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Sample records for acid decomposition reaction

  1. Formic Acid Decomposition on Au catalysts: DFT, Microkinetic Modeling, and Reaction Kinetics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Suyash; Li, Sha; Carrasquillo-Flores, Ronald; Alba-Rubio, Ana C.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-04-01

    A combined theoretical and experimental approach is presented that uses a comprehensive mean-field microkinetic model, reaction kinetics experiments, and scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging to unravel the reaction mechanism and provide insights into the nature of active sites for formic acid (HCOOH) decomposition on Au/SiC catalysts. All input parameters for the microkinetic model are derived from periodic, self-consistent, generalized gradient approximation (GGA-PW91) density functional theory calculations on the Au(111), Au(100), and Au(211) surfaces and are subsequently adjusted to describe the experimental HCOOH decomposition rate and selectivity data. It is shown that the HCOOH decomposition follows the formate (HCOO) mediated path, with 100% selectivity toward the dehydrogenation products (CO21H2) under all reaction conditions. An analysis of the kinetic parameters suggests that an Au surface in which the coordination number of surface Au atoms is 4 may provide a better model for the active site of HCOOH decomposition on these specific supported Au catalysts.

  2. Palladium-atom catalyzed formic acid decomposition and the switch of reaction mechanism with temperature.

    PubMed

    He, Nan; Li, Zhen Hua

    2016-04-21

    Formic acid decomposition (FAD) reaction has been an innovative way for hydrogen energy. Noble metal catalysts, especially palladium-containing nanoparticles, supported or unsupported, perform well in this reaction. Herein, we considered the simplest model, wherein one Pd atom is used as the FAD catalyst. With high-level theoretical calculations of CCSD(T)/CBS quality, we investigated all possible FAD pathways. The results show that FAD catalyzed by one Pd atom follows a different mechanism compared with that catalyzed by surfaces or larger clusters. At the initial stage of the reaction, FAD follows a dehydration route and is quickly poisoned by CO due to the formation of very stable PdCO. PdCO then becomes the actual catalyst for FAD at temperatures approximately below 1050 K. Beyond 1050 K, there is a switch of catalyst from PdCO to Pd atom. The results also show that dehydration is always favoured over dehydrogenation on either the Pd-atom or PdCO catalyst. On the Pd-atom catalyst, neither dehydrogenation nor dehydration follows the formate mechanism. In contrast, on the PdCO catalyst, dehydrogenation follows the formate mechanism, whereas dehydration does not. We also systematically investigated the performance of 24 density functional theory methods. We found that the performance of the double hybrid mPW2PLYP functional is the best, followed by the B3LYP, B3PW91, N12SX, M11, and B2PLYP functionals.

  3. Hydrazine decomposition and other reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Warren E. (Inventor); La France, Donald S. (Inventor); Voge, Hervey H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to the catalytic decomposition of hydrazine, catalysts useful for this decomposition and other reactions, and to reactions in hydrogen atmospheres generally using carbon-containing catalysts.

  4. Organic acids tunably catalyze carbonic acid decomposition.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Busch, Daryle H; Subramaniam, Bala; Thompson, Ward H

    2014-07-10

    Density functional theory calculations predict that the gas-phase decomposition of carbonic acid, a high-energy, 1,3-hydrogen atom transfer reaction, can be catalyzed by a monocarboxylic acid or a dicarboxylic acid, including carbonic acid itself. Carboxylic acids are found to be more effective catalysts than water. Among the carboxylic acids, the monocarboxylic acids outperform the dicarboxylic ones wherein the presence of an intramolecular hydrogen bond hampers the hydrogen transfer. Further, the calculations reveal a direct correlation between the catalytic activity of a monocarboxylic acid and its pKa, in contrast to prior assumptions about carboxylic-acid-catalyzed hydrogen-transfer reactions. The catalytic efficacy of a dicarboxylic acid, on the other hand, is significantly affected by the strength of an intramolecular hydrogen bond. Transition-state theory estimates indicate that effective rate constants for the acid-catalyzed decomposition are four orders-of-magnitude larger than those for the water-catalyzed reaction. These results offer new insights into the determinants of general acid catalysis with potentially broad implications.

  5. A characterization of the two-step reaction mechanism of phenol decomposition by a Fenton reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdés, Cristian; Alzate-Morales, Jans; Osorio, Edison; Villaseñor, Jorge; Navarro-Retamal, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    Phenol is one of the worst contaminants at date, and its degradation has been a crucial task over years. Here, the decomposition process of phenol, in a Fenton reaction, is described. Using scavengers, it was observed that decomposition of phenol was mainly influenced by production of hydroxyl radicals. Experimental and theoretical activation energies (Ea) for phenol oxidation intermediates were calculated. According to these Ea, phenol decomposition is a two-step reaction mechanism mediated predominantly by hydroxyl radicals, producing a decomposition yield order given as hydroquinone > catechol > resorcinol. Furthermore, traces of reaction derived acids were detected by HPLC and GS-MS.

