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Sample records for acid decarboxylase antibody

  1. Cerebellar Ataxia and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, Helena; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Blanco, Yolanda; Martínez-Hernández, Eugenia; Sabater, Lidia; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Rouco, Idoia; Bataller, Luis; Dalmau, Josep O.; Saiz, Albert; Graus, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Current clinical and immunologic knowledge on cerebellar ataxia (CA) with glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibodies (GAD65-Abs) is based on case reports and small series with short-term follow-up data. OBJECTIVE To report the symptoms, additional antibodies, prognostic factors, and long-term outcomes in a cohort of patients with CA and GAD65-Abs. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study and laboratory investigations at a center for autoimmune neurologic disorders among 34 patients with CA and GAD65-Abs, including 25 with long-term follow-up data (median, 5.4 years; interquartile range, 3.1-10.3 years). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Analysis of clinicoimmunologic features and predictors of response to immunotherapy. Immunochemistry on rat brain, cultured neurons, and human embryonic kidney cells expressing GAD65, GAD67, α1-subunit of the glycine receptor, and a repertoire of known cell surface autoantigens were used to identify additional antibodies. Twenty-eight patients with stiff person syndrome and GAD65-Abs served as controls. RESULTS The median age of patients was 58 years (range, 33-80 years); 28 of 34 patients (82%) were women. Nine patients (26%) reported episodes of brainstem and cerebellar dysfunction or persistent vertigo several months before developing CA. The clinical presentation was subacute during a period of weeks in 13 patients (38%). Nine patients (26%) had coexisting stiff person syndrome symptoms. Systemic organ-specific autoimmunities (type 1 diabetes mellitus and others) were present in 29 patients (85%). Twenty of 25 patients with long-term follow-up data received immunotherapy (intravenous immunoglobulin in 10 and corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin or other immunosuppressors in 10), and 7 of them (35%) improved. Predictors of clinical response included subacute onset of CA (odds ratio [OR], 0.50; 95% CI, 0.25-0.99; P = .047) and prompt immunotherapy (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-0.99; P = .01). Similar

  2. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positive neurological syndromes.

    PubMed

    Tohid, Hassaan

    2016-07-01

    A rare kind of antibody, known as anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibody, is found in some patients. The antibody works against the GAD enzyme, which is essential in the formation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter found in the brain. Patients found with this antibody present with motor and cognitive problems due to low levels or lack of GABA, because in the absence or low levels of GABA patients exhibit motor and cognitive symptoms. The anti-GAD antibody is found in some neurological syndromes, including stiff-person syndrome, paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), limbic encephalopathy, cerebellar ataxia, eye movement disorders, and epilepsy. Previously, excluding MFS, these conditions were calledhyperexcitability disorders. However, collectively, these syndromes should be known as "anti-GAD positive neurological syndromes." An important limitation of this study is that the literature is lacking on the subject, and why patients with the above mentioned neurological problems present with different symptoms has not been studied in detail. Therefore, it is recommended that more research is conducted on this subject to obtain a better and deeper understanding of these anti-GAD antibody induced neurological syndromes. PMID:27356651

  3. Alternating skew deviation in association with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Asim V.; Soin, Ketki; Moss, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of an elevated anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody level has been associated with a number of eye movement abnormalities, as well as other findings including cerebellar ataxia and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Skew deviation in association with anti-GAD antibodies has not been previously reported. Here we report a case of alternating skew deviation along with cerebellar-brainstem signs in a patient with an elevated anti-GAD antibody titer. Follow-up neurologic evaluation after treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin revealed improvement in cerebellar-brainstem signs, while ophthalmic evaluation was stable. PMID:26594078

  4. Immunotherapy-responsive limbic encephalitis with antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Markakis, Ioannis; Alexopoulos, Harry; Poulopoulou, Cornelia; Akrivou, Sofia; Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Katsiva, Vassiliki; Lyrakos, Georgios; Gekas, Georgios; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2014-08-15

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) has been recently identified as a target of humoral autoimmunity in a small subgroup of patients with non-paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (NPLE). We present a patient with NPLE and positive anti-GAD antibodies who showed significant improvement after long-term immunotherapy. A 48-year old female was admitted with a two-year history of anterograde amnesia and seizures. Brain MRI revealed bilateral lesions of medial temporal lobes. Screening for anti-neuronal antibodies showed high anti-GAD titers in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with strong evidence of intrathecal production. The patient received treatment with prednisolone and long-term plasma exchange. During a 12-month follow-up, she exhibited complete seizure remission and an improvement in memory and visuo-spatial skills. Anti-GAD antibodies may serve as a useful marker to identify a subset of NPLE patients that respond to immunoregulatory treatment.

  5. Intrathecal-specific glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies at low titers in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Chu, Kon; Byun, Jung-Ick; Moon, Jangsup; Lim, Jung-Ah; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Park, Kyung-Il; Jeon, Daejong; Jung, Ki-Young; Kim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-15

    Autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (Gad-Abs) are implicated in various neurological syndromes. The present study aims to identify intrathecal-specific GAD-Abs and to determine clinical manifestations and treatment outcomes. Nineteen patients had GAD-Abs in cerebrospinal fluid but not in paired serum samples. Neurological syndromes included limbic encephalitis, temporal lobe epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, autonomic dysfunction, and stiff-person syndrome. Immunotherapy had beneficial effects in 57.1% of patients, and the patients with limbic encephalitis responded especially well to immunotherapy. Intrathecal-specific antibodies to GAD at low titers may appear as nonspecific markers of immune activation within the central nervous system rather than pathogenic antibodies causing neuronal dysfunction. PMID:26711563

  6. Elimination of islet cell antibodies and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies II in a patient with newly diagnosed insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Richter, W O; Donner, M G; Schwandt, P

    1997-01-01

    Islet cell antibodies and glutamic acid decarboxylase II (GAD II) antibodies have been discussed in the autoimmune pathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Hence, immunosuppressants, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasmapheresis have been used in an effort to modulate autoimmune activity and thereby prevent the destruction of pancreatic beta-cells. We describe the autoantibody (islet cell antibody and GAD II) kinetics and clinical course in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM treated with a specific immunoglobulin apheresis technique. Five days after the initial diagnosis a 37-year-old patient with IDDM underwent a series of seven immunoglobulin aphereses. Immunoglobulin (IgG, IgA, IgM), islet cell antibody, GAD II, and C-peptide concentrations were monitored for a time course of 74 days. Daily insulin requirements were recorded. One single immunoglobulin apheresis decreased IgG by 66.2 +/- 9.1%, IgA by 66.8 +/- 8.7%, and IgM by 57.7 +/- 12.9%. GAD II antibodies were reduced by 61.9 +/- 12.4%. The islet cell antibody titer declined from 1:32 to 1:4 after the treatment series. There were no relevant changes in the safety parameters determined nor were there any clinical side effects. The efficient decrease in islet cell antibodies and glutamic acid decarboxylase II antibodies in a patient with IDDM encourages further investigations into the impact of this treatment on the clinical course of this autoimmune disorder.

  7. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD) & tissue transglutaminase (anti-TTG) antibodies in patients with thyroid autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Marwaha, R.K.; Garg, M.K.; Tandon, N.; Kanwar, Ratnesh; Narang, A.; Sastry, A.; Saberwal, A.; Bhadra, Kuntal

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Several autoimmune disorders have been reported to be associated with autoimmune thyroiditis and may coexist with other organ-specific autoantibodies. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of tissue transglutaminase (anti-TTG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD) antibodies in patients suffering from autoimmune thyroiditis as diagnosed by anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) antibodies, which may indicate high risk for developing celiac disease or type 1 diabetes mellitus. Methods: Five thousand children and 2800 adults were screening as part of a general health examination done on a voluntary basis in four different parts of Delhi. A total of 577 subjects positive for anti-TPO antibody constituted the cases. Equal number of age and sex matched anti-TPO antibody negative controls were randomly selected from the same cohort to form paired case control study. The cases and controls were further divided into two groups as follows: group-1 (children and adolescent <18 yr), group-2 (adults >18 yr). Serum samples of cases and controls were analysed for thyroid function test (FT3, FT4, and TSH), anti-TTG and anti-GAD antibodies. Results: A total of 1154 subjects (577 cases and 577 controls) were included in this study. Hypothyroidism was present in 40.2 per cent (232) cases compared to only 4.7 per cent (27) in controls (P<0.001). Anti-TTG and anti-GAD antibodies were present in 6.9 and 12.5 per cent subjects among cases compared to 3.5 per cent (P=0.015) and 4.3 per cent (P=0.001) in controls, respectively. Only anti-GAD antibody were significantly positive in cases among children and adolescents (P =0.0044) and adult (P=0.001) compared to controls. Levels of anti-TTG and anti-GAD antibodies increased with increasing titre of anti-TPO antibody. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed high positivity of anti-GAD and anti-TTG antibodies among subjects with thyroid autoimmunity. It is, therefore, important to have

  8. Assessment of the effects of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies and trace elements on cognitive performance in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas S

    2015-01-01

    Background Homeostatic imbalance of trace elements such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) demonstrated adverse effects on brain function among older adults. Objective The present study aimed to investigate the effects of trace elements and the presence of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADAs) in human cognitive abilities among healthy older adults. Methods A total of 100 healthy subjects (65 males, 35 females; age range; 64–96 years) were recruited for this study. Based on Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) score, the participants were classified according to cognitive performance into normal (n=45), moderate (n=30), and severe (n=25). Cognitive functioning, leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), serum trace elements – Fe, Cu, Zn, Zn/Cu, and GADAs were assessed using LOTCA battery, pre-validated physical activity (PA) questionnaire, atomic absorption, and immunoassay techniques, respectively. Results Approximately 45% of the study population (n=45) had normal distribution of cognitive function and 55% of the study population (n=55) had abnormal cognitive function; they were classified into moderate (score 62–92) and severe (score 31–62). There was a significant reduction in the level of Zn and Zn/Cu ratio along with an increase in the level of Fe, Cu, and anti-GADAs in subjects of severe (P=0.01) and moderate (P=0.01) cognitive performance. LOTCA-cognitive scores correlated positively with sex, HbA1c, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Zn/Cu ratio, and negatively with age, PA, body mass index, and anti-GADAs. Significant inter-correlation was reported between serum trace element concentrations and anti-GADAs which suggest producing a cognitive decline via oxidative and neural damage mechanism. Conclusion This study found significant associations among trace elements, anti-GADAs, and cognitive function in older adults. The homeostatic balance of trace elements should be recommended among older adults for better cognitive

  9. Genetics Home Reference: aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... PDF Open All Close All Description Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inherited disorder that ...

  10. Loss of Autonoetic Awareness of Recent Autobiographical Episodes and Accelerated Long-Term Forgetting in a Patient with Previously Unrecognized Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibody Related Limbic Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Juri-Alexander; Vogt, Viola Lara; Widman, Guido; Langen, Karl-Josef; Elger, Christian Erich; Helmstaedter, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 35-year-old male patient presenting with depressed mood and emotional instability, who complained about severe anterograde and retrograde memory deficits characterized by accelerated long-term forgetting and loss of autonoetic awareness regarding autobiographical memories of the last 3 years. Months before he had experienced two breakdowns of unknown etiology giving rise to the differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures after various practitioners and clinics had suggested different etiologies such as a psychosomatic condition, burnout, depression, or dissociative amnesia. Neuropsychological assessment indicated selectively impaired figural memory performance. Extended diagnostics confirmed accelerated forgetting of previously learned and retrievable verbal material. Structural imaging showed bilateral swelling and signal alterations of temporomesial structures (left >right). Video-EEG monitoring revealed a left temporal epileptic focus and subclincal seizure, but no overt seizures. Antibody tests in serum and liquor were positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. These findings led to the diagnosis of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody related limbic encephalitis. Monthly steroid pulses over 6 months led to recovery of subjective memory and to intermediate improvement but subsequent worsening of objective memory performance. During the course of treatment, the patient reported de novo paroxysmal non-responsive states. Thus, antiepileptic treatment was started and the patient finally became seizure free. At the last visit, vocational reintegration was successfully in progress. In conclusion, amygdala swelling, retrograde biographic memory impairment, accelerated long-term forgetting, and emotional instability may serve as indicators of limbic encephalitis, even in the absence of overt epileptic seizures. The monitoring of such patients calls for a standardized and concerted multilevel diagnostic approach with repeated assessments

  11. Zymographic detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Pastor, F I Javier; Diaz, Pilar

    2002-11-01

    The manuscript includes a concise description of a new, fast and simple method for detection of cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity. The method is based on a color shift caused a by pH change and may be an excellent procedure for large screenings of samples from natural sources, as it involves no complex sample processing or purification. The method developed can be used in preliminary approaches to biotransformation processes involving detection of hydroxycinnamic acid decarboxylase activity.

  12. Exponential increase of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody titer after initiating and stopping insulin in a patient with slowly progressive type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akihiro; Nagasawa, Kaoru; Okubo, Minoru; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Mori, Yasumichi

    2015-01-01

    Few articles have described fluctuations in glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADAb) levels after a diagnosis of slowly progressive type 1 diabetes (SPIDDM). Here, we present a case in which GADAb levels exponentially increased after initiating and stopping insulin. A 64-year-old female patient newly diagnosed with SPIDDM was admitted and started multiple daily insulin injections. The patient's GADAb titer was 6.9 U/mL (normal: <1.4 U/mL) and the patient had a type 1 diabetes susceptible HLA class II haplotype known in the Japanese population as: DRB1*04:05-DQB1*04:01. When the patient's "honeymoon period" set in, hypoglycemia was observed and the dose of insulin was reduced. Two months after the diagnosis, 1 unit of insulin glargine/day was being injected and the patient demonstrated good glycemic control. Subsequently, the patient's home doctor recommended that insulin injections be stopped. Three months after the diagnosis, the patient's GADAb titer suddenly increased to 1600 U/mL. The patient's GADAb titer decreased but was still positive (40 U/mL) 36 months after diagnosis. HbA1c levels were maintained below 7%, and oral glucose tolerance tests at 10, 26, and 36 months after diagnosis suggested that the patient had preserved insulin secretion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that describes exponential increases in GADAb after initiating and stopping insulin in a patient with SPIDDM.

  13. Induction of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase by decarboxylase inhibitors in idiopathic parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, F; Meerwaldt, J D; Man in 't Veld, A J; Hovestadt, A; Schalekamp, M A

    1989-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of administration of L-dopa, alone or in combination with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor, on plasma levels of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase (ALAAD). After single-dose administration of L-dopa plus benserazide (Madopar) in healthy subjects and in chronically treated patients with parkinsonism, plasma ALAAD followed for 2 to 3 hours fell, but returned to predosing levels within 90 minutes. Four groups of patients with idiopathic parkinsonism were studied during chronic treatment: Group I, no L-dopa treatment (n = 31); Group II, L-dopa alone (n = 15); Group III, L-dopa plus benserazide (n = 28); and Group IV, L-dopa plus carbidopa (Sinemet, n = 30). Plasma ALAAD 2 hours after dosing was normal in Groups I and II. ALAAD was increased threefold in Groups III and IV, suggesting induction of ALAAD by the coadministration of a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor. In a study of 3 patients in whom L-dopa/benserazide was started, plasma ALAAD rose gradually over 3 to 4 weeks. Further detailed pharmacokinetic studies of L-dopa, dopamine, and ALAAD in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are required to determine if the apparent ALAAD induction by a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor may be related to the loss of clinical efficacy of combination therapy in some patients and how it is related to end-of-dose deterioration and on-off phenomena. PMID:2742363

  14. Induction of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase by decarboxylase inhibitors in idiopathic parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, F; Meerwaldt, J D; Man in 't Veld, A J; Hovestadt, A; Schalekamp, M A

    1989-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of administration of L-dopa, alone or in combination with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor, on plasma levels of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase (ALAAD). After single-dose administration of L-dopa plus benserazide (Madopar) in healthy subjects and in chronically treated patients with parkinsonism, plasma ALAAD followed for 2 to 3 hours fell, but returned to predosing levels within 90 minutes. Four groups of patients with idiopathic parkinsonism were studied during chronic treatment: Group I, no L-dopa treatment (n = 31); Group II, L-dopa alone (n = 15); Group III, L-dopa plus benserazide (n = 28); and Group IV, L-dopa plus carbidopa (Sinemet, n = 30). Plasma ALAAD 2 hours after dosing was normal in Groups I and II. ALAAD was increased threefold in Groups III and IV, suggesting induction of ALAAD by the coadministration of a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor. In a study of 3 patients in whom L-dopa/benserazide was started, plasma ALAAD rose gradually over 3 to 4 weeks. Further detailed pharmacokinetic studies of L-dopa, dopamine, and ALAAD in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are required to determine if the apparent ALAAD induction by a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor may be related to the loss of clinical efficacy of combination therapy in some patients and how it is related to end-of-dose deterioration and on-off phenomena.

  15. Retinoic acid modulation of ultraviolet light-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, N.J.; Breeding, J.

    1982-02-01

    Irradiation of skin with ultraviolet light of sunburn range (UVB) leads to a large and rapid induction of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase in the epidermis. Induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase also occurs following application of the tumor promoting agent 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate and topical retinoic acid is able to block both this ornithine decarboxylase induction and skin tumor promotion. In the studies described below, topical application of retinoic acid to hairless mouse skin leads to a significant inhibition of UVB-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity. The degree of this inhibition was dependent on the dose, timing, and frequency of the application of retinoic acid. To show significant inhibition of UVB-induced ornithine decarboxylase the retinoic acid had to be applied within 5 hr of UVB irradiation. If retinoic acid treatment was delayed beyond 7 hr following UVB, then no inhibition of UVB-induced ornithine decarboxylase was observed. The quantities of retinoic acid used (1.7 nmol and 3.4 nmol) have been shown effective at inhibiting 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13 acetate induced ornithine decarboxylase. The results show that these concentrations of topical retinoic acid applied either before or immediately following UVB irradiation reduces the UVB induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase. The effect of retinoic acid in these regimens on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis is currently under study.

  16. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  17. Selective loss of Purkinje cells in a patient with anti‐glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody‐associated cerebellar ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Kazuyuki; Mitoma, Hiroshi; Wada, Yoshiaki; Oka, Teruaki; Shibahara, Junji; Saito, Yuko; Murayama, Shigeo; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2007-01-01

    Anti‐glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody is associated with the development of progressive cerebellar ataxia and slowly progressive insulin‐dependent diabetes mellitus. Previously, the neurophysiological characteristics of IgG in the cerebrospinal fluid of a patient with anti‐glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody‐associated progressive cerebellar ataxia and slowly progressive insulin‐dependent diabetes mellitus were reported. Using a voltage‐gated whole‐cell recording technique, it was observed that the IgG in the cerebrospinal fluid of the patient selectively suppressed the inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the Purkinje cells. The patient died from aspiration pneumonia. Postmortem examination showed almost complete depletion of the Purkinje cells with Bergmann gliosis. Therefore, the main cause of cerebellar ataxia observed in this case may be attributed to the near‐complete depletion of the Purkinje cells. In this paper, the pathomechanisms underlying Purkinje cell damage are discussed. PMID:17119008

  18. Glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in transgenic mouse septum: an anti-GFP immunofluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Verimli, Ural; Sehirli, Umit S

    2016-09-01

    The septum is a basal forebrain region located between the lateral ventricles in rodents. It consists of lateral and medial divisions. Medial septal projections regulate hippocampal theta rhythm whereas lateral septal projections are involved in processes such as affective functions, memory formation, and behavioral responses. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons of the septal region possess the 65 and 67 isoforms of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. Although data on the glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in the septal region generally appears to indicate glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 dominance, different studies have given inconsistent results in this regard. The aim of this study was therefore to obtain information on the distributions of both of these glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms in the septal region in transgenic mice. Two animal groups of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice were utilized in the experiment. Brain sections from the region were taken for anti-green fluorescent protein immunohistochemistry in order to obtain estimated quantitative data on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons. Following the immunohistochemical procedures, the mean numbers of labeled cells in the lateral and medial septal nuclei were obtained for the two isoform groups. Statistical analysis yielded significant results which indicated that the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase predominates in both lateral and medial septal nuclei (unpaired two-tailed t-test p < 0.0001 for LS, p < 0.01 for MS). This study is the first to reveal the dominance of glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65 in the septal region in glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice. PMID:26643381

  19. Glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in transgenic mouse septum: an anti-GFP immunofluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Verimli, Ural; Sehirli, Umit S

    2016-09-01

    The septum is a basal forebrain region located between the lateral ventricles in rodents. It consists of lateral and medial divisions. Medial septal projections regulate hippocampal theta rhythm whereas lateral septal projections are involved in processes such as affective functions, memory formation, and behavioral responses. Gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons of the septal region possess the 65 and 67 isoforms of the enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase. Although data on the glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform distribution in the septal region generally appears to indicate glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 dominance, different studies have given inconsistent results in this regard. The aim of this study was therefore to obtain information on the distributions of both of these glutamic acid decarboxylase isoforms in the septal region in transgenic mice. Two animal groups of glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein knock-in transgenic mice were utilized in the experiment. Brain sections from the region were taken for anti-green fluorescent protein immunohistochemistry in order to obtain estimated quantitative data on the number of gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neurons. Following the immunohistochemical procedures, the mean numbers of labeled cells in the lateral and medial septal nuclei were obtained for the two isoform groups. Statistical analysis yielded significant results which indicated that the 65 isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase predominates in both lateral and medial septal nuclei (unpaired two-tailed t-test p < 0.0001 for LS, p < 0.01 for MS). This study is the first to reveal the dominance of glutamic acid decarboxylase isoform 65 in the septal region in glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

  20. Isofunctional enzymes PAD1 and UbiX catalyze formation of a novel cofactor required by ferulic acid decarboxylase and 4-hydroxy-3-polyprenylbenzoic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fengming; Ferguson, Kyle L; Boyer, David R; Lin, Xiaoxia Nina; Marsh, E Neil G

    2015-04-17

    The decarboxylation of antimicrobial aromatic acids such as phenylacrylic acid (cinnamic acid) and ferulic acid by yeast requires two enzymes described as phenylacrylic acid decarboxylase (PAD1) and ferulic acid decarboxylase (FDC). These enzymes are of interest for various biotechnological applications, such as the production of chemical feedstocks from lignin under mild conditions. However, the specific role of each protein in catalyzing the decarboxylation reaction remains unknown. To examine this, we have overexpressed and purified both PAD1 and FDC from E. coli. We demonstrate that PAD1 is a flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-containing protein. However, it does not function as a decarboxylase. Rather, PAD1 catalyzes the formation of a novel, diffusible cofactor required by FDC for decarboxylase activity. Coexpression of FDC and PAD1 results in the production of FDC with high levels cofactor bound. Holo-FDC catalyzes the decarboxylation of phenylacrylic acid, coumaric acid and ferulic acid with apparent kcat ranging from 1.4-4.6 s(-1). The UV-visible and mass spectra of the cofactor indicate that it appears to be a novel, modified form of reduced FMN; however, its instability precluded determination of its structure. The E. coli enzymes UbiX and UbiD are related by sequence to PAD1 and FDC respectively and are involved in the decarboxylation of 4-hydroxy-3-octaprenylbenzoic acid, an intermediate in ubiquinone biosynthesis. We found that endogenous UbiX can also activate FDC. This implies that the same cofactor is required for decarboxylation of 4-hydroxy-3-polyprenylbenzoic acid by UbiD and suggests a wider role for this cofactor in metabolism.

  1. Disease-specific monoclonal antibodies targeting glutamate decarboxylase impair GABAergic neurotransmission and affect motor learning and behavioral functions

    PubMed Central

    Manto, Mario; Honnorat, Jérôme; Hampe, Christiane S.; Guerra-Narbona, Rafael; López-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Delgado-García, José María; Saitow, Fumihito; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can be found in patients with type 1 diabetes and a number of neurological disorders, including stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia and limbic encephalitis. The detection of disease-specific autoantibody epitopes led to the hypothesis that distinct GAD autoantibodies may elicit specific neurological phenotypes. We explored the in vitro/in vivo effects of well-characterized monoclonal GAD antibodies. We found that GAD autoantibodies present in patients with stiff person syndrome (n = 7) and cerebellar ataxia (n = 15) recognized an epitope distinct from that recognized by GAD autoantibodies present in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 10) or limbic encephalitis (n = 4). We demonstrated that the administration of a monoclonal GAD antibody representing this epitope specificity; (1) disrupted in vitro the association of GAD with γ-Aminobutyric acid containing synaptic vesicles; (2) depressed the inhibitory synaptic transmission in cerebellar slices with a gradual time course and a lasting suppressive effect; (3) significantly decreased conditioned eyelid responses evoked in mice, with no modification of learning curves in the classical eyeblink-conditioning task; (4) markedly impaired the facilitatory effect exerted by the premotor cortex over the motor cortex in a paired-pulse stimulation paradigm; and (5) induced decreased exploratory behavior and impaired locomotor function in rats. These findings support the specific targeting of GAD by its autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of stiff-person syndrome and cerebellar ataxia. Therapies of these disorders based on selective removal of such GAD antibodies could be envisioned. PMID:25870548

  2. Sensing and adaptation to low pH mediated by inducible amino acid decarboxylases in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Viala, Julie P M; Méresse, Stéphane; Pocachard, Bérengère; Guilhon, Aude-Agnès; Aussel, Laurent; Barras, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    During the course of infection, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium must successively survive the harsh acid stress of the stomach and multiply into a mild acidic compartment within macrophages. Inducible amino acid decarboxylases are known to promote adaptation to acidic environments. Three low pH inducible amino acid decarboxylases were annotated in the genome of S. Typhimurium, AdiA, CadA and SpeF, which are specific for arginine, lysine and ornithine, respectively. In this study, we characterized and compared the contributions of those enzymes in response to acidic challenges. Individual mutants as well as a strain deleted for the three genes were tested for their ability (i) to survive an extreme acid shock, (ii) to grow at mild acidic pH and (iii) to infect the mouse animal model. We showed that the lysine decarboxylase CadA had the broadest range of activity since it both had the capacity to promote survival at pH 2.3 and growth at pH 4.5. The arginine decarboxylase AdiA was the most performant in protecting S. Typhimurium from a shock at pH 2.3 and the ornithine decarboxylase SpeF conferred the best growth advantage under anaerobiosis conditions at pH 4.5. We developed a GFP-based gene reporter to monitor the pH of the environment as perceived by S. Typhimurium. Results showed that activities of the lysine and ornithine decarboxylases at mild acidic pH did modify the local surrounding of S. Typhimurium both in culture medium and in macrophages. Finally, we tested the contribution of decarboxylases to virulence and found that these enzymes were dispensable for S. Typhimurium virulence during systemic infection. In the light of this result, we examined the genomes of Salmonella spp. normally responsible of systemic infection and observed that the genes encoding these enzymes were not well conserved, supporting the idea that these enzymes may be not required during systemic infection.

  3. Substrate Specificity of Thiamine Pyrophosphate-Dependent 2-Oxo-Acid Decarboxylases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; Kötter, Peter; Pronk, Jack T.

    2012-01-01

    Fusel alcohols are precursors and contributors to flavor and aroma compounds in fermented beverages, and some are under investigation as biofuels. The decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids is a key step in the Ehrlich pathway for fusel alcohol production. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, five genes share sequence similarity with genes encoding thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases (2ODCs). PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6 encode differentially regulated pyruvate decarboxylase isoenzymes; ARO10 encodes a 2-oxo-acid decarboxylase with broad substrate specificity, and THI3 has not yet been shown to encode an active decarboxylase. Despite the importance of fusel alcohol production in S. cerevisiae, the substrate specificities of these five 2ODCs have not been systematically compared. When the five 2ODCs were individually overexpressed in a pdc1Δ pdc5Δ pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ strain, only Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the linear-chain 2-oxo acids pyruvate, 2-oxo-butanoate, and 2-oxo-pentanoate in cell extracts. The presence of a Pdc isoenzyme was also required for the production of n-propanol and n-butanol in cultures grown on threonine and norvaline, respectively, as nitrogen sources. These results demonstrate the importance of pyruvate decarboxylases in the natural production of n-propanol and n-butanol by S. cerevisiae. No decarboxylation activity was found for Thi3 with any of the substrates tested. Only Aro10 and Pdc5 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the aromatic substrate phenylpyruvate, with Aro10 showing superior kinetic properties. Aro10, Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 exhibited activity with all branched-chain and sulfur-containing 2-oxo acids tested but with markedly different decarboxylation kinetics. The high affinity of Aro10 identified it as a key contributor to the production of branched-chain and sulfur-containing fusel alcohols. PMID:22904058

  4. Pyruvate decarboxylase from Pisum sativum. Properties, nucleotide and amino acid sequences.

    PubMed

    Mücke, U; Wohlfarth, T; Fiedler, U; Bäumlein, H; Rücknagel, K P; König, S

    1996-04-15

    To study the molecular structure and function of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) from plants the protein was isolated from pea seeds and partially characterised. The active enzyme which occurs in the form of higher oligomers consists of two different subunits appearing in SDS/PAGE and mass spectroscopy experiments. For further experiments, like X-ray crystallography, it was necessary to elucidate the protein sequence. Partial cDNA clones encoding pyruvate decarboxylase from seeds of Pisum sativum cv. Miko have been obtained by means of polymerase chain reaction techniques. The first sequences were found using degenerate oligonucleotide primers designated according to conserved amino acid sequences of known pyruvate decarboxylases. The missing parts of one cDNA were amplified applying the 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends systems. The amino acid sequence deduced from the entire cDNA sequence displays strong similarity to pyruvate decarboxylases from other organisms, especially from plants. A molecular mass of 64 kDa was calculated for this protein correlating with estimations for the smaller subunit of the oligomeric enzyme. The PCR experiments led to at least three different clones representing the middle part of the PDC cDNA indicating the existence of three isozymes. Two of these isoforms could be confirmed on the protein level by sequencing tryptic peptides. Only anaerobically treated roots showed a positive signal for PDC mRNA in Northern analysis although the cDNA from imbibed seeds was successfully used for PCR.

  5. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  6. Molecular cloning and analysis of cDNA encoding a plant tryptophan decarboxylase: comparison with animal dopa decarboxylases.

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, V; Marineau, C; Brisson, N

    1989-01-01

    The sequence of a cDNA clone that includes the complete coding region of tryptophan decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.28, formerly EC 4.1.1.27) from periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) is reported. The cDNA clone (1747 base pairs) was isolated by antibody screening of a cDNA expression library produced from poly(A)+ RNA found in developing seedlings of C. roseus. The clone hybridized to a 1.8-kilobase mRNA from developing seedlings and from young leaves of mature plants. The identity of the clone was confirmed when extracts of transformed Escherichia coli expressed a protein containing tryptophan decarboxylase enzyme activity. The tryptophan decarboxylase cDNA clone encodes a protein of 500 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 56,142 Da. The amino acid sequence shows a high degree of similarity with the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (dopa decarboxylase) and the alpha-methyldopa-hypersensitive protein of Drosophila melanogaster. The tryptophan decarboxylase sequence also showed significant similarity to feline glutamate decarboxylase and mouse ornithine decarboxylase, suggesting a possible evolutionary link between these amino acid decarboxylases. Images PMID:2704736

  7. Volatile Organic Compounds Derived from 2-Keto-Acid Decarboxylase in Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Masateru; Nishizawa, Akito; Tsuji, Kiyomi; Kimura, Shigenobu; Harada, Ken-ichi

    2012-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs), 2-methyl-1-butanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-phenylethanol, were detected together with β-cyclocitral from the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-843. These alcohols were optimally produced after 35 d of culture, during which nitrate nitrogen in the cultured broth became exhausted. Additionally, these alcohols were definitely produced using the 2-keto-acid decarboxylase (MaKDC) in Microcystis strains. These results suggested that these VOCs from Microcystis are significant for their lifecycle, because these compounds are not produced by any other genus of cyanobacteria. This is the first report of 2-keto-acid decarboxylase producing 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-phenylethanol by an oxygenic photosynthetic microorganism. PMID:23047148

  8. Overexpression of PAD1 and FDC1 results in significant cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Richard, Peter; Viljanen, Kaarina; Penttilä, Merja

    2015-01-01

    The S. cerevisiae PAD1 gene had been suggested to code for a cinnamic acid decarboxylase, converting trans-cinnamic acid to styrene. This was suggested for the reason that the over-expression of PAD1 resulted in increased tolerance toward cinnamic acid, up to 0.6 mM. We show that by over-expression of the PAD1 together with the FDC1 the cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity can be increased significantly. The strain over-expressing PAD1 and FDC1 tolerated cinnamic acid concentrations up to 10 mM. The cooperation of Pad1p and Fdc1p is surprising since the PAD1 has a mitochondrial targeting sequence and the FDC1 codes for a cytosolic protein. The cinnamic acid decarboxylase activity was also seen in the cell free extract. The activity was 0.019 μmol per minute and mg of extracted protein. The overexpression of PAD1 and FDC1 resulted also in increased activity with the hydroxycinnamic acids ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid and caffeinic acid. This activity was not seen when FDC1 was overexpressed alone. An efficient cinnamic acid decarboxylase is valuable for the genetic engineering of yeast strains producing styrene. Styrene can be produced from endogenously produced L-phenylalanine which is converted by a phenylalanine ammonia lyase to cinnamic acid and then by a decarboxylase to styrene.

  9. Mechanism of cysteine-dependent inactivation of aspartate/glutamate/cysteine sulfinic acid α-decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingyang; Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2013-02-01

    Animal aspartate decarboxylase (ADC), glutamate decarboxylase (GDC) and cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSADC) catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate, glutamate and cysteine sulfinic acid to β-alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid and hypotaurine, respectively. Each enzymatic product has been implicated in different physiological functions. These decarboxylases use pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor and share high sequence homology. Analysis of the activity of ADC in the presence of different amino determined that beta-alanine production from aspartate was diminished in the presence of cysteine. Comparative analysis established that cysteine also inhibited GDC and CSADC in a concentration-dependent manner. Spectral comparisons of free PLP and cysteine, together with ADC and cysteine, result in comparable spectral shifts. Such spectral shifts indicate that cysteine is able to enter the active site of the enzyme, interact with the PLP-lysine internal aldimine, form a cysteine-PLP aldimine and undergo intramolecular nucleophilic cyclization through its sulfhydryl group, leading to irreversible ADC inactivation. Cysteine is the building block for protein synthesis and a precursor of cysteine sulfinic acid that is the substrate of CSADC and therefore is present in many cells, but the presence of cysteine (at comparable concentrations to their natural substrates) apparently could severely inhibit ADC, CSADC and GDC activity. This raises an essential question as to how animal species prevent these enzymes from cysteine-mediated inactivation. Disorders of cysteine metabolism have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases. The results of our study should promote research in terms of mechanism by which animals maintain their cysteine homeostasis and possible relationship of cysteine-mediated GDC and CSADC inhibition in neurodegenerative disease development. PMID:22718265

  10. Mechanism of cysteine-dependent inactivation of aspartate/glutamate/cysteine sulfinic acid α-decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingyang; Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Ding, Haizhen; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2013-02-01

    Animal aspartate decarboxylase (ADC), glutamate decarboxylase (GDC) and cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSADC) catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate, glutamate and cysteine sulfinic acid to β-alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid and hypotaurine, respectively. Each enzymatic product has been implicated in different physiological functions. These decarboxylases use pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP) as cofactor and share high sequence homology. Analysis of the activity of ADC in the presence of different amino determined that beta-alanine production from aspartate was diminished in the presence of cysteine. Comparative analysis established that cysteine also inhibited GDC and CSADC in a concentration-dependent manner. Spectral comparisons of free PLP and cysteine, together with ADC and cysteine, result in comparable spectral shifts. Such spectral shifts indicate that cysteine is able to enter the active site of the enzyme, interact with the PLP-lysine internal aldimine, form a cysteine-PLP aldimine and undergo intramolecular nucleophilic cyclization through its sulfhydryl group, leading to irreversible ADC inactivation. Cysteine is the building block for protein synthesis and a precursor of cysteine sulfinic acid that is the substrate of CSADC and therefore is present in many cells, but the presence of cysteine (at comparable concentrations to their natural substrates) apparently could severely inhibit ADC, CSADC and GDC activity. This raises an essential question as to how animal species prevent these enzymes from cysteine-mediated inactivation. Disorders of cysteine metabolism have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases. The results of our study should promote research in terms of mechanism by which animals maintain their cysteine homeostasis and possible relationship of cysteine-mediated GDC and CSADC inhibition in neurodegenerative disease development.

  11. Tissue and regional distribution of cysteic acid decarboxylase. A new assay method.

    PubMed

    Wu, J Y; Moss, L G; Chen, M S

    1979-04-01

    A sensitive and rapid assay method method for cysteic acid decarboxylase was develped which combined the selectivity of ion exchange resin (a complete retention of the substrate, cysteic acid, and exclusion of the product, taurine) with the speed of a vacuum filtration. The synthesis and purification of 35S-labeled cysteic acid were described. The validity of the assay was established by the identification of the reaction product as taurine. With this new method, the decarboxylase activity was measured in discrete regions of bovine brain. Putamen had the highest activity, 172 pmol taurine formed/min/mg protein (100%), followed by caudate nucleus, 90%; cerebral cortex, 82%; hypothalamus, 81%; cerebellar cortex, 79%; cerebellar peduncle, 59%; thalamus, 42%; brain stem, 25%; pons, 10%; and corpus callosum, 3%. The decarboxylase activity in various mouse tissues was also determined as follows: liver, 403; brain, 145; kidney, 143; spinal cord, 59; lung, 21; and spleen, 10 pmol taurine formed/min/mg. No activity could be detected in skeleton muscle and heart, suggesting a different biosynthetic pathway for taurine synthesis in these tissues. The advantages and disadvantages of the new assay method are also discussed.

  12. The enzymatic activities of the Escherichia coli basic aliphatic amino acid decarboxylases exhibit a pH zone of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kanjee, Usheer; Gutsche, Irina; Ramachandran, Shaliny; Houry, Walid A

    2011-11-01

    The stringent response regulator ppGpp has recently been shown by our group to inhibit the Escherichia coli inducible lysine decarboxylase, LdcI. As a follow-up to this observation, we examined the mechanisms that regulate the activities of the other four E. coli enzymes paralogous to LdcI: the constitutive lysine decarboxylase LdcC, the inducible arginine decarboxylase AdiA, the inducible ornithine decarboxylase SpeF, and the constitutive ornithine decarboxylase SpeC. LdcC and SpeC are involved in cellular polyamine biosynthesis, while LdcI, AdiA, and SpeF are involved in the acid stress response. Multiple mechanisms of regulation were found for these enzymes. In addition to LdcI, LdcC and SpeC were found to be inhibited by ppGpp; AdiA activity was found to be regulated by changes in oligomerization, while SpeF and SpeC activities were regulated by GTP. These findings indicate the presence of multiple mechanisms regulating the activity of this important family of decarboxylases. When the enzyme inhibition profiles are analyzed in parallel, a "zone of inhibition" between pH 6 and pH 8 is observed. Hence, the data suggest that E. coli utilizes multiple mechanisms to ensure that these decarboxylases remain inactive around neutral pH possibly to reduce the consumption of amino acids at this pH. PMID:21957966

  13. The enzymatic activities of the Escherichia coli basic aliphatic amino acid decarboxylases exhibit a pH zone of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kanjee, Usheer; Gutsche, Irina; Ramachandran, Shaliny; Houry, Walid A

    2011-11-01

    The stringent response regulator ppGpp has recently been shown by our group to inhibit the Escherichia coli inducible lysine decarboxylase, LdcI. As a follow-up to this observation, we examined the mechanisms that regulate the activities of the other four E. coli enzymes paralogous to LdcI: the constitutive lysine decarboxylase LdcC, the inducible arginine decarboxylase AdiA, the inducible ornithine decarboxylase SpeF, and the constitutive ornithine decarboxylase SpeC. LdcC and SpeC are involved in cellular polyamine biosynthesis, while LdcI, AdiA, and SpeF are involved in the acid stress response. Multiple mechanisms of regulation were found for these enzymes. In addition to LdcI, LdcC and SpeC were found to be inhibited by ppGpp; AdiA activity was found to be regulated by changes in oligomerization, while SpeF and SpeC activities were regulated by GTP. These findings indicate the presence of multiple mechanisms regulating the activity of this important family of decarboxylases. When the enzyme inhibition profiles are analyzed in parallel, a "zone of inhibition" between pH 6 and pH 8 is observed. Hence, the data suggest that E. coli utilizes multiple mechanisms to ensure that these decarboxylases remain inactive around neutral pH possibly to reduce the consumption of amino acids at this pH.

  14. Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary structural studies of p-coumaric acid decarboxylase from Lactobacillus plantarum

    SciTech Connect

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Rivas, Blanca de las; Muñoz, Rosario; Mancheño, José M.

    2007-04-01

    The enzyme p-coumaric acid decarboxylase (PDC) from L. plantarum has been recombinantly expressed, purified and crystallized. The structure has been solved at 2.04 Å resolution by the molecular-replacement method. The substrate-inducible p-coumaric acid decarboxylase (PDC) from Lactobacillus plantarum has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and confirmed to possess decarboxylase activity. The recombinant His{sub 6}-tagged enzyme was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method from a solution containing 20%(w/v) PEG 4000, 12%(w/v) 2-propanol, 0.2 M sodium acetate, 0.1 M Tris–HCl pH 8.0 with 0.1 M barium chloride as an additive. Diffraction data were collected in-house to 2.04 Å resolution. Crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 43.15, c = 231.86 Å. The estimated Matthews coefficient was 2.36 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, corresponding to 48% solvent content, which is consistent with the presence of two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure of PDC has been determined by the molecular-replacement method. Currently, the structure of PDC complexed with substrate analogues is in progress, with the aim of elucidating the structural basis of the catalytic mechanism.

  15. Enhancing muconic acid production from glucose and lignin-derived aromatic compounds via increased protocatechuate decarboxylase activity

    DOE PAGES

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Salvachua, Davinia; Khanna, Payal; Smith, Holly; Peterson, Darren J.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-04-22

    The conversion of biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules to cis,cis-muconic acid (referred to hereafter as muconic acid or muconate) has been of recent interest owing to its facile conversion to adipic acid, an important commodity chemical. Metabolic routes to produce muconate from both sugars and many lignin-derived aromatic compounds require the use of a decarboxylase to convert protocatechuate (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), two central aromatic intermediates in this pathway. Several studies have identified the PCA decarboxylase as a metabolic bottleneck, causing an accumulation of PCA that subsequently reduces muconate production. A recent study showed that activity of the PCAmore » decarboxylase is enhanced by co-expression of two genetically associated proteins, one of which likely produces a flavin-derived cofactor utilized by the decarboxylase. Using entirely genome-integrated gene expression, we have engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440-derived strains to produce muconate from either aromatic molecules or sugars and demonstrate in both cases that co-expression of these decarboxylase associated proteins reduces PCA accumulation and enhances muconate production relative to strains expressing the PCA decarboxylase alone. In bioreactor experiments, co-expression increased the specific productivity (mg/g cells/h) of muconate from the aromatic lignin monomer p-coumarate by 50% and resulted in a titer of >15 g/L. In strains engineered to produce muconate from glucose, co-expression more than tripled the titer, yield, productivity, and specific productivity, with the best strain producing 4.92+/-0.48 g/L muconate. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that overcoming the PCA decarboxylase bottleneck can increase muconate yields from biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules in industrially relevant strains and cultivation conditions.« less

  16. A glutamic acid decarboxylase (CgGAD) highly expressed in hemocytes of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Li, Meijia; Wang, Lingling; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Weilin; Xin, Lusheng; Xu, Jiachao; Wang, Hao; Song, Linsheng

    2016-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), a rate-limiting enzyme to catalyze the reaction converting the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate to inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), not only functions in nervous system, but also plays important roles in immunomodulation in vertebrates. However, GAD has rarely been reported in invertebrates, and never in molluscs. In the present study, one GAD homologue (designed as CgGAD) was identified from Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. The full length cDNA of CgGAD was 1689 bp encoding a polypeptide of 562 amino acids containing a conserved pyridoxal-dependent decarboxylase domain. CgGAD mRNA and protein could be detected in ganglion and hemocytes of oysters, and their abundance in hemocytes was unexpectedly much higher than those in ganglion. More importantly, CgGAD was mostly located in those granulocytes without phagocytic capacity in oysters, and could dynamically respond to LPS stimulation. Further, after being transfected into HEK293 cells, CgGAD could promote the production of GABA. Collectively, these findings suggested that CgGAD, as a GABA synthase and molecular marker of GABAergic system, was mainly distributed in hemocytes and ganglion and involved in neuroendocrine-immune regulation network in oysters, which also provided a novel insight to the co-evolution between nervous system and immune system. PMID:27208883

  17. High-resolution autoreactive epitope mapping and structural modeling of the 65 kDa form of human glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, H L; Chandonia, J M; Kash, S F; Kanaani, J; Tunnell, E; Domingo, A; Cohen, F E; Banga, J P; Madec, A M; Richter, W; Baekkeskov, S

    1999-04-16

    The smaller isoform of the GABA-synthesizing enzyme, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65), is unusually susceptible to becoming a target of autoimmunity affecting its major sites of expression, GABA-ergic neurons and pancreatic beta-cells. In contrast, a highly homologous isoform, GAD67, is not an autoantigen. We used homolog-scanning mutagenesis to identify GAD65-specific amino acid residues which form autoreactive B-cell epitopes in this molecule. Detailed mapping of 13 conformational epitopes, recognized by human monoclonal antibodies derived from patients, together with two and three-dimensional structure prediction led to a model of the GAD65 dimer. GAD65 has structural similarities to ornithine decarboxylase in the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-binding middle domain (residues 201-460) and to dialkylglycine decarboxylase in the C-terminal domain (residues 461-585). Six distinct conformational and one linear epitopes cluster on the hydrophilic face of three amphipathic alpha-helices in exons 14-16 in the C-terminal domain. Two of those epitopes also require amino acids in exon 4 in the N-terminal domain. Two distinct epitopes reside entirely in the N-terminal domain. In the middle domain, four distinct conformational epitopes cluster on a charged patch formed by amino acids from three alpha-helices away from the active site, and a fifth epitope resides at the back of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate binding site and involves amino acid residues in exons 6 and 11-12. The epitopes localize to multiple hydrophilic patches, several of which also harbor DR*0401-restricted T-cell epitopes, and cover most of the surface of the protein. The results reveal a remarkable spectrum of human autoreactivity to GAD65, targeting almost the entire surface, and suggest that native folded GAD65 is the immunogen for autoreactive B-cells. PMID:10222205

  18. Effects of glutamate decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter on the bioconversion of GABA in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Kim, Tae Wan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2012-05-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-essential amino acid and a precursor of pyrrolidone, a monomer of nylon 4. GABA can be biosynthesized through the decarboxylation of L: -glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase. In this study, the effects of glutamate decarboxylase (gadA, gadB), glutamate/GABA antiporter (gadC) and GABA aminotransferase (gabT) on GABA production were investigated in Escherichia coli. Glutamate decarboxylase was overexpressed alone or with the glutamate/GABA antiporter to enhance GABA synthesis. GABA aminotransferase, which redirects GABA into the TCA cycle, was knock-out mutated. When gadB and gadC were co-overexpressed in the gabT mutant strain, a final GABA concentration of 5.46 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l of monosodium glutamate (MSG), which corresponded to a GABA yield of 89.5%.

  19. Structure and Mechanism of Ferulic Acid Decarboxylase (FDC1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiya, Mohammad Wadud; Lee, Soon Goo

    2015-01-01

    The nonoxidative decarboxylation of aromatic acids occurs in a range of microbes and is of interest for bioprocessing and metabolic engineering. Although phenolic acid decarboxylases provide useful tools for bioindustrial applications, the molecular bases for how these enzymes function are only beginning to be examined. Here we present the 2.35-Å-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the ferulic acid decarboxylase (FDC1; UbiD) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. FDC1 shares structural similarity with the UbiD family of enzymes that are involved in ubiquinone biosynthesis. The position of 4-vinylphenol, the product of p-coumaric acid decarboxylation, in the structure identifies a large hydrophobic cavity as the active site. Differences in the β2e-α5 loop of chains in the crystal structure suggest that the conformational flexibility of this loop allows access to the active site. The structure also implicates Glu285 as the general base in the nonoxidative decarboxylation reaction catalyzed by FDC1. Biochemical analysis showed a loss of enzymatic activity in the E285A mutant. Modeling of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-5-decaprenylbenzoate, a partial structure of the physiological UbiD substrate, in the binding site suggests that an ∼30-Å-long pocket adjacent to the catalytic site may accommodate the isoprenoid tail of the substrate needed for ubiquinone biosynthesis in yeast. The three-dimensional structure of yeast FDC1 provides a template for guiding protein engineering studies aimed at optimizing the efficiency of aromatic acid decarboxylation reactions in bioindustrial applications. PMID:25862228

  20. Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) is crucial for brain development and motor functions.

    PubMed

    Shih, De-Fen; Hsiao, Chung-Der; Min, Ming-Yuan; Lai, Wen-Sung; Yang, Chianne-Wen; Lee, Wang-Tso; Lee, Shyh-Jye

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is a rare pediatric neuro-metabolic disease in children. Due to the lack of an animal model, its pathogenetic mechanism is poorly understood. To study the role of AADC in brain development, a zebrafish model of AADC deficiency was generated. We identified an aadc gene homolog, dopa decarboxylase (ddc), in the zebrafish genome. Whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis showed that the ddc gene is expressed in the epiphysis, locus caeruleus, diencephalic catecholaminergic clusters, and raphe nuclei of 36-h post-fertilization (hpf) zebrafish embryos. Inhibition of Ddc by AADC inhibitor NSD-1015 or anti-sense morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) reduced brain volume and body length. We observed increased brain cell apoptosis and loss of dipencephalic catecholaminergic cluster neurons in ddc morphants (ddc MO-injected embryos). Seizure-like activity was also detected in ddc morphants in a dose-dependent manner. ddc morphants had less sensitive touch response and impaired swimming activity that could be rescued by injection of ddc plasmids. In addition, eye movement was also significantly impaired in ddc morphants. Collectively, loss of Ddc appears to result in similar phenotypes as that of ADCC deficiency, thus zebrafish could be a good model for investigating pathogenetic mechanisms of AADC deficiency in children. PMID:23940784

  1. GABA production by glutamic acid decarboxylase is regulated by a dynamic catalytic loop.

    PubMed

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Law, Ruby H P; Buckle, Ashley M; Langendorf, Christopher; Tuck, Kellie; Rosado, Carlos J; Faux, Noel G; Mahmood, Khalid; Hampe, Christiane S; Banga, J Paul; Wilce, Matthew; Schmidberger, Jason; Rossjohn, Jamie; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Pike, Robert N; Smith, A Ian; Mackay, Ian R; Rowley, Merrill J; Whisstock, James C

    2007-04-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is synthesized by two isoforms of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65 and GAD67). GAD67 is constitutively active and is responsible for basal GABA production. In contrast, GAD65, an autoantigen in type I diabetes, is transiently activated in response to the demand for extra GABA in neurotransmission, and cycles between an active holo form and an inactive apo form. We have determined the crystal structures of N-terminal truncations of both GAD isoforms. The structure of GAD67 shows a tethered loop covering the active site, providing a catalytic environment that sustains GABA production. In contrast, the same catalytic loop is inherently mobile in GAD65. Kinetic studies suggest that mobility in the catalytic loop promotes a side reaction that results in cofactor release and GAD65 autoinactivation. These data reveal the molecular basis for regulation of GABA homeostasis.

  2. Conversion of levulinic acid to 2-butanone by acetoacetate decarboxylase from Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoungseon; Kim, Seil; Yum, Taewoo; Kim, Yunje; Sang, Byoung-In; Um, Youngsoon

    2013-06-01

    In this study, a novel system for synthesis of 2-butanone from levulinic acid (γ-keto-acid) via an enzymatic reaction was developed. Acetoacetate decarboxylase (AADC; E.C. 4.1.1.4) from Clostridium acetobutylicum was selected as a biocatalyst for decarboxylation of levulinic acid. The purified recombinant AADC from Escherichia coli successfully converted levulinic acid to 2-butanone with a conversion yield of 8.4-90.3 % depending on the amount of AADC under optimum conditions (30 °C and pH 5.0) despite that acetoacetate, a β-keto-acid, is a natural substrate of AADC. In order to improve the catalytic efficiency, an AADC-mediator system was tested using methyl viologen, methylene blue, azure B, zinc ion, and 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) as mediators. Among them, methyl viologen showed the best performance, increasing the conversion yield up to 6.7-fold in comparison to that without methyl viologen. The results in this study are significant in the development of a renewable method for the synthesis of 2-butanone from biomass-derived chemical, levulinic acid, through enzymatic decarboxylation. PMID:23624707

  3. Cloning and primary structure of a human islet isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase from chromosome 10

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsen, A.E.; Hagopian, W.A.; Grubin, C.E.; Dube, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Adler, D.A.; Baermeier, H.; Lernmark, A. ); Mathewes, S.; Grant, F.J.; Foster, D. )

    1991-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase which catalyzes formation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamic acid, is detectable in different isoforms with distinct electrophoretic and kinetic characteristics. GAD has also been implicated as an autoantigen in the vastly differing autoimmune disease stiff-man syndrome and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Despite the differing GAD isoforms, only one type of GAD cDNA (GAD-1), localized to a syntenic region of chromosome 2, has been isolated from rat, mouse, and cat. Using sequence information from GAD-1 to screen a human pancreatic islet cDNA library, the authors describe the isolation of an additional GAD cDNA (GAD-2), which was mapped to the short arm of human chromosome 10. Genomic Southern blotting with GAD-2 demonstrated a hybridization pattern different form that detected by GAD-1. GAD-2 recognizes a 5.6-kilobase transcript in both islets and brain, in contrast to GAD-1, which detects a 3.7-kilobase transcript in brain only. The deduced 585-amino acid sequence coded for by GAD-2 shows < 65% identify to previously published, highly conserved GAD-1 brain sequences, which show > 96% deduced amino acid sequence homology among the three species.

  4. Cysteine Sulfinic Acid Decarboxylase Regulation: A Role for FXR and SHP in Murine Hepatic Taurine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Thomas A.; Matsumoto, Yuri; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Xie, Yan; Hirschberger, Lawrence L.; Stipanuk, Martha H.; Anakk, Sayeepriyadarshini; Moore, David D.; Watanabe, Mitsuhiro; Kennedy, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Background Bile acid synthesis is regulated by nuclear receptors including farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and small heterodimer partner (SHP), and by fibroblast growth factor15/19 (FGF15/19). Because bile acid synthesis involves amino acid conjugation, we hypothesized that hepatic cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD) (a key enzyme in taurine synthesis) is regulated by bile acids. Aims To investigate CSAD regulation by bile acids and CSAD regulatory mechanisms. Methods Mice were fed a control diet or a diet supplemented with either 0.5% cholate or 2% cholestyramine. To gain mechanistic insight into CSAD regulation, we utilized GW4064 (FXR agonist), FGF19, or T-0901317 (LXR agonist) and Shp−/− mice. Tissue mRNA expression was determined by qRT-PCR. Amino acids were measured by HPLC. Results Mice supplemented with dietary cholate exhibited reduced hepatic CSAD mRNA expression while those receiving cholestyramine exhibited increased hepatic CSAD mRNA expression. Activation of FXR suppressed CSAD mRNA expression whereas hepatic CSAD mRNA expression was increased in Shp−/− mice. Hepatic hypotaurine concentration (the product of CSAD) was higher in Shp−/− mice with a corresponding increase in serum (but not hepatic) taurine-conjugated bile acids. FGF19 administration suppressed hepatic CYP7A1 mRNA but did not change CSAD mRNA expression. LXR activation induced CYP7A1 mRNA yet failed to induce CSAD mRNA expression. Conclusion CSAD mRNA expression is physiologically regulated by bile acids in a feedback fashion via mechanisms involving SHP and FXR but not FGF15/19 or LXR. These novel findings implicate bile acids as regulators of CSAD mRNA via mechanisms shared in part with CYP7A1. PMID:24033844

  5. Linkage between the bacterial acid stress and stringent responses: the structure of the inducible lysine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kanjee, Usheer; Gutsche, Irina; Alexopoulos, Eftichia; Zhao, Boyu; El Bakkouri, Majida; Thibault, Guillaume; Liu, Kaiyin; Ramachandran, Shaliny; Snider, Jamie; Pai, Emil F; Houry, Walid A

    2011-03-01

    The Escherichia coli inducible lysine decarboxylase, LdcI/CadA, together with the inner-membrane lysine-cadaverine antiporter, CadB, provide cells with protection against mild acidic conditions (pH∼5). To gain a better understanding of the molecular processes underlying the acid stress response, the X-ray crystal structure of LdcI was determined. The structure revealed that the protein is an oligomer of five dimers that associate to form a decamer. Surprisingly, LdcI was found to co-crystallize with the stringent response effector molecule ppGpp, also known as the alarmone, with 10 ppGpp molecules in the decamer. ppGpp is known to mediate the stringent response, which occurs in response to nutrient deprivation. The alarmone strongly inhibited LdcI enzymatic activity. This inhibition is important for modulating the consumption of lysine in cells during acid stress under nutrient limiting conditions. Hence, our data provide direct evidence for a link between the bacterial acid stress and stringent responses. PMID:21278708

  6. Molecular and functional analyses of amino acid decarboxylases involved in cuticle tanning in Tribolium castaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC) and dopa decarboxylase (DDC) provide b–alanine and dopamine used in insect cuticle tanning. Beta-alanine is conjugated with dopamine to yield N-b-alanyldopamine (NBAD), a substrate for the phenoloxidase laccase that catalyzes the synthesis of cuticle protein cross-li...

  7. Amino acids regulate expression of antizyme-1 to modulate ornithine decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Ray, Ramesh M; Viar, Mary Jane; Johnson, Leonard R

    2012-02-01

    In a glucose-salt solution (Earle's balanced salt solution), asparagine (Asn) stimulates ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in a dose-dependent manner, and the addition of epidermal growth factor (EGF) potentiates the effect of Asn. However, EGF alone fails to activate ODC. Thus, the mechanism by which Asn activates ODC is important for understanding the regulation of ODC activity. Asn reduced antizyme-1 (AZ1) mRNA and protein. Among the amino acids tested, Asn and glutamine (Gln) effectively inhibited AZ1 expression, suggesting a differential role for amino acids in the regulation of ODC activity. Asn decreased the putrescine-induced AZ1 translation. The absence of amino acids increased the binding of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP1) to 5'-mRNA cap and thereby inhibited global protein synthesis. Asn failed to prevent the binding of 4EBP1 to mRNA, and the bound 4EBP1 was unphosphorylated, suggesting the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the regulation of AZ1 synthesis. Rapamycin treatment (4 h) failed to alter the expression of AZ1. However, extending the treatment (24 h) allowed expression in the presence of amino acids, indicating that AZ1 is expressed when TORC1 signaling is decreased. This suggests the involvement of cap-independent translation. However, transient inhibition of mTORC2 by PP242 completely abolished the phosphorylation of 4EBP1 and decreased basal as well as putrescine-induced AZ1 expression. Asn decreased the phosphorylation of mTOR-Ser(2448) and AKT-Ser(473), suggesting the inhibition of mTORC2. In the absence of amino acids, mTORC1 is inhibited, whereas mTORC2 is activated, leading to the inhibition of global protein synthesis and increased AZ1 synthesis via a cap-independent mechanism. PMID:22157018

  8. Glutamic acid decarboxylase and glutamate receptor changes during tolerance and dependence to benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Izzo, Emanuela; Auta, James; Impagnatiello, Francesco; Pesold, Christine; Guidotti, Alessandro; Costa, Erminio

    2001-01-01

    Protracted administration of diazepam elicits tolerance, whereas discontinuation of treatment results in signs of dependence. Tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of diazepam is present in an early phase (6, 24, and 36 h) but disappears in a late phase (72–96 h) of withdrawal. In contrast, signs of dependence such as decrease in open-arm entries on an elevated plus-maze and increased susceptibility to pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures were apparent 96 h (but not 12, 24, or 48 h) after diazepam withdrawal. During the first 72 h of withdrawal, tolerance is associated with changes in the expression of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid type A) receptor subunits (decrease in γ2 and α1; increase in α5) and with an increase of mRNA expression of the most abundant form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD67. In contrast, dl-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor GluR1 subunit mRNA and cognate protein, which are normal during the early phase of diazepam withdrawal, increase by approximately 30% in cortex and hippocampus in association with the appearance of signs of dependence 96 h after diazepam withdrawal. Immunohistochemical studies of GluR1 subunit expression with gold-immunolabeling technique reveal that the increase of GluR1 subunit protein is localized to layer V pyramidal neurons and their apical dendrites in the cortex, and to pyramidal neurons and in their dendritic fields in hippocampus. The results suggest an involvement of GABA-mediated processes in the development and maintenance of tolerance to diazepam, whereas excitatory amino acid-related processes (presumably via AMPA receptors) may be involved in the expression of signs of dependence after withdrawal. PMID:11248104

  9. Glutamic acid decarboxylase and glutamate receptor changes during tolerance and dependence to benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Izzo, E; Auta, J; Impagnatiello, F; Pesold, C; Guidotti, A; Costa, E

    2001-03-13

    Protracted administration of diazepam elicits tolerance, whereas discontinuation of treatment results in signs of dependence. Tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of diazepam is present in an early phase (6, 24, and 36 h) but disappears in a late phase (72-96 h) of withdrawal. In contrast, signs of dependence such as decrease in open-arm entries on an elevated plus-maze and increased susceptibility to pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures were apparent 96 h (but not 12, 24, or 48 h) after diazepam withdrawal. During the first 72 h of withdrawal, tolerance is associated with changes in the expression of GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid type A) receptor subunits (decrease in gamma(2) and alpha(1); increase in alpha(5)) and with an increase of mRNA expression of the most abundant form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD(67). In contrast, dl-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor GluR1 subunit mRNA and cognate protein, which are normal during the early phase of diazepam withdrawal, increase by approximately 30% in cortex and hippocampus in association with the appearance of signs of dependence 96 h after diazepam withdrawal. Immunohistochemical studies of GluR1 subunit expression with gold-immunolabeling technique reveal that the increase of GluR1 subunit protein is localized to layer V pyramidal neurons and their apical dendrites in the cortex, and to pyramidal neurons and in their dendritic fields in hippocampus. The results suggest an involvement of GABA-mediated processes in the development and maintenance of tolerance to diazepam, whereas excitatory amino acid-related processes (presumably via AMPA receptors) may be involved in the expression of signs of dependence after withdrawal.

  10. Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency diagnosed by clinical metabolomic profiling of plasma.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Donti, Taraka R; Cardon, Aaron L; Bacino, C A; Sun, Qin; Emrick, L; Reid Sutton, V; Elsea, Sarah H

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inborn error of metabolism affecting the biosynthesis of serotonin, dopamine, and catecholamines. We report a case of AADC deficiency that was detected using the Global MAPS platform. This is a novel platform that allows for parallel clinical testing of hundreds of metabolites in a single plasma specimen. It uses a state-of-the-art mass spectrometry platform, and the resulting spectra are compared against a library of ~2500 metabolites. Our patient is now a 4 year old boy initially seen at 11 months of age for developmental delay and hypotonia. Multiple tests had not yielded a diagnosis until exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygous variants of uncertain significance (VUS), c.286G>A (p.G96R) and c.260C>T (p.P87L) in the DDC gene, causal for AADC deficiency. CSF neurotransmitter analysis confirmed the diagnosis with elevated 3-methoxytyrosine (3-O-methyldopa). Metabolomic profiling was performed on plasma and revealed marked elevation in 3-methoxytyrosine (Z-score +6.1) consistent with the diagnosis of AADC deficiency. These results demonstrate that the Global MAPS platform is able to diagnose AADC deficiency from plasma. In summary, we report a novel and less invasive approach to diagnose AADC deficiency using plasma metabolomic profiling.

  11. Taurine homeostasis requires de novo synthesis via cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase during zebrafish early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yen-Chia; Ding, Shih-Torng; Lee, Yen-Hua; Wang, Ya-Ching; Huang, Ming-Feng; Liu, I-Hsuan

    2013-02-01

    Cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (Csad) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthesis of taurine. There are a number of physiological roles of taurine, such as bile salt synthesis, osmoregulation, lipid metabolism, and oxidative stress inhibition. To investigate the role of de novo synthesis of taurine during embryonic development, zebrafish csad was cloned and functionally analyzed. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that csad transcripts are maternally deposited, while whole-mount in situ hybridization demonstrated that csad is expressed in yolk syncytial layer and various embryonic tissues such as notochord, brain, retina, pronephric duct, liver, and pancreas. Knockdown of csad significantly reduced the embryonic taurine level, and the affected embryos had increased early mortality and cardiac anomalies. mRNA coinjection and taurine supplementation rescued the cardiac phenotypes suggesting that taurine originating from the de novo synthesis pathway plays a role in cardiac development. Our findings indicated that the de novo synthesis pathway via Csad plays a critical role in taurine homeostasis and cardiac development in zebrafish early embryos. PMID:22907836

  12. Investigation of a substrate-specifying residue within Papaver somniferum and Catharanthus roseus aromatic amino acid decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Lazear, Michael; von Guggenberg, Renee; Ding, Haizhen; Li, Jianyong

    2014-10-01

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs) catalyze the decarboxylation of aromatic amino acids with either benzene or indole rings. Because the substrate selectivity of AAADs is intimately related to their physiological functions, primary sequence data and their differentiation could provide significant physiological insights. However, due to general high sequence identity, plant AAAD substrate specificities have been difficult to identify through primary sequence comparison. In this study, bioinformatic approaches were utilized to identify several active site residues within plant AAAD enzymes that may impact substrate specificity. Next a Papaver somniferum tyrosine decarboxylase (TyDC) was selected as a model to verify our putative substrate-dictating residues through mutation. Results indicated that mutagenesis of serine 372 to glycine enables the P. somniferum TyDC to use 5-hydroxytryptophan as a substrate, and reduces the enzyme activity toward 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (dopa). Additionally, the reverse mutation in a Catharanthus roseus tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) enables the mutant enzyme to utilize tyrosine and dopa as substrates with a reduced affinity toward tryptophan. Molecular modeling and molecular docking of the P. somniferum TyDC and the C. roseus TDC enzymes provided a structural basis to explain alterations in substrate specificity. Identification of an active site residue that impacts substrate selectivity produces a primary sequence identifier that may help differentiate the indolic and phenolic substrate specificities of individual plant AAADs.

  13. Production of Dopamine by Aromatic l-Amino Acid Decarboxylase Cells after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Ren, Li-Qun; Wienecke, Jacob; Hultborn, Hans; Zhang, Mengliang

    2016-06-15

    Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) cells are widely distributed in the spinal cord, and their functions are largely unknown. We have previously found that AADC cells in the spinal cord could increase their ability to produce serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) from 5-hydroxytryptophan after spinal cord injury (SCI). Because AADC is a common enzyme catalyzing 5-hydroxytryptophan to serotonin and l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-dopa) to dopamine (DA), it seems likely that the ability of AADC cells using l-dopa to synthesize DA is also increased. To prove whether or not this is the case, a similar rat sacral SCI model and a similar experimental paradigm were adopted as that which we had used previously. In the chronic SCI rats (> 45 days), no AADC cells expressed DA if there was no exogenous l-dopa application. However, following administration of a peripheral AADC inhibitor (carbidopa) with or without a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (pargyline) co-application, systemic administration of l-dopa resulted in ∼94% of AADC cells becoming DA-immunopositive in the spinal cord below the lesion, whereas in normal or sham-operated rats none or very few of AADC cells became DA-immunopositive with the same treatment. Using tail electromyography, spontaneous tail muscle activity was increased nearly fivefold over the baseline level. When pretreated with a central AADC inhibitor (NSD-1015), further application of l-dopa failed to increase the motoneuron activity although the expression of DA in the AADC cells was not completely inhibited. These findings demonstrate that AADC cells in the spinal cord below the lesion gain the ability to produce DA from its precursor in response to SCI. This ability also enables the AADC cells to produce 5-HT and trace amines, and likely contributes to the development of hyperexcitability. These results might also be implicated for revealing the pathological mechanisms underlying l-dopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26830512

  14. Production of Dopamine by Aromatic l-Amino Acid Decarboxylase Cells after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Ren, Li-Qun; Wienecke, Jacob; Hultborn, Hans; Zhang, Mengliang

    2016-06-15

    Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) cells are widely distributed in the spinal cord, and their functions are largely unknown. We have previously found that AADC cells in the spinal cord could increase their ability to produce serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) from 5-hydroxytryptophan after spinal cord injury (SCI). Because AADC is a common enzyme catalyzing 5-hydroxytryptophan to serotonin and l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-dopa) to dopamine (DA), it seems likely that the ability of AADC cells using l-dopa to synthesize DA is also increased. To prove whether or not this is the case, a similar rat sacral SCI model and a similar experimental paradigm were adopted as that which we had used previously. In the chronic SCI rats (> 45 days), no AADC cells expressed DA if there was no exogenous l-dopa application. However, following administration of a peripheral AADC inhibitor (carbidopa) with or without a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (pargyline) co-application, systemic administration of l-dopa resulted in ∼94% of AADC cells becoming DA-immunopositive in the spinal cord below the lesion, whereas in normal or sham-operated rats none or very few of AADC cells became DA-immunopositive with the same treatment. Using tail electromyography, spontaneous tail muscle activity was increased nearly fivefold over the baseline level. When pretreated with a central AADC inhibitor (NSD-1015), further application of l-dopa failed to increase the motoneuron activity although the expression of DA in the AADC cells was not completely inhibited. These findings demonstrate that AADC cells in the spinal cord below the lesion gain the ability to produce DA from its precursor in response to SCI. This ability also enables the AADC cells to produce 5-HT and trace amines, and likely contributes to the development of hyperexcitability. These results might also be implicated for revealing the pathological mechanisms underlying l-dopa-induced dyskinesia in Parkinson's disease.

  15. Spinal cord injury enables aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase cells to synthesize monoamines.

    PubMed

    Wienecke, Jacob; Ren, Li-Qun; Hultborn, Hans; Chen, Meng; Møller, Morten; Zhang, Yifan; Zhang, Mengliang

    2014-09-01

    Serotonin (5-HT), an important modulator of both sensory and motor functions in the mammalian spinal cord, originates mainly in the raphe nuclei of the brainstem. However, following complete transection of the spinal cord, small amounts of 5-HT remain detectable below the lesion. It has been suggested, but not proven, that this residual 5-HT is produced by intraspinal 5-HT neurons. Here, we show by immunohistochemical techniques that cells containing the enzyme aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) occur not only near the central canal, as reported by others, but also in the intermediate zone and dorsal horn of the spinal gray matter. We show that, following complete transection of the rat spinal cord at S2 level, AADC cells distal to the lesion acquire the ability to produce 5-HT from its immediate precursor, 5-hydroxytryptophan. Our results indicate that this phenotypic change in spinal AADC cells is initiated by the loss of descending 5-HT projections due to spinal cord injury (SCI). By in vivo and in vitro electrophysiology, we show that 5-HT produced by AADC cells increases the excitability of spinal motoneurons. The phenotypic change in AADC cells appears to result from a loss of inhibition by descending 5-HT neurons and to be mediated by 5-HT1B receptors expressed by AADC cells. These findings indicate that AADC cells are a potential source of 5-HT at spinal levels below an SCI. The production of 5-HT by AADC cells, together with an upregulation of 5-HT2 receptors, offers a partial explanation of hyperreflexia below a chronic SCI. PMID:25186745

  16. Single amino-acid replacement is responsible for the stabilization of ornithine decarboxylase in HMOA cells.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Y; Matsufuji, S; Murakami, Y; Hayashi, S

    1993-06-15

    The half-life of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in HMOA cells, a variant cell line derived from hepatoma tissue culture (HTC) cells, is markedly increased compared with that in the parental cell line. In the present study, we examined which of the three relevant factors is responsible for the ODC stabilization in HMOA cells, namely ODC itself, a regulatory protein antizyme and an ODC-degrading activity. SDS/PAGE analysis of radiolabeled ODC revealed that ODC from HMOA cells migrated somewhat faster than that from HTC cells, suggesting that HMOA ODC was structurally altered. Direct sequencing of reverse-transcription/polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) products of ODC mRNA from HMOA cells revealed a T to G replacement, causing a Cys441-->Trp replacement near the C-terminus. No alteration was found in the whole coding region of antizyme mRNA. An authentic mutant ODC cDNA with the same replacement was transfected and expressed in C55.7 ODC-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells. Upon cycloheximide treatment, the mutant ODC activity did not decrease appreciably for at least 3 h, whereas wild-type ODC activity decreased with a half-life of 1 h. In-vitro-synthesized mutant ODC with the Cys441-->Trp (or Ala) replacement was also stable in a reticulocyte-lysate ODC-degradation system. Metabolically labeled and purified mouse ODC was degraded in HMOA cell extracts in the presence of ATP and antizyme as rapidly as in HTC cell extracts, indicating that HMOA cells have a normal ODC degrading activity. These results indicated that the single amino acid replacement, Cys441-->Trp, is responsible for the stabilization of ODC in HMOA cells and that Cys441 is important for rapid ODC turnover.

