POA/PZA-resistant mutants are attenuated in vivo, to potentially explain the lack of evidence of these mutations among PZA-resistant clinical isolates. Infection of mice with panD, clpC1, and mas/ppsA-E mutants showed that whereas growth of clpC1 and mas/ppsA-E mutants was attenuated, the panD mutant grew as well as the wild-type. To determine whether these resistance mechanisms can emerge within the host, mice infected with wild-type M. tuberculosis were treated with POA, and POA-resistant colonies were confirmed for PZA and POA resistance. Genome sequencing revealed that 82 and 18% of the strains contained missense mutations in panD and clpC1, respectively. Consistent with their lower fitness and POA resistance level, independent mas/ppsA-E mutants were not found. In conclusion, we show that the POA/PZA resistance mechanisms due to panD and clpC1 missense mutations are recapitulated in vivo. Whereas the representative clpC1 mutant was attenuated for growth in the mouse infection model, providing a possible explanation for their absence among clinical isolates, the growth kinetics of the representative panD mutant was unaffected. Why POA/PZA resistance-conferring panD mutations are observed in POA-treated mice but not yet among clinical strains isolated from PZA-treated patients remains to be determined.

  14. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 expression in the lateral septum is up-regulated in association with the postpartum period in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changjiu; Driessen, Terri; Gammie, Stephen C

    2012-08-27

    The postpartum period in mammals undergoes a variety of physiological adaptations, including metabolic, behavioral and neuroendocrine alterations. GABA signaling has been strongly linked to various emotional states, stress responses and offspring protection. However, whether GABA signaling may change in the lateral septum (LS), a core brain region for regulating behavioral, emotional and stress responses in postpartum mice has not previously been examined. In this study, we tested whether the expression of two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 (GAD2) and GAD67 (GAD1), the rate-limiting enzyme for GABA synthesis, exhibits altered expression in postpartum mice relative to nonmaternal, virgin mice. Using microdissected septal tissue from virgin and age-matched postpartum females, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were carried out to assess GAD mRNA and protein expression, respectively. We found both protein and mRNA expression of GAD67 in the whole septum was up-regulated in postpartum mice. By contrast, no significant difference in the whole septum was observed in GAD65 expression. We then conducted a finer level of analysis using smaller microdissections and found GAD67 to be significantly increased in rostral LS, but not in caudal LS or medial septum (MS). Further, GAD65 mRNA expression in rostral LS, but not in caudal LS or MS was also significantly elevated in postpartum mice. These findings suggest that an increased GABA production in rostral LS of the postpartum mice via elevated GAD65 and GAD67 expression may contribute to multiple alterations in behavioral and emotional states, and responses to stress that occur during the postpartum period. Given that rostral LS contains GABA neurons that are projection neurons or local interneurons, it still needs to be determined whether the function of elevated GABA is for local or distant action or both.

  15. The novel R347g pathogenic mutation of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase provides additional molecular insights into enzyme catalysis and deficiency.

    PubMed

    Montioli, Riccardo; Paiardini, Alessandro; Kurian, Manju A; Dindo, Mirco; Rossignoli, Giada; Heales, Simon J R; Pope, Simon; Voltattorni, Carla Borri; Bertoldi, Mariarita

    2016-06-01

    We report here a clinical case of a patient with a novel mutation (Arg347→Gly) in the gene encoding aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) that is associated with AADC deficiency. The variant R347G in the purified recombinant form exhibits, similarly to the pathogenic mutation R347Q previously studied, a 475-fold drop of kcat compared to the wild-type enzyme. In attempting to unravel the reason(s) for this catalytic defect, we have carried out bioinformatics analyses of the crystal structure of AADC-carbidopa complex with the modelled catalytic loop (residues 328-339). Arg347 appears to interact with Phe103, as well as with both Leu333 and Asp345. We have then prepared and characterized the artificial F103L, R347K and D345A mutants. F103L, D345A and R347K exhibit about 13-, 97-, and 345-fold kcat decrease compared to the wild-type AADC, respectively. However, unlike F103L, the R347G, R347K and R347Q mutants as well as the D345A variant appear to be more defective in catalysis than in protein folding. Moreover, the latter mutants, unlike the wild-type protein and the F103L variant, share a peculiar binding mode of dopa methyl ester consisting of formation of a quinonoid intermediate. This finding strongly suggests that their catalytic defects are mainly due to a misplacement of the substrate at the active site. Taken together, our results highlight the importance of the Arg347-Leu333-Asp345 hydrogen-bonds network in the catalysis of AADC and reveal the molecular basis for the pathogenicity of the variants R347. Following the above results, a therapeutic treatment for patients bearing the mutation R347G is proposed.

  16. Osmotic demyelination syndrome complicating diabetes with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies and Graves' disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tajitsu, Machiko; Yamada, Tsutomu; Cao, Xia; Fukui, Ayako; Nagai, Junko; Yambe, Yuko; Murase, Takashi; Okada, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    ODS associated with hyperglycemia is rare, with few reports.Immune responses have been recently reported as a mechanism of ODS onset. In the present case, an autoimmune predisposition may have contributed to ODS pathogenesis.

  17. Nucleotide sequence of the pyruvate decarboxylase gene from Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Neale, A D; Scopes, R K; Wettenhall, R E; Hoogenraad, N J

    1987-02-25

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1), the penultimate enzyme in the alcoholic fermentation pathway of Zymomonas mobilis, converts pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. The complete nucleotide sequence of the structural gene encoding pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis has been determined. The coding region is 1704 nucleotides long and encodes a polypeptide of 567 amino acids with a calculated subunit mass of 60,790 daltons. The amino acid sequence was confirmed by comparison with the amino acid sequence of a selection of tryptic fragments of the enzyme. The amino acid composition obtained from the nucleotide sequence is in good agreement with that obtained experimentally.

  18. Low agreement between radio binding assays in analyzing glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65Ab) autoantibodies in patients classified with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Daka, Bledar; Svensson, Maria K; Lernmark, Ke; Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia; Hallmans, Goran; Rolandsson, Olov

    2009-09-01

    Autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65Ab) are used in the classification of diabetes in adults. We assessed the concordance in GAD65 autoantibody levels within subjects between three different GAD65Ab radio binding assays (RBA). Plasma samples from 112 diabetes patients (median age 50 years) initially classified with type 2 diabetes was randomly selected from a local diabetes registry. Coded samples were analyzed with two RBA employing (35)S-labeled GAD65. The first used the pEx9 plasmid (pEx9 RBA), the second employed the pThGAD65 plasmid (pThGAD65 RBA) to label GAD65 by in vitro transcription translation. We also used a commercial kit employing plasmid pGAD17 labelled with (125)I (pGAD17 RBA). Subsequent analyses followed standard procedures. Two different cut-offs for GAD65Ab positivity were used in all three assays. We calculated the correlation, concordance, and agreement between the assays. The proportion of GAD65Ab positivity differed between assays when low cut-offs were used (pEx9 RBA 25%, pThGAD65 RBA 17.9%, and pGAD17 RBA 12.5%, respectively). When high cut-offs were applied, the concordance between the pEx9 RBA and the pThGAD65 RBA was 97.3 while their concordance to the pGAD17 RBA was lower (88.4 and 87.4, respectively). There was a low agreement between both pEx9 RBA and pGAD17 RBA (0.45, 95% CI 0.20-0.70) and between pThGAD65 RBA and pGAD17 RBA (0.43, 95% CI 0.18-0.68). We found discrepancies in determining the GAD65Ab positivity, which constitutes a problem when GAD65Ab are used clinically. Further methodological GAD65Ab assays studies are warranted.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing single amino acid substitutions in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.; Vanderlaan, M.; Jensen, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to non-human primate hemoglobin referred to as Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-2, and Rh-4, and two mAb to human hemoglobin, referred to as H-1 and H-3 were isolated and were partially characterized. Binding studies with these mAb on a panel of hemoglobins and isolated ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. globin chains revealed a unique reactivity pattern for each mAb. Amino acid sequence analysis of the antigens used to generate the binding data suggests that the specific recognition of certain hemoglobin antigens by each mAb is controlled by the presence of a particular amino acid at a specific position within the epitope. The use of synthetic peptides as antigens confirmed this observation for five of the mAb. No synthetic peptides were tested with the sixth mAb, Rh-2. The amino acids required for binding of mAb Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-4, and Rh-2 to hemoglobin are alanine at ..beta..5, threonine at ..beta..13, glutamine at ..beta..125, and leucine at ..cap alpha..68. The non-human primate hemoglobin antibodies require a specific amino acid that is not present in human hemoglobin. The amino acid required for binding of Cap-4, Cap-5, and Rh-4 could arise by a single base change in the ..beta.. globin gene, whereas the amino acid required for Rh-2 binding could only occur if two base changes occurred. Thus these mAb are candidate probes for a somatic cell mutation assay on the basis of the detection of peripheral blood red cells that possess single amino acid substituted hemoglobin as a result of single base substitutions in the globin genes of precursor cells.

  20. Characterization of a second lysine decarboxylase isolated from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Y; Kojima, H; Tanaka, T; Takatsuka, Y; Kamio, Y

    1997-01-01

    We report here on the existence of a new gene for lysine decarboxylase in Escherichia coli K-12. The hybridization experiments with a cadA probe at low stringency showed that the homologous region of cadA was located in lambda Kohara phage clone 6F5 at 4.7 min on the E. coli chromosome. We cloned the 5.0-kb HindIII fragment of this phage clone and sequenced the homologous region of cadA. This region contained a 2,139-nucleotide open reading frame encoding a 713-amino-acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 80,589. Overexpression of the protein and determination of its N-terminal amino acid sequence defined the translational start site of this gene. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 69.4% identity to that of lysine decarboxylase encoded by cadA at 93.7 min on the E. coli chromosome. In addition, the level of lysine decarboxylase activity increased in strains carrying multiple copies of the gene. Therefore, the gene encoding this lysine decarboxylase was designated Idc. Analysis of the lysine decarboxylase activity of strains containing cadA, ldc, or cadA ldc mutations indicated that ldc was weakly expressed under various conditions but is a functional gene in E. coli. PMID:9226257

  1. Feasibility of antibody-poly(glutamic acid) complexes: preparation of high-concentration antibody formulations and their pharmaceutical properties.

    PubMed

    Izaki, Shunsuke; Kurinomaru, Takaaki; Maruyama, Takuya; Uchida, Takayuki; Handa, Kenji; Kimoto, Tomoaki; Shiraki, Kentaro

    2015-06-01

    Development of high-concentration antibody formulations for subcutaneous administration remains challenging. Recently, a precipitation-redissolution method was proposed to prepare suspensions or precipitates of salt-dissociable protein-poly(amino acid) complexes. To elucidate the utility of this method for protein therapy, we investigated the feasibility of a precipitation-redissolution method using poly(amino acid) for high-concentration antibody formulation. Omalizumab and adalimumab formulations of 150 mg/mL could be prepared using poly-l-glutamic acid (polyE) from low-concentration stock solutions. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, circular dichroism, and size-exclusion chromatography revealed that the formation of antibody-polyE complex and precipitation-redissolution process did not significantly affect the immunoreactivity or secondary structure of the antibodies. The precipitation-redissolution method was less time-consuming and more effective than lyophilization-redissolution, evaporation-redissolution, and ultrafiltration from the viewpoint of final yield. Scalability was confirmed from 400 μL to 1.0 L. The general toxicity and pharmacokinetic profiles of the antibody-polyE complex formulations were similar to those of conventional antibody formulations. These results suggested that the precipitation-redissolution method using poly(amino acid) has great potential as a concentration method for antibody formulation and medicinal use.

  2. Vector-mediated chromosomal integration of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integrative vector pINTRS was used to transfer glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity to Streptococcus thermophilus ST128, thus allowing for the production of '-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In pINTRS, the gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was flanked by DNA fragments homologous to a S. ...

  3. Functional analysis and transcriptional regulation of two orthologs of ARO10, encoding broad-substrate-specificity 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases, in the brewing yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus CBS1483.

    PubMed

    Bolat, Irina; Romagnoli, Gabriele; Zhu, Feibai; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2013-09-01

    The hybrid genomes of Saccharomyces pastorianus consist of subgenomes similar to those of S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus, and impact of the genome structure on flavour production and its regulation is poorly understood. This study focuses on ARO10, a 2-oxo-acid decarboxylase involved in production of higher alcohols. In S. pastorianus CBS1483, four ARO10 copies were identified, three resembled S. cerevisiae ARO10 and one S. eubayanus ARO10. Substrate specificities of lager strain (Lg)ScAro10 and LgSeubAro10 were compared by individually expressing them in a pdc1Δ-pdc5Δ-pdc6Δ-aro10Δ-thi3Δ S. cerevisiae strain. Both isoenzymes catalysed decarboxylation of the 2-oxo-acids derived from branched-chain, sulphur-containing amino acids and preferably phenylpyruvate. Expression of both alleles was induced by phenylalanine, however in contrast to the S. cerevisiae strain, the two genes were not induced by leucine. Additionally, LgSeubARO10 showed higher basal expression levels during growth with ammonia. ARO80, which encodes ARO10 transcriptional activator, is located on CHRIV and counts three Sc-like and one Seub-like copies. Deletion of LgSeubARO80 did not affect LgSeubARO10 phenylalanine induction, revealing 'trans' regulation across the subgenomes. ARO10 transcript levels showed a poor correlation with decarboxylase activities. These results provide insights into flavour formation in S. pastorianus and illustrate the complexity of functional characterization in aneuploid strains.

  4. Arginine Decarboxylase Is Localized in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Borrell, A.; Culianez-Macia, F. A.; Altabella, T.; Besford, R. T.; Flores, D.; Tiburcio, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Plants, unlike animals, can use either ornithine decarboxylase or arginine decarboxylase (ADC) to produce the polyamine precursor putrescine. Lack of knowledge of the exact cellular and subcellular location of these enzymes has been one of the main obstacles to our understanding of the biological role of polyamines in plants. We have generated polyclonal antibodies to oat (Avena sativa L.) ADC to study the spatial distribution and subcellular localization of ADC protein in different oat tissues. By immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, we show that ADC is organ specific. By cell fractionation and immunoblotting, we show that ADC is localized in chloroplasts associated with the thylakoid membrane. The results also show that increased levels of ADC protein are correlated with high levels of ADC activity and putrescine in osmotically stressed oat leaves. A model of compartmentalization for the arginine pathway and putrescine biosynthesis in active photosynthetic tissues has been proposed. In the context of endosymbiote-driven metabolic evolution in plants, the location of ADC in the chloroplast compartment may have major evolutionary significance, since it explains (a) why plants can use two alternative pathways for putrescine biosynthesis and (b) why animals do not possess ADC. PMID:12228631

  5. Uncovering the Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 Gallate Decarboxylase Involved in Tannin Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Natalia; Curiel, José Antonio; Reverón, Inés; de las Rivas, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a lactic acid bacterium able to degrade tannins by the subsequent action of tannase and gallate decarboxylase enzymes. The gene encoding tannase had previously been identified, whereas the gene encoding gallate decarboxylase is unknown. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of gallic-acid induced L. plantarum extracts showed a 54-kDa protein which was absent in the uninduced cells. This protein was identified as Lp_2945, putatively annotated UbiD. Homology searches identified ubiD-like genes located within three-gene operons which encoded the three subunits of nonoxidative aromatic acid decarboxylases. L. plantarum is the only bacterium in which the lpdC (lp_2945) gene and the lpdB and lpdD (lp_0271 and lp_0272) genes are separated in the chromosome. Combination of extracts from recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing the lpdB, lpdC, and lpdC genes demonstrated that LpdC is the only protein required to yield gallate decarboxylase activity. However, the disruption of these genes in L. plantarum revealed that the lpdB and lpdC gene products are essential for gallate decarboxylase activity. Similar to L. plantarum tannase, which exhibited activity only in esters derived from gallic and protocatechuic acids, purified His6-LpdC protein from E. coli showed decarboxylase activity against gallic and protocatechuic acids. In contrast to the tannase activity, gallate decarboxylase activity is widely present among lactic acid bacteria. This study constitutes the first genetic characterization of a gallate decarboxylase enzyme and provides new insights into the role of the different subunits of bacterial nonoxidative aromatic acid decarboxylases. PMID:23645198

  6. Binding of actin to thioglycolic acid modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles for antibody conjugation.

    PubMed

    Maltas, Esra; Ertekin, Betul

    2015-01-01

    Thioglycolic acid modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TG-APTS-SPION) were synthesized by using (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) and thioglycolic acid (TG). Actin was immobilized on the nanoparticle surfaces. Binding amount of the actin (Act) on TG-APTS-SPIONs was determined by using a calibration curve equation that was drawn using fluorescence spectra at 280 and 342 nm of excitation and emission wavelengths. Anti-Actin (anti-Act) was interacted with the actin immobilized TG-APTS-SPIONs as primary antibody. Horse radish peroxidase (HRP) was also interacted with antibody conjugated nanoparticles as secondary antibody. The binding capacity of primary and secondary antibodies was also estimated by fluorescence spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis were also clarified binding of the protein and antibodies to the nanoparticles' surfaces. Western blot analysis was also done for actin conjunction with anti Act antibody to confirm binding of the antibody to the protein.

  7. Active site directed irreversible inactivation of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase by the conjugated substrate analogue (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid: development of a suicide substrate.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Jordan, F

    1983-08-02

    (E)-4-(4-Chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid (CPB) was found to irreversibly inactivate brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC, EC 4.1.1.1) in a biphasic, sigmoidal manner, as is found for the kinetic behavior of substrate. An expression was derived for two-site irreversible inhibition of allosteric enzymes, and the kinetic behavior of CPB fit the expression for two-site binding. The calculated Ki's of 0.7 mM and 0.3 mM for CPB were assigned to the catalytic site and the regulatory site, respectively. The presence of pyruvic acid at high concentrations protected PDC from inactivation, whereas low concentrations of pyruvic acid accelerated inactivation by CPB. Pyruvamide, a known allosteric activator of PDC, was found to enhance inactivation by CPB. The results can be explained if pyruvamide binds only to a regulatory site, but CPB and pyruvic acid compete for both the regulatory and the catalytic centers. [1-14C]CPB was found to lose 14CO2 concurrently with the inactivation of the enzyme. Therefore, CPB was being turned over by PDC, in addition to inactivating it. CPB can be labeled a suicide-type inactivator for PDC.

  8. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  9. Microdialysis with radiometric monitoring of L-[β-11C]DOPA to assess dopaminergic metabolism: effect of inhibitors of L-amino acid decarboxylase, monoamine oxidase, and catechol-O-methyltransferase on rat striatal dialysate.

    PubMed

    Okada, Maki; Nakao, Ryuji; Hosoi, Rie; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Inoue, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    The catecholamine, dopamine (DA), is synthesized from 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (L-DOPA) by aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). Dopamine metabolism is regulated by monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). To measure dopaminergic metabolism, we used microdialysis with radiometric detection to monitor L-[β-(11)C]DOPA metabolites in the extracellular space of the rat striatum. We also evaluated the effects of AADC, MAO, and COMT inhibitors on metabolite profiles. The major early species measured after administration of L-[β-(11)C]DOPA were [(11)C]3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid ([(11)C]DOPAC) and [(11)C]homovanillic acid ([(11)C]HVA) in a 1:1 ratio, which shifted toward [(11)C]HVA with time. An AADC inhibitor increased the uptake of L-[β-(11)C]DOPA and L-3-O-methyl-[(11)C]DOPA and delayed the accumulation of [(11)C]DOPAC and [(11)C]HVA. The MAO and COMT inhibitors increased the production of [(11)C]3-methoxytyramine and [(11)C]DOPAC, respectively. These results reflect the L-DOPA metabolic pathway, suggesting that this method may be useful for assessing dopaminergic metabolism.

  10. Antibodies specific for nucleic acids and applications in genomic detection and clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zonglin; Leppla, Stephen H; Li, Baoguang; Elkins, Christopher A

    2014-09-01

    Detection of nucleic acids using antibodies is uncommon. This is in part because nucleic acids are poor immunogens and it is difficult to elicit antibodies having high affinity to each type of nucleic acid while lacking cross-reactivity to others. We describe the origins and applications of a variety of anti-nucleic acid antibodies, including ones reacting with modified nucleosides and nucleotides, single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA, RNA, DNA:RNA hybrids, locked-nucleic acids or peptide nucleic acid:nucleic acid hybrids. Carefully selected antibodies can be excellent reagents for detecting bacteria, viruses, small RNAs, microRNAs, R-loops, cancer cells, stem cells, apoptotic cells and so on. The detection may be sensitive, simple, rapid, specific, reproducible, quantitative and cost-effective. Current microarray and diagnostic methods that depend on cDNA or cRNA can be replaced by using antibody detection of nucleic acids. Therefore, development should be encouraged to explore new utilities and create a robust arsenal of new anti-nucleic acid antibodies.

  11. Novel phage display-derived mycolic acid-specific antibodies with potential for tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Conrad E; Zhao, Bryan Z; Cazenave-Gassiot, Amaury; Pang, Shyue-Wei; Bendt, Anne K; Wenk, Markus R; MacAry, Paul A; Hanson, Brendon J

    2013-10-01

    Tuberculosis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity due to infectious disease. However, current clinical diagnostic methodologies such as PCR, sputum culture, or smear microscopy are not ideal. Antibody-based assays are a suitable alternative but require specific antibodies against a suitable biomarker. Mycolic acid, which has been found in patient sputum samples and comprises a large portion of the mycobacterial cell wall, is an ideal target. However, generating anti-lipid antibodies using traditional hybridoma methodologies is challenging and has limited the exploitation of this lipid as a diagnostic marker. We describe here the isolation and characterization of four anti-mycolic acid antibodies from a nonimmune antibody phage display library that can detect mycolic acids down to a limit of 4.5ng. All antibodies were specific for the methoxy subclass of mycolic acid with weak binding for α mycolic acid and did not show any binding to closely related lipids or other Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) derived lipids. We also determined the clinical utility of these antibodies based on their limit of detection for mycobacteria colony forming units (CFU). In combination with an optimized alkaline hydrolysis method for rapid lipid extraction, these antibodies can detect 10(5) CFU of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, a close relative of Mtb and therefore represent a novel approach for the development of diagnostic assays for lipid biomarkers.

  12. Three Distinct Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a widely conserved signaling molecule that in animals has been adapted as a neurotransmitter. GABA is synthesized from the amino acid glutamate by the action of glutamate decarboxylases (GADs). Two vertebrate genes, GAD1 and GAD2, encode distinct GAD proteins: GAD67 and GAD65, respectively. We have identified a third vertebrate GAD gene, GAD3. This gene is conserved in fishes as well as tetrapods. We analyzed protein sequence, gene structure, synteny, and phylogenetics to identify GAD3 as a homolog of GAD1 and GAD2. Interestingly, we found that GAD3 was lost in the hominid lineage. Because of the importance of GABA as a neurotransmitter, GAD3 may play important roles in vertebrate nervous systems. PMID:27461130

  13. Isolation and sequence of the gene encoding ornithine decarboxylase, SPE1, from Candida albicans by complementation of a spe1 delta strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    McNemar, M D; Gorman, J A; Buckley, H R

    1997-11-01

    The gene encoding ornithine decarboxylase, SPE1, from the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans has been isolated by complementation of an ornithine decarboxylase-negative (spe1 delta) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Four transformants, three of which contain plasmids with the SPE1 gene, were isolated by selection on polyamine-free medium. The C. albicans ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) showed high homology with other eukaryotic ODCs at both the amino acid and nucleic acid levels.

  14. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’Yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-10-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies.

  15. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  16. Wall teichoic acids prevent antibody binding to epitopes within the cell wall of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Samir; Kim, Taehan; Lester, Evan; Deep, Deeksha; Spiegel, David A

    2016-01-15

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen that produces a range of infections including cellulitis, pneumonia, and septicemia. The principle mechanism in antistaphylococcal host defense is opsonization with antibodies and complement proteins, followed by phagocytic clearance. Here we use a previously developed technique for installing chemical epitopes in the peptidoglycan cell wall to show that surface glycopolymers known as wall teichoic acids conceal cell wall epitopes, preventing their recognition and opsonization by antibodies. Thus, our results reveal a previously unrecognized immunoevasive role for wall teichoic acids in S. aureus: repulsion of peptidoglycan-targeted antibodies.

  17. HLA-DR-restricted T cell lines from newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients specific for insulinoma and normal islet beta cell proteins: lack of reactivity to glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, G C; Tremble, J; Bailyes, E; Arden, S D; Kaye, T; McGregor, A M; Banga, J P

    1995-01-01

    T cells reacting with pancreatic islet beta cell proteins play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes in experimental animal models and man, although the islet cell autoantigens against which these T cells are directed remain to be characterized. We have previously shown the presence of disease-related antigens residing in the transplantable RIN insulinoma membranes which are recognized by T cells from diabetic NOD mice. We now report on the establishment of CD4+, T cell lines reacting with insulinoma membranes from six newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic patients. Detailed examination of T cell lines from two patients revealed that both the lines continued to react with normal islet cell proteins and, interestingly, were also stimulated by antigens present in brain microsomes. The two T cell lines showed reactivity with different molecular weight proteins of the insulinoma membranes and both the lines were histocompatibility-linked antigen (HLA)-DR restricted. Although the insulinoma membrane preparation is known to contain glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), none of the six T cell lines proliferates in response to purified GAD. These T cell lines will be valuable in characterizing novel islet beta cell antigens which are likely to be implicated in type 1 diabetes. PMID:7554382

  18. Genetics Home Reference: malonyl-CoA decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... deficiency of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase malonic aciduria malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase deficiency MCD deficiency Related Information How ... molecular characterization of nine new patients with malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase deficiency. J Inherit Metab Dis. 2007 ...

  19. Generation of a chickenized catalytic anti-nucleic acid antibody by complementarity-determining region grafting.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jooho; Byun, Sung June; Seo, Youngsil; KIm, Minjae; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Songmi; Lee, Yuno; Lee, Keun Woo; Kim, Jin-Kyoo; Kwon, Myung-Hee

    2015-02-01

    In contrast to a number of studies on the humanization of non-human antibodies, the reshaping of a non-human antibody into a chicken antibody has never been attempted. Therefore, nothing is known about the animal species-dependent compatibility of the framework regions (FRs) that sustain the appropriate conformation of the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs). In this study, we attempted the reshaping of the variable domains of the mouse catalytic anti-nucleic acid antibody 3D8 (m3D8) into the FRs of a chicken antibody (“chickenization”) by CDR grafting, which is a common method for the humanization of antibodies. CDRs of the acceptor chicken antibody that showed a high homology to the FRs of m3D8 were replaced with those of m3D8, resulting in the chickenized antibody (ck3D8). ck3D8 retained the biochemical properties (DNA binding, DNA hydrolysis, and cellular internalizing activities) and three-dimensional structure of m3D8 and showed reduced immunogenicity in chickens. Our study demonstrates that CDR grafting can be applied to the chickenization of a mouse antibody, probably due to the interspecies compatibility of the FRs.

  20. Coenzyme A biosynthesis: steric course of 4'-phosphopantothenoyl-L-cysteine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Aberhart, D J; Ghoshal, P K; Cotting, J A; Russell, D J

    1985-12-03

    4'-Phosphopantothenoyl-L-cysteine decarboxylase (PPC decarboxylase) was partially purified from rat liver. 4'-Phosphopantothenoyl[2-2H1]-L-cysteine was synthesized and converted by PPC decarboxylase to 4'-phosphol[1-2H1]pantetheine. The product was degraded by reduction with Raney nickel followed by acidic hydrolysis to [1-2H1]ethylamine. The latter was converted to the (-)-camphanamide derivative, NMR studies of which revealed that the deuterium was located in the pro-1S position. Also, unlabeled 4'-phosphopantothenoyl-L-cysteine was incubated with PPC decarboxylase in D2O, giving, after degradation, the (-)-camphanamide of (1R)-[1-2H1]ethylamine. The results show that the decarboxylation takes place with retention of configuration. These results are discussed in terms of possible mechanisms for the decarboxylation.

  1. Structural Basis of the Substrate Specificity and Enzyme Catalysis of a Papaver somniferum Tyrosine Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Guan, Huai; Song, Shuaibao; Robinson, Howard; Liang, Jing; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong; Han, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC), a type II pyridoxal 5'-phosphate decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of tyrosine. Due to a generally high sequence identity to other aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs), primary sequence information is not enough to understand substrate specificities with structural information. In this study, we selected a typical TyDC from Papaver somniferum as a model to study the structural basis of AAAD substrate specificities. Analysis of the native P. somniferum TyDC crystal structure and subsequent molecular docking and dynamics simulation provide some structural bases that explain substrate specificity for tyrosine. The result confirmed the previous proposed mechanism for the enzyme selectivity of indolic and phenolic substrates. Additionally, this study yields the first crystal structure for a plant type II pyridoxal-5'-phosphate decarboxylase.

  2. Structural Basis of the Substrate Specificity and Enzyme Catalysis of a Papaver somniferum Tyrosine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Huai; Song, Shuaibao; Robinson, Howard; Liang, Jing; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong; Han, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC), a type II pyridoxal 5′-phosphate decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of tyrosine. Due to a generally high sequence identity to other aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs), primary sequence information is not enough to understand substrate specificities with structural information. In this study, we selected a typical TyDC from Papaver somniferum as a model to study the structural basis of AAAD substrate specificities. Analysis of the native P. somniferum TyDC crystal structure and subsequent molecular docking and dynamics simulation provide some structural bases that explain substrate specificity for tyrosine. The result confirmed the previous proposed mechanism for the enzyme selectivity of indolic and phenolic substrates. Additionally, this study yields the first crystal structure for a plant type II pyridoxal-5'-phosphate decarboxylase. PMID:28232911

  3. Detection and transfer of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermen...

  4. Molecular analysis of the glutamate decarboxylase locus in Streptococcus thermophilus ST110

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABA ('-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermented da...

  5. Single amino acid fingerprinting of the human antibody repertoire with high density peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Weber, Laura K; Palermo, Andrea; Kügler, Jonas; Armant, Olivier; Isse, Awale; Rentschler, Simone; Jaenisch, Thomas; Hubbuch, Jürgen; Dübel, Stefan; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Breitling, Frank; Loeffler, Felix F

    2017-04-01

    The antibody species that patrol in a patient's blood are an invaluable part of the immune system. While most of them shield us from life-threatening infections, some of them do harm in autoimmune diseases. If we knew exactly all the antigens that elicited all the antibody species within a group of patients, we could learn which ones correlate with immune protection, are irrelevant, or do harm. Here, we demonstrate an approach to this question: First, we use a plethora of phage-displayed peptides to identify many different serum antibody binding peptides. Next, we synthesize identified peptides in the array format and rescreen the serum used for phage panning to validate antibody binding peptides. Finally, we systematically vary the sequence of validated antibody binding peptides to identify those amino acids within the peptides that are crucial for binding "their" antibody species. The resulting immune fingerprints can then be used to trace them back to potential antigens. We investigated the serum of an individual in this pipeline, which led to the identification of 73 antibody fingerprints. Some fingerprints could be traced back to their most likely antigen, for example the immunodominant capsid protein VP1 of enteroviruses, most likely elicited by the ubiquitous poliovirus vaccination. Thus, with our approach, it is possible, to pinpoint those antibody species that correlate with a certain antigen, without any pre-information. This can help to unravel hitherto enigmatic diseases.

  6. Caprylic acid precipitation method for impurity reduction: an alternative to conventional chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Yan; Zhang, Cheng; Yigzaw, Yinges; Vedantham, Ganesh

    2012-10-01

    We report the use of caprylic acid based impurity precipitation as (1) an alternative method to polishing chromatography techniques commonly used for monoclonal antibody purification and (2) an impurity reduction step prior to harvesting the bioreactor. This impurity reduction method was tested with protein A purified antibodies and with cell culture fluid. First, the operational parameters influencing precipitation of host cell proteins and high molecular weight aggregate in protein A pools were investigated. When used as a polishing step, the primary factor affecting purification and yield was determined to be pH. Caprylic acid precipitation was comparable to polishing IEX chromatography in reducing host cell protein and aggregate levels. A virus reduction study showed complete clearance of a model retrovirus during caprylic acid precipitation of protein A purified antibody. Caprylic acid mediated impurity precipitation in cell culture showed that the impurity clearance was generally insensitive to pH and caprylic acid concentration whereas yield was a function of caprylic acid concentration. Protein A purification of caprylic acid precipitated cell culture fluid generated less turbid product pool with reduced levels of host cell proteins and high molecular weight aggregate. The results of this study show caprylic acid precipitation to be an effective purification method that can be incorporated into a production facility with minimal cost as it utilizes existing tanks and process flow. Eliminating flow through chromatography polishing step can provide process intensification by avoiding the process tank volume constraints for high titer processes.

  7. Cloning and sequencing of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes from bacteria and uses therefor

    DOEpatents

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie A [Gainesville, FL; Talarico, Lee Ann [Gainesville, FL; Raj, Krishnan Chandra [Tamil Nadu, IN; Ingram, Lonnie O [Gainesville, FL

    2008-02-05

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids molecules which encode pyruvate decarboxylase enzymes having improved decarboxylase activity, substrate affinity, thermostability, and activity at different pH. The nucleic acids of the invention also have a codon usage which allows for high expression in a variety of host cells. Accordingly, the invention provides recombinant expression vectors containing such nucleic acid molecules, recombinant host cells comprising the expression vectors, host cells further comprising other ethanologenic enzymes, and methods for producing useful substances, e.g., acetaldehyde and ethanol, using such host cells.

  8. Crystal structure of anti-polysialic acid antibody single chain Fv fragment complexed with octasialic acid: insight into the binding preference for polysialic acid.

    PubMed

    Nagae, Masamichi; Ikeda, Akemi; Hane, Masaya; Hanashima, Shinya; Kitajima, Ken; Sato, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2013-11-22

    Polysialic acid is a linear homopolymer of α2-8-linked sialic acids attached mainly onto glycoproteins. Cell surface polysialic acid plays roles in cell adhesion and differentiation events in a manner that is often dependent on the degree of polymerization (DP). Anti-oligo/polysialic acid antibodies have DP-dependent antigenic specificity, and such antibodies are widely utilized in biological studies for detecting and distinguishing between different oligo/polysialic acids. A murine monoclonal antibody mAb735 has a unique preference for longer polymers of polysialic acid (DP >10), yet the mechanism of recognition at the atomic level remains unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of mAb735 single chain variable fragment (scFv735) in complex with octasialic acid at 1.8 Å resolution. In the asymmetric unit, two scFv735 molecules associate with one octasialic acid. In both complexes of the unit, all the complementarity-determining regions except for L3 interact with three consecutive sialic acid residues out of the eight. A striking feature of the complex is that 11 ordered water molecules bridge the gap between antibody and ligand, whereas the direct antibody-ligand interaction is less extensive. The dihedral angles of the trisialic acid unit directly interacting with scFv735 are not uniform, indicating that mAb735 does not strictly favor the previously proposed helical conformation. Importantly, both reducing and nonreducing ends of the bound ligand are completely exposed to solvent. We suggest that mAb735 gains its apparent high affinity for a longer polysialic acid chain by recognizing every three sialic acid units in a paired manner.

  9. In vivo detection of prostatic carcinoma with antibodies against prostatic acid phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    De Land, F.H.; Goldenberg, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Serum prostatic acid phosphates (PAP) immunoassay is used to evaluate patients with prostatic carcinoma; however, as with other tumor markers, the enzyme levels do not necessarily reflect the presence or extent of tumor. The authors investigated the use of radiolabeled PAP antibodies for the in vivo detection of prostatic carcinoma by external scintillation imaging. Nine patients with prostatic carcinoma were entered into the study. Each received from 2.0 to 2.5 mCi of I-131 labeled antibody to PAP, administered i.v. The immunogen (PAP) was purified from normal human seminal fluid. Antiserum was prepared in rabbits by injecting the purified PAP. The antibodies were labeled with I-131 by chloramine-T method (10 to 20 Ci/g of IgG). Total body images were obtained at 24 and 48 hrs following administration of the labeled antibody. Nontarget I-131 activity was diminished by computer processing. Tumor sites detected by I-131 antibodies were correlated with other diagnostic procedures. In 7 of 9 patients primary and metastatic sites of cancer were detected by antibody imaging, however, no bone lesions were detected (6 cases). In 3 patients with concomitant pulmonary tumors, one was identified as of prostate origin. The serum PAP was normal in 4 patients; however, the primary tumor was identified in 3 of these. These findings suggest that the localization of prostatic carcinoma by means of in-vivo imaging of labeled antibodies to PAP is feasible and offers diagnostic opportunities based upon the functional characteristics.

  10. In vivo biotinylation and incorporation of a photo-inducible unnatural amino acid to an antibody-binding domain improve site-specific labeling of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kanje, Sara; Hober, Sophia

    2015-04-01

    Antibodies are important molecules in many research fields, where they play a key role in various assays. Antibody labeling is therefore of great importance. Currently, most labeling techniques take advantage of certain amino acid side chains that commonly appear throughout proteins. This makes it hard to control the position and exact degree of labeling of each antibody. Hence, labeling of the antibody may affect the antibody-binding site. This paper presents a novel protein domain based on the IgG-binding domain C2 of streptococcal protein G, containing the unnatural amino acid BPA, that can cross-link other molecules. This novel domain can, with improved efficiency compared to previously reported similar domains, site-specifically cross-link to IgG at the Fc region. An efficient method for simultaneous in vivo incorporation of BPA and specific biotinylation in a flask cultivation of Escherichia coli is described. In comparison to a traditionally labeled antibody sample, the C2-labeled counterpart proved to have a higher proportion of functional antibodies when immobilized on a solid surface and the same limit of detection in an ELISA. This method of labeling is, due to its efficiency and simplicity, of high interest for all antibody-based assays where it is important that labeling does not interfere with the antibody-binding site.

  11. Comparison between activation of ornithine decarboxylase and histidine decarboxylase in rat stomach.

    PubMed

    Ding, X Q; Chen, D; Rosengren, E; Persson, L; Hakanson, R

    1996-03-01

    We compared the responses of rat stomach ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) to food intake, oral treatment with antisecretagogues, NaHCO3, and hypertonic NaCl, antrectomy, intravenous infusion of gastrin-17, the selective cholecystokinin (CCK)-B/gastrin receptor antagonist L-365,260, and the somatostatin analogue RC-160. The serum gastrin concentration and oxyntic mucosal ODC and HDC activities were higher in freely fed rats than in fasted rats. Food intake in fasted rats raised the serum gastrin concentration and the ODC and HDC activities. Ranitidine, omeprazole, and NaHCO3 raised the serum gastrin concentration and activated ODC and HDC. Hypertonic NaCl raised the ODC activity 200-fold, whereas circulating gastrin and HDC activity were increased only moderately. Infusion of gastrin-17 activated HDC but not ODC. L-365,260 prevented the activation of HDC but not of ODC in response to food intake and treatment with omeprazole, NaHCO3, or hypertonic NaCl. Antrectomy prevented the food- and omeprazole-evoked rise in oxyntic mucosal HDC activity but not the rise in ODC activity. RC-160 suppressed HDC activity after food intake and treatment with omeprazole, NaHCO3, or NaCl. In contrast, RC-160 suppressed omeprazole- and NaHCO3-evoked ODC activation but not that evoked by food intake or NaCl. The results support the view that HDC in the oxyntic mucosa is activated by gastrin and suppressed by somatostatin. The induction of ODC is not mediated by gastrin; ODC activation appears to be related to acid inhibition per se or to mucosal maintenance and repair; somatostatin, or rather the lack of it, might contribute to the induction of ODC after acid blockade. The mechanism behind the activation of rat stomach ODC seems to differ depending on the type of stimulus.

  12. Characterization of four monoclonal antibodies to recombinant human tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Miyazaki, Shuichi; Hokari, Shigeru; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2002-06-01

    In this study we produced a recombinant human Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) enzyme from baculovirus-infected insect cells, generated four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 15A4, 13B9, 1C6 and 3G7, to the enzyme, and characterized these antibodies. In the human serum and lung specimen, all four antibodies appeared to have a high specificity for native TRAP enzyme in western blot analysis, immunohistochemical analysis and enzyme immunoassay. These antibodies may react with respective conformational determinants, therefore, they may be useful for detection of active TRAP. Only one of the antibodies, 15A4 also reacted with a denatured epitope, therefore, it is suitable for western blot analysis, enzyme immunoassay and for immunohistochemistry in the rat. Taken together, having characterized properties of four monoclonal antibodies against recombinant human TRAP enzyme may be useful for development of TRAP specific immunoassays in pathology and hematology of the bone. They will certainly be of use for the study of biosynthesis, regulation and function of the TRAP enzyme.

  13. Subcellular localization of the voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 in the cerebellar dentate nucleus of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Espinaco, V; Elezgarai, I; Díez-García, J; Puente, N; Knöpfel, T; Grandes, P

    2008-09-09

    Deep cerebellar dentate nuclei are in a key position to control motor planning as a result of an integration of cerebropontine inputs and hemispheric Purkinje neurons signals, and their influence through synaptic outputs onto extracerebellar hubs. GABAergic dentate neurons exhibit broader action potentials and slower afterhyperpolarization than non-GABAergic (presumably glutamatergic) neurons. Specific potassium channels may be involved in these distinct firing profiles, particularly, Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 subunits which rapidly activate at relatively positive potentials to support the generation of fast action potentials. To investigate the subcellular localization of Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 in GAD- and GAD+ dentate neurons of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67-green fluorescent protein (GAD67-GFP) knock-in mice a preembedding immunocytochemical method for electron microscopy was used. Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 were in membranes of cell somata, dendrites, axons and synaptic terminals of both GAD- and GAD+ dentate neurons. The vast majority of GAD- somatodendritic membrane segments domains labeled for Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 (96.1% and 84.7%, respectively) whereas 56.2% and 69.8% of GAD- axonal membrane segments were immunopositive for these subunits. Furthermore, density of Kv3.1b immunoparticles was much higher in GAD- somatodendritic than axonal domains. As to GAD+ neurons, only 70.6% and 50% of somatodendritic membrane segments, and 53.3% and 59.5% of axonal membranes exhibited Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 labeling, respectively. In contrast to GAD- cells, GAD+ cells exhibited a higher density labeling for both Kv3 subunits at their axonal than at their somatodendritic membranes. Taken together, Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 potassium subunits are expressed in both GAD- and GAD+ cells, albeit at different densities and distribution. They likely contribute to the distinct biophysical properties of both GAD- and GAD+ neurons in the dentate nucleus.

  14. Characterization of the activity and expression of arginine decarboxylase in human and animal Chlamydia pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bliven, Kimberly A; Fisher, Derek J; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2012-12-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae encodes a functional arginine decarboxylase (ArgDC), AaxB, that activates upon self-cleavage and converts l-arginine to agmatine. In contrast, most Chlamydia trachomatis serovars carry a missense or nonsense mutation in aaxB abrogating activity. The G115R missense mutation was not predicted to impact AaxB functionality, making it unclear whether AaxB variations in other Chlamydia species also result in enzyme inactivation. To address the impact of gene polymorphism on functionality, we investigated the activity and production of the Chlamydia AaxB variants. Because ArgDC plays a critical role in the Escherichia coli acid stress response, we studied the ability of these Chlamydia variants to complement an E. coli ArgDC mutant in an acid shock assay. Active AaxB was detected in four additional species: Chlamydia caviae, Chlamydia pecorum, Chlamydia psittaci, and Chlamydia muridarum. Of the C. trachomatis serovars, only E appears to encode active enzyme. To determine when functional enzyme is present during the chlamydial developmental cycle, we utilized an anti-AaxB antibody to detect both uncleaved and cleaved enzyme throughout infection. Uncleaved enzyme production peaked around 20 h postinfection, with optimal cleavage around 44 h. While the role ArgDC plays in Chlamydia survival or virulence is unclear, our data suggest a niche-specific function.

  15. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of wild type and a mutant histidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a.

    PubMed

    Vanderslice, P; Copeland, W C; Robertus, J D

    1986-11-15

    Prohistidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a is a protein that autoactivates to histidine decarboxylase by cleaving its peptide chain between serines 81 and 82 and converting Ser-82 to a pyruvoyl moiety. The pyruvoyl group serves as the prosthetic group for the decarboxylation reaction. We have cloned and determined the nucleotide sequence of the gene for this enzyme from a wild type strain and from a mutant with altered autoactivation properties. The nucleotide sequence modifies the previously determined amino acid sequence of the protein. A tripeptide missed in the chemical sequence is inserted, and three other amino acids show conservative changes. The activation mutant shows a single change of Gly-58 to an Asp. Sequence analysis up- and downstream from the gene suggests that histidine decarboxylase is part of a polycistronic message, and that the transcriptional promotor region is strongly homologous to those of other Gram-positive organisms.

  16. Resolution of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase into two isozymes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Dikdan, G; Jordan, F

    1986-03-05

    A novel purification method was developed for brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1) that for the first time resolved the enzyme into two isozymes on DEAE-Sephadex chromatography. The isozymes were found to be distinct according to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis: the first one to be eluted gave rise to one band, the second to two bands. The isozymes were virtually the same so far as specific activity, KM, inhibition kinetics and irreversible binding properties by the mechanism-based inhibitor (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid are concerned. This finding resolves a longstanding controversy concerning the quaternary structure of this enzyme.

  17. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Lysophosphatidic Acid Binding by a Humanized Monoclonal Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    J Fleming; J Wojciak; M Campbell; T Huxford

    2011-12-31

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a common product of glycerophospholipid metabolism and an important mediator of signal transduction. Aberrantly high LPA concentrations accompany multiple disease states. One potential approach for treatment of these diseases, therefore, is the therapeutic application of antibodies that recognize and bind LPA as their antigen. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of an anti-LPA antibody (LT3015) Fab fragment in its antigen-free form to 2.15 {angstrom} resolution and in complex with two LPA isotypes (14:0 and 18:2) to resolutions of 1.98 and 2.51 {angstrom}, respectively. The variable CDR (complementarity-determining region) loops at the antigen binding site adopt nearly identical conformations in the free and antigen-bound crystal structures. The crystallographic models reveal that the LT3015 antibody employs both heavy- and light-chain CDR loops to create a network of eight hydrogen bonds with the glycerophosphate head group of its LPA antigen. The head group is almost completely excluded from contact with solvent, while the hydrocarbon tail is partially solvent-exposed. In general, mutation of amino acid residues at the antigen binding site disrupts LPA binding. However, the introduction of particular mutations chosen strategically on the basis of the structures can positively influence LPA binding affinity. Finally, these structures elucidate the exquisite specificity demonstrated by an anti-lipid antibody for binding a structurally simple and seemingly unconstrained target molecule.

  18. Arginase, Arginine Decarboxylase, Ornithine Decarboxylase, and Polyamines in Tomato Ovaries (Changes in Unpollinated Ovaries and Parthenocarpic Fruits Induced by Auxin or Gibberellin).

    PubMed Central

    Alabadi, D.; Aguero, M. S.; Perez-Amador, M. A.; Carbonell, J.

    1996-01-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1) activity has been found in the ovaries and Young fruits of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Rutgers).Changes in arginase, arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), and ornithine decarboxylase activity (EC 4.1.1.17) and levels of free and conjugated putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were determined in unpollinated ovaries and in parthenocarpic fruits during the early stages of development induced by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) or gibberellic acid (GA3). Levels of arginase, free spermine, and conjugates of the three polyamines were constant in unpollinated ovaries and characteristic of a presenescent step. A marked decrease in arginase activity, free spermine, and polyamine conjugates was associated with the initiation of fruit growth due to cell division, and when cell expansion was initiated, the absence of arginase indicated a redirection of nitrogen metabolism to the synthesis of arginine. A transient increase in arginine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase was also observed in 2,4-D-induced fruits. In general, 2,4-D treatments produced faster changes than GA3, and without treatment, unpollinated ovaries developed only slightly and senescence was hardly visible. Sensitivity to 2,4-D and GA3 treatment remained for at least 2 weeks postanthesis. PMID:12226441

  19. Immunohistochemical evidence for the coexistence of histidine decarboxylase-like and glutamate decarboxylase-like immunoreactivities in nerve cells of the magnocellular nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, N; Inagaki, S; Shiosaka, S; Taguchi, Y; Oertel, W H; Tohyama, M; Watanabe, T; Wada, H

    1984-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining of alternate consecutive sections revealed numerous histidine decarboxylase (L-histidine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.22)-like immunoreactive neurons that also contained glutamate decarboxylase (L-glutamate 1-carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.15)-like immunoreactive structures in the tuberal magnocellular nucleus, the caudal magnocellular nucleus, and the postmammillary caudal magnocellular nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus of rats. Furthermore, in immunohistochemical double-staining procedures, almost all neurons in the magnocellular nuclei had both histidine decarboxylase-like and glutamate decarboxylase-like immunoreactivities. These results suggest the coexistence of histamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid in single neurons in these nuclei. Images PMID:6594708

  20. Nucleotide sequence and expression of the Enterobacter aerogenes alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase gene in brewer's yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Sone, H; Fujii, T; Kondo, K; Shimizu, F; Tanaka, J; Inoue, T

    1988-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 1.4-kilobase DNA fragment containing the alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase gene of Enterobacter aerogenes was determined. The sequence contains an entire protein-coding region of 780 nucleotides which encodes an alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase of 260 amino acids. The DNA sequence coding for alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase was placed under the control of the alcohol dehydrogenase I promoter of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a plasmid capable of autonomous replication in both S. cerevisiae and Escherichia coli. Brewer's yeast cells transformed by this plasmid showed alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase activity and were used in laboratory-scale fermentation experiments. These experiments revealed that the diacetyl concentration in wort fermented by the plasmid-containing yeast strain was significantly lower than that in wort fermented by the parental strain. These results indicated that the alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase activity produced by brewer's yeast cells degraded alpha-acetolactate and that this degradation caused a decrease in diacetyl production. PMID:3278689

  1. Opsonic Antibodies to Enterococcus faecalis Strain 12030 Are Directed against Lipoteichoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Theilacker, Christian; Kaczynski, Zbigniew; Kropec, Andrea; Fabretti, Francesca; Sange, Tatjana; Holst, Otto; Huebner, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    A teichoic acid (TA)-like polysaccharide in Enterococcus faecalis has previously been shown to induce opsonic antibodies that protect against bacteremia after active and passive immunization. Here we present new data providing a corrected structure of the antigen and the epitope against which the opsonic antibodies are directed. Capsular polysaccharide isolated from E. faecalis strain 12030 by enzymatic digestion of peptidoglycan and chromatography (enzyme-TA) was compared with lipoteichoic acid (LTA) extracted using butanol and purified by hydrophobic-interaction chromatography (BuOH-LTA). Structural determinations were carried out by chemical analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Antibody specificity was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the opsonophagocytosis assay. After alanine ester hydrolysis, there was structural identity between enzyme-TA and BuOH-LTA of the TA-parts of the two molecules. The basic enterococcal LTA structure was confirmed: 1,3-poly(glycerol phosphate) nonstoichiometrically substituted at position C-2 of the glycerol residues with d-Ala and kojibiose. We also detected a novel substituent at position C-2, [d-Ala→6]-α-d-Glcp-(1→2-[d-Ala→6]-α-d-Glcp-1→). Antiserum raised against enzyme-TA bound equally well to BuOH-LTA and dealanylated BuOH-LTA as to the originally described enzyme-TA antigen. BuOH-LTA was a potent inhibitor of opsonophagocytic killing by the antiserum to enzyme-TA. Immunization with antibiotic-killed whole bacterial cells did not induce a significant proportion of antibodies directed against alanylated epitopes on the TA, and opsonic activity was inhibited completely by both alanylated and dealanylated BuOH-LTA. In summary, the E. faecalis strain 12030 enzyme-TA is structurally and immunologically identical to dealanylated LTA. Opsonic antibodies to E. faecalis 12030 are directed predominantly to nonalanylated epitopes on the LTA molecule. PMID:16988246

  2. Antibody and Viral Nucleic Acid Testing of Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Eastern Equine Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, James A; Brittain, David C; Howard, John J; Oliver, JoAnne

    2015-08-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis diagnostic serum antibody can appear 6 days after the onset of symptoms, and its numbers can increase 4-fold in 4 days, arguing for early and frequent serum testing. In populations where cerebrospinal fluid viral nucleic acid testing sensitivity and specificity remain undetermined, cerebrospinal antibody testing should also be performed.