  6. Pyrite cinder as a cost-effective heterogeneous catalyst in heterogeneous Fenton reaction: decomposition of H(2)O(2) and degradation of Acid Red B.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deli; Liu, Yanxia; Duan, Dong; Ma, Luming

    2014-01-01

    Pyrite cinder (PyC) was employed as a heterogeneous Fenton-like catalyst, and its catalytic activity was evaluated in view of the effects of catalyst dosage, pH and leaching metal ions. PyC showed significant reactivity, and the pseudo-first-order kinetic rate constant for decomposition of H(2)O(2) and degradation of Acid Red B (ARB) were 3.4 and 14.89 (10⁻³ min⁻¹) respectively when pH = 5. When 20 g/L PyC was added into 10 mM H(2)O(2) solution in neutral pH, H(2)O(2) could be completely degraded within 4 h, and more than 90% ARB was removed. Leaching metal ions from PyC were found to have little effect on decomposition of H(2)O(2) or on degradation of ARB. PyC still had high catalytic activity after five successive runs. The decomposition mechanism of H(2)O(2) was analyzed and the Haber-Weiss mechanism was employed in this paper. The electron spin resonance image showed •OH was produced and increased between 3 and 5 min in the PyC catalyzing H(2)O(2) reaction, which demonstrated that PyC had a durable ability to produce •OH.

  7. Acid-catalytic decomposition of peracetic acid in the liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Kharchuk, V.G.; Kolenko, I.P.; Petrov, L.A.

    1985-12-01

    This paper elucidates the kinetic relationships of peracetic acid (PAA) decomposition in the presence of mineral acids and their heterogeneous analogs, polystyrene-di-vinylbenzene cation-exchangers, differing in physicochemical and morphological parameters. It is shown that the thermal decomposition of PAA in acetic acid is an acid-catalyzed reaction. The controlling step of the reaction is protonation of the substrate with formation of an active intermediate form. Sulfonated cation-exchangers are twice as effective as sulfuric acid in this process. Polystyrene-divinylbenzene sulfonated cation-exchangers can be used with success as acid catalysts in oxidation processes involving PAA, because of their high effectiveness, stability, and availability.

  8. Dinitraminic acid (HDN) isomerization and self-decomposition revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Martin; Brinck, Tore

    2008-06-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and the ab initio based CBS-QB3 method have been used to study possible decomposition pathways of dinitraminic acid HN(NO 2) 2 (HDN) in gas-phase. The proton transfer isomer of HDN, O 2NNN(O)OH, and its conformers can be formed and converted into each other through intra- and intermolecular proton transfer. The latter has been shown to proceed substantially faster via double proton transfer. The main mechanism for HDN decomposition is found to be initiated by a dissociation reaction, splitting of nitrogen dioxide from either HDN or the HDN isomer. This reaction has an activation enthalpy of 36.5 kcal/mol at the CBS-QB3 level, which is in good agreement with experimental estimates of the decomposition barrier.

  9. Photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) by TiO2 in the presence of oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Pengyi

    2011-09-15

    Heterogeneous photocatalytic decomposition of perfluoroocatanoic acid (PFOA) by TiO(2) under 254 nm UV light was investigated. Adding oxalic acid as a hole-scavenger significantly accelerated PFOA decomposition under nitrogen atmosphere. Fluoride ion, formic acid and six shorter-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) bearing C(2)-C(7) were identified as intermediates. When using perchloric acid (HClO(4)) as a replacement of oxalic acid to maintain the same pH of the reaction solution, PFOA did not decomposition efficiently. Compared with oxalic acid, potassium iodide (KI, another hole-scavenger) also led to a slower PFOA decomposition, while the addition of an electron acceptor (potassium persulfate, K(2)S(2)O(8)) obviously inhibited PFOA decomposition. This suggested that oxalic acid played more than one role in PFOA decomposition rather than simply providing acidity and acting as a hole-scavenger. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements confirmed the existence of carboxyl anion radicals (CO(2)(-)) in the photocatalytic process, which was a result of the reaction between oxalic acid and photogenerated hole. These findings indicated that PFOA decomposition was primarily induced by CO(2)(-) radicals, although photogenerated electron was also conducive to PFOA decomposition. A possible mechanism for PFOA decomposition was proposed.

  10. Decomposition of pertoluic acid in chlorobenzene solution

    SciTech Connect

    Ariko, N.G.; Kornilova, N.N.; Mitskevich, N.I.

    1985-09-01

    The kinetics and composition of the decomposition products of pertoluic acid in chlorobenzene at 353-403 K were studied. The activation energy of the gross decomposition is 82.4 is identical to 6 kJ/mole; the main products are pertoluic acid and CO/sub 2/. On the basis of the dependence of the yields of CO/sub 2/ on the concentration of the peracid (0.01-0.05 M), it was concluded that the peracid undergoes radical breakdown, and induced breakdown with abstraction of a H atom from OOH group occurs. The formation of toluence (conversion product of the CH/sub 3/-C/sub 6/H/sub 4/. radical) and O/sub 2/ was demonstrated.

  11. Reactions of CO2 with aqueous piperazine solutions: formation and decomposition of mono- and dicarbamic acids/carbamates of piperazine at 25.0 °C.