  17. Structural Basis of Enzymatic Activity for the Ferulic Acid Decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lianming; Sun, Yuna; Huang, Jingwen; Li, Xuemei; Cao, Yi; Meng, Zhaohui; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2011-01-01

    Microbial ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) catalyzes the transformation of ferulic acid to 4-hydroxy-3-methoxystyrene (4-vinylguaiacol) via non-oxidative decarboxylation. Here we report the crystal structures of the Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 FADase and the enzyme in complex with substrate analogues. Our analyses revealed that FADase possessed a half-opened bottom β-barrel with the catalytic pocket located between the middle of the core β-barrel and the helical bottom. Its structure shared a high degree of similarity with members of the phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) superfamily. Structural analysis revealed that FADase catalyzed reactions by an “open-closed” mechanism involving a pocket of 8×8×15 Å dimension on the surface of the enzyme. The active pocket could directly contact the solvent and allow the substrate to enter when induced by substrate analogues. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that the E134A mutation decreased the enzyme activity by more than 60%, and Y21A and Y27A mutations abolished the enzyme activity completely. The combined structural and mutagenesis results suggest that during decarboxylation of ferulic acid by FADase, Trp25 and Tyr27 are required for the entering and proper orientation of the substrate while Glu134 and Asn23 participate in proton transfer. PMID:21283705

  18. Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase deficiency with hyperdopaminuria. Clinical and laboratory findings in response to different therapies.

    PubMed

    Fiumara, A; Bräutigam, C; Hyland, K; Sharma, R; Lagae, L; Stoltenborg, B; Hoffmann, G F; Jaeken, J; Wevers, R A

    2002-08-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC - E.C. 4.1.1.28) converts L-dopa to dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptophan to serotonin. Inherited deficiency of this enzyme leads to decreased brain levels of these neurotransmitters. Clinically this results in the development of a progressive neurometabolic disorder characterized by severe hypotonia, dystonic and choreoathetoid movements, oculogyric crises, and hypothermia from infancy. Here we describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular details of two affected brothers, one of whom, despite the lack of AADC, presented with hyperdopaminuria. In addition, we detail his reactions to treatment with dopaminergic agonists, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and pyridoxine.

  19. Wound-Inducible Biosynthesis of Phytoalexin Hydroxycinnamic Acid Amides of Tyramine in Tryptophan and Tyrosine Decarboxylase Transgenic Tobacco Lines1

    PubMed Central

    Guillet, Gabriel; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    The wound-activated biosynthesis of phytoalexin hydroxycinnamic acid amides of tyramine was compared in untransformed and transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) lines that express tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), tyrosine decarboxylase (TYDC), or both activities. Transgenic in vitro-grown tobacco lines expressing TDC activity accumulated high levels of tryptamine but not hydroxycinnamic amides of tryptamine. In contrast, transgenic tobacco lines expressing TYDC accumulated tyramine as well as p-coumaroyltyramine and feruloyltyramine. The MeOH-soluble and cell wall fractions showed higher concentrations of wound-inducible p-coumaroyltyramine and feruloyltyramine, especially at and around wound sites, in TYDC and TDC ×TYDC tobacco lines compared to wild-type or TDC lines. All the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of hydroxycinnamic acid amides of tyramine were found to be similarly wound inducible in all tobacco genotypes investigated. These results provide experimental evidence that, under some circumstances, TYDC activity can exert a rate-limiting control over the carbon flux allocated to the biosynthesis of hydroxycinnamic acid amides of tyramine. PMID:15665252

  20. Amino acid decarboxylase activity and other chemical characteristics as related to freshness loss in iced cod (Gadus morhua).

    PubMed

    Hernández-Herrero, M Manuela; Duflos, Guillaume; Malle, Pierre; Bouquelet, Stéphane

    2002-07-01

    Biogenic amine levels and other biochemical indicators were measured to study the safety of and the loss of freshness in iced Atlantic cod. Biogenic amine content exhibited high variability during iced storage of Atlantic cod. Ornithine and lysine decarboxylase activity apparently increased at the end of the storage period. Amino acid activity was probably generated by endogenous amino acid decarboxylases of raw fish. No statistical differences were observed in the total volatile base fraction or in the ammonia or monomethylamine contents during iced storage. However, trimethylamine contents showed a significant exponential relationship with time and sensory score. Cod formed inosine as the major metabolite of IMP. The H and G indices showed a linear relationship with time and sensory score and served as good indicators of cod freshness quality. However, the K, Ki, and P indices showed a logarithmic relationship with time and sensory score. IMP, K, Ki, and P served as indicators of freshness lost during the early stages of chilled storage of cod. PMID:12117250

  1. The role of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase in bacillamide C biosynthesis by Bacillus atrophaeus C89.

    PubMed

    Yuwen, Lei; Zhang, Feng-Li; Chen, Qi-Hua; Lin, Shuang-Jun; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Li, Zhi-Yong

    2013-01-01

    For biosynthesis of bacillamide C by Bacillus atrophaeus C89 associated with South China sea sponge Dysidea avara, it is hypothesized that decarboxylation from L-tryptophan to tryptamine could be performed before amidation by the downstream aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) to the non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) gene cluster for biosynthesizing bacillamide C. The structural analysis of decarboxylases' known substrates in KEGG database and alignment analysis of amino acid sequence of AADC have suggested that L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine are the potential substrates of AADC. The enzymatic kinetic experiment of the recombinant AADC proved that L-tryptophan is a more reactive substrate of AADC than L-phenylalanine. Meanwhile, the AADC-catalyzed conversion of L-tryptophan into tryptamine was confirmed by means of HPLC and LC/MS. Thus during bacillamide C biosynthesis, the decarboxylation of L-tryptophan to tryptamine is likely conducted first under AADC catalysis, followed by the amidation of tryptamine with the carboxylic product of NRPS gene cluster.

  2. Inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase induction by retinobenzoic acids in relation to their binding affinities to cellular retinoid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Takagi, K; Suganuma, M; Kagechika, H; Shudo, K; Ninomiya, M; Muto, Y; Fujiki, H

    1988-01-01

    Retinobenzoic acids induce differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60). Like retinoic acid, 14 retinobenzoic acids inhibited the induction of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) by teleocidin in mouse skin. The mechanism(s) of inhibition of ODC induction by 7 retinobenzoic acids, Am 80, Am 81, Am 580, Am 590, Am 68, Sa 80, and Ch 55 was compared with those by all-trans-retinoic acid and the arotinoid compound 19. Application of 114 nmol of Am 80, Am 81, Am 580, Am 590, Am 68, Sa 80, or Ch 55, 10 min before 11.4 nmol of teleocidin, resulted in 76.7%, 82.0%, 76.2%, 28.3%, 48.4%, 58.6%, and 85.1% inhibition of ODC induction, respectively. Since all-trans-retinoic acid and compound 19 were also inhibitory, we determined whether retinobenzoic acids bind to cellular retinoic acid-binding protein (CRABP) isolated from bovine adrenal glands. Am 80 and Am 580 inhibited the specific binding of 3H-retinoic acid to CRABP, but also showed less affinity than authentic unlabeled retinoic acid and compound 19. Am 81, Am 590, Am 68, Sa 80, and Ch 55 at up to 10 microM were not effective competitors of the binding of either 3H-retinoic acid or 3H-retinol. These results suggest that the inhibition of ODC induction can be mediated by pathways that do not involve CRABP or the cellular retinol-binding protein.

  3. An organic solvent-tolerant phenolic acid decarboxylase from Bacillus licheniformis for the efficient bioconversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to vinyl phenol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongfei; Li, Lulu; Ding, Shaojun

    2015-06-01

    A new phenolic acid decarboxylase gene (blpad) from Bacillus licheniformis was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The full-length blpad encodes a 166-amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass and pI of 19,521 Da and 5.02, respectively. The recombinant BLPAD displayed maximum activity at 37 °C and pH 6.0. This enzyme possesses a broad substrate specificity and is able to decarboxylate p-coumaric, ferulic, caffeic, and sinapic acids at the relative ratios of specific activities 100:74.59:34.41:0.29. Kinetic constant K m values toward p-coumaric, ferulic, caffeic, and sinapic acids were 1.64, 1.55, 1.93, and 2.45 mM, and V max values were 268.43, 216.80, 119.07, and 0.78 U mg(-1), respectively. In comparison with other phenolic acid decarboxylases, BLPAD exhibited remarkable organic solvent tolerance and good thermal stability. BLPAD showed excellent catalytic performance in biphasic organic/aqueous systems and efficiently converted p-coumaric and ferulic acids into 4-vinylphenol and 4-vinylguaiacol. At 500 mM of p-coumaric and ferulic acids, the recombinant BLPAD produced a total 60.63 g l(-1) 4-vinylphenol and 58.30 g l(-1) 4-vinylguaiacol with the conversion yields 97.02 and 70.96 %, respectively. The low yield and product concentration are the crucial drawbacks to the practical bioproduction of vinyl phenol derivatives using phenolic acid decarboxylases. These unusual properties make BLPAD a desirable biocatalyst for commercial use in the bioconversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to vinyl phenol derivatives via enzymatic decarboxylation in a biphasic organic/aqueous reaction system. PMID:25547838

  4. Co-localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase and vesicular GABA transporter in cytochrome oxidase patches of macaque striate cortex.

    PubMed

    Adams, Daniel L; Economides, John R; Horton, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    The patches in primary visual cortex constitute hot spots of metabolic activity, manifested by enhanced levels of cytochrome oxidase (CO) activity. They are also labeled preferentially by immunostaining for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and parvalbumin. However, calbindin shows stronger immunoreactivity outside patches. In light of this discrepancy, the distribution of the vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) was examined in striate cortex of two normal macaques. VGAT immunoreactivity was strongest in layers 4B, 4Cα, and 5. In tangential sections, the distribution of CO, GAD, and VGAT was compared in layer 2/3. There was a close match between all three labels. This finding indicates that GABA synthesis is enriched in patches, and that inhibitory synapses are more active in patches than interpatches. PMID:26579566

  5. Terminal Olefin (1-Alkene) Biosynthesis by a Novel P450 Fatty Acid Decarboxylase from Jeotgalicoccus Species ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rude, Mathew A.; Baron, Tarah S.; Brubaker, Shane; Alibhai, Murtaza; Del Cardayre, Stephen B.; Schirmer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Terminal olefins (1-alkenes) are natural products that have important industrial applications as both fuels and chemicals. However, their biosynthesis has been largely unexplored. We describe a group of bacteria, Jeotgalicoccus spp., which synthesize terminal olefins, in particular 18-methyl-1-nonadecene and 17-methyl-1-nonadecene. These olefins are derived from intermediates of fatty acid biosynthesis, and the key enzyme in Jeotgalicoccus sp. ATCC 8456 is a terminal olefin-forming fatty acid decarboxylase. This enzyme, Jeotgalicoccus sp. OleT (OleTJE), was identified by purification from cell lysates, and its encoding gene was identified from a draft genome sequence of Jeotgalicoccus sp. ATCC 8456 using reverse genetics. Heterologous expression of the identified gene conferred olefin biosynthesis to Escherichia coli. OleTJE is a P450 from the cyp152 family, which includes bacterial fatty acid hydroxylases. Some cyp152 P450 enzymes have the ability to decarboxylate and to hydroxylate fatty acids (in α- and/or β-position), suggesting a common reaction intermediate in their catalytic mechanism and specific structural determinants that favor one reaction over the other. The discovery of these terminal olefin-forming P450 enzymes represents a third biosynthetic pathway (in addition to alkane and long-chain olefin biosynthesis) to convert fatty acid intermediates into hydrocarbons. Olefin-forming fatty acid decarboxylation is a novel reaction that can now be added to the catalytic repertoire of the versatile cytochrome P450 enzyme family. PMID:21216900

  6. On the biosynthesis of free and covalently bound PQQ. Glutamic acid decarboxylase from Escherichia coli is a pyridoxo-quinoprotein.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, R A; Groen, B W; Duine, J A

    1989-03-27

    Analysis of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GDC) (EC 4.1.1.15) from Escherichia coli ATCC 11246 revealed the presence of six pyridoxal phosphates (PLPs) as well as six covalently bound pyrroloquinoline quinones (PQQs) per hexameric enzyme molecule. This is the second example of a pyridoxo-quinoprotein, suggesting that other atypical pyridoxoproteins (PLP-containing enzymes) have similar cofactor composition. Since the organism did not produce free PQQ and its quinoprotein glucose dehydrogenase was present in the apo form, free PQQ is not used in the assemblage of GDC. Most probably, biosynthesis of covalently bound cofactor occurs in situ via a route which is different from that of free PQQ. Thus, organisms previously believed to be unable to synthesize (free) PQQ could in fact be able to produce quinoproteins with covalently bound cofactor. Implications for the role of PQQ in eukaryotic cells are discussed.

  7. Aromatic amino Acid decarboxylase deficiency not responding to pyridoxine and bromocriptine therapy: case report and review of response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Alfadhel, Majid; Kattan, Rana

    2014-01-01

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency (MIM #608643) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of monoamines. It is caused by a mutation in the DDC gene that leads to a deficiency in the AADC enzyme. The clinical features of this condition include a combination of dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin deficiencies, and a patient may present with hypotonia, oculogyric crises, sweating, hypersalivation, autonomic dysfunction, and progressive encephalopathy with severe developmental delay. We report the case of an 8-month-old boy who presented with the abovementioned symptoms and who was diagnosed with AADC deficiency based on clinical, biochemical, and molecular investigations. Treatment with bromocriptine and pyridoxine showed no improvement. These data support the findings observed among previously reported cohorts that showed poor response of this disease to current regimens. Alternative therapies are needed to ameliorate the clinical complications associated with this disorder.

  8. Dynamic changes in gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate decarboxylase activity in oats (Avena nuda L.) during steeping and germination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian Guo; Hu, Qing Ping; Duan, Jiang Lian; Tian, Cheng Rui

    2010-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and provides beneficial effects for human and other animals health. To accumulate GABA, samples from two different naked oat cultivars, Baiyan II and Bayou I, were steeped and germinated in an incubator. The content of GABA and glutamic acid as well as the activity of the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) in oats during steeping and germination were investigated with an amino acid automatic analyzer. Compared with raw groats, an increase in GABA content of oat groats during steeping and germination was continuously observed for two oat cultivars. The activity of GAD increased greatly at the end of steeping and the second stage of germination for Baiyan II and Bayou I, respectively. Glutamic acid content of treated oat groats was significantly lower than that in raw groats until the later period of germination. GABA was correlated (p<0.01) significantly and positively with the glutamic acid rather than GAD activity in the current study. The results indicates that steeping and germination process under highly controlled conditions can effectively accumulate the GABA in oat groats for Baiyan II and Bayou I, which would greatly facilitate production of nutraceuticals or food ingredients that enable consumers to gain greater access to the health benefits of oats. However, more assays need to be further performed with more oat cultivars.

  9. Molecular and Functional Analyses of Amino Acid Decarboxylases Involved in Cuticle Tanning in Tribolium castaneum*

    PubMed Central

    Arakane, Yasuyuki; Lomakin, Joseph; Beeman, Richard W.; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Gehrke, Stevin H.; Kanost, Michael R.; Kramer, Karl J.

    2009-01-01

    Aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase (DDC) provide β-alanine and dopamine used in insect cuticle tanning. β-Alanine is conjugated with dopamine to yield N-β-alanyldopamine (NBAD), a substrate for the phenol oxidase laccase that catalyzes the synthesis of cuticle protein cross-linking agents and pigment precursors. We identified ADC and DDC genes in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Tc), and investigated their functions. TcADC mRNA was most abundant prior to the pupal-adult molt. Injection of TcADC double-stranded (ds) RNA (dsTcADC) into mature larvae resulted in depletion of NBAD in pharate adults, accumulation of dopamine, and abnormally dark pigmentation of the adult cuticle. Injection of β-alanine, the expected product of ADC, into dsTcADC-treated pupae rescued the pigmentation phenotype, resulting in normal rust-red color. A similar pattern of catechol content consisting of elevated dopamine and depressed NBAD was observed in the genetic black mutants of Tribolium, in which levels of TcADC mRNA were drastically reduced. Furthermore, from the Tribolium black mutant and dsTcADC-injected insects both exhibited similar changes in material properties. Dynamic mechanical analysis of elytral cuticle from beetles with depleted TcADC transcripts revealed diminished cross-linking of cuticular components, further confirming the important role of oxidation products of NBAD as cross-linking agents during cuticle tanning. Injection of dsTcDDC into larvae produced a lethal pupal phenotype, and the resulting grayish pupal cuticle exhibited many small patches of black pigmentation. When dsTcDDC was injected into young pupae, the resulting adults had abnormally dark brown body color, but there was little mortality. Injection of dsTcDDC resulted in more than a 5-fold increase in levels of DOPA, indicating that lack of TcDDC led to accumulation of its substrate, DOPA. PMID:19366687

  10. Buffer-free production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using an engineered glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taek Jin; Ho, Ngoc Anh Thu; Pack, Seung Pil

    2013-08-15

    Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) converts glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) through decarboxylation using proton as a co-substrate. Since GAD is active only at acidic conditions even though pH increases as the reaction proceeds, the conventional practice of using this enzyme involved the use of relatively high concentration of buffers, which might complicate the downstream purification steps. Here we show by simulation and experiments that the free acid substrate, glutamic acid, rather than its monosodium salt can act as a substrate and buffer at the same time. This yielded the buffer- and salt-free synthesis of GABA conveniently in a batch mode. Furthermore, we engineered GAD to hyper active ones by extending or reducing the length of the enzyme by just one residue at its C-terminus. Through the buffer-free reaction with engineered GAD, we could synthesize 1M GABA in 3h, which can be translated into a space-time yield of 34.3g/L/h.

  11. Gamma-aminobutyric acid production using immobilized glutamate decarboxylase followed by downstream processing with cation exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwoon; Ahn, Jungoh; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Jung, Joon-Ki; Lee, Hongweon; Lee, Eun Gyo

    2013-01-15

    We have developed a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) production technique using his-tag mediated immobilization of Escherichia coli-derived glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamate to GABA. The GAD was obtained at 1.43 g/L from GAD-overexpressed E. coli fermentation and consisted of 59.7% monomer, 29.2% dimer and 2.3% tetramer with a 97.6% soluble form of the total GAD. The harvested GAD was immobilized to metal affinity gel with an immobilization yield of 92%. Based on an investigation of specific enzyme activity and reaction characteristics, glutamic acid (GA) was chosen over monosodium glutamate (MSG) as a substrate for immobilized GAD, resulting in conversion of 2.17 M GABA in a 1 L reactor within 100 min. The immobilized enzymes retained 58.1% of their initial activities after ten consecutive uses. By using cation exchange chromatography followed by enzymatic conversion, GABA was separated from the residual substrate and leached GAD. As a consequence, the glutamic acid was mostly removed with no detectable GAD, while 91.2% of GABA was yielded in the purification step.

  12. Identification of the Enterobacteriaceae in Montasio cheese and assessment of their amino acid decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Maifreni, Michela; Frigo, Francesca; Bartolomeoli, Ingrid; Innocente, Nadia; Biasutti, Marialuisa; Marino, Marilena

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the species of Enterobacteriaceae present in Montasio cheese and to assess their potential to produce biogenic amines. Plate count methods and an Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus Polymerase Chain Reaction (ERIC-PCR) approach, combined with 16S rDNA sequencing, were used to investigate the Enterobacteriaceae community present during the cheesemaking and ripening of 6 batches of Montasio cheese. Additionally, the potential decarboxylation abilities of selected bacterial isolates were qualitatively and quantitatively assessed against tyrosine, histidine, ornithine and lysine. The most predominant species detected during cheese manufacturing and ripening were Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli and Hafnia alvei. The non-limiting physico-chemical conditions (pH, NaCl% and a(w)) during ripening were probably the cause of the presence of detectable levels of Enterobacteriaceae up to 120 d of ripening. The HPLC test showed that cadaverine and putrescine were the amines produced in higher amounts by almost all isolates, indicating that the presence of these amines in cheese can be linked to the presence of high counts of Enterobacteriaceae. 44 isolates produced low amounts of histamine (<300 ppm), and four isolates produced more than 1000 ppm of this amine. Only 9 isolates, belonging to the species Citrobacter freundii, Esch. coli and Raoultella ornithinolytica, appeared to produce tyramine. These data provided new information regarding the decarboxylase activity of some Enterobacteriaceae species, including Pantoea agglomerans, Esch. fergusonii and R. ornithinolytica. PMID:23298547

  13. Knockout of the p-Coumarate Decarboxylase Gene from Lactobacillus plantarum Reveals the Existence of Two Other Inducible Enzymatic Activities Involved in Phenolic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Barthelmebs, Lise; Divies, Charles; Cavin, Jean-François

    2000-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum NC8 contains a pdc gene coding for p-coumaric acid decarboxylase activity (PDC). A food grade mutant, designated LPD1, in which the chromosomal pdc gene was replaced with the deleted pdc gene copy, was obtained by a two-step homologous recombination process using an unstable replicative vector. The LPD1 mutant strain remained able to weakly metabolize p-coumaric and ferulic acids into vinyl derivatives or into substituted phenyl propionic acids. We have shown that L. plantarum has a second acid phenol decarboxylase enzyme, better induced with ferulic acid than with p-coumaric acid, which also displays inducible acid phenol reductase activity that is mostly active when glucose is added. Those two enzymatic activities are in competition for p-coumaric and ferulic acid degradation, and the ratio of the corresponding derivatives depends on induction conditions. Moreover, PDC appeared to decarboxylate ferulic acid in vitro with a specific activity of about 10 nmol · min−1 · mg−1 in the presence of ammonium sulfate. Finally, PDC activity was shown to confer a selective advantage on LPNC8 grown in acidic media supplemented with p-coumaric acid, compared to the LPD1 mutant devoid of PDC activity. PMID:10919793

  14. Harmonization of Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase and Islet Antigen-2 Autoantibody Assays for National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Bonifacio, Ezio; Yu, Liping; Williams, Alastair K.; Eisenbarth, George S.; Bingley, Polly J.; Marcovina, Santica M.; Adler, Kerstin; Ziegler, Anette G.; Mueller, Patricia W.; Schatz, Desmond A.; Krischer, Jeffrey P.; Steffes, Michael W.; Akolkar, Beena

    2010-01-01

    Background/Rationale: Autoantibodies to islet antigen-2 (IA-2A) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA) are markers for diagnosis, screening, and measuring outcomes in National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) consortia studies. A harmonization program was established to increase comparability of results within and among these studies. Methods: Large volumes of six working calibrators were prepared from pooled sera with GADA 4.8–493 World Health Organization (WHO) units/ml and IA-2A 2–235 WHO units/ml. Harmonized assay protocols for IA-2A and GADA using 35S-methionine-labelled in vitro transcribed and translated antigens were developed based on methods in use in three NIDDK laboratories. Antibody thresholds were defined using sera from patients with recent onset type 1 diabetes and healthy controls. To evaluate the impact of the harmonized assay protocol on concordance of IA-2A and GADA results, two laboratories retested stored TEDDY study sera using the harmonized assays. Results: The harmonized assays gave comparable but not identical results in the three laboratories. For IA-2A, using a common threshold of 5 DK units/ml, 549 of 550 control and patient samples were concordantly scored as positive or negative, specificity was greater than 99% with sensitivity 64% in all laboratories. For GADA, using thresholds equivalent to the 97th percentile of 974 control samples in each laboratory, 1051 (97.9%) of 1074 samples were concordant. On the retested TEDDY samples, discordance decreased from 4 to 1.8% for IA-2A (n = 604 samples; P = 0.02) and from 15.4 to 2.7% for GADA (n = 515 samples; P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Harmonization of GADA and IA-2A is feasible using large volume working calibrators and common protocols and is an effective approach to ensure consistency in autoantibody measurements. PMID:20444913

  15. Hydrogen peroxide-independent production of α-alkenes by OleTJE P450 fatty acid decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 OleTJE from Jeotgalicoccus sp. ATCC 8456, a new member of the CYP152 peroxygenase family, was recently found to catalyze the unusual decarboxylation of long-chain fatty acids to form α-alkenes using H2O2 as the sole electron and oxygen donor. Because aliphatic α-alkenes are important chemicals that can be used as biofuels to replace fossil fuels, or for making lubricants, polymers and detergents, studies on OleTJE fatty acid decarboxylase are significant and may lead to commercial production of biogenic α-alkenes in the future, which are renewable and more environmentally friendly than petroleum-derived equivalents. Results We report the H2O2-independent activity of OleTJE for the first time. In the presence of NADPH and O2, this P450 enzyme efficiently decarboxylates long-chain fatty acids (C12 to C20) in vitro when partnering with either the fused P450 reductase domain RhFRED from Rhodococcus sp. or the separate flavodoxin/flavodoxin reductase from Escherichia coli. In vivo, expression of OleTJE or OleTJE-RhFRED in different E. coli strains overproducing free fatty acids resulted in production of variant levels of multiple α-alkenes, with a highest total hydrocarbon titer of 97.6 mg·l-1. Conclusions The discovery of the H2O2-independent activity of OleTJE not only raises a number of fundamental questions on the monooxygenase-like mechanism of this peroxygenase, but also will direct the future metabolic engineering work toward improvement of O2/redox partner(s)/NADPH for overproduction of α-alkenes by OleTJE. PMID:24565055

  16. Overexpression and optimization of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 for high gamma-aminobutyric acid production.

    PubMed

    Tajabadi, Naser; Baradaran, Ali; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Rahim, Raha A; Bakar, Fatimah A; Manap, Mohd Yazid A; Mohammed, Abdulkarim S; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-07-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bioactive compound biosynthesized by microorganisms through decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In this study, a full-length GAD gene was obtained by cloning the template deoxyribonucleic acid to pTZ57R/T vector. The open reading frame of the GAD gene showed the cloned gene was composed of 1410 nucleotides and encoded a 469 amino acids protein. To improve the GABA-production, the GAD gene was cloned into pMG36e-LbGAD, and then expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 cells. The overexpression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and GAD activity, showing a 53 KDa protein with the enzyme activity increased by sevenfold compared with the original GAD activity. The optimal fermentation conditions for GABA production established using response surface methodology were at glutamic acid concentration of 497.973 mM, temperature 36°C, pH 5.31 and time 60 h. Under the conditions, maximum GABA concentration obtained (11.09 mM) was comparable with the predicted value by the model at 11.23 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful cloning (clone-back) and overexpression of the LbGAD gene from L. plantarum to L. plantarum cells. The recombinant Lactobacillus could be used as a starter culture for direct incorporation into a food system during fermentation for production of GABA-rich products.

  17. Overexpression and optimization of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 for high gamma-aminobutyric acid production.

    PubMed

    Tajabadi, Naser; Baradaran, Ali; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Rahim, Raha A; Bakar, Fatimah A; Manap, Mohd Yazid A; Mohammed, Abdulkarim S; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-07-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bioactive compound biosynthesized by microorganisms through decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD). In this study, a full-length GAD gene was obtained by cloning the template deoxyribonucleic acid to pTZ57R/T vector. The open reading frame of the GAD gene showed the cloned gene was composed of 1410 nucleotides and encoded a 469 amino acids protein. To improve the GABA-production, the GAD gene was cloned into pMG36e-LbGAD, and then expressed in Lactobacillus plantarum Taj-Apis362 cells. The overexpression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and GAD activity, showing a 53 KDa protein with the enzyme activity increased by sevenfold compared with the original GAD activity. The optimal fermentation conditions for GABA production established using response surface methodology were at glutamic acid concentration of 497.973 mM, temperature 36°C, pH 5.31 and time 60 h. Under the conditions, maximum GABA concentration obtained (11.09 mM) was comparable with the predicted value by the model at 11.23 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful cloning (clone-back) and overexpression of the LbGAD gene from L. plantarum to L. plantarum cells. The recombinant Lactobacillus could be used as a starter culture for direct incorporation into a food system during fermentation for production of GABA-rich products. PMID:25757029

  18. The selective conversion of glutamic acid in amino acid mixtures using glutamate decarboxylase--a means of separating amino acids for synthesizing biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yinglai; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids (AAs) derived from hydrolysis of protein rest streams are interesting feedstocks for the chemical industry due to their functionality. However, separation of AAs is required before they can be used for further applications. Electrodialysis may be applied to separate AAs, but its efficiency is limited when separating AAs with similar isoelectric points. To aid the separation, specific conversion of an AA to a useful product with different charge behavior to the remaining compounds is desired. Here the separation of L-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-glutamic acid (Glu) was studied. L-Glutamate α-decarboxylase (GAD, Type I, EC 4.1.1.15) was applied to specifically convert Glu into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA has a different charge behavior from Asp therefore allowing a potential separation by electrodialysis. Competitive inhibition and reduced operational stability caused by Asp could be eliminated by maintaining a sufficiently high concentration of Glu. Immobilization of GAD does not reduce the enzyme's initial activity. However, the operational stability was slightly reduced. An initial study on the reaction operating in a continuous mode was performed using a column reactor packed with immobilized GAD. As the reaction mixture was only passed once through the reactor, the conversion of Glu was lower than expected. To complete the conversion of Glu, the stream containing Asp and unreacted Glu might be recirculated back to the reactor after GABA has been removed. Overall, the reaction by GAD is specific to Glu and can be applied to aid the electrodialysis separation of Asp and Glu. PMID:24616376

  19. The selective conversion of glutamic acid in amino acid mixtures using glutamate decarboxylase--a means of separating amino acids for synthesizing biobased chemicals.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yinglai; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids (AAs) derived from hydrolysis of protein rest streams are interesting feedstocks for the chemical industry due to their functionality. However, separation of AAs is required before they can be used for further applications. Electrodialysis may be applied to separate AAs, but its efficiency is limited when separating AAs with similar isoelectric points. To aid the separation, specific conversion of an AA to a useful product with different charge behavior to the remaining compounds is desired. Here the separation of L-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-glutamic acid (Glu) was studied. L-Glutamate α-decarboxylase (GAD, Type I, EC 4.1.1.15) was applied to specifically convert Glu into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA has a different charge behavior from Asp therefore allowing a potential separation by electrodialysis. Competitive inhibition and reduced operational stability caused by Asp could be eliminated by maintaining a sufficiently high concentration of Glu. Immobilization of GAD does not reduce the enzyme's initial activity. However, the operational stability was slightly reduced. An initial study on the reaction operating in a continuous mode was performed using a column reactor packed with immobilized GAD. As the reaction mixture was only passed once through the reactor, the conversion of Glu was lower than expected. To complete the conversion of Glu, the stream containing Asp and unreacted Glu might be recirculated back to the reactor after GABA has been removed. Overall, the reaction by GAD is specific to Glu and can be applied to aid the electrodialysis separation of Asp and Glu.

  20. Japanese cases of acute onset diabetic ketosis without acidosis in the absence of glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yorihiro; Hamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Kawasaki, Yukiko; Ikeda, Hiroki; Honjo, Sachiko; Wada, Yoshiharu; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-01

    We report consecutive Japanese patients presented with acute onset diabetic ketosis who had negative glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody (GADAb) to clarify the clinical characteristics of them. A total of consecutive 1,296 in-patients with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus, who were admitted to our center from April 2003 to October 2008, were analyzed. Among them, 17 patients who presented with acute onset diabetic ketosis without acidosis, and found to be negative for GADAb, were included. They showed male preponderance (n = 15). Ten patients had history of excessive ingestion of sugar-containing soft drink. Patients who successfully withdrew insulin therapy by 6 months (n = 7) showed significantly higher insulin secretion capacity and higher body mass index at the time of diagnosis than those who continued insulin therapy at least for 6 months (n = 10). These findings suggest that some of Japanese patients who presented with acute onset diabetic ketosis and negative for GADAb share several clinical characteristics with atypical type 2 diabetes such as ketosis-prone diabetes and "soft-drink ketosis," but others do not. PMID:20960264

  1. Characterization of bovine aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase expressed in a mouse cell line: comparison with native enzyme.

    PubMed

    Park, D H; Kim, K T; Choi, M U; Samanta, H; Joh, T H

    1992-12-01

    Bovine aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) was expressed in a mouse cell line, using a bovine papilloma virus-derived expression vector containing the full coding region of bovine AADC. The recombinant bovine AADC was characterized biochemically and immunochemically and compared with the native bovine AADC. The specific activity of crude recombinant bovine AADC was 30-fold higher than that of crude native AADC. With regard to optimal pH, effects of pyridoxal phosphate concentration and Km for 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine as a substrate, both native and recombinant enzymes were essentially identical. Rabbit polyclonal antiserum directed against bovine adrenal AADC recognized on Western blot a single protein band (molecular mass = 55,000 Dalton) in both native and recombinant bovine AADC crude extracts. Furthermore, double immunodiffusion analysis showed a single precipitin line of confluence with both enzyme preparations, indicating immunological identity of native and recombinant bovine AADC. Northern blot analysis identified a single mRNA species (2.2 kb) from native and recombinant bovine AADC preparations. The recombinant bovine AADC has two charge isozymes corresponding to those of the native bovine enzyme, although their relative abundances are different between native and recombinant enzymes. Taken together, our results show that recombinant bovine AADC, expressed from bovine AADC cDNA in a mouse cell line is not only enzymatically active, but also shares many biochemical and immunochemical common features with native bovine AADC.

  2. Chronic social subordination stress modulates glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 mRNA expression in central stress circuits

    PubMed Central

    Makinson, Ryan; Lundgren, Kerstin H.; Seroogy, Kim B.; Herman, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic social subordination is a well-known precipitant of numerous psychiatric and physiological health concerns. In this study, we examine the effects of chronic social stress in the visible burrow system (VBS) on the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67 and brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) mRNA in forebrain stress circuitry. Male rats in the VBS system form a dominance hierarchy, whereby subordinate males exhibit neuroendocrine and physiological profiles characteristic of chronic exposure to stress. We found that social subordination decreases GAD67 mRNA in the peri-paraventricular nucleus region of the hypothalamus and the interfascicular nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), and increases in GAD67 mRNA in the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and dorsal medial hypothalamus. Expression of BDNF mRNA increased in the dorsal region of the BNST, but remained unchanged in all other regions examined. Results from this study indicate that social subordination is associated with several region-specific alterations in GAD67 mRNA expression in central stress circuits, whereas changes in the expression of BDNF mRNA are limited to the BNST. PMID:26066725

  3. Inhibition of ultraviolet-B skin carcinogenesis by all-trans-retinoic acid regimens that inhibit ornithine decarboxylase induction

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, M.J.; Lowe, N.J.; Breeding, J.H.; Chalet, M.

    1983-01-01

    There is a correlation between the ability to induce the polyamine-biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and the tumor-promoting ability of various carcinogens in mouse epidermis. Some agents which inhibit skin carcinogenesis also inhibit ODC induction. In this study, all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) regimens that inhibited the induction of epidermal ODC by ultraviolet-B (UVB) were tested for their ability to inhibit UVB skin carcinogenesis. Hairless mice were irradiated once daily with UVB for 20 days, receiving a total dose of UVB (17.1 kJ/sq m). Topical RA was applied immediately (RA, one dose) or applied 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 hr (RA, five doses) after each irradiance. The mice were maintained for 52 weeks and then sacrificed. Groups treated with RA tended to have fewer mice with tumors, fewer tumors per mouse, smaller tumor diameters, and slower growing tumors than did appropriate irradiated control groups. RA given five times was more effective than was RA given one time at inhibiting UVB skin carcinogenesis. These results show that RA treatments that inhibit epidermal ODC induction may be effective in reducing the carcinogenicity of UVB.

  4. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  5. Japanese cases of acute onset diabetic ketosis without acidosis in the absence of glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yorihiro; Hamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Kawasaki, Yukiko; Ikeda, Hiroki; Honjo, Sachiko; Wada, Yoshiharu; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-01

    We report consecutive Japanese patients presented with acute onset diabetic ketosis who had negative glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody (GADAb) to clarify the clinical characteristics of them. A total of consecutive 1,296 in-patients with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus, who were admitted to our center from April 2003 to October 2008, were analyzed. Among them, 17 patients who presented with acute onset diabetic ketosis without acidosis, and found to be negative for GADAb, were included. They showed male preponderance (n = 15). Ten patients had history of excessive ingestion of sugar-containing soft drink. Patients who successfully withdrew insulin therapy by 6 months (n = 7) showed significantly higher insulin secretion capacity and higher body mass index at the time of diagnosis than those who continued insulin therapy at least for 6 months (n = 10). These findings suggest that some of Japanese patients who presented with acute onset diabetic ketosis and negative for GADAb share several clinical characteristics with atypical type 2 diabetes such as ketosis-prone diabetes and "soft-drink ketosis," but others do not.

  6. Estradiol decreases taurine level by reducing cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase via the estrogen receptor-α in female mice liver.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiwang; Zhao, Jianjun; Cao, Wei; Liu, Jiali; Cui, Sheng

    2015-02-15

    Cysteine sulfinic acid decarboxylase (CSAD) and cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) are two rate-limiting enzymes in taurine de novo synthesis, and their expressions are associated with estrogen concentration. The present study was designed to determine the relationship between 17β-estradiol (E₂) and taurine in female mice liver. We initially observed the mice had lower levels of CSAD, CDO, and taurine during estrus than diestrus. We then, respectively, treated the ovariectomized mice, the cultured hepatocytes, and Hep G2 cells with different doses of E₂, and the CSAD and CDO expressions and taurine levels were analyzed. The results showed that E₂ decreased taurine level in the serum and the cultured cells by inhibiting CSAD and CDO expressions. Furthermore, we identified the molecular receptor types through which E₂ plays its role in regulating taurine synthesis, and our results showed that estrogen receptor-α (ERα) expression was much higher than estrogen receptor-β (ERβ) in the liver and hepatocytes, and the inhibiting effects of E₂ on CSAD, CDO, and taurine level were partially abrogated in the ICI-182,780-pretreated liver and hepatocytes, and in ERα knockout mice. These results indicate that estradiol decreases taurine content by reducing taurine biosynthetic enzyme expression in mice liver.

  7. Pyridoxine Supplementation Improves the Activity of Recombinant Glutamate Decarboxylase and the Enzymatic Production of Gama-Aminobutyric Acid.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Su, Lingqia; Wu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) catalyzes the irreversible decarboxylation of L-glutamate to the valuable food supplement γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this study, GAD from Escherichia coli K12, a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme, was overexpressed in E. coli. The GAD produced in media supplemented with 0.05 mM soluble vitamin B6 analog pyridoxine hydrochloride (GAD-V) activity was 154.8 U mL-1, 1.8-fold higher than that of GAD obtained without supplementation (GAD-C). Purified GAD-V exhibited increased activity (193.4 U mg-1, 1.5-fold higher than that of GAD-C), superior thermostability (2.8-fold greater than that of GAD-C), and higher kcat/Km (1.6-fold higher than that of GAD-C). Under optimal conditions in reactions mixtures lacking added PLP, crude GAD-V converted 500 g L-1 monosodium glutamate (MSG) to GABA with a yield of 100%, and 750 g L-1 MSG with a yield of 88.7%. These results establish the utility of pyridoxine supplementation and lay the foundation for large-scale enzymatic production of GABA. PMID:27438707

  8. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65: a link between GABAergic synaptic plasticity in the lateral amygdala and conditioned fear generalization.

    PubMed

    Lange, Maren D; Jüngling, Kay; Paulukat, Linda; Vieler, Marc; Gaburro, Stefano; Sosulina, Ludmila; Blaesse, Peter; Sreepathi, Hari K; Ferraguti, Francesco; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2014-08-01

    An imbalance of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system is considered a major neurobiological pathomechanism of anxiety, and the amygdala is a key brain region involved. Reduced GABA levels have been found in anxiety patients, and genetic variations of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme of GABA synthesis, have been associated with anxiety phenotypes in both humans and mice. These findings prompted us to hypothesize that a deficiency of GAD65, the GAD isoform controlling the availability of GABA as a transmitter, affects synaptic transmission and plasticity in the lateral amygdala (LA), and thereby interferes with fear responsiveness. Results indicate that genetically determined GAD65 deficiency in mice is associated with (1) increased synaptic length and release at GABAergic connections, (2) impaired efficacy of GABAergic synaptic transmission and plasticity, and (3) reduced spillover of GABA to presynaptic GABAB receptors, resulting in a loss of the associative nature of long-term synaptic plasticity at cortical inputs to LA principal neurons. (4) In addition, training with high shock intensities in wild-type mice mimicked the phenotype of GAD65 deficiency at both the behavioral and synaptic level, indicated by generalization of conditioned fear and a loss of the associative nature of synaptic plasticity in the LA. In conclusion, GAD65 is required for efficient GABAergic synaptic transmission and plasticity, and for maintaining extracellular GABA at a level needed for associative plasticity at cortical inputs in the LA, which, if disturbed, results in an impairment of the cue specificity of conditioned fear responses typifying anxiety disorders.

  9. Multiplicity of glutamic acid decarboxylases (GAD) in vertebrates: molecular phylogeny and evidence for a new GAD paralog.

    PubMed

    Bosma, P T; Blázquez, M; Collins, M A; Bishop, J D; Drouin, G; Priede, I G; Docherty, K; Trudeau, V L

    1999-03-01

    The evolution of chordate glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD; EC 4.1.1.15), a key enzyme in the central nervous system synthesizing the neurotransmitter gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) from glutamate, was studied. Prior to this study, molecular data of GAD had been restricted to mammals, which express two distinct forms, GAD65 and GAD67. These are the products of separate genes and probably are derived from a common ancestral GAD following gene duplication at some point during vertebrate evolution. To enable a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis, molecular information of GAD forms in other vertebrate classes was essential. By reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), partial nucleotide sequences of GAD were cloned from brains of zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), turtle (Trachemys scripta), goldfish (Carassius auratus), zebrafish (Danio rerio), and armoured grenadier (Coryphaenoides (Nematonurus) armatus, a deep-sea fish), and from the cerebral ganglion plus neural gland of Ciona intestinalis, a protochordate. Whereas GAD65 and GAD67 homologs were expressed in birds, reptiles, and fish, only a single GAD cDNA with equal similarities to both vertebrate GAD forms was found in the protochordate. This indicates that the duplication of the vertebrate GAD gene occurred between 400 and 560 million years ago. For both GAD65 and GAD67, the generated phylogenetic tree followed the general tree topology for the major vertebrate classes. In turtle, an alternative spliced form of GAD65, putatively encoding a truncated, nonactive GAD, was found. Furthermore, a third GAD form, which is equally divergent from both GAD65 and GAD67, is expressed in C. (N.) armatus. This third form might have originated from an ancient genome duplication specific to modern ray-finned fishes.

  10. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass.

  11. Enhancement of the catalytic activity of ferulic acid decarboxylase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 through random and site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunji; Park, Jiyoung; Jung, Chaewon; Han, Dongfei; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Chong, Youhoon; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme ferulic acid decarboxylase (FADase) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 catalyzes the decarboxylation reaction of lignin monomers and phenolic compounds such as p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, and ferulic acid into their corresponding 4-vinyl derivatives, that is, 4-vinylphenol, 4-vinylcatechol, and 4-vinylguaiacol, respectively. Among various ferulic acid decarboxylase enzymes, we chose the FADase from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4, whose crystal structure is known, and produced mutants to enhance its catalytic activity by random and site-directed mutagenesis. After three rounds of sequential mutations, FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) showed approximately 34-fold higher catalytic activity than wild-type for the production of 4-vinylguaiacol from ferulic acid. Docking analyses suggested that the increased activity of FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) could be due to formation of compact active site compared with that of the wild-type FADase. Considering the amount of phenolic compounds such as lignin monomers in the biomass components, successfully bioengineered FADase(F95L/D112N/V151I) from Enterobacter sp. Px6-4 could provide an ecofriendly biocatalytic tool for producing diverse styrene derivatives from biomass. PMID:26059194

  12. Down-regulation of dendritic spine and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 expressions in the reelin haploinsufficient heterozygous reeler mouse.

    PubMed

    Liu, W S; Pesold, C; Rodriguez, M A; Carboni, G; Auta, J; Lacor, P; Larson, J; Condie, B G; Guidotti, A; Costa, E

    2001-03-13

    Heterozygous reeler mice (HRM) haploinsufficient for reelin express approximately 50% of the brain reelin content of wild-type mice, but are phenotypically different from both wild-type mice and homozygous reeler mice. They exhibit, (i) a down-regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD(67))-positive neurons in some but not every cortical layer of frontoparietal cortex (FPC), (ii) an increase of neuronal packing density and a decrease of cortical thickness because of neuropil hypoplasia, (iii) a decrease of dendritic spine expression density on basal and apical dendritic branches of motor FPC layer III pyramidal neurons, and (iv) a similar decrease in dendritic spines expressed on the basal dendrite branches of CA1 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. To establish whether the defect of GAD(67) down-regulation observed in HRM is responsible for neuropil hypoplasia and decreased dendritic spine density, we studied heterozygous GAD(67) knockout mice (HG(67)M). These mice exhibited a down-regulation of GAD(67) mRNA expression in FPC (about 50%), but they expressed normal amounts of reelin and had no neuropil hypoplasia or down-regulation of dendritic spine expression. These findings, coupled with electron-microscopic observations that reelin colocalizes with integrin receptors on dendritic spines, suggest that reelin may be a factor in the dynamic expression of cortical dendritic spines perhaps by promoting integrin receptor clustering. These findings are interesting because the brain neurochemical and neuroanatomical phenotypic traits exhibited by the HRM are in several ways similar to those found in postmortem brains of psychotic patients.

  13. Down-regulation of dendritic spine and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 expressions in the reelin haploinsufficient heterozygous reeler mouse

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen Sheng; Pesold, Christine; Rodriguez, Miguel A.; Carboni, Giovanni; Auta, James; Lacor, Pascal; Larson, John; Condie, Brian G.; Guidotti, Alessandro; Costa, Erminio

    2001-01-01

    Heterozygous reeler mice (HRM) haploinsufficient for reelin express ≈50% of the brain reelin content of wild-type mice, but are phenotypically different from both wild-type mice and homozygous reeler mice. They exhibit, (i) a down-regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67)-positive neurons in some but not every cortical layer of frontoparietal cortex (FPC), (ii) an increase of neuronal packing density and a decrease of cortical thickness because of neuropil hypoplasia, (iii) a decrease of dendritic spine expression density on basal and apical dendritic branches of motor FPC layer III pyramidal neurons, and (iv) a similar decrease in dendritic spines expressed on the basal dendrite branches of CA1 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. To establish whether the defect of GAD67 down-regulation observed in HRM is responsible for neuropil hypoplasia and decreased dendritic spine density, we studied heterozygous GAD67 knockout mice (HG67M). These mice exhibited a down-regulation of GAD67 mRNA expression in FPC (about 50%), but they expressed normal amounts of reelin and had no neuropil hypoplasia or down-regulation of dendritic spine expression. These findings, coupled with electron-microscopic observations that reelin colocalizes with integrin receptors on dendritic spines, suggest that reelin may be a factor in the dynamic expression of cortical dendritic spines perhaps by promoting integrin receptor clustering. These findings are interesting because the brain neurochemical and neuroanatomical phenotypic traits exhibited by the HRM are in several ways similar to those found in postmortem brains of psychotic patients. PMID:11248103

  14. Crystal Structures of Apo and Liganded 4-Oxalocrotonate Decarboxylase Uncover a Structural Basis for the Metal-Assisted Decarboxylation of a Vinylogous β-Keto Acid.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Samuel L; Coitinho, Juliana B; Costa, Débora M A; Araújo, Simara S; Whitman, Christian P; Nagem, Ronaldo A P

    2016-05-10

    The enzymes in the catechol meta-fission pathway have been studied for more than 50 years in several species of bacteria capable of degrading a number of aromatic compounds. In a related pathway, naphthalene, a toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, is fully degraded to intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle by the soil bacteria Pseudomonas putida G7. In this organism, the 83 kb NAH7 plasmid carries several genes involved in this biotransformation process. One enzyme in this route, NahK, a 4-oxalocrotonate decarboxylase (4-OD), converts 2-oxo-3-hexenedioate to 2-hydroxy-2,4-pentadienoate using Mg(2+) as a cofactor. Efforts to study how 4-OD catalyzes this decarboxylation have been hampered because 4-OD is present in a complex with vinylpyruvate hydratase (VPH), which is the next enzyme in the same pathway. For the first time, a monomeric, stable, and active 4-OD has been expressed and purified in the absence of VPH. Crystal structures for NahK in the apo form and bonded with five substrate analogues were obtained using two distinct crystallization conditions. Analysis of the crystal structures implicates a lid domain in substrate binding and suggests roles for specific residues in a proposed reaction mechanism. In addition, we assign a possible function for the NahK N-terminal domain, which differs from most of the other members of the fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase superfamily. Although the structural basis for metal-dependent β-keto acid decarboxylases has been reported, this is the first structural report for that of a vinylogous β-keto acid decarboxylase and the first crystal structure of a 4-OD. PMID:27082660

  15. HosA, a MarR Family Transcriptional Regulator, Represses Nonoxidative Hydroxyarylic Acid Decarboxylase Operon and Is Modulated by 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Roy, Ajit; Ranjan, Akash

    2016-02-23

    Members of the Multiple antibiotic resistance Regulator (MarR) family of DNA binding proteins regulate transcription of a wide array of genes required for virulence and pathogenicity of bacteria. The present study reports the molecular characterization of HosA (Homologue of SlyA), a MarR protein, with respect to its target gene, DNA recognition motif, and nature of its ligand. Through a comparative genomics approach, we demonstrate that hosA is in synteny with nonoxidative hydroxyarylic acid decarboxylase (HAD) operon and is present exclusively within the mutS-rpoS polymorphic region in nine different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. Using molecular biology and biochemical approach, we demonstrate that HosA binds to a palindromic sequence downstream to the transcription start site of divergently transcribed nonoxidative HAD operon and represses its expression. Furthermore, in silico analysis showed that the recognition motif for HosA is highly conserved in the upstream region of divergently transcribed operon in different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. A systematic chemical search for the physiological ligand revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA) interacts with HosA and derepresses HosA mediated repression of the nonoxidative HAD operon. Based on our study, we propose a model for molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of nonoxidative HAD operon by HosA in Enterobacteriaceae family. PMID:26818787

  16. Role of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 in regulating cortical parvalbumin and GABA membrane transporter 1 expression: Implications for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Curley, Allison A.; Eggan, Stephen M.; Lazarus, Matt S.; Huang, Z. Josh; Volk, David W.; Lewis, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Markers of GABA neurotransmission are altered in multiple regions of the neocortex in individuals with schizophrenia. Lower levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) mRNA and protein, which is responsible for most cortical GABA synthesis, are accompanied by lower levels of GABA membrane transporter 1 (GAT1) mRNA. These alterations are thought to be most prominent in the parvalbumin (PV)-containing subclass of interneurons, which also contain lower levels of PV mRNA. Since GAT1 and PV each reduce the availability of GABA at postsynaptic receptors, lower levels of GAT1 and PV mRNAs have been hypothesized to represent compensatory responses to an upstream reduction in cortical GABA synthesis in schizophrenia. However, such cause-and-effect hypotheses cannot be directly tested in a human illness. Consequently, we used two mouse models with reduced GAD67 expression specifically in PV neurons (PVGAD67+/−) or in all interneurons (GABAGAD67+/−) and quantified GAD67, GAT1 and PV mRNA levels using methods identical to those employed in studies of schizophrenia. Cortical levels of PV or GAT1 mRNAs were not altered in PVGAD67+/− mice during postnatal development or in adulthood. Furthermore, cellular analyses confirmed the predicted reduction in GAD67 mRNA, but failed to show a deficit in PV mRNA in these animals. Levels of PV and GAT1 mRNAs were also unaltered in GABAGAD67+/− mice. Thus, mouse lines with cortical reductions in GAD67 mRNA that match or exceed those present in schizophrenia, and that differ in the developmental timing and cell typespecificity of the GAD67 deficit, failed to provide proof-of-concept evidence that lower PV and GAT1 expression in schizophrenia are a consequence of lower GAD67 expression. Together, these findings suggest that the correlated decrements in cortical GAD67, PV and GAT1 mRNAs in schizophrenia may be a common consequence of some other upstream factor. PMID:23103418

  17. Progesterone receptor isoforms differentially regulate the expression of tryptophan and tyrosine hydroxylase and glutamic acid decarboxylase in the rat hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    González-Flores, Oscar; Gómora-Arrati, Porfirio; García-Juárez, Marcos; Miranda-Martínez, Alfredo; Armengual-Villegas, Alejandra; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Guerra-Araiza, Christian

    2011-10-01

    Progesterone exerts a variety of actions in the brain through the interaction with its receptors (PR) which have two isoforms with different function and regulation: PR-A and PR-B. Progesterone may modulate neurotransmission by regulating the expression of neurotransmitters synthesizing enzymes or their receptors in several brain regions. The role of PR isoforms in this modulation is unknown. We explored the role of PR isoforms in the regulation of tryptophan (TPH) and tyrosine (TH) hydroxylase, and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) expression in the hypothalamus of ovariectomized rats. Two weeks after ovariectomy, animals were subcutaneously injected with 5 μg of estradiol benzoate (EB), and 40 h later, progesterone (P) was intracerebroventricularly (ICV) injected. Each animal received two ICV injections of 1 μg/μl (4 nmol) of PR-B and total PR (PR-A+PR-B) sense or antisense (As) oligonucleotides (ODNs). First injection was made immediately before sc EB injection, and 24h later animals received the second one. Twenty-four hours after P administration, rats were euthanized and brains removed to measure the expression of PR-A and PR-B, TPH, TH and GAD by Western blot. We observed that sense ODNs modified neither PR isoforms nor enzymes expression in the hypothalamus, whereas PR A+B antisense (PR A+B As) clearly decreased the expression of both PR isoforms in this region. ICV administration of PR-B As only decreased PR-B isoform expression with no significant effects on PR-A expression. A differential protein expression of TPH, TH and GAD was observed after PR isoforms antisense administration. PR-B As administration decreased the expression of TPH (65% with respect to control). In contrast, PR A+B As and PR-B As administration increased (51.6% and 34.4%, respectively) TH expression. The administration of PR A+B As and PR-B As diminished GAD expression (33.4% and 41.6%, respectively). Our findings indicate that PR isoforms play a differential role in the

  18. Dual mechanisms regulating glutamate decarboxylases and accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves exposed to multiple stresses.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xin; Chen, Yiyong; Zhang, Lingyun; Fu, Xiumin; Wei, Qing; Grierson, Don; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Yahui; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. It has multiple positive effects on mammalian physiology and is an important bioactive component of tea (Camellia sinensis). GABA generally occurs at a very low level in plants but GABA content increases substantially after exposure to a range of stresses, especially oxygen-deficiency. During processing of tea leaves, a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage are essential for the high accumulation of GABA. This is believed to be initiated by a change in glutamate decarboxylase activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the present study we characterized factors regulating the expression and activity of three tea glutamate decarboxylase genes (CsGAD1, 2, and 3), and their encoded enzymes. The results suggests that, unlike the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there are dual mechanisms regulating the accumulation of GABA in tea leaves exposed to multiple stresses, including activation of CsGAD1 enzymatic activity by calmodulin upon the onset of the stress and accumulation of high levels of CsGAD2 mRNA induced by a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage. PMID:27021285

  19. Dual mechanisms regulating glutamate decarboxylases and accumulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves exposed to multiple stresses

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Xin; Chen, Yiyong; Zhang, Lingyun; Fu, Xiumin; Wei, Qing; Grierson, Don; Zhou, Ying; Huang, Yahui; Dong, Fang; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is one of the major inhibitory neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. It has multiple positive effects on mammalian physiology and is an important bioactive component of tea (Camellia sinensis). GABA generally occurs at a very low level in plants but GABA content increases substantially after exposure to a range of stresses, especially oxygen-deficiency. During processing of tea leaves, a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage are essential for the high accumulation of GABA. This is believed to be initiated by a change in glutamate decarboxylase activity, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. In the present study we characterized factors regulating the expression and activity of three tea glutamate decarboxylase genes (CsGAD1, 2, and 3), and their encoded enzymes. The results suggests that, unlike the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there are dual mechanisms regulating the accumulation of GABA in tea leaves exposed to multiple stresses, including activation of CsGAD1 enzymatic activity by calmodulin upon the onset of the stress and accumulation of high levels of CsGAD2 mRNA induced by a combination of anoxic stress and mechanical damage. PMID:27021285

  20. 4-Vinylphenol biosynthesis from cellulose as the sole carbon source using phenolic acid decarboxylase- and tyrosine ammonia lyase-expressing Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Noda, Shuhei; Kawai, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-03-01

    Streptomyces lividans was adopted as a host strain for 4-vinylphenol (4VPh) production directly from cellulose. In order to obtain novel phenolic acid decarboxylase (PAD) expressed in S. lividans, PADs distributed among Streptomyces species were screened. Three novel PADs, derived from Streptomycessviceus, Streptomyceshygroscopicus, and Streptomycescattleya, were successfully obtained and expressed in S. lividans. S. sviceus PAD (SsPAD) could convert p-hydroxycinnamic acid (pHCA) to 4VPh more efficiently than the others both in vitro and in vivo. For 4VPh production directly from cellulose, l-tyrosine ammonia lyase derived from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and SsPAD were introduced into endoglucanase-secreting S. lividans, and the 4VPh biosynthetic pathway was constructed therein. The created transformants successfully produced 4VPh directly from cellulose.

  1. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and glutamine synthetase (GS) in the area postrema of the cat. Light and electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, Fernando E.; Mehler, William R.; Gibbs, Michael A.; Eng, Lawrence F.; Wu, Jang-Yen

    1987-01-01

    Morphological evidence is presented of the existence of the putative neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in axon terminals and of glutamine synthetase (GS) in ependymoglial cells and astroglial components of the area postrema (AP) of the cat. Purified antiserum directed against the GABA biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and GS antiserum were used. The results showed that punctate structures of variable size corresponding to axon terminals exhibited GAD-immunoreactivity and were distributed in varying densities. The greatest accumulation occurred in the caudal and middle segment of the AP and particularly in the area subpostrema, where the aggregation of terminals was extremely dense. The presence of both GAD-immunoreactive profiles and GS-immunostained ependymoglial cells and astrocytes in the AP provide further evidence of the functional correlation between the two enzymes.

  2. GAD65 antibodies among Greenland Inuit and its relation to glucose intolerance.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Michael Lynge; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of circulating Glutamin-Acid-decarboxylase 65 antibodies in a sample of Greenlanders (Inuit) with clinically verified diabetes with samples of participants from a population survey. The study population included participants with known diabetes from a population-based study (sample 1) and patients with clinically verified diabetes in Nuuk Greenland (sample 2). In addition, age- and gender-matched participants from the population study without known diabetes were categorized in groups with (1) normal glucose tolerance test, (2) with impaired fasting glycemia, (3) with impaired glucose tolerance and (4) with previously unknown diabetes based on oral glucose tolerance test and were enrolled in the study. Presence of circulating Glutamin-Acid-decarboxylase 65 antibodies were measured in all participants. A total of 484 persons were enrolled in the study. Six individuals had circulating Glutamin-Acid-decarboxylase 65 antibodies: four of them had known diabetes, one had impaired glucose tolerance and one normal glucose tolerance test. The prevalence of circulating Glutamin-Acid-decarboxylase 65 antibodies among Greenlanders with diabetes was 4.3 % and less than 1 % among Greenlanders without diabetes (p = 0.001). The prevalence of circulating Glutamin-Acid-decarboxylase 65 antibodies among Greenlanders with and without diabetes is relatively low in a global perspective in accordance with one former study among Inuit. Autoimmune diabetes seems to be uncommon in Greenland .

  3. Efficient production of gamma-aminobutyric acid using Escherichia coli by co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter.

    PubMed

    Dung Pham, Van; Somasundaram, Sivachandiran; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is an important bio-product, which is used in pharmaceutical formulations, nutritional supplements, and biopolymer monomer. The traditional GABA process involves the decarboxylation of glutamate. However, the direct production of GABA from glucose is a more efficient process. To construct the recombinant strains of Escherichia coli, a novel synthetic scaffold was introduced. By carrying out the co-localization of glutamate synthase, glutamate decarboxylase, and GABA transporter, we redirected the TCA cycle flux to GABA pathway. The genetically engineered E. coli strain produced 1.08 g/L of GABA from 10 g/L of initial glucose. Thus, with the introduction of a synthetic scaffold, we increased GABA production by 2.2-fold. The final GABA concentration was increased by 21.8% by inactivating competing pathways.

  4. Production of gamma-aminobutyric acid from glucose by introduction of synthetic scaffolds between isocitrate dehydrogenase, glutamate synthase and glutamate decarboxylase in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pham, Van Dung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Si Jae; Hong, Soon Ho

    2015-08-10

    Escherichia coli were engineered for the direct production of gamma-aminobutyric acid from glucose by introduction of synthetic protein scaffold. In this study, three enzymes consisting GABA pathway (isocitrate dehydrogenase, glutamate synthase and glutamate decarboxylase) were connected via synthetic protein scaffold. By introduction of scaffold, 0.92g/L of GABA was produced from 10g/L of glucose while no GABA was produced in wild type E. coli. The optimum pH and temperature for GABA production were 4.5 and 30°C, respectively. When competing metabolic network was inactivated by knockout mutation, maximum GABA concentration of 1.3g/L was obtained from 10g/L glucose. The recombinant E. coli strain which produces GABA directly from glucose was successfully constructed by introduction of protein scaffold.

  5. Exogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) affects pollen tube growth via modulating putative Ca2+-permeable membrane channels and is coupled to negative regulation on glutamate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Hui; Zou, Jie; Feng, Jing; Peng, Xiong-Bo; Wu, Ju-You; Wu, Ying-Liang; Palanivelu, Ravishankar; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2014-07-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is implicated in pollen tube growth, but the molecular and cellular mechanisms that it mediates are largely unknown. Here, it is shown that exogenous GABA modulates putative Ca(2+)-permeable channels on the plasma membranes of tobacco pollen grains and pollen tubes. Whole-cell voltage-clamp experiments and non-invasive micromeasurement technology (NMT) revealed that the influx of Ca(2+) increases in pollen tubes in response to exogenous GABA. It is also demonstrated that glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting enzyme of GABA biosynthesis, is involved in feedback controls of Ca(2+)-permeable channels to fluctuate intracellular GABA levels and thus modulate pollen tube growth. The findings suggest that GAD activity linked with Ca(2+)-permeable channels relays an extracellular GABA signal and integrates multiple signal pathways to modulate tobacco pollen tube growth. Thus, the data explain how GABA mediates the communication between the style and the growing pollen tubes.

  6. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  7. Increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and glutamic acid decarboxylase in locus coeruleus neurons after rapid eye movement sleep deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, S; Mallick, B N

    2003-03-01

    Norepinephrine, acetylcholine and GABA levels alter during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and its deprivation. Increased synthesis of those neurotransmitters is necessary for their sustained release. Hence, in this study, the concentrations of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzymes responsible for their synthesis, were immunohistochemically estimated within the neurons in locus coeruleus, laterodorsal tegmentum and pedunculopontine tegmentum and medial preoptic area in REM sleep deprived and control rats. It was observed that as compared to controls, deprivation increased TH and GAD significantly in the locus coeruleus only, while in other areas, they remained unchanged. The findings help explaining the mechanism of increase in neurotransmitter levels in the brain after REM sleep deprivation and their significance has been discussed.

  8. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure Suppresses T-independent Antibody Responses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to  3.75mg/kg of perfluoroocatnoic acid (PFOA) for 15d suppresses T-dependent antibody responses (TDAR), suggesting that T helper cells and/or B cells/plasma cells may be impacted. This study evaluated effects of PFOA exposure on the T cell-independent antibody response...

  9. NF-Y binding is required for transactivation of neuronal aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase gene promoter by the POU-domain protein Brn-2.

    PubMed

    Dugast, C; Weber, M J

    2001-04-18

    We have previously characterized binding sites for the NF-Y transcription factor (-71/-52) and Brn-2 POU-domain protein (-92/-71) in the neuronal promoter of the human aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase gene [Mol. Brain Res. 56 (1998) 227]. We have now explored the functional role of these binding sites in transfected SK-N-BE neuroblastoma cells. Mutations of the NF-Y site that abolish binding depressed expression of a luciferase reporter gene up to 25-fold. The overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of NF-YA subunit depressed expression by 60%. Promoter activity was increased by the overexpression of Brn-2. Mutations or deletion of the binding site of Brn-2 did not suppress transcriptional activation by overexpressed Brn-2, while promoters defective in NF-Y binding were not transactivated by Brn-2. A GST-pulldown experiment showed that recombinant human Brn-2 protein weakly interacts with recombinant NF-Y outside of DNA. Cooperative binding of recombinant NF-Y and GST--Brn-2 proteins on the neuronal promoter was evidenced by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The POU-domain of Brn-2 was sufficient for such interaction. The results thus suggest that the activation of the neuronal promoter of the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase gene requires a direct interaction between the ubiquitous NF-Y factor and a cell-specific POU-domain protein. The NF-Y, but not the Brn-2 binding site, is essential for the recruitment of the NF-Y/Brn-2 complex on the promoter. PMID:11311976

  10. T-cell reactivity to glutamic acid decarboxylase in stiff-man syndrome and cerebellar ataxia associated with polyendocrine autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Costa, M; Saiz, A; Casamitjana, R; Castañer, M FernÁndez; SanmartÍ, A; Graus, F; Jaraquemada, D

    2002-01-01

    Antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxilase (GAD-Abs) are present in the serum of 60–80% of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes (DM1) patients and patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome (APS) associated with DM1. Higher titre of GAD-Abs are also present in the serum of 60% of patients with stiff-man syndrome (SMS) and all reported patients with cerebellar ataxia associated with polyendocrine autoimmunity (CAPA). Several studies suggest that GAD-Abs may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of SMS and CAPA but little is known about T-cell responsiveness to GAD-65 in these neurological diseases. To analyse cell-mediated responses to GAD, we studied the peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine responses to recombinant human GAD-65 in 5 patients with SMS, 6 with CAPA, 9 with DM1, 8 with APS and 15 control subjects. GAD-65-specific cellular proliferation was significantly higher in SMS than in CAPA, DM1, APS or controls. In contrast, only T cells from CAPA patients showed a significantly high production of interferon-γ after GAD stimulation, compared to all other patients and controls. No differences were found for IL-4 production. These results suggest that, despite similar humoral autoreactivity, cellular responses to GAD are different between SMS and CAPA, with a greater inflammatory response in CAPA, and this difference may be relevant to the pathogenesis of these diseases. PMID:12197888

  11. Antibody-specific model of amino acid substitution for immunological inferences from alignments of antibody sequences.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in

  12. Tomato aromatic amino acid decarboxylases participate in synthesis of the flavor volatiles 2-phenylethanol and 2-phenylacetaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Tieman, Denise; Taylor, Mark; Schauer, Nicolas; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Hanson, Andrew D.; Klee, Harry J.

    2006-01-01

    An important phenylalanine-derived volatile compound produced by plants is 2-phenylethanol. It is a major contributor to flavor in many foods, including fresh fruits, such as tomato, and an insect-attracting scent in roses and many other flowers. Despite the centrality of 2-phenylethanol to flavor and fragrance, the plant genes responsible for its synthesis have not been identified. Here, we describe a biosynthetic pathway for 2-phenylethanol and other phenylalanine-derived volatiles in tomato fruits and a small family of decarboxylases (LeAADC1A, LeAADC1B, and LeAADC2) that can mediate that pathway's first step. These enzymes each catalyze conversion of phenylalanine to phenethylamine and tyrosine to tyramine. Although tyrosine is the preferred substrate in vitro, phenylalanine levels in tomato fruits far exceed those of tyrosine, indicating that phenylalanine is a physiological substrate. Consistent with this view, overexpression of either LeAADC1A or LeAADC2 in transgenic tomato plants resulted in fruits with up to 10-fold increased emissions of the products of the pathway, including 2-phenylacetaldehyde, 2-phenylethanol, and 1-nitro-2-phenylethane. Further, antisense reduction of LeAADC2 significantly reduced emissions of these volatiles. Besides establishing a biosynthetic route, these results show that it is possible to change phenylalanine-based flavor and aroma volatiles in plants by manipulating expression of a single gene. PMID:16698923

  13. Efficient gamma-aminobutyric acid bioconversion by employing synthetic complex between glutamate decarboxylase and glutamate/GABA antiporter in engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Le Vo, Tam Dinh; Ko, Ji-seun; Park, Si Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hong, Soon Ho

    2013-08-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a precursor of one of the most promising heat-resistant biopolymers, Nylon-4, and can be produced by the decarboxylation of monosodium glutamate (MSG). In this study, a synthetic protein complex was applied to improve the GABA conversion in engineered Escherichia coli. Complexes were constructed by assembling a single protein-protein interaction domain SH3 to the glutamate decarboxylase (GadA and GadB) and attaching a cognate peptide ligand to the glutamate/GABA antiporter (GadC) at the N-terminus, C-terminus, and the 233rd amino acid residue. When GadA and GadC were co-overexpressed via the C-terminus complex, a GABA concentration of 5.65 g/l was obtained from 10 g/l MSG, which corresponds to a GABA yield of 93 %. A significant increase of the GABA productivity was also observed where the GABA productivity increased 2.5-fold in the early culture period due to the introduction of the synthetic protein complex. The GABA pathway efficiency and GABA productivity were enhanced by the introduction of the complex between Gad and glutamate/GABA antiporter.

  14. Glutamic acid decarboxylase activity is stimulated in quail retina neuronal cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus and is regulated by pp60v-src.

    PubMed Central

    Crisanti, P; Lorinet, A M; Calothy, G; Pessac, B

    1985-01-01

    Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) stimulates in quail embryo neuro-retina (NR) cultures the specific activity of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid, a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in NR and in central nervous system. In quail embryo NR cultures transformed by ts NY-68, a thermodependent transformation-defective mutant of RSV, stimulation of GAD activity is regulated by pp60v-src, the product of the src gene of RSV. Fibroblasts and myoblasts have a very low GAD activity that is not stimulated after transformation by RSV. Neuronal clones, previously derived from ts NY-68-transformed established NR cell lines, have a high GAD activity which is regulated by pp60v-src, while other clones have a low GAD activity apparently not regulated by pp60v-src. These data indicate that pp60v-src selectively activates the expression of GAD in distinct neuronal cells of quail embryo NR cultures transformed by RSV. GAD activity is also stimulated in NR cells infected with viruses containing v-mil. PMID:2992933

  15. [Critical amino acids of ornitin decarboxylase degron: the presence and C-terminal arrangement is insufficient for alfa-fetoprotein degradation].

    PubMed

    Morozov, A V; Timofeev, A V; Morozov, V A; Karpov, V L

    2011-01-01

    Mouse ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) degrades in proteasome in an ubiquitin-independent manner with an averagehalf-life of 2 h. The 37 amino acid long C-terminal fragment known as a degradation signal (degron) is responsible for the effective degradation of ODC. Recently, amino acids being critical for degradation in the ODC-degron have been mapped. Mutations of Cys441 and Ala442 led to protein stabilization, while a substitution of other amino acids composing ODC-degron had almost no effect on the protein turnover; whereas insertions or deletions in region between Ala442 and ODC C-terminus diminished greatly rate of protein degradation, e.g. positioning of the key amino acids from the C-terminus was shown to be crucial. Using these data we introduced both key amino acids into the alfa-fetoprotein with truncated exportation signal (deltaAFP), at the same distance from the C-terminus as they being in the ODC (deltaAFPCAG and deltaAFPLCAG). Removal of N-terminal exportation signal prevented secretion of modified proteins. Using in silico approach we demonstrated no significant difference in hydrophobicity or secondary structure between C-terminus of deltaAFP and mutated proteins. The degradation kinetics of deltaAFP, deltaAFPCAG, deltaAFPLCAG in cyloheximide-chase and proteasome inhibition assay (using MG132) was identical. Obtained results suggest that introduced substitutions are insufficient for effective recognition of mutated deltaAFP by26S proteasome. We assume thatadditional amino aci ds composing ODC-degron or their combine action could also affect degradation. Besides that, one cannot exclude that conformation of the mutated deltaAFP limits its C-terminus accessibility to proteasome. PMID:21790016

  16. Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 and Islet Cell Antigen 512/IA-2 Autoantibodies in Relation to Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II DR and DQ Alleles and Haplotypes in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stayoussef, Mouna; Benmansour, Jihen; Al-Jenaidi, Fayza A.; Said, Hichem B.; Rayana, Chiheb B.; Mahjoub, Touhami; Almawi, Wassim Y.

