Science.gov

Sample records for acid decomposition reaction

  1. Formic Acid Decomposition on Au catalysts: DFT, Microkinetic Modeling, and Reaction Kinetics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Suyash; Li, Sha; Carrasquillo-Flores, Ronald; Alba-Rubio, Ana C.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-04-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental approach is presented that uses a comprehensive mean-field microkinetic model, reaction kinetics experiments, and scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging to unravel the reaction mechanism and provide insights into the nature of active sites for formic acid (HCOOH) decomposition on Au/SiC catalysts. All input parameters for the microkinetic model are derived from periodic, self-consistent, generalized gradient approximation (GGA-PW91) density functional theory calculations on the Au(111), Au(100), and Au(211) surfaces and are subsequently adjusted to describe the experimental HCOOH decomposition rate and selectivity data. It is shown that the HCOOH decomposition follows the formate (HCOO) mediated path, with 100% selectivity toward the dehydrogenation products (CO21H2) under all reaction conditions. An analysis of the kinetic parameters suggests that an Au surface in which the coordination number of surface Au atoms is 4 may provide a better model for the active site of HCOOH decomposition on these specific supported Au catalysts.

  2. Palladium-atom catalyzed formic acid decomposition and the switch of reaction mechanism with temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Nan; Li, Zhen Hua

    2016-04-21

    Formic acid decomposition (FAD) reaction has been an innovative way for hydrogen energy. Noble metal catalysts, especially palladium-containing nanoparticles, supported or unsupported, perform well in this reaction. Herein, we considered the simplest model, wherein one Pd atom is used as the FAD catalyst. With high-level theoretical calculations of CCSD(T)/CBS quality, we investigated all possible FAD pathways. The results show that FAD catalyzed by one Pd atom follows a different mechanism compared with that catalyzed by surfaces or larger clusters. At the initial stage of the reaction, FAD follows a dehydration route and is quickly poisoned by CO due to the formation of very stable PdCO. PdCO then becomes the actual catalyst for FAD at temperatures approximately below 1050 K. Beyond 1050 K, there is a switch of catalyst from PdCO to Pd atom. The results also show that dehydration is always favoured over dehydrogenation on either the Pd-atom or PdCO catalyst. On the Pd-atom catalyst, neither dehydrogenation nor dehydration follows the formate mechanism. In contrast, on the PdCO catalyst, dehydrogenation follows the formate mechanism, whereas dehydration does not. We also systematically investigated the performance of 24 density functional theory methods. We found that the performance of the double hybrid mPW2PLYP functional is the best, followed by the B3LYP, B3PW91, N12SX, M11, and B2PLYP functionals.

  3. Palladium-atom catalyzed formic acid decomposition and the switch of reaction mechanism with temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Nan; Li, Zhen Hua

    2016-04-21

    Formic acid decomposition (FAD) reaction has been an innovative way for hydrogen energy. Noble metal catalysts, especially palladium-containing nanoparticles, supported or unsupported, perform well in this reaction. Herein, we considered the simplest model, wherein one Pd atom is used as the FAD catalyst. With high-level theoretical calculations of CCSD(T)/CBS quality, we investigated all possible FAD pathways. The results show that FAD catalyzed by one Pd atom follows a different mechanism compared with that catalyzed by surfaces or larger clusters. At the initial stage of the reaction, FAD follows a dehydration route and is quickly poisoned by CO due to the formation of very stable PdCO. PdCO then becomes the actual catalyst for FAD at temperatures approximately below 1050 K. Beyond 1050 K, there is a switch of catalyst from PdCO to Pd atom. The results also show that dehydration is always favoured over dehydrogenation on either the Pd-atom or PdCO catalyst. On the Pd-atom catalyst, neither dehydrogenation nor dehydration follows the formate mechanism. In contrast, on the PdCO catalyst, dehydrogenation follows the formate mechanism, whereas dehydration does not. We also systematically investigated the performance of 24 density functional theory methods. We found that the performance of the double hybrid mPW2PLYP functional is the best, followed by the B3LYP, B3PW91, N12SX, M11, and B2PLYP functionals. PMID:27005983

  4. Hydrazine decomposition and other reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Warren E. (Inventor); La France, Donald S. (Inventor); Voge, Hervey H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to the catalytic decomposition of hydrazine, catalysts useful for this decomposition and other reactions, and to reactions in hydrogen atmospheres generally using carbon-containing catalysts.

  5. Secondary decomposition reactions in nitramines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Igor

    Thermal decomposition of nitramines is known to proceed via multiple, competing reaction branches, some of which are triggered by secondary reactions between initial decomposition products and unreacted nitramine molecules. Better mechanistic understanding of these secondary reactions is needed to enable extrapolations of measured rates to higher temperatures and pressures relevant to shock ignition. I will present density functional theory (DFT) based simulations of nitramines that aim to re-evaluate known elementary mechanisms and seek alternative pathways in the gas and condensed phases. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research, both directly and through the Naval Research Laboratory.

  6. Structure-dependent photocatalytic decomposition of formic acid on the anatase TiO2(101) surface and strategies to increase its reaction rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yongfei; Luo, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Formic acid is a typical molecule that is involved in a lot important solar energy conversion processes. We perform first-principles calculations on the molecular mechanism of its photocatalytic decomposition reaction (PCD) on the anatase TiO2(101) surface. We find that the reaction barrier is sensitively dependent on the adsorption structure of the molecule. The one-step PCD of the monodentate formic acid has a lower barrier than that of bidentate formate. Coadsorbed water molecules can transform the formate from a bidentate to a monodentate configuration which greatly lower its decomposition barrier. Water molecule can also induce the spontaneous dissociation of the formic acid molecule. The monodentate dissociated formic acid is stabilized by the hydrogen bonds which will slightly enhance the barrier for its photodecomposition. However, the reaction rate can be further enhanced if the hydrogens are removed (for example, by oxygen molecules). Therefore, using coadsorbate and deliberately introducing and removing hydrogen bonds can be two strategies to tailor the photoreaction rate of the molecules.

  7. A characterization of the two-step reaction mechanism of phenol decomposition by a Fenton reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, Cristian; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Osorio, Edison; Villaseñor, Jorge; Navarro-Retamal, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Phenol is one of the worst contaminants at date, and its degradation has been a crucial task over years. Here, the decomposition process of phenol, in a Fenton reaction, is described. Using scavengers, it was observed that decomposition of phenol was mainly influenced by production of hydroxyl radicals. Experimental and theoretical activation energies (Ea) for phenol oxidation intermediates were calculated. According to these Ea, phenol decomposition is a two-step reaction mechanism mediated predominantly by hydroxyl radicals, producing a decomposition yield order given as hydroquinone > catechol > resorcinol. Furthermore, traces of reaction derived acids were detected by HPLC and GS-MS.

  8. Pyrite cinder as a cost-effective heterogeneous catalyst in heterogeneous Fenton reaction: decomposition of H(2)O(2) and degradation of Acid Red B.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deli; Liu, Yanxia; Duan, Dong; Ma, Luming

    2014-01-01

    Pyrite cinder (PyC) was employed as a heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst, and its catalytic activity was evaluated in view of the effects of catalyst dosage, pH and leaching metal ions. PyC showed significant reactivity, and the pseudo-first-order kinetic rate constant for decomposition of H(2)O(2) and degradation of Acid Red B (ARB) were 3.4 and 14.89 (10⁻³ min⁻¹) respectively when pH = 5. When 20 g/L PyC was added into 10 mM H(2)O(2) solution in neutral pH, H(2)O(2) could be completely degraded within 4 h, and more than 90% ARB was removed. Leaching metal ions from PyC were found to have little effect on decomposition of H(2)O(2) or on degradation of ARB. PyC still had high catalytic activity after five successive runs. The decomposition mechanism of H(2)O(2) was analyzed and the Haber-Weiss mechanism was employed in this paper. The electron spin resonance image showed •OH was produced and increased between 3 and 5 min in the PyC catalyzing H(2)O(2) reaction, which demonstrated that PyC had a durable ability to produce •OH.

  9. Bimolecular decomposition pathways for carboxylic acids of relevance to biofuels.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jared M; Nimlos, Mark R; Robichaud, David J

    2015-01-22

    The bimolecular thermal reactions of carboxylic acids were studied using quantum mechanical molecular modeling. Previous work1 investigated the unimolecular decomposition of a variety of organic acids, including saturated, α,β-unsaturated, and β,γ-unsaturated acids, and showed that the type and position of the unsaturation resulted in unique branching ratios between dehydration and decarboxylation, [H2O]/[CO2]. In this work, the effect of bimolecular chemistry (water-acid and acid-acid) is considered with a representative of each acid class. In both cases, the strained 4-centered, unimolecular transition state, typical of most organic acids, is opened up to 6- or 8-centered bimolecular geometries. These larger structures lead to a reduction in the barrier heights (20-45%) of the thermal decomposition pathways for organic acids and an increase in the decomposition kinetics. In some cases, they even cause a shift in the branching ratio of the corresponding product slates.

  10. Amino Acid Free Energy Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Fairchild, Michael; Livesay, Dennis; Jacobs, Donald

    2009-03-01

    The Distance Constraint Model (DCM) describes protein thermodynamics at a coarse-grained level based on a Free Energy Decomposition (FED) that assigns energy and entropy contributions to specific molecular interactions. Application of constraint theory accounts for non-additivity in conformational entropy so that the total free energy of a system can be reconstituted from all its molecular parts. In prior work, a minimal DCM utilized a simple FED involving temperature-independent parameters indiscriminately applied to all residues. Here, we describe a residue-specific FED that depends on local conformational states. The FED of an amino acid is constructed by weighting the energy spectrums associated with local energy minimums in configuration space by absolute entropies estimated using a quasi-harmonic approximation. Interesting temperature-dependent behavior is found. Support is from NIH R01 GM073082 and a CRI postdoctoral Duke research fellowship for H. Wang.

  11. Theoretical study of water cluster catalyzed decomposition of formic acid.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Satoshi

    2014-04-24

    We have performed a number of quantum chemical simulations to examine water cluster catalyzed decomposition of formic acid. The decomposition of formic acid consists of two competing pathways, dehydration, and decarboxylation. We use the Gaussian 4 method of the Gaussian09 software to locate and optimize a transition state of the decomposition reaction and obtain the activation energy. The decomposition starts by transferring a proton of a formic acid to a water molecule. The de Broglie wavelength of a proton is similar to the width of the potential barrier of the decomposition reaction at low temperature. The tunneling, in which a proton penetrates the potential barrier, enhances the decomposition rate. Water molecules serve as the catalyst in the decomposition and reduce the activation energy. The relay of a proton from a water molecule to a neighboring water molecule is accomplished with little change of the geometry of a molecule, resulting in the reduction of the activation energy. Two water molecules are actively involved in the decomposition reaction to reduce the activation energy. We have also examined the effect of water clusters with three, four, and five water molecules on the decomposition reaction. The noncovalent distance between a hydrogen atom of a water molecule and an oxygen atom of a neighboring water molecule decreases in a water cluster due to the cooperative many-body interactions. A water molecule in a water cluster becomes a better proton donor as well as a better proton acceptor. The activation energy of the decomposition is further decreased by the catalytic effect of a water cluster. We calculate the reaction rate using the transition state theory corrected by the tunneling effect of a proton. The calculated reaction rate of the decarboxylation is smaller than that of the dehydration when less than three water molecules are included in the simulation. However, the major product of the decomposition of a formic acid becomes carbon dioxide

  12. Acid-catalytic decomposition of peracetic acid in the liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kharchuk, V.G.; Kolenko, I.P.; Petrov, L.A.

    1985-12-01

    This paper elucidates the kinetic relationships of peracetic acid (PAA) decomposition in the presence of mineral acids and their heterogeneous analogs, polystyrene-di-vinylbenzene cation-exchangers, differing in physicochemical and morphological parameters. It is shown that the thermal decomposition of PAA in acetic acid is an acid-catalyzed reaction. The controlling step of the reaction is protonation of the substrate with formation of an active intermediate form. Sulfonated cation-exchangers are twice as effective as sulfuric acid in this process. Polystyrene-divinylbenzene sulfonated cation-exchangers can be used with success as acid catalysts in oxidation processes involving PAA, because of their high effectiveness, stability, and availability.

  13. Ab initio kinetics of gas phase decomposition reactions.

    PubMed

    Sharia, Onise; Kuklja, Maija M

    2010-12-01

    The thermal and kinetic aspects of gas phase decomposition reactions can be extremely complex due to a large number of parameters, a variety of possible intermediates, and an overlap in thermal decomposition traces. The experimental determination of the activation energies is particularly difficult when several possible reaction pathways coexist in the thermal decomposition. Ab initio calculations intended to provide an interpretation of the experiment are often of little help if they produce only the activation barriers and ignore the kinetics of the decomposition process. To overcome this ambiguity, a theoretical study of a complete picture of gas phase thermo-decomposition, including reaction energies, activation barriers, and reaction rates, is illustrated with the example of the β-octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) molecule by means of quantum-chemical calculations. We study three types of major decomposition reactions characteristic of nitramines: the HONO elimination, the NONO rearrangement, and the N-NO(2) homolysis. The reaction rates were determined using the conventional transition state theory for the HONO and NONO decompositions and the variational transition state theory for the N-NO(2) homolysis. Our calculations show that the HMX decomposition process is more complex than it was previously believed to be and is defined by a combination of reactions at any given temperature. At all temperatures, the direct N-NO(2) homolysis prevails with the activation barrier at 38.1 kcal/mol. The nitro-nitrite isomerization and the HONO elimination, with the activation barriers at 46.3 and 39.4 kcal/mol, respectively, are slow reactions at all temperatures. The obtained conclusions provide a consistent interpretation for the reported experimental data. PMID:21077597

  14. Reactions of CO2 with aqueous piperazine solutions: formation and decomposition of mono- and dicarbamic acids/carbamates of piperazine at 25.0 °C.

    PubMed

    Conway, William; Fernandes, Debra; Beyad, Yaser; Burns, Robert; Lawrance, Geoffrey; Puxty, Graeme; Maeder, Marcel

    2013-02-01

    Piperazine (PZ) is widely recognized as a promising solvent for postcombustion capture (PCC) of carbon dioxide (CO(2)). In view of the highly conflicting data describing the kinetic reactions of CO(2)(aq) in piperazine solutions, the present study focuses on the identification of the chemical mechanism, specifically the kinetic pathways for CO(2)(aq) in piperazine solutions that form the mono- and dicarbamates, using the analysis of stopped-flow spectrophotometric kinetic measurements and (1)H NMR spectroscopic data at 25.0 °C. The complete set of rate and equilibrium constants for the kinetic pathways, including estimations for the protonation constants of the suite of piperazine carbamates/carbamic acids, is reported here using an extended kinetic model which incorporates all possible reactions for CO(2)(aq) in piperazine solutions. From the kinetic data determined in the present study, the reaction of CO(2)(aq) with free PZ was found to be the dominant reactive pathway. The superior reactivity of piperazine is confirmed in the kinetic rate constant determined for the formation of piperazine monocarbamic acid (k(7) = 2.43(3) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), which is within the wide range of published values, making it one of the faster reacting amines. The corresponding equilibrium constant for the formation of the monocarbamic acid, K(7), markedly exceeds that of other monoamines. Kinetic and equilibrium constants for the remaining pathways indicate a minor contribution to the overall kinetics at high pH; however, these pathways may become more significant at higher CO(2) loadings and lower pH values where the concentrations of the reactive species are correspondingly higher. PMID:23286883

  15. Reactions of CO2 with aqueous piperazine solutions: formation and decomposition of mono- and dicarbamic acids/carbamates of piperazine at 25.0 °C.

    PubMed

    Conway, William; Fernandes, Debra; Beyad, Yaser; Burns, Robert; Lawrance, Geoffrey; Puxty, Graeme; Maeder, Marcel

    2013-02-01

    Piperazine (PZ) is widely recognized as a promising solvent for postcombustion capture (PCC) of carbon dioxide (CO(2)). In view of the highly conflicting data describing the kinetic reactions of CO(2)(aq) in piperazine solutions, the present study focuses on the identification of the chemical mechanism, specifically the kinetic pathways for CO(2)(aq) in piperazine solutions that form the mono- and dicarbamates, using the analysis of stopped-flow spectrophotometric kinetic measurements and (1)H NMR spectroscopic data at 25.0 °C. The complete set of rate and equilibrium constants for the kinetic pathways, including estimations for the protonation constants of the suite of piperazine carbamates/carbamic acids, is reported here using an extended kinetic model which incorporates all possible reactions for CO(2)(aq) in piperazine solutions. From the kinetic data determined in the present study, the reaction of CO(2)(aq) with free PZ was found to be the dominant reactive pathway. The superior reactivity of piperazine is confirmed in the kinetic rate constant determined for the formation of piperazine monocarbamic acid (k(7) = 2.43(3) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), which is within the wide range of published values, making it one of the faster reacting amines. The corresponding equilibrium constant for the formation of the monocarbamic acid, K(7), markedly exceeds that of other monoamines. Kinetic and equilibrium constants for the remaining pathways indicate a minor contribution to the overall kinetics at high pH; however, these pathways may become more significant at higher CO(2) loadings and lower pH values where the concentrations of the reactive species are correspondingly higher.

  16. Toluene and benzyl decomposition mechanisms: elementary reactions and kinetic simulations.

    PubMed

    Derudi, Marco; Polino, Daniela; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2011-12-28

    The high temperature decomposition kinetics of toluene and benzyl were investigated by combining a kinetic analysis with the ab initio/master equation study of new reaction channels. It was found that similarly to toluene, which decomposes to benzyl and phenyl losing atomic hydrogen and methyl, also benzyl decomposition proceeds through two channels with similar products. The first leads to the formation of fulvenallene and hydrogen and has already been investigated in detail in recent publications. In this work it is proposed that benzyl can decompose also through a second decomposition channel to form benzyne and methyl. The channel specific kinetic constants of benzyl decomposition were determined by integrating the RRKM/master equation over the C(7)H(7) potential energy surface. The energies of wells and saddle points were determined at the CCSD(T) level on B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) structures. A kinetic mechanism was then formulated, which comprises the benzyl and toluene decomposition reactions together with a recently proposed fulvenallene decomposition mechanism, the decomposition kinetics of the fulvenallenyl radical, and some reactions describing the secondary chemistry originated by the decomposition products. The kinetic mechanism so obtained was used to simulate the production of H atoms measured in a wide pressure and temperature range using different experimental setups. The calculated and experimental data are in good agreement. Kinetic constants of the new reaction channels here examined are reported as a function of temperature at different pressures. The mechanism here proposed is not compatible with the assumption often used in literature kinetic mechanisms that benzyl decomposition can be effectively described through a lumped reaction whose products are the cyclopentadienyl radical and acetylene.

  17. Decomposition of peracetic acid catalyzed by vanadium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, A.P.; Gekhman, A.E.; Moiseev, I.I.; Polotryuk, O.Y.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies the decomposition of peracetic acid (AcOOH) in acetic acid (AcOH) catalyzed by vanadium complexes. It is shown that peractic acid in acetic acid solutions of ammonium anadate decomposes with the predominant formation of 0/sub 2/ and small amounts of CO/sub 2/, the yield of which increases with increasing temperature and peracetic acid concentration. Both reactions proceed without the formation of free radicals in amounts detectable by ESR spectroscopy. The rate of oxygen release under conditions in which the formation of CO/sub 2/ is insignificant obeys a kinetic equation indicating the intermediate formation of a complex between V/sup 5 +/ ions and peracetic acid and the slow conversion of this complex into the observed products.

  18. Kinetics of non-isothermal decomposition of cinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming-rui; Qi, Zhen-li; Chen, Fei-xiong; Yue, Xia-xin

    2014-07-01

    The thermal stability and kinetics of decomposition of cinnamic acid were investigated by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry at four heating rates. The activation energies of this process were calculated from analysis of TG curves by methods of Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Doyle, Distributed Activation Energy Model, Šatava-Šesták and Kissinger, respectively. There are only one stage of thermal decomposition process in TG and two endothermic peaks in DSC. For this decomposition process of cinnamic acid, E and log A[s-1] were determined to be 81.74 kJ mol-1 and 8.67, respectively. The mechanism was Mampel Power law (the reaction order, n = 1), with integral form G(α) = α (α = 0.1-0.9). Moreover, thermodynamic properties of Δ H ≠, Δ S ≠, Δ G ≠ were 77.96 kJ mol-1, -90.71 J mol-1 K-1, 119.41 kJ mol-1.

  19. Decomposition reactions in RDX at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Igor

    2015-03-01

    Mechanisms and rates of elementary reactions controlling condensed-phase decomposition of RDX under elevated temperatures (up to 2000 K) and pressures (up to a few GPa) are not known. Global decomposition kinetics in RDX below 700 K has been measured; however, the observed global pathways result from complex manifolds of elementary reactions and are likely to be altered by elevated temperatures. Elevated pressures can further affect the condensed-phase kinetics and compete with elevated temperatures in promoting some elementary reactions and suppressing others. This presentation will describe density functional theory (DFT) based molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline and molten RDX aimed to delineate the effects of elevated temperatures and pressures on the mechanism of initial dissociation and the resulting secondary reactions. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory, by the Office of Naval Research, and by the DOD High Performance Computing Modernization Program Software Application Institute for Multiscale Reactive Modeling of Insensitive Munitions.

  20. Influence of Sodium Carbonate on Decomposition of Formic Acid by Discharge inside Bubble in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2015-09-01

    An influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubble in water was investigated. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of addition of sodium carbonate, the pH value increased with decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the increase of pH value contributed to improve an efficiency of the formic acid decomposition because the reaction rate of ozone and formic acid increased with increasing pH value. In the case of argon injection, the decomposition rate was not affected by the pH value owing to the high rate constants for loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  1. Computational studies of polysiloxanes : oxidation potentials and decomposition reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Curtiss, L. A.; Redfern, P. C.; Zhang, Z.; Amine, K.

    2011-06-23

    Silicon-containing solvents have tremendous potential for application as electrolytes for electrical energy storage devices such as lithium-ion (air) batteries and supercapacitors. Quantum chemical methods were employed to investigate trends in oxidation potentials and decomposition reactions of a series of polysiloxanes. Various electron-donating and -withdrawing substituents can be used to tune the oxidation potential in shorter chain siloxanes but not in longer ones. Decomposition reactions of siloxanes in their oxidized states were investigated and compared against their carbon analogues. These studies suggest that the Si-O group provides added stability for siloxanes over their carbon analogues. Computational studies have also been performed for various disiloxanes and siloxanes with spacer groups to understand their thermochemical stability and oxidation potentials.

  2. Kinetics of gas phase formic acid decomposition on platinum single crystal and polycrystalline surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, Michael D.; Milligan, Cory A.; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-06-01

    Formic acid dehydrogenation turnover rates (TORs) were measured on Pt(111), Pt(100), and polycrystalline Pt foil surfaces at a total pressure of 800 Torr between 413 and 513 K in a batch reactor connected to an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The TORs, apparent activation energies, and reaction orders are not sensitive to the structure of the Pt surface, within the precision of the measurements. CO introduced into the batch reactor depressed the formic acid dehydrogenation TOR and increased the reaction's apparent activation energies on Pt(111) and Pt(100), consistent with behavior predicted by the Temkin equation. Two reaction mechanisms were explored which explain the formic acid decomposition mechanism on Pt, both of which include dissociative adsorption of formic acid, rate limiting formate decomposition, and quasi-equilibrated hydrogen recombination and CO adsorption. No evidence was found that catalytic supports used in previous studies altered the reaction kinetics or mechanism.

  3. Decomposition of chrysotile asbestos by fluorosulfonic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Sabatini, R.; Petrakis, L.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of a fluorosulfonic acid (FSO{sub 3}H) aqueous solution on decomposing the chrysotile asbestos fibers was investigated by using FT-IR, XRD, and XPS. From the equilibrium of FSO{sub 3}H in an aqueous medium (FSO{sub 3}H + H{sub 2}O = HF + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), the resulting H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} had a strong affinity for the external Mg(OH){sub 2} layers in the tubular, scroll-like chrysotile structure. This acid-base reaction led to the precipitation and lixiviation of MgSO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, MgO, and Mg{sup 2+} ion. Once the breakage of the outer Mg(OH){sub 2} layers occurred, HF readily diffused into the inner silicious layers and then reacted with silicates, converting them into SiO{sub 2} hydrate and H{sub 2}SiF{sub 6}, while the ionic reaction between lixiviated Mg{sup 2+} and F{sup {minus}} resulted in precipitating MgF{sub 2}, thereby destroying the fibrous nature of the asbestos. An optimum combination of HF and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} contributed significantly to enhancing the rate of conversion of asbestos into nonfibrous materials in a short treatment time without any physical agitation.

  4. Revisiting formic acid decomposition on metallic powder catalysts: Exploding the HCOOH decomposition volcano curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yadan; Roberts, Charles A.; Perkins, Ryan T.; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-08-01

    This study revisits the classic volcano curve for HCOOH decomposition by metal catalysts by taking a modern catalysis approach. The metal catalysts (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, Pd, Ni, Rh, Co and Fe) were prepared by H2 reduction of the corresponding metal oxides. The number of surface active sites (Ns) was determined by formic acid chemisorption. In situ IR indicated that both monodentate and bidentate/bridged surface HCOO* were present on the metals. Heats of adsorption (ΔHads) for surface HCOO* values on metals were taken from recently reported DFT calculations. Kinetics for surface HCOO* decomposition (krds) were determined with TPD spectroscopy. Steady-state specific activity (TOF = activity/Ns) for HCOOH decomposition over the metals was calculated from steady-state activity (μmol/g-s) and Ns (μmol/g). Steady-state TOFs for HCOOH decomposition weakly correlated with surface HCOO* decomposition kinetics (krds) and ΔHads of surface HCOO* intermediates. The plot of TOF vs. ΔHads for HCOOH decomposition on metal catalysts does not reproduce the classic volcano curve, but shows that TOF depends on both ΔHads and decomposition kinetics (krds) of surface HCOO* intermediates. This is the first time that the classic catalysis study of HCOOH decomposition on metallic powder catalysts has been repeated since its original publication.

  5. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  6. Comprehensive study of the chemical reactions resulting from the decomposition of chloroform in alkaline aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevez Mews, Jorge

    Chloroform (CHCl3) is a volatile liquid, which has a rather slow rate of decomposition in ground water. It is a known carcinogen and one of the most common contaminants found at toxic waste sites. The dominant degradation process for chloroform in both the atmosphere and the groundwater is the reaction with the hydroxyl radical or hydroxide ion. This process triggers a sequence of reactions which ultimately yield carbon monoxide, hydrogen chloride, and formic acid. The rate of chloroform degradation is considerably larger in solution than that in the gas phase and it increases dramatically with increasing pH. However, only one of the viable reactions had been studied previously at a high level of theory in solution. It is of great interest to gain a deeper understanding of the decomposition reaction mechanism. Quantum mechanical methods are well suited for studying the mechanism of organic reactions. However, a full quantum mechanical treatment of the entire fluid system is not computationally feasible. In this work, combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods are used for studying chemical reactions in condensed phases. In these calculations, the solute molecules are treated quantum mechanically (QM), whereas the solvent molecules are approximated by empirical (MM) potential energy functions. The use of quantum mechanics and statistical sampling simulation is necessary to determine the reaction free energy profile. In the present study, the ab initio Hartree-Fock theory along with the 3-21G basis set was used in the quantum mechanical calculations to elucidate the reaction pathways of chloroform decomposition, with a focus on basic reaction conditions. Statistical mechanical Monte Carlo approach was then applied in molecular mechanical simulations, employing the empirical TIP3P model for water. We employed state-of-the-art electronic structure methods to determine the gas-phase inter-nuclear potential energy profile for all the relevant

  7. On the Reaction Mechanism of Acetaldehyde Decomposition on Mo(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Donghai; Karim, Ayman M.; Wang, Yong

    2012-02-16

    The strong Mo-O bond strength provides promising reactivity of Mo-based catalysts for the deoxygenation of biomass-derived oxygenates. Combining the novel dimer saddle point searching method with periodic spin-polarized density functional theory calculations, we investigated the reaction pathways of a acetaldehyde decomposition on the clean Mo(110) surface. Two reaction pathways were identified, a selective deoxygenation and a nonselective fragmentation pathways. We found that acetaldehyde preferentially adsorbs at the pseudo 3-fold hollow site in the η2(C,O) configuration on Mo(110). Among four possible bond (β-C-H, γ-C-H, C-O and C-C) cleavages, the initial decomposition of the adsorbed acetaldehyde produces either ethylidene via the C-O bond scission or acetyl via the β-C-H bond scission while the C-C and the γ-C-H bond cleavages of acetaldehyde leading to the formation of methyl (and formyl) and formylmethyl are unlikely. Further dehydrogenations of ethylidene into either ethylidyne or vinyl are competing and very facile with low activation barriers of 0.24 and 0.31 eV, respectively. Concurrently, the formed acetyl would deoxygenate into ethylidyne via the C-O cleavage rather than breaking the C-C or the C-H bonds. The selective deoxygenation of acetaldehyde forming ethylene is inhibited by relatively weaker hydrogenation capability of the Mo(110) surface. Instead, the nonselective pathway via vinyl and vinylidene dehydrogenations to ethynyl as the final hydrocarbon fragment is kinetically favorable. On the other hand, the strong interaction between ethylene and the Mo(110) surface also leads to ethylene decomposition instead of desorption into the gas phase. This work was financially supported by the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC). Computing time was granted by a user project (emsl42292) at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). This work was financially supported

  8. Effect of initial solution pH on photo-induced reductive decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yan; Zhang, Chao-Jie; Chen, Pei; Zhou, Qi; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2014-07-01

    The effects of initial solution pH on the decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) with hydrated electrons as reductant were investigated. The reductive decomposition of PFOA depends strongly on the solution pH. In the pH range of 5.0-10.0, the decomposition and defluorination rates of PFOA increased with the increase of the initial solution pH. The rate constant was 0.0295 min(-1) at pH 10.0, which was more than 49.0 times higher than that at pH 5.0. Higher pH also inhibits the generation of toxic intermediates during the PFOA decomposition. For example, the short-chain PFCAs reached a lower maximum concentration in shorter reaction time as pH increasing. The peak areas of accumulated fluorinated and iodinated hydrocarbons detected by GC/MS under acidic conditions were nearly 10-100 times more than those under alkaline conditions. In short, alkaline conditions were more favorable for photo-induced reduction of PFOA as high pH promoted the decomposition of PFOA and inhibited the accumulation of intermediate products. The concentration of hydrated electron, detected by laser flash photolysis, increased with the increase of the initial pH. This was the main reason why the decomposition of PFOA in the UV-KI system depended strongly on the initial pH.

  9. Investigation of thermal decomposition of ascorbic acid by TG-FTIR and thermal kinetics analysis.

    PubMed

    Jingyan, Shi; Yuwen, Liu; Zhiyong, Wang; Cunxin, Wang

    2013-04-15

    The thermal behavior of dry solid ascorbic acid in nitrogen atmosphere in the temperature range of 25-800°C was investigated by TG-FTIR. During the thermal decomposition process, five evolved gaseous species, including H2O, CO2, CO, CH4 and HCOOH, were identified and monitored, in which HCOOH was detected for the first time. The results indicated that ascorbic acid began to decompose at 191°C. Its decomposition process consisted of three stages, and dehydration and decarboxylation to form furfural were the possible principal mechanism. The kinetic analysis for the first decomposition stage was also carried out by the isoconversional method and the master plots method. The results indicated that this process can be described by the model of 1st order reaction.

  10. Catalytic Conversion of Biomass for the Production of Hydrogen; Decomposition of Formic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi Manzour, Faraz

    Highly active bimetallic catalysts were synthesized and used for the decomposition of formic acid for the production of hydrogen. Ruthenium alloys were prepared and resulted in a maximum formic acid conversion of 68% (after one hour at 180 °C) and a turnover frequency of 0.7/s (at 5 wt% formic acid). The most promising catalysts were characterized by the means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Kinetic studies were also carried out over these catalysts for the determination of reaction rate and turnover frequency. Promotion of Ru/C with tin, barium and cesium increased the formic acid conversion by 55%, 18% and 11% respectively.

  11. Decomposition of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) by heterogeneous photocatalysis in acidic aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Lin, Angela Yu-Chen; Shaik, Khaja Lateef; Lin, Cheng-Fang

    2009-09-01

    Decomposition of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) is of prime importance since they are recognized as persistent organic pollutants and are widespread in the environment. PFCAs with longer carbon chain length are particularly of interest because of their noted recalcitrance, toxicity, and bioaccumulation. Here in this study, we demonstrate efficient decomposition of three important PFCAs such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) by heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO(2) as a photocatalyst in acidic aqueous solutions. The PFCAs were decomposed into shorter carbon chain length PFCAs and fluoride ions. Photoholes of excited TiO(2) generated upon UV-irradiation are found to be the oxidation sites for PFCAs. Therefore, creation and sustenance of these photoholes in the acidic aqueous medium has enhanced the decomposition of PFCAs. Heterogeneous photocatalytic treatment achieved more than 99% decomposition and 38% complete mineralization of PFOA in 7h. The decomposition of other PFCAs was as high as 99% with a defluorination efficiency of 38% for PFDA and 54% for PFNA. The presence of perchloric acid was found to enhance the decomposition by facilitating the ionization of PFCAs. The oxygen present in the medium served both as an oxidant and an electron acceptor. The mechanistic details of PFCA decomposition and their corresponding mineralization are elaborated.

  12. Stability of Supported Platinum Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Catalysts for use in Thermochemical Water Splitting Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel M. Ginosar; Lucia M. Petkovic; Anne W. Glenn; Kyle C. Burch

    2007-03-01

    The activity and stability of several metal oxide supported platinum catalysts were explored for the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. The acid decomposition reaction is common to several sulfur based thermochemical water splitting cycles. Reactions were carried out using a feed of concentrated liquid sulfuric acid (96 wt%) at atmospheric pressure at temperatures between 800 and 850 °C and a weight hour space velocity of 52 g acid/g catalyst/hr. Reactions were run at these high space velocities such that variations in kinetics were not masked by surplus catalyst. The influence of exposure to reaction conditions was explored for three catalysts; 0.1-0.2 wt% Pt supported on alumina, zirconia and titania. The higher surface area Pt/Al2O3 and Pt/ZrO2 catalysts were found to have the highest activity but deactivated rapidly. A low surface area Pt/TiO2 catalyst was found to have good stability in short term tests, but slowly lost activity for over 200 hours of continuous operation.

  13. Role of tunable acid catalysis in decomposition of α-hydroxyalkyl hydroperoxides and mechanistic implications for tropospheric chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Busch, Daryle H; Subramaniam, Bala; Thompson, Ward H

    2014-10-16

    Electronic structure calculations have been used to investigate possible gas-phase decomposition pathways of α-hydroxyalkyl hydroperoxides (HHPs), an important source of tropospheric hydrogen peroxide and carbonyl compounds. The uncatalyzed as well as water- and acid-catalyzed decomposition of multiple HHPs have been examined at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The calculations indicate that, compared to an uncatalyzed or water-catalyzed reaction, the free-energy barrier of an acid-catalyzed decomposition leading to an aldehyde or ketone and hydrogen peroxide is dramatically lowered. The calculations also find a direct correlation between the catalytic effect of an acid and the distance separating its hydrogen acceptor and donor sites. Interestingly, the catalytic effect of an acid on the HHP decomposition resulting in the formation of carboxylic acid and water is relatively much smaller. Moreover, since the free-energy barrier of the acid-catalyzed aldehyde- or ketone-forming decomposition is ∼ 25% lower than that required to break the O-OH linkage of the HHP leading to the formation of hydroxyl radical, these results suggest that HHP decomposition is likely not an important source of tropospheric hydroxyl radical. Finally, transition state theory estimates indicate that the effective rate constants for the acid-catalyzed aldehyde- or ketone-forming HHP decomposition pathways are 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than those for the water-catalyzed reaction, indicating that an acid-catalyzed HHP decomposition is kinetically favored as well.

  14. Towards the experimental decomposition rate of carbonic acid (H2CO3) in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Tautermann, Christofer S; Voegele, Andreas F; Loerting, Thomas; Kohl, Ingrid; Hallbrucker, Andreas; Mayer, Erwin; Liedl, Klaus R

    2002-01-01

    Dry carbonic acid has recently been shown to be kinetically stable even at room temperature. Addition of water molecules reduces this stability significantly, and the decomposition (H2CO3 + nH2O --> (n+1)H2O + CO2) is extremely accelerated for n = 1, 2, 3. By including two water molecules, a reaction rate that is a factor of 3000 below the experimental one (10 s(-1)) at room temperature was found. In order to further remove the gap between experiment and theory, we increased the number of water molecules involved to 3 and took into consideration different mechanisms for thorough elucidation of the reaction. A mechanism whereby the reaction proceedes via a six-membered transition state turns out to be the most efficient one over the whole examined temperature range. The determined reaction rates approach experimental values in aqueous solution reasonably well; most especially, a significant increase in the rates in comparison to the decomposition reaction with fewer water molecules is found. Further agreement with experiment is found in the kinetic isotope effects (KIE) for the deuterated species. For water-free carbonic acid, the KIE (i.e., kH2CO3/kD2CO3) for the decomposition reaction is predicted to be 220 at 300 K, whereas it amounts to 2.2-3.0 for the investigated mechanisms including three water molecules. This result is therefore reasonably close to the experimental value of 2 (at 300 K). These KIEs are in much better accordance with the experiment than the KIE for decomposition with fewer water entities. PMID:11822465

  15. Photocatalytic decomposition behavior and reaction pathway of sulfamethazine antibiotic using TiO2.

    PubMed

    Fukahori, Shuji; Fujiwara, Taku

    2015-07-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of sulfanethazine (SMT), one of the sulfonamide antibiotics, in aqueous solution by TiO2 was investigated. The time courses of SMT concentration, the amount of non-purgeable organic carbon, and the concentrations of ions such as SO4(2-), NH4(+), and NO3(-) formed during the photocatalytic reaction were measured and the structures of seven intermediates formed with the disappearance of SMT were also estimated by LC/MS/MS analyses. In addition to that of SMT, the decomposition behaviors of model compounds sulfanilic acid (SA) and 4-amino-2, 6-dimethylpyrimidine (ADMP) were investigated using the TiO2/UV system. The observed photocatalytic degradation behaviors of SMT, SA, and ADMP gave new insight into the degradation pathway of SMT. Especially, the formation of p-aminophenol during SMT decomposition, which until now has not been reported in previous studies concerning the photocatalytic decomposition of SMT and other sulfonamide antibiotics. These results indicate the existence of a novel photocatalytic degradation pathway for sulfonamides. The direct substitution of the sulfonamide group with a hydroxyl group is suggested.

  16. Photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid by transition-metal modified titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng-Jia; Lo, Shang-Lien; Lee, Yu-Chi; Huang, Chang-Chieh

    2015-05-15

    Transition-metal modified TiO₂ was used in a UV reactor to assist in decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in aqueous solutions. Comparing TiO₂ and two types of metal-modified TiO₂ (Fe-TiO₂ and Cu-TiO₂), Cu-TiO₂ exhibited the highest catalytic activity during PFOA decomposition and defluorination. After 12 h of reaction, the PFOA decomposition and defluorination efficiencies by the UV/Cu-TiO₂ system reached 91% and 19%, respectively. PFOA was decomposed into fluoride ions (F(-)) and shorter perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) such as C₆ F₁₃COOH, C₅F₁₁COOH, C₄F₉COOH, C₃F₇COOH, C₂F₅COOH and CF₃COOH. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-zero-order kinetics were used to model the decomposition and defluorination of PFOA, respectively. Rate constant values of PFOA decomposition for the UV/TiO₂, UV/Fe-TiO₂, and UV/Cu-TiO₂ systems were 0.0001, 0.0015, and 0.0031 min(-1), respectively, while rate constant values of PFOA defluorination for the UV/Fe-TiO₂, and UV/Cu-TiO₂ systems were 0.0048 and 0.0077 mg/L·min(-1), respectively. The photocatalysts were prepared by a photodeposition synthesis method and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray, X-ray diffraction and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The Fe-TiO₂ and Cu-TiO₂ catalysts exhibited considerably higher activities than that of TiO₂. The experimental results have demonstrated that the UV/Fe-TiO₂ and UV/Cu-TiO₂ systems could produce traps to capture photo-induced electrons, thereby reduce electron-hole recombination during photocatalytic reactions and consequently enhance the PFOA decomposition.

  17. Rhodamine-6G can photosensitize folic acid decomposition through electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Ito, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    Rhodamine-6G photosensitized folic acid decomposition in aqueous solution, and its quantum yield in the presence of 10 μM folic acid was 9.9 × 10-6. A possible mechanism of this photodecomposition is direct oxidation through an electron transfer from folic acid to rhodamine-6G. The fluorescence lifetime of rhodamine-6G was slightly decreased by folic acid, suggesting electron transfer in the excited singlet state of rhodamine-6G. The quenching rate coefficient estimated from the Stern-Volmer plot of the fluorescence quenching supported that this electron transfer proceeds as a diffusion-controlled reaction. The quantum yields of the electron transfer and the following reaction could be determined.

  18. Efficient decomposition of environmentally persistent perfluorocarboxylic acids by use of persulfate as a photochemical oxidant.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hisao; Yamamoto, Ari; Hayakawa, Etsuko; Taniyasu, Sachi; Yamashita, Nobuyoshi; Kutsuna, Shuzo; Kiatagawa, Hiroshi; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2005-04-01

    Photochemical decomposition of persistent perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) in water by use of persulfate ion (S2O8(2-)) was examined to develop a technique to neutralize stationary sources of PFCAs. Photolysis of S2O8(2-) produced highly oxidative sulfate radical anions (SO4-), which efficiently decomposed perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and other PFCAs bearing C4-C8 perfluoroalkyl groups. The major products were F- and CO2; also, small amounts of PFCAs with shorter than initial chain lengths were detected in the reaction solution. PFOA at a concentration of 1.35 mM (typical of that in untreated wastewater after an emulsifying process in fluoropolymer manufacture) was completely decomposed by a photochemical system with 50 mM S2O8(2-) and 4 h of irradiation from a 200-W xenon-mercury lamp. The initial PFOA decomposition rate was 11 times higherthan with photolysis alone. All sulfur-containing species in the reaction solution were eventually transformed to sulfate ions by this method. This method was successfully applied to the decomposition of perfluorononanoic acid contained in a floor wax solution.

  19. Selective hydrogen production from formic acid decomposition on Pd-Au bimetallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Yueh; Mullen, Gregory M; Flaherty, David W; Mullins, C Buddie

    2014-08-01

    Pd-Au catalysts have shown exceptional performance for selective hydrogen production via HCOOH decomposition, a promising alternative to solve issues associated with hydrogen storage and distribution. In this study, we utilized temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reactive molecular beam scattering (RMBS) in an attempt to unravel the factors governing the catalytic properties of Pd-Au bimetallic surfaces for HCOOH decomposition. Our results show that Pd atoms at the Pd-Au surface are responsible for activating HCOOH molecules; however, the selectivity of the reaction is dictated by the identity of the surface metal atoms adjacent to the Pd atoms. Pd atoms that reside at Pd-Au interface sites tend to favor dehydrogenation of HCOOH, whereas Pd atoms in Pd(111)-like sites, which lack neighboring Au atoms, favor dehydration of HCOOH. These observations suggest that the reactivity and selectivity of HCOOH decomposition on Pd-Au catalysts can be tailored by controlling the arrangement of surface Pd and Au atoms. The findings in this study may prove informative for rational design of Pd-Au catalysts for associated reactions including selective HCOOH decomposition for hydrogen production and electro-oxidation of HCOOH in the direct formic acid fuel cell.

  20. DECOMPOSITION OF TRIHALOACETIC ACIDS AND FORMATION OF THE CORRESPONDING TRIHALOMETHANES IN DRINKING WATER. (R826834)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The decomposition of trihaloacetic acids [bromodichloroacetic acid (BDCAA), dibromochloroacetic acid (DBCAA), tribromoacetic acid (TBAA)], and the formation of the corresponding trihalomethanes [bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), tribromomethane (TBM)] w...

  1. Decomposition of hydroxy amino acids in foraminiferal tests; kinetics, mechanism and geochronological implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bada, J.L.; Shou, M.-Y.; Man, E.H.; Schroeder, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    The diagenesis of the hydroxy amino acids serine and threonine in foraminiferal tests has been investigated. The decomposition pathways of these amino acids are complex; the principal reactions appear to be dehydration, aldol cleavage and decarboxylation. Stereochemical studies indicate that the ??-amino-n-butyric acid (ABA) detected in foraminiferal tests is the end product of threonine dehydration pathway. Decomposition of serine and threonine in foraminiferal tests from two well-dated Caribbean deep-sea cores, P6304-8 and -9, has been found to follow irreversible first-order kinetics. Three empirical equations were derived for the disappearance of serine and threonine and the appearance of ABA. These equations can be used as a new geochronological method for dating foraminiferal tests from other deep-sea sediments. Preliminary results suggest that ages deduced from the ABA kinetics equation are most reliable because "species effect" and contamination problems are not important for this nonbiological amino acid. Because of the variable serine and threonine contents of modern foraminiferal species, it is likely that the accurate age estimates can be obtained from the serine and threonine decomposition equations only if a homogeneous species assemblage or single species sample isolated from mixed natural assemblages is used. ?? 1978.

  2. Students' Understanding of Acid, Base and Salt Reactions in Qualitative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kim-Chwee Daniel; Goh, Ngoh-Khang; Chia, Lian-Sai; Treagust, David F.

    2003-01-01

    Uses a two-tier, multiple-choice diagnostic instrument to determine (n=915) grade 10 students' understanding of the acid, base, and salt reactions involved in basic qualitative analysis. Reports that many students did not understand the formation of precipitates and the complex salts, acid/salt-base reactions, and thermal decomposition involved in…

  3. Efficient decomposition of perfluorocarboxylic acids and alternative fluorochemical surfactants in hot water.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hisao; Nagaoka, Yumiko; Murayama, Misako; Kutsuna, Shuzo

    2008-10-01

    Decomposition of C5-C9 perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) and perfluoroether carboxylic acids (alternatives to PFCA-based surfactants) in hot water in a sealed reactor was investigated. Although PFCAs showed almost no decomposition in hot water at 80 degrees C in the absence of persulfate (S2O8(2-)), the addition of S2O8(2-) to the reaction system led to efficient decomposition, even at this relatively low temperature. The major products in the aqueous and gas phases were F- ions and CO2, respectively, and short-chain PFCAs were also detected in the aqueous phase. For example, when an aqueous solution containing perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, 374 microM) and S2O8(2-) (50.0 mM) was heated at 80 degrees C for 6 h, PFOA concentration in the aqueous phase fell below 1.52 microM (detection limit of HPLC with conductometric detection), and the yields of F- ions [i.e., (moles of F- formed) /(moles of fluorine content in initial PFOA)] and CO2 [i.e, (moles of CO2 formed) /(moles of carbon content in initial PFOA)] were 77.5% and 70.2%, respectively. This method was also effective in decomposing perfluoroether carboxylic acids, such as CF3OC2F4OCF2COOH, CF3OC2F4OC2F4OCF2COOH, and C2F5OC2F4OCF2COOH, which are alternatives to PFCA-based surfactants, producing F- and CO2 with yields of 82.9-88.9% and 87.7-100%, respectively, after reactions at 80 degrees C for 6 h. In addition, the method was successfully used to decompose perfluorononanoic acid in a floor wax solution. When PFOAwastreated at a higher temperature (150 degrees C), other decomposition reactions occurred: the formation of F- and CO2 was dramatically decreased, and 1H-perfluoroalkanes (C(n)F(2n+1)H, n = 4-7) formed in large amounts. This result clearly indicates that treatment with high-temperature water was not suitable for the decomposition of PFCAs to F-: surprisingly, the relatively low temperature of 80 degrees C was preferable.

  4. Effect of metal ions on decomposition of chlorinated organic substances by ozonation in acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Kiyokazu; Tsai, Tsung-Yueh; Nakano, Yoichi; Nishijima, Wataru; Okada, Mitsumasa

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to find metal ions that enhance the ozone decomposition of chlorinated organic substances in acetic acid. Although the pseudo-first order degradation rate constant for 2,4-DCP by ozone in acetic acid in addition of Ca2+, Mg2+, Al3+ and Fe2+ were almost the same as that with no metal ion, the degradation rate in addition of Mn2+ and Fe3+ were 2.4 and 4.5 times as high as that with no metal ion, respectively. The presence of Fe3+ enhanced the degradation of 2,4-DCP by ozone in acetic acid because Fe3+-phenolate complex which have high reactivity with ozone was produced by the reaction between 2,4-DCP and Fe3+ in acetic acid. PMID:15620744

  5. A singular value decomposition approach for kinetic analysis of reactions of HNO with myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Zapata, Adrian L; Kumar, Murugaeson R; Pervitsky, Dmitry; Farmer, Patrick J

    2013-01-01

    The reactions of several horse heart myoglobin species with nitrosyl hydride, HNO, derived from Angeli's salt (AS) and Piloty's acid (PA) have been followed by UV-visible, (1)H NMR and EPR spectroscopies. Spectral analysis of myoglobin-derived speciation during the reactions was obtained by using singular value decomposition methods combined with a global analysis to obtain the rate constants of complex sequential reactions. The analysis also provided spectra for the derived absorbers, which allowed self-consistent calibration to the spectra of known myoglobin species. Using this method, the determined rate for trapping of HNO by metmyoglobin, which produces NO-myoglobin, is found to be 2.7 × 10(5)M(-1)s(-1) at pH7.0 and 1.1 × 10(5)M(-1)s(-1) at pH9.4. The reaction of deoxymyoglobin with HNO generates the adduct HNO-myoglobin directly, but is followed by a secondary reaction of that product with HNO yielding NO-myoglobin; the determined bimolecular rate constants for these reactions are 3.7 × 10(5)M(-1)s(-1) and 1.67 × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1) respectively, and are independent of pH. The derived spectrum for HNO-myoglobin is characterized by a Soret absorbance maximum at 423 nm with an extinction coefficient of 1.66 × 10(5)M(-1)cm(-1). The rate constant for unimolecular loss of HNO from HNO-myoglobin was determined by competitive trapping with CO at 8.9 × 10(-5)s(-1), which gives the thermodynamic binding affinity of HNO to deoxymyoglobin as 4.2 × 10(9)M(-1). These results suggest that the formation of HNO-ferrous heme protein adducts represents an important consideration in the biological action of HNO-releasing drugs.

  6. Atomic decomposition of conceptual DFT descriptors: application to proton transfer reactions.

    PubMed

    Inostroza-Rivera, Ricardo; Yahia-Ouahmed, Meziane; Tognetti, Vincent; Joubert, Laurent; Herrera, Bárbara; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2015-07-21

    In this study, we present an atomic decomposition, in principle exact, at any point on a given reaction path, of the molecular energy, reaction force and reaction flux, which is based on Bader's atoms-in-molecules theory and on Pendás' interacting quantum atoms scheme. This decomposition enables the assessment of the importance and the contribution of each atom or molecular group to these global properties, and may cast the light on the physical factors governing bond formation or bond breaking. The potential use of this partition is finally illustrated by proton transfers in model biological systems.

  7. Reaction mechanism of methylamine decomposition on Ru(0001): a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Lv, Cun-Qin; Liu, Jian-Hong; Song, Xiao-Fei; Guo, Yong; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2014-03-01

    The reaction mechanism of methylamine decomposition on Ru(0001) has been systematically investigated by density functional theory slab calculations. The decomposition network has also been described. The adsorption energies under the most stable configuration of the possible species and the energy barriers of the possible elementary reactions involved are obtained. Desorption is preferred for adsorbing methylamine and hydrogen, whereas for the other species, decomposition is more favorable. Our calculated results show that methylamine decomposition on Ru(0001) starts with H₂CNH₂ formation from methyl dehydrogenation, followed by subsequent methylene dehydrogenation, bond breaking of N--H and C--N in HCNH₂, CH dehydrogenation and C-N bond cleavage in HCNH, and dehydrogenation of NH₂, NH, and CH.

  8. Decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    A cornerstone of ecosystem ecology, decomposition was recognized as a fundamental process driving the exchange of energy in ecosystems by early ecologists such as Lindeman 1942 and Odum 1960). In the history of ecology, studies of decomposition were incorporated into the International Biological Program in the 1960s to compare the nature of organic matter breakdown in various ecosystem types. Such studies still have an important role in ecological studies of today. More recent refinements have brought debates on the relative role microbes, invertebrates and environment in the breakdown and release of carbon into the atmosphere, as well as how nutrient cycling, production and other ecosystem processes regulated by decomposition may shift with climate change. Therefore, this bibliography examines the primary literature related to organic matter breakdown, but it also explores topics in which decomposition plays a key supporting role including vegetation composition, latitudinal gradients, altered ecosystems, anthropogenic impacts, carbon storage, and climate change models. Knowledge of these topics is relevant to both the study of ecosystem ecology as well projections of future conditions for human societies.

  9. Glucose and fructose decomposition in subcritical and supercritical water: Detailed reaction pathway, mechanisms, and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kabyemela, B.M.; Adschiri, T.; Malaluan, R.M.; Arai, K.