  3. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Torkashvand, Fatemeh; Vaziri, Behrouz; Maleknia, Shayan; Heydari, Amir; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Davami, Fatemeh; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB) multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44) cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM) to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb) titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds. PMID:26480023

  4. Glycine receptor antibodies are detected in progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM) but not in saccadic oscillations.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Takahiro; Leite, Maria I; Lang, Bethan; Waters, Patrick; Urano, Yoshiaki; Miyakawa, Saori; Hamada, Junichi; Sakai, Fumihiko; Mochizuki, Hideki; Vincent, Angela

    2012-08-01

    Glycine receptor (GlyR) antibodies were recently identified in a few patients with progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM); none of these patients had antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). An inhibitory glycinergic transmission defect has also been implicated in the mechanism underlying saccadic oscillations, including ocular flutter or opsoclonus; GlyR antibodies have not been reported in these patients. The purpose was to determine whether GlyR antibodies are found in patients with PERM, ocular flutter syndrome (OFS), and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS). GlyR antibodies were first measured in archived sera and CSF from five patients, including one patient with GAD antibody-positive PERM, two patients with OFS, and two patients with OMS. GlyR antibodies were also measured in archived sera from nine other adult patients with OMS. GlyR antibodies and GAD antibodies were both found at high titers in the serum and CSF of the patient with PERM, and their levels paralleled disease activity over time. GlyR antibodies were not found at significant levels in 13 patients with saccadic oscillations. GlyR and GAD antibodies can co-exist in PERM and follow the clinical course. Although saccadic oscillations are a feature of this condition, GlyR antibodies are not commonly found in patients with isolated saccadic oscillations.

  5. Solubility Challenges in High Concentration Monoclonal Antibody Formulations: Relationship with Amino Acid Sequence and Intermolecular Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pindrus, Mariya; Shire, Steven J; Kelley, Robert F; Demeule, Barthélemy; Wong, Rita; Xu, Yiren; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-02

    The purpose of this work was to elucidate the molecular interactions leading to monoclonal antibody self-association and precipitation and utilize biophysical measurements to predict solubility behavior at high protein concentration. Two monoclonal antibodies (mAb-G and mAb-R) binding to overlapping epitopes were investigated. Precipitation of mAb-G solutions was most prominent at high ionic strength conditions and demonstrated strong dependence on ionic strength, as well as slight dependence on solution pH. At similar conditions no precipitation was observed for mAb-R solutions. Intermolecular interactions (interaction parameter, kD) related well with high concentration solubility behavior of both antibodies. Upon increasing buffer ionic strength, interactions of mAb-R tended to weaken, while those of mAb-G became more attractive. To investigate the role of amino acid sequence on precipitation behavior, mutants were designed by substituting the CDR of mAb-R into the mAb-G framework (GM-1) or deleting two hydrophobic residues in the CDR of mAb-G (GM-2). No precipitation was observed at high ionic strength for either mutant. The molecular interactions of mutants were similar in magnitude to those of mAb-R. The results suggest that presence of hydrophobic groups in the CDR of mAb-G may be responsible for compromising its solubility at high ionic strength conditions since deleting these residues mitigated the solubility issue.

  6. A coenzyme-independent decarboxylase/oxygenase cascade for the efficient synthesis of vanillin.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Miura, Misa; Kino, Kuniki

    2014-10-13

    Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavor compounds in the world as well as a promising versatile building block. The biotechnological production of vanillin from plant-derived ferulic acid has attracted much attention as a new alternative to chemical synthesis. One limitation of the known metabolic pathway to vanillin is its requirement for expensive coenzymes. Here, we developed a novel route to vanillin from ferulic acid that does not require any coenzymes. This artificial pathway consists of a coenzyme-independent decarboxylase and a coenzyme-independent oxygenase. When Escherichia coli cells harboring the decarboxylase/oxygenase cascade were incubated with ferulic acid, the cells efficiently synthesized vanillin (8.0 mM, 1.2 g L(-1) ) via 4-vinylguaiacol in one pot, without the generation of any detectable aromatic by-products. The efficient method described here might be applicable to the synthesis of other high-value chemicals from plant-derived aromatics.

  7. Structural and Mechanistic Studies on Klebsiella pneumoniae 2-Oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-12

    The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin was recently shown to proceed via three enzymatic steps. The final conversion is a decarboxylation of the unstable intermediate 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (OHCU) and is catalyzed by OHCU decarboxylase. Here we present the structures of Klebsiella pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase in unliganded form and with bound allantoin. These structures provide evidence that ligand binding organizes the active site residues for catalysis. Modeling of the substrate and intermediates provides additional support for this hypothesis. In addition we characterize the steady state kinetics of this enzyme and report the first OHCU decarboxylase inhibitor, allopurinol, a structural isomer of hypoxanthine. This molecule is a competitive inhibitor of K. pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase with a K{sub i} of 30 {+-} 2 {micro}m. Circular dichroism measurements confirm structural observations that this inhibitor disrupts the necessary organization of the active site. Our structural and biochemical studies also provide further insights into the mechanism of catalysis of OHCU decarboxylation.

  8. Kinetic challenges facing oxalate, malonate, acetoacetate, and oxaloacetate decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Wolfenden, Richard; Lewis, Charles A; Yuan, Yang

    2011-04-20

    To compare the powers of the corresponding enzymes as catalysts, the rates of uncatalyzed decarboxylation of several aliphatic acids (oxalate, malonate, acetoacetate, and oxaloacetate) were determined at elevated temperatures and extrapolated to 25 °C. In the extreme case of oxalate, the rate of the uncatalyzed reaction at pH 4.2 was 1.1 × 10(-12) s(-1), implying a 2.5 × 10(13)-fold rate enhancement by oxalate decarboxylase. Whereas the enzymatic decarboxylation of oxalate requires O(2) and Mn(II), the uncatalyzed reaction is unaffected by the presence of these cofactors and appears to proceed by heterolytic elimination of CO(2).

  9. Antibody-based diagnostic for ‘refractory’ periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Levine, M.; LaPolla, S.; Owen, W.L.; Socransky, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective About 10–15% of US adults are ‘refractory’ to therapy for chronic periodontitis. Recently, studies suggest that these patients have elevated lysine decarboxylase activity in the sulcular microbiota. The aim of this study was to determine whether an elevated IgG antibody response to lysine decarboxylase, alone or with antibody to other bacterial antigens and baseline clinical measurements, would predict ‘refractory’ patients with high accuracy. Methods Chronic periodontitis patients were treated using scaling and root planing (SRP) followed by maintenance SRP and 3-monthly re-examinations. If there was a loss of mean full mouth attachment or more than three sites appeared with >2.5mm new loss within a year, the subjects were re-treated (modified Widman flap surgery and systemically administered tetracycline). If attachment loss as above recurred, the subjects were ‘refractory’. Baseline clinical measurements and specific antibody responses were used in a logistic regression model to predict ‘refractory’ subjects. Results Antibody to a peptide portion of lysine decarboxylase (HKL-Ab) and baseline bleeding on probing (BOP) prevalence measurements predicted attachment loss 3 months after initial therapy [pIAL = loss (0) or gain (1)]. IgG antibody contents to a purified antigen from Actinomyces spp. (A-Ab) and streptococcal d-alanyl glycerol lipoteichoic acid (S-Ab) were related in ‘refractory’ patients (R2 = 0.37, p < 0.01). From the regression equation, the relationship between the antibodies was defined as linear (pLA/S-Ab = 0) or non-linear pLA/S-Ab = 1). Using pLA/S-Ab, pIAL and age, a logistic regression equation was derived from 48 of the patients. Of 59 subjects, 37 had 2–4mm attachment loss and were assigned as ‘refractory’ or successfully treated with 86% accuracy. Conclusion HKL-Ab facilitated an accurate prediction of therapeutic outcome in subjects with moderate periodontitis. PMID:12445226

  10. PVX-tolerant potato development using a nucleic acid-hydrolyzing recombinant antibody.

    PubMed

    Yang, J-G; Hwang, K-H; Kil, E-J; Park, J; Cho, S; Lee, Y-G; Auh, C-K; Rhee, Y; Lee, S

    2017-01-01

    3D8 scFv, a catalytic recombinant antibody developed in the MRL mouse, exhibits nucleic acid-hydrolyzing activity. Previous studies have demonstrated that tobacco plants harboring 3D8 scFv antibodies showed broad-spectrum resistance to infection by both DNA and RNA viruses. In this study, potatoes were transformed with the 3D8 scFv gene and screened by potato virus X (PVX) challenge. Starting with the T0 and T1 potato lines, PVX-tolerant T1 potatoes were identified in the field and characterized by ELISA and RT-PCR analysis. T2 potatoes were propagated for T3 generation and additional virus challenges in the field, and 44% of the 3D8 scFv T3 transgenic potatoes grown in GMO fields were found to be tolerant to PVX infection. Tubers from PVX-tolerant T3 lines were 60% bigger and 24% heavier, compared with tubers from PVX-susceptible transgenic lines and wild-type potatoes. Three-step virus challenge experiments and molecular characterization techniques were used for plants grown in growth chambers or fields to identify 3D8 scFv-transgenic, PVX-tolerant potatoes. These studies also revealed that the viral tolerance enabled by 3D8 scFv persisted during asexual propagation.

  11. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  12. Monomeric S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from plants provides an alternative to putrescine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Eric M; Ekstrom, Jennifer L; Pegg, Anthony E; Ealick, Steven E

    2002-12-10

    S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase has been implicated in cell growth and differentiation and is synthesized as a proenzyme, which undergoes autocatalytic cleavage to generate an active site pyruvoyl group. In mammals, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase is active as a dimer in which each protomer contains one alpha subunit and one beta subunit. In many higher organisms, autocatalysis and decarboxylation are stimulated by putrescine, which binds in a buried site containing numerous negatively charged residues. In contrast, plant S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylases are fully active in the absence of putrescine, with rapid autocatalysis that is not stimulated by putrescine. We have determined the structure of the S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from potato, Solanum tuberosum, to 2.3 A resolution. Unlike the previously determined human enzyme structure, the potato enzyme is a monomer in the crystal structure. Ultracentrifugation studies show that the potato enzyme is also a monomer under physiological conditions, with a weak self-association constant of 6.5 x 10(4) M(-)(1) for the monomer-dimer association. Although the potato enzyme contains most of the buried charged residues that make up the putrescine binding site in the human enzyme, there is no evidence for a putrescine binding site in the potato enzyme. Instead, several amino acid substitutions, including Leu13/Arg18, Phe111/Arg114, Asp174/Val181, and Phe285/His294 (human/potato), provide side chains that mimic the role of putrescine in the human enzyme. In the potato enzyme, the positively charged residues form an extensive network of hydrogen bonds bridging a cluster of highly conserved negatively charged residues and the active site, including interactions with the catalytic residues Glu16 and His249. The results explain the constitutively high activity of plant S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylases in the absence of putrescine and are consistent with previously proposed models for how putrescine together

  13. Structure-based non-canonical amino acid design to covalently crosslink an antibody-antigen complex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianqing; Tack, Drew; Hughes, Randall A; Ellington, Andrew D; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2014-02-01

    Engineering antibodies to utilize non-canonical amino acids (NCAA) should greatly expand the utility of an already important biological reagent. In particular, introducing crosslinking reagents into antibody complementarity determining regions (CDRs) should provide a means to covalently crosslink residues at the antibody-antigen interface. Unfortunately, finding the optimum position for crosslinking two proteins is often a matter of iterative guessing, even when the interface is known in atomic detail. Computer-aided antibody design can potentially greatly restrict the number of variants that must be explored in order to identify successful crosslinking sites. We have therefore used Rosetta to guide the introduction of an oxidizable crosslinking NCAA, l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA), into the CDRs of the anti-protective antigen scFv antibody M18, and have measured crosslinking to its cognate antigen, domain 4 of the anthrax protective antigen. Computed crosslinking distance, solvent accessibility, and interface energetics were three factors considered that could impact the efficiency of l-DOPA-mediated crosslinking. In the end, 10 variants were synthesized, and crosslinking efficiencies were generally 10% or higher, with the best variant crosslinking to 52% of the available antigen. The results suggest that computational analysis can be used in a pipeline for engineering crosslinking antibodies. The rules learned from l-DOPA crosslinking of antibodies may also be generalizable to the formation of other crosslinked interfaces and complexes.

  14. [Stiff-person syndrome and other neurological disorders associated with anti-GAD antibodies].

    PubMed

    Hijazi, J; Bedat-Millet, A-L; Hannequin, D

    2010-01-01

    Autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), originally identified in the stiff-person syndrome, are also associated with rare cases of therapy-resistant epilepsy and sporadic cerebellar ataxia. The association of GAD antibodies with these three syndromes and other auto-immune diseases, particularly type 1 diabetes mellitus, argues for their auto-immune origin. Anti-GAD antibodies inhibit GABAergic circuits inducing a neuronal hyper-excitability that seems to be responsible for these three syndromes. However, an additional mechanism seems to be involved in the degenerative component of the cerebellar ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies. A more accurate diagnosis and the study of neuropathological cases are necessary to document the different mechanisms implicated in these neurological disorders.

  15. A Tat-grafted anti-nucleic acid antibody acquires nuclear-localization property and a preference for TAR RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jong-Geun; Kim, Dong-Sik; Kim, Yong-Sung; Kwon, Myung-Hee

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} We generate '{sub H3}Tat-3D8' by grafting Tat{sub 48-60} peptide to VH CDR of 3D8 scFv antibody. {yields} {sub H3}Tat-3D8 antibody retains nucleic acid binding and hydrolyzing activities. {yields} {sub H3}Tat-3D8 acquires a preference for TAR RNA structure. {yields} Properties of Tat{sub 48-60} is transferred to an antibody via Tat-grafting into a CDR. -- Abstract: The 3D8 single chain variable fragment (3D8 scFv) is an anti-nucleic acid antibody that can hydrolyze nucleic acids and enter the cytosol of cells without reaching the nucleus. The Tat peptide, derived from the basic region of the HIV-1 Tat protein, translocates to cell nuclei and has TAR RNA binding activity. In this study, we generated a Tat-grafted antibody ({sub H3}Tat-3D8) by replacing complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) within the VH domain of the 3D8 scFv with a Tat{sub 48-60} peptide (GRKKRRQRRRPPQ). {sub H3}Tat-3D8 retained the DNA-binding and DNA-hydrolyzing activity of the scFv, and translocated to the nuclei of HeLa cells and preferentially recognized TAR RNA. Thus, the properties associated with the Tat peptide were transferred to the antibody via Tat-grafting without loss of the intrinsic DNA-binding and hydrolyzing activities of the 3D8 scFv antibody.

  16. Polyamine formation by arginine decarboxylase as a transducer of hormonal, environmental and stress stimuli in higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galston, A. W.; Flores, H. E.; Kaur-Sawhney, R.

    1982-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates polyamines including putrescine in the regulation of such diverse plant processes as cell division, embryogenesis and senescence. We find that the enzyme arginine decarboxylase, which controls the rate of putrescine formation in some plant systems, is activated by light acting through P(r) phytochrome as a receptor, by the plant hormone gibberellic acid, by osmotic shock and by other stress stimuli. We therefore propose arginine decarboxylase as a possible transducer of the various initially received tropistic stimuli in plants. The putrescine formed could act by affecting cytoskeletal components.

  17. Absence of malonyl coenzyme A decarboxylase in mice increases cardiac glucose oxidation and protects the heart from ischemic injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute pharmacological inhibition of cardiac malonyl coenzyme A decarboxylase (MCD) protects the heart from ischemic damage by inhibiting fatty acid oxidation and stimulating glucose oxidation. However, it is unknown whether chronic inhibition of MCD results in altered cardiac function, energy metabo...

  18. Molecular analysis of a new member of the opium poppy tyrosine/3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado-Mendoza, I E; López-Meyer, M; Galef, J R; Burnett, R J; Nessler, C L

    1996-01-01

    An aromatic amino acid decarboxylase DNA fragment was generated from opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) genomic DNA by the PCR using primers designed from conserved amino acid sequences of other aromatic amino acid decarboxylase genes. Using this fragment as a probe, a genomic clone was isolated that encodes a new member of the opium poppy tyrosine/3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase gene family (TyDC5). The predicted TyDC5 amino acid sequence shares extensive identity with other opium poppy tyrosine/3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylases (84%), and when expressed in Escherichia coli, it is active against tyrosine and to a lesser extent against 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine. Ribonuclease protection assays indicate that TyDC5 is expressed primarily in the roots of mature poppy plants. A peak of TyDC5 expression was also observed during germination, coincident with the emergence of the radicle from the seed coat. Parallel results were obtained in transgenic tobacco using a TyDC5 promoter fragment (-2060) translationally fused to the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene (GUS). IN TyDC5::GUS tobacco, GUS activity transiently appeared in all parts of the seedling during germination, but was limited to the roots in older plants. These results indicate that TyDC5 expression is transcriptionally regulated and suggest that the TyDC5 enzyme may play an important role in providing precursors for alkaloid synthesis in the roots and germinating seedlings of opium poppy. PMID:8587993

  19. SDR-ELISA: Ultrasensitive and high-throughput nucleic acid detection based on antibody-like DNA nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Wen, Junlin; Chen, Junhua; Zhuang, Li; Zhou, Shungui

    2017-04-15

    An ultrasensitive and high-throughput nucleic acid detection system, termed as strand displacement reaction-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (SDR-ELISA), has been developed on the basis of antibody-like DNA nanostructures. Three digoxigenin or biotin modified hairpin probes are utilized to construct antibody-like DNA nanostructures that feature affinity toward streptavidin and anti-digoxigenin antibody via isothermal target-triggered SDR amplification. These antibody-like nanostructures have been employed to conjugate horseradish-peroxidase-labeled anti-digoxigenin antibody with streptavidin that is immobilized on microliter plate wells for enzyme-linked colorimetric assay. The resulting SDR-ELISA system is ultrasensitive for target DNA with a low detection limit of 5 fM. Moreover, the SDR-ELISA system is capable of discriminating DNA sequences with single base mutations, and do so in a high-throughput manner by detection and quantification of up to 96 or 384 DNA samples in a single shot. This detection system is further applied to detect other DNA targets such as Shewanella oneidensis specific DNA sequence, which indicates the generality of proposed SDR-ELISA system. The integration of SDR amplification and convenient ELISA technique advances an intelligent strategy for ultrasensitive and high-throughput nucleic acid detection, which may be amenable for direct visual detection and quantification using an accompanying quantitative color chart.

  20. Mapping of an autoreactive epitope within glutamate decarboxylase using a diabetes-associated human monoclonal autoantibody and an epitope cDNA library.

    PubMed

    Richter, W; Northemann, W; Müller, M; Böhm, B O

    1996-04-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65) is a major autoantigen in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM) and the neurological disorder Stiff-Man-Syndrome (SMS). We derived a human monoclonal autoantibody (MICA 2) from peripheral blood of a patient newly diagnosed with IDDM, which reacted with GAD65 in Western blots. This indicated that a linear epitope is recognized by MICA 2. Using an epitope cDNA library we mapped the MICA 2 epitope to a contiguous stretch of 26 amino acids (506-531) in the C-terminus of GAD65. Neither blocking experiments with synthetic peptides nor analysis of overlapping decapeptides expressed as fusion proteins allowed us to further narrow down the epitope to the typical size of linear epitopes of 6-8 amino acids. We suggest that a miniconformational epitope provided by amino acids 506-531 is recognized by MICA 2, which withstands SDS gel electrophoresis without destruction or partially refolds during the Western blot procedure. A sequence homology with human heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) maps to this region of GAD65 but no cross-reactivity of MICA 2 with HSP60 occurred. Our data demonstrate that reactivity of an antibody in Western blots does not necessarily define a classic linear epitope of 6-8 amino acids and describe a new autoreactive epitope in GAD65 different from those reported for sera from patients with SMS.

  1. Identification of an inflammation-inducible serum protein recognized by anti-disialic acid antibodies as carbonic anhydrase II.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Zenta; Sato, Chihiro; Kitajima, Ken

    2007-03-01

    Acute-phase proteins are an important marker of inflammation and sometimes have a role in the general defense response towards tissue injury. In the present study, we identified a 32-kDa protein that was immunoreactive with monoclonal antibody 2-4B (mAb.2-4B), which is specific to di/oligoNeu5Gc structures, and that behaved as an acute-phase protein following stimulation with either turpentine oil or lipopolysaccharides. The 32-kDa protein was identified as carbonic anhydrase II (CA-II), based on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analyses of the purified protein. Mouse and human CA-II was immunoreactive and immunoprecipitated with mAb.2-4B, but contained no sialic acid. In addition to mAb.2-4B, the mAb. S2-566 an antibody specific for diNeu5Ac-containing glycans, recognized the CA-II, whereas an anti-oligo/polysialic acid antibody did not. These results indicate that a part of the CA-II protein structure mimics the disialic acid structure recognized by the monoclonal antibodies. This is the first report that CA-II circulates in the serum following inflammation.

  2. Observation of Superoxide Production During Catalysis of Bacillus subtilis Oxalate Decarboxylase at pH4

    PubMed Central

    Twahir, Umar T.; Stedwell, Corey N.; Lee, Cory T.; Richards, Nigel G. J.; Polfer, Nicolas C.; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This contribution describes the trapping of the hydroperoxyl radical at a pH of 4 during turnover of wild-type oxalate decarboxylase and its T165V mutant using the spin trap BMPO. Radicals were detected and identified by a combination of EPR and mass spectrometry. Superoxide, or its conjugate acid, the hydroperoxyl radical, is expected as an intermediate in the decarboxylation and oxidation reactions of the oxalate monoanion both of which are promoted by oxalate decarboxylase. Another intermediate, the carbon dioxide radical anion was also observed. The quantitative yields of superoxide trapping is similar in the wild type and the mutant while it is significantly different for the trapping of the carbon dioxide radical anion. This suggests that the two radicals are released from different sites of the protein. PMID:25526893

  3. Experimental Evidence and In Silico Identification of Tryptophan Decarboxylase in Citrus Genus.

    PubMed

    De Masi, Luigi; Castaldo, Domenico; Pignone, Domenico; Servillo, Luigi; Facchiano, Angelo

    2017-02-11

    Plant tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) converts tryptophan into tryptamine, precursor of indolealkylamine alkaloids. The recent finding of tryptamine metabolites in Citrus plants leads to hypothesize the existence of TDC activity in this genus. Here, we report for the first time that, in Citrus x limon seedlings, deuterium labeled tryptophan is decarboxylated into tryptamine, from which successively deuterated N,N,N-trimethyltryptamine is formed. These results give an evidence of the occurrence of the TDC activity and the successive methylation pathway of the tryptamine produced from the tryptophan decarboxylation. In addition, with the aim to identify the genetic basis for the presence of TDC, we carried out a sequence similarity search for TDC in the Citrus genomes using as a probe the TDC sequence reported for the plant Catharanthus roseus. We analyzed the genomes of both Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis, available in public database, and identified putative protein sequences of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase. Similarly, 42 aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase sequences from 23 plant species were extracted from public databases. Potential sequence signatures for functional TDC were then identified. With this research, we propose for the first time a putative protein sequence for TDC in the genus Citrus.

  4. Purification and properties of diaminopimelate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    White, P. J.; Kelly, Bridget

    1965-01-01

    1. Diaminopimelate decarboxylase from a soluble extract of Escherichia coli A.T.C.C. 9637 was purified 200-fold by precipitation of nucleic acids, fractionation with acetone and then with ammonium sulphate, adsorption on calcium phosphate gel and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose or DEAE-Sephadex. 2. The purified enzyme showed only one component in the ultracentrifuge, with a sedimentation coefficient of 5·4s. One major peak and three much smaller peaks were observed on electrophoresis of the enzyme at pH8·9. 3. The mol.wt. of the enzyme was approx. 200000. The catalytic constant was 2000mol. of meso-diaminopimelic acid decomposed/min./mol. of enzyme, at 37°. The relative rates of decarboxylation at 25°, 37° and 45° were 0·17:1·0:1·6. At 37° the Michaelis constant was 1·7mm and the optimum pH was 6·7–6·8. 4. There was an excess of acidic amino acids over basic amino acids in the enzyme, which was bound only on basic cellulose derivatives at pH6·8. 5. The enzyme had an absolute requirement for pyridoxal phosphate as a cofactor; no other derivative of pyridoxine had activity. A thiol compound (of which 2,3-dimercaptopropan-1-ol was the most effective) was also needed as an activator. 6. In the presence of 2,3-dimercaptopropan-1-ol (1mm), heavy-metal ions (Cu2+, Hg2+) did not inhibit the enzyme, but there was inhibition by several amino acids with analogous structures to diaminopimelate, generally at high concentrations relative to the substrate. Penicillamine was inhibitory at relatively low concentrations; its action was prevented by pyridoxal phosphate. PMID:14343156

  5. Clinical Value of Teichoic Acid Antibody Titers in the Diagnosis and Management of the Staphylococcemias

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Arnold S.; Tillman, David B.; Concepcion, Nelydia; Guze, Lucien B.

    1980-01-01

    Differentiation of endocarditic from nonendocarditic Staphylococcus aureus (SA) septicemia is prognostically and therapeutically important. A study of 68 cases of either SA or streptococcal sepsis, including 50 cases of SA sepsis of both cardiac and noncardiac origin, was done to determine the presence and titer of serum teichoic acid antibodies (TAA's) by double immunodiffusion. Thirty-seven uninfected controls were also examined. There was no statistical difference in either incidence or peak TAA titers in endocardial versus deepseated, extracardiac SA sepsis. However, in both of these groups, incidence and peak titers were significantly higher than in intravascular catheter-related SA sepsis, streptococcal endocarditis and controls (P<0.05). Peak TAA titers in SA sepsis develop on admission or shortly thereafter (6 to 11 days) and permit early decisions on degree of tissue infection, likelihood of metastatic seeding and necessity for higher-dose, longer-term antibiotic therapy. Cases of catheter-related SA sepsis with no clinical evidence of metastatic SA seeding and with negative or low-titered (1:1) TAA's were classified as superficial sepsis. Treatment consisted of short-term, low-dose antistaphylococcal regimens and catheter removal. In posttherapy follow-up after 6 to 12 weeks, all of the patients were cured and no signs of endocarditis or deepseated SA infection developed. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:7385834

  6. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 5 Inhibits B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Antibody Response1

    PubMed Central

    Shotts, Kristin; Donovan, Erin E.; Strauch, Pamela; Pujanauski, Lindsey M.; Victorino, Francisco; Al-Shami, Amin; Fujiwara, Yuko; Tigyi, Gabor; Oravecz, Tamas; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids have emerged as biologically important chemoattractants capable of directing lymphocyte development, trafficking and localization. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a major lysophospholipid found systemically and whose levels are elevated in certain pathological settings such as cancer and infections. Here, we demonstrate that BCR signal transduction by mature murine B cells is inhibited upon LPA engagement of the LPA5 (GPR92) receptor via a Gα12/13 – Arhgef1 pathway. The inhibition of BCR signaling by LPA5 manifests by impaired intracellular calcium store release and most likely by interfering with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity. We further show that LPA5 also limits antigen-specific induction of CD69 and CD86 expression and that LPA5-deficient B cells display enhanced antibody responses. Thus, these data show that LPA5 negatively regulates BCR signaling, B cell activation and immune response. Our findings extend the influence of lysophospholipids on immune function and suggest that alterations in LPA levels likely influence adaptive humoral immunity. PMID:24890721

  7. Development of a generic microfluidic device for simultaneous detection of antibodies and nucleic acids in oral fluids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zongyuan; Abrams, William R; Geva, Eran; de Dood, Claudia J; González, Jesús M; Tanke, Hans J; Niedbala, R Sam; Zhou, Peng; Malamud, Daniel; Corstjens, Paul L A M

    2013-01-01

    A prototype dual-path microfluidic device (Rheonix CARD) capable of performing simultaneously screening (antigen or antibody) and confirmatory (nucleic acid) detection of pathogens is described. The device fully integrates sample processing, antigen or antibody detection, and nucleic acid amplification and detection, demonstrating rapid and inexpensive "sample-to-result" diagnosis with performance comparable to benchtop analysis. For the chip design, a modular approach was followed allowing the optimization of individual steps in the sample processing process. This modular design provides great versatility accommodating different disease targets independently of the production method. In the detection module, a lateral flow (LF) protocol utilizing upconverting phosphor (UCP) reporters was employed. The nucleic acid (NA) module incorporates a generic microtube containing dry reagents. Lateral flow strips and PCR primers determine the target or disease that is diagnosed. Diagnosis of HIV infection was used as a model to investigate the simultaneous detection of both human antibodies against the virus and viral RNA. The serological result is available in less than 30 min, and the confirmation by RNA amplification takes another 60 min. This approach combines a core serological portable diagnostic with a nucleic acid-based confirmatory test.

  8. Dopa decarboxylase activity of the living human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Gjedde, A.; Reith, J.; Dyve, S.; Leger, G.; Guttman, M.; Diksic, M.; Evans, A.; Kuwabara, H. )

    1991-04-01

    Monoaminergic neurons use dopa decarboxylase to form dopamine from L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa). We measured regional dopa decarboxylase activity in brains of six healthy volunteers with 6-({sup 18}F)fluoro-L-dopa and positron emission tomography. We calculated the enzyme activity, relative to its Km, with a kinetic model that yielded the relative rate of conversion of 6-({sup 18}F)fluoro-L-dopa to ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine. Regional values of relative dopa decarboxylase activity ranged from nil in occipital cortex to 1.9 h-1 in caudate nucleus and putamen, in agreement with values obtained in vitro.

  9. Cloning of aldB, which encodes alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase, an exoenzyme from Bacillus brevis.

    PubMed Central

    Diderichsen, B; Wedsted, U; Hedegaard, L; Jensen, B R; Sjøholm, C

    1990-01-01

    A gene for alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (ALDC) was cloned from Bacillus brevis in Escherichia coli and in Bacillus subtilis. The 1.3-kilobase-pair nucleotide sequence of the gene, aldB, encoding ALDC and its flanking regions was determined. An open reading frame of 285 amino acids included a typical N-terminal signal peptide of 24 or 27 amino acids. A B. subtilis strain harboring the aldB gene on a recombinant plasmid processed and secreted ALDC. In contrast, a similar enzyme from Enterobacter aerogenes is intracellular. Images PMID:2198252

  10. Vaccines containing de-N-acetyl sialic acid elicit antibodies protective against Neisseria meningitidis group B and C1

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Gregory R.; Bhandari, Tamara S.; Flitter, Becca A.

    2009-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that were produced by immunization with a vaccine containing the N-propionyl derivative of Neisseria meningitidis group B (MenB) capsular polysaccharide (NPr MBPS) mediate protective responses against MenB but were not reactive with unmodified MBPS or chemically identical human polysialic acid (PSA). Recently, we showed that some of the mAbs were reactive with MBPS derivatives that contain de-N-acetyl sialic acid residues (Moe et al. 2005, Infect Immun 73:2123–2128). In this study we evaluated the immunogenicity of de-N-acetyl sialic acid-containing derivatives of PSA (de-N-acetyl PSA) in mice. Four de-N-acetyl PSA antigens were prepared and conjugated to tetanus toxoid, including completely de-N-acetylated PSA. All of the vaccines elicited anti-de-N-acetyl PSA responses (titers ≥1:10,000) but only vaccines enriched for non-reducing end de-N-acetyl residues by treatment with exoneuraminidase or complete de-N-acetylation elicited high titers against the homologous antigen. Also, non-reducing end de-N-acetyl residue-enriched vaccines elicited IgM and IgG antibodies of all subclasses that could bind to MenB. The results suggest that the zwitterionic characteristic of neuraminic acid, particularly at the non-reducing end may be important for processing and presentation mechanisms that stimulate T cells. Antibodies elicited by all four vaccines were able to activate deposition of human complement proteins and passively protect against challenge by MenB in the infant rat model of meningococcal bacteremia. Some vaccine antisera mediated bactericidal activity against a MenC strain with human complement. Thus, de-N-acetyl PSA antigens are immunogenic and elicit antibodies that can be protective against MenB and C strains. PMID:19414816

  11. Antibodies to staphylococcal peptidoglycan and its peptide epitopes, teichoic acid, and lipoteichoic acid in sera from blood donors and patients with staphylococcal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Wergeland, H I; Haaheim, L R; Natås, O B; Wesenberg, F; Oeding, P

    1989-01-01

    Antibodies to the staphylococcal antigens peptidoglycan, beta-ribitol teichoic acid, and lipoteichoic acid, as well as to the peptidoglycan epitopes L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala, L-Lys-D-Ala, and pentaglycine, were found over a wide range of concentrations in sera from both blood donors and patients with verified or suspected staphylococcal infections. The patient group was heterogeneous with regard to both age and type of staphylococcal infections, being representative for sera sent to our laboratory. In single-antigen assays antibodies to pentaglycine had the highest predictive positive value (67%), although only 32% of the patients had elevated levels of such antibodies. Combinations of test antigens could yield positive predictive values as high as 100%, but then the fraction of positive sera was low. Indeed, the fraction of patient sera which was positive in multiple-antigen tests never exceeded 61%. The clinical usefulness of these seroassays for identifying Staphylococcus aureus as a causative agent was limited, owing to the considerable overlap in the range of antibody concentrations between patient and blood donor sera. PMID:2473994

  12. Molecular cloning and functional identification of a plant ornithine decarboxylase cDNA.

    PubMed

    Michael, A J; Furze, J M; Rhodes, M J; Burtin, D

    1996-02-15

    A cDNA for a plant ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), a key enzyme in putrescine and polyamine biosynthesis, has been isolated from root cultures of the solanaceous plant Datura stramonium. Reverse transcription-PCR employing degenerate oligonucleotide primers representing conserved motifs from other eukaryotic ODCs was used to isolate the cDNA. The longest open reading frame potentially encodes a peptide of 431 amino acids and exhibits similarity to other eukaryotic ODCs, prokaryotic and eukaryotic arginine decarboxylases (ADCs), prokaryotic meso-diaminopimelate decarboxylases and the product of the tabA gene of Pseudomonas syringae cv. tabaci. Residues involved at the active site of the mouse ODC are conserved in the plant enzyme. The plant ODC does not possess the C-terminal extension found in the mammalian enzyme, implicated in rapid turnover of the protein, suggesting that the plant ODC may have a longer half-life. Expression of the plant ODC in Escherichia coli and demonstration of ODC activity confirmed that the cDNA encodes an active ODC enzyme. This is the first description of the primary structure of a eukaryotic ODC isolated from an organism where the alternative ADC routine to putrescine is present.

  13. EPR Spin Trapping of an Oxalate-Derived Free Radical in the Oxalate Decarboxylase Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Imaram, Witcha; Saylor, Benjamin T.; Centonze, Christopher P.; Richards, Nigel G. J.; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    EPR spin trapping experiments on bacterial oxalate decarboxylase from Bacillus subtilis under turn-over conditions are described. The use of doubly 13C-labeled oxalate leads to a characteristic splitting of the observed radical adducts using the spin trap N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone linking them directly to the substrate. The radical was identified as the carbon dioxide radical anion which is a key intermediate in the hypothetical reaction mechanism of both decarboxylase and oxidase activities. X-ray crystallography had identified a flexible loop, SENS161-4, which acts as a lid to the putative active site. Site directed mutagenesis of the hinge amino acids, S161 and T165 was explored and showed increased radical trapping yields compared to the wild type. In particular, T165V shows approximately ten times higher radical yields while at the same time its decarboxylase activity was reduced by about a factor of ten. This mutant lacks a critical H-bond between T165 and R92 resulting in compromised control over its radical chemistry allowing the radical intermediate to leak into the surrounding solution. PMID:21277974

  14. Perturbation of the Monomer-Monomer Interfaces of the Benzoylformate Decarboxylase Tetramer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Forest H.; Rogers, Megan P.; Paul, Lake N.; McLeish, Michael J.

    2014-08-14

    The X-ray structure of benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC) from Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 shows it to be a tetramer. This was believed to be typical of all thiamin diphosphate-dependent decarboxylases until recently when the structure of KdcA, a branched-chain 2-keto acid decarboxylase from Lactococcus lactis, showed it to be a homodimer. This lent credence to earlier unfolding experiments on pyruvate decarboxylase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that indicated that it might be active as a dimer. To investigate this possibility in BFDC, we sought to shift the equilibrium toward dimer formation. Point mutations were made in the noncatalytic monomer–monomer interfaces, but these had a minimal effect on both tetramer formation and catalytic activity. Subsequently, the R141E/Y288A/A306F variant was shown by analytical ultracentrifugation to be partially dimeric. It was also found to be catalytically inactive. Further experiments revealed that just two mutations, R141E and A306F, were sufficient to markedly alter the dimer–tetramer equilibrium and to provide an ~450-fold decrease in kcat. Equilibrium denaturation studies suggested that the residual activity was possibly due to the presence of residual tetramer. The structures of the R141E and A306F variants, determined to <1.5 Å resolution, hinted that disruption of the monomer interfaces will be accompanied by movement of a loop containing Leu109 and Leu110. As these residues contribute to the hydrophobicity of the active site and the correct positioning of the substrate, it seems that tetramer formation may well be critical to the catalytic activity of BFDC.

  15. Keto-isovalerate decarboxylase enzymes and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    McElvain, Jessica; O'Keefe, Daniel P.; Paul, Brian James; Payne, Mark S.; Rothman, Steven Cary; He, Hongxian

    2016-01-19

    Provided herein are polypeptides and polynucleotides encoding such polypeptides which have ketoisovalerate decarboxylase activity. Also provided are recombinant host cells comprising such polypeptides and polynucleotides and methods of use thereof.

  16. NUTRITIONAL FACTORS STIMULATING THE FORMATION OF LYSINE DECARBOXYLASE IN ESCHERICHIA COLI

    PubMed Central

    Maretzki, Andrew; Mallette, M. F.

    1962-01-01

    Maretzki, Andrew (Pennsylvania State University, University Park) and M. F. Mallette. Nutritional factors stimulating the formation of lysine decarboxylase in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 83:720–726. 1962 — Inclusion of complex nitrogen sources in the induction medium was shown to be necessary for the synthesis of appreciable amounts of l-lysine decarboxylase by Escherichia coli B. Hy-case, a commercial acid hydrolyzate of casein, was especially effective in enzyme production, which was assayed manometrically after lysis of the bacteria from without by bacteriophage. Partial fractionation of the Hy-case, identification of the free amino acids, and addition of these amino acids to test media revealed stimulatory effects by methionine, threonine, proline, leucine, and tyrosine. A full complement of amino acids did not match the enzyme levels reached in the presence of Hy-case. Certain peptide fractions obtained from this mixture supplemented the effects of the amino acids in such a way as to suggest direct incorporation of peptide rather than transport or protective roles. Added purines, pyrimidines, iron, and water-soluble vitamins were without effect. Neither carbohydrates nor phosphorylated materials could be detected in the stimulatory fractions. PMID:14469751

  17. Auto-Antibodies and Their Association with Clinical Findings in Women Diagnosed with Microscopic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, Bodil

    2013-01-01

    Background Microscopic colitis (MC) is a disease manifested by diarrhoea and is divided into collagenous and lymphocytic colitis. The aetiology is unknown, but auto-immunity is suggested. Auto-antibodies have been only rarely examined in this entity. The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of auto-antibodies, and to examine associations between the presence of antibodies and clinical findings. Methods and Findings Women with MC verified by biopsy and younger than 73 years, at any Department of Gastroenterology, in the district of Skåne, between 2002 and 2010 were invited to participate in this study. The patients were asked to complete both a questionnaire describing their medical history and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). Blood samples were collected. Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), and antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD), islet antigens-like insulin 2 (anti-IA2), thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), and thyrotropin receptor (TRAK) were analysed. Of 240 women identified, 133 were finally included in the study, median age 63 (59–67) years. Apart from the MC diagnosis, 52% also suffered from irritable bowel syndrome, 31% from hypertension and 31% from allergy. The prevalence of ANA (14%), ASCA IgG (13%), and anti-TPO antibodies (14%) for these patients was slightly higher than for the general population, and were found together with other concomitant diseases. Patients had more of all gastrointestinal symptoms compared with norm values, irrespective of antibody expression. Conclusions Women with MC have a slightly increased prevalence of some auto-antibodies. These antibodies are not associated with symptoms, but are expressed in patients with concomitant diseases, obscuring the pathophysiology and clinical picture of MC. PMID:23776613

  18. Identification of Immunopotentiating Lactic Acid Bacteria that Induce Antibody Production by in vitro Stimulated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Makiko; Hitaka, Akira; Fujino, Himiko; Matsumoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Takanori; Morimatsu, Fumiki; Fujiki, Tsukasa; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester (LLME) is known to remove lysosome-rich cells from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). To evaluate the immunopotentiating ability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), we adopted the in vitro stimulation protocol of LLME-treated PBMCs as a model assay system and monitored the level of antibody produced by stimulated PBMCs. The results indicated that several LAB strains have immunopotentiating ability against PBMCs, as evidenced by the enhanced antibody production and increased number of antigen-specific B cells. Next, we identified T cells as the direct target cells of the immunopotentiating LAB strain L32, suggesting that L32 induced antibody production by PBMCs through T-cell activation. Finally, we tested the immunopotentiating ability of ligands for Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), which is known to mediate the LAB signal, and observed that both L32 and one of the TLR2 ligands, LTA-BS, induced antigen-specific antibody production by in vitro stimulated PBMC. This suggests that L32 and LTA-BS can be used as an adjuvant for stimulating immune reaction in PBMCs.

  19. Recovery from severe frontotemporal dysfunction at 3years after N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antibody encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Leypoldt, Frank; Gelderblom, Mathias; Schöttle, Daniel; Hoffmann, Sascha; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter

    2013-04-01

    Encephalitis associated with antibodies against N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor is characterized by severe memory deficits, decreased consciousness, epileptic seizures and movement disorders and occurs most commonly in young women. Recovery is mostly good but little is known about the disease course in patients whose treatment has been delayed severely. We present a 16-year-old girl with a 36-month follow-up. A single course of methylprednisolone attenuated some symptoms but severe and incapacitating frontotemporal syndrome remained. Second-line treatment with rituximab was initiated 12months after the onset of symptoms. A surprising recovery occurred 18months after treatment and 30months after onset. Recovery in NMDA receptor antibody-associated encephalitis can be severely delayed and does not have to be linear. Whether delayed therapy contributed to recovery in this patient cannot be answered with certainty. Spontaneous recovery independent of therapy is possible, as it has been observed previously as late as 3years after onset. Although serum antibodies disappeared with recovery in this patient, previous cases have shown serum antibodies to be unreliable markers of disease activity. Second-line treatment, especially with substances as well tolerated as rituximab, should at least be considered in NMDA receptor encephalitis with persistent neuropsychiatric syndromes after first-line therapy.

  20. Glutamate decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis: activation by ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Kazumi; Ueno, Yoshie; Oda, Kohei

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) gene from Lactobacillus brevis IFO12005 (Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 61, 1168-1171 (1997)), was cloned and expressed. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 99.6% and 53.1% identity with GAD of L. brevis ATCC367 and L. lactis respectively. The His-tagged recombinant GAD showed an optimum pH of 4.5-5.0, and 54 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The GAD activity and stability was significantly dependent on the ammonium sulfate concentration, as observed in authentic GAD. Gel filtration showed that the inactive form of the GAD was a dimer. In contrast, the ammonium sulfate-activated form was a tetramer. CD spectral analyses at pH 5.5 revealed that the structures of the tetramer and the dimer were similar. Treatment of the GAD with high concentrations of ammonium sulfate and subsequent dilution with sodium glutamate was essential for tetramer formation and its activation. Thus the biochemical properties of the GAD from L. brevis IFO12005 were significantly different from those from other sources.

  1. Altered kinetic properties of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex due to mutation of the beta-subunit of the branched-chain alpha-keto acid decarboxylase (E1) component in lymphoblastoid cells derived from patients with maple syrup urine disease.

    PubMed Central

    Indo, Y; Kitano, A; Endo, F; Akaboshi, I; Matsuda, I

    1987-01-01

    Branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complexes of lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from patients with classical maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) phenotypes were studied in terms of their catalytic functions and analyzed by immunoblotting, using affinity purified anti-bovine BCKDH antibody. Kinetic studies on three cell lines derived from patients with the classical phenotype showed sigmoidal or near sigmoidal kinetics for overall BCKDH activity and a deficiency of the E1 component activity. An immunoblot study revealed a markedly decreased amount of the E1 beta subunit accompanied by weak staining of the E1 alpha subunit. The E2 and E3 component exhibited a cross-reactive peptide. Thus, in at least some patients with MSUD, mutations of the E1 beta subunit might provide an explanation for the altered kinetic properties of the BCKDH complex. Images PMID:3597778

  2. Post-transcriptional regulation of ornithine decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Nowotarski, Shannon L.; Origanti, Sofia; Shantz, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Activity of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and intracellular levels of ODC protein are controlled very tightly. Numerous studies have described ODC regulation at the levels of transcription, translation and protein degradation in normal cells, and dysregulation of these processes in response to oncogenic stimuli. Although post-transcriptional regulation of ODC has been well-documented, the RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that interact with ODC mRNA and control synthesis of the ODC protein have not been defined. Using Ras-transformed rat intestinal epithelial cells (Ras12V cells) as a model, we have begun identifying the RBPs that associate with the ODC transcript. Binding of RBPs could potentially regulate ODC synthesis by either changing mRNA stability or rate of mRNA translation. Techniques for measuring RBP binding and translation initiation are described here. Targeting control of ODC translation or mRNA decay could be a valuable method of limiting polyamine accumulation and subsequent tumor development in a variety of cancers. PMID:21318880

  3. A Porphodimethene Chemical Inhibitor of Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Kenneth W.; Zhang, Zhan; Sakemura-Nakatsugawa, Noriko; Huang, Jui-Wen; Vu, Nhu Mai; Chiang, Yi-Kun; Lin, Chih-Lung; Kwan, Jennifer Y. Y.; Yue, Shijun; Jitkova, Yulia; To, Terence; Zahedi, Payam; Pai, Emil F.; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Liu, Fei-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) catalyzes the conversion of uroporphyrinogen to coproporphyrinogen during heme biosynthesis. This enzyme was recently identified as a potential anticancer target; its inhibition leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species, likely mediated by the Fenton reaction, thereby decreasing cancer cell viability and working in cooperation with radiation and/or cisplatin. Because there is no known chemical UROD inhibitor suitable for use in translational studies, we aimed to design, synthesize, and characterize such a compound. Initial in silico-based design and docking analyses identified a potential porphyrin analogue that was subsequently synthesized. This species, a porphodimethene (named PI-16), was found to inhibit UROD in an enzymatic assay (IC50 = 9.9 µM), but did not affect porphobilinogen deaminase (at 62.5 µM), thereby exhibiting specificity. In cellular assays, PI-16 reduced the viability of FaDu and ME-180 cancer cells with half maximal effective concentrations of 22.7 µM and 26.9 µM, respectively, and only minimally affected normal oral epithelial (NOE) cells. PI-16 also combined effectively with radiation and cisplatin, with potent synergy being observed in the case of cisplatin in FaDu cells (Chou-Talalay combination index <1). This work presents the first known synthetic UROD inhibitor, and sets the foundation for the design, synthesis, and characterization of higher affinity and more effective UROD inhibitors. PMID:24587102

  4. Properties of oxaloacetate decarboxylase from Veillonella parvula.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, S K; Wong, M; Hamilton, I R

    1982-01-01

    Oxaloacetate decarboxylase was purified to 136-fold from the oral anaerobe Veillonella parvula. The purified enzyme was substantially free of contaminating enzymes or proteins. Maximum activity of the enzyme was exhibited at pH 7.0 for both carboxylation and decarboxylation. At this pH, the Km values for oxaloacetate and Mg2+ were at 0.06 and 0.17 mM, respectively, whereas the Km values for pyruvate, CO2, and Mg2+ were 3.3, 1.74, and 1.85 mM, respectively. Hyperbolic kinetics were observed with all of the aforementioned compounds. The Keq' was 2.13 X 10(-3) mM-1 favoring the decarboxylation of oxaloacetate. In the carboxylation step, avidin, acetyl coenzyme A, biotin, and coenzyme A were not required. ADP and NADH had no effect on either the carboxylation or decarboxylation step, but ATP inhibited the carboxylation step competitively and the decarboxylation step noncompetitively. These types of inhibition fitted well with the overall lactate metabolism of the non-carbohydrate-fermenting anaerobe. PMID:7076619

  5. Endogenous Inactivators of Arginase, l-Arginine Decarboxylase, and Agmatine Amidinohydrolase in Evernia prunastri Thallus 1

    PubMed Central

    Legaz, María Estrella; Vicente, Carlos

    1983-01-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1), l-arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), and agmatine amidinohydrolase (EC 3.5.3.11) activities spontaneously decay in Evernia prunastri thalli incubated on 40 millimolar l-arginine used as inducer of the three enzymes if dithiothreitol is not added to the media. Lichen thalli accumulate both chloroatranorin and evernic acid in parallel to the loss of activity. These substances behave as inactivators of the enzymes at a range of concentrations between 2 and 20 micromolar, whereas several concentrations of dithiothreitol reverse, to some extent, the in vitro inactivation. PMID:16662821

  6. Endogenous Inactivators of Arginase, l-Arginine Decarboxylase, and Agmatine Amidinohydrolase in Evernia prunastri Thallus.

    PubMed

    Legaz, M E; Vicente, C

    1983-02-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1), l-arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), and agmatine amidinohydrolase (EC 3.5.3.11) activities spontaneously decay in Evernia prunastri thalli incubated on 40 millimolar l-arginine used as inducer of the three enzymes if dithiothreitol is not added to the media. Lichen thalli accumulate both chloroatranorin and evernic acid in parallel to the loss of activity. These substances behave as inactivators of the enzymes at a range of concentrations between 2 and 20 micromolar, whereas several concentrations of dithiothreitol reverse, to some extent, the in vitro inactivation.

  7. Immunohistochemical analysis of brain lesions using S100B and glial fibrillary acidic protein antibodies in arundic acid- (ONO-2506) treated stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Hideaki; Niwa, Atsuko; Satou, Takao; Ohta, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Shigeo; Tabuchi, Masaki; Ooshima, Kana

    2009-10-01

    Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) used as a model of essential hypertension cause a high incidence of brain stroke on the course of hypertension. Incidences and sizes of brain lesions are known to relate to the astrocyte activities. Therefore, relation between brain damage and the expression profile of the astrocytes was investigated with morphometric and immunohistochemical analyses using astrocyte marker antibodies of S100B and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) with or without arundic acid administration, a suppressor on the activation of astrocytes. Arundic acid extended the average life span of SHRSP. An increase in brain tissue weight was inhibited concomitant with a lower rate of gliosis/hemosiderin deposit/scarring in brain lesions. S100B- or GFAP-positive dot and filamentous structures were decreased in arundic acid-treated SHRSP, and this effect was most pronounced in the cerebral cortex, white matter, and pons, and less so in the hippocampus, diencephalon, midbrain, and cerebellum. Blood pressure decreased after administration of arundic acid in the high-dose group (100 mg/kg/day arundic acid), but not in the low-dose group (30 mg/kg/day). These data indicate that arundic acid can prevent hypertension-induced stroke, and may inhibit the enlargement of the stroke lesion by preventing the inflammatory changes caused by overproduction of the S100B protein in the astrocytes.