    2011-01-01

    The frequencies of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and islet cell antigen (ICA) 512/IA-2 (512/IA-2) are functions of the specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). We investigated the association of HLA class II (DR and DQ) alleles and haplotypes with the presence of GAD and IA-2 autoantibodies in T1D. Autoantibodies were tested in 88 Tunisian T1D patients and 112 age- and gender-matched normoglycemic control subjects by enzyme immunoassay. Among T1D patients, mean anti-GAD antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*030101 allele (P < 0.001), together with the DRB1*030101/DQB1*0201 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.002) haplotypes, while lower anti-GAD titers were associated with the DRB1*070101 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) alleles and DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.001) haplotypes. Mean anti-IA-2 antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*040101 allele (P = 0.007) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.001) haplotypes but were lower in the DRB1*110101 allele (P = 0.010) and the DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.025) haplotypes. Multinomial regression analysis confirmed the positive association of DRB1*030101 and the negative association of DRB1*110101 and DQB1*030101, along with the DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 haplotypes, with anti-GAD levels. In contrast, only the DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 haplotype was positively associated with altered anti-IA-2 titers. Increased GAD65 and IA-2 antibody positivity is differentially associated with select HLA class II alleles and haplotypes, confirming the heterogeneous nature of T1D. PMID:21490167

  17. Role of the NR2A/2B subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in glutamate-induced glutamic acid decarboxylase alteration in cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Monnerie, H; Hsu, F-C; Coulter, D A; Le Roux, P D

    2010-12-29

    The vulnerability of brain neuronal cell subpopulations to neurologic insults varies greatly. Among cells that survive a pathological insult, for example ischemia or brain trauma, some may undergo morphological and/or biochemical changes that may compromise brain function. The present study is a follow-up of our previous studies that investigated the effect of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity on the GABA synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65/67)'s expression in surviving DIV 11 cortical GABAergic neurons in vitro [Monnerie and Le Roux, (2007) Exp Neurol 205:367-382, (2008) Exp Neurol 213:145-153]. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated decrease in GAD expression was found following glutamate exposure. Here we examined which NMDAR subtype(s) mediated the glutamate-induced change in GAD protein levels. Western blotting techniques on cortical neuron cultures showed that glutamate's effect on GAD proteins was not altered by NR2B-containing diheteromeric (NR1/NR2B) receptor blockade. By contrast, blockade of triheteromeric (NR1/NR2A/NR2B) receptors fully protected against a decrease in GAD protein levels following glutamate exposure. When receptor location on the postsynaptic membrane was examined, extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was observed to be sufficient to decrease GAD protein levels similar to that observed after glutamate bath application. Blocking diheteromeric receptors prevented glutamate's effect on GAD proteins after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation. Finally, NR2B subunit examination with site-specific antibodies demonstrated a glutamate-induced, calpain-mediated alteration in NR2B expression. These results suggest that glutamate-induced excitotoxic NMDAR stimulation in cultured GABAergic cortical neurons depends upon subunit composition and receptor location (synaptic vs. extrasynaptic) on the neuronal membrane. Biochemical alterations in surviving cortical GABAergic neurons in various disease states may contribute to the altered

  18. Molecular cloning of genomic DNA and chromosomal assignment of the gene for human aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, the enzyme for catecholamine and serotonin biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi-Ichinose, Chiho ); Ichinose, Hiroshi; Nagatsu, Toshiharu ); Takahashi, Eiichi; Hori, Tadaaki )

    1992-03-03

    Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) catalyzes the decarboxylation of both L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and L-5-hydroxytryptophan to dopamine and serotonin, respectively, which are major mammalian neurotransmitters and hormones belonging to catecholamines and indoleamines. This report describes the organization of the human AADC gene. The authors proved that the gene of human AADC consists of 15 exons spanning more than 85 kilobases and exists as a single copy in the haploid genome. The boundaries between exon and intron followed the AG/GT rule. The sizes of exons and introns ranged from 20 to 400 bp and from 1.0 to 17.7 kb, respectively, while the sizes of four introns were not determined. Untranslated regions located in the 5{prime} region of mRNA were encoded by two exons, exons 1 and 2. The transcriptional starting point was determined around G at position {minus}111 by primer extension and S1 mapping. There were no typical TATA box' and CAAT box' within 540 bp from the transcriptional starting point. The human AADC gene was mapped to chromosome band 7p12.1-p12.3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization. This is the first report on the genomic structure and chromosomal localization of the AADC gene in mammals.

  19. Characterization of CD4+ T cells specific for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and proinsulin in a patient with stiff-person syndrome but without type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hänninen, Arno; Soilu-Hänninen, Merja; Hampe, Christiane S.; Deptula, Angie; Geubtner, Kelly; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Reijonen, Helena

    2010-01-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase GAD is a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of GABA and an important autoantigen in both type 1 diabetes (T1D) and in stiff-person syndrome (SPS). Autoantibodies (GADA) to the 65kD isoform of GAD are a characteristic feature in both diseases. Approximately 30% of SPS patients develop diabetes, yet, it is unclear to which extent co-existing autoimmunity to GAD65 and other islet autoantigens determines the risk of developing T1D. In this study we monitored CD4+ T-cell responses to GAD65 and proinsulin in a patient with SPS who remained normoglycemic during the 46-month follow-up. Fluctuating but persistent T-cell reactivity to GAD65 was identified, as well as T-cell reactivity to proinsulin at one time point. The majority of the T-cell clones isolated from the SPS patient produced high levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-13, IL-5 and IL-4). We also examined levels of GADA, insulin and IA-2 autoantibodies, and epitope specificity of GADA. In both serum and cerebrospinal fluid GADA levels were high, and GADA persisted throughout the follow-up. Despite T-cell reactivity to both GAD65 and proinsulin, autoantibodies to other islet autoantigens did not develop. Further follow-up will determine whether or not the beta-cell autoimmunity observed in this patient will eventually lead to T1D. PMID:20503259

  20. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and substance P in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis: Effects of vagal stimulation on GAD immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Gibbs, M. A.; Mehler, W. R.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of its biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the neuropeptide substance P in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), and gelatinous nucleus (GEL). In addition, electrical stimulation was applied to the night vagus nerve at the cervical level to assess the effects on GAD-immunoreactivity (GAR-IR). GAD-IR terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. They showed pronounced density at the level of the ASP and gradual decrease towards the solitary complex. Nerve cells were not labelled in our preparations. Ultrastructural studies showed symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contracts between labelled terminals and non-immunoreactive dendrites, axons, or neurons. Some of the labelled terminals contained both clear- and dense-core vesicles. Our preliminary findings, after electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, revealed a bilateral decrease of GAD-IR that was particularly evident at the level of the ASP. SP-immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed varying densities in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. In our preparations, the lateral sub-division of the NTS showed the greatest accumulation. The ASP showed medium density of immunoreactive varicosities and terminals and the AP and GEL displayed scattered varicose axon terminals. The electron microscopy revealed that all immunoreactive terminals contained clear-core vesicles which make symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contact with unlabelled dendrites. It is suggested that the GABAergic terminals might correspond to vagal afferent projections and that GAD/GABA and substance P might be co-localized in the same terminal allowing the possibility of a regulated release of the transmitters in relation to demands.

  1. High-yield production of vanillin from ferulic acid by a coenzyme-independent decarboxylase/oxygenase two-stage process.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Miura, Misa; Kuroiwa, Mari; Kino, Kuniki

    2015-05-25

    Vanillin is one of the world's most important flavor and fragrance compounds in foods and cosmetics. Recently, we demonstrated that vanillin could be produced from ferulic acid via 4-vinylguaiacol in a coenzyme-independent manner using the decarboxylase Fdc and the oxygenase Cso2. In this study, we investigated a new two-pot bioprocess for vanillin production using the whole-cell catalyst of Escherichia coli expressing Fdc in the first stage and that of E. coli expressing Cso2 in the second stage. We first optimized the second-step Cso2 reaction from 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin, a rate-determining step for the production of vanillin. Addition of FeCl2 to the cultivation medium enhanced the activity of the resulting E. coli cells expressing Cso2, an iron protein belonging to the carotenoid cleavage oxygenase family. Furthermore, a butyl acetate-water biphasic system was effective in improving the production of vanillin. Under the optimized conditions, we attempted to produce vanillin from ferulic acid by a two-pot bioprocess on a flask scale. In the first stage, E. coli cells expressing Fdc rapidly decarboxylated ferulic acid and completely converted 75 mM of this substrate to 4-vinylguaiacol within 2 h at pH 9.0. After the first-stage reaction, cells were removed from the reaction mixture by centrifugation, and the pH of the resulting supernatant was adjusted to 10.5, the optimal pH for Cso2. This solution was subjected to the second-stage reaction. In the second stage, E. coli cells expressing Cso2 efficiently oxidized 4-vinylguaiacol to vanillin. The concentration of vanillin reached 52 mM (7.8 g L(-1)) in 24 h, which is the highest level attained to date for the biotechnological production of vanillin using recombinant cells.

  2. A monoclonal antibody against the plant growth regulator, abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Banowetz, G M; Hess, J R; Carman, J G

    1994-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against the plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA) conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin through C-4. One of these antibodies was characterized for use in a competition fluorescence enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (F-ELISA). The antibody detected femtomole quantities of ABA when used in the F-ELISA and showed minimal cross-reactivity with ABA metabolites and structural analogs. Dilution analysis suggested that the F-ELISA could be used to determine the ABA content of methanolic extracts of crude samples of wheat seeds without further purification. The F-ELISA was used to determine the effect of seed priming on ABA levels in wheat seeds. The antibody also was used in a modified noncompetitive indirect ELISA to measure ABA content of wheat caryopses. The noncompetitive ELISA was more sensitive than the F-ELISA, although the F-ELISA had a broader measuring range. When our anti-ABA antibody and a commercially available anti-ABA antibody were compared by indirect ELISA, there were no significant differences between the ABA estimates.

  3. Enhancement of γ-aminobutyric acid production in recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum by co-expressing two glutamate decarboxylase genes from Lactobacillus brevis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Jiang, Junjun; Li, Yongfu; Li, Youxin; Xie, Yilong

    2013-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), a non-protein amino acid, is a bioactive component in the food, feed and pharmaceutical fields. To establish an effective single-step production system for GABA, a recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum strain co-expressing two glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) genes (gadB1 and gadB2) derived from Lactobacillus brevis Lb85 was constructed. Compared with the GABA production of the gadB1 or gadB2 single-expressing strains, GABA production by the gadB1-gadB2 co-expressing strain increased more than twofold. By optimising urea supplementation, the total production of L-glutamate and GABA increased from 22.57 ± 1.24 to 30.18 ± 1.33 g L⁻¹, and GABA production increased from 4.02 ± 0.95 to 18.66 ± 2.11 g L⁻¹ after 84-h cultivation. Under optimal urea supplementation, L-glutamate continued to be consumed, GABA continued to accumulate after 36 h of fermentation, and the pH level fluctuated. GABA production increased to a maximum level of 27.13 ± 0.54 g L⁻¹ after 120-h flask cultivation and 26.32 g L⁻¹ after 60-h fed-batch fermentation. The conversion ratio of L-glutamate to GABA reached 0.60-0.74 mol mol⁻¹. By co-expressing gadB1 and gadB2 and optimising the urea addition method, C. glutamicum was genetically improved for de novo biosynthesis of GABA from its own accumulated L-glutamate.

  4. The influence of the cell free solution of lactic acid bacteria on tyramine production by food borne-pathogens in tyrosine decarboxylase broth.

    PubMed

    Toy, Nurten; Özogul, Fatih; Özogul, Yesim

    2015-04-15

    The function of cell-free solutions (CFSs) of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on tyramine and other biogenic amine production by different food borne-pathogens (FBPs) was investigated in tyrosine decarboxylase broth (TDB) using HPLC. Cell free solutions were prepared from four LAB strains. Two different concentrations which were 50% (5 ml CFS+5 ml medium/1:1) and 25% (2.5 ml CFS+7.5 ml medium/1:3) CFS and the control without CFS were prepared. Both concentration of CFS of Streptococcus thermophilus and 50% CFS of Pediococcus acidophilus inhibited tyramine production up to 98% by Salmonella paratyphi A. Tyramine production by Escherichia coli was also inhibited by 50% CFS of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and 25% CFS of Leuconostoc lactis. subsp. cremoris. The inhibitor effect of 50% CFS of P. acidophilus was the highest on tyramine production (55%) by Listeria monocytogenes, following Lc. lactis subsp. lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris (20%) whilst 25% CFS of Leu. mes. subsp. cremoris and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis showed stimulator effects (160%). The stimulation effects of 50% CFS of S. thermophilus and Lc. lactis subsp. lactis were more than 70% by Staphylococcus aureus comparing to the control. CFS of LAB strains showed statistically inhibitor effect since lactic acid inhibited microbial growth, decreased pH quickly and reduced the formation of AMN and BAs. Consequently, in order to avoid the formation of high concentrations of biogenic amines in fermented food by bacteria, it is advisable to use CFS for food and food products.

  5. Environmental stress causes oxidative damage to plant mitochondria leading to inhibition of glycine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicolas L; Day, David A; Millar, A Harvey

    2002-11-01

    A cytotoxic product of lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), rapidly inhibited glycine, malate/pyruvate, and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent O2 consumption by pea leaf mitochondria. Dose- and time-dependence of inhibition showed that glycine oxidation was the most severely affected with a K(0.5) of 30 microm. Several mitochondrial proteins containing lipoic acid moieties differentially lost their reactivity to a lipoic acid antibody following HNE treatment. The most dramatic loss of antigenicity was seen with the 17-kDa glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) H-protein, which was correlated with the loss of glycine-dependent O2 consumption. Paraquat treatment of pea seedlings induced lipid peroxidation, which resulted in the rapid loss of glycine-dependent respiration and loss of H-protein reactivity with lipoic acid antibodies. Pea plants exposed to chilling and water deficit responded similarly. In contrast, the damage to other lipoic acid-containing mitochondrial enzymes was minor under these conditions. The implication of the acute sensitivity of glycine decarboxylase complex H-protein to lipid peroxidation products is discussed in the context of photorespiration and potential repair mechanisms in plant mitochondria.

  6. Mechanism of lysergic acid diethylamide interference with rabbit antibody biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Voss, E W; Winkelhake, J L

    1974-04-01

    Lymphoid cells from hyperimmune rabbits producing antibodies to a hapten, incubated in the presence of d-lysergic acid diethylamide, continued to synthesize protein at a normal rate. Isoelectric focusing analysis of the low-molecular-weight protein secreted by the cells incubated with lysergic acid diethylamide indicated two components, with pI's of 4.9 and 5.2. Immune cells not exposed to lysergic acid diethylamide secreted only 7S IgG molecules with an average pI of approximately 7.0.

  7. Differential gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase and type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase in basal ganglia, thalamus, and hypothalamus of the monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.L.; Isackson, P.J.; Hendry, S.H.; Jones, E.G. )

    1991-06-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry, using cRNA probes, revealed a complementarity in the distributions of cells in the basal ganglia, basal nucleus of Meynert, thalamus, hypothalamus, and rostral part of the midbrain that showed gene expression for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or the alpha-subunit of type II calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CAM II kinase-alpha). Cells in certain nuclei such as the thalamic reticular nucleus, globus pallidus, and pars reticulata of the substantia nigra show GAD gene expression only; others in nuclei such as the basal nucleus of Meynert, medial mamillary nuclei, and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei show CAM II kinase-alpha gene expression only. A few nuclei, for example, the pars compacta of the substantia nigra and the greater part of the subthalamic nucleus, display gene expression for neither GAD nor CAM II kinase-alpha. In other nuclei, notably those of the dorsal thalamus, and possibly in the striatum, GAD- and CAM II kinase-expressing cells appear to form two separate populations that, in most thalamic nuclei, together account for the total cell population. In situ hybridization reveals large amounts of CAM II kinase-alpha mRNA in the neuropil of most nuclei containing CAM II kinase-alpha-positive cells, suggesting its association with dendritic polyribosomes. The message may thus be translated at those sites, close to the synapses with which the protein is associated. The in situ hybridization results, coupled with those from immunocytochemical staining for CAM II kinase-alpha protein, indicate that CAM II kinase-alpha is commonly found in certain non-GABAergic afferent fiber systems but is not necessarily present in the postsynaptic cells on which they terminate. It appears to be absent from most GABAergic fiber systems but can be present in the cells on which they terminate.

  8. Tomato Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes SlGAD2 and SlGAD3 Play Key Roles in Regulating γ-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Takayama, Mariko; Koike, Satoshi; Kusano, Miyako; Matsukura, Chiaki; Saito, Kazuki; Ariizumi, Tohru; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) can accumulate relatively high levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during fruit development. However, the molecular mechanism underlying GABA accumulation and its physiological function in tomato fruits remain elusive. We previously identified three tomato genes (SlGAD1, SlGAD2 and SlGAD3) encoding glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), likely the key enzyme for GABA biosynthesis in tomato fruits. In this study, we generated transgenic tomato plants in which each SlGAD was suppressed and those in which all three SlGADs were simultaneously suppressed. A significant decrease in GABA levels, i.e. 50-81% compared with wild-type (WT) levels, was observed in mature green (MG) fruits of the SlGAD2-suppressed lines, while a more drastic reduction (up to <10% of WT levels) was observed in the SlGAD3- and triple SlGAD-suppressed lines. These findings suggest that both SlGAD2 and SlGAD3 expression are crucial for GABA biosynthesis in tomato fruits. The importance of SlGAD3 expression was also confirmed by generating transgenic tomato plants that over-expressed SlGAD3. The MG and red fruits of the over-expressing transgenic lines contained higher levels of GABA (2.7- to 5.2-fold) than those of the WT. We also determined that strong down-regulation of the SlGADs had little effect on overall plant growth, fruit development or primary fruit metabolism under normal growth conditions.

  9. A distinct immunogenic region of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 is naturally processed and presented by human islet cells to cytotoxic CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Knight, R R; Dolton, G; Kronenberg-Versteeg, D; Eichmann, M; Zhao, M; Huang, G C; Beck, K; Cole, D K; Sewell, A K; Skowera, A; Peakman, M

    2015-01-01

    CD8 T cells specific for islet autoantigens are major effectors of β cell damage in type 1 diabetes, and measurement of their number and functional characteristics in blood represent potentially important disease biomarkers. CD8 T cell reactivity against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) in HLA-A*0201 subjects has been reported to focus on an immunogenic region 114-123 (VMNILLQYVV), with studies demonstrating both 114-123 and 114-122 epitopes being targeted. However, the fine specificity of this response is unclear and the key question as to which epitope(s) β cells naturally process and present and, therefore, the pathogenic potential of CD8 T cells with different specificities within this region has not been addressed. We generated human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201-restricted CD8 T cell clones recognizing either 114-122 alone or both 114-122 and 114-123. Both clone types show potent and comparable effector functions (cytokine and chemokine secretion) and killing of indicator target cells externally pulsed with cognate peptide. However, only clones recognizing 114-123 kill target cells transfected with HLA-A*0201 and GAD2 and HLA-A*0201(+) human islet cells. We conclude that the endogenous pathway of antigen processing by HLA-A*0201-expressing cells generates GAD65114-123 as the predominant epitope in this region. These studies highlight the importance of understanding β cell epitope presentation in the design of immune monitoring for potentially pathogenic CD8 T cells.

  10. The novel R347g pathogenic mutation of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase provides additional molecular insights into enzyme catalysis and deficiency.

    PubMed

    Montioli, Riccardo; Paiardini, Alessandro; Kurian, Manju A; Dindo, Mirco; Rossignoli, Giada; Heales, Simon J R; Pope, Simon; Voltattorni, Carla Borri; Bertoldi, Mariarita

    2016-06-01

    We report here a clinical case of a patient with a novel mutation (Arg347→Gly) in the gene encoding aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) that is associated with AADC deficiency. The variant R347G in the purified recombinant form exhibits, similarly to the pathogenic mutation R347Q previously studied, a 475-fold drop of kcat compared to the wild-type enzyme. In attempting to unravel the reason(s) for this catalytic defect, we have carried out bioinformatics analyses of the crystal structure of AADC-carbidopa complex with the modelled catalytic loop (residues 328-339). Arg347 appears to interact with Phe103, as well as with both Leu333 and Asp345. We have then prepared and characterized the artificial F103L, R347K and D345A mutants. F103L, D345A and R347K exhibit about 13-, 97-, and 345-fold kcat decrease compared to the wild-type AADC, respectively. However, unlike F103L, the R347G, R347K and R347Q mutants as well as the D345A variant appear to be more defective in catalysis than in protein folding. Moreover, the latter mutants, unlike the wild-type protein and the F103L variant, share a peculiar binding mode of dopa methyl ester consisting of formation of a quinonoid intermediate. This finding strongly suggests that their catalytic defects are mainly due to a misplacement of the substrate at the active site. Taken together, our results highlight the importance of the Arg347-Leu333-Asp345 hydrogen-bonds network in the catalysis of AADC and reveal the molecular basis for the pathogenicity of the variants R347. Following the above results, a therapeutic treatment for patients bearing the mutation R347G is proposed.

  11. Structural perspective on the direct inhibition mechanism of EGCG on mammalian histidine decarboxylase and DOPA decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Pérez, M Victoria; Pino-Ángeles, Almudena; Medina, Miguel A; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Moya-García, Aurelio A

    2012-01-23

    Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) and l-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (DDC) are homologous enzymes that are responsible for the synthesis of important neuroactive amines related to inflammatory, neurodegenerative, and neoplastic diseases. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin in green tea, has been shown to target histamine-producing cells and to promote anti-inflammatory, antitumor, and antiangiogenic effects. Previous experimental work has demonstrated that EGCG has a direct inhibitory effect on both HDC and DDC. In this study, we investigated the binding modes of EGCG to HDC and DDC as a first step for designing new polyphenol-based HDC/DDC-specific inhibitors. PMID:22107329

  12. Evolution of Substrate Specificity within a Diverse Family of [beta/alpha]-Barrel-fold Basic Amino Acid Decarboxylases X-ray Structure Determination of Enzymes with Specificity for L-Arginine and Carboxynorspermidine

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xiaoyi; Lee, Jeongmi; Michael, Anthony J.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2010-08-26

    Pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate (PLP)-dependent basic amino acid decarboxylases from the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel-fold class (group IV) exist in most organisms and catalyze the decarboxylation of diverse substrates, essential for polyamine and lysine biosynthesis. Herein we describe the first x-ray structure determination of bacterial biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase (CANSDC) to 2.3- and 2.0-{angstrom} resolution, solved as product complexes with agmatine and norspermidine. Despite low overall sequence identity, the monomeric and dimeric structures are similar to other enzymes in the family, with the active sites formed between the {beta}/{alpha}-barrel domain of one subunit and the {beta}-barrel of the other. ADC contains both a unique interdomain insertion (4-helical bundle) and a C-terminal extension (3-helical bundle) and it packs as a tetramer in the asymmetric unit with the insertions forming part of the dimer and tetramer interfaces. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed that the ADC solution structure is a tetramer. Specificity for different basic amino acids appears to arise primarily from changes in the position of, and amino acid replacements in, a helix in the {beta}-barrel domain we refer to as the 'specificity helix.' Additionally, in CANSDC a key acidic residue that interacts with the distal amino group of other substrates is replaced by Leu{sup 314}, which interacts with the aliphatic portion of norspermidine. Neither product, agmatine in ADC nor norspermidine in CANSDC, form a Schiff base to pyridoxal 5{prime}-phosphate, suggesting that the product complexes may promote product release by slowing the back reaction. These studies provide insight into the structural basis for the evolution of novel function within a common structural-fold.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies recognizing single amino acid substitutions in hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Stanker, L.H.; Branscomb, E.; Vanderlaan, M.; Jensen, R.H.

    1986-06-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to non-human primate hemoglobin referred to as Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-2, and Rh-4, and two mAb to human hemoglobin, referred to as H-1 and H-3 were isolated and were partially characterized. Binding studies with these mAb on a panel of hemoglobins and isolated ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. globin chains revealed a unique reactivity pattern for each mAb. Amino acid sequence analysis of the antigens used to generate the binding data suggests that the specific recognition of certain hemoglobin antigens by each mAb is controlled by the presence of a particular amino acid at a specific position within the epitope. The use of synthetic peptides as antigens confirmed this observation for five of the mAb. No synthetic peptides were tested with the sixth mAb, Rh-2. The amino acids required for binding of mAb Cap-4, Cap-5, Rh-4, and Rh-2 to hemoglobin are alanine at ..beta..5, threonine at ..beta..13, glutamine at ..beta..125, and leucine at ..cap alpha..68. The non-human primate hemoglobin antibodies require a specific amino acid that is not present in human hemoglobin. The amino acid required for binding of Cap-4, Cap-5, and Rh-4 could arise by a single base change in the ..beta.. globin gene, whereas the amino acid required for Rh-2 binding could only occur if two base changes occurred. Thus these mAb are candidate probes for a somatic cell mutation assay on the basis of the detection of peripheral blood red cells that possess single amino acid substituted hemoglobin as a result of single base substitutions in the globin genes of precursor cells.

  14. Cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase: Characterization, inhibition, and metabolic role in taurine formation

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    Cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase, an enzyme that plays a major role in the formation of taurine from cysteine, has been purified from rat liver to homogeneity and characterized. The physical properties of the enzyme were studied, along with its substrate specificity. Multiple forms of the enzyme were found in rat liver, kidney, and brain with isoelectric points ranging from pH 5.6 to 4.9. These multiple forms did not differ in their substrate specificity. It was found by using gel electrofocusing and polyclonal antibodies raised to the liver enzyme that the different forms of cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase are identical in the various rat tissues studied. Various inhibitors of the enzyme were tested both in vitro and in vivo in order to evaluate the role of cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase in taurine formation in mammalian tissues. In in vitro studies, cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase was irreversibly inhibited by {beta}-ethylidene-DL-aspartate (Ki = 10 mM), and competitive inhibition was found using mercaptomethylsuccinate (Ki = 0.1 mM) and D-cysteinesulfinate (Ki = 0.32 mM) when L-cysteinesulfinate was used as a substrate. In order to be able to test these inhibitors in vivo, L-(1-{sup 14}C)cysteinesulfonate was evaluated as a probe for the in vivo measurement of cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase activity. The metabolism of cysteinesulfonate and the product of its transamination, {beta}-sulfopyruvate, was studied, and it was found that L-(1-{sup 14}C)cysteinesulfonate is an accurate and convenient probe for cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase activity. Using L-(1-{sup 14}C)cysteinesulfonate, it was found that D-cysteinesulfinate inhibits cysteinesulfinate decarboxylase activity by greater than 90% in the intact mouse and that inhibition lasts for up to fifteen hours.

  15. Boronic acid-modified magnetic materials for antibody purification

    PubMed Central

    Dhadge, Vijaykumar L.; Hussain, Abid; Azevedo, Ana M.; Aires-Barros, Raquel; Roque, Ana C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Aminophenyl boronic acids can form reversible covalent ester interactions with cis-diol-containing molecules, serving as a selective tool for binding glycoproteins as antibody molecules that possess oligosaccharides in both the Fv and Fc regions. In this study, amino phenyl boronic acid (APBA) magnetic particles (MPs) were applied for the magnetic separation of antibody molecules. Iron oxide MPs were firstly coated with dextran to avoid non-specific binding and then with 3-glycidyloxypropyl trimethoxysilane to allow further covalent coupling of APBA (APBA_MP). When contacted with pure protein solutions of human IgG (hIgG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), APBA_MP bound 170 ± 10 mg hIgG g−1 MP and eluted 160 ± 5 mg hIgG g−1 MP, while binding only 15 ± 5 mg BSA g−1 MP. The affinity constant for the interaction between hIgG and APBA_MP was estimated as 4.9 × 105 M−1 (Ka) with a theoretical maximum capacity of 492 mg hIgG adsorbed g−1 MP (Qmax), whereas control particles bound a negligible amount of hIgG and presented an estimated theoretical maximum capacity of 3.1 mg hIgG adsorbed g−1 MP (Qmax). APBA_MPs were also tested for antibody purification directly from CHO cell supernatants. The particles were able to bind 98% of IgG loaded and to recover 95% of pure IgG (purity greater than 98%) at extremely mild conditions. PMID:24258155

  16. Boronic acid-modified magnetic materials for antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Dhadge, Vijaykumar L; Hussain, Abid; Azevedo, Ana M; Aires-Barros, Raquel; Roque, Ana C A

    2014-02-01

    Aminophenyl boronic acids can form reversible covalent ester interactions with cis-diol-containing molecules, serving as a selective tool for binding glycoproteins as antibody molecules that possess oligosaccharides in both the Fv and Fc regions. In this study, amino phenyl boronic acid (APBA) magnetic particles (MPs) were applied for the magnetic separation of antibody molecules. Iron oxide MPs were firstly coated with dextran to avoid non-specific binding and then with 3-glycidyloxypropyl trimethoxysilane to allow further covalent coupling of APBA (APBA_MP). When contacted with pure protein solutions of human IgG (hIgG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), APBA_MP bound 170 ± 10 mg hIgG g(-1) MP and eluted 160 ± 5 mg hIgG g(-1) MP, while binding only 15 ± 5 mg BSA g(-1) MP. The affinity constant for the interaction between hIgG and APBA_MP was estimated as 4.9 × 10(5) M(-1) (Ka) with a theoretical maximum capacity of 492 mg hIgG adsorbed g(-1) MP (Qmax), whereas control particles bound a negligible amount of hIgG and presented an estimated theoretical maximum capacity of 3.1 mg hIgG adsorbed g(-1) MP (Qmax). APBA_MPs were also tested for antibody purification directly from CHO cell supernatants. The particles were able to bind 98% of IgG loaded and to recover 95% of pure IgG (purity greater than 98%) at extremely mild conditions.

  17. Vector-mediated chromosomal integration of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The integrative vector pINTRS was used to transfer glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity to Streptococcus thermophilus ST128, thus allowing for the production of '-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In pINTRS, the gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was flanked by DNA fragments homologous to a S. ...

  18. Arginine Decarboxylase Is Localized in Chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Borrell, A.; Culianez-Macia, F. A.; Altabella, T.; Besford, R. T.; Flores, D.; Tiburcio, A. F.

    1995-01-01

    Plants, unlike animals, can use either ornithine decarboxylase or arginine decarboxylase (ADC) to produce the polyamine precursor putrescine. Lack of knowledge of the exact cellular and subcellular location of these enzymes has been one of the main obstacles to our understanding of the biological role of polyamines in plants. We have generated polyclonal antibodies to oat (Avena sativa L.) ADC to study the spatial distribution and subcellular localization of ADC protein in different oat tissues. By immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, we show that ADC is organ specific. By cell fractionation and immunoblotting, we show that ADC is localized in chloroplasts associated with the thylakoid membrane. The results also show that increased levels of ADC protein are correlated with high levels of ADC activity and putrescine in osmotically stressed oat leaves. A model of compartmentalization for the arginine pathway and putrescine biosynthesis in active photosynthetic tissues has been proposed. In the context of endosymbiote-driven metabolic evolution in plants, the location of ADC in the chloroplast compartment may have major evolutionary significance, since it explains (a) why plants can use two alternative pathways for putrescine biosynthesis and (b) why animals do not possess ADC. PMID:12228631

  19. Uncovering the Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 gallate decarboxylase involved in tannin degradation.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Natalia; Curiel, José Antonio; Reverón, Inés; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario

    2013-07-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a lactic acid bacterium able to degrade tannins by the subsequent action of tannase and gallate decarboxylase enzymes. The gene encoding tannase had previously been identified, whereas the gene encoding gallate decarboxylase is unknown. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of gallic-acid induced L. plantarum extracts showed a 54-kDa protein which was absent in the uninduced cells. This protein was identified as Lp_2945, putatively annotated UbiD. Homology searches identified ubiD-like genes located within three-gene operons which encoded the three subunits of nonoxidative aromatic acid decarboxylases. L. plantarum is the only bacterium in which the lpdC (lp_2945) gene and the lpdB and lpdD (lp_0271 and lp_0272) genes are separated in the chromosome. Combination of extracts from recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing the lpdB, lpdC, and lpdC genes demonstrated that LpdC is the only protein required to yield gallate decarboxylase activity. However, the disruption of these genes in L. plantarum revealed that the lpdB and lpdC gene products are essential for gallate decarboxylase activity. Similar to L. plantarum tannase, which exhibited activity only in esters derived from gallic and protocatechuic acids, purified His6-LpdC protein from E. coli showed decarboxylase activity against gallic and protocatechuic acids. In contrast to the tannase activity, gallate decarboxylase activity is widely present among lactic acid bacteria. This study constitutes the first genetic characterization of a gallate decarboxylase enzyme and provides new insights into the role of the different subunits of bacterial nonoxidative aromatic acid decarboxylases.

  20. Uncovering the Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 Gallate Decarboxylase Involved in Tannin Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Natalia; Curiel, José Antonio; Reverón, Inés; de las Rivas, Blanca

    2013-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a lactic acid bacterium able to degrade tannins by the subsequent action of tannase and gallate decarboxylase enzymes. The gene encoding tannase had previously been identified, whereas the gene encoding gallate decarboxylase is unknown. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of gallic-acid induced L. plantarum extracts showed a 54-kDa protein which was absent in the uninduced cells. This protein was identified as Lp_2945, putatively annotated UbiD. Homology searches identified ubiD-like genes located within three-gene operons which encoded the three subunits of nonoxidative aromatic acid decarboxylases. L. plantarum is the only bacterium in which the lpdC (lp_2945) gene and the lpdB and lpdD (lp_0271 and lp_0272) genes are separated in the chromosome. Combination of extracts from recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing the lpdB, lpdC, and lpdC genes demonstrated that LpdC is the only protein required to yield gallate decarboxylase activity. However, the disruption of these genes in L. plantarum revealed that the lpdB and lpdC gene products are essential for gallate decarboxylase activity. Similar to L. plantarum tannase, which exhibited activity only in esters derived from gallic and protocatechuic acids, purified His6-LpdC protein from E. coli showed decarboxylase activity against gallic and protocatechuic acids. In contrast to the tannase activity, gallate decarboxylase activity is widely present among lactic acid bacteria. This study constitutes the first genetic characterization of a gallate decarboxylase enzyme and provides new insights into the role of the different subunits of bacterial nonoxidative aromatic acid decarboxylases. PMID:23645198

  1. Glycine decarboxylase in Rhodopseudomonas spheroides and in rat liver mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Tait, G. H.

    1970-01-01

    1. Glycine decarboxylase and glycine–bicarbonate exchange activities were detected in extracts of Rhodopseudomonas spheroides and in rat liver mitochondria and their properties were studied. 2. The glycine decarboxylase activity from both sources is stimulated when glyoxylate is added to the assay system. 3. Several proteins participate in these reactions and a heat-stable low-molecular-weight protein was purified from both sources. 4. These enzyme activities increase markedly when R. spheroides is grown in the presence of glycine, glyoxylate, glycollate, oxalate or serine. 5. All the enzymes required to catalyse the conversion of glycine into acetyl-CoA via serine and pyruvate were detected in extracts of R. spheroides; of these glycine decarboxylase has the lowest activity. 6. The increase in the activity of glycine decarboxylase on illumination of R. spheroides in a medium containing glycine, and the greater increase when ATP is also present in the medium, probably accounts for the increased incorporation of the methylene carbon atom of glycine into fatty acids found previously under these conditions (Gajdos, Gajdos-Török, Gorchein, Neuberger & Tait, 1968). 7. The results are compared with those obtained by other workers on the glycine decarboxylase and glycine–bicarbonate exchange activities in other systems. PMID:5476725

  2. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  3. Active site directed irreversible inactivation of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase by the conjugated substrate analogue (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid: development of a suicide substrate.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Jordan, F

    1983-08-01

    (E)-4-(4-Chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid (CPB) was found to irreversibly inactivate brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC, EC 4.1.1.1) in a biphasic, sigmoidal manner, as is found for the kinetic behavior of substrate. An expression was derived for two-site irreversible inhibition of allosteric enzymes, and the kinetic behavior of CPB fit the expression for two-site binding. The calculated Ki's of 0.7 mM and 0.3 mM for CPB were assigned to the catalytic site and the regulatory site, respectively. The presence of pyruvic acid at high concentrations protected PDC from inactivation, whereas low concentrations of pyruvic acid accelerated inactivation by CPB. Pyruvamide, a known allosteric activator of PDC, was found to enhance inactivation by CPB. The results can be explained if pyruvamide binds only to a regulatory site, but CPB and pyruvic acid compete for both the regulatory and the catalytic centers. [1-14C]CPB was found to lose 14CO2 concurrently with the inactivation of the enzyme. Therefore, CPB was being turned over by PDC, in addition to inactivating it. CPB can be labeled a suicide-type inactivator for PDC.

  4. Antibodies specific for nucleic acids and applications in genomic detection and clinical diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zonglin; Leppla, Stephen H; Li, Baoguang; Elkins, Christopher A

    2014-09-01

    Detection of nucleic acids using antibodies is uncommon. This is in part because nucleic acids are poor immunogens and it is difficult to elicit antibodies having high affinity to each type of nucleic acid while lacking cross-reactivity to others. We describe the origins and applications of a variety of anti-nucleic acid antibodies, including ones reacting with modified nucleosides and nucleotides, single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA, RNA, DNA:RNA hybrids, locked-nucleic acids or peptide nucleic acid:nucleic acid hybrids. Carefully selected antibodies can be excellent reagents for detecting bacteria, viruses, small RNAs, microRNAs, R-loops, cancer cells, stem cells, apoptotic cells and so on. The detection may be sensitive, simple, rapid, specific, reproducible, quantitative and cost-effective. Current microarray and diagnostic methods that depend on cDNA or cRNA can be replaced by using antibody detection of nucleic acids. Therefore, development should be encouraged to explore new utilities and create a robust arsenal of new anti-nucleic acid antibodies.

  5. Crenarchaeal Arginine Decarboxylase Evolved from an S-Adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase Enzyme*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Teresa N.; Graham, David E.

    2008-01-01

    The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus uses arginine to produce putrescine for polyamine biosynthesis. However, genome sequences from S. solfataricus and most crenarchaea have no known homologs of the previously characterized pyridoxal 5′-phosphate or pyruvoyl-dependent arginine decarboxylases that catalyze the first step in this pathway. Instead they have two paralogs of the S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC). The gene at locus SSO0585 produces an AdoMetDC enzyme, whereas the gene at locus SSO0536 produces a novel arginine decarboxylase (ArgDC). Both thermostable enzymes self-cleave at conserved serine residues to form amino-terminal β-domains and carboxyl-terminal α-domains with reactive pyruvoyl cofactors. The ArgDC enzyme specifically catalyzed arginine decarboxylation more efficiently than previously studied pyruvoyl enzymes. α-Difluoromethylarginine significantly reduced the ArgDC activity of purified enzyme, and treating growing S. solfataricus cells with this inhibitor reduced the cells' ratio of spermidine to norspermine by decreasing the putrescine pool. The crenarchaeal ArgDC had no AdoMetDC activity, whereas its AdoMetDC paralog had no ArgDC activity. A chimeric protein containing the β-subunit of SSO0536 and the α-subunit of SSO0585 had ArgDC activity, implicating residues responsible for substrate specificity in the amino-terminal domain. This crenarchaeal ArgDC is the first example of alternative substrate specificity in the AdoMetDC family. ArgDC activity has evolved through convergent evolution at least five times, demonstrating the utility of this enzyme and the plasticity of amino acid decarboxylases. PMID:18650422

  6. An examination of aspartate decarboxylase and glutamate decarboxylase activity in mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Graham; Ding, Haizhen; Rocheleau, Tom; Mayhew, George; Reddy, Erin; Han, Qian; Christensen, Bruce M.; Li, Jianyong

    2010-01-01

    A major pathway of beta-alanine synthesis in insects is through the alpha-decarboxylation of aspartate, but the enzyme involved in the decarboxylation of aspartate has not been clearly defined in mosquitoes and characterized in any insect species. In this study, we expressed two putative mosquito glutamate decarboxylase-like enzymes of mosquitoes and critically analyzed their substrate specificity and biochemical properties. Our results provide clear biochemical evidence establishing that one of them is an aspartate decarboxylase and the other is a glutamate decarboxylase. The mosquito aspartate decarboxylase functions exclusively on the production of beta-alanine with no activity with glutamate. Likewise the mosquito glutamate decarboxylase is highly specific to glutamate with essentially no activity with aspartate. Although insect aspartate decarboxylase shares high sequence identity with glutamate decarboxylase, we are able to closely predict aspartate decarboxylase from glutamate decarboxylase based on the difference of their active site residues. PMID:19842059

  7. Three Distinct Glutamate Decarboxylase Genes in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a widely conserved signaling molecule that in animals has been adapted as a neurotransmitter. GABA is synthesized from the amino acid glutamate by the action of glutamate decarboxylases (GADs). Two vertebrate genes, GAD1 and GAD2, encode distinct GAD proteins: GAD67 and GAD65, respectively. We have identified a third vertebrate GAD gene, GAD3. This gene is conserved in fishes as well as tetrapods. We analyzed protein sequence, gene structure, synteny, and phylogenetics to identify GAD3 as a homolog of GAD1 and GAD2. Interestingly, we found that GAD3 was lost in the hominid lineage. Because of the importance of GABA as a neurotransmitter, GAD3 may play important roles in vertebrate nervous systems. PMID:27461130

  8. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  9. Protection against dengue disease by synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Flingai, Seleeke; Plummer, Emily M.; Patel, Ami; Shresta, Sujan; Mendoza, Janess M.; Broderick, Kate E.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Muthumani, Kar; Weiner, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most important mosquito-borne viral infection in humans. In recent years, the number of cases and outbreaks has dramatically increased worldwide. While vaccines are being developed, none are currently available that provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes. Advances in human antibody isolation have uncovered DENV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) that are capable of preventing infection from multiple serotypes. Yet delivering monoclonal antibodies using conventional methods is impractical due to high costs. Engineering novel methods of delivering monoclonal antibodies could tip the scale in the fight against DENV. Here we demonstrate that simple intramuscular delivery by electroporation of synthetic DNA plasmids engineered to express modified human nAbs against multiple DENV serotypes confers protection against DENV disease and prevents antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of disease in mice. This synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy approach may have important applications in the fight against infectious disease. PMID:26220099

  10. Protection against dengue disease by synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Flingai, Seleeke; Plummer, Emily M; Patel, Ami; Shresta, Sujan; Mendoza, Janess M; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Muthumani, Kar; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most important mosquito-borne viral infection in humans. In recent years, the number of cases and outbreaks has dramatically increased worldwide. While vaccines are being developed, none are currently available that provide balanced protection against all DENV serotypes. Advances in human antibody isolation have uncovered DENV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) that are capable of preventing infection from multiple serotypes. Yet delivering monoclonal antibodies using conventional methods is impractical due to high costs. Engineering novel methods of delivering monoclonal antibodies could tip the scale in the fight against DENV. Here we demonstrate that simple intramuscular delivery by electroporation of synthetic DNA plasmids engineered to express modified human nAbs against multiple DENV serotypes confers protection against DENV disease and prevents antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of disease in mice. This synthetic nucleic acid antibody prophylaxis/immunotherapy approach may have important applications in the fight against infectious disease. PMID:26220099

  11. Generation of a chickenized catalytic anti-nucleic acid antibody by complementarity-determining region grafting.

    PubMed

    Roh, Jooho; Byun, Sung June; Seo, Youngsil; KIm, Minjae; Lee, Jae-Ho; Kim, Songmi; Lee, Yuno; Lee, Keun Woo; Kim, Jin-Kyoo; Kwon, Myung-Hee

    2015-02-01

    In contrast to a number of studies on the humanization of non-human antibodies, the reshaping of a non-human antibody into a chicken antibody has never been attempted. Therefore, nothing is known about the animal species-dependent compatibility of the framework regions (FRs) that sustain the appropriate conformation of the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs). In this study, we attempted the reshaping of the variable domains of the mouse catalytic anti-nucleic acid antibody 3D8 (m3D8) into the FRs of a chicken antibody (“chickenization”) by CDR grafting, which is a common method for the humanization of antibodies. CDRs of the acceptor chicken antibody that showed a high homology to the FRs of m3D8 were replaced with those of m3D8, resulting in the chickenized antibody (ck3D8). ck3D8 retained the biochemical properties (DNA binding, DNA hydrolysis, and cellular internalizing activities) and three-dimensional structure of m3D8 and showed reduced immunogenicity in chickens. Our study demonstrates that CDR grafting can be applied to the chickenization of a mouse antibody, probably due to the interspecies compatibility of the FRs.

  12. Myocardial Infarct Imaging of Antibodies to Canine Cardiac Myosin with Indium-111-Diethylenetriamine Pentaacetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaw, Ban An; Fallon, John T.; Strauss, H. William; Haber, Edgar

    1980-07-01

    Antibodies, by virtue of marked selectivity and affinity, may lend themselves to identification of structures of unique antigenic specificity in vivo. In experimental myocardial infarction in dogs, F(ab')2 fragments of antibodies to cardiac myosin that had been labeled with iodine-131 were shown to localize within the lesion. Because the energy characteristics of iodine isotopes are not ideal for imaging with a gamma camera, a new method for labeling antibody fragments with divalent or polyvalent radionuclides was developed. A bifunctional chelating agent, diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid was covalently coupled, by an amide bond, to Fab fragments of antibodies to canine cardiac myosin. A stable chelate was then formed with indium-111, a nuclide that has appropriate half-life and energy characteristics for gamma imaging. Antibodies treated in this way retain their antigen-binding activity and are useful in locating myocardial infarcts in vivo.

  13. Myocardial infarct imaging of antibodies to canine cardiac myosin with indium-111-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Khaw, B A; Fallon, F T; Strauss, H W; Haber, E

    1980-07-11

    Antibodies, by virtue of marked selectivity and affinity, may lend themselves to identification of structures of unique antigenic specificity in vivo. In experimental myocardial infarction in dogs, F(ab')2 fragments of antibodies to cardiac myosin that had been labeled with iodine-131 were shown to localize within the lesion. Because the energy characteristics of iodine isotopes are not ideal for imaging with a gamma camera, a new method for labeling antibody fragments with divalent or polyvalent radionuclides was developed. A bifunctional chelating agent, diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid was covalently coupled, by an amide bond, to Fab fragments of antibodies to canine cardiac myosin. A stable chelate was then formed with indium-111, a nuclide that has appropriate half-life and energy characteristics for gamma imaging. Antibodies treated in this way retain their antigen-binding activity and are useful in locating myocardial infarcts in vivo. PMID:7384803

  14. Binding of actin to thioglycolic acid modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles for antibody conjugation.

    PubMed

    Maltas, Esra; Ertekin, Betul

    2015-01-01

    Thioglycolic acid modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (TG-APTS-SPION) were synthesized by using (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTS) and thioglycolic acid (TG). Actin was immobilized on the nanoparticle surfaces. Binding amount of the actin (Act) on TG-APTS-SPIONs was determined by using a calibration curve equation that was drawn using fluorescence spectra at 280 and 342 nm of excitation and emission wavelengths. Anti-Actin (anti-Act) was interacted with the actin immobilized TG-APTS-SPIONs as primary antibody. Horse radish peroxidase (HRP) was also interacted with antibody conjugated nanoparticles as secondary antibody. The binding capacity of primary and secondary antibodies was also estimated by fluorescence spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis were also clarified binding of the protein and antibodies to the nanoparticles' surfaces. Western blot analysis was also done for actin conjunction with anti Act antibody to confirm binding of the antibody to the protein. PMID:25451750

  15. Characterization of arginine decarboxylase from Dianthus caryophyllus.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Hak; Cho, Ki Joon; Choi, Yu Jin; Park, Ky Young; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2004-04-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines in higher plants, whereas ornithine decarboxylase represents the sole pathway of polyamine biosynthesis in animals. Previously, we characterized a genomic clone from Dianthus caryophyllus, in which the deduced polypeptide of ADC was 725 amino acids with a molecular mass of 78 kDa. In the present study, the ADC gene was subcloned into the pGEX4T1 expression vector in combination with glutathione S-transferase (GST). The fusion protein GST-ADC was water-soluble and thus was purified by sequential GSTrap-arginine affinity chromatography. A thrombin-mediated on-column cleavage reaction was employed to release free ADC from GST. Hiload superdex gel filtration FPLC was then used to obtain a highly purified ADC. The identity of the ADC was confirmed by immunoblot analysis, and its specific activity with respect to (14)C-arginine decarboxylation reaction was determined to be 0.9 CO(2) pkat mg(-1) protein. K(m) and V(max) of the reaction between ADC and the substrate were 0.077 +/- 0.001 mM and 6.0 +/- 0.6 pkat mg(-1) protein, respectively. ADC activity was reduced by 70% in the presence of 0.1 mM Cu(2+) or CO(2+), but was only marginally affected by Mg(2+), or Ca(2+) at the same concentration. Moreover, spermine at 1 mM significantly reduced its activity by 30%.

  16. Detection and transfer of the glutamate decarboxylase gene in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermen...

  17. Molecular analysis of the glutamate decarboxylase locus in Streptococcus thermophilus ST110

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GABA ('-aminobutyric acid) is generated from glutamate by the action of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and characterized by hypotensive, diuretic and tranquilizing effects in humans and animals. The production of GABA by lactic acid starter bacteria would enhance the functionality of fermented da...

  18. Improving impurities clearance by amino acids addition to buffer solutions for chromatographic purifications of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Takashi; Hosono, Mareto

    2015-07-15

    The performance of amino acids in Protein A affinity chromatography, anion exchange chromatography and cation exchange chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification was investigated. Glycine, threonine, arginine, glutamate, and histidine were used as buffer components in the equilibration, washing, and elution steps of these chromatographies. Improved clearance of impurity, high molecular weight species (HMW) and host cell proteins (HCP) was observed in the purification processes when using the amino acids as base-buffer constituents, additives or eluents compared with that of buffers without these amino acids. In addition, we designed a buffer system in which the mobile phases were composed of only a single amino acid, histidine, and applied it to the above three chromatographies. Effective HMW and HCP clearance was also obtained in this manner. These results suggest that amino acids may enhance impurity clearance during the purification of monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26057847

  19. Brain glutamate decarboxylase and pyrroloquinoline quinone.

    PubMed

    Choi, S Y; Khemlani, L S; Churchich, J E

    1992-01-01

    Porcine brain glutamate decarboxylase was examined for the presence of covalently bound pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). HPLC analysis of pure glutamate decarboxylase subjected to the hexanol extraction procedure gave negative results when monitored at 320 nm, the maximum of absorbance of 4-hydroxy-5-hexoxy-PQQ. Resolved glutamate decarboxylase exhibits a structureless absorption band at wavelengths longer than 300 nm which cannot be attributed to PQQ. The holoenzyme is not a pyridoxal-quinoprotein; its catalytic mechanism involves the participation of only one cofactor, i.e. pyridoxal-5-P. Free PQQ is a strong inhibitor of the decarboxylase (Ki = 13 microM) and the reaction with the protein results in spectral changes resembling those of polylysine treated with PQQ. If the concentration of free PQQ in some regions of the brain reaches the micromolar level, then PQQ might play a role in the regulation of glutamate decarboxylase activity.

  20. Locomotor response to L-DOPA in reserpine-treated rats following central inhibition of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase: further evidence for non-dopaminergic actions of L-DOPA and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Alachkar, Amal; Brotchie, Jonathan M; Jones, Owen T

    2010-09-01

    L-DOPA is the most widely used treatment for Parkinson's disease. The anti-parkinsonian and pro-dyskinetic actions of L-DOPA are widely attributed to its conversion, by the enzyme aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), to dopamine. We investigated the hypothesis that exogenous L-DOPA can induce behavioural effects without being converted to dopamine in the reserpine-treated rat-model of Parkinson's disease. A parkinsonian state was induced with reserpine (3 mg/kg s.c.). Eighteen hours later, the rats were administered L-DOPA plus the peripherally acting AADC inhibitor benserazide (25 mg/kg), with or without the centrally acting AADC inhibitor NSD1015 (100 mg/kg). L-DOPA/benserazide alone reversed reserpine-induced akinesia (4158+/-1125 activity counts/6 h, cf vehicle 1327+/-227). Addition of NSD1015 elicited hyperactive behaviour that was approximately 7-fold higher than L-DOPA/benserazide (35755+/-5226, P<0.001). The hyperactivity induced by L-DOPA and NSD1015 was reduced by the alpha(2C) antagonist rauwolscine (1 mg/kg) and the 5-HT(2C) agonist MK212 (5 mg/kg), but not by the D2 dopamine receptor antagonist remoxipride (3 mg/kg) or the D1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 (1 mg/kg). These data suggest that L-DOPA, or metabolites produced via routes not involving AADC, might be responsible for the generation of at least some L-DOPA actions in reserpine-treated rats. PMID:20542064

  1. Glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific, long-term expression in neocortical neurons from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors containing the phosphate-activated glutaminase, vesicular glutamate transporter-1, or glutamic acid decarboxylase promoter.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Morten; Kong, Lingxin; Zhang, Guo-rong; Liu, Meng; Wang, Xiaodan; Szabo, Gabor; Curthoys, Norman P; Geller, Alfred I

    2007-05-01

    Many potential uses of direct gene transfer into neurons require restricting expression to one of the two major types of forebrain neurons, glutamatergic or GABAergic neurons. Thus, it is desirable to develop virus vectors that contain either a glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific promoter. The brain/kidney phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG), the product of the GLS1 gene, produces the majority of the glutamate for release as neurotransmitter, and is a marker for glutamatergic neurons. A PAG promoter was partially characterized using a cultured kidney cell line. The three vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) are expressed in distinct populations of neurons, and VGLUT1 is the predominant VGLUT in the neocortex, hippocampus, and cerebellar cortex. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) produces GABA; the two molecular forms of the enzyme, GAD65 and GAD67, are expressed in distinct, but largely overlapping, groups of neurons, and GAD67 is the predominant form in the neocortex. In transgenic mice, an approximately 9 kb fragment of the GAD67 promoter supports expression in most classes of GABAergic neurons. Here, we constructed plasmid (amplicon) Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors that placed the Lac Z gene under the regulation of putative PAG, VGLUT1, or GAD67 promoters. Helper virus-free vector stocks were delivered into postrhinal cortex, and the rats were sacrificed 4 days or 2 months later. The PAG or VGLUT1 promoters supported approximately 90% glutamatergic neuron-specific expression. The GAD67 promoter supported approximately 90% GABAergic neuron-specific expression. Long-term expression was observed using each promoter. Principles for obtaining long-term expression from HSV-1 vectors, based on these and other results, are discussed. Long-term glutamatergic or GABAergic neuron-specific expression may benefit specific experiments on learning or specific gene therapy approaches. Of note, promoter analyses might identify regulatory elements that determine

  2. In vivo biotinylation and incorporation of a photo-inducible unnatural amino acid to an antibody-binding domain improve site-specific labeling of antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kanje, Sara; Hober, Sophia

    2015-04-01

    Antibodies are important molecules in many research fields, where they play a key role in various assays. Antibody labeling is therefore of great importance. Currently, most labeling techniques take advantage of certain amino acid side chains that commonly appear throughout proteins. This makes it hard to control the position and exact degree of labeling of each antibody. Hence, labeling of the antibody may affect the antibody-binding site. This paper presents a novel protein domain based on the IgG-binding domain C2 of streptococcal protein G, containing the unnatural amino acid BPA, that can cross-link other molecules. This novel domain can, with improved efficiency compared to previously reported similar domains, site-specifically cross-link to IgG at the Fc region. An efficient method for simultaneous in vivo incorporation of BPA and specific biotinylation in a flask cultivation of Escherichia coli is described. In comparison to a traditionally labeled antibody sample, the C2-labeled counterpart proved to have a higher proportion of functional antibodies when immobilized on a solid surface and the same limit of detection in an ELISA. This method of labeling is, due to its efficiency and simplicity, of high interest for all antibody-based assays where it is important that labeling does not interfere with the antibody-binding site.

  3. Cloning and sequencing of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) genes from bacteria and uses therefor

    DOEpatents

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie A [Gainesville, FL; Talarico, Lee Ann [Gainesville, FL; Raj, Krishnan Chandra [Tamil Nadu, IN; Ingram, Lonnie O [Gainesville, FL

    2008-02-05

    The invention provides isolated nucleic acids molecules which encode pyruvate decarboxylase enzymes having improved decarboxylase activity, substrate affinity, thermostability, and activity at different pH. The nucleic acids of the invention also have a codon usage which allows for high expression in a variety of host cells. Accordingly, the invention provides recombinant expression vectors containing such nucleic acid molecules, recombinant host cells comprising the expression vectors, host cells further comprising other ethanologenic enzymes, and methods for producing useful substances, e.g., acetaldehyde and ethanol, using such host cells.

  4. Characterization of the activity and expression of arginine decarboxylase in human and animal Chlamydia pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bliven, Kimberly A; Fisher, Derek J; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2012-12-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae encodes a functional arginine decarboxylase (ArgDC), AaxB, that activates upon self-cleavage and converts l-arginine to agmatine. In contrast, most Chlamydia trachomatis serovars carry a missense or nonsense mutation in aaxB abrogating activity. The G115R missense mutation was not predicted to impact AaxB functionality, making it unclear whether AaxB variations in other Chlamydia species also result in enzyme inactivation. To address the impact of gene polymorphism on functionality, we investigated the activity and production of the Chlamydia AaxB variants. Because ArgDC plays a critical role in the Escherichia coli acid stress response, we studied the ability of these Chlamydia variants to complement an E. coli ArgDC mutant in an acid shock assay. Active AaxB was detected in four additional species: Chlamydia caviae, Chlamydia pecorum, Chlamydia psittaci, and Chlamydia muridarum. Of the C. trachomatis serovars, only E appears to encode active enzyme. To determine when functional enzyme is present during the chlamydial developmental cycle, we utilized an anti-AaxB antibody to detect both uncleaved and cleaved enzyme throughout infection. Uncleaved enzyme production peaked around 20 h postinfection, with optimal cleavage around 44 h. While the role ArgDC plays in Chlamydia survival or virulence is unclear, our data suggest a niche-specific function.

  5. Stiff-person syndrome with amphiphysin antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Murinson, Beth B.; Guarnaccia, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Stiff-person syndrome (SPS), formerly Stiff-man syndrome, is a rare autoimmune disease usually exhibiting severe spasms and thoracolumbar stiffness, with very elevated glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD Ab). A paraneoplastic variant, less well characterized, is associated with amphiphysin antibodies (amphiphysin Ab). The objective of this study was to identify distinctive clinical features of amphiphysin Ab-associated SPS. Methods: Records associated with 845 sera tested in the Yale SPS project were examined, and 621 patients with clinically suspected SPS were included in the study. Clinical characteristics were assessed with correction for multiple comparisons. Results: In all, 116 patients had GAD antibodies and 11 patients had amphiphysin Ab; some clinical information was available for 112 and 11 of these patients, respectively. Patients with amphiphysin Ab-associated SPS were exclusively female; mean age was 60. All except one had breast cancer; none had diabetes. Compared to patients with GAD Ab-associated SPS, those with amphiphysin Ab were older (p = 0.02) and showed a dramatically different stiffness pattern (p < 0.0000001) with cervical involvement more likely, p ≤ 0.001. Electromyography showed continuous motor unit activity or was reported positive in eight. Benzodiazepines at high dose (average 50 mg/day diazepam) were partially effective. Four patients were steroid responsive and tumor excision with chemotherapy produced marked clinical improvement in three of five patients. Conclusions: Amphiphysin Ab-associated stiff-person syndrome is strongly associated with cervical region stiffness, female sex, breast cancer, advanced age, EMG abnormalities, and benzodiazepine responsiveness. The condition may respond to steroids and can dramatically improve with cancer treatment. GLOSSARY EAE = experimental autoimmune encephalitis; GAD Ab = glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies; ICC = immunocytochemistry; PERM = progressive variant with

  6. STEREOLOGICAL ESTIMATES OF THE BASAL FOREBRAIN CELL POPULATION IN THE RAT, INCLUDING NEURONS CONTAINING CHOLINE ACETYLTRANSFERASE (ChAT), GLUTAMIC ACID DECARBOXYLASE (GAD) OR PHOSPHATE-ACTIVATED GLUTAMINASE (PAG) AND COLOCALIZING VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTERS (VGluTs)

    PubMed Central

    GRITTI, I.; HENNY, P.; GALLONI, F.; MAINVILLE, L.; MARIOTTI, M.; JONES, B. E.

    2006-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in modulating cortical activity and influencing attention, learning and memory. These activities are fulfilled importantly yet not entirely by cholinergic neurons. Noncholinergic neurons also contribute and are comprised by GABAergic neurons and other possibly glutamatergic neurons. The aim of the present study was to estimate the total number of cells in the BF of the rat and the proportions of that total represented by cholinergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons. For this purpose, cells were counted using unbiased stereological methods within the medial septum, diagonal band, magnocellular preoptic nucleus, substantia innominata and globus pallidus in sections stained for Nissl substance and/or the neurotransmitter enzymes, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) or phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). In Nissl-stained sections, the total number of neurons in the BF was estimated as ~355,000 and the numbers of ChAT-immuno-positive (+) as ~22,000, GAD+ ~119,000 and PAG+ ~316,000, corresponding to ~5%, ~35% and ~90% of the total. Thus, of the large population of BF neurons, only a small proportion has the capacity to synthesize acetylcholine (ACh), one third to synthesize GABA and the vast majority to synthesize glutamate (Glu). Moreover, through the presence of PAG, a proportion of ACh- and GABA-synthesizing neurons also have the capacity to synthesize Glu. In sections dual fluorescent immunostained for vesicular transporters, VGluT3 and not VGluT2 was present in the cell bodies of most PAG+ and ChAT+ and half the GAD+ cells. Given previous results showing that VGluT2 and not VGluT3 was present in BF axon terminals and not colocalized with VAChT or VGAT, we conclude that the BF cell population influences cortical and subcortical regions through neurons which release ACh, GABA or Glu from their terminals but which in part can also synthesize and release Glu from their soma or

  7. Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Lysophosphatidic Acid Binding by a Humanized Monoclonal Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    J Fleming; J Wojciak; M Campbell; T Huxford

    2011-12-31

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a common product of glycerophospholipid metabolism and an important mediator of signal transduction. Aberrantly high LPA concentrations accompany multiple disease states. One potential approach for treatment of these diseases, therefore, is the therapeutic application of antibodies that recognize and bind LPA as their antigen. We have determined the X-ray crystal structure of an anti-LPA antibody (LT3015) Fab fragment in its antigen-free form to 2.15 {angstrom} resolution and in complex with two LPA isotypes (14:0 and 18:2) to resolutions of 1.98 and 2.51 {angstrom}, respectively. The variable CDR (complementarity-determining region) loops at the antigen binding site adopt nearly identical conformations in the free and antigen-bound crystal structures. The crystallographic models reveal that the LT3015 antibody employs both heavy- and light-chain CDR loops to create a network of eight hydrogen bonds with the glycerophosphate head group of its LPA antigen. The head group is almost completely excluded from contact with solvent, while the hydrocarbon tail is partially solvent-exposed. In general, mutation of amino acid residues at the antigen binding site disrupts LPA binding. However, the introduction of particular mutations chosen strategically on the basis of the structures can positively influence LPA binding affinity. Finally, these structures elucidate the exquisite specificity demonstrated by an anti-lipid antibody for binding a structurally simple and seemingly unconstrained target molecule.

  8. Induction of antibodies to hyaluronic acid by immunization of rabbits with encapsulated streptococci

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The immunogenicity of hyaluronic acid was investigated. Rabbits were immunized with encapsulated group A and C streptococci. Intact long- chain hyaluronate was conjugated to BSA for use as antigen in an ELISA. Antibodies to the hyaluronate-BSA conjugate were detected in peak immune sera. The specificity of the antibodies for both mammalian and streptococcal hyaluronate was shown by inhibition studies. To further confirm the presence of antihyaluronate antibodies, hyaluronidase- digested streptococcal hyaluronate was conjugated to biotin and used as an antigen in the ELISA. A clear immunization effect was shown for each rabbit by the study of preimmune and postimmunization bleedings. Titers for each rabbit increased by greater than 32 - 256 - fold. Inhibition studies using hyaluronidase-digested hyaluronate and periodate-treated hyaluronate showed that the immunodominant site of antibody reactivity was a terminal glucuronic acid residue. Further studies showed that the carboxyl group of the terminal glucuronide was the major immunoreactive site. Both mammalian and streptococcal hyaluronate inhibited the immune rabbit sera reaction to streptococcal hyaluronate, demonstrating crossreactivity of these molecules. Thus, hyaluronate was shown to be immunogenic in rabbits. PMID:2427634

  9. Effects of acid exposure on the conformation, stability, and aggregation of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ejima, Daisuke; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Fukada, Harumi; Yumioka, Ryosuke; Nagase, Kazuo; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Philo, John S

    2007-03-01

    Exposure of antibodies to low pH is often unavoidable for purification and viral clearance. The conformation and stability of two humanized monoclonal antibodies (hIgG4-A and -B) directed against different antigens and a mouse monoclonal antibody (mIgG1) in 0.1M citrate at acidic pH were studied using circular dichroism (CD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and sedimentation velocity. Near- and far-UV CD spectra showed that exposure of these antibodies to pH 2.7-3.9 induced only limited conformational changes, although the changes were greater at the lower pH. However, the acid conformation is far from unfolded or so-called molten globule structure. Incubation of hIgG4-A at pH 2.7 and 3.5 at 4 degrees C over the course of 24 h caused little change in the near-UV CD spectra, indicating that the acid conformation is stable. Sedimentation velocity showed that the hIgG4-A is largely monomeric at pH 2.7 and 3.5 as well as at pH 6.0. No time-dependent changes in sedimentation profile occurred upon incubation at these low pHs, consistent with the conformational stability observed by CD. The sedimentation coefficient of the monomer at pH 2.7 or 3.5 again suggested that no gross conformational changes occur at these pHs. DSC analysis of the antibodies showed thermal unfolding at pH 2.7-3.9 as well as at pH 6.0, but with decreased melting temperatures at the lower pH. These results are consistent with the view that the antibodies undergo limited conformational change, and that incubation at 4 degrees C at low pH results in no time-dependent conformational changes. Titration of hIgG4-A from pH 3.5 to 6.0 resulted in recovery of native monomeric proteins whose CD and DSC profiles resembled those of the original sample. However, titration from pH 2.7 resulted in lower recovery of monomeric antibody, indicating that the greater conformational changes observed at this pH cannot be fully reversed to the native structure by a simple pH titration.

  10. Resolution of brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase into two isozymes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, D J; Dikdan, G; Jordan, F

    1986-03-01

    A novel purification method was developed for brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.1) that for the first time resolved the enzyme into two isozymes on DEAE-Sephadex chromatography. The isozymes were found to be distinct according to sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis: the first one to be eluted gave rise to one band, the second to two bands. The isozymes were virtually the same so far as specific activity, KM, inhibition kinetics and irreversible binding properties by the mechanism-based inhibitor (E)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-3-butenoic acid are concerned. This finding resolves a longstanding controversy concerning the quaternary structure of this enzyme.

  11. Antibody and Viral Nucleic Acid Testing of Serum and Cerebrospinal Fluid for Diagnosis of Eastern Equine Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Brittain, David C.; Howard, John J.; Oliver, JoAnne

    2015-01-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis diagnostic serum antibody can appear 6 days after the onset of symptoms, and its numbers can increase 4-fold in 4 days, arguing for early and frequent serum testing. In populations where cerebrospinal fluid viral nucleic acid testing sensitivity and specificity remain undetermined, cerebrospinal antibody testing should also be performed. PMID:26063852

  12. Identification of the Enterococcus faecalis Tyrosine Decarboxylase Operon Involved in Tyramine Production

    PubMed Central

    Connil, Nathalie; Le Breton, Yoann; Dousset, Xavier; Auffray, Yanick; Rincé, Alain; Prévost, Hervé

    2002-01-01

    Screening of a library of Enterococcus faecalis insertional mutants allowed isolation of a mutant affected in tyramine production. The growth of this mutant was similar to that of the wild-type E. faecalis JH2-2 strain in Maijala broth, whereas high-performance liquid chromatography analyses showed that tyramine production, which reached 1,000 μg ml−1 for the wild-type strain, was completely abolished. Genetic analysis of the insertion locus revealed a gene encoding a decarboxylase with similarity to eukaryotic tyrosine decarboxylases. Sequence analysis revealed a pyridoxal phosphate binding site, indicating that this enzyme belongs to the family of amino acid decarboxylases using this cofactor. Reverse transcription-PCR analyses demonstrated that the gene (tdc) encoding the putative tyrosine decarboxylase of E. faecalis JH2-2 is cotranscribed with the downstream gene encoding a putative tyrosine-tyramine antiporter and with the upstream tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase gene. This study is the first description of a tyrosine decarboxylase gene in prokaryotes. PMID:12089039

  13. The immune response to (3-amino, 5-succinylaminobenzoyl)-p-aminophenylarsenic acid. Immunofluorescent studies of cells making anti-arsanilic acid antibody or anti-m-aminosuccinanilic acid antibody*

    PubMed Central

    Thursh, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    The cells synthesizing antibodies in response to immunization with (3-diazo, 5-succinylaminobenzoyl) p-aminophenylarsenic acid—bovine gamma globulin (3A, 5S-BGG) and related antigens have been studied using fluorescent anti-arsanilic acid (anti-Ars), anti-m-aminosuccinanilic acid (anti-Suc) and anti-BGG antibodies, all fluorescent reagents having been prepared from specific precipitates. In the primary response, 1.6 per cent of all cells staining with anti-hapten antibodies after treatment of the smears with a mixture of Ars-rabbit gamma globulin (Ars-RGG) and Suc-RGG stain with both (1.9 per cent of cells staining with anti-Ars; 9.5 per cent of cells staining with anti-Suc). In the secondary response, 12.8 per cent of all cells staining with antihapten antibody stain with both (17.1 per cent of cells staining with anti-Ars; 50.6 per cent of cells staining with anti-Suc). No differences are noted in the percentages of cells staining with both anti-Ars and anti-Suc in animals given a mixture of Ars-BGG and Suc-BGG compared to animals given 3A, 5S-BGG or a doubly conjugated Ars-Suc-BGG (AS-BGG). Comparable numbers of doubly staining cells are present in controls given only Ars-BGG or only Suc-BGG. This is interpreted as indicating that most and probably all of the doubly staining cells noted in the experimental groups are related to an antigenic cross reaction rather than to the synthesis of two antibodies by a single cell. Evidence that this is a cross reaction of intracellular antibody is presented. No cells staining with both antihapten and anticarrier protein (BGG) antibodies have been observed. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4 PMID:4193666

  14. Retina maturation following administration of thyroxine in developing rats: effects on polyamine metabolism and glutamate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Macaione, S; Di Giorgio, R M; Nicotina, P A; Ientile, R

    1984-08-01

    The effects of subcutaneous daily treatment with thyroxine on cell proliferation, differentiation, polyamines, and gamma-aminobutyric acid metabolism in the rat retina were studied during the first 20 postnatal days. The retinal layers of the treated rats displayed an enhanced cell differentiation which reached its maximum 9-12 days from birth; but this effect stopped very quickly and was finished by the 20th postnatal day. Primarily there was an increase in ornithine decarboxylase activity which was accompanied by an increase in putrescine, spermidine, and spermine levels. S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase was induced later than ODC; corresponding with the enhanced synaptogenesis, glutamate decarboxylase increased 15-fold between the fourth and 15th days. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that thyroxine may exert some of its effects by inducing the enzymes which regulate polyamine metabolism and synaptogenesis.

  15. Arginine modifications by methylglyoxal: discovery in a recombinant monoclonal antibody and contribution to acidic species.

    PubMed

    Chumsae, Chris; Gifford, Kathreen; Lian, Wei; Liu, Hongcheng; Radziejewski, Czeslaw H; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2013-12-01

    Heterogeneity is common among protein therapeutics. For example, the so-called acidic species (charge variants) are typically observed when recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are analyzed by weak-cation exchange chromatography (WCX). Several protein post-translational modifications have been established as contributors but still cannot completely account for all heterogeneity. As reported herein, an unexpected modification by methylglyoxal (MGO) was identified, for the first time, in a recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Modifications of arginine residues by methylglyoxal lead to two adducts (dihydroxyimidazolidine and hydroimidazolone) with increases of molecular weights of 72 and 54 Da, respectively. In addition, the modification by methylglyoxal causes the antibody to elute earlier in the weak cation exchange chromatogram. Consequently, the extent to which an antibody was modified at multiple sites corresponds to the degree of shift in elution time. Furthermore, cell culture parameters also affected the extent of modifications by methylglyoxal, a highly reactive metabolite that can be generated from glucose or lipids or other metabolic pathways. Our findings again highlight the impact that cell culture conditions can have on the product quality of recombinant protein pharmaceuticals.

  16. Arginine Modifications by Methylglyoxal: Discovery in a Recombinant Monoclonal Antibody and Contribution to Acidic Species

    PubMed Central

    Chumsae, Chris; Gifford, Kathreen; Lian, Wei; Liu, Hongcheng; Radziejewski, Czeslaw H.; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneity is common among protein therapeutics. For example, the so-called acidic species (charge variants) are typically observed when recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are analyzed by weak-cation exchange chromatography (WCX). Several protein post-translational modifications have been established as contributors, but still cannot completely account for all heterogeneity. As reported herein, an unexpected modification by methylglyoxal (MGO) was identified, for the first time, in a recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Modifications of arginine residues by methylglyoxal lead to two adducts (dihydroxyimidazolidine and hydroimidazolone) with increase of molecular weights of 72 and 54 Daltons, respectively. In addition, the modification by methylglyoxal causes the antibody to elute earlier in the weak cation exchange chromatogram. Consequently, the extent to which an antibody was modified at multiple sites corresponds to the degree of shift in elution time. Furthermore, cell culture parameters also affected the extent of modifications by methylglyoxal, a highly reactive metabolite that can be generated from glucose or lipids or other metabolic pathways. Our findings again highlight the impact that cell culture conditions can have on the product quality of recombinant protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:24168114

  17. Aerobically incubated medium for decarboxylase testing of Enterobacteriaceae by replica-plating methods.

    PubMed

    Maccani, J E

    1979-12-01

    An aerobically incubated, agar-based medium was developed for amino acid decarboxylase testing of Enterobacteriaceae family members by replica-plating methods. Results with the new medium agreed 97 to 99% with the reference broth method of Moeller, and no false-positive reactions were encountered.