    PubMed

    Conway, William; Fernandes, Debra; Beyad, Yaser; Burns, Robert; Lawrance, Geoffrey; Puxty, Graeme; Maeder, Marcel

    2013-02-07

    Piperazine (PZ) is widely recognized as a promising solvent for postcombustion capture (PCC) of carbon dioxide (CO(2)). In view of the highly conflicting data describing the kinetic reactions of CO(2)(aq) in piperazine solutions, the present study focuses on the identification of the chemical mechanism, specifically the kinetic pathways for CO(2)(aq) in piperazine solutions that form the mono- and dicarbamates, using the analysis of stopped-flow spectrophotometric kinetic measurements and (1)H NMR spectroscopic data at 25.0 °C. The complete set of rate and equilibrium constants for the kinetic pathways, including estimations for the protonation constants of the suite of piperazine carbamates/carbamic acids, is reported here using an extended kinetic model which incorporates all possible reactions for CO(2)(aq) in piperazine solutions. From the kinetic data determined in the present study, the reaction of CO(2)(aq) with free PZ was found to be the dominant reactive pathway. The superior reactivity of piperazine is confirmed in the kinetic rate constant determined for the formation of piperazine monocarbamic acid (k(7) = 2.43(3) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), which is within the wide range of published values, making it one of the faster reacting amines. The corresponding equilibrium constant for the formation of the monocarbamic acid, K(7), markedly exceeds that of other monoamines. Kinetic and equilibrium constants for the remaining pathways indicate a minor contribution to the overall kinetics at high pH; however, these pathways may become more significant at higher CO(2) loadings and lower pH values where the concentrations of the reactive species are correspondingly higher.

  12. Decomposition of peracetic acid catalyzed by vanadium complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, A.P.; Gekhman, A.E.; Moiseev, I.I.; Polotryuk, O.Y.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies the decomposition of peracetic acid (AcOOH) in acetic acid (AcOH) catalyzed by vanadium complexes. It is shown that peractic acid in acetic acid solutions of ammonium anadate decomposes with the predominant formation of 0/sub 2/ and small amounts of CO/sub 2/, the yield of which increases with increasing temperature and peracetic acid concentration. Both reactions proceed without the formation of free radicals in amounts detectable by ESR spectroscopy. The rate of oxygen release under conditions in which the formation of CO/sub 2/ is insignificant obeys a kinetic equation indicating the intermediate formation of a complex between V/sup 5 +/ ions and peracetic acid and the slow conversion of this complex into the observed products.

  13. Study of condition-dependent decomposition reactions; Part I. The thermal behaviour and decomposition of 2-nitrobenzoyl chloride.

    PubMed

    Lever, Sarah D; Papadaki, Maria

    2004-11-11

    The risks associated with batch processing in the manufacture of chemicals and pharmaceuticals via highly exothermic reactions are of special interest due to the possibility of runaway reactions. o-Nitrated benzoyl chlorides are intermediates in the production of agrochemicals and are produced via the reaction of o-nitrated carboxylic acids with thionyl chloride in a solvent mixture. ortho-Nitrated acyl chlorides have exploded violently on attempted distillation on numerous occasions. An inadequate investigation of the process prior to large-scale operation is the most likely cause. Here we present preliminary results of studies on the decomposition of 2-nitrobenzoyl chloride. This study has revealed that the decomposition reaction is strongly condition dependent. The heating rate of the sample plays a preponderant role in the course of the decomposition reaction. That renders the interpretation of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) or adiabatic calorimetry measurements, which are routinely used to assess the thermochemistry and safety of the large-scale reactions, problematic. Following this on-going study, we report here key features of the system that have been identified.

  14. Thermodynamics behind carbon nanotube growth via endothermic catalytic decomposition reaction.

    PubMed

    Harutyunyan, Avetik R; Kuznetsov, Oleg A; Brooks, Christopher J; Mora, Elena; Chen, Gugang

    2009-02-24

    Carbon filaments can be grown using hydrocarbons with either exothermic or endothermic catalytic decomposition enthalpies. By in situ monitoring the evolution of the reaction enthalpy during nanotube synthesis via methane gas, we found that although the decomposition reaction of methane is endothermic an exothermic process is superimposed which accompanies the nanotube growth. Analysis shows that the main contributor in this liberated heat is the radiative heat transfer from the surroundings, along with dehydrogenation reaction of in situ formed secondary hydrocarbons on the catalyst surface and the carbon hydrogenation/oxidation processes. This finding implies that nanotube growth process enthalpy is exothermic, and particularly, it extends the commonly accepted temperature gradient driven growth mechanism to the growth via hydrocarbons with endothermic decomposition enthalpy.

  15. Kinetics of non-isothermal decomposition of cinnamic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming-rui; Qi, Zhen-li; Chen, Fei-xiong; Yue, Xia-xin

    2014-07-01

    The thermal stability and kinetics of decomposition of cinnamic acid were investigated by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry at four heating rates. The activation energies of this process were calculated from analysis of TG curves by methods of Flynn-Wall-Ozawa, Doyle, Distributed Activation Energy Model, Šatava-Šesták and Kissinger, respectively. There are only one stage of thermal decomposition process in TG and two endothermic peaks in DSC. For this decomposition process of cinnamic acid, E and log A[s-1] were determined to be 81.74 kJ mol-1 and 8.67, respectively. The mechanism was Mampel Power law (the reaction order, n = 1), with integral form G(α) = α (α = 0.1-0.9). Moreover, thermodynamic properties of Δ H ≠, Δ S ≠, Δ G ≠ were 77.96 kJ mol-1, -90.71 J mol-1 K-1, 119.41 kJ mol-1.