  8. Kinetic Characterisation of a Single Chain Antibody against the Hormone Abscisic Acid: Comparison with Its Parental Monoclonal

    PubMed Central

    Badescu, George O.; Marsh, Andrew; Smith, Timothy R.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Napier, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    A single-chain Fv fragment antibody (scFv) specific for the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli as a fusion protein. The kinetics of ABA binding have been measured using surface plasmon resonance spectrometry (BIAcore 2000) using surface and solution assays. Care was taken to calculate the concentration of active protein in each sample using initial rate measurements under conditions of partial mass transport limitation. The fusion product, parental monoclonal antibody and the free scFv all have low nanomolar affinity constants, but there is a lower dissociation rate constant for the parental monoclonal resulting in a three-fold greater affinity. Analogue specificity was tested and structure-activity binding preferences measured. The biologically-active (+)-ABA enantiomer is recognised with an affinity three orders of magnitude higher than the inactive (-)-ABA. Metabolites of ABA including phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid and deoxy-ABA have affinities over 100-fold lower than that for (+)-ABA. These properties of the scFv make it suitable as a sensor domain in bioreporters specific for the naturally occurring form of ABA. PMID:27023768

  9. Stimulation of L-asparate beta-decarboxylase formation by L-glutamate in Pseudomonas dacunhae and Improved production of L-alanine.

    PubMed

    Shibatani, T; Kakimoto, T; Chibata, I

    1979-09-01

    The formation of L-asparate beta-decarboxylase by Pseudomonas dacunhae was compared on media containing a variety of organic acids and amino acids as a carbon source. Although the enzyme was formed constitutively when the organism was grown on basal medium or on that containing tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, it was induced twofold by L-glutamate and repressed one-tenth by L-serine. L-Glutamine, L-proline, L-leucine, glycine, and L-threonine also showed induction effects lower than that of L-glutamate. L-Glutamate derepressed the serine effect. This glutamate effect was observed effect was observed with other microoganisms, e.g., Achromobacter pestifer and Achromobacter liquidum. Since the intermediates from L-glutamate metabolism had no effect, this induction effect was specific to L-glutamate. The formation of some glutamate-related enzymes was measured and is discussed in relation to the formation of L-asparate beta-decarboxylase. L-Asparate beta-decarboxylase was purified to an electrophoretically homogenous state from L-glutamate-grown cells of P. dacunhae, and some properties were compared with those of the enzyme from fumarate-grown cells. The two enzymes were identical in disc electrophoresis, molecular weight, and some enzymatic properties. The industrial production of L-alanine from L-aspartic acid acid was improved by using the culture broth with highly induced L-asparate beta-decarboxylase (9.4 U/ml of broth).

  10. Hypothalamic L-Histidine Decarboxylase Is Up-Regulated During Chronic REM Sleep Deprivation of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Gloria E.; Koban, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A competition of neurobehavioral drives of sleep and wakefulness occurs during sleep deprivation. When enforced chronically, subjects must remain awake. This study examines histaminergic neurons of the tuberomammillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus in response to enforced wakefulness in rats. We tested the hypothesis that the rate-limiting enzyme for histamine biosynthesis, L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC), would be up-regulated during chronic rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REM-SD) because histamine plays a major role in maintaining wakefulness. Archived brain tissues of male Sprague Dawley rats from a previous study were used. Rats had been subjected to REM-SD by the flowerpot paradigm for 5, 10, or 15 days. For immunocytochemistry, rats were transcardially perfused with acrolein-paraformaldehyde for immunodetection of L-HDC; separate controls used carbodiimide-paraformaldehyde for immunodetection of histamine. Immunolocalization of histamine within the tuberomammillary nucleus was validated using carbodiimide. Because HDC antiserum has cross-reactivity with other decarboxylases at high antibody concentrations, titrations localized L-HDC to only tuberomammillary nucleus at a dilution of ≥ 1:300,000. REM-SD increased immunoreactive HDC by day 5 and it remained elevated in both dorsal and ventral aspects of the tuberomammillary complex. Our results suggest that up-regulation of L-HDC within the tuberomammillary complex during chronic REM-SD may be responsible for maintaining wakefulness. PMID:27997552

  11. Hypothalamic L-Histidine Decarboxylase Is Up-Regulated During Chronic REM Sleep Deprivation of Rats.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gloria E; Koban, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A competition of neurobehavioral drives of sleep and wakefulness occurs during sleep deprivation. When enforced chronically, subjects must remain awake. This study examines histaminergic neurons of the tuberomammillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus in response to enforced wakefulness in rats. We tested the hypothesis that the rate-limiting enzyme for histamine biosynthesis, L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC), would be up-regulated during chronic rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REM-SD) because histamine plays a major role in maintaining wakefulness. Archived brain tissues of male Sprague Dawley rats from a previous study were used. Rats had been subjected to REM-SD by the flowerpot paradigm for 5, 10, or 15 days. For immunocytochemistry, rats were transcardially perfused with acrolein-paraformaldehyde for immunodetection of L-HDC; separate controls used carbodiimide-paraformaldehyde for immunodetection of histamine. Immunolocalization of histamine within the tuberomammillary nucleus was validated using carbodiimide. Because HDC antiserum has cross-reactivity with other decarboxylases at high antibody concentrations, titrations localized L-HDC to only tuberomammillary nucleus at a dilution of ≥ 1:300,000. REM-SD increased immunoreactive HDC by day 5 and it remained elevated in both dorsal and ventral aspects of the tuberomammillary complex. Our results suggest that up-regulation of L-HDC within the tuberomammillary complex during chronic REM-SD may be responsible for maintaining wakefulness.

  12. Localization of key amino acid residues in the dominant conformational epitopes on thyroid peroxidase recognized by mouse monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Godlewska, Marlena; Czarnocka, Barbara; Gora, Monika

    2012-09-01

    Autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase (TPO), the major target autoantigen in autoimmune thyroid diseases, recognize conformational epitopes limited to two immunodominant regions (IDRs) termed IDR-A and -B. The apparent restricted heterogeneity of TPO autoantibodies was discovered using TPO-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and later confirmed by human recombinant Fabs. In earlier studies we identified key amino acids crucial for the interaction of human autoantibodies with TPO. Here we show the critical residues that participate in binding of five mAbs to the conformational epitopes on the TPO surface. Using ELISA we tested the reactivity of single and multiple TPO mutants expressed in CHO cells with a panel of mAbs specifically recognizing IDR-A (mAb 2 and 9) and IDR-B (mAb 15, 18, 64). We show that antibodies recognizing very similar regions on the TPO surface may interact with different sets of residues. We found that residues K713 and E716 contribute to the interaction between mAb 2 and TPO. The epitope for mAb 9 is critically dependent on residues R646 and E716. Moreover, we demonstrate that amino acids E604 and D630 are part of the functional epitope for mAb 15, and amino acids D624 and K627 for mAb 18. Finally, residues E604, D620, D624, K627, and D630 constitute the epitope for mAb 64. This is the first detailed study identifying the key resides for binding of mAbs 2, 9, 15, 18, and 64. Better understanding of those antibodies' specificity will be helpful in elucidating the properties of TPO as an antigen in autoimmune disorders.

  13. Oxalate decarboxylase and oxalate oxidase activities can be interchanged with a specificity switch of up to 282,000 by mutating an active site lid.

    PubMed

    Burrell, Matthew R; Just, Victoria J; Bowater, Laura; Fairhurst, Shirley A; Requena, Laura; Lawson, David M; Bornemann, Stephen

    2007-10-30

    Oxalate decarboxylases and oxalate oxidases are members of the cupin superfamily of proteins that have many common features: a manganese ion with a common ligand set, the substrate oxalate, and dioxygen (as either a unique cofactor or a substrate). We have hypothesized that these enzymes share common catalytic steps that diverge when a carboxylate radical intermediate becomes protonated. The Bacillus subtilis decarboxylase has two manganese binding sites, and we proposed that Glu162 on a flexible lid is the site 1 general acid. We now demonstrate that a decarboxylase can be converted into an oxidase by mutating amino acids of the lid that include Glu162 with specificity switches of 282,000 (SEN161-3DAS), 275,000 (SENS161-4DSSN), and 225,000 (SENS161-4DASN). The structure of the SENS161-4DSSN mutant showed that site 2 was not affected. The requirement for substitutions other than of Glu162 was, at least in part, due to the need to decrease the Km for dioxygen for the oxidase reaction. Reversion of decarboxylase activity could be achieved by reintroducing Glu162 to the SENS161-4DASN mutant to give a relative specificity switch of 25,600. This provides compelling evidence for the crucial role of Glu162 in the decarboxylase reaction consistent with it being the general acid, for the role of the lid in controlling the Km for dioxygen, and for site 1 being the sole catalytically active site. We also report the trapping of carboxylate radicals produced during turnover of the mutant with the highest oxidase activity. Such radicals were also observed with the wild-type decarboxylase.

  14. Effects of down-regulating ornithine decarboxylase upon putrescine-associated metabolism and growth in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Heidi L.; Blomstedt, Cecilia K.; Neale, Alan D.; Gleadow, Ros; DeBoer, Kathleen D.; Hamill, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum L. homozygous for an RNAi construct designed to silence ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) had significantly lower concentrations of nicotine and nornicotine, but significantly higher concentrations of anatabine, compared with vector-only controls. Silencing of ODC also led to significantly reduced concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), tyramine and phenolamides (caffeoylputrescine and dicaffeoylspermidine) with concomitant increases in concentrations of amino acids ornithine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine. Root transcript levels of S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase, S-adenosyl methionine synthase and spermidine synthase (polyamine synthesis enzymes) were reduced compared with vector controls, whilst transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase (putrescine synthesis), putrescine methyltransferase (nicotine production) and multi-drug and toxic compound extrusion (alkaloid transport) proteins were elevated. In contrast, expression of two other key proteins required for alkaloid synthesis, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinic acid production) and a PIP-family oxidoreductase (nicotinic acid condensation reactions), were diminished in roots of odc-RNAi plants relative to vector-only controls. Transcriptional and biochemical differences associated with polyamine and alkaloid metabolism were exacerbated in odc-RNAi plants in response to different forms of shoot damage. In general, apex removal had a greater effect than leaf wounding alone, with a combination of these injury treatments producing synergistic responses in some cases. Reduced expression of ODC appeared to have negative effects upon plant growth and vigour with some leaves of odc-RNAi lines being brittle and bleached compared with vector-only controls. Together, results of this study demonstrate that ornithine decarboxylase has important roles in facilitating both primary and secondary metabolism in Nicotiana. PMID

  15. Effects of down-regulating ornithine decarboxylase upon putrescine-associated metabolism and growth in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Heidi L; Blomstedt, Cecilia K; Neale, Alan D; Gleadow, Ros; DeBoer, Kathleen D; Hamill, John D

    2016-05-01

    Transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum L. homozygous for an RNAi construct designed to silence ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) had significantly lower concentrations of nicotine and nornicotine, but significantly higher concentrations of anatabine, compared with vector-only controls. Silencing of ODC also led to significantly reduced concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), tyramine and phenolamides (caffeoylputrescine and dicaffeoylspermidine) with concomitant increases in concentrations of amino acids ornithine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine. Root transcript levels of S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase, S-adenosyl methionine synthase and spermidine synthase (polyamine synthesis enzymes) were reduced compared with vector controls, whilst transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase (putrescine synthesis), putrescine methyltransferase (nicotine production) and multi-drug and toxic compound extrusion (alkaloid transport) proteins were elevated. In contrast, expression of two other key proteins required for alkaloid synthesis, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinic acid production) and a PIP-family oxidoreductase (nicotinic acid condensation reactions), were diminished in roots of odc-RNAi plants relative to vector-only controls. Transcriptional and biochemical differences associated with polyamine and alkaloid metabolism were exacerbated in odc-RNAi plants in response to different forms of shoot damage. In general, apex removal had a greater effect than leaf wounding alone, with a combination of these injury treatments producing synergistic responses in some cases. Reduced expression of ODC appeared to have negative effects upon plant growth and vigour with some leaves of odc-RNAi lines being brittle and bleached compared with vector-only controls. Together, results of this study demonstrate that ornithine decarboxylase has important roles in facilitating both primary and secondary metabolism in Nicotiana.

  16. Gene cloning, recombinant expression, purification and characterization of l-methionine decarboxylase from Streptomyces sp. 590.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaya; Okada, Akane; Yamamoto, Kumiko; Okugochi, Tomomi; Kusaka, Chika; Kudou, Daizou; Nemoto, Michiko; Inagaki, Junko; Hirose, Yuu; Okajima, Toshihide; Tamura, Takashi; Soda, Kenji; Inagaki, Kenji

    2016-12-21

    l-Methionine decarboxylase (MetDC) from Streptomyces sp. 590 depends on pyridoxal 5'-phosphate and catalyzes the non-oxidative decarboxylation of l-methionine to produce 3-methylthiopropylamine and carbon dioxide. MetDC gene (mdc) was determined to consist of 1,674 bp encoding 557 amino acids, and the amino acid sequence is similar to that of l-histidine decarboxylases and l-valine decarboxylases from Streptomyces sp. strains. The mdc gene was cloned and recombinant MetDC was heterologously expressed by Escherichia coli The purification of recombinant MetDC was carried out by DEAE-Toyopearl and Ni-NTA agarose column chromatography. The recombinant enzyme was homodimeric with a molecular mass of 61,000 Da and showed optimal activity between 45 to 55 °C and at pH 6.6, and the stability below 30 °C and between pH 4.6 to 7.0. l-Methionine and l-norleucine were good substrates for MetDC. The Michaelis constants for l-methionine and l-norleucine were 30 and 73 mM, respectively. The recombinant MetDC (0.50 U/ml) severely inhibited growth of human tumour cells A431 (epidermoid ovarian carcinoma cell line) and MDA-MB-231 (breast cancer cell line), however showed relatively low cytotoxicity for human normal cell NHDF-Neo (dermal fibroblast cell line from neonatal foreskin). This study revealed the properties of the gene and the protein sequence of MetDC for the first time.

  17. HA Antibody-Mediated FcγRIIIa Activity Is Both Dependent on FcR Engagement and Interactions between HA and Sialic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Freek; Kwaks, Ted; Brandenburg, Boerries; Koldijk, Martin H.; Klaren, Vincent; Smal, Bastiaan; Korse, Hans J. W. M.; Geelen, Eric; Tettero, Lisanne; Zuijdgeest, David; Stoop, Esther J. M.; Saeland, Eirikur; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H. E.; Koudstaal, Wouter; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with receptors for the Fc region of IgG (FcγRs) have been shown to contribute to the in vivo protection against influenza A viruses provided by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that bind to the viral hemagglutinin (HA) stem. In particular, Fc-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) has been shown to contribute to protection by stem-binding bnAbs. Fc-mediated effector functions appear not to contribute to protection provided by strain-specific HA head-binding antibodies. We used a panel of anti-stem and anti-head influenza A and B monoclonal antibodies with identical human IgG1 Fc domains and investigated their ability to mediate ADCC-associated FcγRIIIa activation. Antibodies which do not interfere with sialic acid binding of HA can mediate FcγRIIIa activation. However, the FcγRIIIa activation was inhibited when a mutant HA, unable to bind sialic acids, was used. Antibodies which block sialic acid receptor interactions of HA interfered with FcγRIIIa activation. The inhibition of FcγRIIIa activation by HA head-binding and sialic acid receptor-blocking antibodies was confirmed in plasma samples of H5N1 vaccinated human subjects. Together, these results suggest that in addition to Fc–FcγR binding, interactions between HA and sialic acids on immune cells are required for optimal Fc-mediated effector functions by anti-HA antibodies. PMID:27746785

  18. Characterisation of the nucleic acid binding features of the PRRSV 7ap and its ability to induce antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed

    Olasz, Ferenc; Dénes, Béla; Bálint, Ádám; Magyar, Tibor; Belák, Sándor; Zádori, Zoltán

    2017-03-01

    A short alternative open reading frame named ORF7a has recently been discovered within the nucleocapsid gene of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) genome. Proteins (7ap) translated from the ORF7a of two divergent strains - a type I and a type II - are able to completely reduce the motility of nucleic acids at relatively high molar charge ratios in gel retardation assays indicating strong dsDNA- and ssRNA-binding capability. Conserved RNA- and DNA-binding properties suggest that nucleic acid binding is a functional property of the divergent 7aps, and not an arbitrary consequence of their net positive charge. Sera from Hu7ap-immunised pigs and mice did not react with Hu7ap or Hu7ap-GFP; however, antinuclear antibodies were detected in the sera of the immunised animals, suggesting an ability of Hu7ap to interact with or mimic autoantigenic macromolecules.

  19. GABAB receptor antibodies in limbic encephalitis and anti-GAD–associated neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Boronat, A.; Sabater, L.; Saiz, A.; Dalmau, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: γ-Aminobutyric acid-B receptor antibodies (GABABR-ab) were recently described in 15 patients with limbic encephalitis (LE), associated with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) or with concurrent glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies. We analyzed the frequency of GABABR-ab in 147 patients with LE or neurologic syndromes associated with GAD-ab. Methods: We examined the presence of GABABR-ab in 70 patients with LE (33 paraneoplastic with onconeural antibodies, 18 paraneoplastic without onconeural antibodies [5 with Gad-ab], and 19 idiopathic with either GAD-ab [5 patients] or seronegative) and 77 patients with GAD-ab-associated neurologic syndromes other than LE (29 stiff-person syndrome, 28 cerebellar ataxia, 14 epilepsy, and 6 with diverse paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes). GABABR-ab were analyzed in serum or CSF by indirect immunofluorescence on HEK293 cells transfected with GABAB1 and GABAB2 receptor subunits. Results: GABABR-ab were detected in 10 of the 70 patients with LE (14%). Eight had SCLC and 2 were idiopathic. One of the 8 patients with LE with SCLC had an additional onconeural antibody (Hu) and 2 GAD-ab. GABABR-ab were identified in 7 (70%) of the 10 patients with LE and SCLC without onconeural antibodies. GABABR-ab antibodies were not found in patients with GAD-ab and stiff-person syndrome, idiopathic cerebellar ataxia, or epilepsy. However, one patient with GAD-ab, paraneoplastic cerebellar ataxia, and anaplastic carcinoid of the thymus also presented GABABR-ab. Conclusions: GABABR-ab are the most common antibodies found in LE associated with SCLC previously considered “seronegative.” In patients with GAD-ab, the frequency of GABABR-ab is low and only observed in the context of cancer. PMID:21357831

  20. Status spasticus and psoas muscle edema due to anti-GAD antibody associated stiff-man syndrome.

    PubMed

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey

    2015-08-01

    Severe muscle rigidity and spasms are uncommon causes of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admissions. Stiff-man syndrome (SMS) is a rare disorder characterized by continuous muscle spasms, axial muscle rigidity, "tin soldier gait," and continuous motor unit activity on electromyography. There are three clinical variants of SMS; stiff-limb syndrome, classical SMS, and paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. Three types of antibodies have been associated with SMS; however, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies are the most frequent and are seen in the idiopathic type of SMS. The spasms of SMS can be very disabling and severe enough to cause muscle ruptures and skeletal fractures. We present a case of anti-GAD positive SMS with "status spasticus" causing bilateral psoas myoedema and rhabdomyolysis due to repeated axial muscle jerking in a 64-year-old man and discuss the differential diagnosis of a "jerking patient in the ICU."

  1. Bacopa monniera recombinant mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase: Biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, Shakeel J; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Patel, Parth; Kumari, Uma; Khan, Bashir M

    2015-08-01

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD; EC 4.1.1.33) is an important enzyme in the mevalonic acid pathway catalyzing the Mg(2+)-ATP dependant decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP) to isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Bacopa monniera recombinant MDD (BmMDD) protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain and purified to apparent homogeneity. Km and Vmax for MVAPP were 144 μM and 52 U mg(-1) respectively. The values of turnover (kcat) and kcat/Km for mevalonate 5-diphosphate were determined to be 40s(-1) and 2.77×10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and kcat and kcat/Km values for ATP were found to be 30 s(-1) and 2.20×10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. pH activity profile indicated the involvement of carboxylate ion, lysine and arginine for the activity of enzyme. The apparent activation energy for the BmMDD catalyzed reaction was 12.7 kJ mol(-1). Optimum pH and temperature for the forward reaction was found to be 8.0 and 45 °C. The enzyme was most stable at pH 7 at 20 °C with the deactivation rate constant (Kd(*)) of 1.69×10(-4) and half life (t1/2) of 68 h. The cation studies suggested that BmMDD is a cation dependant enzyme and optimum activity was achieved in the presence of Mg(2+).

  2. Conformational stabilization of rat s-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase by putrescine.

    PubMed

    Wada, Makiko; Shirahata, Akira

    2010-01-01

    The activity and processing of mammalian S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) is stimulated by putrescine. To obtain new insights into the mechanism through which putrescine stimulates AdoMetDC, we investigated conformational changes in rat prostate AdoMetDC in the presence or absence of putrescine. We examined the reactivity of purified rat prostate AdoMetDC to the SH-reagent iodoacetic acid (IAA) and its susceptibility to proteolysis in the presence or absence of putrescine using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The activity of AdoMetDC treated with IAA in the absence of putrescine was reduced, but about 80% of its activity remained after treatment with IAA in the presence of putrescine. In the presence of putrescine, IAA incorporation was 1.9 mol IAA/mol of AdoMetDC α-subunit, while there was no incorporation of IAA in the β-subunit of AdoMetDC. In the absence of putrescine, 5.0 mol of IAA/mol of α-subunit and 0.9 mol of IAA/mol of β-subunit were incorporated. Only Cys292 and Cys310 were carboxymethylated by IAA in the presence of putrescine. In contrast, in the absence of putrescine all cysteines were carboxymethylated by IAA. In addition, putrescine slowed the rate of AdoMetDC degradation by trypsin. These results demonstrate that the conformation of AdoMetDC purified from rat prostate is stabilized by putrescine.

  3. Increased humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in growing pigs pre-treated with poly-γ-glutamic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee-Hoon; Kang, Ik-Jae; Kim, A-Reum; Noh, You-Sun; Chung, Hee-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine improved in 8-week-old growing pigs born to well-vaccinated sows pre-treated with 60 mg of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) three days before vaccination. Antibody against FMD virus serotype O was measured 0, 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-vaccination, using a PrioCHECK FMDV type O ELISA kit. The results showed that positive antibody reactions against FMDV serotype O antigen among a component of the vaccine significantly increased in response to pre-injection with γ-PGA. PMID:26645341

  4. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of Drosophila 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Ding, H; Robinson, H; Christensen, B; Li, J

    2010-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase (DDC), also known as aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of a number of aromatic L-amino acids. Physiologically, DDC is responsible for the production of dopamine and serotonin through the decarboxylation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively. In insects, both dopamine and serotonin serve as classical neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, or neurohormones, and dopamine is also involved in insect cuticle formation, eggshell hardening, and immune responses. In this study, we expressed a typical DDC enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, critically analyzed its substrate specificity and biochemical properties, determined its crystal structure at 1.75 Angstrom resolution, and evaluated the roles residues T82 and H192 play in substrate binding and enzyme catalysis through site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme. Our results establish that this DDC functions exclusively on the production of dopamine and serotonin, with no activity to tyrosine or tryptophan and catalyzes the formation of serotonin more efficiently than dopamine. The crystal structure of Drosophila DDC and the site-directed mutagenesis study of the enzyme demonstrate that T82 is involved in substrate binding and that H192 is used not only for substrate interaction, but for cofactor binding of drDDC as well. Through comparative analysis, the results also provide insight into the structure-function relationship of other insect DDC-like proteins.

  5. Comparison of 5 monoclonal antibodies for immunopurification of human butyrylcholinesterase on Dynabeads: KD values, binding pairs, and amino acid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Targosova, Katarina; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) is a stoichiometric bioscavenger of nerve agents and organophosphorus pesticides. Mass spectrometry methods detect stable nerve agent adducts on the active site serine of HuBChE. The first step in sample preparation is immunopurification of HuBChE from plasma. Our goal was to identify monoclonal antibodies that could be used to immunopurify HuBChE on Dynabeads Protein G. Mouse anti-HuBChE monoclonal antibodies were obtained in the form of ascites fluid, dead hybridoma cells stored frozen at −80°C for 30 years, or recently frozen hybridoma cells. RNA from 4 hybridoma cell lines was amplified by PCR for determination of their nucleotide and amino acid sequences. Full-length light and heavy chains were expressed, and the antibodies purified from culture medium. A fifth monoclonal was purchased. The 5 monoclonal antibodies were compared for ability to capture HuBChE from human plasma on Dynabeads Protein G. In addition, they were evaluated for binding affinity by Biacore and ELISA. Epitope mapping by pairing analysis was performed on the Octet Red96 instrument. The 5 monoclonal antibodies, B2 12-1, B2 18-5, 3E8, mAb2, and 11D8, had similar KD values of 10−9 M for HuBChE. Monoclonal B2 18-5 outperformed the others in the Dynabeads Protein G assay where it captured 97% of the HuBChE in 0.5 ml plasma. Pairing analysis showed that 3E8 and B2 12-1 share the same epitope, 11D8 and B2 18-5 share the same epitope, but mAb2 and B2 12-1 or mAb2 and 3E8 bind to different epitopes on HuBChE. B2 18-5 was selected for establishment of a stable CHO cell line for production of mouse anti-HuBChE monoclonal. PMID:26343001

  6. Comparison of 5 monoclonal antibodies for immunopurification of human butyrylcholinesterase on Dynabeads: KD values, binding pairs, and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Targosova, Katarina; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A; Johnson, Rudolph C; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2015-10-05

    Human butyrylcholinesterase (HuBChE) is a stoichiometric bioscavenger of nerve agents and organophosphorus pesticides. Mass spectrometry methods detect stable nerve agent adducts on the active site serine of HuBChE. The first step in sample preparation is immunopurification of HuBChE from plasma. Our goal was to identify monoclonal antibodies that could be used to immunopurify HuBChE on Dynabeads Protein G. Mouse anti-HuBChE monoclonal antibodies were obtained in the form of ascites fluid, dead hybridoma cells stored frozen at -80 °C for 30 years, or recently frozen hybridoma cells. RNA from 4 hybridoma cell lines was amplified by PCR for determination of their nucleotide and amino acid sequences. Full-length light and heavy chains were expressed, and the antibodies purified from culture medium. A fifth monoclonal was purchased. The 5 monoclonal antibodies were compared for ability to capture HuBChE from human plasma on Dynabeads Protein G. In addition, they were evaluated for binding affinity by Biacore and ELISA. Epitope mapping by pairing analysis was performed on the Octet Red96 instrument. The 5 monoclonal antibodies, B2 12-1, B2 18-5, 3E8, mAb2, and 11D8, had similar KD values of 10(-9) M for HuBChE. Monoclonal B2 18-5 outperformed the others in the Dynabeads Protein G assay where it captured 97% of the HuBChE in 0.5 ml plasma. Pairing analysis showed that 3E8 and B2 12-1 share the same epitope, 11D8 and B2 18-5 share the same epitope, but mAb2 and B2 12-1 or mAb2 and 3E8 bind to different epitopes on HuBChE. B2 18-5 was selected for establishment of a stable CHO cell line for production of mouse anti-HuBChE monoclonal.

  7. Understanding Particle Formation: Solubility of Free Fatty Acids as Polysorbate 20 Degradation Byproducts in Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody Formulations.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Nidhi; Demeule, Barthélemy; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-02

    The purpose of this work was to determine the aqueous solubilities at 2-8 °C of the major free fatty acids (FFAs) formed by polysorbate 20 (PS20) degradation and identify possible ways to predict, delay, or mitigate subsequent particle formation in monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. The FFA solubility limits at 2-8 °C were determined by titrating known amounts of FFA in monoclonal antibody formulations and identifying the FFA concentration leading to visible and subvisible particle formation. The solubility limits of lauric, myristic, and palmitic acids at 2-8 °C were 17 ± 1 μg/mL, 3 ± 1 μg/mL, and 1.5 ± 0.5 μg/mL in a formulation containing 0.04% (w/v) PS20 at pH 5.4 and >22 μg/mL, 3 ± 1 μg/mL, and 0.75 ± 0.25 μg/mL in a formulation containing 0.02% (w/v) PS20 at pH 6.0. For the first time, a 3D correlation between FFA solubility, PS20 concentration, and pH has been reported providing a rational approach for the formulator to balance these with regard to potential particle formation. The results suggest that the lower solubilities of the longer chain FFAs, generated from degradation of the stearate, palmitate, and myristate fraction of PS20, is the primary cause of seeding and subsequent FFA precipitation rather than the most abundant lauric acid.

  8. Time-course of SKF-81297-induced increase in glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 mRNA levels in striatonigral neurons and decrease in GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit mRNA levels in the substantia nigra, pars reticulata, in adult rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Soghomonian, J-J

    2008-06-26

    Striatal projection neurons use GABA as their neurotransmitter and express the rate-limiting synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the vesicular GABA transporter vGAT. The chronic systemic administration of an agonist of dopamine D1/D5-preferring receptors is known to alter GAD mRNA levels in striatonigral neurons in intact and dopamine-depleted rats. In the present study, the effects of a single or subchronic systemic administration of the dopamine D1/D5-preferring receptor agonist SKF-81297 on GAD65, GAD67, PPD and vGAT mRNA levels in the striatum and GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit mRNA levels in the substantia nigra, pars reticulata, were measured in rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion. After a single injection of SKF-81297, striatal GAD65 mRNA levels were significantly increased at 3 but not 72 h. In contrast, striatal GAD67 mRNA levels were increased and nigral alpha1 mRNA levels were decreased at 72 but not 3 h. Single cell analysis on double-labeled sections indicated that increased GAD or vGAT mRNA levels after acute SKF-81297 occurred in striatonigral neurons identified by their lack of preproenkephalin expression. Subchronic SKF-81297 induced significant increases in striatal GAD67, GAD65, preprodynorphin and vGAT mRNA levels and decreases in nigral alpha1 mRNA levels. In the striatum contralateral to the 6-OHDA lesion, subchronic but not acute SKF-81297 induced a significant increase in GAD65 mRNA levels. The other mRNA levels were not significantly altered. Finally, striatal GAD67 mRNA levels were negatively correlated with nigral alpha1 mRNA levels in the dopamine-depleted but not dopamine-intact side. The results suggest that different signaling pathways are involved in the modulation by dopamine D1/D5 receptors of GAD65 and GAD67 mRNA levels in striatonigral neurons. They also suggest that the down-regulation of nigral GABA(A) receptors is linked to the increase in striatal GAD67 mRNA levels in the dopamine

  9. Immunoreactivity of polyclonal antibodies generated against the carboxy terminus of the predicted amino acid sequence of the Huntington disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Alkatib, G.; Graham, R.; Pelmear-Telenius, A.

    1994-09-01

    A cDNA fragment spanning the 3{prime}-end of the Huntington disease gene (from 8052 to 9252) was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector containing the E. Coli lac promoter and a portion of the coding sequence for {beta}-galactosidase. The truncated {beta}-galactosidase gene was cleaved with BamHl and fused in frame to the BamHl fragment of the Huntington disease gene 3{prime}-end. Expression analysis of proteins made in E. Coli revealed that 20-30% of the total cellular proteins was represented by the {beta}-galactosidase-huntingtin fusion protein. The identity of the Huntington disease protein amino acid sequences was confirmed by protein sequence analysis. Affinity chromatography was used to purify large quantities of the fusion protein from bacterial cell lysates. Affinity-purified proteins were used to immunize New Zealand white rabbits for antibody production. The generated polyclonal antibodies were used to immunoprecipitate the Huntington disease gene product expressed in a neuroblastoma cell line. In this cell line the antibodies precipitated two protein bands of apparent gel migrations of 200 and 150 kd which together, correspond to the calculated molecular weight of the Huntington disease gene product (350 kd). Immunoblotting experiments revealed the presence of a large precursor protein in the range of 350-750 kd which is in agreement with the predicted molecular weight of the protein without post-translational modifications. These results indicate that the huntingtin protein is cleaved into two subunits in this neuroblastoma cell line and implicate that cleavage of a large precursor protein may contribute to its biological activity. Experiments are ongoing to determine the precursor-product relationship and to examine the synthesis of the huntingtin protein in freshly isolated rat brains, and to determine cellular and subcellular distribution of the gene product.

  10. ArrayPitope: Automated Analysis of Amino Acid Substitutions for Peptide Microarray-Based Antibody Epitope Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Christian Skjødt; Østerbye, Thomas; Marcatili, Paolo; Lund, Ole; Buus, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Identification of epitopes targeted by antibodies (B cell epitopes) is of critical importance for the development of many diagnostic and therapeutic tools. For clinical usage, such epitopes must be extensively characterized in order to validate specificity and to document potential cross-reactivity. B cell epitopes are typically classified as either linear epitopes, i.e. short consecutive segments from the protein sequence or conformational epitopes adapted through native protein folding. Recent advances in high-density peptide microarrays enable high-throughput, high-resolution identification and characterization of linear B cell epitopes. Using exhaustive amino acid substitution analysis of peptides originating from target antigens, these microarrays can be used to address the specificity of polyclonal antibodies raised against such antigens containing hundreds of epitopes. However, the interpretation of the data provided in such large-scale screenings is far from trivial and in most cases it requires advanced computational and statistical skills. Here, we present an online application for automated identification of linear B cell epitopes, allowing the non-expert user to analyse peptide microarray data. The application takes as input quantitative peptide data of fully or partially substituted overlapping peptides from a given antigen sequence and identifies epitope residues (residues that are significantly affected by substitutions) and visualize the selectivity towards each residue by sequence logo plots. Demonstrating utility, the application was used to identify and address the antibody specificity of 18 linear epitope regions in Human Serum Albumin (HSA), using peptide microarray data consisting of fully substituted peptides spanning the entire sequence of HSA and incubated with polyclonal rabbit anti-HSA (and mouse anti-rabbit-Cy3). The application is made available at: www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/ArrayPitope. PMID:28095436

  11. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket.

    PubMed

    Debler, Erik W; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A

    2009-11-03

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes Asp(H35) and Glu(L34) to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the Glu(L34) to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 10(9)-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations.

  12. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, Erik W.; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-12-01

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes Asp{sup H35} and Glu{sup L34} to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the Glu{sup L34} to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 10{sup 9}-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations.

  13. Production of a soluble single-chain variable fragment antibody against okadaic acid and exploration of its specific binding.

    PubMed

    He, Kuo; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Wang, Lixia; Du, Xinjun; Wei, Dong

    2016-06-15

    Okadaic acid is a lipophilic marine algal toxin commonly responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). Outbreaks of DSP have been increasing and are of worldwide public health concern; therefore, there is a growing demand for more rapid, reliable, and economical analytical methods for the detection of this toxin. In this study, anti-okadaic acid single-chain variable fragment (scFv) genes were prepared by cloning heavy and light chain genes from hybridoma cells, followed by fusion of the chains via a linker peptide. An scFv-pLIP6/GN recombinant plasmid was constructed and transformed into Escherichia coli for expression, and the target scFv was identified with IC-CLEIA (chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay). The IC15 was 0.012 ± 0.02 μg/L, and the IC50 was 0.25 ± 0.03 μg/L. The three-dimensional structure of the scFv was simulated with computer modeling, and okadaic acid was docked to the scFv model to obtain a putative structure of the binding complex. Two predicted critical amino acids, Ser32 and Thr187, were then mutated to verify this theoretical model. Both mutants exhibited significant loss of binding activity. These results help us to understand this specific scFv-antigen binding mechanism and provide guidance for affinity maturation of the antibody in vitro. The high-affinity scFv developed here also has potential for okadaic acid toxin detection.

  14. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A.; Byrne, Barry J.; Herzog, Roland W.; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. PMID:26053072

  15. Identification and molecular cloning of glutamate decarboxylase gene from Lactobacillus casei

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Yasaman; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Rabbani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) possesses several physiological functions such as neurotransmission, induction of hypotension, diuretic and tranquilizer effects. Production of GABA-enriched products by lactic acid bacteria has been a focus of different researches in recent years because of their safety and health-promoting specifities. In this study, glutamate decarboxylase (gad) gene of a local strains Lactobacillus casei was identified and cloned. In order to clone the gad gene from this strain, the PCR was carried out using primers designed based on conserved regions. The PCR product was purified and ligated into PGEM-T vector. Comparison of obtained sequences shows that this fragment codes the pyridoxal 5′-phosphate binding region. This strain could possibly be used for the industrial GABA production and also for development of functional fermented foods. Gad gene manipulation can also either decrease or increase the activity of enzyme in bacteria. PMID:27844008

  16. Crystal structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis diaminopimelate decarboxylase, an essential enzyme in bacterial lysine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gokulan, Kuppan; Rupp, Bernhard; Pavelka, Martin S; Jacobs, William R; Sacchettini, James C

    2003-05-16

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis lysA gene encodes the enzyme meso-diaminopimelate decarboxylase (DAPDC), a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme. The enzyme catalyzes the final step in the lysine biosynthetic pathway converting meso-diaminopimelic acid (DAP) to l-lysine. The lysA gene of M. tuberculosis H37Rv has been established as essential for bacterial survival in immunocompromised mice, demonstrating that de novo biosynthesis of lysine is essential for in vivo viability. Drugs targeted against DAPDC could be efficient anti-tuberculosis drugs, and the three-dimensional structure of DAPDC from M. tuberculosis complexed with reaction product lysine and the ternary complex with PLP and lysine in the active site has been determined. The first structure of a DAPDC confirms its classification as a fold type III PLP-dependent enzyme. The structure shows a stable 2-fold dimer in head-to-tail arrangement of a triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel-like alpha/beta domain and a C-terminal beta sheet domain, similar to the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) fold family. PLP is covalently bound via an internal aldimine, and residues from both domains and both subunits contribute to the binding pocket. Comparison of the structure with eukaryotic ODCs, in particular with a di-fluoromethyl ornithine (DMFO)-bound ODC from Trypanosoma bruceii, indicates that corresponding DAP-analogues might be potential inhibitors for mycobacterial DAPDCs.

  17. Characterization of Plasmodium phosphatidylserine decarboxylase expressed in yeast and application for inhibitor screening.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Kumar, Vidya; Pachikara, Niseema; Garg, Aprajita; Lawres, Lauren; Toh, Justin Y; Voelker, Dennis R; Ben Mamoun, Choukri

    2016-03-01

    Phospholipid biosynthesis is critical for the development, differentiation and pathogenesis of several eukaryotic pathogens. Genetic studies have validated the pathway for phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis from phosphatidylserine catalyzed by phosphatidylserine decarboxylase enzymes (PSD) as a suitable target for development of antimicrobials; however no inhibitors of this class of enzymes have been discovered. We show that the Plasmodium falciparum PSD can restore the essential function of the yeast gene in strains requiring PSD for growth. Genetic, biochemical and metabolic analyses demonstrate that amino acids between positions 40 and 70 of the parasite enzyme are critical for proenzyme processing and decarboxylase activity. We used the essential role of Plasmodium PSD in yeast as a tool for screening a library of anti-malarials. One of these compounds is 7-chloro-N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-quinolinamine, an inhibitor with potent activity against P. falciparum, and low toxicity toward mammalian cells. We synthesized an analog of this compound and showed that it inhibits PfPSD activity and eliminates Plasmodium yoelii infection in mice. These results highlight the importance of 4-quinolinamines as a novel class of drugs targeting membrane biogenesis via inhibition of PSD activity.

  18. Characterization of Plasmodium phosphatidylserine decarboxylase expressed in yeast and application for inhibitor screening

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Lawres, Lauren; Toh, Justin Y.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ben Mamoun, Choukri

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phospholipid biosynthesis is critical for the development, differentiation and pathogenesis of several eukaryotic pathogens. Genetic studies have validated the pathway for phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis from phosphatidylserine catalyzed by phosphatidylserine decarboxylase enzymes (PSD) as a suitable target for development of antimicrobials; however no inhibitors of this class of enzymes have been discovered. We show that the Plasmodium falciparum PSD can restore the essential function of the yeast gene in strains requiring PSD for growth. Genetic, biochemical and metabolic analyses demonstrate that amino acids between positions 40 and 70 of the parasite enzyme are critical for proenzyme processing and decarboxylase activity. We used the essential role of Plasmodium PSD in yeast as a tool for screening a library of anti-malarials. One of these compounds is 7-chloro-N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-quinolinamine, an inhibitor with potent activity against P. falciparum, and low toxicity toward mammalian cells. We synthesized an analog of this compound and showed that it inhibits PfPSD activity and eliminates Plasmodium yoelii infection in mice. These results highlight the importance of 4-quinolinamines as a novel class of drugs targeting membrane biogenesis via inhibition of PSD activity PMID:26585333

  19. Identification of Anti-Long Chain Saturated Fatty Acid IgG Antibodies in Serum of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Dequina A.; Salto, Lorena M.; Boston, Ava M.; Kim, Nan Sun; Larios, Marco; Beeson, W. Lawrence; Firek, Anthony F.; Casiano, Carlos A.; Langridge, William H. R.; Cordero-MacIntyre, Zaida; De Leon, Marino

    2015-01-01

    High levels of serum long chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFAs) have been associated with inflammation in type 2 diabetes. Dietary SFAs can promote inflammation, the secretion of IgG antibodies, and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. This study characterizes anti-LCSFA IgG antibodies from patients with type 2 diabetes. Serum samples from several cohorts with type 2 diabetes were analyzed for the presence of anti-LCSFA IgG, the cytokine IL-1β, and nonesterified fatty acids. Anti-LCSFA IgG was isolated from patient samples and used for in vitro characterization of avidity and specificity. A cohort participating in En Balance, a diabetes health education program that improved diabetes management, tested positive for anti-LCSFA IgG. Following the 3-month program, the cohort showed a significant reduction in anti-LCSFA IgG levels. Anti-LCSFA antibodies isolated from these patients demonstrated high avidity, were specific for long chain SFAs, and correlated with serum fatty acids in patients with managed type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, anti-LCSFA IgG neutralized PA-induced IL-1β secretion by dendritic cells. Our data shows that nonesterified SFAs are recognized by IgG antibodies present in human blood. The identification of anti-LCSFA IgG antibodies in human sera establishes a basis for further exploration of lipid induced immune responses in diabetic patients. PMID:26633920

  20. Identification of Anti-Long Chain Saturated Fatty Acid IgG Antibodies in Serum of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Dequina A; Salto, Lorena M; Boston, Ava M; Kim, Nan Sun; Larios, Marco; Beeson, W Lawrence; Firek, Anthony F; Casiano, Carlos A; Langridge, William H R; Cordero-MacIntyre, Zaida; De Leon, Marino

    2015-01-01

    High levels of serum long chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFAs) have been associated with inflammation in type 2 diabetes. Dietary SFAs can promote inflammation, the secretion of IgG antibodies, and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. This study characterizes anti-LCSFA IgG antibodies from patients with type 2 diabetes. Serum samples from several cohorts with type 2 diabetes were analyzed for the presence of anti-LCSFA IgG, the cytokine IL-1β, and nonesterified fatty acids. Anti-LCSFA IgG was isolated from patient samples and used for in vitro characterization of avidity and specificity. A cohort participating in En Balance, a diabetes health education program that improved diabetes management, tested positive for anti-LCSFA IgG. Following the 3-month program, the cohort showed a significant reduction in anti-LCSFA IgG levels. Anti-LCSFA antibodies isolated from these patients demonstrated high avidity, were specific for long chain SFAs, and correlated with serum fatty acids in patients with managed type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, anti-LCSFA IgG neutralized PA-induced IL-1β secretion by dendritic cells. Our data shows that nonesterified SFAs are recognized by IgG antibodies present in human blood. The identification of anti-LCSFA IgG antibodies in human sera establishes a basis for further exploration of lipid induced immune responses in diabetic patients.

  1. Detection of antibody to staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid with a microenzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, M M; Jenkins, K E; Kabat, W J; Buranosky, T

    1984-01-01

    Sera from individuals with Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis and osteomyelitis and from some individuals with other forms of gram-positive endocarditis yielded higher readings in a microenzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against lipoteichoic acid from S. aureus than did sera from individuals with other types of serious staphylococcal infection or non-staphylococcal osteomyelitis, or from unselected inpatients. PMID:6715523

  2. Glycine receptor antibodies in PERM and related syndromes: characteristics, clinical features and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-González, Alexander; Leite, M. Isabel; Waters, Patrick; Woodhall, Mark; Coutinho, Ester; Balint, Bettina; Lang, Bethan; Pettingill, Philippa; Carr, Aisling; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Press, Raomand; Lunn, Michael P.; Lim, Ming; Maddison, Paul; Meinck, H.-M.; Vandenberghe, Wim

    2014-01-01

    The clinical associations of glycine receptor antibodies have not yet been described fully. We identified prospectively 52 antibody-positive patients and collated their clinical features, investigations and immunotherapy responses. Serum glycine receptor antibody endpoint titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:60 000. In 11 paired samples, serum levels were higher than (n = 10) or equal to (n = 1) cerebrospinal fluid levels; there was intrathecal synthesis of glycine receptor antibodies in each of the six pairs available for detailed study. Four patients also had high glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (>1000 U/ml), and one had high voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibody (2442 pM). Seven patients with very low titres (<1:50) and unknown or alternative diagnoses were excluded from further study. Three of the remaining 45 patients had newly-identified thymomas and one had a lymphoma. Thirty-three patients were classified as progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus, and two as stiff person syndrome; five had a limbic encephalitis or epileptic encephalopathy, two had brainstem features mainly, two had demyelinating optic neuropathies and one had an unclear diagnosis. Four patients (9%) died during the acute disease, but most showed marked improvement with immunotherapies. At most recent follow-up, (2–7 years, median 3 years, since first antibody detection), the median modified Rankin scale scores (excluding the four deaths) decreased from 5 at maximal severity to 1 (P < 0.0001), but relapses have occurred in five patients and a proportion are on reducing steroids or other maintenance immunotherapies as well as symptomatic treatments. The glycine receptor antibodies activated complement on glycine receptor-transfected human embryonic kidney cells at room temperature, and caused internalization and lysosomal degradation of the glycine receptors at 37°C. Immunoglobulin G antibodies bound to rodent spinal cord and brainstem co-localizing with

  3. Suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses in mice exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid: Role of PPARalpha and T- and B-cell targeting

    EPA Science Inventory

    T-cell-dependent antibody responses (TDAR) are suppressed in female C57BL/6N mice exposed to ≥3.75 mg/kg of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) for 15 days. To determine if suppression of humoral immunity by PFOA is peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARa)-dependent and...

  4. Cancer Cell Targeting Using Folic Acid/Anti-HER2 Antibody Conjugated Fluorescent CdSe/CdS/ZnS-Mercaptopropionic Acid and CdTe-Mercaptosuccinic Acid Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpal; Kumar, Manoj; Soni, Udit; Arora, Vikas; Bansal, Vivek; Gupta, Dikshi; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Sapra, Sameer; Singh, Harpal

    2016-01-01

    CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique and direct aqueous synthesis respectively using thiol stabilizers. Synthesized CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe QDs stabilized with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) were used as fluorescent labels after conjugation with folic acid (FA) and anti-HER2 antibodies. Photoluminescence quantum yield of folated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA QDs was 59% and 77% than that of non-folated hydrophilic QDs. The folate receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid-conjugated CdTe-MSA and CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs showed higher cellular internalization as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopic studies. Folated and non-folated CdTe-MSA QDs were highly toxic and exhibited only 10% cell viability as compared to > 80% cell viability with CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs over the concentration ranging from 3.38 to 50 pmoles. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results of human breast cancer tissue samples showed positive results with anti-HER2 antibody conjugated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs with better sensitivity and specificity as compared to conventional IHC analysis using diaminobenzedene staining.

  5. Lotus hairy roots expressing inducible arginine decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, María A; Ruiz, Oscar A; Sánchez, Diego H

    2004-05-01

    Biotechnological uses of plant cell-tissue culture usually rely on constitutive transgene expression. However, such expression of transgenes may not always be desirable. In those cases, the use of an inducible promoter could be an alternative approach. To test this hypothesis, we developed two binary vectors harboring a stress-inducible promoter from Arabidopsis thaliana, driving the beta-glucuronidase reporter gene and the oat arginine decarboxylase. Transgenic hairy roots of Lotus corniculatus were obtained with osmotic- and cold-inducible beta-glucuronidase and arginine decarboxylase activities. The increase in the activity of the latter was accompanied by a significant rise in total free polyamines level. Through an organogenesis process, we obtained L. corniculatus transgenic plants avoiding deleterious phenotypes frequently associated with the constitutive over-expression of arginine decarboxylation and putrescine accumulation.

  6. Arginine decarboxylase as the source of putrescine for tobacco alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The putrescine which forms a part of nicotine and other pyrrolidine alkaloids is generally assumed to arise through the action of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, we have previously noted that changes in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an alternate source of putrescine, parallel changes in tissue alkaloids, while changes in ODC activity do not. This led us to undertake experiments to permit discrimination between ADC and ODC as enzymatic sources of putrescine destined for alkaloids. Two kinds of evidence presented here support a major role for ADC in the generation of putrescine going into alkaloids: (a) A specific 'suicide inhibitor' of ADC effectively inhibits the biosynthesis of nicotine and nornicotine in tobacco callus, while the analogous inhibitor of ODC is less effective, and (b) the flow of 14C from uniformly labelled arginine into nicotine is much more efficient than that from ornithine.

  7. Amino acid and glucose metabolism in fed-batch CHO cell culture affects antibody production and glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian; Wagtberg Sen, Jette; Rasmussen, Søren Kofoed; Kontoravdi, Cleo; Weilguny, Dietmar; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-03-01

    Fed-batch Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture is the most commonly used process for IgG production in the biopharmaceutical industry. Amino acid and glucose consumption, cell growth, metabolism, antibody titer, and N-glycosylation patterns are always the major concerns during upstream process optimization, especially media optimization. Gaining knowledge on their interrelations could provide insight for obtaining higher immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer and better controlling glycosylation-related product quality. In this work, different fed-batch processes with two chemically defined proprietary media and feeds were studied using two IgG-producing cell lines. Our results indicate that the balance of glucose and amino acid concentration in the culture is important for cell growth, IgG titer and N-glycosylation. Accordingly, the ideal fate of glucose and amino acids in the culture could be mainly towards energy and recombinant product, respectively. Accumulation of by-products such as NH4(+) and lactate as a consequence of unbalanced nutrient supply to cell activities inhibits cell growth. The levels of Leu and Arg in the culture, which relate to cell growth and IgG productivity, need to be well controlled. Amino acids with the highest consumption rates correlate with the most abundant amino acids present in the produced IgG, and thus require sufficient availability during culture. Case-by-case analysis is necessary for understanding the effect of media and process optimization on glycosylation. We found that in certain cases the presence of Man5 glycan can be linked to limitation of UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis as a result of insufficient extracellular Gln. However, under different culture conditions, high Man5 levels can also result from low α-1,3-mannosyl-glycoprotein 2-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GnTI) and UDP-GlcNAc transporter activities, which may be attributed to high level of NH4+ in the cell culture. Furthermore, galactosylation of the mAb Fc glycans

  8. Improvement of the Process Stability of Arylmalonate Decarboxylase by Immobilization for Biocatalytic Profen Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Aßmann, Miriam; Mügge, Carolin; Gaßmeyer, Sarah Katharina; Enoki, Junichi; Hilterhaus, Lutz; Kourist, Robert; Liese, Andreas; Kara, Selin

    2017-01-01

    The enzyme arylmalonate decarboxylase (AMDase) enables the selective synthesis of enantiopure (S)-arylpropinates in a simple single-step decarboxylation of dicarboxylic acid precursors. However, the poor enzyme stability with a half-life time of about 1.2 h under process conditions is a serious limitation of the productivity, which results in a need for high catalyst loads. By immobilization on an amino C2 acrylate carrier the operational stability of the (S)-selective AMDase variant G74C/M159L/C188G/V43I/A125P/V156L was increased to a half-life of about 8.6 days, which represents a 158-fold improvement. Further optimization was achieved by simple immobilization of the cell lysate to eliminate the cost- and time intensive enzyme purification step. PMID:28360905

  9. Establishment and characterization of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against human intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) using synthetic regional peptides and recombinant I-FABP.