  18. Immunomagnetic separation of scum-forming bacteria using polyclonal antibody that recognizes mycolic acids.

    PubMed

    Morisada, S; Miyata, N; Iwahori, K

    2002-10-01

    Mycolic acid-containing bacteria (mycolata) are thought to be involved in scum formation in aeration basins of activated sludge plants due to their ability to produce biosurfactants and their cell surface hydrophobicity. To isolate these bacteria, immunomagnetic separation (IMS) using an anti-mycolic acid polyclonal antibody was investigated. IMS that targeted Gordonia amarae SC1 exhibited a 100% recovery at 5x10(3) CFU ml(-1). At cell concentration of 7.8x10(6) CFU ml(-1), the recovery was lowered, but 80% of cells were still captured. Effect of bead concentrations on the recovery of SC1 at 10(6) CFU ml(-1) was examined. The results showed that addition of more than 6-7x10(6) beads for 1x10(6) CFU reached a maximum recovery (83%). Furthermore, the IMS procedure optimized with SC1 cells was tested with another mycolata. The results suggested that variation of the recovery for each mycolata is dependent on the specificity of the polyclonal antibody and that mycolata which are recognized by the antibody can be recovered by this procedure. PMID:12133606

  19. Profiling protein thiol oxidation in tumor cells using sulfenic acid-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Ho; Carroll, Kate S

    2009-09-22

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) functions as a second messenger that can activate cell proliferation through chemoselective oxidation of cysteine residues in signaling proteins. The connection between H2O2 signaling, thiol oxidation, and activation of growth pathways has emerged as fertile ground for the development of strategies for cancer treatment. Central to achieving this goal is the development of tools and assays that facilitate characterization of the molecular events associated with tumorigenesis and evaluation of patient response to therapy. Here we report on the development of an immunochemical method for detecting sulfenic acid, the initial oxidation product that results when a thiolate reacts with H2O2. For this approach, the sulfenic acid is derivatized with a chemical tag to generate a unique epitope for recognition. The elicited antibody is exquisitely specific, context-independent, and capable of visualizing sulfenic acid formation in cells. Applying this approach to several systems, including cancer cell lines, shows it can be used to monitor differences in thiol redox status and reveals a diverse pattern of sulfenic acid modifications across different subtypes of breast tumors. These studies demonstrate a general strategy for producing antibodies against a specific oxidation state of cysteine and show the utility of these reagents for profiling thiol oxidation associated with pathological conditions such as breast cancer.

  20. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Torkashvand, Fatemeh; Vaziri, Behrouz; Maleknia, Shayan; Heydari, Amir; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Davami, Fatemeh; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB) multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44) cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM) to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb) titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds.

  1. Miller-Fisher Syndrome: Are Anti-GAD Antibodies Implicated in Its Pathophysiology?

    PubMed Central

    Papagiannopoulos, Sotirios; Theodoridou, Varvara; Argyropoulou, Ourania; Bostantjopoulou, Sevasti

    2016-01-01

    Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS) is considered as a variant of the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and its characteristic clinical features are ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Typically, it is associated with anti-GQ1b antibodies; however, a significant percentage (>10%) of these patients are seronegative. Here, we report a 67-year-old female patient who presented with the typical clinical features of MFS. Workup revealed antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in relatively high titers while GQ1b antibodies were negative. Neurological improvement was observed after intravenous gamma globulin and follow-up examinations showed a continuous clinical amelioration with simultaneous decline of anti-GAD levels which finally returned to normal values. This case indicates that anti-GAD antibodies may be associated with a broader clinical spectrum and future studies in GQ1b-seronegative patients could determine ultimately their clinical and pathogenetic significance in this syndrome. PMID:27239355

  2. Expression of human arginine decarboxylase, the biosynthetic enzyme for agmatine

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Meng-Yang; Iyo, Abiye; Piletz, John E.; Regunathan, Soundar

    2011-01-01

    Agmatine, an amine formed by decarboxylation of L-arginine by arginine decarboxylase (ADC), has been recently discovered in mammalian brain and other tissues. While the cloning and sequencing of ADC from plant and bacteria have been reported extensively, the structure of mammalian enzyme is not known. Using homology screening approach, we have identified a human cDNA clone that exhibits ADC activity when expressed in COS-7 cells. The cDNA and deduced amino acid sequence of this human ADC clone is distinct from ADC of other forms. Human ADC is a 460-amino acid protein that shows about 48% identity to mammalian ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) but has no ODC activity. While naive COS-7 cells do not make agmatine, these cells are able to produce agmatine, as measured by HPLC, when transfected with ADC cDNA. Northern blot analysis using the cDNA probe indicated the expression of ADC message in selective human brain regions and other human tissues. PMID:14738999

  3. Genetic manipulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) shunt in rice: overexpression of truncated glutamate decarboxylase (GAD2) and knockdown of γ-aminobutyric acid transaminase (GABA-T) lead to sustained and high levels of GABA accumulation in rice kernels.

    PubMed

    Shimajiri, Yasuka; Oonishi, Takayuki; Ozaki, Kae; Kainou, Kumiko; Akama, Kazuhito

    2013-06-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a non-protein amino acid commonly present in all organisms. Because cellular levels of GABA in plants are mainly regulated by synthesis (glutamate decarboxylase, GAD) and catabolism (GABA-transaminase, GABA-T), we attempted seed-specific manipulation of the GABA shunt to achieve stable GABA accumulation in rice. A truncated GAD2 sequence, one of five GAD genes, controlled by the glutelin (GluB-1) or rice embryo globulin promoters (REG) and GABA-T-based trigger sequences in RNA interference (RNAi) cassettes controlled by one of these promoters as well, was introduced into rice (cv. Koshihikari) to establish stable transgenic lines under herbicide selection using pyriminobac. T₁ and T₂ generations of rice lines displayed high GABA concentrations (2-100 mg/100 g grain). In analyses of two selected lines from the T₃ generation, there was a strong correlation between GABA level and the expression of truncated GAD2, whereas the inhibitory effect of GABA-T expression was relatively weak. In these two lines both with two T-DNA copies, their starch, amylose, and protein levels were slightly lower than non-transformed cv. Koshihikari. Free amino acid analysis of mature kernels of these lines demonstrated elevated levels of GABA (75-350 mg/100 g polished rice) and also high levels of several amino acids, such as Ala, Ser, and Val. Because these lines of seeds could sustain their GABA content after harvest (up to 6 months), the strategy in this study could lead to the accumulation GABA and for these to be sustained in the edible parts.

  4. Production and characterization of highly specific monoclonal antibodies to D-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Matsuura, Yurino; Yonenaga, Yayoi; Tsuneura, Yumi; Aso, Mariko; Kurose, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2014-12-01

    Most of the functions of D-amino acids (D-AA) remain unclear because of little analytic methods for specific detection/determination. In this study, a highly specific monoclonal antibody to D-glutamic acid (D-Glu-MAb) was produced using a hybridoma method. Characterization of D-Glu-MAb by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that it has high selectivity against D-Glu-glutaraldehyde (GA) conjugates, while no cross-reaction was observed when 38 other kinds of AA-GA conjugates were used. Moreover, subsequent indirect competitive ELISA disclosed that an epitope of D-Glu-MAb is a D-Glu-GA molecule in the conjugates, suggesting that D-Glu-MAb could be a useful tool to investigate the functional analysis of D-Glu in immunostaining.

  5. Fermentanomics informed amino acid supplementation of an antibody producing mammalian cell culture.

    PubMed

    Read, Erik K; Bradley, Scott A; Smitka, Tim A; Agarabi, Cyrus D; Lute, Scott C; Brorson, Kurt A

    2013-01-01

    Fermentanomics, or a global understanding of a culture state on the molecular level empowered by advanced techniques like NMR, was employed to show that a model hybridoma culture supplied with glutamine and glucose depletes aspartate, cysteine, methionine, tryptophan, and tyrosine during antibody production. Supplementation with these amino acids prevents depletion and improves culture performance. Furthermore, no significant changes were observed in the distribution of glycans attached to the IgG3 in cultures supplemented with specific amino acids, arguing that this strategy can be implemented without fear of impact on important product quality attributes. In summary, a targeted strategy of quantifying media components and designing a supplementation strategy can improve bioprocess cell cultures when enpowered by fermentanomics tools.

  6. Mammalian Dopa decarboxylase: structure, catalytic activity and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bertoldi, Mariarita

    2014-03-15

    Mammalian Dopa decarboxylase catalyzes the conversion of L-Dopa and L-5-hydroxytryptophan to dopamine and serotonin, respectively. Both of them are biologically active neurotransmitters whose levels should be finely tuned. In fact, an altered concentration of dopamine is the cause of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. The chemistry of the enzyme is based on the features of its coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP). The cofactor is highly reactive and able to perform multiple reactions, besides decarboxylation, such as oxidative deamination, half-transamination and Pictet-Spengler cyclization. The structure resolution shows that the enzyme has a dimeric arrangement and provides a molecular basis to identify the residues involved in each catalytic activity. This information has been combined with kinetic studies under steady-state and pre-steady-state conditions as a function of pH to shed light on residues important for catalysis. A great effort in DDC research is devoted to design efficient and specific inhibitors in addition to those already used in therapy that are not highly specific and are responsible for the side effects exerted by clinical approach to either Parkinson's disease or aromatic amino acid decarboxylase deficiency. PMID:24407024

  7. A novel approach to inhibit intracellular vitamin B6-dependent enzymes: proof of principle with human and plasmodium ornithine decarboxylase and human histidine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Christen, Philipp; Gehring, Heinz

    2011-07-01

    Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (vitamin B(6))-dependent enzymes play central roles in the metabolism of amino acids. Moreover, the synthesis of polyamines, which are essential for cell growth, and of biogenic amines, such as histamine and other signal transmitters, relies on these enzymes. Certain B(6) enzymes thus are prime targets for pharmacotherapeutic intervention. We have devised a novel, in principle generally applicable strategy for obtaining small-molecule cell-permeant inhibitors of specific B(6) enzymes. The imine adduct of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate and the specific amino acid substrate, the first intermediate in all pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent reactions of amino acids, was reduced to a stable secondary amine. This coenzyme-substrate-conjugate was modified further to make it membrane-permeant and, guided by structure-based modeling, to boost its affinity to the apoform of the target enzyme. Inhibitors of this type effectively decreased the respective intracellular enzymatic activity (IC(50) in low micromolar range), providing lead compounds for inhibitors of human ornithine decarboxylase (hODC), plasmodium ornithine decarboxylase, and human histidine decarboxylase. The inhibitors of hODC interfere with the metabolism of polyamines and efficiently prevent the proliferation of tumor cell lines (IC(50)∼ 25 μM). This approach to specific inhibition of intracellular B(6) enzymes might be applied in a straightforward manner to other B(6) enzymes of emerging medicinal interest. PMID:21454364

  8. A coenzyme-independent decarboxylase/oxygenase cascade for the efficient synthesis of vanillin.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Miura, Misa; Kino, Kuniki

    2014-10-13

    Vanillin is one of the most widely used flavor compounds in the world as well as a promising versatile building block. The biotechnological production of vanillin from plant-derived ferulic acid has attracted much attention as a new alternative to chemical synthesis. One limitation of the known metabolic pathway to vanillin is its requirement for expensive coenzymes. Here, we developed a novel route to vanillin from ferulic acid that does not require any coenzymes. This artificial pathway consists of a coenzyme-independent decarboxylase and a coenzyme-independent oxygenase. When Escherichia coli cells harboring the decarboxylase/oxygenase cascade were incubated with ferulic acid, the cells efficiently synthesized vanillin (8.0 mM, 1.2 g L(-1) ) via 4-vinylguaiacol in one pot, without the generation of any detectable aromatic by-products. The efficient method described here might be applicable to the synthesis of other high-value chemicals from plant-derived aromatics.

  9. Characterization and translational regulation of the arginine decarboxylase gene in carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.).

    PubMed

    Chang, K S; Lee, S H; Hwang, S B; Park, K Y

    2000-10-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4.1.1.9) is a key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis in plants. We characterized a carnation genomic clone, gDcADC8, in which the deduced polypeptide of ADC was 725 amino acids with a molecular mass of 77.7 kDa. The unusually long 5'-UTR that contained a short upstream open reading frame (uORF) of seven amino acids (MQKSLHI) was predicted to form an extensive secondary structure (free energy of approximately -117 kcal mol-1) using the Zuker m-fold algorithm. The result that an ADC antibody detected two bands of 45 and 33 kDa in a petal extract suggested the full length of the 78 kDa polypeptide precursor converted into two polypeptides in the processing reaction. To investigate the role of the transcript leader in translation, in vitro transcription/translation reactions with various constructs of deletion and mutation were performed using wheat germ extract. The ADC transcript leader affected positively downstream translation in both wheatgerm extract and primary transformant overexpressing ADC gene. It was demonstrated that heptapeptide (8.6 kDa) encoded by the ADC uORF was synthesized in vitro. Both uORF peptide, and the synthetic heptapeptide MQKSLHI of the uORF, repressed the translation of downstream ORF. Mutation of the uORF ATG codon alleviated the inhibitory effect. ORF translation was not affected by either a frame-shift mutation in uORF or a random peptide. To our knowledge, this is the first report to provide evidence that a uORF may inhibit the translation of a downstream ORF, not only in cis but also in trans, and that the leader sequence of the ADC gene is important for efficient translation.

  10. Patient With Homer-3 Antibodies and Cerebellitis

    PubMed Central

    Höftberger, Romana; Sabater, Lidia; Ortega, Angel; Dalmau, Josep; Graus, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    Importance Homer proteins are a family of scaffolding proteins of the postsynaptic density. Homer-3 colocalizes and modulates the activity of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR5). Cerebellitis has been reported in association with antibodies to mGluR1. We describe the second patient with cerebellitis and Homer-3 antibodies and report a novel, highly specific immunoblot assay. Observations A 38-year-old man had acute onset of headache, nausea, vomiting, and confusion. He developed a pancerebellar syndrome during the ensuing week. Extensive studies did not reveal any tumor. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed a white blood cell count of 60/µL (to convert to ×109 per liter, multiply by 0.001). Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings were normal. For 2 years, the patient was treated with intravenous immunoglobulins and steroids, with partial improvement of the cerebellar ataxia. The patient was negative for onconeural (Hu, Yo, Ri, CV2, Tr, amphiphysin, and Ma2), glutamic acid decarboxylase, and mGluR1 antibodies. Immunohistochemistry on rat brain revealed immunostaining of the cerebellar molecular layer. Homer-3 antibodies were demonstrated by immunoblot of recombinant Homer-3. The clinical features of this patient and a previously described patient with Homer-3 antibodies are similar to those of patients with mGluR1 antibodies. Conclusions and Relevance We report the second case of autoimmune cerebellar ataxia associated with Homer-3 antibodies. The presence of Homer-3 autoantibodies should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with subacute cerebellar ataxia of unknown cause. PMID:23400636

  11. Structural and Mechanistic Studies on Klebsiella pneumoniae 2-Oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-11-12

    The stereospecific oxidative degradation of uric acid to (S)-allantoin was recently shown to proceed via three enzymatic steps. The final conversion is a decarboxylation of the unstable intermediate 2-oxo-4-hydroxy-4-carboxy-5-ureidoimidazoline (OHCU) and is catalyzed by OHCU decarboxylase. Here we present the structures of Klebsiella pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase in unliganded form and with bound allantoin. These structures provide evidence that ligand binding organizes the active site residues for catalysis. Modeling of the substrate and intermediates provides additional support for this hypothesis. In addition we characterize the steady state kinetics of this enzyme and report the first OHCU decarboxylase inhibitor, allopurinol, a structural isomer of hypoxanthine. This molecule is a competitive inhibitor of K. pneumoniae OHCU decarboxylase with a K{sub i} of 30 {+-} 2 {micro}m. Circular dichroism measurements confirm structural observations that this inhibitor disrupts the necessary organization of the active site. Our structural and biochemical studies also provide further insights into the mechanism of catalysis of OHCU decarboxylation.

  12. The Ornithine Decarboxylase Gene of Caenorhabditis Elegans: Cloning, Mapping and Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Macrae, M.; Plasterk, RHA.; Coffino, P.

    1995-01-01

    The gene (odc-1) encoding ornithine decarboxylase, a key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, was cloned and characterized. Two introns interrupt the coding sequence of the gene. The deduced protein contains 422 amino acids and is homologous to ornithine decarboxylases of other eukaryotic species. In vitro translation of a transcript of the cDNA yielded an enzymatically active product. The mRNA is 1.5 kb in size and is formed by trans-splicing to SL1, a common 5' RNA segment. odc-1 maps to the middle of LG V, between dpy-11 and unc-42 and near a breakpoint of the nDf32 deficiency strain. Enzymatic activity is low in starved stage 1 (L1) larva and, after feeding, rises progressively as the worms develop. Targeted gene disruption was used to create a null allele. Homozygous mutants are normally viable and show no apparent defects, with the exception of a somewhat reduced brood size. In vitro assays for ornithine decarboxylase activity, however, show no detectable enzymatic activity, suggesting that ornithine decarboxylase is dispensible for nematode growth in the laboratory. PMID:7498733

  13. The ornithine decarboxylase gene of Caenorhabditis elegans: Cloning, mapping and mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Macrae, M.; Coffino, P.; Plasterk, R.H.A.

    1995-06-01

    The gene (odc-1) encoding ornithine decarboxylase, a key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, was cloned and characterized. Two introns interrupt the coding sequence of the gene. The deduced protein contains 442 amino acids and is homologous to ornithine decarboxylases of other eukaryotic species. In vitro translation of a transcript of the cDNA yielded an enzymatically active product. The mRNA is 1.5 kb in size and is formed by trans-splicing to SL1, a common 5{prime} RNA segment. odc-1 maps to the middle of LG V, between dpy-11 and unc-42 and near a breakpoint of the nDf32 deficiency strain. Enzymatic activity is low in starved 1 (L1) larva and, after feeding, rises progressively as the worms develop. Targeted gene disruption was used to create a null allele. Homozygous mutants are normally viable and show no apparent defects, with the exception of a somewhat reduced brood size. In vitro assays for ornithine decarboxylase activity, however, show no detectable enzymatic activity, suggesting that ornithine decarboxylase is dispensible for nematode growth in the laboratory. 37 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A defect in pyruvate decarboxylase in a child with an intermittent movement disorder

    PubMed Central

    Blass, John P.; Avigan, Joel; Uhlendorf, B. William

    1970-01-01

    A patient with an intermittent movement disorder has been found to have an inherited defect in pyruvate decarboxylase ((2-oxo-acid carboxy-lyase, E.C. 4.1.1.1.). The patient is a 9 yr old boy who since infancy has had repeated episodes of a combined cerebellar and choreoathetoid movement disorder. He has an elevated level of pyruvic acid in his blood, an elevated urinary alanine content, and less marked elevations in blood alanine and lactate. Methods were developed to study his metabolic abnormality in dilute suspensions of white blood cells and cultured skin fibroblasts, as well as in cell-free sonicates of fibroblasts. Oxidation of pyruvic acid-1-14C and pyruvic acid-2-14C by his cells and pyruvate decarboxylase activity in sonicates of his cells were less than 20% of those in cells from control subjects. Oxidation of glutamic acid-U-14C, acetate-1-14C, and palmitate-1-14C was normal, as was incorporation of alanine-U-14C into protein. The rate of oxidation of pyruvic acid by the father's cells and the activity of pyruvate decarboxylase in the father's sonicated fibroblasts were intermediate between those of the patient and those of controls. Values for the mother were at or just below the lower limits of the ranges in controls. Kinetic data suggested the posibility of several forms of pyruvate decarboxylase in this family. Possible mechanisms relating the chemical abnormality and the clinical symptoms in this patient are discussed. PMID:4313434

  15. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  16. Glycine decarboxylase controls photosynthesis and plant growth.

    PubMed

    Timm, Stefan; Florian, Alexandra; Arrivault, Stephanie; Stitt, Mark; Fernie, Alisdair R; Bauwe, Hermann

    2012-10-19

    Photorespiration makes oxygenic photosynthesis possible by scavenging 2-phosphoglycolate. Hence, compromising photorespiration impairs photosynthesis. We examined whether facilitating photorespiratory carbon flow in turn accelerates photosynthesis and found that overexpression of the H-protein of glycine decarboxylase indeed considerably enhanced net-photosynthesis and growth of Arabidopsis thaliana. At the molecular level, lower glycine levels confirmed elevated GDC activity in vivo, and lower levels of the CO(2) acceptor ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate indicated higher drain from CO(2) fixation. Thus, the photorespiratory enzyme glycine decarboxylase appears as an important feed-back signaller that contributes to the control of the Calvin-Benson cycle and hence carbon flow through both photosynthesis and photorespiration.

  17. Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase in phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Khan, A J; Minocha, S C

    1989-01-01

    It has been reported that while bacteria and higher plants possess two different pathways for the biosynthesis of putrescine, via ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and arginine decarboxylase (ADC); the fungi, like animals, only use the former pathway. We found that contrary to the earlier reports, two of the phytopathogenic fungi (Ceratocystis minor and Verticillium dahliae) contain significant levels of ADC activity with very little ODC. The ADC in these fungi has high pH optimum (8.4) and low Km (0.237 mM for C. minor, 0.103 mM for V. dahliae), and is strongly inhibited by alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), putrescine and spermidine, further showing that this enzyme is probably involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and not in the catabolism of arginine as in Escherichia coli. The growth of these fungi is strongly inhibited by DFMA while alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) has little effect.

  18. Development and application of monoclonal antibodies against the mycotoxin mycophenolic acid.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Richard; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2015-11-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) is frequently found, often in high concentrations, in a broad range of food and feed matrices. Apart from the well-known contamination of blue-veined cheeses caused by the use of toxinogenic Penicillium roqueforti strains for manufacturing, a broad range of other Penicillium spp. is able to produce this immunosuppressive toxin. Therefore, MPA has been proposed to be a suitable marker for Penicillium-infected food commodities. In the present work, a high-affinity monoclonal antibody (mAb) for the specific detection of MPA was developed by immunizing mice with a MPA-protein conjugate coupled by an activated ester method. Under the conditions of a direct competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA), 50% inhibition and detection limits of MPA standard curves were 1.2 and 0.3 ng/ml, respectively. Furthermore, the mAb could be successfully employed for the production of an immunoaffinity (IA) column enabling the efficient enrichment of MPA from processed foodstuffs. By combining the IA clean-up with a polyclonal antibody-based EIA, an ultrasensitive analysis method could be established which allowed the reliable and reproducible detection of MPA in artificially contaminated tomato ketchup as a model matrix at concentrations as low as 0.1 ng/g. PMID:26382857

  19. Standardization of natural mycolic acid antigen composition and production for use in biomarker antibody detection to diagnose active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ndlandla, F L; Ejoh, V; Stoltz, A C; Naicker, B; Cromarty, A D; van Wyngaardt, S; Khati, M; Rotherham, L S; Lemmer, Y; Niebuhr, J; Baumeister, C R; Al Dulayymi, J R; Swai, H; Baird, M S; Verschoor, J A

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is characterized by the abundance of species specific, antigenic cell wall lipids called mycolic acids. These wax-like molecules all share an identical, amphiphilic mycolic motif, but have different functional groups in a long hydrophobic hydrocarbon mero-chain that divide them into three main classes: alpha-, keto- and methoxy-mycolic acids. Whereas alpha-mycolic acids constitutively maintain an abundance of around 50%, the ratio of methoxy- to keto-mycolic acid types may vary depending on, among other things, the growth stage of M. tuberculosis. In human patients, antibodies to mycolic acids have shown potential as diagnostic serum biomarkers for active TB. Variations in mycolic acid composition affect the antigenic properties and can potentially compromise the precision of detection of anti-mycolic acids antibodies in patient sera to natural mixtures. We demonstrate this here with combinations of synthetic mycolic acid antigens, tested against TB patient and control sera. Combinations of methoxy- and α-mycolic acids are more antigenic than combinations of keto- and α-mycolic acids, showing the former to give a more sensitive test for TB biomarker antibodies. Natural mixtures of mycolic acids isolated from mature cultures of M. tuberculosis H37Rv give the same sensitivity as that with synthetic methoxy- and α-mycolic acids in combination, in a surface plasmon resonance inhibition biosensor test. To ensure that the antigenic activity of isolates of natural mycolic acids is reproducible, we cultured M. tuberculosis H37Rv on Middlebrook 7H10 solid agar plates to stationary growth phase in a standardized, optimal way. The proportions of mycolic acid classes in various batches of the isolates prepared from these cultures were compared to a commercially available natural mycolic acid isolate. LC-MS/MS and NMR data for quantitation of mycolic acids class compositions show that the variation in batches

  20. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    SciTech Connect

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  1. Teichoic acid antibody test: its use in patients with coagulase-positive staphylococcal bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Larinkari, U M; Valtonen, M V; Sarvas, M; Valtonen, V V

    1977-11-01

    We have studied the occurrence and specificity of teichoic acid antibodies (TAAs), measured by double diffusion in agar, in 114 patients with bacteremia of whom 47 had coagulase-positive staphylococcal bacteremia. A total of 30% of the 47 patients with coagulase-positive staphylococcal bacteremia had a TAA titer of 1:8 or more, and an additional 30% had a titer of 1:2 or 1:4. High TAA titers were most often connected with coagulase-positive staphylococcal endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and deep wound infections. None of the six coagulase-negative patients with staphylococcal bacteremia nor any of the 92 controls had titers exceeding 1:1. A total of 10% of the other patients with bacteremia showed positive results on the TAA test at low titer levels. Compared to the antistaphylolysin value, the TAA test was about equally specific but more sensitive.

  2. In vitro inhibition of lysine decarboxylase activity by organophosphate esters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sufang; Wan, Bin; Zhang, Lianying; Yang, Yu; Guo, Liang-Hong

    2014-12-01

    Organophosphate esters (OPEs), a major group of organophosphorus flame retardants, are regarded as emerging environmental contaminants of health concern. Amino acid decarboxylases catalyze the conversion of amino acids into polyamines that are essential for cell proliferation, hypertrophy and tissue growth. In this paper, inhibitory effect of twelve OPEs with aromatic, alkyl or chlorinated alkyl substituents on the activity of lysine decarboxylase (LDC) was assessed quantitatively with an economic and label-free fluorescence sensor and cell assay. The sensor comprises a macrocyclic host (cucurbit[7]uril) and a fluorescent dye (acridine orange) reporter. The twelve OPEs were found to vary in their capacity to inhibit LDC activity. Alkyl group substituted OPEs had no inhibitory effect. By contrast, six OPEs substituted with aromatic or chlorinated alkyl groups inhibited LDC activity significantly with IC50 ranging from 1.32 μM to 9.07 μM. Among them, the inhibitory effect of tri-m-cresyl phosphate (TCrP) was even more effective as an inhibitor than guanosine 5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate (ppGpp) (1.60 μM), an LDC natural inhibitor in vivo. Moreover, at non-cytotoxic concentrations, these six OPEs showed perceptible inhibitory effects on LDC activity in PC12 living cells, and led to a marked loss in the cadaverine content. Molecular docking analysis of the LDC/OPE complexes revealed that different binding modes contribute to the difference in their inhibitory effect. Our finding suggested that LDC, as a new potential biological target of OPEs, might be implicated in toxicological and pathogenic mechanism of OPEs. PMID:25264276

  3. Cellular Plasticity Induced by Anti–α-Amino-3-Hydroxy-5-Methyl-4-Isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Encephalitis Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiaoyu; Hughes, Ethan G; Moscato, Emilia H; Parsons, Thomas D; Dalmau, Josep; Balice-Gordon, Rita J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Autoimmune-mediated anti–α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) encephalitis is a severe but treatment-responsive disorder with prominent short-term memory loss and seizures. The mechanisms by which patient antibodies affect synapses and neurons leading to symptoms are poorly understood. Methods The effects of patient antibodies on cultures of live rat hippocampal neurons were determined with immunostaining, Western blot, and electrophysiological analyses. Results We show that patient antibodies cause a selective decrease in the total surface amount and synaptic localization of GluA1- and GluA2-containing AMPARs, regardless of receptor subunit binding specificity, through increased internalization and degradation of surface AMPAR clusters. In contrast, patient antibodies do not alter the density of excitatory synapses, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) clusters, or cell viability. Commercially available AMPAR antibodies directed against extracellular epitopes do not result in a loss of surface and synaptic receptor clusters, suggesting specific effects of patient antibodies. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of spontaneous miniature postsynaptic currents show that patient antibodies decrease AMPAR-mediated currents, but not NMDAR-mediated currents. Interestingly, several functional properties of neurons are also altered: inhibitory synaptic currents and vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid transporter (vGAT) staining intensity decrease, whereas the intrinsic excitability of neurons and short-interval firing increase. Interpretation These results establish that antibodies from patients with anti-AMPAR encephalitis selectively eliminate surface and synaptic AMPARs, resulting in a homeostatic decrease in inhibitory synaptic transmission and increased intrinsic excitability, which may contribute to the memory deficits and epilepsy that are prominent in patients with this disorder. PMID:25369168

  4. A Tat-grafted anti-nucleic acid antibody acquires nuclear-localization property and a preference for TAR RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jong-Geun; Kim, Dong-Sik; Kim, Yong-Sung; Kwon, Myung-Hee

    2011-03-18

    Highlights: {yields} We generate '{sub H3}Tat-3D8' by grafting Tat{sub 48-60} peptide to VH CDR of 3D8 scFv antibody. {yields} {sub H3}Tat-3D8 antibody retains nucleic acid binding and hydrolyzing activities. {yields} {sub H3}Tat-3D8 acquires a preference for TAR RNA structure. {yields} Properties of Tat{sub 48-60} is transferred to an antibody via Tat-grafting into a CDR. -- Abstract: The 3D8 single chain variable fragment (3D8 scFv) is an anti-nucleic acid antibody that can hydrolyze nucleic acids and enter the cytosol of cells without reaching the nucleus. The Tat peptide, derived from the basic region of the HIV-1 Tat protein, translocates to cell nuclei and has TAR RNA binding activity. In this study, we generated a Tat-grafted antibody ({sub H3}Tat-3D8) by replacing complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) within the VH domain of the 3D8 scFv with a Tat{sub 48-60} peptide (GRKKRRQRRRPPQ). {sub H3}Tat-3D8 retained the DNA-binding and DNA-hydrolyzing activity of the scFv, and translocated to the nuclei of HeLa cells and preferentially recognized TAR RNA. Thus, the properties associated with the Tat peptide were transferred to the antibody via Tat-grafting without loss of the intrinsic DNA-binding and hydrolyzing activities of the 3D8 scFv antibody.

  5. Sequence-specific formation of d-amino acids in a monoclonal antibody during light exposure.

    PubMed

    Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The photoirradiation of a monoclonal antibody 1 (mAb1) at λ = 254 nm and λmax = 305 nm resulted in the sequence-specific generation of d-Val, d-Tyr, and potentially d-Ala and d-Arg, in the heavy chain sequence [95-101] YCARVVY. d-Amino acid formation is most likely the product of reversible intermediary carbon-centered radical formation at the (α)C-positions of the respective amino acids ((α)C(•) radicals) through the action of Cys thiyl radicals (CysS(•)). The latter can be generated photochemically either through direct homolysis of cystine or through photoinduced electron transfer from Trp and/or Tyr residues. The potential of mAb1 sequences to undergo epimerization was first evaluated through covalent H/D exchange during photoirradiation in D2O, and proteolytic peptides exhibiting deuterium incorporation were monitored by HPLC-MS/MS analysis. Subsequently, mAb1 was photoirradiated in H2O, and peptides, for which deuterium incorporation in D2O had been documented, were purified by HPLC and subjected to hydrolysis and amino acid analysis. Importantly, not all peptide sequences which incorporated deuterium during photoirradiation in D2O also exhibited photoinduced d-amino acid formation. For example, the heavy chain sequence [12-18] VQPGGSL showed significant deuterium incorporation during photoirradiation in D2O, but no photoinduced formation of d-amino acids was detected. Instead this sequence contained ca. 22% d-Val in both a photoirradiated and a control sample. This observation could indicate that d-Val may have been generated either during production and/or storage or during sample preparation. While sample preparation did not lead to the formation of d-Val or other d-amino acids in the control sample for the heavy chain sequence [95-101] YCARVVY, we may have to consider that during hydrolysis N-terminal residues (such as in VQPGGSL) may be more prone to epimerization. We conclude that the photoinduced, radical-dependent formation of d-amino acids

  6. Nitrogen isotope effects on glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, L.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-05-03

    The nitrogen isotope effect on the decarboxylation of glutamic acid by glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli has been measured by comparison of the isotopic composition of the amino nitrogen of the product ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid isolated after 10-20% reaction with that of the starting glutamic acid. At pH 4.7, 37 /sup 0/C, the isotope effect is k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9855 +/- 0.0006 when compared to unprotonated glutamic acid. Interpretation of this result requires knowledge of the equilibrium nitrogen isotope effect for Schiff base formation. This equilibrium isotope effect is K/sup 14//K/sup 15/ - 0.9824 for the formation of the unprotonated Schiff base between unprotonated valine and salicylaldehyde. Analysis of the nitrogen isotope effect on decarboxylation of glutamic acid and of the previously measured carbon isotope effect on this same reaction shows that decarboxylation and Schiff base formation are jointly rate limiting. The enzyme-bound Schiff base between glutamate and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate partitions approximately 2:1 between decarboxylation and return to the starting state. The nitrogen isotope effect also reveals that the Schiff base nitrogen is protonated in this intermediate.

  7. Effect of the mobile phase on antibody-based enantiomer separations of amino acids in high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hofstetter, Oliver; Lindstrom, Heather; Hofstetter, Heike

    2004-09-17

    The effect of the mobile phase parameters flow rate, temperature, pH and ionic strength, as well as the addition of various organic modifiers on the enantiomer separation of various aromatic alpha-amino acids was investigated using two antibody-based chiral stationary phases that have opposing stereoselectivity. On both columns, a decrease in flow rate or temperature resulted in increased interaction with the retained enantiomer. It was found that the retention factor k2 depends on the affinity between the analyte and the immobilized antibody and is not independent of the flow rate. Optimum separations of all amino acids investigated were obtained at pH 7.4 on both columns. While increased k2 values were obtained at low ionic strength on the anti-D-amino acid antibody column, no such effect was observed on the anti-L-amino acid antibody column. The addition of organic modifiers did not improve separations. In all studies, the unretained enantiomer eluted with the void volume.

  8. Polyamine formation by arginine decarboxylase as a transducer of hormonal, environmental and stress stimuli in higher plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galston, A. W.; Flores, H. E.; Kaur-Sawhney, R.

    1982-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates polyamines including putrescine in the regulation of such diverse plant processes as cell division, embryogenesis and senescence. We find that the enzyme arginine decarboxylase, which controls the rate of putrescine formation in some plant systems, is activated by light acting through P(r) phytochrome as a receptor, by the plant hormone gibberellic acid, by osmotic shock and by other stress stimuli. We therefore propose arginine decarboxylase as a possible transducer of the various initially received tropistic stimuli in plants. The putrescine formed could act by affecting cytoskeletal components.

  9. Absence of malonyl coenzyme A decarboxylase in mice increases cardiac glucose oxidation and protects the heart from ischemic injury

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acute pharmacological inhibition of cardiac malonyl coenzyme A decarboxylase (MCD) protects the heart from ischemic damage by inhibiting fatty acid oxidation and stimulating glucose oxidation. However, it is unknown whether chronic inhibition of MCD results in altered cardiac function, energy metabo...

  10. Induction of dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) decarboxylase in blowfly integument by ecdysone. A demonstration of synthesis of the enzyme de novo.

    PubMed Central

    Fragoulis, E G; Sekeris, C E

    1975-01-01

    The activity of the enzyme dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) decarboxylase, present in the epidermis cells of blowfly larvae, increases during the late third instar under the influence of the steroid hormone, ecdysone. By using the double-labelling technique and immune precipitation with univalent antibody to dopa decarboxylase, we demonstrated that the increase in enzyme activity was due to a stimulation of synthesis of enzyme molecules de novo. In this respect, the action of ecdysone is similar to the action of other steroid hormones. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:807198

  11. Evidence for PQQ as cofactor in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) decarboxylase of pig kidney.

    PubMed

    Groen, B W; van der Meer, R A; Duine, J A

    1988-09-12

    Pig kidney 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.28) was purified to homogeneity. Treatment of the enzyme with phenylhydrazine (PH) according to a procedure developed for analysis of quinoproteins gave products which were identified as the hydrazone of pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) and the C(5)-hydrazone of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ). This method failed, however, in quantifying the amounts of cofactor. Direct hydrolysis of the enzyme by refluxing with hexanol and concentrated HCl led to detachment of PQQ from the protein in a quantity of 1 PQQ per enzyme molecule. In view of the reactivity of PQQ towards amines and amino acids, we postulate that it participates as a covalently bound cofactor in the catalytic cycle of the enzyme, in interplay with PLP. Since several other enzymes have been reported to show the atypical behaviour of dopa decarboxylase, it seems that the PLP-containing group of enzymes can be subdivided into pyridoxoproteins and pyridoxo-quinoproteins.

  12. Observation of superoxide production during catalysis of Bacillus subtilis oxalate decarboxylase at pH 4.

    PubMed

    Twahir, Umar T; Stedwell, Corey N; Lee, Cory T; Richards, Nigel G J; Polfer, Nicolas C; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    This contribution describes the trapping of the hydroperoxyl radical at a pH of 4 during turnover of wild-type oxalate decarboxylase and its T165V mutant using the spin-trap BMPO. Radicals were detected and identified by a combination of EPR and mass spectrometry. Superoxide, or its conjugate acid, the hydroperoxyl radical, is expected as an intermediate in the decarboxylation and oxidation reactions of the oxalate monoanion, both of which are promoted by oxalate decarboxylase. Another intermediate, the carbon dioxide radical anion was also observed. The quantitative yields of superoxide trapping are similar in the wild type and the mutant while it is significantly different for the trapping of the carbon dioxide radical anion. This suggests that the two radicals are released from different sites of the protein. PMID:25526893

  13. Observation of Superoxide Production During Catalysis of Bacillus subtilis Oxalate Decarboxylase at pH4

    PubMed Central

    Twahir, Umar T.; Stedwell, Corey N.; Lee, Cory T.; Richards, Nigel G. J.; Polfer, Nicolas C.; Angerhofer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This contribution describes the trapping of the hydroperoxyl radical at a pH of 4 during turnover of wild-type oxalate decarboxylase and its T165V mutant using the spin trap BMPO. Radicals were detected and identified by a combination of EPR and mass spectrometry. Superoxide, or its conjugate acid, the hydroperoxyl radical, is expected as an intermediate in the decarboxylation and oxidation reactions of the oxalate monoanion both of which are promoted by oxalate decarboxylase. Another intermediate, the carbon dioxide radical anion was also observed. The quantitative yields of superoxide trapping is similar in the wild type and the mutant while it is significantly different for the trapping of the carbon dioxide radical anion. This suggests that the two radicals are released from different sites of the protein. PMID:25526893

  14. Sequencing, characterization, and gene expression analysis of the histidine decarboxylase gene cluster of Morganella morganii.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Chiara; Borgo, Francesca; de Las Rivas, Blanca; Muñoz, Rosario; Ricci, Giovanni; Fortina, Maria Grazia

    2014-03-01

    The histidine decarboxylase gene cluster of Morganella morganii DSM30146(T) was sequenced, and four open reading frames, named hdcT1, hdc, hdcT2, and hisRS were identified. Two putative histidine/histamine antiporters (hdcT1 and hdcT2) were located upstream and downstream the hdc gene, codifying a pyridoxal-P dependent histidine decarboxylase, and followed by hisRS gene encoding a histidyl-tRNA synthetase. This organization was comparable with the gene cluster of other known Gram negative bacteria, particularly with that of Klebsiella oxytoca. Recombinant Escherichia coli strains harboring plasmids carrying the M. morganii hdc gene were shown to overproduce histidine decarboxylase, after IPTG induction at 37 °C for 4 h. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments revealed the hdc and hisRS genes were highly induced under acidic and histidine-rich conditions. This work represents the first description and identification of the hdc-related genes in M. morganii. Results support the hypothesis that the histidine decarboxylation reaction in this prolific histamine producing species may play a role in acid survival. The knowledge of the role and the regulation of genes involved in histidine decarboxylation should improve the design of rational strategies to avoid toxic histamine production in foods.

  15. Prostate-specific RNA aptamer: promising nucleic acid antibody-like cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Karina; Neves, Adriana F.; Rocha, Rafael M.; Faria, Paulo R.; Alves, Patrícia T.; Souza, Aline G.; Fujimura, Patrícia T.; Santos, Fabiana A. A.; Araújo, Thaise G.; Ward, Laura S.; Goulart, Luiz R.

    2015-01-01

    We described the selection of a novel nucleic acid antibody-like prostate cancer (PCa) that specifically binds to the single-stranded DNA molecule from a 277-nt fragment that may have been partially paired and bound to the PCA3 RNA conformational structure. PCA3-277 aptamer ligands were obtained, and the best binding molecule, named CG3, was synthesized for validation. Aiming to prove its diagnostic utility, we used an apta-qPCR assay with CG3-aptamer conjugated to magnetic beads to capture PCA3 transcripts, which were amplified 97-fold and 7-fold higher than conventional qPCR in blood and tissue, respectively. Histopathologic analysis of 161 prostate biopsies arranged in a TMA and marked with biotin-labeled CG3-aptamer showed moderate staining in both cytoplasm and nucleus of PCa samples; in contrast, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) samples presented strong nuclear staining (78% of the cases). No staining was observed in stromal cells. In addition, using an apta-qPCR, we demonstrated that CG3-aptamer specifically recognizes the conformational PCA3-277 molecule and at least three other transcript variants, indicating that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is processed after transcription. We suggest that CG3-aptamer may be a useful PCa diagnostic tool. In addition, this molecule may be used in drug design and drug delivery for PCa therapy. PMID:26174796

  16. Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA) Receptor 5 Inhibits B Cell Antigen Receptor Signaling and Antibody Response1

    PubMed Central

    Shotts, Kristin; Donovan, Erin E.; Strauch, Pamela; Pujanauski, Lindsey M.; Victorino, Francisco; Al-Shami, Amin; Fujiwara, Yuko; Tigyi, Gabor; Oravecz, Tamas; Pelanda, Roberta; Torres, Raul M.

    2014-01-01

    Lysophospholipids have emerged as biologically important chemoattractants capable of directing lymphocyte development, trafficking and localization. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a major lysophospholipid found systemically and whose levels are elevated in certain pathological settings such as cancer and infections. Here, we demonstrate that BCR signal transduction by mature murine B cells is inhibited upon LPA engagement of the LPA5 (GPR92) receptor via a Gα12/13 – Arhgef1 pathway. The inhibition of BCR signaling by LPA5 manifests by impaired intracellular calcium store release and most likely by interfering with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor activity. We further show that LPA5 also limits antigen-specific induction of CD69 and CD86 expression and that LPA5-deficient B cells display enhanced antibody responses. Thus, these data show that LPA5 negatively regulates BCR signaling, B cell activation and immune response. Our findings extend the influence of lysophospholipids on immune function and suggest that alterations in LPA levels likely influence adaptive humoral immunity. PMID:24890721

  17. Are Onconeural Antibodies a Clinical Phenomenology in Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongliang; Zhou, Chunkui; Wu, Limin; Ni, Fengming; Zhu, Jie; Jin, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs) occur in patients with cancer and can cause clinical symptoms and signs of dysfunction of the nervous system that are not due to a local effect of the tumor or its metastases. Most of these clinical syndromes in adults are associated with lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer (SCLC), lymphoma, and gynecological tumors. The finding of highly specific antibodies directed against onconeural antigens has revolutionized the diagnosis and promoted the understanding of these syndromes and led to the current hypothesis of an autoimmune pathophysiology. Accumulating data strongly suggested direct pathogenicity of these antibodies. The field of PNS has expanded rapidly in the past few years with the discovery of limbic encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65, the voltage (VGKC-gated potassium channel) complex, the methyl (N-NMDA-D-aspartate), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) (B) receptors, and so forth. Despite this, the clinical spectrum of these diseases has not yet been fully investigated. The clinical importance of these conditions lies in their frequent response to immunotherapies and, less commonly, their association with distinctive tumors. This review provides an overview on the pathogenesis and diagnosis of PNS, with emphasis on the role of antibodies in limbic encephalitis. PMID:23983403

  18. Immunological Detection and Quantitation of Tryptophan Decarboxylase in Developing Catharanthus roseus Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Jesus Alvarez; Owen, Terence G.; Kurz, Wolfgang G. W.; De Luca, Vincenzo

    1989-01-01

    l-Tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) (EC 4.2.1.27) enzyme activity was induced in cell suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus after treatment with a Pythium aphanidermatum elicitor preparation. The enzyme was extracted from lyophilized cells containing high levels of TDC and the protein was purified to homogeneity. The pure protein was used to produce highly specific polyclonal antibodies, and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to quantitate the level of TDC antigen during seedling development and in leaves of the mature plant. Western immunoblotting of proteins after SDS-PAGE with anti-TDC antibodies detected several immunoreactive proteins (40, 44, 54.8, 55, and 67 kilodaltons) which appeared at different stages during seedling development and in leaves of the mature plant. The major 54.8 and 55 kilodalton antigenic proteins in immunoblots appeared transiently between days 1 to 5 and 5 to 8 of seedling development, respectively. The 54.8 kilodalton protein was devoid of TDC enzyme activity, whereas the appearance of the 55 kilodalton protein coincided with the appearance of this decarboxylase activity. The minor immunoreactive proteins (40, 44, and 67 kilodaltons) appeared after day 5 of seedling development and in older leaves of the mature plant, and their relationship, if any, to TDC is presently unknown. Results suggest that the synthesis and degradation of TDC protein is highly regulated in Catharanthus roseus and that this regulation follows a preset developmental program. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:16667047

  19. The ornithine decarboxylase gene odc is required for alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis in Bordetella spp.: putrescine is a precursor of alcaligin.

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, T J; Armstrong, S K

    1996-01-01

    Chromosomal insertions defining Bordetella bronchiseptica siderophore phenotypic complementation group III mutants BRM3 and BRM5 were found to reside approximately 200 to 300 bp apart by restriction mapping of cloned genomic regions associated with the insertion markers. DNA hybridization analysis using B. bronchiseptica genomic DNA sequences flanking the cloned BRM3 insertion marker identified homologous Bordetella pertussis UT25 cosmids that complemented the siderophore biosynthesis defect of the group III B. bronchiseptica mutants. Subcloning and complementation analysis localized the complementing activity to a 2.8-kb B. pertussis genomic DNA region. Nucleotide sequencing identified an open reading frame predicted to encode a polypeptide exhibiting strong similarity at the primary amino acid level with several pyridoxal phosphate-dependent amino acid decarboxylases. Alcaligin production was fully restored to group III mutants by supplementation of iron-depleted culture media with putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane), consistent with defects in an ornithine decarboxylase activity required for alcaligin siderophore biosynthesis. Concordantly, the alcaligin biosynthesis defect of BRM3 was functionally complemented by the heterologous Escherichia coli speC gene encoding an ornithine decarboxylase activity. Enzyme assays confirmed that group III B. bronchiseptica siderophore-deficient mutants lack an ornithine decarboxylase activity required for the biosynthesis of alcaligin. Siderophore production by an analogous mutant of B. pertussis constructed by allelic exchange was undetectable. We propose the designation odc for the gene defined by these mutations that abrogate alcaligin siderophore production. Putrescine is an essential precursor of alcaligin in Bordetella spp. PMID:8550442

  20. Antibody Binding Specificity for Kappa (Vκ) Light Chain-containing Human (IgM) Antibodies: Polysialic Acid (PSA) Attached to NCAM as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Watzlawik, Jens O.; Kahoud, Robert J.; Wootla, Bharath; Painter, Meghan M.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Carey, William A.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies of the IgM isotype are often neglected as potential therapeutics in human trials, animal models of human diseases as well as detecting agents in standard laboratory techniques. In contrast, several human IgMs demonstrated proof of efficacy in cancer models and models of CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Reasons for their lack of consideration include difficulties to express, purify and stabilize IgM antibodies, challenge to identify (non-protein) antigens, low affinity binding and fundamental knowledge gaps in carbohydrate and lipid research. This manuscript uses HIgM12 as an example to provide a detailed protocol to detect antigens by Western blotting, immunoprecipitations and immunocytochemistry. HIgM12 targets polysialic acid (PSA) attached to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Early postnatal mouse brain tissue from wild type (WT) and NCAM knockout (KO) mice lacking the three major central nervous system (CNS) splice variants NCAM180, 140 and 120 was used to evaluate the importance of NCAM for binding to HIgM12. Further enzymatic digestion of CNS tissue and cultured CNS cells using endoneuraminidases led us to identify PSA as the specific binding epitope for HIgM12. PMID:27404858

  1. Specificity of the antibody receptor site to D-lysergamide: model of a physiological receptor for lysergic acid diethylamide.

    PubMed

    Van Vunakis, H; Farrow, J T; Gjika, H B; Levine, L

    1971-07-01

    Antibodies to D-lysergic acid have been produced in rabbits and guinea pigs and a radioimmunoassay for the hapten was developed. The specificity of this lysergamide-antilysergamide reaction was determined by competitive binding with unlabeled lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psychotomimetic drugs, neurotransmitters, and other compounds with diverse structures. LSD and several related ergot alkaloids were potent competitors, three to seven times more potent than lysergic acid itself. The N,N-dimethyl derivatives of several compounds, including tryptamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, 4-hydroxytryptamine, 5-methoxytryptamine, tyramine, and mescaline, were only about ten times less effective than lysergic acid, even though these compounds lack some of the ring systems of lysergic acid. The pattern of inhibition by related compounds with various substituents suggests that the antibody receptor site recognizes structural features resembling the LSD molecule. In particular, the aromatic nucleus and the dimethylated ethylamine side chain in phenylethylamine and tryptamine derivatives may assume in solution a conformation resembling ring A and the methylated nitrogen in ring C of LSD. Among the tryptamine derivatives, a large percentage of the most potent competitors are also psychotomimetic compounds.

  2. Molecular cloning and functional identification of a plant ornithine decarboxylase cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Michael, A J; Furze, J M; Rhodes, M J; Burtin, D

    1996-01-01

    A cDNA for a plant ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), a key enzyme in putrescine and polyamine biosynthesis, has been isolated from root cultures of the solanaceous plant Datura stramonium. Reverse transcription-PCR employing degenerate oligonucleotide primers representing conserved motifs from other eukaryotic ODCs was used to isolate the cDNA. The longest open reading frame potentially encodes a peptide of 431 amino acids and exhibits similarity to other eukaryotic ODCs, prokaryotic and eukaryotic arginine decarboxylases (ADCs), prokaryotic meso-diaminopimelate decarboxylases and the product of the tabA gene of Pseudomonas syringae cv. tabaci. Residues involved at the active site of the mouse ODC are conserved in the plant enzyme. The plant ODC does not possess the C-terminal extension found in the mammalian enzyme, implicated in rapid turnover of the protein, suggesting that the plant ODC may have a longer half-life. Expression of the plant ODC in Escherichia coli and demonstration of ODC activity confirmed that the cDNA encodes an active ODC enzyme. This is the first description of the primary structure of a eukaryotic ODC isolated from an organism where the alternative ADC routine to putrescine is present. PMID:8660289

  3. Surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence implementation of a single-step competition assay: demonstration of fatty acid measurement using an anti-fatty acid monoclonal antibody and a Cy5-labeled fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Vareiro, Margarida M L M; Tranchant, Isabelle; Maplin, Sandra; Zak, Kris; Gani, M M; Slevin, Christopher J; Hailes, Helen C; Tabor, Alethea B; Cameron, Petra J; Jenkins, A Toby A; Williams, David E

    2008-06-15

    The development of a single-step, separation-free method for measurement of low concentrations of fatty acid using a surface plasmon resonance-enhanced fluorescence competition assay with a surface-bound antibody is described. The assay behavior was unexpectedly complex. A nonlinear coverage-dependent self-quenching of emission from surface-bound fluorescent label was deduced from the response kinetics and attributed to a surface plasmon-mediated energy transfer between adsorbed fluorophores, modified by the effects of plasmon interference. Principles of assay design to avoid complications from such effects are discussed. An anti-fatty acid mouse monoclonal antibody reacting to the alkyl chain was prepared and supported on a gold chip at a spacing appropriate for surface-plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPEFS), by applying successively a self-assembled biotinylated monolayer, then streptavidin, then biotinylated protein A, and then the antibody, which was crosslinked to the protein A. Synthesis of a fluorescently (Cy5) tagged C-11 fatty acid is reported. SPEFS was used to follow the kinetics of the binding of the labeled fatty acid to the antibody, and to implement a competition assay with free fatty acid (undecanoic acid), sensitive at the 1 microM scale, a sensitivity limit caused by the low affinity of antibodies for free fatty acids, rather than the SPEFS technique itself. Free fatty acid concentration in human serum is in the range 0.1-1mM, suggesting that this measurement approach could be applied in a clinical diagnostic context. Finally, a predictive, theoretical model of fatty acid binding was developed that accounted for the observed "overshoot" kinetics.

  4. Auto-Antibodies and Their Association with Clinical Findings in Women Diagnosed with Microscopic Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, Bodil

    2013-01-01

    Background Microscopic colitis (MC) is a disease manifested by diarrhoea and is divided into collagenous and lymphocytic colitis. The aetiology is unknown, but auto-immunity is suggested. Auto-antibodies have been only rarely examined in this entity. The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of auto-antibodies, and to examine associations between the presence of antibodies and clinical findings. Methods and Findings Women with MC verified by biopsy and younger than 73 years, at any Department of Gastroenterology, in the district of Skåne, between 2002 and 2010 were invited to participate in this study. The patients were asked to complete both a questionnaire describing their medical history and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). Blood samples were collected. Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA), and antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD), islet antigens-like insulin 2 (anti-IA2), thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), and thyrotropin receptor (TRAK) were analysed. Of 240 women identified, 133 were finally included in the study, median age 63 (59–67) years. Apart from the MC diagnosis, 52% also suffered from irritable bowel syndrome, 31% from hypertension and 31% from allergy. The prevalence of ANA (14%), ASCA IgG (13%), and anti-TPO antibodies (14%) for these patients was slightly higher than for the general population, and were found together with other concomitant diseases. Patients had more of all gastrointestinal symptoms compared with norm values, irrespective of antibody expression. Conclusions Women with MC have a slightly increased prevalence of some auto-antibodies. These antibodies are not associated with symptoms, but are expressed in patients with concomitant diseases, obscuring the pathophysiology and clinical picture of MC. PMID:23776613

  5. Perturbation of the Monomer-Monomer Interfaces of the Benzoylformate Decarboxylase Tetramer

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Forest H.; Rogers, Megan P.; Paul, Lake N.; McLeish, Michael J.

    2014-08-14

    The X-ray structure of benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC) from Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633 shows it to be a tetramer. This was believed to be typical of all thiamin diphosphate-dependent decarboxylases until recently when the structure of KdcA, a branched-chain 2-keto acid decarboxylase from Lactococcus lactis, showed it to be a homodimer. This lent credence to earlier unfolding experiments on pyruvate decarboxylase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that indicated that it might be active as a dimer. To investigate this possibility in BFDC, we sought to shift the equilibrium toward dimer formation. Point mutations were made in the noncatalytic monomer–monomer interfaces, but these had a minimal effect on both tetramer formation and catalytic activity. Subsequently, the R141E/Y288A/A306F variant was shown by analytical ultracentrifugation to be partially dimeric. It was also found to be catalytically inactive. Further experiments revealed that just two mutations, R141E and A306F, were sufficient to markedly alter the dimer–tetramer equilibrium and to provide an ~450-fold decrease in kcat. Equilibrium denaturation studies suggested that the residual activity was possibly due to the presence of residual tetramer. The structures of the R141E and A306F variants, determined to <1.5 Å resolution, hinted that disruption of the monomer interfaces will be accompanied by movement of a loop containing Leu109 and Leu110. As these residues contribute to the hydrophobicity of the active site and the correct positioning of the substrate, it seems that tetramer formation may well be critical to the catalytic activity of BFDC.

  6. Keto-isovalerate decarboxylase enzymes and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    McElvain, Jessica; O'Keefe, Daniel P.; Paul, Brian James; Payne, Mark S.; Rothman, Steven Cary; He, Hongxian

    2016-01-19

    Provided herein are polypeptides and polynucleotides encoding such polypeptides which have ketoisovalerate decarboxylase activity. Also provided are recombinant host cells comprising such polypeptides and polynucleotides and methods of use thereof.

  7. Separation of post-translational modifications in monoclonal antibodies by exploiting subtle conformational changes under mildly acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyi; Ionescu, Roxana; Peekhaus, Norbert; Leung, Jin-Yu; Ha, Sha; Vlasak, Josef

    2010-10-15

    Chromatographic separation plays a key role in the identification, quantification, and characterization of protein variants. Here we describe separation of species containing two post-translational modifications (glycosylation and methionine oxidation) in the Fc fragment of a monoclonal antibody. The method is based on cation-exchange chromatography under mildly acidic conditions that destabilize mainly the CH2 domain. Our data suggest that the separation is not mediated by the chemical modification itself, but rather by subtle structural changes induced by the chemical modification in the domain-decoupled conformation that monoclonal antibodies adopt around pH 4. Compared to other procedures already described in the literature, this method demonstrates an improved separation and allows purification of species in the native fold for additional functional characterization. This approach of separation under conditions where the protein assumes an alternative conformation could find a more general utility for the separation of chemical modifications in proteins.

  8. A role for glutamate decarboxylase during tomato ripening: the characterisation of a cDNA encoding a putative glutamate decarboxylase with a calmodulin-binding site.

    PubMed

    Gallego, P P; Whotton, L; Picton, S; Grierson, D; Gray, J E

    1995-03-01

    A tomato fruit cDNA library was differentially screened to identify mRNAs present at higher levels in fruit of the tomato ripening mutant rin (ripening inhibitor). Complete sequencing of a unique clone ERT D1 revealed an open reading frame with homology to several glutamate decarboxylases. The deduced polypeptide sequence has 80% overall amino acid sequence similarity to a Petunia hybrida glutamate decarboxylase (petGAD) which carries a calmodulin-binding site at its carboxyl terminus and ERT D1 appears to have a similar domain. ERT D1 mRNA levels peaked at the first visible sign of fruit colour change during normal tomato ripening and then declined, whereas in fruit of the ripening impaired mutant, rin, accumulation of this mRNA continued until at least 14 days after the onset of ripening. This mRNA was present at much lower levels in other tissues, such as leaves, roots and stem, and was not increased by wounding. Possible roles for GAD, and its product gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in fruit, are discussed.

  9. Characterization of a second ornithine decarboxylase isolated from Morganella morganii.

    PubMed

    De Las Rivas, Blanca; González, Ramón; Landete, José María; Muñoz, Rosario

    2008-03-01

    The genes involved in the putrescine formation by Morganella morganii were investigated because putrescine is an indicator of food process deterioration. We report here on the existence of a new gene for ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) in M. morganii. The sequenced 5,311-bp DNA region showed the presence of four complete and one partial open reading frame. Putative functions have been assigned to several gene products by sequence comparison with the proteins included in the databases. The third open reading frame (speC) encoded a 722-amino acid protein showing 70.9% identity to the M. morganii ODC previously characterized (SpeF). The speC gene has been expressed in Escherichia coli, resulting in ODC activity. The presence of a functional promoter (PspeC) located upstream of speC has been demonstrated. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR assay was used to quantify expression of both M. morganii ODC-encoding genes, speC and speF, under different growth conditions. This assay allows us to identify SpeF as the inducible M. morganii ODC, since it was highly expressed in the presence of ornithine.

  10. Ornithine decarboxylase and S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase in skin fibroblasts of normal and cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Buehler, B; Wright, R; Schott, S; Darby, B; Rennert, O M

    1977-03-01

    The key enzymes in the synthesis of the naturally occurring polyamines, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) decarboxylase, were investigated during cell growth and aging in fibroblast cultures from normal patients and patients with cystic fibrosis. A linear correlation between increased S-adenosyl methionine activity and putrescine concentration was apparent in all cell lines. A putrescine concentration of 0.8 mM was optimal for enhancement of SAM decarboxylase activity. The passage number of the cell line correlated inversely with maximal putrescine-stimulated SAM decarboxylase activity, earlier passage numbers having the highest specific activity (Fig. 1). No significant differences in basal or putrescine-stimulated SAM decarboxylase activity were noted between normal fibroblast cultures and cells from patients with cystic fibrosis (Fig. 2). SAM decarboxylase activity increased as the cell lines approached confluence. Activity was lowest during exponential growth (Fig. 3). ODC activity was increased during early exponential growth and fell as cells reached confluence (Fig. 4). No differences in ODC activity and putrescine inhibition between the normal and cystic fibrosis cell cultures at equivalent points of exponential growth were noted.

  11. Kinetic Characterisation of a Single Chain Antibody against the Hormone Abscisic Acid: Comparison with Its Parental Monoclonal.

    PubMed

    Badescu, George O; Marsh, Andrew; Smith, Timothy R; Thompson, Andrew J; Napier, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    A single-chain Fv fragment antibody (scFv) specific for the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli as a fusion protein. The kinetics of ABA binding have been measured using surface plasmon resonance spectrometry (BIAcore 2000) using surface and solution assays. Care was taken to calculate the concentration of active protein in each sample using initial rate measurements under conditions of partial mass transport limitation. The fusion product, parental monoclonal antibody and the free scFv all have low nanomolar affinity constants, but there is a lower dissociation rate constant for the parental monoclonal resulting in a three-fold greater affinity. Analogue specificity was tested and structure-activity binding preferences measured. The biologically-active (+)-ABA enantiomer is recognised with an affinity three orders of magnitude higher than the inactive (-)-ABA. Metabolites of ABA including phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid and deoxy-ABA have affinities over 100-fold lower than that for (+)-ABA. These properties of the scFv make it suitable as a sensor domain in bioreporters specific for the naturally occurring form of ABA.

  12. Kinetic Characterisation of a Single Chain Antibody against the Hormone Abscisic Acid: Comparison with Its Parental Monoclonal

    PubMed Central

    Badescu, George O.; Marsh, Andrew; Smith, Timothy R.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Napier, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    A single-chain Fv fragment antibody (scFv) specific for the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli as a fusion protein. The kinetics of ABA binding have been measured using surface plasmon resonance spectrometry (BIAcore 2000) using surface and solution assays. Care was taken to calculate the concentration of active protein in each sample using initial rate measurements under conditions of partial mass transport limitation. The fusion product, parental monoclonal antibody and the free scFv all have low nanomolar affinity constants, but there is a lower dissociation rate constant for the parental monoclonal resulting in a three-fold greater affinity. Analogue specificity was tested and structure-activity binding preferences measured. The biologically-active (+)-ABA enantiomer is recognised with an affinity three orders of magnitude higher than the inactive (-)-ABA. Metabolites of ABA including phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid and deoxy-ABA have affinities over 100-fold lower than that for (+)-ABA. These properties of the scFv make it suitable as a sensor domain in bioreporters specific for the naturally occurring form of ABA. PMID:27023768

  13. Endogenous Inactivators of Arginase, l-Arginine Decarboxylase, and Agmatine Amidinohydrolase in Evernia prunastri Thallus 1

    PubMed Central

    Legaz, María Estrella; Vicente, Carlos

    1983-01-01

    Arginase (EC 3.5.3.1), l-arginine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.19), and agmatine amidinohydrolase (EC 3.5.3.11) activities spontaneously decay in Evernia prunastri thalli incubated on 40 millimolar l-arginine used as inducer of the three enzymes if dithiothreitol is not added to the media. Lichen thalli accumulate both chloroatranorin and evernic acid in parallel to the loss of activity. These substances behave as inactivators of the enzymes at a range of concentrations between 2 and 20 micromolar, whereas several concentrations of dithiothreitol reverse, to some extent, the in vitro inactivation. PMID:16662821

  14. Properties of oxaloacetate decarboxylase from Veillonella parvula.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, S K; Wong, M; Hamilton, I R

    1982-01-01

    Oxaloacetate decarboxylase was purified to 136-fold from the oral anaerobe Veillonella parvula. The purified enzyme was substantially free of contaminating enzymes or proteins. Maximum activity of the enzyme was exhibited at pH 7.0 for both carboxylation and decarboxylation. At this pH, the Km values for oxaloacetate and Mg2+ were at 0.06 and 0.17 mM, respectively, whereas the Km values for pyruvate, CO2, and Mg2+ were 3.3, 1.74, and 1.85 mM, respectively. Hyperbolic kinetics were observed with all of the aforementioned compounds. The Keq' was 2.13 X 10(-3) mM-1 favoring the decarboxylation of oxaloacetate. In the carboxylation step, avidin, acetyl coenzyme A, biotin, and coenzyme A were not required. ADP and NADH had no effect on either the carboxylation or decarboxylation step, but ATP inhibited the carboxylation step competitively and the decarboxylation step noncompetitively. These types of inhibition fitted well with the overall lactate metabolism of the non-carbohydrate-fermenting anaerobe. PMID:7076619

  15. HA Antibody-Mediated FcγRIIIa Activity Is Both Dependent on FcR Engagement and Interactions between HA and Sialic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Freek; Kwaks, Ted; Brandenburg, Boerries; Koldijk, Martin H.; Klaren, Vincent; Smal, Bastiaan; Korse, Hans J. W. M.; Geelen, Eric; Tettero, Lisanne; Zuijdgeest, David; Stoop, Esther J. M.; Saeland, Eirikur; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H. E.; Koudstaal, Wouter; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with receptors for the Fc region of IgG (FcγRs) have been shown to contribute to the in vivo protection against influenza A viruses provided by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that bind to the viral hemagglutinin (HA) stem. In particular, Fc-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) has been shown to contribute to protection by stem-binding bnAbs. Fc-mediated effector functions appear not to contribute to protection provided by strain-specific HA head-binding antibodies. We used a panel of anti-stem and anti-head influenza A and B monoclonal antibodies with identical human IgG1 Fc domains and investigated their ability to mediate ADCC-associated FcγRIIIa activation. Antibodies which do not interfere with sialic acid binding of HA can mediate FcγRIIIa activation. However, the FcγRIIIa activation was inhibited when a mutant HA, unable to bind sialic acids, was used. Antibodies which block sialic acid receptor interactions of HA interfered with FcγRIIIa activation. The inhibition of FcγRIIIa activation by HA head-binding and sialic acid receptor-blocking antibodies was confirmed in plasma samples of H5N1 vaccinated human subjects. Together, these results suggest that in addition to Fc–FcγR binding, interactions between HA and sialic acids on immune cells are required for optimal Fc-mediated effector functions by anti-HA antibodies. PMID:27746785

  16. Effects of down-regulating ornithine decarboxylase upon putrescine-associated metabolism and growth in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Heidi L; Blomstedt, Cecilia K; Neale, Alan D; Gleadow, Ros; DeBoer, Kathleen D; Hamill, John D

    2016-05-01

    Transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum L. homozygous for an RNAi construct designed to silence ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) had significantly lower concentrations of nicotine and nornicotine, but significantly higher concentrations of anatabine, compared with vector-only controls. Silencing of ODC also led to significantly reduced concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), tyramine and phenolamides (caffeoylputrescine and dicaffeoylspermidine) with concomitant increases in concentrations of amino acids ornithine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine. Root transcript levels of S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase, S-adenosyl methionine synthase and spermidine synthase (polyamine synthesis enzymes) were reduced compared with vector controls, whilst transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase (putrescine synthesis), putrescine methyltransferase (nicotine production) and multi-drug and toxic compound extrusion (alkaloid transport) proteins were elevated. In contrast, expression of two other key proteins required for alkaloid synthesis, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinic acid production) and a PIP-family oxidoreductase (nicotinic acid condensation reactions), were diminished in roots of odc-RNAi plants relative to vector-only controls. Transcriptional and biochemical differences associated with polyamine and alkaloid metabolism were exacerbated in odc-RNAi plants in response to different forms of shoot damage. In general, apex removal had a greater effect than leaf wounding alone, with a combination of these injury treatments producing synergistic responses in some cases. Reduced expression of ODC appeared to have negative effects upon plant growth and vigour with some leaves of odc-RNAi lines being brittle and bleached compared with vector-only controls. Together, results of this study demonstrate that ornithine decarboxylase has important roles in facilitating both primary and secondary metabolism in Nicotiana. PMID

  17. Effects of down-regulating ornithine decarboxylase upon putrescine-associated metabolism and growth in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Heidi L.; Blomstedt, Cecilia K.; Neale, Alan D.; Gleadow, Ros; DeBoer, Kathleen D.; Hamill, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum L. homozygous for an RNAi construct designed to silence ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) had significantly lower concentrations of nicotine and nornicotine, but significantly higher concentrations of anatabine, compared with vector-only controls. Silencing of ODC also led to significantly reduced concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), tyramine and phenolamides (caffeoylputrescine and dicaffeoylspermidine) with concomitant increases in concentrations of amino acids ornithine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine. Root transcript levels of S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase, S-adenosyl methionine synthase and spermidine synthase (polyamine synthesis enzymes) were reduced compared with vector controls, whilst transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase (putrescine synthesis), putrescine methyltransferase (nicotine production) and multi-drug and toxic compound extrusion (alkaloid transport) proteins were elevated. In contrast, expression of two other key proteins required for alkaloid synthesis, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinic acid production) and a PIP-family oxidoreductase (nicotinic acid condensation reactions), were diminished in roots of odc-RNAi plants relative to vector-only controls. Transcriptional and biochemical differences associated with polyamine and alkaloid metabolism were exacerbated in odc-RNAi plants in response to different forms of shoot damage. In general, apex removal had a greater effect than leaf wounding alone, with a combination of these injury treatments producing synergistic responses in some cases. Reduced expression of ODC appeared to have negative effects upon plant growth and vigour with some leaves of odc-RNAi lines being brittle and bleached compared with vector-only controls. Together, results of this study demonstrate that ornithine decarboxylase has important roles in facilitating both primary and secondary metabolism in Nicotiana. PMID

  18. Effects of down-regulating ornithine decarboxylase upon putrescine-associated metabolism and growth in Nicotiana tabacum L.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Heidi L; Blomstedt, Cecilia K; Neale, Alan D; Gleadow, Ros; DeBoer, Kathleen D; Hamill, John D

    2016-05-01

    Transgenic plants of Nicotiana tabacum L. homozygous for an RNAi construct designed to silence ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) had significantly lower concentrations of nicotine and nornicotine, but significantly higher concentrations of anatabine, compared with vector-only controls. Silencing of ODC also led to significantly reduced concentrations of polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine), tyramine and phenolamides (caffeoylputrescine and dicaffeoylspermidine) with concomitant increases in concentrations of amino acids ornithine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate and glutamine. Root transcript levels of S-adenosyl methionine decarboxylase, S-adenosyl methionine synthase and spermidine synthase (polyamine synthesis enzymes) were reduced compared with vector controls, whilst transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase (putrescine synthesis), putrescine methyltransferase (nicotine production) and multi-drug and toxic compound extrusion (alkaloid transport) proteins were elevated. In contrast, expression of two other key proteins required for alkaloid synthesis, quinolinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase (nicotinic acid production) and a PIP-family oxidoreductase (nicotinic acid condensation reactions), were diminished in roots of odc-RNAi plants relative to vector-only controls. Transcriptional and biochemical differences associated with polyamine and alkaloid metabolism were exacerbated in odc-RNAi plants in response to different forms of shoot damage. In general, apex removal had a greater effect than leaf wounding alone, with a combination of these injury treatments producing synergistic responses in some cases. Reduced expression of ODC appeared to have negative effects upon plant growth and vigour with some leaves of odc-RNAi lines being brittle and bleached compared with vector-only controls. Together, results of this study demonstrate that ornithine decarboxylase has important roles in facilitating both primary and secondary metabolism in Nicotiana.

  19. Amino acid interaction networks provide a new lens for therapeutic antibody discovery and anti-viral drug optimization.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Karthik; Shriver, Zachary; Babcock, Gregory J

    2015-04-01

    Identification of epitopes on viral proteins for the design/identification of broadly-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnAbs) or specific immunogens for vaccine development is hampered by target amino acid diversity. Recently, bnAbs have been isolated for variable viruses by screening B cells from infected individuals for neutralization breadth. Epitope mapping and structural analysis of bnAbs revealed, while some of these bnAbs target glycan moieties, most target protein regions that are conserved in sequence and/or structure. However, almost universally viruses develop mutations that allow escape from neutralization suggesting protein function may not be dependent on the observed conservation. An alternative method for identification of conserved amino acid sequences utilizes an amino acid network-based approach. Calculation of a significant interaction network (SIN) score allows for selection of amino acids that are conserved and constrained within the protein system. Amino acids with high SIN scores are predicted to mutate at lower frequency due to the impact mutation has on the structure/function of a protein. By ascertaining regions of high SIN score, therapeutics can be appropriately designed to target these regions of low mutability. Further, the use of atomic interaction networks to examine protein structure and protein-protein interfaces can complement existing structure-based computational approaches for therapeutic engineering. PMID:25913816

  20. Association between a polymorphism of the 65K-glutamate decarboxylase gene and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Kure, S.; Aoki, Y.; Narisawa, K.