  16. Reaction kinetics of paddy husk thermal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.K.; Sharma, S.K.; Singh, D.

    1996-12-31

    Paddy husk production in world is estimated to be around 80 million tons. It has a calorific value of 15 MJ/kg and thus has a tremendous potential as a renewable energy source. Its current uses are: cattle feed, raw material for paper and board, furfural production and silica industries. A large quantity of paddy husk is used in husk fired boiler furnaces at a very low efficiency. For efficient design of husk fired furnaces, reliable data on thermal characteristics of rice husk is essential which is lacking in the literature. In the present study, paddy husk was subjected to Thermogravimetric Analysis at heating rates of 10 and 100 C/min. in a thermal analyzer. The analysis was carried out in air and mixture of oxygen and nitrogen (5:95%) atmosphere. Reaction kinetic parameters such as activation energy, frequency factor and order of reaction have been evaluated and reported. These are relevant to the design of paddy husk fired gasifiers, furnaces and other thermochemical conversion equipment. The results of the thermochemical studies and their potential applications are presented in the paper.

  17. Decomposition of two haloacetic acids in water using UV radiation, ozone and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kunping; Guo, Jinsong; Yang, Min; Junji, Hirotsuji; Deng, Rongsen

    2009-03-15

    The decomposition of two haloacetic acids (HAAs), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), from water was studied by means of single oxidants: ozone, UV radiation; and by the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) constituted by combinations of O(3)/UV radiation, H(2)O(2)/UV radiation, O(3)/H(2)O(2), O(3)/H(2)O(2)/UV radiation. The concentrations of HAAs were analyzed at specified time intervals to elucidate the decomposition of HAAs. Single O(3) or UV did not result in perceptible decomposition of HAAs within the applied reaction time. O(3)/UV showed to be more suitable for the decomposition of DCAA and TCAA in water among the six methods of oxidation. Decomposition of DCAA was easier than TCAA by AOPs. For O(3)/UV in the semi-continuous mode, the effective utilization rate of ozone for HAA decomposition decreased with ozone addition. The kinetics of HAAs decomposition by O(3)/UV and the influence of coexistent humic acids and HCO(3)(-) on the decomposition process were investigated. The decomposition of the HAAs by the O(3)/UV accorded with the pseudo-first-order mode under the constant initial dissolved O(3) concentration and fixed UV radiation. The pseudo-first-order rate constant for the decomposition of DCAA was more than four times that for TCAA. Humic acids can cause the H(2)O(2) accumulation and the decrease in rate constants of HAAs decomposition in the O(3)/UV process. The rate constants for the decomposition of DCAA and TCAA decreased by 41.1% and 23.8%, respectively, when humic acids were added at a concentration of 1.2mgTOC/L. The rate constants decreased by 43.5% and 25.9%, respectively, at an HCO(3)(-) concentration of 1.0mmol/L.

  18. Influence of Sodium Carbonate on Decomposition of Formic Acid by Discharge inside Bubble in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2015-09-01

    An influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubble in water was investigated. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of addition of sodium carbonate, the pH value increased with decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the increase of pH value contributed to improve an efficiency of the formic acid decomposition because the reaction rate of ozone and formic acid increased with increasing pH value. In the case of argon injection, the decomposition rate was not affected by the pH value owing to the high rate constants for loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  19. Kinetics of gas phase formic acid decomposition on platinum single crystal and polycrystalline surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detwiler, Michael D.; Milligan, Cory A.; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-06-01

    Formic acid dehydrogenation turnover rates (TORs) were measured on Pt(111), Pt(100), and polycrystalline Pt foil surfaces at a total pressure of 800 Torr between 413 and 513 K in a batch reactor connected to an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The TORs, apparent activation energies, and reaction orders are not sensitive to the structure of the Pt surface, within the precision of the measurements. CO introduced into the batch reactor depressed the formic acid dehydrogenation TOR and increased the reaction's apparent activation energies on Pt(111) and Pt(100), consistent with behavior predicted by the Temkin equation. Two reaction mechanisms were explored which explain the formic acid decomposition mechanism on Pt, both of which include dissociative adsorption of formic acid, rate limiting formate decomposition, and quasi-equilibrated hydrogen recombination and CO adsorption. No evidence was found that catalytic supports used in previous studies altered the reaction kinetics or mechanism.

  20. Revisiting formic acid decomposition on metallic powder catalysts: Exploding the HCOOH decomposition volcano curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yadan; Roberts, Charles A.; Perkins, Ryan T.; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-08-01

    This study revisits the classic volcano curve for HCOOH decomposition by metal catalysts by taking a modern catalysis approach. The metal catalysts (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, Pd, Ni, Rh, Co and Fe) were prepared by H2 reduction of the corresponding metal oxides. The number of surface active sites (Ns) was determined by formic acid chemisorption. In situ IR indicated that both monodentate and bidentate/bridged surface HCOO* were present on the metals. Heats of adsorption (ΔHads) for surface HCOO* values on metals were taken from recently reported DFT calculations. Kinetics for surface HCOO* decomposition (krds) were determined with TPD spectroscopy. Steady-state specific activity (TOF = activity/Ns) for HCOOH decomposition over the metals was calculated from steady-state activity (μmol/g-s) and Ns (μmol/g). Steady-state TOFs for HCOOH decomposition weakly correlated with surface HCOO* decomposition kinetics (krds) and ΔHads of surface HCOO* intermediates. The plot of TOF vs. ΔHads for HCOOH decomposition on metal catalysts does not reproduce the classic volcano curve, but shows that TOF depends on both ΔHads and decomposition kinetics (krds) of surface HCOO* intermediates. This is the first time that the classic catalysis study of HCOOH decomposition on metallic powder catalysts has been repeated since its original publication.