    PubMed

    Kajiura, Satoshi; Yashiki, Tetsuya; Funaoka, Hiroyuki; Ohkaru, Yasuhiko; Nishikura, Ken; Kanda, Tatsuo; Ajioka, Yoichi; Igarashi, Michihiro; Hatakeyama, Katsuyoshi; Fujii, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We have succeeded in raising highly specific anti-human intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (I-FABP) monoclonal antibodies by immunizing animals with three synthetic regional peptides, i.e., the amino terminal (RP-1: N-acetylated 1-19-cysteine), middle portion (RP-2: cysteinyl-91-107) and carboxylic terminal (RP-3: cysteinyl-121-131) regions of human I-FABP, and the whole I-FABP molecule as antigens. We also raised a polyclonal antibody by immunizing with a recombinant (r) I-FABP. To ascertain the specificity of these antibodies for human I-FABP, the immunological reactivity of each was examined by a binding assay using rI-FABP, partially purified native I-FABP and related proteins such as liver-type (L)-FABP, heart-type (H)-FABP, as well as the regional peptides as reactants, and by Western blot analysis. In addition, the expression and distribution of I-FABP in the human gastrointestinal tract were investigated by an immunohistochemical technique using a carboxylic terminal region-specific monoclonal antibody, 8F9, and a polyclonal antibody, DN-R2. Our results indicated that both the monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies established in this study were highly specific for I-FABP, but not for L-FABP and H-FABP. Especially, the monoclonal antibodies raised against the regional peptides, showed regional specificity for the I-FABP molecule. Immunoreactivity of I-FABP was demonstrated in the mucosal epithelium of the jejunum and ileum by immunohistochemical staining, and the immunoreactivity was based on the presence of the whole I-FABP molecule but not the presence of any precursors or degradation products containing a carboxylic terminal fragment. It is concluded that some of these monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, such as 8F9, 4205, and DN-R2, will be suitable for use in research on the immunochemistry and clinical chemistry of I-FABP because those antibodies can recognize both types of native and denatured I-FABP. In order to detect I-FABP in blood samples, it

  10. Ornithine decarboxylase activity and: [125I]iododeoxyuridine incorporation in rat prostate.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, D J; Donaldson, L J; Thomas, G H

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between ornithine decarboxylase activity and [125I]iododexyuridine incorporation was studied in prostates from castrated rats (aged 5, 26 and 80 weeks) injected daily with testosterone for up to 10 days. The results suggest that ornithine decarboxylase activity is a parameter of secretory activity, rather than growth, in the ventral prostate. In the dorsolateral prostate, ornithine decarboxylase activity tends to parallel [125I]iododeoxyuridine incorporation. PMID:1212206

  11. Spontaneous downbeat nystagmus as a clue for the diagnosis of ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies.

    PubMed

    Vale, Thiago Cardoso; Pedroso, José Luiz; Alquéres, Rafaela Almeida; Dutra, Lívia Almeida; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2015-12-15

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamic acid to the neurotransmitter gamma-amino butyric acid. Antibodies against GAD (anti-GAD-Ab) are associated with an array of autoimmune-related neurological conditions, such as stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, epilepsy and limbic encephalitis. The clinical spectrum of ataxia associated with anti-GAD-Ab comprises slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia syndrome evolving in months or years, associated with cerebellar atrophy on brain MRI. There are few reports of patients with ataxia associated with anti-GAD-Ab presenting with abnormal ocular movements, such as downbeat nystagmus (DBN).We present two patients with ataxia associated with anti-GAD-Ab from a large series of ataxic subjects who presented with cerebellar ataxia combined with spontaneous DBN. All patients underwent a thorough neurological evaluation with the use of ataxia scales, brain MRI scans, cerebrospinal fluid examination, 18FDG-PET/CT scans, laboratory work-up with on coneural and immune encephalitis antibodies, serum and cerebrospinal fluid levels of anti-GAD-Ab, and the antibody specificity index to measure the intrathecal synthesis of anti-GAD-Ab. All patients were treated with cycles of intravenous immunoglobulin and had mild/partial ataxia improvement and no improvement of DBN. The finding of DBN may work as a diagnostic clue in the context of adult-onset non-hereditary ataxias.

  12. Neutral and Acidic Oligosaccharides Supplementation Does Not Increase the Vaccine Antibody Response in Preterm Infants in a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Jolice P.; Westerbeek, Elisabeth A. M.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; Berbers, Guy A. M.; Lafeber, Harrie N.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

    2013-01-01

    Background In preterm infants, a decreased immunological response and lower serological effectiveness are observed after immunizations due to ineffectiveness of both humoral and cellular immune mechanisms. Objective To determine the effect of 80% neutral oligosaccharides [small-chain galacto-oligosaccharides/long-chain fructo-oligosaccharides (scGOS/lcFOS)] in combination with 20% pectin-derived acidic oligosaccharides (pAOS) on antibody concentrations after DTaP-IPV-Hib immunization in preterm infants. Design In this randomized clinical trial, preterm infants with gestational age <32 weeks and/or birth weight <1500 g received enteral supplementation with scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS or placebo (maltodextrin) between days 3 and 30 of life. Blood samples were collected at 5 and 12 months of age. Results In total, 113 infants were included. Baseline and nutritional characteristics were not different in both groups. Geometric mean titers were not different after prebiotic supplementation at 5 months, Ptx (37/44 EU/ml), FHA (78/96 EU/ml), Prn (78/80 EU/ml), Diphtheria (0.40/0.57 IU/ml), Tetanus (0.74/0.99 IU/ml) and Hib (0.35/0.63 µg/ml), and at 12 months Ptx (55/66 EU/ml), FHA (122/119 EU/ml), Prn (116/106 Eu/ml), Diphtheria (0.88/1.11 IU/ml), Tetanus (1.64/1.79 IU/ml) and Hib (2.91/2.55 µg/ml). Conclusions Enteral supplementation of neutral (scGOS/lcFOS) and acidic oligosaccharides (pAOS) does not improve the immunization response in preterm infants. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN16211826 ISRCTN16211826 PMID:23951035

  13. Antibodies to Yeast Phenylalanine Transfer Ribonucleic Acid Are Specific for the Odd Nucleoside Y in the Anticodon Loop

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sara; Aharonov, Aharon; Sela, Michael; Von Der Haar, Friedrich; Cramer, Friedrich

    1974-01-01

    Antibodies with specificity to a single species of tRNA were elicited in a goat by immunization with a glutaraldehyde conjugate of yeast phenylalanine transfer RNA with bovine gamma globulin. The specificity of the antibodies was studied by a radioimmunoassay measuring the direct binding of [3H]tRNAPhe or the inhibition of the binding. The antibodies formed are predominantly directed towards the characteristic highly modified nucleoside Y, which is located right next to the anticodon. The antibodies bind specifically to tRNAPhe, to oligonucleotides derived by enzymatic digestion from the anticodon loop of tRNAPhe, and to the Y nucleoside itself. tRNA species which do not contain Y in their sequences, or tRNAPhe from which the Y base has been excised, do not bind to the antibodies. Yeast tRNAPhe can be separated from other tRNA species with an immunoadsorbent of antibodies to tRNAPhe. PMID:4527666

  14. A Vibrio cholerae Classical TcpA Amino Acid Sequence Induces Protective Antibody That Binds an Area Hypothesized To Be Important for Toxin-Coregulated Pilus Structure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ronald K.; Kirn, Thomas J.; Meeks, Michael D.; Wade, Terri K.; Wade, William F.

    2004-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that has been associated with cholera pandemics since the early 1800s. Whole-cell, killed, and live-attenuated oral cholera vaccines are in use. We and others have focused on the development of a subunit cholera vaccine that features standardized epitopes from various V. cholerae macromolecules that are known to induce protective antibody responses. TcpA protein is assembled into toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), a type IVb pilus required for V. cholerae colonization, and thus is a strong candidate for a cholera subunit vaccine. Polypeptides (24 to 26 amino acids) in TcpA that can induce protective antibody responses have been reported, but further characterization of their amino acid targets relative to tertiary or quaternary TCP structures has not been done. We report a refinement of the TcpA sequences that can induce protective antibody. One sequence, TcpA 15 (residues 170 to 183), induces antibodies that bind linear TcpA in a Western blot as well as weakly bind soluble TcpA in solution. These antibodies bind assembled pili at high density and provide 80 to 100% protection in the infant mouse protection assay. This is in sharp contrast to other anti-TcpA peptide sera (TcpA 11, TcpA 13, and TcpA 17) that bind very strongly in Western blot and solution assays yet do not provide protection or effectively bind TCP, as evidenced by immunoelectron microscopy. The sequences of TcpA 15 that induce protective antibody were localized on a model of assembled TCP. These sequences are centered on a site that is predicted to be important for TCP structure. PMID:15385509

  15. Human milk polyunsaturated long-chain fatty acids and secretory immunoglobulin A antibodies and early childhood allergy.

    PubMed

    Duchén, K; Casas, R; Fagerås-Böttcher, M; Yu, G; Björkstén, B

    2000-02-01

    changes in PUFA serum phospholipids, particularly for the n-6 PUFA. The AA: EPA ratio in maternal milk was related, however, to the AA:EPA only in serum from non-allergic children, while this was not the case in allergic children. The levels of total S-IgA, anti-cat S-IgA, anti-ovalbumin S-IgA, and anti-beta-lactoglobulin S-IgA in milk from mothers of allergic, as compared to non-allergic, children were similar through the first 3 months of lactation. Low levels of n-3 PUFA in human milk, and particularly a high AA:EPA ratio in maternal milk and serum phospholipids in the infants, were related to the development of symptoms of allergic disease at 18 months of age. The milk PUFA composition influenced the composition of PUFA in serum phospholipids of the children. We also showed that the lower levels of colostral anti-ovalbumin S-IgA and lower total S-IgA in mature milk from atopic mothers did not influence the development of allergic disease in the children up to 18 months of age. The findings indicate that low alpha-linolenic acid, C18:3 n-3 (LNA) and n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCP) 20-22 carbon chains, but not the levels of S-IgA antibodies to allergens, are related to the development of atopy in children.

  16. Cloning and functional analysis of the orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase gene (PbrURA3) of the pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Reinoso, Cristina; Sorais, Françoise; Niño-Vega, Gustavo A; Fermiñán, Encarnación; San-Blas, Gioconda; Domínguez, Angel

    2005-07-15

    A genomic clone encoding the Paracoccidioides brasiliensis orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase gene (PbrURA3) was isolated by screening a subgenomic plasmid DNA library of this fungus, using a PCR amplification product of the gene as a probe. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene contains an open reading frame of 855 bp with a single intron (162 bp), and encodes a putative 285 amino acids polypeptide of estimated molecular weight 31.1 kDa and isoelectric point 6.5. The deduced amino acid sequence predicted a 73.4% identity with orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase of Aspergillus nidulans. Functionality of the gene was demonstrated by transformation into a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura3 null mutant.

  17. Serological studies of an acid-labile O-polysaccharide of Proteus vulgaris OX19 lipopolysaccharide using human and rabbit antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kaca, W; Swierzko, A S; Ziolkowski, A; Amano, K; Senchenkova, S N; Knirel, Y A

    1998-01-01

    In a Weil-Felix test, sera from patients infected with Rickettsia sp. agglutinate Proteus OX types of bacteria and Proteus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) are responsible for the cross-reaction. Data on the character of LPS of one of the OX group strains, Proteus vulgaris OX19, are contradictory, and it remained unclear whether it has an O-polysaccharide (OPS) and is thus LPS of the smooth type (S) or not (rough-type LPS). Our studies showed that P. vulgaris OX19 (strain PZH-24) produces a smooth-type LPS that contains a long-chain OPS, but it undergoes depolymerization during mild acid hydrolysis conventionally used for LPS delipidation and loses the serological activity. An elucidation of the complete structure of OPS demonstrated the presence of a glycosyl phosphate linkage responsible for the acid-lability of the polysaccharide chain. In ELISA, both IgM type antibodies in a Weil-Felix test with human anti-Rickettsia typhi sera and rabbit anti-P. vulgaris OX19 antibodies reacted with OPS. Rabbit antibodies did not inhibit the cross-reaction with human antibodies and thus bind to different epitopes.

  18. Characterization of a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent l-lysine decarboxylase/oxidase from Burkholderia sp. AIU 395.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Asami; Matsui, Daisuke; Takahashi, Narumi; Yamada, Miwa; Asano, Yasuhisa; Isobe, Kimiyasu

    2014-11-01

    A novel enzyme, which catalyzed decarboxylation of l-lysine into cadaverine with release of carbon dioxide and oxidative deamination of l-lysine into l-2-aminoadipic 5-semialdehyde with release of ammonia and hydrogen peroxide, was found from a newly isolated Burkholderia sp. AIU 395. The enzyme was specific to l-lysine and did not exhibit enzyme activities for other l-amino acids, l-lysine derivatives, d-amino acids, and amines. The apparent Km values for l-lysine in the oxidation and decarboxylation reactions were estimated to be 0.44 mM and 0.84 mM, respectively. The molecular mass was estimated to be 150 kDa, which was composed of two identical subunits with molecular mass of 76.5 kDa. The enzyme contained one mol of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate per subunit as a prosthetic group. The enzyme exhibiting decarboxylase and oxidase activities for l-lysine was first reported here, while the deduced amino acid sequence was homologous to that of putative lysine decarboxylases from the genus Burkholderia.

  19. Structural insights into the Escherichia coli lysine decarboxylases and molecular determinants of interaction with the AAA+ ATPase RavA

    PubMed Central

    Kandiah, Eaazhisai; Carriel, Diego; Perard, Julien; Malet, Hélène; Bacia, Maria; Liu, Kaiyin; Chan, Sze W. S.; Houry, Walid A.; Ollagnier de Choudens, Sandrine; Elsen, Sylvie; Gutsche, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The inducible lysine decarboxylase LdcI is an important enterobacterial acid stress response enzyme whereas LdcC is its close paralogue thought to play mainly a metabolic role. A unique macromolecular cage formed by two decamers of the Escherichia coli LdcI and five hexamers of the AAA+ ATPase RavA was shown to counteract acid stress under starvation. Previously, we proposed a pseudoatomic model of the LdcI-RavA cage based on its cryo-electron microscopy map and crystal structures of an inactive LdcI decamer and a RavA monomer. We now present cryo-electron microscopy 3D reconstructions of the E. coli LdcI and LdcC, and an improved map of the LdcI bound to the LARA domain of RavA, at pH optimal for their enzymatic activity. Comparison with each other and with available structures uncovers differences between LdcI and LdcC explaining why only the acid stress response enzyme is capable of binding RavA. We identify interdomain movements associated with the pH-dependent enzyme activation and with the RavA binding. Multiple sequence alignment coupled to a phylogenetic analysis reveals that certain enterobacteria exert evolutionary pressure on the lysine decarboxylase towards the cage-like assembly with RavA, implying that this complex may have an important function under particular stress conditions. PMID:27080013

  20. Suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses in mice exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid: Role of PPARa and T- and B-cell targeting

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Dosing information, body weights during exposure and immune system endpoints. This dataset is associated with the following publication:DeWitt, J., W. Williams , J. Creech, and R. Luebke. Suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses in mice exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid: Role of PPARalpha and T- and B-cell targeting. JOURNAL OF IMMUNOTOXICOLOGY. Taylor & Francis, Inc., Philadelphia, PA, USA, 13(1): 38-45, (2016).

  1. [Cloning, prokaryotic expression and characterization of lysine decarboxylase gene from Huperzia serrata].

    PubMed

    Di, Ci; Li, Jing; Tang, Yuntao; Peng, Qingzhong

    2014-08-01

    Huperzine A is a promising drug to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, its biosynthetic pathway is still unknown. Lysine decarboxylase (LDC) has been proposed to catalyze the first-step of the biosynthesis of huperzine A. To identify and characterize LDCs from Huperzia serrata, we isolated two LDC fragments (LDC1 and LDC2) from leaves of H. serrata by RT-PCR and then cloned them into pMD 19-T vector. Sequence analysis showed that LDC1 and LDC2 genes shared 95.3% identity and encoded the protein of 212 and 202 amino acid residues respectively. Thus, we ligated LDC genes into pET-32a(+) to obtain recombinant expressing vectors pET-32a(+)/LDC1 and pET-32a(+)/LDC2 respectively. We further introduced two expression vectors into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and cultured positive colonies of E. coli in liquid LB medium. After inducing for 4 hours with 260 μg/mL IPTG at 30 degrees C, soluble recombinant Trx-LDC1 and Trx-LDC2 were obtained and isolated for purification using a Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. We incubated purified recombinant proteins with L-lysine in the enzyme reaction buffer at 37 degrees C and then derived the reaction products using dansyl chloride. It was found that both Trx-LDC1 and Trx-LDC2 had decarboxylase activity, could convert L-lysine into cadaverine by way of thin layer chromatography assay. Further, bioinformatics analysis indicated that deduced LDC1 and LDC2 had different physicochemical properties, but similar secondary and three-dimensional structures.

  2. [One amino acid mutation in an anti-CD20 antibody fragment that affects the yield bacterial secretion and the affinity].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin-Xing; Xiong, Dong-Sheng; Fan, Dong-Mei; Shao, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Yuan-Fu; Zhu, Zhen-Ping; Yang, Chun-Zheng

    2003-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed against CD20, either unmodified or in radiolabeled forms, have been successfully exploited in clinic as effective therapeutic agents in the management of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. The antibody fragment is a potential agent in image and therapy of tumor. To further improve the soluble expression of anti-CD20 antibody Fab' fragment, PCR was used to mutate the anti-CD20 VL and VH genes and its biological activity was identified. The expression vector of chimeric antibody Fab' was constructed and expressed in E. coli. The data of mutant clone DNA sequence showed that the amino acid of light chain gene of the parent anti-CD20 antibody (H47) was successful mutated as Ser (GAG)-Asn (CAG). The soluble expression of mutated anti-CD20 Fab' (CD20-7) was 3.8 mg/g dry cell weight, while the parent (CD20-2) was 1.3 mg/g dry cell weight. The affinity constant Ka of CD20-7 was 2.2 x 10(9) L/mol. The primary results of competitive assays by FACS showed that CD20-7 could partially block the sites through which parent antibody (HI47) bind to Raji cells. There was difference in the Raji cells (CD20+)-binding activity between the mutant CD20-7 and parent CD20-2. The site mutation of anti-CD20 Fab' gene make it possible that the anti-CD20 antibody fragment was succeeded to obtain higher expression. In this thesis, we succeeded in completing mutation and expression of anti-CD20 Fab' genes, distinguishing its biological activity, and obtaining its highly expression. These period results will lay a foundation for development of other kind of anti-CD20 engineering antibody (for instance: Fab' Diabody and miniantibody), and make it possible for anti-CD20 antibody to be applied to tumor therapy in civil in the future.

  3. Cell biology, physiology and enzymology of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Di Bartolomeo, Francesca; Wagner, Ariane; Daum, Günther

    2017-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine is one of the most abundant phospholipids whose major amounts are formed by phosphatidylserine decarboxylases (PSD). Here we provide a comprehensive description of different types of PSDs in the different kingdoms of life. In eukaryotes, type I PSDs are mitochondrial enzymes, whereas other PSDs are localized to other cellular compartments. We describe the role of mitochondrial Psd1 proteins, their function, enzymology, biogenesis, assembly into mitochondria and their contribution to phospholipid homeostasis in much detail. We also discuss briefly the cellular physiology and the enzymology of Psd2. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipids of Mitochondria edited by Guenther Daum.

  4. Pantothenic acid biosynthesis in zymomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Luan; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Viitanen, Paul V.

    2014-07-01

    Zymomonas is unable to synthesize pantothenic acid and requires this essential vitamin in growth medium. Zymomonas strains transformed with an operon for expression of 2-dehydropantoate reductase and aspartate 1-decarboxylase were able to grow in medium lacking pantothenic acid. These strains may be used for ethanol production without pantothenic acid supplementation in seed culture and fermentation media.

  5. Six Amino Acid Residues in a 1200 Å2 Interface Mediate Binding of Factor VIII to an IgG4κ Inhibitory Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jasper C.; Ettinger, Ruth A.; Schuman, Jason T.; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Wamiq-Adhami, Muhammad; Nguyen, Phuong-Cac T.; Nakaya-Fletcher, Shelley M.; Puranik, Komal; Thompson, Arthur R.; Pratt, Kathleen P.

    2015-01-01

    The development of neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies complicates the treatment of many hemophilia A patients. The C-terminal C2 domain is a particularly antigenic FVIII region. A crystal structure of recombinant FVIII-C2 bound to an Fab fragment of the patient-derived monoclonal antibody BO2C11, which recognizes an immunodominant inhibitor epitope on FVIII and blocks its ability to bind von Willebrand factor (VWF) and phospholipids, revealed that 15 amino acids in FVIII contact this antibody. Forty-three recombinant FVIII-C2 proteins, each with a surface-exposed side chain mutated to alanine or another residue, were generated, and surface plasmon resonance studies were carried out to evaluate effects of these substitutions on BO2C11/FVIII-C2 binding affinity. Thermodynamic analysis of experiments carried out at three temperatures indicated that one beta hairpin turn at the antigen-antibody interface (FVIII-F2196, N2198, M2199 and F2200) plus two non-contiguous arginines (FVIII-R2215 and R2220), contributed appreciably to the affinity. B-domain-deleted (BDD) FVIII-F2196A, FVIII-F2196K and FVIII-M2199A were generated and characterized. Their pro-coagulant activities and binding to VWF were similar to those of WT-BDD-FVIII, and FVIII-F2196K avoided neutralization by BO2C11 and murine inhibitory mAb 1B5. This study suggests specific sites for amino acid substitutions to rationally design FVIII variants capable of evading immunodominant neutralizing anti-FVIII antibodies. PMID:25615825

  6. Treatment of idiopathic parkinsonism with L-dopa in the absence and presence of decarboxylase inhibitors: effects on plasma levels of L-dopa, dopa decarboxylase, catecholamines and 3-O-methyl-dopa.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, F; Meerwaldt, J D; Man in't Veld, A J; Hovestadt, A; Schalekamp, M A

    1989-05-01

    The effect of levodopa (L-dopa), alone or in combination with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor (PDI), on plasma levels of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase (ALAAD, = dopa decarboxylase), L-dopa, 3-O-methyl-dopa (3-OMD), dopamine (DA), noradrenaline, adrenaline and dopamine beta-hydroxylase has been studied. In healthy subjects and in patients with parkinsonism plasma ALAAD level fell after administration of L-dopa + benserazide, but returned to previous levels within 90 min. In a cross-sectional study blood was obtained, 2 h after dosing, from 104 patients with idiopathic parkinsonism, divided into four groups: no L-dopa treatment (group 1), L-dopa alone (group 2), L-dopa + benserazide (Madopar) (group 3) and L-dopa + carbidopa (Sinemet) (group 4). Plasma ALAAD, which was normal in groups 1 and 2, was increased 3-fold in groups 3 and 4, indicating that there was induction of ALAAD by the co-administration of PDI. Despite this induction of ALAAD, in groups 3 and 4, with half the daily L-dopa dose compared with group 2, plasma L-dopa and 3-OMD levels were 5 times higher, while plasma DA levels were not different. The DA/L-dopa ratio was decreased 5-fold in group 2 and 16-fold in groups 3 and 4 as compared with group 1. Neither 3-OMD levels nor 3-OMD/L-dopa ratios correlated with the occurrence of on-off fluctuations. In a longitudinal study of three patients started on Madopar treatment the induction of plasma ALAAD was found to occur gradually over 3-4 weeks. Further detailed pharmacokinetic studies in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are required in order to elucidate whether the ALAAD induction by PDI may be related to the loss of clinical efficacy of combination therapy in some patients and how it is related to end-of-dose deterioration and on-off phenomena.

  7. Functionally diverse biotin-dependent enzymes with oxaloacetate decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Lietzan, Adam D; St Maurice, Martin

    2014-02-15

    Biotin-dependent enzymes catalyze carboxylation, decarboxylation and transcarboxylation reactions that participate in the primary metabolism of a wide range of organisms. In all cases, the overall reaction proceeds via two half reactions that take place in physically distinct active sites. In the first half-reaction, a carboxyl group is transferred to the 1-N' of a covalently tethered biotin cofactor. The tethered carboxybiotin intermediate subsequently translocates to a second active site where the carboxyl group is either transferred to an acceptor substrate or, in some bacteria and archaea, is decarboxylated to biotin and CO2 in order to power the export of sodium ions from the cytoplasm. A homologous carboxyltransferase domain is found in three enzymes that catalyze diverse overall reactions: carbon fixation by pyruvate carboxylase, decarboxylation and sodium transport by the biotin-dependent oxaloacetate decarboxylase complex, and transcarboxylation by transcarboxylase from Propionibacterium shermanii. Over the past several years, structural data have emerged which have greatly advanced the mechanistic description of these enzymes. This review assembles a uniform description of the carboxyltransferase domain structure and catalytic mechanism from recent studies of pyruvate carboxylase, oxaloacetate decarboxylase and transcarboxylase, three enzymes that utilize an analogous carboxyltransferase domain to catalyze the biotin-dependent decarboxylation of oxaloacetate.

  8. Tyrosine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis: soluble expression and characterization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Ni, Ye

    2014-02-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC, EC 4.1.1.25) is an enzyme that catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-tyrosine to produce tyramine and CO2. In this study, a 1881-bp tdc gene from Lactobacillus brevis was cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). Glucose was discovered to play an important role in the soluble expression of rLbTDC. After optimization, recombinant TDC (rLbTDC) was achieved in excellent solubility and a yield of 224mg rLbTDC/L broth. The C-terminal His-Tagged rLbTDC was one-step purified with 90% recovery. Based on SDS-PAGE and gel filtration analysis, rLbTDC is a dimer composed of two identical subunits of approximately 70kDa. Using l-tyrosine as substrate, the specific activity of rLbTDC was determined to be 133.5U/mg in the presence of 0.2mM pyridoxal-5'-phosphate at 40°C and pH 5.0. The Km and Vmax values of rLbTDC were 0.59mM and 147.1μmolmin(-1)mg(-1), respectively. In addition to l-tyrosine, rLbTDC also exhibited decarboxylase activity towards l-DOPA. This study has demonstrated, for the first time, the soluble expression of tdc gene from L. brevis in heterologous host.

  9. Crystal structure of pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae

    PubMed Central

    Buddrus, Lisa; Andrews, Emma S. V.; Leak, David J.; Danson, Michael J.; Arcus, Vickery L.; Crennell, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) is a thiamine pyrophosphate- and Mg2+ ion-dependent enzyme that catalyses the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. It is rare in bacteria, but is a key enzyme in homofermentative metabolism, where ethanol is the major product. Here, the previously unreported crystal structure of the bacterial pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae is presented. The crystals were shown to diffract to 2.15 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 204.56, b = 177.39, c = 244.55 Å and R r.i.m. = 0.175 (0.714 in the highest resolution bin). The structure was solved by molecular replacement using PDB entry 2vbi as a model and the final R values were R work = 0.186 (0.271 in the highest resolution bin) and R free = 0.220 (0.300 in the highest resolution bin). Each of the six tetramers is a dimer of dimers, with each monomer sharing its thiamine pyrophosphate across the dimer interface, and some contain ethylene glycol mimicking the substrate pyruvate in the active site. Comparison with other bacterial PDCs shows a correlation of higher thermostability with greater tetramer interface area and number of interactions. PMID:27599861

  10. Effects of immunization with natural and recombinant lysine decarboxylase on canine gingivitis development.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jennifer L; DeMars, Paul L; Collins, Lindsay M; Stoner, Julie A; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Komori, Naoka; Singh, Anil; Feasley, Christa L; Haddock, James A; Levine, Martin

    2012-10-19

    Periodontal disease, gingival inflammation (gingivitis) and periodontal attachment loss (periodontitis), causes tooth loss and susceptibility to chronic inflammation. Professionally scaling and cleaning the teeth regularly controls the disease, but is expensive in companion animals. Eikenella corrodens is common in canine oral cavities where it is a source of lysine decarboxylase (LDC). In human dental biofilms (plaques), LDC converts lysine to cadaverine and impairs the gingival epithelial barrier to bacteria. LDC vaccination may therefore retard gingivitis development. Year-old beagle dogs provided blood samples, and had weight and clinical measurements (biofilm and gingivitis) recorded. After scaling and cleaning, two dogs were immunized subcutaneously with 0.2mg native LDC from E. corrodens and 2 sets of four dogs with 0.2mg recombinant LDC purified from Escherichia coli. A third set of 4 dogs was immunized intranasally. Rehydragel(®), Emulsigen(®), Polygen™ or Carbigen™ were used as adjuvant. Four additional pairs of dogs were sham-immunized with each adjuvant alone (controls). Immunizations were repeated twice, 3 weeks apart, and clinical measurements were obtained after another 2 weeks, when the teeth were scaled and cleaned again. Tooth brushing was then stopped and the diet was changed from hard to soft chow. Clinical measurements were repeated after 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. Compared with sham-immunized dogs, gingivitis was reduced over all 8 weeks of soft diet after subcutaneous immunization with native LDC, or after intranasal immunization with recombinant LDC in Carbigen™, but for only 6 of the 8 weeks after subcutaneous immunization with recombinant LDC in Emulsigen(®) (repeated measures ANOVA). Subcutaneous vaccination induced a strong serum IgG antibody response that decreased during the soft diet period, whereas intranasal immunization induced a weak serum IgA antibody response that did not decrease. Immunization with recombinant LDC may

  11. Cancer Cell Targeting Using Folic Acid/Anti-HER2 Antibody Conjugated Fluorescent CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpal; Kumar, Manoj; Soni, Udit; Arora, Vikas; Bansal, Vivek; Gupta, Dikshi; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Sapra, Sameer; Singh, Harpal

    2015-12-01

    CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique and direct aqueous synthesis respectively using thiol stabilizers. Synthesized CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe QDs stabilized with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) were used as fluorescent labels after conjugation with folic acid (FA) and anti-HER2 antibodies. Photoluminescence quantum yield of folated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA QDs was 59% and 77% than that of non-folated hydrophilic QDs. The folate receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid-conjugated CdTe-MSA and CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs showed higher cellular internalization as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopic studies. Folated and non-folated CdTe-MSA QDs were highly toxic and exhibited only 10% cell viability as compared to > 80% cell viability with CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs over the concentration ranging from 3.38 to 50 pmoles. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results of human breast cancer tissue samples showed positive results with anti-HER2 antibody conjugated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs with better sensitivity and specificity as compared to conventional IHC analysis using diaminobenzedene staining.

  12. Antibody immobilization on poly(L-lactic acid) nanofibers advantageously carried out by means of a non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolci, L. S.; Liguori, A.; Merlettini, A.; Calzà, L.; Castellucci, M.; Gherardi, M.; Colombo, V.; Focarete, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the comparison between a conventional wet-chemical method and a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma process for the conjugation of biomolecules on the surface of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun fibers is reported. Physico-chemical and morphological characteristics of chemically and plasma functionalized mats are studied and compared with those of pristine mats. The efficiency in biomolecules immobilization is assessed by the covalent conjugation of an antibody (anti-CD10) on the functionalized PLLA fibers. The achieved results highlight that the proposed plasma process enables antibodies to be successfully immobilized on the surface of PLLA fibers, demonstrating that non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma can be an effective, highly flexible and environmentally friendly alternative to the still widely employed wet-chemical methods for the conjugation of biomolecules onto biomaterials.

  13. Characterization of antibody responses to endogenous and exogenous antigen in the nonobese diabetic mouse.

    PubMed

    Koczwara, Kerstin; Schenker, Mike; Schmid, Sandra; Kredel, Katharina; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2003-02-01

    It is suggested that a T-helper cell 2 (Th2) shift and Th2 spreading of autoimmunity following immunization with beta-cell antigen causes diabetes protection. To address this, antibody titer and subclass to insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)65, IA-2, and IA-2beta proteins were measured by radiobinding assays in untreated or immunized female nonobese diabetic mice. Untreated nonobese diabetic mice developed autoantibodies to insulin (IAA), but not GAD or IA-2/IA-2beta, and IAA-positive mice had increased diabetes risk (P < 0.001). IAA were IgG1 and IgG2b. In immunized mice, IgG1 and lesser IgG2b insulin antibodies were promoted by subcutaneous injection of insulin plus incomplete Freund's adjuvant, insulin plus Montanide ISA 720, and glucagon plus incomplete Freund's adjuvant, but not by incomplete Freund's adjuvant plus GAD65, IA-2beta, or phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, or adjuvant alone. Diabetes incidence was significantly reduced in immunized groups with elevated insulin antibody (IA) responses. Spreading of antibody responses to GAD or IA-2/IA-2beta following immunization was rare, and antibody epitope spreading was only detected in IA-2beta immunized mice. Humoral autoimmunity in nonobese diabetic mice is, therefore, limited to IAA with Th2 subclass phenotype and is associated with increased diabetes risk. This contrasts the diabetes protection provided by immunization protocols that promote this response and suggests that Th2 immunity may not be the principal regulator of beta-cell destruction in autoimmune diabetes.

  14. The Type-Specific Neutralizing Antibody Response Elicited by a Dengue Vaccine Candidate Is Focused on Two Amino Acids of the Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    VanBlargan, Laura A.; Mukherjee, Swati; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Durbin, Anna P.; Whitehead, Stephen S.; Pierson, Theodore C.

    2013-01-01

    Dengue viruses are mosquito-borne flaviviruses that circulate in nature as four distinct serotypes (DENV1-4). These emerging pathogens are responsible for more than 100 million human infections annually. Severe clinical manifestations of disease are predominantly associated with a secondary infection by a heterotypic DENV serotype. The increased risk of severe disease in DENV-sensitized populations significantly complicates vaccine development, as a vaccine must simultaneously confer protection against all four DENV serotypes. Eliciting a protective tetravalent neutralizing antibody response is a major goal of ongoing vaccine development efforts. However, a recent large clinical trial of a candidate live-attenuated DENV vaccine revealed low protective efficacy despite eliciting a neutralizing antibody response, highlighting the need for a better understanding of the humoral immune response against dengue infection. In this study, we sought to identify epitopes recognized by serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies elicited by monovalent DENV1 vaccination. We constructed a panel of over 50 DENV1 structural gene variants containing substitutions at surface-accessible residues of the envelope (E) protein to match the corresponding DENV2 sequence. Amino acids that contribute to recognition by serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies were identified as DENV mutants with reduced sensitivity to neutralization by DENV1 immune sera, but not cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies elicited by DENV2 vaccination. We identified two mutations (E126K and E157K) that contribute significantly to type-specific recognition by polyclonal DENV1 immune sera. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis of sera from 24 participants of a phase I clinical study revealed a markedly reduced capacity to neutralize a E126K/E157K DENV1 variant. Sera from 77% of subjects recognized the E126K/E157K DENV1 variant and DENV2 equivalently (<3-fold difference). These data indicate the type

  15. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  16. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  17. Tyrosine decarboxylase activity of Lactobacillus brevis IOEB 9809 isolated from wine and L. brevis ATCC 367.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Arribas, V; Lonvaud-Funel, A

    1999-11-01

    Tyramine, a frequent amine in wines, is produced from tyrosine by the tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC) activity of bacteria. The tyramine-producing strain Lactobacillus brevis IOEB 9809 isolated from wine and the reference strain L. brevis ATCC 367 were studied. At the optimum pH, 5.0, K(m) values of IOEB 9809 and ATCC 367 crude extracts for L-tyrosine were 0.58 mM and 0.67 mM, and V(max) was higher for the wine strain (115 U) than the ATCC 367 (66 U). TDC exhibited a preference for L-tyrosine over L-DOPA as substrate. Enzyme activity was pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent and it was stabilized by the substrate and coenzyme. In contrast, glycerol and beta-mercaptoethanol strongly inhibited TDC. Tyramine competitively inhibited TDC for both strains. Citric acid, lactic acid and ethanol had an inhibitory effect on cells and crude extracts, but none could inhibit TDC at the usual concentrations in wines.

  18. Functional and conformational transitions of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from Bacopa monniera.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, Shakeel; Patel, Krunal; Khan, Bashir; Bhosale, Siddharth; Gaikwad, Sushama

    2016-02-01

    Functional and conformational transitions of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), a key enzyme of mevalonate pathway in isoprenoid biosynthesis, from Bacopa monniera (BmMDD), cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli were studied under thermal, chemical and pH-mediated denaturation conditions using fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopy. Native BmMDD is a helix dominant structure with 45% helix and 11% sheets and possesses seven tryptophan residues with two residues exposed on surface, three residues partially exposed and two situated in the interior of the protein. Thermal denaturation of BmMDD causes rapid structural transitions at and above 40°C and transient exposure of hydrophobic residues at 50°C, leading to aggregation of the protein. An acid induced molten globule like structure was observed at pH 4, exhibiting altered but compact secondary structure, distorted tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule displayed different response at higher temperature and similar response to chemical denaturation as compared to the native protein. The surface tryptophans have predominantly positively charged amino acids around them, as indicated by higher KSV for KI as compared to that for CsCl. The native enzyme displayed two different lifetimes, τ1 (1.203±0.036 ns) and τ2 (3.473±0.12 ns) indicating two populations of tryptophan.

  19. The bifunctional pyruvate decarboxylase/pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Thermococcus guaymasensis.

    PubMed

    Eram, Mohammad S; Oduaran, Erica; Ma, Kesen

    2014-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis produces ethanol as a metabolic end product, and an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) catalyzing the reduction of acetaldehyde to ethanol has been purified and characterized. However, the enzyme catalyzing the formation of acetaldehyde has not been identified. In this study an enzyme catalyzing the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate was purified and characterized from T. guaymasensis under strictly anaerobic conditions. The enzyme had both pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activities. It was oxygen sensitive, and the optimal temperatures were 85°C and >95°C for the PDC and POR activities, respectively. The purified enzyme had activities of 3.8 ± 0.22 U mg(-1) and 20.2 ± 1.8 U mg(-1), with optimal pH-values of 9.5 and 8.4 for each activity, respectively. Coenzyme A was essential for both activities, although it did not serve as a substrate for the former. Enzyme kinetic parameters were determined separately for each activity. The purified enzyme was a heterotetramer. The sequences of the genes encoding the subunits of the bifunctional PDC/POR were determined. It is predicted that all hyperthermophilic β -keto acids ferredoxin oxidoreductases are bifunctional, catalyzing the activities of nonoxidative and oxidative decarboxylation of the corresponding β -keto acids.

  20. Expanding the active pH range of Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase by breaking the cooperativeness.

    PubMed

    Thu Ho, Ngoc Anh; Hou, Chen Yuan; Kim, Woo Hyun; Kang, Taek Jin

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) transforms glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the consumption of a proton. The enzyme is active under acidic environments only and sharply loses its activity as pH approaches neutrality with concomitant structural deformation. In an attempt to understand better the role of this cooperative loss of activity upon pH shifts, we prepared and studied a series of GAD site-specific mutants. In this report, we show that the cooperativeness was kept intact by at least two residues, Glu89 and His465, of which Glu89 is newly identified to be involved in the cooperativity system of GAD. Double mutation on these residues not only broke the cooperativity in the activity change but also yielded a mutant GAD that retained the activity at neutral pH. The resulting mutant GAD that was active at neutral pH inhibited the cell growth in a glycerol medium by converting intracellular Glu into GABA in an uncontrolled manner, which explains in part why the cooperativeness of GAD has to be kept by several layers of safety keepers. This unexpected result might be utilized to convert a low-valued by-product of biodiesel production, glycerol, into value-added product, GABA.

  1. Characterization of acidic and basic variants of IgG1 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies based on non-denaturing IEF fractionation.

    PubMed

    Dada, Oluwatosin O; Jaya, Nomalie; Valliere-Douglass, John; Salas-Solano, Oscar

    2015-08-20

    Characterization of both the acidic and basic regions of imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (icIEF) profile of an IgG1 antibody was achieved through preparative immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing (IPG-IEF) fractionation. Recent attempts at using this method to fractionate charge variants of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have shown promising results, but identification of the chemical modifications in the variants was limited to the basic species. We have optimized the method to achieve enrichment of each variant across the icIEF profile of an IgG1 mAb. The fractionation was followed by extended characterization to elucidate the composition of the acidic, main, and basic species observed in the icIEF profile. Deamidation, sialylation, glycation, and fragmentation were identified as the main modifications contributing to acidic variants of the mAb while C-terminal lysine, C-terminal proline amidation, and uncyclized N-terminal glutamine were the major species contributing to the basic variants. This characterization allows a better understanding of the modifications that contribute to the charge variants observed by icIEF, facilitating the evaluation of impacts on product safety and efficacy.

  2. Levodopa combined with peripheral decarboxylase inhibition in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Barbeau, André; Mars, Harold; Botez, Mihai I.; Joubert, Marie

    1972-01-01

    The authors report their experience, over a 26-month period, in the management of 60 parkinsonian patients with the combination of levodopa and an inhibitor of peripheral dopa-decarboxylase, Ro 4-4602. This approach to Parkinson's disease is useful, safe, and at least as effective as levodopa alone. To date there have been no recognizable toxic effects attributable to Ro 4-4602. This agent appears to prolong the duration of action of levodopa, smoothing out its therapeutic effects. The percentage of patients obtaining a very good and excellent response is slightly increased. There is a possible diminution in the late-occurring bradykinetic and hypotonic freezing episodes. Nausea and cardiac arrhythmias are lessened, as are the incidence and severity of hypotension. Abnormal involuntary movements remain the limiting adverse side effect. PMID:5034697

  3. An endosymbiont positively modulates ornithine decarboxylase in host trypanosomatids

    SciTech Connect

    Frossard, Mariana Lins; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Matta, Renato Augusto da; Souza, Wanderley de; Garcia de Mello, Fernando; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado . E-mail: motta@biof.ufrj.br

    2006-05-05

    Summary: Some trypanosomatids, such as Crithidia deanei, are endosymbiont-containing species. Aposymbiotic strains are obtained after antibiotic treatment, revealing interesting aspects of this symbiotic association. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) promotes polyamine biosynthesis and contributes to cell proliferation. Here, we show that ODC activity is higher in endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids than in aposymbiotic cells, but isolated endosymbionts did not display this enzyme activity. Intriguingly, expressed levels of ODC were similar in both strains, suggesting that ODC is positively modulated in endosymbiont-bearing cells. When the aposymbiotic strain was grown in conditioned medium, obtained after cultivation of the endosymbiont-bearing strain, cellular proliferation as well as ODC activity and localization were similar to that observed in the endosymbiont-containing trypanosomatids. Furthermore, dialyzed-heated medium and trypsin treatment reduced ODC activity of the aposymbiont strain. Taken together, these data indicate that the endosymbiont can enhance the protozoan ODC activity by providing factors of protein nature, which increase the host polyamine metabolism.

  4. Altered subcellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase in Alzheimer's disease brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Tatjana . E-mail: Tatjana.Nilsson@ki.se; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Volkman, Inga; Winblad, Bengt; Folkesson, Ronnie; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2006-06-02

    The amyloid precursor protein can through ligand-mimicking induce expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. We report here the regional distribution and cellular localization of ODC immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. In frontal cortex and hippocampus of control cases, the most pronounced ODC immunoreactivity was found in the nucleus. In possible and definite AD the immunoreactivity had shifted to the cytoplasm. In cerebellum of control cases, ODC staining was found in a small portion of Purkinje cells, mostly in the nucleus. In AD, both possible and definite, the number of stained Purkinje cells increased significantly and immunoreactivity was shifted to the cytoplasm, even though it was still prominent in the nucleus. In conclusion, our study reveals an early shift of the ODC immunoreactivity in AD from the nuclear compartment towards the cytoplasm.

  5. In vitro translation of the upstream open reading frame in the mammalian mRNA encoding S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Raney, A; Baron, A C; Mize, G J; Law, G L; Morris, D R

    2000-08-11

    The upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the mRNA encoding S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase is a polyamine-responsive element that suppresses translation of the associated downstream cistron in vivo. In this paper, we provide the first direct evidence of peptide synthesis from the S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase uORF using an in vitro translation system. We examine both the influence of cation concentration on peptide synthesis and the effect of altering the uORF sequence on peptide synthesis. Synthesis of wild type and altered peptides was similar at all concentrations of magnesium tested. In contrast, synthesis of the wild type peptide was more sensitive than that of altered peptides to elevated concentrations of the naturally occurring polyamines, spermidine and spermine, as well as several polyamine analogs. The sensitivity of in vitro synthesis to spermidine was influenced by both the amino acid sequence and the length of the peptide product of the uORF. Findings from the present study correlate with the effects of the uORF and polyamines on translation of a downstream cistron in vivo and support the hypothesis that polyamines and the structure of the nascent peptide create a rate-limiting step in uORF translation, perhaps through a ribosome stalling mechanism.

  6. Mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene: cloning, structure, and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Brabant, M; McConlogue, L; van Daalen Wetters, T; Coffino, P

    1988-01-01

    We used molecular cloning to isolate a functional gene for mouse ornithine decarboxylase (OrnDCase; L-ornithine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.17) from a cell line in which that gene had been selectively amplified. The position of the 5' terminus of the mRNA was identified, and the coding sequence was shown to be preceded by a 312- or 313-nucleotide (nt) untranslated leader. The latter is highly G + C rich, particularly in its 5'-most portion. The leader can be anticipated to have extensive and stable secondary structure. The transcription unit of the gene is of relatively small size, approximately equal to 6.2 kilobases (kb) from the start site to the proximal site of polyadenylylation. Sequence analysis of DNA near the transcription start position demonstrated the presence of a "TATA" box, but no "CAAT" box. Functional properties of the cloned gene were tested by transfecting it into cultured cells. Expression of the putative full-length gene efficiently conferred ornithine decarboxylase activity on recipient mutant cells deficient in that activity. To assess the function and strength of the OrnDCase promoter region and to delimit its boundaries, we used a transient expression assay. Upstream of a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was placed a portion of the OrnDCase gene, including the presumed promoter region, spanning a region from approximately equal to 3.0 kb 5' of the site of transcription initiation to the first 250 nt of the transcript. When expressed in mouse NIH 3T3 cells, this OrnDCase genomic element was comparable in strength to the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat promoter. A similar construct, truncated so as to retain only 264 base pairs of the OrnDCase gene 5' to the site of transcription start, yielded undiminished levels of expression. Images PMID:3353375

  7. Antibodies to the GABAB receptor in limbic encephalitis with seizures: case series and characterisation of the antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Eric; Lai, Meizan; Peng, Xiaoyu; Hughes, Ethan; Constantinescu, Radu; Raizer, Jeffrey; Friedman, Daniel; Skeen, Mark B; Grisold, Wolfgang; Kimura, Akio; Ohta, Kouichi; Iizuka, Takahiro; Guzman, Miguel; Graus, Francesc; Moss, Stephen J; Balice-Gordon, Rita; Dalmau, Josep

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Some encephalitides or seizure disorders once thought idiopathic now seem to be immune mediated. We aimed to describe the clinical features of one such disorder and to identify the autoantigen involved. Methods 15 patients who were suspected to have paraneoplastic or immune-mediated limbic encephalitis were clinically assessed. Confocal microscopy, immunoprecipitation, and mass spectrometry were used to characterise the autoantigen. An assay of HEK293 cells transfected with rodent GABAB1 or GABAB2 receptor subunits was used as a serological test. 91 patients with encephalitis suspected to be paraneoplastic or immune mediated and 13 individuals with syndromes associated with antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 were used as controls. Findings All patients presented with early or prominent seizures; other symptoms, MRI, and electroencephalography findings were consistent with predominant limbic dysfunction. All patients had antibodies (mainly IgG1) against a neuronal cell-surface antigen; in three patients antibodies were detected only in CSF. Immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry showed that the antibodies recognise the B1 subunit of the GABAB receptor, an inhibitory receptor that has been associated with seizures and memory dysfunction when disrupted. Confocal microscopy showed colocalisation of the antibody with GABAB receptors. Seven of 15 patients had tumours, five of which were small-cell lung cancer, and seven patients had non-neuronal autoantibodies. Although nine of ten patients who received immunotherapy and cancer treatment (when a tumour was found) showed neurological improvement, none of the four patients who were not similarly treated improved (p=0.005). Low levels of GABAB1 receptor antibodies were identified in two of 104 controls (p<0.0001). Interpretation GABAB receptor autoimmune encephalitis is a potentially treatable disorder characterised by seizures and, in some patients, associated with small-cell lung cancer and

  8. Cloning and sequencing of two Ceriporiopsis subvermispora bicupin oxalate oxidase allelic isoforms: implications for the reaction specificity of oxalate oxidases and decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Escutia, Marta R; Bowater, Laura; Edwards, Anne; Bottrill, Andrew R; Burrell, Matthew R; Polanco, Rubén; Vicuña, Rafael; Bornemann, Stephen

    2005-07-01

    Oxalate oxidase is thought to be involved in the production of hydrogen peroxide for lignin degradation by the dikaryotic white rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. This enzyme was purified, and after digestion with trypsin, peptide fragments of the enzyme were sequenced using quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Starting with degenerate primers based on the peptide sequences, two genes encoding isoforms of the enzyme were cloned, sequenced, and shown to be allelic. Both genes contained 14 introns. The sequences of the isoforms revealed that they were both bicupins that unexpectedly shared the greatest similarity to microbial bicupin oxalate decarboxylases rather than monocupin plant oxalate oxidases (also known as germins). We have shown that both fungal isoforms, one of which was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, are indeed oxalate oxidases that possess < or =0.2% oxalate decarboxylase activity and that the organism is capable of rapidly degrading exogenously supplied oxalate. They are therefore the first bicupin oxalate oxidases to have been described. Heterologous expression of active enzyme was dependent on the addition of manganese salts to the growth medium. Molecular modeling provides new and independent evidence for the identity of the catalytic site and the key amino acid involved in defining the reaction specificities of oxalate oxidases and oxalate decarboxylases.

  9. Clinical immunogenicity of the d-amino acid peptide therapeutic etelcalcetide: Method development challenges and anti-drug antibody clinical impact assessments.

    PubMed

    Kroenke, Mark A; Weeraratne, Dohan K; Deng, Hongjie; Sloey, Bethlyn; Subramanian, Raju; Wu, Benjamin; Serenko, Michael; Hock, M Benjamin

    2017-03-06

    The immunogenicity risk assessment and bioanalytical strategy for novel therapeutics should account for both unique biophysical properties and potential consequences of immunogenicity. When assessing the immunogenicity risk of etelcalcetide, a peptide agonist of the calcium-sensing receptor, we considered the potential that the d-amino acid 'backbone' and biotransformation of etelcalcetide could allow the drug to act as a hapten. As a consequence, we validated and implemented a surface plasmon resonance immunoassay platform with both etelcalcetide and etelcalcetide-'carrier' surfaces to detect anti-drug antibodies (ADA). No evidence of in-vitro neutralizing activity with surrogate controls was detected despite multiple immunization approaches and a sensitive cell-based activity assay. Therefore, a neutralizing assay was not implemented for clinical support. We conducted an integrated analysis of immunogenicity data pooled from two pivotal placebo-controlled trials to define the clinical impact of anti-etelcalcetide antibodies. While both pre-existing and developing anti-etelcalcetide antibodies were detected, we show here that they have no consequences for clinical exposure, efficacy, or safety of etelcalcetide.