    1999-08-01

    The authors are developing a new catalyst-free process of cellulose decomposition in supercritical water. In their initial study on the cellulose decomposition in supercritical water, the main products of cellulose decomposition were found to be oligomers of glucose (cellobiose, cellotriose, etc.) and glucose at short residence times (400 C, 25 MPa, 0.05 s). The kinetics of glucose at these conditions can be useful in understanding the reaction pathways of cellulose. Experiments were performed on the products of glucose decomposition at short residence times to elucidate the reaction pathways and evaluate kinetics of glucose and fructose decomposition in sub- and supercritical water. The conditions were a temperature of 300--400 C and pressure of 25--40 MPa for extremely short residence times between 0.02 and 2 s. The products of glucose decomposition were fructose, a product of isomerization, 1,6-anhydroglucose, a product of dehydration, and erythrose and glyceraldehyde, products of C-C bond cleavage. Fructose underwent reactions similar to glucose except that it did not form 1,6-anhydroglucose and isomerization to glucose is negligible. The mechanism for the products formed from C-C bond cleavage could be explained by reverse aldol condensation and the double-bond rule of the respective enediols formed during the Lobry de Bruyn Alberda van Ekenstein transformation. The differential equations resulting from the proposed pathways were fit to experimental results to obtain the kinetic rate constants.

  10. Influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by pulsed discharge plasma inside bubble in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    The influence of sodium carbonate on the decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubbles in water was investigated experimentally. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of sodium carbonate additive, the pH increased owing to the decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the percentage of conversion of formic acid increased with increasing pH because the reaction rate of ozone with formic acid increased with increasing pH. In the case of argon injection, the percentage of conversion was not affected by the pH owing to the high rate loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  11. Decomposition reactions as general Poisson processes: Theory and an experimental example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydén, Tobias; Wernersson, Mikael

    1995-10-01

    The classical theory of decomposition reaction kinetics depends on a ``large scale'' assumption. In this paper we show how this assumption can be replaced by the assumption that the nucleation process is a space-time Poisson process. This framework is unifying in the sense that it includes many earlier formulas as special cases, and it naturally takes boundary effects into account. We consider the conversion of a sphere in detail, and fit the parameters of this model to gypsum decomposition experimental data. The so obtained model shows, for this particular reaction, that the boundary effects decrease with temperature.

  12. Singlet oxygen generation from the decomposition of alpha-linolenic acid hydroperoxide by cytochrome c and lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shuna; Bao, Zhijuan; Ma, Huimin; Zhang, Deqing; Zheng, Xiaoping

    2007-06-01

    Generation of singlet oxygen is first investigated in the decomposition of polyunsaturated lipid peroxide, alpha-linolenic acid hydroperoxide (LAOOH), by heme-proteins such as cytochrome c and lactoperoxidase. Chemiluminescence and electron spin resonance methods are used to confirm the singlet oxygen generation and quantify its yield. Decomposition products of LAOOH are characterized by HPLC-ESI-MS, which suggests that singlet oxygen is produced via the decomposition of a linear tetraoxide intermediate (Russell's mechanism). Free radicals formed in the decomposition are also identified by the electron spin resonance technique, and the results show that peroxyl, alkyl, and epoxyalkyl radicals are involved. The changes of cytochrome c and lactoperoxidase in the reaction are monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy, revealing the action of a monoelectronic and two-electronic oxidation for cytochrome c and lactoperoxidase, respectively. These results suggest that cytochrome c causes a homolytic reaction of LAOOH, generating alkoxyl radical and then peroxyl radical, which in turn releases singlet oxygen following the Russell mechanism, whereas lactoperoxidase leads to a heterolytic reaction of LAOOH, and the resulting ferryl porphyryl radical of lactoperoxidase abstracts the hydrogen atom from LAOOH to give peroxyl radical and then singlet oxygen. This observation would be important for a better understanding of the damage mechanism of cell membrane or lipoprotein by singlet oxygen and various radicals generated in the peroxidation and decomposition of lipids induced by heme-proteins.

  13. A DFT analysis of thermal decomposition reactions important to natural products.

    PubMed

    Setzer, William N

    2010-07-01

    The thermal decomposition reactions of several important natural flavor and fragrance chemicals have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT, B3LYP/6-31G*). Retro-aldol reactions of glucose, fructose, hernandulcin, epihernandulcin, [3]-gingerol, and [4]-isogingerol; retro-carbonyl-ene reactions of isopulegol, lavandulol, isolyratol, and indicumenone; and pyrolytic syn elimination reactions of linalyl acetate, alpha-terpinyl acetate, and bornyl acetate, have been carried out. The calculations indicate activation enthalpies of around 30 kcal/mol for the retro-aldol reactions and for retro-carbonyl-ene reactions, comparable to pericyclic reactions such as the Cope rearrangement and electrocyclic reactions, and therefore important reactions at elevated temperatures (e.g., boiling aqueous solutions, gas-chromatograph injection ports). Activation enthalpies for pyrolytic eliminations are around 40 kcal/mol and are unlikely to occur during extraction or GC analysis. PMID:20734926

  14. Pt/TiO2 (Rutile) Catalysts for Sulfuric Acid Decomposition in Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Petkovic; D. M. Ginosar; H. W. Rollins; K. C. Burch; P. J. Pinhero; H. H. Farrell

    2008-04-01

    Thermochemical cycles consist of a series of chemical reactions to produce hydrogen from water at lower temperatures than by direct thermal decomposition. All the sulfur-based cycles for water splitting employ the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. This work reports the studies performed on platinum supported on titania (rutile) catalysts to investigate the causes of catalyst deactivation under sulfuric acid decomposition reaction conditions. Samples of 1 wt% Pt/TiO2 (rutile) catalysts were submitted to flowing concentrated sulfuric acid at 1123 K and atmospheric pressure for different times on stream (TOS) between 0 and 548 h. Post-operation analyses of the spent catalyst samples showed that Pt oxidation and sintering occurred under reaction conditions and some Pt was lost by volatilization. Pt loss rate was higher at initial times but total loss appeared to be independent of the gaseous environment. Catalyst activity showed an initial decrease that lasted for about 66 h, followed by a slight recovery of activity between 66 and 102 h TOS, and a period of slower deactivation after 102 h TOS. Catalyst sulfation did not seem to be detrimental to catalyst activity and the activity profile suggested that a complex dynamical situation involving platinum sintering, volatilization, and oxidation, along with TiO2 morphological changes affected catalyst activity in a non-monotonic way.

  15. S-matrix decomposition, natural reaction channels, and the quantum transition state approach to reactive scattering.

    PubMed

    Manthe, Uwe; Ellerbrock, Roman

    2016-05-28

    A new approach for the quantum-state resolved analysis of polyatomic reactions is introduced. Based on the singular value decomposition of the S-matrix, energy-dependent natural reaction channels and natural reaction probabilities are defined. It is shown that the natural reaction probabilities are equal to the eigenvalues of the reaction probability operator [U. Manthe and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 3411 (1993)]. Consequently, the natural reaction channels can be interpreted as uniquely defined pathways through the transition state of the reaction. The analysis can efficiently be combined with reactive scattering calculations based on the propagation of thermal flux eigenstates. In contrast to a decomposition based straightforwardly on thermal flux eigenstates, it does not depend on the choice of the dividing surface separating reactants from products. The new approach is illustrated studying a prototypical example, the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction. The natural reaction probabilities and the contributions of the different vibrational states of the methyl product to the natural reaction channels are calculated and discussed. The relation between the thermal flux eigenstates and the natural reaction channels is studied in detail.

  16. The thermochemistry and reaction mechanisms in the decomposition of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C.F.

    1994-05-01

    The chemical processes involved in the decomposition of energetic materials have been investigated theoretically using quantum chemical methods to determine the thermochemistry and reaction pathways. The Bond-Additivity-Corrected Moller-Plesset 4th order perturbation theory method (BAC-MP4) has been used to determine heats of formation and free energies of reaction intermediates of decomposition. In addition, the BAC-MP4 method has been used to determine action pathways involving these intermediates. A theoretical method for calculating solvation energies has been developed to treat the non-idealities of high pressure and the condensed phase. The resulting chemical processes involving decomposition and ignition are presented for nitrate compounds, nitramines, and nitromethane.

  17. Thermal decomposition of sugarcane straw, kinetics and heat of reaction in synthetic air.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Ordóñez, Yesid Javier; Tannous, Katia

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the thermal decomposition, kinetics and heat of reaction of sugarcane straw in synthetic air by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The TG and DSC experiments were carried out using heating rates of 2.5°C/min, 5°C/min, and 10°C/min, and particle diameter of 0.250mm. In the study of the smoldering reaction were identified three consecutive stages, drying, oxidative pyrolysis, and combustion. Thus, the kinetic pathway was composed by six independent parallel reactions, three for each stage after drying, in which the activation energies were 176, 313, 150, 80, 150, and 100kJ/mol. The heat of reaction in synthetic air was completely exothermic releasing 8MJ/kg. The modeled curves of thermal decomposition of sugarcane straw presented good agreement with experimental data. Then, the kinetic parameters obtained could be used to analyze different processes involving smoldering.

  18. Ab initio calculations of the reaction pathways for methane decomposition over the Cu (111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajewski, Grzegorz; Pao, Chun-Wei

    2011-08-01

    Growth of large-area, few-layer graphene has been reported recently through the catalytic decomposition of methane (CH4) over a Cu surface at high temperature. In this study, we used ab initio calculations to investigate the minimum energy pathways of successive dehydrogenation reactions of CH4 over the Cu (111) surface. The geometries and energies of all the reaction intermediates and transition states were identified using the climbing image nudged elastic band method. The activation barriers for CH4 decomposition over this Cu surface are much lower than those in the gas phase; furthermore, analysis of electron density differences revealed significant degrees of charge transfer between the adsorbates and the Cu atoms along the reaction path; these features reveal the role of Cu as the catalytic material for graphene growth. All the dehydrogenation reactions are endothermic, except for carbon dimer (C2) formation, which is, therefore, the most critical step for subsequent graphene growth, in particular, on Cu (111) surface.

  19. Reaction behaviors of decomposition of monocrotophos in aqueous solution by UV and UV/O processes.

    PubMed

    Ku, Y; Wang, W; Shen, Y S

    2000-02-01

    The decomposition of monocrotophos (cis-3-dimethoxyphosphinyloxy-N-methyl-crotonamide) in aqueous solution by UV and UV/O(3) processes was studied. The experiments were carried out under various solution pH values to investigate the decomposition efficiencies of the reactant and organic intermediates in order to determine the completeness of decomposition. The photolytic decomposition rate of monocrotophos was increased with increasing solution pH because the solution pH affects the distribution and light absorbance of monocrotophos species. The combination of O(3) with UV light apparently promoted the decomposition and mineralization of monocrotophos in aqueous solution. For the UV/O(3) process, the breakage of the >C=C< bond of monocrotophos by ozone molecules was found to occur first, followed by mineralization by hydroxyl radicals to generate CO(3)(2-), PO4(3-), and NO(3)(-) anions in sequence. The quasi-global kinetics based on a simplified consecutive-parallel reaction scheme was developed to describe the temporal behavior of monocrotophos decomposition in aqueous solution by the UV/O(3) process. PMID:10648946

  20. A Review of Study on Thermal Energy Transport System by Synthesis and Decomposition Reactions of Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiusheng; Yabe, Akira; Kajiyama, Shiro; Fukuda, Katsuya

    The study on thermal energy transport system by synthesis and decomposition reactions of methanol was reviewed. To promote energy conservation and global environment protection, a two-step liquid-phase methanol synthesis process, which starts with carbonylation of methanol to methyl formate, then followed by the hydrogenolysis of the formate, was studied to recover wasted or unused discharged heat from industrial sources for the thermal energy demands of residential and commercial areas by chemical reactions. The research and development of the system were focused on the following three points. (1) Development of low-temperature decomposition and synthetic catalysts, (2) Development of liquid phase reactor (heat exchanger accompanying chemical reaction), (3) Simulation of the energy transport efficiency of entire system which contains heat recovery and supply sections. As the result of the development of catalyst, promising catalysts which agree with the development purposes for the methyl formate decomposition reaction and the synthetic reaction are being developed though some studies remain for the methanol decomposition and synthetic reactions. In the fundamental development of liquid phase reactor, the solubilities of CO and H2 gases in methanol and methyl formate were measured by the method of total pressure decrease due to absorption under pressures up to 1500kPa and temperatures up to 140°C. The diffusivity of CO gas in methanol was determined by measuring the diameter and solution time of single CO bubbles in methanol. The chemical reaction rate of methanol synthesis by hydrogenolysis of methyl formate was measured using a plate-type of Raney copper catalyst in a reactor with rectangular channel and in an autoclave reactor. The reaction characteristics were investigated by carrying out the experiments at various temperatures, flow rates and at various catalyst development conditions. We focused on the effect of Raney copper catalyst thickness on the liquid

  1. Toward a reaction rate model of condensed-phase RDX decomposition under high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Shock ignition of energetic molecular solids is driven by microstructural heterogeneities, at which even moderate stresses can result in sufficiently high temperatures to initiate material decomposition and chemical energy release. Mesoscale modeling of these ``hot spots'' requires a reaction rate model that describes the energy release with a sub-microsecond resolution and under a wide range of temperatures. No such model is available even for well-studied energetic materials such as RDX. In this presentation, I will describe an ongoing effort to develop a reaction rate model of condensed-phase RDX decomposition under high temperatures using first-principles molecular dynamics, transition-state theory, and reaction network analysis. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory, by the Office of Naval Research, and by the DoD High Performance Computing Modernization Program Software Application Institute for Multiscale Reactive Modeling of Insensitive Munitions.

  2. Toward a reaction rate model of condensed-phase RDX decomposition under high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, Igor

    2014-03-01

    Shock ignition of energetic molecular solids is driven by microstructural heterogeneities, at which even moderate stresses can result in sufficiently high temperatures to initiate material decomposition and the release of the chemical energy. Mesoscale modeling of these ``hot spots'' requires a chemical reaction rate model that describes the energy release with a sub-microsecond resolution and under a wide range of temperatures. No such model is available even for well-studied energetic materials such as RDX. In this presentation, I will describe an ongoing effort to develop a reaction rate model of condensed-phase RDX decomposition under high temperatures using first-principles molecular dynamics, transition-state theory, and reaction network analysis. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory, by the Office of Naval Research, and by the DOD High Performance Computing Modernization Program Software Application Institute for Multiscale Reactive Modeling of Insensitive Munitions.

  3. Combined activation strain model and energy decomposition analysis methods: a new way to understand pericyclic reactions.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Israel

    2014-05-01

    The recently introduced activation strain model (ASM) has allowed us to gain more insight into the intimacies of different fundamental processes in chemistry. In combination with the energy decomposition analysis (EDA) method, we have nowadays a very useful tool to quantitatively understand the physical factors that govern the activation barriers of reactions within organic and organometallic chemistry. In this Perspective article, we present selected illustrative examples of the application of this method to pericyclic reactions (Diels-Alder and double group transfer reactions) to show that this methodology nicely complements other more traditional, widely used theoretical methods.

  4. GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

    1999-05-26

    Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N15H3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia.

  5. Initial Reaction Steps in the Condensed-Phase Decomposition of Propellants

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C F; Piqueras, M C

    2001-12-11

    Understanding the reaction mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials in the condensed phase is critical to our development of detailed kinetic models of propellant combustion. To date, the reaction mechanisms in the condensed phase have been represented by global, reactions. The detailed elementary reactions subsequent to the initial NO{sub 2} bond scissioning are not known. Using quantum chemical calculations, we have investigated the possible early steps in the decomposition of energetic materials that can occur in the condensed phase. We have used methylnitrate, methylnitramine, and nitroethane as prototypes for O-NO{sub 2}, N-NO{sub 2} and C-NO{sub 2} nitro compounds. We find the energetic radicals formed from the initial NO{sub 2} bond scissioning can be converted to unsaturated non-radical intermediates as an alternative to the unzipping of the energetic radical. We propose a new, prompt oxidation mechanism in which the trapped HONO can add back onto the energetic molecule. This produces oxidation products in the condensed phase that normally would not be produced until much later in the flame. We have shown that this prompt oxidation mechanism is a general feature of both nitramines and nitrate esters. The resulting HONO formed by the H-atom abstraction will be strongly influenced by the cage effect of the condensed phase. The applicability of this mechanism is demonstrated for decomposition of ethylnitrate, illustrating the importance of the cage effect in enabling this mechanism to occur at low temperatures.

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure, and thermal decomposition of the cobalt(II) complex with 2-picolinic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Di; Zhong, Guo-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The cobalt(II) complex of 2-picolinic acid (Hpic), namely, [Co(pic)₂(H₂O)₂] · 2H₂O, was synthesized with the reaction of cobalt acetate and 2-picolinic acid as the reactants by solid-solid reaction at room temperature. The composition and structure of the complex were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The crystal structure of the complex belongs to monoclinic system and space group P2(1)/n, with cell parameters of a = 9.8468(7) Å, b = 5.2013(4) Å, c = 14.6041(15) Å, β = 111.745(6)°, V = 747.96(11) ų, Z = 2, D(c) = 1.666 g cm⁻³, R₁ = 0.0297, and wR₂ = 0.0831. In the title complex, the Co(II) ion is six-coordinated by two pyridine N atoms and two carboxyl O atoms from two 2-picolinic acid anions, and two O atoms from two H2O molecules, and forming a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. The thermal decomposition processes of the complex under nitrogen include dehydration and pyrolysis of the ligand, and the final residue is cobalt oxalate at about 450°C.

  7. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Thermal Decomposition of the Cobalt(II) Complex with 2-Picolinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di

    2014-01-01

    The cobalt(II) complex of 2-picolinic acid (Hpic), namely, [Co(pic)2(H2O)2] · 2H2O, was synthesized with the reaction of cobalt acetate and 2-picolinic acid as the reactants by solid-solid reaction at room temperature. The composition and structure of the complex were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The crystal structure of the complex belongs to monoclinic system and space group P2(1)/n, with cell parameters of a = 9.8468(7) Å, b = 5.2013(4) Å, c = 14.6041(15) Å, β = 111.745(6)°, V = 747.96(11) Å3, Z = 2, Dc = 1.666 g cm−3, R1 = 0.0297, and wR2 = 0.0831. In the title complex, the Co(II) ion is six-coordinated by two pyridine N atoms and two carboxyl O atoms from two 2-picolinic acid anions, and two O atoms from two H2O molecules, and forming a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. The thermal decomposition processes of the complex under nitrogen include dehydration and pyrolysis of the ligand, and the final residue is cobalt oxalate at about 450°C. PMID:24578654

  8. Sulfurized limonite as material for fast decomposition of organic compounds by heterogeneous Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kei; Tanaka, Toshinori; Tsuda, Yutaka; Ban, Masahiro; Koveke, Edwin P; Koinuma, Michio; Ohira, Shin-Ichi

    2014-08-15

    Rapid decomposition of wastewater contaminants using sulfurized limonite (S-limonite) was investigated. Limonite is used for desulfurization of biogases, and S-limonite is obtained from desulfurization plants as solid waste. In this work, the profitable use of S-limonite in water treatment was examined. The divalent Fe in S-limonite was expected to produce OH radicals, as Fe(2+) ions and limonite thermally treated with H2 do. Methylene blue was used for batch-wise monitoring of the decomposition performance. The decomposition rate was fast and the methylene blue solution color disappeared in only 10s when a small amount of H2O2 was added (1mM in the sample solution) in the presence of S-limonite. The OH radicals were formed by a heterogeneous reaction on the S-limonite surface and Fenton reaction with dissolved Fe(2+). The decomposition of pentachlorophenol was also examined; it was successfully decomposed in batch-wise tests. The surfaces of limonite before sulfurization, S-limonite, and S-limonite after use for water treatment were performed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that S-limonite reverted to limonite after being used for water treatment.

  9. First-principles study of the paths of the decomposition reaction of LiBH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Riccarda; Züttel, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    A clear description of the paths of thermal decomposition of complex borohydrides represents a crucial step forward to their utilisation as a reservoir of hydrogen and hence as materials for solid state hydrogen storage. We present in this work a theoretical study of the possible paths of decomposition of LiBH4 by means of density functional theory approach. Our first-principles calculations showed the possibility to form linear chains of tetraborate of lithium in the residue of decomposition, among other thermodynamically competitive reactions. Their analytical formula LiBH x agreed with the quantitative analysis already reported by Schlesinger and co-workers in the 1940s. The structure showed the formula unit Li4B4H10, and the analytical formula LiBH2.5, of which the Gibbs free energy of formation was -111.76 kJ mol-1. The lattice stability was confirmed by the phonon calculations, which revealed all positive normal modes. Comparatively, the formation of lithium dodecaborate(12) is presented and discussed. The calculated standard Gibbs free energy of the decomposition reactions considered in the present work were in the range (158,286) kJ mol-1 of LiBH4 decomposed.

  10. A Lewis acid-promoted Pinner reaction

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, Dominik; Nemecek, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Summary Carbonitriles and alcohols react in a Lewis acid-promoted Pinner reaction to carboxylic esters. Best results are obtained with two equivalents of trimethylsilyl triflate as Lewis acid. Good yields are achieved with primary alcohols and aliphatic or benzylic carbonitriles, but the straightforward synthesis of acrylates and benzoates starting with acrylonitrile and benzonitrile, respectively, is similarly possible. Phenols are not acylated under these reaction conditions. The method has been used for the first total synthesis of the natural product monaspilosin. In the reaction of benzyl alcohols variable amounts of amides are formed in a Ritter-type side reaction. PMID:23946857

  11. Fundamental mechanistic studies in formic acid decomposition on transition metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-03-01

    Formic acid (HCOOH) is a simple molecule that is an abundant product of biomass processing and can serve as an internal source of hydrogen for oxygen removal and upgrading of biomass to chemicals and fuels. In addition, HCOOH can be used as a fuel for low temperature direct fuel cells. We present a systematic study of the HCOOH decomposition reaction mechanism starting from first-principles and including reactivity experiments and microkinetic modeling. In particular, periodic self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations are performed to determine the stability of reactive intermediates and activation energy barriers of elementary steps. Pre-exponential factors are determined from vibrational frequency calculations. Mean-field microkinetic models are developed and calculated reaction rates and reaction orders are then compared with experimentally measured ones. These comparisons provide useful insights on the nature of the active site, most-abundant surface intermediates as a function of reaction conditions and feed composition. Trends across metals on the fundamental atomic-scale level up to selectivity trends will be discussed. Finally, we identify from first-principles alloy surfaces, which may possess better catalytic properties for selective dehydrogenation of HCOOH than monometallic surfaces, thereby guiding synthesis towards promising novel catalytic materials. Work supported as part of the Institute of Atom-efficient Chemical Transformation (IACT), an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  12. Substrate decomposition in galvanic displacement reaction: Contrast between gold and silver nanoparticle formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tapas; Satpati, Biswarup

    2015-06-24

    We have investigated substrate decomposition during formation of silver and gold nanoparticles in galvanic displacement reaction on germanium surfaces. Silver and gold nanoparticles were synthesized by electroless deposition on sputter coated germanium thin film (∼ 200 nm) grown initially on silicon substrate. The nanoparticles formation and the substrate corrosion were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy.

  13. Red-Light Initiated Decomposition of α-Hydroxy Methylperoxy Radical in the Presence of Organic and Inorganic Acids: Implications for the HOx Formation in the Lower Stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical calculations have been carried out to investigate the gas-phase decomposition of α-hydroxy methylperoxy (HOCH2(OO)) radical in the absence and presence of formic acid, acetic acid, nitric acid, and sulfuric acid. The HOCH2(OO) radical decomposition represents a new source of the HOx radical in troposphere. The results suggest that sulfuric acid will be more effective than other acids in catalyzing the peroxy radical decomposition. However, the significant stability of prereaction and postreaction complexes in all the bimolecular reactions implies a new photomechanism for the acid-mediated decomposition of the HOCH2(OO) radical that involves the visible or near IR overtone excitation of the OH stretching modes or electronic excitation of the O-O peroxy moiety in the acid-bound radical. This new overtone or electronic excitation-based photomechanism for the peroxy radical decomposition may provide useful insight into the missing photolytic source of the HOx at high solar zenith angles corresponding to the dawn or dusk photochemistry. PMID:27070960

  14. Red-Light Initiated Decomposition of α-Hydroxy Methylperoxy Radical in the Presence of Organic and Inorganic Acids: Implications for the HOx Formation in the Lower Stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical calculations have been carried out to investigate the gas-phase decomposition of α-hydroxy methylperoxy (HOCH2(OO)) radical in the absence and presence of formic acid, acetic acid, nitric acid, and sulfuric acid. The HOCH2(OO) radical decomposition represents a new source of the HOx radical in troposphere. The results suggest that sulfuric acid will be more effective than other acids in catalyzing the peroxy radical decomposition. However, the significant stability of prereaction and postreaction complexes in all the bimolecular reactions implies a new photomechanism for the acid-mediated decomposition of the HOCH2(OO) radical that involves the visible or near IR overtone excitation of the OH stretching modes or electronic excitation of the O-O peroxy moiety in the acid-bound radical. This new overtone or electronic excitation-based photomechanism for the peroxy radical decomposition may provide useful insight into the missing photolytic source of the HOx at high solar zenith angles corresponding to the dawn or dusk photochemistry.

  15. Thermochemical properties and non-isothermal decomposition reaction kinetics of 3,4-dinitrofurazanfuroxan (DNTF).

    PubMed

    Feng-qi, Zhao; Pei, Chen; Rong-zu, Hu; Yang, Luo; Zhi-zhong, Zhang; Yan-shui, Zhou; Xu-wu, Yang; Yin, Gao; Sheng-li, Gao; Qi-zhen, Shi

    2004-09-10

    The constant-volume combustion energy, DeltacU (DNTF, s, 298.15K) and kinetic behavior of the exothermic decomposition reaction of the title compound (DNTF) are determined by a precise rotating bomb calorimeter and DSC, respectively. Its standard enthalpy of combustion, DeltacHmtheta (DNTF, s, 298.15K), standard enthalpy of formation, DeltacHmtheta (DNTF, s, 298.15K) and kinetic parameters of the major exothermic decomposition reaction in a temperature-programmed mode [the apparent activation energy (Ea) and pre-exponential factor (A)] are calculated. The values of DeltacU (DNTF, s, 298.15K), DeltacHmtheta (DNTF, s, 298.15K), and DeltacHmtheta (DNTF, s, 298.15K) of DNTF are -9733.96 +/- 8.59 Jg(-1), -3018.29 +/- 2.68 kJ mol(-1), and 657.23 +/- 2.70 kJ mol(-1), respectively. The kinetic model function in integral form and the value of E(a) and A of the major exothermic decomposition reaction of DNTF are 1-(1-alpha)1/3, 177.03 kJ mol(-1) and 10(13.68)s(-1), respectively. The critical temperature of thermal explosion of DNTF is 240.6 degrees C. PMID:15363515

  16. Mechanistic insight into the hydrazine decomposition on Rh(111): effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhigang; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wen, Zengqiang; Wei, Shuxian; Liu, Yunjie; Fu, Dianling; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue

    2013-10-14

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity for hydrazine (N2H4) decomposition on Rh(111). Reaction mechanisms via intramolecular and NH2-assisted N2H4 decompositions are comparatively analyzed, including adsorption configuration, reaction energy and barrier of elementary step, and reaction network. Our results show that the most favorable N2H4 decomposition pathway starts with the initial N-N bond scission to the NH2 intermediate, followed by stepwise H stripping from adsorbed N2Hx (x = 1-4) species, and finally forms the N2 and NH3 products. Comparatively, the stepwise intramolecular dehydrogenation via N2H4→ N2H3→ N2H2→ N2H → N2, and N2H4→ NH2→ NH → N with or without NH2 promotion effect, are unfavorable due to higher energy barriers encountered. Energy barrier analysis, reaction rate constants, and electronic structures are used to identify the crucial competitive route. The promotion effect of the NH2 intermediate is structurally reflected in the weakening of the N-H bond and strengthening of the N-N bond in N2Hx in the coadsorption system; it results intrinsically from the less structural deformation of the adsorbate, and weakening of the interaction between dehydrogenated fragment and departing H in transition state. Our results highlight the crucial effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity and provide a theoretical approach to analyze the effect. PMID:23990024

  17. Mechanistic insight into the hydrazine decomposition on Rh(111): effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhigang; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wen, Zengqiang; Wei, Shuxian; Liu, Yunjie; Fu, Dianling; Zhao, Lianming; Guo, Wenyue

    2013-10-14

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to systematically investigate the effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity for hydrazine (N2H4) decomposition on Rh(111). Reaction mechanisms via intramolecular and NH2-assisted N2H4 decompositions are comparatively analyzed, including adsorption configuration, reaction energy and barrier of elementary step, and reaction network. Our results show that the most favorable N2H4 decomposition pathway starts with the initial N-N bond scission to the NH2 intermediate, followed by stepwise H stripping from adsorbed N2Hx (x = 1-4) species, and finally forms the N2 and NH3 products. Comparatively, the stepwise intramolecular dehydrogenation via N2H4→ N2H3→ N2H2→ N2H → N2, and N2H4→ NH2→ NH → N with or without NH2 promotion effect, are unfavorable due to higher energy barriers encountered. Energy barrier analysis, reaction rate constants, and electronic structures are used to identify the crucial competitive route. The promotion effect of the NH2 intermediate is structurally reflected in the weakening of the N-H bond and strengthening of the N-N bond in N2Hx in the coadsorption system; it results intrinsically from the less structural deformation of the adsorbate, and weakening of the interaction between dehydrogenated fragment and departing H in transition state. Our results highlight the crucial effect of reaction intermediate on catalytic activity and provide a theoretical approach to analyze the effect.

  18. Ab initio calculations of the reaction pathways for methane decomposition over the Cu (111) surface.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Grzegorz; Pao, Chun-Wei

    2011-08-14

    Growth of large-area, few-layer graphene has been reported recently through the catalytic decomposition of methane (CH(4)) over a Cu surface at high temperature. In this study, we used ab initio calculations to investigate the minimum energy pathways of successive dehydrogenation reactions of CH(4) over the Cu (111) surface. The geometries and energies of all the reaction intermediates and transition states were identified using the climbing image nudged elastic band method. The activation barriers for CH(4) decomposition over this Cu surface are much lower than those in the gas phase; furthermore, analysis of electron density differences revealed significant degrees of charge transfer between the adsorbates and the Cu atoms along the reaction path; these features reveal the role of Cu as the catalytic material for graphene growth. All the dehydrogenation reactions are endothermic, except for carbon dimer (C(2)) formation, which is, therefore, the most critical step for subsequent graphene growth, in particular, on Cu (111) surface. PMID:21842949

  19. Synthesis and Decomposition of Zinc Iodide: Model Reactions for Investigating Chemical Change in the Introductory Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeo, Stephen

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss two colorful reactions not widely used by chemical educators in high schools or college chemistry laboratories: The synthesis of zinc iodide from its elements, zinc and iodine, and the subsequent decomposition of zinc iodide back into its elements. These reactions are important for chemistry teachers to know about because they can be performed by introductory students to understand different aspects of chemical change such as the concepts of reaction, compound, bonding, excess and limiting reactants, an empirical formula, balanced chemical equation, the conservation of matter and energy, the Law of the Conservation of Mass, and the Law of Constant Composition. These concepts, in turn, are important because they are fundamental to chemistry, are widely taught by chemistry teachers, and are deceptively difficult for introductory chemistry students to understand. The synthesis of zinc iodide has many scientific advantages over current syntheses of binary compounds from elements such as the syntheses of copper sulfide and magnesium oxide. For example, zinc iodide can be synthesized to 1% of theoretical mass in less than a half an hour and can be readily analyzed qualitatively as well as quantitatively by two different titrations. As a set of reactions, the synthesis and decomposition of zinc iodide is safe to perform, reliable, inexpensive, and does not pose a threat to the environment. The author has developed a small collection of teacher activities describing the synthesis and decomposition of zinc iodide. The activities are innovative because they contain improvements not found in the existing literature. Appropriate for high school and first year college chemistry teachers, all of the activities contain detailed procedures and discussions as well as safety and disposal requirements.

  20. Determination of the Thermal Decomposition Products of Terephthalic Acid by Using Curie-Point Pyrolyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begüm Elmas Kimyonok, A.; Ulutürk, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    The thermal decomposition behavior of terephthalic acid (TA) was investigated by thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) and Curie-point pyrolysis. TG/DTA analysis showed that TA is sublimed at 276°C prior to decomposition. Pyrolysis studies were carried out at various temperatures ranging from 160 to 764°C. Decomposition products were analyzed and their structures were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 11 degradation products were identified at 764°C, whereas no peak was observed below 445°C. Benzene, benzoic acid, and 1,1‧-biphenyl were identified as the major decomposition products, and other degradation products such as toluene, benzophenone, diphenylmethane, styrene, benzaldehyde, phenol, 9H-fluorene, and 9-phenyl 9H-fluorene were also detected. A pyrolysis mechanism was proposed based on the findings.

  1. Collisional activation of N2O decomposition and CO oxidation reactions on isolated rhodium clusters.

    PubMed

    Parry, Imogen S; Kartouzian, Aras; Hamilton, Suzanne M; Balaj, O Petru; Beyer, Martin K; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2013-09-12

    The reactions of nitrous oxide decorated rhodium clusters, RhnN2O(+) (n = 5, 6), have been studied by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. Collision induced dissociation with Ar is shown to lead to one of two processes; desorption of the intact N2O moiety (indicating molecular adsorption in the parent cluster) or N2O decomposition liberating molecular nitrogen with the latter becoming increasingly dominant at higher collision energies. Consistent with the results of earlier studies, which employed infrared excitation [Hermes, A. C.; et al. J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2011, 2, 3053], Rh5ON2O(+) is observed to behave qualitatively differently to Rh5N2O(+) with decomposition of the nitrous oxide dominating the chemistry of the former. In other experiments, the reactivity of RhnN2O(+) clusters with CO has been studied. Chemisorption of (13)CO is calculated to deposit ca. 2 eV into the parent cluster, initiating a range of chemical processes on the cluster surface, which are fit to a simple reaction mechanism. Clear differences are again observed in the reaction branching ratios for Rh5N2O(+) and Rh6N2O(+) parent cluster ions. For the n = 5 cluster, the combined N2O reduction/CO oxidation is the most significant reaction channel, while the n = 6 cluster preferentially is oxidized to Rh6O(+) with loss of N2 and CO. Even larger differences are observed in the reactions of the N2O decorated cluster oxides, RhnON2O(+), for which more reaction possibilities arise. The results of all studies are discussed in relation to infrared driven processes on the same parent cluster species [Hamilton, S. M.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 1448; J. Phys. Chem. A, 2011, 115, 2489].

  2. Comparison of unimolecular decomposition pathways for carboxylic acids of relevance to biofuels.

    PubMed

    Clark, Jared M; Nimlos, Mark R; Robichaud, David J

    2014-01-01

    Quantum mechanical molecular modeling is used [M06-2X/6-311++G(2df,p)] to compare activation energies and rate constants for unimolecular decomposition pathways of saturated and unsaturated carboxylic acids that are important in the production of biofuels and that are models for plant and algae-derived intermediates. Dehydration and decarboxylation reactions are considered. The barrier heights to decarboxylation and dehydration are similar in magnitude for saturated acids (∼71 kcal mol(-1)), with an approximate 1:1 [H2O]/[CO2] branching ratio over the temperature range studied (500-2000 K). α,β-Unsaturation lowers the barrier to decarboxylation between 2.2 and 12.2 kcal mol(-1) while increasing the barriers to dehydration by ∼3 kcal mol(-1). The branching ratio, as a result, is an order of magnitude smaller, [H2O]/[CO2] = 0.07. For some α,β-unsaturated acids, six-center transition states are available for dehydration, with barrier heights of ∼35.0 kcal mol(-1). The branching ratio for these acids can be as high as 370:1. β,γ-Unsaturation results in a small lowering in the barrier height to decarboxylation (∼70.0 kcal mol(-1)). β,γ-Unsaturation also leads to a lowering in the dehydration pathway from 1.7 to 5.1 kcal mol(-1). These results are discussed with respect to predicted kinetic values for acids of importance in biofuels production.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10679 - Carboxylic acid, substituted alkylstannylene ester, reaction products with inorganic acid tetra...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alkylstannylene ester, reaction products with inorganic acid tetra alkyl ester (generic). 721.10679 Section 721... Carboxylic acid, substituted alkylstannylene ester, reaction products with inorganic acid tetra alkyl ester... identified generically as carboxylic acid, substituted alkylstannylene ester, reaction products...

  4. Thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates of BTATz-CMDB propellant.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Wang, Bo-Zhou; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Cheng; Hu, Rong-Zu; Ren, Ying-Hui; Xu, Si-Yu; Xu, Kang-Zhen; Ren, Xiao-Ning

    2010-09-15

    The composite modified double base (CMDB) propellants (nos. RB0601 and RB0602) containing 3,6-bis (1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-yl-amino)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (BTATz) without and with the ballistic modifier were prepared and their thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates were investigated. The results show that there are three mass-loss stages in TG curve and two exothermic peaks in DSC curve for the BTATz-CMDB propellant. The first two mass-loss stages occur in succession and the temperature ranges are near apart, and the decomposition peaks of the two stages overlap each other, inducing only one visible exothermic peak appear in DSC curve during 350-550 K. The reaction mechanisms of the main exothermal decomposition processes of RB0601 and RB0602 are all classified as chemical reaction, the mechanism functions are f(alpha)=(1-alpha)(2), and the kinetic equations are dalpha/dt = 10(19.24)(1-alpha)(2)e(-2.32x10(4)/T) and dalpha/dt = 10(20.32)(1-alpha)(2)e(-2.32x10(4)/T). The thermal safety evaluation on the BTATz-CMDB propellants was obtained. With the substitution of 26% RDX by BTATz and with the help of the ballistic modifier in the CMDB propellant formulation, the burning rate can be improved by 89.0% at 8 MPa and 47.1% at 22 MPa, the pressure exponent can be reduced to 0.353 at 14-20 MPa.

  5. Single Photon Initiated Decomposition Rearrangement Reactions (spidrr) of Organic Molecules Mediated by the Ni+ Cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellert, Darrin; Mansell, Adam; Theis, Zachary; Gutierrez, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The Bellert group at Baylor University has developed a novel method for performing single photon initiated decomposition rearrangement reactions (SPIDRR) of organic molecules mediated by a transition metal cation. The advantage that SPIDRR affords is the direct measurement of first order microcanonical rate constants, k(E), determined at resolved internal energies. Furthermore, the SPIDRR technique measures kinetic details of exothermic reactions where product production is limited only by submerged activation barriers (kinetic barriers that are at energies below the separated reactant limit). Thus, such reactions approach unit efficiency, are thermodynamically driven, and are of greater relevance to catalytic research. Direct measurements of k(E) values extend to isotopically labelled species that provide direct measurement of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE), furnishing unique insight into the mechanistic details of a reaction. This talk presents results from the visible photon initiated, Ni+ induced decarbonylation reaction of propionaldehyde. Here a rather unique energy dependent behavior of the measured rate constants was observed and attributed to a dynamic competition between parallel reaction coordinates available to the photo-excited precursor. RRKM calculations in concert with high level DFT is used to support and further experimental results.

  6. Photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid by iron and niobium co-doped titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Estrellan, Carl Renan; Salim, Chris; Hinode, Hirofumi

    2010-07-15

    The photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in aqueous solution using Fe and Nb co-doped TiO(2) (Fe:Nb-TiO(2)) prepared by sol-gel method was investigated. The photocatalytic activity of Fe:Nb-TiO(2) towards PFOA degradation was compared to that of pure TiO(2) synthesized using the same method, and that of the commercially available TiO(2) photocatalyst, Aeroxide TiO(2) P25 (AO-TiO(2) P25). The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, DRS, BET-N(2) adsorption isotherm, and SEM-EDX techniques and the data were correlated to the photocatalytic activity. Fe:Nb-TiO(2) showed the highest activity compared to the undoped TiO(2) and the commercially available TiO(2). Such activity was attributable to the effects of co-doping both on the physico-chemical properties and surface interfacial charge transfer mechanisms. Perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) with shorter carbon chain length and fluoride ions were identified as photocatalytic reaction intermediates and products.

  7. [Effects of simulated acid rain on decomposition of soil organic carbon and crop straw].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Zhu; Huang, Yao; Yang, Xin-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the organic carbon decomposition in different acidity soils, a 40-day incubation test was conducted with the paddy soils of pH 5.48, 6.70 and 8.18. The soils were amended with 0 and 15 g x kg(-1) of rice straw, adjusted to the moisture content of 400 g x kg(-1) air-dried soil by using simulated rain of pH 6.0, 4.5, and 3.0, and incubated at 20 degrees C. The results showed that straw, acid rain, and soil co-affected the CO2 emission from soil system. The amendment of straw increased the soil CO2 emission rate significantly. Acid rain had no significant effects on soil organic carbon decomposition, but significantly affected the straw decomposition in soil. When treated with pH 3.0 acid rain, the amount of decomposed straw over 40-day incubation in acid (pH 5.48) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils was 8% higher, while that in neutral soil (pH 6.70) was 15% lower, compared to the treatment of pH 6.0 rain. In the treatment of pH 3.0 acid rain, the decomposition rate of soil organic C in acid (pH 5.48) soil was 43% and 50% (P < 0.05) higher than that in neutral (pH 6.70) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils, while the decomposition rate of straw in neutral soil was 17% and 16% (P < 0.05) lower than that in acid and alkaline soils, respectively.

  8. [Effects of simulated acid rain on decomposition of soil organic carbon and crop straw].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Zhu; Huang, Yao; Yang, Xin-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the organic carbon decomposition in different acidity soils, a 40-day incubation test was conducted with the paddy soils of pH 5.48, 6.70 and 8.18. The soils were amended with 0 and 15 g x kg(-1) of rice straw, adjusted to the moisture content of 400 g x kg(-1) air-dried soil by using simulated rain of pH 6.0, 4.5, and 3.0, and incubated at 20 degrees C. The results showed that straw, acid rain, and soil co-affected the CO2 emission from soil system. The amendment of straw increased the soil CO2 emission rate significantly. Acid rain had no significant effects on soil organic carbon decomposition, but significantly affected the straw decomposition in soil. When treated with pH 3.0 acid rain, the amount of decomposed straw over 40-day incubation in acid (pH 5.48) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils was 8% higher, while that in neutral soil (pH 6.70) was 15% lower, compared to the treatment of pH 6.0 rain. In the treatment of pH 3.0 acid rain, the decomposition rate of soil organic C in acid (pH 5.48) soil was 43% and 50% (P < 0.05) higher than that in neutral (pH 6.70) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils, while the decomposition rate of straw in neutral soil was 17% and 16% (P < 0.05) lower than that in acid and alkaline soils, respectively. PMID:19459394

  9. Caecal decomposition of uric acid in captive and free ranging willow ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus lagopus).

    PubMed

    Mortensen, A; Tindall, A R

    1981-02-01

    Urine entering the caeca of birds contains significant amounts of uric acid. The discovery of great numbers of bacteria utilizing uric acid in the caeca has encouraged the discussion about nitrogen recycling in birds. In this work caecal decomposition of uric acid in wild and captive willow ptarmigan has been investigated using radioactively labelled uric acid injected directly into one of the caeca. The appearance of radioactive CO2 in the expired air was taken as an indication of uric acid breakdown. The decomposition occurred at a rate corresponding to a half-life of 26 min (11-36 min). The results are in accordance with the previously reported observations of huge numbers of uric acid utilizing bacteria in the caeca of a variety of birds, and also with the nitrogen recycling theory. However, no conclusion concerning the nitrogen recycling can be drawn. PMID:7282388

  10. Reaction of atomic hydrogen with formic acid.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qian; Berski, Slawomir; Latajka, Zdzislaw; Räsänen, Markku; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2014-04-01

    We study the reaction of atomic hydrogen with formic acid and characterize the radical products using IR spectroscopy in a Kr matrix and quantum chemical calculations. The reaction first leads to the formation of an intermediate radical trans-H2COOH, which converts to the more stable radical trans-cis-HC(OH)2via hydrogen atom tunneling on a timescale of hours at 4.3 K. These open-shell species are observed for the first time as well as a reaction between atomic hydrogen and formic acid. The structural assignment is aided by extensive deuteration experiments and ab initio calculations at the UMP2 and UCCSD(T) levels of theory. The simplest geminal diol radical trans-cis-HC(OH)2 identified in the present work as the final product of the reaction should be very reactive, and further reaction channels are of particular interest. These reactions and species may constitute new channels for the initiation and propagation of more complex organic species in the interstellar clouds.

  11. Carrying out thermodynamic calculations and definition of the main reactions of decomposition of vapours of ethyl alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sechin, A. I.; Kyrmakova, O. S.; Ivanova, T. A.

    2015-04-01

    Thermodynamic opportunities of course of chemical reactions of decomposition of the vapors of ethyl alcohol necessary at development of devices where these reactions will take place are considered. The entalpiyny method of calculation of constants of balance of probable chemical reactions is given in the Excel editor. Independent reactions of process of oxidation are defined. By result of thermodynamic calculation of each reaction schedules of dependence of a constant of balance on environment temperature from which follows are constructed that one reactions proceed until the end of aside formation of the final products, and others are improbable or impossible. The analysis of the received results shows that reactions of oxidation will successfully proceed in the established directions, and for an intensification of process of decomposition it is necessary to provide a supply of some energy which quantity will be sufficient for oxidation of vapors of ethyl alcohol. Results of calculations showed good convergence with programs of thermodynamic calculations like "Aster - 4" and "TERRA".

  12. Gallic Acid, Ellagic Acid and Pyrogallol Reaction with Metallic Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, J. A.; González, L.; Vargas, A.; Olave, G.

    2003-06-01

    The reaction between gallic acid, ellagic acid and pyrogallol with metallic iron was studied using infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Most hydrolysable tannins with interesting anticorrosive or inhibition properties are structurally related to these compounds, thus they may be used as models for the study of hydrolysable tannins and related polyphenols. The interaction was followed up to 3 months. Results indicated two different behaviors. At polyphenol concentrations higher than 1% iron converts to sparingly soluble and amorphous ferric (and ferrous) polyphenolate complexes. At lower concentrations (0.1%), the hydrolysis reactions are dominant, resulting in the formation of oxyhydroxides, which can be further reduced to compounds like magnetite by the polyphenols.

  13. Layered decomposition for the model order reduction of timescale separated biochemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Thomas P; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2014-09-01

    Biochemical reaction networks tend to exhibit behaviour on more than one timescale and they are inevitably modelled by stiff systems of ordinary differential equations. Singular perturbation is a well-established method for approximating stiff systems at a given timescale. Standard applications of singular perturbation partition the state variable into fast and slow modules and assume a quasi-steady state behaviour in the fast module. In biochemical reaction networks, many reactants may take part in both fast and slow reactions; it is not necessarily the case that the reactants themselves are fast or slow. Transformations of the state space are often required in order to create fast and slow modules, which thus no longer model the original species concentrations. This paper introduces a layered decomposition, which is a natural choice when reaction speeds are separated in scale. The new framework ensures that model reduction can be carried out without seeking state space transformations, and that the effect of the fast dynamics on the slow timescale can be described directly in terms of the original species.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of shear localization and decomposition reactions in shock-loaded HMX crystal

    DOE PAGES

    Austin, Ryan A.; Barton, Nathan R.; Reaugh, John E.; Fried, Laurence E.

    2015-05-14

    A numerical model is developed to study the shock wave ignition of HMX crystal. The model accounts for the coupling between crystal thermal/mechanical responses and chemical reactions that are driven by the temperature field. This allows for the direct numerical simulation of decomposition reactions in the hot spots formed by shock/impact loading. The model is used to simulate intragranular pore collapse under shock wave loading. In a reference case: (i) shear-enabled micro-jetting is responsible for a modest extent of reaction in the pore collapse region, and (ii) shear banding is found to be an important mode of localization. The shearmore » bands, which are filled with molten HMX, grow out of the pore collapse region and serve as potential ignition sites. The model predictions of shear banding and reactivity are found to be quite sensitive to the respective flow strengths of the solid and liquid phases. In this regard, it is shown that reasonable assumptions of liquid-HMX viscosity can lead to chemical reactions within the shear bands on a nanosecond time scale.« less

  15. Direct numerical simulation of shear localization and decomposition reactions in shock-loaded HMX crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, Ryan A.; Barton, Nathan R.; Reaugh, John E.; Fried, Laurence E.

    2015-05-14

    A numerical model is developed to study the shock wave ignition of HMX crystal. The model accounts for the coupling between crystal thermal/mechanical responses and chemical reactions that are driven by the temperature field. This allows for the direct numerical simulation of decomposition reactions in the hot spots formed by shock/impact loading. The model is used to simulate intragranular pore collapse under shock wave loading. In a reference case: (i) shear-enabled micro-jetting is responsible for a modest extent of reaction in the pore collapse region, and (ii) shear banding is found to be an important mode of localization. The shear bands, which are filled with molten HMX, grow out of the pore collapse region and serve as potential ignition sites. The model predictions of shear banding and reactivity are found to be quite sensitive to the respective flow strengths of the solid and liquid phases. In this regard, it is shown that reasonable assumptions of liquid-HMX viscosity can lead to chemical reactions within the shear bands on a nanosecond time scale.

  16. Reaction sequences in simulated neutralized current acid waste slurry during processing with formic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.; Wiemers, K.D.; Langowski, M.H.; Powell, M.R.; Larson, D.E.

    1993-11-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed for the Department of Energy to immobilize high-level and transuranic wastes as glass for permanent disposal. Pacific Northwest Laboratory is supporting the HWVP design activities by conducting laboratory-scale studies using a HWVP simulated waste slurry. Conditions which affect the slurry processing chemistry were evaluated in terms of offgas composition and peak generation rate and changes in slurry composition. A standard offgas profile defined in terms of three reaction phases, decomposition of H{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, destruction of NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, and production of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} was used as a baseline against which changes were evaluated. The test variables include nitrite concentration, acid neutralization capacity, temperature, and formic acid addition rate. Results to date indicate that pH is an important parameter influencing the N{sub 2}O/NO{sub x} generation ratio; nitrite can both inhibit and activate rhodium as a catalyst for formic acid decomposition to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}; and a separate reduced metal phase forms in the reducing environment. These data are being compiled to provide a basis for predicting the HWVP feed processing chemistry as a function of feed composition and operation variables, recommending criteria for chemical adjustments, and providing guidelines with respect to important control parameters to consider during routine and upset plant operation.

  17. Reactions of tetraphenyltitanium with organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Razuvaev, G.A.; Vyshinskaya, L.I.; Vasil'eva, G.A.

    1987-12-10

    As a result of the reactions of tetraphenyltitanium with dibasic organic acids high yields were obtained of new thermally stable titanium(III) complexes: phenyltitanium(III)carboxylates. Under the action of proton-active reagents (hydrochloric acid, cyclopentadiene, methanol) the latter break down with the breakage of titanium-phenyl bond. The proposed structure was based on IR- and ESR-spectral data. The dinuclear structure of the complexes was established on the basis of a study of the triplet structure of the ESR spectra, which showed the existence of intermolecular titanium-titanium exchange through methylene groups of the dicarboxylate bridges.

  18. Effects of simulated acid precipitation on decomposition and leaching of organic carbon in forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F.H.; Alexander, M.

    1984-09-01

    Soil samples from three watersheds of New York State were treated with simulated rain at pH 3.5, 4.1, and 5.6 daily for 14 d, at 12 3-d intervals in three separate tests, or at 22 7-d intervals. Except for one system of treating the three forest soils, simulated acid rain reduced the amount of organic matter leached from samples of soil from which more than 0.05% of the organic carbon was leached during the exposure period. In the soil samples representing the exceptions, acid rain enhanced the leaching of organic matter. Samples from the organic layer of the treated samples of acid soil were taken at two equal depths, and the rates of organic matter decomposition in the two layers were studied. As compared with simulated rain at pH 5.6, simulated acid rain reduced the decomposition of organic matter in the three soils at both depths in three of the five tests and at both depths of two of the soils in the fourth test. In some instances, organic matter decomposition was enhanced by the simulated acid rain. Except for the sample of soil at the highest initial pH, carbon mineralization was inhibited in soils and treatments in which simulated acid rain reduced the amount of organic carbon leached, and it was stimulated in soils and treatments in which the quantity of organic carbon leached was increased by the simulated acid rain. 12 references, 3 figures, 8 tables.

  19. The FB-Line and F-Canyon HAN/Nitric Acid Decomposition Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T.

    1998-08-19

    Separations requested SRTC study the autocatalytic decomposition of the hydroxylamine nitrate which may occur in the presence of concentrated nitric acid with respect to making-up cold feed solutions. The data obtained from this study will provide Separations an envelope within which safe operations can be conducted.

  20. PROPERTIES OF CP: COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS, AND REACTION TO SPARK, FRICTION AND IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K

    2005-09-28

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear and isothermal heating, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, was used to monitor CP decomposition at linear heating rates of 1-7 C min{sup -1} in perforated pans and of 0.1-1.0 C min{sup -1} in sealed pans. The kinetic triplet was calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05, and predictions for 210 and 240 C are compared to isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  1. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, R. M.; Sims, H. E.; Taylor, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or 'finishing' processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO2 product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles.

  2. CP: AN INVESTIGATION OF COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS, AND REACTION TO VARIOUS STIMULI

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K; Fontes, A T

    2005-03-23

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear heating rates, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Using differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, CP was decomposed at linear heating rates of 1, 3, and 7 C/min and the kinetic triplet calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  3. Integrated boiler, superheater, and decomposer for sulfuric acid decomposition

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Jr., Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Gelbard, Fred; Lenard, Roger X.