    1994-09-01

    Autoimmunity against 65K-glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65), one of two forms of the {gamma}-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing enzyme, is commonly associated with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). To study the predisposing effect of the GAD65 genotype on IDDM, we performed a case-control study screening an association between a newly-identified GAD65 polymorphism and IDDM in the Japanese population. The identified polymorphism was a microsatellite that was located in an intron near the 3{prime} end of the GAD65 gene consisting of variable numbers of a (CA)-dinucleotide repeat. We amplified the polymorphic region by polymerase chain reaction, and, for each individual in the control group (n=254) and the IDDM group (n=108), determined a pair of (CA)-repeat numbers, each number derived from one or the other of their alleles. In both groups we found 13 allelic variants with different repeat numbers, ranging from 19 to 31 repeats of the (CA) dinucleotide. The most frequent allelic variant in the IDDM group was 20 repeats; (CA){sub 20}. A higher frequency of a genotype containing two (CA){sub 20} alleles (p=0.005) was observed in the IDDM group (41.7%) compared with the control group (26.8%). Odds ratio (a 95% confidence interval) for a heterozygote or a homozygote of (CA){sub 20} versus a subject without (CA){sub 20} was 1.2 (0.66-2.25) and 2.23 (1.18-4.21), respectively. No significant association was observed between the (CA)-repeat genotype and the appearance of anti-GAD antibodies in the patients whose duration of the diabetes was less than 4 years (n=35). Therefore, genetic variations in GAD65 appears to be associated with IDDM susceptibility.

  1. G glycoprotein amino acid residues required for human monoclonal antibody RAB1 neutralization are conserved in rabies virus street isolates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Rowley, Kirk J; Booth, Brian J; Sloan, Susan E; Ambrosino, Donna M; Babcock, Gregory J

    2011-08-01

    Replacement of polyclonal anti-rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) used in rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) with a monoclonal antibody will eliminate cost and availability constraints that currently exist using RIG in the developing world. The human monoclonal antibody RAB1 has been shown to neutralize all rabies street isolates tested; however for the laboratory-adapted fixed strain, CVS-11, mutation in the G glycoprotein of amino acid 336 from asparagine (N) to aspartic acid (D) resulted in resistance to neutralization. Interestingly, this same mutation in the G glycoprotein of a second laboratory-adapted fixed strain (ERA) did not confer resistance to RAB1 neutralization. Using cell surface staining and lentivirus pseudotyped with rabies virus G glycoprotein (RABVpp), we identified an amino acid alteration in CVS-11 (K346), not present in ERA (R346), which was required in combination with D336 to confer resistance to RAB1. A complete analysis of G glycoprotein sequences from GenBank demonstrated that no identified rabies isolates contain the necessary combination of G glycoprotein mutations for resistance to RAB1 neutralization, consistent with the broad neutralization of RAB1 observed in direct viral neutralization experiments with street isolates. All combinations of amino acids 336 and 346 reported in the sequence database were engineered into the ERA G glycoprotein and RAB1 was able to neutralize RABVpp bearing ERA G glycoprotein containing all known combinations at these critical residues. These data demonstrate that RAB1 has the capacity to neutralize all identified rabies isolates and a minimum of two distinct mutations in the G glycoprotein are required for abrogation of RAB1 neutralization.

  2. Ornithine Decarboxylase, Polyamines, and Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in Senecio and Crotalaria

    PubMed Central

    Birecka, Helena; Birecki, Mieczyslaw; Cohen, Eric J.; Bitonti, Alan J.; McCann, Peter P.

    1988-01-01

    When tested for ornithine and arginine decarboxylases, pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Senecio riddellii, S. longilobus (Compositae), and Crotalaria retusa (Leguminosae) plants exhibited only ornithine decarboxylase activity. This contrasts with previous studies of four species of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Heliotropium (Boraginaceae) in which arginine decarboxylase activity was very high relative to that of ornithine decarboxylase. Unlike Heliotropium angiospermum and Heliotropium indicum, in which endogenous arginine was the only detectable precursor of putrescine channeled into pyrrolizidines, in the species studied here—using difluoromethylornithine and difluoromethylarginine as the enzyme inhibitors—endogenous ornithine was the main if not the only precursor of putrescine converted into the alkaloid aminoalcohol moiety. In S. riddellii and C. retusa at flowering, ornithine decarboxylase activity was present mainly in leaves, especially the young ones. However, other very young organs such as inflorescence and growing roots exhibited much lower or very low activities; the enzyme activity in stems was negligible. There was no correlation between the enzyme activity and polyamine or alkaloid content in either species. In both species only free polyamines were detected except for C. retusa roots and inflorescence—with relatively very high levels of these compounds—in which conjugated putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were also found; agmatine was not identified by HPLC in any plant organ except for C. retusa roots with rhizobial nodules. Organ- or age-dependent differences in the polyamine levels were small or insignificant. The highest alkaloid contents were found in young leaves and inflorescence. PMID:16665870

  3. Arginine Decarboxylase of Oats Is Clipped from a Precursor into Two Polypeptides Found in the Soluble Enzyme 1

    PubMed Central

    Malmberg, Russell L.; Smith, Katherine E.; Bell, Erin; Cellino, Michael L.

    1992-01-01

    We have examined soluble oat (Avena sativa) arginine decarboxylase by probing its structure with polyclonal antibodies that separately recognize amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal antigens and with a monoclonal antibody that immunoprecipitates enzyme activity. These experiments indicated that oat arginine decarboxylase is clipped from a 66,000-D precursor polypeptide into 42,000- and 24,000-D produce polypeptides. Both of these are found in the enzyme and may be held together by disulfide bonds. A full-length precursor protein could not be detected in plants but could be produced by expression of the cDNA in Escherichia coli. Analysis of the expression of the cDNA in E. coli, with antibodies and using pulse labeling with [35S]methionine, indicated that the bulk of the expressed protein was the full-length 66,000-D form. Small amounts of 42,000- and 24,000-D polypeptides could also be detected. A reconstruction experiment, adding a radioactively labeled full-length protein isolated from E. coli to powdered oat leaves, supported the idea that the protein extraction method used for western blots was not likely to result in artifactual proteolytic degradation. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:16652937

  4. Increased humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in growing pigs pre-treated with poly-γ-glutamic acid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee-Hoon; Kang, Ik-Jae; Kim, A-Reum; Noh, You-Sun; Chung, Hee-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine improved in 8-week-old growing pigs born to well-vaccinated sows pre-treated with 60 mg of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) three days before vaccination. Antibody against FMD virus serotype O was measured 0, 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-vaccination, using a PrioCHECK FMDV type O ELISA kit. The results showed that positive antibody reactions against FMDV serotype O antigen among a component of the vaccine significantly increased in response to pre-injection with γ-PGA. PMID:26645341

  5. Frequent coexpression of the vesicular glutamate transporter 1 and 2 genes, as well as coexpression with genes for choline acetyltransferase or glutamic acid decarboxylase in neurons of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Danik, Marc; Cassoly, Estelle; Manseau, Frédéric; Sotty, Florence; Mouginot, Didier; Williams, Sylvain

    2005-08-15

    It is widely believed that expression of the vesicular glutamate transporter genes VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 is restricted to glutamatergic neurons and that the two transporters segregate in different sets of neurons. Using single-cell multiplex RT-PCR (sc-RT-mPCR), we show that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 mRNAs were coexpressed in most of the sampled neurons from the rat hippocampus, cortex, and cerebellum at postnatal Day (P)14 but not P60. In accordance, changes in VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 mRNA concentrations were found to occur in these and other brain areas between P14 and P60, as revealed by semiquantitative RT-PCR and quantitated by ribonuclease protection assay. VGLUT1 and -2 coexpression in the hippocampal formation is supported further by in situ hybridization data showing that virtually all cells in the CA1-CA3 pyramidal and granule cell layers were highly positive for both transcripts until P14. It was revealed using sc-RT-mPCR that transcripts for VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 were also present in neurons of the cerebellum, striatum, and septum that expressed markers for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic or cholinergic phenotypes, as well as in hippocampal cells containing transcripts for the glial fibrillary acidic protein. Our study suggests that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 proteins may often transport glutamate into vesicles within the same neuron, especially during early postnatal development, and that they are expressed widely in presumed glutamatergic, GABAergic, and cholinergic neurons, as well as in astrocytes. Furthermore, our study shows that such coexpressing neurons remain in the adult brain and identifies several areas that contain them in both young and adult rats. PMID:15983996

  6. Understanding Particle Formation: Solubility of Free Fatty Acids as Polysorbate 20 Degradation Byproducts in Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody Formulations.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Nidhi; Demeule, Barthélemy; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the aqueous solubilities at 2-8 °C of the major free fatty acids (FFAs) formed by polysorbate 20 (PS20) degradation and identify possible ways to predict, delay, or mitigate subsequent particle formation in monoclonal antibody (mAb) formulations. The FFA solubility limits at 2-8 °C were determined by titrating known amounts of FFA in monoclonal antibody formulations and identifying the FFA concentration leading to visible and subvisible particle formation. The solubility limits of lauric, myristic, and palmitic acids at 2-8 °C were 17 ± 1 μg/mL, 3 ± 1 μg/mL, and 1.5 ± 0.5 μg/mL in a formulation containing 0.04% (w/v) PS20 at pH 5.4 and >22 μg/mL, 3 ± 1 μg/mL, and 0.75 ± 0.25 μg/mL in a formulation containing 0.02% (w/v) PS20 at pH 6.0. For the first time, a 3D correlation between FFA solubility, PS20 concentration, and pH has been reported providing a rational approach for the formulator to balance these with regard to potential particle formation. The results suggest that the lower solubilities of the longer chain FFAs, generated from degradation of the stearate, palmitate, and myristate fraction of PS20, is the primary cause of seeding and subsequent FFA precipitation rather than the most abundant lauric acid. PMID:26419285

  7. Bacopa monniera recombinant mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase: Biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, Shakeel J; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Patel, Parth; Kumari, Uma; Khan, Bashir M

    2015-08-01

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD; EC 4.1.1.33) is an important enzyme in the mevalonic acid pathway catalyzing the Mg(2+)-ATP dependant decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP) to isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Bacopa monniera recombinant MDD (BmMDD) protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) strain and purified to apparent homogeneity. Km and Vmax for MVAPP were 144 μM and 52 U mg(-1) respectively. The values of turnover (kcat) and kcat/Km for mevalonate 5-diphosphate were determined to be 40s(-1) and 2.77×10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and kcat and kcat/Km values for ATP were found to be 30 s(-1) and 2.20×10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. pH activity profile indicated the involvement of carboxylate ion, lysine and arginine for the activity of enzyme. The apparent activation energy for the BmMDD catalyzed reaction was 12.7 kJ mol(-1). Optimum pH and temperature for the forward reaction was found to be 8.0 and 45 °C. The enzyme was most stable at pH 7 at 20 °C with the deactivation rate constant (Kd(*)) of 1.69×10(-4) and half life (t1/2) of 68 h. The cation studies suggested that BmMDD is a cation dependant enzyme and optimum activity was achieved in the presence of Mg(2+).

  8. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of Drosophila 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Q.; Ding, H; Robinson, H; Christensen, B; Li, J

    2010-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase (DDC), also known as aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of a number of aromatic L-amino acids. Physiologically, DDC is responsible for the production of dopamine and serotonin through the decarboxylation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively. In insects, both dopamine and serotonin serve as classical neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, or neurohormones, and dopamine is also involved in insect cuticle formation, eggshell hardening, and immune responses. In this study, we expressed a typical DDC enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, critically analyzed its substrate specificity and biochemical properties, determined its crystal structure at 1.75 Angstrom resolution, and evaluated the roles residues T82 and H192 play in substrate binding and enzyme catalysis through site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme. Our results establish that this DDC functions exclusively on the production of dopamine and serotonin, with no activity to tyrosine or tryptophan and catalyzes the formation of serotonin more efficiently than dopamine. The crystal structure of Drosophila DDC and the site-directed mutagenesis study of the enzyme demonstrate that T82 is involved in substrate binding and that H192 is used not only for substrate interaction, but for cofactor binding of drDDC as well. Through comparative analysis, the results also provide insight into the structure-function relationship of other insect DDC-like proteins.

  9. Expression of arginine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase genes in apple cells and stressed shoots.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yu-Jin; Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Honda, Chikako; Nada, Kazuyoshi; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2005-04-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) are two important enzymes responsible for putrescine biosynthesis. In this study, a full-length ADC cDNA (MdADC) was isolated from apple [Malus sylvestris (L.) Mill. var. domestica (Borkh.) Mansf.]. Meanwhile, a partial ODC (pMdODC) could be amplified only by a second RCR from the RT-PCR products, whereas a full-length ODC could not be obtained by either cDNA library screening or 5'- and 3'-RACEs, suggesting quite low expression. Moreover, D-arginine, an ADC inhibitor, caused a decrease in ADC activity and severely inhibited the growth of apple callus, which could be partially resumed by exogenous addition of putrescine, whereas alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), an inhibitor for ODC, caused the incomplete repression of callus growth without changing ODC activity. RNA gel blot showed that the expression level of MdADC was high in young tissues/organs with rapid cell division and was positively induced by chilling, salt, and dehydration, implying its involvement in both cell growth and these stress responses. By contrast, the transcript of ODC could not be detected by RNA gel blot analysis. Based on the present study, it is possible to conclude that (i) the ODC pathway is active in apple, although the expression level of the pMdODC gene homologous with its counterparts found in other plant species is quite low; and (ii) MdADC expression correlates with cell growth and stress responses to chilling, salt, and dehydration, suggesting that ADC is a primary biosynthetic pathway for putrescine biosynthesis in apple.

  10. Antitumor effects of methotrexate-monoclonal anti-prostatic acid phosphatase antibody conjugate on human prostate tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Deguchi, T.; Chu, T.M.; Leong, S.S.; Horoszewicz, J.S.; Lee, C.L.

    1986-03-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) was conjugated to an IgG/sub 1/ monoclonal antibody (MCA) specific for human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) by an active ester method, resulting in a molar ratio of MTX to IgG/sub 1/ of 14. MTX-MCA conjugate retained 94% of free antibody activity and preserved 90% of dihydrofolate reductase inhibitory activity of free MTX. MTX-MCA conjugate was shown to be accumulated in vitro by prostate tumor cells (LNCaP) 1.3 times higher than that of MTX conjugate to normal mouse IgG (NIgG) and 6.2 times higher than that of free MTX. Antitumor activity in vitro exhibited that MTX-MCA conjugate is more effective on inhibition (52%) of /sup 3/H-deoxyuridine incorporation into LNCaP cells than that of MTX-NIgG (39%), but both were less effective than free MTX (70%). The in vivo distribution of /sup 3/H-MTX-MCA conjugate in human prostate tumor xenograft (tumor: blood ratio 5.1) was higher than those of /sup 3/H-MTX-NIgG conjugate (1.1) and of free /sup 3/H-MTX (1.5). Anti-tumor activity in vivo demonstrated that MTX-MCA conjugate retarded the growth of xenografted human prostate tumor greatly and persistently, as compared with the control groups. These results suggested that MTX-monoclonal anti-PAP antibody conjugate represents a potential reagent for immunochemotherapy of human prostate tumor (NIH CA-34536, CA-15437 and ACS CH-269.

  11. Immunoreactivity of polyclonal antibodies generated against the carboxy terminus of the predicted amino acid sequence of the Huntington disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Alkatib, G.; Graham, R.; Pelmear-Telenius, A.

    1994-09-01

    A cDNA fragment spanning the 3{prime}-end of the Huntington disease gene (from 8052 to 9252) was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector containing the E. Coli lac promoter and a portion of the coding sequence for {beta}-galactosidase. The truncated {beta}-galactosidase gene was cleaved with BamHl and fused in frame to the BamHl fragment of the Huntington disease gene 3{prime}-end. Expression analysis of proteins made in E. Coli revealed that 20-30% of the total cellular proteins was represented by the {beta}-galactosidase-huntingtin fusion protein. The identity of the Huntington disease protein amino acid sequences was confirmed by protein sequence analysis. Affinity chromatography was used to purify large quantities of the fusion protein from bacterial cell lysates. Affinity-purified proteins were used to immunize New Zealand white rabbits for antibody production. The generated polyclonal antibodies were used to immunoprecipitate the Huntington disease gene product expressed in a neuroblastoma cell line. In this cell line the antibodies precipitated two protein bands of apparent gel migrations of 200 and 150 kd which together, correspond to the calculated molecular weight of the Huntington disease gene product (350 kd). Immunoblotting experiments revealed the presence of a large precursor protein in the range of 350-750 kd which is in agreement with the predicted molecular weight of the protein without post-translational modifications. These results indicate that the huntingtin protein is cleaved into two subunits in this neuroblastoma cell line and implicate that cleavage of a large precursor protein may contribute to its biological activity. Experiments are ongoing to determine the precursor-product relationship and to examine the synthesis of the huntingtin protein in freshly isolated rat brains, and to determine cellular and subcellular distribution of the gene product.

  12. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, Erik W.; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-12-01

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes Asp{sup H35} and Glu{sup L34} to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the Glu{sup L34} to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 10{sup 9}-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations.

  13. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket.

    PubMed

    Debler, Erik W; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A

    2009-11-01

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes Asp(H35) and Glu(L34) to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the Glu(L34) to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 10(9)-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations.

  14. Kinetics of Antibody Aggregation at Neutral pH and Ambient Temperatures Triggered by Temporal Exposure to Acid.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Hiroshi; Honda, Shinya

    2016-09-15

    The purification process of an antibody in manufacturing involves temporal exposure of the molecules to low pH followed by neutralization-pH-shift stress-which causes aggregation. It remains unclear how aggregation triggered by pH-shift stress grows at neutral pH and how it depends on the temperature in an ambient range. We used static and dynamic light scattering to monitor the time-dependent evolution of the aggregate size of the pH-shift stressed antibody between 4.0 and 40.0 °C. A power-law relationship between the effective molecular weight and the effective hydrodynamic radius was found, indicating that the aggregates were fractal with a dimension of 1.98. We found that the aggregation kinetics in the lower-temperature range, 4.0-25.0 °C, were well described by the Smoluchowski aggregation equation. The temperature dependence of the effective aggregation rate constant gave 13 ± 1 kcal/mol of endothermic activation energy. Temporal acid exposure creates an enriched population of unfolded protein molecules that are competent of aggregating. Therefore, the energetically unfavorable unfolding step is not required and the aggregation proceeds faster. These findings provide a basis for predicting the growth of aggregates during storage under practical, ambient conditions. PMID:27537343

  15. Immunodiagnostic monoclonal antibody-based sandwich ELISA of fasciolosis by detection of Fasciola gigantica circulating fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Anuracpreeda, Panat; Chawengkirttikul, Runglawan; Sobhon, Prasert

    2016-09-01

    Up to now, parasitological diagnosis of fasciolosis is often unreliable and possesses low sensitivity. Hence, the detection of circulating parasite antigens is thought to be a better alternative for diagnosis of fasciolosis, as it reflects the real parasite burden. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) against recombinant Fasciola gigantica fatty acid binding protein (rFgFABP) has been produced. As well, a reliable sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (sandwich ELISA) has been developed for the detection of circulating FABP in the sera of mice experimentally and cattle naturally infected with F. gigantica. MoAb 3A3 and biotinylated rabbit anti-recombinant FABP antibody were selected due to their high reactivities and specificities. The lower detection limit of sandwich ELISA was 5 pg mL-1, and no cross-reaction with other parasite antigens was observed. This assay could detect F. gigantica infection from day 1 post infection. In experimental mice, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of this assay were 93·3, 100 and 98·2%, while in natural cattle they were 96·7, 100 and 99·1%. Hence, this sandwich ELISA method showed high efficiencies and precisions for diagnosis of fasciolosis by F. gigantica. PMID:27312522

  16. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A; Byrne, Barry J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation.

  17. [Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against human bone gamma-carboxyglutamic acid containing protein (BGP) and its immunohistochemical application to various human tissues].

    PubMed

    Takada, J; Ohta, T; Koshiba, H

    1990-05-01

    Bone gamma-carboxyglutamic acid containing protein (BGP) has been considered to play an important role in mineralization of bone, because this protein is capable of binding to calcium ions. However, the function and localization of BGP in normal bones have not yet been fully understood. In this study, we prepared monoclonal antibodies against human BGP, by immunizing BALB/c mice with human BGP. All five monoclonal antibodies obtained were shown to bind specifically to human BGP, but not to the other bone-derived proteins. In immunohistochemical analysis, these antibodies were shown to react with osteoblasts and osteocytes in normal human bone tissues, but not with chondrocytes, osteoclasts and osteoid tissues. These antibodies are expected to be useful for the diagnosis of human osteoblastic tumors and also for the analysis of the role of BGP in the ossification process in bone.

  18. Identification of Anti-Long Chain Saturated Fatty Acid IgG Antibodies in Serum of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Dequina A.; Salto, Lorena M.; Boston, Ava M.; Kim, Nan Sun; Larios, Marco; Beeson, W. Lawrence; Firek, Anthony F.; Casiano, Carlos A.; Langridge, William H. R.; Cordero-MacIntyre, Zaida; De Leon, Marino

    2015-01-01

    High levels of serum long chain saturated fatty acids (LCSFAs) have been associated with inflammation in type 2 diabetes. Dietary SFAs can promote inflammation, the secretion of IgG antibodies, and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. This study characterizes anti-LCSFA IgG antibodies from patients with type 2 diabetes. Serum samples from several cohorts with type 2 diabetes were analyzed for the presence of anti-LCSFA IgG, the cytokine IL-1β, and nonesterified fatty acids. Anti-LCSFA IgG was isolated from patient samples and used for in vitro characterization of avidity and specificity. A cohort participating in En Balance, a diabetes health education program that improved diabetes management, tested positive for anti-LCSFA IgG. Following the 3-month program, the cohort showed a significant reduction in anti-LCSFA IgG levels. Anti-LCSFA antibodies isolated from these patients demonstrated high avidity, were specific for long chain SFAs, and correlated with serum fatty acids in patients with managed type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, anti-LCSFA IgG neutralized PA-induced IL-1β secretion by dendritic cells. Our data shows that nonesterified SFAs are recognized by IgG antibodies present in human blood. The identification of anti-LCSFA IgG antibodies in human sera establishes a basis for further exploration of lipid induced immune responses in diabetic patients. PMID:26633920

  19. Crystal structures of the wild-type, P1A mutant, and inactivated malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase: a structural basis for the decarboxylase and hydratase activities.

    PubMed

    Almrud, Jeffrey J; Poelarends, Gerrit J; Johnson, William H; Serrano, Hector; Hackert, Marvin L; Whitman, Christian P

    2005-11-15

    Malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase (MSAD) from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 is a tautomerase superfamily member that converts malonate semialdehyde to acetaldehyde by a mechanism utilizing Pro-1 and Arg-75. Pro-1 and Arg-75 have also been implicated in the hydratase activity of MSAD in which 2-oxo-3-pentynoate is processed to acetopyruvate. Crystal structures of MSAD (1.8 A resolution), the P1A mutant of MSAD (2.7 A resolution), and MSAD inactivated by 3-chloropropiolate (1.6 A resolution), a mechanism-based inhibitor activated by the hydratase activity of MSAD, have been determined. A comparison of the P1A-MSAD and MSAD structures reveals little geometric alteration, indicating that Pro-1 plays an important catalytic role but not a critical structural role. The structures of wild-type MSAD and MSAD covalently modified at Pro-1 by 3-oxopropanoate, the adduct resulting from the incubation of MSAD and 3-chloropropiolate, implicate Asp-37 as the residue that activates a water molecule for attack at C-3 of 3-chloropropiolate to initiate a Michael addition of water. The interactions of Arg-73 and Arg-75 with the C-1 carboxylate group of the adduct suggest these residues polarize the alpha,beta-unsaturated acid and facilitate the addition of water. On the basis of these structures, a mechanism for the inactivation of MSAD by 3-chloropropiolate can be formulated along with mechanisms for the decarboxylase and hydratase activities. The results also provide additional evidence supporting the hypothesis that MSAD and trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase, a tautomerase superfamily member preceding MSAD in the trans-1,3-dichloropropene degradation pathway, diverged from a common ancestor but retained the key elements for the conjugate addition of water.

  20. Expression of an abscisic acid-binding single-chain antibody influences the subcellular distribution of abscisic acid and leads to developmental changes in transgenic potato plants.

    PubMed

    Strauss, M; Kauder, F; Peisker, M; Sonnewald, U; Conrad, U; Heineke, D

    2001-07-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Désirée) plants were transformed to express a single-chain variable-fragment antibody against abscisic acid (ABA), and present in the endoplasmic reticulum at to up to 0.24% of the soluble leaf protein. The resulting transgenic plants were only able to grow normally at 95% humidity and moderate light. Four-week-old plants accumulated ABA to high extent, were retarded in growth and their leaves were smaller than those of control plants. Leaf stomatal conductivity was increased due to larger stomates. The subcellular concentrations of ABA in the chloroplast, cytoplasm and vacuole, and the apoplastic space of leaves were determined. In the 4-week-old transgenic plants the concentration of ABA not bound to the antibody was identical to that of control plants and the stomates were able to close in response to lower humidity of the atmosphere. A detailed analysis of age-dependent changes in plant metabolism showed that leaves of young transformed plants developed in ABA deficiency and leaves of older plants in ABA excess. Phenotypic changes developed in ABA deficiency partly disappeared in older plants.

  1. Glycine receptor antibodies in PERM and related syndromes: characteristics, clinical features and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-González, Alexander; Leite, M. Isabel; Waters, Patrick; Woodhall, Mark; Coutinho, Ester; Balint, Bettina; Lang, Bethan; Pettingill, Philippa; Carr, Aisling; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Press, Raomand; Lunn, Michael P.; Lim, Ming; Maddison, Paul; Meinck, H.-M.; Vandenberghe, Wim

    2014-01-01

    The clinical associations of glycine receptor antibodies have not yet been described fully. We identified prospectively 52 antibody-positive patients and collated their clinical features, investigations and immunotherapy responses. Serum glycine receptor antibody endpoint titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:60 000. In 11 paired samples, serum levels were higher than (n = 10) or equal to (n = 1) cerebrospinal fluid levels; there was intrathecal synthesis of glycine receptor antibodies in each of the six pairs available for detailed study. Four patients also had high glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (>1000 U/ml), and one had high voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibody (2442 pM). Seven patients with very low titres (<1:50) and unknown or alternative diagnoses were excluded from further study. Three of the remaining 45 patients had newly-identified thymomas and one had a lymphoma. Thirty-three patients were classified as progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus, and two as stiff person syndrome; five had a limbic encephalitis or epileptic encephalopathy, two had brainstem features mainly, two had demyelinating optic neuropathies and one had an unclear diagnosis. Four patients (9%) died during the acute disease, but most showed marked improvement with immunotherapies. At most recent follow-up, (2–7 years, median 3 years, since first antibody detection), the median modified Rankin scale scores (excluding the four deaths) decreased from 5 at maximal severity to 1 (P < 0.0001), but relapses have occurred in five patients and a proportion are on reducing steroids or other maintenance immunotherapies as well as symptomatic treatments. The glycine receptor antibodies activated complement on glycine receptor-transfected human embryonic kidney cells at room temperature, and caused internalization and lysosomal degradation of the glycine receptors at 37°C. Immunoglobulin G antibodies bound to rodent spinal cord and brainstem co-localizing with

  2. Assaying Ornithine and Arginine Decarboxylases in Some Plant Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Birecka, Helena; Bitonti, Alan J.; McCann, Peter P.

    1985-01-01

    A release of 14CO2 not related to ornithine decarboxylase activity was found in crude leaf extracts from Lycopersicon esculentum, Avena sativa, and especially from the pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing Heliotropium angiospermum when incubated with [1-14C]- or [U-14C]ornithine. The total 14CO2 produced was about 5- to 100-fold higher than that due to ornithine decarboxylase activities calculated from labeled putrescine (Put) found by thin-layer electrophoresis in the incubation mixtures. Partial purification with (NH4)2SO4 did not eliminate completely the interfering decarboxylation. When incubated with labeled arginine, a very significant 14CO2 release not related to arginine decarboxylase activity was observed only in extracts from H. angiospermum leaves, especially in Tris·HCl buffer. Under the assay conditions, these extracts exhibited oxidative degradation of added Put and agmatine (Agm) and also revealed a high arginase activity. Amino-guanidine at 0.1 to 0.2 millimolar prevented Put degradation and greatly decreased oxidative degradation of Agm; ornithine at 15 to 20 millimolar significantly inhibited arginase activity. A verification of the reliability of the standard 14CO2-based method by assessing labeled Put and/or Agm—formed in the presence of added aminoguanidine and/or ornithine when needed—is recommended especially when crude or semicrude plant extracts are assayed. When based on Put and/or Agm formed at 1.0 to 2.5 millimolar of substrate, the activities of ornithine decarboxylase and arginine decarboxylase in the youngest leaves of the tested species ranged between 1.1 and 3.6 and 1 and 1600 nanomoles per hour per gram fresh weight, respectively. The enzyme activities are discussed in relation to the biosynthesis of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. PMID:16664441

  3. Monoclonal antibody R24 distinguishes between different N-acetyl- and N-glycolylneuraminic acid derivatives of ganglioside GD3.

    PubMed

    Tai, T; Kawashima, I; Furukawa, K; Lloyd, K O

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) R24 was previously shown to be directed toward ganglioside GD3 [Pukel, C. S., Lloyd, K. O., Travassos, L. R., Dippold, W. G., Oettgen, H. F., and Old, L. J. (1982) J. Exp. Med. 155, 1133-1147]. The structural specificity of the MAb has now been further characterized based on binding to structurally related glycolipids, including four GD3 derivatives with different N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc) substituents. Three assay systems (enzyme immunostaining on thin-layer chromatography, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immune adherence inhibition assay) were used. MAb R24 was found to react with (NeuAc-NeuAc-)GD3 and (NeuAc-NeuGc-)GD3 but not with (NeuGc-NeuAc-)GD3 or (NeuGc-NeuGc-)GD3. These results clearly indicate that the outer sialic acid (Sia) moiety of GD3 is crucial and must be a NeuAc residue, while the inner sialic acid is less involved in binding to the MAb and can be either NeuAc or NeuGc. The MAb was also found to cross-react weakly with two gangliosides, GT1a and GQ1b, but none of other gangliosides nor neutral glycolipids tested reacted. These findings suggest that the epitope detected by MAb R24 is the trisaccharide structure NeuAc alpha 2----8Sia alpha 2----3Gal-, which must be in a terminal position.

  4. Isobutanol production in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae by overexpression of 2-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase and valine biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Seo, Seung-Oh; Bae, Yi-Hyun; Nan, Hong; Jin, Yong-Su; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-11-01

    Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce advanced biofuels such as isobutanol has received much attention because this yeast has a natural capacity to produce higher alcohols. In this study, construction of isobutanol production systems was attempted by overexpression of effective 2-keto acid decarboxylase (KDC) and combinatorial overexpression of valine biosynthetic enzymes in S. cerevisiae D452-2. Among the six putative KDC enzymes from various microorganisms, 2-ketoisovalerate decarboxylase (Kivd) from L. lactis subsp. lactis KACC 13877 was identified as the most suitable KDC for isobutanol production in the yeast. Isobutanol production by the engineered S. cerevisiae was assessed in micro-aerobic batch fermentations using glucose as a sole carbon source. 93 mg/L isobutanol was produced in the Kivd overexpressing strain, which corresponds to a fourfold improvement as compared with the control strain. Isobutanol production was further enhanced to 151 mg/L by additional overexpression of acetolactate synthase (Ilv2p), acetohydroxyacid reductoisomerase (Ilv5p), and dihydroxyacid dehydratase (Ilv3p) in the cytosol.

  5. The hydratase activity of malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase: mechanistic and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Poelarends, Gerrit J; Serrano, Hector; Johnson, William H; Hoffman, David W; Whitman, Christian P

    2004-12-01

    Malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase (MSAD) is a member of the tautomerase superfamily, a group of structurally homologous proteins that have a characteristic beta-alpha-beta-fold and a catalytic amino-terminal proline. In addition to its physiological decarboxylase activity, the conversion of malonate semialdehyde to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide, the enzyme has now been found to display a promiscuous hydratase activity, converting 2-oxo-3-pentynoate to acetopyruvate, with a kcat/Km value of 6.0 x 102 M-1 s-1. Pro-1 and Arg-75 are critical for both activities, and the pKa of Pro-1 was determined to be approximately 9.2 by a direct 15N NMR titration. These observations implicate a decarboxylation mechanism in which Pro-1 polarizes the carbonyl oxygen of substrate by hydrogen bonding and/or an electrostatic interaction. Arg-75 may position the carboxylate group into a favorable orientation for decarboxylation. Both the hydratase activity and the pKa value of Pro-1 are shared with trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase, another tautomerase superfamily member that precedes MSAD in a bacterial degradation pathway for trans-1,3-dichloropropene. Hence, MSAD and CaaD could have evolved by divergent evolution from a common ancestral protein, retaining the necessary catalytic components for the conjugate addition of water.

  6. Characterization of Plasmodium phosphatidylserine decarboxylase expressed in yeast and application for inhibitor screening

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae-Yeon; Lawres, Lauren; Toh, Justin Y.; Voelker, Dennis R.; Ben Mamoun, Choukri

    2016-01-01

    Summary Phospholipid biosynthesis is critical for the development, differentiation and pathogenesis of several eukaryotic pathogens. Genetic studies have validated the pathway for phosphatidylethanolamine synthesis from phosphatidylserine catalyzed by phosphatidylserine decarboxylase enzymes (PSD) as a suitable target for development of antimicrobials; however no inhibitors of this class of enzymes have been discovered. We show that the Plasmodium falciparum PSD can restore the essential function of the yeast gene in strains requiring PSD for growth. Genetic, biochemical and metabolic analyses demonstrate that amino acids between positions 40 and 70 of the parasite enzyme are critical for proenzyme processing and decarboxylase activity. We used the essential role of Plasmodium PSD in yeast as a tool for screening a library of anti-malarials. One of these compounds is 7-chloro-N-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-4-quinolinamine, an inhibitor with potent activity against P. falciparum, and low toxicity toward mammalian cells. We synthesized an analog of this compound and showed that it inhibits PfPSD activity and eliminates Plasmodium yoelii infection in mice. These results highlight the importance of 4-quinolinamines as a novel class of drugs targeting membrane biogenesis via inhibition of PSD activity PMID:26585333

  7. Suppression of antigen-specific antibody responses in mice exposed to perfluorooctanoic acid: Role of PPARalpha and T- and B-cell targeting

    EPA Science Inventory

    T-cell-dependent antibody responses (TDAR) are suppressed in female C57BL/6N mice exposed to ≥3.75 mg/kg of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) for 15 days. To determine if suppression of humoral immunity by PFOA is peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARa)-dependent and...

  8. A second 5-carboxyvanillate decarboxylase gene, ligW2, is important for lignin-related biphenyl catabolism in Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xue; Masai, Eiji; Kasai, Daisuke; Miyauchi, Keisuke; Katayama, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Masao

    2005-09-01

    A lignin-related biphenyl compound, 5,5'-dehydrodivanillate (DDVA), is degraded to 5-carboxyvanillate (5CVA) by the enzyme reactions catalyzed by DDVA O-demethylase (LigX), meta-cleavage oxygenase (LigZ), and meta-cleavage compound hydrolase (LigY) in Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6. 5CVA is then transformed to vanillate by a nonoxidative 5CVA decarboxylase and is further degraded through the protocatechuate 4,5-cleavage pathway. A 5CVA decarboxylase gene, ligW, was isolated from SYK-6 (X. Peng, E. Masai, H. Kitayama, K. Harada, Y, Katayama, and M. Fukuda, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 68:4407-4415, 2002). However, disruption of ligW slightly affected the 5CVA decarboxylase activity and the growth rate on DDVA of the mutant, suggesting the presence of an alternative 5CVA decarboxylase gene. Here we isolated a second 5CVA decarboxylase gene, ligW2, which consists of a 1,050-bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide with a molecular mass of 39,379 Da. The deduced amino acid sequence encoded by ligW2 exhibits 37% identity with the sequence encoded by ligW. Based on a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of the reaction product from 5CVA catalyzed by LigW2 in the presence of deuterium oxide, LigW2 was indicated to be a nonoxidative decarboxylase of 5CVA, like LigW. After disruption of ligW2, both the growth rate on DDVA and the 5CVA decarboxylase activity of the mutant were decreased to approximately 30% of the wild-type levels. The ligW ligW2 double mutant lost both the ability to grow on DDVA and the 5CVA decarboxylase activity. These results indicate that both ligW and ligW2 contribute to 5CVA degradation, although ligW2 plays the more important role in the growth of SYK-6 cells on DDVA.

  9. Analysis of Mammalian Histidine Decarboxylase Dimerization Interface Reveals an Electrostatic Hotspot Important for Catalytic Site Topology and Function.

    PubMed

    Moya-García, Aurelio A; Rodríguez-Agudo, Daniel; Hayashi, Hideyuki; Medina, Miguel Angel; Urdiales, José Luis; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2011-06-14

    Selective intervention of mammalian histidine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.22) could provide a useful antihistaminic strategy against many different pathologies. It is known that global conformational changes must occur during reaction that involves the monomer-monomer interface of the enzyme. Thus, the dimerization surface is a promising target for histidine decarboxylase inhibition. In this work, a rat apoenzyme structural model is used to analyze the interface of the dimeric active HDC. The dimerization surface mainly involves the fragments 1-213 and 308-371 from both subunits. Part of the overlapping surfaces conforms each catalytic site entrance and the substrate-binding sites. In addition, a cluster of charged residues is located in each overlapping surface, so that both electrostatic hotspots mediate in the interaction between the catalytic sites of the dimeric enzyme. It is experimentally demonstrated that the carboxyl group of aspartate 315 is critical for the proper conformation of the holoenzyme and the progression of the reaction. Comparison to the available information on other evolutionary related enzymes also provides new insights for characterization and intervention of homologous l-amino acid decarboxylases. PMID:26596454

  10. Increased Putrescine Biosynthesis through Transfer of Mouse Ornithine Decarboxylase cDNA in Carrot Promotes Somatic Embryogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bastola, D. R.; Minocha, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.) cells were transformed with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains containing 3[prime]-truncated mouse ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) cDNA under the control of a cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. A neomycin phosphotransferase gene linked with a nopaline synthase promoter was used to select transformed cell lines on kanamycin. Although the nontransformed cells contained no ODC, high amounts of mouse-specific ODC activity were observed in the transformed cells. Transgenic cells showed a significant increase in the cellular content of putrescine compared to control cells. Spermidine, however, remained unaffected. Not only did the transformed cells exhibit improved somatic embryogenesis in the auxin-free medium, they also regenerated some embryos in the presence of inhibitory concentrations of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. These cells acquired tolerance to [alpha]-difluoromethylarginine (a potent inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase) at concentrations that inhibit growth as well as embryogenesis in nontransformed carrot cells, showing that the mouse ODC can replace the carrot arginine decarboxylase for putrescine biosynthesis in the transgenic cells. PMID:12228581

  11. Bacterial Lysine Decarboxylase Influences Human Dental Biofilm Lysine Content, Biofilm Accumulation and Sub-Clinical Gingival Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lohinai, Z.; Keremi, B.; Szoko, E.; Tabi, T.; Szabo, C.; Tulassay, Z.; Levine, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Dental biofilms contain a protein that inhibits mammalian cell growth, possibly lysine decarboxylase from Eikenella corrodens. This enzyme decarboxylates lysine, an essential amino acid for dentally attached cell turnover in gingival sulci. Lysine depletion may stop this turnover, impairing the barrier to bacterial compounds. The aims of this study were to determine biofilm lysine and cadaverine contents before oral hygiene restriction (OHR), and their association with plaque index (PI) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) after OHR for a week. Methods Laser-induced fluorescence after capillary electrophoresis was used to determine lysine and cadaverine contents in dental biofilm, tongue biofilm and saliva before OHR and in dental biofilm after OHR. Results Before OHR, lysine and cadaverine contents of dental biofilm were similar and 10-fold greater than in saliva or tongue biofilm. After a week of OHR, the biofilm content of cadaverine increased and that of lysine decreased, consistent with greater biofilm lysine decarboxylase activity. Regression indicated that PI and GCF exudation were positively related to biofilm lysine post-OHR, unless biofilm lysine exceeded the minimal blood plasma content in which case PI was further increased but GCF exudation was reduced. Conclusions After OHR, lysine decarboxylase activity seems to determine biofilm lysine content and biofilm accumulation. When biofilm lysine exceeds minimal blood plasma content after OHR, less GCF appeared despite more biofilm. Lysine appears important for biofilm accumulation and the epithelial barrier to bacterial proinflammatory agents. Clinical Relevance Inhibiting lysine decarboxylase may retard the increased GCF exudation required for microbial development and gingivitis. PMID:22141361

  12. Cancer Cell Targeting Using Folic Acid/Anti-HER2 Antibody Conjugated Fluorescent CdSe/CdS/ZnS-Mercaptopropionic Acid and CdTe-Mercaptosuccinic Acid Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpal; Kumar, Manoj; Soni, Udit; Arora, Vikas; Bansal, Vivek; Gupta, Dikshi; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Sapra, Sameer; Singh, Harpal

    2016-01-01

    CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique and direct aqueous synthesis respectively using thiol stabilizers. Synthesized CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe QDs stabilized with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) were used as fluorescent labels after conjugation with folic acid (FA) and anti-HER2 antibodies. Photoluminescence quantum yield of folated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA QDs was 59% and 77% than that of non-folated hydrophilic QDs. The folate receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid-conjugated CdTe-MSA and CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs showed higher cellular internalization as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopic studies. Folated and non-folated CdTe-MSA QDs were highly toxic and exhibited only 10% cell viability as compared to > 80% cell viability with CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs over the concentration ranging from 3.38 to 50 pmoles. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results of human breast cancer tissue samples showed positive results with anti-HER2 antibody conjugated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs with better sensitivity and specificity as compared to conventional IHC analysis using diaminobenzedene staining. PMID:27398438

  13. Analysis of the Mycoplasma genitalium MgpB Adhesin to Predict Membrane Topology, Investigate Antibody Accessibility, Characterize Amino Acid Diversity, and Identify Functional and Immunogenic Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Iverson-Cabral, Stefanie L.; Wood, Gwendolyn E.; Totten, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is a sexually transmitted pathogen and is associated with reproductive tract disease that can be chronic in nature despite the induction of a strong antibody response. Persistent infection exacerbates the likelihood of transmission, increases the risk of ascension to the upper tract, and suggests that M. genitalium may possess immune evasion mechanism(s). Antibodies from infected patients predominantly target the MgpB adhesin, which is encoded by a gene that recombines with homologous donor sequences, thereby generating sequence variation within and among strains. We have previously characterized mgpB heterogeneity over the course of persistent infection and have correlated the induction of variant-specific antibodies with the loss of that particular variant from the infected host. In the current study, we examined the membrane topology, antibody accessibility, distribution of amino acid diversity, and the location of functional and antigenic epitopes within the MgpB adhesin. Our results indicate that MgpB contains a single transmembrane domain, that the majority of the protein is surface exposed and antibody accessible, and that the attachment domain is located within the extracellular C-terminus. Not unexpectedly, amino acid diversity was concentrated within and around the three previously defined variable regions (B, EF, and G) of MgpB; while nonsynonymous mutations were twice as frequent as synonymous mutations in regions B and G, region EF had equal numbers of nonsynonymous and synonymous mutations. Interestingly, antibodies produced during persistent infection reacted predominantly with the conserved C-terminus and variable region B. In contrast, infection-induced antibodies reacted poorly with the N-terminus, variable regions EF and G, and intervening conserved regions despite the presence of predicted B cell epitopes. Overall, this study provides an important foundation to define how different segments of the MgpB adhesin contribute to

  14. Platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pulkrabek, S M

    1996-12-01

    The proper diagnosis of patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenias can be accomplished by using the advances made in the field of platelet serology. These techniques range from solid phase red cell adherence to sequencing platelet antigen amino acids by polymerase chain reaction. This article describes platelet antigens, the clinical tests available to detect platelet antigens and antibodies, and the value of these tests in supporting clinical diagnoses.

  15. Induction of opsonic antibodies to the gamma-D-glutamic acid capsule of Bacillus anthracis by immunization with a synthetic peptide-carrier protein conjugate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taia T; Fellows, Patricia F; Leighton, Terrance J; Lucas, Alexander H

    2004-04-01

    The capsule of Bacillus anthracis, a polymer of gamma-D-glutamic acid, functions as a virulence determinant and is a poor immunogen. In this study we show that antibodies reactive with the B. anthracis capsule can be elicited in mice by immunization with a conjugate consisting of a synthetic gamma-D-glutamic acid nonamer peptide (gamma-D-glu9) covalently coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The serum response to gamma-D-glu9 was comprised primarily of IgG antibodies that recognized an epitope requiring a minimum of four gamma-linked D-glutamic acid residues. Antibodies to (gamma-D-glu9) bound to the surface of encapsulated B. anthracis cells and mediated opsonophagoctosis. These findings suggest that anti-capsular antibodies could mediate the clearance of vegetative B. anthracis cells in vivo. Thus, inclusion of an immunogenic capsular component as well as protective antigen in new anthrax vaccines would generate immune responses targeting both the bacteremic and toxigenic aspects of anthrax infection and thus may increase protective efficacy.

  16. Amino acid and glucose metabolism in fed-batch CHO cell culture affects antibody production and glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian; Wagtberg Sen, Jette; Rasmussen, Søren Kofoed; Kontoravdi, Cleo; Weilguny, Dietmar; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-03-01

    Fed-batch Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture is the most commonly used process for IgG production in the biopharmaceutical industry. Amino acid and glucose consumption, cell growth, metabolism, antibody titer, and N-glycosylation patterns are always the major concerns during upstream process optimization, especially media optimization. Gaining knowledge on their interrelations could provide insight for obtaining higher immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer and better controlling glycosylation-related product quality. In this work, different fed-batch processes with two chemically defined proprietary media and feeds were studied using two IgG-producing cell lines. Our results indicate that the balance of glucose and amino acid concentration in the culture is important for cell growth, IgG titer and N-glycosylation. Accordingly, the ideal fate of glucose and amino acids in the culture could be mainly towards energy and recombinant product, respectively. Accumulation of by-products such as NH4(+) and lactate as a consequence of unbalanced nutrient supply to cell activities inhibits cell growth. The levels of Leu and Arg in the culture, which relate to cell growth and IgG productivity, need to be well controlled. Amino acids with the highest consumption rates correlate with the most abundant amino acids present in the produced IgG, and thus require sufficient availability during culture. Case-by-case analysis is necessary for understanding the effect of media and process optimization on glycosylation. We found that in certain cases the presence of Man5 glycan can be linked to limitation of UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis as a result of insufficient extracellular Gln. However, under different culture conditions, high Man5 levels can also result from low α-1,3-mannosyl-glycoprotein 2-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GnTI) and UDP-GlcNAc transporter activities, which may be attributed to high level of NH4+ in the cell culture. Furthermore, galactosylation of the mAb Fc glycans

  17. Amino acid and glucose metabolism in fed-batch CHO cell culture affects antibody production and glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian; Wagtberg Sen, Jette; Rasmussen, Søren Kofoed; Kontoravdi, Cleo; Weilguny, Dietmar; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-03-01

    Fed-batch Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture is the most commonly used process for IgG production in the biopharmaceutical industry. Amino acid and glucose consumption, cell growth, metabolism, antibody titer, and N-glycosylation patterns are always the major concerns during upstream process optimization, especially media optimization. Gaining knowledge on their interrelations could provide insight for obtaining higher immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer and better controlling glycosylation-related product quality. In this work, different fed-batch processes with two chemically defined proprietary media and feeds were studied using two IgG-producing cell lines. Our results indicate that the balance of glucose and amino acid concentration in the culture is important for cell growth, IgG titer and N-glycosylation. Accordingly, the ideal fate of glucose and amino acids in the culture could be mainly towards energy and recombinant product, respectively. Accumulation of by-products such as NH4(+) and lactate as a consequence of unbalanced nutrient supply to cell activities inhibits cell growth. The levels of Leu and Arg in the culture, which relate to cell growth and IgG productivity, need to be well controlled. Amino acids with the highest consumption rates correlate with the most abundant amino acids present in the produced IgG, and thus require sufficient availability during culture. Case-by-case analysis is necessary for understanding the effect of media and process optimization on glycosylation. We found that in certain cases the presence of Man5 glycan can be linked to limitation of UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis as a result of insufficient extracellular Gln. However, under different culture conditions, high Man5 levels can also result from low α-1,3-mannosyl-glycoprotein 2-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GnTI) and UDP-GlcNAc transporter activities, which may be attributed to high level of NH4+ in the cell culture. Furthermore, galactosylation of the mAb Fc glycans

  18. Spontaneous downbeat nystagmus as a clue for the diagnosis of ataxia associated with anti-GAD antibodies.

    PubMed

    Vale, Thiago Cardoso; Pedroso, José Luiz; Alquéres, Rafaela Almeida; Dutra, Lívia Almeida; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2015-12-15

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of glutamic acid to the neurotransmitter gamma-amino butyric acid. Antibodies against GAD (anti-GAD-Ab) are associated with an array of autoimmune-related neurological conditions, such as stiff-person syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, epilepsy and limbic encephalitis. The clinical spectrum of ataxia associated with anti-GAD-Ab comprises slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia syndrome evolving in months or years, associated with cerebellar atrophy on brain MRI. There are few reports of patients with ataxia associated with anti-GAD-Ab presenting with abnormal ocular movements, such as downbeat nystagmus (DBN).We present two patients with ataxia associated with anti-GAD-Ab from a large series of ataxic subjects who presented with cerebellar ataxia combined with spontaneous DBN. All patients underwent a thorough neurological evaluation with the use of ataxia scales, brain MRI scans, cerebrospinal fluid examination, 18FDG-PET/CT scans, laboratory work-up with on coneural and immune encephalitis antibodies, serum and cerebrospinal fluid levels of anti-GAD-Ab, and the antibody specificity index to measure the intrathecal synthesis of anti-GAD-Ab. All patients were treated with cycles of intravenous immunoglobulin and had mild/partial ataxia improvement and no improvement of DBN. The finding of DBN may work as a diagnostic clue in the context of adult-onset non-hereditary ataxias.

  19. Arginine decarboxylase as the source of putrescine for tobacco alkaloids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiburcio, A. F.; Galston, A. W.

    1986-01-01

    The putrescine which forms a part of nicotine and other pyrrolidine alkaloids is generally assumed to arise through the action of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, we have previously noted that changes in the activity of arginine decarboxylase (ADC), an alternate source of putrescine, parallel changes in tissue alkaloids, while changes in ODC activity do not. This led us to undertake experiments to permit discrimination between ADC and ODC as enzymatic sources of putrescine destined for alkaloids. Two kinds of evidence presented here support a major role for ADC in the generation of putrescine going into alkaloids: (a) A specific 'suicide inhibitor' of ADC effectively inhibits the biosynthesis of nicotine and nornicotine in tobacco callus, while the analogous inhibitor of ODC is less effective, and (b) the flow of 14C from uniformly labelled arginine into nicotine is much more efficient than that from ornithine.

  20. Amino acid metabolism inhibits antibody-driven kidney injury by inducing autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Kapil; Shinde, Rahul; Liu, Haiyun; Gnana-Prakasam, Jaya P; Veeranan-Karmegam, Rajalakshmi; Huang, Lei; Ravishankar, Buvana; Bradley, Jillian; Kvirkvelia, Nino; McMenamin, Malgorzata; Xiao, Wei; Kleven, Daniel; Mellor, Andrew L; Madaio, Michael P; McGaha, Tracy L

    2015-06-15

    Inflammatory kidney disease is a major clinical problem that can result in end-stage renal failure. In this article, we show that Ab-mediated inflammatory kidney injury and renal disease in a mouse nephrotoxic serum nephritis model was inhibited by amino acid metabolism and a protective autophagic response. The metabolic signal was driven by IFN-γ-mediated induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) enzyme activity with subsequent activation of a stress response dependent on the eIF2α kinase general control nonderepressible 2 (GCN2). Activation of GCN2 suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production in glomeruli and reduced macrophage recruitment to the kidney during the incipient stage of Ab-induced glomerular inflammation. Further, inhibition of autophagy or genetic ablation of Ido1 or Gcn2 converted Ab-induced, self-limiting nephritis to fatal end-stage renal disease. Conversely, increasing kidney IDO1 activity or treating mice with a GCN2 agonist induced autophagy and protected mice from nephritic kidney damage. Finally, kidney tissue from patients with Ab-driven nephropathy showed increased IDO1 abundance and stress gene expression. Thus, these findings support the hypothesis that the IDO-GCN2 pathway in glomerular stromal cells is a critical negative feedback mechanism that limits inflammatory renal pathologic changes by inducing autophagy.

  1. Sensitive Detection of Capsaicinoids Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Anti-Homovanillic Acid Polyclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shingo; Yatabe, Rui; Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, highly functional biosensors have been developed in preparation for possible large-scale terrorist attacks using chemical warfare agents. Practically applicable sensors are required to have various abilities, such as high portability and operability, the capability of performing rapid and continuous measurement, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed the detection method of capsaicinoids, the main component of some lachrymators, using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor as an on-site detection sensor. Homovanillic acid, which has a vanillyl group similar to capsaicinoids such as capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, was bound to Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH) for use as an immunogen to generate polyclonal antibodies. An indirect competitive assay was carried out to detect capsaicinoids using SPR sensor chips on which different capsaicin analogues were immobilized. For the sensor chip on which 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine hydrochloride was immobilized, a detection limit of 150 ppb was achieved. We found that the incubation time was not required and the detection can be completed in five minutes. PMID:25586413

  2. A Vibrio cholerae Classical TcpA Amino Acid Sequence Induces Protective Antibody That Binds an Area Hypothesized To Be Important for Toxin-Coregulated Pilus Structure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ronald K.; Kirn, Thomas J.; Meeks, Michael D.; Wade, Terri K.; Wade, William F.

    2004-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that has been associated with cholera pandemics since the early 1800s. Whole-cell, killed, and live-attenuated oral cholera vaccines are in use. We and others have focused on the development of a subunit cholera vaccine that features standardized epitopes from various V. cholerae macromolecules that are known to induce protective antibody responses. TcpA protein is assembled into toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), a type IVb pilus required for V. cholerae colonization, and thus is a strong candidate for a cholera subunit vaccine. Polypeptides (24 to 26 amino acids) in TcpA that can induce protective antibody responses have been reported, but further characterization of their amino acid targets relative to tertiary or quaternary TCP structures has not been done. We report a refinement of the TcpA sequences that can induce protective antibody. One sequence, TcpA 15 (residues 170 to 183), induces antibodies that bind linear TcpA in a Western blot as well as weakly bind soluble TcpA in solution. These antibodies bind assembled pili at high density and provide 80 to 100% protection in the infant mouse protection assay. This is in sharp contrast to other anti-TcpA peptide sera (TcpA 11, TcpA 13, and TcpA 17) that bind very strongly in Western blot and solution assays yet do not provide protection or effectively bind TCP, as evidenced by immunoelectron microscopy. The sequences of TcpA 15 that induce protective antibody were localized on a model of assembled TCP. These sequences are centered on a site that is predicted to be important for TCP structure. PMID:15385509

  3. [Simultaneous demonstration of glutamate decarboxylase and synaptophysin in paraffin sections of rat cerebellum].

    PubMed

    Korzhevskiy, D E; Gilerovich, Ye G; Kirik, O V; Alekseyeva, O S; Grigoriyev, I P

    2015-01-01

    The article presents highly reproducible and inexpensive protocol for simultaneous demonstration of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD67), the key enzyme of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis and synaptophysin (SYP), a marker protein of synaptic vesicles using confocal laser microscopy. In the cerebellar cortex, GAD labels Purkinje cells and pinceaux in their basal parts and is unevenly distributed in the neuropil of molecular and granular layers. SYP clearly marks the contours of large dendrites of Purkinje cells in molecular layer, while in the granular layers it labels parts of cerebellar glomeruli--the terminals of the mossy fibers. GAD-immunopositive structures (GABA-ergic axons of stellate cells--Golgi cells) are often located at periphery of the glomeruli. In the peripheral zone of the glomeruli, colocalization of GAD- and SYP-immunopositive structures was observed, suggesting the presence of GABA-ergic synapses in this zone.

  4. Molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the cDNA encoding rat liver cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD).

    PubMed

    Reymond, I; Sergeant, A; Tappaz, M

    1996-06-01

    The taurine biosynthesis enzyme, cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD), was purified to homogeneity from rat liver. Three CSD peptides generated by tryptic cleavage were isolated and partially sequenced. Two of them showed a marked homology with glutamate decarboxylase and their respective position on the CSD amino acid sequence was postulated accordingly. Using appropriate degenerated primers derived from these two peptides, a PCR amplified DNA fragment was generated from liver poly(A)+ mRNA, cloned and used as a probe to screen a rat liver cDNA library. Three cDNAs, length around 1800 bp, were isolated which all contained an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 493 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 55.2 kDa close to the experimental values for CSD. The encoded protein contained the sequence of the three peptides isolated from homogenous liver CSD. Our data confirm and significantly extend those recently published (Kaisaki et al. (1995) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1262, 79-82). Indeed, an additional base pair found 1371 bp downstream from the initiation codon led to a shift in the open reading frame which extended the carboxy-terminal end by 15 amino acid residues and altogether modified 36 amino acids. The validity of this correction is supported by the finding that the corrected reading frame encoded a peptide issued from CSD tryptic cleavage that was not encoded anywhere in the CSD sequence previously reported. PMID:8679699

  5. Enhanced sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies in a variant of equine infectious anemia virus is linked to amino acid substitutions in the surface unit envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, R F; Berger, S L; Rushlow, K E; McManus, J M; Cook, S J; Harrold, S; Raabe, M L; Montelaro, R C; Issel, C J

    1995-01-01

    Serial passage of the prototype (PR) cell-adapted Wyoming strain of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) in fetal donkey dermal (FDD) rather than fetal horse (designated fetal equine kidney [FEK]) cell cultures resulted in the generation of a variant virus strain which produced accelerated cytopathic effects in FDD cells and was 100- to 1,000-fold more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies than its parent. This neutralization-sensitive variant was designated the FDD strain. Although there were differences in glycosylation between the PR and FDD strains, passage of the FDD virus in FEK cells did not reduce its sensitivity to neutralizing antibody. Nucleotide sequencing of the region encoding the surface unit (SU) protein from the FDD strain revealed nine amino acid substitutions compared with the PR strain. Two of these substitutions resulted in changes in the polarity of charge, four caused the introduction of a charged residue, and three had no net change in charge. Nucleotide sequence analysis was extended to the region of the FDD virus genome encoding the extracellular domain of the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein (TM). Unlike the situation with the FDD virus coding region, there were minor variations in nucleotide sequence between individual molecular clones containing this region of the TM gene. Although each clone contained three nucleotide substitutions compared with the PR strain, only one of these was common to all, and this did not affect the amino acid content. Of the remaining two nucleotide substitutions, only one resulted in an amino acid change, and in each case, this change appeared to be conservative. To determine if amino acid substitutions in the SU protein of FDD cell-grown viruses were responsible for the enhanced sensitivity to neutralizing antibodies, chimeric viruses were constructed by using an infectious molecular clone of EIAV. These chimeric viruses contained all of the amino acid substitutions found in the FDD virus strain and were

  6. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with monoclonal antibody for quantification of homovanillic acid [corrected] in human urine samples.

    PubMed

    Shi, R Z; Ho, Y P; Yeung, J H; Or, P M; To, K K; Lau, M W; Arumanayagam, M

    1998-08-01

    A monoclonal antibody to homovanillic acid (HVA) was prepared by synthesis of a HVA-protein conjugate (HVA-ovalbumin) as an immunogen, immunization of mice, and the subsequent hybridization technique. Monoclonal antibodies were screened on the basis of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. An indirect ELISA was developed for quantification of HVA in human urine. The assay was characterized and shown to have high specificity, with cross-reactivities to vanillylmandelic acid and normetanephrine at 0.18% and <0.1%, respectively. The assay coefficients of variation were <10% within the working range of 0.5-40 mg/L. Initial results from testing urine samples of patients with neuroblastoma and other diseases were validated by HPLC, suggesting that this ELISA method is a reliable and convenient system for quantification of HVA in urine and can be used in the mass screening of neuroblastoma in infants.

  7. Structural insights into the Escherichia coli lysine decarboxylases and molecular determinants of interaction with the AAA+ ATPase RavA

    PubMed Central

    Kandiah, Eaazhisai; Carriel, Diego; Perard, Julien; Malet, Hélène; Bacia, Maria; Liu, Kaiyin; Chan, Sze W. S.; Houry, Walid A.; Ollagnier de Choudens, Sandrine; Elsen, Sylvie; Gutsche, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The inducible lysine decarboxylase LdcI is an important enterobacterial acid stress response enzyme whereas LdcC is its close paralogue thought to play mainly a metabolic role. A unique macromolecular cage formed by two decamers of the Escherichia coli LdcI and five hexamers of the AAA+ ATPase RavA was shown to counteract acid stress under starvation. Previously, we proposed a pseudoatomic model of the LdcI-RavA cage based on its cryo-electron microscopy map and crystal structures of an inactive LdcI decamer and a RavA monomer. We now present cryo-electron microscopy 3D reconstructions of the E. coli LdcI and LdcC, and an improved map of the LdcI bound to the LARA domain of RavA, at pH optimal for their enzymatic activity. Comparison with each other and with available structures uncovers differences between LdcI and LdcC explaining why only the acid stress response enzyme is capable of binding RavA. We identify interdomain movements associated with the pH-dependent enzyme activation and with the RavA binding. Multiple sequence alignment coupled to a phylogenetic analysis reveals that certain enterobacteria exert evolutionary pressure on the lysine decarboxylase towards the cage-like assembly with RavA, implying that this complex may have an important function under particular stress conditions. PMID:27080013

  8. Pantothenic acid biosynthesis in zymomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Luan; Tomb, Jean-Francois; Viitanen, Paul V.

    2014-07-01

    Zymomonas is unable to synthesize pantothenic acid and requires this essential vitamin in growth medium. Zymomonas strains transformed with an operon for expression of 2-dehydropantoate reductase and aspartate 1-decarboxylase were able to grow in medium lacking pantothenic acid. These strains may be used for ethanol production without pantothenic acid supplementation in seed culture and fermentation media.

  9. Six Amino Acid Residues in a 1200 Å2 Interface Mediate Binding of Factor VIII to an IgG4κ Inhibitory Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jasper C.; Ettinger, Ruth A.; Schuman, Jason T.; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Wamiq-Adhami, Muhammad; Nguyen, Phuong-Cac T.; Nakaya-Fletcher, Shelley M.; Puranik, Komal; Thompson, Arthur R.; Pratt, Kathleen P.

    2015-01-01

    The development of neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies complicates the treatment of many hemophilia A patients. The C-terminal C2 domain is a particularly antigenic FVIII region. A crystal structure of recombinant FVIII-C2 bound to an Fab fragment of the patient-derived monoclonal antibody BO2C11, which recognizes an immunodominant inhibitor epitope on FVIII and blocks its ability to bind von Willebrand factor (VWF) and phospholipids, revealed that 15 amino acids in FVIII contact this antibody. Forty-three recombinant FVIII-C2 proteins, each with a surface-exposed side chain mutated to alanine or another residue, were generated, and surface plasmon resonance studies were carried out to evaluate effects of these substitutions on BO2C11/FVIII-C2 binding affinity. Thermodynamic analysis of experiments carried out at three temperatures indicated that one beta hairpin turn at the antigen-antibody interface (FVIII-F2196, N2198, M2199 and F2200) plus two non-contiguous arginines (FVIII-R2215 and R2220), contributed appreciably to the affinity. B-domain-deleted (BDD) FVIII-F2196A, FVIII-F2196K and FVIII-M2199A were generated and characterized. Their pro-coagulant activities and binding to VWF were similar to those of WT-BDD-FVIII, and FVIII-F2196K avoided neutralization by BO2C11 and murine inhibitory mAb 1B5. This study suggests specific sites for amino acid substitutions to rationally design FVIII variants capable of evading immunodominant neutralizing anti-FVIII antibodies. PMID:25615825

  10. Monoclonal antibodies toward different Tn-amino acid backbones display distinct recognition patterns on human cancer cells. Implications for effective immuno-targeting of cancer.

    PubMed

    Mazal, Daniel; Lo-Man, Richard; Bay, Sylvie; Pritsch, Otto; Dériaud, Edith; Ganneau, Christelle; Medeiros, Andrea; Ubillos, Luis; Obal, Gonzalo; Berois, Nora; Bollati-Fogolin, Mariela; Leclerc, Claude; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2013-06-01

    The Tn antigen (GalNAcα-O-Ser/Thr) is a well-established tumor-associated marker which represents a good target for the design of anti-tumor vaccines. Several studies have established that the binding of some anti-Tn antibodies could be affected by the density of Tn determinant or/and by the amino acid residues neighboring O-glycosylation sites. In the present study, using synthetic Tn-based vaccines, we have generated a panel of anti-Tn monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of their binding to various synthetic glycopeptides, modifying the amino acid carrier of the GalNAc(*) (Ser* vs Thr*), showed subtle differences in their fine specificities. We found that the recognition of these glycopeptides by some of these MAbs was strongly affected by the Tn backbone, such as a S*S*S* specific MAb (15G9) which failed to recognize a S*T*T* or a T*T*T* structure. Different binding patterns of these antibodies were also observed in FACS and Western blot analysis using three human cancer cell lines (MCF-7, LS174T and Jurkat). Importantly, an immunohistochemical analysis of human tumors (72 breast cancer and 44 colon cancer) showed the existence of different recognition profiles among the five antibodies evaluated, demonstrating that the aglyconic part of the Tn structure (Ser vs Thr) plays a key role in the anti-Tn specificity for breast and colon cancer detection. This new structural feature of the Tn antigen could be of important clinical value, notably due to the increasing interest of this antigen in anticancer vaccine design as well as for the development of anti-Tn antibodies for in vivo diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  11. A possible association between elevated serum levels of brain-specific auto-antibodies and reduced plasma levels of docosahexaenoic acid in autistic children.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Gehan A; El-Khashab, Heba Y; Al-Ayadhi, Laila Y

    2015-03-15

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are not only essential for energy production, but they also exhibit a range of immunomodulatory properties that progress through T cell mediated events. Autoimmunity may have a pathogenic role in a subgroup of autistic children. This study is the first to investigate the relationship between serum levels of anti-myelin basic protein (anti-MBP) brain-specific auto-antibodies and reduced plasma levels of PUFAs in autistic children. Plasma levels of PUFAs (including linoleic, alphalinolenic, arachidonic "AA" and docosahexaenoic "DHA" acids) and serum anti-MBP were measured in 80 autistic children, aged between 4 and 12 years, and 80 healthy-matched children. Autistic patients had significantly lower plasma levels of PUFAs than healthy children. On the other hand, ω6/ω3 ratio (AA/DHA) was significantly higher in autistic patients than healthy children. Low plasma DHA, AA, linolenic and linoleic acids were found in 67.5%, 50%, 40% and 35%, respectively of autistic children. On the other hand, 70% of autistic patients had elevated ω6/ω3 ratio. Autistic patients with increased serum levels of anti-MBP auto-antibodies (75%) had significantly lower plasma DHA (P<0.5) and significantly higher ω6/ω3 ratio (P<0.5) than patients who were seronegative for these antibodies. In conclusions, some autistic children have a significant positive association between reduced levels of plasma DHA and increased serum levels of anti-MBP brain-specific auto-antibodies. However, replication studies of larger samples are recommended to validate whether reduced levels of plasma PUFAs are a mere association or have a role in the induction of the production of anti-MBP in some autistic children.

  12. Inactivation of malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase by 3-halopropiolates: evidence for hydratase activity.

    PubMed

    Poelarends, Gerrit J; Serrano, Hector; Johnson, William H; Whitman, Christian P

    2005-07-01

    Malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase (MSAD) from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 catalyzes the metal ion-independent decarboxylation of malonate semialdehyde and represents one of three known enzymatic activities in the tautomerase superfamily. The characterized members of this superfamily are structurally homologous proteins that share a beta-alpha-beta fold and a catalytic amino-terminal proline. Sequence analysis, chemical labeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and NMR studies of MSAD identified Pro-1 as a key active site residue in which the amino group has a pKa value of 9.2. The available evidence suggests a mechanism involving polarization of the C-3 carbonyl group of malonate semialdehyde by the cationic Pro-1. A second critical active site residue, Arg-75, could assist in the reaction by placing the substrate's carboxylate group in a favorable conformation for decarboxylation. In addition to the decarboxylase activity, MSAD has a hydratase activity as demonstrated by the MSAD-catalyzed conversion of 2-oxo-3-pentynoate to acetopyruvate. In view of this activity, MSAD was incubated with 3-bromo- and 3-chloropropiolate, and the subsequent reactions were characterized. Both compounds result in the irreversible inactivation of MSAD, making them the first identified inhibitors of MSAD. Inactivation by 3-chloropropiolate occurs in a time- and concentration-dependent manner and is due to the covalent modification of Pro-1. The proposed mechanism for inactivation involves the initial hydration of the 3-halopropiolate followed by a rearrangement to an alkylating agent, either an acyl halide or a ketene. The results provide additional evidence for the hydratase activity of MSAD and further support for the hypothesis that MSAD and trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase, the preceding enzyme in the trans-1,3-dichloropropene catabolic pathway, diverged from a common ancestor but conserved the necessary catalytic machinery for the conjugate addition of water.

  13. Decarboxylases involved in polyamine biosynthesis and their inactivation by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Hillary, Rebecca A; Pegg, Anthony E

    2003-04-11

    Polyamines are ubiquitous cellular components that are involved in normal and neoplastic growth. Polyamine biosynthesis is very highly regulated in mammalian cells by the activities of two key decarboxylases acting on ornithine and S-adenosylmethionine. Recent studies, which include crystallographic analysis of the recombinant human proteins, have provided a detailed knowledge of their structure and function. Ornithine decarboxylase is a PLP-requiring decarboxylase, whereas S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) contains a covalently bound pyruvate prosthetic group. Both enzymes have a key cysteine residue, which is involved in protonation of the Schiff base intermediate C(alpha) to form the product. These residues, Cys360 in ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and Cys82 in AdoMetDC, react readily with nitric oxide (NO), which is therefore a potent inactivator of polyamine synthesis. The inactivation of these enzymes may mediate some of the antiproliferative actions of NO.

  14. Regulation of human ornithine decarboxylase expression by the c-Myc.Max protein complex.

    PubMed

    Peña, A; Reddy, C D; Wu, S; Hickok, N J; Reddy, E P; Yumet, G; Soprano, D R; Soprano, K J

    1993-12-25

    The presence of a CACGTG element within a region of the human ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) promoter located at -491 to -474 base pairs 5' to the start site of transcription suggested that the c-Myc.Max protein complex may play a role in the regulation of ODC expression during growth. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and methylation interference analysis showed that the nuclei of WI-38 cells expressing ODC contained proteins that bound to this region of the ODC gene in a manner that correlated with growth-associated ODC expression. Also, use of antibodies against c-Myc and Max and purified recombinant c-Myc and Max protein in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed that these proteins can specifically bind this portion of the human ODC promoter. Transient transfection studies showed that increase in the level of c-Myc and/or Max led to a significant enhancement of expression of a human ODC promoter-CAT reporter construct. Moreover, treatment of actively growing WI-38 cells with an antisense oligomer to c-Myc reduced the amount of endogenous protein complex formed and the amount of endogenous ODC mRNA expressed. These studies show that the c-Myc.Max protein complex plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of human ODC in vivo.