  10. Amino acid sequence diversity within the family of antibodies bearing the major antiarsonate cross-reactive idiotype of the A strain mouse

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    VH region amino acid sequences are described for five A/J anti-p- azophenylarsonate (anti-Ars) hybridoma antibodies for which the VL region sequences have previously been determined, thus completing the V domain sequences of these molecules. These antibodies all belong to the family designated Ars-A which bears the major anti-arsonate cross- reactive idiotype (CRI) of the A strain mouse. However, they differ in the degree to which they express the CRI in standard competition radioimmunoassays. Although the sequences are closely related, all are different from each other. Replacements are distributed throughout the VH region and occur in positions of the chain encoded by all three gene segments, VH, DH, and JH. It is likely that somatic diversification processes play a dominant role in producing the sequence variability in each of these segments. The number of differences from the sequence encoded by the germline is smallest for antibodies that express the CRI most strongly, suggesting that somatic diversification is responsible for loss of the CRI in members of the Ars-A antibody family. There is an unusual degree of clustering of differences in both CDR2 and CDR3 and many of the substitutions are located in "hot spots" of variation. The large number of differences between the chains prohibits the unambiguous identification of positions at which alterations play a major role in reducing the expression of the CRI. However, the data suggest that the loss of the CRI is associated with a definable repertoire of somatic changes at a restricted number of highly variable sites. PMID:6415209

  11. Production of site-specific antibody-drug conjugates using optimized non-natural amino acids in a cell-free expression system.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Erik S; Heibeck, Tyler H; Gill, Avinash; Li, Xiaofan; Murray, Christopher J; Madlansacay, Mary Rose; Tran, Cuong; Uter, Nathan T; Yin, Gang; Rivers, Patrick J; Yam, Alice Y; Wang, Willie D; Steiner, Alexander R; Bajad, Sunil U; Penta, Kalyani; Yang, Wenjin; Hallam, Trevor J; Thanos, Christopher D; Sato, Aaron K

    2014-02-19

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are a targeted chemotherapeutic currently at the cutting edge of oncology medicine. These hybrid molecules consist of a tumor antigen-specific antibody coupled to a chemotherapeutic small molecule. Through targeted delivery of potent cytotoxins, ADCs exhibit improved therapeutic index and enhanced efficacy relative to traditional chemotherapies and monoclonal antibody therapies. The currently FDA-approved ADCs, Kadcyla (Immunogen/Roche) and Adcetris (Seattle Genetics), are produced by conjugation to surface-exposed lysines, or partial disulfide reduction and conjugation to free cysteines, respectively. These stochastic modes of conjugation lead to heterogeneous drug products with varied numbers of drugs conjugated across several possible sites. As a consequence, the field has limited understanding of the relationships between the site and extent of drug loading and ADC attributes such as efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity. A robust platform for rapid production of ADCs with defined and uniform sites of drug conjugation would enable such studies. We have established a cell-free protein expression system for production of antibody drug conjugates through site-specific incorporation of the optimized non-natural amino acid, para-azidomethyl-l-phenylalanine (pAMF). By using our cell-free protein synthesis platform to directly screen a library of aaRS variants, we have discovered a novel variant of the Methanococcus jannaschii tyrosyl tRNA synthetase (TyrRS), with a high activity and specificity toward pAMF. We demonstrate that site-specific incorporation of pAMF facilitates near complete conjugation of a DBCO-PEG-monomethyl auristatin (DBCO-PEG-MMAF) drug to the tumor-specific, Her2-binding IgG Trastuzumab using strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) copper-free click chemistry. The resultant ADCs proved highly potent in in vitro cell cytotoxicity assays.

  12. A Liquid-Based Colorimetric Assay of Lysine Decarboxylase and Its Application to Enzymatic Assay.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Hyun; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Kim, Hyun Joong; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Seo, Hyung-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Song, Hun-Seok; Kim, Yun-Gon; Park, Kyungmoon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2015-12-28

    A liquid-based colorimetric assay using a pH indicator was introduced for high-throughput monitoring of lysine decarboxylase activity. The assay is based on the color change of bromocresol purple, measured at 595 nm in liquid reaction mixture, due to an increase of pH by the production of cadaverine. Bromocresol purple was selected as the indicator because it has higher sensitivity than bromothymol blue and pheonol red within a broad range and shows good linearity within the applied pH. We applied this for simple determination of lysine decarboxylase reusability using 96-well plates, and optimization of conditions for enzyme overexpression with different concentrations of IPTG on lysine decarboxylase. This assay is expected to be applied for monitoring and quantifying the liquid-based enzyme reaction in biotransformation of decarboxylase in a high-throughput way.

  13. Antibody-based donor-acceptor spatial reconfiguration in decorated lanthanide-doped nanoparticle colloids for the quantification of okadaic acid biotoxin.

    PubMed

    Stipić, Filip; Burić, Petra; Jakšić, Željko; Pletikapić, Galja; Dutour Sikirić, Maja; Zgrablić, Goran; Frkanec, Leo; Lyons, Daniel M

    2015-11-01

    With the increasing movement away from the mouse bioassay for the detection of toxins in commercially harvested shellfish, there is a growing demand for the development of new and potentially field-deployable tests in its place. In this direction we report the development of a simple and sensitive nanoparticle-based luminescence technique for the detection of the marine biotoxin okadaic acid. Photoluminescent lanthanide nanoparticles were conjugated with fluorophore-labelled anti-okadaic acid antibodies which, upon binding to okadaic acid, gave rise to luminescence resonance energy transfer from the nanoparticle to the organic fluorophore dye deriving from a reduction in distance between the two. The intensity ratio of the fluorophore: nanoparticle emission peaks was found to correlate with okadaic acid concentration, and the sensor showed a linear response in the 0.37-3.97 μM okadaic acid range with a limit of detection of 0.25 μM. This work may have important implications for the development of new, cheap, and versatile biosensors for a range of biomolecules and that are sufficiently simple to be applied in the field or at point-of-care.

  14. Gene expression of ornithine decarboxylase, cyclooxygenase-2, and gastrin in atrophic gastric mucosa infected with Helicobacter pylori before and after eradication therapy.

    PubMed

    Konturek, Peter C; Rembiasz, Kazimierz; Konturek, Stanislaw J; Stachura, Jerzy; Bielanski, Wladyslaw; Galuschka, K; Karcz, Danuta; Hahn, Eckhart G

    2003-01-01

    H. pylori (Hp) -induced atrophic gastritis is a well-known risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Whether Hp eradication can prevent or retard the progress of atrophy and metaplasia has been the topic of numerous studies but the subject remains controversial. Recently, the increased expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), gastrin and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 has been shown to be increased in premalignant lesions in gastric mucosa and to play an essential role in the malignant transformation. The aim of the study is to assess the effect of eradication therapy on atrophic gastritis and analyze the gene expression for ODC, COX-2 and gastrin in gastric mucosa after succesful eradication in patients with atrophic gastritis. Twenty patients with chronic atrophic gastritis including both corpus and antrum of the stomach were included in this study. Four antral mucosal biopsy specimens were obtained from antrum and four from corpus. The histopathologic evaluation of gastritis was based on Sydney classification of gastritis. All patients were Hp positive based on the [13C] urea breath test (UBT) and the presence of anti-Hp IgG and anti-CagA-antibodies detected by ELISA. The patients were then eradicated with triple therapy consiting of omeprazol (2 x 20 mg), amoxycillin (2 x 1 g) and clarithromycin (2 x 500 mg) for seven days and vitamin C 1 g/day for three months. In gastric mucosal samples obtained from the antrum and corpus before and after eradication, the mRNA expression for ODC, COX-2, and gastrin was assessed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In all patients the gastric secretory analysis was performed by measuring gastric acid output and serum gastrin levels. After triple therapy the successful eradication assessed by UBT was observed in 95% of patients. In 45% of patients the infection with CagA-positive Hp strain was observed. Three months after eradication a significant reduction in the gastric activity (neutrophilic

  15. Single-chain site-specific mutations of fluorescein-amino acid contact residues in high affinity monoclonal antibody 4-4-20.

    PubMed

    Denzin, L K; Whitlow, M; Voss, E W

    1991-07-25

    Previous crystallographic studies of high affinity anti-fluorescein monoclonal antibody 4-4-20 (Ka = 1.7 x 10(10) M-1) complexed with fluorescyl ligand resolved active site contact residues involved in binding. For better definition of the relative roles of three light chain antigen contact residues (L27dhis, L32tyr and L34arg), four site-specific mutations (L27dhis to L27lys, L32tyr to L32phe, and L34arg to L34lys and L34his) were generated and expressed in single-chain antigen binding derivatives of monoclonal antibody 4-4-20 containing two different polypeptide linkers (SCA 4-4-20/205c, 25 amino acids and SCA 4-4-20/212, 14 amino acids). Results showed that L27dhis and L32tyr were necessary for wild type binding affinities, however, were not required for near-wild type Qmax values (where Qmax is the maximum fluoroscein fluorescence quenching expressed as percent). Tyrosine L32 which hydrogen bonds with ligand was also characterized at the haptenic level through the use of 9-hydroxyphenylfluoron which lacks the carboxyl group to which L32 tyrosine forms a hydrogen bond. Results demonstrated that wild type SCA and mutant L32phe possessed similar HPF binding characteristics. Active site contact residue L34arg was important for fluorescein quenching maxima and binding affinity (L34his mutant), however, substitution of lysine for arginine at L34 did not have a significant effect on observed Qmax value. In addition, substitutions had no effect on structural and topological characteristics, since all mutants retained similar idiotypic and metatypic properties. Finally, two linkers were comparatively examined to determine relative contributions to mutant binding properties and stability. No linker effects were observed. Collectively, these results verified the importance of these light chain fluorescein contact residues in the binding pocket of monoclonal antibody 4-4-20.

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies against Pectin

    PubMed Central

    Liners, Françoise; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Didembourg, Christian; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize a conformation of homopolygalacturonic acid (pectic acid) induced by an optimum concentration of calcium and sodium of about 1 and 150 millinormal, respectively. The epitope recognized is probably part of the dimers of pectin chains associated according to the `egg box' model. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667195

  17. Resistance to neutralization by broadly reactive antibodies to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 glycoprotein conferred by a gp41 amino acid change.

    PubMed Central

    Thali, M; Charles, M; Furman, C; Cavacini, L; Posner, M; Robinson, J; Sodroski, J

    1994-01-01

    A neutralization-resistant variant of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that emerged during in vitro propagation of the virus in the presence of neutralizing serum from an infected individual has been described. A threonine-for-alanine substitution at position 582 in the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein of the variant virus was responsible for the neutralization-resistant phenotype (M.S. Reitz, Jr., C. Wilson, C. Naugle, R. C. Gallo, and M. Robert-Guroff, Cell 54:57-63, 1988). The mutant virus also exhibited reduced sensitivity to neutralization by 30% of HIV-1-positive sera that neutralized the parental virus, suggesting that a significant fraction of the neutralizing activity within these sera can be affected by the amino acid change in gp41 (C. Wilson, M. S. Reitz, Jr., K. Aldrich, P. J. Klasse, J. Blomberg, R. C. Gallo, and M. Robert-Guroff, J. Virol. 64:3240-3248, 1990). It is shown here that the change of alanine 582 to threonine specifically confers resistance to neutralizing by antibodies directed against both groups of discontinuous, conserved epitopes related to the CD4 binding site on the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein. Only minor differences in binding of these antibodies to wild-type and mutant envelope glycoproteins were observed. Thus, the antigenic structure of gp120 can be subtly affected by an amino acid change in gp41, with important consequences for sensitivity to neutralization. Images PMID:7507184

  18. Novel approaches using alkaline or acid/guanidine treatment to eliminate therapeutic antibody interference in the measurement of total target ligand.

    PubMed

    Salimi-Moosavi, Hossein; Lee, Jean; Desilva, Binodh; Doellgast, George

    2010-04-06

    Measurement of the total target ligand can help to provide pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) informations. However, the presence of monocloncal antibody therapeutics (ThAs) interferes with ELISA determinations of the total target proteins. The interferences can cause over- or under-estimation of the target protein analysis. The nature of interferences was dependent upon the ThA, target protein, antibody reagents and assay conditions of the ELISA. We have developed novel alkaline and acid/guanidine treatment approaches to dissociate the protein binding and preferentially denature the ThA. The neutralized target proteins can be determined by ELISA. These methods provide reproducible measurements of total target protein without ThA interference. Serum samples, standards and QCs containing target protein and ThA were treated with alkaline buffer (pH>13) containing casein or acid/guanidine buffer (pH<1). Total target proteins for two different ThA systems were successfully measured and interferences were completely eliminated by the treatments. These methods were successfully applied to analysis in pre-clinical serum samples.

  19. Detection of antibodies against therapeutic proteins in the presence of residual therapeutic protein using a solid-phase extraction with acid dissociation (SPEAD) sample treatment prior to ELISA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Holly W; Butterfield, Anthony; Sun, Deqin

    2007-12-01

    The evaluation of the potential immunogenicity of therapeutic proteins in nonclinical safety studies has become complicated by the development of biopharmaceuticals that are dosed at high concentrations and/or have long half lives. These products remain in the circulation of the test system for extended periods of time, resulting in samples containing high concentrations of drug that interfere with standard immunogenicity assays. This protocol describes a novel solid-phase extraction with acid dissociation (SPEAD) sample treatment that removes the interfering therapeutic protein "drug" from the sample prior to performance of a direct immunoassay for detection of anti-drug antibodies (ADA). A biotin-avidin capture technique is used to physically separate ADA and ADA:Drug complexes from the drug and the sample matrix. The acid dissociation step removes the ADA from the biotin-avidin complex, and detection is performed by simple direct enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). The SPEAD treatment allows for detection of ADA in an ELISA format and results in a >10-100-fold increase in residual drug tolerance as compared to an immunoassay without the sample treatment. The method can be used for serum samples from all species, but is presented here as an assay for detection of anti-drug antibodies in cynomolgus monkey serum.

  20. Preparation of an anti-acid sphingomyelinase monoclonal antibody for the quantitative determination and polypeptide analysis of lysosomal sphingomyelinase in fibroblasts from normal and Niemann-Pick type A patients.

    PubMed

    Rousson, R; Parvaz, P; Bonnet, J; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C; Louisot, P; Vanier, M T

    1993-04-02

    An anti-acid sphingomyelinase monoclonal antibody has been prepared using an in vitro booster technique. The antigen, acid sphingomyelinase, was purified from human placentas by sequential chromatographic steps in the presence of the non-ionic detergent Nonidet P40. This monoclonal antibody (MAB 236) precipitates specifically the enzyme activity by immunoadsorption techniques and presents the same specificity to normal and mutated sphingomyelinase in Niemann-Pick type A patients. MAB 236 is the first antibody able to precipitate the protein in the presence of detergent thereby permitting the quantitative determination of normal and mutated sphingomyelinase in tissue and cell extracts. Polypeptide analysis and quantitative determination experiments using this monoclonal antibody showed no difference between patients and normal controls.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi has not lost its S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase: characterization of the gene and the encoded enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Persson, K; Aslund, L; Grahn, B; Hanke, J; Heby, O

    1998-01-01

    All attempts to identify ornithine decarboxylase in the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi have failed. The parasites have instead been assumed to depend on putrescine uptake and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) for their synthesis of the polyamines spermidine and spermine. We have now identified the gene encoding AdoMetDC in T. cruzi by PCR cloning, with degenerate primers corresponding to conserved amino acid sequences in AdoMetDC proteins of other trypanosomatids. The amplified DNA fragment was used as a probe to isolate the complete AdoMetDC gene from a T. cruzi genomic library. The AdoMetDC gene was located on chromosomes with a size of approx. 1.4 Mbp, and contained a coding region of 1110 bp, specifying a sequence of 370 amino acid residues. The protein showed a sequence identity of only 25% with human AdoMetDC, the major differences being additional amino acids present in the terminal regions of the T. cruzi enzyme. As expected, a higher sequence identity (68-72%) was found in comparison with trypanosomatid AdoMetDCs. When the coding region was expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant protein underwent autocatalytic cleavage, generating a 33-34 kDa alpha subunit and a 9 kDa beta subunit. The encoded protein catalysed the decarboxylation of AdoMet (Km 0.21 mM) and was stimulated by putrescine but inhibited by the polyamines, weakly by spermidine and strongly by spermine. Methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG), a potent inhibitor of human AdoMetDC, was a poor inhibitor of the T. cruzi enzyme. This differential sensitivity to MGBG suggests that the two enzymes are sufficiently different to warrant the search for compounds that might interfere with the progression of Chagas' disease by selectively inhibiting T. cruzi AdoMetDC. PMID:9677309

  2. Aspartate 203 of the oxaloacetate decarboxylase beta-subunit catalyses both the chemical and vectorial reaction of the Na+ pump.

    PubMed Central

    Di Berardino, M; Dimroth, P

    1996-01-01

    We report here a new mode of coupling between the chemical and vectorial reaction explored for the oxaloacetate decarboxylase Na+ pump from Klebsiella pneumoniae. The membrane-bound beta-subunit is responsible for the decarboxylation of carboxybiotin and the coupled translocation of Na+ ions across the membrane. The biotin prosthetic group which is attached to the alpha-subunit becomes carboxylated by carboxyltransfer from oxaloacetate. The two conserved aspartic acid residues within putative membrane-spanning domains of the beta-subunit (Asp149 and Asp203) were exchanged by site-directed mutagenesis. Mutants D149Q and D149E retained oxaloacetate decarboxylase and Na+ transport activities. Mutants D203N and D203E, however, had lost these two activities, but retained the ability to form the carboxybiotin enzyme. Direct participation of Asp203 in the catalysis of the decarboxylation reaction is therefore indicated. In addition, all previous and present data on the enzyme support a model in which the same aspartic acid residue provides a binding site for the metal ion catalysing its movement across the membrane. The model predicts that asp203 in its dissociated form binds Na+ and promotes its translocation, while the protonated residue transfers the proton to the acid-labile carboxybiotin which initiates its decarboxylation. Strong support for the model comes from the observation that Na+ transport by oxaloacetate decarboxylation is accompanied by H+ transport in the opposite direction. The inhibition of oxaloacetate decarboxylation by high Na+ concentrations in a pH-dependent manner is also in agreement with the model. Images PMID:8617230

  3. Post-transcriptional regulation of ornithine decarboxylase in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Bassez, T; Paris, J; Omilli, F; Dorel, C; Osborne, H B

    1990-11-01

    The level at which ornithine decarboxylase expression is regulated in growing oocytes has been investigated. Immunoprecipitation of the in vivo labelled proteins showed that ornithine decarboxylase accumulated less rapidly in stage IV oocytes than in previtellogenic stage I + II oocytes. Quantitative Northern analysis showed that ornithine decarboxylase mRNA is abundant in oocytes (about 8 x 10(8) transcripts/cell) and this number does not significantly change during oogenesis. Polysome analysis showed that this mRNA is present in polysomes in stage I + II oocytes but has passed into puromycin-insensitive mRNP particles by stage IV of oogenesis. Therefore, during the growth phase of oogenesis, ornithine decarboxylase expression is regulated at a translational level. These results are discussed relative to the temporal expression of ornithine decarboxylase and of other proteins whose expression also decreases during oogenesis. In order to perform these experiments, the cDNA (XLODC1) corresponding to Xenopus laevis ornithine decarboxylase mRNA was cloned and sequenced.

  4. Structure and Function of 4-Hydroxyphenylacetate Decarboxylase and Its Cognate Activating Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Brinda; Buckel, Wolfgang; Golding, Bernard T; Ullmann, G Matthias; Martins, Berta M

    2016-01-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (4Hpad) is the prototype of a new class of Fe-S cluster-dependent glycyl radical enzymes (Fe-S GREs) acting on aromatic compounds. The two-enzyme component system comprises a decarboxylase responsible for substrate conversion and a dedicated activating enzyme (4Hpad-AE). The decarboxylase uses a glycyl/thiyl radical dyad to convert 4-hydroxyphenylacetate into p-cresol (4-methylphenol) by a biologically unprecedented Kolbe-type decarboxylation. In addition to the radical dyad prosthetic group, the decarboxylase unit contains two [4Fe-4S] clusters coordinated by an extra small subunit of unknown function. 4Hpad-AE reductively cleaves S-adenosylmethionine (SAM or AdoMet) at a site-differentiated [4Fe-4S]2+/+ cluster (RS cluster) generating a transient 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical that produces a stable glycyl radical in the decarboxylase by the abstraction of a hydrogen atom. 4Hpad-AE binds up to two auxiliary [4Fe-4S] clusters coordinated by a ferredoxin-like insert that is C-terminal to the RS cluster-binding motif. The ferredoxin-like domain with its two auxiliary clusters is not vital for SAM-dependent glycyl radical formation in the decarboxylase, but facilitates a longer lifetime for the radical. This review describes the 4Hpad and cognate AE families and focuses on the recent advances and open questions concerning the structure, function and mechanism of this novel Fe-S-dependent class of GREs.

  5. Complete amino acid sequence of heavy chain variable regions derived from two monoclonal anti-p-azophenylarsonate antibodies of BALB/c mice expressing the major cross-reactive idiotype of the A/J strain

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The primary structure of A/J anti-p-azophenylarsonate (anti-Ars) antibodies expressing the major A-strain cross-reactive idiotype (CRIA) has provided important insights into issues of antibody diversity and the molecular basis of idiotypy in this important model system. Until recently, this idiotype was thought to be rarely, if ever, expressed in BALB/c mice. Indeed, it has been reported that BALB/c mice lack the heavy chain variable segment (VH) gene that is utilized by the entire family of anti-Ars antibodies expressing the A/J CRI. Recently, however, it has been possible to elicit CRIA+, Ars binding antibodies in the BALB/c strain by immunizing first with anti-CRI and then with antigen. Such BALB/c, CRIA+ anti-Ars antibodies can be induced occasionally with antigen alone. VH region amino acid sequences are described for two CRIA+ hybridoma products derived from BALB/c mice. While remarkably similar to each other, their VH segments (1-98) differ from the VH segments of A/J CRIA+, anti-Ars antibodies in over 40 positions. Rather than the usual JH2 gene segment used by most A/J CRIA+ anti-Ars antibodies, one BALB/c CRIA+ hybridoma utilizes a JH1 gene segment, while the other uses a JH4. However, the D segments of both of the BALB/c antibodies are remarkably homologous to the D segments of several A/J CRIA+ antibodies sequenced previously, as are the amino terminal amino acid sequences of their light chains. These data imply that BALB/c mice express the A/J CRIA by producing antibodies with very similar, if not identical, light chain and heavy chain D segments, but in the context of different VH and JH gene segments than their A/J counterparts. The results document that molecules that share serologic specificities can have vastly different primary structures. PMID:6207261

  6. Biochemical evaluation of a parsley tyrosine decarboxylase results in a novel 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde synthase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Gillaspy, Glenda; Zhao, Bingyu; Harich, Kim; White, Robert H; Li, Jianyong

    2012-02-10

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs) are effectively indistinguishable from plant aromatic acetaldehyde syntheses (AASs) through primary sequence comparison. Spectroscopic analyses of several characterized AASs and AAADs were performed to look for absorbance spectral identifiers. Although this limited survey proved inconclusive, the resulting work enabled the reevaluation of several characterized plant AAS and AAAD enzymes. Upon completion, a previously reported parsley AAAD protein was demonstrated to have AAS activity. Substrate specificity tests demonstrate that this novel AAS enzyme has a unique substrate specificity towards tyrosine (km 0.46mM) and dopa (km 1.40mM). Metabolite analysis established the abundance of tyrosine and absence of dopa in parsley extracts. Such analysis indicates that tyrosine is likely to be the sole physiological substrate. The resulting information suggests that this gene is responsible for the in vivo production of 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (4-HPAA). This is the first reported case of an AAS enzyme utilizing tyrosine as a primary substrate and the first report of a single enzyme capable of producing 4-HPAA from tyrosine.

  7. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-03-26

    The authors have measured the /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D/sub 2/O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D/sub 2/O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier.

  8. Increasing thermal stability and catalytic activity of glutamate decarboxylase in E. coli: An in silico study.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Yasaman; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Saber, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is an enzyme that converts l-glutamate to gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) that is a widely used drug to treat mental disorders like Alzheimer's disease. In this study for the first time point mutation was performed virtually in the active site of the E. coli GAD in order to increase thermal stability and catalytic activity of the enzyme. Energy minimization and addition of water box were performed using GROMACS 5.4.6 package. PoPMuSiC 2.1 web server was used to predict potential spots for point mutation and Modeller software was used to perform point mutation on three dimensional model. Molegro virtual docker software was used for cavity detection and stimulated docking study. Results indicate that performing mutation separately at positions 164, 302, 304, 393, 396, 398 and 410 increase binding affinity to substrate. The enzyme is predicted to be more thermo- stable in all 7 mutants based on ΔΔG value.

  9. pH shift enhancement of Candida utilis pyruvate decarboxylase production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Allen Kuan-Liang; Breuer, Michael; Hauer, Bernhard; Rogers, Peter L; Rosche, Bettina

    2005-10-20

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) catalyses the synthesis of asymmetric carbinols, e.g., chiral precursors for pharmaceuticals such as ephedrine and pseudoephedrine. The production of PDC by Candida utilis in a minimal medium was improved by manipulating the pH during fermentation in a 5 L bioreactor. At an aeration rate of 0.1 vvm with a stirrer speed of 300 rpm at constant pH 6, a specific PDC activity of 141 U/g dry cell weight (DCW) was achieved (average of two fermentations +/-13%). By allowing the yeast to acidify the growth medium from pH 6 to 2.9, the final specific PDC activity increased by a factor of 2.7 to 385 U/g DCW (average from 4 fermentations +/-16%). The effect of this pH drift on PDC production was confirmed by another experiment with a manual shift of pH from 6 to 3 by addition of 5 M sulfuric acid. The final PDC activity was 392 U/g DCW (average from two fermentations +/-5%). However, experiments with constant pH of 6, 5, 4, or 3 resulted in average specific activities of only 102 to 141 U/g DCW, suggesting that a transitional pH change rather than the absolute pH value was responsible for the increased specific PDC activity.

  10. Hepatoerythropoietic Porphyria Caused by a Novel Homoallelic Mutation in Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase Gene in Egyptian Patients.

    PubMed

    Farrag, M S; Mikula, I; Richard, E; Saudek, V; De Verneuil, H; Martásek, P

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are metabolic disorders resulting from mutations in haem biosynthetic pathway genes. Hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP) is a rare type of porphyria caused by the deficiency of the fifth enzyme (uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase, UROD) in this pathway. The defect in the enzymatic activity is due to biallelic mutations in the UROD gene. Currently, 109 UROD mutations are known. The human disease has an early onset, manifesting in infancy or early childhood with red urine, skin photosensitivity in sun-exposed areas, and hypertrichosis. Similar defects and links to photosensitivity and hepatopathy exist in several animal models, including zebrafish and mice. In the present study, we report a new mutation in the UROD gene in Egyptian patients with HEP. We show that the homozygous c.T163A missense mutation leads to a substitution of a conserved phenylalanine (amino acid 55) for isoleucine in the enzyme active site, causing a dramatic decrease in the enzyme activity (19 % of activity of wild-type enzyme). Inspection of the UROD crystal structure shows that Phe-55 contacts the substrate and is located in the loop that connects helices 2 and 3. Phe-55 is strictly conserved in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic UROD. The F55I substitution likely interferes with the enzyme-substrate interaction.

  11. Dynamic expression of a glutamate decarboxylase gene in multiple non-neural tissues during mouse development

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, Dennis M; Condie, Brian G

    2001-01-01

    Background Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is the biosynthetic enzyme for the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Mouse embryos lacking the 67-kDa isoform of GAD (encoded by the Gad1 gene) develop a complete cleft of the secondary palate. This phenotype suggests that this gene may be involved in the normal development of tissues outside of the CNS. Although Gad1 expression in adult non-CNS tissues has been noted previously, no systematic analysis of its embryonic expression outside of the nervous system has been performed. The objective of this study was to define additional structures outside of the central nervous system that express Gad1, indicating those structures that may require its function for normal development. Results Our analysis detected the localized expression of Gad1 transcripts in several developing tissues in the mouse embryo from E9.0-E14.5. Tissues expressing Gad1 included the tail bud mesenchyme, the pharyngeal pouches and arches, the ectodermal placodes of the developing vibrissae, and the apical ectodermal ridge (AER), mesenchyme and ectoderm of the limb buds. Conclusions Some of the sites of Gad1 expression are tissues that emit signals required for patterning and differentiation (AER, vibrissal placodes). Other sites correspond to proliferating stem cell populations that give rise to multiple differentiated tissues (tail bud mesenchyme, pharyngeal endoderm and mesenchyme). The dynamic expression of Gad1 in such tissues suggests a wider role for GABA signaling in development than was previously appreciated. PMID:11178105

  12. Overexpression of Tyrosine hydroxylase and Dopa decarboxylase associated with pupal melanization in Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sisi; Wang, Mo; Li, Xianchun

    2015-01-01

    Melanism has been found in a wide range of species, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain largely elusive. In this study, we studied the molecular mechanisms of the pupal melanism in Spodoptera exigua. The full length cDNA sequences of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopa decarboxylase (DDC), two key enzymes in the biosynthesis pathway of melanin, were cloned, and their temporal expression patterns in the integument were compared during the larval-pupal metamorphosis process of the S. exigua wild type (SEW) and melanic mutant (SEM) strains. No amino acid change in the protein sequence of TH and DDC was found between the two strains. Both DDC and TH were significantly over-expressed in the integument of the SEM strain at late-prepupa and 0 h pupa, respectively, compared with those of the SEW strain. Feeding 5th instar larvae of SEM with diets incorporated with 1 mg/g of the DDC inhibitor L-α-Methyl-DOPA and 0.75 mg/g of the TH inhibitor 3-iodo-tyrosine (3-IT) resulted in 20% pupae with partially-rescued phenotype and 68.2% of pupae with partially- or fully-rescued phenotype, respectively. These results indicate that overexpressions of TH and DDC are involved in the pupal melanization of S. exigua. PMID:26084938

  13. Crystal Structure and Pyridoxal 5-Phosphate Binding Property of Lysine Decarboxylase from Selenomonas ruminantium

    PubMed Central

    Sagong, Hye-Young; Son, Hyeoncheol Francis; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Il-Kwon; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Lysine decarboxylase (LDC) is a crucial enzyme for acid stress resistance and is also utilized for the biosynthesis of cadaverine, a promising building block for bio-based polyamides. We determined the crystal structure of LDC from Selenomonas ruminantium (SrLDC). SrLDC functions as a dimer and each monomer consists of two distinct domains; a PLP-binding barrel domain and a sheet domain. We also determined the structure of SrLDC in complex with PLP and cadaverine and elucidated the binding mode of cofactor and substrate. Interestingly, compared with the apo-form of SrLDC, the SrLDC in complex with PLP and cadaverine showed a remarkable structural change at the PLP binding site. The PLP binding site of SrLDC contains the highly flexible loops with high b-factors and showed an open-closed conformational change upon the binding of PLP. In fact, SrLDC showed no LDC activity without PLP supplement, and we suggest that highly flexible PLP binding site results in low PLP affinity of SrLDC. In addition, other structurally homologous enzymes also contain the flexible PLP binding site, which indicates that high flexibility at the PLP binding site and low PLP affinity seems to be a common feature of these enzyme family. PMID:27861532

  14. Overexpression of Actinidia deliciosa pyruvate decarboxylase 1 gene enhances waterlogging stress in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Yu; Huang, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Gang; Xuan, Ji-Ping; Guo, Zhong-Ren

    2016-09-01

    Ethanolic fermentation is classically associated with waterlogging tolerance when plant cells switch from respiration to anaerobic fermentation. Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), which catalyzes the first step in this pathway, is thought to be the main regulatory enzyme. Here, we cloned a full-length PDC cDNA sequence from kiwifruit, named AdPDC1. We determined the expression of the AdPDC1 gene in kiwifruit under different environmental stresses using qRT-PCR, and the results showed that the increase of AdPDC1 expression during waterlogging stress was much higher than that during salt, cold, heat and drought stresses. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced the resistance to waterlogging stress but could not enhance resistance to cold stress at five weeks old seedlings. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis could not enhance resistance to NaCl and mannitol stresses at the stage of seed germination and in early seedlings. These results suggested that the kiwifruit AdPDC1 gene is required during waterlogging but might not be required during other environmental stresses. Expression of the AdPDC1 gene was down-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) in kiwifruit, and overexpression of the AdPDC1 gene in Arabidopsis inhibited seed germination and root length under ABA treatment, indicating that ABA might negatively regulate the AdPDC1 gene under waterlogging stress.

  15. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of an arginine decarboxylase gene from peach (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji Hong; Ban, Yusuke; Wen, Xiao-Peng; Nakajima, Ikuko; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2009-01-15

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC), one of the enzymes responsible for putrescine (Put) biosynthesis, has been shown to be implicated in stress response. In the current paper attempts were made to clone and characterize a gene encoding ADC from peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch, 'Akatsuki'). Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) gave rise to a full-length ADC cDNA (PpADC) with a complete open reading frame of 2178 bp, encoding a 725 amino acid polypeptide. Homology search and sequence multi-alignment demonstrated that the deduced PpADC protein sequence shared a high identity with ADCs from other plants, including several highly conservative motifs and amino acids. Southern blotting indicated that PpADC existed in peach genome as a single gene. Expression levels of PpADC in different tissues of peach (P. persica 'Akatsuki') were spatially and developmentally regulated. Treatment of peach shoots from 'Mochizuki' with exogenous 5 mM Put, an indirect product of ADC, remarkably induced accumulation of PpADC mRNA. Transcripts of PpADC in peach leaves from 'Mochizuki' were quickly induced, either transiently or continuously, in response to dehydration, high salinity (200 mM NaCl), low temperature (4 degrees C) and heavy metal (150 microM CdCl(2)), but repressed by high temperature 37 degrees C) during a 2-day treatment, which changed in an opposite direction when the stresses were otherwise removed with the exception of CdCl(2) treatment. In addition, steady-state of PpADC mRNA could be also transiently up-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) in 'Mochizuki' leaves. All of these, taken together, suggest that PpADC is a stress-responsive gene and can be considered as a potential target that is genetically manipulated so as to create novel germplasms with enhanced stress tolerance in the future.

  16. Role of glutamate decarboxylase-like protein 1 (GADL1) in taurine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingyang; Ge, Xiaomei; Ding, Haizhen; Jiang, Honglin; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2012-11-30

    This manuscript concerns the tissue-specific transcription of mouse and cattle glutamate decarboxylase-like protein 1 (GADL1) and the biochemical activities of human GADL1 recombinant protein. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that GADL1 appears late in evolution, only being found in reptiles, birds, and mammals. RT-PCR determined that GADL1 mRNA is transcribed at high levels in mouse and cattle skeletal muscles and also in mouse kidneys. Substrate screening determined that GADL1, unlike its name implies, has no detectable GAD activity, but it is able to efficiently catalyze decarboxylation of aspartate, cysteine sulfinic acid, and cysteic acid to β-alanine, hypotaurine, and taurine, respectively. Western blot analysis verified the presence of GADL1 in mouse muscles, kidneys, C2C12 myoblasts, and C2C12 myotubes. Incubation of the supernatant of fresh muscle or kidney extracts with cysteine sulfinic acid resulted in the detection of hypotaurine or taurine in the reaction mixtures, suggesting the possible involvement of GADL1 in taurine biosynthesis. However, when the tissue samples were incubated with aspartate, no β-alanine production was observed. We proposed several possibilities that might explain the inactivation of ADC activity of GADL1 in tissue protein extracts. Although β-alanine-producing activity was not detected in the supernatant of tissue protein extracts, its potential role in β-alanine synthesis cannot be excluded. There are several inhibitors of the ADC activity of GADL1 identified. The discovery of GADL1 biochemical activities, in conjunction with its expression and activities in muscles and kidneys, provides some tangible insight toward establishing its physiological function(s).

  17. Immunochemical approach using monoclonal antibody against Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) to discern cannabis plants and to investigate new drug candidates.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-01

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb-4A4) against Δ9- tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) showing extensive cross-reactivity against various cannabinoids was prepared. Using this antibody, a competitive enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) was developed to detect Δ9-THCA in the range of 1 to 100 mg/ml. Various cannabinoids including Δ9-THC (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid), Δ8-THCA (Δ8-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid), Δ8-THC (Δ8-tetrahydrocannabinol), CBD (cannabidiol), and CBN (cannabinol) were recognized by MAb-4A4, and their cross-reactivities were 55-1600% compared with Δ9-THCA (100%). This novel characteristic of this MAb enabled detection of marijuana residues in biological samples by detection of residual cannabinoids. The ELISA using MAb-4A4 was found to be applicable even for withered samples which contained only trace amounts of Δ9-THCA and Δ9-THC. In addition, this method using MAb-4A4 could be useful in forensic analysis since the MAb-4A4 also shows cross-reactivities against cannabinoid metabolites in body fluids. As well as forensic applications using this MAb, an investigation of new drug candidates focusing on cannabinoid metabolites arising from biotransformation in plant tissue was performed using immunochemical screening. The resulting new drug candidates were cannabinoid glycosides biotransformed by Pinellia ternata whose bioactivity is as yet unidentified. Our results indicate the utility of the application of ELISA using MAb-4A4 for further experiments involving marijuana and cannabinoids not only in the forensic field but also in the context of drug discovery.

  18. Improving ante mortem diagnosis of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection by use of oral fluids for bacterial, nucleic acid, and antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Lirola, Luis G; Xiao, Chao-Ting; Zavala, Marissa; Halbur, Patrick G; Opriessnig, T

    2013-02-15

    Swine erysipelas is an economically important disease caused by Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. Pen-based collection of oral fluids has recently been utilized for monitoring infection dynamics in swine operations. The diagnostic performance of bacterial isolation, real-time PCR, and antibody detection by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fluorescent microbead-based immunoassay (FMIA) methods were evaluated on pen-based oral fluid samples from pigs experimentally infected with E. rhusiopathiae (n=112) and from negative controls (n=32). While real-time PCR was a sensitive method with an overall detection rate of 100% (7/7 pens) one day post inoculation (dpi), E. rhusiopathiae was successfully isolated in only 28.6% (2/7 pens). Anti-Erysipelothrix IgM and IgG antibodies in pen-based oral fluids were detected at 4 to 5 dpi by FMIA and at 5 and 8 dpi by ELISA. The number of infected animals per pen, and in particular the timing of antimicrobial treatment administration impacted bacterial isolation and ELISA results. In oral fluid field samples, E. rhusiopathiae DNA was found in 23.3% of the samples while anti-E. rhusiopathiae IgG and IgM antibodies were found in 59.6% and 5.5% of the samples, respectively. The results suggest that an algorithm integrating oral fluids as specimen and real-time PCR and FMIA as detection methods is effective for earlier detection of an erysipelas outbreak thereby allowing for a more effective treatment outcome.

  19. Multiple roles of the active site lysine of Dopa decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Mariarita; Voltattorni, Carla Borri

    2009-08-15

    The pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent-enzyme Dopa decarboxylase, responsible for the irreversible conversion of l-Dopa to dopamine, is an attractive drug target. The contribution of the pyridoxal-Lys303 to the catalytic mechanisms of decarboxylation and oxidative deamination is analyzed. The K303A variant binds the coenzyme with a 100-fold decreased apparent equilibrium binding affinity with respect to the wild-type enzyme. Unlike the wild-type, K303A in the presence of l-Dopa displays a parallel progress course of formation of both dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (plus ammonia) with a burst followed by a linear phase. Moreover, the finding that the catalytic efficiencies of decarboxylation and of oxidative deamination display a decrease of 1500- and 17-fold, respectively, with respect to the wild-type, is indicative of a different impact of Lys303 mutation on these reactions. Kinetic analyses reveal that Lys303 is involved in external aldimine formation and hydrolysis as well as in product release which affects the rate-determining step of decarboxylation.

  20. Studies on uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase from Chlorella kessleri (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Juárez, Angela B; Aldonatti, Carmen; Vigna, María S; Ríos de Molina, María Del C

    2007-02-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UroD) (EC 4.1.1.37) is an enzyme from the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway, in which chlorophyll is the main final product in algae. This is the first time that a study on UroD activity has been performed in a green alga (Chlorella). We isolated and partially purified the enzyme from a Chlorella kessleri (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta) strain (Copahue, Neuquén, Argentina), and describe for the first time some of its properties. In C. kessleri, the decarboxylation of uroporphyrinogen III occurs in two stages, via 7 COOH and then 6 and 5 COOH intermediates, with the decarboxylation of the 7 COOH compound being the rate-limiting step for the reaction. Cultures in the exponential growth phase showed the highest specific activity values. The most suitable conditions to measure UroD activity in C. kessleri were as follows: 0.23-0.3 mg protein/mL, approximately 6-8 micromol/L uroporphyrinogen III, and 20 min incubation time. Gel filtration chromatography and Western blot assays indicated that UroD from C. kessleri is a dimer of approximately 90 kDa formed by species of lower molecular mass, which conserves enzymatic activity.

  1. Chemical modification of oxalate decarboxylase to improve adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rihui; He, Junbin; Wu, Jia; Cai, Xinghua; Long, Han; Chen, Shengfeng; Liu, Haiqian

    2017-02-03

    In order to enhance the adsorption capacity of oxalate decarboxylase (Oxdc) on calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and improve the application performance of Oxdc, chemical modification of Oxdc with ethylenediaminetetraacetic dianhydride (EDTAD) was investigated in this work. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis results demonstrated that Oxdc and EDTAD have been covalently bound, and suggested that the chemical modification occurred at the free amino of the side chain and the α-amine of the N-terminus of Oxdc. Fluorescene and circular dichroic measurement showed that the structure and conformation of Oxdc were tinily altered after modification by EDTAD. The optimum pH of EDTAD-modified Oxdc was shifted to the alkaline side about 1.5 unit and it has a higher thermostability. The analysis of kinetic parameters indicated that the EDTAD-modified Oxdc showed a higher affinity towards the substrate. Through modification the adsorption capacity of Oxdc onto CaOx monohydrate crystals was increased by 42.42%.

  2. Molecular cloning and expression of the mouse ornithine decarboxylase gene.

    PubMed Central

    McConlogue, L; Gupta, M; Wu, L; Coffino, P

    1984-01-01

    We used mRNA from a mutant S49 mouse lymphoma cell line that produces ornithine decarboxylase (OrnDCase) as its major protein product to synthesize and clone cDNA. Plasmids containing OrnDCase cDNA were identified by hybrid selection of OrnDCase mRNA and in vitro translation. The two of these with the largest inserts together span 2.05 kilobases of cDNA. Southern blot analysis of DNA from wild-type or mutant S49 cells, cleaved with EcoRI or with BamHI, revealed multiple bands homologous to OrnD-Case cDNA, only one of which was amplified in the mutant cells. RNA transfer blot analysis showed that the major OrnD-Case mRNA in the mouse lymphoma cells is 2.0 kilobases long. A similar size mRNA was found in mouse kidney and was more abundant in the kidneys of mice treated with testosterone, an inducer of OrnDCase activity in that tissue. Images PMID:6582509

  3. Expression of ornithine decarboxylase in precancerous and cancerous gastric lesions

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xin-Pu; Li, Jian-Sheng; Li, Hui-Yan; Zeng, Shi-Ping; Zhao, Ye; Zeng, Jiang-Zheng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in precancerous and cancerous gastric lesions. METHODS: We studied the expression of ODC in gastric mucosa from patients with chronic superficial gastritis (CSG, n = 32), chronic atrophic gastritis [CAG, n = 43; 15 with and 28 without intestinal metaplasia (IM)], gastric dysplasia (DYS, n = 11) and gastric cancer (GC, n = 48) tissues using immunohistochemical staining. All 134 biopsy specimens of gastric mucosa were collected by gastroscopy. METHODS: The positive rate of ODC expression was 34.4%, 42.9%, 73.3%, 81.8% and 91.7% in cases with CSG, CAG without IM, CAG with IM, DYS and GC, respectively (P < 0.01), The positive rate of ODC expression increased in the order of CSG < CAG (without IM) < CAG (with IM) < DYS and finally, GC. In addition, ODC positive immunostaining rate was lower in well-differentiated GC than in poorly-differentiated GC (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The expression of ODC is positively correlated with the degree of malignity of gastric mucosa and development of gastric lesions. This finding indicates that ODC may be used as a good biomarker in the screening and diagnosis of precancerous lesions. PMID:17569126

  4. Ornithine decarboxylase as a marker for premalignancy in the stomach.

    PubMed Central

    Patchett, S E; Alstead, E M; Butruk, L; Przytulski, K; Farthing, M J

    1995-01-01

    Assessment of mucosal ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in the human large bowel may be of value as a marker of potential malignant risk. Its value as a marker of premalignancy in the upper gastrointestinal tract is less clear. Using a [14C]-ornithine bioassay, gastric mucosal ODC activity was measured in 32 normal subjects and 22 patients with confirmed gastric cancer. These results were compared with 47 patients at increased risk of upper gastrointestinal malignancy, (32 patients with partial gastric resection, 15 patients with familial adenomatous polyposis). Median ODC activity in normal subjects was 371 pmol/mg protein/h, (interquartile range (IQR), 230-617). There was no variation with age or sex and no relation to Helicobacter pylori status. Normal subjects had significantly lower ODC activity than patients with a gastric resection or confirmed gastric cancer, but similar to patients with familial adenomatous polyposis. Furthermore, no difference in activity was identified between patients with a gastric resection and established gastric cancer. ODC activity was, however, significantly increased in areas of gastric atrophy or intestinal metaplasia, regardless of the clinical group from which the samples were obtained. It is concluded that measurement of mucosal ODC activity does not provide additional predictive information of malignant risk in the stomach and investigation of other potential biomarkers of malignancy is warranted. PMID:7672662

  5. Histidine Decarboxylase Deficiency Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Manal; Machavoine, François; Rignault, Rachel; Dam, Julie; Dy, Michel; Thieblemont, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the role of histamine in inflammation. Since this monoamine has also been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of type-1 diabetes, we assessed its effect in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. To this end, we used mice (inactivated) knocked out for the gene encoding histidine decarboxylase, the unique histamine-forming enzyme, backcrossed on a NOD genetic background. We found that the lack of endogenous histamine in NOD HDC−/− mice decreased the incidence of diabetes in relation to their wild-type counterpart. Whereas the proportion of regulatory T and myeloid-derived suppressive cells was similar in both strains, histamine deficiency was associated with increased levels of immature macrophages, as compared with wild-type NOD mice. Concerning the cytokine pattern, we found a decrease in circulating IL-12 and IFN-γ in HDC−/− mice, while IL-6 or leptin remained unchanged, suggesting that histamine primarily modulates the inflammatory environment. Paradoxically, exogenous histamine given to NOD HDC−/− mice provided also protection against T1D. Our study supports the notion that histamine is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes, thus providing additional evidence for its role in the regulation of the immune response. PMID:26090474

  6. Ornithine decarboxylase antizyme inhibitor 2 regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Kanerva, Kristiina; Maekitie, Laura T.; Baeck, Nils; Andersson, Leif C.

    2010-07-01

    Antizyme inhibitor 1 (AZIN1) and 2 (AZIN2) are proteins that activate ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis. Both AZINs release ODC from its inactive complex with antizyme (AZ), leading to formation of the catalytically active ODC. The ubiquitously expressed AZIN1 is involved in cell proliferation and transformation whereas the role of the recently found AZIN2 in cellular functions is unknown. Here we report the intracellular localization of AZIN2 and present novel evidence indicating that it acts as a regulator of vesicle trafficking. We used immunostaining to demonstrate that both endogenous and FLAG-tagged AZIN2 localize to post-Golgi vesicles of the secretory pathway. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed that the vesicles associate mainly with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). RNAi-mediated knockdown of AZIN2 or depletion of cellular polyamines caused selective fragmentation of the TGN and retarded the exocytotic release of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. Exogenous addition of polyamines normalized the morphological changes and reversed the inhibition of protein secretion. Our findings demonstrate that AZIN2 regulates the transport of secretory vesicles by locally activating ODC and polyamine biosynthesis.

  7. Reactivation of substrate-inactivated brain glutamate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Meeley, M P; Martin, D L

    1983-03-01

    The effects of ATP and inorganic phosphate (Pi) on the reactivation of glutamate apodecarboxylase by its cofactor pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (pyridoxal-P) was studied. Apoenzyme was prepared by preincubation with glutamate. Apoenzyme prepared with glutamate alone was reactivated slowly and incompletely by adding a saturating concentration of pyridoxal-P (20 microM). Reactivation was slightly enhanced by 1-10 mM Pi. Reactivation by pyridoxal-P plus Pi was greatly enhanced by the presence of low concentrations (less than 100 microM) of ATP during the preparation of apoenzyme with glutamate. Reactivation was much lower if Pi was omitted. Enhancement of reactivation by ATP was due to its effect during apoenzyme formation, since ATP did not enhance reactivation if added only during reactivation and since the enhancing effect persisted after the removal of free ATP by chromatography on Sephadex G-25 after apoenzyme preparation and before reactivation. Reactivation was inhibited by high concentrations of ATP (greater than 100 microM), possibly by competition of ATP for the cofactor binding site. Four factors (glutamate, pyridoxal-P, ATP, and Pi) control a cycle of inactivation and reactivation that appears to be important in the regulation of brain glutamate decarboxylase.

  8. Expression of arginine decarboxylase in brain regions and neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyo, Abiye H.; Zhu, Meng-Yang; Ordway, Gregory A.; Regunathan, Soundar

    2010-01-01

    After our initial report of a mammalian gene for arginine decarboxylase, an enzyme for the synthesis of agmatine from arginine, we have determined the regional expression of ADC in rat. We have analyzed the expression of ADC in rat brain regions by activity, protein and mRNA levels, and the regulation of expression in neuronal cells by RNA interference. In rat brain, ADC was widely expressed in major brain regions, with a substantial amount in hypothalamus, followed by cortex, and with least amounts in locus coeruleus and medulla. ADC mRNA was detected in primary astrocytes and C6 glioma cells. While no ADC message was detected in fresh neurons (3 days old), significant message appeared in differentiated neurons (3 weeks old). PC12 cells, treated with nerve growth factor, had higher ADC mRNA compared with naive cells. The siRNA mixture directed towards the N-terminal regions of ADC cDNA down-regulated the levels of mRNA and protein in cultured neurons/C6 glioma cells and these cells produced lower agmatine. Thus, this study demonstrates that ADC message is expressed in rat brain regions, that it is regulated in neuronal cells and that the down-regulation of ADC activity by specific siRNA leads to lower agmatine production. PMID:16445852

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  10. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  11. Reduction of Oxalate Levels in Tomato Fruit and Consequent Metabolic Remodeling Following Overexpression of a Fungal Oxalate Decarboxylase1[W

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Niranjan; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Ghosh, Sudip; Narula, Kanika; Tayal, Rajul; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2013-01-01

    The plant metabolite oxalic acid is increasingly recognized as a food toxin with negative effects on human nutrition. Decarboxylative degradation of oxalic acid is catalyzed, in a substrate-specific reaction, by oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC), forming formic acid and carbon dioxide. Attempts to date to reduce oxalic acid levels and to understand the biological significance of OXDC in crop plants have met with little success. To investigate the role of OXDC and the metabolic consequences of oxalate down-regulation in a heterotrophic, oxalic acid-accumulating fruit, we generated transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing an OXDC (FvOXDC) from the fungus Flammulina velutipes specifically in the fruit. These E8.2-OXDC fruit showed up to a 90% reduction in oxalate content, which correlated with concomitant increases in calcium, iron, and citrate. Expression of OXDC affected neither carbon dioxide assimilation rates nor resulted in any detectable morphological differences in the transgenic plants. Comparative proteomic analysis suggested that metabolic remodeling was associated with the decrease in oxalate content in transgenic fruit. Examination of the E8.2-OXDC fruit proteome revealed that OXDC-responsive proteins involved in metabolism and stress responses represented the most substantially up- and down-regulated categories, respectively, in the transgenic fruit, compared with those of wild-type plants. Collectively, our study provides insights into OXDC-regulated metabolic networks and may provide a widely applicable strategy for enhancing crop nutritional value. PMID:23482874

  12. The amino acid residues at 102 and 104 in GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus regulate viral neutralization susceptibility to the porcine serum neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Fan, Baochao; Liu, Xing; Bai, Juan; Zhang, Tingjie; Zhang, Qiaoya; Jiang, Ping

    2015-06-02

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is mainly responsible for the heavy economic losses in pig industry in the world. A number of neutralizing epitopes have been identified in the viral structural proteins GP3, GP4, GP5 and M. In this study, the important amino acid (aa) residues of HP-PRRSV strain BB affecting neutralization susceptibility of antibody were examined using resistant strains generated under neutralizing antibody (NAb) pressure in MARC-145 cells, reverse genetic technique and virus neutralization assay. HP-PRRSV strain BB was passaged under the pressure of porcine NAb serum in vitro. A resistant strain BB34s with 102 and 104 aa substitutions in GP5, which have been predicted to be the positive sites for pressure selection (Delisle et al., 2012), was cloned and identified. To determine the effect of the two aa residues on neutralization, eight recombinant PRRSV strains were generated, and neutralization assay results confirmed that the aa residues 102 and 104 in GP5 played an important role in NAbs against HP-PRRSV in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Alignment of GP5 sequences revealed that the variant aa residues at 102 and 104 were frequent among type 2 PRRSV strains. It may be helpful for understanding the mechanism regulating the neutralization susceptibility of PRRSV to the NAbs and monitoring the antigen variant strains in the field.