    2010-01-12

    A method and apparatus, constructed of ceramics and other corrosion resistant materials, for decomposing sulfuric acid into sulfur dioxide, oxygen and water using an integrated boiler, superheater, and decomposer unit comprising a bayonet-type, dual-tube, counter-flow heat exchanger with a catalytic insert and a central baffle to increase recuperation efficiency.

  4. Evaluation and characterization of the methane-carbon dioxide decomposition reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, R. J.; Schubert, F. H.; Shumar, J. W.; Steenson, T. S.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate and characterize the carbon dioxide-methane (CO2-CH4) decomposition reaction, i.e., CO2 + CH4 = 2C + 2H2O. The primary objective was to determine the feasibility of applying this reaction at low temperatures as a technique for recovering the oxygen (O2) remaining in the CO2 which exits mixed with CH4 from a Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem (as part of an air revitalization system of a manned spacecraft). A test unit was designed, fabricated, and assembled for characterizing the performance of various catalysts for the reaction and ultraviolet activation of the CH4 and CO2. The reactor included in the test unit was designed to have sufficient capacity to evaluate catalyst charges of up to 76 g (0.17 lb). The test stand contained the necessary instrumentation and controls to obtain the data required to characterize the performance of the catalysts and sensitizers tested: flow control and measurement, temperature control and measurement, product and inlet gas analysis, and pressure measurement. A product assurance program was performed implementing the concepts of quality control and safety into the program effort.

  5. Water dissociation in a radio-frequency electromagnetic field with ex situ electrodes—decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid and tetrahydrofuran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Jens; Holzer, Frank; Kraus, Markus; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Roland, Ulf

    2016-10-01

    The application of radio waves with a frequency of 13.56 MHz on electrolyte solutions in a capillary reactor led to the formation of reactive hydrogen and oxygen species and finally to molecular oxygen and hydrogen. This process of water splitting can be principally used for the elimination of hazardous chemicals in water. Two compounds, namely perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and tetrahydrofuran, were converted using this process. Their main decomposition products were highly volatile and therefore transferred to a gas phase, where they could be identified by GC-MS analyses. It is remarkable that the chemical reactions could benefit from both the oxidizing and reducing species formed in the plasma process, which takes place in gas bubbles saturated with water vapor. The breaking of C-C and C-F bonds was proven in the case of PFOA, probably initiated by electron impacts and radical reactions.

  6. Formation of Aldehydic Phosphatidylcholines during the Anaerobic Decomposition of a Phosphatidylcholine Bearing the 9-Hydroperoxide of Linoleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipid oxidation-derived carbonyl compounds are associated with the development of various physiological disorders. Formation of most of these products has recently been suggested to require further reactions of oxygen with lipid hydroperoxides. However, in rat and human tissues, the formation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal is greatly elevated during hypoxic/ischemic conditions. Furthermore, a previous study found an unexpected result that the decomposition of a phosphatidylcholine (PC) bearing the 13-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid under a nitrogen atmosphere afforded 9-oxononanoyl-PC rather than 13-oxo-9,11-tridecadienoyl-PC as the main aldehydic PC. In the present study, products of the anaerobic decomposition of a PC bearing the 9-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid were analysed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. 9-Oxononanoyl-PC (ONA-PC) and several well-known bioactive aldehydes including 12-oxo-9-hydroperoxy-(or oxo or hydroxy)-10-dodecenoyl-PCs were detected. Hydrolysis of the oxidized PC products, methylation of the acids obtained thereby, and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy with electron impact ionization further confirmed structures of some of the key aldehydic PCs. Novel, hydroxyl radical-dependent mechanisms of formation of ONA-PC and peroxyl-radical dependent mechanisms of formation of the rest of the aldehydes are proposed. The latter mechanisms will mainly be relevant to tissue injury under hypoxic/anoxic conditions, while the former are relevant under both normoxia and hypoxia/anoxia. PMID:27366754

  7. Formation of Aldehydic Phosphatidylcholines during the Anaerobic Decomposition of a Phosphatidylcholine Bearing the 9-Hydroperoxide of Linoleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Arnold N

    2016-01-01

    Lipid oxidation-derived carbonyl compounds are associated with the development of various physiological disorders. Formation of most of these products has recently been suggested to require further reactions of oxygen with lipid hydroperoxides. However, in rat and human tissues, the formation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal is greatly elevated during hypoxic/ischemic conditions. Furthermore, a previous study found an unexpected result that the decomposition of a phosphatidylcholine (PC) bearing the 13-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid under a nitrogen atmosphere afforded 9-oxononanoyl-PC rather than 13-oxo-9,11-tridecadienoyl-PC as the main aldehydic PC. In the present study, products of the anaerobic decomposition of a PC bearing the 9-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid were analysed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. 9-Oxononanoyl-PC (ONA-PC) and several well-known bioactive aldehydes including 12-oxo-9-hydroperoxy-(or oxo or hydroxy)-10-dodecenoyl-PCs were detected. Hydrolysis of the oxidized PC products, methylation of the acids obtained thereby, and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy with electron impact ionization further confirmed structures of some of the key aldehydic PCs. Novel, hydroxyl radical-dependent mechanisms of formation of ONA-PC and peroxyl-radical dependent mechanisms of formation of the rest of the aldehydes are proposed. The latter mechanisms will mainly be relevant to tissue injury under hypoxic/anoxic conditions, while the former are relevant under both normoxia and hypoxia/anoxia.

  8. The Chlorate-Iodine-Nitrous Acid Clock Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T. P.; Faria, Roberto B.

    2014-01-01

    A new clock reaction based on chlorate, iodine and nitrous acid is presented. The induction period of this new clock reaction decreases when the initial concentrations of chlorate, nitrous acid and perchloric acid increase, but it is independent on the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism is based on the LLKE autocatalytic mechanism for the chlorite-iodide reaction and the initial reaction between chlorate and nitrous acid to produce nitrate and chlorite. This new clock reaction opens the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions containing chlorate or nitrous acid, which in both cases has not been observed until now. PMID:25313803

  9. The chlorate-iodine-nitrous acid clock reaction.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T P; Faria, Roberto B

    2014-01-01

    A new clock reaction based on chlorate, iodine and nitrous acid is presented. The induction period of this new clock reaction decreases when the initial concentrations of chlorate, nitrous acid and perchloric acid increase, but it is independent on the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism is based on the LLKE autocatalytic mechanism for the chlorite-iodide reaction and the initial reaction between chlorate and nitrous acid to produce nitrate and chlorite. This new clock reaction opens the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions containing chlorate or nitrous acid, which in both cases has not been observed until now. PMID:25313803

  10. A simple method for decomposition of peracetic acid in a microalgal cultivation system.

    PubMed

    Sung, Min-Gyu; Lee, Hansol; Nam, Kibok; Rexroth, Sascha; Rögner, Matthias; Kwon, Jong-Hee; Yang, Ji-Won

    2015-03-01

    A cost-efficient process devoid of several washing steps was developed, which is related to direct cultivation following the decomposition of the sterilizer. Peracetic acid (PAA) is known to be an efficient antimicrobial agent due to its high oxidizing potential. Sterilization by 2 mM PAA demands at least 1 h incubation time for an effective disinfection. Direct degradation of PAA was demonstrated by utilizing components in conventional algal medium. Consequently, ferric ion and pH buffer (HEPES) showed a synergetic effect for the decomposition of PAA within 6 h. On the contrary, NaNO3, one of the main components in algal media, inhibits the decomposition of PAA. The improved growth of Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis PCC6803 was observed in the prepared BG11 by decomposition of PAA. This process involving sterilization and decomposition of PAA should help cost-efficient management of photobioreactors in a large scale for the production of value-added products and biofuels from microalgal biomass. PMID:25270405

  11. High pressure sulfuric acid decomposition experiments for the sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, Carlos E; Reay, Andrew R.; Andazola, James C.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Gelbard, Fred

    2005-09-01

    A series of three pressurized sulfuric acid decomposition tests were performed to (1) obtain data on the fraction of sulfuric acid catalytically converted to sulfur dioxide, oxygen, and water as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) demonstrate real-time measurements of acid conversion for use as process control, (3) obtain multiple measurements of conversion as a function of temperature within a single experiment, and (4) assess rapid quenching to minimize corrosion of metallic components by undecomposed acid. All four of these objectives were successfully accomplished. This report documents the completion of the NHI milestone on high pressure H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition tests for the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle project. All heated sections of the apparatus, (i.e. the boiler, decomposer, and condenser) were fabricated from Hastelloy C276. A ceramic acid injection tube and a ceramic-sheathed thermocouple were used to minimize corrosion of hot liquid acid on the boiler surfaces. Negligible fracturing of the platinum on zirconia catalyst was observed in the high temperature decomposer. Temperature measurements at the exit of the decomposer and at the entry of the condenser indicated that the hot acid vapors were rapidly quenched from about 400 C to less than 20 C within a 14 cm length of the flow path. Real-time gas flow rate measurements of the decomposition products provided a direct measurement of acid conversion. Pressure in the apparatus was preset by a pressure-relief valve that worked well at controlling the system pressure. However, these valves sometimes underwent abrupt transitions that resulted in rapidly varying gas flow rates with concomitant variations in the acid conversion fraction.

  12. Thermochemical decomposition of spent sulfuric acid on a catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Perfilev, V.M.; CHapyluk, N.S.; Mel'nikov, S.E.; Sushchev, V.S.

    1986-03-01

    The paper reports on an investigation of the thermocatalytic splitting of SSA obtained as a waste material in the production of liquid paraffins. The studies were performed by a dynamic method in the continuous-flow unit with a quartz reactor in the form of an open tube. These studies are of value because commercial utilization of sulfuric acid wastes is an important ecological and economic problem. The studies of the catalyst behavior in thermocatalytic splitting of SSA established that the specific surface area of the silica gel without impregnation, or impregnated with 1.6% iron(III) oxide, decrease in 20 h of operation. This decrease in surface area is apparently related to recrystallization processes.

  13. Low symmetry pyrazole-based tripodal tetraamine ligands: metal complexes and ligand decomposition reactions.

    PubMed

    Cubanski, John R; Cameron, Scott A; Crowley, James D; Blackman, Allan G

    2013-02-14

    The new low symmetry pyrazole-based tripodal tetraamine ligands 2-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-N,N-bis(1H-pyrazol-1-ylmethyl)ethanamine (bmpz) and 2-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-N-[2-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)ethyl]-N-(1H-pyrazol-1-ylmethyl)ethanamine (bepz) have been prepared and characterised, as have metal complexes containing these ligands. X-ray crystal structures of [Co(bmpz)Cl](2)[CoCl(4)]·H(2)O, [Co(bmpz)MeCN](ClO(4))(2)·0.13H(2)O, [Zn(bmpz)MeCN](ClO(4))(2)·0.15H(2)O, [Zn(bepz)OH(2)](ClO(4))(2)·0.5H(2)O and [(Co(bepz)Cl)(2)]Cl(2)·6H(2)O confirm coordination of the intact tripodal ligands to the metal ions through all four N atoms. However, attempts to make Cu(2+) complexes containing bmpz and bepz gave, respectively, [Cu(7)Cl(2)]·0.2H(2)O and [Cu(8)Cl(2)] (7 = 1-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-N-(1H-pyrazol-1-ylmethyl)ethanamine, 8 = 2-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)-N-[2-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl)ethyl]ethanamine), complexes containing the tridentate ligands 7 and 8 which are formed by loss of a pyrazolylmethyl arm from the appropriate tripodal ligand. This decomposition reaction occurs in protic solvents both in the presence and absence of metal ions, and is ascribed to the presence of an aminal functionality in the tripodal ligands. A possible mechanism for the decomposition, based on NMR and ESMS data, is suggested.

  14. Analytic study of the chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides - atomic iodine donors - in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser: 1. Criteria for the development of the branching chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, Aleksandr I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2009-02-28

    The scheme of chemical processes proceeding in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) is analysed. Based on the analysis performed, the complete system of differential equations corresponding to this scheme is replaced by a simplified system of equations describing in dimensionless variables the chain dark decomposition of iodides - atomic iodine donors, in the COIL active medium. The procedure solving this system is described, the basic parameters determining the development of the chain reaction are found and its specific time intervals are determined. The initial stage of the reaction is analysed and criteria for the development of the branching chain decomposition reaction of iodide in the COIL active medium are determined. (active media)

  15. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... Substances § 721.10125 Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and.... (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester,...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... Substances § 721.10125 Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and.... (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester,...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... Substances § 721.10125 Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and.... (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester,...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... Substances § 721.10125 Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and.... (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester,...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... Substances § 721.10125 Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and.... (1) The chemical substances identified generically as alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester,...

  20. Thermal decomposition of lignocellulosic biomass in the presence of acid catalysts.

    PubMed

    Larabi, Cherif; al Maksoud, Walid; Szeto, Kai C; Roubaud, Anne; Castelli, Pierre; Santini, Catherine C; Walter, Jean J

    2013-11-01

    Transformation of lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels involves multiple processes, in which thermal decomposition, hydrotreatment are the most central steps. Current work focuses on the impact of several solid acids and Keggin-type heteropolyacids on the decomposition temperature (Td) of pine wood and the characterization of the resulted products. It has been observed that a mechanical mixture of solid acids with pine wood has no influence on Td, while the use of heteropolyacids lower the Td by 100°C. Moreover, the treatment of biomass with a catalytic amount of H3PW12O40 leads to formation of three fractions: solid, liquid and gas, which have been investigated by elemental analysis, TGA, FTIR, GC-MS and NMR. The use of heteropolyacid leads, at 300°C, to a selective transformation of more than 50 wt.% of the holocellulose part of the lignocellulosic biomass. Moreover, 60 wt.% of the catalyst H3PW12O40 are recovered.

  1. Heterogeneous reactions of epoxides in acidic media.

    PubMed

    Lal, Vinita; Khalizov, Alexei F; Lin, Yun; Galvan, Maria D; Connell, Brian T; Zhang, Renyi

    2012-06-21

    Epoxides have recently been identified as important intermediates in the gas phase oxidation of hydrocarbons, and their hydrolysis products have been observed in ambient aerosols. To evaluate the role of epoxides in the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA), the kinetics and mechanism of heterogeneous reactions of two model epoxides, isoprene oxide and α-pinene oxide, with sulfuric acid, ammonium bisulfate, and ammonium sulfate have been investigated using complementary experimental techniques. Kinetic experiments using a fast flow reactor coupled to an ion drift-chemical ionization mass spectrometer (ID-CIMS) show a fast irreversible loss of the epoxides with the uptake coefficients (γ) of (1.7 ± 0.1) × 10(-2) and (4.6 ± 0.3) × 10(-2) for isoprene oxide and α-pinene oxide, respectively, for 90 wt % H(2)SO(4) and at room temperature. Experiments using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) reveal that diols are the major products in ammonium bisulfate and dilute H(2)SO(4) (<25 wt %) solutions for both epoxides. In concentrated H(2)SO(4) (>65 wt %), acetals are formed from isoprene oxide, whereas organosulfates are produced from α-pinene oxide. The reaction of the epoxides with ammonium sulfate is slow and no products are observed. The epoxide reactions using bulk samples and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy reveal the presence of diols as the major products for isoprene oxide, accompanied by aldehyde formation. For α-pinene oxide, organosulfate formation is observed with a yield increasing with the acidity. Large yields of organosulfates in all NMR experiments with α-pinene oxide are attributed to the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) from the use of deuterated sulfuric acid and water. Our results suggest that acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of epoxides results in the formation of a wide range of products, and some of the products have low volatility and contribute to SOA growth under ambient conditions

  2. Study of the decomposition pathway of 12-molybdophosphoric acid in aqueous solutions by micro Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bajuk-Bogdanović, D; Uskoković-Marković, S; Hercigonja, R; Popa, A; Holclajtner-Antunović, I

    2016-01-15

    Micro Raman spectroscopy was applied to investigate the speciation of heteropoly and isopoly molybdates in 0.05 and 0.005 M aqueous solutions of 12-molybdophosphoric acid at pH values between 1 and 6. For comparative purposes, (31)P NMR spectroscopy was applied too. It is shown that stability of Keggin anion is influenced both by pH and concentration of solution. The Keggin structure is stable in acidic solutions (pH<1.6) while defective Keggin structures are formed with further alkalization (up to pH5.6). Monolacunary anion PMo11O(39)(7-) is the main component in the pH region from 1.6 to 3.4. Further removal of molybdenyl species causes the appearance of other vacant Keggin structures such as PMo9O31(OH)(3)(6-) and PMo6O(25)(9-) at about pH4. At pH5.0, anion PMo6O(25)(9-) is the main species. In solutions with pH greater than 5.0, heteropolymolybdates disappear completely and isopolymolybdates Mo7O(24)(6-) and MoO(4)(2-) are formed in higher amounts. In more diluted solution of 0.005 M, the decomposition scheme of 12-molybdophosphoric acid solution with increasing of pH takes place without observation of significant amounts of Mo7O(24)(6-) species. If alkalinization is performed with 0.5 M instead of 5 M NaOH, there are no significant changes in the Raman spectra of solutions. It is shown that the spectra of evaporated samples may be used for the identification of molecular species in corresponding concentrated solutions. However, Raman spectra of dry residues of more diluted solutions differ from spectra of corresponding solutions due to the reactions performed during the process of drying and cannot be used for unambiguous identification of species in solution. Acidification of 0.05 M solution of Na2MoO4 shows that at pH>5.6, molybdate anion MoO(4)(2-) dominates, while in the pH range between 5.6 and 1, heptamolybdate anion Mo7O(24)(6-) is preferentially formed.

  3. Trends in Formic Acid Decomposition on Model Transition Metal Surfaces: A Density Functional Theory Study

    SciTech Connect

    Herron, Jeffrey A.; Scaranto, Jessica; Ferrin, Peter A.; Li, Sha; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-12-05

    We present a first-principles, self-consistent periodic density functional theory (PW91-GGA) study of formic acid (HCOOH) decomposition on model (111) and (100) facets of eight fcc metals (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, Pd, Ni, Ir, and Rh) and (0001) facets of four hcp (Co, Os, Ru, and Re) metals. The calculated binding energies of key formic acid decomposition intermediates including formate (HCOO), carboxyl (COOH), carbon monoxide (CO), water (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), hydroxyl (OH), carbon (C), oxygen (O), and hydrogen (H; H2) are presented. Using these energetics, we develop thermochemical potential energy diagrams for both the carboxyl-mediated and the formate-mediated dehydrogenation mechanisms on each surface. We evaluate the relative stability of COOH, HCOO, and other isomeric intermediates (i.e., CO + OH, CO2 + H, CO + O + H) on these surfaces. These results provide insights into formic acid decomposition selectivity (dehydrogenation versus dehydration), and in conjunction with calculated vibrational frequency modes, the results can assist with the experimental search for the elusive carboxyl (COOH) surface intermediate. Results are compared against experimental reports in the literature.

  4. Shock wave and modeling study of the thermal decomposition reactions of pentafluoroethane and 2-H-heptafluoropropane.

    PubMed

    Cobos, C J; Sölter, L; Tellbach, E; Troe, J

    2014-06-01

    The thermal decomposition reactions of CF3CF2H and CF3CFHCF3 have been studied in shock waves by monitoring the appearance of CF2 radicals. Temperatures in the range 1400-2000 K and Ar bath gas concentrations in the range (2-10) × 10(-5) mol cm(-3) were employed. It is shown that the reactions are initiated by C-C bond fission and not by HF elimination. Differing conclusions in the literature about the primary decomposition products, such as deduced from experiments at very low pressures, are attributed to unimolecular falloff effects. By increasing the initial reactant concentrations in Ar from 60 to 1000 ppm, a retardation of CF2 formation was observed while the final CF2 yields remained close to two CF2 per C2F5H or three CF2 per C3F7H decomposed. This is explained by secondary bimolecular reactions which lead to comparably stable transient species like CF3H, releasing CF2 at a slower rate. Quantum-chemical calculations and kinetic modeling help to identify the reaction pathways and provide estimates of rate constants for a series of primary and secondary reactions in the decomposition mechanism.

  5. Solid Molecular Phosphine Catalysts for Formic Acid Decomposition in the Biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Hausoul, Peter J C; Broicher, Cornelia; Vegliante, Roberta; Göb, Christian; Palkovits, Regina

    2016-04-25

    The co-production of formic acid during the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid offers the possibility for on-site hydrogen production and reductive transformations. Phosphorus-based porous polymers loaded with Ru complexes exhibit high activity and selectivity in the base-free decomposition of formic acid to CO2 and H2 . A polymeric analogue of 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (DPPE) gave the best results in terms of performance and stability. Recycling tests revealed low levels of leaching and only a gradual decrease in the activity over seven runs. An applicability study revealed that these catalysts even facilitate selective removal of formic acid from crude product mixtures arising from the synthesis of levulinic acid.

  6. Anaerobic decomposition of benzoic acid during methane fermentation: Specific activity of fatty acid intermediates and postion of radioactive label

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the pathway of anaerobic decomposition of benzoic acid by a mixed methanogenic culture of bacteria was conducted. Specific activities of the possible fatty acid intermediates cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, propanoic acid, and acetic acid were determined. In the case of propanoic acid, the position of the radioactive label was also determined by isotropic trapping and Phares-Schmidt degradation of the intermediate. The specific activities of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid and propanoic acid are the same as the benzoate substrate fed to the mixed methanogenic cultures. These fatty acids must be direct breakdown products from the aromatic ring. When (4{minus}{sup 14}C) benzoate is the substrate, the propanoic acid produced is labeled exclusively in the carboxyl position. This supports the pathway proposed by Keith et al. (1978), but would be unlikely for the pathway proposed by Evans (1977). The specific activity of the acetic acid isolated from a culture fed (4{minus}{sup 14}C) benzoate is 42% of the specific activity of the substrate. This is possible only if the methylmalonyl-CoA pathway for the conversion of propanoate to acetate is not being utilized. The amount of various intermediates found indicates that at least three syntrophically linked organisms are present in the mixed methanogenic culture. One is responsible for the production of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, one for the production of acetate from propanoate, and one for the production of methane.

  7. Modeling the contribution of soil fauna to litter decomposition influenced by acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, B.; Loucks, O.L; Kuperman, R. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1993-06-01

    The effect of acidic deposition on soil pH and therefore on soil invertebrates and litter decomposition is being investigated in oak-hickory forests across a three-state, midwest, pollution gradient. The role of soil invertebrates has been assessed previously through the use of feeding, assimilation and respiratory rates. These energetic parameters depend strongly on the form of the allometric equations which have been improved here by incorporating uncertainties in body and population size. Results show that changes in reproduction and turnover dynamics of soil invertebrates (particularly of earthworms) due to acid-induced changes in soil pH explains observed patterns in litter depth.

  8. The Kinetics and Mechanism of the Decomposition of Murexide in Acid Solution: An Experiment for Teaching Principles of Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoche, Wilhelm; Rees, Norman H.

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results are provided for an experiment on the decomposition of murexide in acid solution. The experiment, suitable for advanced courses, can be easily performed in a 6-hour laboratory period. (JN)

  9. Ascorbic acid decomposition into oxalate ions: a simple synthetic route towards oxalato-bridged heterometallic 3d-4f clusters.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Alina S; Shova, Sergiu; Ion, Adrian E; Maxim, Catalin; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel; Andruh, Marius

    2015-04-28

    Two types of oxalato-bridged heterometallic 3d-4f dodeca- and hexanuclear compounds have been obtained by connecting six bi- and, respectively, trinuclear moieties through oxalato bridges arising from the slow decomposition of the L-ascorbic acid.

  10. Theoretical Study of the Thermal Decomposition of Carboxylic Acids at Pyrolysis Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J. M.; Robichaud, D. J.; Nimlos, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are important in the processing of biomass into renewable fuels and chemicals. They are formed from the pretreatment and pyrolysis of hemicellulose biopolymers and are released from the decomposition of sugars. They result from the deconstruction of polyhydroxyalkanoates (bacterial carbon storage polymers) from fatty acids derived from algae, bacteria, and oil crops. The thermal deoxygenation of carboxylic acids is an important step in the conversion of biomass into aliphatic hydrocarbons suitable for use in renewable biofuels and as petrochemical replacements. Decarboxylation, a primary decomposition pathway under pyrolysis conditions, represents an ideal conversion process, because it eliminates two atoms of oxygen for every carbon atom removed. Problematically, additional deoxygenation processes exist (e.g. dehydration) that are in direct competition with decarboxylation and result in the formation of reactive and more fragmented end products. To better understand the competition between decarboxylation and other deoxygenation processes and to gain insight into possible catalysts that would favor decarboxylation, we have investigated the mechanisms and thermochemistry of the various unimolecular and bimolecular deoxygenation pathways for a family of C1-C4 organic acids using electronic structure calculations at the M06-2X/6-311++G(2df,p) level of theory.

  11. Multicomponent cascade reactions of unprotected carbohydrates and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Benjamin; Linke, Michael; Mahrwald, Rainer

    2015-06-01

    Herein an operationally simple multicomponent reaction of unprotected carbohydrates with amino acids and isonitriles is presented. By the extension of this Ugi-type reaction to an unprotected disaccharide a novel glycopeptide structure was accessible.

  12. Integrated model of reaction rate equations and thermal energy balance in aerobic bioreactor for food waste decomposition.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Osamu; Isoda, Satoru

    2011-06-01

    The integrated model is composed of two basic parts: one is a reaction rate model of biodegradation in combination with bioenergetics and the other is a thermal engineering model of energy flow and balance in the bioreactor. Integrating these models provides possibility to estimate microbial activity using time course of physicochemical parameters such as bed temperature, bed weight, and/or C02 concentration during decomposition.

  13. Formation of titanium phosphate composites during phosphoric acid decomposition of natural sphene

    SciTech Connect

    Maslova, Marina V.; Rusanova, Daniela Naydenov, Valeri; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Gerasimova, Lidia G.

    2008-12-15

    Decomposition of mineral sphene, CaTiOSiO{sub 4}, by H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is investigated in detail. During the dissolution process, simultaneous calcium leaching and formation of titanium phosphate (TiP) take place. The main product of decomposition is a solid titanium phosphate-silica composite. The XRD, solid-sate NMR, IR, TGA, SEM and BET data were used to identify and characterize the composite as a mixture of crystalline Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O and silica. When 80% phosphoric acid is used the decomposition degree is higher than 98% and calcium is completely transferred into the liquid phase. Formation of Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O proceeds via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases, Ti(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}).2H{sub 2}O and Ti(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}). The sorption affinities of TiP composites were examined in relation to caesium and strontium ions. A decrease of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} concentration leads to formation of composites with greater sorption properties. The maximum sorption capacity of TiP is observed when 60% H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is used in sphene decomposition. The work demonstrates a valuable option within the Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} composite synthesis scheme, to use phosphoric acid flows for isolation of CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O fertilizer. - Graphical abstract: A new synthesis scheme for preparation of composite titanium phosphate (TiP) ion-exchangers upon one-stage decomposition process of natural sphene with phosphoric acid is presented. Syntheses of {alpha}-TiP-silica composites proceed via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases. The concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} determines the porosity of final products and their sorption affinities.

  14. Different nanostructured In₂O₃ for photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenmin; Zhang, Pengyi; Shao, Tian; Wang, Jinlong; Jin, Ling; Li, Xiaoyun

    2013-09-15

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), an emerging persistent organic pollutant, recently receives worldwide concerns including methods for its efficient decomposition. Three kinds of nanostructured In₂O₃ materials including porous microspheres, nanocubes and nanoplates were obtained by dehydration of the corresponding In(OH)₃ nanostructures at 500 °C for 2 h. The In(OH)₃ nanostructures with different morphologies were solvothermally synthesized by using different mixed solvents. As-obtained In₂O₃ nanomaterials showed great photocatalytic activity for PFOA decomposing. The decomposition rates of PFOA by different In₂O₃ materials, i.e. porous microspheres, nanoplates and nanocubes were 74.7, 41.9 and 17.3 times as fast as that by P25 TiO2, respectively. The In₂O₃ porous microspheres showed the highest activity, by which the half-life of PFOA was shortened to 5.3 min. The roles of surface oxygen vacancies on the adsorption and photocatalytic decomposition of PFOA were discussed, and it was found that In₂O₃ materials with higher oxygen vacancy defects show better activity. PMID:23742955

  15. Magnetite-supported sulfonic acid: a retrievable nanocatalyst for the Ritter reaction and multicomponent reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetite-sulfonic acid (NanocatFe-OSO3H), prepared by wet-impregnation method, serves as a magnetically retrievable sustainable catalyst for the Ritter reaction which can be used in several reaction cycles without any loss of activity.

  16. Mechanistic insights into the dissociation and decomposition of carbonic acid in water via the hydroxide route: an ab initio metadynamics study.

    PubMed

    Galib, Mirza; Hanna, Gabriel

    2011-12-22

    The dissociation and decomposition of carbonic acid (H2CO3) in water are important reactions in the pH regulation in blood, CO2 transport in biological systems, and the global carbon cycle. H2CO3 is known to have three conformers [cis-cis (CC), cis-trans (CT), and trans-trans (TT)], but their individual reaction dynamics in water has not been probed experimentally. In this paper, we have investigated the energetics and mechanisms of the conformational changes, dissociation (H2CO3 -->/<-- HCO3(-) + H(+)), and decomposition via the hydroxide route (HCO3(-) --> CO2+OH(-)) of all three conformers of H2CO3 in water using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) in conjunction with metadynamics. It was found that, unlike in the gas phase, the interconversion between the various conformers occurs via two different pathways, one involving a change in one of the two dihedral angles (O=C-O-H) and the other a proton transfer through a hydrogen-bond wire. The free energy barriers/changes for the various conformational changes via the first pathway were calculated and contrasted with the previously calculated values for the gas phase. The CT and TT conformers were found to undergo decomposition in water via a two-step process: first, the dissociation and then the decomposition of HCO3(-) into CO2 and OH(-). The CC conformer does not directly decompose but first undergoes a conformational change to CT or TT prior to decomposition. This is in contrast with the concerted mechanism proposed for the gas phase, which involves a dehydroxylation of one of the OH groups and a simultaneous deprotonation of the other OH group to yield CO2 and H2O. The dissociation in water was seen to involve the repeated formation and breakage of a hydrogen-bond wire with neighboring water molecules, whereas the decomposition is initiated by the diffusion of H(+) away from HCO3(-); this decomposition mechanism differs from that proposed for the water route dehydration (HCO3(-) + H3O(+) --> CO2 + H2O

  17. Mechanistic insights into the dissociation and decomposition of carbonic acid in water via the hydroxide route: an ab initio metadynamics study.

    PubMed

    Galib, Mirza; Hanna, Gabriel

    2011-12-22

    The dissociation and decomposition of carbonic acid (H2CO3) in water are important reactions in the pH regulation in blood, CO2 transport in biological systems, and the global carbon cycle. H2CO3 is known to have three conformers [cis-cis (CC), cis-trans (CT), and trans-trans (TT)], but their individual reaction dynamics in water has not been probed experimentally. In this paper, we have investigated the energetics and mechanisms of the conformational changes, dissociation (H2CO3 -->/<-- HCO3(-) + H(+)), and decomposition via the hydroxide route (HCO3(-) --> CO2+OH(-)) of all three conformers of H2CO3 in water using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) in conjunction with metadynamics. It was found that, unlike in the gas phase, the interconversion between the various conformers occurs via two different pathways, one involving a change in one of the two dihedral angles (O=C-O-H) and the other a proton transfer through a hydrogen-bond wire. The free energy barriers/changes for the various conformational changes via the first pathway were calculated and contrasted with the previously calculated values for the gas phase. The CT and TT conformers were found to undergo decomposition in water via a two-step process: first, the dissociation and then the decomposition of HCO3(-) into CO2 and OH(-). The CC conformer does not directly decompose but first undergoes a conformational change to CT or TT prior to decomposition. This is in contrast with the concerted mechanism proposed for the gas phase, which involves a dehydroxylation of one of the OH groups and a simultaneous deprotonation of the other OH group to yield CO2 and H2O. The dissociation in water was seen to involve the repeated formation and breakage of a hydrogen-bond wire with neighboring water molecules, whereas the decomposition is initiated by the diffusion of H(+) away from HCO3(-); this decomposition mechanism differs from that proposed for the water route dehydration (HCO3(-) + H3O(+) --> CO2 + H2O

  18. Reexamination of CO formation during formic acid decomposition on the Pt(1 1 1) surface in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingying; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Peng; Liu, Chengbu

    2016-08-01

    Existing theoretical results for formic acid (HCOOH) decomposition on Pt(1 1 1) cannot rationalize the easy CO poisoning of the catalysts in the gas phase. The present work reexamined HCOOH decomposition on Pt(1 1 1) by considering the effect of the initial adsorption structure of the reactant on the reactivity. Our calculations present a new adsorption configuration of HCOOH on Pt(1 1 1), from which the formation of CO is found to be competing with the formation of CO2. The newly proposed mechanism improves our understanding for the mechanism of HCOOH decomposition catalyzed by Pt-based catalysts.

  19. Decomposition Studies of Triphenylboron, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboric Acid in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions Containing Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.; Peterson, R. A.

    1997-02-11

    This report documents the copper-catalyzed chemical kinetics of triphenylboron, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboric acid (3PB, 2PB and PBA) in aqueous alkaline solution contained in carbon-steel vessels between 40 and 70 degrees C.

  20. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  1. Reaction of arenesulfinimidic acid derivatives with thiophenols

    SciTech Connect

    Pel'kis, N.P.; Levchenko, E.S.

    1986-07-20

    The amides and esters of N-substituted arenesulfinimidic acids are reduced by the action of thiophenols primarily to N-substituted arenesulfenamides, while the thiophenols are oxidized to the corresponding derivatives of the arenesulfinic acids.

  2. Thermal decomposition reactions of cotton fabric treated with piperazine-phosphonates derivatives as a flame retardant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a great scientific interest in exploring the great potential of the piperazine-phosphonates in flame retardant (FR) application on cotton fabric by investigating the thermal decomposition of cotton fabric treated with them. This research tries to understand the mode of action of the t...

  3. Effects of acid stress on aerobic decomposition of algal and aquatic macrophyte detritus: Direct comparison in a radiocarbon assay

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, S.A.; Benner, R.; Armstrong, A.; Sobecky, P.; Hodson, R.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Radiolabeled phytoplankton and macrophyte lignocelluloses were incubated at pHs 4 and 7 in water from a naturally acidic freshwater wetland (Okefenokee Swamp; ambient pH, 3.8 to 4.2), a freshwater reservoir (L-Lake; pH 6.7 to 7.2), and a marine marsh (Sapelo Island; pH {approximately}7.8). The data suggest that acidity is an important factor in explaining the lower decomposition rates of algae in Okefenokee Swamp water relative to L-Lake or Sapelo Island water. The decomposition of algal substrate was less sensitive to low pH ({approximately}5 to 35% inhibition) than was the decomposition of lignocellulose ({approximately}30 to 70% inhibition). These substrate-dependent differences were greater and more consistent in salt marsh than in L-lake incubations. In both freshwater sites, the extent to which decomposition was suppressed by acidity was greater for green algal substrate than for mixed diatom or blue-green algal (cyanobacteria) substrates. The use of different bases to adjust pH or incubation in a defined saltwater medium had no significant effect on substrate-dependent differences. Although pH differences with lignocellulose were larger in marine incubations, amendment of lake water with marine bacteria or with calcium, known to stabilize exoenzymes in soils, did not magnify the sensitivity of decomposition to acid stress.

  4. The mechanism of methanol decomposition by CuO. A theoretical study based on the reaction force and reaction electronic flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Cerón, Maria Luisa; Herrera, Barbara; Araya, Paulo; Gracia, Francisco; Toro-Labbé, Alejandro

    2011-07-01

    A theoretical study of methanol decomposition using a model representing the initial step of the reaction CH₃OH + CuO → CH₂O + H₂O + Cu is presented. Theoretical calculations using B3LYP/6-31 G along with Lanl2DZ pseudopotentials on metallic centers were performed and the results discussed within the framework of the reaction force analysis. It has been found that the reaction takes place following a stepwise mechanism: first, copper reduction (Cu⁺² → Cu⁺) accompanies the oxygen transposition and then a second reduction takes place (Cu⁺ → Cu₀) together with a proton transfer that produce formaldehyde and release a water molecule.

  5. Multi-level quantum Monte Carlo wave functions for complex reactions: the decomposition of α-hydroxy-dimethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Fracchia, Francesco; Filippi, Claudia; Amovilli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    We present here several novel features of our recently proposed Jastrow linear generalized valence bond (J-LGVB) wave functions, which allow a consistently accurate description of complex potential energy surfaces (PES) of medium-large systems within quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). In particular, we develop a multilevel scheme to treat different regions of the molecule at different levels of the theory. As prototypical study case, we investigate the decomposition of α-hydroxy-dimethylnitrosamine, a carcinogenic metabolite of dimethylnitrosamine (NDMA), through a two-step mechanism of isomerization followed by a retro-ene reaction. We compute a reliable reaction path with the quadratic configuration interaction method and employ QMC for the calculation of the electronic energies. We show that the use of multideterminantal wave functions is very important to correctly describe the critical points of this PES within QMC, and that our multilevel J-LGVB approach is an effective tool to significantly reduce the cost of QMC calculations without loss of accuracy. As regards the complex PES of α-hydroxy-dimethylnitrosamine, the accurate energies computed with our approach allows us to confirm the validity of the two-step reaction mechanism of decomposition originally proposed within density functional theory, but with some important differences in the barrier heights of the individual steps.

  6. Model Experiment of Thermal Runaway Reactions Using the Aluminum-Hydrochloric Acid Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitabayashi, Suguru; Nakano, Masayoshi; Nishikawa, Kazuyuki; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for the education of students about thermal runaway reactions based on the reaction between aluminum and hydrochloric acid as a model reaction is proposed. In the introductory part of the exercise, the induction period and subsequent thermal runaway behavior are evaluated via a simple observation of hydrogen gas evolution and…

  7. Efficient photochemical decomposition of long-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids by means of an aqueous/liquid CO2 biphasic system.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hisao; Yamamoto, Ari; Kutsuna, Shuzo

    2005-10-01

    Photochemical decomposition of persistent and bioaccumulative long-chain (C9-C11) perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) with persulfate ion (S2O8(2-)) in an aqueous/liquid CO2 biphasic system was examined to develop a technique to neutralize stationary sources of the long-chain PFCAs. The long-chain PFCAs, namely, perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA), and perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUA), which are used as emulsifying agents and as surface treatment agents in industry, are relatively insoluble in water but are soluble in liquid CO2; therefore, introduction of liquid CO2 to the aqueous photoreaction system reduces the interference of colloidal PFCA particles. When the biphasic system was used to decompose these PFCAs, the extent of reaction was 6.4-51 times as high as that achieved in the absence of CO2. In the biphasic system, PFNA, PFDA, and PFUA (33.5-33.6 micromol) in 25.0 mL of water were 100%, 100%, and 77.1% decomposed, respectively, after 12 h of irradiation with a 200-W xenon-mercury lamp; F- ions were produced as a major product, and short-chain PFCAs, which are less bioaccumulative than the original PFCAs, were minor products. All of the initial S2O8(2-) was transformed to SO42-. The system also efficiently decomposed PFCAs at lower concentrations (e.g., 4.28-16.7 micromol of PFDA in 25.0 mL) and was successfully applied to decompose PFNA in floor wax.

  8. MELCOR-H2 Benchmarking of the SNL Transient Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Sal B.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Gelbard, Fred; Pickard, Paul; Cole, Randy; McFadden, Katherine; Drennen, Tom; Martin, Billy; Louie, David; Archuleta, Louis; Revankar, Shripad T.; Vierow, Karen; El-Genk, Mohamed; Tournier, Jean Michel

    2007-07-01

    MELCOR is a world-renowned nuclear reactor safety analysis code that is used to simulate both light water and gas-cooled reactors. MELCOR-H2 is an extension of MELCOR that can model detailed nuclear reactors that are fully coupled with modular secondary-system components and the sulfur iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle for the generation of hydrogen and electricity. The models are applicable to both steady state and transient calculations. Previous work has shown that the hydrogen generation rate calculated by MELCOR-H2 for the SI cycle was within the expected theoretical yield, thus providing a macroscopic confirmation that MELCOR-H2's computational approach is reasonable. However, in order to better quantify its adequacy, benchmarking of the code with experimental data is required. Sulfuric acid decomposition experiments were conducted during late 2006 at Sandia National Laboratories, and MELCOR-H2 was used to simulate them. We developed an input deck based on the experiment's geometry, as well as the initial and boundary conditions, and then proceeded to compare the experimental acid conversion efficiency and SO{sub 2} production data with the code output. The comparison showed that the simulation output was typically within less than 10% of experimental data, and that key experimental data trends such as acid conversion efficiency, molar acid flow rate, and solution mole % were computed adequately by the MELCOR-H2. (authors)

  9. Jammed acid-base reactions at interfaces.

    PubMed

    Gibbs-Davis, Julianne M; Kruk, Jennifer J; Konek, Christopher T; Scheidt, Karl A; Geiger, Franz M

    2008-11-19

    Using nonlinear optics, we show that acid-base chemistry at aqueous/solid interfaces tracks bulk pH changes at low salt concentrations. In the presence of 10 to 100 mM salt concentrations, however, the interfacial acid-base chemistry remains jammed for hours, until it finally occurs within minutes at a rate that follows the kinetic salt effect. For various alkali halide salts, the delay times increase with increasing anion polarizability and extent of cation hydration and lead to massive hysteresis in interfacial acid-base titrations. The resulting implications for pH cycling in these systems are that interfacial systems can spatially and temporally lag bulk acid-base chemistry when the Debye length approaches 1 nm.

  10. Decomposition of organochlorine compounds in flue gas from municipal solid waste incinerators using natural and activated acid clays.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Hee; Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Matsuo, Takayuki; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2014-09-01

    High-temperature particle control (HTPC) using a ceramic filter is a dust collection method without inefficient cooling and reheating of flue gas treatment; thus, its use is expected to improve the energy recovery efficiency of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs). However there are concerns regarding de novo synthesis and a decrease in the adsorptive removal efficiency of dioxins (DXNs) at approximately 300 degrees C. In this study, the effect of natural and activated acid clays on the decomposition of monochlorobenzene (MCB), one of the organochlorine compounds in MSW flue gas, was investigated. From the results of MCB removal tests at 30-300 degrees C, the clays were classified as adsorption, decomposition, and low removal types. More than half of the clays (four kinds of natural acid clays and two kinds of activated acid clays) were of the decomposition type. In addition, the presence of Cl atoms detached from MCB was confirmed by washing the clay used in the MCB removal test at 300 degrees C. Activated acid clay was expected to have high dechlorination performance because of its proton-rich-composition, but only two clays were classed as decomposition type. Conversely, all the natural acid clays used in this work were of the decomposition type, which contained relatively higher di- and trivalent metal oxides such as Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, and CaO. These metal oxides might contribute to the catalytic dechlorination of MCB at 300 degrees C. Therefore, natural and activated acid clays can be used as alternatives for activated carbon at 300 degrees C to remove organochloride compounds such as DXNs. Their utilization is expected to mitigate the latent risks related to the adoption of HTPC, and also to contribute to the improvement of energy recovery efficiency of MSWI. Implications: The effect of natural and activated acid clays on MCB decomposition was investigated to evaluate their suitability as materials for the removal of organochlorine compounds, such as

  11. Iminodicarboxylic acids in the Murchison meteorite: Evidence of Strecker reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Narcinda R.; Cooper, George W.

    2005-06-01

    α-Amino acids and α-hydroxy acids are well known constituents of several carbonaceous meteorites. One proposed mechanism of their formation is the reactions of CN -, NH 3, aldehydes and ketones in aqueous solution, a Strecker-like synthesis. Iminodicarboxylic acids, relatively unusual in molecular structure, are significant by-products of laboratory Strecker syntheses of α-amino acids. It is therefore notable that an analogous suite of imino acids has not been reported in CM2 chondrites where amino and hydroxy acids are abundant. In this work, aqueous extracts of the Murchison meteorite were examined for the presence of imino acids; GC-MS and HPLC molecular analyses revealed a complex suite of such acids. With the exception of one of the seven-carbon members, all of the C4 through C7 imino acids were observed in Murchison. These observations suggest that the Strecker synthesis made, at least, some contribution to the formation of extraterrestrial amino acids.

  12. Thermal decomposition of sodium bicarbonate and its effect on the reaction of sodium bicarbonate and sulfur dioxide in a simulated flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Keener, T.C.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of thermally decomposing sodium bicarbonate while simultaneously reacting with SO/sub 2/, was studied. The study was performed by quantitatively determining the rate of thermal decomposition as a function of particle size in an SO/sub 2/ free gas stream. The rate of reaction of sodium carbonate (product of the thermal decomposition) with SO/sub 2/ was then studied, and the data applied to a pore-plugging model which accounts for the loss in reactivity with increased reaction time. The reaction of sodium bicarbonate with SO/sub 2/ was then studied and the results compared to that for sodium carbonate. From the analysis of the data, the activation energy for the thermal decomposition reaction, the SO/sub 2/ sodium carbonate and SO/sub 2/ sodium bicarbonate reaction were derived. The thermal decomposition reaction of sodium biocarbonate was found to be similar to that of calcium carbonate below the point where heat transfer is rate limiting. The degree of conversion of sodium bicarbonate was found to be 12-17 times greater (depending on particle size) than that of sodium carbonate in the temperature range 250/sup 0/-350/sup 0/F (120/sup 0/-177/sup 0/C). This greater conversion was qualitatively explained by hypothesizing the formation of an activated species during thermal decomposition which would be more chemically reactive.

  13. Acid-functionalized polyolefin materials and their use in acid-promoted chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Tian, Chengcheng; Bauer, John Christopher; Dai, Sheng

    2016-06-07

    An acid-functionalized polyolefin material that can be used as an acid catalyst in a wide range of acid-promoted chemical reactions, wherein the acid-functionalized polyolefin material includes a polyolefin backbone on which acid groups are appended. Also described is a method for the preparation of the acid catalyst in which a precursor polyolefin is subjected to ionizing radiation (e.g., electron beam irradiation) of sufficient power and the irradiated precursor polyolefin reacted with at least one vinyl monomer having an acid group thereon. Further described is a method for conducting an acid-promoted chemical reaction, wherein an acid-reactive organic precursor is contacted in liquid form with a solid heterogeneous acid catalyst comprising a polyolefin backbone of at least 1 micron in one dimension and having carboxylic acid groups and either sulfonic acid or phosphoric acid groups appended thereto.

  14. Imino Acids in the Murchison Meteorite: Evidence of Strecker Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Cooper, G. W.

    2003-01-01

    Both alpha-amino acids and alpha-hydroxy acids occur in aqueous extracts of the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite. The Strecker-cyanohydrin reaction, the reaction of carbonyl compounds, cyanide, and ammonia to produce amino and hydroxy acids, has been proposed as a source of such organic acids in meteorites. Such syntheses are consistent with the suggestion that interstellar precursors of meteoritic organic compounds accreted on the meteorite parent body together with other ices. Subsequent internal heating of the parent body melted these ices and led to the formation of larger compounds in synthetic reactions during aqueous alteration, which probably occurred at temperatures between 273K and 298K. In the laboratory, imino acids are observed as important by-products of the Strecker synthesis.

  15. Kinetics and Mechanism of the CIO + CIO Reaction: Pressure and Temperature Dependences of the Bimolecular and Termolecular Channels andThermal Decomposition of Chlorine Peroxide, CIOOCI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Friedl, Randall R.; Sander, Stanley P.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the CIO + CIO reaction and the thermal decomposition of CIOOCI were studied using the flash photolysis/long path ultraviolet absorption technique. Pressure and temperature dependences were determined for the rate coefficients for the bimolecular and termolecular reaction channels, and for the thermal decompositon of CIOOCI.

  16. Endothermic decompositions of inorganic monocrystalline thin plates. II. Displacement rate modulation of the reaction front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertrand, G.; Comperat, M.; Lallemant, M.

    1980-09-01

    Copper sulfate pentahydrate dehydration into trihydrate was investigated using monocrystalline platelets with (110) crystallographic orientation. Temperature and pressure conditions were selected so as to obtain elliptical trihydrate domains. The study deals with the evolution, vs time, of elliptical domain dimensions and the evolution, vs water vapor pressure, of the {D}/{d} ratio of ellipse axes and on the other hand of the interface displacement rate along a given direction. The phenomena observed are not basically different from those yielded by the overall kinetic study of the solid sample. Their magnitude, however, is modulated depending on displacement direction. The results are analyzed within the scope of our study of endothermic decomposition of solids.

  17. Modified Fenton reaction for trichlorophenol dechlorination by enzymatically generated H2O2 and gluconic acid chelate.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Deepak K; Bachas, Leonidas G; Bhattacharyya, D

    2007-02-01

    Glucose oxidase is a well-known enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of beta-D-glucose to produce gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Fenton reaction is a powerful oxidation technology used for the oxidation of groundwater pollutants. For the application of Fenton reaction in groundwater remediation, successful operation of Fenton reaction near neutral pH, and on-site generation of both H2O2 and chelate will be beneficial. The focus of this experimental study was to couple the glucose oxidation reaction with chelate-based Fenton reaction. The idea was to use the hydrogen peroxide and chelate gluconic acid generated during glucose oxidation for the dechlorination of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) by Fenton reaction. The oxidation of glucose was achieved using the enzyme in free and immobilized forms. The rate of production of hydrogen peroxide was determined for each system, and was used to estimate the time required for complete consumption of glucose during the process, thus avoiding any traces of glucose in the Fenton reaction. In the case of free enzyme reaction, separation of the enzyme was achieved using an ultrafiltration membrane before initiating the Fenton reaction. The oxidation of TCP by Fenton reaction was performed at varying ratios of gluconic acid/Fe, and its effect on the decomposition of TCP and H2O2 was studied. TCP degradation was studied both in terms of parent compound degradation and free chloride generation.

  18. Solution of rocks and refractory minerals by acids at high temperatures and pressures. Determination of silica after decomposition with hydrofluoric acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, I.; Rowe, J.J.

    1965-01-01

    A modified Morey bomb was designed which contains a removable nichromecased 3.5-ml platinium crucible. This bomb is particularly useful for decompositions of refractory samples for micro- and semimicro-analysis. Temperatures of 400-450?? and pressures estimated as great as 6000 p.s.i. were maintained in the bomb for periods as long as 24 h. Complete decompositions of rocks, garnet, beryl, chrysoberyl, phenacite, sapphirine, and kyanite were obtained with hydrofluoric acid or a mixture of hydrofluoric and sulfuric acids; the decomposition of chrome refractory was made with hydrochloric acid. Aluminum-rich samples formed difficultly soluble aluminum fluoride precipitates. Because no volatilization losses occur, silica can be determined on sample solutions by a molybdenum-blue procedure using aluminum(III) to complex interfering fluoride. ?? 1965.

  19. The role of alkoxy radicals in the heterogeneous reaction of two structural isomers of dimethylsuccinic acid.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chiu Tung; Chan, Man Nin; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-10-14

    A key challenge in understanding the transformation chemistry of organic aerosols is to quantify how changes in molecular structure alter heterogeneous reaction mechanisms. Here we use two model systems to investigate how the relative locations of branched methyl groups control the heterogeneous reaction of OH with two isomers of dimethylsuccinic acid (C6H10O4). 2,2-Dimethylsuccinic acid (2,2-DMSA) and 2,3-dimethylsuccinic acid (2,3-DMSA) differ only in the location of the two branched methyl groups, thus enabling a closer inspection of how the distribution of carbon reaction sites impacts the chemical evolution of the aerosol. The heterogeneous reaction of OH with 2,3-DMSA (reactive OH uptake coefficient, γ = 0.99 ± 0.16) is found to be ∼2 times faster than that of 2,2-DMSA (γ = 0.41 ± 0.07), which is attributed to the larger stability of the tertiary alkyl radical produced by the initial OH abstraction reaction. While changes in the average aerosol oxidation state (OSC) and the carbon number (NC) are similar for both isomers upon reaction, significant differences are observed in the underlying molecular distribution of reaction products. The reaction of OH with the 2,3-DMSA isomer produces two major reaction products: a product containing a new alcohol functional group (C6H10O5) formed by intermolecular hydrogen abstraction and a C5 compound formed via carbon-carbon (C-C) bond scission. Both of these reaction products are explained by the formation and subsequent reaction of a tertiary alkoxy radical. In contrast, the OH reaction with the 2,2-DMSA isomer forms four dominant reaction products, the majority of which are C5 scission products. The difference in the quantity of C-C bond scission products for these two isomers is unexpected since decomposition is assumed to be favored for the isomer with the most tertiary carbon sites (i.e. 2,3-DMSA). For both isomers, there is a much larger abundance of C6 alcohol relative to C6 ketone products, which suggests

  20. New nickel catalysts for the formation of filamentous carbon in the reaction of methane decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ermakova, M.A.; Ermakov, D.Y.; Kuvshinov, G.G.; Plyasova, L.M.

    1999-10-01

    A method for intentional synthesis of metal catalysts, specifically nickel catalysts for methane decomposition, was developed. The method was based on impregnation of a porous metal oxide with the precursor of a textural promoter followed by reduction of the latter. The desired texture of NiO was provided by precalcining it at a certain temperature within the range 300 to 900 C. A family of nickel-based catalytic systems with various concentrations of the active component, metal particle sizes, and stability to deactivation in the course of synthesis of filamentous carbon was prepared. The yield of carbon and mechanical strength of carbon particles growing on the catalyst during methane decomposition were found to increase with the concentration of nickel in the catalyst, to reach their maxima at 90--96% nickel. The highest yield of carbon (375--384 g carbon per g nickel) was observed for the catalyst with particles of 10--40 nm average diameter. The effect of textural promoters (SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO, TiO{sub 2}, and ZrO{sub 2}) on the catalyst performance was studied; the highest carbon yield was obtained with SiO{sub 2}.