  15. Purification and characterisation of pyruvate decarboxylase from pea seeds (Pisum sativum cv. Miko).

    PubMed

    Mücke, U; König, S; Hübner, G

    1995-02-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) was purified from pea seeds. The catalytically active holoenzyme is an oligomer of two types of subunits with molecular masses of about 65 kDa and 68 kDa, respectively. The active enzyme is a mixture of tetramers, octamers and even higher oligomers. These differences in the quaternary structure compared with PDC from yeast (tetramer) do not result in a different kinetic behaviour. The activity of pea PDC as well as that of yeast PDC is regulated by its substrate pyruvate resulting in a sigmoid shape of the v/S-plot. At the optimum pH of 6.0 a S0.5-value of 1 mM pyruvate is found that increases with rising pH and increasing concentrations of phosphate. The substrate analogue activator pyruvamide activates the enzyme resulting in a hyperbolic v/S-plot. The stability of PDC from pea seeds in solution is about one order of magnitude higher than that of yeast PDC. Despite the described similarities of the two enzymes no significant cross reactivity of the anti-pea PDC antibody with the enzyme from yeast occurs. PMID:7794525

  16. Treatment of idiopathic parkinsonism with L-dopa in the absence and presence of decarboxylase inhibitors: effects on plasma levels of L-dopa, dopa decarboxylase, catecholamines and 3-O-methyl-dopa.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, F; Meerwaldt, J D; Man in't Veld, A J; Hovestadt, A; Schalekamp, M A

    1989-05-01

    The effect of levodopa (L-dopa), alone or in combination with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor (PDI), on plasma levels of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase (ALAAD, = dopa decarboxylase), L-dopa, 3-O-methyl-dopa (3-OMD), dopamine (DA), noradrenaline, adrenaline and dopamine beta-hydroxylase has been studied. In healthy subjects and in patients with parkinsonism plasma ALAAD level fell after administration of L-dopa + benserazide, but returned to previous levels within 90 min. In a cross-sectional study blood was obtained, 2 h after dosing, from 104 patients with idiopathic parkinsonism, divided into four groups: no L-dopa treatment (group 1), L-dopa alone (group 2), L-dopa + benserazide (Madopar) (group 3) and L-dopa + carbidopa (Sinemet) (group 4). Plasma ALAAD, which was normal in groups 1 and 2, was increased 3-fold in groups 3 and 4, indicating that there was induction of ALAAD by the co-administration of PDI. Despite this induction of ALAAD, in groups 3 and 4, with half the daily L-dopa dose compared with group 2, plasma L-dopa and 3-OMD levels were 5 times higher, while plasma DA levels were not different. The DA/L-dopa ratio was decreased 5-fold in group 2 and 16-fold in groups 3 and 4 as compared with group 1. Neither 3-OMD levels nor 3-OMD/L-dopa ratios correlated with the occurrence of on-off fluctuations. In a longitudinal study of three patients started on Madopar treatment the induction of plasma ALAAD was found to occur gradually over 3-4 weeks. Further detailed pharmacokinetic studies in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are required in order to elucidate whether the ALAAD induction by PDI may be related to the loss of clinical efficacy of combination therapy in some patients and how it is related to end-of-dose deterioration and on-off phenomena. PMID:2760634

  17. Treatment of idiopathic parkinsonism with L-dopa in the absence and presence of decarboxylase inhibitors: effects on plasma levels of L-dopa, dopa decarboxylase, catecholamines and 3-O-methyl-dopa.

    PubMed

    Boomsma, F; Meerwaldt, J D; Man in't Veld, A J; Hovestadt, A; Schalekamp, M A

    1989-05-01

    The effect of levodopa (L-dopa), alone or in combination with a peripheral decarboxylase inhibitor (PDI), on plasma levels of aromatic-L-amino acid decarboxylase (ALAAD, = dopa decarboxylase), L-dopa, 3-O-methyl-dopa (3-OMD), dopamine (DA), noradrenaline, adrenaline and dopamine beta-hydroxylase has been studied. In healthy subjects and in patients with parkinsonism plasma ALAAD level fell after administration of L-dopa + benserazide, but returned to previous levels within 90 min. In a cross-sectional study blood was obtained, 2 h after dosing, from 104 patients with idiopathic parkinsonism, divided into four groups: no L-dopa treatment (group 1), L-dopa alone (group 2), L-dopa + benserazide (Madopar) (group 3) and L-dopa + carbidopa (Sinemet) (group 4). Plasma ALAAD, which was normal in groups 1 and 2, was increased 3-fold in groups 3 and 4, indicating that there was induction of ALAAD by the co-administration of PDI. Despite this induction of ALAAD, in groups 3 and 4, with half the daily L-dopa dose compared with group 2, plasma L-dopa and 3-OMD levels were 5 times higher, while plasma DA levels were not different. The DA/L-dopa ratio was decreased 5-fold in group 2 and 16-fold in groups 3 and 4 as compared with group 1. Neither 3-OMD levels nor 3-OMD/L-dopa ratios correlated with the occurrence of on-off fluctuations. In a longitudinal study of three patients started on Madopar treatment the induction of plasma ALAAD was found to occur gradually over 3-4 weeks. Further detailed pharmacokinetic studies in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid are required in order to elucidate whether the ALAAD induction by PDI may be related to the loss of clinical efficacy of combination therapy in some patients and how it is related to end-of-dose deterioration and on-off phenomena.

  18. Two isoforms of glutamate decarboxylase in Arabidopsis are regulated by calcium/calmodulin and differ in organ distribution.

    PubMed

    Zik, M; Arazi, T; Snedden, W A; Fromm, H

    1998-08-01

    The nucleotide sequences of cDNAs encoding two isoforms of Arabidopsis glutamate decarboxylase, designated GAD1 (57.1 kDa) and GAD2 (56.1 kDa) and sharing 82% identical amino acid sequences, were determined. The recombinant proteins bound [35S] calmodulin (CaM) in the presence of calcium, and a region of 30-32 amino acids from the C-terminal of each isoform was sufficient for CaM binding when fused to glutathione S-transferase. Full-length GAD1 and GAD2 were expressed in Sf9 insect cells infected with recombinant baculovirus vectors. Recombinant proteins were partially purified by CaM affinity chromatography and were found to exhibit glutamate decarboxylase activity, which was dependent on the presence of Ca2+/CaM at pH 7.3. Southern hybridizations with GAD gene-specific probes suggest that Arabidopsis possesses one gene related to GAD1 and one to GAD2. Northern hybridization and western blot analysis revealed that GAD1 was expressed only in roots and GAD2 in roots, leaves, inflorescence stems and flowers. Our study provides the first evidence for the occurrence of multiple functional Ca2+/CaM-regulated GAD gene products in a single plant, suggesting that regulation of Arabidopsis GAD activity involves modulation of isoform-specific gene expression and stimulation of the catalytic activity of GAD by calcium signalling via CaM.

  19. Antibody immobilization on poly(L-lactic acid) nanofibers advantageously carried out by means of a non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolci, L. S.; Liguori, A.; Merlettini, A.; Calzà, L.; Castellucci, M.; Gherardi, M.; Colombo, V.; Focarete, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the comparison between a conventional wet-chemical method and a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma process for the conjugation of biomolecules on the surface of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun fibers is reported. Physico-chemical and morphological characteristics of chemically and plasma functionalized mats are studied and compared with those of pristine mats. The efficiency in biomolecules immobilization is assessed by the covalent conjugation of an antibody (anti-CD10) on the functionalized PLLA fibers. The achieved results highlight that the proposed plasma process enables antibodies to be successfully immobilized on the surface of PLLA fibers, demonstrating that non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma can be an effective, highly flexible and environmentally friendly alternative to the still widely employed wet-chemical methods for the conjugation of biomolecules onto biomaterials.

  20. Crystal structure of pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae.

    PubMed

    Buddrus, Lisa; Andrews, Emma S V; Leak, David J; Danson, Michael J; Arcus, Vickery L; Crennell, Susan J

    2016-09-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) is a thiamine pyrophosphate- and Mg(2+) ion-dependent enzyme that catalyses the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. It is rare in bacteria, but is a key enzyme in homofermentative metabolism, where ethanol is the major product. Here, the previously unreported crystal structure of the bacterial pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae is presented. The crystals were shown to diffract to 2.15 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 204.56, b = 177.39, c = 244.55 Å and Rr.i.m. = 0.175 (0.714 in the highest resolution bin). The structure was solved by molecular replacement using PDB entry 2vbi as a model and the final R values were Rwork = 0.186 (0.271 in the highest resolution bin) and Rfree = 0.220 (0.300 in the highest resolution bin). Each of the six tetramers is a dimer of dimers, with each monomer sharing its thiamine pyrophosphate across the dimer interface, and some contain ethylene glycol mimicking the substrate pyruvate in the active site. Comparison with other bacterial PDCs shows a correlation of higher thermostability with greater tetramer interface area and number of interactions. PMID:27599861

  1. Crystal structure of pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae

    PubMed Central

    Buddrus, Lisa; Andrews, Emma S. V.; Leak, David J.; Danson, Michael J.; Arcus, Vickery L.; Crennell, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) is a thiamine pyrophosphate- and Mg2+ ion-dependent enzyme that catalyses the non-oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate to acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. It is rare in bacteria, but is a key enzyme in homofermentative metabolism, where ethanol is the major product. Here, the previously unreported crystal structure of the bacterial pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymobacter palmae is presented. The crystals were shown to diffract to 2.15 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 204.56, b = 177.39, c = 244.55 Å and R r.i.m. = 0.175 (0.714 in the highest resolution bin). The structure was solved by molecular replacement using PDB entry 2vbi as a model and the final R values were R work = 0.186 (0.271 in the highest resolution bin) and R free = 0.220 (0.300 in the highest resolution bin). Each of the six tetramers is a dimer of dimers, with each monomer sharing its thiamine pyrophosphate across the dimer interface, and some contain ethylene glycol mimicking the substrate pyruvate in the active site. Comparison with other bacterial PDCs shows a correlation of higher thermostability with greater tetramer interface area and number of interactions. PMID:27599861

  2. Effects of immunization with natural and recombinant lysine decarboxylase on canine gingivitis development.

    PubMed

    Peters, Jennifer L; DeMars, Paul L; Collins, Lindsay M; Stoner, Julie A; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Komori, Naoka; Singh, Anil; Feasley, Christa L; Haddock, James A; Levine, Martin

    2012-10-19

    Periodontal disease, gingival inflammation (gingivitis) and periodontal attachment loss (periodontitis), causes tooth loss and susceptibility to chronic inflammation. Professionally scaling and cleaning the teeth regularly controls the disease, but is expensive in companion animals. Eikenella corrodens is common in canine oral cavities where it is a source of lysine decarboxylase (LDC). In human dental biofilms (plaques), LDC converts lysine to cadaverine and impairs the gingival epithelial barrier to bacteria. LDC vaccination may therefore retard gingivitis development. Year-old beagle dogs provided blood samples, and had weight and clinical measurements (biofilm and gingivitis) recorded. After scaling and cleaning, two dogs were immunized subcutaneously with 0.2mg native LDC from E. corrodens and 2 sets of four dogs with 0.2mg recombinant LDC purified from Escherichia coli. A third set of 4 dogs was immunized intranasally. Rehydragel(®), Emulsigen(®), Polygen™ or Carbigen™ were used as adjuvant. Four additional pairs of dogs were sham-immunized with each adjuvant alone (controls). Immunizations were repeated twice, 3 weeks apart, and clinical measurements were obtained after another 2 weeks, when the teeth were scaled and cleaned again. Tooth brushing was then stopped and the diet was changed from hard to soft chow. Clinical measurements were repeated after 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. Compared with sham-immunized dogs, gingivitis was reduced over all 8 weeks of soft diet after subcutaneous immunization with native LDC, or after intranasal immunization with recombinant LDC in Carbigen™, but for only 6 of the 8 weeks after subcutaneous immunization with recombinant LDC in Emulsigen(®) (repeated measures ANOVA). Subcutaneous vaccination induced a strong serum IgG antibody response that decreased during the soft diet period, whereas intranasal immunization induced a weak serum IgA antibody response that did not decrease. Immunization with recombinant LDC may

  3. Activities of Arginine and Ornithine Decarboxylases in Various Plant Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Birecka, Helena; Bitonti, Alan J.; McCann, Peter P.

    1985-01-01

    In extracts from the youngest leaves of Avena sativa, Hordeum vulgare, Zea Mays, Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris, Lactuca sativa, and four pyrrolizidine alkaloid-bearing species of Heliotropium, the activities of ornithine decarboxylase, close to Vmax, ranged between traces and 1.5 nanomoles per hour per gram fresh weight when based on putrescine formed during incubation with labeled ornithine. The arginine decarboxylase activities in the same extracts ranged between 8 and 8000 nanomoles per hour per gram fresh weight being lowest in the borages and highest in oat and barley. α-Difluoromethylornithine and α-difluoromethylarginine inhibited ornithine and arginine decarboxylases, respectively, in all species. Agmatine, putrescine, spermidine, and spermine were found in all, diaminopropane in eight, and cadaverine in three species. No correlation was observed between arginine or ornithine decarboxylase level and the levels of total polyamines. The in vitro decarboxylase activities found in the borages cannot explain the high accumulation of putrescine-derived pyrrolizidines in their youngest leaves if the pyrrolizidines are produced in situ from arginine and/or ornithine as precursors; other possibilities are discussed. In assays of ornithine decarboxylase, an interference of decarboxylation not due to this enzyme was observed in extracts from all species. In arginine decarboxylase assays, the interfering decarboxylation as well as the interference of arginase were apparent in two species. Addition of aminoguanidine was needed to suppress oxidative degradation of putrescine and agmatine during incubation of extracts from pea, bean, lettuce, Heliotropium angiospermum, and Heliotropium indicum. PMID:16664442

  4. Use of a Plackett-Burman statistical design to determine the effect of selected amino acids on monoclonal antibody production in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    González-Leal, I J; Carrillo-Cocom, L M; Ramírez-Medrano, A; López-Pacheco, F; Bulnes-Abundis, D; Webb-Vargas, Y; Alvarez, M M

    2011-01-01

    Culture media design is central to the optimization of monoclonal antibody (mAb) production. Although general strategies do not currently exist for optimization of culture media, the combined use of statistical design and analysis of experiments and strategies based on simple material balances can facilitate culture media design. In this study, we evaluate the effect of selected amino acids on the growth rate and monoclonal antibody production of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44) cell line. These amino acids were selected based on their relative mass fraction in the specific mAb produced in this study, their consumption rate during bioreactor experiments, and also through a literature review. A Plackett-Burman statistical design was conducted to minimize the number of experiments needed to obtain statistically relevant information. The effect of this set of amino acids was evaluated during exponential cell culture (considering viable cell concentration and the specific growth rate as main output variables) and during the high cell-density stage (considering mAb final concentration and specific productivity as relevant output variables). For this particular cell line, leucine (Leu) and arginine (Arg) had the highest negative and positive effects on cell viability, respectively; Leu and threonine (Thr) had the highest negative effect on growth rate, and valine (Val) and Arg demonstrated the highest positive impact on mAb final concentration. Results suggest the pertinence of a two-stage strategy for amino acid supplementation, with a mixture optimized for cell growth and a different amino acid mixture for mAb production at high density.

  5. Production of monoclonal antibody for okadaic acid and its utilization in an ultrasensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and one-step immunochromatographic strip.

    PubMed

    Liu, Biing-Hui; Hung, Chun-Tse; Lu, Chuan-Chen; Chou, Hong-Non; Yu, Feng-Yih

    2014-02-12

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a common marine biotoxin that accumulates in bivalves and causes diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). This study generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific to OA from a hybridoma cell line, 6B1A3, which was obtained by fusion of myeloma cells (P3/NS1/1-AG4-1) with spleen cells isolated from a BALB/c mouse immunized with OA-γ-globulin. The 6B1A3 mAb belongs to the immunoglobulin G1 (κ chain) isotype. Both competitive direct and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were established for characterization of the antibody. The concentrations causing 50% inhibition of binding of OA-horseradish peroxidase to the antibody by OA were calculated to be 0.077 ng/mL in the cdELISA. A rapid and sensitive mAb-based gold nanoparticle immunochromatographic strip was also established. This proposed strip has a detection limit of 5 ng/mL for OA and can be finished in 10 min. Extensive analyses of 20 seafood samples with ELISA revealed that 10 were slightly contaminated with OA, with a mean concentration of 0.892 ng/g. Analysis of OA in shellfish samples showed that data acquired by the immunochromatographic strip agreed well with those acquired by the ELISA. The mAb-based ELISA and immunochromatographic strip assay developed in this study have adequate sensitivity and accuracy for rapid screening of OA in shellfish samples.

  6. Expression and localization of cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase in major salivary glands of male mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shengnan; Liu, Ying; Ma, Qiwang; Cui, Sheng; Liu, Jiali

    2015-04-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) is the most abundant free amino acid in mammalian cells. It plays a significant role in cell development, nutrition, and survival, such as in the regulation of ion transport and osmoregulation. Cysteine sulfinate decarboxylase (CSD) is the rate-limiting biosynthetic enzyme of taurine. Recently, the synthesis of taurine has been observed in the central nervous system, kidney, liver, and muscle. However, the synthesis of taurine in the salivary glands has still not been described in detail. We have detected CSD expression in the major salivary glands of adult male mice by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, and immunofluorescence. In addition, we determined the content of taurine by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results show that taurine is present in high concentrations in the major salivary glands of male mice. CSD messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein are expressed in the major salivary glands of male mice. The relative levels of CSD mRNA increase from the submandibular gland (SMG) to the sublingual gland (SLG) and parotid gland (PG), but the levels of the CSD protein are the opposite. The immunofluorescence results indicate that CSD is mainly located in the excretory ducts (EDs) and interlobular duct (IL) of SMG and ED in SLG, respectively. These results suggest that the major salivary glands of male mice produce taurine through the CSD pathway, and the synthesis of taurine might be related to sodium reabsorption in the salivary glands. PMID:25645459

  7. Functional and conformational transitions of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from Bacopa monniera.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, Shakeel; Patel, Krunal; Khan, Bashir; Bhosale, Siddharth; Gaikwad, Sushama

    2016-02-01

    Functional and conformational transitions of mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), a key enzyme of mevalonate pathway in isoprenoid biosynthesis, from Bacopa monniera (BmMDD), cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli were studied under thermal, chemical and pH-mediated denaturation conditions using fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopy. Native BmMDD is a helix dominant structure with 45% helix and 11% sheets and possesses seven tryptophan residues with two residues exposed on surface, three residues partially exposed and two situated in the interior of the protein. Thermal denaturation of BmMDD causes rapid structural transitions at and above 40°C and transient exposure of hydrophobic residues at 50°C, leading to aggregation of the protein. An acid induced molten globule like structure was observed at pH 4, exhibiting altered but compact secondary structure, distorted tertiary structure and exposed hydrophobic residues. The molten globule displayed different response at higher temperature and similar response to chemical denaturation as compared to the native protein. The surface tryptophans have predominantly positively charged amino acids around them, as indicated by higher KSV for KI as compared to that for CsCl. The native enzyme displayed two different lifetimes, τ1 (1.203±0.036 ns) and τ2 (3.473±0.12 ns) indicating two populations of tryptophan.

  8. The Bifunctional Pyruvate Decarboxylase/Pyruvate Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase from Thermococcus guaymasensis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus guaymasensis produces ethanol as a metabolic end product, and an alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) catalyzing the reduction of acetaldehyde to ethanol has been purified and characterized. However, the enzyme catalyzing the formation of acetaldehyde has not been identified. In this study an enzyme catalyzing the production of acetaldehyde from pyruvate was purified and characterized from T. guaymasensis under strictly anaerobic conditions. The enzyme had both pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR) activities. It was oxygen sensitive, and the optimal temperatures were 85°C and >95°C for the PDC and POR activities, respectively. The purified enzyme had activities of 3.8 ± 0.22 U mg−1 and 20.2 ± 1.8 U mg−1, with optimal pH-values of 9.5 and 8.4 for each activity, respectively. Coenzyme A was essential for both activities, although it did not serve as a substrate for the former. Enzyme kinetic parameters were determined separately for each activity. The purified enzyme was a heterotetramer. The sequences of the genes encoding the subunits of the bifunctional PDC/POR were determined. It is predicted that all hyperthermophilic β-keto acids ferredoxin oxidoreductases are bifunctional, catalyzing the activities of nonoxidative and oxidative decarboxylation of the corresponding β-keto acids. PMID:24982594

  9. Antiinflammatory drug effects on ultraviolet light-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase and DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, N.J.; Breeding, J.

    1980-06-01

    Epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity is greatly elevated in response to tumor promoting agents and ultraviolet light. The purpose of this paper is to report modification of ultraviolet-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity by antiinflammatory agents. Topical triamoinolone acetonide and indomethacin were found to significantly inhibit the UV-B induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase in hairless mice when applied following ultraviolet light irradiation. The corticosteroid also showed inhibition of ultraviolet light increased epidermal DNA synthesis. Indomethacin failed to show any inhibition of DNA synthesis.

  10. Structural features of mammalian histidine decarboxylase reveal the basis for specific inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Moya-García, AA; Pino-Ángeles, A; Gil-Redondo, R; Morreale, A; Sánchez-Jiménez, F

    2009-01-01

    For a long time the structural and molecular features of mammalian histidine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.22), the enzyme that produces histamine, have evaded characterization. We overcome the experimental problems for the study of this enzyme by using a computer-based modelling and simulation approach, and have now the conditions to use histidine decarboxylase as a target in histamine pharmacology. In this review, we present the recent (last 5 years) advances in the structure–function relationship of histidine decarboxylase and the strategy for the discovery of new drugs. PMID:19413567

  11. Structure of the Homodimeric Glycine Decarboxylase P-protein from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Suggests a Mechanism for Redox Regulation*

    PubMed Central

    Hasse, Dirk; Andersson, Evalena; Carlsson, Gunilla; Masloboy, Axel; Hagemann, Martin; Bauwe, Hermann; Andersson, Inger

    2013-01-01

    Glycine decarboxylase, or P-protein, is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme in one-carbon metabolism of all organisms, in the glycine and serine catabolism of vertebrates, and in the photorespiratory pathway of oxygenic phototrophs. P-protein from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is an α2 homodimer with high homology to eukaryotic P-proteins. The crystal structure of the apoenzyme shows the C terminus locked in a closed conformation by a disulfide bond between Cys972 in the C terminus and Cys353 located in the active site. The presence of the disulfide bridge isolates the active site from solvent and hinders the binding of PLP and glycine in the active site. Variants produced by substitution of Cys972 and Cys353 by Ser using site-directed mutagenesis have distinctly lower specific activities, supporting the crucial role of these highly conserved redox-sensitive amino acid residues for P-protein activity. Reduction of the 353–972 disulfide releases the C terminus and allows access to the active site. PLP and the substrate glycine bind in the active site of this reduced enzyme and appear to cause further conformational changes involving a flexible surface loop. The observation of the disulfide bond that acts to stabilize the closed form suggests a molecular mechanism for the redox-dependent activation of glycine decarboxylase observed earlier. PMID:24121504

  12. Cloning and expression of pig kidney dopa decarboxylase: comparison of the naturally occurring and recombinant enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, P S; Dominici, P; Borri Voltattorni, C

    1996-01-01

    L-Aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (dopa decarboxylase; DDC) is a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent homodimeric enzyme that catalyses the decarboxylation of L-dopa and other L-aromatic amino acids. To advance structure-function studies with the enzyme, a cDNA that codes for the protein from pig kidney has been cloned by joining a partial cDNA obtained by library screening with a synthetic portion constructed by the annealing and extension of long oligonucleotides. The hybrid cDNA was then expressed in Escherichia coli to produce recombinant protein. During characterization of the recombinant enzyme it was unexpectedly observed that it possesses certain differences from the enzyme purified from pig kidney. Whereas the later protein binds 1 molecule of PLP per dimer, the recombinant enzyme was found to bind two molecules of coenzyme per dimer. Moreover, the Vmax was twice that of the protein purified from tissue. On addition of substrate, the absorbance changes accompanying transaldimination were likewise 2-fold greater in the recombinant enzyme. Examination of the respective apoenzymes by absorbance, CD and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed distinct differences. The recombinant apoprotein has no significant absorbance at 335 nm, unlike the pig kidney apoenzyme; in the latter case this residual absorbance is associated with a positive dichroic signal. When excited at 335 nm the pig kidney apoenzyme has a pronounced emission maximum at 385 nm, in contrast with its recombinant counterpart, which shows a weak broad emission at about 400 nm. However, the holoenzyme-apoenzyme transition did not markedly alter the respective fluorescence properties of either recombinant or pig kidney DDC when excited at 335 nm. Taken together, these findings indicate that recombinant pig kidney DDC has two active-site PLP molecules and therefore displays structural characteristics typical of PLP-dependent homodimeric enzymes. The natural enzyme contains one active-site PLP molecule

  13. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase is essential for viability, and a single Leu-to-Pro mutation in a conserved sequence leads to thermosensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Bergès, T; Guyonnet, D; Karst, F

    1997-01-01

    The mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase is an enzyme which converts mevalonate diphosphate to isopentenyl diphosphate, the building block of isoprenoids. We used the Saccharomyces cerevisiae temperature-sensitive mutant defective for mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase previously described (C. Chambon, V. Ladeveve, M. Servouse, L. Blanchard, C. Javelot, B. Vladescu, and F. Karst, Lipids 26:633-636, 1991) to characterize the mutated allele. We showed that a single change in a conserved amino acid accounts for the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the mutant. Complementation experiments were done both in the erg19-mutated background and in a strain in which the ERG19 gene, which was shown to be an essential gene for yeast, was disrupted. Epitope tagging of the wild-type mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase allowed us to isolate the enzyme in an active form by a versatile one-step immunoprecipitation procedure. Furthermore, during the course of this study, we observed that a high level of expression of the wild-type ERG19 gene led to a lower sterol steady-state accumulation compared to that of a wild-type strain, suggesting that this enzyme may be a key enzyme in mevalonate pathway regulation. PMID:9244250

  14. Altered subcellular localization of ornithine decarboxylase in Alzheimer's disease brain

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Tatjana . E-mail: Tatjana.Nilsson@ki.se; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Volkman, Inga; Winblad, Bengt; Folkesson, Ronnie; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2006-06-02

    The amyloid precursor protein can through ligand-mimicking induce expression of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. We report here the regional distribution and cellular localization of ODC immunoreactivity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. In frontal cortex and hippocampus of control cases, the most pronounced ODC immunoreactivity was found in the nucleus. In possible and definite AD the immunoreactivity had shifted to the cytoplasm. In cerebellum of control cases, ODC staining was found in a small portion of Purkinje cells, mostly in the nucleus. In AD, both possible and definite, the number of stained Purkinje cells increased significantly and immunoreactivity was shifted to the cytoplasm, even though it was still prominent in the nucleus. In conclusion, our study reveals an early shift of the ODC immunoreactivity in AD from the nuclear compartment towards the cytoplasm.

  15. An endosymbiont positively modulates ornithine decarboxylase in host trypanosomatids

    SciTech Connect

    Frossard, Mariana Lins; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Matta, Renato Augusto da; Souza, Wanderley de; Garcia de Mello, Fernando; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado . E-mail: motta@biof.ufrj.br

    2006-05-05

    Summary: Some trypanosomatids, such as Crithidia deanei, are endosymbiont-containing species. Aposymbiotic strains are obtained after antibiotic treatment, revealing interesting aspects of this symbiotic association. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) promotes polyamine biosynthesis and contributes to cell proliferation. Here, we show that ODC activity is higher in endosymbiont-bearing trypanosomatids than in aposymbiotic cells, but isolated endosymbionts did not display this enzyme activity. Intriguingly, expressed levels of ODC were similar in both strains, suggesting that ODC is positively modulated in endosymbiont-bearing cells. When the aposymbiotic strain was grown in conditioned medium, obtained after cultivation of the endosymbiont-bearing strain, cellular proliferation as well as ODC activity and localization were similar to that observed in the endosymbiont-containing trypanosomatids. Furthermore, dialyzed-heated medium and trypsin treatment reduced ODC activity of the aposymbiont strain. Taken together, these data indicate that the endosymbiont can enhance the protozoan ODC activity by providing factors of protein nature, which increase the host polyamine metabolism.

  16. Antibody-based donor-acceptor spatial reconfiguration in decorated lanthanide-doped nanoparticle colloids for the quantification of okadaic acid biotoxin.

    PubMed

    Stipić, Filip; Burić, Petra; Jakšić, Željko; Pletikapić, Galja; Dutour Sikirić, Maja; Zgrablić, Goran; Frkanec, Leo; Lyons, Daniel M

    2015-11-01

    With the increasing movement away from the mouse bioassay for the detection of toxins in commercially harvested shellfish, there is a growing demand for the development of new and potentially field-deployable tests in its place. In this direction we report the development of a simple and sensitive nanoparticle-based luminescence technique for the detection of the marine biotoxin okadaic acid. Photoluminescent lanthanide nanoparticles were conjugated with fluorophore-labelled anti-okadaic acid antibodies which, upon binding to okadaic acid, gave rise to luminescence resonance energy transfer from the nanoparticle to the organic fluorophore dye deriving from a reduction in distance between the two. The intensity ratio of the fluorophore: nanoparticle emission peaks was found to correlate with okadaic acid concentration, and the sensor showed a linear response in the 0.37-3.97 μM okadaic acid range with a limit of detection of 0.25 μM. This work may have important implications for the development of new, cheap, and versatile biosensors for a range of biomolecules and that are sufficiently simple to be applied in the field or at point-of-care. PMID:26283497

  17. Antibody-based donor-acceptor spatial reconfiguration in decorated lanthanide-doped nanoparticle colloids for the quantification of okadaic acid biotoxin.

    PubMed

    Stipić, Filip; Burić, Petra; Jakšić, Željko; Pletikapić, Galja; Dutour Sikirić, Maja; Zgrablić, Goran; Frkanec, Leo; Lyons, Daniel M

    2015-11-01

    With the increasing movement away from the mouse bioassay for the detection of toxins in commercially harvested shellfish, there is a growing demand for the development of new and potentially field-deployable tests in its place. In this direction we report the development of a simple and sensitive nanoparticle-based luminescence technique for the detection of the marine biotoxin okadaic acid. Photoluminescent lanthanide nanoparticles were conjugated with fluorophore-labelled anti-okadaic acid antibodies which, upon binding to okadaic acid, gave rise to luminescence resonance energy transfer from the nanoparticle to the organic fluorophore dye deriving from a reduction in distance between the two. The intensity ratio of the fluorophore: nanoparticle emission peaks was found to correlate with okadaic acid concentration, and the sensor showed a linear response in the 0.37-3.97 μM okadaic acid range with a limit of detection of 0.25 μM. This work may have important implications for the development of new, cheap, and versatile biosensors for a range of biomolecules and that are sufficiently simple to be applied in the field or at point-of-care.

  18. Immunohistochemical evidence for colocalization of gamma-aminobutyric acid and serotonin in neurons of the ventral medulla oblongata projecting to the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Hökfelt, T; Seroogy, K; Oertel, W; Verhofstad, A A; Wu, J Y

    1987-04-28

    Fluorescence immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the medulla oblongata of colchicine-treated rats that had been incubated with guinea pig antibodies to serotonin (5-HT) and either rabbit or sheep antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). Numerous cells in the rostral ventrolateral medulla in the region of nucleus raphe magnus were immunostained for either 5-HT or GAD. A substantial number of neurons showed positive immunoreactivity for both substances, and were most frequently observed in the lateral aspect of nucleus raphe magnus. In addition, a number of the 5-HT/GAD-containing neurons were retrogradely labelled with Fast blue dye that had been injected into the thoracic spinal cord. This work provides evidence for colocalization of the classical neurotransmitters 5-HT and GABA in single cells of the ventral medulla oblongata, some of which project to the spinal cord. PMID:3555707

  19. The electrochemical investigation of the catalytic power of pyruvate decarboxylase and its coenzyme.

    PubMed

    Bell, Patrick; Hoyt, Kathryn; Shabangi, Masangu

    2006-05-01

    The change in the energy barriers for the heterogeneous reduction of pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) relative to its coenzyme, thiamin pyrophosphate (ThPP), was determined experimentally using square wave voltammetry (SWV) to be 5.3 kcal/mol. These results are in agreement with those of reaction rate acceleration provided by thiamin-dependent decarboxylases relative to their coenzyme as determined kinetically based on the pK(a) suppression by the enzyme environment.

  20. Characterization of Glutamate Decarboxylase (GAD) from Lactobacillus sakei A156 Isolated from Jeot-gal.

    PubMed

    Sa, Hyun Deok; Park, Ji Yeong; Jeong, Seon-Ju; Lee, Kang Wook; Kim, Jeong Hwan

    2015-05-01

    A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing microorganism was isolated from jeot-gal (anchovy), a Korean fermented seafood. The isolate, A156, produced GABA profusely when incubated in MRS broth with monosodium glutamate (3% (w/v)) at 37°C for 48 h. A156 was identified as Lactobacillus sakei by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The GABA conversion yield was 86% as determined by GABase enzyme assay. The gadB gene encoding glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) was cloned by PCR. gadC encoding a glutamate/GABA antiporter was located immediately upstream of gadB. The operon structure of gadCB was confirmed by RT-PCR. gadB was overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) and recombinant GAD was purified. The purified GAD was 54.4 kDa in size by SDS-PAGE. Maximum GAD activity was observed at pH 5.0 and 55°C and the activity was dependent on pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. The Km and Vmax of GAD were 0.045 mM and 0.011 mM/min, respectively, when glutamate was used as the substrate.

  1. Mutational Analysis of Substrate Interactions with the Active Site of Dialkylglycine Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Fogle, Emily J.; Toney, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes catalyze many different types of reactions at the α-, β-, and γ-carbons of amine and amino acid substrates. Dialkylglycine decarboxylase (DGD) is an unusual PLP dependent enzyme that catalyzes two reaction types, decarboxylation and transamination, in the same active site. A structurally-based, functional model has been proposed for the DGD active site, which maintains that R406 is important in determining substrate specificity through interactions with the substrate carboxylate while W138 provides specificity for short-chain alkyl groups. The mechanistic roles of R406 and W138 were investigated using site directed mutagenesis, alternate substrates, and analysis of steady-state and half-reaction kinetics. Experiments on the R406M and R406K mutants confirm the importance of R406 in substrate binding. Surprisingly, this work also shows that the positive charge of R406 facilitates catalysis of decarboxylation. The W138F mutant demonstrates that W138 indeed acts to limit the size of the subsite C binding pocket, determining specificity for 2,2-dialkylglycines with small side chains as predicted by the model. Finally, work with the double mutant W138F/M141R shows that these mutations expand substrate specificity to include L-glutamate and lead to an increase in specificity for L-glutamate over 2-aminoisobutyrate of approximately eight orders of magnitude compared to WT DGD. PMID:20540501

  2. Deletion of pyruvate decarboxylase by a new method for efficient markerless gene deletions in Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Peters, Björn; Junker, Anja; Brauer, Katharina; Mühlthaler, Bernadette; Kostner, David; Mientus, Markus; Liebl, Wolfgang; Ehrenreich, Armin

    2013-03-01

    Gluconobacter oxydans, a biotechnologically relevant species which incompletely oxidizes a large variety of carbohydrates, alcohols, and related compounds, contains a gene for pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC). This enzyme is found only in very few species of bacteria where it is normally involved in anaerobic ethanol formation via acetaldehyde. In order to clarify the role of PDC in the strictly oxidative metabolism of acetic acid bacteria, we developed a markerless in-frame deletion system for strain G. oxydans 621H which uses 5-fluorouracil together with a plasmid-encoded uracil phosphoribosyltransferase as counter selection method and used this technique to delete the PDC gene (GOX1081) of G. oxydans 621H. The PDC deletion mutant accumulated large amounts of pyruvate but almost no acetate during growth on D-mannitol, D-fructose or in the presence of L-lactate. This suggested that in G. oxydans acetate formation occurs by decarboxylation of pyruvate and subsequent oxidation of acetaldehyde to acetate. This observation and the efficiency of the markerless deletion system were confirmed by constructing deletion mutants of two acetaldehyde dehydrogenases (GOX1122 and GOX2018) and of the acetyl-CoA-synthetase (GOX0412). Acetate formation during growth of these mutants on mannitol did not differ significantly from the wild-type strain.

  3. Design of inhibitors of orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase using bioisosteric replacement and determination of inhibition kinetics.

    PubMed

    Poduch, Ewa; Bello, Angelica M; Tang, Sishi; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Pai, Emil F; Kotra, Lakshmi P

    2006-08-10

    Inhibitors of orotidine monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) have applications in RNA viral, parasitic, and other infectious diseases. ODCase catalyzes the decarboxylation of orotidine monophosphate (OMP), producing uridine monophosphate (UMP). Novel inhibitors 6-amino-UMP and 6-cyano-UMP were designed on the basis of the substructure volumes in the substrate OMP and in an inhibitor of ODCase, barbituric acid monophosphate, BMP. A new enzyme assay method using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was developed to investigate the inhibition kinetics of ODCase. The reaction rates were measured by monitoring the heat generated during the decarboxylation reaction of orotidine monophosphate. Kinetic parameters (k(cat) = 21 s(-1) and KM = 5 microM) and the molar enthalpy (DeltaH(app) = 5 kcal/mol) were determined for the decarboxylation of the substrate by ODCase. Competitive inhibition of the enzyme was observed and the inhibition constants (Ki) were determined to be 12.4 microM and 29 microM for 6-aza-UMP and 6-cyano-UMP, respectively. 6-Amino-UMP was found to be among the potent inhibitors of ODCase, having an inhibition constant of 840 nM. We reveal here the first inhibitors of ODCase designed by the principles of bioisosterism and a novel method of using isothermal calorimetry for enzyme inhibition studies.

  4. Biochemical evaluation of a parsley tyrosine decarboxylase results in a novel 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde synthase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Torrens-Spence, Michael P; Gillaspy, Glenda; Zhao, Bingyu; Harich, Kim; White, Robert H; Li, Jianyong

    2012-02-10

    Plant aromatic amino acid decarboxylases (AAADs) are effectively indistinguishable from plant aromatic acetaldehyde syntheses (AASs) through primary sequence comparison. Spectroscopic analyses of several characterized AASs and AAADs were performed to look for absorbance spectral identifiers. Although this limited survey proved inconclusive, the resulting work enabled the reevaluation of several characterized plant AAS and AAAD enzymes. Upon completion, a previously reported parsley AAAD protein was demonstrated to have AAS activity. Substrate specificity tests demonstrate that this novel AAS enzyme has a unique substrate specificity towards tyrosine (km 0.46mM) and dopa (km 1.40mM). Metabolite analysis established the abundance of tyrosine and absence of dopa in parsley extracts. Such analysis indicates that tyrosine is likely to be the sole physiological substrate. The resulting information suggests that this gene is responsible for the in vivo production of 4-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (4-HPAA). This is the first reported case of an AAS enzyme utilizing tyrosine as a primary substrate and the first report of a single enzyme capable of producing 4-HPAA from tyrosine.

  5. Molecular characterization of Mtb-OMP decarboxylase by modeling, docking and dynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Madhusudana, P; Babajan, B; Chaitanya, M; Anuradha, C M; Shobharani, C; Chikati, Rajasekar; Kumar, Chitta Suresh; Rao, K R S Sambasiva; Poda, Sudhakar

    2012-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), the second most deadly disease in the world is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). In the present work a unique enzyme of Mtb orotidine 5' monophosphate decarboxylase (Mtb-OMP Decase) is selected as drug target due to its indispensible role in biosynthesis of pyrimidines. The present work is focused on understanding the structural and functional aspects of Mtb-OMP Decase at molecular level. Due to absence of crystal structure, the 3D structure of Mtb-OMP Decase was predicted by MODELLER9V7 using a known structural template 3L52. Energy minimization and refinement of the developed 3D model was carried out with Gromacs 3.2.1 and the optimized homology model was validated by PROCHECK,WHAT-IF and PROSA2003. Further, the surface active site amino acids were quantified by WHAT-IF pocket. The exact binding interactions of the ligands, 6-idiouridine 5' monophosphate and its designed analogues with the receptor Mtb-OMP Decase were predicted by docking analysis with AUTODOCK 4.0. This would be helpful in understanding the blockade mechanism of OMP Decase and provide a candidate lead for the discovery of Mtb-OMP Decase inhibitors, which may bring insights into outcome new therapy to treat drug resistant Mtb.

  6. Hepatoerythropoietic Porphyria Caused by a Novel Homoallelic Mutation in Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase Gene in Egyptian Patients.

    PubMed

    Farrag, M S; Mikula, I; Richard, E; Saudek, V; De Verneuil, H; Martásek, P

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are metabolic disorders resulting from mutations in haem biosynthetic pathway genes. Hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP) is a rare type of porphyria caused by the deficiency of the fifth enzyme (uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase, UROD) in this pathway. The defect in the enzymatic activity is due to biallelic mutations in the UROD gene. Currently, 109 UROD mutations are known. The human disease has an early onset, manifesting in infancy or early childhood with red urine, skin photosensitivity in sun-exposed areas, and hypertrichosis. Similar defects and links to photosensitivity and hepatopathy exist in several animal models, including zebrafish and mice. In the present study, we report a new mutation in the UROD gene in Egyptian patients with HEP. We show that the homozygous c.T163A missense mutation leads to a substitution of a conserved phenylalanine (amino acid 55) for isoleucine in the enzyme active site, causing a dramatic decrease in the enzyme activity (19 % of activity of wild-type enzyme). Inspection of the UROD crystal structure shows that Phe-55 contacts the substrate and is located in the loop that connects helices 2 and 3. Phe-55 is strictly conserved in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic UROD. The F55I substitution likely interferes with the enzyme-substrate interaction.

  7. Identification of malic and soluble oxaloacetate decarboxylase enzymes in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Espariz, Martín; Repizo, Guillermo; Blancato, Víctor; Mortera, Pablo; Alarcón, Sergio; Magni, Christian

    2011-06-01

    Two paralogous genes, maeE and citM, that encode putative malic enzyme family members were identified in the Enterococcus faecalis genome. MaeE (41 kDa) and CitM (42 kDa) share a high degree of homology between them (47% identities and 68% conservative substitutions). However, the genetic context of each gene suggested that maeE is associated with malate utilization whereas citM is linked to the citrate fermentation pathway. In the present work, we focus on the biochemical characterization and physiological contribution of these enzymes in E. faecalis. With this aim, the recombinant versions of the two proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli, affinity purified and finally their kinetic parameters were determined. This approach allowed us to establish that MaeE is a malate oxidative decarboxylating enzyme and CitM is a soluble oxaloacetate decarboxylase. Moreover, our genetic studies in E. faecalis showed that the citrate fermentation phenotype is not affected by citM deletion. On the other hand, maeE gene disruption resulted in a malate fermentation deficient strain indicating that MaeE is responsible for malate metabolism in E. faecalis. Lastly, it was demonstrated that malate fermentation in E. faecalis is associated with cytoplasmic and extracellular alkalinization which clearly contributes to pH homeostasis in neutral or mild acidic conditions. PMID:21518252

  8. Overexpression of Tyrosine hydroxylase and Dopa decarboxylase associated with pupal melanization in Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sisi; Wang, Mo; Li, Xianchun

    2015-01-01

    Melanism has been found in a wide range of species, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain largely elusive. In this study, we studied the molecular mechanisms of the pupal melanism in Spodoptera exigua. The full length cDNA sequences of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopa decarboxylase (DDC), two key enzymes in the biosynthesis pathway of melanin, were cloned, and their temporal expression patterns in the integument were compared during the larval-pupal metamorphosis process of the S. exigua wild type (SEW) and melanic mutant (SEM) strains. No amino acid change in the protein sequence of TH and DDC was found between the two strains. Both DDC and TH were significantly over-expressed in the integument of the SEM strain at late-prepupa and 0 h pupa, respectively, compared with those of the SEW strain. Feeding 5th instar larvae of SEM with diets incorporated with 1 mg/g of the DDC inhibitor L-α-Methyl-DOPA and 0.75 mg/g of the TH inhibitor 3-iodo-tyrosine (3-IT) resulted in 20% pupae with partially-rescued phenotype and 68.2% of pupae with partially- or fully-rescued phenotype, respectively. These results indicate that overexpressions of TH and DDC are involved in the pupal melanization of S. exigua. PMID:26084938

  9. Overexpression of Actinidia deliciosa pyruvate decarboxylase 1 gene enhances waterlogging stress in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Yu; Huang, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Gang; Xuan, Ji-Ping; Guo, Zhong-Ren

    2016-09-01

    Ethanolic fermentation is classically associated with waterlogging tolerance when plant cells switch from respiration to anaerobic fermentation. Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), which catalyzes the first step in this pathway, is thought to be the main regulatory enzyme. Here, we cloned a full-length PDC cDNA sequence from kiwifruit, named AdPDC1. We determined the expression of the AdPDC1 gene in kiwifruit under different environmental stresses using qRT-PCR, and the results showed that the increase of AdPDC1 expression during waterlogging stress was much higher than that during salt, cold, heat and drought stresses. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced the resistance to waterlogging stress but could not enhance resistance to cold stress at five weeks old seedlings. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis could not enhance resistance to NaCl and mannitol stresses at the stage of seed germination and in early seedlings. These results suggested that the kiwifruit AdPDC1 gene is required during waterlogging but might not be required during other environmental stresses. Expression of the AdPDC1 gene was down-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) in kiwifruit, and overexpression of the AdPDC1 gene in Arabidopsis inhibited seed germination and root length under ABA treatment, indicating that ABA might negatively regulate the AdPDC1 gene under waterlogging stress.

  10. Overexpression of Actinidia deliciosa pyruvate decarboxylase 1 gene enhances waterlogging stress in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-Yu; Huang, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Gang; Xuan, Ji-Ping; Guo, Zhong-Ren

    2016-09-01

    Ethanolic fermentation is classically associated with waterlogging tolerance when plant cells switch from respiration to anaerobic fermentation. Pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), which catalyzes the first step in this pathway, is thought to be the main regulatory enzyme. Here, we cloned a full-length PDC cDNA sequence from kiwifruit, named AdPDC1. We determined the expression of the AdPDC1 gene in kiwifruit under different environmental stresses using qRT-PCR, and the results showed that the increase of AdPDC1 expression during waterlogging stress was much higher than that during salt, cold, heat and drought stresses. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis enhanced the resistance to waterlogging stress but could not enhance resistance to cold stress at five weeks old seedlings. Overexpression of kiwifruit AdPDC1 in transgenic Arabidopsis could not enhance resistance to NaCl and mannitol stresses at the stage of seed germination and in early seedlings. These results suggested that the kiwifruit AdPDC1 gene is required during waterlogging but might not be required during other environmental stresses. Expression of the AdPDC1 gene was down-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) in kiwifruit, and overexpression of the AdPDC1 gene in Arabidopsis inhibited seed germination and root length under ABA treatment, indicating that ABA might negatively regulate the AdPDC1 gene under waterlogging stress. PMID:27191596

  11. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  13. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. The mitochondria are an important part of cells. They are ... often, in people with other kinds of liver disease and some autoimmune diseases. Risks Risks for having ...

  14. The regulation of branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase of liver, kidney and heart by phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W A; Halestrap, A P

    1981-01-01

    1. Incubation of mitochondria from heart, liver and kidney with [32P]phosphate allowed 32P incorporation into two intramitochondrial proteins, the decarboxylase alpha-subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (mol.wt 42000) and a protein of mol.wt. 48000. 2. This latter protein incorporated 32P more slowly than did pyruvate dehydrogenase, was not precipitated by antibody to pyruvate dehydrogenase and showed behaviour distinct from that of pyruvate dehydrogenase towards high-speed centrifugation and pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase. 3. 32P incorporation into the protein was greatly diminished by the presence of 0.1 mM-4-methyl-2-oxopentanoate, but enhanced by pyruvate (1 mM), hypo-osmotic treatment of mitochondria and, under some conditions, by uncoupler. 4. The activity of branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase was assayed in parallel experiments. Under appropriate conditions the enzyme was inhibited when 32P incorporation was increased and activated when incorporation was decreased. The data suggest that the 48000-mol.wt. phosphorylated protein is identical with the decarboxylase subunit of branched-chain 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase and that this enzyme may be controlled by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle akin to that for pyruvate dehydrogenase. 5. Strict correlation between activity and 32P incorporation was not observed, and a scheme for the regulation of the enzyme is proposed to account for these discrepancies. PMID:7316988

  15. Characterization of Escherichia coli K1 colominic acid-specific murine antibodies that are cross-protective against Neisseria meningitidis groups B, C, and Y.

    PubMed

    Park, In Ho; Lin, Jisheng; Choi, Ji Eun; Shin, Jeon-Soo

    2014-06-01

    The capsular polysaccharide (PS) of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (NMGB) is α(2-8)-linked N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), which is almost identical to the O-acetylated colominic acid (CA) of Escherichia coli K1 Although E. coli K1 has long been known to elicit cross-protective antibodies against NMGB, limited information on these highly cross-reactive antibodies is available. In the present study, six new monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to both E. coli K1 CA and NMGB PS were produced by immunizing Balb/c mice with E. coli K1, and their serological and molecular properties were characterized, together with 12 previously reported hybridoma mAbs. Among the bactericidal mAbs against NMGB, both HmenB5 and HmenB18, which are genetically identical though of different mouse origins, were able to kill serogroup C and Y meningococci. Based on SPR sensograms, the binding affinity of HmenB18 for PS was suggested to be associated with at least two different binding forces: the polyanionicity of Neu5Ac and an interaction with the O-acetyl groups of Neu5Ac. Molecular analysis showed that similar to most mAbs presenting a few restricted V region germline genes, the V region genes of HmenB18 were 979% and 986% identical to the closest IGHV1-1401 and IGLV15-10301 germline gene alleles, respectively, and V-D-J editing in this mAb generated an unusually long VH-CDR3 sequence (17 amino acid residues), containing one basic arginine, two hydrophobic isoleucine residues and a 'YAMDY' motif. Models of the mAb combining sites demonstrate that most of the mAbs exhibited a wide, shallow groove with a high overall positive charge, as seen in mAb735, which is specific for a polyanionic helical epitope. In contrast, the combining site of HmenB18 was shown to be wide but to present a relatively weak positive charge, consistent with the extensive recognition by HmenB18 of the various structural epitopes formed with the Neu5Ac residue and its O-acetylation.

  16. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of an arginine decarboxylase gene from peach (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji Hong; Ban, Yusuke; Wen, Xiao-Peng; Nakajima, Ikuko; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2009-01-15

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC), one of the enzymes responsible for putrescine (Put) biosynthesis, has been shown to be implicated in stress response. In the current paper attempts were made to clone and characterize a gene encoding ADC from peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch, 'Akatsuki'). Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) gave rise to a full-length ADC cDNA (PpADC) with a complete open reading frame of 2178 bp, encoding a 725 amino acid polypeptide. Homology search and sequence multi-alignment demonstrated that the deduced PpADC protein sequence shared a high identity with ADCs from other plants, including several highly conservative motifs and amino acids. Southern blotting indicated that PpADC existed in peach genome as a single gene. Expression levels of PpADC in different tissues of peach (P. persica 'Akatsuki') were spatially and developmentally regulated. Treatment of peach shoots from 'Mochizuki' with exogenous 5 mM Put, an indirect product of ADC, remarkably induced accumulation of PpADC mRNA. Transcripts of PpADC in peach leaves from 'Mochizuki' were quickly induced, either transiently or continuously, in response to dehydration, high salinity (200 mM NaCl), low temperature (4 degrees C) and heavy metal (150 microM CdCl(2)), but repressed by high temperature 37 degrees C) during a 2-day treatment, which changed in an opposite direction when the stresses were otherwise removed with the exception of CdCl(2) treatment. In addition, steady-state of PpADC mRNA could be also transiently up-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA) in 'Mochizuki' leaves. All of these, taken together, suggest that PpADC is a stress-responsive gene and can be considered as a potential target that is genetically manipulated so as to create novel germplasms with enhanced stress tolerance in the future.

  17. Mechanistic characterization of a bacterial malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase: identification of a new activity on the tautomerase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Poelarends, Gerrit J; Johnson, William H; Murzin, Alexey G; Whitman, Christian P

    2003-12-01

    Malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase (MSAD) has been identified as the protein encoded by the orf130 gene from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 on the basis of the genomic context of the gene as well as its ability to catalyze the decarboxylation of malonate semialdehyde to generate acetaldehyde. The enzyme is found in a degradative pathway for the xenobiotic nematocide trans-1,3-dichloropropene. MSAD has no sequence homology to previously characterized decarboxylases, but the presence of a conserved motif (Pro1-(X)8 -Gly-Arg11-X-Asp-X-Gln) in its N-terminal region suggested a relationship to the tautomerase superfamily. Sequence analysis identified Pro1 and Arg75 as potential active site residues that might be involved in the MSAD activity. The results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirmed the importance of these residues to activity and provided further evidence to implicate MSAD as a new member of the tautomerase superfamily. MSAD is the first identified decarboxylase in the superfamily and is possibly the first characterized member of a new and distinct family within this superfamily. Malonate semialdehyde is analogous to a beta-keto acid, and enzymes that catalyze the decarboxylation of these acids generally utilize metal ion catalysis, a Schiff base intermediate, or polarization of the carbonyl group by hydrogen bonding and/or electrostatic interactions. A mechanistic analysis shows that the rate of the reaction is not affected by the presence of a metal ion or EDTA while the incubation of MSAD with the substrate in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride results in the irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. The site of modification is Pro1. These observations are consistent with the latter two mechanisms, but do not exclude the first mechanism. Based on the sequence analysis, the outcome of the mutagenesis and mechanistic experiments, and the roles determined for Pro1 and the conserved arginine in all tautomerase superfamily members characterized

  18. Cloning and expression of the gene encoding alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase from Acetobacter aceti ssp. xylinum in brewer's yeast.

    PubMed

    Yamano, S; Tanaka, J; Inoue, T

    1994-02-14

    Acetobacter aceti ssp. xylinum genomic library was constructed using cosmid pJB8 in Escherichia coli. The gene encoding alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (ALDC) was isolated from the library by direct measurement of ALDC activity. The ALDC gene was expressed by its own promoter in E. coli. The nucleotide sequence was determined, and an open reading frame which may encode a protein composed of 304 amino acids with a molecular weight of 33,747 was found. A brewer's yeast was transformed with the YEp-type plasmid containing the ALDC gene placed under the control of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter. The laboratory-scale growth test confirmed that the total diacetyl concentration was considerably reduced by the transformant. The analysis of the wort indicates that the Acetobacter ALDC reduces the concentration of diacetyl more effectively than that of 2,3-pentanedione.

  19. Monoclonal antibody production and indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay development of 3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid based on novel haptens.

    PubMed

    Li, Guopeng; Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Feng; Li, Jiaying; Xing, Yuan; Wang, Tiangang; Zhou, Xilong; Ji, Baoping; Ren, Wanpeng

    2016-10-15

    Two novel immunizing haptens of 3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid (MQCA) were synthesized and conjugated with cationized bovine serum albumin. Female BALB/c mice were immunized with above conjugates, splenocytes were fused with Sp2/0 cells to produce monoclonal antibody. Compared with previous studies, antibodies raised in this work showed higher sensitivity. Meantime, a novel heterologous coating hapten was also prepared. The indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) based on the optimum condition showed an IC50 of 3.1μg/kg (ppb), and the linear range of 0.46-10.5ppb for MQCA. The limit of detect (LOD) of MQCA in swine muscle, swine liver and chicken was 0.32, 0.54, and 0.28ppb, respectively. The LOD of this assay can satisfy the minimum required performance levels (4ppb) for MQCA. These results indicated that the proposed ELISA, with high sensitivity and specificity, as well as good reproducibility and accuracy, is suitable for determination of MQCA residues in food samples.

  20. The amino acid residues at 102 and 104 in GP5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus regulate viral neutralization susceptibility to the porcine serum neutralizing antibody.

    PubMed

    Fan, Baochao; Liu, Xing; Bai, Juan; Zhang, Tingjie; Zhang, Qiaoya; Jiang, Ping

    2015-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is mainly responsible for the heavy economic losses in pig industry in the world. A number of neutralizing epitopes have been identified in the viral structural proteins GP3, GP4, GP5 and M. In this study, the important amino acid (aa) residues of HP-PRRSV strain BB affecting neutralization susceptibility of antibody were examined using resistant strains generated under neutralizing antibody (NAb) pressure in MARC-145 cells, reverse genetic technique and virus neutralization assay. HP-PRRSV strain BB was passaged under the pressure of porcine NAb serum in vitro. A resistant strain BB34s with 102 and 104 aa substitutions in GP5, which have been predicted to be the positive sites for pressure selection (Delisle et al., 2012), was cloned and identified. To determine the effect of the two aa residues on neutralization, eight recombinant PRRSV strains were generated, and neutralization assay results confirmed that the aa residues 102 and 104 in GP5 played an important role in NAbs against HP-PRRSV in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Alignment of GP5 sequences revealed that the variant aa residues at 102 and 104 were frequent among type 2 PRRSV strains. It may be helpful for understanding the mechanism regulating the neutralization susceptibility of PRRSV to the NAbs and monitoring the antigen variant strains in the field.

  1. Construction, expression, and characterization of a single-chain variable fragment antibody against 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in the hemolymph of silkworm larvae.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Pongkitwitoon, Benyakan; Nakamura, Seiko; Sasaki-Tabata, Kaori; Tanizaki, Yusuke; Maenaka, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2011-07-01

    A single-chain variable fragment antibody against herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D-scFv) has been successfully expressed in the hemolymph of silkworm larvae using a rapid Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid DNA system. Variable heavy- and light-chain domains were cloned directly from the cDNA of the hybridoma cell line 2C4 and assembled together with flexible peptide linker (Gly(4)Ser)(3) between two domains. The yield of functional 2,4-D-scFv after purification was 640 μg per 30 ml of hemolymph, which is equivalent to 21.3 mg per liter of hemolymph. The characterization of 2,4-D-scFv using an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) revealed that it has wide cross-reactivities against 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (65.5%), 2,4-dichlorophenol (47.9%), and 2,4-dichlorobenzoic acid (26.0%), making it possible to apply 2,4-D-scFv to icELISA for detecting/determining 2,4-D and its metabolites. Judging from its cost and time requirements and its ease of handling, this BmNPV bacmid DNA expression system is more useful for expressing functional scFv than bacterial systems, which frequently require costly and time-consuming refolding.

  2. Antibody validation

    PubMed Central

    Bordeaux, Jennifer; Welsh, Allison W.; Agarwal, Seema; Killiam, Elizabeth; Baquero, Maria T.; Hanna, Jason A.; Anagnostou, Valsamo K.; Rimm, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies are among the most frequently used tools in basic science research and in clinical assays, but there are no universally accepted guidelines or standardized methods for determining the validity of these reagents. Furthermore, for commercially available antibodies, it is clear that what is on the label does not necessarily correspond to what is in the tube. To validate an antibody, it must be shown to be specific, selective, and reproducible in the context for which it is to be used. In this review, we highlight the common pitfalls when working with antibodies, common practices for validating antibodies, and levels of commercial antibody validation for seven vendors. Finally, we share our algorithm for antibody validation for immunohistochemistry and quantitative immunofluorescence. PMID:20359301

  3. The DOPA decarboxylase (DDC) gene is associated with alerting attention.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bi; Chen, Chuansheng; Moyzis, Robert K; Dong, Qi; Chen, Chunhui; He, Qinghua; Li, Jin; Li, Jun; Lei, Xuemei; Lin, Chongde

    2013-06-01

    DOPA decarboxylase (DDC) is involved in the synthesis of dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin. It has been suggested that genes involved in the dopamine, norepinephrine, and cholinergic systems play an essential role in the efficiency of human attention networks. Attention refers to the cognitive process of obtaining and maintaining the alert state, orienting to sensory events, and regulating the conflicts of thoughts and behavior. The present study tested seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the DDC gene for association with attention, which was assessed by the Attention Network Test to detect three networks of attention, including alerting, orienting, and executive attention, in a healthy Han Chinese sample (N=451). Association analysis for individual SNPs indicated that four of the seven SNPs (rs3887825, rs7786398, rs10499695, and rs6969081) were significantly associated with alerting attention. Haplotype-based association analysis revealed that alerting was associated with the haplotype G-A-T for SNPs rs7786398-rs10499695-rs6969081. These associations remained significant after correcting for multiple testing by max(T) permutation. No association was found for orienting and executive attention. This study provides the first evidence for the involvement of the DDC gene in alerting attention. A better understanding of the genetic basis of distinct attention networks would allow us to develop more effective diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of deficient or underdeveloped alerting attention as well as its related prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Ornithine decarboxylase antizyme inhibitor 2 regulates intracellular vesicle trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Kanerva, Kristiina; Maekitie, Laura T.; Baeck, Nils; Andersson, Leif C.

    2010-07-01

    Antizyme inhibitor 1 (AZIN1) and 2 (AZIN2) are proteins that activate ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis. Both AZINs release ODC from its inactive complex with antizyme (AZ), leading to formation of the catalytically active ODC. The ubiquitously expressed AZIN1 is involved in cell proliferation and transformation whereas the role of the recently found AZIN2 in cellular functions is unknown. Here we report the intracellular localization of AZIN2 and present novel evidence indicating that it acts as a regulator of vesicle trafficking. We used immunostaining to demonstrate that both endogenous and FLAG-tagged AZIN2 localize to post-Golgi vesicles of the secretory pathway. Immuno-electron microscopy revealed that the vesicles associate mainly with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). RNAi-mediated knockdown of AZIN2 or depletion of cellular polyamines caused selective fragmentation of the TGN and retarded the exocytotic release of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. Exogenous addition of polyamines normalized the morphological changes and reversed the inhibition of protein secretion. Our findings demonstrate that AZIN2 regulates the transport of secretory vesicles by locally activating ODC and polyamine biosynthesis.

  5. Histidine Decarboxylase Deficiency Prevents Autoimmune Diabetes in NOD Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Manal; Machavoine, François; Rignault, Rachel; Dam, Julie; Dy, Michel; Thieblemont, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the role of histamine in inflammation. Since this monoamine has also been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of type-1 diabetes, we assessed its effect in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse model. To this end, we used mice (inactivated) knocked out for the gene encoding histidine decarboxylase, the unique histamine-forming enzyme, backcrossed on a NOD genetic background. We found that the lack of endogenous histamine in NOD HDC−/− mice decreased the incidence of diabetes in relation to their wild-type counterpart. Whereas the proportion of regulatory T and myeloid-derived suppressive cells was similar in both strains, histamine deficiency was associated with increased levels of immature macrophages, as compared with wild-type NOD mice. Concerning the cytokine pattern, we found a decrease in circulating IL-12 and IFN-γ in HDC−/− mice, while IL-6 or leptin remained unchanged, suggesting that histamine primarily modulates the inflammatory environment. Paradoxically, exogenous histamine given to NOD HDC−/− mice provided also protection against T1D. Our study supports the notion that histamine is involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes, thus providing additional evidence for its role in the regulation of the immune response. PMID:26090474

  6. Amiloride inhibits rat mucosal ornithine decarboxylase activity and DNA synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich-Baker, M.G.; Wang, P.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Johnson, L.R. )

    1988-03-01

    Refeeding fasted rats induces a dramatic trophic response in gastrointestinal mucosa and is associated with elevations in both rate of DNA synthesis and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity. The signal for these increases is unknown. Amiloride prevents cell alkalinization by blocking Na{sup +}-H{sup +} exchange at apical epithelial cell membranes. In study 1, rats were fasted 48 h, treated with amiloride (0.5 to 500 mg/kg), and refed for 4 h. Refeeding increased ODC activities in the jejunal mucosa (X8) and liver (X19) but not in the oxyntic gland mucosa. In the jejunum, but not the liver, the activation of ODC was completely abolished by 100 mg/kg amiloride. In study 2, the rate of DNA synthesis was determine by measuring the rate of ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation 16 h after refeeding. Refeeding resulted in significantly increased rates of DNA synthesis over fasted levels, and amiloride at 100 mg/kg significantly reduced the elevations in the jejenum and liver. In conclusion, amiloride inhibits the postprandial increases in jejunal ODC activity and DNA synthesis in the jejunum and liver. The results indicate that (1) the Na{sup +}-H{sup +} antiport is essential to the increased ODC activity in the jejunum and liver after a meal and (2) increases in DNA synthesis and their suppression by amiloride are not necessary linked to ODC activity.

  7. Studies on uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase from Chlorella kessleri (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Juárez, Angela B; Aldonatti, Carmen; Vigna, María S; Ríos de Molina, María Del C

    2007-02-01

    Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UroD) (EC 4.1.1.37) is an enzyme from the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway, in which chlorophyll is the main final product in algae. This is the first time that a study on UroD activity has been performed in a green alga (Chlorella). We isolated and partially purified the enzyme from a Chlorella kessleri (Trebouxiophyceae, Chlorophyta) strain (Copahue, Neuquén, Argentina), and describe for the first time some of its properties. In C. kessleri, the decarboxylation of uroporphyrinogen III occurs in two stages, via 7 COOH and then 6 and 5 COOH intermediates, with the decarboxylation of the 7 COOH compound being the rate-limiting step for the reaction. Cultures in the exponential growth phase showed the highest specific activity values. The most suitable conditions to measure UroD activity in C. kessleri were as follows: 0.23-0.3 mg protein/mL, approximately 6-8 micromol/L uroporphyrinogen III, and 20 min incubation time. Gel filtration chromatography and Western blot assays indicated that UroD from C. kessleri is a dimer of approximately 90 kDa formed by species of lower molecular mass, which conserves enzymatic activity.

  8. Localization of histidine decarboxylase mRNA in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bayliss, D A; Wang, Y M; Zahnow, C A; Joseph, D R; Millhorn, D E

    1990-08-01

    The recent cloning of a cDNA encoding fetal rat liver histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the synthesizing enzyme for histamine, allows the study of the central histaminergic system at the molecular level. To this end, Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses were used to determine the regional and cellular distribution of neurons which express HDC mRNA in rat brain. Three hybridizing species which migrate as 1.6-, 2.6-, and 3.5-kb RNA were identified with Northern blots. The major (2.6 kb) and minor (3.5 kb) species, characteristic of HDC mRNA in fetal liver, were expressed at high levels in diencephalon and at just detectable levels in hippocampus, but not in other brain regions. In contrast, the 1.6-kb species was present in all brain regions examined except the olfactory bulb. Cells which contain HDC mRNA were found by in situ hybridization in the hypothalamus; HDC mRNA-containing cells were not detected in other areas, including the hippocampus. Hypothalamic neurons which express HDC mRNA were localized to all aspects of the tuberomammillary nucleus, a result consistent with previous immunohistochemical findings. PMID:19912749

  9. Chloroform induction of ornithine decarboxylase activity in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Savage, R E; Westrich, C; Guion, C; Pereira, M A

    1982-01-01

    Chloroform is a drinking water contaminant that has been demonstrated to be carcinogenic to mice and rats resulting in an increased incidence of liver and kidney tumors, respectively. The mechanism of chloroform carcinogenicity might be by tumor initiation and/or promotion. Since induction of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity has been proposed as a molecular marker for tumor promoters, we have investigated the effect of chloroform on ODC activity in rats. Chloroform induced a dose-dependent increase of hepatic ODC with an apparent threshold at 100 mg/kg body weight. Female rats were two to four times more susceptible to to chloroform. Upon daily dosing of chloroform for 7 days the liver became less susceptible, with the last dose of chloroform resulting in only 10% of the activity observed after a single dose. Nuclear RNA polymerase I activity was also induced by chloroform. Chloroform, rather than increasing the activity of renal ODC, resulted in a 35% reduction. The induction by chloroform of hepatic ODC activity might be associated with regenerative hyperplasia while the renal carcinogenicity of chloroform could not be demonstrated to be associated with ODC induction. PMID:7151757

  10. [Marked clinical improvement by plasmapheresis in a patient with stiff-man syndrome: a case with a negative anti-GAD antibody].

    PubMed

    Nakamagoe, K; Ohkoshi, N; Hayashi, A; Hisahara, S; Shoji, S

    1995-08-01

    We described a 56-year-old man with stiff-man syndrome, who was markedly improved after plasmapheresis therapy. He had a 12-year history of progressive painful stiffness of his back and limbs, muscle cramps and difficulty in walking. He had been taking oral diazepam and prednisolone. On examination the abdominal and paraspinal muscles and limbs were continuously contracting, confirmed by surface and needle electromyography. Antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and pancreatic islet cells in the serum were negative, but antinuclear antibody and anti-smooth-muscle antibody were present. The patient underwent a course of 4 double filtration plasma exchanges of 3,000 ml each in an 8-day period. Plasmapheresis resulted in marked clinical improvement. The disappearance of muscular cramps and a reduction of stiffness occurred within 24 hours after the first plasmapheresis, and he was able to walk unassisted. The patient's subjective improvement continued over 4 months after the plasma exchange. This case provides additional evidence of the autoimmune mechanism of stiff-man syndrome. Plasmapheresis is one choice in the management for stiff-man syndrome.

  11. Reduction of Oxalate Levels in Tomato Fruit and Consequent Metabolic Remodeling Following Overexpression of a Fungal Oxalate Decarboxylase1[W

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Niranjan; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Ghosh, Sudip; Narula, Kanika; Tayal, Rajul; Datta, Asis; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2013-01-01

    The plant metabolite oxalic acid is increasingly recognized as a food toxin with negative effects on human nutrition. Decarboxylative degradation of oxalic acid is catalyzed, in a substrate-specific reaction, by oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC), forming formic acid and carbon dioxide. Attempts to date to reduce oxalic acid levels and to understand the biological significance of OXDC in crop plants have met with little success. To investigate the role of OXDC and the metabolic consequences of oxalate down-regulation in a heterotrophic, oxalic acid-accumulating fruit, we generated transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants expressing an OXDC (FvOXDC) from the fungus Flammulina velutipes specifically in the fruit. These E8.2-OXDC fruit showed up to a 90% reduction in oxalate content, which correlated with concomitant increases in calcium, iron, and citrate. Expression of OXDC affected neither carbon dioxide assimilation rates nor resulted in any detectable morphological differences in the transgenic plants. Comparative proteomic analysis suggested that metabolic remodeling was associated with the decrease in oxalate content in transgenic fruit. Examination of the E8.2-OXDC fruit proteome revealed that OXDC-responsive proteins involved in metabolism and stress responses represented the most substantially up- and down-regulated categories, respectively, in the transgenic fruit, compared with those of wild-type plants. Collectively, our study provides insights into OXDC-regulated metabolic networks and may provide a widely applicable strategy for enhancing crop nutritional value. PMID:23482874

  12. Insect ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) complements SPE1 knock-out of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soon-Yong; Park, Hee Yun; Paek, Aron; Kim, Gil Seob; Jeong, Seong Eun

    2009-12-31

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines, which are essential for cell growth, differentiation, and proliferation. This report presents the characterization of an ODC-encoding cDNA (SlitODC) isolated from a moth species, the tobacco cutworm, Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera); its expression in a polyamine-deficient strain of yeast, S. cerevisiae; and the recovery in polyamine levels and proliferation rate with the introduction of the insect enzyme. SlitODC encodes 448 amino acid residues, 4 amino acids longer than B. Mori ODC that has 71% identity, and has a longer C-terminus, consistent with B. mori ODC, than the reported dipteran enzymes. The null mutant yeast strain in the ODC gene, SPE1, showed remarkably depleted polyamine levels; in putrescine, spermidine, and spermine, the levels were > 7, > 1, and > 4%, respectively, of the levels in the wild-type strain. This consequently caused a significant arrest in cell proliferation of > 4% of the wild-type strain in polyaminefree media. The transformed strain, with the substituted SlitODC for the deleted endogenous ODC, grew and proliferated rapidly at even a higher rate than the wild-type strain. Furthermore, its polyamine content was significantly higher than even that in the wild-type strain as well as the spe1-null mutant, particularly with a very continuously enhanced putrescine level, reflecting no inhibition mechanism operating in the putrescine synthesis step by any corresponding insect ODC antizymes to SlitODC in this yeast system. PMID:19937472

  13. Structural Basis for Putrescine Activation of Human S-Adenosylmethionine Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, Shridhar; Lopez, Maria M.; Makhatadze, George I.; Fang, Qingming; Pegg, Anthony E.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2009-01-23

    Putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane) activates the autoprocessing and decarboxylation reactions of human S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC), a critical enzyme in the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. In human AdoMetDC, putrescine binds in a buried pocket containing acidic residues Asp174, Glu178, and Glu256. The pocket is away from the active site but near the dimer interface; however, a series of hydrophilic residues connect the putrescine binding site and the active site. Mutation of these acidic residues modulates the effects of putrescine. D174N, E178Q, and E256Q mutants were expressed and dialyzed to remove putrescine and studied biochemically using X-ray crystallography, UV-CD spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, and ITC binding studies. The results show that the binding of putrescine to the wild type dimeric protein is cooperative. The D174N mutant does not bind putrescine, and the E178Q and E256Q mutants bind putrescine weakly with no cooperativity. The crystal structure of the mutants with and without putrescine and their complexes with S-adenosylmethionine methyl ester were obtained. Binding of putrescine results in a reorganization of four aromatic residues (Phe285, Phe315, Tyr318, and Phe320) and a conformational change in the loop 312-320. The loop shields putrescine from the external solvent, enhancing its electrostatic and hydrogen bonding effects. The E256Q mutant with putrescine added shows an alternate conformation of His243, Glu11, Lys80, and Ser229, the residues that link the active site and the putrescine binding site, suggesting that putrescine activates the enzyme through electrostatic effects and acts as a switch to correctly orient key catalytic residues.

  14. Arginine Decarboxylase and Putrescine Oxidase in Ovaries of Pisum sativum L. (Changes during Ovary Senescence and Early Stages of Fruit Development).

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Amador, M. A.; Carbonell, J.