  13. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Capture and Directional Differentiation into Vascular Endothelial Cells for Metal Stent-Coated Chitosan/Hyaluronic Acid Loading CD133 Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Feng, Bo; Fan, Qingyu; Yang, Feng; Shang, Debin; Sui, Jinghan; Zhao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    A series of metal stents coated with chitosan/hyaluronic acid (CS/HA) loading antibodies by electrostatic self-assembled method were prepared, and the types of cells captured by antibodies and their differentiation in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) evaluated by molecular biology and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that CD133 stent can selectively capture hematopoietic stem cells (HSC),which directionally differentiate into vascular ECs in peripheral blood by (CS/HA) induction, and simultaneously inhibit migration and proliferation of immune cells and vascular smooth muscle cells (MCs). CD34 stent can capture HSC, hematopoietic progenitor cells that differentiate into vascular ECs and immune cells, promoting smooth MCs growth, leading to thrombosis, inflammation, and rejection. CD133 stent can be implanted into miniature pig heart coronary and can repair vascular damage by capturing own HSC, thus contributing to the rapid natural vascular repair, avoiding inflammation and rejection, thrombosis and restenosis. These studies demonstrated that CD133 stent of HSC capture will be an ideal coated metal stent providing a new therapeutic approach for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. PMID:25404533

  14. Mutagenesis of the aspartic acid ligands in human serum transferrin: lobe-lobe interaction and conformation as revealed by antibody, receptor-binding and iron-release studies.

    PubMed Central

    Mason, A; He, Q Y; Tam, B; MacGillivray, R A; Woodworth, R

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant non-glycosylated human serum transferrin and mutants in which the liganding aspartic acid (D) in one or both lobes was changed to a serine residue (S) were produced in a mammalian cell system and purified from the tissue culture media. Significant downfield shifts of 20, 30, and 45 nm in the absorption maxima were found for the D63S-hTF, D392S-hTF and the double mutant, D63S/D392S-hTF when compared to wild-type hTF. A monoclonal antibody to a sequential epitope in the C-lobe of hTF reported affinity differences between the apo- and iron-forms of each mutant and the control. Cell-binding studies performed under the same buffer conditions used for the antibody work clearly showed that the mutated lobe(s) had an open cleft. It is not clear whether the receptor itself may play a role in promoting the open conformation or whether the iron remains in the cleft. PMID:9461487

  15. Role of Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) in Arabidopsis thaliana defence against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas viridiflava.

    PubMed

    Rossi, F R; Marina, M; Pieckenstain, F L

    2015-07-01

    Polyamine biosynthesis starts with putrescine production through the decarboxylation of arginine or ornithine. In Arabidopsis thaliana, putrescine is synthesised exclusively by arginine decarboxylase (ADC), which exists as two isoforms (ADC1 and 2) that are differentially regulated by abiotic stimuli, but their role in defence against pathogens has not been studied in depth. This work analysed the participation of ADC in Arabidopsis defence against Pseudomonas viridiflava. ADC activity and expression, polyamine levels and bacterial resistance were analysed in null mutants of each ADC isoform. In non-infected wild-type (WT) plants, ADC2 expression was much higher than ADC1. Analysis of adc mutants demonstrated that ADC2 contributes to a much higher extent than ADC1 to basal ADC activity and putrescine biosynthesis. In addition, adc2 mutants showed increased basal expression of salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-dependent PR genes. Bacterial infection induced putrescine accumulation and ADC1 expression in WT plants, but pathogen-induced putrescine accumulation was blocked in adc1 mutants. Results suggest a specific participation of ADC1 in defence, although basal resistance was not decreased by dysfunction of either of the two ADC genes. In addition, and as opposed to WT plants, bacterial infection increased ADC2 expression and ADC activity in adc1 mutants, which could counterbalance the lack of ADC1. Results demonstrate a major contribution of ADC2 to total ADC activity and the specific induction of ADC1 in response to infection. A certain degree of functional redundancy between the two isoforms in relation to their contribution to basal resistance is also evident.

  16. Functional Roles of the Dimer-Interface Residues in Human Ornithine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Yun; Liu, Yi-Liang; Lin, Chih-Li; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) catalyzes the decarboxylation of ornithine to putrescine and is the rate-limiting enzyme in the polyamine biosynthesis pathway. ODC is a dimeric enzyme, and the active sites of this enzyme reside at the dimer interface. Once the enzyme dissociates, the enzyme activity is lost. In this paper, we investigated the roles of amino acid residues at the dimer interface regarding the dimerization, protein stability and/or enzyme activity of ODC. A multiple sequence alignment of ODC and its homologous protein antizyme inhibitor revealed that 5 of 9 residues (residues 165, 277, 331, 332 and 389) are divergent, whereas 4 (134, 169, 294 and 322) are conserved. Analytical ultracentrifugation analysis suggested that some dimer-interface amino acid residues contribute to formation of the dimer of ODC and that this dimerization results from the cooperativity of these interface residues. The quaternary structure of the sextuple mutant Y331S/Y389D/R277S/D332E/V322D/D134A was changed to a monomer rather than a dimer, and the Kd value of the mutant was 52.8 µM, which is over 500-fold greater than that of the wild-type ODC (ODC_WT). In addition, most interface mutants showed low but detectable or negligible enzyme activity. Therefore, the protein stability of these interface mutants was measured by differential scanning calorimetry. These results indicate that these dimer-interface residues are important for dimer formation and, as a consequence, are critical for enzyme catalysis. PMID:25140796

  17. Epilepsy and hippocampal neurodegeneration induced by glutamate decarboxylase inhibitors in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Patricia; Tapia, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme responsible for GABA synthesis, requires pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. Thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and γ-glutamyl-hydrazone (PLPGH) inhibit the free PLP-dependent isoform (GAD65) activity after systemic administration, leading to epilepsy in mice and in young, but not in adult rats. However, the competitive GAD inhibitor 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) induces convulsions in both immature and adult rats. In the present study we tested comparatively the epileptogenic and neurotoxic effects of PLPGH, TSC and MPA, administered by microdialysis in the hippocampus of adult awake rats. Cortical EEG and motor behavior were analyzed during the next 2h, and aspartate, glutamate and GABA were measured by HPLC in the microdialysis-collected fractions. Twenty-four hours after drug administration rats were fixed for histological analysis of the hippocampus. PLPGH or TSC did not affect the motor behavior, EEG or cellular morphology, although the extracellular concentration of GABA was decreased. In contrast, MPA produced intense wet-dog shakes, EEG epileptiform discharges, a >75% reduction of extracellular GABA levels and remarkable neurodegeneration of the CA1 region, with >80% neuronal loss. The systemic administration of the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 30 min before MPA did not prevent the MPA-induced epilepsy but significantly protected against its neurotoxic effect, reducing neuronal loss to <30%. We conclude that in adult awake rats, drugs acting on PLP availability have only a weak effect on GABA neurotransmission, whereas direct GAD inhibition produced by MPA induces hyperexcitation leading to epilepsy and hippocampal neurodegeneration. Because this degeneration was prevented by the blockade of NMDA receptors, we conclude that it is due to glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity consequent to disinhibition of the hippocampal excitatory circuits.

  18. Hepatic ornithine decarboxylase induction by potato glycoalkaloids in rats.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, K A; Grosjean, O K; Henika, P R; Friedman, M

    1991-08-01

    The induction of hepatic ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in rat livers by the potato glycoalkaloids alpha-solanine, alpha-chaconine, and their aglycone solanidine, has been studied. Ip administration of alpha-solanine at 7.5, 15 and 30 mg/kg body weight produced markedly elevated enzyme activity at 4 hr after treatment, with a linear dose response. The increase was four-fold at the lowest dose administered to 12-fold at the highest. ODC activity was measured at 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 24hr after alpha-solanine was given. A statistically significant increase in enzyme activity was evident at 3 hr after treatment; maximal activity occurred at 5 hr and was approximately 12 times greater than the dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) control level. Elevated activities persisted for several hours, decreasing to about one-third of the maximal level at 8 hr. The relative effects of alpha-solanine, alpha-chaconine and solanidine on ODC activities were studied at 4 hr using an equimolar dose of 17 mM/kg body weight. ODC activity induced by alpha-chaconine was higher than that induced by alpha-solanine; the latter activity was two-thirds that of the former. The aglycone solanidine did not induce any increase in activity compared with the DMSO control. ODC activity with dexamethasone, a glucocorticoid, at 4 mg/kg body weight, followed a pattern similar to that of alpha-solanine. However, maximal activity occurred slightly earlier at 4 hr after treatment. The results show that the extent of induced ODC activity depends on the structure of the potato alkaloid.

  19. [Soluble elastin and antibody formation].

    PubMed

    Stoklasová, A; Randová, Z; Wimmerová, J; Ledvina, M

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, we have obtained antibodies in rabbits to peptides prepared by digestion of elastin with either oxalic acid or phosphoric acid. By Elisa assay, we have shown the lowest production of antibodies against elastin-derived peptides prepared by digestion of N-elastin with phosphoric acid. We have found a strong cross-reactivity between antibodies obtained to peptides prepared by different digestion of insoluble elastin from bovine ligamentum nuchae or aorta and these antigens. A less pronounced cross-reactivity was observed in case of elastin-derived peptides from porcine aorta.

  20. Acid resistance contributes to the high-pressure carbon dioxide resistance of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Soichi; Shimazaki, Junji; Kawaharada, Kazumichi; Matsuda, Tsukasa; Aoyagi, Hiroki; Wakabayashi, Hidekazu; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Yamasaki, Makari; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Effect of deletion of acid resistant genes of E. coli on the high-pressure carbon dioxide (HPC) resistance was investigated. Genes coding amino acid decarboxylases, such as lysine, arginine, and glutamate decarboxylase, were found to contribute to HPC resistance. Protonophore-treated cells showed hypersensitivity to HPC, confirming that HPC induced cytoplasm acidification and exerted severe damage on cells by intrusion of gaseous carbon dioxide into cytoplasm.

  1. Purification, properties and cDNA cloning of glutamate decarboxylase in germinated faba bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Yin, Yongqi; Guo, Qianghui; Gu, Zhenxin

    2013-06-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid with bioactive functions in humans. In this work, glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15, GAD) which is key in the GABA bioformation was purified from 5-day germinated faba beans and characterized. A single band was observed at 58 kDa using sodium dodecyl sulphate gel electrophoresis. GAD optimal activity was at pH 6.0 at 40°C with a K(m) value for glutamic acid (Glu) of 2.63 mM. The enzyme was inhibited significantly by Cu(2+), Fe(3+), Mg(2+), Ba(2+), aminoxyacetate, EGTA, Na(2)EDTA, l-cysteine and beta-mercaptoethanol; and activated at low Ca(2+) 0.2mM. Using RT-PCR, the GAD cDNA was sequenced which indicated 1787 bp long, containing a 1527 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded 509 amino-acid peptides with a calculated molecular weight of 57.74 kDa and a pI of 5.41 (GenBank accession number: JX444699).

  2. The effect of a high fat diet on pyruvate decarboxylase deficiency without central nervous system involvement.

    PubMed

    Kodama, S; Yagi, R; Ninomiya, M; Goji, K; Takahashi, T; Morishita, Y; Matsuo, T

    1983-01-01

    A nine-year-old Japanese boy with low pyruvate decarboxylase activity in fibroblasts showed no central nervous symptoms except for muscle fatigue. The pyruvate decarboxylase activities in fibroblasts of the patient and two control subjects were 0.407 +/- 0.083, 1.029 +/- 0.137 and 1.607 +/- 0.096 mumoles/g protein/30 min, respectively. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) was the same in the patient and controls. There was no inhibitor of pyruvate decarboxylase in the patient's fibroblasts. A high fat diet has been given to the patient for five years. At present he does not complain of any kind of muscle fatigue, except after severe exercise. Mental and physiological development of the patient are within the normal ranges. However, trials of orally administered thiamine hydrochloride or thiamine hydrochloride combined with lipoamide did not improve his muscle fatigue.

  3. GAD Antibodies as Key Link Between Chronic Intestinal Pseudoobstruction, Autonomic Neuropathy, and Limb Stiffness in a Nondiabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Andrea; Mannartz, Vera; Wasmuth, Hermann; Trautwein, Christian; Neumann, Ulf-Peter; Weis, Joachim; Grosse, Joachim; Fuest, Matthias; Hilz, Max-J.; Schulz, Joerg B.; Haubrich, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIP) can be a severe burden and even a life-threatening disorder. Typically, several years of uncertainty are passing before diagnosis. We are reporting the case of a young woman with a decade of severe, progressive gastrointestinal dysmotility. Unusually, she had also developed an autonomic neuropathy, and a stiff limb syndrome. In addition to achalasia and CIP the young woman also developed neuropathic symptoms: orthostatic intolerance, urinary retention, a Horner syndrome, and lower limb stiffness. Careful interdisciplinary diagnostics excluded underlying infectious, rheumatoid, metabolic or tumorous diseases. The detection of GAD (glutamic acid decarboxylase) antibodies, however, seemed to link CIP, autonomic neuropathy, and limb stiffness and pointed at an autoimmune origin of our patient's complaints. This was supported by the positive effects of intravenous immunoglobulin. In response to this therapy the body weight had stabilized, orthostatic tolerance had improved, and limb stiffness was reversed. The case suggested that GAD antibodies should be considered in CIP also in nondiabetic patients. This may support earlier diagnosis and immunotherapy. PMID:26252289

  4. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.115 Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a...

  5. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.115 Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus subtilis. The food additive...

  6. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.115 Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a...

  7. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.115 Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a...

  8. When Good Intentions Go Awry: Modification of a Recombinant Monoclonal Antibody in Chemically Defined Cell Culture by Xylosone, an Oxidative Product of Ascorbic Acid.

    PubMed

    Chumsae, Chris; Hossler, Patrick; Raharimampionona, Haly; Zhou, Yu; McDermott, Sean; Racicot, Chris; Radziejewski, Czeslaw; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2015-08-04

    With the advent of new initiatives to develop chemically defined media, cell culture scientists screen many additives to improve cell growth and productivity. However, the introduction or increase of supplements, typically considered beneficial or protective on their own, to the basal media or feed stream may cause unexpected detrimental consequences to product quality. For instance, because cultured cells are constantly under oxidative stress, ascorbic acid (vitamin C, a potent natural reducing agent) is a common additive to cell culture media. However, as reported herein, a recombinant monoclonal antibody (adalimumab) in cell culture was covalently modified by xylosone (molecular weight 148), an oxidative product of ascorbate. Containing reactive carbonyl groups, xylosone modifies various amines (e.g., the N-termini of the heavy and light chains and susceptible lysines), forming either hemiaminal (+148 Da) or Schiff base (imine, +130 Da) products. Our findings show, for the first time, that ascorbate-derived xylosone can contribute to an increase in molecular heterogeneity, such as acidic species. Our work serves as a reminder that additives to cell culture and their metabolites may become reactive and negatively impact the overall product quality and should be carefully monitored with any changes in cell culture conditions.

  9. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Gamat, Melissa; Malinowski, Rita L.; Parkhurst, Linnea J.; Steinke, Laura M.; Marker, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO) to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effect in mediating

  10. Molecular Evolution and Functional Characterization of a Bifunctional Decarboxylase Involved in Lycopodium Alkaloid Biosynthesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Hanada, Kousuke; Maruyama, Akira; Aoyagi, Kaori; Komatsu, Kana; Ueno, Hideki; Yamashita, Madoka; Sasaki, Ryosuke; Oikawa, Akira; Yamazaki, Mami

    2016-01-01

    Lycopodium alkaloids (LAs) are derived from lysine (Lys) and are found mainly in Huperziaceae and Lycopodiaceae. LAs are potentially useful against Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, and myasthenia gravis. Here, we cloned the bifunctional lysine/ornithine decarboxylase (L/ODC), the first gene involved in LA biosynthesis, from the LA-producing plants Lycopodium clavatum and Huperzia serrata. We describe the in vitro and in vivo functional characterization of the L. clavatum L/ODC (LcL/ODC). The recombinant LcL/ODC preferentially catalyzed the decarboxylation of l-Lys over l-ornithine (l-Orn) by about 5 times. Transient expression of LcL/ODC fused with the amino or carboxyl terminus of green fluorescent protein, in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, showed LcL/ODC localization in the cytosol. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) hairy roots and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants expressing LcL/ODC enhanced the production of a Lys-derived alkaloid, anabasine, and cadaverine, respectively, thus, confirming the function of LcL/ODC in plants. In addition, we present an example of the convergent evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase that resulted in the production of Lys-derived alkaloids in Leguminosae (legumes) and Lycopodiaceae (clubmosses). This convergent evolution event probably occurred via the promiscuous functions of the ancestral Orn decarboxylase, which is an enzyme involved in the primary metabolism of polyamine. The positive selection sites were detected by statistical analyses using phylogenetic trees and were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, suggesting the importance of those sites in granting the promiscuous function to Lys decarboxylase while retaining the ancestral Orn decarboxylase function. This study contributes to a better understanding of LA biosynthesis and the molecular evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase. PMID:27303024

  11. Effects of anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody IM7 carried with chitosan polylactic acid-coated nano-particles on the treatment of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yizhuo; Zhao, Xinghui; Li, Xiuli; Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Zhongyu; Li, Yali

    2017-01-01

    Failure in early diagnosis and ineffective treatment are the major causes of ovarian cancer mortality. Hyaluronan and its receptor, cluster of differentiation (CD)44, have been considered to be valid targets for treating cancer. The anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody IM7 is effective in treating ovarian cancer; however, its toxicity should not be ignored. The present study has developed a new drug carrier system composed of chitosan nano-particles coated with polylactic acid (PLA) to improve the treatment efficacy and reduce toxicity. An ionic crosslinking method and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide were used to prepare the IM7 antibody, which was loaded with chitosan nano-particles. The surfaces of the nano-particles were coated with PLA to generate PLA-chitosan-IM7. Subsequently, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to observe the size and zeta potential of the nano-particles. In addition, a spectrophotometer was used to calculate the loading rate and release rate of the nano-particles in acidic and neutral environments. MTT assay was used to evaluate the anti-proliferative effect of PLA-chitosan-IM7 on the human ovarian cancer cell line HO-8910PM. In addition, an in vivo imaging system was used to further investigate the effect of PLA-chitosan-IM7 on the treatment of mice with ovarian cancer. A total of 35 days subsequent to PLA-chitosan-IM7 treatment, all animals were sacrificed by CO2, and the tumors were removed and weighted. The PLA-chitosan-IM7 nano-particles were successfully prepared, since TEM revealed that their size was 300-400 nm and their zeta potential was +25 mV. According to the spectrophotometry results, the loading rate was 52%, and PLA-chitosan-IM7 exhibited good resistance to acids. MTT assay demonstrated that PLA-chitosan-IM7 could suppress the proliferation of HO-8910PM cells in vitro. The in vivo imaging system revealed that PLA-chitosan-IM7 was effective in controlling the development

  12. Effects of anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody IM7 carried with chitosan polylactic acid-coated nano-particles on the treatment of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yizhuo; Zhao, Xinghui; Li, Xiuli; Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Zhongyu; Li, Yali

    2017-01-01

    Failure in early diagnosis and ineffective treatment are the major causes of ovarian cancer mortality. Hyaluronan and its receptor, cluster of differentiation (CD)44, have been considered to be valid targets for treating cancer. The anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody IM7 is effective in treating ovarian cancer; however, its toxicity should not be ignored. The present study has developed a new drug carrier system composed of chitosan nano-particles coated with polylactic acid (PLA) to improve the treatment efficacy and reduce toxicity. An ionic crosslinking method and 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride/N-hydroxysuccinimide were used to prepare the IM7 antibody, which was loaded with chitosan nano-particles. The surfaces of the nano-particles were coated with PLA to generate PLA-chitosan-IM7. Subsequently, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to observe the size and zeta potential of the nano-particles. In addition, a spectrophotometer was used to calculate the loading rate and release rate of the nano-particles in acidic and neutral environments. MTT assay was used to evaluate the anti-proliferative effect of PLA-chitosan-IM7 on the human ovarian cancer cell line HO-8910PM. In addition, an in vivo imaging system was used to further investigate the effect of PLA-chitosan-IM7 on the treatment of mice with ovarian cancer. A total of 35 days subsequent to PLA-chitosan-IM7 treatment, all animals were sacrificed by CO2, and the tumors were removed and weighted. The PLA-chitosan-IM7 nano-particles were successfully prepared, since TEM revealed that their size was 300–400 nm and their zeta potential was +25 mV. According to the spectrophotometry results, the loading rate was 52%, and PLA-chitosan-IM7 exhibited good resistance to acids. MTT assay demonstrated that PLA-chitosan-IM7 could suppress the proliferation of HO-8910PM cells in vitro. The in vivo imaging system revealed that PLA-chitosan-IM7 was effective in controlling the

  13. Glutamate Decarboxylase 1 Overexpression as a Poor Prognostic Factor in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Ying; Chao, Tung-Bo; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tian, Yu-Feng; Chen, Tzu-Ju; Lee, Sung-Wei; He, Hong-Lin; Chang, I-Wei; Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Lin, Ching-Yih; Li, Chien-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) which serves as a rate-limiting enzyme involving in the production of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), exists in the GABAergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). Little is known about the relevance of GAD1 to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Through data mining on a data set derived from a published transcriptome database, this study first identified GAD1 as a differentially upregulated gene in NPC. We aimed to evaluate GAD1 expression and its prognostic effect on patients with early and locoregionally advanced NPC. Methods: We evaluated GAD1 immunohistochemistry and performed an H-score analysis on biopsy specimens from 124 patients with nonmetastasized NPC receiving treatment. GAD1 overexpression was defined as an H score higher than the median value. The findings of such an analysis are correlated with clinicopathological behaviors and survival rates, namely disease-specific survival (DSS), distant-metastasis-free survival (DMeFS), and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rates. Results: GAD1 overexpression was significantly associated with an increase in the primary tumor status (p < 0.001) and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages III-IV (p = 0.002) and was a univariate predictor of adverse outcomes of DSS (p = 0.002), DMeFS (p < 0.0001), and LRFS (p = 0.001). In the multivariate comparison, in addition to advanced AJCC stages III-IV, GAD1 overexpression remained an independent prognosticator of short DSS (p = 0.004, hazard ratio = 2.234), DMeFS (p < 0.001, hazard ratio = 4.218), and LRFS (p = 0.013, hazard ratio = 2.441) rates. Conclusions: Our data reveal that GAD1 overexpression was correlated with advanced disease status and may thus be a critical prognostic indicator of poor outcomes in NPC and a potential therapeutic target to facilitate the development of effective treatment modalities. PMID:27698909

  14. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Binding and Reaction Catalysis in Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; McWhorter, William J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-09-17

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes the final step of the mevalonate pathway, the Mg{sup 2+}-ATP dependent decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP), producing isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Synthesis of IPP, an isoprenoid precursor molecule that is a critical intermediate in peptidoglycan and polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential in Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.), and thus the enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are ideal antimicrobial targets. MDD belongs to the GHMP superfamily of metabolite kinases that have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, yet the crystallization of GHMP kinase ternary complexes has proven to be difficult. To further our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of GHMP kinases with the purpose of developing broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that target the substrate and nucleotide binding sites, we report the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant (S192A and D283A) ternary complexes of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD. Comparison of apo, MVAPP-bound, and ternary complex wild-type MDD provides structural information about the mode of substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Structural characterization of ternary complexes of catalytically deficient MDD S192A and D283A (k{sub cat} decreased 10{sup 3}- and 10{sup 5}-fold, respectively) provides insight into MDD function. The carboxylate side chain of invariant Asp{sup 283} functions as a catalytic base and is essential for the proper orientation of the MVAPP C3-hydroxyl group within the active site funnel. Several MDD amino acids within the conserved phosphate binding loop ('P-loop') provide key interactions, stabilizing the nucleotide triphosphoryl moiety. The crystal structures presented here provide a useful foundation for structure-based drug design.

  15. Caprylic acid-induced impurity precipitation from protein A capture column elution pool to enable a two-chromatography-step process for monoclonal antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji; Wang, Lu; Twarowska, Barbara; Laino, Sarah; Sparks, Colleen; Smith, Timothy; Russell, Reb; Wang, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the use of caprylic acid (CA) to precipitate impurities from the protein A capture column elution pool for the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the objective of developing a two chromatography step antibody purification process. A CA-induced impurity precipitation in the protein A column elution pool was evaluated as an alternative method to polishing chromatography techniques for use in the purification of mAbs. Parameters including pH, CA concentrations, mixing time, mAb concentrations, buffer systems, and incubation temperatures were evaluated on their impacts on the impurity removal, high-molecular weight (HMW) formation and precipitation step yield. Both pH and CA concentration, but not mAb concentrations and buffer systems, are key parameters that can affect host-cell proteins (HCPs) clearance, HMW species, and yield. CA precipitation removes HCPs and some HMW species to the acceptable levels under the optimal conditions. The CA precipitation process is robust at 15-25°C. For all five mAbs tested in this study, the optimal CA concentration range is 0.5-1.0%, while the pH range is from 5.0 to 6.0. A purification process using two chromatography steps (protein A capture column and ion exchange polishing column) in combination with CA-based impurity precipitation step can be used as a robust downstream process for mAb molecules with a broad range of isoelectric points. Residual CA can be effectively removed by the subsequent polishing cation exchange chromatography.

  16. First evidence of a membrane-bound, tyramine and beta-phenylethylamine producing, tyrosine decarboxylase in Enterococcus faecalis: a two-dimensional electrophoresis proteomic study.

    PubMed

    Pessione, Enrica; Pessione, Alessandro; Lamberti, Cristina; Coïsson, Daniel Jean; Riedel, Kathrin; Mazzoli, Roberto; Bonetta, Silvia; Eberl, Leo; Giunta, Carlo

    2009-05-01

    The soluble and membrane proteome of a tyramine producing Enterococcus faecalis, isolated from an Italian goat cheese, was investigated. A detailed analysis revealed that this strain also produces small amounts of beta-phenylethylamine. Kinetics of tyramine and beta-phenylethylamine accumulation, evaluated in tyrosine plus phenylalanine-enriched cultures (stimulated condition), suggest that the same enzyme, the tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC), catalyzes both tyrosine and phenylalanine decarboxylation: tyrosine was recognized as the first substrate and completely converted into tyramine (100% yield) while phenylalanine was decarboxylated to beta-phenylethylamine (10% yield) only when tyrosine was completely depleted. The presence of an aspecific aromatic amino acid decarboxylase is a common feature in eukaryotes, but in bacteria only indirect evidences of a phenylalanine decarboxylating TDC have been presented so far. Comparative proteomic investigations, performed by 2-DE and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, on bacteria grown in conditions stimulating tyramine and beta-phenylethylamine biosynthesis and in control conditions revealed 49 differentially expressed proteins. Except for aromatic amino acid biosynthetic enzymes, no significant down-regulation of the central metabolic pathways was observed in stimulated conditions, suggesting that tyrosine decarboxylation does not compete with the other energy-supplying routes. The most interesting finding is a membrane-bound TDC highly over-expressed during amine production. This is the first evidence of a true membrane-bound TDC, longly suspected in bacteria on the basis of the gene sequence.

  17. Factors affecting the hydroxycinnamate decarboxylase/vinylphenol reductase activity of dekkera/brettanomyces: application for dekkera/brettanomyces control in red wine making.

    PubMed

    Benito, S; Palomero, F; Morata, A; Calderón, F; Suárez-Lepe, J A

    2009-01-01

    The growth of Dekkera/Brettanomyces yeasts during the ageing of red wines-which can seriously reduce the quality of the final product-is difficult to control. The present study examines the hydroxycinnamate decarboxylase/vinylphenol reductase activity of different strains of Dekkera bruxellensis and Dekkera anomala under a range of growth-limiting conditions with the aim of finding solutions to this problem. The yeasts were cultured in in-house growth media containing different quantities of growth inhibitors such as ethanol, SO(2), ascorbic acid, benzoic acid and nicostatin, different sugar contents, and at different pHs and temperatures. The reduction of p-coumaric acid and the formation of 4-ethylphenol were periodically monitored by HPLC-PDA. The results of this study allow the optimization of differential media for detecting/culturing these yeasts, and suggest possible ways of controlling these organisms in wineries.

  18. A Nucleic-Acid Hydrolyzing Single Chain Antibody Confers Resistance to DNA Virus Infection in HeLa Cells and C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gunsup; Yu, Jaelim; Cho, Seungchan; Byun, Sung-June; Kim, Dae Hyun; Lee, Taek-Kyun; Kwon, Myung-Hee; Lee, Sukchan

    2014-01-01

    Viral protein neutralizing antibodies have been developed but they are limited only to the targeted virus and are often susceptible to antigenic drift. Here, we present an alternative strategy for creating virus-resistant cells and animals by ectopic expression of a nucleic acid hydrolyzing catalytic 3D8 single chain variable fragment (scFv), which has both DNase and RNase activities. HeLa cells (SCH7072) expressing 3D8 scFv acquired significant resistance to DNA viruses. Virus challenging with Herpes simplex virus (HSV) in 3D8 scFv transgenic cells and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay based on direct DNA cleavage analysis revealed that the induced resistance in HeLa cells was acquired by the nucleic acid hydrolyzing catalytic activity of 3D8 scFv. In addition, pseudorabies virus (PRV) infection in WT C57BL/6 mice was lethal, whereas transgenic mice (STG90) that expressed high levels of 3D8 scFv mRNA in liver, muscle, and brain showed a 56% survival rate 5 days after PRV intramuscular infection. The antiviral effects against DNA viruses conferred by 3D8 scFv expression in HeLa cells as well as an in vivo mouse system can be attributed to the nuclease activity that inhibits viral genome DNA replication in the nucleus and/or viral mRNA translation in the cytoplasm. Our results demonstrate that the nucleic-acid hydrolyzing activity of 3D8 scFv confers viral resistance to DNA viruses in vitro in HeLa cells and in an in vivo mouse system. PMID:24968358

  19. Monoclonal antipeptide antibodies against amino acid residues 1101-1106 of human C4 distinguish C4A from C4B.

    PubMed

    Reilly, B D; Levine, P; Rothbard, J; Skanes, V M

    1991-01-01

    Comparison of amino acid sequences of the alpha-chain fragment of human C4, C4d, has shown C4A- and C4B-specific sequences at residues 1101-1106 in which the aspartic acid-histidine substitution at position 1106 may be related to the amide and ester bond forming properties of these molecules. Peptides containing twelve amino acid residues of the C4A- or C4B-specific sequences were synthesized and injected into female Balb/c mice. Serum from 2 mice, one immunized with the C4A-specific peptide and the other with the C4B-specific peptide, gave strong isotype-specific responses in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against affinity-purified C4A3 and C4B2B1. Spleen cells from these mice were fused with the mouse myeloma SP2/0-Ag 14, and two cloned cell lines, AII-1 and BII-1, were established from hybrids. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting of monoclonal antibodies AII-1 and BII-1 show that the former reacts with the C4A but not with the C4B alpha-chain and the latter with C4B but not with the C4A alpha-chain. Furthermore, immunoblotting of C4 allelic variants showed that AII-1 reacted with all C4A allotypes tested, including A6, A4, A3 and A2, whereas BII-1 reacted with all C4B allotypes tested, including B5, B3, B2, and B1.

  20. Viscosity-Lowering Effect of Amino Acids and Salts on Highly Concentrated Solutions of Two IgG1 Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujing; Zhang, Ning; Hu, Tao; Dai, Weiguo; Feng, Xiuying; Zhang, Xinyi; Qian, Feng

    2015-12-07

    Monoclonal antibodies display complicated solution properties in highly concentrated (>100 mg/mL) formulations, such as high viscosity, high aggregation propensity, and low stability, among others, originating from protein-protein interactions within the colloidal protein solution. These properties severely hinder the successful development of high-concentration mAb solution for subcutaneous injection. We hereby investigated the effects of several small-molecule excipients with diverse biophysical-chemical properties on the viscosity, aggregation propensity, and stability on two model IgG1 (JM1 and JM2) mAb formulations. These excipients include nine amino acids or their salt forms (Ala, Pro, Val, Gly, Ser, HisHCl, LysHCl, ArgHCl, and NaGlu), four representative salts (NaCl, NaAc, Na2SO4, and NH4Cl), and two chaotropic reagents (urea and GdnHCl). With only salts or amino acids in their salt-forms, significant decrease in viscosity was observed for JM1 (by up to 30-40%) and JM2 (by up to 50-80%) formulations, suggesting charge-charge interaction between the mAbs dictates the high viscosity of these mAbs formulations. Most of these viscosity-lowering excipients did not induce substantial protein aggregation or changes in the secondary structure of the mAbs, as evidenced by HPLC-SEC, DSC, and FT-IR analysis, even in the absence of common protein stabilizers such as sugars and surfactants. Therefore, amino acids in their salt-forms and several common salts, such as ArgHCl, HisHCl, LysHCl, NaCl, Na2SO4, and NaAc, could potentially serve as viscosity-lowering excipients during high-concentration mAb formulation development.

  1. [Study of nucleic acid structure by immunochemical methods. I. Antibodies specific for 6-sulfo-5,6-dihydro-4-methoxyaminopyrimidinone-2].

    PubMed

    Poverennyĭ, A M; Podgorodnichenko, V K; Monastyrskaia, G S; Bryskina, L E; Sverdlov, E D

    1978-01-01

    Immunization of animals with DNA modified by a mixture of bisulphite and O-methylhydroxylamine and methylated bovine serum albumin results in production of antibodies mainly reacting with modified DNA. Antibodies that react with denatured DNA were produced in minute quantity. It was shown that elicited antibodies possess a high specificity and have the ability to recognize only nucleotides with a double modification. The immune sera were fractionated by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography and the antibody activity was demonstrable in the 19S and 7S fractions. The attempts to induce synthesis of antibodies by injection of DNA modified by O-methylhydroxylamine failed.

  2. Determinants of the Differential Antizyme-Binding Affinity of Ornithine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yen-Chin; Hsu, Den-Hua; Huang, Chi-Liang; Liu, Yi-Liang; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a ubiquitous enzyme that is conserved in all species from bacteria to humans. Mammalian ODC is degraded by the proteasome in a ubiquitin-independent manner by direct binding to the antizyme (AZ). In contrast, Trypanosoma brucei ODC has a low binding affinity toward AZ. In this study, we identified key amino acid residues that govern the differential AZ binding affinity of human and Trypanosoma brucei ODC. Multiple sequence alignments of the ODC putative AZ-binding site highlights several key amino acid residues that are different between the human and Trypanosoma brucei ODC protein sequences, including residue 119, 124,125, 129, 136, 137 and 140 (the numbers is for human ODC). We generated a septuple human ODC mutant protein where these seven bases were mutated to match the Trypanosoma brucei ODC protein sequence. The septuple mutant protein was much less sensitive to AZ inhibition compared to the WT protein, suggesting that these amino acid residues play a role in human ODC-AZ binding. Additional experiments with sextuple mutants suggest that residue 137 plays a direct role in AZ binding, and residues 119 and 140 play secondary roles in AZ binding. The dissociation constants were also calculated to quantify the affinity of the ODC-AZ binding interaction. The Kd value for the wild type ODC protein-AZ heterodimer ([ODC_WT]-AZ) is approximately 0.22 μM, while the Kd value for the septuple mutant-AZ heterodimer ([ODC_7M]-AZ) is approximately 12.4 μM. The greater than 50-fold increase in [ODC_7M]-AZ binding affinity shows that the ODC-7M enzyme has a much lower binding affinity toward AZ. For the mutant proteins ODC_7M(-Q119H) and ODC_7M(-V137D), the Kd was 1.4 and 1.2 μM, respectively. These affinities are 6-fold higher than the WT_ODC Kd, which suggests that residues 119 and 137 play a role in AZ binding. PMID:22073206

  3. Phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 in human malonyl-CoA decarboxylase expressed in silkworm Bombyx mori regulates catalytic decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Wook; Makishima, Yu; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Chung, Shin-Kyo; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-11-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is a vital catalytic reaction of lipid metabolism. While it is established that phosphorylation of MCD modulates the enzymatic activity, the specific phosphorylation sites associated with the catalytic function have not been documented due to lack of sufficient production of MCD with proper post-translational modifications. Here, we used the silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid system to express human MCD (hMCD) and mapped phosphorylation effects on enzymatic function. Purified MCD from silkworm displayed post-translational phosphorylation and demonstrated coherent enzymatic activity with high yield (-200 μg/silkworm). Point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites, Ser-204 or Tyr-405 of hMCD, identified by bioinformatics and proteomics analyses reduced the catalytic activity, underscoring the functional significance of phosphorylation in modulating decarboxylase-based catalysis. Identified phosphorylated residues are distinct from the decarboxylation catalytic site, implicating a phosphorylation-induced global conformational change of MCD as responsible in altering catalytic function. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 regulates the decarboxylase function of hMCD leveraging the silkworm-based BmNPV bacmid expression system that offers a fail-safe eukaryotic production platform implementing proper post-translational modification such as phosphorylation.

  4. Inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylase from Z. mobilis by novel analogues of thiamine pyrophosphate: investigating pyrophosphate mimics.

    PubMed

    Erixon, Karl M; Dabalos, Chester L; Leeper, Finian J

    2007-03-07

    Replacement of the thiazolium ring of thiamine pyrophosphate with a triazole gives extremely potent inhibitors of pyruvate decarboxylase from Z. mobilis, with K(I) values down to 20 pM; this system was used to explore pyrophosphate mimics and several effective analogues were discovered.

  5. A retrospective study on IVF outcome in euthyroid patients with anti-thyroid antibodies: effects of levothyroxine, acetyl-salicylic acid and prednisolone adjuvant treatments

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Anti-thyroid antibodies (ATA), even if not associated with thyroid dysfunction, are suspected to cause poorer outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF). Methods We retrospectively analyzed: (a) the prevalence of ATA in euthyroid infertile women, (b) IVF outcome in euthyroid, ATA+ patients, and (c) the effect of adjuvant treatments (levothyroxine alone or associated with acetylsalicylic acid and prednisolone) on IVF results in ATA+ patients. One hundred twenty-nine euthyroid, ATA+ women undergoing IVF were compared with 200 matched, ATA-controls. During IVF cycle, 38 ATA+ patients did not take any adjuvant treatment, 55 received levothyroxin (LT), and 38 received LT +acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)+prednisolone (P). Results The prevalence of ATA among euthyroid, infertile patients was 10.5%, similar to the one reported in euthyroid women between 18 and 45 years. ATA+ patients who did not receive any adjuvant treatment showed significantly poorer ovarian responsiveness to stimulation and IVF results than controls. ATA+ patients receiving LT responded better to ovarian stimulation, but had IVF results as poor as untreated ATA+ women. Patients receiving LT+ASA+P had significantly higher pregnancy and implantation rates than untreated ATA+ patients (PR/ET 25.6% and IR 17.7% vs. PR/ET 7.5% and IR 4.7%, respectively), and overall IVF results comparable to patients without ATA (PR/ET 32.8% and IR 19%). Conclusion These observations suggest that euthyroid ATA+ patients undergoing IVF could have better outcome if given LT+ASA+P as adjuvant treatment. This hypothesis must be verified in further randomized, prospective studies. PMID:19941670

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Geskin, Larisa J

    2015-10-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized cancer therapy. Approaches targeting specific cellular targets on the malignant cells and in tumor microenvironment have been proved to be successful in hematologic malignancies, including cutaneous lymphomas. mAb-based therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma has demonstrated high response rates and a favorable toxicity profile in clinical trials. Several antibodies and antibody-based conjugates are approved for use in clinical practice, and many more are in ongoing and planned clinical trials. In addition, these safe and effective drugs can be used as pillars for sequential therapies in a rational stepwise manner.

  7. Rapid detection and quantification of tyrosine decarboxylase gene (tdc) and its expression in gram-positive bacteria associated with fermented foods using PCR-based methods.

    PubMed

    Torriani, Sandra; Gatto, Veronica; Sembeni, Silvia; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna; Belletti, Nicoletta; Gardini, Fausto; Bover-Cid, Sara

    2008-01-01

    In this study, PCR-based procedures were developed to detect the occurrence and quantify the expression of the tyrosine decarboxylase gene (tdc) in gram-positive bacteria associated with fermented foods. Consensus primers were used in conventional and reverse transcription PCR to analyze a collection of 87 pure cultures of lactic acid bacteria and staphylococci. All enterococci, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus curvatus, and Lactobacillus fermentum strains and 1 of 10 Staphylococcus xylosus strains produced amplification products with the primers DEC5 and DEC3 in accordance with results of the screening plate method and with previously reported result obtained with high-performance liquid chromatography. No amplicons were obtained for tyramine-negative strains, confirming the high specificity of these new primers. A novel quantitative real-time PCR assay was successfully applied to quantify tdc and its transcript in pure cultures and in meat and meat products. This assay allowed estimation of the influence of different variables (pH, temperature, and NaCl concentration) on the tdc expression of the tyraminogenic strain Enterococcus faecalis EF37 after 72 h of growth in M17 medium. Data obtained suggest that stressful conditions could induce greater tyrosine decarboxylase activity. The culture-independent PCR procedures developed here may be used for reliable and fast detection and quantification of bacterial tyraminogenic activity without the limitations of conventional techniques.

  8. Substitution at aspartic acid 1128 in the SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein mediates escape from a S2 domain-targeting neutralizing monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Keng, Choong-Tat; Leung, Cynthia Sau-Wai; Peiris, J S Malik; Poon, Leo Lit Man; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs), are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S) protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2): 941-50). In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111-1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A) exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus.

  9. Substitution at Aspartic Acid 1128 in the SARS Coronavirus Spike Glycoprotein Mediates Escape from a S2 Domain-Targeting Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Oi-Wing; Keng, Choong-Tat; Leung, Cynthia Sau-Wai; Peiris, J. S. Malik; Poon, Leo Lit Man; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2014-01-01

    The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent for the infectious disease, SARS, which first emerged 10 years ago. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that has crossed the species barriers to infect humans. Bats, which harbour a diverse pool of SARS-like CoVs (SL-CoVs), are believed to be the natural reservoir. The SARS-CoV surface Spike (S) protein is a major antigenic determinant in eliciting neutralizing antibody production during SARS-CoV infection. In our previous work, we showed that a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target the S2 subunit of the S protein are capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV infection in vitro (Lip KM et al, J Virol. 2006 Jan; 80(2): 941–50). In this study, we report our findings on the characterization of one of these mAbs, known as 1A9, which binds to the S protein at a novel epitope within the S2 subunit at amino acids 1111–1130. MAb 1A9 is a broadly neutralizing mAb that prevents viral entry mediated by the S proteins of human and civet SARS-CoVs as well as bat SL-CoVs. By generating mutant SARS-CoV that escapes the neutralization by mAb 1A9, the residue D1128 in S was found to be crucial for its interaction with mAb 1A9. S protein containing the substitution of D1128 with alanine (D1128A) exhibited a significant decrease in binding capability to mAb 1A9 compared to wild-type S protein. By using a pseudotyped viral entry assay, it was shown that the D1128A substitution in the escape virus allows it to overcome the viral entry blockage by mAb 1A9. In addition, the D1128A mutation was found to exert no effects on the S protein cell surface expression and incorporation into virion particles, suggesting that the escape virus retains the same viral entry property as the wild-type virus. PMID:25019613

  10. The expression of acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins on the surface membrane of different tissues in autoimmune and normal mice which are the target molecules for anti-double-stranded DNA antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Sun, K H; Liu, W T; Tang, S J; Tsai, C Y; Hsieh, S C; Wu, T H; Han, S H; Yu, C L

    1996-01-01

    Affinity-purified polyclonal anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) antibodies from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) exert a cytostatic effect on cultured rat glomerular mesangial cells (MC). The cognate antigens expressed on the surface of MC have been proved to be acidic ribosomal phosphoproteins (P proteins) in our previous study. The mesangial cytostatic effect of anti-dsDNA antibodies is attributed to the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with membrane-expressed P proteins, but not to the effect of minute amounts of anti-ribosomal P proteins antibodies contained in the anti-dsDNA preparations. Immunofluorescence staining of the native cells demonstrated that anti-dsDNA antibodies bound to the surface of rat mesangial cells, rat brain astrocytes (RBA-1) and mouse fibroblasts (3T3). Anti-dsDNA antibodies also exert potent cytostatic effects on these cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the plasma membranes of different cell lines and tissues from normal and autoimmune mice were isolated and probed by anti-dsDNA antibodies in Western blot analysis. We found the actively proliferating cells such as MC, RBA-1 and 3T3 may express both P0 (38,000 MW) and P1 (19,000 MW) on the surface membrane. In addition, the kidney, liver and spleen from either autoimmune MRL-lpr/lpr or BALB/c mice may constantly express P0 protein, but the expression of P1 is inconsistent. In contrast, brain and muscle from either mice failed to express P proteins on their surface. Unexpectedly, a high molecular weight substance (larger than 205,000 MW) with unknown nature appears in the membrane of brain and muscle tissues in both mice. Immunoprecipitation of the surface-biotinylated MC-lysate by anti-dsDNA antibodies further confirmed that P1 (19,000 MW) and P2 (17,000 MW) are really expressed on the cell surface. These results suggest that P proteins expressed on the surface of different tissues become the targets for anti-dsDNA antibodies mediating pleomorphic tissue

  11. Effect of the hexapeptide dalargin on ornithine decarboxylase activity in the duodenal mucosa of rats with experimental duodenal ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, K.N.; Shitin, A.G.; Polonskii, V.M.; Vinogradov, V.A.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of dalargin on ornithine decarboxylase in homogenates of the duodenal ulcer from rats with experimental duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine. Activity of the enzyme was expressed in pmoles /sup 14/CO/sub 2//mg protein/h. Protein was determined by Lowry's method. The findings indicate that stimulation of ornithine decarboxylase and the antiulcerative effect of dalargin may be due to direct interaction of the peptide with cells of the intestinal mucosa and with enterocytes.

  12. Unusual space-group pseudo symmetry in crystals of human phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Manoj, N.; Ealick, S.E.

    2010-12-01

    Phosphopantothenoylcysteine (PPC) decarboxylase is an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of coenzyme A and catalyzes the decarboxylation of PPC to phosphopantetheine. Human PPC decarboxylase has been expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The Laue class of the diffraction data appears to be {bar 3}m, suggesting space group R32 with two monomers per asymmetric unit. However, the crystals belong to the space group R3 and the asymmetric unit contains four monomers. The structure has been solved using molecular replacement and refined to a current R factor of 29%. The crystal packing can be considered as two interlaced lattices, each consistent with space group R32 and with the corresponding twofold axes parallel to each other but separated along the threefold axis. Thus, the true space group is R3 with four monomers per asymmetric unit.

  13. HemQ: An iron-coproporphyrin oxidative decarboxylase for protoheme synthesis in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, Harry A.; Gerdes, Svetlana

    2015-02-21

    Genes for chlorite dismutase-like proteins are found widely among heme-synthesizing bacteria and some Archaea. It is now known that among the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria these proteins do not possess chlorite dismutase activity but instead are essential for heme synthesis. These proteins, named HemQ, are ironcoproporphyrin (coproheme) decarboxylases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of coproheme III into protoheme IX. As purified, HemQs do not contain bound heme, but readily bind exogeneously supplied heme with low micromolar affinity. We find that the heme-bound form of HemQ has low peroxidase activity and in the presence of peroxide the bound heme may be destroyed. Furthermore, it is possible that HemQ may serve a dual role as a decarboxylase in heme biosynthesis and a regulatory protein in heme homeostasis.

  14. HemQ: an iron-coproporphyrin oxidative decarboxylase for protoheme synthesis in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Harry A.; Gerdes, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Genes for chlorite dismutase-like proteins are found widely among hemesynthesizing bacteria and some Archaea. It is now known that among the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria these proteins do not possess chlorite dismutase activity but instead are essential for heme synthesis. These proteins, named HemQ, are ironcoproporphyrin (coproheme) decarboxylases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of coproheme III into protoheme IX. As purified, HemQs do not contain bound heme, but readily bind exogeneously supplied heme with low micromolar affinity. The heme-bound form of HemQ has low peroxidase activity and in the presence of peroxide the bound heme may be destroyed. Thus, it is possible that HemQ may serve a dual role as a decarboxylase in heme biosynthesis and a regulatory protein in heme homeostasis. PMID:25711532

  15. Increase of histidine decarboxylase activity in mice hypothalamus after intracerebroventricular administration of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Niimi, M; Mochizuki, T; Cacabelos, R; Yamatodani, A

    1993-10-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of lipopolysaccharide on histidine decarboxylase activity and histamine content in the hypothalamus were investigated in male mice of ddY strain in vivo. Two-fold increase in histidine decarboxylase activity (HDC) was observed 4 h after administration of 50 mcg lipopolysaccharide, and HDC activity returned to the basal level within 12 h after injection. Furthermore, histamine contents showed a slight decrease at 1 and 2 h and a mild increase at 12 h after administration. However, changes in histamine content were not statistically significant. These results suggest that the increase of HDC activity in the hypothalamus by lipopolysaccharide may be involved in the central neuroimmune responses.