  1. Fluorogenic, catalytic, photochemical reaction for amplified detection of nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Subrata; Fülöp, Annabelle; Mokhir, Andriy

    2013-09-18

    Photochemical, nucleic acid-induced reactions, which are controlled by nontoxic red light, are well-suited for detection of nucleic acids in live cells, since they do not require any additives and can be spatially and temporally regulated. We have recently described the first reaction of this type, in which a phenylselenyl derivative of thymidine (5'-PhSeT-ODNa) is cleaved in the presence of singlet oxygen (Fülöp, A., Peng, X., Greenberg, M. M., Mokhir, A. (2010) A nucleic acid directed, red light-induced chemical reaction. Chem. Commun. 46, 5659-5661). The latter reagent is produced upon exposure of a photosensitizer 3'-PS-ODNb (PS = Indium(III)-pyropheophorbide-a-chloride: InPPa) to >630 nm light. In 2012 we reported on a fluorogenic version of this reaction (Dutta, S., Flottmann, B., Heilemann, M., Mokhir, A. (2012) Hybridization and reaction-based, fluorogenic nucleic acid probes. Chem. Commun. 47, 9664-9666), which is potentially applicable for the detection of nucleic acids in cells. Unfortunately, its yield does not exceed 25% and no catalytic turnover could be observed in the presence of substrate excess. This problem occurs due to the efficient, competing oxidation of the substrate containing an electron rich carbon-carbon double bonds (SCH═CHS) in the presence of singlet oxygen with formation of a noncleavable product (SCH═CHSO). Herein we describe a related, but substantially improved photochemical, catalytic transformation of a fluorogenic, organic substrate, which consists of 9,10-dialkoxyanthracene linked to fluorescein, with formation of a bright fluorescent dye. In highly dilute solution this reaction occurs only in the presence of a nucleic acid template. We developed three types of such a reaction and demonstrated that they are high yielding and generate over 7.7 catalytic turnovers, are sensitive to single mismatches in nucleic acid targets, and can be applied for determination of both the amount of nucleic acids and potentially their

  2. Perfluorinated resinsulfonic acid--a catalyst for certain organic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Etlis, V.S.; Beshenova, E.P.; Semenova, E.A.; Shomina, F.N.; Dreiman, N.A.; Balaev, G.A.

    1986-09-10

    The purpose of this work was to examine the possibility of using, as a catalyst in certain organic reactions, the perfluorinated resinsulfonic acid F-4SK in the H form, which is an analog of the perfluorinated resinsulfonic acid Nafion-H.

  3. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo substituted phenyl azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato...

  8. Marangoni instability in the iodate-arsenous acid reaction front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pópity-Tóth, Éva; Pótári, Gábor; Erdős, István; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2014-07-01

    Horizontally propagating chemical fronts leading to the formation of a single stable convection roll are investigated in the iodate-arsenous acid reaction with arsenous acid stoichiometrically limiting, leaving the surface active iodine present in the product mixture. In sufficiently thin solution layers with open upper surface, the contribution of Marangoni instability is significantly enhanced. Acting in the same direction as buoyancy driven instability, it distorts the entire tilted reaction front that becomes 50% more elongated. The corresponding three-dimensional calculations based on the empirical rate-law of the reaction corroborate the experimental findings.

  9. Marangoni instability in the iodate–arsenous acid reaction front

    SciTech Connect

    Pópity-Tóth, Éva; Pótári, Gábor; Erdős, István; Tóth, Ágota; Horváth, Dezső

    2014-07-28

    Horizontally propagating chemical fronts leading to the formation of a single stable convection roll are investigated in the iodate–arsenous acid reaction with arsenous acid stoichiometrically limiting, leaving the surface active iodine present in the product mixture. In sufficiently thin solution layers with open upper surface, the contribution of Marangoni instability is significantly enhanced. Acting in the same direction as buoyancy driven instability, it distorts the entire tilted reaction front that becomes 50% more elongated. The corresponding three-dimensional calculations based on the empirical rate-law of the reaction corroborate the experimental findings.

  10. Influence of solid-state acidity on the decomposition of sucrose in amorphous systems. I.

    PubMed

    Alkhamis, Khouloud A

    2008-10-01

    It was of interest to develop a method for solid-state acidity measurements using pH indicators and to correlate this method to the degradation rate of sucrose. Amorphous samples containing lactose 100mg/ml, sucrose 10mg/ml, citrate buffer (1-50mM) and sodium chloride (to adjust the ionic strength) were prepared by freeze-drying. The lyophiles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and Karl Fischer titremetry. The solid-state acidity of all lyophiles was measured using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and suitable indicators (thymol blue or bromophenol blue). The prepared lyophiles were subjected to a temperature of 60 degrees C and were analyzed for degradation using the Trinder kit. The results obtained from this study have shown that the solid-state acidity depends mainly on the molar ratio of the salt and the acid used in buffer preparation and not on the initial pH of the solution. The degradation of sucrose in the lyophiles is extremely sensitive to the solid-state acidity and the ionic strength. Reasonable correlation was obtained between the Hammett acidity function and sucrose degradation rate. The use of cosolvents (in the calibration plots) can provide good correlations with the rate of an acid-catalyzed reaction, sucrose inversion, in amorphous lyophiles. PMID:18647642

  11. Effects of Acid on Plant Litter Decomposition in an Arctic Lake

    PubMed Central

    McKinley, Vicky L.; Vestal, J. Robie

    1982-01-01

    The effects of acid on the microbial decomposition of the dominant aquatic macrophyte (Carex sp.) in Toolik Lake, Alaska were studied in microcosms during the ice-free season of 1980. Toolik Lake is slightly buffered, deep, and very oligotrophic. Microbial activities, as determined by 14C-acetate incorporation into extractable lipids, associated with Carex litter were significantly (P < 0.01) reduced within 2 days at pHs of 3.0 and 4.0, but not 5.0, 5.5, or 6.0, as compared with ambient controls (pH 7.4). ATP levels were significantly reduced at pH 3.0, but not at the other pHs tested. After 18 days, microbial activity significantly correlated with weight loss (P < 0.05), nitrogen content (P < 0.01), and C/N ratios (P < 0.01) of the litter, but did not correlate with ATP levels. Scanning electron microscopy of the litter surface revealed that the fungi present at ambient pH did not become dominant at pHs below 5.5, diatoms were absent below pH 4.0, and bacterial numbers and extracellular slime were greatly reduced at pH 4.0 and below. Mineralization of Carex14C-lignin-labeled or 14C-cellulose-labeled lignocellulose was reduced at pH 2.0, but not at pH 4.0, 5.0, or 6.0, compared with controls (pH 7). We concluded that if the pH of the water from this slightly buffered lake was sufficiently reduced, rates of litter decomposition would be significantly reduced. Images PMID:16346015

  12. Effects of acid on plant litter decomposition in an arctic lake. [Carex aquatilis

    SciTech Connect

    McKinley, V.L.; Vestal, J.R.

    1982-05-01

    The effects of acid on the microbial decomposition of the dominant aquatic macrophyte (Carex sp.) in Toolik Lake, Alaska were studied in microcosms during the ice-free season of 1980. Toolik Lake is slightly buffered, deep, and very oligotrophic. Microbial activities, as determined by /sup 14/C-acetate incorporation into extractable lipids, associated with Carex litter were signficantly (P < 0.01) reduced within 2 days at pHs of 3.0 and 4.0, but not 5.0, 5.5 or 6.0, as compared with ambient controls (pH 7.4). ATP levels were signficantly reduced at pH 3.0 but not at the other pHs tested. After 18 days, microbial activity signficantly correlated with weight loss (P < 0.05), nitrogen content (P < 0.01), and C/N ratios (P < 0.01) of the liter, but did not correlate with ATP levels. Scanning electron microscopy of the litter surface revealed that the fungi present at ambient pH did not become domimant at pHs below 5.5, diatoms were absent below pH 4.0, and bacterial numbers and extracellular slime were greatly reduced at pH 4.0 and below. Mineralization of Carex /sup 14/C-lignin-labeled or /sup 14/C-cellulose-labeled ligno-cellulose was reduced at pH 2.0, but not at pH 4.0, 5.0, or 6.0, compared with controls (pH '). We concluded that if the pH of the water from this slightly buffered lake was sufficiently reduced, rates of litter decomposition would be significantly reduced.

  13. Solvent effects in acid-catalyzed biomass conversion reactions.

    PubMed

    Mellmer, Max A; Sener, Canan; Gallo, Jean Marcel R; Luterbacher, Jeremy S; Alonso, David Martin; Dumesic, James A

    2014-10-27

    Reaction kinetics were studied to quantify the effects of polar aprotic organic solvents on the acid-catalyzed conversion of xylose into furfural. A solvent of particular importance is γ-valerolactone (GVL), which leads to significant increases in reaction rates compared to water in addition to increased product selectivity. GVL has similar effects on the kinetics for the dehydration of 1,2-propanediol to propanal and for the hydrolysis of cellobiose to glucose. Based on results obtained for homogeneous Brønsted acid catalysts that span a range of pKa values, we suggest that an aprotic organic solvent affects the reaction kinetics by changing the stabilization of the acidic proton relative to the protonated transition state. This same behavior is displayed by strong solid Brønsted acid catalysts, such as H-mordenite and H-beta. PMID:25214063

  14. Reaction mechanism for the thermal decomposition of BCl3/CH4/H2 gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Guillaume; Vignoles, Gérard L; Leyssale, Jean-Marc

    2011-10-27

    This paper presents an ab initio study of the B/C/Cl/H gas phase mechanism, featuring 10 addition-elimination reactions involving BH(i)Cl(j) (i + j ≤ 3) species and a first description of the chemical interaction between the carbon-containing and boron-containing subsystems through the three reactions BCl(3) + CH(4) ⇌ BCl(2)CH(3) + HCl, BHCl(2) + CH(4) ⇌ BCl(2)CH(3) + H(2), and BCl(2) + CH(4) ⇌ BHCl(2) + CH(3). A reaction mechanism is then proposed and used to perform some illustrative equilibrium and kinetic calculations in the context of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of boron carbide. Our results show that the new addition-elimination reaction paths play a crucial role by lowering considerably the activation barrier with respect to previous theoretical evaluations; they also confirm that BCl(2)CH(3) is an important species in the mechanism.

  15. Depressing the hydrogenation and decomposition reaction in H2O2 synthesis by supporting AuPD on oxygen functionalized carbon nanofibers

    DOE PAGES

    Villa, Alberto; Freakley, Simon J.; Schiavoni, Marco; Edwards, Jennifer K.; Hammond, Ceri; Wang, Wu; Wang, Di; Prati, Laura; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Hutchings, Graham J.; et al

    2015-12-03

    In this work, we show that the introduction of acidic oxygen functionalities to the surface of carbon nanofibers serves to depress the hydrogenation and the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide during the direct synthesis of H2O2. Furthermore, the presence of acidic groups enhances the H2O2 productivity in the case of supported AuPd nanoparticles.

  16. Thermal decomposition of energetic materials. 5. reaction processes of 1,3,5-trinitrohexahydro-s-triazine below its melting point.

    PubMed

    Maharrey, Sean; Behrens, Richard

    2005-12-15

    Through the use of simultaneous thermogravimetry modulated beam mass spectrometry, optical microscopy, hot-stage time-lapsed microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy measurements, the physical and chemical processes that control the thermal decomposition of 1,3,5-trinitrohexahydro-s-triazine (RDX) below its melting point (160-189 degrees C) have been identified. Two gas-phase reactions of RDX are predominant during the early stages of an experiment. One involves the loss of HONO and HNO and leads to the formation of H2O, NO, NO2, and oxy-s-triazine (OST) or s-triazine. The other involves the reaction of NO with RDX to form NO2 and 1-nitroso-3,5-dinitrohexahydro-s-triazine (ONDNTA), which subsequently decomposes to form a set of products of which CH2O and N2O are the most abundant. Products from the gas-phase RDX decomposition reactions, such as ONDNTA, deposit on the surface of the RDX particles and lead to the development of a new set of reaction pathways that occur on the surface of the RDX particles. The initial surface reactions occur on surfaces of those RDX particles in the sample that can accumulate the greatest amount of products from the gas-phase reactions. Initial surface reactions are characterized by the formation of islands of reactivity on the RDX surface and lead to the development of an orange-colored nonvolatile residue (NVR) film on the surface of the RDX particles. The NVR film is most likely formed via the decomposition of ONDNTA on the surface of the RDX particles. The NVR film is a nonstoichiometric and dynamic material, which reacts directly with RDX and ONDNTA, and is composed of remnants from RDX and ONDNTA molecules that have reacted with the NVR. Reactions involving the NVR become dominant during the later stage of the decomposition process. The NVR reacts with RDX to form ONDNTA via abstraction of an oxygen atom from an NO2 group. ONDNTA may undergo rapid loss of N2 and NO2 with the remaining portion of the molecule being

  17. Mesoporous Silica Supported Pd-MnOx Catalysts with Excellent Catalytic Activity in Room-Temperature Formic Acid Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Min-Ho; Oh, Duckkyu; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Lee, Sung-Wook; Park, Jong-Soo; Lee, Kwan-Young; Lee, Dong-Wook

    2016-09-01

    For the application of formic acid as a liquid organic hydrogen carrier, development of efficient catalysts for dehydrogenation of formic acid is a challenging topic, and most studies have so far focused on the composition of metals and supports, the size effect of metal nanoparticles, and surface chemistry of supports. Another influential factor is highly desired to overcome the current limitation of heterogeneous catalysis for formic acid decomposition. Here, we first investigated the effect of support pore structure on formic acid decomposition performance at room temperature by using mesoporous silica materials with different pore structures such as KIE-6, MCM-41, and SBA-15, and achieved the excellent catalytic activity (TOF: 593 h‑1) by only controlling the pore structure of mesoporous silica supports. In addition, we demonstrated that 3D interconnected pore structure of mesoporous silica supports is more favorable to the mass transfer than 2D cylindrical mesopore structure, and the better mass transfer provides higher catalytic activity in formic acid decomposition. If the pore morphology of catalytic supports such as 3D wormhole or 2D cylinder is identical, large pore size combined with high pore volume is a crucial factor to achieve high catalytic performance.

  18. Mesoporous Silica Supported Pd-MnOx Catalysts with Excellent Catalytic Activity in Room-Temperature Formic Acid Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Min-Ho; Oh, Duckkyu; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Lee, Sung-Wook; Park, Jong-Soo; Lee, Kwan-Young; Lee, Dong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    For the application of formic acid as a liquid organic hydrogen carrier, development of efficient catalysts for dehydrogenation of formic acid is a challenging topic, and most studies have so far focused on the composition of metals and supports, the size effect of metal nanoparticles, and surface chemistry of supports. Another influential factor is highly desired to overcome the current limitation of heterogeneous catalysis for formic acid decomposition. Here, we first investigated the effect of support pore structure on formic acid decomposition performance at room temperature by using mesoporous silica materials with different pore structures such as KIE-6, MCM-41, and SBA-15, and achieved the excellent catalytic activity (TOF: 593 h−1) by only controlling the pore structure of mesoporous silica supports. In addition, we demonstrated that 3D interconnected pore structure of mesoporous silica supports is more favorable to the mass transfer than 2D cylindrical mesopore structure, and the better mass transfer provides higher catalytic activity in formic acid decomposition. If the pore morphology of catalytic supports such as 3D wormhole or 2D cylinder is identical, large pore size combined with high pore volume is a crucial factor to achieve high catalytic performance. PMID:27666280

  19. 40 CFR 721.10664 - Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic). 721.10664 Section 721.10664... Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic). (a... generically as alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10629 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10664 - Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic). 721.10664 Section 721.10664... Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic). (a... generically as alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10629 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (PMN...

  3. Compact Ag@Fe3O4 Core-shell Nanoparticles by Means of Single-step Thermal Decomposition Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brollo, Maria Eugênia F.; López-Ruiz, Román; Muraca, Diego; Figueroa, Santiago J. A.; Pirota, Kleber R.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2014-10-01

    A temperature pause introduced in a simple single-step thermal decomposition of iron, with the presence of silver seeds formed in the same reaction mixture, gives rise to novel compact heterostructures: brick-like Ag@Fe3O4 core-shell nanoparticles. This novel method is relatively easy to implement, and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining a multifunctional heteroparticle in which a noble metal is surrounded by magnetite. Structural analyses of the samples show 4 nm silver nanoparticles wrapped within compact cubic external structures of Fe oxide, with curious rectangular shape. The magnetic properties indicate a near superparamagnetic like behavior with a weak hysteresis at room temperature. The value of the anisotropy involved makes these particles candidates to potential applications in nanomedicine.

  4. A STUDY OF THE PROPERTIES OF CP: COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS AND REACTION TO SPARK, FRICTION AND IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K; Fontes, A T

    2005-03-30

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear heating rates, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Using differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, CP was decomposed at linear heating rates of 1, 3, and 7 C/min and the kinetic triplet calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  5. Angiotensin II modification by decomposition products of linoleic acid-derived lipid hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki; Lee, Seon Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are highly susceptible to oxidation induced by reactive oxygen species and enzymes, leading to the formation of lipid hydroperoxides. The linoleic acid (LA)-derived hydroperoxide, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (HPODE) undergoes homolytic decomposition to reactive aldehydes, 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal (ONE), 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal, trans-4,5-epoxy-2(E)-decenal (EDE), and 4-hydroperoxy-2(E)-nonenal (HPNE), which can covalently modify peptides and proteins. ONE and HNE have been shown to react with angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and modify the N-terminus, Arg(2), and His(6). ONE-derived pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P) alters the biological activities of Ang II considerably. The present study revealed that EDE and HPNE preferentially modified the N-terminus and His(6) of Ang II. In addition to the N-substituted pyrrole of [N-C4H2]-Ang II and Michael addition products of [His(6)(EDE)]-Ang II, hydrated forms were detected as major products, suggesting considerable involvement of the vicinal dihydrodiol (formed by epoxide hydration) in EDE-derived protein modification in vivo. Substantial amounts of [N-(EDE-H2O)]-Ang II isomers were also formed and their synthetic pathway might involve the tautomerization of a carbinolamine intermediate, followed by intramolecular cyclization and dehydration. The main HPNE-derived products were [His(6)(HPNE)]-Ang II and [N-(HPNE-H2O)]-Ang II. However, ONE, HNE, and malondialdehyde-derived modifications were dominant, because HPNE is a precursor of these aldehydes. A mixture of 13-HPODE and [(13)C18]-13-HPODE (1:1) was then used to determine the major modifications derived from LA peroxidation. The characteristic doublet (1:1) observed in the mass spectrum and the mass difference of the [M+H](+) doublet aided the identification of Ang P (N-terminal α-ketoamide), [N-ONE]-Ang II (4-ketoamide), [Arg(2)(ONE-H2O)]-Ang II, [His(6)(HNE)]-Ang II (Michael addition product), [N-C4H2]-Ang II (EDE-derived N-substituted pyrrole

  6. Angiotensin II modification by decomposition products of linoleic acid-derived lipid hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryo; Goto, Takaaki; Oe, Tomoyuki; Lee, Seon Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids are highly susceptible to oxidation induced by reactive oxygen species and enzymes, leading to the formation of lipid hydroperoxides. The linoleic acid (LA)-derived hydroperoxide, 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (HPODE) undergoes homolytic decomposition to reactive aldehydes, 4-oxo-2(E)-nonenal (ONE), 4-hydroxy-2(E)-nonenal, trans-4,5-epoxy-2(E)-decenal (EDE), and 4-hydroperoxy-2(E)-nonenal (HPNE), which can covalently modify peptides and proteins. ONE and HNE have been shown to react with angiotensin (Ang) II (DRVYIHPF) and modify the N-terminus, Arg(2), and His(6). ONE-derived pyruvamide-Ang II (Ang P) alters the biological activities of Ang II considerably. The present study revealed that EDE and HPNE preferentially modified the N-terminus and His(6) of Ang II. In addition to the N-substituted pyrrole of [N-C4H2]-Ang II and Michael addition products of [His(6)(EDE)]-Ang II, hydrated forms were detected as major products, suggesting considerable involvement of the vicinal dihydrodiol (formed by epoxide hydration) in EDE-derived protein modification in vivo. Substantial amounts of [N-(EDE-H2O)]-Ang II isomers were also formed and their synthetic pathway might involve the tautomerization of a carbinolamine intermediate, followed by intramolecular cyclization and dehydration. The main HPNE-derived products were [His(6)(HPNE)]-Ang II and [N-(HPNE-H2O)]-Ang II. However, ONE, HNE, and malondialdehyde-derived modifications were dominant, because HPNE is a precursor of these aldehydes. A mixture of 13-HPODE and [(13)C18]-13-HPODE (1:1) was then used to determine the major modifications derived from LA peroxidation. The characteristic doublet (1:1) observed in the mass spectrum and the mass difference of the [M+H](+) doublet aided the identification of Ang P (N-terminal α-ketoamide), [N-ONE]-Ang II (4-ketoamide), [Arg(2)(ONE-H2O)]-Ang II, [His(6)(HNE)]-Ang II (Michael addition product), [N-C4H2]-Ang II (EDE-derived N-substituted pyrrole

  7. High-Temperature Decomposition of Brønsted Acid Sites in Gallium-Substituted Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    K Al-majnouni; N Hould; W Lonergan; D Vlachos; R Lobo

    2011-12-31

    The dehydroxylation of Broensted acid sites (BAS) in Ga-substituted zeolites was investigated at temperatures up to 850 C using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and mass spectrometry-temperature programmed desorption (MS-TPD). X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) revealed that the majority of gallium has tetrahedral coordination even after complete dehydroxylation. The interatomic gallium-oxygen distance and gallium coordination number determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) are consistent with gallium in tetrahedral coordination at low T (< 550 C). Upon heating Ga-Beta and Ga-ZSM5 to 850 C, analysis of the EXAFS showed that 70 and 80% of the gallium was still in tetrahedral coordination. The remainder of the gallium was found to be in octahedral coordination. No trigonal Ga atoms were observed. FTIR measurements carried out at similar temperatures show that the intensity of the OH vibration due to BAS has been eliminated. MS-TPD revealed that hydrogen in addition to water evolved from the samples during dehydroxylation. This shows that dehydrogenation in addition to dehydration is a mechanism that contributes to BAS decomposition. Dehydrogenation was further confirmed by exposing the sample to hydrogen to regenerate some of the BAS as monitored by FTIR and MS-TPD.

  8. Kinetic study of free fatty acid esterification reaction catalyzed by recoverable and reusable hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Hung

    2013-02-01

    The catalytic performance and recoverability of several homogeneous acid catalysts (hydrochloric, sulfuric, and nitric acids) for the esterification of enzyme-hydrolyzed free fatty acid (FFA) and methanol were studied. Although all tested catalysts drove the reaction to a high yield, hydrochloric acid was the only catalyst that could be considerably recovered and reused. The kinetics of the esterification reaction catalyzed by hydrochloric acid was investigated under varying catalyst loading (0.1-1M), reaction temperature (303-343K), and methanol/FFA molar ratio (1:1-20:1). In addition, a pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model incorporating the above factors was developed. A good agreement (r(2)=0.98) between the experimental and calculated data was obtained, thus proving the reliability of the model. Furthermore, the reusability of hydrochloric acid in FFA esterification can be predicted by the developed model. The recoverable hydrochloric acid achieved high yields of FFA esterification within five times of reuse.

  9. Ozone decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  10. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  11. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates.

  12. Using adaptive proper orthogonal decomposition to solve the reaction-diffusion equation

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, M A; Green, W H

    2007-12-03

    We introduce an adaptive POD method to reduce the computational cost of reacting flow simulations. The scheme is coupled with an operator-splitting algorithm to solve the reaction-diffusion equation. For the reaction sub-steps, locally valid basis vectors, obtained via POD and the method of snapshots, are used to project the minor species mass fractions onto a reduced dimensional space thereby decreasing the number of equations that govern combustion chemistry. The method is applied to a one-dimensional laminar premixed CH{sub 4}-air flame using GRImech 3.0; with errors less than 0:25%, a speed-up factor of 3:5 is observed. The speed-up results from fewer source term evaluations required to compute the Jacobian matrices.

  13. Unimolecular decomposition reactions at low-pressure: A comparison of competitive methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    The lack of a simple rate coefficient expression to describe the pressure and temperature dependence hampers chemical modeling of flame systems. Recently developed simplified models to describe unimolecular processes include the calculation of rate constants for thermal unimolecular reactions and recombinations at the low pressure limit, at the high pressure limit and in the intermediate fall-off region. Comparison between two different applications of Troe's simplified model and a comparison between the simplified model and the classic RRKM theory are described.

  14. Kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid by inhibition of the hydrochloric acid-bromate reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Rezaei, B.; Movahedinia, H.

    2002-10-01

    A new analytical method was developed for the determination of ascorbic acid in fruit juice and pharmaceuticals. The method is based on its inhibition effect on the reaction between hydrochloric acid and bromate. The decolourisation of Methyl Orange by the reaction products was used to monitor the reaction spectrophotometrically at 510 nm. The linearity range of the calibration graph depends on bromate concentration. The variable affecting the rate of the reaction was investigated. The method is simple, rapid, relatively sensitive and precise. The limit of detection is 7.6×10 -6 M and calibration rang is 8×10 -6-1.2×10 -3 M ascorbic acid. The relative standard deviation of seven replication determinations of 8×10 -6 and 2×10 -5 M ascorbic acid was 2.8 and 1.7%, respectively. The influence of potential interfering substance was studied. The method was successfully applied for the determination of ascorbic acid in pharmaceuticals.

  15. Nucleic Acid Templated Chemical Reaction in a Live Vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nucleic acid templated reactions are enabled by the hybridization of probe-reagent conjugates resulting in high effective reagent concentration and fast chemical transformation. We have developed a reaction that harnesses cellular microRNA (miRNA) to yield the cleavage of a linker releasing fluorogenic rhodamine in a live vertebrate. The reaction is based on the catalytic photoreduction of an azide by a ruthenium complex. We showed that this system reports specific expression of miRNA in living tissues of a vertebrate. PMID:27413783

  16. Nucleic Acid Templated Chemical Reaction in a Live Vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Holtzer, Laurent; Oleinich, Igor; Anzola, Marcello; Lindberg, Eric; Sadhu, Kalyan K; Gonzalez-Gaitan, Marcos; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2016-06-22

    Nucleic acid templated reactions are enabled by the hybridization of probe-reagent conjugates resulting in high effective reagent concentration and fast chemical transformation. We have developed a reaction that harnesses cellular microRNA (miRNA) to yield the cleavage of a linker releasing fluorogenic rhodamine in a live vertebrate. The reaction is based on the catalytic photoreduction of an azide by a ruthenium complex. We showed that this system reports specific expression of miRNA in living tissues of a vertebrate.

  17. Catalytical Conversion of Carbohydrates into Lactic Acid via Hydrothermal Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhen; Jin, Fangming; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Shiping; Yao, Guodong

    2010-11-01

    This paper focuses on catalytical conversion of carbohydrates into lactic acid, under the hydrothermal conditions, which may have a promising future for its high speediness and effectiveness. The catalysis of ZnO was investigated to improve the lactic acid yields. The results showed that the lactic acid yields increased immensely by the addition of ZnO. The effects of the reaction time and the addition amount of ZnO on the conversion of carbohydrates to lactic acid were studied. The highest lactic acid yields reached up to 28% starting from glucose after the reaction time of 60 s under the conditions of 0.2 mmol ZnO, 300° C, the filling rate of 35%, and over 30% starting from fructose at the same temperature and filling rate when the reaction time of 40 s and 2.0 mmol ZnO were employed. The collaborative effects of ZnO and NaOH used as the catalysts together at the same time were also studied. Furthermore, the catalytic mechanism of ZnO in the hydrothermal conversion of carbohydrates into lactic acid was discussed.

  18. Kinetics and mechanism of the acid-catalyzed decomposition of omega-diazoacetophenones and their o-carbomethyoxy derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Denisova, T.G.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of the acid-catalyzed decomposition of omega-diazoacetophenones and their o-carbomethoxy derivatives have been studied and their rate constants and activation energies measured in dioxane-H/sub 2/O (D/sub 2/O) and aqueous (D/sub 2/O)-dioxane mixtures (40:60 by volume) in the presence of H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (D/sub 2/SO/sub 4/), as well as in acetic and deuteroacetic acids, in the temperature range 290-328 K. Based on the results of k/sub H//k/sub D/ and ..delta..S not identical to measurements, assumptions have been made concerning the mechanism of the catalytic decomposition of the indicated diazoketones.

  19. Decomposition techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Sample decomposition is a fundamental and integral step in the procedure of geochemical analysis. It is often the limiting factor to sample throughput, especially with the recent application of the fast and modern multi-element measurement instrumentation. The complexity of geological materials makes it necessary to choose the sample decomposition technique that is compatible with the specific objective of the analysis. When selecting a decomposition technique, consideration should be given to the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the sample, elements to be determined, precision and accuracy requirements, sample throughput, technical capability of personnel, and time constraints. This paper addresses these concerns and discusses the attributes and limitations of many techniques of sample decomposition along with examples of their application to geochemical analysis. The chemical properties of reagents as to their function as decomposition agents are also reviewed. The section on acid dissolution techniques addresses the various inorganic acids that are used individually or in combination in both open and closed systems. Fluxes used in sample fusion are discussed. The promising microwave-oven technology and the emerging field of automation are also examined. A section on applications highlights the use of decomposition techniques for the determination of Au, platinum group elements (PGEs), Hg, U, hydride-forming elements, rare earth elements (REEs), and multi-elements in geological materials. Partial dissolution techniques used for geochemical exploration which have been treated in detail elsewhere are not discussed here; nor are fire-assaying for noble metals and decomposition techniques for X-ray fluorescence or nuclear methods be discussed. ?? 1992.

  20. Dissociative attachment reactions of electrons with strong acid molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, N.G.; Smith, D.; Viggiano, A.A.; Paulson, J.F.; Henchman, M.J.

    1986-06-15

    Using the flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe (FALP) technique, we have determined (at variously 300 and 570 K) the dissociative attachment coefficients ..beta.. for the reactions of electrons with the common acids HNO/sub 3/ (producing NO/sup -//sub 2/) and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (HSO/sup -//sub 4/), the superacids FSO/sub 3/H (FSO/sup -//sub 3/), CF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/H (CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/), ClSO/sub 3/H (ClSO/sup -//sub 3/,Cl/sup -/), the acid anhydride (CF/sub 3/SO/sub 2/)/sub 2/O (CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/), and the halogen halides HBr (Br/sup -/) and HI (I/sup -/). The anions formed in the reactions are those given in the parentheses. The reactions with HF and HCl were investigated, but did not occur at a measurable rate since they are very endothermic. Dissociative attachment is rapid for the common acids, the superacids, and the anhydride, the measured ..beta.. being appreciable fractions of the theoretical maximum ..beta.. for such reactions, ..beta../sub max/. The HI reaction is very fast ( ..beta..approx...beta../sub max/) but the HBr reaction occurs much more slowly because it is significantly endothermic. The data indicate that the extreme acidity of the (Bronsted-type) superacids has its equivalence in the very efficient gas-phase dissociative attachment which these species undergo when reacting with free electrons. The anions of the superacids generated in these reactions, notably FSO/sup -//sub 3/ and CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/, are very stable (unreactive) implying exceptionally large electron affinities for the FSO/sub 3/ and CF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/ radicals.

  1. ALS (acidic lithium sulphate) decomposition method (part iv) Kjeldahl determination of nitrogen in heterocyclic ring compounds containing nitrogennitrogen bond.

    PubMed

    Yoshikuni, N

    1994-01-01

    Heterocyclic ring compounds containing nitrogennitrogen bonds such as 1H-1,2,4 triazole, 2,4,6 trimethylbenzenesulfonyltriazolide and pyridazine can be completely decomposed in the molten state with mixtures of various ratios of concentrated sulphuric acid and lithium sulphate (molten ALS) flux containing a catalyst such as silver sulphate. The quantitative recovery of nitrogen in the above three compounds with the molten ALS flux decomposition system can be obtained by the Kjeldahl method.

  2. Lewis Acids as Activators in CBS-Catalysed Diels-Alder Reactions: Distortion Induced Lewis Acidity Enhancement of SnCl4.

    PubMed

    Nödling, Alexander R; Möckel, Robert; Tonner, Ralf; Hilt, Gerhard

    2016-09-01

    The effect of several Lewis acids on the CBS catalyst (named after Corey, Bakshi and Shibata) was investigated in this study. While (2) H NMR spectroscopic measurements served as gauge for the activation capability of the Lewis acids, in situ FT-IR spectroscopy was employed to assess the catalytic activity of the Lewis acid oxazaborolidine complexes. A correlation was found between the Δδ((2) H) values and rate constants kDA , which indicates a direct translation of Lewis acidity into reactivity of the Lewis acid-CBS complexes. Unexpectedly, a significant deviation was found for SnCl4 as Lewis acid. The SnCl4 -CBS adduct was much more reactive than the Δδ((2) H) values predicted and gave similar reaction rates to those observed for the prominent AlBr3 -CBS adduct. To rationalize these results, quantum mechanical calculations were performed. The frontier molecular orbital approach was applied and a good correlation between the LUMO energies of the Lewis acid-CBS-naphthoquinone adducts and kDA could be found. For the SnCl4 -CBS-naphthoquinone adduct an unusual distortion was observed leading to an enhanced Lewis acidity. Energy decomposition analysis with natural orbitals for chemical valence (EDA-NOCV) calculations revealed the relevant interactions and activation mode of SnCl4 as Lewis acid in Diels-Alder reactions. PMID:27492791

  3. Mutagenicity and genotoxicity of sorbic acid-amine reaction products.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, C; Marc, F; Fritsch, P; Cassand, P; de Saint Blanquat, G

    2000-11-01

    Sorbic acid (E200) and its salts (potassium and calcium sorbate: E202 and E203) are allowed for use as preservatives in numerous processed foods. Sorbic acid had a conjugated system of double bonds which makes it susceptible to nucleophilic attack, sometimes giving mutagenic products. Under conditions typical of food processing (50-80 degrees C), we analysed the cyclic derivatives resulting from a double addition reaction between sorbic acid and various amines. Mutagenesis studies, involving Ames' test and genotoxicity studies with HeLa cells and plasmid DNA, showed that none of the products studied presented either mutagenic or genotoxic activities.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10448 - Acetic acid, hydroxy- methoxy-, methyl ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine (generic). 721.10448 Section 721.10448 Protection... Acetic acid, hydroxy- methoxy-, methyl ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine (generic). (a... generically as acetic acid, hydroxymethoxy-, methyl ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10448 - Acetic acid, hydroxy- methoxy-, methylester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, methylester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine (generic). 721.10448 Section 721.10448 Protection... Acetic acid, hydroxy- methoxy-, methylester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine (generic). (a... generically as acetic acid, hydroxymethoxy-, methyl ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine...

  6. Reactions of Thiocyanate Ions with Acid: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glidewell, Christopher; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results are provided for a three-part experiment involving reactions of potassium thiocynate (KNCS) with sulfuric acid. The experiment represents the final stage of structured work prior to students' research projects during their final year. (JM)

  7. Four acid-catalysed dehydration reactions proceed without interference.

    PubMed

    Lirag, Rio Carlo; Miljanić, Ognjen Š

    2014-08-25

    Four acid-catalysed dehydration reactions can proceed in one pot, simultaneously and without interference, to yield one imine, one acetal (or boronic ester), one ester and one alkene, even though many other cross-products could be conceived. This advanced self-sorting behaviour is attributed to different dehydration rates, brought about by dissimilar electronic properties of starting materials.

  8. Wash Bottle Laboratory Exercises: Iodide-Catalyzed H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] Decomposition Reaction Kinetics Using the Initial Rate Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2010-01-01

    A wash bottle water displacement scheme is used to determine the kinetics of the iodide-catalyzed H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] decomposition reaction. The reagents (total volume 5.00 mL) are added to a test tube that is placed in a wash bottle containing water. The mass of the water displaced in [approximately]60 s is measured. The reaction is…

  9. Mechanistic insights into the decomposition of fructose to hydroxy methyl furfural in neutral and acidic environments using high-level quantum chemical methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, R. S.; Redfern, P. C.; Greeley, J.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2011-03-28

    Efficient catalytic chemical transformation of fructose to hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF) is one of the key steps for attaining industrial level conversion of biomass to useful chemicals. We report an investigation of the reaction mechanisms for the decomposition of fructose to HMF in both neutral and acidic environments at the Gaussian-4 level of theory including calculation of enthalpies, free energies, and effective solvation interactions. In neutral water solvent, the transformation of fructose to HMF involves a four step reaction sequence with four transition states. The effective activation energy relative to fructose in neutral water at 298 K is very large, about 74 kcal/mol, so that transformation in neutral media around this temperature is unlikely. In contrast, the computed potential energy surface is much more favorable for the transformation in acidic media at 498 K, as the effective activation barrier is about 39 kcal/mol. The transformation in acidic media is a much more complex mechanism involving dehydration and hydrogen transfer steps, which are more favorable when protonated intermediates are involved.

  10. Mechanistic insights into the decomposition of fructose to hydroxy methyl furfural in neutral and acidic environments using high-level quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Assary, Rajeev S; Redfern, Paul C; Greeley, Jeffrey; Curtiss, Larry A

    2011-04-21

    Efficient catalytic chemical transformation of fructose to hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF) is one of the key steps for attaining industrial level conversion of biomass to useful chemicals. We report an investigation of the reaction mechanisms for the decomposition of fructose to HMF in both neutral and acidic environments at the Gaussian-4 level of theory including calculation of enthalpies, free energies, and effective solvation interactions. In neutral water solvent, the transformation of fructose to HMF involves a four step reaction sequence with four transition states. The effective activation energy relative to fructose in neutral water at 298 K is very large, about 74 kcal/mol, so that transformation in neutral media around this temperature is unlikely. In contrast, the computed potential energy surface is much more favorable for the transformation in acidic media at 498 K, as the effective activation barrier is about 39 kcal/mol. The transformation in acidic media is a much more complex mechanism involving dehydration and hydrogen transfer steps, which are more favorable when protonated intermediates are involved. PMID:21443225

  11. Mechanistic Insights into the Decomposition of Fructose to Hydroxy Methyl Furfural in Neutral and Acidic Environments Using High-Level Quantum Chemical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Redfern, Paul C.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2011-04-21

    Efficient catalytic chemical transformation of fructose to hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF) is one of the key steps for attaining industrial level conversion of biomass to useful chemicals. We report an investigation of the reaction mechanisms for the decomposition of fructose to HMF in both neutral and acidic environments at the Gaussian-4 level of theory including calculation of enthalpies, free energies, and effective solvation interactions. In neutral water solvent, the transformation of fructose to HMF involves a four step reaction sequence with four transition states. The effective activation energy relative to fructose in neutral water at 298 K is very large, about 74 kcal/mol, so that transformation in neutral media around this temperature is unlikely. In contrast, the computed potential energy surface is much more favorable for the transformation in acidic media at 498 K, as the effective activation barrier is about 39 kcal/mol. The transformation in acidic media is a much more complex mechanism involving dehydration and hydrogen transfer steps, which are more favorable when protonated intermediates are involved.

  12. Mechanistic Insights into the Decomposition of Fructose to Hydroxy Methyl Furfural in Neutral and Acidic Environments Using High-Level Quantum Chemical Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Redfern, Paul C.; Greeley, Jeffrey; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2011-03-28

    Efficient catalytic chemical transformation of fructose to hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF) is one of the key steps for attaining industrial level conversion of biomass to useful chemicals. We report an investigation of the reaction mechanisms for the decomposition of fructose to HMF in both neutral and acidic environments at the Gaussian-4 level of theory including calculation of enthalpies, free energies, and effective solvation interactions. In neutral water solvent, the transformation of fructose to HMF involves a four step reaction sequence with four transition states. The effective activation energy relative to fructose in neutral water at 298 K is very large, about 74 kcal/mol, so that transformation in neutral media around this temperature is unlikely. In contrast, the computed potential energy surface is much more favorable for the transformation in acidic media at 498 K, as the effective activation barrier is about 39 kcal/mol. The transformation in acidic media is a much more complex mechanism involving dehydration and hydrogen transfer steps, which are more favorable when protonated intermediates are involved.

  13. Carboxylic acid free novel isocyanide-based reactions.

    PubMed

    Soeta, Takahiro; Ukaji, Yutaka

    2014-02-01

    In order to develop a practical method for the construction of drug-like and heterocyclic compounds, we have designed a novel Passerini- or Ugi-type reaction system where a compound (which we write in the general form as Z-X) composed of an electrophilic (Z) and a nucleophilic group (X) could essentially perform the same function as the carboxylic acid. Based on this concept, we have developed the O-silylative Passerini reaction and the borinic acid catalyzed α-addition of isocyanides to aldehydes and water. In addition, we have designed and demonstrated the addition reaction of isocyanides to nitrones in the presence of TMSCl to afford the corresponding 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-1-carboxyamides. Furthermore, a novel [5 + 1] cycloaddition of isocyanide was explored with C,N-cyclic N'-acyl azomethine imines as a "1,5-dipole" via a strategy involving intramolecular trapping of the isocyanide.

  14. Cyanuric acid + nitric oxide reaction at 700 sup 0 C and the effects of oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Wicke, B.G.; Grady, K.A.; Ratcliffe, J.W. )

    1989-11-01

    The reaction of cyanuric acid, (HNCO)/sub 3/, with nitric oxide has been examined in a flow tube under conditions similar to those initially reported for RAPRENO/sub chi/. Surface interactions are shown to play an important role in the observed chemistry. In a quartz flow tube at 700{sup 0}C, (HNCO)/sub 3/ decomposes slowly; addition of nitric oxide does not affect the (HNCO)/sub 3/ decomposition, and no NO reduction occurs. In an otherwise equivalent stainless-steel flow system, (HNCO)/sub 3/ decomposes rapidly to H/sub 2/, CO, and N/sub 2/ at 700{sup 0}C. In this stainless-steel flow tube, NO is efficiently reduced to N/sub 2/ by (HNCO)/sub 3/. At 700{sup 0}C, the stoichiometry of this fast chemistry is 2(HNCO)/sub 3/ + 9 NO{yields}3 H/sub 2/O + 7.5 N/sub 2/ + 6 CO/sub 2/. O/sub 2/ also reacts rapidly with (HNCO)/sub 3/ vapor at 700{sup 0}C in stainless steel. The dominant nitrogen-containing product of this reaction is NO. This reaction of (HNCO)/sub 3/ vapor with O/sub 2/ is faster than the corresponding reaction with NO. Under conditions examined here in stainless steel, reduction of NO by (HNCO)/sub 3/ in the presence of O/sub 2/ occurs only after the O/sub 2/ is consumed.

  15. Decomposition of superimposed ground reaction forces into left and right force profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B. L.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    The process of collecting ground reaction force data by mounting a forceplate beneath a treadmill belt has the advantage that numerous walking trials can be analyzed without the problem of subjects 'targeting' their footsteps. However, a potential problem is that the measured forces represent a summation of bilateral force profiles during the double support phase of walking. To address this issue, an algorithm is described for decomposing superimposed ground reaction force data into individual left and right profiles. It is based on an examination of the side-to-side oscillations of the measured center of pressure (CoP). Whenever the measured CoP exceeds a certain threshold, it is assumed that the person is being supported by a single limb, and the measured GRF data reflect the forces under that limb. Conversely, when the measured CoP indicates that both feet are on the treadmill, it is assumed that the location of the individual CoP under each foot is given by wL2 and wR2. These quantities reflect the greatest excursion of the measured CoP towards the left and right sides of the forceplate, respectively. With this assumption, individual GRF profiles can be calculated by means of solving two simultaneous equations--one describing the equilibrium of forces in the vertical direction, and one describing the equilibrium of moments about an antero-posterior axis of the forceplate. The algorithm describing this procedure is simple enough to be implemented on a spreadsheet and yields estimates for average force, impulse, peak force and stance time that are typically within 3% of the true values.

  16. Template directed reactions of 2-aminoadenylic acid derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, T. R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    The template-directed oligomerization of activated derivatives of 2-aminoadenylic acid (paA) on polyuridylic acid (poly(U)) in aqueous buffers was studied. The reaction differs from that of adenylic acid (pA) under identical conditions, in that only di- and tri-nucleotides are observed as substantial products rather than a longer sequence of oligomers. The reaction of paA also differs from that of pA in that it does not require Mg (2+), and is less susceptible to increased temperature. The relevance of these observations to the chemical evolution of polynucleotide replication is discussed. Improved syntheses of paA and its diphosphate are reported.

  17. Depressing the hydrogenation and decomposition reaction in H2O2 synthesis by supporting AuPD on oxygen functionalized carbon nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Freakley, Simon J.; Schiavoni, Marco; Edwards, Jennifer K.; Hammond, Ceri; Wang, Wu; Wang, Di; Prati, Laura; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Hutchings, Graham J.; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2015-12-03

    In this work, we show that the introduction of acidic oxygen functionalities to the surface of carbon nanofibers serves to depress the hydrogenation and the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide during the direct synthesis of H2O2. Furthermore, the presence of acidic groups enhances the H2O2 productivity in the case of supported AuPd nanoparticles.

  18. Heterogeneous atmospheric reactions - Sulfuric acid aerosols as tropospheric sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, A. C.; Golden, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The reaction probabilities of various atmospheric species incident on a bulk sulfuric acid surface are measured in order to determine the role of sulfuric acid aerosols as pollutant sinks. Reaction products and unreacted starting materials leaving a Knudsen cell flow reactor after collision at 300 K with a H2SO4 surface or a soot surface were detected by mass spectrometry. Significant collision reaction probabilities are observed on a H2SO4 surface for H2O2, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, N2O5, H2O and NH3, and on soot for NH3. Estimates of the contribution of heterogeneous reactions to pollutant removal under atmospheric conditions indicate that while aerosol removal in the stratosphere is insignificant (loss rate constants approximately 10 to the -10th/sec), heterogeneous reactions may be the dominant loss process for several tropospheric species (loss rate constant approximately 10 to the -5th/sec, comparable to photolysis rate constants).

  19. Central role of phenanthroline mono-N-oxide in the decomposition reactions of tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(II) and -iron(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Bellér, Gábor; Lente, Gábor; Fábián, István

    2010-05-01

    1,10-Phenanthroline mono-N-oxide (phenO) is a product of the decomposition of tris(1,10-phenanthroline)iron(III), Fe(phen)(3)(3+), and has a slight autocatalytic effect on the overall reaction. The mechanism is proposed to involve Fe(phen)(3)(4+) as a minor intermediate. The addition of phenO significantly influences the kinetic features of the decomposition of Fe(phen)(3)(3+) and the oxidation of Fe(phen)(3)(2+) by HSO(5)(-). The autocatalytic decomposition explains the difficulties in the preparation of Fe(phen)(3)(3+) and may contribute to exotic kinetic phenomena studied using Fe(phen)(3)(3+)/Fe(phen)(3)(3+) as a supposedly innocent indicator.

  20. Acid-Base Pairs in Lewis Acidic Zeolites Promote Direct Aldol Reactions by Soft Enolization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Van de Vyver, Stijn; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-08-17

    Hf-, Sn-, and Zr-Beta zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions.

  1. Influence of ions on aqueous acid-base reactions.

    PubMed

    Cox, M Jocelyn; Siwick, Bradley J; Bakker, Huib J

    2009-01-12

    We study the effects of bromide salts on the rate and mechanism of the aqueous proton/deuteron-transfer reaction between the photoacid 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (HPTS) and the base acetate. The proton/deuteron release is triggered by exciting HPTS with 400 nm femtosecond laser pulses. Probing the electronic and vibrational resonances of the photoacid, the conjugate photobase, the hydrated proton/deuteron and the accepting base with femtosecond visible and mid-infrared pulses monitors the proton transfer. Two reaction channels are identified: 1) direct long-range proton transfer over hydrogen-bonded water bridges that connect the acid and base and 2) acid dissociation to produce fully solvated protons followed by proton scavenging from solution by acetate. We observe that the addition of salt affects the long-range reaction pathway, and reduces both the rate at which protons are released to solution by HPTS and the rate at which solvated protons are scavenged from solution by acetate. We study the dependence of these effects on the nature and concentration of the dissolved salt.

  2. Serum uric acid levels during leprosy reaction episodes

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Junior, Eduardo R.; Arruda, Talita A.; Lopes, Jose C.; Fontes, Cor J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur mainly in the multibacillary forms of the disease. The reactions are classified as type 1 (reverse reaction) or type 2 (erythema nodosum leprosum). Leprosy-associated oxidative stress has been widely demonstrated. Several recent studies have shown uric acid (UA) to have antioxidative effects under pathologic conditions. The objective of this study was to assess serum levels of UA in patients with leprosy reactions, with the aim of monitoring their levels before and after treatment, compared with levels in leprosy patients without reactions. Methods. The study included patients aged 18–69 years assisted at a leprosy treatment reference center in the Central Region of Brazil. Patients who were pregnant; were using immunosuppressant drugs or immunobiologicals; or had an autoimmune disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or tuberculosis were excluded. Upon recruitment, all individuals were clinically assessed for skin lesions and neural or systemic impairment. Some patients had already completed treatment for leprosy, while others were still undergoing treatment or had initiated treatment after being admitted. The treatment of the reactional episode was started only after the initial evaluation. Laboratory assessments were performed upon admission (baseline) and at approximately 30 and 60 days (time points 1 and 2, respectively). Results. A total of 123 leprosy patients were recruited between June 2012 and June 2015; among them, 56, 42, and 25 presented with type 1, type 2, and no reactions, respectively. Serum UA levels were significantly reduced in patients with type 2 leprosy reactions compared with patients in the control group and remained lower in the two subsequent assessments, after initiation of anti-reaction treatments, with similar values to those recorded before the treatment. Discussion. The decreased serum UA levels in patients with

  3. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  4. Reaction of oleic acid particles with NO3 radicals: Products, mechanism, and implications for radical-initiated organic aerosol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Kenneth S; Ziemann, Paul J

    2006-03-16

    The heterogeneous reaction of liquid oleic acid aerosol particles with NO3 radicals in the presence of NO2, N2O5, and O2 was investigated in an environmental chamber using a combination of on-line and off-line mass spectrometric techniques. The results indicate that the major reaction products, which are all carboxylic acids, consist of hydroxy nitrates, carbonyl nitrates, dinitrates, hydroxydinitrates, and possibly more highly nitrated products. The key intermediate in the reaction is the nitrooxyalkylperoxy radical, which is formed by the addition of NO3 to the carbon-carbon double bond and subsequent addition of O2. The nitrooxyalkylperoxy radicals undergo self-reactions to form hydroxy nitrates and carbonyl nitrates, and may also react with NO2 to form nitrooxy peroxynitrates. The latter compounds are unstable and decompose to carbonyl nitrates and dinitrates. It is noteworthy that in this reaction nitrooxyalkoxy radicals appear not to be formed, as indicated by the absence of the expected products of decomposition or isomerization of these species. This is different from gas-phase alkene-NO3 reactions, in which a large fraction of the products are formed through these pathways. The results may indicate that, for liquid organic aerosol particles in low NOx environments, the major products of the radical-initiated oxidation (including by OH radicals) of unsaturated and saturated organic compounds will be substituted forms of the parent compound rather than smaller decomposition products. These compounds will remain in the particle and can potentially enhance particle hygroscopicity and the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei. PMID:16526637

  5. ENERGY EFFICIENCY LIMITS FOR A RECUPERATIVE BAYONET SULFURIC ACID DECOMPOSITION REACTOR FOR SULFUR CYCLE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Edwards, T.

    2009-06-11

    A recuperative bayonet reactor design for the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition step in sulfur-based thermochemical hydrogen cycles was evaluated using pinch analysis in conjunction with statistical methods. The objective was to establish the minimum energy requirement. Taking hydrogen production via alkaline electrolysis with nuclear power as the benchmark, the acid decomposition step can consume no more than 450 kJ/mol SO{sub 2} for sulfur cycles to be competitive. The lowest value of the minimum heating target, 320.9 kJ/mol SO{sub 2}, was found at the highest pressure (90 bar) and peak process temperature (900 C) considered, and at a feed concentration of 42.5 mol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This should be low enough for a practical water-splitting process, even including the additional energy required to concentrate the acid feed. Lower temperatures consistently gave higher minimum heating targets. The lowest peak process temperature that could meet the 450-kJ/mol SO{sub 2} benchmark was 750 C. If the decomposition reactor were to be heated indirectly by an advanced gas-cooled reactor heat source (50 C temperature difference between primary and secondary coolants, 25 C minimum temperature difference between the secondary coolant and the process), then sulfur cycles using this concept could be competitive with alkaline electrolysis provided the primary heat source temperature is at least 825 C. The bayonet design will not be practical if the (primary heat source) reactor outlet temperature is below 825 C.