  1. Azo dye Acid Red 27 decomposition kinetics during ozone oxidation and adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Beak, Mi H; Ijagbemi, Christianah O; Kim, Dong S

    2009-05-01

    To elucidate the effects of ozone dosage, catalysts, and temperature on azo dye decomposition rate in treatment processes, the decomposition kinetics of Acid Red 27 by ozone was investigated. Acid Red 27 decomposition rate followed the first-order reaction with complete dye discoloration in 20 min of ozone reaction. The dye decay rate increases as ozone dosage increases. Using Mn, Zn and Ni as transition metal catalysts during the ozone oxidation process, Mn displayed the greatest catalytic effect with significant increase in the rate of decomposition. The rate of decomposition decreases with increase in temperature and beyond 40 degrees C, increase in decomposition rate was followed by a corresponding increase in temperature. The FT-IR spectra in the range of 1,000-1,800 cm(-1) revealed specific band variations after the ozone oxidation process, portraying structural changes traceable to cleavage of bonds in the benzene ring, the sulphite salt group, and the C-N located beside the -N = N- bond. From the (1)H-NMR spectra, the breaking down of the benzene ring showed the disappearance of the 10 H peaks at 7-8 ppm, which later emerged with a new peak at 6.16 ppm. In a parallel batch test of azo dye Acid Red 27 adsorption onto activated carbon, a low adsorption capacity was observed in the adsorption test carried out after three minutes of ozone injection while the adsorption process without ozone injection yielded a high adsorption capacity.

  2. Stratospheric Reactions of Peroxynitric Acid.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-23

    was always at least 10 times greater than the HOONO2 concentration at the time of the 03 addition. Because of the small absorption coefficient [ Herzberg ...and J. N. Pitts, Jr., Pressure and temperature dependence of the unimolecular decomposition of HO2N02, J. Chem. Phys., 68, 4505, 1978. Herzberg ... Gerhard , Infrared and Raman Spectra, Vol. II, van Nostrand Reinhold Company, 1945, p. 286. Howard, C. J., Kinetics of the reaction of HO2 with NO2, J. Chem

  3. Explosive enantiospecific decomposition of aspartic acid on Cu surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mhatre, B S; Dutta, S; Reinicker, A; Karagoz, B; Gellman, A J

    2016-12-01

    Aspartic acid adsorbed on Cu surfaces is doubly deprotonated. On chiral Cu(643)(R&S) its enantiomers undergo enantiospecific decomposition via an autocatalytic explosion. Once initiated, the decomposition mechanism proceeds via sequential cleavage of the C3-C4 and C1-C2 bonds each yielding CO2, followed by conversion of the remaining species into N[triple bond, length as m-dash]CCH3.

  4. Comprehensive study of the chemical reactions resulting from the decomposition of chloroform in alkaline aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevez Mews, Jorge

    Chloroform (CHCl3) is a volatile liquid, which has a rather slow rate of decomposition in ground water. It is a known carcinogen and one of the most common contaminants found at toxic waste sites. The dominant degradation process for chloroform in both the atmosphere and the groundwater is the reaction with the hydroxyl radical or hydroxide ion. This process triggers a sequence of reactions which ultimately yield carbon monoxide, hydrogen chloride, and formic acid. The rate of chloroform degradation is considerably larger in solution than that in the gas phase and it increases dramatically with increasing pH. However, only one of the viable reactions had been studied previously at a high level of theory in solution. It is of great interest to gain a deeper understanding of the decomposition reaction mechanism. Quantum mechanical methods are well suited for studying the mechanism of organic reactions. However, a full quantum mechanical treatment of the entire fluid system is not computationally feasible. In this work, combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods are used for studying chemical reactions in condensed phases. In these calculations, the solute molecules are treated quantum mechanically (QM), whereas the solvent molecules are approximated by empirical (MM) potential energy functions. The use of quantum mechanics and statistical sampling simulation is necessary to determine the reaction free energy profile. In the present study, the ab initio Hartree-Fock theory along with the 3-21G basis set was used in the quantum mechanical calculations to elucidate the reaction pathways of chloroform decomposition, with a focus on basic reaction conditions. Statistical mechanical Monte Carlo approach was then applied in molecular mechanical simulations, employing the empirical TIP3P model for water. We employed state-of-the-art electronic structure methods to determine the gas-phase inter-nuclear potential energy profile for all the relevant

  5. Thermal decomposition of gaseous ammonium nitrate at low pressure: kinetic modeling of product formation and heterogeneous decomposition of nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Lin, M C