  16. Identification of FAH Domain-containing Protein 1 (FAHD1) as Oxaloacetate Decarboxylase*

    PubMed Central

    Pircher, Haymo; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Diener, Thomas; Metzger, Christina; Albertini, Eva; Taferner, Andrea; Unterluggauer, Hermann; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R.; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder

    2015-01-01

    Fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) domain-containing proteins occur in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, where they carry out diverse enzymatic reactions, probably related to structural differences in their respective FAH domains; however, the precise relationship between structure of the FAH domain and the associated enzyme function remains elusive. In mammals, three FAH domain-containing proteins, FAHD1, FAHD2A, and FAHD2B, are known; however, their enzymatic function, if any, remains to be demonstrated. In bacteria, oxaloacetate is subject to enzymatic decarboxylation; however, oxaloacetate decarboxylases (ODx) were so far not identified in eukaryotes. Based on molecular modeling and subsequent biochemical investigations, we identified FAHD1 as a eukaryotic ODx enzyme. The results presented here indicate that dedicated oxaloacetate decarboxylases exist in eukaryotes. PMID:25575590

  17. HemQ: An iron-coproporphyrin oxidative decarboxylase for protoheme synthesis in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Dailey, Harry A.; Gerdes, Svetlana

    2015-02-21

    Genes for chlorite dismutase-like proteins are found widely among heme-synthesizing bacteria and some Archaea. It is now known that among the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria these proteins do not possess chlorite dismutase activity but instead are essential for heme synthesis. These proteins, named HemQ, are ironcoproporphyrin (coproheme) decarboxylases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of coproheme III into protoheme IX. As purified, HemQs do not contain bound heme, but readily bind exogeneously supplied heme with low micromolar affinity. We find that the heme-bound form of HemQ has low peroxidase activity and in the presence of peroxide the bound heme may be destroyed.more » Furthermore, it is possible that HemQ may serve a dual role as a decarboxylase in heme biosynthesis and a regulatory protein in heme homeostasis.« less

  18. Structural Asymmetry and Disulfide Bridges among Subunits Modulate the Activity of Human Malonyl-CoA Decarboxylase*

    PubMed Central

    Aparicio, David; Pérez-Luque, Rosa; Carpena, Xavier; Díaz, Mireia; Ferrer, Joan C.; Loewen, Peter C.; Fita, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is an essential facet in the regulation of fatty acid metabolism. The structure of human peroxisomal MCD reveals a molecular tetramer that is best described as a dimer of structural heterodimers, in which the two subunits present markedly different conformations. This molecular organization is consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity. Each subunit has an all-helix N-terminal domain and a catalytic C-terminal domain with an acetyltransferase fold (GNAT superfamily). Intersubunit disulfide bridges, Cys-206–Cys-206 and Cys-243–Cys-243, can link the four subunits of the tetramer, imparting positive cooperativity to the catalytic process. The combination of a half-of-the-sites mechanism within each structural heterodimer and positive cooperativity in the tetramer produces a complex regulatory picture that is further complicated by the multiple intracellular locations of the enzyme. Transport into the peroxisome has been investigated by docking human MCD onto the peroxisomal import protein peroxin 5, which revealed interactions that extend beyond the C-terminal targeting motif. PMID:23482565

  19. The krebs cycle enzyme α-ketoglutarate decarboxylase is an essential glycosomal protein in bloodstream African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Steven; Szempruch, Anthony; Hajduk, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    α-Ketoglutarate decarboxylase (α-KDE1) is a Krebs cycle enzyme found in the mitochondrion of the procyclic form (PF) of Trypanosoma brucei. The bloodstream form (BF) of T. brucei lacks a functional Krebs cycle and relies exclusively on glycolysis for ATP production. Despite the lack of a functional Krebs cycle, α-KDE1 was expressed in BF T. brucei and RNA interference knockdown of α-KDE1 mRNA resulted in rapid growth arrest and killing. Cell death was preceded by progressive swelling of the flagellar pocket as a consequence of recruitment of both flagellar and plasma membranes into the pocket. BF T. brucei expressing an epitope-tagged copy of α-KDE1 showed localization to glycosomes and not the mitochondrion. We used a cell line transfected with a reporter construct containing the N-terminal sequence of α-KDE1 fused to green fluorescent protein to examine the requirements for glycosome targeting. We found that the N-terminal 18 amino acids of α-KDE1 contain overlapping mitochondrion- and peroxisome-targeting sequences and are sufficient to direct localization to the glycosome in BF T. brucei. These results suggest that α-KDE1 has a novel moonlighting function outside the mitochondrion in BF T. brucei.

  20. Crystal Structures of Malonyl-Coenzyme A Decarboxylase Provide Insights into Its Catalytic Mechanism and Disease-Causing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Froese, D. Sean; Forouhar, Farhad; Tran, Timothy H.; Vollmar, Melanie; Kim, Yi Seul; Lew, Scott; Neely, Helen; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Shen, Yang; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Everett, John K.; Cannone, Giuseppe; Puranik, Sriharsha; Savitsky, Pavel; Krojer, Tobias; Pilka, Ewa S.; Kiyani, Wasim; Lee, Wen Hwa; Marsden, Brian D.; von Delft, Frank; Allerston, Charles K.; Spagnolo, Laura; Gileadi, Opher; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Oppermann, Udo; Yue, Wyatt W.; Tong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Summary Malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase (MCD) is found from bacteria to humans, has important roles in regulating fatty acid metabolism and food intake, and is an attractive target for drug discovery. We report here four crystal structures of MCD from human, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Agrobacterium vitis, and Cupriavidus metallidurans at up to 2.3 Å resolution. The MCD monomer contains an N-terminal helical domain involved in oligomerization and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The four structures exhibit substantial differences in the organization of the helical domains and, consequently, the oligomeric states and intersubunit interfaces. Unexpectedly, the MCD catalytic domain is structurally homologous to those of the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase superfamily, especially the curacin A polyketide synthase catalytic module, with a conserved His-Ser/Thr dyad important for catalysis. Our structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, provide a molecular basis for understanding pathogenic mutations and catalysis, as well as a template for structure-based drug design. PMID:23791943

  1. The Krebs Cycle Enzyme α-Ketoglutarate Decarboxylase Is an Essential Glycosomal Protein in Bloodstream African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Steven; Szempruch, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    α-Ketoglutarate decarboxylase (α-KDE1) is a Krebs cycle enzyme found in the mitochondrion of the procyclic form (PF) of Trypanosoma brucei. The bloodstream form (BF) of T. brucei lacks a functional Krebs cycle and relies exclusively on glycolysis for ATP production. Despite the lack of a functional Krebs cycle, α-KDE1 was expressed in BF T. brucei and RNA interference knockdown of α-KDE1 mRNA resulted in rapid growth arrest and killing. Cell death was preceded by progressive swelling of the flagellar pocket as a consequence of recruitment of both flagellar and plasma membranes into the pocket. BF T. brucei expressing an epitope-tagged copy of α-KDE1 showed localization to glycosomes and not the mitochondrion. We used a cell line transfected with a reporter construct containing the N-terminal sequence of α-KDE1 fused to green fluorescent protein to examine the requirements for glycosome targeting. We found that the N-terminal 18 amino acids of α-KDE1 contain overlapping mitochondrion- and peroxisome-targeting sequences and are sufficient to direct localization to the glycosome in BF T. brucei. These results suggest that α-KDE1 has a novel moonlighting function outside the mitochondrion in BF T. brucei. PMID:25416237

  2. Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase overexpression in Escherichia coli resulted in high ethanol production and rewired metabolic enzyme networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingfeng; Li, Xuefeng; Bu, Chunya; Wang, Hui; Shi, Guanglu; Yang, Xiushan; Hu, Yong; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase are efficient enzymes for ethanol production in Zymomonas mobilis. These two enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli, a promising candidate for industrial ethanol production, resulting in high ethanol production in the engineered E. coli. To investigate the intracellular changes to the enzyme overexpression for homoethanol production, 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were performed. More than 1,000 protein spots were reproducibly detected in the gel by image analysis. Compared to the wild-type, 99 protein spots showed significant changes in abundance in the recombinant E. coli, in which 46 were down-regulated and 53 were up-regulated. Most proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycerol metabolism and other energy metabolism were up-regulated, whereas proteins involved in glycolysis and glyoxylate pathway were down-regulated, indicating the rewired metabolism in the engineered E. coli. As glycolysis is the main pathway for ethanol production, and it was inhibited significantly in engineered E. coli, further efforts should be directed at minimizing the repression of glycolysis to optimize metabolism network for higher yields of ethanol production.

  3. SIRT4 coordinates the balance between lipid synthesis and catabolism by repressing malonyl CoA decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Gaëlle; German, Natalie J.; Saha, Asish K.; de Boer, Vincent C. J.; Davies, Michael; Koves, Timothy R.; Dephoure, Noah; Fischer, Frank; Boanca, Gina; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Lovitch, Scott B.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Kurland, Irwin J.; Steegborn, Clemens; Gygi, Steven P.; Muoio, Deborah M.; Ruderman, Neil B.; Haigis, Marcia C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Lipid metabolism is tightly controlled by the nutritional state of the organism. Nutrient-rich conditions increase lipogenesis whereas nutrient deprivation promotes fat oxidation. In this study, we identify the mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT4, as a novel regulator of lipid homeostasis. SIRT4 is active in nutrient-replete conditions to repress fatty acid oxidation while promoting lipid anabolism. SIRT4 deacetylates and inhibits malonyl CoA decarboxylase (MCD), an enzyme that produces acetyl CoA from malonyl CoA. Malonyl CoA provides the carbon skeleton for lipogenesis and also inhibits fat oxidation. Mice lacking SIRT4 display elevated MCD activity and decreased malonyl CoA in skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue. Consequently, SIRT4 KO mice display deregulated lipid metabolism leading to increased exercise tolerance and protection against diet-induced obesity. In sum, this work elucidates SIRT4 as an important regulator of lipid homeostasis, identifies MCD as a novel SIRT4 target, and deepens our understanding of the malonyl CoA regulatory axis. PMID:23746352

  4. Cell density-correlated induction of pyruvate decarboxylase under aerobic conditions in the yeast Pichia stipitis.

    PubMed

    Mergler, M; Klinner, U

    2001-01-01

    During the aerobic batch cultivation of P. stipitis CBS 5776 with glucose, pyruvate decarboxylase was activated in a cell number-correlated manner. Activation started when a cell number between 7 x 10(7) and x 10(8) cells ml(-1) was reached and the enzyme activity increased during further cultivation. This induction might have been triggered either by an unknown quorum sensing system or by a shortage of cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA.

  5. Autoradiographic measurement of relative changes in ornithine decarboxylase in axotomized superior cervical ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.R.

    1986-05-01

    An autoradiographic method is described for detecting changes in ornithine decarboxylase in axotomized superior cervical ganglion neurons of rats using (3H)difluoromethylornithine. An increase in binding to neurons was seen at 12 h and 1 day after crushing the postganglionic nerves. Binding returned to control values between 3 and 5 days postoperation. The patterns found using this method were in general agreement with prior reports of enzymatic changes in whole ganglia.

  6. Method for altering antibody light chain interactions

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.; Stevens, Priscilla Wilkins; Raffen, Rosemarie; Schiffer, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    A method for recombinant antibody subunit dimerization including modifying at least one codon of a nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in the interface segment of the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a first polarity; and modifying at least one codon of the nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in an interface segment of the heavy polypeptide variable region corresponding to a position in the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a second polarity opposite the first polarity. Nucleic acid sequences which code for novel light chain proteins, the latter of which are used in conjunction with the inventive method, are also provided.

  7. Reducing biogenic-amine-producing bacteria, decarboxylase activity, and biogenic amines in raw milk cheese by high-pressure treatments.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Javier; del Olmo, Ana; Picón, Antonia; Gaya, Pilar; Nuñez, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    Biogenic amines may reach concentrations of public health concern in some cheeses. To minimize biogenic amine buildup in raw milk cheese, high-pressure treatments of 400 or 600 MPa for 5 min were applied on days 21 and 35 of ripening. On day 60, counts of lactic acid bacteria, enterococci, and lactobacilli were 1 to 2 log units lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 4 to 6 log units lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa than in control cheese. At that time, aminopeptidase activity was 16 to 75% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 56 to 81% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa than in control cheese, while the total free amino acid concentration was 35 to 53% higher in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 3 to 15% higher in cheeses treated at 600 MPa, and decarboxylase activity was 86 to 96% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 93 to 100% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. Tyramine, putrescine, and cadaverine were the most abundant amines in control cheese. The total biogenic amine concentration on day 60, which reached a maximum of 1.089 mg/g dry matter in control cheese, was 27 to 33% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 40 to 65% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. On day 240, total biogenic amines attained a concentration of 3.690 mg/g dry matter in control cheese and contents 11 to 45% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 73 to 76% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. Over 80% of the histidine and 95% of the tyrosine had been converted into histamine and tyramine in control cheese by day 60. Substrate depletion played an important role in the rate of biogenic amine buildup, becoming a limiting factor in the case of some amino acids.

  8. Reducing Biogenic-Amine-Producing Bacteria, Decarboxylase Activity, and Biogenic Amines in Raw Milk Cheese by High-Pressure Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Calzada, Javier; del Olmo, Ana; Picón, Antonia; Gaya, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amines may reach concentrations of public health concern in some cheeses. To minimize biogenic amine buildup in raw milk cheese, high-pressure treatments of 400 or 600 MPa for 5 min were applied on days 21 and 35 of ripening. On day 60, counts of lactic acid bacteria, enterococci, and lactobacilli were 1 to 2 log units lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 4 to 6 log units lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa than in control cheese. At that time, aminopeptidase activity was 16 to 75% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 56 to 81% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa than in control cheese, while the total free amino acid concentration was 35 to 53% higher in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 3 to 15% higher in cheeses treated at 600 MPa, and decarboxylase activity was 86 to 96% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 93 to 100% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. Tyramine, putrescine, and cadaverine were the most abundant amines in control cheese. The total biogenic amine concentration on day 60, which reached a maximum of 1.089 mg/g dry matter in control cheese, was 27 to 33% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 40 to 65% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. On day 240, total biogenic amines attained a concentration of 3.690 mg/g dry matter in control cheese and contents 11 to 45% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 73 to 76% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. Over 80% of the histidine and 95% of the tyrosine had been converted into histamine and tyramine in control cheese by day 60. Substrate depletion played an important role in the rate of biogenic amine buildup, becoming a limiting factor in the case of some amino acids. PMID:23241980

  9. Different mRNAs code for dopa decarboxylase in tissues of neuronal and nonneuronal origin

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, M.; Coge, F.; Gros, F.; Thibault, J. )

    1991-03-15

    A cDNA clone for dopa decarboxylase has been isolated from a rat pheochromocytoma cDNA library and the cDNA sequence has been determined. It corresponds to an mRNA of 2094 nucleotides. The length of the mRNA was measured by primer-extension of rat pheochromocytoma RNA and the 5{prime} end of the sequence of the mRNA was confirmed by the PCR. A probe spanning the translation initiation site of the mRNA was used to hybridize with mRNAs from various organs of the rat. S1 nuclease digestion of the mRNAs annealed with this probe revealed two classes of mRNAs. The comparison of the cDNA sequence and published sequences for rat liver, human pheochromocytoma, and Droxophila dopa decarboxylase supported the conclusion that two mRNAs are produced: one is specific for tissue of neuronal origin and the other is specific for tissues of nonneuronal (mesodermal or endodermal) origin. The neuronal mRNA contains a 5{prime} untranslated sequence that is highly conserved between human and rat pheochromocytoma including a GA stretch. The coding sequence and the 3{prime} untranslated sequence of mRNAs from rat liver and pheochromocytoma are identical. The rat mRNA differs only in the 5{prime} untranslated region. Thus a unique gene codes for dopa decarboxylase and this gene gives rise to at least two transcripts presumably in response to different signals during development.

  10. Novel protein–protein interaction between spermidine synthase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Arjun K.; Agnihotri, Pragati; Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Pratap, J. Venkatesh

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • L. donovani spermidine synthase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase have been cloned and purified. • S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase has autocatalytic property. • GST pull down assay shows the two proteins to form a metabolon. • Isothermal titration calorimetry shows that binding was exothermic having K{sub d} value of 0.4 μM. • Interaction confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. - Abstract: Polyamine biosynthesis pathway has long been considered an essential drug target for trypanosomatids including Leishmania. S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDc) and spermidine synthase (SpdSyn) are enzymes of this pathway that catalyze successive steps, with the product of the former, decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (dcSAM), acting as an aminopropyl donor for the latter enzyme. Here we have explored the possibility of and identified the protein–protein interaction between SpdSyn and AdoMetDc. The protein–protein interaction has been identified using GST pull down assay. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that the interaction is thermodynamically favorable. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies also confirms the interaction, with SpdSyn exhibiting a change in tertiary structure with increasing concentrations of AdoMetDc. Size exclusion chromatography suggests the presence of the complex as a hetero-oligomer. Taken together, these results suggest that the enzymes indeed form a heteromer. Computational analyses suggest that this complex differs significantly from the corresponding human complex, implying that this complex could be a better therapeutic target than the individual enzymes.

  11. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) decarboxylase activity in the arthropod nervous system.

    PubMed

    Murdock, L L; Wirtz, R A; Köhler, G

    1973-04-01

    1. When homogenates of brains from mature adult locusts (Locusta migratoria) were incubated with l-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)[3-(14)C]alanine the major radioactive metabolite was dopamine, suggesting the presence of a dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) decarboxylase. 2. Decarboxylation of l-dopa by this tissue, measured under optimum conditions by a radiochemical method, was 21mumol of CO(2)/h per g wet wt. Apparent decarboxylation of l-tyrosine proceeded at 0.34mumol of CO(2)/h per g wet wt. There was no detectable decarboxylation of l-tryptophan, l-histidine or l-phenylalanine. 3. Dopa decarboxylase activity was found in all major regions of the ventral nerve cord of the mature locust (range: 4-7mumol of CO(2)/h per g wet wt.) but was low or absent in thoracic peripheral nerve. 4. Marked decarboxylation of l-dopa was found in homogenates of brains of four other species of insects, and in brain and ventral nerve cord, but not in the claw nerve, of the crayfish. 5. The activity of the locust brain enzyme may be slightly lower at the time of imaginal ecdysis than during the mature period. By contrast, the dopa decarboxylase that produces dopamine as an intermediate in cuticle biosynthesis is known to be high in activity at the time of ecdysis and low in activity during the intermoult stages.

  12. How does Listeria monocytogenes combat acid conditions?

    PubMed

    Smith, James L; Liu, Yanhong; Paoli, George C

    2013-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a major foodborne pathogen, possesses a number of mechanisms that enable it to combat the challenges posed by acidic environments, such as that of acidic foods and the gastrointestinal tract. One mechanism employed by L. monocytogenes for survival at low pH is the adaptive acid tolerance response (ATR) in which a short adaptive period at a nonlethal pH induces metabolic changes that allow the organism to survive a lethal pH. Overcoming acid conditions by L. monocytogenes involves a variety of regulatory responses, including the LisRK 2-component regulatory system, the SOS response, components of the σ(B) regulon, changes in membrane fluidity, the F0F1-ATPase proton pump, and at least 2 enzymatic systems that regulate internal hydrogen ion concentration (glutamate decarboxylase and arginine deiminase). It is not clear if these mechanisms exert their protective effects separately or in concert, but it is probable that these mechanisms overlap. Studies using mutants indicate that the glutamate decarboxylase system can protect L. monocytogenes when the organism is present in acidic juices, yogurt, salad dressing, mayonnaise, and modified CO2 atmospheres. The glutamate decarboxylase system also has a role in protecting L. monocytogenes against the acidic environment of the stomach. There is a need to study other acid resistance mechanisms of L. monocytogenes to determine their effectiveness in protecting the organism in acidic foods or during transit through the acid stomach.

  13. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  14. Suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses in mice exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid: Role of PPARα and T- and B-cell targeting.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, Jamie C; Williams, Wanda C; Creech, N Jonathan; Luebke, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-dependent antibody responses (TDAR) are suppressed in female C57BL/6N mice exposed to ≥3.75 mg/kg of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) for 15 days. To determine if suppression of humoral immunity by PFOA is peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARα)-dependent and if suppression is associated with specific targeting of T- or B-cells, three separate experiments were conducted: (1) female PPARα constitutive knockout (PPARα KO; B6.129S4-Ppar(tm1Gonz)N12) and wild-type controls (WT; C57BL/6-Tac) exposed to 0, 7.5, or 30 mg PFOA/kg for 15 days were immunized on Day 11 with a T-cell-dependent antigen and sera then collected for measures of antigen-specific IgM titers (TDAR) 5 days later; (2) female C57BL/6N WT mice exposed to 0, 0.94, 1.88, 3.75, or 7.5 mg PFOA/kg for 15 days were immunized with a T-cell-independent antigen on Day 11 and sera were then collected for analyses of antigen-specific IgM titers (TIAR) 7 days later; and (3) splenic lymphocyte phenotypes were assessed in unimmunized female C57BL/6N WT mice exposed to 0, 3.75, or 7.5 mg PFOA/kg for 10 days to investigate effects of PFOA in the absence of specific immunization. Separate groups of mice were immunized with a T-cell-dependent antigen after 11 days of exposure and splenic lymphocyte sub-populations were assessed after 13 or 15 days of exposure to assess numbers of stimulated cells. The results indicated that exposure to ≥1.88 mg PFOA/kg suppressed the TIAR; exposure to 30 mg PFOA/kg suppressed the TDAR in both PPARα KO and WT mice. The percentage of splenic B-cells was unchanged. Results obtained in the PPARα KO mice indicated that PPARα suppression of TDAR was independent of PPARα involvement. Suppression of the TIAR and the TDAR with minimal lymphocyte sub-population effects suggested that effects on humoral immunity are likely mediated by disruption of B-cell/plasma cell function.

  15. Amino acid sequence and immunological characterization with monoclonal antibodies of two toxins from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann.

    PubMed

    Zamudio, F; Saavedra, R; Martin, B M; Gurrola-Briones, G; Hérion, P; Possani, L D

    1992-02-15

    Two toxins, which we propose to call toxins 2 and 3, were purified to homogeneity from the venom of the scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann. The full primary structures of both peptides (66 amino acid residues each) was determined. Sequence comparison indicates that the two new toxins display 79% identity and present a high similarity to previously characterized Centruroides toxins, the most similar toxins being Centruroides suffusus toxin 2 and Centruroides limpidus tecomanus toxin 1. Six monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed against purified fraction II-9.2 (which contains toxins 2 and 3) were isolated in order to carry out the immunochemical characterization of these toxins. mAb BCF2, BCF3, BCF7 and BCF9 reacted only with toxin 2, whereas BCF1 and BCF8 reacted with both toxins 2 and 3 with the same affinity. Simultaneous binding of mAb pairs to the toxin and cross-reactivity of the venoms of different scorpions with the mAb were examined. The results of these experiments showed that the mAb define four different epitopes (A-D). Epitope A (BCF8) is topographically unrelated to epitopes B (BCF2 and BCF7), C (BCF3) and D (BCF9) but the latter three appear to be more closely related or in close proximity to each other. Epitope A was found in all Centruroides venoms tested as well as on four different purified toxins of C. noxius, and thus seems to correspond to a highly conserved structure. Based on the cross-reactivity of their venoms with the mAb, Centruroides species could be classified in the following order: Centruroides elegans, Centruroides suffusus suffusus = Centruroides infamatus infamatus, Centruroides limpidus tecomanus, Centruroides limpidus limpidus, and Centruroides limpidus acatlanensis, according to increasing immunochemical relatedness of their toxins to those of Centruroides noxius. All six mAb inhibited the binding of toxin 2 to rat brain synaptosomal membranes, but only mAb BCF2, which belongs to the IgG2a subclass, displayed a clear

  16. Role of protein kinase C in diacylglycerol-mediated induction of ornithine decarboxylase and reduction of epidermal growth factor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Jetten, A M; Ganong, B R; Vandenbark, G R; Shirley, J E; Bell, R M

    1985-01-01

    Tumor-promoting phorbol esters induce ornithine decarboxylase (ODCase) activity and reduce epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding in rat tracheal epithelial 2C5 cells. Phorbol esters activate protein kinase C by interacting at the same site as sn-1,2-diacylglycerols, the presumed physiological regulators. The effects of added sn-1,2-diacylglycerols and those generated by phospholipase C treatment of 2C5 cells on ODCase induction and EGF binding were investigated to establish a role for protein kinase C in these cellular responses. Treatment of 2C5 cells with phospholipase C induced ODCase activity and reduced EGF binding, whereas phospholipases A2 and D were inactive. When sn-1,2-diacylglycerols containing fatty acids 3-10 carbons in length were added to 2C5 cells, those diacylglycerols containing fatty acids 5-10 carbons in length caused ODCase induction and reduction in EGF binding. sn-1,2-Dioctanoylglycerol was one of the most active compounds tested. It induced ODCase in a dose- (50-500 microM) and time-dependent manner. The reduction of binding of 125I-labeled EGF by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol was also time and dose dependent and appeared to result from a change in EGF affinity and not the number of receptor sites. This series of sn-1,2-diacylglycerols showed similar structure-function relationships in their ability to induce ODCase activity, to decrease EGF binding, to stimulate protein kinase C, and to inhibit [3H]phorbol dibutyrate binding to the phorbol ester receptor. These data demonstrate biological activities for a number of diacylglycerols and indicate that protein kinase C activation is implicated in ODCase induction and decreased EGF binding. PMID:3157191

  17. Aversive odorant causing appetite decrease downregulates tyrosine decarboxylase gene expression in the olfactory receptor neuron of the blowfly, Phormia regina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Yuko; Ozaki, Mamiko

    2012-01-01

    In the blowfly Phormia regina, exposure to d-limonene for 5 days during feeding inhibits proboscis extension reflex behavior due to decreasing tyramine (TA) titer in the brain. TA is synthesized by tyrosine decarboxylase (Tdc) and catalyzed into octopamine (OA) by TA ß-hydroxylase (Tbh). To address the mechanisms of TA titer regulation in the blowfly, we cloned Tdc and Tbh cDNAs from P. regina (PregTdc and PregTbh). The deduced amino acid sequences of both proteins showed high identity to those of the corresponding proteins from Drosophila melanogaster at the amino acid level. PregTdc was expressed in the antenna, labellum, and tarsus whereas PregTbh was expressed in the head, indicating that TA is mainly synthesized in the sensory organs whereas OA is primarily synthesized in the brain. d-Limonene exposure significantly decreased PregTdc expression in the antenna but not in the labellum and the tarsus, indicating that PregTdc expressed in the antenna is responsible for decreasing TA titer. PregTdc-like immunoreactive material was localized in the thin-walled sensillum. In contrast, the OA/TA receptor (PregOAR/TAR) was localized to the thick-walled sensillum. The results indicated that d-limonene inhibits PregTdc expression in the olfactory receptor neurons in the thin-walled sensilla, likely resulting in reduced TA levels in the receptor neurons in the antenna. TA may be transferred from the receptor neuron to the specific synaptic junction in the antennal lobe of the brain through the projection neurons and play a role in conveying the aversive odorant information to the projection and local neurons.

  18. RosettaAntibody: antibody variable region homology modeling server.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Aroop; Kim, Eric T; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2009-07-01

    The RosettaAntibody server (http://antibody.graylab.jhu.edu) predicts the structure of an antibody variable region given the amino-acid sequences of the respective light and heavy chains. In an initial stage, the server identifies and displays the most sequence homologous template structures for the light and heavy framework regions and each of the complementarity determining region (CDR) loops. Subsequently, the most homologous templates are assembled into a side-chain optimized crude model, and the server returns a picture and coordinate file. For users requesting a high-resolution model, the server executes the full RosettaAntibody protocol which additionally models the hyper-variable CDR H3 loop. The high-resolution protocol also relieves steric clashes by optimizing the CDR backbone torsion angles and by simultaneously perturbing the relative orientation of the light and heavy chains. RosettaAntibody generates 2000 independent structures, and the server returns pictures, coordinate files, and detailed scoring information for the 10 top-scoring models. The 10 models enable users to use rational judgment in choosing the best model or to use the set as an ensemble for further studies such as docking. The high-resolution models generated by RosettaAntibody have been used for the successful prediction of antibody-antigen complex structures.

  19. Carbon Dioxide Effects on Ethanol Production, Pyruvate Decarboxylase, and Alcohol Dehydrogenase Activities in Anaerobic Sweet Potato Roots 1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ling A.; Hammett, Larry K.; Pharr, David M.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of varied anaerobic atmospheres on the metabolism of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam.) roots was studied. The internal gas atmospheres of storage roots changed rapidly when the roots were submerged under water. O2 and N2 gases disappeared quickly and were replaced by CO2. There were no appreciable differences in gas composition among the four cultivars that were studied. Under different anaerobic conditions, ethanol concentration in the roots was highest in a CO2 environment, followed by submergence and a N2 environment in all the cultivars except one. A positive relationship was found between ethanol production and pyruvate decarboxylase activity from both 100% CO2-treated and 100% N2-treated roots. CO2 atmospheres also resulted in higher pyruvate decarboxylase activity than did N2 atmospheres. Concentrations of CO2 were higher within anaerobic roots than those in the ambient anaerobic atmosphere. The level of pyruvate decarboxylase and ethanol in anaerobic roots was proportional to the ambient CO2 concentration. The measurable activity of pyruvate decarboxylase that was present in the roots was about 100 times less than that of alcohol dehydrogenase. Considering these observations, it is suggested that the rate-limiting enzyme for ethanol biosynthesis in sweet potato storage roots under anoxia is likely to be pyruvate decarboxylase rather than alcohol dehydrogenase. PMID:16662798

  20. An archaeal glutamate decarboxylase homolog functions as an aspartate decarboxylase and is involved in β-alanine and coenzyme A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Ishibashi, Takuya; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2014-03-01

    β-Alanine is a precursor for coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis and is a substrate for the bacterial/eukaryotic pantothenate synthetase and archaeal phosphopantothenate synthetase. β-Alanine is synthesized through various enzymes/pathways in bacteria and eukaryotes, including the direct decarboxylation of Asp by aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC), the degradation of pyrimidine, or the oxidation of polyamines. However, in most archaea, homologs of these enzymes are not present; thus, the mechanisms of β-alanine biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, we performed a biochemical and genetic study on a glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) homolog encoded by TK1814 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. GADs are distributed in all three domains of life, generally catalyzing the decarboxylation of Glu to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA). The recombinant TK1814 protein displayed not only GAD activity but also ADC activity using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor. Kinetic studies revealed that the TK1814 protein prefers Asp as its substrate rather than Glu, with nearly a 20-fold difference in catalytic efficiency. Gene disruption of TK1814 resulted in a strain that could not grow in standard medium. Addition of β-alanine, 4'-phosphopantothenate, or CoA complemented the growth defect, whereas GABA could not. Our results provide genetic evidence that TK1814 functions as an ADC in T. kodakarensis, providing the β-alanine necessary for CoA biosynthesis. The results also suggest that the GAD activity of TK1814 is not necessary for growth, at least under the conditions applied in this study. TK1814 homologs are distributed in a wide range of archaea and may be responsible for β-alanine biosynthesis in these organisms.

  1. An Archaeal Glutamate Decarboxylase Homolog Functions as an Aspartate Decarboxylase and Is Involved in β-Alanine and Coenzyme A Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Ishibashi, Takuya; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2014-01-01

    β-Alanine is a precursor for coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis and is a substrate for the bacterial/eukaryotic pantothenate synthetase and archaeal phosphopantothenate synthetase. β-Alanine is synthesized through various enzymes/pathways in bacteria and eukaryotes, including the direct decarboxylation of Asp by aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC), the degradation of pyrimidine, or the oxidation of polyamines. However, in most archaea, homologs of these enzymes are not present; thus, the mechanisms of β-alanine biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, we performed a biochemical and genetic study on a glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) homolog encoded by TK1814 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. GADs are distributed in all three domains of life, generally catalyzing the decarboxylation of Glu to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA). The recombinant TK1814 protein displayed not only GAD activity but also ADC activity using pyridoxal 5′-phosphate as a cofactor. Kinetic studies revealed that the TK1814 protein prefers Asp as its substrate rather than Glu, with nearly a 20-fold difference in catalytic efficiency. Gene disruption of TK1814 resulted in a strain that could not grow in standard medium. Addition of β-alanine, 4′-phosphopantothenate, or CoA complemented the growth defect, whereas GABA could not. Our results provide genetic evidence that TK1814 functions as an ADC in T. kodakarensis, providing the β-alanine necessary for CoA biosynthesis. The results also suggest that the GAD activity of TK1814 is not necessary for growth, at least under the conditions applied in this study. TK1814 homologs are distributed in a wide range of archaea and may be responsible for β-alanine biosynthesis in these organisms. PMID:24415726

  2. Kinetic, Mutational, and Structural Analysis of Malonate Semialdehyde Decarboxylase from Coryneform bacterium strain FG41: Mechanistic Implications for the Decarboxylase and Hydratase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Youzhong; Serrano, Hector; Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Johnson, William H.; Hackert, Marvin L.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 (designated Pp MSAD) is in a bacterial catabolic pathway for the nematicide 1,3-dichloropropene. MSAD has two known activities: it catalyzes the metal-ion independent decarboxylation of malonate semialdehyde to produce acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide, as well as a low-level hydration of 2-oxo-3-pentynoate to yield acetopyruvate. The latter activity is not known to be biologically relevant. Previous studies identified Pro-1, Asp-37, and a pair of arginines (Arg-73 and Arg-75) as critical residues in these activities. MSAD from Coryneform bacterium strain FG41 (designated FG41 MSAD) shares 38% pairwise sequence identity with the Pseudomonas enzyme including Pro-1 and Asp-37. However, Gln-73 replaces Arg-73, and the second arginine is shifted to Arg-76 by the insertion of a glycine. In order to determine how these changes relate to the activities of FG41 MSAD, the gene was cloned and the enzyme expressed and characterized. The enzyme has a comparable decarboxylase activity, but a significantly reduced hydratase activity. Mutagenesis along with crystal structures of the native enzyme (2.0 Å resolution) and the enzyme modified by a 3-oxopropanoate moiety (resulting from the incubation of enzyme and 3-bromopropiolate) (2.2 Å resolution) provided a structural basis. The roles of Pro-1 and Asp-37 are likely the same as those proposed for MSAD. However, the side chains of Thr-72, Gln-73, and Tyr-123 replace those of Arg-73 and Arg-75 in the mechanism and play a role in binding and catalysis. The structures also show that Arg-76 is likely too distant to play a direct role in the mechanism. FG41 MSAD is the second functionally annotated homologue in the MSAD family of the tautomerase superfamily and could represent a new subfamily. PMID:23781927

  3. Production of biogenic amines by lactic acid bacteria: screening by PCR, thin-layer chromatography, and high-performance liquid chromatography of strains isolated from wine and must.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Antonella; Cersosimo, Manuela; Del Prete, Vincenzo; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2006-02-01

    Biogenic amines are frequently found in wine and other fermented food. We investigated the ability of 133 strains of lactic acid bacteria isolated from musts and wines of different origins to produce histamine, tyramine, and putrescine. We detected the genes responsible for encoding the corresponding amino acid decarboxylases through PCR assays using two primer sets for every gene: histidine decarboxylase (hdc), tyrosine decarboxylase (tdc), and ornithine decarboxylase (odc); these primers were taken from the literature or designed by us. Only one strain of Lactobacillus hilgardii was shown to possess the hdc gene, whereas four strains of Lactobacillus brevis had the tdc gene. None of the Oenococcus oeni strains, the main agents of malolactic fermentation, was a biogenic amine producer. All PCR amplicon band-positive results were confirmed by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses.

  4. Gluatamic Acid Decarboxylase Activity Decreases in Mouse Neocortex after Lesions of the Basal Forebrain.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-22

    J.T., Price, D.L. and DeLong, M.R., Alzheimer’s disease : a disorder of cortical cholinergic innervation. Science, 219(1983) 1184-1190. 4. Crutcher, K.A...Iversen, L.L., Reynolds, G.P., Mountjoy, C.Q. and Roth, M., Neurochemical characteristics of early and late onset types of Alzheimer’s disease , Brit...Rev., 2 (1980) 295-316. 29. Whitehouse, P.J., Price, D. L., Struble, R.G., Clark, A.W., Coyle, J.T. and DeLong. M.R., Alzheimer’s disease and senile

  5. Amino acid sequence of the Fv region of a human monoclonal IgM (protein WEA) with antibody activity against 3,4-pyruvylated galactose in Klebsiella polysaccharides K30 and K33.

    PubMed Central

    Goñi, F; Frangione, B

    1983-01-01

    We have determined the amino acid sequence of the Fv [variable heavy (VH) and variable light (VL)] region of a human monoclonal IgM-kappa with antibody activity against 3,4-pyruvylated galactose, isolated from the plasma of patient WEA with Waldenström macroglobulinemia. The VH region has 114 residues, belongs to subgroup III, and has a very short third complementarity-determining region (CDR3), probably due to a small D segment/or an unusual D-J rearrangement (D, diversity; J, joining). The VL region has 108 residues and belongs to subgroup V kappa I. Compared to other members of the human VHIII and V kappa I families, WEA Fv does not appear to have significant differences within the framework residues but has unique CDRs that might be responsible for the particular antibody activity. Another IgM-kappa (GAL), which has an as-yet-undetermined antibody activity, shares a striking homology in V kappa with WEA, including an identical CDR1. PMID:6410398

  6. Improved neutralising antibody response against foot-and-mouth-disease virus in mice inoculated with a multi-epitope peptide vaccine using polyinosinic and poly-cytidylic acid as an adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yimei; Lu, Zengjun; Li, Pinghua; Sun, Pu; Fu, Yuanfang; Bai, Xingwen; Bao, Huifang; Chen, Yingli; Li, Dong; Liu, Zaixin

    2012-10-01

    A peptide-based vaccine for foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) was designed. The peptide immunogen had a G-H loop domain optimised for immunogenicity and broad-spectrum antigenicity to different lineages of serotype-O FMD viruses (FMDVs). Polyinosinic and poly-cytidylic acid [poly (I:C)] was used as the adjuvant to overcome the low humoral antibody levels often observed in association with peptide-based vaccines. The multi-epitope peptide alone induced the secretion of a certain level of neutralising antibodies in mice. In contrast, co-administration of the multi-epitope peptide with poly (I:C) induced the secretion of a significantly higher level of neutralising antibodies (P<0.005). Indeed, the resultant level was slightly higher even than that induced by the inactivated vaccine (P>0.05). These initial results indicate that poly (I:C) is highly effective as an adjuvant for use with the FMDV multi-epitope peptide vaccine. This combination could yield a promising vaccine for the prevention and control of FMD. Further study is needed to evaluate the efficiency of this combination on animals susceptible naturally to FMDV.

  7. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  8. A calmodulin like EF hand protein positively regulates oxalate decarboxylase expression by interacting with E-box elements of the promoter

    PubMed Central

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Kamthan, Mohan; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Pratima; Ansari, Sekhu; Thakur, Sarjeet Singh; Chaudhuri, Abira; Datta, Asis

    2015-01-01

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC) enzyme has immense biotechnological applications due to its ability to decompose anti-nutrient oxalic acid. Flammulina velutipes, an edible wood rotting fungus responds to oxalic acid by induction of OXDC to maintain steady levels of pH and oxalate anions outside the fungal hyphae. Here, we report that upon oxalic acid induction, a calmodulin (CaM) like protein-FvCaMLP, interacts with the OXDC promoter to regulate its expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that FvCamlp specifically binds to two non-canonical E-box elements (AACGTG) in the OXDC promoter. Moreover, substitutions of amino acids in the EF hand motifs resulted in loss of DNA binding ability of FvCamlp. F. velutipes mycelia treated with synthetic siRNAs designed against FvCaMLP showed significant reduction in FvCaMLP as well as OXDC transcript pointing towards positive nature of the regulation. FvCaMLP is different from other known EF hand proteins. It shows sequence similarity to both CaMs and myosin regulatory light chain (Cdc4), but has properties typical of a calmodulin, like binding of 45Ca2+, heat stability and Ca2+ dependent electrophoretic shift. Hence, FvCaMLP can be considered a new addition to the category of unconventional Ca2+ binding transcriptional regulators. PMID:26455820

  9. A calmodulin like EF hand protein positively regulates oxalate decarboxylase expression by interacting with E-box elements of the promoter.

    PubMed

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Kamthan, Mohan; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Pratima; Ansari, Sekhu; Thakur, Sarjeet Singh; Chaudhuri, Abira; Datta, Asis

    2015-10-12

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC) enzyme has immense biotechnological applications due to its ability to decompose anti-nutrient oxalic acid. Flammulina velutipes, an edible wood rotting fungus responds to oxalic acid by induction of OXDC to maintain steady levels of pH and oxalate anions outside the fungal hyphae. Here, we report that upon oxalic acid induction, a calmodulin (CaM) like protein-FvCaMLP, interacts with the OXDC promoter to regulate its expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that FvCamlp specifically binds to two non-canonical E-box elements (AACGTG) in the OXDC promoter. Moreover, substitutions of amino acids in the EF hand motifs resulted in loss of DNA binding ability of FvCamlp. F. velutipes mycelia treated with synthetic siRNAs designed against FvCaMLP showed significant reduction in FvCaMLP as well as OXDC transcript pointing towards positive nature of the regulation. FvCaMLP is different from other known EF hand proteins. It shows sequence similarity to both CaMs and myosin regulatory light chain (Cdc4), but has properties typical of a calmodulin, like binding of (45)Ca(2+), heat stability and Ca(2+) dependent electrophoretic shift. Hence, FvCaMLP can be considered a new addition to the category of unconventional Ca(2+) binding transcriptional regulators.

  10. Fluorimetric assay for ornithine decarboxylase by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, K; Kai, M; Kohashi, K; Ohkura, Y

    1980-12-05

    A highly sensitive method for the assay of ornithine decarboxylase in sample solutions prepared from rat tissue homogenate is described which employs high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Putrescine formed from ornithine under the optimal conditions for the enzyme reaction is treated by Cellex P column chromatography for clean-up and converted into the fluorescamine derivative in the presence of cupric ion which inhibits the reaction of interfering amines with fluorescamine. The derivative is separated by reversed-phase chromatography on LiChrosorb RP-18 with linear gradient elution. The lower limit of detection for putrescine formed enzymatically is 5 pmol.

  11. Antibodies for immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Newman, D J

    2000-01-01

    What is an immunoassay without an antibody? Clearly the name provides the answer to this question; without antibodies there would be no immunoassays. An immunoassay is an analytical technique, quantitative or qualitative, that relies absolutely on the specificity and affinity of the interaction between epitope and paratope for generation of a detectable response. The actual detection of this binding interaction can be via one of literally hundreds of different signal transduction mechanisms, e.g., fluorimetry, chemiluminescence, agglutination (turbidimetry or nephelometry) enzyme reactions, and so forth (1 -4), but these are simply transducing systems for the primary binding interaction. Antibodies thus provide us with an exquisitely sensitive and specific analytical technology for detecting and quantifying epitopic structures. These structures include amino-acid derivatives, e.g., thyroid hormones, peptides, e.g., vasopressin, proteins, e.g., cytokines, as well as carbohydrate structures, e.g., CA-125. Immunoassay technology has developed to such an extent that it is probably the most versatile analytical tool available able to identify and quantify epitopic structures across the milli- to zeptomolar concentration ranges (2).

  12. Amine cations promote concurrent conversion of prohistidine decarboxylase from Lactobacillus 30a to active enzyme and a modified proenzyme.

    PubMed Central

    van Poelje, P D; Snell, E E

    1988-01-01

    Activation of prohistidine decarboxylase (pi 6) from Lactobacillus 30a proceeds by an intramolecular, pH- and monovalent cation-dependent reaction in which its constituent pi chains are cleaved nonhydrolytically between Ser-81 and Ser-82 with loss of NH3 and conversion of Ser-82 to the pyruvoyl residue of active histidine decarboxylase (alpha beta)6. Amines with pKa values more than 7.0 substitute for K+ or NH4+ in the activation of prohistidine decarboxylase, but they also catalyze its inactivation in a competing reaction, pi 6----pi'6. Sequence analysis of the appropriate tryptic peptide from amine-inactivated prohistidine decarboxylase established that inactivation results from conversion of Ser-82 of the pi chain to an aminoacrylate residue. The inactivated proenzyme (pi'6) does not form histidine decarboxylase; this fact eliminates one of two postulated mechanisms of activation and, thus, favors activation by beta-elimination of the acyl group of an intermediate ester formed between Ser-81 and Ser-82. L-Histidine is bound by the proenzyme (Kd = 1.7 x 10(-4) M) and is an effective activator; one binding site is present per pi subunit. K+, NH4+, and Na+ competitively inhibit (Ki values = 2.8-4.4 x 10(-3) M) activation by histidine. The data suggest the presence of two classes of monovalent cation binding sites on prohistidine decarboxylase: one (near Ser-82) is readily saturable and one is unsaturable even by 2.4 M K+. Images PMID:3250558

  13. Local anesthetics inhibit induction of ornithine decarboxylase by the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate.

    PubMed Central

    Yuspa, S H; Lichti, U; Ben, T

    1980-01-01

    The induction of ornithine decarboxylase (L-ornithine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.17) activity in mouse epidermal cells in vivo and in vitro occurs rapidly after exposure to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). This induction has characteristics of a cell surface receptor-mediated process. Local anesthetics modify a variety of cellular responses mediated by membrane receptors. When cultured mouse epidermal cells were exposed to the local anesthetics lidocaine, tetracaine, or procaine (0.1-1 mM), induction of the decarboxylase by TPA was inhibited by more than 90%. In vivo, lidocaine essentially abolishes the decarboxylase response of mouse epidermis when applied shortly after TPA. In contrast, local anesthetics have no effect on the enzyme's activity when added directly to the assay mixture and, in concert with TPA, have only a minimal effect on overall protein synthesis relative to controls. However, lidocaine has no effect on TPA-stimulated DNA synthesis in vitro (12-fold with or without lidocaine). Local anesthetics also markedly inhibit induction of the decarboxylase by ultraviolet light, which is probably not membrane mediated. Furthermore, in culture, lidocaine has only a small inhibitory effect on ornithine decarboxylase when given before TPA but is an effective inhibitor even when given up to 4-5 hr after the promoter, a time when decarboxylase activity has already increased. These findings suggest that local anesthetics, which are tertiary amines, do not act at the site of interaction of TPA and its putative receptor but may be acting specifically on polyamine biosynthesis. These drugs could be useful agents to determine the role of the polyamine pathway in tumor promotion. PMID:6933562

  14. Three amino acid residues in the envelope of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF07_BC regulate viral neutralization susceptibility to the human monoclonal neutralizing antibody IgG1b12.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jianhui; Zhao, Juan; Chen, Qingqing; Huang, Weijin; Wang, Youchun

    2014-10-01

    The CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of envelope glycoprotein (Env) is an important conserved target for anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies IgG1 b12 (b12) could recognize conformational epitopes that overlap the CD4bs of Env. Different virus strains, even derived from the same individual, showed distinct neutralization susceptibility to b12. We examined the key amino acid residues affecting b12 neutralization susceptibility using single genome amplification and pseudovirus neutralization assay. Eleven amino acid residues were identified that affect the sensitivity of Env to b12. Through site-directed mutagenesis, an amino acid substitution at position 182 in the V2 region of Env was confirmed to play a key role in regulating the b12 neutralization susceptibility. The introduction of V182L to a resistant strain enhanced its sensitivity to b12 more than twofold. Correspondingly, the introduction of L182V to a sensitive strain reduced its sensitivity to b12 more than tenfold. Amino acid substitution at positions 267 and 346 could both enhance the sensitivity to b12 more than twofold. However, no additive effect was observed when the three site mutageneses were introduced into the same strain, and the sensitivity was equivalent to the single V182L mutation. CRF07_BC is a major circulating recombinant form of HIV-1 prevalent in China. Our data may provide important information for understanding the molecular mechanism regulating the neutralization susceptibility of CRF07_BC viruses to b12 and may be helpful for a vaccine design targeting the CD4bs epitopes.

  15. Pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, functions as a CoA-dependent pyruvate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Ma, K; Hutchins, A; Sung, S J; Adams, M W

    1997-09-02

    Pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) has been previously purified from the hyperthermophilic archaeon, Pyrococcus furiosus, an organism that grows optimally at 100 degrees C by fermenting carbohydrates and peptides. The enzyme contains thiamine pyrophosphate and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetyl-CoA and CO2 and reduces P. furiosus ferredoxin. Here we show that this enzyme also catalyzes the formation of acetaldehyde from pyruvate in a CoA-dependent reaction. Desulfocoenzyme A substituted for CoA showing that the cofactor plays a structural rather than a catalytic role. Ferredoxin was not necessary for the pyruvate decarboxylase activity of POR, nor did it inhibit acetaldehyde production. The apparent Km values for CoA and pyruvate were 0.11 mM and 1.1 mM, respectively, and the optimal temperature for acetaldehyde formation was above 90 degrees C. These data are comparable to those previously determined for the pyruvate oxidation reaction of POR. At 80 degrees C (pH 8.0), the apparent Vm value for pyruvate decarboxylation was about 40% of the apparent Vm value for pyruvate oxidation rate (using P. furiosus ferredoxin as the electron acceptor). Tentative catalytic mechanisms for these two reactions are presented. In addition to POR, three other 2-keto acid ferredoxin oxidoreductases are involved in peptide fermentation by hyperthermophilic archaea. It is proposed that the various aldehydes produced by these oxidoreductases in vivo are used by two aldehyde-utilizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase, the physiological roles of which were previously unknown.

  16. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  17. Evaluation of nucleic acid stabilization products for ambient temperature shipping and storage of viral RNA and antibody in a dried whole blood format.

    PubMed

    Dauner, Allison L; Gilliland, Theron C; Mitra, Indrani; Pal, Subhamoy; Morrison, Amy C; Hontz, Robert D; Wu, Shuenn-Jue L

    2015-07-01

    Loss of sample integrity during specimen transport can lead to false-negative diagnostic results. In an effort to improve upon the status quo, we used dengue as a model RNA virus to evaluate the stabilization of RNA and antibodies in three commercially available sample stabilization products: Whatman FTA Micro Cards (GE Healthcare Life Sciences, Pittsburgh, PA), DNAstāble Blood tubes (Biomātrica, San Diego, CA), and ViveST tubes (ViveBio, Alpharetta, GA). Both contrived and clinical dengue-positive specimens were stored on these products at ambient temperature or 37°C for up to 1 month. Antibody and viral RNA levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays, respectively, and compared with frozen unloaded controls. We observed reduced RNA and antibody levels between stabilized contrived samples and frozen controls at our earliest time point, and this was particularly pronounced for the FTA cards. However, despite some time and temperature dependent loss, a 94.6-97.3% agreement was observed between stabilized clinical specimens and their frozen controls for all products. Additional considerations such as cost, sample volume, matrix, and ease of use should inform any decision to incorporate sample stabilization products into a diagnostic testing workflow. We conclude that DNAstāble Blood and ViveST tubes are useful alternatives to traditional filter paper for ambient temperature shipment of clinical specimens for downstream molecular and serological testing.

  18. Molecular cloning, characterization, and function analysis of a mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase gene from Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Qin, Lei; Xu, Yingjie; Ren, Ang; Fang, Xing; Mu, Dashuai; Tan, Qi; Zhao, Mingwen

    2012-05-01

    This study investigated the role of the mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase gene in the triterpene biosynthetic pathway of Ganoderma lucidum. The mevalonate pyrophosphate decarboxylase gene (mvd) was isolated using a degenerate primer-PCR technique. An analysis of the Gl-mvd transcription profile revealed a positive correlation between the expression of the Gl-mvd gene and triterpene content changes in G. lucidum during development. Furthermore, a promoter deletion analysis was conducted in G. lucidum to investigate the promoter activity and the role of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) responsive elements in the mvd promoter under the MeJA elicitor. The overexpression of Gl-mvd increased triterpene accumulation compared with the wild-type strain and increased the expression of several genes involved in the triterpene biosynthetic pathway. The findings of this study suggest that mvd may play an important role in triterpene biosynthesis regulation. Moreover, there may be the interactions among the genes involved in the triterpene biosynthetic pathway in the G. lucidum. Additionally, this study provides an approach for improving triterpene content through the overexpression of a key gene.

  19. Production of pyruvate from mannitol by mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Shiori; Tanaka, Hideki; Hirayama, Makoto; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mannitol is contained in brown macroalgae up to 33% (w/w, dry weight), and thus is a promising carbon source for white biotechnology. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key cell factory, is generally regarded to be unable to assimilate mannitol for growth. We have recently succeeded in producing S. cerevisiae that can assimilate mannitol through spontaneous mutations of Tup1-Cyc8, each of which constitutes a general corepressor complex. In this study, we demonstrate production of pyruvate from mannitol using this mannitol-assimilating S. cerevisiae through deletions of all 3 pyruvate decarboxylase genes. The resultant mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative strain produced 0.86 g/L pyruvate without use of acetate after cultivation for 4 days, with an overall yield of 0.77 g of pyruvate per g of mannitol (the theoretical yield was 79%). Although acetate was not needed for growth of this strain in mannitol-containing medium, addition of acetate had a significant beneficial effect on production of pyruvate. This is the first report of production of a valuable compound (other than ethanol) from mannitol using S. cerevisiae, and is an initial platform from which the productivity of pyruvate from mannitol can be improved. PMID:26588105

  20. Production of pyruvate from mannitol by mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shiori; Tanaka, Hideki; Hirayama, Makoto; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mannitol is contained in brown macroalgae up to 33% (w/w, dry weight), and thus is a promising carbon source for white biotechnology. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key cell factory, is generally regarded to be unable to assimilate mannitol for growth. We have recently succeeded in producing S. cerevisiae that can assimilate mannitol through spontaneous mutations of Tup1-Cyc8, each of which constitutes a general corepressor complex. In this study, we demonstrate production of pyruvate from mannitol using this mannitol-assimilating S. cerevisiae through deletions of all 3 pyruvate decarboxylase genes. The resultant mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative strain produced 0.86 g/L pyruvate without use of acetate after cultivation for 4 days, with an overall yield of 0.77 g of pyruvate per g of mannitol (the theoretical yield was 79%). Although acetate was not needed for growth of this strain in mannitol-containing medium, addition of acetate had a significant beneficial effect on production of pyruvate. This is the first report of production of a valuable compound (other than ethanol) from mannitol using S. cerevisiae, and is an initial platform from which the productivity of pyruvate from mannitol can be improved.