  6. Decomposition of dinitrotoluene isomers and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in spent acid from toluene nitration process by ozonation and photo-ozonation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Shing; Juan, Chien-Neng; Wei, Kuo-Ming

    2007-08-17

    Ozone and UV/O3 were employed to mineralize dinitrotoluene (DNT) isomers and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in spent acid from toluene nitration process. The oxidative degradation tests were carried out to elucidate the influence of various operating variables on the performance of mineralization of total organic compounds (TOC) in spent acid, including reaction temperature, intensity of UV (254 nm) irradiation, dosage of ozone and concentration of sulfuric acid. It is remarkable that the nearly complete mineralization of organic compounds can be achieved by ozonation combined with UV irradiation. Nevertheless, the hydroxyl radicals (*OH) would not be generated by either ozone decomposition or photolysis of ozone under the experimental condition of this study. According to the spectra identified by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) and further confirmed by gas chromatograph/flame ionization detector (GC/FID), the multiple oxidation pathways of DNT isomers are given, which include o-, m-, p-mononitrotoluene (MNT) and 1,3-dinitrobenzene, respectively. In addition, oxidative degradation of 2,4,6-TNT leads to a 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene intermediate. PMID:17257749

  7. Decomposition of dinitrotoluene isomers and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene in spent acid from toluene nitration process by ozonation and photo-ozonation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Shing; Juan, Chien-Neng; Wei, Kuo-Ming

    2007-08-17

    Ozone and UV/O3 were employed to mineralize dinitrotoluene (DNT) isomers and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) in spent acid from toluene nitration process. The oxidative degradation tests were carried out to elucidate the influence of various operating variables on the performance of mineralization of total organic compounds (TOC) in spent acid, including reaction temperature, intensity of UV (254 nm) irradiation, dosage of ozone and concentration of sulfuric acid. It is remarkable that the nearly complete mineralization of organic compounds can be achieved by ozonation combined with UV irradiation. Nevertheless, the hydroxyl radicals (*OH) would not be generated by either ozone decomposition or photolysis of ozone under the experimental condition of this study. According to the spectra identified by gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) and further confirmed by gas chromatograph/flame ionization detector (GC/FID), the multiple oxidation pathways of DNT isomers are given, which include o-, m-, p-mononitrotoluene (MNT) and 1,3-dinitrobenzene, respectively. In addition, oxidative degradation of 2,4,6-TNT leads to a 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene intermediate.

  8. Cooperative effects of different temperatures and pressures on the initial and subsequent decomposition reactions of the nitrogen-rich energetic crystal 3,3'-dinitroamino-4,4'-azoxyfurazan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Zhu, Weihua; Xiao, Heming

    2016-03-14

    We performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to study the initiation mechanisms and subsequent chemical decomposition reactions of the nitrogen-rich furazan explosive 3,3'-dinitroamino-4,4'-azoxyfurazan (DNAAF) at low temperatures (363-963 K) coupled with different pressures (1-5 GPa). Two different initial decomposition mechanisms which are dependent on the temperature and pressure were found: bimolecular intermolecular hydrogen transfer and unimolecular N-NO2 bond breaking. The subsequent decomposition reactions are sensitive to both the temperature and the pressure. The pressure could accelerate or decelerate the decomposition of DNAAF, while the temperature can change the effect of the pressure on the decomposition. Our study may provide new insights into the initial mechanisms and subsequent decomposition of furazan explosives at low temperatures coupled with different pressures in atomic detail.

  9. Predictions of diagenetic reactions in the presence of organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Wendy J.; Thyne, Geoffrey D.

    1992-02-01

    Stability constants have been estimated for cation complexes with anions of monofunctional and difunctional acids (combinations of Ca, Mg, Fe, Al, Sr, Mn, U, Th, Pb, Cu, Zn with formate, acetate, propionate, oxalate, malonate, succinate, and salicylate) between 0 and 200°C. Difunctional acid anions form much more stable complexes than monofunctional acid anions with aluminum; the importance of the aluminum-acetate complex is relatively minor in comparison to aluminum oxalate and malonate complexes. Divalent metal cations such as Mg, Ca, and Fe form more stable complexes with acetate than with difunctional acid anions. Aluminum-oxalate can dominate the species distribution of aluminum under acidic pH conditions, whereas the divalent cation-acetate and oxalate complexes rarely account for more than 60% of the total dissolved cation, and then only in more alkaline waters. Mineral thermodynamic affinities were calculated using the reaction path model EQ3/6 for waters having variable organic acid anion (OAA) contents under conditions representative of those found during normal burial diagenesis. The following scenarios are possible: 1) K-feldspar and albite are stable, anorthite dissolves 2) All feldpars are stable 3) Carbonates can be very unstable to slightly unstable, but never increase in stability. Organic acid anions are ineffective at neutral to alkaline pH in modifying stabilities of aluminosilicate minerals whereas the anions are variably effective under a wide range of pH in modifying carbonate mineral stabilities. Reaction path calculations demonstrate that the sequence of mineral reactions occurring in an arkosic sandstone-fluid system is only slightly modified by the presence of OAA. A spectrum of possible sandstone alteration mineralogies can be obtained depending on the selected boundary conditions: EQ3/6 predictions include quartz overgrowth, calcite replacement of plagioclase, albitization of plagioclase, and the formation of porosity-occluding calcite

  10. Laboratory measurements of heterogeneous reactions on sulfuric acid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Leah R.; Manion, Jeffrey A.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Increasing evidence from field, modeling, and laboratory studies suggests that heterogeneous reactions on stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles may contribute to global ozone depletion. Using a Knudsen cell reactor technique, the authors have studied the uptake, reactivity, and solubility of several trace atmospheric species on cold sulfuric acid surfaces representative of stratospheric aerosol particles. The results suggest that the heterogeneous conversion of N2O5 to HNO3 is fast enough to significantly affect the partitioning of nitrogen species in the global stratosphere and thus contribute to global ozone depletion. The hydrolysis of ClONO2 is slower and unlikely to be important under normal conditions at midlatitudes. The solubilities of HCl and HNO3 in sulfuric acid down to 200 K were found to be quite low. For HCl, this means that little HCl is available for reaction on the surfaces of stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles. The low solubility of HNO3 means that this product of heterogeneous reactions will enter the gas phase, and the denitrification observed in polar regions is unlikely to occur in the global stratosphere.

  11. Water-wire catalysis in photoinduced acid-base reactions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh-Hoon; Mohammed, Omar F

    2012-07-01

    The pronounced ability of water to form a hyperdense hydrogen (H)-bond network among itself is at the heart of its exceptional properties. Due to the unique H-bonding capability and amphoteric nature, water is not only a passive medium, but also behaves as an active participant in many chemical and biological reactions. Here, we reveal the catalytic role of a short water wire, composed of two (or three) water molecules, in model aqueous acid-base reactions synthesizing 7-hydroxyquinoline derivatives. Utilizing femtosecond-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, we tracked the trajectories of excited-state proton transfer and discovered that proton hopping along the water wire accomplishes the reaction more efficiently compared to the transfer occurring with bulk water clusters. Our finding suggests that the directionality of the proton movements along the charge-gradient H-bond network may be a key element for long-distance proton translocation in biological systems, as the H-bond networks wiring acidic and basic sites distal to each other can provide a shortcut for a proton in searching a global minimum on a complex energy landscape to its destination.

  12. Glucose and fructose to platform chemicals: understanding the thermodynamic landscapes of acid-catalysed reactions using high-level ab initio methods.

    PubMed

    Assary, Rajeev S; Kim, Taejin; Low, John J; Greeley, Jeff; Curtiss, Larry A

    2012-12-28

    Molecular level understanding of acid-catalysed conversion of sugar molecules to platform chemicals such as hydroxy-methyl furfural (HMF), furfuryl alcohol (FAL), and levulinic acid (LA) is essential for efficient biomass conversion. In this paper, the high-level G4MP2 method along with the SMD solvation model is employed to understand detailed reaction energetics of the acid-catalysed decomposition of glucose and fructose to HMF. Based on protonation free energies of various hydroxyl groups of the sugar molecule, the relative reactivity of gluco-pyranose, fructo-pyranose and fructo-furanose are predicted. Calculations suggest that, in addition to the protonated intermediates, a solvent assisted dehydration of one of the fructo-furanosyl intermediates is a competing mechanism, indicating the possibility of multiple reaction pathways for fructose to HMF conversion in aqueous acidic medium. Two reaction pathways were explored to understand the thermodynamics of glucose to HMF; the first one is initiated by the protonation of a C2-OH group and the second one through an enolate intermediate involving acyclic intermediates. Additionally, a pathway is proposed for the formation of furfuryl alcohol from glucose initiated by the protonation of a C2-OH position, which includes a C-C bond cleavage, and the formation of formic acid. The detailed free energy landscapes predicted in this study can be used as benchmarks for further exploring the sugar decomposition reactions, prediction of possible intermediates, and finally designing improved catalysts for biomass conversion chemistry in the future. PMID:22932938

  13. The electrochemical reactions of pure In with Li and Na: anomalous electrolyte decomposition, benefits of FEC additive, phase transitions and electrode performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hawks, Samantha A; Baggetto, Loic; Bridges, Craig A; Veith, Gabriel M

    2014-01-01

    Indium thin films are evaluated as an anode material for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries (theoretical capacities of 1012 mAh g-1 for Li and 467 mAh g-1 for Na). The native surface oxides are responsible for the anomalous electrolyte decomposition during the first cycle while oxidized In species are found to be responsible for the electrolyte decomposition during the subsequent cycles. The presence of 5wt% FEC electrolyte additive suppresses the occurrence of the anomalous electrolyte decomposition during the first cycle but is not sufficient to prevent the decomposition upon further cycling from 0 to 2 V. Prevention of the anomalous decomposition can be achieved by restricting the charge cut-off, for instance at 1.1 V, or by using larger amounts of FEC. The In films show moderately good capacity retention with storage capacities when cycled with Li (950 mAh g-1) but significantly less when cycled with Na (125 mAh g-1). XRD data reveal that several known Li-In phases (i.e LiIn, Li3In2, LiIn2 and Li13In3) form during the electrochemical reaction. In contrast, the reaction with Na is severely limited. The largest amount of inserted Na is evidenced for cells short-circuited 40 hrs at 65C, for which the XRD data show the coexistence of NaIn, In, and an unknown phase. During cycling, mechanical degradation due to repeated expansion/shrinkage, evidenced by SEM, coupled with SEI formation is the primary source of the capacity fade. Finally, we show that the In thin films exhibit very high rate capability for both Li (100 C) and Na (30 C).

  14. Kinetics of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margitan, J. J.; Watson, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    An extensive study was made of the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid in a laser photolysis-resonance fluorescence system. A 266 nm laser was used to photolyze HNO3 in the temperature range 225-415 K at pressures of 20-300 torr. A temperature dependence was detected below room temperature, with a leveling off at 298 K and a wide spread in the rate constants. A pressure dependence was observed over the entire range and was more pronounced at lower temperatures. The results are noted to be in agreement with those of previous investigations. However, the wide range of rate constants are suggested to be a problem for stratospheric HO(x) modeling for anthropogenic effects. No explanation could be given of the varying results obtained by other investigators regarding the kinetics of the reactions.

  15. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... identified generically as a hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (PMN P-99-0052) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  18. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10211 - Octadecanoic acid, reaction products with diethylenetriamine and urea, acetates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Octadecanoic acid, reaction products... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10211 Octadecanoic acid, reaction... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octadecanoic acid, reaction products...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... identified generically as a hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (PMN P-99-0052) is subject...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane (PMN P-98-1036; CAS No. 207409-71-0) is subject to...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... identified generically as a hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (PMN P-99-0052) is subject...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10211 - Octadecanoic acid, reaction products with diethylenetriamine and urea, acetates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Octadecanoic acid, reaction products... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10211 Octadecanoic acid, reaction... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octadecanoic acid, reaction products...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10251 - Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10251 Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-09-366) is subject to reporting...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane (PMN P-98-1036; CAS No. 207409-71-0) is subject to...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane (PMN P-98-1036; CAS No. 207409-71-0) is subject to...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... identified generically as a hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (PMN P-99-0052) is subject...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane (PMN P-98-1036; CAS No. 207409-71-0) is subject to...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10251 - Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acids, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10251 Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-09-366) is subject to reporting...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10211 - Octadecanoic acid, reaction products with diethylenetriamine and urea, acetates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Octadecanoic acid, reaction products... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10211 Octadecanoic acid, reaction... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octadecanoic acid, reaction products...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10464 - Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10464 Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-03-461) is subject to reporting...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... identified generically as a hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (PMN P-99-0052) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10211 - Octadecanoic acid, reaction products with diethylenetriamine and urea, acetates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Octadecanoic acid, reaction products... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10211 Octadecanoic acid, reaction... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octadecanoic acid, reaction products...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane (PMN P-98-1036; CAS No. 207409-71-0) is subject to...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10251 - Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10251 Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-09-366) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10464 - Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10464 Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-03-461) is subject to reporting...

  4. Effect of simulated acid rain on the litter decomposition of Quercus acutissima and Pinus massoniana in forest soil microcosms and the relationship with soil enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congyan; Guo, Peng; Han, Guomin; Feng, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Peng; Tian, Xingjun

    2010-06-01

    With the continuing increase in human activities, ecologists are increasingly interested in understanding the effects of acid rain on litter decomposition. Two dominant litters were chosen from Zijin Mountain in China: Quercus acutissima from a broad-leaved forest and Pinus massoniana from a coniferous forest. The litters were incubated in microcosms and treated with simulated acid rain (gradient pH levels). During a six-month incubation, changes in chemical composition (i.e., lignin, total carbohydrate, and nitrogen), litter mass losses, soil pH values, and activities of degradative enzymes were determined. Results showed that litter mass losses were depressed after exposure to acid rain and the effects of acid rain on the litter decomposition rates of needles were higher than on those of leaves. Results also revealed that simulated acid rain restrained the activities of cellulase, invertase, nitrate reductase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, and urease, while it enhanced the activities of catalase in most cases during the six-month decomposition process. Catalase and polyphenol oxidase were primarily responsible for litter decomposition in the broad-leaved forest, while invertase, nitrate reductase, and urease were primarily responsible for litter decomposition in the coniferous forest. The results suggest acid rain-restrained litter decomposition may be due to the depressed enzymatic activities. According to the results of this study, soil carbon in subtropical forests would accumulate as a long-term consequence of continued acid rain. This may presumably alter the balance of ecosystem carbon flux, nutrient cycling, and humus formation, which may, in turn, have multiple effects on forest ecosystems.

  5. Effect of simulated acid rain on the litter decomposition of Quercus acutissima and Pinus massoniana in forest soil microcosms and the relationship with soil enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congyan; Guo, Peng; Han, Guomin; Feng, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Peng; Tian, Xingjun

    2010-06-01

    With the continuing increase in human activities, ecologists are increasingly interested in understanding the effects of acid rain on litter decomposition. Two dominant litters were chosen from Zijin Mountain in China: Quercus acutissima from a broad-leaved forest and Pinus massoniana from a coniferous forest. The litters were incubated in microcosms and treated with simulated acid rain (gradient pH levels). During a six-month incubation, changes in chemical composition (i.e., lignin, total carbohydrate, and nitrogen), litter mass losses, soil pH values, and activities of degradative enzymes were determined. Results showed that litter mass losses were depressed after exposure to acid rain and the effects of acid rain on the litter decomposition rates of needles were higher than on those of leaves. Results also revealed that simulated acid rain restrained the activities of cellulase, invertase, nitrate reductase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, and urease, while it enhanced the activities of catalase in most cases during the six-month decomposition process. Catalase and polyphenol oxidase were primarily responsible for litter decomposition in the broad-leaved forest, while invertase, nitrate reductase, and urease were primarily responsible for litter decomposition in the coniferous forest. The results suggest acid rain-restrained litter decomposition may be due to the depressed enzymatic activities. According to the results of this study, soil carbon in subtropical forests would accumulate as a long-term consequence of continued acid rain. This may presumably alter the balance of ecosystem carbon flux, nutrient cycling, and humus formation, which may, in turn, have multiple effects on forest ecosystems. PMID:20382410

  6. Formic acid production from carbohydrates biomass by hydrothermal reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, J.; Jin, F.; Kishita, A.; Tohji, K.; Enomoto, H.

    2010-03-01

    The formation of formic acid or formate salts by hydrothermal oxidation of model biomass materials (glucose, starch and cellulose) was investigated. All experiments were conducted in a batch reactor, made of SUS 316 tubing, providing an internal volume of 5.7 cm3. A 30 wt% hydrogen peroxide aqueous solution was used as an oxidant. The experiments were carried out with temperature of 250°C, reaction time varying from 0.5 min to 5 min, H2O2 supply of 240%, and alkaline concentration varying from 0 to 1.25 M. Similar to glucose, in the cases of the oxidation of hydrothermal starch and cellulose, the addition of alkaline can also improve the yield of formic acid. And the yield were glucose>starch> cellulose in cases of with or without of alkaline addition.

  7. Bismuth sulphides prepared by thermal and hydrothermal decomposition of a single source precursor: the effect of reaction parameters on morphology, microstructure and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Guilherme Oliveira; de Oliveira Porto, Arilza; Viana, Marcelo Machado; da Silva, Herculano Vieira; de Souza, Yara Gonçalves; da Silva, Hugo Wallison Alves; de Lima, Geraldo Magela; Matencio, Tulio

    2013-10-14

    Bismuth sulphides were prepared by thermal and hydrothermal decomposition of a precursor, bismuth tris-diethyldithiocarbamate, at different temperatures and times. The obtained results showed that the thermal decomposition of the precursor in a tube furnace was not very appropriate to control particle size and morphology. XRD results showed that at 310 °C the precursor was not fully decomposed but at 500 °C besides the orthorhombic bismuth sulphide, the metallic bismuth also started to be formed. At the highest temperature 1D crystals were formed with an apparent mean crystal size of 138 nm. However, hydrothermal decomposition was shown to be a very suitable method to control particle size and morphology just by varying some parameters such as temperature and time. For 6 hours reaction time, as temperature increased, the apparent mean crystal size decreased. The particle morphology was also very affected by this parameter, at 180 °C only 1D particles (nanorods) with lengths varying from 25 to 4700 nm were formed but at 200 °C not only 1D particles but also 2D particles were (nanosheets) obtained. Bismuth sulphide particles obtained at 180 °C and 24 hours reaction time were shown to be formed mostly by 2D particles compared to those obtained at 6 hours. It was clearly seen that the increase in reaction time and temperature led to the formation of bi-dimensional particles. The presence of 1D crystals in the samples obtained by hydrothermal decomposition at 180 °C/6 h and 180 °C/24 h is responsible for their high catalytic efficiency towards methylene blue dye degradation. PMID:23994884

  8. Influence of oxidation of Pd/Al sub 2 O sub 3 for the reactions of CO with NH sub 3 and formamide decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, D.K.; Worley, S.D. )

    1990-12-27

    The reaction of CO with NH{sub 3} and the decomposition reactions for HNCO and formamide over Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films have been investigated by infrared spectroscopy. The formation of isocyanate species (NCO) was observed during all of these reactions over preoxidized Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, but not over prereduced surfaces. These NCO species were formed on Pd but spilled over to the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support. Palladium became reduced during the course of the reaction of CO with NH{sub 3}. A mechanism is proposed in which the reduction of Pd{sup {delta}+} and the formation of a Pd formamide species are key features.

  9. Catalytic effect of water, formic acid, or sulfuric acid on the reaction of formaldehyde with OH radicals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weichao; Du, Benni; Qin, Zhenglong

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, for the hydrogen abstraction reaction of HCHO by OH radicals assisted by water, formic acid, or sulfur acid, the possible reaction mechanisms and kinetics have been investigated theoretically using quantum chemistry methods and transition-state theory. The potential energy surfaces calculated at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(df,pd)//MP2(full)/6-311++G(df,pd) levels of theory reveal that, due to the formation of strong hydrogen bond(s), the relative energies of the transition states involving catalyst are significantly reduced compared to that reaction without catalyst. However, the kinetics calculations show that the rate constants are smaller by about 3, 9, or 10 orders of magnitude for water, formic acid, or sulfur acid assisted reactions than that uncatalyzed reaction, respectively. Consequently, none of the water, formic acid, or sulfur acid can accelerate the title reaction in the atmosphere.

  10. Study of the Effect of UV Radiation on the Decomposition of 4-Chloro-2-Methylphenoxyacetic Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; Karetnikova, E. A.; Sokolova, I. V.; Mayer, G. V.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of UV radiation wavelength on the disappearance kinetics of 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in the presence of activated sludge and humic acids has been examined. Variations in the kinetic curves of MCPA removal in the presence of humic acids were determined from results on accumulation of carbon dioxide gas. Spectral-luminescence and chromato-mass-spectrometry data reveal the presence in the medium of the biotransformation product 2-methyl-4-chlorophenol, which is utilized after 14 days. Addition of humic acids, on the one hand, reduced the rates of subsequent biodecomposition of MCPA. On the other hand, in the process of transformation of the herbicide in the presence of humic acids a photobioproduct was detected which does not contain chlorine: 2-methylphenoxyacetic acid.

  11. Surface reactions of iron - enriched smectites: adsorption and transformation of hydroxy fatty acids and phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polubesova, Tamara; Olshansky, Yaniv; Eldad, Shay; Chefetz, Benny

    2014-05-01

    Iron-enriched smectites play an important role in adsorption and transformation of soil organic components. Soil organo-clay complexes, and in particular humin contain hydroxy fatty acids, which are derived from plant biopolymer cutin. Phenolic acids belong to another major group of organic acids detected in soil. They participate in various soil processes, and are of concern due to their allelopathic activity. We studied the reactivity of iron-enriched smectites (Fe(III)-montmorillonite and nontronite) toward both groups of acids. We used fatty acids- 9(10),16-dihydroxypalmitic acid (diHPA), isolated from curtin, and 9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic acid (triHPA); the following phenolic acids were used: ferulic, p-coumaric, syringic, and vanillic. Adsorption of both groups of acids was measured. The FTIR spectra of fatty acid-mineral complexes indicated inner-sphere complexation of fatty acids with iron-enriched smectites (versus outer-sphere complexation with Ca(II)-montmorillonite). The LC-MS results demonstrated enhanced esterification of fatty acids on the iron-enriched smectite surfaces (as compared to Ca(II)-montmorillonite). This study suggests that fatty acids can be esterified on the iron-enriched smectite surfaces, which results in the formation of stable organo-mineral complexes. These complexes may serve as a model for the study of natural soil organo-clay complexes and humin. The reaction of phenolic acids with Fe(III)-montmorillonite demonstrated their oxidative transformation by the mineral surfaces, which was affected by molecular structure of acids. The following order of their transformation was obtained: ferulic >syringic >p-coumaric >vanillic. The LC-MS analysis demonstrated the presence of dimers, trimers, and tetramers of ferulic acid on the surface of Fe(III)-montmorillonite. Oxidation and transformation of ferulic acid were more intense on the surface of Fe(III)-montmorillonite as compared to Fe(III) in solution due to stronger complexation on

  12. Reactions of atomic hydrogen with formic acid and carbon monoxide in solid parahydrogen II: Deuterated reaction studies.

    PubMed

    Wonderly, William R; Anderson, David T

    2014-09-11

    It is difficult to determine whether the measured rate constant for reaction of atomic hydrogen with formic acid reported in Part 1 reflects the H atom quantum diffusion rate or the rate constant for the tunneling reaction step. In Part 2 of this series, we present kinetic studies of the postphotolysis H atom reactions with deuterated formic acid (DCOOD) to address this ambiguity. Short duration 193 nm in situ photolysis of DCOOD trapped in solid parahydrogen results in partial depletion of the DCOOD precursor and photoproduction of primarily CO, CO2, DOCO, HCO and mobile H atoms. At 1.9 K we observe post-irradiation growth in the concentrations of DOCO and HCO that can be explained by H atom tunneling reactions with DCOOD and CO, respectively. Conducting experiments with different deuterium isotopomers of formic acid (DCOOD, DCOOH, HCOOD and HCOOH) provides strong circumstantial evidence the reaction involves H atom abstraction from the alkyl group of formic acid. Further, the anomalous temperature dependence measured for the H + HCOOH reaction in Part 1 is also observed for the analogous reactions with deuterated formic acid. The rate constants extracted for H atom reactions with DCOOD and HCOOH are equivalent to within experimental uncertainty. This lack of a kinetic isotope effect in the measured rate constant is interpreted as evidence the reactions are diffusion limited; the measured rate constant reflects the H atom diffusion rate and not the tunneling reaction rate. Whether or not H atom reactions with chemical species in solid parahydrogen are diffusion limited is one of the outstanding questions in this field, and this work makes significant strides toward showing the reaction kinetics with formic acid are diffusion limited.

  13. Effects of phosphoric acid on the lead-acid battery reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Osamu; Iwakura, Chiaki; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Tamura, Hideo

    1986-10-01

    The addition of a small amount of phosphoric acid to 5 M H2SO4 (commercial electrolyte of lead-acid batteries) results in various positive effects on the lead-acid battery reactions: (1) depression of the corrosion rate of the lead substrate through a preferential formation of alpha-PbO2 on the substrate surface; (2) retardation of hard sulfate formation or of deactivation of active materials; and (3) change in the crystal morphology of PbSO2 formed on the discharge of PbO2. Most of these effects results from chemisorption of phosphoric acid on PbSO4 crystals produced in the discharge process of PbO2.

  14. Products and Mechanism of the Reaction of 1-Pentadecene with NO3 Radicals and the Effect of a -ONO2 Group on Alkoxy Radical Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Geoffrey K; Claflin, Megan S; Ziemann, Paul J

    2015-10-29

    The linear C15 alkene, 1-pentadecene, was reacted with NO3 radicals in a Teflon environmental chamber and yields of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and particulate β-hydroxynitrates, β-carbonylnitrates, and organic peroxides (β-nitrooxyhydroperoxides + dinitrooxyperoxides) were quantified using a variety of methods. Reaction occurs almost solely by addition of NO3 to the C═C double bond and measured yields of β-hydroxynitrate isomers indicate that 92% of addition occurs at the terminal carbon. Molar yields of reaction products determined from measurements, a proposed reaction mechanism, and mass-balance considerations were 0.065 for β-hydroxynitrates (0.060 and 0.005 for 1-nitrooxy-2-hydroxypentadecane and 1-hydroxy-2-nitrooxypentadecane isomers), 0.102 for β-carbonylnitrates, 0.017 for organic peroxides, 0.232 for β-nitrooxyalkoxy radical isomerization products, and 0.584 for tetradecanal and formaldehyde, the volatile C14 and C1 products of β-nitrooxyalkoxy radical decomposition. Branching ratios for decomposition and isomerization of β-nitrooxyalkoxy radicals were 0.716 and 0.284 and should be similar for other linear 1-alkenes ≥ C6 whose alkyl chains are long enough to allow for isomerization to occur. These branching ratios have not been measured previously, and they differ significantly from those estimated using structure-activity relationships, which predict >99% isomerization. It appears that the presence of a -ONO2 group adjacent to an alkoxy radical site greatly enhances the rate of decomposition relative to isomerization, which is otherwise negligible, and that the effect is similar to that of a -OH group. The results provide insight into the effects of molecular structure on mechanisms of oxidation of volatile organic compounds and should be useful for improving structure-activity relationships that are widely used to predict the fate of these compounds in the atmosphere and for modeling SOA formation and aging.

  15. Decomposition of energetic chemicals contaminated with iron or stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Chervin, Sima; Bodman, Glenn T; Barnhart, Richard W

    2006-03-17

    Contamination of chemicals or reaction mixtures with iron or stainless steel is likely to take place during chemical processing. If energetic and thermally unstable chemicals are involved in a manufacturing process, contamination with iron or stainless steel can impact the decomposition characteristics of these chemicals and, subsequently, the safety of the processes, and should be investigated. The goal of this project was to undertake a systematic approach to study the impact of iron or stainless steel contamination on the decomposition characteristics of different chemical classes. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the decomposition reaction by testing each chemical pure, and in mixtures with iron and stainless steel. The following classes of energetic chemicals were investigated: nitrobenzenes, tetrazoles, hydrazines, hydroxylamines and oximes, sulfonic acid derivatives and monomers. The following non-energetic groups were investigated for contributing effects: halogens, hydroxyls, amines, amides, nitriles, sulfonic acid esters, carbonyl halides and salts of hydrochloric acid. Based on the results obtained, conclusions were drawn regarding the sensitivity of the decomposition reaction to contamination with iron and stainless steel for the chemical classes listed above. It was demonstrated that the most sensitive classes are hydrazines and hydroxylamines/oximes. Contamination of these chemicals with iron or stainless steel not only destabilizes them, leading to decomposition at significantly lower temperatures, but also sometimes causes increased severity of the decomposition. The sensitivity of nitrobenzenes to contamination with iron or stainless steel depended upon the presence of other contributing groups: the presence of such groups as acid chlorides or chlorine/fluorine significantly increased the effect of contamination on decomposition characteristics of nitrobenzenes. The decomposition of sulfonic acid derivatives and tetrazoles

  16. Studies on Lewis acid-mediated intramolecular cyclization reactions of allene-ene systems.

    PubMed

    Hiroi, K; Watanabe, T; Tsukui, A

    2000-03-01

    The Lewis acid-mediated reactions of allene-ene compounds, derived from 3-methylcitronellal or dimethyl malonate, were carried out using various Lewis acids such as ethylaluminum dichloride, diethylaluminum chloride, titanium chloride, zinc chloride etherate, or boron trifluoride etherate, affording unexpectedly intramolecular [2+2]cycloaddition products under some particular reaction conditions without any formation of intramolecular ene reaction products.

  17. [Microflora of active ooze participating in the decomposition of sulfanilic acid].

    PubMed

    Orshanskaia, F B; Arkad'eva, A Z; Kozlova, E I

    1975-01-01

    Microflora of domestic water can be a source of active ooze adapted to sulphanilic acid. Adaptation of the microflora to sulphanilic acid at a concentration of 170-200 mg/l takes 6 to 8 days. The microflora of active ooze, immediately after adaptation, consists mainly of Pseudomonas species, Ps. denitrificans, Ps. fluorescens, Ps. striata, Ps. putida, etc., and also of Achromobacter stutzeri, Achromobacter flavum, Mycobacterium phlei, Mycobacterium mucosum, Bacillus mesentericus, Bac. cereus, saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and Rhodotorula glutinus. The number of the species decreased as a result of long cultivation of active ooze on a minimal medium with sulphanilic acid as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen; the following strains prevailed: Ps. putida, Ps. eisenbergii, strains of Mycobacterium phlei and Flavobacterium solare. The isolated strains of Ps. putida and Ps. eisenbergii decomposed sulphanilic acid by 60.0--79.5 percent, and together with Mycobacterium phlei by 100 percent during 4 to 7 days. The ability to oxidize sulphanilic acid decreased after storage. Addition to the medium of other sources of carbon, nitrogen and vitamins did not restore the lost ability of the microorganisms to decompose sulphanilic acid.

  18. Bioorthogonal tetrazine-mediated transfer reactions facilitate reaction turnover in nucleic acid-templated detection of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoxing; Cisneros, Brandon T; Cole, Christian M; Devaraj, Neal K

    2014-12-31

    Tetrazine ligations have proven to be a powerful bioorthogonal technique for the detection of many labeled biomolecules, but the ligating nature of these reactions can limit reaction turnover in templated chemistry. We have developed a transfer reaction between 7-azabenzonorbornadiene derivatives and fluorogenic tetrazines that facilitates turnover amplification of the fluorogenic response in nucleic acid-templated reactions. Fluorogenic tetrazine-mediated transfer (TMT) reaction probes can be used to detect DNA and microRNA (miRNA) templates to 0.5 and 5 pM concentrations, respectively. The endogenous oncogenic miRNA target mir-21 could be detected in crude cell lysates and detected by imaging in live cells. Remarkably, the technique is also able to differentiate between miRNA templates bearing a single mismatch with high signal to background. We imagine that TMT reactions could find wide application for amplified fluorescent detection of clinically relevant nucleic acid templates.

  19. Calculated rate constants of the chemical reactions involving the main byproducts SO2F, SOF2, SO2F2 of SF6 decomposition in power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuwei; Rong, Mingzhe; Yang, Kang; Yang, Aijun; Wang, Xiaohua; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Dingxin; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-04-01

    SF6 is widely used in electrical equipment as an insulating gas. In the presence of an electric arc, partial discharge (PD) or spark, SF6 dissociation products (such as SF2, SF3 and SF4) react with the unavoidable gas impurities (such as water vapor and oxygen), electrodes and surrounding solid insulation materials, forming several toxic and corrosive byproducts. The main stable decomposition products are SO2F, SO2F2 and SOF2, which have been confirmed experimentally to have a direct relationship with discharge faults, and are thus expected to be useful in the fault diagnosis of power equipment. Various studies have been performed of the main SF6 decomposition species and their concentrations under different types of faults. However, most of the experiments focused on the qualitative analysis of the relationship between the stable products and discharge faults. Although some theoretical research on the formation of main SF6 derivatives have been carried out using chemical kinetics models, the basic data (chemical reactions and their rate constants) adopted in the model are inaccurate and incomplete. The complex chemical reactions of SF6 with the impurities are ignored in most cases. The rate constants of some reactions obtained at ambient temperature or in a narrow temperature range are adopted in the models over a far greater range, for example up to 12 000 K, due to the difficulty in the experimental measurement and theoretical estimation of rate coefficients, particularly at high temperatures. Therefore, improved theoretical models require not only the consideration of additional SF6 decomposition reactions in the presence of impurities but also on improved values of rate constants. This paper is devoted to determining the rate constants of the chemical reactions relating to the main byproducts of SF6 decomposition in SF6 gas-insulated power equipment: SO2F, SOF2 and SO2F2. Quantum chemistry calculations with density functional theory, conventional

  20. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. I. The model.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Rivard, Ugo; Iftimie, Radu

    2010-07-28

    Ultrafast, time-resolved investigations of acid-base neutralization reactions have recently been performed using systems containing the photoacid 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) and various Bronsted bases. Two conflicting neutralization mechanisms have been formulated by Mohammed et al. [Science 310, 83 (2005)] and Siwick et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 13412 (2007)] for the same acid-base system. Herein an ab initio molecular dynamics based computational model is formulated, which is able to investigate the validity of the proposed mechanisms in the general context of ground-state acid-base neutralization reactions. Our approach consists of using 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (exp. pKa congruent with 1) as a model for excited-state HPTS( *) (pKa congruent with 1.4) and carboxylate ions for the accepting base. We employ our recently proposed dipole-field/quantum mechanics (QM) treatment [P. Maurer and R. Iftimie, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074112 (2010)] of the proton donor and acceptor molecules. This approach allows one to tune the free energy of neutralization to any desired value as well as model initial nonequilibrium hydration effects caused by a sudden increase in acidity, making it possible to achieve a more realistic comparison with experimental data than could be obtained via a full-QM treatment of the entire system. It is demonstrated that the dipole-field/QM model reproduces correctly key properties of the 2,4,6-tricyanophenol acid molecule including gas-phase proton dissociation energies and dipole moments, and condensed-phase hydration structure and pKa values.

  1. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. I. The model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Rivard, Ugo; Iftimie, Radu

    2010-07-01

    Ultrafast, time-resolved investigations of acid-base neutralization reactions have recently been performed using systems containing the photoacid 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) and various Brønsted bases. Two conflicting neutralization mechanisms have been formulated by Mohammed et al. [Science 310, 83 (2005)] and Siwick et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 13412 (2007)] for the same acid-base system. Herein an ab initio molecular dynamics based computational model is formulated, which is able to investigate the validity of the proposed mechanisms in the general context of ground-state acid-base neutralization reactions. Our approach consists of using 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (exp. pKa≅1) as a model for excited-state HPTS∗ (pKa≅1.4) and carboxylate ions for the accepting base. We employ our recently proposed dipole-field/quantum mechanics (QM) treatment [P. Maurer and R. Iftimie, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074112 (2010)] of the proton donor and acceptor molecules. This approach allows one to tune the free energy of neutralization to any desired value as well as model initial nonequilibrium hydration effects caused by a sudden increase in acidity, making it possible to achieve a more realistic comparison with experimental data than could be obtained via a full-QM treatment of the entire system. It is demonstrated that the dipole-field/QM model reproduces correctly key properties of the 2,4,6-tricyanophenol acid molecule including gas-phase proton dissociation energies and dipole moments, and condensed-phase hydration structure and pKa values.

  2. Versatile Multicomponent Reaction Macrocycle Synthesis Using α-Isocyano-ω-carboxylic Acids.

    PubMed

    Liao, George P; Abdelraheem, Eman M M; Neochoritis, Constantinos G; Kurpiewska, Katarzyna; Kalinowska-Tłuścik, Justyna; McGowan, David C; Dömling, Alexander

    2015-10-16

    The direct macrocycle synthesis of α-isocyano-ω-carboxylic acids via an Ugi multicomponent reaction is introduced. This multicomponent reaction (MCR) protocol differs by being especially short, convergent, and versatile, giving access to 12-22 membered rings.

  3. High School Forum: "Invitations to Enquiry": The Calcite/Acid Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herron, J. Dudley, Ed.; Driscoll, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a high school chemistry experiment which involves the reaction between calcite and hydrochloric and sulfuric acids. This reaction can be carried out as a projected demonstration and on an individual basis. (HM)

  4. Ab Initio Chemical Kinetics for the CH3 + O((3)P) Reaction and Related Isomerization-Decomposition of CH3O and CH2OH Radicals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z F; Raghunath, P; Lin, M C

    2015-07-16

    The kinetics and mechanism of the CH3 + O reaction and related isomerization-decomposition of CH3O and CH2OH radicals have been studied by ab initio molecular orbital theory based on the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ, CCSD/aug-cc-pVDZ, and G2M//B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p) levels of theory. The predicted potential energy surface of the CH3 + O reaction shows that the CHO + H2 products can be directly generated from CH3O by the TS3 → LM1 → TS7 → LM2 → TS4 path, in which both LM1 and LM2 are very loose and TS7 is roaming-like. The result for the CH2O + H reaction shows that there are three low-energy barrier processes including CH2O + H → CHO + H2 via H-abstraction and CH2O + H → CH2OH and CH2O + H → CH3O by addition reactions. The predicted enthalpies of formation of the CH2OH and CH3O radicals at 0 K are in good agreement with available experimental data. Furthermore, the rate constants for the forward and some key reverse reactions have been predicted at 200-3000 K under various pressures. Based on the new reaction pathway for CH3 + O, the rate constants for the CH2O + H and CHO + H2 reactions were predicted with the microcanonical variational transition-state/Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (VTST/RRKM) theory. The predicted total and individual product branching ratios (i.e., CO versus CH2O) are in good agreement with experimental data. The rate constant for the hydrogen abstraction reaction of CH2O + H has been calculated by the canonical variational transition-state theory with quantum tunneling and small-curvature corrections to be k(CH2O + H → CHO + H2) = 2.28 × 10(-19) T(2.65) exp(-766.5/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the 200-3000 K temperature range. The rate constants for the addition giving CH3O and CH2OH and the decomposition of the two radicals have been calculated by the microcanonical RRKM theory with the time-dependent master equation solution of the multiple quantum well system in the 200-3000 K temperature range at 1 Torr to

  5. Ozonolysis of Mixed Oleic-Acid/Stearic-Acid Particles: Reaction Kinetics and Chemical Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. T.; Katrib, Y.; Biskos, G.; Buseck, P. R.; Davidovits, P.; Jayne, J. T.; Mochida, M.; Wise, M. E.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Atmospheric particles directly and indirectly affect global climate and have a primary role in regional issues of air pollution, visibility, and human health. Atmospheric particles have a variety of shapes, dimensions, and chemical compositions, and these physicochemical properties evolve (i.e., "age") during transport of the particles through the atmosphere, in part because of the chemical reactions of particle-phase organic molecules with gas-phase atmospheric oxidants. As a global average, hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozone (O3) are responsible quantitatively for most oxidant aging of atmospheric particles. The reactions of the hydroxyl radical occur in the surface region of a particle because of the nearly diffusion-limited bimolecular rate constant of OH with a variety of organic molecules. Ozone, on the other hand, is a selective agent for the unsaturated bonds of organic molecules and may diffuse a considerable distance into particles prior to reaction. The reaction of oleic acid with ozone has recently emerged as a model system to better understand the atmospheric chemical oxidation processes affecting organic particles. The ozonolysis of mixed oleic-acid/stearic-acid (OL/SA) aerosol particles from 0/100 to 100/0 weight percent composition is studied. The magnitude of the divergence of the particle beam inside an aerosol mass spectrometer shows that, in the concentration range 100/0 to 60/40, the mixed OL/SA particles are liquid prior to reaction. Upon ozonolysis, particles with SA composition greater than 25% change shape, indicating that they have solidified. Transmission electron micrographs show that SA(s) forms needles. For SA compositions greater than 10%, the reaction kinetics exhibit an initial fast decay of OL for low O3 exposure with no further loss of OL at higher O3 exposures. For compositions from 50/50 to 10/90, the residual OL concentration remains at 28+/-2% of its initial value. The initial reactive uptake coefficient for O3, as determined by

  6. Kinetic Studies on the Reaction between Dicyanocobinamide and Hypochlorous Acid

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Dhiman; Ali, Iyad; Abdulridha, Rasha M.; Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N.; Saed, Ghassan M.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a potent oxidant generated by myeloperoxidase (MPO), which is an abundant enzyme used for defense against microbes. We examined the potential role of HOCl in corrin ring destruction and subsequent formation of cyanogen chloride (CNCl) from dicyanocobinamide ((CN)2-Cbi). Stopped-flow analysis revealed that the reaction consists of at least three observable steps, including at least two sequential transient intermediates prior to corrin ring destruction. The first two steps were attributed to sequential replacement of the two cyanide ligands with hypochlorite, while the third step was the destruction of the corrin ring. The formation of (OCl)(CN)-Cbi and its conversion to (OCl)2-Cbi was fitted to a first order rate equation with second order rate constants of 0.002 and 0.0002 µM−1s−1, respectively. The significantly lower rate of the second step compared to the first suggests that the replacement of the first cyanide molecule by hypochlorite causes an alteration in the ligand trans effects changing the affinity and/or accessibility of Co toward hypochlorite. Plots of the apparent rate constants as a function of HOCl concentration for all the three steps were linear with Y-intercepts close to zero, indicating that HOCl binds in an irreversible one-step mechanism. Collectively, these results illustrate functional differences in the corrin ring environments toward binding of diatomic ligands. PMID:25375773

  7. [Influencing factors and reaction mechanism of chloroacetic acid reduction by cast iron].

    PubMed

    Tang, Shun; Yang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Xie, Yue-Feng

    2014-03-01

    The chloroacetic acids are ubiquitous present as a class of trace chlorinated organic pollutants in surface and drinking water. Most of chloroacetic acids are known or suspected carcinogens and, when at high concentrations, are of great concern to human health. In order to economically remove chloroacetic acids, the degradation of chloroacetic acids by cast iron was investigated. Moreover, the effect of iron style, pretreatment process, shocking mode and dissolved oxygen on chloroacetic acids reduced by cast iron was discussed. Compared to iron source and acid pretreatment, mass transfer was more important to chloroacetic acid removal. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and monochloroacetic acid (MCAA) were the main products of anoxic and oxic degradation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) by cast iron during the researched reaction time, respectively. With longtitudinal shock, the reaction kinetics of chloroaectic acid removal by cast iron conformed well to the pseudo first order reaction. The anoxic reaction constants of TCAA, DCAA and MCAA were 0.46 h(-1), 0.03 h(-1) and 0, and their oxic constants were 1.24 h(-1), 0.79 h(-1) and 0.28 h(-1), respectively. The removal mechanisms of chloroacetic acids were different under various oxygen concentrations, including sequential hydrogenolysis for anoxic reaction and sequential hydrogenolysis and direct transformation possible for oxic reaction, respectively.

  8. Malonic acid concentration as a control parameter in the kinetic analysis of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction under batch conditions.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Slavica M; Anić, Slobodan R; Cupić, Zeljko D; Pejić, Natasa D; Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana Z

    2008-11-28

    The influence of the initial malonic acid concentration [MA]0 (8.00 x 10(-3) < or = [MA]0 < or = 4.30 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)) in the presence of bromate (6.20 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)), bromide (1.50 x 10(-5) mol dm(-3)), sulfuric acid (1.00 mol dm(-3)) and cerium sulfate (2.50 x 10(-3) mol dm(-3)) on the dynamics and the kinetics of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactions was examined under batch conditions at 30.0 degrees C. The kinetics of the BZ reaction was analyzed by the earlier proposed method convenient for the examinations of the oscillatory reactions. In the defined region of parameters where oscillograms with only large-amplitude relaxation oscillations appeared, the pseudo-first order of the overall malonic acid decomposition with a corresponding rate constant of 2.14 x 10(-2) min(-1) was established. The numerical results on the dynamics and kinetics of the BZ reaction, carried out by the known skeleton model including the Br2O species, were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The already found saddle node infinite period (SNIPER) bifurcation point in transition from a stable quasi-steady state to periodic orbits and vice versa is confirmed by both experimental and numerical investigations of the system under consideration. Namely, the large-amplitude relaxation oscillations with increasing periods between oscillations in approaching the bifurcation points at the beginning and the end of the oscillatory domain, together with excitability of the stable quasi-steady states in their vicinity are obtained.

  9. Decomposition of cyclohexanoic acid by the UV/H2O2 process under various conditions.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Atefeh; Drzewicz, Przemysław; Martin, Jonathan W; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2012-06-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a broad range of alicyclic and aliphatic compounds that are persistent and contribute to the toxicity of oil sands process affected water (OSPW). In this investigation, cyclohexanoic acid (CHA) was selected as a model naphthenic acid, and its oxidation was investigated using advanced oxidation employing a low-pressure ultraviolet light in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (UV/H(2)O(2) process). The effects of two pHs and common OSPW constituents, such as chloride (Cl(-)) and carbonate (CO(3)(2-)) were investigated in ultrapure water. The optimal molar ratio of H(2)O(2) to CHA in the treatment process was also investigated. The pH had no significant effect on the degradation, nor on the formation and degradation of byproducts in ultrapure water. The presence of CO(3)(2-) or Cl(-) significantly decreased the CHA degradation rate. The presence of 700 mg/L CO(3)(2-) or 500 mg/L Cl(-), typical concentrations in OSPW, caused a 55% and 23% decrease in the pseudo-first order degradation rate constants for CHA, respectively. However, no change in byproducts or in the degradation trend of byproducts, in the presence of scavengers was observed. A real OSPW matrix also had a significant impact by decreasing the CHA degradation rate, such that by spiking CHA into the OSPW, the degradation rate decreased up to 82% relative to that in ultrapure water. The results of this study show that UV/H(2)O(2) AOP is capable of degrading CHA as a model NA in ultrapure water. However, in the real applications, the effect of radical scavengers should be taken into consideration for the achievement of best performance of the process. PMID:22521165

  10. Glucose and Fructose to Platform Chemicals: Understanding the Thermodynamic Landscapes of Acid-Catalysed Reactions Using High-Level ab Initio Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Kim, Taijin; Low, John; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2012-12-28

    Molecular level understanding of acid-catalysed conversion of sugar molecules to platform chemicals such as hydroxy-methyl furfural (HMF), furfuryl alcohol (FAL), and levulinic acid (LA) is essential for efficient biomass conversion. In this paper, the high-level G4MP2 method along with the SMD solvation model is employed to understand detailed reaction energetics of the acid-catalysed decomposition of glucose and fructose to HMF. Based on protonation free energies of various hydroxyl groups of the sugar molecule, the relative reactivity of gluco-pyranose, fructo-pyranose and fructo-furanose are predicted. Calculations suggest that, in addition to the protonated intermediates, a solvent assisted dehydration of one of the fructo-furanosyl intermediates is a competing mechanism, indicating the possibility of multiple reaction pathways for fructose to HMF conversion in aqueous acidic medium. Two reaction pathways were explored to understand the thermodynamics of glucose to HMF; the first one is initiated by the protonation of a C2–OH group and the second one through an enolate intermediate involving acyclic intermediates. Additionally, a pathway is proposed for the formation of furfuryl alcohol from glucose initiated by the protonation of a C2–OH position, which includes a C–C bond cleavage, and the formation of formic acid. The detailed free energy landscapes predicted in this study can be used as benchmarks for further exploring the sugar decomposition reactions, prediction of possible intermediates, and finally designing improved catalysts for biomass conversion chemistry in the future.

  11. Thermal decomposition of methanol in the sonolysis of methanol-water mixtures. Spin-trapping evidence for isotope exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, C.M.; Lion, Y.; Kondo, T.; Riesz, P.

    1987-11-05

    The spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzenesulfonate was used to monitor the yield of free radicals produced during sonolysis of water-methanol mixtures. Methyl radicals and CH/sub 2/OH radicals were observed as well as the isotopically mixed radicals CH/sub 2/D and CHD/sub 2/ when CH/sub 3/OD:D/sub 2/O mixtures were studied. The results clearly show that thermal decomposition of methanol to methyl radicals occurs in the gas phase. The methyl radical yield rises sharply at very low concentrations of methanol, reaches a maximum at 5 mol dm/sup -3/ in water and decreases to a smaller value in methanol. The yield of methyl radicals as a function of methanol concentration is discussed in terms of the different factors influencing the sonochemistry.

  12. Thermal decomposition of ethylpentaborane in gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Glen E

    1956-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of ethylpentaborane at temperatures of 185 degrees to 244 degrees C is approximately a 1.5-order reaction. The products of the decomposition were hydrogen, methane, a nonvolatile boron hydride, and traces of decaborane. Measurements of the rate of decomposition of pentaborane showed that ethylpentaborane has a greater rate of decomposition than pentaborane.

  13. Decomposition of Alternative Chirality Amino Acids by Alkaliphilic Anaerobe from Owens Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Alisa; Pikuta, Elena V.; Guisler, Melissa; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    The study of alkaliphilic microbial communities from anaerobic sediments of Owens and Mono Lakes in California led to the isolation of a bacterial strain capable of metabolizing amino acids with alternative chirality. According to the phylogenetic analysis, the anaerobic strain BK1 belongs to the genus Tindallia; however, despite the characteristics of other described species of this genus, the strain BK1 was able to grow on D-arginine and Dlysine. Cell morphology of this strain showed straight, motile, non-spore-forming rods with sizes 0.45 x 1.2-3 microns. Physiological characteristics of the strain showed that it is catalase negative, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, and obligately alkaliphilic. This isolate is unable to grow at pH 7 and requires CO3 (2-) ions for growth. The strain has chemo-heterotrophic metabolism and is able to ferment various proteolysis products and some sugars. It plays the role of a primary anaerobe within the trophic chain of an anaerobic microbial community by the degradation of complex protein molecules to smaller and less energetic molecules. The new isolate requires NaCl for growth, and can grow within the range of 0.5-13 %, with the optimum at 1 % NaCl (w/v). The temperature range for the growth of the new isolate is 12-40 C with optimum at 35 C. The pH range for the growth of strain BK1 occurs between 7.8 and 11.0 with optimum at 9.5. This paper presents detailed physiological characteristics of the novel isolate from Owens Lake, a unique relic ecosystem of Astrobiological significance, and makes an accent on the ability of this strain to utilize L-amino acids.

  14. Visible-light-mediated chan-lam coupling reactions of aryl boronic acids and aniline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Woo-Jin; Tsukamoto, Tatsuhiro; Kobayashi, Shū

    2015-05-26

    The copper(II)-catalyzed aerobic oxidative coupling reaction between aryl boronic acids and aniline derivatives was found to be improved significantly under visible-light-mediated photoredox catalysis. The substrate scope of this oxidative Chan-Lam reaction was thus expanded to include electron-deficient aryl boronic acids as viable starting materials.

  15. Formation of phenol under conditions of the reaction of oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinovsky, I.O.; Leshcheva, A.N.; Pogorelov, V.V.; Gelbshtein, A.I.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes conditions for the oxidation of benzene to phenol. It is shown that a reaction mixture of water, carbon monoxide, and oxygen are essential to the oxidation. The oxidation is a side reaction found to occur during the oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid in a medium of trifluoroacetic acid.

  16. Acid decomposition and thiourea leaching of silver from hazardous jarosite residues: Effect of some cations on the stability of the thiourea system.

    PubMed

    Calla-Choque, D; Nava-Alonso, F; Fuentes-Aceituno, J C

    2016-11-01

    The recovery of silver from hazardous jarosite residues was studied employing thiourea as leaching agent at acid pH and 90°C. The stability of the thiourea in synthetic solutions was evaluated in the presence of some cations that can be present in this leaching system: cupric and ferric ions as oxidant species, and zinc, lead and iron as divalent ions. Two silver leaching methods were studied: the simultaneous jarosite decomposition-silver leaching, and the jarosite decomposition followed by the silver leaching. The study with synthetic solutions demonstrated that cupric and ferric ions have a negative effect on thiourea stability due to their oxidant properties. The effect of cupric ions is more significant than the effect of ferric ions; other studied cations (Fe(2+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+)) had no effect on the stability of thiourea. When the decomposition of jarosite and the silver leaching are carried out simultaneously, 70% of the silver can be recovered. When the acid decomposition was performed at pH 0.5 followed by the leaching step at pH 1, total silver recovery increased up to 90%. The zinc is completely dissolved with any of these processes while the lead is practically insoluble with these systems producing a lead-rich residue.

  17. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  18. Lewis Acid Catalyzed Selective Reactions of Donor-Acceptor Cyclopropanes with 2-Naphthols.