    2009-12-03

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH(4)NO(3) (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH(4)NO(3) at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH(3) and HNO(3), followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO(3), HNO(3) + M --> OH + NO(2) + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N(2), N(2)O, H(2)O, and NH(3), which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH(3)-NO(2) (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO(3) itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO(3) in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO(3), HNO(3) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)) --> OH + NO(2) + (B(2)O(3)/SiO(2)), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH(3) and H(2)O; the rate could be represented by k(2b) = 7.91 x 10(7) exp(-12 600/T) s(-1), which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO(3) decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  6. Thermal Decomposition of Gaseous Ammonium Nitrate at Low Pressure: Kinetic Modeling of Product Formation and Heterogeneous Decomposition of Nitric Acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Lin, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, NH4NO3 (AN), in the gas phase has been studied at 423-56 K by pyrolysis/mass spectrometry under low-pressure conditions using a Saalfeld reactor coated with boric acid. The sublimation of NH4NO3 at 423 K was proposed to produce equal amounts of NH3 and HNO3, followed by the decomposition reaction of HNO3, HNO3 + M → OH + NO2 + M (where M = third-body and reactor surface). The absolute yields of N2, N2O, H2O, and NH3, which can be unambiguously measured and quantitatively calibrated under a constant pressure at 5-6.2 torr He are kinetically modeled using the detailed [H,N,O]-mechanism established earlier for the simulation of NH3-NO2 (Park, J.; Lin, M. C. Technologies and Combustion for a Clean Environment. Proc. 4th Int. Conf. 1997, 34-1, 1-5) and ADN decomposition reactions (Park, J.; Chakraborty, D.; Lin, M. C. Proc. Combust. Inst. 1998, 27, 2351-2357). Since the homogeneous decomposition reaction of HNO3 itself was found to be too slow to account for the consumption of reactants and the formation of products, we also introduced the heterogeneous decomposition of HNO3 in our kinetic modeling. The heterogeneous decomposition rate of HNO3, HNO3 + (B2O3/SiO2) → OH + NO2 + (B2O3/SiO2), was determined by varying its rate to match the modeled result to the measured concentrations of NH3 and H2O; the rate could be represented by k2b = 7.91 × 107 exp(-12 600/T) s-1, which appears to be consistent with those reported by Johnston and co-workers (Johnston, H. S.; Foering, L.; Tao, Y.-S.; Messerly, G. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1951, 73, 2319-2321) for HNO3 decomposition on glass reactors at higher temperatures. Notably, the concentration profiles of all species measured could be satisfactorily predicted by the existing [H,N,O]-mechanism with the heterogeneous initiation process.

  7. Kinetics of glucose decomposition during dilute-acid hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Qian; Lee, Yong Y; Torget, Robert W

    2004-01-01

    Recent research work in-house both at Auburn University and National Renewable Energy Laboratory has demonstrated that extremely low concentrations of acid (e.g., 0.05-0.2 wt% sulfuric acid) and high temperatures (e.g., 200-230 degrees C) are reaction conditions that can be effectively applied for hydrolysis of the cellulosic component of biomass. These conditions are far from those of the conventional dilute-acid hydrolysis processes, and the kinetic data for glucose decomposition are not currently available. We investigated the kinetics of glucose decomposition covering pH values of 1.5-2.2 and temperatures of 180-230 degrees C using glass ampoule reactors. The primary factors controlling glucose decomposition are the reaction medium, acid concentration, and temperature. Based on the experimental data, a kinetic model was developed and the best-fit kinetic parameters were determined. However, a consistent discrepancy in the rate of glucose disappearance was found between that of the model based on pure glucose data and that observed during the actual process of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysis. This was taken as an indication that glucose recombines with acid-soluble lignin during the hydrolysis process, and this conclusion was incorporated accordingly into the overall model of glucose decomposition.

  8. Effect of initial solution pH on photo-induced reductive decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yan; Zhang, Chao-Jie; Chen, Pei; Zhou, Qi; Zhang, Wei-Xian

    2014-07-01

    The effects of initial solution pH on the decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) with hydrated electrons as reductant were investigated. The reductive decomposition of PFOA depends strongly on the solution pH. In the pH range of 5.0-10.0, the decomposition and defluorination rates of PFOA increased with the increase of the initial solution pH. The rate constant was 0.0295 min(-1) at pH 10.0, which was more than 49.0 times higher than that at pH 5.0. Higher pH also inhibits the generation of toxic intermediates during the PFOA decomposition. For example, the short-chain PFCAs reached a lower maximum concentration in shorter reaction time as pH increasing. The peak areas of accumulated fluorinated and iodinated hydrocarbons detected by GC/MS under acidic conditions were nearly 10-100 times more than those under alkaline conditions. In short, alkaline conditions were more favorable for photo-induced reduction of PFOA as high pH promoted the decomposition of PFOA and inhibited the accumulation of intermediate products. The concentration of hydrated electron, detected by laser flash photolysis, increased with the increase of the initial pH. This was the main reason why the decomposition of PFOA in the UV-KI system depended strongly on the initial pH.