    1995-01-01

    Enzymatic activities involved in putrescine metabolism in ovaries of Pisum sativum L. during ovary senescence and fruit set were investigated. Accumulation of putrescine was observed during incubation of extracts from gibberellic acid-treated unpollinated ovaries (young developing fruits) but not in extracts from untreated ovaries (senescent ovaries). Extracts from pea ovaries showed arginine decarboxylase (ADC) activity, but ornithine decarboxylase and arginase activity were not detected. ADC activity decreased in presenescent ovaries and increased markedly after induction of fruit set with gibberellic acid. Increases in ADC activity were also observed with application of other plant growth substances (benzy-ladenine and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), after pollination, and in the slender (la crys) pea mutant. By contrast, putrescine oxidase activity increased in presenescent ovaries but did not increase during early fruit development. All of these results suggest that ADC and putrescine oxidase are involved in the control of putrescine metabolism. Ovary senescence is characterized by the absence of putrescine biosynthesis enzymes and increased levels of putrescine oxidase and fruit development by an increase in ADC and a constant level of putrescine oxidase. PMID:12228409

  15. Identification of AⅡ amacrine, displaced amacrine, and bistratified ganglion cell types in human retina with antibodies against calretinin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sammy C S; Weltzien, Felix; Madigan, Michele C; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against calretinin are markers for one type of rod pathway interneuron (AⅡ amacrine cell) in the retina of some but not all mammalian species. The AⅡ cells play a crucial role in night-time (scotopic) vision and have been proposed as a target for optogenetic restoration of vision in retinal disease. In the present study we aimed to characterize the AⅡ cells in human retina. Postmortem human donor eyes were obtained with ethical approval and processed for calretinin immunofluorescence. Calretinin-positive somas in the inner nuclear and the ganglion cell layer were filled with the lipophilic dye DiI. The large majority (over 80%) of calretinin-immunoreactive cells is located in the inner nuclear layer, is immunopositive for glycine transporter 1, and shows the typical morphology of AⅡ amacrine cells. In addition, a small proportion of calretinin-positive cells in the inner nuclear layer and in the ganglion cell layer is glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive and shows the morphology of widefield amacrine cells (stellate, semilunar, and thorny amacrine cells). About half of the calretinin cells in the ganglion cell layer are bistratified ganglion cells resembling the small bistratified (presumed blue-ON/yellow-OFF) and the G17 ganglion cell previously described in primates. We conclude that in human retina, antibodies against calretinin can be used to identify AⅡ amacrine cells in the inner nuclear layer as well as widefield amacrine and small bistratified ganglion cells in the ganglion cell layer. PMID:26053777

  16. DL-a-Monofluoromethylputrescine is a potent irreversible inhibitor of Escherichia coli ornithine decarboxylase.

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, A; McCann, P P; Bey, P

    1982-01-01

    DL-alpha-Monofluoromethylputrescine (compound R.M.I. 71864) is an enzyme-activated irreversible inhibitor of the biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase from Escherichia coli. This compound, however, has much less effect in vitro on ornithine decarboxylase obtained from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These findings are in contrast with those previously found with the substrate analogue DL-alpha-difluoromethylornithine (compound R.M.I. 71782). The K1 of the DL-alpha-monofluoromethylputrescine for the E. coli ornithine decarboxylase is 110 microM, and the half-life (t1/2) calculated for an infinite concentration of inhibitor is 2.1 min. When DL-alpha-monofluoromethylputrescine is used in combination with DL-alpha-difluoromethylarginine (R.M.I. 71897), an irreversible inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase, in vivo in E. coli, both decarboxylase activities are inhibited (greater than 95%) but putrescine levels are only decreased to about one-third of control values and spermidine levels are slightly increased. PMID:6812566

  17. A putative amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, NMB1612, from Neisseria meningitidis, induces murine bactericidal antibodies against meningococci expressing heterologous NMB1612 proteins.

    PubMed

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Humbert, María Victoria; Laver, Jay R; Phillips, Renee; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-08-26

    The nmb1612 (NEIS1533) gene encoding the ~27-kDa putative amino acid ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, periplasmic substrate-binding protein from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) strain MC58 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant (r)NMB1612 was used for animal immunization studies. Immunization of mice with rNMB1612 adsorbed to Al(OH)3 and in liposomes with and without MPLA, induced antiserum with bactericidal activity in an assay using baby rabbit complement, against the homologous strain MC58 (encoding protein representative of Allele 62) and killed heterologous strains encoding proteins of three other alleles (representative of Alleles 1, 64 and 68), with similar SBA titres. However, strain MC58 was not killed (titre <4) in a human serum bactericidal assay (hSBA) using anti-rNMB1612 sera, although another strain (MC168) expressing the same protein was killed (median titres of 16-64 in the hSBA). Analysis of the NMB1612 amino acid sequences from 4351 meningococcal strains in the pubmlst.org/Neisseria database and a collection of 13 isolates from colonized individuals and from patients, showed that antibodies raised against rNMB1612 could potentially kill at least 72% of the MenB strains in the complete sequence database. For MenB disease occurring specifically in the UK from 2013 to 2015, >91% of the isolates causing disease in this recent period expressed NMB1612 protein encoded by Allele 1 and could be potentially killed by sera raised to the recombinant antigen in the current study. The NMB1612 protein was surface-accessible and expressed by different meningococcal strains. In summary, the properties of (i) NMB1612 protein conservation and expression, (ii) limited amino acid sequence variation between proteins encoded by different alleles, and (iii) the ability of a recombinant protein to induce cross-strain bactericidal antibodies, would all suggest a promising antigen for consideration for inclusion in new

  18. Ultraviolet radiation induction of ornithine decarboxylase in rat keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, C.F.; Gajic, D.; Drucker, D.J. )

    1990-05-01

    UV radiation plays an important role in the induction of cutaneous malignancy, including basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas and malignant melanoma. In addition to its effects on DNA damage and repair mechanisms, UV radiation has been shown to modulate the expression of specific genes, altering the levels of their mRNAs and the synthesis of their corresponding proteins. In order to gain further information about the molecular effects of UV radiation, we have studied the regulation of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene expression in response to UVB radiation. ODC is the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, is involved in growth and differentiation, and has been implicated in carcinogenesis. Keratinocytes grown in culture were either sham-irradiated or exposed to increasing doses of UVB (1-5 mJ/cm2). Northern blot analysis of keratinocyte RNA under basal conditions demonstrated the presence of two ODC mRNA transcripts. Increasing exposure to UVB resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the levels of both ODC mRNA transcripts. The induction of ODC gene expression following UVB was noted 2 h after UVB exposure, and ODC mRNA levels continued to increase up to 24 h after UVB exposure. The UVB-induced increase in ODC gene expression was not serum dependent, despite the ability of serum alone to induce ODC gene expression. The mRNA transcripts for actin and hexosaminidase A were not induced after UVB exposure. These studies show that the UVB-induced increase in ODC activity is due, at least in part, to an increase in ODC gene expression and they provide a useful model for the analysis of the molecular effects of UVB radiation.

  19. Catalysis of acetoin formation by brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase isozymes.

    PubMed

    Stivers, J T; Washabaugh, M W

    1993-12-14

    Catalysis of C(alpha)-proton transfer from 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)thiamin diphosphate (HETDP) by pyruvate decarboxylase isozymes (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis was investigated by determining the steady-state kinetics of the reaction of [1-L]acetaldehyde (L = H, D, or T) to form acetoin and the primary kinetic isotope effects on the reaction. The PDC isozyme mixture and alpha 4 isozyme (alpha 4-PDC) have different steady-state kinetic parameters and isotope effects for acetoin formation in the presence and absence of the nonsubstrate allosteric effector pyruvamide: pyruvamide activation occurs by stabilization of the acetaldehyde/PDC ternary complex. The magnitudes of primary L(V/K)-type (L = D or T) isotope effects on C(alpha)-proton transfer from alpha 4-PDC-bound HETDP provide no evidence for significant breakdown of the Swain-Schaad relationship that would indicate partitioning of the putative C(alpha)-carbanion/enamine intermediate between HETDP and products. The substrate concentration dependence of the deuterium primary kinetic isotope effects provides evidence for an intrinsic isotope effect of 4.1 for C(alpha)-proton transfer from alpha 4-PDC-bound HETDP. A 1.10 +/- 0.02-fold 14C isotope discrimination against [1,2-14C]acetaldehyde in acetoin formation is inconsistent with a stepwise mechanism, in which the addition step occurs after rate-limiting formation of the C(alpha)-carbanion/enamine as a discrete enzyme-bound intermediate, and provides evidence for a concerted reaction mechanism with an important component of carbon-carbon bond formation in the transition state.

  20. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  1. Caprylic acid-induced impurity precipitation from protein A capture column elution pool to enable a two-chromatography-step process for monoclonal antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji; Wang, Lu; Twarowska, Barbara; Laino, Sarah; Sparks, Colleen; Smith, Timothy; Russell, Reb; Wang, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the use of caprylic acid (CA) to precipitate impurities from the protein A capture column elution pool for the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the objective of developing a two chromatography step antibody purification process. A CA-induced impurity precipitation in the protein A column elution pool was evaluated as an alternative method to polishing chromatography techniques for use in the purification of mAbs. Parameters including pH, CA concentrations, mixing time, mAb concentrations, buffer systems, and incubation temperatures were evaluated on their impacts on the impurity removal, high-molecular weight (HMW) formation and precipitation step yield. Both pH and CA concentration, but not mAb concentrations and buffer systems, are key parameters that can affect host-cell proteins (HCPs) clearance, HMW species, and yield. CA precipitation removes HCPs and some HMW species to the acceptable levels under the optimal conditions. The CA precipitation process is robust at 15-25°C. For all five mAbs tested in this study, the optimal CA concentration range is 0.5-1.0%, while the pH range is from 5.0 to 6.0. A purification process using two chromatography steps (protein A capture column and ion exchange polishing column) in combination with CA-based impurity precipitation step can be used as a robust downstream process for mAb molecules with a broad range of isoelectric points. Residual CA can be effectively removed by the subsequent polishing cation exchange chromatography.

  2. Inhibition of Ornithine Decarboxylase and Growth of the Fungus Helminthosporium maydis1

    PubMed Central

    Birecka, Helena; Garraway, Michael O.; Baumann, Russell J.; McCann, Peter P.

    1986-01-01

    α-dl-Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), a specific enzyme-activated inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, at 0.5 to 2.0 millimolar significantly inhibited mycelial growth and especially sporulation of Helminthosporium maydis in the dark; its inhibitory effect on sporulation was greatly increased under light conditions. Putrescine at 0.25 millimolar fully prevented the inhibitory effects of DFMO; the inhibition caused by the latter could not be prevented by cadaverine or CaCl2. α-dl-Difluoromethylarginine, a specific enzyme-activated inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase, at 0.1 to 2.0 millimolar had a weak inhibitory effect on the fungus. The effect was not dependent on the inhibitor concentration and there was no detectable arginine decarboxylase activity in the fungus. PMID:16664707

  3. Viscosity-Lowering Effect of Amino Acids and Salts on Highly Concentrated Solutions of Two IgG1 Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujing; Zhang, Ning; Hu, Tao; Dai, Weiguo; Feng, Xiuying; Zhang, Xinyi; Qian, Feng

    2015-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies display complicated solution properties in highly concentrated (>100 mg/mL) formulations, such as high viscosity, high aggregation propensity, and low stability, among others, originating from protein-protein interactions within the colloidal protein solution. These properties severely hinder the successful development of high-concentration mAb solution for subcutaneous injection. We hereby investigated the effects of several small-molecule excipients with diverse biophysical-chemical properties on the viscosity, aggregation propensity, and stability on two model IgG1 (JM1 and JM2) mAb formulations. These excipients include nine amino acids or their salt forms (Ala, Pro, Val, Gly, Ser, HisHCl, LysHCl, ArgHCl, and NaGlu), four representative salts (NaCl, NaAc, Na2SO4, and NH4Cl), and two chaotropic reagents (urea and GdnHCl). With only salts or amino acids in their salt-forms, significant decrease in viscosity was observed for JM1 (by up to 30-40%) and JM2 (by up to 50-80%) formulations, suggesting charge-charge interaction between the mAbs dictates the high viscosity of these mAbs formulations. Most of these viscosity-lowering excipients did not induce substantial protein aggregation or changes in the secondary structure of the mAbs, as evidenced by HPLC-SEC, DSC, and FT-IR analysis, even in the absence of common protein stabilizers such as sugars and surfactants. Therefore, amino acids in their salt-forms and several common salts, such as ArgHCl, HisHCl, LysHCl, NaCl, Na2SO4, and NaAc, could potentially serve as viscosity-lowering excipients during high-concentration mAb formulation development.

  4. [Study of nucleic acid structure by immunochemical methods. I. Antibodies specific for 6-sulfo-5,6-dihydro-4-methoxyaminopyrimidinone-2].

    PubMed

    Poverennyĭ, A M; Podgorodnichenko, V K; Monastyrskaia, G S; Bryskina, L E; Sverdlov, E D

    1978-01-01

    Immunization of animals with DNA modified by a mixture of bisulphite and O-methylhydroxylamine and methylated bovine serum albumin results in production of antibodies mainly reacting with modified DNA. Antibodies that react with denatured DNA were produced in minute quantity. It was shown that elicited antibodies possess a high specificity and have the ability to recognize only nucleotides with a double modification. The immune sera were fractionated by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography and the antibody activity was demonstrable in the 19S and 7S fractions. The attempts to induce synthesis of antibodies by injection of DNA modified by O-methylhydroxylamine failed. PMID:79979

  5. [Study of nucleic acid structure by immunochemical methods. I. Antibodies specific for 6-sulfo-5,6-dihydro-4-methoxyaminopyrimidinone-2].

    PubMed

    Poverennyĭ, A M; Podgorodnichenko, V K; Monastyrskaia, G S; Bryskina, L E; Sverdlov, E D

    1978-01-01

    Immunization of animals with DNA modified by a mixture of bisulphite and O-methylhydroxylamine and methylated bovine serum albumin results in production of antibodies mainly reacting with modified DNA. Antibodies that react with denatured DNA were produced in minute quantity. It was shown that elicited antibodies possess a high specificity and have the ability to recognize only nucleotides with a double modification. The immune sera were fractionated by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography and the antibody activity was demonstrable in the 19S and 7S fractions. The attempts to induce synthesis of antibodies by injection of DNA modified by O-methylhydroxylamine failed.

  6. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate.

    PubMed

    Gamat, Melissa; Malinowski, Rita L; Parkhurst, Linnea J; Steinke, Laura M; Marker, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO) to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effect in mediating

  7. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Gamat, Melissa; Malinowski, Rita L.; Parkhurst, Linnea J.; Steinke, Laura M.; Marker, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO) to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effect in mediating

  8. Molecular Evolution and Functional Characterization of a Bifunctional Decarboxylase Involved in Lycopodium Alkaloid Biosynthesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Hanada, Kousuke; Maruyama, Akira; Aoyagi, Kaori; Komatsu, Kana; Ueno, Hideki; Yamashita, Madoka; Sasaki, Ryosuke; Oikawa, Akira; Yamazaki, Mami

    2016-01-01

    Lycopodium alkaloids (LAs) are derived from lysine (Lys) and are found mainly in Huperziaceae and Lycopodiaceae. LAs are potentially useful against Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, and myasthenia gravis. Here, we cloned the bifunctional lysine/ornithine decarboxylase (L/ODC), the first gene involved in LA biosynthesis, from the LA-producing plants Lycopodium clavatum and Huperzia serrata. We describe the in vitro and in vivo functional characterization of the L. clavatum L/ODC (LcL/ODC). The recombinant LcL/ODC preferentially catalyzed the decarboxylation of l-Lys over l-ornithine (l-Orn) by about 5 times. Transient expression of LcL/ODC fused with the amino or carboxyl terminus of green fluorescent protein, in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, showed LcL/ODC localization in the cytosol. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) hairy roots and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants expressing LcL/ODC enhanced the production of a Lys-derived alkaloid, anabasine, and cadaverine, respectively, thus, confirming the function of LcL/ODC in plants. In addition, we present an example of the convergent evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase that resulted in the production of Lys-derived alkaloids in Leguminosae (legumes) and Lycopodiaceae (clubmosses). This convergent evolution event probably occurred via the promiscuous functions of the ancestral Orn decarboxylase, which is an enzyme involved in the primary metabolism of polyamine. The positive selection sites were detected by statistical analyses using phylogenetic trees and were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, suggesting the importance of those sites in granting the promiscuous function to Lys decarboxylase while retaining the ancestral Orn decarboxylase function. This study contributes to a better understanding of LA biosynthesis and the molecular evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase. PMID:27303024

  9. Molecular Evolution and Functional Characterization of a Bifunctional Decarboxylase Involved in Lycopodium Alkaloid Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bunsupa, Somnuk; Hanada, Kousuke; Maruyama, Akira; Aoyagi, Kaori; Komatsu, Kana; Ueno, Hideki; Yamashita, Madoka; Sasaki, Ryosuke; Oikawa, Akira; Saito, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Mami

    2016-08-01

    Lycopodium alkaloids (LAs) are derived from lysine (Lys) and are found mainly in Huperziaceae and Lycopodiaceae. LAs are potentially useful against Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and myasthenia gravis. Here, we cloned the bifunctional lysine/ornithine decarboxylase (L/ODC), the first gene involved in LA biosynthesis, from the LA-producing plants Lycopodium clavatum and Huperzia serrata We describe the in vitro and in vivo functional characterization of the L. clavatum L/ODC (LcL/ODC). The recombinant LcL/ODC preferentially catalyzed the decarboxylation of l-Lys over l-ornithine (l-Orn) by about 5 times. Transient expression of LcL/ODC fused with the amino or carboxyl terminus of green fluorescent protein, in onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells and Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, showed LcL/ODC localization in the cytosol. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) hairy roots and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants expressing LcL/ODC enhanced the production of a Lys-derived alkaloid, anabasine, and cadaverine, respectively, thus, confirming the function of LcL/ODC in plants. In addition, we present an example of the convergent evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase that resulted in the production of Lys-derived alkaloids in Leguminosae (legumes) and Lycopodiaceae (clubmosses). This convergent evolution event probably occurred via the promiscuous functions of the ancestral Orn decarboxylase, which is an enzyme involved in the primary metabolism of polyamine. The positive selection sites were detected by statistical analyses using phylogenetic trees and were confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis, suggesting the importance of those sites in granting the promiscuous function to Lys decarboxylase while retaining the ancestral Orn decarboxylase function. This study contributes to a better understanding of LA biosynthesis and the molecular evolution of plant Lys decarboxylase. PMID:27303024

  10. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Binding and Reaction Catalysis in Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Barta, Michael L.; McWhorter, William J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V.

    2012-09-17

    Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes the final step of the mevalonate pathway, the Mg{sup 2+}-ATP dependent decarboxylation of mevalonate 5-diphosphate (MVAPP), producing isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP). Synthesis of IPP, an isoprenoid precursor molecule that is a critical intermediate in peptidoglycan and polyisoprenoid biosynthesis, is essential in Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus spp.), and thus the enzymes of the mevalonate pathway are ideal antimicrobial targets. MDD belongs to the GHMP superfamily of metabolite kinases that have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, yet the crystallization of GHMP kinase ternary complexes has proven to be difficult. To further our understanding of the catalytic mechanism of GHMP kinases with the purpose of developing broad spectrum antimicrobial agents that target the substrate and nucleotide binding sites, we report the crystal structures of wild-type and mutant (S192A and D283A) ternary complexes of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD. Comparison of apo, MVAPP-bound, and ternary complex wild-type MDD provides structural information about the mode of substrate binding and the catalytic mechanism. Structural characterization of ternary complexes of catalytically deficient MDD S192A and D283A (k{sub cat} decreased 10{sup 3}- and 10{sup 5}-fold, respectively) provides insight into MDD function. The carboxylate side chain of invariant Asp{sup 283} functions as a catalytic base and is essential for the proper orientation of the MVAPP C3-hydroxyl group within the active site funnel. Several MDD amino acids within the conserved phosphate binding loop ('P-loop') provide key interactions, stabilizing the nucleotide triphosphoryl moiety. The crystal structures presented here provide a useful foundation for structure-based drug design.

  11. Epigenetic signature of panic disorder: a role of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) DNA hypomethylation?

    PubMed

    Domschke, Katharina; Tidow, Nicola; Schrempf, Marie; Schwarte, Kathrin; Klauke, Benedikt; Reif, Andreas; Kersting, Anette; Arolt, Volker; Zwanzger, Peter; Deckert, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    Glutamate decarboxylases (GAD67/65; GAD1/GAD2) are crucially involved in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis and thus were repeatedly suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. In the present study, DNA methylation patterns in the GAD1 and GAD2 promoter and GAD1 intron 2 regions were investigated for association with panic disorder, with particular attention to possible effects of environmental factors. Sixty-five patients with panic disorder (f=44, m=21) and 65 matched healthy controls were analyzed for DNA methylation status at 38 GAD1 promoter/intron2 and 10 GAD2 promoter CpG sites via direct sequencing of sodium bisulfate treated DNA extracted from blood cells. Recent positive and negative life events were ascertained. Patients and controls were genotyped for GAD1 rs3762556, rs3791878 and rs3762555, all of which are located in the analyzed promoter region. Patients with panic disorder exhibited significantly lower average GAD1 methylation than healthy controls (p<0.001), particularly at three CpG sites in the promoter as well as in intron 2. The occurrence of negative life events was correlated with relatively decreased average methylation mainly in the female subsample (p=0.01). GAD1 SNP rs3762555 conferred a significantly lower methylation at three GAD1 intron 2 CpG sites (p<0.001). No differential methylation was observed in the GAD2 gene. The present pilot data suggest a potentially compensatory role of GAD1 gene hypomethylation in panic disorder possibly mediating the influence of negative life events and depending on genetic variation. Future studies are warranted to replicate the present finding in independent samples, preferably in a longitudinal design.

  12. Glutamate Decarboxylase 1 Overexpression as a Poor Prognostic Factor in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Ying; Chao, Tung-Bo; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tian, Yu-Feng; Chen, Tzu-Ju; Lee, Sung-Wei; He, Hong-Lin; Chang, I-Wei; Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Lin, Ching-Yih; Li, Chien-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) which serves as a rate-limiting enzyme involving in the production of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), exists in the GABAergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). Little is known about the relevance of GAD1 to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Through data mining on a data set derived from a published transcriptome database, this study first identified GAD1 as a differentially upregulated gene in NPC. We aimed to evaluate GAD1 expression and its prognostic effect on patients with early and locoregionally advanced NPC. Methods: We evaluated GAD1 immunohistochemistry and performed an H-score analysis on biopsy specimens from 124 patients with nonmetastasized NPC receiving treatment. GAD1 overexpression was defined as an H score higher than the median value. The findings of such an analysis are correlated with clinicopathological behaviors and survival rates, namely disease-specific survival (DSS), distant-metastasis-free survival (DMeFS), and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rates. Results: GAD1 overexpression was significantly associated with an increase in the primary tumor status (p < 0.001) and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages III-IV (p = 0.002) and was a univariate predictor of adverse outcomes of DSS (p = 0.002), DMeFS (p < 0.0001), and LRFS (p = 0.001). In the multivariate comparison, in addition to advanced AJCC stages III-IV, GAD1 overexpression remained an independent prognosticator of short DSS (p = 0.004, hazard ratio = 2.234), DMeFS (p < 0.001, hazard ratio = 4.218), and LRFS (p = 0.013, hazard ratio = 2.441) rates. Conclusions: Our data reveal that GAD1 overexpression was correlated with advanced disease status and may thus be a critical prognostic indicator of poor outcomes in NPC and a potential therapeutic target to facilitate the development of effective treatment modalities. PMID:27698909

  13. Glutamate Decarboxylase 1 Overexpression as a Poor Prognostic Factor in Patients with Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Ying; Chao, Tung-Bo; Sheu, Ming-Jen; Tian, Yu-Feng; Chen, Tzu-Ju; Lee, Sung-Wei; He, Hong-Lin; Chang, I-Wei; Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Lin, Ching-Yih; Li, Chien-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) which serves as a rate-limiting enzyme involving in the production of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), exists in the GABAergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). Little is known about the relevance of GAD1 to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Through data mining on a data set derived from a published transcriptome database, this study first identified GAD1 as a differentially upregulated gene in NPC. We aimed to evaluate GAD1 expression and its prognostic effect on patients with early and locoregionally advanced NPC. Methods: We evaluated GAD1 immunohistochemistry and performed an H-score analysis on biopsy specimens from 124 patients with nonmetastasized NPC receiving treatment. GAD1 overexpression was defined as an H score higher than the median value. The findings of such an analysis are correlated with clinicopathological behaviors and survival rates, namely disease-specific survival (DSS), distant-metastasis-free survival (DMeFS), and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) rates. Results: GAD1 overexpression was significantly associated with an increase in the primary tumor status (p < 0.001) and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages III-IV (p = 0.002) and was a univariate predictor of adverse outcomes of DSS (p = 0.002), DMeFS (p < 0.0001), and LRFS (p = 0.001). In the multivariate comparison, in addition to advanced AJCC stages III-IV, GAD1 overexpression remained an independent prognosticator of short DSS (p = 0.004, hazard ratio = 2.234), DMeFS (p < 0.001, hazard ratio = 4.218), and LRFS (p = 0.013, hazard ratio = 2.441) rates. Conclusions: Our data reveal that GAD1 overexpression was correlated with advanced disease status and may thus be a critical prognostic indicator of poor outcomes in NPC and a potential therapeutic target to facilitate the development of effective treatment modalities.

  14. Reduced Glutamate Decarboxylase 65 Protein Within Primary Auditory Cortex Inhibitory Boutons in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Moyer, Caitlin E.; Delevich, Kristen M.; Fish, Kenneth N.; Asafu-Adjei, Josephine K.; Sampson, Allan R.; Dorph-Petersen, Karl-Anton; Lewis, David A.; Sweet, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is associated with perceptual and physiological auditory processing impairments that may result from primary auditory cortex excitatory and inhibitory circuit pathology. High-frequency oscillations are important for auditory function and are often reported to be disrupted in schizophrenia. These oscillations may, in part, depend on upregulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid synthesis by glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) in response to high interneuron firing rates. It is not known whether levels of GAD65 protein or GAD65-expressing boutons are altered in schizophrenia. Methods We studied two cohorts of subjects with schizophrenia and matched control subjects, comprising 27 pairs of subjects. Relative fluorescence intensity, density, volume, and number of GAD65-immunoreactive boutons in primary auditory cortex were measured using quantitative confocal microscopy and stereologic sampling methods. Bouton fluorescence intensities were used to compare the relative expression of GAD65 protein within boutons between diagnostic groups. Additionally, we assessed the correlation between previously measured dendritic spine densities and GAD65-immunoreactive bouton fluorescence intensities. Results GAD65-immunoreactive bouton fluorescence intensity was reduced by 40% in subjects with schizophrenia and was correlated with previously measured reduced spine density. The reduction was greater in subjects who were not living independently at time of death. In contrast, GAD65-immunoreactive bouton density and number were not altered in deep layer 3 of primary auditory cortex of subjects with schizophrenia. Conclusions Decreased expression of GAD65 protein within inhibitory boutons could contribute to auditory impairments in schizophrenia. The correlated reductions in dendritic spines and GAD65 protein suggest a relationship between inhibitory and excitatory synapse pathology in primary auditory cortex. PMID:22624794

  15. Enzyme architecture: deconstruction of the enzyme-activating phosphodianion interactions of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Lawrence M; Amyes, Tina L; Goryanova, Bogdana; Gerlt, John A; Richard, John P

    2014-07-16

    The mechanism for activation of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) by interactions of side chains from Gln215 and Try217 at a gripper loop and R235, adjacent to this loop, with the phosphodianion of OMP was probed by determining the kinetic parameters k(cat) and K(m) for all combinations of single, double, and triple Q215A, Y217F, and R235A mutations. The 12 kcal/mol intrinsic binding energy of the phosphodianion is shown to be equal to the sum of the binding energies of the side chains of R235 (6 kcal/mol), Q215 (2 kcal/mol), Y217 (2 kcal/mol), and hydrogen bonds to the G234 and R235 backbone amides (2 kcal/mol). Analysis of a triple mutant cube shows small (ca. 1 kcal/mol) interactions between phosphodianion gripper side chains, which are consistent with steric crowding of the side chains around the phosphodianion at wild-type OMPDC. These mutations result in the same change in the activation barrier to the OMPDC-catalyzed reactions of the whole substrate OMP and the substrate pieces (1-β-D-erythrofuranosyl)orotic acid (EO) and phosphite dianion. This shows that the transition states for these reactions are stabilized by similar interactions with the protein catalyst. The 12 kcal/mol intrinsic phosphodianion binding energy of OMP is divided between the 8 kcal/mol of binding energy, which is utilized to drive a thermodynamically unfavorable conformational change of the free enzyme, resulting in an increase in (k(cat))(obs) for OMPDC-catalyzed decarboxylation of OMP, and the 4 kcal/mol of binding energy, which is utilized to stabilize the Michaelis complex, resulting in a decrease in (K(m))(obs).

  16. Plant ornithine decarboxylase is not post-transcriptionally feedback regulated by polyamines but can interact with a cytosolic ribosomal protein S15 polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Illingworth, Crista; Michael, Anthony J

    2012-02-01

    The formation of putrescine by ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a key regulatory step in polyamine biosynthesis in metazoa and fungi. Excess polyamines post-transcriptionally induce the synthesis of a unique non-competitive protein inhibitor of ODC, termed antizyme. Binding of antizyme to an ODC monomer subunit results in enzymatic inhibition, rapid ubiquitin-independent degradation of ODC by the 26S proteasome and recycling of antizyme. Plants possess an additional route for synthesizing putrescine via arginine decarboxylase (ADC). No homologue of ODC antizyme has been detected in plant genomes but several biochemical studies have reported plant ODC antizyme proteins of 9 and 16 kDa. Here we show that plant cells grown in liquid culture do not exhibit any substantial post-transcriptional, polyamine-responsive feedback regulation of ODC or ADC. However, using the yeast two hybrid system, a plant ODC-binding polypeptide was detected: the C-terminal 84-87 amino acids of cytosolic ribosomal protein (rp) S15. The Arabidopsis rpS15 polypeptide interacted specifically with plant ODC but not with human or Saccharomyces cerevisiae ODCs. Co-expression of either the full length or C-terminal rpS15 polypeptides with a plant ODC in yeast did not reduce ODC enzymatic activity. Only the full length mRNA encoding rpS15 was detected in Arabidopsis cells, suggesting that the C-terminal rpS15 polypeptide is encoded by a low abundance mRNA or the polypeptide is not physiologically relevant in plants. These results confirm the primacy of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase as the key regulatory enzyme in plant polyamine biosynthesis. PMID:21814791

  17. Phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 in human malonyl-CoA decarboxylase expressed in silkworm Bombyx mori regulates catalytic decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Wook; Makishima, Yu; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Chung, Shin-Kyo; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-11-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is a vital catalytic reaction of lipid metabolism. While it is established that phosphorylation of MCD modulates the enzymatic activity, the specific phosphorylation sites associated with the catalytic function have not been documented due to lack of sufficient production of MCD with proper post-translational modifications. Here, we used the silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid system to express human MCD (hMCD) and mapped phosphorylation effects on enzymatic function. Purified MCD from silkworm displayed post-translational phosphorylation and demonstrated coherent enzymatic activity with high yield (-200 μg/silkworm). Point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites, Ser-204 or Tyr-405 of hMCD, identified by bioinformatics and proteomics analyses reduced the catalytic activity, underscoring the functional significance of phosphorylation in modulating decarboxylase-based catalysis. Identified phosphorylated residues are distinct from the decarboxylation catalytic site, implicating a phosphorylation-induced global conformational change of MCD as responsible in altering catalytic function. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 regulates the decarboxylase function of hMCD leveraging the silkworm-based BmNPV bacmid expression system that offers a fail-safe eukaryotic production platform implementing proper post-translational modification such as phosphorylation.

  18. A novel approach for measuring sphingosine-1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid binding to carrier proteins using monoclonal antibodies and the Kinetic Exclusion Assay.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Jonathan K; Glass, Thomas R; Lackie, Steve J; Wojciak, Jonathan M

    2016-09-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) are bioactive signaling lysophospholipids that activate specific G protein-coupled receptors on the cell surface triggering numerous biological events. In circulation, S1P and LPA associate with specific carrier proteins or chaperones; serum albumin binds both S1P and LPA while HDL shuttles S1P via interactions with apoM. We used a series of kinetic exclusion assays in which monoclonal anti-S1P and anti-LPA antibodies competed with carrier protein for the lysophospholipid to measure the equilibrium dissociation constants (Kd) for these carrier proteins binding S1P and the major LPA species. Fatty acid-free (FAF)-BSA binds these lysophospholipids with the following Kd values: LPA(16:0), 68 nM; LPA(18:1), 130 nM; LPA(18:2), 350 nM; LPA(20:4), 2.2 μM; and S1P, 41 μM. FAF human serum albumin binds each lysophospholipid with comparable affinities. By measuring the apoM concentration and expanding the model to include endogenous ligand, we were able to resolve the Kd values for S1P binding apoM in the context of human HDL and LDL particles (21 nM and 2.4 nM, respectively). The novel competitive assay and analysis described herein enables measurement of Kd values of completely unmodified lysophospholipids binding unmodified carrier proteins in solution, and thus provide insights into S1P and LPA storage in the circulation system and may be useful in understanding chaperone-dependent receptor activation and signaling. PMID:27444045

  19. Subunit gamma of the oxaloacetate decarboxylase Na(+) pump: interaction with other subunits/domains of the complex and binding site for the Zn(2+) metal ion.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Markus; Wild, Markus R; Dahinden, Pius; Dimroth, Peter

    2002-01-29

    The oxaloacetate decarboxylase Na(+) pump of Klebsiella pneumoniae is an enzyme complex composed of the peripheral alpha subunit and the two integral membrane-bound subunits beta and gamma. The alpha subunit consists of the N-terminal carboxyltransferase domain and the C-terminal biotin domain, which are connected by a flexible proline/alanine-rich linker peptide. To probe interactions between the two domains of the alpha subunit and between alpha-subunit domains and the gamma subunit, the relevant polypeptides were synthesized in Escherichia coli and subjected to copurification studies. The two alpha-subunit domains had no distinct affinity toward each other and could, therefore, not be purified as a unit on avidin-sepharose. The two domains reacted together catalytically, however, performing the carboxyl transfer from oxaloacetate to protein-bound biotin. This reaction was enhanced up to 6-fold in the presence of the Zn(2+)-containing gamma subunit. On the basis of copurification with different tagged proteins, the C-terminal biotin domain but not the N-terminal carboxyltransferase domain of the alpha subunit formed a strong complex with the gamma subunit. Upon the mutation of gamma H78 to alanine, the binding affinity to subunit alpha was lost, indicating that this amino acid may be essential for formation of the oxaloacetate decarboxylase enzyme complex. The binding residues for the Zn(2+) metal ion were identified by site-directed and deletion mutagenesis. In the gamma D62A or gamma H77A mutant, the Zn(2+) content of the decarboxylase decreased to 35% or 10% of the wild-type enzyme, respectively. Less than 5% of the Zn(2+) present in the wild-type enzyme was found if the two C-terminal gamma-subunit residues H82 and P83 were deleted. Corresponding with the reduced Zn(2+) contents in these mutants, the oxaloacetate decarboxylase activities were diminished. These results indicate that aspartate 62, histidine 77, and histidine 82 of the gamma subunit are ligands

  20. Putrescine and spermidine control degradation and synthesis of ornithine decarboxylase in Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, G.R.; Seyfzadeh, M.; Davis, R.H.

    1988-07-15

    Neurospora crassa mycelia, when starved for polyamines, have 50-70-fold more ornithine decarboxylase activity and enzyme protein than unstarved mycelia. Using isotopic labeling and immunoprecipitation, we determined the half-life and the synthetic rate of the enzyme in mycelia differing in the rates of synthesis of putrescine, the product of ornithine decarboxylase, and spermidine, the main end-product of the polyamine pathway. When the pathway was blocked between putrescine and spermidine, ornithine decarboxylase synthesis rose 4-5-fold, regardless of the accumulation of putrescine. This indicates that spermidine is a specific signal for the repression of enzyme synthesis. When both putrescine and spermidine synthesis were reduced, the half-life of the enzyme rapidly increased 10-fold. The presence of either putrescine or spermidine restored the normal enzyme half-life of 55 min. Tests for an ornithine decarboxylase inhibitory protein (antizyme) were negative. The regulatory mechanisms activated by putrescine and spermidine account for most or all of the regulatory amplitude of this enzyme in N. crassa.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Bordetella bronchiseptica KU1201, the First Isolation Source of Arylmalonate Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Enoki, Junichi; Hemmi, Risa; Kourist, Robert; Kawakami, Norifumi; Miyamoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the 6.8-Mbp draft genome sequence of the phenylmalonate-assimilating bacterium Bordetella bronchiseptica KU1201 identified 6,358 protein-coding sequences. This will give us an insight into the catabolic variability of this strain for aromatic compounds, along with the roles of arylmalonate decarboxylases in nature. PMID:25953178

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Bordetella bronchiseptica KU1201, the First Isolation Source of Arylmalonate Decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Enoki, Junichi; Hemmi, Risa; Kourist, Robert; Kawakami, Norifumi; Miyamoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the 6.8-Mbp draft genome sequence of the phenylmalonate-assimilating bacterium Bordetella bronchiseptica KU1201 identified 6,358 protein-coding sequences. This will give us an insight into the catabolic variability of this strain for aromatic compounds, along with the roles of arylmalonate decarboxylases in nature.

  3. Incorporation of N-acetylneuraminic acid into Haemophilus somnus lipooligosaccharide (LOS): enhancement of resistance to serum and reduction of LOS antibody binding.

    PubMed

    Inzana, Thomas J; Glindemann, Gretchen; Cox, Andrew D; Wakarchuk, Warren; Howard, Michael D

    2002-09-01

    Haemophilus somnus isolates from cases of thrombotic meningoencephalitis, pneumonia, and other disease sites are capable of undergoing a high rate of phase variation in the oligosaccharide component of their lipooligosaccharides (LOS). In contrast, the LOS of commensal strains isolated from the normal reproductive tract phase vary little or not at all. In addition, the LOS of H. somnus shares conserved epitopes with LOS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Haemophilus influenzae, and other species that can incorporate sialic acid into their LOS. We now report that growth of disease isolates of H. somnus with CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NeuAc) or NeuAc added to the medium resulted in incorporation of NeuAc into the LOS. However, NeuAc was not incorporated into the LOS of commensal isolates and one disease isolate following growth in medium containing CMP-NeuAc or NeuAc. Sialylated LOS was detected by an increase in the molecular size or an increase in the amount of the largest-molecular-size LOS electrophoretic bands, which disappeared following treatment with neuraminidase. Sialylated LOS could also be detected by reactivity with Limax flavus agglutinin lectin, which is specific for sialylated species, by dot blot assay; this reactivity was also reversed by neuraminidase treatment. H. somnus strain 2336 LOS was found to contain some sialic acid when grown in medium lacking CMP-NeuAc or NeuAc, although supplementation enhanced NeuAc incorporation. In contrast strain 738, an LOS phase variant of strain 2336, was less extensively sialylated when the growth medium was supplemented with CMP-NeuAc or NeuAc, as determined by electrophoretic profiles and electrospray mass spectrometry. The sialyltransferase of H. somnus strain 738 was confirmed to preferentially sialylate the Gal(beta)-(1-3)-GlcNAc component of the lacto-N-tetraose structure by capillary electrophoresis assay. Enhanced sialylation of the strain 2336 LOS inhibited the binding of monoclonal antibodies to LOS by

  4. Incorporation of N-acetylneuraminic acid into Haemophilus somnus lipooligosaccharide (LOS): enhancement of resistance to serum and reduction of LOS antibody binding.

    PubMed

    Inzana, Thomas J; Glindemann, Gretchen; Cox, Andrew D; Wakarchuk, Warren; Howard, Michael D

    2002-09-01

    Haemophilus somnus isolates from cases of thrombotic meningoencephalitis, pneumonia, and other disease sites are capable of undergoing a high rate of phase variation in the oligosaccharide component of their lipooligosaccharides (LOS). In contrast, the LOS of commensal strains isolated from the normal reproductive tract phase vary little or not at all. In addition, the LOS of H. somnus shares conserved epitopes with LOS from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Haemophilus influenzae, and other species that can incorporate sialic acid into their LOS. We now report that growth of disease isolates of H. somnus with CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid (CMP-NeuAc) or NeuAc added to the medium resulted in incorporation of NeuAc into the LOS. However, NeuAc was not incorporated into the LOS of commensal isolates and one disease isolate following growth in medium containing CMP-NeuAc or NeuAc. Sialylated LOS was detected by an increase in the molecular size or an increase in the amount of the largest-molecular-size LOS electrophoretic bands, which disappeared following treatment with neuraminidase. Sialylated LOS could also be detected by reactivity with Limax flavus agglutinin lectin, which is specific for sialylated species, by dot blot assay; this reactivity was also reversed by neuraminidase treatment. H. somnus strain 2336 LOS was found to contain some sialic acid when grown in medium lacking CMP-NeuAc or NeuAc, although supplementation enhanced NeuAc incorporation. In contrast strain 738, an LOS phase variant of strain 2336, was less extensively sialylated when the growth medium was supplemented with CMP-NeuAc or NeuAc, as determined by electrophoretic profiles and electrospray mass spectrometry. The sialyltransferase of H. somnus strain 738 was confirmed to preferentially sialylate the Gal(beta)-(1-3)-GlcNAc component of the lacto-N-tetraose structure by capillary electrophoresis assay. Enhanced sialylation of the strain 2336 LOS inhibited the binding of monoclonal antibodies to LOS by

  5. Polyamine and differentiation: induction of ornithine decarboxylase by parathyroid hormone is a good marker of differentiated chondrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Takigawa, M; Ishida, H; Takano, T; Suzuki, F

    1980-01-01

    The activity of ornithine decarboxylase (OD-Case:L-ornithine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.17) in rabbit costal chondrocytes in culture increased markedly after addition of parathyroid hormone (PTH), reaching a maximum 4 to 5 hr after PTH addition. The increase in ODCase activity was followed by increase in the intracellular concentrations of polyamines, especially putrescine, which increased in 6 hr to about 3-fold that of untreated cultures. The induction of ODCase by PTH was not observed in L, 3T3, HeLa, buffalo rat liver, or BHK cells. Retinyl acetate and retinoic acid both inhibited expression of the differentiated phenotype of chondrocytes by rabbit costal chondrocytes in culture within 3 days after their addition, as judged by morphological change and decrease in sulfate incorporation into glycosaminoglycans but did not inhibit cell proliferation. PTH could not induce an increase in ODCase in de-differentiated cells that had been pretreated with retinyl acetate or retinoic acid for 3 days. but 4 days after removal of the retinoids, these de-differentiated cells regained the ability to synthesize ODCase in response to PTH. These facts suggest that the induction of ODCase and the formation of putrescine by PTH are good markers of the differentiated phenotype of cultured chondrocytes. Images PMID:6929498

  6. Studies on polyamine and ornithine metabolism in rat colon: effects of two synergistically. Acting inducers of ornithine decarboxylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in rat colon mucosa was determined by the release of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from radiolabeled ornithine in the presence (total enzyme) or absence (holoenzyme) of added pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP). Total leucine incorporation into acid-precipitable protein over 30 minute was calculated by dividing the /sup 3/H-leucine in protein by the specific activity of the intracellular leucine. Amino acids, polyamines, and PLP-semicarbazide were quantified by high pressure liquid chromatography. Ornithine aminotransaminase activity (OAT) was measured as the quantity of pyrolline (5-carboxy) produced from alpha-ketoglutarate and ornithine. After 10 weeks on a high or no vitamin B/sub 6/ diet, no change in basal ODC activity was seen; however, sodium deoxycholate instillation in vitamin B/sub 6/ deficient rats led to a large increase in total but not holo-ODC activity. In rats fed normal chow diet, no increases in mucosal PLP levels were seen after either treatment. Increases in general protein synthesis rate could not account for the peaks in ODC activity after either stimulus. Putrescine increases were proportional to peaks of ODC activity after either stimulus, while spermine levels remained depressed for 18 hours after starvation/refeeding. Ornithine levels were increased after either stimulus, and this increase was linked to decreases in OAT activity, indicating short-term coordination of overall ornithine metabolism to favor polyamine biosynthesis.

  7. Rapid detection and quantification of tyrosine decarboxylase gene (tdc) and its expression in gram-positive bacteria associated with fermented foods using PCR-based methods.

    PubMed

    Torriani, Sandra; Gatto, Veronica; Sembeni, Silvia; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna; Belletti, Nicoletta; Gardini, Fausto; Bover-Cid, Sara

    2008-01-01

    In this study, PCR-based procedures were developed to detect the occurrence and quantify the expression of the tyrosine decarboxylase gene (tdc) in gram-positive bacteria associated with fermented foods. Consensus primers were used in conventional and reverse transcription PCR to analyze a collection of 87 pure cultures of lactic acid bacteria and staphylococci. All enterococci, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus curvatus, and Lactobacillus fermentum strains and 1 of 10 Staphylococcus xylosus strains produced amplification products with the primers DEC5 and DEC3 in accordance with results of the screening plate method and with previously reported result obtained with high-performance liquid chromatography. No amplicons were obtained for tyramine-negative strains, confirming the high specificity of these new primers. A novel quantitative real-time PCR assay was successfully applied to quantify tdc and its transcript in pure cultures and in meat and meat products. This assay allowed estimation of the influence of different variables (pH, temperature, and NaCl concentration) on the tdc expression of the tyraminogenic strain Enterococcus faecalis EF37 after 72 h of growth in M17 medium. Data obtained suggest that stressful conditions could induce greater tyrosine decarboxylase activity. The culture-independent PCR procedures developed here may be used for reliable and fast detection and quantification of bacterial tyraminogenic activity without the limitations of conventional techniques.

  8. Rapid detection and quantification of tyrosine decarboxylase gene (tdc) and its expression in gram-positive bacteria associated with fermented foods using PCR-based methods.

    PubMed

    Torriani, Sandra; Gatto, Veronica; Sembeni, Silvia; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna; Belletti, Nicoletta; Gardini, Fausto; Bover-Cid, Sara

    2008-01-01

    In this study, PCR-based procedures were developed to detect the occurrence and quantify the expression of the tyrosine decarboxylase gene (tdc) in gram-positive bacteria associated with fermented foods. Consensus primers were used in conventional and reverse transcription PCR to analyze a collection of 87 pure cultures of lactic acid bacteria and staphylococci. All enterococci, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus curvatus, and Lactobacillus fermentum strains and 1 of 10 Staphylococcus xylosus strains produced amplification products with the primers DEC5 and DEC3 in accordance with results of the screening plate method and with previously reported result obtained with high-performance liquid chromatography. No amplicons were obtained for tyramine-negative strains, confirming the high specificity of these new primers. A novel quantitative real-time PCR assay was successfully applied to quantify tdc and its transcript in pure cultures and in meat and meat products. This assay allowed estimation of the influence of different variables (pH, temperature, and NaCl concentration) on the tdc expression of the tyraminogenic strain Enterococcus faecalis EF37 after 72 h of growth in M17 medium. Data obtained suggest that stressful conditions could induce greater tyrosine decarboxylase activity. The culture-independent PCR procedures developed here may be used for reliable and fast detection and quantification of bacterial tyraminogenic activity without the limitations of conventional techniques. PMID:18236668

  9. Functional stability of 3D8 scFv, a nucleic acid-hydrolyzing single chain antibody, under different biochemical and physical conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joungmin; Park, Hyunjoon; Kim, Minjae; Seo, Youngsil; Lee, Yeonjin; Byun, Sung June; Lee, Sukchan; Kwon, Myung-Hee

    2015-12-30

    3D8 single-chain Fv (scFv) is a catalytic nucleic acid antibody with anti-viral activity against a broad spectrum of viruses. Here we investigated the functional stability of 3D8 scFv to provide a basis for engineering a 3D8 scFv derivative and for developing stable formulations with improved stability and potential use as an anti-viral agent. The stability of 3D8 scFv was assessed by measuring its DNA-hydrolyzing activity under different biochemical and physical conditions using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based method. In addition, the anti-influenza (H9N2) effect of 3D8 scFv was evaluated in A549 cells. 3D8 scFv was stable at 50°C for 6h at pH 7.2, for 3 days at pH 4-10 at 37°C and 30 days at pH 4-8 at 37°C. The stability was not affected by a reducing condition, freeze-thawing for up to 30 cycles, or lyophilization. Evaluation of the anti-virus effect showed that cells treated with 32-128 units of 3D8 scFv showed a 50% decrease in influenza replication compared to untreated cells. Based on its enzymatic stability in various biochemical and physical environments, 3D8 scFv holds good potential for development as an anti-viral therapeutic. PMID:26536531

  10. Molecular characterization of a disease associated conformational epitope on GAD65 recognised by a human monoclonal antibody b96.11.

    PubMed

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Hampe, Christiane S; O'connor, Karen; Banga, J Paul; Mackay, Ian R; Rowley, Merrill J; El-Kabbani, Ossama

    2007-02-01

    Autoantibodies to the 65kDa isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65) are associated with type I diabetes and recognise highly conformational epitope(s) that remain to be defined. The human recombinant Fab from mAb b96.11 inhibits binding of most GAD65 antibody positive sera from patients and its epitope has previously been localized to the middle region of GAD65. Recent studies indicate that b96.11 antibody specificity predicts the risk of developing type 1 diabetes in prediabetic individuals. We describe the use homology modelling, protein-protein docking simulations and biopanning of random peptide phage displayed libraries with b96.11 to predict contact amino acids on the interface of GAD65/Fab b96.11 complex. Further analysis by in vitro mutagenesis of GAD65 followed by radioimmunoprecipitation refined the amino acids contributing to the b96.11 epitope. Our studies show an interface characterized by a protruding antibody-combining site centered on the long heavy chain CDR3 loop of Fab b96.11 establishing interactions with the critical residue Phe(344) in the core of the epitope on GAD65, surrounded by charged sites within (375)RK(376) and (305)DER(307). The epitope requires residues from both middle and the C-terminal domains, and is the first precise definition of an epitope on GAD65. The nature of the b96.11 epitope leads to considerations of potential structural variations for differences in antigenicity between the isoforms GAD65 and GAD67. The study shows the utility of using a combination of in silico techniques and experimental data for molecular characterization and localization of conformational epitopes for which crystal structures are lacking.

  11. Fern L-methionine decarboxylase: Kinetics and mechanism of decarboxylation and abortive transamination

    SciTech Connect

    Akhtar, M.; Stevenson, D.E.; Gani, D. )

    1990-08-21

    L-Methionine decarboxylase from Dryopteris filix-mas catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-methionine and a range of straight- and branched-chain L-amino acids to give the corresponding amine products. The deuterium solvent isotope effects for the decarboxylation of (2S)-methionine are {sup D}(V/K) = 6.5 and {sup D}V = 2.3, for (2S)-valine are {sup D}(V/K) = 1.9 and {sup D}V = 2.6, and for (2S)-lecuine are {sup D}(V/K) = 2.5 and {sup D}V = 1.0 at pL 5.5. At pL 6.0 and above, where the value of k{sub cat} for all of the substrates is low, the solvent isotope effects on V{sub max} for methionine are 1.1-1.2 whereas the effects on V/K remain unchanged, indicating that the solvent-sensitive transition state occurs before the first irreversible step, carbon dioxide desorption. At very high concentration, the product amine can promote transamination of the coenzyme. However, the reaction occurs infrequently and does not influence the partitioning between decarboxylation and substrate-mediated abortive transamination under steady-state turnover conditions. The partition ratio, normal catalytic versus abortive events, can be determined from the amount of substrate consumed by a known amount of enzyme at infinite time, and the rate of inactivation can be determined by measuring the decrease in enzyme activity with respect to time. Experiments conducted in deuterium oxide allowed the solvent isotope effects for the partition ratio and the abortive reaction to be determined. {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopic analysis of 3-(methylthio)-1-aminopropane isolated from incubations conducted in 50 molar % deuterium oxide at pL 4.8 and at pL 6.5 indicated that the proton donor was monoprotic and, therefore, is probably the imidazolium side chain of a histidine residue.

  12. Minimal antizyme peptide fully functioning in the binding and inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase and antizyme inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ju-Yi; Yang, Jung-Yen; Lin, Chih-Li; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih

    2011-01-01

    Antizyme (AZ) is a protein with 228 amino acid residues that regulates ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) by binding to ODC and dissociating its homodimer, thus inhibiting its enzyme activity. Antizyme inhibitor (AZI) is homologous to ODC, but has a higher affinity than ODC for AZ. In this study, we quantified the biomolecular interactions between AZ and ODC as well as AZ and AZI to identify functional AZ peptides that could bind to ODC and AZI and inhibit their function as efficiently as the full-length AZ protein. For these AZ peptides, the inhibitory ability of AZ_95-228 was similar to that of AZ_WT. Furthermore, AZ_95-176 displayed an inhibition (IC(50): 0.20 µM) similar to that of AZ-95-228 (IC(50): 0.16 µM), even though a large segment spanning residues 177-228 was deleted. However, further deletion of AZ_95-176 from either the N-terminus or the C-terminus decreased its ability to inhibit ODC. The AZ_100-176 and AZ_95-169 peptides displayed a noteworthy decrease in ability to inhibit ODC, with IC(50) values of 0.43 and 0.37 µM, respectively. The AZ_95-228, AZ_100-228 and AZ_95-176 peptides had IC(50) values comparable to that of AZ_WT and formed AZ-ODC complexes with K(d,AZ-ODC) values of 1.5, 5.3 and 5.6 µM, respectively. Importantly, our data also indicate that AZI can rescue AZ peptide-inhibited ODC enzyme activity and that it can bind to AZ peptides with a higher affinity than ODC. Together, these data suggest that these truncated AZ proteins retain their AZI-binding ability. Thus, we suggest that AZ_95-176 is the minimal AZ peptide that is fully functioning in the binding of ODC and AZI and inhibition of their function. PMID:21931692

  13. Method for altering antibody light chain interactions

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.; Stevens, Priscilla Wilkins; Raffen, Rosemarie; Schiffer, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    A method for recombinant antibody subunit dimerization including modifying at least one codon of a nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in the interface segment of the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a first polarity; and modifying at least one codon of the nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in an interface segment of the heavy polypeptide variable region corresponding to a position in the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a second polarity opposite the first polarity. Nucleic acid sequences which code for novel light chain proteins, the latter of which are used in conjunction with the inventive method, are also provided.

  14. Effect of the hexapeptide dalargin on ornithine decarboxylase activity in the duodenal mucosa of rats with experimental duodenal ulcer

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, K.N.; Shitin, A.G.; Polonskii, V.M.; Vinogradov, V.A.

    1987-08-01

    The authors study the effect of dalargin on ornithine decarboxylase in homogenates of the duodenal ulcer from rats with experimental duodenal ulcer induced by cysteamine. Activity of the enzyme was expressed in pmoles /sup 14/CO/sub 2//mg protein/h. Protein was determined by Lowry's method. The findings indicate that stimulation of ornithine decarboxylase and the antiulcerative effect of dalargin may be due to direct interaction of the peptide with cells of the intestinal mucosa and with enterocytes.

  15. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis Antibody Binding Is Dependent on Amino Acid Identity of a Small Region Within the GluN1 Amino Terminal Domain

    PubMed Central

    Gleichman, Amy J.; Spruce, Lynn A.; Dalmau, Josep; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Lynch, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Anti-NMDA receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a newly identified autoimmune disorder that targets NMDARs, causing severe neurological symptoms including hallucinations, psychosis, and seizures, and may result in death (Dalmau et al., 2008). However, the exact epitope to which these antibodies bind is unknown. A clearly defined antigenic region could provide more precise testing, allow for comparison of immunogenicity between patients to explore potential clinically relevant variations, elucidate the functional effects of antibodies, and make patients’ antibodies a more effective tool with which to study NMDAR function. Here, we use human cerebrospinal fluid to explore the antigenic region of the NMDAR. We created a series of mutants within the amino terminal domain of GluN1 that change patient antibody binding in transfected cells in stereotyped ways. These mutants demonstrate that the N368/G369 region of GluN1 is crucial for the creation of immunoreactivity. Mass spectrometry experiments show that N368 is glycosylated in transfected cells and rat brain regions; however, this glycosylation is not directly required for epitope formation. Mutations of residues N368/G369 change the closed time of the receptor in single channel recordings; more frequent channel openings correlates with the degree of antibody staining, and acute antibody exposure prolongs open time of the receptor. The staining pattern of mutant receptors is similar across subgroups of patients, indicating consistent immunogenicity, although we have identified one region that has a variable role in epitope formation. These findings provide tools for detailed comparison of antibodies across patients and suggest an interaction between antibody binding and channel function. PMID:22875940

  16. Regulation of human ornithine decarboxylase expression following prolonged quiescence: role for the c-Myc/Max protein complex.

    PubMed

    Peña, A; Wu, S; Hickok, N J; Soprano, D R; Soprano, K J

    1995-02-01

    WI-38 cells can remain quiescent for long periods of time and still be induced to reenter the cell cycle by the addition of fresh serum. However, the longer these cells remain growth arrested, the more time they require to enter S phase. This prolongation of the prereplicative phase has been localized to a point early in G1, after the induction of "immediate early" G1 genes such as c-fos and c-jun but before maximal expression of "early" G1 genes such as ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). Understanding the molecular basis for ODC mRNA induction can therefore provide information about the molecular events which regulate the progression of cells out of long-term quiescence into G1 and subsequently into DNA synthesis. Studies utilizing electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) of nuclear extracts from short- and long-term quiescent WI-38 cells identified a region of the human ODC promoter at -491 bp to -474 bp which exhibited a protein binding pattern that correlated with the temporal pattern of ODC mRNA expression. The presence of a CACGTG element within this fragment, studies with antibodies against c-Myc and Max, the use of purified recombinant c-Myc protein in the mobility shift assay, and antisense studies suggest that these proteins can specifically bind this portion of the human ODC promoter in a manner consistent with growth-associated modulation of the expression of ODC and other early G1 genes following prolonged quiescence. These studies suggest a role for the c-Myc/Max protein complex in regulating events involved in the progression of cells out of long-term quiescence into G1 and subsequently into S.

  17. Crystal Structures of Malonyl-Coenzyme A Decarboxylase Provide Insights into Its Catalytic Mechanism and Disease-Causing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Froese, D. Sean; Forouhar, Farhad; Tran, Timothy H.; Vollmar, Melanie; Kim, Yi Seul; Lew, Scott; Neely, Helen; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Shen, Yang; Xiao, Rong; Acton, Thomas B.; Everett, John K.; Cannone, Giuseppe; Puranik, Sriharsha; Savitsky, Pavel; Krojer, Tobias; Pilka, Ewa S.; Kiyani, Wasim; Lee, Wen Hwa; Marsden, Brian D.; von Delft, Frank; Allerston, Charles K.; Spagnolo, Laura; Gileadi, Opher; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Oppermann, Udo; Yue, Wyatt W.; Tong, Liang

    2013-01-01

    Summary Malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase (MCD) is found from bacteria to humans, has important roles in regulating fatty acid metabolism and food intake, and is an attractive target for drug discovery. We report here four crystal structures of MCD from human, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Agrobacterium vitis, and Cupriavidus metallidurans at up to 2.3 Å resolution. The MCD monomer contains an N-terminal helical domain involved in oligomerization and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The four structures exhibit substantial differences in the organization of the helical domains and, consequently, the oligomeric states and intersubunit interfaces. Unexpectedly, the MCD catalytic domain is structurally homologous to those of the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase superfamily, especially the curacin A polyketide synthase catalytic module, with a conserved His-Ser/Thr dyad important for catalysis. Our structures, along with mutagenesis and kinetic studies, provide a molecular basis for understanding pathogenic mutations and catalysis, as well as a template for structure-based drug design. PMID:23791943

  18. Functional analysis of cis-aconitate decarboxylase and trans-aconitate metabolism in riboflavin-producing filamentous Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Takashi; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2014-05-01

    In Ashbya gossypii, isocitrate lyase (ICL1) is a very crucial enzyme for riboflavin production. Itaconate, the inhibitor of ICL1, has been used as an antimetabolite for mutagenic studies in A. gossypii. It has been reported that itaconate is produced from cis-aconitate by cis-aconitate decarboxylase (CAD1) in Aspergillus terreus. In this study, identification of CAD1 gene and determination of the presence of itaconate in the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in A. gossypii were carried out to confirm itaconate metabolism. Although no CAD1 candidate gene was found and no itaconate production was observed, cis- and trans-aconitate were detected in the riboflavin production phase. It is known that trans-aconitate inhibits aconitase (ACO1) in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In A. gossypii, the transcription level of AGR110Wp, the homolog of trans-aconitate 3-methyltransferase (TMT1), was enhanced by almost threefold during riboflavin production than that during its growth phase. TMT1 catalyzes the methylation reaction of trans-aconitate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Thus, these results suggest that the enhancement of the transcription level of this TMT1 homolog decreases the trans-aconitate level, which may mitigate the inhibition of ACO1 by oxidative stress in the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in A. gossypii. This is a novel finding in A. gossypii, which may open new metabolic engineering ideas for improving riboflavin productivity. PMID:24315530

  19. Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase overexpression in Escherichia coli resulted in high ethanol production and rewired metabolic enzyme networks.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingfeng; Li, Xuefeng; Bu, Chunya; Wang, Hui; Shi, Guanglu; Yang, Xiushan; Hu, Yong; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase are efficient enzymes for ethanol production in Zymomonas mobilis. These two enzymes were over-expressed in Escherichia coli, a promising candidate for industrial ethanol production, resulting in high ethanol production in the engineered E. coli. To investigate the intracellular changes to the enzyme overexpression for homoethanol production, 2-DE and LC-MS/MS were performed. More than 1,000 protein spots were reproducibly detected in the gel by image analysis. Compared to the wild-type, 99 protein spots showed significant changes in abundance in the recombinant E. coli, in which 46 were down-regulated and 53 were up-regulated. Most proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycerol metabolism and other energy metabolism were up-regulated, whereas proteins involved in glycolysis and glyoxylate pathway were down-regulated, indicating the rewired metabolism in the engineered E. coli. As glycolysis is the main pathway for ethanol production, and it was inhibited significantly in engineered E. coli, further efforts should be directed at minimizing the repression of glycolysis to optimize metabolism network for higher yields of ethanol production.

  20. The krebs cycle enzyme α-ketoglutarate decarboxylase is an essential glycosomal protein in bloodstream African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Steven; Szempruch, Anthony; Hajduk, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    α-Ketoglutarate decarboxylase (α-KDE1) is a Krebs cycle enzyme found in the mitochondrion of the procyclic form (PF) of Trypanosoma brucei. The bloodstream form (BF) of T. brucei lacks a functional Krebs cycle and relies exclusively on glycolysis for ATP production. Despite the lack of a functional Krebs cycle, α-KDE1 was expressed in BF T. brucei and RNA interference knockdown of α-KDE1 mRNA resulted in rapid growth arrest and killing. Cell death was preceded by progressive swelling of the flagellar pocket as a consequence of recruitment of both flagellar and plasma membranes into the pocket. BF T. brucei expressing an epitope-tagged copy of α-KDE1 showed localization to glycosomes and not the mitochondrion. We used a cell line transfected with a reporter construct containing the N-terminal sequence of α-KDE1 fused to green fluorescent protein to examine the requirements for glycosome targeting. We found that the N-terminal 18 amino acids of α-KDE1 contain overlapping mitochondrion- and peroxisome-targeting sequences and are sufficient to direct localization to the glycosome in BF T. brucei. These results suggest that α-KDE1 has a novel moonlighting function outside the mitochondrion in BF T. brucei.

  1. Cloning and molecular characterization of an ornithine decarboxylase gene and its expression during embryonic development of the housefly, Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Toutges, Michelle J; Santoso, Adi

    2011-10-01

    We are interested in identifying targets that may be used to develop new control products for the common housefly, Musca domestica, a vector of disease for many vertebrates. One such target, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), is an embryonic enzyme involved in the regulation of polyamines and is a critical enzyme during M. domestica development. In this study, the cDNA for ODC from M. domestica was cloned, sequenced, and characterized. The full-length cDNA was 1,337-bp, consistent with a single band of approximately 1.35 kb obtained by northern analysis. The open-reading frame contains 1,191 bp, yielding a deduced polypeptide of 396 amino acid residues with a predicted mass of 44,618 Da. The deduced M. domestica ODC protein was homologous to other ODC proteins. mRNA expression profiles analyzed by real-time PCR indicated that the ODC transcript is temporally regulated throughout embryogenesis. Sequence data and Southern blot analysis suggests that there were likely only one or two closely linked copies of the M. domestica ODC gene.

  2. Cloning and molecular characterization of an ornithine decarboxylase gene and its expression during embryonic development of the housefly, Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Toutges, Michelle J; Santoso, Adi

    2011-10-01

    We are interested in identifying targets that may be used to develop new control products for the common housefly, Musca domestica, a vector of disease for many vertebrates. One such target, ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), is an embryonic enzyme involved in the regulation of polyamines and is a critical enzyme during M. domestica development. In this study, the cDNA for ODC from M. domestica was cloned, sequenced, and characterized. The full-length cDNA was 1,337-bp, consistent with a single band of approximately 1.35 kb obtained by northern analysis. The open-reading frame contains 1,191 bp, yielding a deduced polypeptide of 396 amino acid residues with a predicted mass of 44,618 Da. The deduced M. domestica ODC protein was homologous to other ODC proteins. mRNA expression profiles analyzed by real-time PCR indicated that the ODC transcript is temporally regulated throughout embryogenesis. Sequence data and Southern blot analysis suggests that there were likely only one or two closely linked copies of the M. domestica ODC gene. PMID:21928394

  3. Histidine decarboxylase deficiency causes tourette syndrome: parallel findings in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Castellan Baldan, Lissandra; Williams, Kyle A; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Pogorelov, Vladimir; Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Crowley, Michael; Anderson, George M; Loring, Erin; Gorczyca, Roxanne; Billingslea, Eileen; Wasylink, Suzanne; Panza, Kaitlyn E; Ercan-Sencicek, A Gulhan; Krusong, Kuakarun; Leventhal, Bennett L; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Bloch, Michael H; Hughes, Zoë A; Krystal, John H; Mayes, Linda; de Araujo, Ivan; Ding, Yu-Shin; State, Matthew W; Pittenger, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by tics, sensorimotor gating deficiencies, and abnormalities of cortico-basal ganglia circuits. A mutation in histidine decarboxylase (Hdc), the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of histamine (HA), has been implicated as a rare genetic cause. Hdc knockout mice exhibited potentiated tic-like stereotypies, recapitulating core phenomenology of TS; these were mitigated by the dopamine (DA) D2 antagonist haloperidol, a proven pharmacotherapy, and by HA infusion into the brain. Prepulse inhibition was impaired in both mice and humans carrying Hdc mutations. HA infusion reduced striatal DA levels; in Hdc knockout mice, striatal DA was increased and the DA-regulated immediate early gene Fos was upregulated. DA D2/D3 receptor binding was altered both in mice and in humans carrying the Hdc mutation. These data confirm histidine decarboxylase deficiency as a rare cause of TS and identify HA-DA interactions in the basal ganglia as an important locus of pathology. PMID:24411733

  4. HemQ: An iron-coproporphyrin oxidative decarboxylase for protoheme synthesis in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Dailey, Harry A.; Gerdes, Svetlana

    2015-02-21

    Genes for chlorite dismutase-like proteins are found widely among heme-synthesizing bacteria and some Archaea. It is now known that among the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria these proteins do not possess chlorite dismutase activity but instead are essential for heme synthesis. These proteins, named HemQ, are ironcoproporphyrin (coproheme) decarboxylases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of coproheme III into protoheme IX. As purified, HemQs do not contain bound heme, but readily bind exogeneously supplied heme with low micromolar affinity. We find that the heme-bound form of HemQ has low peroxidase activity and in the presence of peroxide the bound heme may be destroyed.more » Furthermore, it is possible that HemQ may serve a dual role as a decarboxylase in heme biosynthesis and a regulatory protein in heme homeostasis.« less

  5. Unusual space-group pseudo symmetry in crystals of human phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Manoj, N.; Ealick, S.E.

    2010-12-01

    Phosphopantothenoylcysteine (PPC) decarboxylase is an essential enzyme in the biosynthesis of coenzyme A and catalyzes the decarboxylation of PPC to phosphopantetheine. Human PPC decarboxylase has been expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. The Laue class of the diffraction data appears to be {bar 3}m, suggesting space group R32 with two monomers per asymmetric unit. However, the crystals belong to the space group R3 and the asymmetric unit contains four monomers. The structure has been solved using molecular replacement and refined to a current R factor of 29%. The crystal packing can be considered as two interlaced lattices, each consistent with space group R32 and with the corresponding twofold axes parallel to each other but separated along the threefold axis. Thus, the true space group is R3 with four monomers per asymmetric unit.

  6. HemQ: an iron-coproporphyrin oxidative decarboxylase for protoheme synthesis in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Harry A.; Gerdes, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Genes for chlorite dismutase-like proteins are found widely among hemesynthesizing bacteria and some Archaea. It is now known that among the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria these proteins do not possess chlorite dismutase activity but instead are essential for heme synthesis. These proteins, named HemQ, are ironcoproporphyrin (coproheme) decarboxylases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of coproheme III into protoheme IX. As purified, HemQs do not contain bound heme, but readily bind exogeneously supplied heme with low micromolar affinity. The heme-bound form of HemQ has low peroxidase activity and in the presence of peroxide the bound heme may be destroyed. Thus, it is possible that HemQ may serve a dual role as a decarboxylase in heme biosynthesis and a regulatory protein in heme homeostasis. PMID:25711532

  7. HemQ: An iron-coproporphyrin oxidative decarboxylase for protoheme synthesis in Firmicutes and Actinobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, Harry A.; Gerdes, Svetlana

    2015-02-21

    Genes for chlorite dismutase-like proteins are found widely among heme-synthesizing bacteria and some Archaea. It is now known that among the Firmicutes and Actinobacteria these proteins do not possess chlorite dismutase activity but instead are essential for heme synthesis. These proteins, named HemQ, are ironcoproporphyrin (coproheme) decarboxylases that catalyze the oxidative decarboxylation of coproheme III into protoheme IX. As purified, HemQs do not contain bound heme, but readily bind exogeneously supplied heme with low micromolar affinity. We find that the heme-bound form of HemQ has low peroxidase activity and in the presence of peroxide the bound heme may be destroyed. Furthermore, it is possible that HemQ may serve a dual role as a decarboxylase in heme biosynthesis and a regulatory protein in heme homeostasis.

  8. Autoradiographic measurement of relative changes in ornithine decarboxylase in axotomized superior cervical ganglion neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, M.R.

    1986-05-01

    An autoradiographic method is described for detecting changes in ornithine decarboxylase in axotomized superior cervical ganglion neurons of rats using (3H)difluoromethylornithine. An increase in binding to neurons was seen at 12 h and 1 day after crushing the postganglionic nerves. Binding returned to control values between 3 and 5 days postoperation. The patterns found using this method were in general agreement with prior reports of enzymatic changes in whole ganglia.

  9. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ...

  10. Reducing biogenic-amine-producing bacteria, decarboxylase activity, and biogenic amines in raw milk cheese by high-pressure treatments.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Javier; del Olmo, Ana; Picón, Antonia; Gaya, Pilar; Nuñez, Manuel

    2013-02-01

    Biogenic amines may reach concentrations of public health concern in some cheeses. To minimize biogenic amine buildup in raw milk cheese, high-pressure treatments of 400 or 600 MPa for 5 min were applied on days 21 and 35 of ripening. On day 60, counts of lactic acid bacteria, enterococci, and lactobacilli were 1 to 2 log units lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 4 to 6 log units lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa than in control cheese. At that time, aminopeptidase activity was 16 to 75% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 56 to 81% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa than in control cheese, while the total free amino acid concentration was 35 to 53% higher in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 3 to 15% higher in cheeses treated at 600 MPa, and decarboxylase activity was 86 to 96% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 93 to 100% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. Tyramine, putrescine, and cadaverine were the most abundant amines in control cheese. The total biogenic amine concentration on day 60, which reached a maximum of 1.089 mg/g dry matter in control cheese, was 27 to 33% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 40 to 65% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. On day 240, total biogenic amines attained a concentration of 3.690 mg/g dry matter in control cheese and contents 11 to 45% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 73 to 76% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. Over 80% of the histidine and 95% of the tyrosine had been converted into histamine and tyramine in control cheese by day 60. Substrate depletion played an important role in the rate of biogenic amine buildup, becoming a limiting factor in the case of some amino acids.