    PubMed

    Kaicharla, Trinadh; Roy, Tony; Thangaraj, Manikandan; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Biju, Akkattu T

    2016-08-16

    Lewis acid-catalyzed reactions of 2-substituted cyclopropane 1,1-dicarboxylates with 2-naphthols is reported. The reaction exhibits tunable selectivity depending on the nature of Lewis acid employed and proceed as a dearomatization/rearomatization sequence. With Bi(OTf)3 as the Lewis acid, a highly selective dehydrative [3+2] cyclopentannulation takes place leading to the formation of naphthalene-fused cyclopentanes. Interestingly, engaging Sc(OTf)3 as the Lewis acid, a Friedel-Crafts-type addition of 2-naphthols to cyclopropanes takes place, thus affording functionalized 2-naphthols. Both reactions furnished the target products in high regioselectivity and moderate to high yields. PMID:27391792

  19. Redox reactions of Pu(IV) and Pu(III) in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid in HNO(3) solutions.

    PubMed

    Tkac, Peter; Precek, Martin; Paulenova, Alena

    2009-12-21

    The reduction of Pu(IV) in the presence of acetohydroxamic acid (HAHA) was monitored by vis-NIR spectroscopy. All experiments were performed under low HAHA/Pu(IV) ratios, where only the Pu(IV)-monoacetohydroxamate complex and Pu uncomplexed with HAHA were present in relevant concentrations. Time dependent concentrations of all absorbing species were resolved using molar extinction coefficients for Pu(IV), Pu(III), and the Pu(AHA)(3+) complex by deconvolution of spectra. From fitting of the experimental data by rate equations integrated by a numeric method three reactions were proposed to describe a mechanism responsible for the reduction and oxidation of plutonium in the presence of HAHA and HNO(3). Decomposition of Pu(AHA)(3+) follows a second order reaction mechanism with respect to its own concentration and leads to the formation of Pu(III). At low HAHA concentrations, a two-electron reduction of uncomplexed Pu(IV) with HAHA also occurs. Formed Pu(III) is unstable and slowly reoxidizes back to Pu(IV), which, at the point when all HAHA is decomposed, can be catalyzed by the presence of nitrous acid.

  20. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10428 - Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine. 721.10428 Section 721.10428 Protection of Environment..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products...

  3. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10428 - Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine. 721.10428 Section 721.10428 Protection of Environment..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products...

  6. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product...

  7. A green approach towards adoption of chemical reaction model on 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-di-(tert-butylperoxy)hexane decomposition by differential isoconversional kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Das, Mitali; Shu, Chi-Min

    2016-01-15

    This study investigated the thermal degradation products of 2,5-dimethyl-2,5-di-(tert-butylperoxy) hexane (DBPH), by TG/GC/MS to identify runaway reaction and thermal safety parameters. It also included the determination of time to maximum rate under adiabatic conditions (TMR(ad)) and self-accelerating decomposition temperature obtained through Advanced Kinetics and Technology Solutions. The apparent activation energy (Ea) was calculated from differential isoconversional kinetic analysis method using differential scanning calorimetry experiments. The Ea value obtained by Friedman analysis is in the range of 118.0-149.0 kJ mol(-1). The TMR(ad) was 24.0 h with an apparent onset temperature of 82.4°C. This study has also established an efficient benchmark for a thermal hazard assessment of DBPH that can be applied to assure safer storage conditions.

  8. Effective molarity in a nucleic acid-controlled reaction.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Michael J; Price, Nathan E; Gates, Kent S

    2016-06-01

    Positioning of reactive functional groups within a DNA duplex can enable chemical reactions that otherwise would not occur to an appreciable extent. However, few studies have quantitatively defined the extent to which the enforced proximity of reaction partners in duplex DNA can favor chemical processes. Here, we measured substantial effective molarities (as high as 25M) afforded by duplex DNA to a reaction involving interstrand cross-link formation between 2'-deoxyadenosine and a 2-deoxyribose abasic (Ap) site.

  9. Predicting protein decomposition: the case of aspartic-acid racemization kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M J; Waite, E R; van Duin, A C

    1999-01-01

    The increase in proportion of the non-biological (D-) isomer of aspartic acid (Asp) relative to the L-isomer has been widely used in archaeology and geochemistry as a tool for dating. the method has proved controversial, particularly when used for bones. The non-linear kinetics of Asp racemization have prompted a number of suggestions as to the underlying mechanism(s) and have led to the use of mathematical transformations which linearize the increase in D-Asp with respect to time. Using one example, a suggestion that the initial rapid phase of Asp racemization is due to a contribution from asparagine (Asn), we demonstrate how a simple model of the degradation and racemization of Asn can be used to predict the observed kinetics. A more complex model of peptide bound Asx (Asn + Asp) racemization, which occurs via the formation of a cyclic succinimide (Asu), can be used to correctly predict Asx racemization kinetics in proteins at high temperatures (95-140 degrees C). The model fails to predict racemization kinetics in dentine collagen at 37 degrees C. The reason for this is that Asu formation is highly conformation dependent and is predicted to occur extremely slowly in triple helical collagen. As conformation strongly influences the rate of Asu formation and hence Asx racemization, the use of extrapolation from high temperatures to estimate racemization kinetics of Asx in proteins below their denaturation temperature is called into question. In the case of archaeological bone, we argue that the D:L ratio of Asx reflects the proportion of non-helical to helical collagen, overlain by the effects of leaching of more soluble (and conformationally unconstrained) peptides. Thus, racemization kinetics in bone are potentially unpredictable, and the proposed use of Asx racemization to estimate the extent of DNA depurination in archaeological bones is challenged. PMID:10091247

  10. Reaction of folic acid with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Mark D.; Chorney, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen-containing functional groups on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used to covalently bond folic acid molecules to the SWNTs. Infrared spectroscopy confirms intact molecular binding to the SWNTs through the formation of an amide bond between a carboxylic acid group on an SWNT and the primary amine group of folic acid. The folic acid-functionalized SWNTs are readily dispersible in water and phosphate-buffered saline, and the dispersions are stable for a period of two weeks or longer. These folic acid-functionalized SWNTs offer potential for use as biocompatible SWNTs.

  11. 40 CFR 721.10429 - Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and tall-oil...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and tall-oil fatty acids. 721.10429 Section 721.10429... Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and tall-oil fatty acids... identified as fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10429 - Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and tall-oil...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and tall-oil fatty acids. 721.10429 Section 721.10429... Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and tall-oil fatty acids... identified as fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and...

  13. Organo-niobate Ionic Liquids: Synthesis, Characterization and Application as Acid Catalyst in Pechmann Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Valerio C. D.; Alves, Melquizedeque B.; Souza, Ernesto R.; Pinto, Ivana O.; Rubim, Joel C.; Andrade, Carlos Kleber Z.; Suarez, Paulo A. Z.

    2007-01-01

    The combinations of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride with NbCl5 yielded ionic mixtures with different melting point temperatures and acidity depending on the niobium molar fraction. The mixtures were characterized by thermal (DSC) and spectroscopic (FT-IR and 1H NMR) analysis. The Pechmann reactions of different phenols with ethylacetoacetate, producing coumarins, was used as model to evaluate the catalytic behavior of these mixtures as acid Lewis catalyst. These reactions were carried out using acidic mixtures of 60 mol%.

  14. Kinetics of stabilised Criegee intermediates derived from alkene ozonolysis: reactions with SO2, H2O and decomposition under boundary layer conditions.

    PubMed

    Newland, Mike J; Rickard, Andrew R; Alam, Mohammed S; Vereecken, Luc; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William J

    2015-02-14

    The removal of SO2 in the presence of alkene-ozone systems has been studied for ethene, cis-but-2-ene, trans-but-2-ene and 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene, as a function of humidity, under atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on relative humidity for all four alkene-ozone systems confirming a significant reaction for stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCI) with H2O. The observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with relative rate constants, k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2), of 3.3 (±1.1) × 10(-5) for CH2OO, 26 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, 33 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene, and 8.7 (±2.5) × 10(-5) for (CH3)2COO derived from 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene. The relative rate constants for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) are -2.3 (±3.5) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH2OO, 13 (±43) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, -14 (±31) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene and 63 (±14) × 10(11) cm(-3) for (CH3)2COO. Uncertainties are ±2σ and represent combined systematic and precision components. These values are derived following the approximation that a single SCI is present for each system; a more comprehensive interpretation, explicitly considering the differing reactivity for syn- and anti-SCI conformers, is also presented. This yields values of 3.5 (±3.1) × 10(-4) for k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2) of anti-CH3CHOO and 1.2 (±1.1) × 10(13) for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) of syn-CH3CHOO. The reaction of the water dimer with CH2OO is also considered, with a derived value for k(CH2OO + (H2O)2)/k(CH2OO + SO2) of 1.4 (±1.8) × 10(-2). The observed SO2 removal rate constants, which technically represent upper limits, are consistent with decomposition being a significant, structure dependent, sink in the atmosphere for syn-SCI.

  15. Kinetics of stabilised Criegee intermediates derived from alkene ozonolysis: reactions with SO2, H2O and decomposition under boundary layer conditions.

    PubMed

    Newland, Mike J; Rickard, Andrew R; Alam, Mohammed S; Vereecken, Luc; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William J

    2015-02-14

    The removal of SO2 in the presence of alkene-ozone systems has been studied for ethene, cis-but-2-ene, trans-but-2-ene and 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene, as a function of humidity, under atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on relative humidity for all four alkene-ozone systems confirming a significant reaction for stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCI) with H2O. The observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with relative rate constants, k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2), of 3.3 (±1.1) × 10(-5) for CH2OO, 26 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, 33 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene, and 8.7 (±2.5) × 10(-5) for (CH3)2COO derived from 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene. The relative rate constants for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) are -2.3 (±3.5) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH2OO, 13 (±43) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, -14 (±31) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene and 63 (±14) × 10(11) cm(-3) for (CH3)2COO. Uncertainties are ±2σ and represent combined systematic and precision components. These values are derived following the approximation that a single SCI is present for each system; a more comprehensive interpretation, explicitly considering the differing reactivity for syn- and anti-SCI conformers, is also presented. This yields values of 3.5 (±3.1) × 10(-4) for k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2) of anti-CH3CHOO and 1.2 (±1.1) × 10(13) for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) of syn-CH3CHOO. The reaction of the water dimer with CH2OO is also considered, with a derived value for k(CH2OO + (H2O)2)/k(CH2OO + SO2) of 1.4 (±1.8) × 10(-2). The observed SO2 removal rate constants, which technically represent upper limits, are consistent with decomposition being a significant, structure dependent, sink in the atmosphere for syn-SCI. PMID:25562069

  16. Aqueous Phase Photo-Oxidation of Succinic Acid: Changes in Hygroscopic Properties and Reaction Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, P. K.; Ninokawa, A.; Hofstra, J.; de Lijser, P.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have been identified as important factors in understanding climate change. The extent to which aerosols affect climate is determined, in part, by hygroscopic properties which can change as a result of atmospheric processing. Dicarboxylic acids, components of atmospheric aerosol, have a wide range of hygroscopic properties and can undergo oxidation and photolysis reactions in the atmosphere. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of succinic acid aerosol, a non-hygroscopic four carbon dicarboxylic acid, were measured with a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and compared to reaction products resulting from the aqueous phase photo-oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide and succinic acid. Reaction products were determined and quantified using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a function of hydrogen peroxide:succinic acid concentration ratio and photolysis time. Although reaction products include larger non-hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. adipic acid) and smaller hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. malonic and oxalic acids), comparison of hygroscopic growth curves to Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) predictions suggests that the hygroscopic properties of many of the product mixtures are largely independent of the hygroscopicity of the individual components. This study provides a framework for future investigations to fully understand and predict the role of chemical reactions in altering atmospheric conditions that affect climate.

  17. Actual-Waste Tests of Enhanced Chemical Cleaning for Retrieval of SRS HLW Sludge Tank Heels and Decomposition of Oxalic Acid - 12256

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Christopher J.; King, William D.; Ketusky, Edward T.

    2012-07-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge. During ECC actual waste testing, the introduction of ozone was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels. This testing did not identify physical or chemical changes in the ECC product sludge that would impact downstream processing. The results from these tests confirm observations made by AREVA NP during larger scale testing with waste simulants. This testing, however, had a decreased utilization of ozone, requiring approximately 5 moles of ozone per mole of oxalate decomposed. Decomposition of oxalates in sludge dissolved in 2 wt% OA to levels near 100 ppm oxalate using ECC process conditions required 8 to 12.5 hours without the aid of UV light and 4.5 to 8 hours with the aid of UV light. The pH and ORP were tracked during decomposition testing. Sludge components were tracked during OA decomposition, showing that most components have the highest soluble levels in the initial dissolved sludge and early decomposition samples and exhibit lower soluble levels as OA decomposition progresses. The Deposition Tank storage conditions that included pH adjustment to approximately 1 M free hydroxide tended to bring the soluble concentrations in the ECC product to nearly the same level for each test regardless of storage time, storage temperature, and contact with other tank sludge material. (authors)

  18. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  19. Uptake of Hypobromous Acid (HOBr) by Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions: Low-Temperature Solubility and Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Ashbourn, Samatha F. M.; Rammer, Thomas A.; Golden, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol/L/atm. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with Delta H = -46.2 kJ/mol and Delta S = -106.2 J/mol/K for 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into aqueous 45 wt% H2SO4, the solubility can be described by log H* = 3665/T - 10.63. For 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4, log H* = 2412/T - 5.55. At temperatures colder than approx. 213 K, the solubility of HOBr in 45 wt% H2SO4 is noticeably larger than in 70 wt% H2SO4. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Our measurements indicate chemical reaction of HOBr upon uptake into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2, particularly at 70 wt% H2SO4.

  20. Investigating hydrogel dosimeter decomposition by chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The chemical oxidative decomposition of leucocrystal violet micelle hydrogel dosimeters was investigated using the reaction of ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide or sodium bicarbonate with hydrogen peroxide. The second reaction is more effective at dye decomposition in gelatin hydrogels. Additional chemical analysis is required to determine the decomposition products.

  1. Process for chemical reaction of amino acids and amides yielding selective conversion products

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Jonathan E.

    2006-05-23

    The invention relates to processes for converting amino acids and amides to desirable conversion products including pyrrolidines, pyrrolidinones, and other N-substituted products. L-glutamic acid and L-pyroglutamic acid provide general reaction pathways to numerous and valuable selective conversion products with varied potential industrial uses.

  2. Hydroxyalkoxy radicals: importance of intramolecular hydrogen bonding on chain branching reactions in the combustion and atmospheric decomposition of hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alexander C; Francisco, Joseph S

    2014-11-20

    During both the atmospheric oxidation and combustion of volatile organic compounds, sequential addition of oxygen can lead to compounds that contain multiple hydrogen-bonding sites. The presence of two or more of these sites on a hydrocarbon introduces the possibility of intramolecular H-bonding, which can have a stabilizing effect on the reactants, products, and transition states of subsequent reactions. The present work compares the absolute energies of two sets of conformations, those that contain intramolecular H-bonds and those that lack intramolecular H-bonds, for each reactant, product, and transition state species in the 1,2 through 1,7 H-migrations and Cα-Cβ, Cα-H, and Cα-OH-bond scission reactions in the n-hydroxyeth-1-oxy through n-hydroxyhex-1-oxy radicals, for n ranging from 1 to 6. The difference in energy between the two conformations represents the balance between the stabilizing effects of H-bonds and the steric cost of bringing the two H-bonding sites together. The effect of intramolecular H-bonding and the OH group is assessed by comparing the net intramolecular H-bond stabilization energies, the reaction enthalpies, and barrier heights of the n-hydroxyalkoxy radical reactions with the corresponding alkoxy radicals values. The results suggest that there is a complex dependence on the location of the two H-bonding groups, the location of the abstraction or bond scission, and the shape of the transition state that dictates the extent to which intramolecular H-bonding effects the relative importance of H-migration and bond scission reactions for each n-hydroxyalkoxy radical. These findings have important implications for future studies on hydrocarbons with multiple H-bonding sites.

  3. The effects of phytic acid on the Maillard reaction and the formation of acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Zhou, Yamin; Ma, Jimei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Hong

    2013-11-01

    Phytic acid, myo-inositol hexaphosphoric acid, exists in substantial (1-5%) amounts in edible plant seeds. In this study the effects of phytic acid on the Maillard reaction and the formation of acrylamide were investigated. Both phytic acid and phosphate enhanced browning in glucose/β-alanine system, but phytic acid was less effective than phosphate. Higher pH favoured the catalytic activities for both of them. The influence of the types of sugar and amino acid on the reaction was also examined. Browning was suppressed by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions, but an additive effect was observed for ferrous ions and phytic acid in glucose/β-alanine solution at pH 8.0. Both phytic acid and phosphate promoted the polymerisation of the reaction intermediates. The kinetics of Maillard reaction was first-ordered reaction in the presence of phytic acid. Phytic acid was less effective than phosphate in the formation of acrylamide. When potato slices were treated with sodium phytate and calcium chloride successively, the formation of acrylamide was greatly suppressed. PMID:23768320

  4. High temperature shock tube and theoretical studies on the thermal decomposition of dimethyl carbonate and its bimolecular reactions with H and D-atoms.

    PubMed

    Peukert, S L; Sivaramakrishnan, R; Michael, J V

    2013-05-01

    The shock tube technique was used to study the high temperature thermal decomposition of dimethyl carbonate, CH3OC(O)OCH3 (DMC). The formation of H-atoms was measured behind reflected shock waves by using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS). The experiments span a T-range of 1053-1157 K at pressures ∼0.5 atm. The H-atom profiles were simulated using a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for DMC thermal decomposition. Simulations indicate that the formation of H-atoms is sensitive to the rate constants for the energetically lowest-lying bond fission channel, CH3OC(O)OCH3 → CH3 + CH3OC(O)O [A], where H-atoms form instantaneously at high temperatures from the sequence of radical β-scissions, CH3OC(O)O → CH3O + CO2 → H + CH2O + CO2. A master equation analysis was performed using CCSD(T)/cc-pv∞z//M06-2X/cc-pvtz energetics and molecular properties for all thermal decomposition processes in DMC. The theoretical predictions were found to be in good agreement with the present experimentally derived rate constants for the bond fission channel (A). The theoretically derived rate constants for this important bond-fission process in DMC can be represented by a modified Arrhenius expression at 0.5 atm over the T-range 1000-2000 K as, kA(T) = 6.85 × 10(98)T (-24.239) exp(-65250 K/T) s(-1). The H-atom temporal profiles at long times show only minor sensitivity to the abstraction reaction, H + CH3OC(O)OCH3 → H2 + CH3OC(O)OCH2 [B]. However, H + DMC is an important fuel destruction reaction at high temperatures. Consequently, measurements of D-atom profiles using D-ARAS allowed unambiguous rate constant measurements for the deuterated analog of reaction B, D + CH3OC(O)OCH3 → HD + CH3OC(O)OCH2 [C]. Reaction C is a surrogate for H + DMC since the theoretically predicted kinetic isotope effect at high temperatures (1000 - 2000K) is close to unity, kC ≈ 1.2 kB. TST calculations employing CCSD(T)/cc-pv∞z//M06-2X/cc-pvtz energetics and molecular properties

  5. Direct microwave-assisted amino acid synthesis by reaction of succinic acid and ammonia in the presence of magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Liu, Dandan; Shi, Weiguang; Hua, Yingjie; Wang, Chongtai; Liu, Xiaoyang

    2013-10-01

    Since the discovery of submarine hot vents in the late 1970s, it has been postulated that submarine hydrothermal environments would be suitable for emergence of life on Earth. To simulate warm spring conditions, we designed a series of microwave-assisted amino acid synthesis involving direct reactions between succinic acid and ammonia in the presence of the magnetite catalyst. These reactions which generated aspartic acid and glycine were carried out under mild temperatures and pressures (90-180 °C, 4-19 bar). We studied this specific reaction inasmuch as succinic acid and ammonia were traditionally identified as prebiotic compounds in primitive deep-sea hydrothermal systems on Earth. The experimental results were discussed in both biochemical and geochemical context to offer a possible route for abiotic amino acid synthesis. With extremely diluted starting materials (0.002 M carboxylic acid and 0.002 M ammonia) and catalyst loading, an obvious temperature dependency was observed in both cases [neither product was detected at 90 °C in comparison with 21.08 μmol L-1 (aspartic acid) and 70.25 umol L-1 (glycine) in 180 °C]. However, an opposite trend presented for reaction time factor, namely a positive correlation for glycine, but a negative one for aspartic acid.

  6. Carbocations as Lewis acid catalysts in Diels-Alder and Michael addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Bah, Juho; Franzén, Johan

    2014-01-20

    In general, Lewis acid catalysts are metal-based compounds that owe their reactivity to a low-lying empty orbital. However, one potential Lewis acid that has received negligible attention as a catalyst is the carbocation. We have demonstrated the potential of the carbocation as a highly powerful Lewis acid catalyst for organic reactions. The stable and easily available triphenylmethyl (trityl) cation was found to be a highly efficient catalyst for the Diels-Alder reaction for a range of substrates. Catalyst loadings as low as 500 ppm, excellent yields, and good endo/exo selectivities were achieved. Furthermore, by changing the electronic properties of the substituents on the tritylium ion, the Lewis acidity of the catalyst could be tuned to control the outcome of the reaction. The ability of this carbocation as a Lewis acid catalyst was also further extended to the Michael reaction.

  7. Conversion of waste cellulose to ethanol. Phase 2: Reaction kinetics with phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, M. B.; Isbell, R. E.

    1982-05-01

    Waste cellulosic material can be hydrolyzed in dilute acid solution to produce fermentable sugars which can then be converted into ethanol. A laboratory investigation was made of the feasibility of using phosphoric acid as the hydrolysis catalyst. The hydrolysis reaction with phosphoric acid solutions was compared with the reaction employing the more conventional dilute sulfuric acid catalyst. The purpose of this research was to examine the hydrolysis step in a proposed process for the conversion of cellulose (from wood, newspapers, municipal solid waste, or other sources) into ethanol - by which a potentially valuable co-product, DICAL (dicalcium phosphate), might be made and sold with or without the lignin content as a fertilizer. The pertinent reaction kinetics for the acid catalyzed production of glucose from cellulose consists of consecutive, pseudo-first order reactions.

  8. [Effects of low molecular weight organic acids on redox reactions of mercury].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shi-Bo; Sun, Rong-Guo; Wang, Ding-Yong; Wang, Xiao-Wen; Zhang, Cheng

    2014-06-01

    To study the effects of the main component of vegetation root exudates-low molecular weight organic acids on the redox reactions of mercury, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the roles of tartaric, citric, and succinic acid in the redox reactions of mercury, and to analyze their interaction mechanism. The results indicated that tartaric acid significantly stimulated the mercury reduction reaction, while citric acid had inhibitory effect. Succinic acid improved the reduction rate at low concentration, and inhibited the reaction at high concentration. The mercury reduction rate by tartaric acid treatment was second-order with respect to Hg2+ concentration, ranging from 0.0014 L x (ng x min)(-1) to 0.005 6 L x (ng x min)(-1). All three organic acids showed a capacity for oxidating Hg(0) in the early stage, but the oxidized Hg(0) was subsequently reduced. The oxidation capacity of the three organic acids was in the order of citric acid > tartaric acid > succinic acid.

  9. Soft X-ray induced decomposition of phenylalanine and tyrosine: Acomparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Zubavichus, Y.; Zharnikov, M.; Shaporenko, A.; Fuchs, O.; Weinhart, L.; Heske, C.; Umbach, E.; Denlinger, J.D.; Grunze, M.

    2003-11-19

    The pristine state and soft X-ray induced decomposition of two aromatic amino acids, viz. phenylalanine and tyrosine, have been studied by means of XPS and NEXAFS. The spectroscopic data on the radiation decomposition have been supplemented by a mass-spectral analysis of desorbed species in the residual gas. Despite very similar chemical structures, the two amino acids show a drastically different behavior towards ionizing radiation: phenylalanine degrades very quickly whereas tyrosine shows a prominent stability against radiation damage. Reasons for this difference are discussed in relation to radical-mediated reactions responsible for the decomposition.

  10. The reaction of selenium (IV) with ascorbic acid: its relevance in aqueous and soil systems.

    PubMed

    Pettine, Maurizio; Gennari, Francesca; Campanella, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic processes able to reduce oxidized Se species may have a strong influence on the environmental behavior of selenium since Se toxicity, bioavailability and mobility follow the order Se(-II)acid, which is exudated from plant roots, aquatic macrophytes and phytoplankton and also derives from decomposition of organic matter (e.g. litter, dead roots, algal cells), is present either in soil solution or in the water phase and may interact with Se affecting its speciation and environmental behavior. The rates of the reduction of Se(IV) by ascorbic acid (C(6)H(8)O(6)=H(2)A) were measured in NaCl and NaClO(4) solutions with 1 μM Se(IV) and 100-1000 μM H(2)A as a function of pH, temperature and ionic strength and in the presence of possible interfering metals. The rates of the reaction decreased abruptly with increasing of pH in the range 2-5.5, while slowly at lower pH. The rates showed a small influence of temperature in the range 10-40°C and were independent of ionic strength from 0.01 M to 1M. The values of the second-order rate constant (k) calculated from the values of k(1)/[H(2)A](T) can be determined from the equation: log k = -0.92 × pH - 3368.4/T + 0.24 × I(0.5) + 16.94 for the pH range 2-5.5 (σ=±0.23), from 10 to 40 °C and from 0.01 to 1M ionic strength. The effect of pH and ionic strength on the reaction suggests that the second-order rate expression over the entire pH range investigated can be determined from (H(2)A=C(6)H(8)O(6); HA=C(6)H(7)O(6)(-); H(2)B=H(2)SeO(3); HB=HSeO(3)(-)) [formula, see text] where K(HA), K(A), K(HB), K(B) are the dissociation constants of selenous acid and ascorbic acid, k(H2A-H2B)=5577±78 and k(H2A-HB)=812±102 M(-1)h(-1). The presence of Cu(II), which is a strong catalyzer for the oxidation of H(2)A, decreases the rates of Se(IV) reduction by H(2)A in oxygenated waters. Mn(IV) causes an oxidation of Se(IV) to Se(VI) at high Mn(IV)/H(2)A molar ratios (>0.3), while does not affect

  11. The reaction of hyaluronic acid and its monomers, glucuronic acid and N-acetylglucosamine, with reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jahn, M; Baynes, J W; Spiteller, G

    1999-10-15

    Synovial fluid is a approximately 0.15% (w/v) aqueous solution of hyaluronic acid (HA), a polysaccharide consisting of alternating units of GlcA and GlcNAc. In synovial fluid of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, HA is thought to be degraded either by radicals generated by Fenton chemistry (Fe2+/H2O2) or by NaOCl generated by myeloperoxidase. We investigated the course of model reactions of these two reactants in physiological buffer with HA, and with the corresponding monomers GlcA and GlcNAc. meso-Tartaric acid, arabinuronic acid, arabinaric acid and glucaric acid were identified by GC-MS as oxidation products of glucuronic acid. When GlcNAc was oxidised, erythronic acid, arabinonic acid, 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-gluconic acid, glyceric acid, erythrose and arabinose were formed. NaOCl oxidation of HA yielded meso-tartaric acid; in addition, arabinaric acid and glucaric acid were obtained by oxidation with Fe2+/H2O2. These results indicate that oxidative degradation of HA proceeds primarily at glucuronic acid residues. meso-Tartaric acid may be a useful biomarker of hyaluronate oxidation since it is produced by both NaOCl and Fenton chemistry.

  12. Development of a multichannel Fourier-transform spectrometer to measure weak chemiluminescence: Application to the emission of singlet-oxygen dimol in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide with gallic acid and K 3[Fe(CN) 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukino, Kazuo; Satoh, Toshihiro; Ishii, Hiroshi; Nakata, Munetaka

    2008-05-01

    A Fourier-transform spectrometer equipped with a Savart-plate polarization interferometer was developed for observation of weak chemiluminescence and applied to a measurement of emission spectra in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide with gallic acid and K 3[Fe(CN) 6]. The band appearing at ˜580 nm in the chemiluminescence spectrum was assigned to the emission of singlet-oxygen dimol, the peak wavelength being shifted from that observed in the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with sodium hypochlorite, ˜633 nm. The band intensity was increased with the increasing concentration of K 3[Fe(CN) 6] up to ˜100 mM, and thereafter the peak wavelength was shifted from 580 to 700 nm with a decrease in the intensity.

  13. 40 CFR 721.6477 - Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic anhydride. 721.6477 Section 721.6477... Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic... identified generically as alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols,...

  14. 40 CFR 721.6477 - Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic anhydride. 721.6477 Section 721.6477... Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic... identified generically as alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols,...

  15. 40 CFR 721.6477 - Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic anhydride. 721.6477 Section 721.6477... Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic... identified generically as alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols,...

  16. 40 CFR 721.6477 - Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic anhydride. 721.6477 Section 721.6477... Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic... identified generically as alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols,...

  17. 40 CFR 721.6477 - Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic anhydride. 721.6477 Section 721.6477... Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic... identified generically as alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols,...

  18. Effective and site-specific phosphoramidation reaction for universally labeling nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Chih; Chen, Hsing-Yin; Ko, Ni Chien; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Wu, Min Hui; Wang, Li-Fang; Wang, Yun-Ming; Chang, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Eng-Chi; Wang, Tzu-Pin

    2014-03-15

    Here we report efficient and selective postsynthesis labeling strategies, based on an advanced phosphoramidation reaction, for nucleic acids of either synthetic or enzyme-catalyzed origin. The reactions provided phosphorimidazolide intermediates of DNA or RNA which, whether reacted in one pot (one-step) or purified (two-step), were directly or indirectly phosphoramidated with label molecules. The acquired fluorophore-labeled nucleic acids, prepared from the phosphoramidation reactions, demonstrated labeling efficacy by their F/N ratio values (number of fluorophores per molecule of nucleic acid) of 0.02-1.2 which are comparable or better than conventional postsynthesis fluorescent labeling methods for DNA and RNA. Yet, PCR and UV melting studies of the one-step phosphoramidation-prepared FITC-labeled DNA indicated that the reaction might facilitate nonspecific hybridization in nucleic acids. Intrinsic hybridization specificity of nucleic acids was, however, conserved in the two-step phosphoramidation reaction. The reaction of site-specific labeling nucleic acids at the 5'-end was supported by fluorescence quenching and UV melting studies of fluorophore-labeled DNA. The two-step phosphoramidation-based, effective, and site-specific labeling method has the potential to expedite critical research including visualization, quantification, structural determination, localization, and distribution of nucleic acids in vivo and in vitro.

  19. A Mini-Review on Solid Acid Catalysts for Esterification Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirsam, Rajkumar; Hansora, Dharmesh; Usmani, Ghayas A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of research pertaining to solid acid catalysts for esterification reactions. Prominence has been given to the literatures that have been appeared during the last two decades. A variety of reactions catalyzed by solid acid catalysts have been tabulated according to their broad classification; industrially important reactions have been outlined. Examples, where the use of various solid acid catalysts have led to an improvement in the selectivity of the desired products, have also been discussed. Various catalyzed esterification reactions using different approaches and previous kinetic studies have been reviewed. Types, preparation and synthesis of various solid acid catalysts have been reviewed and discussed. Suggestions have been summarized for their implementation in future work.

  20. Envisioning an enzymatic Diels-Alder reaction by in situ acid-base catalyzed diene generation.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Johansson, Adam Johannes; Manta, Bianca; Olsson, Philip; Brinck, Tore

    2012-06-01

    We present and evaluate a new and potentially efficient route for enzyme-mediated Diels-Alder reactions, utilizing general acid-base catalysis. The viability of employing the active site of ketosteroid isomerase is demonstrated.

  1. Why and How To Teach Acid-Base Reactions without Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Terry S.

    1997-01-01

    Recommends an approach to the treatment of acid-base equilibria that involves treating each reaction as either going to completion or not occurring at all. Compares the method with the traditional approach step by step. (DDR)

  2. 40 CFR 721.6181 - Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction product with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6181 Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde... as fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl...

  3. 40 CFR 721.6181 - Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction product with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6181 Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde... as fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  8. 40 CFR 721.6181 - Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction product with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6181 Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde... as fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl...

  9. 40 CFR 721.6181 - Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction product with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6181 Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde... as fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl...

  10. 40 CFR 721.6181 - Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction product with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6181 Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde... as fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  12. Kinetics of Acid Reactions: Making Sense of Associated Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Mocerino, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    In chemical kinetics, in addition to the concepts related to kinetics, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium and the characteristics of the reactants are often involved when comparing the rates of different reactions, making such comparisons very challenging for students at all levels, as well as for pre-service science teachers. Consequently, four…

  13. Reaction of /alpha/,/beta/-unsaturated acyl isothiocyanates with salts of dithiocarbamic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Krus, K.; Masias, A.; Beletskaya, I.P.

    1989-01-10

    The reaction of unsaturated isothiocyanates with the sodium and calcium salts of N-alkyl- and N,N-dialkyldithiocarbamic acids was studied. Depending on the structure of the dithiocarbamate, the reaction products are thiazines or acyl dithiocarbamates. For the salts of methyldithiocarbamic acid the effect of the concentration and the nature of the metal on the relative yields of 6-phenyl-3-methylpropiorhodanine and 6-phenylpropiorhodanine was studied. A method is proposed for the synthesis of 3-substituted propiorhodanines.

  14. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  15. Proton transfer reactions between nitric acid and acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde in the solid phase.

    PubMed

    Lasne, Jérôme; Laffon, Carine; Parent, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    The heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions of acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde with solid nitric acid (HNO(3)) films have been studied with Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (RAIRS) under Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) conditions in the 90-170 K temperature range. In the bulk or at the surface of the films, nitric acid transfers its proton to the carbonyl function of the organic molecules, producing protonated acetone-H(+), hydroxyacetone-H(+), acetaldehyde-H(+) and benzaldehyde-H(+), and nitrate anions NO(3)(-), a reaction not observed when nitric acid is previously hydrated [J. Lasne, C. Laffon and Ph. Parent, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 697]. This provides a molecular-scale description of the carbonyl protonation reaction in an acid medium, the first step of the acid-catalyzed condensation of carbonyl compounds, fuelling the growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere.

  16. Decomposition of 14C containing organic molecules released from radioactive waste by gamma-radiolysis under repository conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kani, Yuko; Noshita, Kenji; Kawasaki, Toru; Nasu, Yuji; Nishimura, Tsutomu; Sakuragi, Tomofumi; Asano, Hidekazu

    2008-04-01

    Decomposition of 14C containing organic molecules into an inorganic compound has been investigated by γ-ray irradiation experiments under simulated repository conditions for radioactive waste. Lower molecular weight organic acids, alcohols, and aldehydes leached from metallic waste are reacted with OH radicals to give carbonic acid. A decomposition efficiency that expresses consumption of OH radicals by decomposition reaction of organic molecules is proposed. Decomposition efficiency increases with increasing concentration of organic molecules (1×10 -6-1×10 -3 mol dm -3) and is not dependent on dose rate (10-1000 Gy h -1). Observed dependence indicates that decomposition efficiency is determined by reaction probability of OH radicals with organic molecules.

  17. Effects of salt concentration on the reaction rate of Glc with amino acids, peptides, and proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Keiko; Noumi, Yuri; Nakajima, Katsumi; Nagatsuka, Chiharu; Aizawa, Haruko; Nakawaki, Rie; Mizude, Eri; Otsuka, Yuzuru; Homma, Takeshi; Chuyen, Nguyen Van

    2009-11-01

    The reaction between the amino group and the carbonyl group is important in food quality control. Furthermore, advanced glycation end products from foods are considered to relate to aging and diabetes. Thus, it is important to control this reaction. In this study, we investigated the effects of salt concentration on the rates of browning reaction of amino acid, peptides, and proteins. A high concentration of sodium chloride retarded the reaction rate of Glc with amino acids as measured with the absorbance at 470 nm, but did not change the browning rate of Glc with peptides. On the other hand, sodium chloride retarded the browning reaction rate of proteins as measured with polymerization degree or by the loss of Lys. It is hoped that the results of this study will be applied in the control of amino-carbonyl reaction rates in the food industry. PMID:19897911

  18. Multifunctional Co0.85Se/graphene hybrid nanosheets: controlled synthesis and enhanced performances for the oxygen reduction reaction and decomposition of hydrazine hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin-Fei; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Ultrathin nanosheets possess novel electronic structures and physical properties as compared with their corresponding bulk samples. However, the controlled synthesis of ultrathin monolayer nanosheets still remains a great challenge due to the lack of an intrinsic driving force for anisotropic growth of two-dimensional (2D) structures. Here we demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, the in situ synthesis of large-scale ultrathin single-crystalline Co0.85Se nanosheets on graphene oxide (GO) sheets, with a thickness of 3 nm. Owing to the synergetic chemical coupling effects between GO and Co0.85Se, the Co0.85Se/graphene hybrid nanosheets exhibit the highest catalytic performance among the available cobalt chalcogenide-based catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Moreover, Co0.85Se/graphene hybrid nanosheets can catalyze the decomposition of hydrazine hydrate rapidly, with 97% of hydrazine hydrate being degraded in 12 min and the degradation rate remaining constant over 10 consecutive cycles, thus having great potential as long-term catalysts in wastewater treatment.Ultrathin nanosheets possess novel electronic structures and physical properties as compared with their corresponding bulk samples. However, the controlled synthesis of ultrathin monolayer nanosheets still remains a great challenge due to the lack of an intrinsic driving force for anisotropic growth of two-dimensional (2D) structures. Here we demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, the in situ synthesis of large-scale ultrathin single-crystalline Co0.85Se nanosheets on graphene oxide (GO) sheets, with a thickness of 3 nm. Owing to the synergetic chemical coupling effects between GO and Co0.85Se, the Co0.85Se/graphene hybrid nanosheets exhibit the highest catalytic performance among the available cobalt chalcogenide-based catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Moreover, Co0.85Se/graphene hybrid nanosheets can catalyze the decomposition of hydrazine hydrate rapidly

  19. Direct studies of the thermal decomposition of N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} and of the reaction of CO with O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.W.; Patterson, P.M.; Klemm, R.B.

    1992-02-01

    The thermal decompositions of N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} was investigated by monitoring the kinetics of formation of O({sup 3}P) atoms in the reflected shock regime using atomic resonance absorption spectrophotometry (A.R.A.S.). The temperature range was 1805K to 2379K for N{sub 2}O and 2332K to 2869K for CO{sub 2}. Total densities were 3--4 {times} 10{sup 18} molecules cm{sup {minus}3} and hence the reported rate constants are at or near the low pressure limit for unimolecular decomposition. The results were expressed by the following Arrhenius equations: CO{sub 2} k(T) = (1.63 {plus_minus} 1.96) {times} 10{sup {minus}8} exp({minus}122565 {plus_minus} 5183/RT) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} N{sub 2}O k(T) = (6.02 {plus_minus} 2.81) {times} 10{sup 10} exp({minus}53397 {plus_minus} 1865/RT) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Uncertainties in the Arrhenius expressions are given at the one standard deviation level and the mean deviations of the experimental data from the respective expression are {plus_minus} 18.6% and {plus_minus} 30.7%. Corresponding values for the reverse reaction, k{sub rev}(CO{sub 2}) were computed from the expression k{sub for}/k{sub rev} = K{sub c}. The value obtained for k{sub rev}(CO{sub 2}) was (2.18 {plus_minus} 0.83) {times} 10{sup {minus}34} cm{sup 6} molecule{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}, independent of temperature from 2332K to 2869K. Preliminary results are also reported for the direct determination of the rate constant for the reaction, CO + O{sub 2} {yields} CO{sub 2} + O, from measurements of the initial rate of formation of O({sup 3}P) atoms. 35 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Direct studies of the thermal decomposition of N sub 2 O and CO sub 2 and of the reaction of CO with O sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.W.; Patterson, P.M.; Klemm, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal decompositions of N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} was investigated by monitoring the kinetics of formation of O({sup 3}P) atoms in the reflected shock regime using atomic resonance absorption spectrophotometry (A.R.A.S.). The temperature range was 1805K to 2379K for N{sub 2}O and 2332K to 2869K for CO{sub 2}. Total densities were 3--4 {times} 10{sup 18} molecules cm{sup {minus}3} and hence the reported rate constants are at or near the low pressure limit for unimolecular decomposition. The results were expressed by the following Arrhenius equations: CO{sub 2} k(T) = (1.63 {plus minus} 1.96) {times} 10{sup {minus}8} exp({minus}122565 {plus minus} 5183/RT) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} N{sub 2}O k(T) = (6.02 {plus minus} 2.81) {times} 10{sup 10} exp({minus}53397 {plus minus} 1865/RT) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Uncertainties in the Arrhenius expressions are given at the one standard deviation level and the mean deviations of the experimental data from the respective expression are {plus minus} 18.6% and {plus minus} 30.7%. Corresponding values for the reverse reaction, k{sub rev}(CO{sub 2}) were computed from the expression k{sub for}/k{sub rev} = K{sub c}. The value obtained for k{sub rev}(CO{sub 2}) was (2.18 {plus minus} 0.83) {times} 10{sup {minus}34} cm{sup 6} molecule{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}, independent of temperature from 2332K to 2869K. Preliminary results are also reported for the direct determination of the rate constant for the reaction, CO + O{sub 2} {yields} CO{sub 2} + O, from measurements of the initial rate of formation of O({sup 3}P) atoms. 35 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Acid-Base Chemistry According to Robert Boyle: Chemical Reactions in Words as well as Symbols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodney, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Examples of acid-base reactions from Robert Boyle's "The Sceptical Chemist" are used to illustrate the rich information content of chemical equations. Boyle required lengthy passages of florid language to describe the same reaction that can be done quite simply with a chemical equation. Reading or hearing the words, however, enriches the student's…

  2. CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PRODUCTS FROM THE REACTION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is of biological significance and may be implicated in the overall toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenic. The course of the reaction in aqueous phase was monitored and an initial product, dimethylthioarsin...

  3. A sulfenylation reaction: direct synthesis of 3-arylsulfinylindoles from arylsulfinic acids and indoles in water.

    PubMed

    Miao, Tao; Li, Pinhua; Zhang, Yicheng; Wang, Lei

    2015-02-20

    A novel and efficient electrophilic sulfenylation of indoles with arylsulfinic acids is realized. The reaction utilizes readily available starting materials in water under catalyst- and additive-free conditions, providing an alternative and attractive approach to 3-arylsulfinylindoles with high yields. Preliminary mechanistic investigation suggested that the reaction is through an electrophilic substitution process.

  4. Exploring water catalysis in the reaction of thioformic acid with hydroxyl radical: a global reaction route mapping perspective.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Vikas

    2014-06-12

    Hydrogen abstraction pathways, in the gas-phase reaction of tautomers of thioformic acid (TFA), TFA(thiol), and TFA(thione), with hydroxyl radical in the presence and absence of single water molecule acting as a catalyst, is investigated with high-level quantum mechanical calculations at CCSD(T)/6-311++G(2d,2p)//MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p), CCSD(T)/6-311++G(d,p)//DFT/BHandHLYP/6-311++G(d,p), and DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,2p) levels of the theory. A systematic and automated search of the potential energy surface (PES) for the reaction pathways is performed using the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) method that employs an uphill walking technique to search prereaction complexes and transition states. The computations reveal significant lowering of the PES and substantial reduction in the activation energy for the hydrogen abstraction pathway in the presence of water, thereby proving water as an efficient catalyst in the reaction of both the TFA tautomers with OH radical. The hydrogen-bonding interactions are observed to be responsible for the large catalytic effect of water. Notably, in the case of TFA(thiol), formyl hydrogen abstraction is observed to be kinetically more favorable, while acidic hydrogen abstraction is observed to be thermodynamically more feasible. Interestingly, in the case of TFA(thione), reaction pathways involving only formyl hydrogen abstraction were observed to be feasible. The water-catalyzed hydrogen abstraction reaction of TFA with hydroxyl radical, investigated in this work, can provide significant insights into the corresponding reaction in the biological systems.

  5. Chemical Reaction between Boric Acid and Phosphine Indicates Boric Acid as an Antidote for Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Motahareh; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed F.; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aluminium phosphide (AlP) is a fumigant pesticide which protects stored grains from insects and rodents. When it comes into contact with moisture, AlP releases phosphine (PH3), a highly toxic gas. No efficient antidote has been found for AlP poisoning so far and most people who are poisoned do not survive. Boric acid is a Lewis acid with an empty p orbital which accepts electrons. This study aimed to investigate the neutralisation of PH3 gas with boric acid. Methods: This study was carried out at the Baharlou Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, between December 2013 and February 2014. The volume of released gas, rate of gas evolution and changes in pH were measured during reactions of AlP tablets with water, acidified water, saturated boric acid solution, acidified saturated boric acid solution, activated charcoal and acidified activated charcoal. Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the resulting probable adduct between PH3 and boric acid. Results: Activated charcoal significantly reduced the volume of released gas (P <0.01). Although boric acid did not significantly reduce the volume of released gas, it significantly reduced the rate of gas evolution (P <0.01). A gaseous adduct was formed in the reaction between pure AlP and boric acid. Conclusion: These findings indicate that boric acid may be an efficient and non-toxic antidote for PH3 poisoning. PMID:27606109

  6. Chemical Reaction between Boric Acid and Phosphine Indicates Boric Acid as an Antidote for Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Motahareh; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed F.; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aluminium phosphide (AlP) is a fumigant pesticide which protects stored grains from insects and rodents. When it comes into contact with moisture, AlP releases phosphine (PH3), a highly toxic gas. No efficient antidote has been found for AlP poisoning so far and most people who are poisoned do not survive. Boric acid is a Lewis acid with an empty p orbital which accepts electrons. This study aimed to investigate the neutralisation of PH3 gas with boric acid. Methods: This study was carried out at the Baharlou Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, between December 2013 and February 2014. The volume of released gas, rate of gas evolution and changes in pH were measured during reactions of AlP tablets with water, acidified water, saturated boric acid solution, acidified saturated boric acid solution, activated charcoal and acidified activated charcoal. Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the resulting probable adduct between PH3 and boric acid. Results: Activated charcoal significantly reduced the volume of released gas (P <0.01). Although boric acid did not significantly reduce the volume of released gas, it significantly reduced the rate of gas evolution (P <0.01). A gaseous adduct was formed in the reaction between pure AlP and boric acid. Conclusion: These findings indicate that boric acid may be an efficient and non-toxic antidote for PH3 poisoning.

  7. A Comparative Study of French and Turkish Students' Ideas on Acid-Base Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this comparative study was to determine the knowledge that French and Turkish upper secondary-school students (grades 11 and 12) acquire on the concept of acid-base reactions. Following an examination of the relevant curricula and textbooks in the two countries, 528 students answered six written questions about the acid-base concept.…

  8. Benzyl- and 2- and 4-nitrobenzylcyclopropanes and their reaction with organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.N.; Trofimova, E.V.; Mochalov, S.S.; Shabarov, Yu.S.

    1988-12-10

    The nitration of benzylcyclopropane and its transformations in organic acids were studied. Under the conditions of electrophilic nitration the small ring is preserved while the ratio of the o- and p-nitrophenyl derivatives amount to 1.1:1. The reaction of benzylcyclopropane with formic and acetic acids takes place with the addition of the fragments of the acid at the 1,2-bond of the three-carbon ring; o- and p-nitrobenzylcyclopropanes do not react with formic and acetic acids, with trifluoroacetic acid they form trifluoroacetates, and in the case of the ortho-substituted isomer nucleophilic assistance from the nitro group is observed. Significant differences in the behavior of phenylcyclopropane and benzylcyclopropane due to the destruction of the conjugation between the fragments in the molecule are observed in the acid-catalyzed reactions.

  9. [Study of Reaction Dynamics between Bovine Serum Albumin and Folic Acid by Stopped-Flow/Fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Ye, San-xian; Luo, Yun-jing; Qiao, Shu-liang; Li, Li; Liu, Cai-hong; Shi, Jian-long; An, Xue-jing

    2016-01-01

    As a kind of coenzyme of one-carbon enzymes in vivo, folic acid belongs to B vitamins, which can interact with other vitamins and has great significance for converting among amino acids, dividing growth of cells and protein synthesis reactions. Half-life, concentration and reaction rate constant of drugs are important parameters in pharmacokinetic study. In this paper, by utilizing fluorescence spectrophotometer and stopped-flow spectrum analyzer, reaction kinetic parameters between bovine serum albumin(BSA) and folic acid in a bionic system have been investigated, which provide references for parameters of drug metabolism related to folic acid. By using Stern-Volmer equation dealing with fluorescence quenching experiments data, we concluded that under 25, 30, and 37 degrees C, the static quenching constants of folic acid to intrinsic fluorescence from bovine serum albumin were 2.455 x 10(10), 4.900 x 10(10) and 6.427 x 10(10) L x mol(-1) x s(-1) respectively; The results of kinetic reaction rate have shown that the reaction rate of BSA and folic acid are greater than 100 mol x L(-1) x s(-1) at different temperatures, pH and buffering media, illustrating that the quenching mechanism between BSA and folic acid is to form composite static quenching process. Reaction concentration of bovine serum albumin and its initial concentration were equal to the secondary reaction formula, and the correlation coefficient was 0.998 7, while the half-life (t1/2) was 0.059 s at physiological temperature. With the increase of folic acid concentration, the apparent rate constant of this reaction had a linear increasing trend, the BSA fluorescence quenching rate constant catalyzed by folic acid was 3.174 x 10(5) mol x L(-1) x s(-1). Furthermore, with different buffer, the apparent rate constant and reaction rate constant of BSA interacting with folic acid were detected to explore the influence on the reaction under physiological medium, which is of great significance to determine the

  10. [Study of Reaction Dynamics between Bovine Serum Albumin and Folic Acid by Stopped-Flow/Fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Ye, San-xian; Luo, Yun-jing; Qiao, Shu-liang; Li, Li; Liu, Cai-hong; Shi, Jian-long; An, Xue-jing

    2016-01-01

    As a kind of coenzyme of one-carbon enzymes in vivo, folic acid belongs to B vitamins, which can interact with other vitamins and has great significance for converting among amino acids, dividing growth of cells and protein synthesis reactions. Half-life, concentration and reaction rate constant of drugs are important parameters in pharmacokinetic study. In this paper, by utilizing fluorescence spectrophotometer and stopped-flow spectrum analyzer, reaction kinetic parameters between bovine serum albumin(BSA) and folic acid in a bionic system have been investigated, which provide references for parameters of drug metabolism related to folic acid. By using Stern-Volmer equation dealing with fluorescence quenching experiments data, we concluded that under 25, 30, and 37 degrees C, the static quenching constants of folic acid to intrinsic fluorescence from bovine serum albumin were 2.455 x 10(10), 4.900 x 10(10) and 6.427 x 10(10) L x mol(-1) x s(-1) respectively; The results of kinetic reaction rate have shown that the reaction rate of BSA and folic acid are greater than 100 mol x L(-1) x s(-1) at different temperatures, pH and buffering media, illustrating that the quenching mechanism between BSA and folic acid is to form composite static quenching process. Reaction concentration of bovine serum albumin and its initial concentration were equal to the secondary reaction formula, and the correlation coefficient was 0.998 7, while the half-life (t1/2) was 0.059 s at physiological temperature. With the increase of folic acid concentration, the apparent rate constant of this reaction had a linear increasing trend, the BSA fluorescence quenching rate constant catalyzed by folic acid was 3.174 x 10(5) mol x L(-1) x s(-1). Furthermore, with different buffer, the apparent rate constant and reaction rate constant of BSA interacting with folic acid were detected to explore the influence on the reaction under physiological medium, which is of great significance to determine the

  11. Reversible click reactions with boronic acids to build supramolecular architectures in water.

    PubMed

    Arzt, Matthias; Seidler, Christiane; Ng, David Y W; Weil, Tanja

    2014-08-01

    The interaction of boronic acids with various bifunctional reagents offers great potential for the preparation of responsive supramolecular architectures. Boronic acids react with 1,2-diols yielding cyclic boronate esters that are stable at pH>7.4 but can be hydrolyzed at pH<5.0. The phenylboronic acid (PBA)-salicylhydroxamic acid (SHA) system offers ultra-fast reaction kinetics and high binding affinities. This Focus Review summarizes the current advances in exploiting the bioorthogonal interaction of boronic acids to build pH-responsive supramolecular architectures in water.

  12. The Use of Gel Electrophoresis to Study the Reactions of Activated Amino Acids with Oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zieboll, Gerhard; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used gel electrophoresis to study the primary covalent addition of amino acids to oligonu-cleotides or their analogs and the subsequent addition of further molecules of the amino acids to generate peptides covalently linked to the oligonucleotides. We have surveyed the reactions of a variety of amino acids with the phosphoramidates derived from oligonucleotide 5 inches phosphates and ethylenediamine. We find that arginine and amino acids can interact with oligonucleotidesl through stacking interactions react most efficiently. D- and L-amino acids give indistinguishable families of products.

  13. Reaction kinetics of free fatty acids esterification in palm fatty acid distillate using coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Arif; Rochmadi, Wijaya, Karna; Budiman, Arief

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a new strategy of preparing novel carbon-based solid acids has been developed. In this research, the esterification reactions of Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD) with methanol, using coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst from biomass wastes as catalyst, were studied. In this study, the coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalysts were synthesized by sulfonating the coconut shell biochar using concentrated H2SO4. The kinetics of free fatty acid (FFA) esterification in PFAD using a coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst was also studied. The effects of the mass ratio of catalyst to oil (1-10%), the molar ratio of methanol to oil (6:1-12:1), and the reaction temperature (40-60°C) were studied for the conversion of PFAD to optimize the reaction conditions. The results showed that the optimal conditions were an methanol to PFAD molar ratio of 12:1, the amount of catalyst of 10%w, and reaction temperature of 60°C. The proposed kinetic model shows a reversible second order reaction and represents all the experimental data satisfactorily, providing deeper insight into the kinetics of the reaction.

  14. Enantioconvergent Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction of Racemic Alkyne-Dicobalt Complex (Nicholas Reaction) Catalyzed by Chiral Brønsted Acid.