  9. Role of tunable acid catalysis in decomposition of α-hydroxyalkyl hydroperoxides and mechanistic implications for tropospheric chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Busch, Daryle H; Subramaniam, Bala; Thompson, Ward H

    2014-10-16

    Electronic structure calculations have been used to investigate possible gas-phase decomposition pathways of α-hydroxyalkyl hydroperoxides (HHPs), an important source of tropospheric hydrogen peroxide and carbonyl compounds. The uncatalyzed as well as water- and acid-catalyzed decomposition of multiple HHPs have been examined at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The calculations indicate that, compared to an uncatalyzed or water-catalyzed reaction, the free-energy barrier of an acid-catalyzed decomposition leading to an aldehyde or ketone and hydrogen peroxide is dramatically lowered. The calculations also find a direct correlation between the catalytic effect of an acid and the distance separating its hydrogen acceptor and donor sites. Interestingly, the catalytic effect of an acid on the HHP decomposition resulting in the formation of carboxylic acid and water is relatively much smaller. Moreover, since the free-energy barrier of the acid-catalyzed aldehyde- or ketone-forming decomposition is ∼ 25% lower than that required to break the O-OH linkage of the HHP leading to the formation of hydroxyl radical, these results suggest that HHP decomposition is likely not an important source of tropospheric hydroxyl radical. Finally, transition state theory estimates indicate that the effective rate constants for the acid-catalyzed aldehyde- or ketone-forming HHP decomposition pathways are 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than those for the water-catalyzed reaction, indicating that an acid-catalyzed HHP decomposition is kinetically favored as well.

  10. A novel decomposition technique of friable asbestos by CHClF2-decomposed acidic gas.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Kozawa, Takahiro; Onda, Ayumu; Kanazawa, Masazumi; Shinohara, Junichi; Takanami, Tetsuro; Shiraishi, Masatsugu

    2009-04-30

    Asbestos was widely used in numerous materials and building products due to their desirable properties. It is, however, well known that asbestos inhalation causes health damage and its inexpensive decomposition technique is necessary to be developed for pollution prevention. We report here an innovative decomposition technique of friable asbestos by acidic gas (HF and HCl) generated from the decomposition of CHClF(2) by the reaction with superheated steam at 800 degrees C. Chrysotile-asbestos fibers were completely decomposed to sellaite and magnesium silicofluoride hexahydrate by the reaction with CHClF(2)-decomposed acidic gas at 150 degrees C for 30 min. At high temperatures beyond 400 degrees C, sellaite and hematite were detected in the decomposed product. In addition, crocidolite containing wastes and amosite containing wastes were decomposed at 500 degrees C and 600 degrees C for 30 min, respectively, by CHClF(2)-decomposed acidic gas. The observation of the reaction products by phase-contrast microscopy (PCM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed that the resulting products did not contain any asbestos.

  11. Photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid by transition-metal modified titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng-Jia; Lo, Shang-Lien; Lee, Yu-Chi; Huang, Chang-Chieh

    2015-05-15

    Transition-metal modified TiO₂ was used in a UV reactor to assist in decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in aqueous solutions. Comparing TiO₂ and two types of metal-modified TiO₂ (Fe-TiO₂ and Cu-TiO₂), Cu-TiO₂ exhibited the highest catalytic activity during PFOA decomposition and defluorination. After 12 h of reaction, the PFOA decomposition and defluorination efficiencies by the UV/Cu-TiO₂ system reached 91% and 19%, respectively. PFOA was decomposed into fluoride ions (F(-)) and shorter perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) such as C₆ F₁₃COOH, C₅F₁₁COOH, C₄F₉COOH, C₃F₇COOH, C₂F₅COOH and CF₃COOH. The pseudo-first-order and pseudo-zero-order kinetics were used to model the decomposition and defluorination of PFOA, respectively. Rate constant values of PFOA decomposition for the UV/TiO₂, UV/Fe-TiO₂, and UV/Cu-TiO₂ systems were 0.0001, 0.0015, and 0.0031 min(-1), respectively, while rate constant values of PFOA defluorination for the UV/Fe-TiO₂, and UV/Cu-TiO₂ systems were 0.0048 and 0.0077 mg/L·min(-1), respectively. The photocatalysts were prepared by a photodeposition synthesis method and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray, X-ray diffraction and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The Fe-TiO₂ and Cu-TiO₂ catalysts exhibited considerably higher activities than that of TiO₂. The experimental results have demonstrated that the UV/Fe-TiO₂ and UV/Cu-TiO₂ systems could produce traps to capture photo-induced electrons, thereby reduce electron-hole recombination during photocatalytic reactions and consequently enhance the PFOA decomposition.

  12. Rhodamine-6G can photosensitize folic acid decomposition through electron transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Ito, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    Rhodamine-6G photosensitized folic acid decomposition in aqueous solution, and its quantum yield in the presence of 10 μM folic acid was 9.9 × 10-6. A possible mechanism of this photodecomposition is direct oxidation through an electron transfer from folic acid to rhodamine-6G. The fluorescence lifetime of rhodamine-6G was slightly decreased by folic acid, suggesting electron transfer in the excited singlet state of rhodamine-6G. The quenching rate coefficient estimated from the Stern-Volmer plot of the fluorescence quenching supported that this electron transfer proceeds as a diffusion-controlled reaction. The quantum yields of the electron transfer and the following reaction could be determined.