  11. Reducing Biogenic-Amine-Producing Bacteria, Decarboxylase Activity, and Biogenic Amines in Raw Milk Cheese by High-Pressure Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Calzada, Javier; del Olmo, Ana; Picón, Antonia; Gaya, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amines may reach concentrations of public health concern in some cheeses. To minimize biogenic amine buildup in raw milk cheese, high-pressure treatments of 400 or 600 MPa for 5 min were applied on days 21 and 35 of ripening. On day 60, counts of lactic acid bacteria, enterococci, and lactobacilli were 1 to 2 log units lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 4 to 6 log units lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa than in control cheese. At that time, aminopeptidase activity was 16 to 75% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 56 to 81% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa than in control cheese, while the total free amino acid concentration was 35 to 53% higher in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 3 to 15% higher in cheeses treated at 600 MPa, and decarboxylase activity was 86 to 96% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 93 to 100% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. Tyramine, putrescine, and cadaverine were the most abundant amines in control cheese. The total biogenic amine concentration on day 60, which reached a maximum of 1.089 mg/g dry matter in control cheese, was 27 to 33% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 40 to 65% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. On day 240, total biogenic amines attained a concentration of 3.690 mg/g dry matter in control cheese and contents 11 to 45% lower in cheeses treated at 400 MPa and 73 to 76% lower in cheeses treated at 600 MPa. Over 80% of the histidine and 95% of the tyrosine had been converted into histamine and tyramine in control cheese by day 60. Substrate depletion played an important role in the rate of biogenic amine buildup, becoming a limiting factor in the case of some amino acids. PMID:23241980

  12. Distribution of the thiamin diphosphate C(2)-proton during catalysis of acetaldehyde formation by brewers' yeast pyruvate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Harris, T K; Washabaugh, M W

    1995-10-31

    The distribution of tritium derived from enzyme-bound [thiazole-2-T]thiamin diphosphate (TDP) during the reaction of pyruvate to form acetaldehyde catalyzed by pyruvate decarboxylase isozymes (PDC; EC 4.1.1.1) from Saccharomyces carlsbergensis was determined under single-turnover conditions ([E] > [S]) in the presence of the nonsubstrate allosteric effector pyruvamide. The specific radioactivity of the [1-L]acetaldehyde product and solvent ([L]H2O) was 43 +/- 4% and 54 +/- 2%, respectively, of the initial specific radioactivity of PDC-bound [thiazole-2-T]TDP and was independent of the extent of the single-turnover reaction. There is little (< or = 3%) or no return of the abstracted C(2)-hydron to the C(2) position of PDC-bound TDP. This provides evidence that the abstracted C(2)-hydron is involved in the specific protonation of the C(alpha) position of the PDC-bound intermediate 2-(1-hydroxyethyl)thiamin diphosphate (HETDP), which is cleaved to form [1-L]acetaldehyde and PDC-bound [thiazole-2-H]TDP. The partial exchange of C(2)-derived tritium into solvent requires that (1) hydron transfer from C(2) occurs to a catalytic-base in which the conjugate catalytic acid is partially shielded from hydron exchange with the solvent, (2) the conjugate catalytic acid transfers the C(2)-derived hydron to the C(alpha) position of HETDP, and (3) hydron transfer to C(2) to regenerate the coenzyme occurs either from solvent directly or from a second catalytic acid of the enzyme that undergoes rapid hydron exchange with the solvent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Novel protein–protein interaction between spermidine synthase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from Leishmania donovani

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Arjun K.; Agnihotri, Pragati; Srivastava, Vijay Kumar; Pratap, J. Venkatesh

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • L. donovani spermidine synthase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase have been cloned and purified. • S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase has autocatalytic property. • GST pull down assay shows the two proteins to form a metabolon. • Isothermal titration calorimetry shows that binding was exothermic having K{sub d} value of 0.4 μM. • Interaction confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. - Abstract: Polyamine biosynthesis pathway has long been considered an essential drug target for trypanosomatids including Leishmania. S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDc) and spermidine synthase (SpdSyn) are enzymes of this pathway that catalyze successive steps, with the product of the former, decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine (dcSAM), acting as an aminopropyl donor for the latter enzyme. Here we have explored the possibility of and identified the protein–protein interaction between SpdSyn and AdoMetDc. The protein–protein interaction has been identified using GST pull down assay. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that the interaction is thermodynamically favorable. Fluorescence spectroscopy studies also confirms the interaction, with SpdSyn exhibiting a change in tertiary structure with increasing concentrations of AdoMetDc. Size exclusion chromatography suggests the presence of the complex as a hetero-oligomer. Taken together, these results suggest that the enzymes indeed form a heteromer. Computational analyses suggest that this complex differs significantly from the corresponding human complex, implying that this complex could be a better therapeutic target than the individual enzymes.

  14. The root-specific glutamate decarboxylase (GAD1) is essential for sustaining GABA levels in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bouché, Nicolas; Fait, Aaron; Zik, Moriyah; Fromm, Hillel

    2004-05-01

    In plants, as in most eukaryotes, glutamate decarboxylase catalyses the synthesis of GABA. The Arabidopsis genome contains five glutamate decarboxylase genes and one of these genes (glutamate decarboxylase1; i.e. GAD1 ) is expressed specifically in roots. By isolating and analyzing three gad1 T-DNA insertion alleles, derived from two ecotypes, we investigated the potential role of GAD1 in GABA production. We also analyzed a promoter region of the GAD1 gene and show that it confers root-specific expression when fused to reporter genes. Phenotypic analysis of the gad1 insertion mutants revealed that GABA levels in roots were drastically reduced compared with those in the wild type. The roots of the wild type contained about sevenfold more GABA than roots of the mutants. Disruption of the GAD1 gene also prevented the accumulation of GABA in roots in response to heat stress. Our results show that the root-specific calcium/calmodulin-regulated GAD1 plays a major role in GABA synthesis in plants under normal growth conditions and in response to stress.

  15. Identification, cloning, and nucleotide sequencing of the ornithine decarboxylase antizyme gene of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Canellakis, E S; Paterakis, A A; Huang, S C; Panagiotidis, C A; Kyriakidis, D A

    1993-01-01

    The ornithine decarboxylase antizyme gene of Escherichia coli was identified by immunological screening of an E. coli genomic library. A 6.4-kilobase fragment containing the antizyme gene was subcloned and sequenced. The open reading frame encoding the antizyme was identified on the basis of its ability to direct the synthesis of immunoreactive antizyme. Antizyme shares significant homology with bacterial transcriptional activators of the two-component regulatory system family; these systems consist of a "sensor" kinase and a transcriptional regulator. The open reading frame next to antizyme is homologous to sensor kinases. Antizyme overproduction inhibits the activities of both ornithine and arginine decarboxylases without affecting their protein levels. Extracts from E. coli bearing an antizyme gene-containing plasmid exhibit increased antizyme activity. These data strongly suggest that (i) the cloned gene encodes the ornithine decarboxylase antizyme and (ii) antizyme is a bifunctional protein serving as both an inhibitor of polyamine biosynthesis as well as a transcriptional regulator of an as yet unknown set of genes. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:8346225

  16. Different mRNAs code for dopa decarboxylase in tissues of neuronal and nonneuronal origin

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, M.; Coge, F.; Gros, F.; Thibault, J. )

    1991-03-15

    A cDNA clone for dopa decarboxylase has been isolated from a rat pheochromocytoma cDNA library and the cDNA sequence has been determined. It corresponds to an mRNA of 2094 nucleotides. The length of the mRNA was measured by primer-extension of rat pheochromocytoma RNA and the 5{prime} end of the sequence of the mRNA was confirmed by the PCR. A probe spanning the translation initiation site of the mRNA was used to hybridize with mRNAs from various organs of the rat. S1 nuclease digestion of the mRNAs annealed with this probe revealed two classes of mRNAs. The comparison of the cDNA sequence and published sequences for rat liver, human pheochromocytoma, and Droxophila dopa decarboxylase supported the conclusion that two mRNAs are produced: one is specific for tissue of neuronal origin and the other is specific for tissues of nonneuronal (mesodermal or endodermal) origin. The neuronal mRNA contains a 5{prime} untranslated sequence that is highly conserved between human and rat pheochromocytoma including a GA stretch. The coding sequence and the 3{prime} untranslated sequence of mRNAs from rat liver and pheochromocytoma are identical. The rat mRNA differs only in the 5{prime} untranslated region. Thus a unique gene codes for dopa decarboxylase and this gene gives rise to at least two transcripts presumably in response to different signals during development.

  17. RosettaAntibody: antibody variable region homology modeling server.

    PubMed

    Sircar, Aroop; Kim, Eric T; Gray, Jeffrey J

    2009-07-01

    The RosettaAntibody server (http://antibody.graylab.jhu.edu) predicts the structure of an antibody variable region given the amino-acid sequences of the respective light and heavy chains. In an initial stage, the server identifies and displays the most sequence homologous template structures for the light and heavy framework regions and each of the complementarity determining region (CDR) loops. Subsequently, the most homologous templates are assembled into a side-chain optimized crude model, and the server returns a picture and coordinate file. For users requesting a high-resolution model, the server executes the full RosettaAntibody protocol which additionally models the hyper-variable CDR H3 loop. The high-resolution protocol also relieves steric clashes by optimizing the CDR backbone torsion angles and by simultaneously perturbing the relative orientation of the light and heavy chains. RosettaAntibody generates 2000 independent structures, and the server returns pictures, coordinate files, and detailed scoring information for the 10 top-scoring models. The 10 models enable users to use rational judgment in choosing the best model or to use the set as an ensemble for further studies such as docking. The high-resolution models generated by RosettaAntibody have been used for the successful prediction of antibody-antigen complex structures.

  18. Aversive odorant causing appetite decrease downregulates tyrosine decarboxylase gene expression in the olfactory receptor neuron of the blowfly, Phormia regina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Yuko; Ozaki, Mamiko

    2012-01-01

    In the blowfly Phormia regina, exposure to d-limonene for 5 days during feeding inhibits proboscis extension reflex behavior due to decreasing tyramine (TA) titer in the brain. TA is synthesized by tyrosine decarboxylase (Tdc) and catalyzed into octopamine (OA) by TA ß-hydroxylase (Tbh). To address the mechanisms of TA titer regulation in the blowfly, we cloned Tdc and Tbh cDNAs from P. regina (PregTdc and PregTbh). The deduced amino acid sequences of both proteins showed high identity to those of the corresponding proteins from Drosophila melanogaster at the amino acid level. PregTdc was expressed in the antenna, labellum, and tarsus whereas PregTbh was expressed in the head, indicating that TA is mainly synthesized in the sensory organs whereas OA is primarily synthesized in the brain. d-Limonene exposure significantly decreased PregTdc expression in the antenna but not in the labellum and the tarsus, indicating that PregTdc expressed in the antenna is responsible for decreasing TA titer. PregTdc-like immunoreactive material was localized in the thin-walled sensillum. In contrast, the OA/TA receptor (PregOAR/TAR) was localized to the thick-walled sensillum. The results indicated that d-limonene inhibits PregTdc expression in the olfactory receptor neurons in the thin-walled sensilla, likely resulting in reduced TA levels in the receptor neurons in the antenna. TA may be transferred from the receptor neuron to the specific synaptic junction in the antennal lobe of the brain through the projection neurons and play a role in conveying the aversive odorant information to the projection and local neurons.

  19. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  20. Radioimmunodetection of lymph node invasion in prostatic cancer. The use of iodine 123 (123I)-labeled monoclonal anti-prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) 227 A F(ab')2 antibody fragments in vivo.

    PubMed

    Leroy, M; Teillac, P; Rain, J D; Saccavini, J C; Le Duc, A; Najean, Y

    1989-07-01

    The therapeutic indications in prostatic cancer depend on the regional and distant extension of the cancer and are difficult to assess before lymphadenectomy. Radioimmunodetection of lymph node involvement with monoclonal anti-prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antibodies can be proposed as a noninvasive alternative to lymphadenectomy. Fifteen patients with various stages of histologically proven prostatic cancer were examined by immunolymphoscintigraphy (ILS) before treatment to detect lymph node metastases. These patients had Stage A (n = 7), Stage B (n = 3), Stage C (n = 2), and Stage D (n = 3) tumors. They received between 100 and 400 micrograms of monoclonal antibody 227 A in the form of F(ab')2 fragments labeled with iodine 123 (123I). The antibody was injected directly into the periprostatic area. ILS images were obtained after 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours. Three days later, each patient underwent a lymphadenectomy for histologic examination. The results of the histologic examination and ILS were compared. In ten patients, the examination did not show any images capable of being interpreted as lymphadenopathy and histologic examination confirmed the integrity of the nodes examined. In five cases, scintigraphy suggested the presence of lymph node invasion by prostatic cancer and this was confirmed by histologic examination in three of the five cases. Overall, in terms of lymphadenopathy, this examination had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 83%. Therefore, ILS appears to be capable of detecting lymph node metastases in prostatic cancer.

  1. An archaeal glutamate decarboxylase homolog functions as an aspartate decarboxylase and is involved in β-alanine and coenzyme A biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Hiroya; Yokooji, Yuusuke; Ishibashi, Takuya; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2014-03-01

    β-Alanine is a precursor for coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthesis and is a substrate for the bacterial/eukaryotic pantothenate synthetase and archaeal phosphopantothenate synthetase. β-Alanine is synthesized through various enzymes/pathways in bacteria and eukaryotes, including the direct decarboxylation of Asp by aspartate 1-decarboxylase (ADC), the degradation of pyrimidine, or the oxidation of polyamines. However, in most archaea, homologs of these enzymes are not present; thus, the mechanisms of β-alanine biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, we performed a biochemical and genetic study on a glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) homolog encoded by TK1814 from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. GADs are distributed in all three domains of life, generally catalyzing the decarboxylation of Glu to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA). The recombinant TK1814 protein displayed not only GAD activity but also ADC activity using pyridoxal 5'-phosphate as a cofactor. Kinetic studies revealed that the TK1814 protein prefers Asp as its substrate rather than Glu, with nearly a 20-fold difference in catalytic efficiency. Gene disruption of TK1814 resulted in a strain that could not grow in standard medium. Addition of β-alanine, 4'-phosphopantothenate, or CoA complemented the growth defect, whereas GABA could not. Our results provide genetic evidence that TK1814 functions as an ADC in T. kodakarensis, providing the β-alanine necessary for CoA biosynthesis. The results also suggest that the GAD activity of TK1814 is not necessary for growth, at least under the conditions applied in this study. TK1814 homologs are distributed in a wide range of archaea and may be responsible for β-alanine biosynthesis in these organisms.

  2. Kinetic, mutational, and structural analysis of malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase from Coryneform bacterium strain FG41: mechanistic implications for the decarboxylase and hydratase activities.

    PubMed

    Guo, Youzhong; Serrano, Hector; Poelarends, Gerrit J; Johnson, William H; Hackert, Marvin L; Whitman, Christian P

    2013-07-16

    Malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 (designated Pp MSAD) is in a bacterial catabolic pathway for the nematicide 1,3-dichloropropene. MSAD has two known activities: it catalyzes the metal ion-independent decarboxylation of malonate semialdehyde to produce acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide and a low-level hydration of 2-oxo-3-pentynoate to yield acetopyruvate. The latter activity is not known to be biologically relevant. Previous studies identified Pro-1, Asp-37, and a pair of arginines (Arg-73 and Arg-75) as critical residues in these activities. In terms of pairwise sequence, MSAD from Coryneform bacterium strain FG41 (designated FG41 MSAD) is 38% identical with the Pseudomonas enzyme, including Pro-1 and Asp-37. However, Gln-73 replaces Arg-73, and the second arginine is shifted to Arg-76 by the insertion of a glycine. To determine how these changes relate to the activities of FG41 MSAD, the gene was cloned and the enzyme expressed and characterized. The enzyme has a comparable decarboxylase activity but a significantly reduced hydratase activity. Mutagenesis along with crystal structures of the native enzyme (2.0 Å resolution) and the enzyme modified by a 3-oxopropanoate moiety (resulting from the incubation of the enzyme and 3-bromopropiolate) (2.2 Å resolution) provided a structural basis. The roles of Pro-1 and Asp-37 are likely the same as those proposed for Pp MSAD. However, the side chains of Thr-72, Gln-73, and Tyr-123 replace those of Arg-73 and Arg-75 in the mechanism and play a role in binding and catalysis. The structures also show that Arg-76 is likely too distant to play a direct role in the mechanism. FG41 MSAD is the second functionally annotated homologue in the MSAD family of the tautomerase superfamily and could represent a new subfamily.

  3. Kinetic, Mutational, and Structural Analysis of Malonate Semialdehyde Decarboxylase from Coryneform bacterium strain FG41: Mechanistic Implications for the Decarboxylase and Hydratase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Youzhong; Serrano, Hector; Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Johnson, William H.; Hackert, Marvin L.; Whitman, Christian P.

    2013-01-01

    Malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase from Pseudomonas pavonaceae 170 (designated Pp MSAD) is in a bacterial catabolic pathway for the nematicide 1,3-dichloropropene. MSAD has two known activities: it catalyzes the metal-ion independent decarboxylation of malonate semialdehyde to produce acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide, as well as a low-level hydration of 2-oxo-3-pentynoate to yield acetopyruvate. The latter activity is not known to be biologically relevant. Previous studies identified Pro-1, Asp-37, and a pair of arginines (Arg-73 and Arg-75) as critical residues in these activities. MSAD from Coryneform bacterium strain FG41 (designated FG41 MSAD) shares 38% pairwise sequence identity with the Pseudomonas enzyme including Pro-1 and Asp-37. However, Gln-73 replaces Arg-73, and the second arginine is shifted to Arg-76 by the insertion of a glycine. In order to determine how these changes relate to the activities of FG41 MSAD, the gene was cloned and the enzyme expressed and characterized. The enzyme has a comparable decarboxylase activity, but a significantly reduced hydratase activity. Mutagenesis along with crystal structures of the native enzyme (2.0 Å resolution) and the enzyme modified by a 3-oxopropanoate moiety (resulting from the incubation of enzyme and 3-bromopropiolate) (2.2 Å resolution) provided a structural basis. The roles of Pro-1 and Asp-37 are likely the same as those proposed for MSAD. However, the side chains of Thr-72, Gln-73, and Tyr-123 replace those of Arg-73 and Arg-75 in the mechanism and play a role in binding and catalysis. The structures also show that Arg-76 is likely too distant to play a direct role in the mechanism. FG41 MSAD is the second functionally annotated homologue in the MSAD family of the tautomerase superfamily and could represent a new subfamily. PMID:23781927

  4. Development of a Novel Cysteine Sulfinic Acid Decarboxylase Knockout Mouse: Dietary Taurine Reduces Neonatal Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eunkyue; Park, Seung Yong; Schuller-Levis, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    We engineered a CSAD KO mouse to investigate the physiological roles of taurine. The disruption of the CSAD gene was verified by Southern, Northern, and Western blotting. HPLC indicated an 83% decrease of taurine concentration in the plasma of CSAD−/−. Although CSAD−/− generation (G)1 and G2 survived, offspring from G2 CSAD−/− had low brain and liver taurine concentrations and most died within 24 hrs of birth. Taurine concentrations in G3 CSAD−/− born from G2 CSAD−/− treated with taurine in the drinking water were restored and survival rates of G3 CSAD−/− increased from 15% to 92%. The mRNA expression of CDO, ADO, and TauT was not different in CSAD−/− compared to WT and CSAD mRNA was not expressed in CSAD−/−. Expression of Gpx 1 and 3 was increased significantly in CSAD−/− and restored to normal levels with taurine supplementation. Lactoferrin and the prolactin receptor were significantly decreased in CSAD−/−. The prolactin receptor was restored with taurine supplementation. These data indicated that CSAD KO is a good model for studying the effects of taurine deficiency and its treatment with taurine supplementation. PMID:24639894

  5. A calmodulin like EF hand protein positively regulates oxalate decarboxylase expression by interacting with E-box elements of the promoter

    PubMed Central

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Kamthan, Mohan; Kumar, Avinash; Sharma, Pratima; Ansari, Sekhu; Thakur, Sarjeet Singh; Chaudhuri, Abira; Datta, Asis

    2015-01-01

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OXDC) enzyme has immense biotechnological applications due to its ability to decompose anti-nutrient oxalic acid. Flammulina velutipes, an edible wood rotting fungus responds to oxalic acid by induction of OXDC to maintain steady levels of pH and oxalate anions outside the fungal hyphae. Here, we report that upon oxalic acid induction, a calmodulin (CaM) like protein-FvCaMLP, interacts with the OXDC promoter to regulate its expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that FvCamlp specifically binds to two non-canonical E-box elements (AACGTG) in the OXDC promoter. Moreover, substitutions of amino acids in the EF hand motifs resulted in loss of DNA binding ability of FvCamlp. F. velutipes mycelia treated with synthetic siRNAs designed against FvCaMLP showed significant reduction in FvCaMLP as well as OXDC transcript pointing towards positive nature of the regulation. FvCaMLP is different from other known EF hand proteins. It shows sequence similarity to both CaMs and myosin regulatory light chain (Cdc4), but has properties typical of a calmodulin, like binding of 45Ca2+, heat stability and Ca2+ dependent electrophoretic shift. Hence, FvCaMLP can be considered a new addition to the category of unconventional Ca2+ binding transcriptional regulators. PMID:26455820

  6. Three amino acid residues in the envelope of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF07_BC regulate viral neutralization susceptibility to the human monoclonal neutralizing antibody IgG1b12.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jianhui; Zhao, Juan; Chen, Qingqing; Huang, Weijin; Wang, Youchun

    2014-10-01

    The CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of envelope glycoprotein (Env) is an important conserved target for anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies IgG1 b12 (b12) could recognize conformational epitopes that overlap the CD4bs of Env. Different virus strains, even derived from the same individual, showed distinct neutralization susceptibility to b12. We examined the key amino acid residues affecting b12 neutralization susceptibility using single genome amplification and pseudovirus neutralization assay. Eleven amino acid residues were identified that affect the sensitivity of Env to b12. Through site-directed mutagenesis, an amino acid substitution at position 182 in the V2 region of Env was confirmed to play a key role in regulating the b12 neutralization susceptibility. The introduction of V182L to a resistant strain enhanced its sensitivity to b12 more than twofold. Correspondingly, the introduction of L182V to a sensitive strain reduced its sensitivity to b12 more than tenfold. Amino acid substitution at positions 267 and 346 could both enhance the sensitivity to b12 more than twofold. However, no additive effect was observed when the three site mutageneses were introduced into the same strain, and the sensitivity was equivalent to the single V182L mutation. CRF07_BC is a major circulating recombinant form of HIV-1 prevalent in China. Our data may provide important information for understanding the molecular mechanism regulating the neutralization susceptibility of CRF07_BC viruses to b12 and may be helpful for a vaccine design targeting the CD4bs epitopes.

  7. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  8. Combination treatment for allergic conjunctivitis - Plant derived histidine decarboxylase inhibitor and H1 antihistaminic drug.

    PubMed

    Bakrania, Anita K; Patel, Snehal S

    2015-08-01

    Aim of present investigation was to study the effect of catechin and the combination of catechin and cetirizine in ovalbumin induced animal model of allergic conjunctivitis. Guinea pigs were divided into 5 groups: normal control, disease control, disease treated with catechin 100 mg/kg, disease treated with cetirizine 10 mg/kg, disease treated with combination of catechin and cetirizine, 50 mg/kg & 5 mg/kg respectively. Sensitization was carried out by intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin for the period of 14 day. Simultaneously, catechin was administered orally for 14 days while, cetirizine was administered at the day of experiment. Determination of clinical scoring, mast cell and blood histamine content, histidine decarboxylase activity from stomach was carried out. Vascular permeability was measured by dye leakage after secondary challenge of allergen and conjunctival tissues were subjected for histopathological examinations. Treatment with catechin, cetirizine and combination showed significant (P < 0.05) decrease in clinical scoring and vascular permeability. While, catechin 100 mg/kg and catechin 50 mg/kg showed significant (P < 0.05) decrease in histamine content in mast and blood. The treatment also showed significant (P < 0.05) decrease in the histidine decarboxylase enzyme activity. However, cetirizine group did not show any difference in enzyme activity as well as histamine content. Histopathological examination also showed improvement in ulceration and decrease in edema and inflammation in all treatment groups. From the present study, we can conclude that catechin exhibits potent anti-allergic activity by histidine decarboxylase enzyme inhibition and combination shown significant anti-allergic activity at reduced dose by both enzyme inhibition as well as inhibition of histamine receptors.

  9. Mechanism of citrate metabolism by an oxaloacetate decarboxylase-deficient mutant of Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    PubMed

    Pudlik, Agata M; Lolkema, Juke S

    2011-08-01

    Citrate metabolism in resting cells of Lactococcus lactis IL1403(pFL3) results in the formation of two end products from the intermediate pyruvate, acetoin and acetate (A. M. Pudlik and J. S. Lolkema, J. Bacteriol. 193:706-714, 2011). Pyruvate is formed from citrate following uptake by the transporter CitP through the subsequent actions of citrate lyase and oxaloacetate decarboxylase. The present study describes the metabolic response of L. lactis when oxaloacetate accumulates in the cytoplasm. The oxaloacetate decarboxylase-deficient mutant ILCitM(pFL3) showed nearly identical rates of citrate consumption, but the end product profile in the presence of glucose shifted from mainly acetoin to only acetate. In addition, in contrast to the parental strain, the mutant strain did not generate proton motive force. Citrate consumption by the mutant strain was coupled to the excretion of oxaloacetate, with a yield of 80 to 85%. Following citrate consumption, oxaloacetate was slowly taken up by the cells and converted to pyruvate by a cryptic decarboxylase and, subsequently, to acetate. The transport of oxaloacetate is catalyzed by CitP. The parental strain IL1403(pFL3) containing CitP consumed oxaloacetate, while the original strain, IL1403, not containing CitP, did not. Moreover, oxaloacetate consumption was enhanced in the presence of L-lactate, indicating exchange between oxaloacetate and L-lactate catalyzed by CitP. Hence, when oxaloacetate inadvertently accumulates in the cytoplasm, the physiological response of L. lactis is to excrete oxaloacetate in exchange with citrate by an electroneutral mechanism catalyzed by CitP. Subsequently, in a second step, oxaloacetate is taken up by CitP and metabolized to pyruvate and acetate.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  11. Cloning, expression and characterization of the ornithine decarboxylase gene from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rishikesh; Rafia, Sheikh; Saran, Shweta

    2014-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis that decarboxylates ornithine to form the diamine putrescine. We report here the isolation, expression and characterization of a homolog of ODC from Dictyostelium discoideum. DdODC is conserved and shows sequence and structural homology with that from human. Both ODC transcript and protein are expressed at all stages of development and show high expression in prestalk/stalk cells. It is cytosolic and predominantly perinuclear in localization. Both overexpression of DdODC and putrescine treatment resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation. PMID:25896203

  12. Fusion of pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase increases ethanol production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lewicka, Aleksandra J; Lyczakowski, Jan J; Blackhurst, Gavin; Pashkuleva, Christiana; Rothschild-Mancinelli, Kyle; Tautvaišas, Dainius; Thornton, Harry; Villanueva, Hugo; Xiao, Weike; Slikas, Justinas; Horsfall, Louise; Elfick, Alistair; French, Christopher

    2014-12-19

    Ethanol is an important biofuel. Heterologous expression of Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase (Pdc) and alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhB) increases ethanol production in Escherichia coli. A fusion of PDC and ADH was generated and expressed in E. coli. The fusion enzyme was demonstrated to possess both activities. AdhB activity was significantly lower when fused to PDC than when the two enzymes were expressed separately. However, cells expressing the fusion protein generated ethanol more rapidly and to higher levels than cells coexpressing Pdc and AdhB, suggesting a specific rate enhancement due to the fusion of the two enzymes.

  13. The growing spectrum of antibody-associated inflammatory brain diseases in children

    PubMed Central

    Hladio, Manisha; Twilt, Marinka; Dalmau, Josep; Benseler, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical spectrum, diagnostic evaluation, current management, and neurologic outcome of pediatric antibody-associated inflammatory brain diseases (AB-associated IBrainD). Methods: We performed a single-center retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients aged ≤18 years diagnosed with an AB-associated IBrainD at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, between January 2005 and June 2013. Standardized clinical data, laboratory test results, neuroimaging features, and treatment regimens were captured. Results: Of 169 children (93 female, 55%) diagnosed with an IBrainD, 16 (10%) had an AB-associated IBrainD. Median age at presentation was 13.3 years (range 3.1–17.9); 11 (69%) were female. Nine patients (56%) had anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis, 4 (25%) had aquaporin-4 autoimmunity, 2 (13%) had Hashimoto encephalitis, and 1 (6%) had anti–glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) encephalitis. The key presenting features in children with anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis, Hashimoto encephalopathy, and anti-GAD65 encephalitis included encephalopathy, behavioral symptoms, and seizures; patients with aquaporin-4 autoimmunity showed characteristic focal neurologic deficits. Six patients (38%) required intensive care unit admission at presentation. Median time from symptom onset to diagnosis was 55 days (range 6–358). All but 1 patient received immunosuppressive therapy. One child with anti–NMDA receptor encephalitis died due to multiorgan failure. At last follow-up, after a median follow-up time of 1.7 years (range 0.8–3.7), 27% of the children had function-limiting neurologic sequelae. Conclusions: Children with AB-associated IBrainD represent an increasing subgroup among IBrainD; 1 in 4 children has function-limiting residual neurologic deficits. Awareness of the different clinical patterns is important in order to facilitate timely diagnosis and initiate immunosuppressive treatment. PMID:25909091

  14. Identification of the active site of human mitochondrial malonyl-coenzyme a decarboxylase: A combined computational study.

    PubMed

    Ling, Baoping; Liu, Yuxia; Li, Xiaoping; Wang, Zhiguo; Bi, Siwei

    2016-06-01

    Malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD) can control the level of malonyl-CoA in cell through the decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA, and plays an essential role in regulating fatty acid metabolism, thus it is a potential target for drug discovery. However, the interactions of MCD with CoA derivatives are not well understood owing to unavailable crystal structure with a complete occupancy in the active site. To identify the active site of MCD, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the interactions of human mitochondrial MCD (HmMCD) and CoA derivatives. The findings reveal that the active site of HmMCD indeed resides in the prominent groove which resembles that of CurA. However, the binding modes are slightly different from the one observed in CurA due to the occupancy of the side chain of Lys183 from the N-terminal helical domain instead of the adenine ring of CoA. The residues 300 - 305 play an essential role in maintaining the stability of complex mainly through hydrogen bond interactions with the pyrophosphate moiety of acetyl-CoA. Principle component analysis elucidates the conformational distribution and dominant concerted motions of HmMCD. MM_PBSA calculations present the crucial residues and the major driving force responsible for the binding of acetyl-CoA. These results provide useful information for understanding the interactions of HmMCD with CoA derivatives. Proteins 2016; 84:792-802. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26948533

  15. [Molecular cloning and characterization of S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase gene (DoSAMDC1) in Dendrobium officinale].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Da-Wei; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2013-06-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase (SAMDC) is a key enzyme in the polyamines biosynthesis, thus is essential for basic physiological and biochemical processes in plant. In the present study, a full length cDNA of DoSAMDC1 gene was obtained from symbiotic germinated seeds of an endangered medicinal orchid species Dendrobium officinale, using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-PCR technique for the first time. The full length cDNA was 1 979 bp, with three open reading frames, i.e. tiny-uORF, small-uORF and main ORF (mORF). The mORF was deduced to encode a 368 amino acid (aa) protein with a molecular mass of 40.7 kD and a theoretical isoelectric point of 5.2. The deduced DoSAMDC1 protein, without signal peptide, had two highly conserved function domains (proenzyme cleavage site and PEST domain) and a 22-aa transmembrane domain (89-110). Multiple sequence alignments and phylogenetic relationship analyses revealed DoSAMDC1 had a higher level of sequence similarity to monocot SAMDCs than those of dicot. Expression patterns using qRT-PCR analyses showed that DoSAMDC1 transcripts were expressed constitutively without significant change in the five tissues (not infected with fungi). While in the symbiotic germinated seeds, the expression level was enhanced by 2.74 fold over that in the none-germinated seeds, indicating possible involvement of the gene in symbiotic seed germination of D. officinale.

  16. Secondary. beta. -deuterium isotope effects in decarboxylation and elimination reactions of. cap alpha. -lactylthiamin: intrinsic isotope effects of pyruvate decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Kluger, R.; Brandl, M.

    1986-11-26

    The reactions of the adduct of pyruvate and thiamine, lactylthiamin (2-(lact-2-yl)thiamine), are accurate nonenzymic models for reactions of intermediates formed during catalysis by pyruvate decarboxylase. The enzymatic reaction generates lactylthiamin diphosphate from pyruvate and thiamine diphosphate. ..beta..-Deuterium isotope effects were determined for the nonenzymic reactions, and the results were related to isotope effects on the enzymic reaction. 2-(Lact-2-yl-..beta..-d/sub 3/) thiamine was prepared by condensation of methyl pyruvate-d/sub 3/ with thiamine followed by hydrolysis. The isotope effect for decarboxylation of lactylthiamin in acidic solution at 25/sup 0/C (k/sub H3//k/sub D3/) is 1.09 (standard deviation (SD) 0.015) in pH 3.8, 0.5 M sodium acetate: isotope effect = 1.095 (SD 0.014) in 0.001 M HCl. The reaction was also studied using 38% ethanolic aqueous sodium acetate (pH 3.8 before mixing with ethanol) since the enzymic sites are less polar than water and the reaction is significantly accelerated by the cosolvent. The isotope effect is within statistical range of that for the reaction in water, 1.105 (SD 0.016), indicating that acceleration by the solvent does not change the extent of hyperconjugative stabilization of the transition state relative to the ground state. The isotope effect for the base-catalyzed elimination of pyruvate from lactylthiamin was determined from kinetic studies by using multiwavelength analysis for reactions in pH 11 sodium carbonate solution. The isotope effect (k/sub H3//k/sub D3/) is 1.12 (SD 0.01), which is slightly higher than the effect on decarboxylation.

  17. Peptide Antibodies: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies recognize epitopes with amino acid residues adjacent in sequence ("linear" epitopes). Such antibodies can be made to virtually any sequence and have been immensely important in all areas of molecular biology and diagnostics due to their versatility and to the rapid growth in protein sequence information. Today, peptide antibodies can be routinely and rapidly made to large numbers of peptides, including peptides with posttranslationally modified residues, and are used for immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoassays. In the future, peptide antibodies will continue to be immensely important for molecular biology, TCR- and MHC-like peptide antibodies may be produced routinely, peptide antibodies with predetermined conformational specificities may be designed, and peptide-based vaccines may become part of vaccination programs.

  18. Controlled delivery of antibodies from injectable hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Nathan A; Babcock, Lyndsey R; Murray, Ellen A; Krebs, Melissa D

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are currently used for the treatment of various diseases, but large doses delivered systemically are typically required. Localized controlled delivery techniques would afford major benefits such as decreasing side effects and required doses. Injectable biopolymer systems are an attractive solution due to their minimally invasive potential for controlled release in a localized area. Here, alginate-chitosan hydrogels are demonstrated to provide controlled delivery of IgG model antibodies and also of Fab antibody fragments. Also, an alternate delivery system comprised of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded with antibodies and encapsulated in alginate was shown to successfully provide another level of control over release. These biopolymer systems that offer controlled delivery for antibodies and antibody fragments will be promising for many applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

  19. Heterologous expression and characterization of tyrosine decarboxylase from Enterococcus faecalis R612Z1 and Enterococcus faecium R615Z1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Xu, Wenjuan; Du, Lihui; Wang, Daoying; Zhu, Yongzhi; Geng, Zhiming; Zhang, Muhan; Xu, Weimin

    2014-04-01

    Tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC) is responsible for tyramine production and can catalyze phenylalanine to produce β-phenylethylamine. Enterococcus strains are a group of bacteria predominantly producing tyramine and β-phenylethylamine in water-boiled salted duck. In this study, the heterologous expression and characterization of two TDCs from Enterococcus faecalis R612Z1 (612TDC) and Enterococcus faecium R615Z1 (615TDC) were studied. The recombinant putative proteins of 612TDC and 615TDC were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. 612TDC is a 620-amino-acid protein with a molecular mass of 70.0 kDa, whereas 615TDC is a 625-amino-acid protein with a molecular mass of 70.3 kDa. Both 612TDC and 615TDC showed an optimum temperature of 25 °C for the tyrosine and phenylalanine substrates. However, 612TDC revealed maximal activity at pH 5.5, whereas 615TDC revealed maximal activity at pH 6.0. Kinetic studies showed that 612TDC and 615TDC exhibited higher specificity for tyrosine than for phenylalanine. The catalysis abilities of both 612TDC and 615TDC for phenylalanine were restrained significantly with the increase in NaCl concentration, but this was not the case for tyrosine. This study revealed that the enzyme properties of the purified recombinant 612TDC and 615TDC were similar, although their amino acid sequences had 84% identity. PMID:24680070

  20. Isotope effect studies of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent histidine decarboxylase from Morganella morganii

    SciTech Connect

    Abell, L.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-08-09

    The pyridoxal 5'-phosphate dependent histidine decarboxylase from Morganella morganii shows a nitrogen isotope effect k/sup 14//k/sup 15/ = 0.9770 +/- 0.0021, a carbon isotope effect k/sup 12//k/sup 13/ = 1.0308 +/- 0.0006, and a carbon isotope effect for L-(..cap alpha..-/sup 2/H)histidine of 1.0333 +/- 0.0001 at pH 6.3, 37/sup 0/C. These results indicate that the overall decarboxylation rate is limited jointly by the rate of Schiff base interchange and by the rate of decarboxylation. Although the observed isotope effects are quite different from those for the analogous glutamate decarboxylase from Escherichia coli, the intrinsic isotope effects for the two enzymes are essentially the same. The difference in observed isotope effects occurs because of a roughly twofold difference in the partitioning of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-substrate Schiff base between decarboxylation and Schiff base interchange. The observed nitrogen isotope effect requires that the imine nitrogen in this Schiff base is protonated. Comparison of carbon isotope effects for deuteriated and undeuteriated substrates reveals that the deuterium isotope effect on the decarboxylation step is about 1.20; thus, in the transition state for the decarboxylation step, the carbon-carbon bond is about two-thirds broken.

  1. The effective molarity of the substrate phosphoryl group in the transition state for yeast OMP decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Annette; Wolfenden, Richard

    2005-02-01

    The second order rate constant (k(cat)/K(m)) for decarboxylation of orotidine by yeast OMP decarboxylase (ODCase), measured by trapping (14)CO(2) released during the reaction, is 2 x 10(-4)M(-1)s(-1). This very low activity may be compared with a value of 3 x 10(7)M(-1)s(-1) for the action of yeast OMP decarboxylase on the normal substrate OMP. Both activities are strongly inhibited by 6-hydroxy UMP (BMP), and abrogated by mutation of Asp-96 to alanine. These results, in conjunction with the binding affinity of inorganic phosphate as a competitive inhibitor (K(i)=7 x 10(-4)M), imply an effective concentration of 1.1 x 10(9)M for the substrate phosphoryl group in stabilizing the transition state for enzymatic decarboxylation of OMP. The observed difference in rate (1.5 x 10(11)-fold) is the largest effect of a simple substituent that appears to have been reported for an enzyme reaction.

  2. Production of pyruvate from mannitol by mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shiori; Tanaka, Hideki; Hirayama, Makoto; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mannitol is contained in brown macroalgae up to 33% (w/w, dry weight), and thus is a promising carbon source for white biotechnology. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key cell factory, is generally regarded to be unable to assimilate mannitol for growth. We have recently succeeded in producing S. cerevisiae that can assimilate mannitol through spontaneous mutations of Tup1-Cyc8, each of which constitutes a general corepressor complex. In this study, we demonstrate production of pyruvate from mannitol using this mannitol-assimilating S. cerevisiae through deletions of all 3 pyruvate decarboxylase genes. The resultant mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative strain produced 0.86 g/L pyruvate without use of acetate after cultivation for 4 days, with an overall yield of 0.77 g of pyruvate per g of mannitol (the theoretical yield was 79%). Although acetate was not needed for growth of this strain in mannitol-containing medium, addition of acetate had a significant beneficial effect on production of pyruvate. This is the first report of production of a valuable compound (other than ethanol) from mannitol using S. cerevisiae, and is an initial platform from which the productivity of pyruvate from mannitol can be improved. PMID:26588105

  3. Structural analysis of mevalonate-3-kinase provides insight into the mechanisms of isoprenoid pathway decarboxylases

    PubMed Central

    Vinokur, Jeffrey M; Korman, Tyler P; Sawaya, Michael R; Collazo, Michael; Cascio, Duillio; Bowie, James U

    2015-01-01

    In animals, cholesterol is made from 5-carbon building blocks produced by the mevalonate pathway. Drugs that inhibit the mevalonate pathway such as atorvastatin (lipitor) have led to successful treatments for high cholesterol in humans. Another potential target for the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis is mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), which catalyzes the phosphorylation of (R)-mevalonate diphosphate, followed by decarboxylation to yield isopentenyl pyrophosphate. We recently discovered an MDD homolog, mevalonate-3-kinase (M3K) from Thermoplasma acidophilum, which catalyzes the identical phosphorylation of (R)-mevalonate, but without concomitant decarboxylation. Thus, M3K catalyzes half the reaction of the decarboxylase, allowing us to separate features of the active site that are required for decarboxylation from features required for phosphorylation. Here we determine the crystal structure of M3K in the apo form, and with bound substrates, and compare it to MDD structures. Structural and mutagenic analysis reveals modifications that allow M3K to bind mevalonate rather than mevalonate diphosphate. Comparison to homologous MDD structures show that both enzymes employ analogous Arg or Lys residues to catalyze phosphate transfer. However, an invariant active site Asp/Lys pair of MDD previously thought to play a role in phosphorylation is missing in M3K with no functional replacement. Thus, we suggest that the invariant Asp/Lys pair in MDD may be critical for decarboxylation rather than phosphorylation. PMID:25422158

  4. Structural analysis of mevalonate-3-kinase provides insight into the mechanisms of isoprenoid pathway decarboxylases.

    PubMed

    Vinokur, Jeffrey M; Korman, Tyler P; Sawaya, Michael R; Collazo, Michael; Cascio, Duillio; Bowie, James U

    2015-02-01

    In animals, cholesterol is made from 5-carbon building blocks produced by the mevalonate pathway. Drugs that inhibit the mevalonate pathway such as atorvastatin (lipitor) have led to successful treatments for high cholesterol in humans. Another potential target for the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis is mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD), which catalyzes the phosphorylation of (R)-mevalonate diphosphate, followed by decarboxylation to yield isopentenyl pyrophosphate. We recently discovered an MDD homolog, mevalonate-3-kinase (M3K) from Thermoplasma acidophilum, which catalyzes the identical phosphorylation of (R)-mevalonate, but without concomitant decarboxylation. Thus, M3K catalyzes half the reaction of the decarboxylase, allowing us to separate features of the active site that are required for decarboxylation from features required for phosphorylation. Here we determine the crystal structure of M3K in the apo form, and with bound substrates, and compare it to MDD structures. Structural and mutagenic analysis reveals modifications that allow M3K to bind mevalonate rather than mevalonate diphosphate. Comparison to homologous MDD structures show that both enzymes employ analogous Arg or Lys residues to catalyze phosphate transfer. However, an invariant active site Asp/Lys pair of MDD previously thought to play a role in phosphorylation is missing in M3K with no functional replacement. Thus, we suggest that the invariant Asp/Lys pair in MDD may be critical for decarboxylation rather than phosphorylation. PMID:25422158

  5. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species.

  6. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species. PMID:27602045

  7. Production of pyruvate from mannitol by mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shiori; Tanaka, Hideki; Hirayama, Makoto; Murata, Kousaku; Kawai, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mannitol is contained in brown macroalgae up to 33% (w/w, dry weight), and thus is a promising carbon source for white biotechnology. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a key cell factory, is generally regarded to be unable to assimilate mannitol for growth. We have recently succeeded in producing S. cerevisiae that can assimilate mannitol through spontaneous mutations of Tup1-Cyc8, each of which constitutes a general corepressor complex. In this study, we demonstrate production of pyruvate from mannitol using this mannitol-assimilating S. cerevisiae through deletions of all 3 pyruvate decarboxylase genes. The resultant mannitol-assimilating pyruvate decarboxylase-negative strain produced 0.86 g/L pyruvate without use of acetate after cultivation for 4 days, with an overall yield of 0.77 g of pyruvate per g of mannitol (the theoretical yield was 79%). Although acetate was not needed for growth of this strain in mannitol-containing medium, addition of acetate had a significant beneficial effect on production of pyruvate. This is the first report of production of a valuable compound (other than ethanol) from mannitol using S. cerevisiae, and is an initial platform from which the productivity of pyruvate from mannitol can be improved.

  8. A preliminary crystallographic analysis of the putative mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Byres, Emma; Martin, David M. A.; Hunter, William N.

    2005-06-01

    The gene encoding the putative mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase, an enzyme from the mevalonate pathway of isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis, has been cloned from T. brucei. Recombinant protein has been expressed, purified and highly ordered crystals obtained and characterized to aid the structure–function analysis of this enzyme. Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase catalyses the last and least well characterized step in the mevalonate pathway for the biosynthesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate, an isoprenoid precursor. A gene predicted to encode the enzyme from Trypanosoma brucei has been cloned, a highly efficient expression system established and a purification protocol determined. The enzyme gives monoclinic crystals in space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 51.5, b = 168.7, c = 54.9 Å, β = 118.8°. A Matthews coefficient V{sub M} of 2.5 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} corresponds to two monomers, each approximately 42 kDa (385 residues), in the asymmetric unit with 50% solvent content. These crystals are well ordered and data to high resolution have been recorded using synchrotron radiation.

  9. Catalytic irreversible inhibition of bacterial and plant arginine decarboxylase activities by novel substrate and product analogues.

    PubMed

    Bitonti, A J; Casara, P J; McCann, P P; Bey, P

    1987-02-15

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) activity from Escherichia coli and two plant species (oats and barley) was inhibited by five new substrate (arginine) and product (agmatine) analogues. The five compounds, (E)-alpha-monofluoromethyldehydroarginine (delta-MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylarginine (MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylagatine (FMA), alpha-ethynylagmatine (EA) and alpha-allenylagmatine (AA), were all more potent inhibitors of ADC activity than was alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), the only irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme described previously. The inhibition caused by the five compounds was apparently enzyme-activated and irreversible, since the loss of enzyme activity followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, was time-dependent, the natural substrate of ADC (arginine) blocked the effects of the inhibitors, and the inhibition remained after chromatography of inhibited ADC on Sephadex G-25 or on overnight dialysis of the enzyme. DFMA, FMA, delta-MFMA and MFMA were effective at very low concentrations (10 nM-10 microM) at inhibiting ADC activity in growing E. coli. FMA was also shown to deplete putrescine effectively in E. coli, particularly when combined with an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, alpha-monofluoromethyl-putrescine. The potential uses of the compounds for the study of the role of polyamine biosynthesis in bacteria and plants is discussed.

  10. Catalytic irreversible inhibition of bacterial and plant arginine decarboxylase activities by novel substrate and product analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Bitonti, A J; Casara, P J; McCann, P P; Bey, P

    1987-01-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) activity from Escherichia coli and two plant species (oats and barley) was inhibited by five new substrate (arginine) and product (agmatine) analogues. The five compounds, (E)-alpha-monofluoromethyldehydroarginine (delta-MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylarginine (MFMA), alpha-monofluoromethylagatine (FMA), alpha-ethynylagmatine (EA) and alpha-allenylagmatine (AA), were all more potent inhibitors of ADC activity than was alpha-difluoromethylarginine (DFMA), the only irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme described previously. The inhibition caused by the five compounds was apparently enzyme-activated and irreversible, since the loss of enzyme activity followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, was time-dependent, the natural substrate of ADC (arginine) blocked the effects of the inhibitors, and the inhibition remained after chromatography of inhibited ADC on Sephadex G-25 or on overnight dialysis of the enzyme. DFMA, FMA, delta-MFMA and MFMA were effective at very low concentrations (10 nM-10 microM) at inhibiting ADC activity in growing E. coli. FMA was also shown to deplete putrescine effectively in E. coli, particularly when combined with an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, alpha-monofluoromethyl-putrescine. The potential uses of the compounds for the study of the role of polyamine biosynthesis in bacteria and plants is discussed. PMID:3297044

  11. Evolutionary Trails of Plant Group II Pyridoxal Phosphate-Dependent Decarboxylase Genes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC) enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species. PMID:27602045

  12. Stereochemistry of 4-carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase and muconolactone isomerase in the. beta. -ketoadipate pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, C.P.; Chari, R.V.J.; Ngai, K.L.; Kozarich, J.W.

    1986-05-01

    The protocatechuate and catechol pathways, two separate and parallel branches of the ..beta..-ketoadipate pathway in Pseudomonas putida, converge at a common intermediate - ..beta..-ketoadipate enol-lactone. The enol-lactone is generated by 4-carboxymuconolactone decarboxylase in the protocatechuate pathway while muconolactone isomerase produces it in the catechol pathway. The presence of these enzymes as well as ..beta..-carboxymuconate cycloisomerase and its substrate, ..beta..-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate, in a NMR tube, leads to the following sequence of events. Lactonization of ..beta..-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate produces 4-carboxymuconolactone which decarboxylates enzymatically with deuteration by D/sub 2/O to afford 2-(/sup 2/H)-4-ketoadipate enol-lactone - the substrate for muconolactone isomerase. Further conversion of the monodeuterated enol-lactone by muconolactone isomerase affords muconolactone which is nearly completely deuterated at the 4 position. The proton ricochets between the 2 and 4 positions with concurrent washout while in the 2 position. Based on the known absolute stereochemistry of 4-carboxymuconolactone and muconolactone, these results suggest that both the decarboxylase and isomerase proceed by syn mechanisms, but operate on opposite faces of the common enol-lactone substrate.

  13. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    PubMed

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  14. Effect of Baicalin-loaded PEGylated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles modified by OX26 antibody on regulating the levels of baicalin and amino acids during cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhidong; Zhang, Li; He, Qiansong; Liu, Xiaolei; Okeke, Chukwunweike Ikechukwu; Tong, Ling; Guo, Lili; Yang, Hongyun; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Hainan; Gu, Xing

    2015-07-15

    Baicalin has many pharmacological activities, including neuroprotective function against ischemia and neurodegeneration. In our previous study, we found that Baicalin-loaded PEGylated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles modified by OX26 antibody (OX26-PEG-CSLN) might be a promising carrier to deliver drugs across the blood-brain barrier for the treatment of brain diseases. So, the aim of this present study was to further elucidate the mechanisms of OX26-PEG-CSLN cerebral ischemia protection by monitoring the changes of extracellular amino acids. In addition, we investigated the effect of OX26-PEG-CSLN on the excitotoxic neuronal injury as well as the pharmacokinetic profiles of baicalin in cerebrospinal fluid during ischemia-reperfusion period. The cerebrospinal fluid was collected by a microdialysis technique and divided into two parts - one part for pharmacokinetic study of baicalin using LC-MS/MS method and the other for pharmacodynamic study which was done by pre- column derivatization of the amino acids and analysis using a high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector (HPLC-FLD). The pharmacokinetic study showed that the AUC value of OX26-PEG-CSLN was 5.69-fold higher than that of the baicalin solution (Sol) (P<0.05) and the Cmax value of OX26-PEG-CSLN was 6.84-fold higher than that of the Sol (P<0.05). Moreover, the extracellular levels of glutamate (Glu), aspartic acid (Asp), glycine (Gly), taurine (Tau) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were measured for monitoring the imbalance of amino acids caused by ischemia and reperfusion. The excitotoxic index (EI) was also calculated for evaluating the imbalance between excitatory amino acid and inhibitory amino acid. The pharmacodynamic study showed that OX26-PEG-CSLN had stronger effect than Sol in reducing the content of aspartic, glutamic acid and increasing the concentrations of glycine, taurine and γ-aminobutyric acid during ischemia-reperfusion period. In conclusion, OX26-PEG-CSLN improved

  15. Gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) release in the ciliated protozoon Paramecium occurs by neuronal-like exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ramoino, P; Milanese, M; Candiani, S; Diaspro, A; Fato, M; Usai, C; Bonanno, G

    2010-04-01

    Paramecium primaurelia expresses a significant amount of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). Paramecia possess both glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)-like and vesicular GABA transporter (vGAT)-like proteins, indicating the ability to synthesize GABA from glutamate and to transport GABA into vesicles. Using antibodies raised against mammalian GAD and vGAT, bands with an apparent molecular weight of about 67 kDa and 57 kDa were detected. The presence of these bands indicated a similarity between the proteins in Paramecium and in mammals. VAMP, syntaxin and SNAP, putative proteins of the release machinery that form the so-called SNARE complex, are present in Paramecium. Most VAMP, syntaxin and SNAP fluorescence is localized in spots that vary in size and density and are primarily distributed near the plasma membrane. Antibodies raised against mammal VAMP-3, sintaxin-1 or SNAP-25 revealed protein immunoblot bands having molecular weights consistent with those observed in mammals. Moreover, P. primaurelia spontaneously releases GABA into the environment, and this neurotransmitter release significantly increases after membrane depolarization. The depolarization-induced GABA release was strongly reduced not only in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) but also by pre-incubation with bafilomycin A1 or with botulinum toxin C1 serotype. It can be concluded that GABA occurs in Paramecium, where it is probably stored in vesicles capable of fusion with the cell membrane; accordingly, GABA can be released from Paramecium by stimulus-induced, neuronal-like exocytotic mechanisms.

  16. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  17. Detection of Campylobacter antibodies in sheep sera by a Dot-ELISA using acid extracts from c. fetus ssp. fetus and c. jejuni strains and comparison with a complement fixation test.

    PubMed

    Gürtürk, K; Ekin, I H; Aksakal, A; Solmaz, H

    2002-04-01

    In this study, a dot-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Dot-ELISA) was evaluated in comparison with a complement fixation test (CFT) for the detection of Campylobacter antibodies in sheep sera. Acid glycine extracts (AGE) of both Campylobacter fetus ssp. fetus and Campylobacter jejuni strains that had been isolated from the gall-bladder of slaughtered sheep was used as antigen in both tests. A total of 153 sheep sera from aborted (74) and slaughtered (79) sheep were examined by both Dot-ELISA and CFT. Twenty-two sera showed anti-complementary activity were not suitable for CFT. Of the 22 sera showing anti-complementary activity, two sera were found to be positive in Dot-ELISA. Eighty-eight (67.2%) of the remaining 131 sera were negative by both Dot-ELISA and CFT using AGE of both Campylobacter strains whereas 43 sera (32.8%) gave different reaction patterns in Dot-ELISA and CFT with the extracts of both Campylobacter strains. Twelve sera were positive by both tests using AGE of C. fetus ssp. fetus but CFT failed to detect antibodies in nine of these sera when AGE of C. jejuni was used. Twelve sera were positive by both tests only when AGE of C. fetus ssp. fetus was used. Eleven sera were positive only by CFT. Seven of these reacted only with the AGE of C. fetus ssp. fetus and four sera were positive by using AGE of both Campylobacter strains. The remaining eight sera were found to be positive only by dot-immunobinding assay either with the AGE of both Campylobacter strains or with the AGE of one of the Campylobacter strains. It is concluded that Dot-ELISA using AGE from C. fetus ssp. fetus could be employed for the detection of Campylobacter antibodies in sheep sera and the additional use of AGE from C. jejuni as antigen appeared not to be profitable for this purpose.

  18. Antibody directed to a synthetic peptide encoding the NH2-terminal 16 amino acids of the adenovirus type 2 E1B-53K tumor antigen recognizes the E1B-20K tumor antigen.

    PubMed

    Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1984-01-15

    A peptide, H2N-Glu-Arg-Arg-Asn-Pro-Ser-Glu-Arg-Gly-Val-Pro-Ala-Gly-Phe-Ser-Gly-(Cys )COOH, containing the amino acid sequence at the NH2 terminus of the adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) E1B-coded large T antigen (E1B-53K) has been synthesized. Anti-peptide antibody was generated in rabbits and used to immunoprecipitate Ad T antigens from Ad2 early infected cell extracts. In addition to the expected E1B-53K T antigen, anti-peptide antibody precipitated the Ad2 E1B-20K T antigen that was previously shown to be related to E1B-53K (M. Green, K.H. Brackmann, M.A. Cartas, and T. Matsuo, J. Virol. 42, 30-41, 1982). Anti-peptide prepared against the COOH terminus of the E1B-53K T antigen or against the NH2 terminus of the E1B-19K T antigen did not precipitate the E1B-20K T antigen. These data suggest that the Ad2 E1B-20K T antigen initiates translation at nucleotide 2016 in reading frame 3, as does E1B-53K. The viral mRNA that encodes the E1B-20K T antigen has not been identified.

  19. An investigation of the well-water quality: immunosensor for pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa detection based on antibody-modified poly(pyrrole-3 carboxylic acid) screen-printed carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Bekir, Karima; Bousimma, Feriel; Barhoumi, Houcine; Fedhila, Kais; Maaref, Abderrazak; Bakhrouf, Amina; Ben Ouada, Hafedh; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Mansour, Hedi

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we describe a new immunosensor designed for the detection and the quantification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria in water. The developed biosensing system was based on the immobilization of purified polyclonal anti P. aeruginosa antibodies on electropolymerized poly(pyrrole-3-carboxylic acid)/glassy carbon electrode. The building of the immunosensor step by step was evaluated by electrochemical measurements such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical signature of the immunosensor was established by the change of the charge transfer resistance when the bacteria suspended in solution became attached to the immobilized antibodies. As a result, stable and high sensitive impedimetric immunosensor was obtained with a sensitivity of 0.19 kΩ/decade defined in the linear range from 10(1) to 10(7) CFU/mL of cellular concentrations. A low detection limit was obtained for the P. aeruginosa bacteria and a high selectivity when other bacteria were occasioned as well as Escherichia coli. The developed immunosensor was applied in detecting pathogenic P. aeruginosa in well-water.

  20. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community.

    PubMed

    Zargar, K; Saville, R; Phelan, R M; Tringe, S G; Petzold, C J; Keasling, J D; Beller, H R

    2016-08-10

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extracts, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene.

  1. Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and agmatinase (AGMAT): an alternative pathway for synthesis of polyamines in pig conceptuses and uteri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arginine, a precursor for the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and polyamines, is critical for implantation and development of the conceptus. We first reported that the arginine decarboxylase (ADC)/agmatinase(AGMAT) pathway as an alternative pathway for synthesis of polyamines in the ovine conceptuses...

  2. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National Academy Press, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and Microorganisms § 173.115...

  3. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations...

  4. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations...

  5. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. Copies may be obtained from the National... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations...

  6. CONFIRMATIONAL IDENTIFICATION OF ESCHERICHIA COLI, A COMPARISON OF GENOTYPIC AND PHENOTYPIC ASSAYS FOR GLUTAMATE DECARBOXYLASE AND B-D-GLUCURONIDASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genotypic and phenotypic assays for glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) and B-D-glucuronidase (GUD) were compared for their abilities to detect various strains of Escherichia coli and to discriminate among other bacterial species. Test strains included nonpathogenic E.coli, three major...

  7. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community.

    PubMed

    Zargar, K; Saville, R; Phelan, R M; Tringe, S G; Petzold, C J; Keasling, J D; Beller, H R

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extracts, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene. PMID:27506494

  8. 21 CFR 173.115 - Alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation derived from a recombinant Bacillus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Enzyme Preparations and... Bacillus subtilis. The food additive alpha-acetolactate decarboxylase (α-ALDC) enzyme preparation, may be safely used in accordance with the following conditions: (a) The food additive is the enzyme...

  9. Repeated immobilization stress alters rat hippocampal and prefrontal cortical morphology in parallel with endogenous agmatine and arginine decarboxylase levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Meng-Yang; Wang, Wei-Ping; Huang, Jingjing; Feng, Yang-Zheng; Regunathan, Soundar; Bissette, Garth

    2008-01-01

    Agmatine, an endogenous amine derived from decarboxylation of L-arginine catalyzed by arginine decarboxylase, has been proposed as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the brain. In the present study we examined whether agmatine has neuroprotective effects against repeated immobilization-induced morphological changes in brain tissues and possible effects of immobilization stress on endogenous agmatine levels and arginine decarboxylase expression in rat brains. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to two hour immobilization stress daily for seven days. This paradigm significantly increased plasma corticosterone levels, and the glutamate efflux in the hippocampus as measured by in vivo microdialysis. Immunohistochemical staining with β-tubulin III showed that repeated immobilization caused marked morphological alterations in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex that were prevented by simultaneous treatment with agmatine (50 mg/kg/day, i.p.). Likewise, endogenous agmatine levels measured by high performance liquid chromatography in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and hypothalamus were significantly increased by immobilization, as compared to controls. The increased endogenous agmatine levels, ranging from 92% to 265% of controls, were accompanied by a significant increase of arginine decarboxylase protein levels in the same regions. These results demonstrate that administration of exogenous agmatine protects the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex against neuronal insults caused by repeated immobilization. The parallel increase in endogenous brain agmatine and arginine decarboxylase protein levels triggered by repeated immobilization indicates that the endogenous agmatine system may play an important role in adaptation to stress as a potential neuronal self-protection mechanism. PMID:18832001

  10. Insulin and phorbol myristic acetate induce ornithine decarboxylase in Reuber H35 rat hepatoma cells by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Goodman, S A; Esau, B; Koontz, J W

    1988-11-01

    Reuber H35 rat hepatoma cells respond to insulin or to tumor promoting phorbol esters with an increase in ornithine decarboxylase enzyme activity. This occurs in a time- and dose-dependent manner with both types of agonist. We report here that the increase in ornithine decarboxylase activity with optimal concentrations of both agonists is additive. Furthermore, the initial increase is dependent on continued RNA and protein synthesis. We also find that both of these agonists cause an increase in mRNA coding for ornithine decarboxylase in a time- and dose-dependent manner which suggests that the increase in enzyme activity can be accounted for by the increase in transcript levels. The difference in the time course of induction by the agonists, the additivity of induction by the two agonists, the differential sensitivity of induction to cycloheximide and RNA synthesis inhibitors, and the observation that phorbol myristic acetate causes a further increase in ornithine decarboxylase activity and transcript levels in cells already maximally induced by insulin suggest that these two agonists act through separate mechanisms.

  11. In vitro Characterization of Phenylacetate Decarboxylase, a Novel Enzyme Catalyzing Toluene Biosynthesis in an Anaerobic Microbial Community

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, K.; Saville, R.; Phelan, R. M.; Tringe, S. G.; Petzold, C. J.; Keasling, J. D.; Beller, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic bacterial biosynthesis of toluene from phenylacetate was reported more than two decades ago, but the biochemistry underlying this novel metabolism has never been elucidated. Here we report results of in vitro characterization studies of a novel phenylacetate decarboxylase from an anaerobic, sewage-derived enrichment culture that quantitatively produces toluene from phenylacetate; complementary metagenomic and metaproteomic analyses are also presented. Among the noteworthy findings is that this enzyme is not the well-characterized clostridial p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase (CsdBC). However, the toluene synthase under study appears to be able to catalyze both phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation. Observations suggesting that phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylation in complex cell-free extracts were catalyzed by the same enzyme include the following: (i) the specific activity for both substrates was comparable in cell-free extracts, (ii) the two activities displayed identical behavior during chromatographic separation of cell-free extracts, (iii) both activities were irreversibly inactivated upon exposure to O2, and (iv) both activities were similarly inhibited by an amide analog of p-hydroxyphenylacetate. Based upon these and other data, we hypothesize that the toluene synthase reaction involves a glycyl radical decarboxylase. This first-time study of the phenylacetate decarboxylase reaction constitutes an important step in understanding and ultimately harnessing it for making bio-based toluene. PMID:27506494

  12. Control by Ethylene of Arginine Decarboxylase Activity in Pea Seedlings and Its Implication for Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth 1

    PubMed Central

    Apelbaum, Akiva; Goldlust, Arie; Icekson, Isaac

    1985-01-01

    Activity of arginine decarboxylase in etiolated pea seedlings appears 24 hours after seed imbibition, reaches its highest level on the 4th day, and levels off until the 7th day. This activity was found in the apical and subapical tissue of the roots and shoots where intensive DNA synthesis occurs. Exposure of the seedlings to ethylene greatly reduced the specific activity of this enzyme. The inhibition was observed within 30 min of the hormone application, and maximal effect—90% inhibition—after 18 hours. Ethylene at physiological concentrations affected the enzyme activity; 50% inhibitory rate was recorded at 0.12 microliters per liter ethylene and maximal response at 1.2 microliters per liter. Ethylene provoked a 5-fold increase in the Kmapp of arginine decarboxylase for its substrate and reduced the Vmaxapp by 10-fold. However, the enzyme recovered from the inhibition and regained control activity 7 hours after transferral of the seedlings to ethylene-free atmosphere. Reducing the endogenous level of ethylene in the tissue by hypobaric pressure, or by exposure to light, as well as interfering with ethylene action by treatment with silver thiosulfate or 2,5-norbornadiene, caused a gradual increase in the specific activity of arginine decarboxylase in the apical tissue of the etiolated seedlings. On the basis of these findings, the possible control of arginine decarboxylase activity by endogenous ethylene, and its implication for the hormone effect on plant growth, are discussed. PMID:16664464

  13. The Response of Dopa Decarboxylase Activity to Variations in Gene Dosage in Drosophila: A Possible Location of the Structural Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hodgetts, Ross B.

    1975-01-01

    A location of the structural gene(s) for dopa decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.26) is proposed on the basis of enzyme determinations in a set of duplication-bearing aneuploids, which revealed only one dosage-sensitive region in the Drosophila genome. This region lies between 36EF and 37D on the left arm of chromosome 2. PMID:1126620

  14. Evidence of Two Functionally Distinct Ornithine Decarboxylation Systems in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Andrea; Trip, Hein; Lonvaud-Funel, Aline; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amines are low-molecular-weight organic bases whose presence in food can result in health problems. The biosynthesis of biogenic amines in fermented foods mostly proceeds through amino acid decarboxylation carried out by lactic acid bacteria (LAB), but not all systems leading to biogenic amine production by LAB have been thoroughly characterized. Here, putative ornithine decarboxylation pathways consisting of a putative ornithine decarboxylase and an amino acid transporter were identified in LAB by strain collection screening and database searches. The decarboxylases were produced in heterologous hosts and purified and characterized in vitro, whereas transporters were heterologously expressed in Lactococcus lactis and functionally characterized in vivo. Amino acid decarboxylation by whole cells of the original hosts was determined as well. We concluded that two distinct types of ornithine decarboxylation systems exist in LAB. One is composed of an ornithine decarboxylase coupled to an ornithine/putrescine transmembrane exchanger. Their combined activities results in the extracellular release of putrescine. This typical amino acid decarboxylation system is present in only a few LAB strains and may contribute to metabolic energy production and/or pH homeostasis. The second system is widespread among LAB. It is composed of a decarboxylase active on ornithine and l-2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA) and a transporter that mediates unidirectional transport of ornithine into the cytoplasm. Diamines that result from this second system are retained within the cytosol. PMID:22247134

  15. Bacterial-injection-induced syntheses of N-beta-alanyldopamine and Dopa decarboxylase in the hemolymph of coleopteran insect, Tenebrio molitor larvae.

    PubMed

    Kim, M H; Joo, C H; Cho, M Y; Kwon, T H; Lee, K M; Natori, S; Lee, T H; Lee, B L

    2000-05-01

    Injection of Escherichia coli into larvae of the coleopteran Tenebrio molitor resulted in the appearance of a dopamine-like substance on the electrochemical detector. To characterize this dopamine-like substance, we purified it to homogeneity from the immunized hemolymph and determined its molecular structure to be N-beta-alanyldopamine using the liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric method. Chemically synthesized N-beta-alanyldopamine showed the same retention time on HPLC as the purified N-beta-alanyldopamine from immunized larvae. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of N-beta-alanyldopamine synthesis in vivo, we examined the enzyme activity of Dopa decarboxylase against E. coli-injected hemolymph of T. molitor larvae. The enzyme activity of Dopa decarboxylase increased dramatically approximately 8 h after injection; Dopa decarboxylase activity of injected larvae being 10-times higher than naive larvae after 24 h. To evaluate the extent of quantitative changes of Dopa decarboxylase in response to bacterial challenge, Tenebrio Dopa decarboxylase was purified to homogeneity from the whole larvae and a cDNA clone for Tenebrio Dopa decarboxylase was isolated. RNA blot hybridization revealed that expression of the Dopa decarboxylase gene was activated transiently 3-8 h after E. coli challenge. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that Tenebrio Dopa decarboxylase was detected from 8 to 24 h in E. coli-injected larval extract. Thus, bacterial injection into T. molitor larvae might induce transcriptional activation of a Dopa decarboxylase gene, and then synthesis of N-beta-alanyldopamine. The synthesized N-beta-alanyldopamine might be used as a substrate by phenoloxidase during melanin synthesis in the humoral defense response or the melanotic encapsulation reaction of the cellular defense response.

  16. Development of a therapeutic monoclonal antibody that targets secreted fatty acid-binding protein aP2 to treat type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Burak, M Furkan; Inouye, Karen E; White, Ariel; Lee, Alexandra; Tuncman, Gurol; Calay, Ediz S; Sekiya, Motohiro; Tirosh, Amir; Eguchi, Kosei; Birrane, Gabriel; Lightwood, Daniel; Howells, Louise; Odede, Geofrey; Hailu, Hanna; West, Shauna; Garlish, Rachel; Neale, Helen; Doyle, Carl; Moore, Adrian; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S

    2015-12-23

    The lipid chaperone aP2/FABP4 has been implicated in the pathology of many immunometabolic diseases, including diabetes in humans, but aP2 has not yet been targeted for therapeutic applications. aP2 is not only an intracellular protein but also an active adipokine that contributes to hyperglycemia by promoting hepatic gluconeogenesis and interfering with peripheral insulin action. Serum aP2 levels are markedly elevated in mouse and human obesity and strongly correlate with metabolic complications. These observations raise the possibility of a new strategy to treat metabolic disease by targeting serum aP2 with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to aP2. We evaluated mAbs to aP2 and identified one, CA33, that lowered fasting blood glucose, improved systemic glucose metabolism, increased systemic insulin sensitivity, and reduced fat mass and liver steatosis in obese mouse models. We examined the structure of the aP2-CA33 complex and resolved the target epitope by crystallographic studies in comparison to another mAb that lacked efficacy in vivo. In hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies, we found that the antidiabetic effect of CA33 was predominantly linked to the regulation of hepatic glucose output and peripheral glucose utilization. The antibody had no effect in aP2-deficient mice, demonstrating its target specificity. We conclude that an aP2 mAb-mediated therapeutic constitutes a feasible approach for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:26702093

  17. Expression of an oxalate decarboxylase impairs the necrotic effect induced by Nep1-like protein (NLP) of Moniliophthora perniciosa in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Leonardo F; Dias, Cristiano V; Cidade, Luciana C; Mendes, Juliano S; Pirovani, Carlos P; Alvim, Fátima C; Pereira, Gonçalo A G; Aragão, Francisco J L; Cascardo, Júlio C M; Costa, Marcio G C

    2011-07-01

    Oxalic acid (OA) and Nep1-like proteins (NLP) are recognized as elicitors of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants, which is crucial for the pathogenic success of necrotrophic plant pathogens and involves reactive oxygen species (ROS). To determine the importance of oxalate as a source of ROS for OA- and NLP-induced cell death, a full-length cDNA coding for an oxalate decarboxylase (FvOXDC) from the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes, which converts OA into CO(2) and formate, was overexpressed in tobacco plants. The transgenic plants contained less OA and more formic acid compared with the control plants and showed enhanced resistance to cell death induced by exogenous OA and MpNEP2, an NLP of the hemibiotrophic fungus Moniliophthora perniciosa. This resistance was correlated with the inhibition of ROS formation in the transgenic plants inoculated with OA, MpNEP2, or a combination of both PCD elicitors. Taken together, these results have established a pivotal function for oxalate as a source of ROS required for the PCD-inducing activity of OA and NLP. The results also indicate that FvOXDC represents a potentially novel source of resistance against OA- and NLP-producing pathogens such as M. perniciosa, the causal agent of witches' broom disease of cacao (Theobroma cacao L.).

  18. Short-term UV-B and UV-C radiations preferentially decrease spermidine contents and arginine decarboxylase transcript levels of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Jantaro, Saowarath; Pothipongsa, Apiradee; Khanthasuwan, Suparaporn; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the short term effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiations on changes in pigments and polyamine contents, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells after exposure to UV-radiation were extracted by dimethylformamide and perchloric acid for pigments and polyamines determination, respectively. Cell growth was slightly decreased after 1 h exposure to UV-A and UV-B radiations. UV-C had little effect on cell growth despite the decrease of photosynthetic rate by about 18%. UV-A and UV-B decreased the contents of chlorophyll a and carotenoids whereas UV-C decreased chlorophyll a but had no effect on carotenoids. Spermidine contents were unaffected by UV-A, in contrast to the reduction of 25 and 50% by UV-B and UV-C, respectively. All three types of UV-radiation particularly reduced perchloric acid-insoluble spermidine. Importantly, putrescine and spermine which accounted for less than 1% of intracellular polyamines were increased by about three- to eight-fold by UV-B and UV-C, respectively. The changes in polyamines contents by UV-B and UV-C were consistent with the changes in transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase mRNA, but not with the protein levels. The decrease in the transcripts of adc2 but not adc1 was observed with UV-B and UV-C treatments.

  19. Relation between coumarate decarboxylase and vinylphenol reductase activity with regard to the production of volatile phenols by native Dekkera bruxellensis strains under 'wine-like' conditions.