    PubMed

    Terada, Masahiro; Ota, Yusuke; Li, Feng; Toda, Yasunori; Kondoh, Azusa

    2016-08-31

    Catalytic enantioselective syntheses enable a practical approach to enantioenriched molecules. While most of these syntheses have been accomplished by reaction at the prochiral sp(2)-hybridized carbon atom, little attention has been paid to enantioselective nucleophilic substitution at the sp(3)-hybridized carbon atom. In particular, substitution at the chiral sp(3)-hybridized carbon atom of racemic electrophiles has been rarely exploited. To establish an unprecedented enantioselective substitution reaction of racemic electrophiles, enantioconvergent Nicholas reaction of an alkyne-dicobalt complex derived from racemic propargylic alcohol was developed using a chiral phosphoric acid catalyst. In the present enantioconvergent process, both enantiomers of the racemic alcohol were transformed efficiently to a variety of thioethers with high enantioselectivity. The key to achieving success is dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation (DYKAT) of enantiomeric cationic intermediates generated via dehydroxylation of the starting racemic alcohol under the influence of the chiral phosphoric acid catalyst. The present fascinating DYKAT involves the efficient racemization of these enantiomeric intermediates and effective resolution of these enantiomers through utilization of the chiral conjugate base of the phosphoric acid. PMID:27490239

  15. Enantioconvergent Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction of Racemic Alkyne-Dicobalt Complex (Nicholas Reaction) Catalyzed by Chiral Brønsted Acid.

    PubMed

    Terada, Masahiro; Ota, Yusuke; Li, Feng; Toda, Yasunori; Kondoh, Azusa

    2016-08-31

    Catalytic enantioselective syntheses enable a practical approach to enantioenriched molecules. While most of these syntheses have been accomplished by reaction at the prochiral sp(2)-hybridized carbon atom, little attention has been paid to enantioselective nucleophilic substitution at the sp(3)-hybridized carbon atom. In particular, substitution at the chiral sp(3)-hybridized carbon atom of racemic electrophiles has been rarely exploited. To establish an unprecedented enantioselective substitution reaction of racemic electrophiles, enantioconvergent Nicholas reaction of an alkyne-dicobalt complex derived from racemic propargylic alcohol was developed using a chiral phosphoric acid catalyst. In the present enantioconvergent process, both enantiomers of the racemic alcohol were transformed efficiently to a variety of thioethers with high enantioselectivity. The key to achieving success is dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation (DYKAT) of enantiomeric cationic intermediates generated via dehydroxylation of the starting racemic alcohol under the influence of the chiral phosphoric acid catalyst. The present fascinating DYKAT involves the efficient racemization of these enantiomeric intermediates and effective resolution of these enantiomers through utilization of the chiral conjugate base of the phosphoric acid.

  16. Journey through the potential energy surfaces for the isomerization and decomposition reactions of the telluroformaldehyde analogues: H2A═Te and HFA═Te (A = C, Si, and Ge).

    PubMed

    Jaufeerally, Naziah B; Abdallah, Hassan H; Ramasami, Ponnadurai; Schaefer, Henry F

    2013-07-11

    The unavailability of monomeric heavy ketone analogues has been ascribed to the evanescence of the very reactive A═E double bond (A and E are the heavier group 14 and group 16 elements, respectively). Can the isolation of any of the monomeric telluro-ketones be assisted by an energetic favorability on its potential energy surface (PES)? In this light, the reaction pathways for the isomerization and decomposition reactions of H2A═Te and HFA═Te (A = C, Si, and Ge) molecules on their singlet state PES have been studied using second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). The barrier heights reported suggest that telluroformaldehyde, silanetellone, and germatellone are kinetically more resistant to unimolecular reactions than the corresponding lighter chalcogen analogues. However, upon replacing a hydrogen atom by fluorine, the barrier heights of most of the isomerization and decomposition reactions are lowered. Among the unimolecular reactions studied for the H2A═Te and HFA═Te (A = C, Si, and Ge) molecules, the decomposition of cis-FGeTeH into HF and GeTe is found to be the most facile reaction, with a barrier height of only 4.6 kcal/mol. We also predict the ground state telluro-ketones to be viable molecules, as they have no imaginary vibrational frequencies and their lowest vibrational frequencies are always >100 cm(-1). In view of the scarcity of information on the chemistry of the mentioned telluro-ketones, the molecular parameters of various isomers and decomposition products have been reported, and should be useful for future experimental investigations.

  17. Catalyst for sodium chlorate decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Production of oxygen by rapid decomposition of cobalt oxide and sodium chlorate mixture is discussed. Cobalt oxide serves as catalyst to accelerate reaction. Temperature conditions and chemical processes involved are described.

  18. Mechanistic investigation of the uncatalyzed esterification reaction of acetic acid and acid halides with methanol: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Monsurat M; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Honarparvar, Bahareh; Kruger, Hendrik G

    2016-10-01

    Implementation of catalysts to drive reactions from reactants to products remains a burden to synthetic and organic chemists. In spite of investigations into the kinetics and mechanism of catalyzed esterification reactions, less effort has been made to explore the possibility of an uncatalyzed esterification process. Therefore, a comprehensive mechanistic perspective for the uncatalyzed mechanism at the molecular level is presented. Herein, we describe the non-catalyzed esterification reaction of acetic acid and its halide derivatives (XAc, where X= OH, F, Cl, Br, I) with methanol (MeOH) through a concerted process. The reaction in vacuum and methanol was performed using the density functional theory (DFT) method at M06-2X level with def2-TZVP basis set after a careful literature survey and computations. Esterification through cyclic 4- or 6-membered transition state structures in one- or two-step concerted mechanisms were investigated. The present study outlines the possible cyclic geometry conformations that may occur during experiments at simple ratio of reactants. The free energy of activation for acetic acid and acetyl chloride are 36 kcal mol(-1) and 21 kcal mol(-1), respectively. These are in good agreement with available experimental results from the literature. The selected quantum chemical descriptors proved to be useful tools in chemical reactivity prediction for the reaction mechanism. This quantum mechanics study can serve as a necessary step towards revisiting uncatalyzed reaction mechanisms in some classical organic reactions. PMID:27604278

  19. Dual effects of aliphatic carboxylic acids on cresolase and catecholase reactions of mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Gheibi, N; Saboury, A A; Haghbeen, K; Rajaei, F; Pahlevan, A A

    2009-10-01

    Catecholase and cresolase activities of mushroom tyrosinase (MT) were studied in presence of some n-alkyl carboxylic acid derivatives. Catecholase activity of MT achieved its optimal activity in presence of 1.0, 1.25, 2.0, 2.2 and 3.2 mM of pyruvic acid, acrylic acid, propanoic acid, 2-oxo-butanoic acid, and 2-oxo-octanoic acid, respectively. Contrarily, the cresolase activity of MT was inhibited by all type of the above acids. Propanoic acid caused an uncompetitive mode of inhibition (K(i)=0.14 mM), however, the pyruvic, acrylic, 2-oxo-butanoic and 2-oxo-octanoic acids showed a competitive manner of inhibition with the inhibition constants (K(i)) of 0.36, 0.6, 3.6 and 4.5 mM, respectively. So, it seems that, there is a physical difference in the docking of mono- and o-diphenols to the tyrosinase active site. This difference could be an essential determinant for the course of the catalytic cycle. Monophenols are proposed to bind only the oxyform of the tyrosinase. It is likely that the binding of acids occurs through their carboxylate group with one copper ion of the binuclear site. Thus, they could completely block the cresolase reaction, by preventing monophenol binding to the enzyme. From an allosteric point of view, n-alkyl acids may be involved in activation of MT catecholase reactions.

  20. Explosive decomposition of a melamine-cyanuric acid supramolecular assembly for fabricating defect-rich nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes with significantly promoted catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongkui; Dai, Yitao; Ge, Guifang; Wang, Guiru

    2015-05-26

    A facile and scalable approach for fabricating structural defect-rich nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (MCSA-CNTs) through explosive decomposition of melamine-cyanuric acid supramolecular assembly is presented. In comparison to pristine carbon nanotubes, MCSA-CNT exhibits significantly enhanced catalytic performance in oxidant- and steam-free direct dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene, demonstrating the potential for metal-free clean and energy-saving styrene production. This finding also opens a new horizon for preparing highly-efficient carbocatalysts rich in structural defect sites for diverse transformations.

  1. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-01-12

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

  2. Explosive decomposition of a melamine-cyanuric acid supramolecular assembly for fabricating defect-rich nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes with significantly promoted catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongkui; Dai, Yitao; Ge, Guifang; Wang, Guiru

    2015-05-26

    A facile and scalable approach for fabricating structural defect-rich nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (MCSA-CNTs) through explosive decomposition of melamine-cyanuric acid supramolecular assembly is presented. In comparison to pristine carbon nanotubes, MCSA-CNT exhibits significantly enhanced catalytic performance in oxidant- and steam-free direct dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene, demonstrating the potential for metal-free clean and energy-saving styrene production. This finding also opens a new horizon for preparing highly-efficient carbocatalysts rich in structural defect sites for diverse transformations. PMID:25900736

  3. Hydrodynamic instability in the open system of the iodate-arsenous acid reaction.

    PubMed

    Pópity-Tóth, Éva; Pimienta, Véronique; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2013-10-28

    Hydrodynamic instability arising in horizontally propagating vertical chemical fronts leading to the formation of a single stable convection roll is investigated experimentally in the iodate-arsenous acid reaction for various stoichiometry. In the presence of a free surface, the tilted reaction front becomes more elongated due to the evaporation of the surface active iodine and the decrease in the surface tension during the reaction. The experimental conditions are then identified where Marangoni instability represents the driving force for the distortion of the reaction front at the surface.

  4. Activation of stratospheric chlorine by reactions in liquid sulphuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, R.A.; MacKenzie, A.R. ); Mueller, R.H.; Peter, Th.; Crutzen, P.J. )

    1994-06-22

    The authors discuss activation mechanisms for chlorine compounds in the stratosphere, based on laboratory measurements for the solubility and reaction rates of HOCl and HCl in H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] solutions, as found on aerosols in the stratosphere. Their interest is in the impact of the large increase in aerosol loading in the stratosphere in the winter on 1991-92 due to the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. While laboratory data is not available for the temperature range close to 190 K, they argue that should the solubility and hydrolysis rates be high enough, this excess aerosol density could have contributed a significant additional amount of reactive chlorine to the stratosphere.

  5. A novel metabolic activation associated with glutathione in dimethylmonothioarsinic acid (DMMTA(V))-induced toxicity obtained from in vitro reaction of DMMTA(V) with glutathione.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Hidetoshi; Shimoda, Yasuyo; Miura, Motofumi; Kato, Koichi; Yamanaka, Kenzo; Hata, Akihisa; Yamano, Yuko; Endo, Yoko; Endo, Ginji

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the metabolic processing of dimethylmonothioarsinic acid (DMMTA(V)), which is a metabolite of inorganic arsenic and has received a great deal of attention recently due to its high toxicity. The metabolites produced from an in vitro reaction with GSH were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometer (HPLC-TOFMS), HPLC with a photodiode array detector (PDA), and also gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC with a flame photometric detector (FPD). The reaction of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)) with GSH did not generate DMA(V)-SG but did generate dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)) or DMA(III)-SG. On the contrary, we confirmed that the reaction of DMMTA(V) with GSH directly produced the stable complex of DMMTA(V)-SG without reduction through a trivalent dimethylated arsenic such as DMA(III) and DMA(III)-SG. Furthermore, the present study suggests the production of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and dimethylmercaptoarsine (DMA(III)-SH), a trivalent dimethylated arsenic, as well as DMA(III) and DMA(III)-SG in the decomposition process of DMMTA(V)-SG. These results indicate that the toxicity of DMMTA(V) depends not only on the formation of DMA(III) but also on at least those of H2S and DMA(III)-SH. PMID:26653748

  6. Particle growth by acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions of organic carbonyls on preexisting aerosols.

    PubMed

    Jang, Myoseon; Carroll, Brian; Chandramouli, Bharadwaj; Kamens, Richard M

    2003-09-01

    Aerosol growth by the heterogeneous reactions of different aliphatic and alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls in the presence/absence of acidified seed aerosols was studied in a 2 m long flow reactor (2.5 cm i.d.) and a 0.5-m3 Teflon film bag under darkness. For the flow reactor experiments, 2,4-hexadienal, 5-methyl-3-hexen-2-one, 2-cyclohexenone, 3-methyl-2-cyclopentenone, 3-methyl-2-cyclohexenone, and octanal were studied. The carbonyls were selected based on their reactivity for acid-catalyzed reactions, their proton affinity, and their similarity to the ring-opening products from the atmospheric oxidation of aromatics. To facilitate acid-catalyzed heterogeneous hemiacetal/acetal formation, glycerol was injected along with inorganic seed aerosols into the flow reactor system. Carbonyl heterogeneous reactions were accelerated in the presence of acid catalysts (H2SO4), leading to higher aerosol yields than in their absence. Aldehydes were more reactive than ketones for acid-catalyzed reactions. The conjugated functionality also resulted in higher organic aerosol yieldsthan saturated aliphatic carbonyls because conjugation with the olefinic bond increases the basicity of the carbonyl leading to increased stability of the protonated carbonyl. Aerosol population was measured from a series of sampling ports along the length of the flow reactor using a scanning mobility particle sizer. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry of either an impacted liquid aerosol layer or direct reaction of carbonyls as a thin liquid layer on a zinc selenide FTIR disk was employed to demonstrate the direct transformation of chemical functional groups via the acid-catalyzed reactions. These results strongly indicate that atmospheric multifunctional organic carbonyls, which are created by atmospheric photooxidation reactions, can contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation through acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reactions. Exploratory studies in 25- and 190-m3 outdoor chambers

  7. Urea-acetylene dicarboxylic acid reaction: A likely pathway for prebiotic uracil formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaraman, A. S.; Kazi, Z. A.; Choughuley, A. S. U.; Chadha, M. S.

    1980-12-01

    A number of routes have been suggested for the prebiotic synthesis of uracil involving the reaction of urea with malic acid, propiolic acid, cyanoacetylene and others. Cyanoacetylene has been detected in the interstellar medium as well as simulated prebiotic experiments. It is therefore plausible that dicyanoacetylene and its hydrolytic product acetylene dicarboxylic acid, (ADCA) may have played a role in chemical evolution. This aspect has been examined in the present work for the synthesis of uracil from ADCA and urea reaction. It was found that when ADCA reacted with urea, uracil was formed only in the presence of phosphoric acid and phosphates. Ammonium phosphates gave higher yields of uracil than other phosphates. In the absence of phosphoric acid or phosphates no uracil formation took place. This type of synthesis could have taken place in prebiotic oceans which contained ammonium phosphates and other salts.

  8. Interactive effects of cadmium and acid rain on photosynthetic light reaction in soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Chen, Minmin; Wang, Lei; Liang, Chanjuan; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2012-05-01

    Interactive effects of cadmium (Cd(2+)) and acid rain on photosynthetic light reaction in soybean seedlings were investigated under hydroponic conditions. Single treatment with Cd(2+) or acid rain and the combined treatment decreased the content of chlorophyll, Hill reaction rate, the activity of Mg(2+)-ATPase, maximal photochemical efficiency and maximal quantum yield, increased initial fluorescence and damaged the chloroplast structure in soybean seedlings. In the combined treatment, the change in the photosynthetic parameters and the damage of chloroplast structure were stronger than those of any single pollution. Meanwhile, Cd(2+) and acid rain had the interactive effects on the test indices in soybean seedlings. The results indicated that the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain aggravated the toxic effect of the single pollution of Cd(2+) or acid rain on the photosynthetic parameters due to the serious damage to the chloroplast structure.

  9. Preparation of Pd-Co-based nanocatalysts and their superior applications in formic acid decomposition and methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yu-ling; Liu, Ya-cheng; Liang, Fei; Wang, Li-min

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid (FA) and methanol, as convenient hydrogen-containing materials, are most widely used for fuel cells. However, using suitable and low-cost catalysts to further improve their energy performance still is a matter of great significance. Herein, PdCo and PdCo@Pd nanocatalysts (NCs) are successfully prepared by the facile method. Pd 3d binding energy decreases due to the presence of Co. Consequently, PdCo@Pd NCs exhibit high catalytic activity and selectivity toward FA dehydrogenation at room temperature. The gas-generation rate at 30 min is 65.4 L h(-1)  g(-1) . PdCo/C has the worst catalytic performance in this reaction, despite the fact that it has a high gas-generation rate in the initial 30 min. Furthermore, both PdCo and PdCo@Pd NCs have enhanced electrocatalytic performance toward methanol oxidation. Their maximum currents are 966 and 1205 mA mg(-1) , respectively, which is much higher than monometallic Pd/C. PMID:25504901

  10. Ultrasonic and densimetric titration applied for acid-base reactions.

    PubMed

    Burakowski, Andrzej; Gliński, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Classical acoustic acid-base titration was monitored using sound speed and density measurements. Plots of these parameters, as well as of the adiabatic compressibility coefficient calculated from them, exhibit changes with the volume of added titrant. Compressibility changes can be explained and quantitatively predicted theoretically in terms of Pasynski theory of non-compressible hydrates combined with that of the additivity of the hydration numbers with the amount and type of ions and molecules present in solution. It also seems that this development could be applied in chemical engineering for monitoring the course of chemical processes, since the applied experimental methods can be carried out almost independently on the medium under test (harmful, aggressive, etc.).

  11. Formation of aromatic compounds from carbohydrates. X reaction of xylose, glucose, and glucuronic acid in acidic solution at 300C

    SciTech Connect

    Theander, O.; Nelson, D.A.; Hallen, R.T.

    1987-04-01

    For several years our respective groups have investigated the formation of aromatic compounds from carbohydrates in aqueous solution at various pH-values under reflux or hydrothermolytic conditions. For instance, previous papers in this series concerned the degradation of hexoses, pentoses, erythrose, dihydroxyacetone, and hexuronic acids to phenolic and enolic components. Of particular interest were the isolation and identification of catechols, an acetophenone, and chromones from pentoses and hexuronic acids at pH 4.5. The formation of these compounds, as well as reductic acid, was found to be more pronounced than that of 2-furaldehyde under acidic conditions. The aromatic precursors of 3 and 4 were also isolated from these reaction mixtures. This is in contrast to the high yields of 2 obtained from pentoses and hexuronic acids at very low pH.

  12. Influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of acidic, neutral and basic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Chi; Zhao, Xia; Pu, Jiang-Hua; Luan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Monosaccharide composition analysis is important for structural characterization of polysaccharides. To investigate the influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides, we chose alginate, starch, chitosan and chondroitin sulfate as representative of acidic, neutral, basic and complex polysaccharides to compare the release degree of monosaccharides under different hydrolytic conditions. The hydrolysis stability of 10 monosaccharide standards was also explored. Results showed that the basic sugars were hard to release but stable, the acidic sugars (uronic acids) were easy to release but unstable, and the release and stability of neutral sugars were in between acidic and basic sugars. In addition, the hydrolysis process was applied to monosaccharide composition analysis of Hippocampus trimaculatus polysaccharide and the appropriate hydrolytic condition was accorded with that of the above four polysaccharides. Thus, different hydrolytic conditions should be used for the monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides based on their structural characteristics. PMID:27083372

  13. Mechanistic study of secondary organic aerosol components formed from nucleophilic addition reactions of methacrylic acid epoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Miner, C. R.; Mael, L. E.; Elrod, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    Recently, methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) has been proposed as a precursor to an important class of isoprene-derived compounds found in secondary organic aerosol (SOA): 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) and a set of oligomers, nitric acid esters and sulfuric acid esters related to 2-MG. However, the specific chemical mechanisms by which MAE could form these compounds have not been previously studied. In order to determine the relevance of these processes to atmospheric aerosol, MAE and 2-MG have been synthesized and a series of bulk solution-phase experiments aimed at studying the reactivity of MAE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been performed. The present results indicate that the acid-catalyzed MAE reaction is more than 600 times slower than a similar reaction of an important isoprene-derived epoxide, but is still expected to be kinetically feasible in the atmosphere on more acidic SOA. The specific mechanism by which MAE leads to oligomers was identified, and the reactions of MAE with a number of atmospherically relevant nucleophiles were also investigated. Because the nucleophilic strengths of water, sulfate, alcohols (including 2-MG), and acids (including MAE and 2-MG) in their reactions with MAE were found to be of a similar magnitude, it is expected that a diverse variety of MAE + nucleophile product species may be formed on ambient SOA. Thus, the results indicate that epoxide chain reaction oligomerization will be limited by the presence of high concentrations of non-epoxide nucleophiles (such as water); this finding is consistent with previous environmental chamber investigations of the relative humidity-dependence of 2-MG-derived oligomerization processes and suggests that extensive oligomerization may not be likely on ambient SOA because of other competitive MAE reaction mechanisms.

  14. Mechanistic study of secondary organic aerosol components formed from nucleophilic addition reactions of methacrylic acid epoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Miner, C. R.; Mael, L. E.; Elrod, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) has been proposed as a precursor to an important class of isoprene-derived compounds found in secondary organic aerosol (SOA): 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) and a set of oligomers, nitric acid esters, and sulfuric acid esters related to 2-MG. However, the specific chemical mechanisms by which MAE could form these compounds have not been previously studied with experimental methods. In order to determine the relevance of these processes to atmospheric aerosol, MAE and 2-MG have been synthesized and a series of bulk solution-phase experiments aimed at studying the reactivity of MAE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been performed. The present results indicate that the acid-catalyzed MAE reaction is more than 600 times slower than a similar reaction of an important isoprene-derived epoxide, but is still expected to be kinetically feasible in the atmosphere on more acidic SOA. The specific mechanism by which MAE leads to oligomers was identified, and the reactions of MAE with a number of atmospherically relevant nucleophiles were also investigated. Because the nucleophilic strengths of water, sulfate, alcohols (including 2-MG), and acids (including MAE and 2-MG) in their reactions with MAE were found to be of similar magnitudes, it is expected that a diverse variety of MAE + nucleophile product species may be formed on ambient SOA. Thus, the results indicate that epoxide chain reaction oligomerization will be limited by the presence of high concentrations of non-epoxide nucleophiles (such as water); this finding is consistent with previous environmental chamber investigations of the relative humidity dependence of 2-MG-derived oligomerization processes and suggests that extensive oligomerization may not be likely on ambient SOA because of other competitive MAE reaction mechanisms.

  15. Antioxidant effect of non-enzymatic browning reaction products on linoleic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, N.S.K.

    1987-01-01

    In aqueous lysine-sucrose model systems, the effects of reaction time, pH and molar ratio were studied on the formation of non-enzymatic browning reaction (NBR) products. The extent of sucrose hydrolysis was measured and the antioxidant effect of NBR products on linoleic acid emulsions was examined. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra were obtained at various stages of browning. Sucrose produced NMR produces with lysine in an aqueous system at 100/sup 0/C. The C-13 NMR spectra indicated that the NBR started when sucrose and lysine were dissolved in water. The C-13 NMR spectra also showed that heating did not have an effect on the gross composition of polymeric species. The absorbance at 480 nm of 0.75 M lysine-sucrose solution heated up to 6 hours increased with reaction times. The pH values of heated lysine-sucrose solution gradually decreased with reaction time. When 0.75 M sucrose or lysine solution was heated separately up to 6 hours, there were no changes in absorbance in pH. In the pH range of 3.52-6.35, higher absorbance was obtained from heated lysine-sucrose solution at acidic pH levels than at neutral pH levels. As the concentration of lysine and sucrose solution was increased, the absorbance increased. At longer reaction times or acidic pH levels, enhanced hydrolysis of sucrose to reducing sugars resulted in more NBR products. NBR products obtained at a longer reaction time, an acidic pH, and higher concentration of reactants showed a darker brown color and were effective in preventing the formation of peroxides. The oxygen uptake of linoleic acid emulsion having NBR products was smaller than that of linoleic acid emulsion without NBR products. Based on these results, it was concluded that sucrose may act as an antioxidant in processed foods containing both amino acids and lipids.

  16. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  17. A historical note on the iodine-sulphuric acid reaction of amyloid.

    PubMed

    Aterman, K

    1976-10-22

    The historical development of the iodine-sulphuric acid reaction for amyloid is described. The reaction dates back to 1814 when Colin and Gaultier de Claubry, and independently Stromeyer, introduced the iodine reaction for starch. A variant of the acidified iodine reaction appears to have been used for printing paper by Gmelin in 1829, and in 1838 Schleiden used the iodine-sulphuric acid test on plants to demonstrate what he considered to be a transformation of the plant material into starch. Shortly afterwards Payen (1839) defined "cellulose", and the iodine-sulphuric acid reaction became a standard procedure used by botanists to demonstrate this plant component. In 1853 Virchow used Harting's (1847) procedure to demonstrate the reaction of Purkynĕ's corpora amylacea to this test, on the assumption that they might be cellulose derivatives, and applied it to what appeared to be similar corpuscles in a "waxy" spleen. The first histochemical reaction for amyloidosis had thus been introduced into pathology, and continued to exert from that time on an important influence on amyloid research, whose impact is felt to the present day. PMID:791904

  18. Sulfuric, hydrochloric, and nitric acid-catalyzed triacetone triperoxide (TATP) reaction mixtures: an aging study.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Mark; Bilusich, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    The organic peroxide explosive triacetone triperoxide (TATP) is regularly encountered by law enforcement agents in various stages of its production. This study utilizes solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to examine sulfuric acid-, hydrochloric acid-, and nitric acid-catalyzed TATP syntheses during the initial 24 h of these reactions at low temperatures (5-9°C). Additionally, aging of the reaction mixtures was examined at both low and ambient temperatures (19-21°C) for a further 9 days. For each experiment, TATP could be readily identified in the headspace above the reaction mixture 1 h subsequent to the combination of reagents; at 24 h, TATP and diacetone diperoxide (DADP) were prominent. TATP degraded more rapidly than DADP. Additionally, chlorinated acetones chloroacetone and 1,1,-dichloroacetone were identified in the headspace above the hydrochloric acid-catalyzed TATP reaction mixture. These were not present when the catalyst was sulfuric acid or nitric acid. PMID:21595692

  19. Acid-catalyzed heterogeneous reaction of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol with hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qifan; Wang, Weigang; Ge, Maofa

    2015-05-01

    Acid-catalyzed heterogeneous oxidation with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been suggested to be a potential pathway for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from isoprene and its oxidation products. However, knowledge of the chemical mechanism and kinetics for this process is still incomplete. 3-Methyl-2-buten-1-ol (MBO321), an aliphatic alcohol structurally similar to isoprene, is emitted by pine forests and widely used in the manufacturing industries. Herein the uptake of MBO321 into H2SO4-H2O2 mixed solution was investigated using a flow-tube reactor coupled to a mass spectrometer. The reactive uptake coefficients (γ) were acquired for the first time and were found to increase rapidly with increasing acid concentration. Corresponding aqueous-phase reactions were performed to further study the mechanism of this acid-catalyzed reaction. MBO321 could convert to 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO232) and yield isoprene in acidic media. Organic hydroperoxides (ROOHs) were found to be generated through the acid-catalyzed route, which could undergo a rearrangement reaction and result in the formation of acetone and acetaldehyde. Organosulfates, which have been proposed to be SOA tracer compounds in the atmosphere, were also produced during the oxidation process. These results suggest that the heterogeneous acid-catalyzed reaction of MBO321 with H2O2 may contribute to SOA mass under certain atmospheric conditions.

  20. Chemoselective O-acylation of hydroxyamino acids and amino alcohols under acidic reaction conditions: History, scope and applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Amino acids, whether natural, semisynthetic or synthetic, are among the most important and useful chiral building blocks available for organic chemical synthesis. In principle, they can function as inexpensive, chiral and densely functionalized starting materials. On the other hand, the use of amino acid starting materials routinely necessitates protective group chemistry, and in reality, large-scale preparations of even the simplest side-chain derivatives of many amino acids often become annoyingly strenuous due to the necessity of employing protecting groups, on one or more of the amino acid functionalities, during the synthetic sequence. However, in the case of hydroxyamino acids such as hydroxyproline, serine, threonine, tyrosine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), many O-acyl side-chain derivatives are directly accessible via a particularly expedient and scalable method not commonly applied until recently. Direct acylation of unprotected hydroxyamino acids with acyl halides or carboxylic anhydrides under appropriately acidic reaction conditions renders possible chemoselective O-acylation, furnishing the corresponding side-chain esters directly, on multigram-scale, in a single step, and without chromatographic purification. Assuming a certain degree of stability under acidic reaction conditions, the method is also applicable for a number of related compounds, such as various amino alcohols and the thiol-functional amino acid cysteine. While the basic methodology underlying this approach has been known for decades, it has evolved through recent developments connected to amino acid-derived chiral organocatalysts to become a more widely recognized procedure for large-scale preparation of many useful side-chain derivatives of hydroxyamino acids and related compounds. Such derivatives are useful in peptide chemistry and drug development, as amino acid amphiphiles for asymmetric catalysis, and as amino acid acrylic precursors for preparation of

  1. Ligand-Promoted, Boron-Mediated Chemoselective Carboxylic Acid Aldol Reaction.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hideoki; Morita, Yuya; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2016-05-01

    The first carboxylic acid selective aldol reaction mediated by boron compounds and a mild organic base (DBU) was developed. Inclusion of electron-withdrawing groups in the amino acid derivative ligands reacted with BH3·SMe2 forms a boron promoter with increased Lewis acidity at the boron atom and facilitated the carboxylic acid selective enolate formation, even in the presence of other carbonyl groups such as amides, esters, ketones, or aliphatic aldehydes. The remarkable ligand effect led to the broad substrate scope including biologically relevant compounds. PMID:27104352

  2. Is trichloroacetic acid an insufficient sample quencher of redox reactions?

    PubMed

    Curbo, Sophie; Reiser, Kathrin; Rundlöf, Anna-Klara; Karlsson, Anna; Lundberg, Mathias

    2013-03-01

    The global protein thiol pool has been reported to play a major role in the defense against oxidative stress as a redox buffer similar to glutathione. The present study uses a novel method to visualize cellular changes of the global protein thiol pool in response to induced oxidative stress. Unexpectedly, the results showed an uneven distribution of protein thiols in resting cells with no apparent change in their level or distribution in response to diamide as has been reported previously. Further analysis revealed that thiol pool oxidation is artificially high due to insufficient activity of the widely used sample quencher trichloroacetic acid (TCA). This suggests that previously published articles based on TCA as a quencher should be interpreted with caution as TCA could have caused similar artifacts. Overall, the results presented here question the major role for the global thiol pool in the defense against oxidative stress. Instead our hypothesis is that the fraction of proteins involved in response to oxidative stress is much smaller than previously anticipated in support of a fine-tuned cell signaling by redox regulation.

  3. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction products of secondary alkyl... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... substances identified generically as reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction products of secondary alkyl... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... substances identified generically as reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction products of secondary alkyl... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... substances identified generically as reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction products of secondary alkyl... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... substances identified generically as reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  11. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction products of secondary alkyl... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... substances identified generically as reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  13. Theoretical investigations on decomposition of HCOOH catalyzed by Pd7 cluster.

    PubMed

    Li, Song Ju; Zhou, Xin; Tian, Wei Quan

    2012-11-29

    Density functional theory based calculations have been performed to investigate decomposition of HCOOH on a Pd(7) cluster in vacuum and solution. The adsorption of HCOOH on Pd(7) cluster occurs on a layer-by-layer quasi-planar conformation of Pd(7) with 4 atoms on top and 3 atoms below. Possible reaction pathways for the decomposition of HCOOH adsorbed on Pd(7) cluster in vacuum and solution are located and compared in terms of the reaction enengies and barriers. Formic acid prefers to decompose through dehydrogenation rather than dehydrate under the significant effect of solvent. The toxic species, CO generated on Pt surface, could not possibly appear in the catalytic decomposition of formic acid on Pd(7) cluster due to high reaction barrier, thus no poisoning of catalyst would occur on Pd surface. The Pd(7) cluster model rationalizes experimental observation, and the predictions are in good agreement with the ones based on the surface model. PMID:23102058

  14. An experimental study of tissue reaction to hyaluronic acid (Restylane) and polymethylmethacrylate (Metacrill) in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Simone C; Macedo, Jefferson L S; Magalhães, Albino V

    2012-10-01

    The aging skin is a challenge for medical science. Plastic surgeons and dermatologists are called every day to solve problems like filling wrinkles or folds. The material used must be biocompatible because abnormal reactions may cause catastrophic results. This study analyzes the biological behavior of polymethylmethacrylate (Metacrill) and hyaluronic acid (Restylane), using a histopathologic study in mice. A prospective study was performed using 40 mice for each substance: polymethylmethacrylate or hyaluronic acid was injected into the right ear, the left ear been used as a control. Histopathologic analyses of the right ear, liver, and kidney were performed at intervals during the study and revealed the development of a granulomatous reaction with fibrosis and absorption of spheres and signs of liver and kidney sistematization for polymethylmethacrylate. A discrete cellular reaction, with less formation of fibrosis, and no giant cells were seen in the mice injected with hyaluronic acid.

  15. Investigation and application of multiple reactions between molybdoniobium heteropoly acid and di- or trimethylthionines

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoyam, F.B.; Karapetyan, A.A.

    1986-03-01

    This paper presents the results of the study and use of reactions of molybdoniobic acid (MNA) with di- and trimethylthiones (DMT and TMT, respectively). It was found that light absorption of acetone solutions of the products of outer-sphere interaction between MNA and DMT or TMT enabled the determination of optimum acidity for MNA formation. Reaction between TMT and MNA gives two different compounds containing two and five associated dye cations, different in molar extinction coefficient and optimum reaction acidity (pH 0.05-0.25 and 0.35-0.90). Formation of the 6th and 8th molybdenum series with an identical composition of the outer sphere is shown. A highly sensitive photometric method for determining niobium has been developed.

  16. Theoretical stusy of the reaction between 2,2',4' - trihydroxyazobenzene-5-sulfonic acid and zirconium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, Mary H.

    1960-01-01

    Zirconium reacts with 2,2',4'-trihydroxyazobenzene-5-sulfonic acid in acid solutions to Form two complexes in which the ratios of dye to zirconium are 1 to 1 and 2 to 1. Both complexes are true chelates, with zirconium acting as a bridge between the two orthohydroxy dye groups. Apparent equilibrium constants for the reactions to form each of the complexes are determined. The reactions are used as a basis for the determination of the active component in the dye and a graphical method for the determination of reagent purity is described. Four absorption spectra covering the wave length region from 350 to 750 mu are given, which completely define the color system associated with the reactions in solutions where the hydrochloric acid concentration ranges from 0.0064N to about 7N.

  17. Characterization of the esterification reaction in high free fatty acid oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altic, Lucas Eli Porter

    Energy and vegetable oil prices have caused many biodiesel producers to turn to waste cooking oils as feedstocks. These oils contain high levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) which make them difficult or impossible to convert to biodiesel by conventional production methods. Esterification is required for ultra-high FFA feedstocks such as Brown Grease. In addition, ultrasonic irradiation has the potential to improve the kinetics of the esterification reaction. 2-level, multi-factor DOE experiments were conducted to characterize the esterification reaction in ultra-high FFA oils as well as determine whether ultrasonic irradiation gives any benefit besides energy input. The study determined that sulfuric acid content had the greatest effect followed by temperature and water content (inhibited reaction). Methanol content had no effect in the range studied. A small interaction term existed between sulfuric acid and temperature. The study also concluded that sonication did not give any additional benefit over energy input.

  18. An Investigation of Solid-State Amidization and Imidization Reactions in Vapor Deposited Poly (amic acid)

    SciTech Connect

    Anthamatten, M; Letts, S A; Day, K; Cook, R C; Gies, A P; Hamilton, T P; Nonidez, W K

    2004-06-28

    The condensation polymerization reaction of 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA) with pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) to form poly(amic acid) and the subsequent imidization reaction to form polyimide were investigated for films prepared using vapor deposition polymerization techniques. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of films at different temperatures indicate that additional solid-state polymerization occurs prior to imidization reactions. Experiments reveal that, upon vapor deposition, poly(amic acid) oligomers form that have a number-average molecular weight of about 1500 Daltons. Between 100 - 130 C these chains undergo additional condensation reaction to form slightly higher molecular weight oligomers. Calorimetry measurements show that this reaction is exothermic ({Delta}H {approx} -30 J/g) with an activation energy of about 120 kJ/mol. Experimental reaction enthalpies are compared to results from ab initio molecular modeling calculations to estimate the number of amide groups formed. At higher temperatures (150 - 300 C) imidization of amide linkages occurs as an endothermic reaction ({Delta}H {approx} +120 J/g) with an activation energy of about 130 kJ/mol. Solid-state kinetics were found to depend on reaction conversion as well as the processing conditions used to deposit films.

  19. Oxygen dependency of one-electron reactions generating ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide from ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the two separate one-electron reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid was investigated. The rate of ascorbate radical (Asc(-)) formation (and stability) was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. A product of ascorbic acid oxidation was measurable levels of hydrogen peroxide, as high as 32.5 μM from 100 μM ascorbic acid. Evidence for a feedback mechanism where hydrogen peroxide generated during the oxidation of ascorbic acid accelerates further oxidation of ascorbic acid is also presented. The second one-electron oxidation reaction of ascorbic acid leading to the disappearance of Asc(-) was also strongly inhibited in samples flushed with argon. In the range of 0.05-1.2 mM ascorbic acid, maximum levels of measurable hydrogen peroxide were achieved with an initial concentration of 0.2 mM ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide generation was greatly diminished at ascorbic acid levels of 0.8 mM or above.

  20. Mechanism of silver- and copper-catalyzed decarboxylation reactions of aryl carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Xue, Liqin; Su, Weiping; Lin, Zhenyang

    2011-11-28

    Silver- and copper-catalyzed decarboxylation reactions of aryl carboxylic acids were investigated with the aid of density functional theory calculations. The reaction mechanism starts with a carboxylate complex of silver or copper. Decarboxylation occurs via ejecting CO(2) from the carboxylate complex followed by protodemetallation with an aryl carboxylic acid molecule to regenerate the starting complex. Our results indicated that the primary factor to affect the overall reaction barriers is the ortho steric destabilization effect on the starting carboxylate complexes for most cases. Certain ortho substituents that are capable of coordinating with the catalyst metal center without causing significant ring strain stabilize the decarboxylation transition states and reduce the overall reaction barriers. However, the coordination effect is found to be the secondary factor when compared with the ortho effect. PMID:21979246

  1. 40 CFR 721.10189 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Substances § 721.10189 Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acids, tall-oil,...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10189 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Substances § 721.10189 Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acids, tall-oil,...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10189 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Substances § 721.10189 Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acids, tall-oil,...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10189 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Substances § 721.10189 Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acids, tall-oil,...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10189 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Substances § 721.10189 Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acids, tall-oil,...

  6. Investigation of the complex reaction coordinate of acid catalyzed amide hydrolysis from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-05-01

    The rate-determining step of acid catalyzed peptide hydrolysis is the nucleophilic attack of a water molecule to the carbon atom of the amide group. Therein the addition of the hydroxyl group to the amide carbon atom involves the association of a water molecule transferring one of its protons to an adjacent water molecule. The protonation of the amide nitrogen atom follows as a separate reaction step. Since the nucleophilic attack involves the breaking and formation of several bonds, the underlying reaction coordinate is rather complex. We investigate this reaction step from path sampling Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations. This approach does not require the predefinition of reaction coordinates and is thus particularly suited for investigating reaction mechanisms. From our simulations the most relevant components of the reaction coordinate are elaborated. Though the C⋯O distance of the oxygen atom of the water molecule performing the nucleophilic attack and the corresponding amide carbon atom is a descriptor of the reaction progress, a complete picture of the reaction coordinate must include all three molecules taking part in the reaction. Moreover, the proton transfer is found to depend on favorable solvent configurations. Thus, also the arrangement of non-reacting, i.e. solvent water molecules needs to be considered in the reaction coordinate.

  7. Reversible ring-opening reactions of nimetazepam and nitrazepam in acidic media at body temperature.

    PubMed

    Inotsume, N; Nakano, M

    1980-11-01

    Hydrolytic reactions of nimetazepam and nitrazepam in acidic solutions at body temperature were studied spectrophotometrically. The open-ring compounds produced by hydrolysis were in equilibrium with the corresponding closed-ring compounds (protonated nimetazepam and nitrazepam). Forward-reaction rate constants of both drugs were greater than the rate constant of diazepam. In nimetazepam, the forward-reaction rate constant was smaller than the reverse-reaction rate constant; in nitrazepam, the reverse-reaction rate constant was much smaller than the forward-reaction rate constant, and possible amide bond cleavage was indicated. The activation energies of the forward and reverse reactions of nimetazepam and the forward reaction of nitrazepam were calculated from Arrhenius-type plots, whereas no clear temperature dependency was observed in the reverse-reaction rate constant of nitrazepam. The effect of pH on these reactions also was examined. In addition, the pKa values of nimetazepam and nitrazepam were calculated to be 2.53 and 2.77, respectively.

  8. Enantioselective aldol reaction between isatins and cyclohexanone catalyzed by amino acid sulphonamides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Qi; Hao, Qing; Sun, Yanhua; Luo, Yiming; Yang, Hua

    2015-04-01

    Sulphonamides derived from primary α-amino acid were successfully applied to catalyze the aldol reaction between isatin and cyclohexanone under neat conditions. More interestingly, molecular sieves, as privileged additives, were found to play a vital role in achieving high enantioselectivity. Consequently, high yields (up to 99%) along with good enantioselectivities (up to 92% ee) and diastereoselectivities (up to 95:5 dr) were obtained. In addition, this reaction was also conveniently scaled up, demonstrating the applicability of this protocol.

  9. Coupling of hydrologic transport and chemical reactions in a stream affected by acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, B.A.; Broshears, R.E.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream, examined the coupling of hydrologic transport to chemical reactions affecting metal concentrations. Injection of LiCl as a conservative tracer was used to determine discharge and residence time along a 1497-m reach. Transport of metals downstream from inflows of acidic, metal-rich water was evaluated based on synoptic samples of metal concentrations and the hydrologic characteristics of the stream. Transport of SO4 and Mn was generally conservative, but in the subreaches most affected by acidic inflows, transport was reactive. Both 0.1-??m filtered and particulate Fe were reactive over most of the stream reach. Filtered Al partitioned to the particulate phase in response to high instream concentrations. Simulations that accounted for the removal of SO4, Mn, Fe, and Al with first-order reactions reproduced the steady-state profiles. The calculated rate constants for net removal used in the simulations embody several processes that occur on a stream-reach scale. The comparison between rates of hydrologie transport and chemical reactions indicates that reactions are only important over short distances in the stream near the acidic inflows, where reactions occur on a comparable time scale with hydrologic transport and thus affect metal concentrations.

  10. Kinetics and Quantitative Structure—Activity Relationship Study on the Degradation Reaction from Perfluorooctanoic Acid to Trifluoroacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure–activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure–activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure–activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1–C2 (RC1–C2 and EC1–C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated. PMID:25196516

  11. Kinetics and quantitative structure-activity relationship study on the degradation reaction from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-08-14

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure-activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure-activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure-activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1-C2 (RC1-C2 and EC1-C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated.

  12. Acid-base chemical reaction model for nucleation rates in the polluted atmospheric boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Modi; Titcombe, Mari; Jiang, Jingkun; Jen, Coty; Kuang, Chongai; Fischer, Marc L; Eisele, Fred L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Hanson, David R; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H

    2012-11-13

    Climate models show that particles formed by nucleation can affect cloud cover and, therefore, the earth's radiation budget. Measurements worldwide show that nucleation rates in the atmospheric boundary layer are positively correlated with concentrations of sulfuric acid vapor. However, current nucleation theories do not correctly predict either the observed nucleation rates or their functional dependence on sulfuric acid concentrations. This paper develops an alternative approach for modeling nucleation rates, based on a sequence of acid-base reactions. The model uses empirical estimates of sulfuric acid evaporation rates obtained from new measurements of neutral molecular clusters. The model predicts that nucleation rates equal the sulfuric acid vapor collision rate times a prefactor that is less than unity and that depends on the concentrations of basic gaseous compounds and preexisting particles. Predicted nucleation rates and their dependence on sulfuric acid vapor concentrations are in reasonable agreement with measurements from Mexico City and Atlanta. PMID:23091030

  13. Acid-base chemical reaction model for nucleation rates in the polluted atmospheric boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Modi; Titcombe, Mari; Jiang, Jingkun; Jen, Coty; Kuang, Chongai; Fischer, Marc L; Eisele, Fred L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Hanson, David R; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H

    2012-11-13

    Climate models show that particles formed by nucleation can affect cloud cover and, therefore, the earth's radiation budget. Measurements worldwide show that nucleation rates in the atmospheric boundary layer are positively correlated with concentrations of sulfuric acid vapor. However, current nucleation theories do not correctly predict either the observed nucleation rates or their functional dependence on sulfuric acid concentrations. This paper develops an alternative approach for modeling nucleation rates, based on a sequence of acid-base reactions. The model uses empirical estimates of sulfuric acid evaporation rates obtained from new measurements of neutral molecular clusters. The model predicts that nucleation rates equal the sulfuric acid vapor collision rate times a prefactor that is less than unity and that depends on the concentrations of basic gaseous compounds and preexisting particles. Predicted nucleation rates and their dependence on sulfuric acid vapor concentrations are in reasonable agreement with measurements from Mexico City and Atlanta.

  14. Determination of Free Fatty Acids and Triglycerides by Gas Chromatography Using Selective Esterification Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kail, Brian W; Link, Dirk D; Morreale, Bryan D

    2012-11-01

    A method for selectively determining both free fatty acids (FFA) and triacylglycerides (TAGs) in biological oils was investigated and optimized using gas chromatography after esterification of the target species to their corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The method used acid catalyzed esterification in methanolic solutions under conditions of varying severity to achieve complete conversion of more reactive FFAs while preserving the concentration of TAGs. Complete conversion of both free acids and glycerides to corresponding FAMEs was found to require more rigorous reaction conditions involving heating to 120°C for up to 2 h. Method validation was provided using gas chromatography–flame ionization detection, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The method improves on existing methods because it allows the total esterified lipid to be broken down by FAMEs contributed by FFA compared to FAMEs from both FFA and TAGs. Single and mixed-component solutions of pure fatty acids and triglycerides, as well as a sesame oil sample to simulate a complex biological oil, were used to optimize the methodologies. Key parameters that were investigated included: HCl-to-oil ratio, temperature and reaction time. Pure free fatty acids were found to esterify under reasonably mild conditions (10 min at 50°C with a 2.1:1 HCl to fatty acid ratio) with 97.6 ± 2.3% recovery as FAMEs, while triglycerides were largely unaffected under these reaction conditions. The optimized protocol demonstrated that it is possible to use esterification reactions to selectively determine the free acid content, total lipid content, and hence, glyceride content in biological oils. This protocol also allows gas chromatography analysis of FAMEs as a more ideal analyte than glyceride species in their native state.

  15. Identification of hydroxycinnamic acid-maillard reaction products in low-moisture baking model systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Deshou; Chiaro, Christopher; Maddali, Pranav; Prabhu, K Sandeep; Peterson, Devin G

    2009-11-11

    The chemistry and fate of hydroxycinnamic acids (ferulic, p-coumeric, caffeic, sinapic, and cinnamic acid) in a glucose/glycine simulated baking model (10% moisture at 200 degrees C for 15 min) were investigated. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of glucose/glycine and glucose/glycine/hydroxycinnamic acid model systems confirmed the phenolics reacted with Maillard intermediates; two main reaction product adducts were reported. On the basis of isotopomeric analysis, LC-MS, and NMR spectroscopy, structures of two ferulic acid-Maillard reaction products were identified as 6-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-5-(hydroxymethyl)-8-oxabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one (adduct I) and 2-(6-(furan-2-yl)-7-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1-methyl-3-oxo-2,5-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-5-en-2-yl)acetic acid (adduct II). In addition, a pyrazinone-type Maillard product, 2-(5-(furan-2-yl)-6-methyl-2-oxopyrazin-1(2H)-yl) acetic acid (IIa), was identified as an intermediate for reaction product adduct II, whereas 3-deoxy-2-hexosulose was identified as an intermediate of adduct I. Both adducts I and II were suggested to be generated by pericyclic reaction mechanisms. Quantitative gas chromatography (GC) analysis and liquid chromatography (LC) also indicated that the addition of ferulic acid to a glucose/glycine model significantly reduced the generation of select Maillard-type aroma compounds, such as furfurals, methylpyrazines, 2-acetylfuran, 2-acetylpyridine, 2-acetylpyrrole, and cyclotene as well as inhibited color development in these Maillard models. In addition, adducts I and II suppressed the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated expression of two prototypical pro-inflammatory genes, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, in an in vitro murine macrophage model; ferulic acid reported negligible activity.

  16. The role of boronic acids in accelerating condensation reactions of α-effect amines with carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Gillingham, Dennis

    2016-08-10

    A broad palette of bioconjugation reactions are available for chemical biologists, but an area that still requires investigation is high-rate constant reactions. These are indispensable in certain applications, particularly for in vivo labelling. Appropriately positioned boronic acids accelerate normally sluggish Schiff base condensations of α-effect nucleophiles by five orders of magnitude - providing a new entry to the rare set of reactions that have a rate constant above 100 M(-1) s(-1) under physiological conditions. I summarize here a number of recent reports, including work from my own group, and outline a mechanistic picture that explains the differing behaviour of seemingly similar substrate classes.

  17. Effect of amino acids on the formation of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in creatinine/phenylalanine and creatinine/phenylalanine/4-oxo-2-nonenal reaction mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Rosario; Alcón, Esmeralda; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2013-12-15

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) formation in mixtures of creatinine, phenylalanine, amino acids and 4-oxo-2-nonenal was studied, to analyse the role of amino acids on the generation of this heterocyclic aromatic amine. When oxidised lipid was absent, cysteine, serine, aspartic acid, threonine, asparagine, tryptophan, tyrosine, proline, and methionine increased significantly (p < 0.05) the amount of PhIP formed in comparison to the control. When lipid was present, only the addition of methionine, glycine, and serine increased significantly (p < 0.05) the amount of PhIP produced, while histidine, cysteine, lysine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and alanine reduced significantly (p < 0.05) PhIP. These results may be a consequence of the different competitive reactions that occur. Thus, in the absence of lipids, thermal decomposition of the amino acids produced reactive carbonyls that converted phenylalanine into phenylacetaldehyde as a key step in the formation of PhIP. When oxidised lipid was present, amino acids competed with phenylalanine for the lipid, and amino acid degradation products were formed, among which alpha-keto acids seemed to play a role in these reactions. These results suggest that PhIP can be produced by several alternative reaction pathways from all major food components, including amino acids and lipids, in addition to carbohydrates. PMID:23993611

  18. Effect of amino acids on the formation of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in creatinine/phenylalanine and creatinine/phenylalanine/4-oxo-2-nonenal reaction mixtures.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Rosario; Alcón, Esmeralda; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2013-12-15

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) formation in mixtures of creatinine, phenylalanine, amino acids and 4-oxo-2-nonenal was studied, to analyse the role of amino acids on the generation of this heterocyclic aromatic amine. When oxidised lipid was absent, cysteine, serine, aspartic acid, threonine, asparagine, tryptophan, tyrosine, proline, and methionine increased significantly (p < 0.05) the amount of PhIP formed in comparison to the control. When lipid was present, only the addition of methionine, glycine, and serine increased significantly (p < 0.05) the amount of PhIP produced, while histidine, cysteine, lysine, tryptophan, tyrosine, and alanine reduced significantly (p < 0.05) PhIP. These results may be a consequence of the different competitive reactions that occur. Thus, in the absence of lipids, thermal decomposition of the amino acids produced reactive carbonyls that converted phenylalanine into phenylacetaldehyde as a key step in the formation of PhIP. When oxidised lipid was present, amino acids competed with phenylalanine for the lipid, and amino acid degradation products were formed, among which alpha-keto acids seemed to play a role in these reactions. These results suggest that PhIP can be produced by several alternative reaction pathways from all major food components, including amino acids and lipids, in addition to carbohydrates.