  1. Rational design of ornithine decarboxylase with high catalytic activity for the production of putrescine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyang; Kyeong, Hyun-Ho; Choi, Jung Min; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2014-09-01

    Putrescine finds wide industrial applications in the synthesis of polymers, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and surfactants. Owing to economic and environmental concerns, the microbial production of putrescine has attracted a great deal of attention, and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is known to be a key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway. Herein, we present the design of ODC from Escherichia coli with high catalytic efficiency using a structure-based rational approach. Through a substrate docking into the model structure of the enzyme, we first selected residues that might lead to an increase in catalytic activity. Of the selected residues that are located in the α-helix and the loops constituting the substrate entry site, a mutational analysis of the single mutants identified two key residues, I163 and E165. A combination of two single mutations resulted in a 62.5-fold increase in the catalytic efficiency when compared with the wild-type enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations of the best mutant revealed that the substrate entry site becomes more flexible through mutations, while stabilizing the formation of the dimeric interface of the enzyme. Our approach can be applied to the design of other decarboxylases with high catalytic efficiency for the production of various chemicals through bio-based processes.

  2. Decarboxylase gene expression and cadaverine and putrescine production by Serratia proteamaculans in vitro and in beef.

    PubMed

    De Filippis, Francesca; Pennacchia, Carmela; Di Pasqua, Rosangela; Fiore, Alberto; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Villani, Francesco; Ercolini, Danilo

    2013-08-01

    Studies of the molecular basis of microbial metabolic activities that are important for the changes in food quality are valuable in order to help in understanding the behavior of spoiling bacteria in food. The growth of a psychrotrophic Serratia proteamaculans strain was monitored in vitro and in artificially inoculated raw beef. Two growth temperatures (25°C and 4°C) were tested in vitro, while growth at 15°C and 4°C was monitored in beef. During growth, the expression of inducible lysine and ornithine-decarboxylase genes was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), while the presence of cadaverine and putrescine was quantified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The expression of the decarboxylase genes, and the consequent production of cadaverine and putrescine were shown to be influenced by the temperature, as well as by the complexity of the growth medium. Generally, the maximum gene expression and amine production took place during the exponential and early stationary phase, respectively. In addition, lower temperatures caused slower growth and gene downregulation. Higher amounts of cadaverine compared to putrescine were found during growth in beef with the highest concentrations corresponding to microbial loads of ca. 9CFU/g. The differences found in gene expression evaluated in vitro and in beef suggested that such activities are more reliably investigated in situ in specific food matrices.

  3. Transport of phosphatidylserine from the endoplasmic reticulum to the site of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase2 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Muthukumar; Riekhof, Wayne R; Voelker, Dennis R

    2015-02-01

    Over the past two decades, most of the genes specifying lipid synthesis and metabolism in yeast have been identified and characterized. Several of these biosynthetic genes and their encoded enzymes have provided valuable tools for the genetic and biochemical dissection of interorganelle lipid transport processes in yeast. One such pathway involves the synthesis of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and its non-vesicular transport to the site of phosphatidylserine decarboxylase2 (Psd2p) in membranes of the Golgi and endosomal sorting system. In this review, we summarize the identification and characterization of the yeast phosphatidylserine decarboxylases, and examine their role in studies of the transport-dependent pathways of de novo synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn). The emerging picture of the Psd2p-specific transport pathway is one in which the enzyme and its non-catalytic N-terminal domains act as a hub to nucleate the assembly of a multiprotein complex, which facilitates PtdSer transport at membrane contact sites between the ER and Golgi/endosome membranes. After transport to the catalytic site of Psd2p, PtdSer is decarboxylated to form PtdEtn, which is disseminated throughout the cell to support the structural and functional needs of multiple membranes.

  4. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species. PMID:27602045

  5. Arginine and Ornithine Decarboxylases, the Polyamine Biosynthetic Enzymes of Mung Bean Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Arie; Friedman, Ra'Anan; Levin, Nitsa

    1982-01-01

    General properties and relative activities of l-arginine decarboxylase (ADC) (EC 4.1.1.19) and l-ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) (EC 4.1.1.17), two important enzymes in putrescine and polyamine biosynthesis, were investigated in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.) tissues. Both activities increase linearly with increasing concentrations of crude enzyme, but the increase in ADC activity is considerably greater. The decarboxylation reaction is linear for up to 30 to 60 minutes, and both enzymes have a pH optimum of 7.2. α-Difluoromethyl-ornithine inhibits ODC activity of excised roots, while increasing ADC activity. High specific activity of both enzymes is detected in terminal buds and leaves, while root and hypocotyl activity is low. Different ADC-to-ODC activity ratios are found in various tissues of mung bean plants. Substantial increase in the activity of both enzymes is detected in incubated sections as compared with intact plants. A comparison of several plant species indicates a wide range of ADC-to-ODC activity ratio. It is suggested that both ADC and ODC are active in plant tissues and that their relative contribution to putrescine biosynthesis is dependent upon the type of tissue and growth process. PMID:16662312

  6. [The pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Keizer, R J; Huitema, A D R; Damen, C W N; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2007-03-24

    Monoclonal antibodies (MOABs) are, due to their specificity, increasingly being deployed for therapeutic purposes. MOABs are derived from immunoglobulins and are fully or partially of murine or human origin. They are administered parenterally: mostly intravenously, but subcutaneous or intramuscular administration is also possible, in which case absorption probably occurs through the lymphatic system. The distribution of MOABs from the bloodstream into the tissues is slow and is hampered by the high molecular size of the MOABs, which is a lesser problem for fragments of antibodies (Fab fragments). MOABs are metabolised to peptides and amino acids. This process takes place in many tissues of the body, but probably predominantly in epithelial cells. As a consequence of the saturable binding of the MOAB to its target, a dose-dependent (non-linear) elimination is often observed. Immune reactions can accelerate the elimination of antibodies, partially depending on the degree ofhumanisation of the antibody. Antibodies and endogenous immunoglobulins are protected from elimination by binding to protective receptors (neonatal Fc-receptor; FcRn), which explains their long half-lives (up to 4 weeks). Metabolic pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs have not been reported and are not expected. It is expected that in the years to come, new MOABs directed towards new targets will appear on the market, as well as existing antibodies with improved pharmacokinetic properties.

  7. On the effect of alkaline pH and cofactor availability in the conformational and oligomeric state of Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Giovannercole, F; Mérigoux, C; Zamparelli, C; Verzili, D; Grassini, G; Buckle, M; Vachette, P; De Biase, D

    2017-01-05

    Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (EcGad) is a homohexameric pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme. It is the structural component of the major acid resistance system that protects E. coli from strong acid stress (pH < 3), typically encountered in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. In fact EcGad consumes one proton/catalytic cycle while yielding γ-aminobutyrate and carbon dioxide from the decarboxylation of l-glutamate. Two isoforms of Gad occur in E. coli (GadA and GadB) that are 99% identical in sequence. GadB is the most intensively investigated. Prompted by the observation that some transcriptomic and proteomic studies show EcGad to be expressed in conditions far from acidic, we investigated the structural organization of EcGadB in solution in the pH range 7.5-8.6. Small angle X-ray scattering, combined with size exclusion chromatography, and analytical ultracentrifugation analysis show that the compact and entangled EcGadB hexameric structure undergoes dissociation into dimers as pH alkalinizes. When PLP is not present, the dimeric species is the most abundant in solution, though evidence for the occurrence of a likely tetrameric species was also obtained. Trp fluorescence emission spectra as well as limited proteolysis studies suggest that PLP plays a key role in the acquisition of a folding necessary for the canonical catalytic activity.

  8. Inhibitory activity of the flower buds of Lonicera japonica Thunb. against histamine production and L-histidine decarboxylase in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Inami, Yoshihiro; Matsui, Yuko; Hoshino, Tomoko; Murayama, Chiaki; Norimoto, Hisayoshi

    2014-06-17

    In previous studies we found that anionic surfactants such as sodium laurate (SL) and/or sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) exert actions on epidermal keratinocytes rather than mast cells to give rise of histamine production and skin itching through increasing the expression of the 53-kDa active form of L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC). In addition, with treatment of SL in a three-dimensional human keratinocyte culture, increases in both the 53-kDa HDC and histamine production are detected and thus this culture assay is applied to screen anti-itching materials from natural resources. In this study, the inhibitory activity of "Kin-gin-ka" (flower buds of Lonicera japonica Thunb., FLJ) against histamine production and expression of the active form of HDC were examined in this culture assay. FLJ is a well-known traditional Chinese medicine, being used to treat fevers, coughs and some infectious diseases. The result showed both FLJ and chlorogenic acid had inhibitory activities against the expression of 53-kDa HDC and histamine production. However, chlorogenic acid showed a weaker effect on histamine production than that of FLJ, suggesting that other chemical constituents besides chlorogenic acid could contribute to the inhibitory activities. Thus, a further chemical study of FLJ is now under investigation.

  9. Direct spectroscopic observation of a brewer's yeast pyruvate decarboxylase-bound enamine intermediate produced from a suicide substrate. Evidence for nonconcerted decarboxylation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Jordan, F

    1983-11-25

    The conjugated alpha-keto acid (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid, a suicide substrate (Kuo, D. J., and Jordan, F. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 3735-3740), when reacted with brewer's yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1), was found to produce a new absorption band centered at 440 nm. The band was attributed to the formation of a thiamindiphosphate-bound intermediate produced upon decarboxylation and was not observed in the absence of either thiamindiphosphate or apoprotein. Simultaneously, with the appearance of the spectral band, the enzyme was inactivated irreversibly. The combined evidence suggested that the spectral band pertains to an enzyme-bound conjugated enamine and the results constitute the first direct observation of such an intermediate in any thiamindiphosphate requiring enzymatic reaction. It could be concluded that for the alpha-keto acid employed, CO2 loss and C-protonation of the enamine take place in a stepwise, rather than concerted, manner and that the steps culminating in CO2 loss are faster overall than the subsequent steps that lead to the release of the product. The observation of stoichiometric concentration of enzyme-bound enamine intermediate supports the previous suggestion that alpha-hydroxyethyl thiamindiphosphate is not the true intermediate, but rather the enamine is (Ullrich, J., and Mannshreck, A. (1967) Eur. J. Biochem 1, 110-116).

  10. Efficient production of L-lactic acid from xylose by a recombinant Candida utilis strain.

    PubMed

    Tamakawa, Hideyuki; Ikushima, Shigehito; Yoshida, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Efficient L-lactic acid production from xylose was achieved using a pyruvate decarboxylase-deficient Candida utilis strain expressing an L-lactate dehydrogenase, an NADH-preferring mutated xylose reductase (XR), a xylitol dehydrogenase and a xylulokinase. The recombinant strain showed 53% increased L-lactic acid production compared with the reference strain expressing native XR (NADPH-preferring).

  11. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003352.htm Serum herpes simplex antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Serum herpes simplex antibodies is a blood test that looks for antibodies ...

  12. The growing spectrum of antibody-associated inflammatory brain diseases in children

    PubMed Central

    Hladio, Manisha; Twilt, Marinka; Dalmau, Josep; Benseler, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical spectrum, diagnostic evaluation, current management, and neurologic outcome of pediatric antibody-associated inflammatory brain diseases (AB-associated IBrainD). Methods: We performed a single-center retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients aged ≤18 years diagnosed with an AB-associated IBrainD at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, between January 2005 and June 2013. Standardized clinical data, laboratory test results, neuroimaging features, and treatment regimens were captured. Results: Of 169 children (93 female, 55%) diagnosed with an IBrainD, 16 (10%) had an AB-associated IBrainD. Median age at presentation was 13.3 years (range 3.1–17.9); 11 (69%) were female. Nine patients (56%) had anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis, 4 (25%) had aquaporin-4 autoimmunity, 2 (13%) had Hashimoto encephalitis, and 1 (6%) had anti–glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) encephalitis. The key presenting features in children with anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis, Hashimoto encephalopathy, and anti-GAD65 encephalitis included encephalopathy, behavioral symptoms, and seizures; patients with aquaporin-4 autoimmunity showed characteristic focal neurologic deficits. Six patients (38%) required intensive care unit admission at presentation. Median time from symptom onset to diagnosis was 55 days (range 6–358). All but 1 patient received immunosuppressive therapy. One child with anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis died due to multiorgan failure. At last follow-up, after a median follow-up time of 1.7 years (range 0.8–3.7), 27% of the children had function-limiting neurologic sequelae. Conclusions: Children with AB-associated IBrainD represent an increasing subgroup among IBrainD; 1 in 4 children has function-limiting residual neurologic deficits. Awareness of the different clinical patterns is important in order to facilitate timely diagnosis and initiate immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:25909091

  13. Peptide Antibodies: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies recognize epitopes with amino acid residues adjacent in sequence ("linear" epitopes). Such antibodies can be made to virtually any sequence and have been immensely important in all areas of molecular biology and diagnostics due to their versatility and to the rapid growth in protein sequence information. Today, peptide antibodies can be routinely and rapidly made to large numbers of peptides, including peptides with posttranslationally modified residues, and are used for immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoassays. In the future, peptide antibodies will continue to be immensely important for molecular biology, TCR- and MHC-like peptide antibodies may be produced routinely, peptide antibodies with predetermined conformational specificities may be designed, and peptide-based vaccines may become part of vaccination programs.

  14. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  15. Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and agmatinase (AGMAT): an alternative pathway for synthesis of polyamines in pig conceptuses and uteri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine, a precursor for the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and polyamines, is critical for implantation and development of the conceptus. We first reported that the arginine decarboxylase (ADC)/agmatinase(AGMAT) pathway as an alternative pathway for synthesis of polyamines in the ovine conceptuses...

  16. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus subtilis. 173.115 Section 173.115 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... Bacillus subtilis. The food additive alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation, may be... derived from a modified Bacillus subtilis strain that contains the gene coding for α-ALDC from...

  17. CONFIRMATIONAL IDENTIFICATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI, A COMPARISON OF GENOTYPIC AND PHENOTYPIC ASSAYS FOR GLUTAMATE DECARBOXYLASE AND B-D-GLUCURONIDASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genotypic and phenotypic assays for glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and B-D-glucuronidase (GUD) were compared for their abilities to detect various strains of Escherichia coli and to discriminate among other bacterial species. Test strains included nonpathogenic E.coli, three major...

  18. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, K.; Saville, R.; Phelan, R. M.; Tringe, S. G.; Petzold, C. J.; Keasling, J. D.; Beller, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extracts, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene. PMID:27506494

  19. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community.

    PubMed

    Zargar, K; Saville, R; Phelan, R M; Tringe, S G; Petzold, C J; Keasling, J D; Beller, H R

    2016-08-10

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extracts, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene.

  20. Control by Ethylene of Arginine Decarboxylase Activity in Pea Seedlings and Its Implication for Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth 1

    PubMed Central

    Apelbaum, Akiva; Goldlust, Arie; Icekson, Isaac

    1985-01-01

    Activity of arginine decarboxylase in etiolated pea seedlings appears 24 hours after seed imbibition, reaches its highest level on the 4th day, and levels off until the 7th day. This activity was found in the apical and subapical tissue of the roots and shoots where intensive DNA synthesis occurs. Exposure of the seedlings to ethylene greatly reduced the specific activity of this enzyme. The inhibition was observed within 30 min of the hormone application, and maximal effect—90% inhibition—after 18 hours. Ethylene at physiological concentrations affected the enzyme activity; 50% inhibitory rate was recorded at 0.12 microliters per liter ethylene and maximal response at 1.2 microliters per liter. Ethylene provoked a 5-fold increase in the Kmapp of arginine decarboxylase for its substrate and reduced the Vmaxapp by 10-fold. However, the enzyme recovered from the inhibition and regained control activity 7 hours after transferral of the seedlings to ethylene-free atmosphere. Reducing the endogenous level of ethylene in the tissue by hypobaric pressure, or by exposure to light, as well as interfering with ethylene action by treatment with silver thiosulfate or 2,5-norbornadiene, caused a gradual increase in the specific activity of arginine decarboxylase in the apical tissue of the etiolated seedlings. On the basis of these findings, the possible control of arginine decarboxylase activity by endogenous ethylene, and its implication for the hormone effect on plant growth, are discussed. PMID:16664464

  1. Expression and stereochemical and isotope effect studies of active 4-oxalocrotonate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Stanley, T M; Johnson, W H; Burks, E A; Whitman, C P; Hwang, C C; Cook, P F

    2000-02-01

    4-Oxalocrotonate decarboxylase (4-OD) and vinylpyruvate hydratase (VPH) from Pseudomonas putida mt-2 form a complex that converts 2-oxo-3-hexenedioate to 2-oxo-4-hydroxypentanoate in the catechol meta fission pathway. To facilitate mechanistic and structural studies of the complex, the two enzymes have been coexpressed and the complex has been purified to homogeneity. In addition, Glu-106, a potential catalytic residue in VPH, has been changed to glutamine, and the resulting E106QVPH mutant has been coexpressed with 4-OD and purified to homogeneity. The 4-OD/E106QVPH complex retains full decarboxylase activity, with comparable kinetic parameters to those observed for 4-OD in the wild-type complex, but is devoid of any detectable hydratase activity. Decarboxylation of (5S)-2-oxo-3-[5-D]hexenedioate by either the 4-OD/VPH complex or the mutant complex generates 2-hydroxy-2,4E-[5-D]pentadienoate in D(2)O. Ketonization of 2-hydroxy-2,4-pentadienoate by the wild-type complex is highly stereoselective and results in the formation of 2-oxo-(3S)-[3-D]-4-pentenoate, while the mutant complex generates a racemic mixture. These results indicate that 2-hydroxy-2, 4-pentadienoate is the product of 4-OD and that 2-oxo-4-pentenoate results from a VPH-catalyzed process. On this basis, the previously proposed hypothesis for the conversion of 2-oxo-3-hexenedioate to 2-oxo-4-hydroxypentanoate has been revised [Lian, H., and Whitman, C. P. (1994) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 116, 10403-10411]. Finally, the observed (13)C kinetic isotope effect on the decarboxylation of 2-oxo-3-hexenedioate by the 4-OD/VPH complex suggests that the decarboxylation step is nearly rate-limiting. Because the value is not sensitive to either magnesium or manganese, it is likely that the transition state for carbon-carbon bond cleavage is late and that the metal positions the substrate and polarizes the carbonyl group, analogous to its role in oxalacetate decarboxylase.

  2. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  3. An assembly of proteins and lipid domains regulates transport of phosphatidylserine to phosphatidylserine decarboxylase 2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Riekhof, Wayne R; Wu, Wen-I; Jones, Jennifer L; Nikrad, Mrinalini; Chan, Mallory M; Loewen, Christopher J R; Voelker, Dennis R

    2014-02-28

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae uses multiple biosynthetic pathways for the synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine. One route involves the synthesis of phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the transport of this lipid to endosomes, and decarboxylation by PtdSer decarboxylase 2 (Psd2p) to produce phosphatidylethanolamine. Several proteins and protein motifs are known to be required for PtdSer transport to occur, namely the Sec14p homolog PstB2p/Pdr17p; a PtdIns 4-kinase, Stt4p; and a C2 domain of Psd2p. The focus of this work is on defining the protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions of these components. PstB2p interacts with a protein encoded by the uncharacterized gene YPL272C, which we name Pbi1p (PstB2p-interacting 1). PstB2p, Psd2, and Pbi1p were shown to be lipid-binding proteins specific for phosphatidic acid. Pbi1p also interacts with the ER-localized Scs2p, a binding determinant for several peripheral ER proteins. A complex between Psd2p and PstB2p was also detected, and this interaction was facilitated by a cryptic C2 domain at the extreme N terminus of Psd2p (C2-1) as well the previously characterized C2 domain of Psd2p (C2-2). The predicted N-terminal helical region of PstB2p was necessary and sufficient for promoting the interaction with both Psd2p and Pbi1p. Taken together, these results support a model for PtdSer transport involving the docking of a PtdSer donor membrane with an acceptor via specific protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. Specifically, our model predicts that this process involves an acceptor membrane complex containing the C2 domains of Psd2p, PstB2p, and Pbi1p that ligate to Scs2p and phosphatidic acid present in the donor membrane, forming a zone of apposition that facilitates PtdSer transfer.

  4. Transcriptional and functional analysis of oxalyl-coenzyme A (CoA) decarboxylase and formyl-CoA transferase genes from Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    PubMed

    Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Bruno-Bárcena, Jose M; Hassan, Hosni M; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2006-03-01

    Oxalic acid is found in dietary sources (such as coffee, tea, and chocolate) or is produced by the intestinal microflora from metabolic precursors, like ascorbic acid. In the human intestine, oxalate may combine with calcium, sodium, magnesium, or potassium to form less soluble salts, which can cause pathological disorders such as hyperoxaluria, urolithiasis, and renal failure in humans. In this study, an operon containing genes homologous to a formyl coenzyme A transferase gene (frc) and an oxalyl coenzyme A decarboxylase gene (oxc) was identified in the genome of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus. Physiological analysis of a mutant harboring a deleted version of the frc gene confirmed that frc expression specifically improves survival in the presence of oxalic acid at pH 3.5 compared with the survival of the wild-type strain. Moreover, the frc mutant was unable to degrade oxalate. These genes, which have not previously been described in lactobacilli, appear to be responsible for oxalate degradation in this organism. Transcriptional analysis using cDNA microarrays and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed that mildly acidic conditions were a prerequisite for frc and oxc transcription. As a consequence, oxalate-dependent induction of these genes occurred only in cells first adapted to subinhibitory concentrations of oxalate and then exposed to pH 5.5. Where genome information was available, other lactic acid bacteria were screened for frc and oxc genes. With the exception of Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium lactis, none of the other strains harbored genes for oxalate utilization.

  5. Structural determinants for the inhibitory ligands of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Meza-Avina, Maria Elena; Wei, Lianhu; Liu, Yan; Poduch, Ewa; Bello, Angelica M.; Mishra, Ram K.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P.

    2010-06-14

    In recent years, orotidine-5{prime}-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) has gained renewed attention as a drug target. As a part of continuing efforts to design novel inhibitors of ODCase, we undertook a comprehensive study of potent, structurally diverse ligands of ODCase and analyzed their structural interactions in the active site of ODCase. These ligands comprise of pyrazole or pyrimidine nucleotides including the mononucleotide derivatives of pyrazofurin, barbiturate ribonucleoside, and 5-cyanouridine, as well as, in a computational approach, 1,4-dihydropyridine-based non-nucleoside inhibitors such as nifedipine and nimodipine. All these ligands bind in the active site of ODCase exhibiting distinct interactions paving the way to design novel inhibitors against this interesting enzyme. We propose an empirical model for the ligand structure for rational modifications in new drug design and potentially new lead structures.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the inducible lysine decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Alexopoulos, E.; Kanjee, U.; Snider, J.; Houry, W.A.; Pai, E.F.

    2010-02-11

    The decameric inducible lysine decarboxylase (LdcI) from Escherichia coli has been crystallized in space groups C2 and C222{sub 1}; the Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}{sup 2+} cluster was used to derivatize the C2 crystals. The method of single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS) as implemented in SHELXD was used to solve the Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}{sup 2+}-derivatized structure to 5 {angstrom} resolution. Many of the Ta{sub 6}Br{sub 12}{sup 2+}-binding sites had twofold and fivefold noncrystallographic symmetry. Taking advantage of this feature, phase modification was performed in DM. The electron-density map of LdcI displays many features in agreement with the low-resolution negative-stain electron-density map [Snider et al. (2006), J. Biol. Chem. 281, 1532-1546].

  7. Histidine decarboxylase deficiency causes Tourette syndrome: parallel findings in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Baldan, Lissandra Castellan; Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Crowley, Michael; Anderson, George M.; Loring, Erin; Gorczyca, Roxanne; Billingslea, Eileen; Wasylink, Suzanne; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Ercan-Sencicek, A. Gulhan; Krusong, Kuakarun; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Bloch, Michael H.; Hughes, Zoë A.; Krystal, John H.; Mayes, Linda; de Araujo, Ivan; Ding, Yu-Shin; State, Matthew W.; Pittenger, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by tics, sensorimotor gating deficiencies, and abnormalities of cortico-basal ganglia circuits. A mutation in histidine decarboxylase (Hdc), the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of histamine (HA), has been implicated as a rare genetic cause. Hdc knockout mice exhibited potentiated tic-like stereotypies, recapitulating core phenomenology of TS; these were mitigated by the dopamine D2 antagonist haloperidol, a proven pharmacotherapy, and by HA infusion into the brain. Prepulse inhibition was impaired in both mice and humans carrying Hdc mutations. HA infusion reduced striatal dopamine (DA) levels; in Hdc knockout mice, striatal DA was increased and the DA-regulated immediate early gene Fos was upregulated. Dopamine D2/D3 receptor binding was altered both in mice and in humans carrying the Hdc mutation. These data confirm HDC deficiency as a rare cause of TS and identify histamine-dopamine interactions in the basal ganglia as an important locus of pathology. PMID:24411733

  8. Molecular mechanism of allosteric substrate activation in a thiamine diphosphate-dependent decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Versées, Wim; Spaepen, Stijn; Wood, Martin D H; Leeper, Finian J; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steyaert, Jan

    2007-11-30

    Thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzymes are involved in a wide variety of metabolic pathways. The molecular mechanism behind active site communication and substrate activation, observed in some of these enzymes, has since long been an area of debate. Here, we report the crystal structures of a phenylpyruvate decarboxylase in complex with its substrates and a covalent reaction intermediate analogue. These structures reveal the regulatory site and unveil the mechanism of allosteric substrate activation. This signal transduction relies on quaternary structure reorganizations, domain rotations, and a pathway of local conformational changes that are relayed from the regulatory site to the active site. The current findings thus uncover the molecular mechanism by which the binding of a substrate in the regulatory site is linked to the mounting of the catalytic machinery in the active site in this thiamine diphosphate-dependent enzyme.

  9. Some Aspects of Yeast Anaerobic Metabolism Examined by the Inhibition of Pyruvate Decarboxylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Earl V.

    1998-10-01

    Incubation of yeast cells with various sugars in aqueous alkaline phosphate solutions under anaerobic conditions results in the accumulation of pyruvate in the cell medium after short periods of up to 15 minutes. This accumulation of pyruvate as the end product of glycolysis results from the inhibition of pyruvate decarboxylase under the conditions. This pyruvate production can be readily measured in the cell-free medium by a spectrophotometric assay using lactic dehydrogenase and NADH. The production of pyruvate can be directly related to the ability of the yeast cells to metabolize particular carbon sources provided. Comparison of pyruvate production by yeast from a variety of common sugars, for example, provides students with a means to assess what sugars are readily utilized by this organism. An additional advantage for student laboratory studies is the availability of Sacchromyces cerevisiae at minimal cost as dry granules which are easily weighed and quickly activated.

  10. The importance of SERINE DECARBOXYLASE1 (SDC1) and ethanolamine biosynthesis during embryogenesis of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Yunus, Ian Sofian; Liu, Yu-Chi; Nakamura, Yuki

    2016-11-01

    In plants, ethanolamine is considered a precursor for the synthesis of choline, which is an essential dietary nutrient for animals. An enzyme serine decarboxylase (SDC) has been identified and characterized in Arabidopsis, which directly converts serine to ethanolamine, a precursor to phosphorylethanolamine and its subsequent metabolites in plants. However, the importance of SDC and ethanolamine production in plant growth and development remains unclear. Here, we show that SDC is required for ethanolamine biosynthesis in vivo and essential in plant embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. The knockout of SDC1 caused an embryonic lethal defect due to the developmental arrest of the embryos at the heart stage. During embryo development, the expression was observed at the later stages, at which developmental defect occurred in the knockout mutant. Overexpression of SDC1 in planta increased levels of ethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylcholine both in leaves and siliques. These results suggest that SDC1 plays an essential role in ethanolamine biosynthesis during the embryogenesis in Arabidopsis.

  11. Genetic Confirmation of the Role of Sulfopyruvate Decarboxylase in Coenzyme M Biosynthesis in Methanococcus maripaludis

    DOE PAGES

    Sarmiento, Felipe; Ellison, Courtney K.; Whitman, William B.

    2013-01-01

    Coenzyme M is an essential coenzyme for methanogenesis. The proposed biosynthetic pathway consists of five steps, of which the fourth step is catalyzed by sulfopyruvate decarboxylase (ComDE). Disruption of the gene comE by transposon mutagenesis resulted in a partial coenzyme M auxotroph, which grew poorly in the absence of coenzyme M and retained less than 3% of the wild type level of coenzyme M biosynthesis. Upon coenzyme M addition, normal growth of the mutant was restored. Moreover, complementation of the mutation with the wild type comE gene in trans restored full growth in the absence of coenzyme M. Thesemore » results confirm that ComE plays an important role in coenzyme M biosynthesis. The inability to yield a complete CoM auxotroph suggests that either the transposon insertion failed to completely inactivate the gene or M. maripaludis possesses a promiscuous activity that partially complemented the mutation.« less

  12. Hydroxydibenzoylmethane induces apoptosis through repressing ornithine decarboxylase in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ming-Fu; Liao, Ya-Fan; Hung, Ying-Cheng; Lin, Chih-Li; Hour, Tzyh-Chyuan; Lue, Ko-Huang; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis and a target for chemoprevention. Hydroxydibenzoylmethane (HDB), a derivative of dibenzoylmethane of licorice, is a promising chemopreventive agent. In this paper, we investigated whether HDB would inhibit the ODC pathway to enhance apoptosis in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells. We found ODC enzyme activity was reduced during HDB treatment. Overexpression of ODC in HL-60 parental cells could reduce HDB-induced apoptosis, which leads to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), through lessening intracellular ROS. Furthermore, ODC overexpression protected cytochrome c release and the activation of caspase-3 following HDB treatment. The results demonstrated HDB-induced apoptosis was through a mechanism of down-regulation of ODC and occurred along a ROS-dependent mitochondria-mediated pathway. PMID:21372632

  13. Requirement for both H and L chain V regions, VH and VK joining amino acids, and the unique H chain D region for the high affinity binding of an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody.

    PubMed

    Ruff-Jamison, S; Glenney, J R

    1993-04-15

    Sequence analysis of a panel of antibodies to phosphotyrosine revealed predominant H and L chain V regions in the immune response and a unique D segment in the Py20 mAb, which exhibits a high affinity for phosphotyrosine. In order to determine the influence of somatic diversity on the high affinity binding of Py20, H and L chain V regions were expressed in Escherichia coli as an Fv dimer. Whereas the H or L chain V regions of Py20 alone were unable to bind phosphotyrosine, the Fv binds phosphotyrosine with an affinity comparable with the intact IgG as determined by fluorescence quenching experiments (1.55 x 10(-7) M vs 1.25 x 10(-7) M, respectively). Substitution of the Py20 V regions with other IgG V regions that differed greatly in sequence abolished binding. A high affinity Py20-combining site was dependent on the presence of the unique D-D segment. Replacement of the Py20 D-D region with a single homologous D region resulted in a decrease in affinity (5.9 x 10(-7) M). Substitution of this D-D region for the D region of another anti-phosphotyrosine antibody that is known to bind phosphotyrosine weakly (1 x 10(-3) M) conferred high affinity binding. Removal of three tyrosines from the first of the two D regions was accompanied by a fivefold reduction in affinity for phosphotyrosine. In addition, changing the VK and VH junctional amino acids resulted in a complete loss of binding. Therefore, the formation of the high affinity Py20 combining site requires both a H and L chain that are similar in sequence to those of Py20 including the unique D region and the junctional amino acids.

  14. Characterization of new polyclonal antibodies specific for 40 and 42 amino acid-long amyloid beta peptides: their use to examine the cell biology of presenilins and the immunohistochemistry of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy cases.

    PubMed Central

    Barelli, H.; Lebeau, A.; Vizzavona, J.; Delaere, P.; Chevallier, N.; Drouot, C.; Marambaud, P.; Ancolio, K.; Buxbaum, J. D.; Khorkova, O.; Heroux, J.; Sahasrabudhe, S.; Martinez, J.; Warter, J. M.; Mohr, M.; Checler, F.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the main histological lesion is a proteinaceous deposit, the senile plaque, which is mainly composed of a peptide called A beta. The aggregation process is thought to occur through enhanced concentration of A beta 40 or increased production of the more readily aggregating 42 amino acid-long A beta 42 species. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Specificity of the antibodies was assessed by dot blot, Western blot, ELISA, and immunoprecipitation procedures on synthetic and endogenous A beta produced by secreted HK293 cells. A beta and p3 production by wild-type and mutated presenilin 1-expressing cells transiently transfected with beta APP751 was monitored after metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation procedures. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on brains of sporadic and typical cerebrovascular amyloid angiopathy (CAA) cases. RESULTS: Dot and Western blot analyses indicate that IgG-purified fractions of antisera recognize native and denaturated A beta s. FCA3340 and FCA 3542 display full specificity for A beta 40 and A beta 42, respectively. Antibodies immunoprecipitate their respective synthetic A beta species but also A beta s and their related p3 counterparts endogenously secreted by transfected human kidney 293 cells. This allowed us to show that mutations on presenilin 1 triggered similar increased ratios of A beta 42 and its p 342 counterpart over total A beta and p3. ELISA assays allow detection of about 25-50 pg/ml of A beta s and remain linear up to 750 to 1500 pg/ml without any cross-reactivity. FCA18 and FCA3542 label diffuse and mature plaques of a sporadic AD case whereas FCA3340 only reveals the mature lesions and particularly labels their central dense core. In a CAA case, FCA18 and FCA3340 reveal leptomeningeal and cortical arterioles whereas FCA3542 only faintly labels such structures. CONCLUSIONS: Polyclonal antibodies exclusively recognizing A beta 40 (FCA 3340) or A beta 42 (FCA3542) were obtained. These

  15. Reconciling the structural attributes of avian antibodies.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Paul J; Law, Ruby H P; Gilgunn, Sarah; Hearty, Stephen; Caradoc-Davies, Tom T; Lloyd, Gordon; O'Kennedy, Richard J; Whisstock, James C

    2014-05-30

    Antibodies are high value therapeutic, diagnostic, biotechnological, and research tools. Combinatorial approaches to antibody discovery have facilitated access to unique antibodies by surpassing the diversity limitations of the natural repertoire, exploitation of immune repertoires from multiple species, and tailoring selections to isolate antibodies with desirable biophysical attributes. The V-gene repertoire of the chicken does not utilize highly diverse sequence and structures, which is in stark contrast to the mechanism employed by humans, mice, and primates. Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has generated high quality, high affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic, diagnostic and biotechnological applications. Furthermore, extensive examination of the amino acid characteristics of the chicken repertoire has provided significant insight into mechanisms employed by the avian immune system. A paucity of avian antibody crystal structures has limited our understanding of the structural consequences of these uniquely chicken features. This paper presents the crystal structure of two chicken single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies generated from large libraries by phage display against important human antigen targets, which capture two unique CDRL1 canonical classes in the presence and absence of a non-canonical disulfide constrained CDRH3. These structures cast light on the unique structural features of chicken antibodies and contribute further to our collective understanding of the unique mechanisms of diversity and biochemical attributes that render the chicken repertoire of particular value for antibody generation.

  16. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity.

  17. Molecular screening of wine lactic acid bacteria degrading hydroxycinnamic acids.

    PubMed

    de las Rivas, Blanca; Rodríguez, Héctor; Curiel, José Antonio; Landete, José María; Muñoz, Rosario

    2009-01-28

    The potential to produce volatile phenols from hydroxycinnamic acids was investigated for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from Spanish grape must and wine. A PCR assay was developed for the detection of LAB that potentially produce volatile phenols. Synthetic degenerate oligonucleotides for the specific detection of the pdc gene encoding a phenolic acid decarboxylase were designed. The pdc PCR assay amplifies a 321 bp DNA fragment from phenolic acid decarboxylase. The pdc PCR method was applied to 85 strains belonging to the 6 main wine LAB species. Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, and Pediococcus pentosaceus strains produce a positive response in the pdc PCR assay, whereas Oenococcus oeni, Lactobacillus hilgardii, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains did not produce the expected PCR product. The production of vinyl and ethyl derivatives from hydroxycinnamic acids in culture media was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. A relationship was found between pdc PCR amplification and volatile phenol production, so that the LAB strains that gave a positive pdc PCR response produce volatile phenols, whereas strains that did not produce a PCR amplicon did not produce volatile phenols. The proposed method could be useful for a preliminary identification of LAB strains able to produce volatile phenols in wine.

  18. Decarboxylation of Substituted Cinnamic Acids by Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated during Malt Whisky Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Sylvie; Priest, Fergus G.

    2000-01-01

    Seven strains of Lactobacillus isolated from malt whisky fermentations and representing Lactobacillus brevis, L. crispatus, L. fermentum, L. hilgardii, L. paracasei, L. pentosus, and L. plantarum contained genes for hydroxycinnamic acid (p-coumaric acid) decarboxylase. With the exception of L. hilgardii, these bacteria decarboxylated p-coumaric acid and/or ferulic acid, with the production of 4-vinylphenol and/or 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively, although the relative activities on the two substrates varied between strains. The addition of p-coumaric acid or ferulic acid to cultures of L. pentosus in MRS broth induced hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase mRNA within 5 min, and the gene was also induced by the indigenous components of malt wort. In a simulated distillery fermentation, a mixed culture of L. crispatus and L. pentosus in the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae decarboxylated added p-coumaric acid more rapidly than the yeast alone but had little activity on added ferulic acid. Moreover, we were able to demonstrate the induction of hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase mRNA under these conditions. However, in fermentations with no additional hydroxycinnamic acid, the bacteria lowered the final concentration of 4-vinylphenol in the fermented wort compared to the level seen in a pure-yeast fermentation. It seems likely that the combined activities of bacteria and yeast decarboxylate p-coumaric acid and then reduce 4-vinylphenol to 4-ethylphenol more effectively than either microorganism alone in pure cultures. Although we have shown that lactobacilli participate in the metabolism of phenolic compounds during malt whisky fermentations, the net result is a reduction in the concentrations of 4-vinylphenol and 4-vinylguaiacol prior to distillation. PMID:11097909

  19. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  20. Proteolytic degradation of glutamate decarboxylase mediates disinhibition of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells in cathepsin D-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tokiko; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Yamasaki, Ryo; Yamada, Jun; Zhang, Jian; Ukai, Kiyoharu; Koike, Masato; Mine, Kazunori; von Figura, Kurt; Peters, Christoph; Saftig, Paul; Fukuda, Takaichi; Uchiyama, Yasuo; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Although of clinical importance, little is known about the mechanism of seizure in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL). In the present study, we have attempted to elucidate the mechanism underlying the seizure of cathepsin D-deficient (CD-/-) mice that show a novel type of lysosomal storage disease with a phenotype resembling late infantile NCL. In hippocampal slices prepared from CD-/- mice at post-natal day (P)24, spontaneous burst discharges were recorded from CA3 pyramidal cells. At P24, the mean amplitude of IPSPs after stimulation of the mossy fibres was significantly smaller than that of wild-type mice, which was substantiated by the decreased level of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contents in the hippocampus measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). At this stage, activated microglia were found to accumulate in the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampal CA3 subfield of CD-/- mice. However, there was no significant change in the numerical density of GABAergic interneurons in the CA3 subfield of CD-/- mice at P24, estimated by counting the number of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 67-immunoreactive somata. In the hippocampus and the cortex of CD-/- mice at P24, some GABAergic interneurons displayed extremely high somatic granular immunoreactivites for GAD67, suggesting the lysosomal accumulation of GAD67. GAD67 levels in axon terminals abutting on to perisomatic regions of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells was not significantly changed in CD-/- mice even at P24, whereas the total protein levels of GAD67 in both the hippocampus and the cortex of CD-/- mice after P24 were significantly decreased as a result of degradation. Furthermore, the recombinant human GAD65/67 was rapidly digested by the lysosomal fraction prepared from the whole brain of wild-type and CD-/- mice. These observations strongly suggest that the reduction of GABA contents, presumably because of lysosomal degradation of GAD67 and lysosomal accumulation of its degraded forms

  1. Use of isotope effects to determine the chemical mechanism of oxidative decarboxylases: NADP malic enzyme and NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Grisson, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical mechanism of the NADP-linked oxidative decarboxylases chicken liver malic enzyme and pig heart isocitrate dehydrogenase has been examined using carbon and deuterium isotope effects and their variation with pH, metal ions, and solution viscosity. The following /sup 13/C isotope effects on V/K for malate are observed with the stated metal ion at pH 8.0 and 25/sup 0/C: Mg/sup 2 +/, 1.0336; Mn/sup 2 +/, 1.0365; Cd/sup 2 +/, 1.0366; Zn/sup 2 +/, 1.03373; Co/sup 2 +/, 1.0283; and Ni/sup 2 +/, 1.025. The /sup 13/C isotope effect on nonenzymatic decarboxylation of dibasic oxalacetate at 25/sup 0/C and the stated metal ion is : Mg/sup 2 +/, 1.0489; Mn/sup 2 +/, 1.0505; Ni/sup 2 +/, 1.044; Cd/sup 2 +/, 1.0492; Zn/sup 2 +/, 1.0504; and Co/sup 2 +/, 1.0480. By quantitating the partitioning of the 2-ketocarboxylic acid reaction intermediate between reverse hydride transfer and decarboxylation, it is possible to solve for the intrinsic isotope effects in both reactions. With malic enzyme activated by Mg/sup 2 +/, the partitioning ratio of oxalacetate between pyruvate and malate formation is 0.47. This gives an intrinsic deuterium and /sup 13/C isotope effect of 5.6 and 1.0493, respectively. The /sup 13/C isotope effect for the Mg/sup 2 +/ catalyzed nonenzymatic decarboxylation of oxalacetate is 1.0489, thereby suggesting a similarity of transition states between the enzymatic and nonenzymatic processes. The observed /sup 13/C primary isotope effect for isocitrate in the isocitrate dehydrogenase reaction is obscured by the stickiness of isocitrate at neutral pH. At low pH, the external commitment is eliminated and the observed /sup 13/C isotope effect increases to a limiting value of 1.0353. The pK of the pH dependence of /sup 13/(V/K) is 4.7.

  2. Gut Microbial Metabolites Fuel Host Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myunghoo; Qie, Yaqing; Park, Jeongho; Kim, Chang H

    2016-08-10

    Antibody production is a metabolically demanding process that is regulated by gut microbiota, but the microbial products supporting B cell responses remain incompletely identified. We report that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), produced by gut microbiota as fermentation products of dietary fiber, support host antibody responses. In B cells, SCFAs increase acetyl-CoA and regulate metabolic sensors to increase oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, and fatty acid synthesis, which produce energy and building blocks supporting antibody production. In parallel, SCFAs control gene expression to express molecules necessary for plasma B cell differentiation. Mice with low SCFA production due to reduced dietary fiber consumption or microbial insufficiency are defective in homeostatic and pathogen-specific antibody responses, resulting in greater pathogen susceptibility. However, SCFA or dietary fiber intake restores this immune deficiency. This B cell-helping function of SCFAs is detected from the intestines to systemic tissues and conserved among mouse and human B cells, highlighting its importance.

  3. Complete mapping of viral escape from neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Scott E.

    2017-01-01

    Identifying viral mutations that confer escape from antibodies is crucial for understanding the interplay between immunity and viral evolution. We describe a high-throughput approach to quantify the selection that monoclonal antibodies exert on all single amino-acid mutations to a viral protein. This approach, mutational antigenic profiling, involves creating all replication-competent protein variants of a virus, selecting with antibody, and using deep sequencing to identify enriched mutations. We use mutational antigenic profiling to comprehensively identify mutations that enable influenza virus to escape four monoclonal antibodies targeting hemagglutinin, and validate key findings with neutralization assays. We find remarkable mutation-level idiosyncrasy in antibody escape: for instance, at a single residue targeted by two antibodies, some mutations escape both antibodies while other mutations escape only one or the other. Because mutational antigenic profiling rapidly maps all mutations selected by an antibody, it is useful for elucidating immune specificities and interpreting the antigenic consequences of viral genetic variation. PMID:28288189

  4. Threonine 57 is required for the post-translational activation of Escherichia coli aspartate α-decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Michael E.; Yorke, Briony A.; Kershaw, Tom; Lovelock, Sarah; Lobley, Carina M. C.; Kilkenny, Mairi L.; Smith, Alison G.; Blundell, Tom L.; Pearson, Arwen R.; Abell, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Aspartate α-decarboxylase is a pyruvoyl-dependent decarboxylase required for the production of β-alanine in the bacterial pantothenate (vitamin B5) biosynthesis pathway. The pyruvoyl group is formed via the intramolecular rearrangement of a serine residue to generate a backbone ester intermediate which is cleaved to generate an N-terminal pyruvoyl group. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues adjacent to the active site, including Tyr22, Thr57 and Tyr58, reveals that only mutation of Thr57 leads to changes in the degree of post-translational activation. The crystal structure of the site-directed mutant T57V is consistent with a non-rearranged backbone, supporting the hypothesis that Thr57 is required for the formation of the ester intermediate in activation. PMID:24699660

  5. Threonine 57 is required for the post-translational activation of Escherichia coli aspartate α-decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Webb, Michael E; Yorke, Briony A; Kershaw, Tom; Lovelock, Sarah; Lobley, Carina M C; Kilkenny, Mairi L; Smith, Alison G; Blundell, Tom L; Pearson, Arwen R; Abell, Chris

    2014-04-01

    Aspartate α-decarboxylase is a pyruvoyl-dependent decarboxylase required for the production of β-alanine in the bacterial pantothenate (vitamin B5) biosynthesis pathway. The pyruvoyl group is formed via the intramolecular rearrangement of a serine residue to generate a backbone ester intermediate which is cleaved to generate an N-terminal pyruvoyl group. Site-directed mutagenesis of residues adjacent to the active site, including Tyr22, Thr57 and Tyr58, reveals that only mutation of Thr57 leads to changes in the degree of post-translational activation. The crystal structure of the site-directed mutant T57V is consistent with a non-rearranged backbone, supporting the hypothesis that Thr57 is required for the formation of the ester intermediate in activation.

  6. Computational, structural, and kinetic evidence that Vibrio vulnificus FrsA is not a cofactor-independent pyruvate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kellett, Whitney F; Brunk, Elizabeth; Desai, Bijoy J; Fedorov, Alexander A; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Richards, Nigel G J

    2013-03-19

    The fermentation-respiration switch (FrsA) protein in Vibrio vulnificus was recently reported to catalyze the cofactor-independent decarboxylation of pyruvate. We now report quantum mechanical/molecular mechenical calculations that examine the energetics of C-C bond cleavage for a pyruvate molecule bound within the putative active site of FrsA. These calculations suggest that the barrier to C-C bond cleavage in the bound substrate is 28 kcal/mol, which is similar to that estimated for the uncatalyzed decarboxylation of pyruvate in water at 25 °C. In agreement with the theoretical predictions, no pyruvate decarboxylase activity was detected for recombinant FrsA protein that could be crystallized and structurally characterized. These results suggest that the functional annotation of FrsA as a cofactor-independent pyruvate decarboxylase is incorrect.

  7. Computational, Structural and Kinetic Evidence that Vibrio vulnificus FrsA is not a Cofactor-Independent Pyruvate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Kellett, Whitney F.; Brunk, Elizabeth; Desai, Bijoy J.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Richards, Nigel G. J.

    2013-01-01

    The fermentation-respiration switch (FrsA) protein in Vibrio vulnificus was recently reported to catalyze the cofactor-independent decarboxylation of pyruvate. We now report QM/MM calculations that examine the energetics of C-C bond cleavage for a pyruvate molecule bound within the putative active site of FrsA. These calculations suggest that the barrier to C-C bond cleavage in the bound substrate is 28 kcal/mol, which is similar to that estimated for the uncatalyzed decarboxylation of pyruvate in water at 25 °C. In agreement with the theoretical predictions, no pyruvate decarboxylase activity was detected for recombinant FrsA protein that could be crystallized and structurally characterized. These results suggest that the functional annotation of FrsA as a cofactor-independent pyruvate decarboxylase is incorrect. PMID:23452154

  8. /sup 3/H-DFMA metabolism in tobacco: non-specific, arginase mediated inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Slocum, R.D.; Feirer, R.L.

    1987-04-01

    ..cap alpha..-Difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) is a specific, enzyme-activated, irreversible inhibit of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) in vitro. ADC catalyzes the first step leading to putrescine biosynthesis and the activity of this enzyme is closely linked to overall polyamine (PA) biosynthesis in non-meristematic plant tissues. Consequently, ADC represents an important target enzyme for inhibitors of PA metabolism. DFMA has been shown to inhibit ADC activity in a variety of tissues in vivo but its specificity in tobacco was questioned since ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity was also inhibited. Further studies have shown that (/sup 3/H)-DFMA is efficiently hydrolyzed in tobacco to (/sup 3/H)-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ODC. Tobacco and bovine arginases also catalyze the hydrolysis of DFMA in vitro, suggesting a role for this enzyme in mediating the non-specific inhibition of ODC by DFMA in tobacco flowers.

  9. FcWRKY70, a WRKY protein of Fortunella crassifolia, functions in drought tolerance and modulates putrescine synthesis by regulating arginine decarboxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jingyan; Hu, Jianbing; Wang, Wei; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Qinghua; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2015-11-01

    WRKY comprises a large family of transcription factors in plants, but most WRKY members are still poorly understood. In this study, we report functional characterization of a Group III WRKY gene (FcWRKY70) from Fortunella crassifolia. FcWRKY70 was greatly induced by drought and abscisic acid, but slightly or negligibly by salt and cold. Overexpression of FcWRKY70 in tobacco (Nicotiana nudicaulis) and lemon (Citrus lemon) conferred enhanced tolerance to dehydration and drought stresses. Transgenic tobacco and lemon exhibited higher expression levels of ADC (arginine decarboxylase), and accumulated larger amount of putrescine in comparison with wild type (WT). Treatment with D-arginine, an inhibitor of ADC, caused transgenic tobacco plants more sensitive to dehydration. Knock-down of FcWRKY70 in kumquat down-regulated ADC abundance and decreased putrescine level, accompanied by compromised dehydration tolerance. The promoter region of FcADC contained two W-box elements, which were shown to be interacted with FcWRKY70. Taken together, our data demonstrated that FcWRKY70 functions in drought tolerance by, at least partly, promoting production of putrescine via regulating ADC expression.

  10. Production of itaconate by whole-cell bioconversion of citrate mediated by expression of multiple cis-aconitate decarboxylase (cadA) genes in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junyoung; Seo, Hyung-Min; Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Song, Hun-Seok; Kim, Jung-Ho; Jeon, Jong-Min; Choi, Kwon-Young; Kim, Wooseong; Yoon, Jeong-Jun; Kim, Yun-Gon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2017-01-01

    Itaconate, a C5 unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, is an important chemical building block that is used in manufacturing high-value products, such as latex and superabsorbent polymers. Itaconate is produced by fermentation of sugars by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus terreus. However, fermentation by A. terreus involves a long fermentation period and the formation of various byproducts, resulting in high production costs. E. coli has been developed as an alternative for producing itaconate. However, fermentation of glucose gives low conversion yields and low productivity. Here, we report the whole-cell bioconversio