  19. Dissolution of acidic and basic compounds from the rotating disk: influence of convective diffusion and reaction.

    PubMed

    McNamara, D P; Amidon, G L

    1986-09-01

    A mass transfer model was developed to describe the dissolution and reaction of acidic and basic compounds from a rotating disk in unbuffered water. Dissolution of two carboxylic acids, 2-naphthoic acid (1) and naproxen [(+)-6-methoxy-alpha-methyl-2-naphthaleneacetic acid, 2], and the free base, papaverine (6,7-dimethoxy-1-veratrylisoquinoline, 3), in aqueous solutions (mu = 0.1 with KCI) at 25 degrees C were investigated. An automated dissolution apparatus, which consisted of microcomputer-controlled autoburets, was constructed to monitor and adjust the pH of the aqueous solutions during the experiments. Unique features of the mass transfer model include treatment of mass transfer as a convective diffusion process rather than a stagnant film diffusion only process; treatment of ionization and acid-base reactions as heterogeneous reactions; use of experimental diffusion coefficients for all species, particularly H+ and OH-; and application of boundary conditions that specify flux for surface ionization produced species. The model accurately predicted the dissolution rate assuming the solubility, pKa, and diffusion coefficient of the compound were independently known. The model also predicted pH at the solid-liquid surface, the flux of H+ from the surface, and the contribution of A- to the total acid flux as a function of bulk pH of the aqueous solution. PMID:3783452

  20. Palm fatty acid biodiesel: process optimization and study of reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Praveen K S; Singh, Onkar; Singh, R P

    2010-01-01

    The relatively high cost of refined oils render the resulting fuels unable to compete with petroleum derived fuel. In this study, biodiesel is prepared from palm fatty acid (PFA) which is a by-product of palm oil refinery. The process conditions were optimized for production of palm fatty acid methyl esters. A maximum conversion of 94.4% was obtained using two step trans-esterification with 1:10 molar ratio of oil to methanol at 65°C. Sulfuric acid and Sodium hydroxide were used as acid and base catalyst respectively. The composition of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) obtained was similar to that of palm oil. The biodiesel produced met the established specifications of biodiesel of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). The kinetics of the trans-esterification reaction was also studied and the data reveals that the reaction is of first order in fatty acid and methanol (MeOH) and over all the reaction is of second order. PMID:20972357

  1. Evaluation of Hanford high level waste vitrification chemistry for an NCAW simulant -- FY 1994: Potential exothermic reactions in the presence of formic acid, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Sills, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    A potential for an uncontrollable exothermic reaction between nitrate and organic salts during preparation of a high level waste melter feed has been identified. In order to examine this potential more closely, the thermal behavior of simulated neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) treated with various organic reductants was studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were collected on simulated waste samples and their supernates treated with organics. Organic reductants used were formic acid, glycolic acid, and oxalic acid. For comparison, samples of untreated simulant and untreated simulant with added noble metals were tested. When heated, untreated simulant samples both with and without noble metals showed no exothermic behavior. All of the treated waste simulant samples showed exothermic behavior. Onset temperatures of exothermic reactions were 120 C to 210 C. Many onset temperatures, particularly those for formic acid treated samples, are well below 181 C, the estimated maximum steam coil temperature (considered to be a worst case maximum temperature for chemical process tank contents). The enthalpies of the reactions were {minus}180 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} J/Kg supernate ({minus}181 J/g) for the oxalic acid treated simulant supernate to {minus}1,150 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} J/Kg supernate ({minus}1,153 J/g) for the formic acid treated simulant supernate.

  2. Ascorbic acid-induced crosslinking of lens proteins: evidence supporting a Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Ortwerth, B J; Olesen, P R

    1988-08-31

    The incubation of calf lens extracts with 20 mM ascorbic acid under sterile conditions for 8 weeks caused extensive protein crosslinking, which was not observed with either 20 mM sorbitol or 20 mM glucose. While no precipitation was observed, ascorbic acid did induce the formation of high-molecular-weight protein aggregates as determined by Agarose A-5m chromatography. Proteins modified by ascorbic acid bound strongly to a boronate affinity column, however, crosslinked proteins were present mainly in the unbound fraction. These observations suggest that the cis-diol groups of ascorbic acid were present in the primary adduct, but were either lost during the crosslinking reaction or sterically hindered from binding to the column matrix. The amino acid composition of the ascorbic acid-modified proteins was identical to controls except for a 15% decrease in lysine. Amino acid analysis after borohydride reduction, however, showed a 25% decrease in lysine, a 7% decrease in arginine and an additional peak which eluted between phenylalanine and histidine. Extensive browning occurred during the ascorbic acid-modification reaction. This resulted in protein-bound chromophores with a broad absorption spectrum from 300 to 400 nm, and protein-bound fluorophores with excitation/emission maxima of 350/450 nm. A 4 week incubation of dialyzed crude lens extract with [1-14C]ascorbic acid showed increased incorporation for 2 weeks, followed by a decrease over the next 2 weeks as crosslinking was initiated. The addition of cyanoborohydride to the reaction mixture completely inhibited crosslinking and increased [1-14C]ascorbic acid incorporation to a plateau value of 180 nmol per mg protein. Amino acid analysis showed a 50% loss of lysine, and 8% decrease in arginine and the presence of a new peak which eluted slightly earlier than methionine. These data are consistent with the non-enzymatic glycation of lens proteins by either ascorbic acid or an oxidation product of ascorbic acid via

  3. A study of the metal binding capacity of saccharinic acids formed during the alkali catalysed decomposition of cellulosic materials: nickel complexation by glucoisosaccharinic acids and xyloisosaccharinic acids.

    PubMed

    Almond, Michael; Belton, Daniel; Humphreys, Paul N; Laws, Andrew P

    2016-06-01

    The stoichiometry of the metal complexes formed between nickel and the ligand β-glucoisosaccharinic acid (β-GISA) and a racemic mixture of enantiomers of xyloisosaccharinic acid (XISA) has been determined at both neutral and alkaline pHs. Bjerrum plots, Job's plots and conductance measurements indicated that for each of the systems one to one Ni(ligand) complexes were formed at near neutral pHs (<7.5). At intermediate alkaline pHs (7.5-13) there is evidence to support the formation and precipitation of Ni2(ligand)(OH)3 complexes, finally, at high pH (>13) sparingly soluble Ni2(ligand)(OH)4 complexes were formed. The stability constants for the Ni(β-GISA), Ni(α-GISA) and Ni(XISA) complexes formed at neutral pH were determined under identical conditions using polarographic studies. The measured stability constants for Ni(β-GISA) (log10 β = 1.94 ± 0.15) and for Ni(α-GISA)(log10 β = 2.07 ± 0.13) are very similar; the value measured for the Ni(XISA) complex (log10 β = 0.83) was an order of magnitude smaller. The stability constants for the Ni2(Ligand)(OH)4 complexes formed at highly alkaline pHs were determined using the Schubert method. The measured stability constant for Ni2(β-GISA)(OH)4 (log10 β = 30.6 ± 0.5) was an order of magnitude bigger than the value for Ni2(α-GISA)(OH)4 (log10 β = 29.0 ± 0.5) measured under identical conditions. Attempts to measure the stability constant for Ni2(XISA)(OH)4 were unsuccessful; Ni2(XISA)(OH)4 complexes were not present in significant amounts at high pH to allow the log10β value to be determined by the Schubert method. PMID:27107221

  4. Simulated acid rain alters litter decomposition and enhances the allelopathic potential of the invasive plant Wedelia trilobata (Creeping Daisy)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive species and acid rain cause global environmental problems. Limited information exists, however, concerning the effects of acid rain on the invasiveness of these plants. For example, creeping daisy, an invasive exotic allelopathic weed, has caused great damage in southern China where acid ra...

  5. Polyol-acid anhydride-n-alkyl-alkylene diamine reaction product and motor fuel composition containing same

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, R.L.; Jenkins, R.H. Jr.

    1987-02-17

    A fuel composition for an internal combustion engine comprising: (a) a major portion of a liquid hydrocarbon fuel and (b) a minor amount, as a deposit inhibitor additive, of a reaction product of a process comprising: (i) reacting a dibasic acid anhydride with a polyol, thereby forming an ester of maleic acid; (ii) reacting the ester of maleic acid with an N-alkyl-alkylene diamine, thereby forming the reaction product; and (iii) recovering the reaction product.

  6. Synthesis of ortho acid ester-type 1,3-dioxolanofullerenes: radical reaction of [60]fullerene with halocarboxylic acids promoted by lead(IV) acetate.

    PubMed

    You, Xun; Li, Fa-Bao; Wang, Guan-Wu

    2014-11-21

    A lead(IV) acetate-promoted radical reaction of [60]fullerene with halocarboxylic acids has been exploited to synthesize rare ortho acid ester-type 1,3-dioxolanofullerenes, the hydroxyl group of which can be further transformed to an ester or ether group. Intriguingly, an ortho acid ester-type 1,3-dioxolanofullerene can also be converted to a 1,4-dioxanonofullerene in the presence of a base or manipulated to another ortho acid ester-type 1,3-dioxolanofullerene by reaction with a stronger halocarboxylic acid. Moreover, two possible reaction pathways leading to the observed products are also proposed.

  7. Lewis acid promoted highly diastereoselective Petasis Borono-Mannich reaction: efficient synthesis of optically active β,γ-unsaturated α-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Xu, Ming-Hua

    2012-04-20

    An efficient and straightforward method for the preparation of highly enantiomerically enriched β,γ-unsaturated α-amino acid derivatives by a Lewis acid promoted diastereoselective Petasis reaction of vinylboronic acid, N-tert-butanesulfinamide, and glyoxylic acid has been developed. The synthetic utilities of the approach were demonstrated by the rapid and convenient construction of challenging cyclopenta[c]proline derivatives.

  8. A general method for preparing lanthanide oxide nanoparticles via thermal decomposition of lanthanide(III) complexes with 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid and hydrazine ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimalagandhi, Karuppannan; Premkumar, Thathan; Vairam, Sundararajan

    2016-09-01

    Six new lanthanide(III) complexes (i.e., [Ln(L)2(NA)1.5]·3H2O, where Ln=La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), and Ce(III) and L and NA indicate N2H4 and C10H6(1-O)(2-COO), respectively) with 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid [C10H6(1-O)(2-COOH)] and hydrazine (N2H4) as co-ligands were characterized by elemental, FTIR, UV-visible, and XRD techniques. In the FT-IR spectra, the N-N stretching frequency in the range of 981-949 cm-1 demonstrates evidence of the presence of coordinated N2H4, indicating the bidentate bridging nature of hydrazine in the complexes. These complexes show symmetric and asymmetric COO- stretching from 1444 to 1441 cm-1 and 1582 to 1557 cm-1, respectively, indicating bidentate coordination. TG-DTA studies revealed that the compounds underwent endothermic dehydration from 98 to 110 °C. This was followed by the exothermic decomposition of oxalate intermediates to yield the respective metal oxides as the end products. From SEM images, the average size of the metal oxide particles prepared by thermal decomposition of the complexes was determined to be 39-42 nm. The powder X-ray and SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) studies revealed the presence of the respective nano-sized metal oxides. The kinetic parameters of the decomposition of the complexes were calculated using the Coats-Redfern equation.

  9. Enhanced visible-light photocatalytic decomposition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid over ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Pengxiang; Yao, Jinhua; Chen, Huan; Jiang, Fang; Xie, Xianchuan

    2016-11-01

    ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 heterojunction photocatalyst was successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal method and applied to visible-light photocatalytic decomposition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) from aqueous phase. The flower-like ZnIn2S4 particles were dispersed on the surface of g-C3N4 nanosheets in the ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite. The composite showed higher separation rate of electron-hole pairs as compared to ZnIn2S4 and g-C3N4. Consequently, the ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite exhibited enhanced visible light photocatalytic decomposition efficiency of 2,4-D, within 20% ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite owning the highest photocatalytic efficiency and initial rate. The initial rates of 2,4-D degradation on g-C3N4, ZnIn2S4, and 20% ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 were 1.23, 0.57 and 3.69mmol/(gcath), respectively. The h(+) and O2(-) were found to be the dominant active species for 2,4-D decomposition. The photocatalytic degradation pathways of 2,4-D by ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 under visible light irradiation were explored. The ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite displayed high photostability in recycling tests, reflecting its promising potential as an effective visible light photocatalyst for 2,4-D treatment.

  10. Enhanced visible-light photocatalytic decomposition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid over ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Pengxiang; Yao, Jinhua; Chen, Huan; Jiang, Fang; Xie, Xianchuan

    2016-11-01

    ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 heterojunction photocatalyst was successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal method and applied to visible-light photocatalytic decomposition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) from aqueous phase. The flower-like ZnIn2S4 particles were dispersed on the surface of g-C3N4 nanosheets in the ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite. The composite showed higher separation rate of electron-hole pairs as compared to ZnIn2S4 and g-C3N4. Consequently, the ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite exhibited enhanced visible light photocatalytic decomposition efficiency of 2,4-D, within 20% ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite owning the highest photocatalytic efficiency and initial rate. The initial rates of 2,4-D degradation on g-C3N4, ZnIn2S4, and 20% ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 were 1.23, 0.57 and 3.69mmol/(gcath), respectively. The h(+) and O2(-) were found to be the dominant active species for 2,4-D decomposition. The photocatalytic degradation pathways of 2,4-D by ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 under visible light irradiation were explored. The ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite displayed high photostability in recycling tests, reflecting its promising potential as an effective visible light photocatalyst for 2,4-D treatment. PMID:27267690

  11. Kinetic resolution of acids in acylation reactions in the presence of chiral tertiary amines

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, V.M.; Dem'yanovich, V.M.; Khlebnikov, V.A.

    1988-07-10

    Asymmetric synthesis has now become an important method for the production of optically active compounds, and its most attractive form is asymmetric catalysis. This work was devoted to an investigation into asymmetric catalysis with chiral tertiary amines in acylation reactions. During the acylation of alcohols and amines by the action of racemic 2-phenylpropionic and 2-methyl-3-phenylpropionic acids in the presence of S-nicotine the initial acids are resolved kinetically. The (R)-2-phenylpropionic acid obtained in this way had an optical purity of 0.5-1.5%.

  12. Elucidation of noble metal/formic acid chemistry during DWPF feed preparation. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, L.F.

    1991-12-31

    Eleven reports are included: evaluation of noble metal compounds as catalysts for aerobic decomposition of formic acid; reaction of NaNO{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 2} with formic acid under argon; effects of Ru, Rh, Pd chlorides on formic acid decomposition in presence of IDMS (pH=11.0) sludge; effects of additives on catalysts on decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen; Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid; the question of whether this decomposition can be heterogeneous catalysis; inhibition of this reaction by additives; nitrilotriacetic acid inhibitor; uses of gelatin and other water soluble polymers to control flocculation rate; comparison of catalytic activities of Rh, Ru, Pd in Purex and HM sludges; experiments on homogeneous vs heterogeneous nature of Rh catalyst. Figs, refs, tabs.

  13. Elucidation of noble metal/formic acid chemistry during DWPF feed preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    Eleven reports are included: evaluation of noble metal compounds as catalysts for aerobic decomposition of formic acid; reaction of NaNO[sub 3] and NaNO[sub 2] with formic acid under argon; effects of Ru, Rh, Pd chlorides on formic acid decomposition in presence of IDMS (pH=11.0) sludge; effects of additives on catalysts on decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen; Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid; the question of whether this decomposition can be heterogeneous catalysis; inhibition of this reaction by additives; nitrilotriacetic acid inhibitor; uses of gelatin and other water soluble polymers to control flocculation rate; comparison of catalytic activities of Rh, Ru, Pd in Purex and HM sludges; experiments on homogeneous vs heterogeneous nature of Rh catalyst. Figs, refs, tabs.

  14. o-Iodoxybenzoic acid mediated oxidative desulfurization initiated domino reactions for synthesis of azoles.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Pramod S; Pathare, Sagar P; Akamanchi, Krishnacharaya G

    2012-04-20

    A systematic exploration of thiophilic ability of o-iodoxybenzoic acid (IBX) for oxidative desulfurization to trigger domino reactions leading to new methodologies for synthesis of different azoles is described. A variety of highly substituted oxadiazoles, thiadiazoles, triazoles, and tetrazoles have been successfully synthesized in good to excellent yields, starting from readily accessible thiosemicarbazides, bis-diarylthiourea, 1,3-disubtituted thiourea, and thioamides.

  15. Deuteration of pentacene in benzoic acid: Monitoring the reaction kinetics via low-temperature optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Corval, A.; Casalegno, R.; Astilean, S.; Trommsdorff, H.P.

    1992-06-25

    In the deuteration of pentacene in benzoic acid, this reaction is monitored via low-temperature optical spectroscopy to observe the proton-deuterium rate of exchange between the solvent and solute molecules. Of the 14 pentacene protons, 6 have an exchange rate 2 orders of magnitude greater than the remaining 8. 20 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Nonmetal catalyzed insertion reactions of diazocarbonyls to acid derivatives in fluorinated alcohols.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, Lidia; Azzouzi-Zriba, Kaouther; Bonnet-Delpon, Danièle; Crousse, Benoit

    2011-02-18

    The insertion reaction of diazocarbonyls to acids could be performed smoothly in fluorinated alcohols in the absence of metal catalyst. This new procedure allowed the chemoselective preparation of various functionalized compounds such as acyloxyesters, depsipeptides, and sulfonate, phosphonate, or boronate derivatives.

  17. Determination of the Molar Volume of Hydrogen from the Metal-Acid Reaction: An Experimental Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin; Chapman, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Describes an alternative technique for determining the molar volume of hydrogen from the metal-acid reaction in which the metal sample is encased in a specially prepared cage and a pipette filler is used to fill an inverted burette with water. Eliminates some difficulties encountered with the conventional technique. (JRH)

  18. Permanganate oxidation of α-amino acids: kinetic correlations for the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F

    2011-09-01

    The reactions of permanganate ion with seven α-amino acids in aqueous KH(2)PO(4)/K(2)HPO(4) buffers have been followed spectrophotometrically at two different wavelengths: 526 nm (decay of MnO(4)(-)) and 418 nm (formation of colloidal MnO(2)). All of the reactions studied were autocatalyzed by colloidal MnO(2), with the contribution of the autocatalytic reaction pathway decreasing in the order glycine > l-threonine > l-alanine > l-glutamic acid > l-leucine > l-isoleucine > l-valine. The rate constants corresponding to the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic pathways were obtained by means of either a differential rate law or an integrated one, the latter requiring the use of an iterative method for its implementation. The activation parameters for the two pathways were determined and analyzed to obtain statistically significant correlations for the series of reactions studied. The activation enthalpy of the nonautocatalytic pathway showed a strong, positive dependence on the standard Gibbs energy for the dissociation of the protonated amino group of the α-amino acid. Linear enthalpy-entropy correlations were found for both pathways, leading to isokinetic temperatures of 370 ± 21 K (nonautocatalytic) and 364 ± 28 K (autocatalytic). Mechanisms in agreement with the experimental data are proposed for the two reaction pathways.

  19. Woodland Decomposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, J.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the role of the main organisms involved in woodland decomposition and discusses some of the variables affecting the rate of nutrient cycling. Suggests practical work that may be of value to high school students either as standard practice or long-term projects. (CW)

  20. Geminal Brønsted Acid Ionic Liquids as Catalysts for the Mannich Reaction in Water

    PubMed Central

    He, Leqin; Qin, Shenjun; Chang, Tao; Sun, Yuzhuang; Zhao, Jiquan

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium geminal Brønsted acid ionic liquids (GBAILs) based on zwitterionic 1,2-bis[N-methyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl)-alkylammonium]ethane (where the carbon number of the alkyl chain is 4, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, or 18) and p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate were synthesized. The catalytic ionic liquids were applied in three-component Mannich reactions with an aldehyde, ketone, and amine at 25 °C in water. The effects of the type and amount of catalyst and reaction time as well as the scope of the reaction were investigated. Results showed that GBAIL-C14 has excellent catalytic activity and fair reusability. The catalytic procedure was simple, and the catalyst could be recycled seven times via a simple separation process without noticeable decreases in catalytic activity. PMID:24837832

  1. Geminal Brønsted acid ionic liquids as catalysts for the Mannich reaction in water.

    PubMed

    He, Leqin; Qin, Shenjun; Chang, Tao; Sun, Yuzhuang; Zhao, Jiquan

    2014-05-15

    Quaternary ammonium geminal Brønsted acid ionic liquids (GBAILs) based on zwitterionic 1,2-bis[N-methyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl)-alkylammonium]ethane (where the carbon number of the alkyl chain is 4, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, or 18) and p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate were synthesized. The catalytic ionic liquids were applied in three-component Mannich reactions with an aldehyde, ketone, and amine at 25 °C in water. The effects of the type and amount of catalyst and reaction time as well as the scope of the reaction were investigated. Results showed that GBAIL-C14 has excellent catalytic activity and fair reusability. The catalytic procedure was simple, and the catalyst could be recycled seven times via a simple separation process without noticeable decreases in catalytic activity.

  2. Chemoselective Boron-Catalyzed Nucleophilic Activation of Carboxylic Acids for Mannich-Type Reactions.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Nagai, Hideoki; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-06-10

    The carboxyl group (COOH) is an omnipresent functional group in organic molecules, and its direct catalytic activation represents an attractive synthetic method. Herein, we describe the first example of a direct catalytic nucleophilic activation of carboxylic acids with BH3·SMe2, after which the acids are able to act as carbon nucleophiles, i.e. enolates, in Mannich-type reactions. This reaction proceeds with a mild organic base (DBU) and exhibits high levels of functional group tolerance. The boron catalyst is highly chemoselective toward the COOH group, even in the presence of other carbonyl moieties, such as amides, esters, or ketones. Furthermore, this catalytic method can be extended to highly enantioselective Mannich-type reactions by using a (R)-3,3'-I2-BINOL-substituted boron catalyst.

  3. Chemical remodeling of cell-surface sialic acids through a palladium-triggered bioorthogonal elimination reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Cheng, Bo; Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhaoyue; Hong, Weiyao; Chen, Xing; Chen, Peng R

    2015-04-27

    We herein report a chemical decaging strategy for the in situ generation of neuramic acid (Neu), a unique type of sialic acid, on live cells by the use of a palladium-mediated bioorthogonal elimination reaction. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) were found to be a highly efficient and biocompatible depropargylation catalyst for the direct conversion of metabolically incorporated N-(propargyloxycarbonyl)neuramic acid (Neu5Proc) into Neu on cell-surface glycans. This conversion chemically mimics the enzymatic de-N-acetylation of N-acetylneuramic acid (Neu5Ac), a proposed mechanism for the natural occurrence of Neu on cell-surface glycans. The bioorthogonal elimination was also exploited for the manipulation of cell-surface charge by unmasking the free amine at C5 to neutralize the negatively charged carboxyl group at C1 of sialic acids.

  4. Direct observation of unstable reaction intermediates by acid-base complex formation.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Yuji

    2013-06-01

    The structures of several unstable or metastable reaction intermediates that were photoproduced in crystals were analyzed by using X-ray techniques. The presence of enough void space around the reactive group(s) is an essential factor for the reaction to occur with retention of the single-crystal form. To expand the void space, an acid group (COOH) was substituted onto the reactant molecule and acid-base complex crystals were prepared with several amines, such as dibenzylamine and dicyclohexylamine. Following the formation of such acid-base complexes in crystals, the metastable structures of nitrenes and red species of photochromic salicylideneanilines have been successfully analyzed by using X-ray techniques. Moreover, the structure of a Pt complex anion in the excited state has been analyzed, which formed acid-base complex crystals with various alkylammonium cations. The formation of acid-base complexes will be a powerful tool for directly observing the structure of unstable or metastable reaction intermediates by using X-ray techniques.

  5. Cirrus cloud mimic surfaces in the laboratory: organic acids, bases and NOx heterogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodeau, J.; Oriordan, B.

    2003-04-01

    CIRRUS CLOUD MIMIC SURFACES IN THE LABORATORY:ORGANIC ACIDS, BASES AND NOX HETEROGENEOUS REACTIONS. B. ORiordan, J. Sodeau Department of Chemistry and Environment Research Institute, University College Cork, Ireland j.sodeau@ucc.ie /Fax: +353-21-4902680 There are a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic sources for the simple carboxylic acids to be found in the troposphere giving rise to levels as high as 45 ppb in certain urban areas. In this regard it is of note that ants of genus Formica produce some 10Tg of formic acid each year; some ten times that produced by industry. The expected sinks are those generally associated with tropospheric chemistry: the major routes studied, to date, being wet and dry deposition. No studies have been carried out hitherto on the role of water-ice surfaces in the atmospheric chemistry of carboxylic acids and the purpose of this paper is to indicate their potential function in the heterogeneous release of atmospheric species such as HONO. The deposition of formic acid on a water-ice surface was studied using FT-RAIR spectroscopy over a range of temperatures between 100 and 165K. In all cases ionization to the formate (and oxonium) ions was observed. The results were confirmed by TPD (Temperature Programmed Desorption) measurements, which indicated that two distinct surface species adsorb to the ice. Potential reactions between the formic acid/formate ion surface and nitrogen dioxide were subsequently investigated by FT-RAIRS. Co-deposition experiments showed that N2O3 and the NO+ ion (associated with water) were formed as products. A mechanism is proposed to explain these results, which involves direct reaction between the organic acid and nitrogen dioxide. Similar experiments involving acetic acid also indicate ionization on a water-ice surface. The results are put into the context of atmospheric chemistry potentially occuring on cirrus cloud surfaces.

  6. Secondary organic aerosol-forming reactions of glyoxal with amino acids.

    PubMed

    De Haan, David O; Corrigan, Ashley L; Smith, Kyle W; Stroik, Daniel R; Turley, Jacob J; Lee, Frances E; Tolbert, Margaret A; Jimenez, Jose L; Cordova, Kyle E; Ferrell, Grant R

    2009-04-15

    Glyoxal, the simplest and most abundant alpha-dicarbonyl compound in the atmosphere, is scavenged by clouds and aerosol, where it reacts with nucleophiles to form low-volatility products. Here we examine the reactions of glyoxal with five amino acids common in clouds. When glyoxal and glycine, serine, aspartic acid or ornithine are present at concentrations as low as 30/microM in evaporating aqueous droplets or bulk solutions, 1,3-disubstituted imidazoles are formed in irreversible second-order reactions detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In contrast, glyoxal reacts with arginine preferentially at side chain amino groups, forming nonaromatic five-membered rings. All reactions were accompanied by browning. The uptake of 45 ppb glyoxal by solid-phase glycine aerosol at 50% RH was also studied and found to cause particle growth and the production of imidazole measured by scanning mobility particle sizing and AMS, respectively, with a glyoxal uptake coefficient alpha = 0.0004. Comparison of reaction kinetics in bulk and in drying droplets shows that conversion of glyoxal dihydrate to monohydrate accelerates the reaction by over 3 orders of magnitude, allowing these reactions to occur at atmospheric conditions.

  7. Secondary organic aerosol-forming reactions of glyoxal with amino acids.

    PubMed

    De Haan, David O; Corrigan, Ashley L; Smith, Kyle W; Stroik, Daniel R; Turley, Jacob J; Lee, Frances E; Tolbert, Margaret A; Jimenez, Jose L; Cordova, Kyle E; Ferrell, Grant R

    2009-04-15

    Glyoxal, the simplest and most abundant alpha-dicarbonyl compound in the atmosphere, is scavenged by clouds and aerosol, where it reacts with nucleophiles to form low-volatility products. Here we examine the reactions of glyoxal with five amino acids common in clouds. When glyoxal and glycine, serine, aspartic acid or ornithine are present at concentrations as low as 30/microM in evaporating aqueous droplets or bulk solutions, 1,3-disubstituted imidazoles are formed in irreversible second-order reactions detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In contrast, glyoxal reacts with arginine preferentially at side chain amino groups, forming nonaromatic five-membered rings. All reactions were accompanied by browning. The uptake of 45 ppb glyoxal by solid-phase glycine aerosol at 50% RH was also studied and found to cause particle growth and the production of imidazole measured by scanning mobility particle sizing and AMS, respectively, with a glyoxal uptake coefficient alpha = 0.0004. Comparison of reaction kinetics in bulk and in drying droplets shows that conversion of glyoxal dihydrate to monohydrate accelerates the reaction by over 3 orders of magnitude, allowing these reactions to occur at atmospheric conditions. PMID:19475956

  8. Infrared studies of the reaction of methanesulfonic acid with trimethylamine on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Noriko; Arquero, Kristine D; Dawson, Matthew L; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    Organosulfur compounds generated from a variety of biological as well as anthropogenic sources are oxidized in air to form sulfuric acid and methanesulfonic acid (MSA). Both of these acids formed initially in the gas phase react with ammonia and amines in air to form and grow new particles, which is important for visibility, human health and climate. A competing sink is deposition on surfaces in the boundary layer. However, relatively little is known about reactions after they deposit on surfaces. We report here diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectrometry (DRIFTS) studies of the reaction of MSA with trimethylamine (TMA) on a silicon powder at atmospheric pressure in synthetic air and at room temperature, either in the absence or in the presence of water vapor. In both cases, DRIFTS spectra of the product surface species are essentially the same as the transmission spectrum obtained for trimethylaminium methanesulfonate, indicating the formation of the salt on the surface with a lower limit to the reaction probability of γ > 10(-6). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first infrared study to demonstrate this chemistry from the heterogeneous reaction of MSA with an amine on a surface. This heterogeneous chemistry appears to be sufficiently fast that it could impact measurements of gas-phase amines through reactions with surface-adsorbed acids on sampling lines and inlets. It could also represent an additional sink for amines in the boundary layer, especially at night when the gas-phase reactions of amines with OH radical and ozone are minimized.

  9. Decomposition procedure using methyl orthoformate to analyze silicone polymers.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Yuichiro; Sogabe, Keisuke; Ohtani, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    A new decomposition method for structural analysis of polysiloxanes (silicones) was developed using methyl orthoformate. The siloxane bonds in samples with vinyl and/or methyl side groups decomposed under relatively mild acidic conditions up to around 70°C and were followed by methoxylation at the cleaved linkages with few side reactions. The product yields with respect to the siloxane monomer units were 98-100% for low molecular weight model siloxane compounds. Additionally, this method decomposed the silicone polymer sample in a similar manner with decomposition yields of 98 and 103% for the dimethylsiloxane main chain and dimethylvinylsilyl end groups, respectively. These results demonstrate that the proposed decomposition method should be an effective pretreatment procedure for structural and compositional analyses of silicone polymers. PMID:25007937

  10. Heterogeneous Reactions of Acetic Acid with Oxide Surfaces: Effects of Mineralogy and Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Larish, Whitney A; Fang, Yuan; Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the heterogeneous uptake of gaseous acetic acid on different oxides including γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and CaO under a range of relative humidity conditions. Under dry conditions, the uptake of acetic acid leads to the formation of both acetate and molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on γ-Al2O3 and CaO and only molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on SiO2. More importantly, under the conditions of this study, dimers are the major form for molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on all three particle surfaces investigated, even at low acetic acid pressures under which monomers are the dominant species in the gas phase. We have also determined saturation surface coverages for acetic acid adsorption on these three oxides under dry conditions as well as Langmuir adsorption constants in some cases. Kinetic analysis shows that the reaction rate of acetic acid increases by a factor of 3-5 for γ-Al2O3 when relative humidity increases from 0% to 15%, whereas for SiO2 particles, acetic acid and water are found to compete for surface adsorption sites. PMID:27322707

  11. Heterogeneous Reactions of Acetic Acid with Oxide Surfaces: Effects of Mineralogy and Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Larish, Whitney A; Fang, Yuan; Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the heterogeneous uptake of gaseous acetic acid on different oxides including γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and CaO under a range of relative humidity conditions. Under dry conditions, the uptake of acetic acid leads to the formation of both acetate and molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on γ-Al2O3 and CaO and only molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on SiO2. More importantly, under the conditions of this study, dimers are the major form for molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on all three particle surfaces investigated, even at low acetic acid pressures under which monomers are the dominant species in the gas phase. We have also determined saturation surface coverages for acetic acid adsorption on these three oxides under dry conditions as well as Langmuir adsorption constants in some cases. Kinetic analysis shows that the reaction rate of acetic acid increases by a factor of 3-5 for γ-Al2O3 when relative humidity increases from 0% to 15%, whereas for SiO2 particles, acetic acid and water are found to compete for surface adsorption sites.

  12. Relative Reaction Rates of Sulfamic Acid and Hydroxylamine with Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-03-28

    This report describes a study of comparative reaction rates where the reductant is in excess, as in the 1B bank in the Purex process. The results of this work apply to planned plant tests to partially substitute HAN for the ferrous sulfamate reductant in the Purex 1B bank.

  13. Origin and yields of acetic acid in pentose-based Maillard reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Davidek, Tomas; Gouézec, Elisabeth; Devaud, Stéphanie; Blank, Imre

    2008-04-01

    The formation of acetic acid from pentoses was studied in aqueous buffered systems (90-120 degrees C, pH 6.0-8.0) containing equimolar concentrations of 13C-labeled xylose and glycine. Acetic acid was quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy using an isotope dilution assay. Acetic acid was mainly formed from the C-1/C-2 carbon atoms of xylose (77-87%), while small amounts were also formed from the C-4/C-5 atoms of the pentose sugar (9-15%). Temperature and pH had only a small effect on the relative contribution of the sugar carbon atoms to acetic acid. These results support beta-dicarbonyl cleavage of 1-deoxypento-2,4-diulose as a major pathway leading to acetic acid in pentose-based Maillard reaction systems under food processing conditions. Acetic acid was confirmed as a major degradation product of pentoses at the early stage of the Maillard reaction, yielding 16 mol% and 28 mol% at pH 6.0 and pH 8.0, respectively. PMID:18448822

  14. The mechanism of low levels of nitrogen dioxide reaction with unsaturated fatty acid esters

    SciTech Connect

    Gallon, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Nitrogen dioxide is a toxic air pollutant that exists at less than 0.5 ppm in the atmosphere. This toxic compound is known to initiate autoxidation of unsaturated fatty acids both in vivo and in vitro. When autoxidation occurs in vivo, membrane damage that can lead to cell death can occur. Low concentrations of nitrogen dioxide were shown to react with the polyunsaturated fatty acid esters, methyl linoleate and methyl linoleate, by a H-abstraction mechanism. However, methyl oleate, an unsaturated fatty acid ester, was demonstrated to react with a low concentration of nitrogen dioxide by only an addition mechanism. Although methyl oleate reacts by an addition mechanism, a 50:50 molar solution of methyl oleate and methyl linoleate reacted with a low level of nitrogen dioxide exclusively by a H-abstraction mechanism. Therefore, low levels of nitrogen dioxide will probably react with polyunsaturated fatty acid components of pulmonary lipids by a H-abstraction mechanism forming nitrous acid directly in the cell membrane. Vitamin E was demonstrated to be able to act as a preventative antioxidant in the nitrogen dioxide and methyl linoleate reactions; but vitamin C could not prevent nitrogen dioxide from reacting with methyl linoleate by a H-abstraction mechanism. These results suggest that low levels of nitrogen dioxide will react with polyunsaturated fatty acids by a H-abstraction mechanism and that vitamin E can be used to prevent the reaction from occurring.

  15. Lactic acid conversion to 2,3-pentanedione and acrylic acid over silica-supported sodium nitrate: Reaction optimization and identification of sodium lactate as the active catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Wadley, D.C.; Tam, M.S.; Miller, D.J.

    1997-01-15

    Lactic acid is converted to 2,3-pentanedione, acrylic acid, and other products in vapor-phase reactions over silica-supported sodium lactate formed from sodium nitrate. Multiparameter optimization of reaction conditions using a Box-Benkhen experimental design shows that the highest yield and selectivity to 2,3-pentanedione are achieved at low temperature, elevated pressure, and long contact time, while yield and selectivity to acrylic acid are most favorable at high temperature, low pressure, and short contact time. Post-reaction Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses of the catalyst indicate that sodium nitrate as the initial catalyst material is transformed to sodium lactate at the onset of reaction via proton transfer from lactic acid to nitrate. The resultant nitric acid vaporizes as it is formed, leaving sodium lactate as the sole sodium-bearing species on the catalyst during reaction. 19 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Kinetics and reaction engineering of levulinic acid production from aqueous glucose solutions.

    PubMed

    Weingarten, Ronen; Cho, Joungmo; Xing, Rong; Conner, William Curtis; Huber, George W

    2012-07-01

    We have developed a kinetic model for aqueous-phase production of levulinic acid from glucose using a homogeneous acid catalyst. The proposed model shows a good fit with experimental data collected in this study in a batch reactor. The model was also fitted to steady-state data obtained in a plug flow reactor (PFR) and a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The kinetic model consists of four key steps: (1) glucose dehydration to form 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF); (2) glucose reversion/degradation reactions to produce humins (highly polymerized insoluble carbonaceous species); (3) HMF rehydration to form levulinic acid and formic acid; and (4) HMF degradation to form humins. We use our model to predict the optimal reactor design and operating conditions for HMF and levulinic acid production in a continuous reactor system. Higher temperatures (180-200 °C) and shorter reaction times (less than 1 min) are essential to maximize the HMF content. In contrast, relatively low temperatures (140-160 °C) and longer residence times (above 100 min) are essential for maximum levulinic acid yield. We estimate that a maximum HMF carbon yield of 14% can be obtained in a PFR at 200 °C and a reaction time of 10 s. Levulinic acid can be produced at 57% carbon yield (68% of the theoretical yield) in a PFR at 149 °C and a residence time of 500 min. A system of two consecutive PFR reactors shows a higher performance than a PFR and CSTR combination. However, compared to a single PFR, there is no distinct advantage to implement a system of two consecutive reactors.

  17. Heterogeneous Reactions of ClONO2, HCl, and HOCl on Liquid Sulfuric Acid Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1994-01-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of ClONO2 + H2O yields HNO3 + HOCl (1), ClONO2 + HCl yields C12 + HNO3 (2), and HOCl + HCl yields Cl2 + H2O (3) on liquid sulfuric acid surfaces have been studied using a fast flow reactor coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The main objectives of the study are to investigate: (a) the temperature dependence of these reactions at a fixed H2O partial pressure typical of the lower stratosphere (that is, by changing temperature at a constant water partial pressure, the H2SO4 content of the surfaces is also changed), (b) the relative importance or competition between reactions 1 and 2, and (c) the effect of HNO3 on the reaction probabilities due to the formation of a H2SO4/HNO3/H2O ternary system. The measurements show that all the reactions depend markedly on temperature at a fixed H2O partial pressure: they proceed efficiently at temperatures near 200 K and much slower at temperatures near 220 K. The reaction probability (gamma(sub 1)) for ClONO2 hydrolysis approaches 0.01 at temperatures below 200 K, whereas the values for gamma(sub 2) and gamma(sub 3) are on the order of a few tenths at 200 K. Although detailed mechanisms for these reactions are still unknown, the present data indicate that the competition between ClONO2 hydrolysis and ClONO2 reaction with HCl may depend on temperature (or H2SO4 Wt %): in the presence of gaseous HCl at stratospheric concentrations, reaction 2 is dominant at lower temperatures (less than 200 K), but reaction 1 becomes important at temperatures above 210 K. Furthermore, reaction probability measurements performed on the H2SO4/HNO3/ H2O ternary solutions do not exhibit noticeable deviation from those performed on the H2SO4/H2O binary system, suggesting little effect of HNO3 in sulfate aerosols on the ClONO2 and HOCl reactions with HCl. The results reveal that significant reductions in the chlorine-containing reservoir species (such as ClONO2 and HCl) can take place on stratospheric sulfate aerosols at

  18. Reaction of chlorine dioxide with amino acids and peptides: kinetics and mutagenicity studies.

    PubMed

    Tan, H K; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1987-08-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is currently being considered as an alternate to chlorine as a disinfectant for water treatment. Many organic compounds present in water and food treated with ClO2 are subject to oxidation. 21 amino acids and 3 peptides (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester (aspartame), L-glycyl-L-tryptophan and L-tryptophylglycine) were studied for their reactivity with ClO2. Chlorine dioxide reacted only with 6 amino acids in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer, pH 6.0. The reaction with cysteine, tryptophan and tyrosine was too rapid to be monitored either iodometrically or spectrophotometrically. The reaction with histidine, hydroxyproline and proline was found to be pseudo-first order. ClO2 readily reacted with L-glycyl-L-tryptophan and L-tryptophylglycine but not with aspartame. Mutagenicity studies with the Salmonella microsome assay of the reaction mixtures of ClO2 with those 6 reactive amino acids and the 3 peptides indicated that the reaction products of the 3 peptides, hydroxyproline, and tyrosine exerted mutagenic activity toward both tester strains of TA98 and TA100 in the presence and absence of rat-liver S9 mix.

  19. Reactions between Criegee Intermediates and the Inorganic Acids HCl and HNO3 : Kinetics and Atmospheric Implications.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Murray, Craig

    2016-08-22

    Criegee intermediates (CIs) are a class of reactive radicals that are thought to play a key role in atmospheric chemistry through reactions with trace species that can lead to aerosol particle formation. Recent work has suggested that water vapor is likely to be the dominant sink for some CIs, although reactions with trace species that are sufficiently rapid can be locally competitive. Herein, we use broadband transient absorption spectroscopy to measure rate constants for the reactions of the simplest CI, CH2 OO, with two inorganic acids, HCl and HNO3 , both of which are present in polluted urban atmospheres. Both reactions are fast; at 295 K, the reactions of CH2 OO with HCl and HNO3 have rate constants of 4.6×10(-11)  cm(3)  s(-1) and 5.4×10(-10)  cm(3)  s(-1) , respectively. Complementary quantum-chemical calculations show that these reactions form substituted hydroperoxides with no energy barrier. The results suggest that reactions of CIs with HNO3 in particular are likely to be competitive with those with water vapor in polluted urban areas under conditions of modest relative humidity.

  20. Influence of solid-state acidity on the decomposition of sucrose in amorphous systems II (effect of buffer).

    PubMed

    Alkhamis, Khouloud A

    2009-04-01

    It was of interest to investigate the solid-state acidity using indicator probe molecules and sucrose degradation. Amorphous samples containing lactose, sucrose, buffers (citrate, malate, tartarate, or phosphate) with different pH values, and sodium chloride (to adjust the ionic strength) were prepared by freeze-drying. The lyophiles were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and Karl Fischer titrimetry. The solid-state acidity of all lyophiles was measured using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and suitable indicators (thymol blue or bromophenol blue). Selected lyophiles were subjected to a temperature of 60 degrees C and were analyzed for sucrose degradation using the Trinder kit. The results obtained from this study have shown that good correlation can be obtained between the solid-state acidity and the molar ratio of the salt and the acid in solution. The degradation of sucrose in the lyophiles is extremely sensitive to the solid-state acidity and might be able to provide a better estimate for the acidity than the indicator probe molecules. The Hammett acidity-rate profile for sucrose degradation in the lyophiles (using four different buffers) was also obtained. The profile showed similarity to the pH-rate profile in solution, and no buffer catalysis for sucrose degradation was detected in this study. PMID:19016102

  1. Theoretical study on reaction mechanism of fulminic acid HCNO with CN radical.

    PubMed

    Pang, Jing-Lin; Xie, Hong-Bin; Zhang, Shao-Wen; Ding, Yi-Hong; Tang, Ao-Qing

    2008-06-12

    The HCNO + CN reaction is one potentially important process during the NO-reburning process for the reduction of NOx pollutants from fossil fuel combustion emissions. To compare with the recent experimental study, we performed the first theoretical potential energy surface investigation on the mechanism of HCNO + CN at the G3B3 and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ levels based on the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) structures, covering various entrance, isomerization, and decomposition channels. The results indicate that the most favorable channel is to barrierlessly form the entrance isomer L1c NCCHNO followed by successive ring closure and concerted CC and NO bond rupture to generate the product P1 HCN + NCO. However, the formation of P4 (3)HCCN + NO, predicted as the only major product in the recent experiment, is kinetically much less competitive. This conclusion is further supported by the master equation rate constant calculation. Future experimental reinvestigations are strongly desired to test the newly predicted mechanism for the CN + HCNO reaction. Implications of the present results are discussed. PMID:18476677

  2. Thermodynamical characteristics of the reaction of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate with L-amino acids in aqueous buffer solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barannikov, V. P.; Badelin, V. G.; Venediktov, E. A.; Mezhevoi, I. N.; Guseinov, S. S.

    2011-01-01

    The reaction of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate with L-isomers of alanine, lysine, arginine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and glycine in phosphate buffer solution was studied by absorption spectroscopy and the calorimetry of dissolution at physiological acidity of the medium (pH 7.35). The formation constants of Schiff bases during reactions and changes in Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy were determined. It was shown that the formation constant of the Schiff base and its spectral properties depend on the nature of the bound amino acid. The progress of the reaction with a majority of amino acids is governed by the entropy factor due to the predominant role of the dehydration effect of the reaction center of amino acids during chemical reactions. The intramolecular electrostatic interaction of an ionized phosphate group with the positively charged amino group on the end of the chain of amino acid residue stabilizes the Schiff bases formed by lysine and arginine. The extinction coefficient of the base, equilibrium constant, and the exothermic effect of the reaction then increase. The excess negative charge on the end of the chain of amino acid residues of aspartic and glutamic acids destabilizes the molecule of the Schiff base. In this case, the equilibrium constant decreases and the endothermic effect of the reaction increases.

  3. Modeling of Turing Structures in the Chlorite-Iodide-Malonic Acid-Starch Reaction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengyel, Istivan; Epstein, Irving R.

    1991-02-01

    Recent experiments on the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid-starch reaction in a gel reactor give the first evidence of the existence of the symmetry breaking, reaction-diffusion structures predicted by Turing in 1952. A five-variable model that describes the temporal behavior of the system is reduced to a two-variable model, and its spatial behavior is analyzed. Structures have been found with wavelengths that are in good agreement with those observed experimentally. The gel plays a key role by binding key iodine species, thereby creating the necessary difference in the effective diffusion coefficients of the activator and inhibitor species, iodide and chlorite ions, respectively.

  4. Organocatalytic Enantioselective Aza-Friedel-Crafts Reaction of Cyclic Ketimines with Pyrroles using Imidazolinephosphoric Acid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Matsuda, Nazumi; Ohara, Mutsuyo

    2016-07-01

    Organocatalytic enantioselective aza-Friedel-Crafts reactions of cyclic ketimines with pyrroles or indoles were catalyzed by imidazoline/phosphoric acid catalysts. The reaction was applied to various 3H-indol-3-ones to afford products in excellent yields and enantioselectivities. The chiral catalysts can be recovered by a single separation step using column chromatography and are reusable without further purification. Based on the experimental investigations, a possible transition state has been proposed to explain the origin of the asymmetric induction. PMID:27124556

  5. Pitchfork and winged-cusp singularities in iodate-arsenous acid reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ru-Sheng

    1994-09-01

    The iodate-arsenous acid reaction was reported to be able to exhibit hysteresis bistability, including mushrooms and isolas, in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR) when an additional flow of solvent is introduced [N. Ganapathisubramanian and K. Showalter, J. Chem. Phys. 80, 4177 (1984)]. Based on their kinetic data and the empirical rate law, it is shown that the reaction may also exhibit pitchfork-type and winged cusp-type singularities if additional flows of the reactants are introduced to the CSTR.

  6. Library of Antifouling Surfaces Derived From Natural Amino Acids by Click Reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Hu, Xin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Ye-Min; Liu, Xiao-Jiu; Xie, Bin-Bin; Yao, Chen; Li, Yi; Li, Xin-Song

    2015-08-12

    Biofouling is of great concern in numerous applications ranging from ophthalmological implants to catheters, and from bioseparation to biosensors. In this report, a general and facile strategy to combat surface fouling is developed by grafting of amino acids onto polymer substrates to form zwitterionic structure through amino groups induced epoxy ring opening click reaction. First of all, a library of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) hydrogels with zwitterionic surfaces were prepared, resulting in the formation of pairs of carboxyl anions and protonated secondary amino cations. The analysis of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the successful immobilization of amino acids on the hydrogel surfaces. After that, the contact angle and equilibrium water content of the modified hydrogels showed that the hydrogels exhibited improved hydrophilicity compared with the parent hydrogel. Furthermore, the protein deposition was evaluated by bicinchoninic acid assay using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme as models. The results indicated that the performance of the hydrogels was determined by the nature of incorporated amino acid: the hydrogels incorporated with neutral amino acids had nonspecific antiadsorption capability to both BSA and lysozyme; the hydrogels incorporated with charged amino acids showed antiadsorption behaviors against protein with same charge and enhanced adsorption to the protein with opposite charge; the optimal antiadsorption performance was observed on the hydrogels incorporated with polar amino acids with a hydroxyl residual. The improvement of antiprotein fouling of the neutral amino acids grafted hydrogels can be ascribed to the formation of zwitterionic surfaces. Finally, a couple of soft contact lenses grafted with amino acids were fabricated having improved antifouling property and hydrophilicity. The result demonstrated the success of

  7. Quantitative study of solid-state acid-base reactions between polymorphs of flufenamic acid and magnesium oxide using X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoming; Stowell, Joseph G; Morris, Kenneth R; Byrn, Stephen R

    2010-03-11

    The purpose of this study is to investigate solid-state acid-base reactions between polymorphs of flufenamic acid (FFA) and magnesium oxide (MgO) using X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Polymorphs of FFA were blended with MgO and stored under conditions of 96.5% RH and 89% RH at 40 degrees C. The disappearance of FFA and production of magnesium flufenamate were monitored by XRPD. It was observed that the reactions between FFA and MgO proceeded following the Jander equation. Form I of FFA is more reactive with MgO than Form III. Differential accessibility of reactive groups is hypothesized as one of the reasons that Form I is more reactive than Form III. It was noted that the reaction between FFA and MgO could be mitigated by adding another acidic excipient such as polyacrylic acid to prevent the acid-base reaction with FFA. The effectiveness of polyacrylic acid was impacted by the mixing order of the tertiary mixture. Mixing polyacrylic acid and MgO first provided the most significant protection. In conclusion, solid-state acid-base reactions could be investigated using XRPD. Different forms may have distinct reactivity. Acid-base reactions in the solid state could be mitigated through the addition of another "shielding" excipient.

  8. 40 CFR 721.9400 - Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reaction product of phenolic... Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and glyceride... substances identified generically as Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9400 - Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction product of phenolic... Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and glyceride... substances identified generically as Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10363 - Alkenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4′ -methylenebis...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4â² -methylenebis (cyclohexanamine) (generic). 721.10363 Section... Substances § 721.10363 Alkenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4..., reaction products with 4,4′ -methylenebis (cyclohexanamine) (PMN P-10-47) is subject to reporting...

  11. 40 CFR 721.9400 - Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction product of phenolic... Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and glyceride... substances identified generically as Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10363 - Alkenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4′ -methylenebis...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4â² -methylenebis (cyclohexanamine) (generic). 721.10363 Section... Substances § 721.10363 Alkenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4..., reaction products with 4,4′ -methylenebis (cyclohexanamine) (PMN P-10-47) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9400 - Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction product of phenolic... Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and glyceride... substances identified generically as Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9400 - Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction product of phenolic... Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and glyceride... substances identified generically as Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10363 - Alkenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4′ -methylenebis...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4â² -methylenebis (cyclohexanamine) (generic). 721.10363 Section... Substances § 721.10363 Alkenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4..., reaction products with 4,4′ -methylenebis (cyclohexanamine) (PMN P-10-47) is subject to reporting...

  16. One-pot synthesis of magnetically recyclable mesoporous silica supported acid-base catalysts for tandem reactions.

    PubMed

    Jun, Samuel Woojoo; Shokouhimehr, Mohammadreza; Lee, Dong Jun; Jang, Youngjin; Park, Jinkyung; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2013-09-14

    We report one-pot synthesis of magnetically recyclable mesoporous silica catalysts for tandem acid-base reactions. The catalysts could be easily recovered from the reaction mixture using a magnet, and the pore size of the catalysts could be controlled by introducing a swelling agent, resulting in the significant enhancement of the reaction rate.

  17. Organosulfate Formation through the Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide with Unsaturated Fatty Acids and Long-Chain Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Passananti, Monica; Kong, Lingdong; Shang, Jing; Dupart, Yoan; Perrier, Sébastien; Chen, Jianmin; Donaldson, D James; George, Christian

    2016-08-22

    The heterogeneous reaction between SO2 and unsaturated compounds results in the efficient production of organosulfates for several fatty acids and long-chain alkenes. The presence of an acid group, the physical state of the reactants (solid or liquid), the nature of the double bond (cis, trans, terminal), and the use of light irradiation all have an impact on the reaction rate. The reaction was investigated using different set-ups (coated flow tube, aerosol flow tube, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform cell). The reaction products were identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry and the impact of this reaction on organosulfate formation in the atmosphere is discussed.

  18. Organosulfate Formation through the Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide with Unsaturated Fatty Acids and Long-Chain Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Passananti, Monica; Kong, Lingdong; Shang, Jing; Dupart, Yoan; Perrier, Sébastien; Chen, Jianmin; Donaldson, D James; George, Christian

    2016-08-22

    The heterogeneous reaction between SO2 and unsaturated compounds results in the efficient production of organosulfates for several fatty acids and long-chain alkenes. The presence of an acid group, the physical state of the reactants (solid or liquid), the nature of the double bond (cis, trans, terminal), and the use of light irradiation all have an impact on the reaction rate. The reaction was investigated using different set-ups (coated flow tube, aerosol flow tube, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform cell). The reaction products were identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry and the impact of this reaction on organosulfate formation in the atmosphere is discussed. PMID:27458109

  19. Dynamic behavior of the bray-liebhafsky oscillatory reaction controlled by sulfuric acid and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejić, N.; Vujković, M.; Maksimović, J.; Ivanović, A.; Anić, S.; Čupić, Ž.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.

    2011-12-01

    The non-periodic, periodic and chaotic regimes in the Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) oscillatory reaction observed in a continuously fed well stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under isothermal conditions at various inflow concentrations of the sulfuric acid were experimentally studied. In each series (at any fixed temperature), termination of oscillatory behavior via saddle loop infinite period bifurcation (SNIPER) as well as some kind of the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation is presented. In addition, it was found that an increase of temperature, in different series of experiments resulted in the shift of bifurcation point towards higher values of sulfuric acid concentration.

  20. Concerted effects in the reaction of rad OH radicals with aromatics: radiolytic oxidation of salicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarran, G.; Schuler, R. H.

    2003-06-01

    Liquid chromatographic and capillary electrophoretic studies have been used to resolve the products produced in the radiolytic oxidation of salicylic acid in aqueous solution. These studies have shown that, as in the case of phenol, rad OH radicals preferentially add to the positions ortho and para to the OH substituent. However, in contrast to its reaction with phenol, addition at the ortho position is favored over addition at the para position. Because rad OH radical is a strong electrophile this difference suggests that the electron population at the ortho position in the salicylate anion is enhanced as a result of the hydrogen bonding in salicylic acid.