  13. Preparation and properties of novel double-chain nonionic surfactants with acid decomposition function.

    PubMed

    Ono, Daisuke; Sato, Hirofumi; Shizuma, Motohiro; Nakamura, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Novel double-chain nonionic surfactants with an acid decomposition function were prepared by acid-catalyzed condensation of chloroacetone with fatty alcohols (octyl, decyl, and dodecyl), followed by a Williamson reaction with polyethylene glycol without any expensive reagents and special equipment. These surfactants showed easy micelle formation compared to those of polyoxyethylene (n=9) dodecyl ether (C(12)EO9), and good foaming properties. The emulsion stability of these surfactants was almost the same as that of C(12)EO9. They decomposed completely after 30 min at pH 1. After 28 days they were more than 60% biodegradable and were almost the same as sodium dodecanoate.

  14. An analysis of the thermal decomposition reactions of organic electrolytes used in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campion, Christopher Lawrence

    The thermal decomposition of LiPF6 in solution with carbonate solvents has been investigated. The thermal dissociation of LiPF6 into LiF and PF5 is known. In solution, PF 5 reacts with carbonates to form a variety of decomposition products including: carbon dioxide (CO2), ethers (R2O), alkylfluorides (RF), phosphorus oxyfluoride (OPF3), and fluorophosphates (OPF 2OR, OPF(OR)2), assignment of structure is supported by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography with Mass Selective Detection (GC-MS). Similar decomposition products are observed during the thermal decomposition of carbonate solutions of LiPF6. Since solutions of LiPF6 are widely used as Li-ion battery electrolytes, there is interest among battery manufacturers and researchers as to the thermal decomposition of this electrolyte. Here we describe the structural and mechanistic investigations of the thermal decomposition of lithium-ion battery electrolytes. The electrolyte undergoes autocatalytic decomposition reactions at moderately elevated temperatures (80--100°C) to produce a large number of decomposition products. Results indicate that the thermal decomposition reactions are suppressed by the electrode, particularly the cathode, or intended stabilizing additives.

  15. Selective hydrogen production from formic acid decomposition on Pd-Au bimetallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wen-Yueh; Mullen, Gregory M; Flaherty, David W; Mullins, C Buddie

    2014-08-06

    Pd-Au catalysts have shown exceptional performance for selective hydrogen production via HCOOH decomposition, a promising alternative to solve issues associated with hydrogen storage and distribution. In this study, we utilized temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and reactive molecular beam scattering (RMBS) in an attempt to unravel the factors governing the catalytic properties of Pd-Au bimetallic surfaces for HCOOH decomposition. Our results show that Pd atoms at the Pd-Au surface are responsible for activating HCOOH molecules; however, the selectivity of the reaction is dictated by the identity of the surface metal atoms adjacent to the Pd atoms. Pd atoms that reside at Pd-Au interface sites tend to favor dehydrogenation of HCOOH, whereas Pd atoms in Pd(111)-like sites, which lack neighboring Au atoms, favor dehydration of HCOOH. These observations suggest that the reactivity and selectivity of HCOOH decomposition on Pd-Au catalysts can be tailored by controlling the arrangement of surface Pd and Au atoms. The findings in this study may prove informative for rational design of Pd-Au catalysts for associated reactions including selective HCOOH decomposition for hydrogen production and electro-oxidation of HCOOH in the direct formic acid fuel cell.

  16. Change of monochloroacetic acid to biodegradable organic acids by hydrothermal reaction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoungrean; Fujita, Masafumi; Daimon, Hiroyuki; Fujie, Koichi

    2004-04-30

    The feasibility of biodegradability improvement induced from the structural conversion of refractory pollutants by hydrothermal reaction was investigated. Monochloroacetic acid (MCAA) was selected as a preliminary material represented for linear hydrocarbon structured refractory pollutants. Under the tested conditions, MCAA was partially destructed and then converted to biodegradable reaction products by hydrolysis, dehydration and thermal decomposition. The identified products were glycolic acid, citric acid and formic acid. Total organic carbon (TOC) reduction during the structural conversion did not exceed 24%, except the results at the reaction conditions of 350 degrees C and 17 MPa. However, Produced biodegradable organic acids were reduced by thermal decomposition with increasing reaction temperature and time. At the reaction temperature of 250 and 300 degrees C, biodegradability (BOD/COD(Cr)) was reached at 0.51 in 6.9 min and 0.52 in 7.4 min despite the presence of dissociated chlorine ions. The detachment of recalcitrant chlorine ion from MCAA and the production of biodegradable organic acids by hydrothermal reaction were directly related to the biodegradability improvement of reaction products.

  17. Radical Reactions in the Decomposition of Energetic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-08

    PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. University of Chicago 5801 South Ellis Avenue Chicago , IL 60637 -5418 ABSTRACT Final Report...Decomposition of Energetic Materials" L. J. Butler, The University of Chicago W911NF1010314, Program Manager James Parker Final  Report  for

  18. Students' Understanding of Acid, Base and Salt Reactions in Qualitative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kim-Chwee Daniel; Goh, Ngoh-Khang; Chia, Lian-Sai; Treagust, David F.

    2003-01-01

    Uses a two-tier, multiple-choice diagnostic instrument to determine (n=915) grade 10 students' understanding of the acid, base, and salt reactions involved in basic qualitative analysis. Reports that many students did not understand the formation of precipitates and the complex salts, acid/salt-base reactions, and thermal decomposition involved in…

  19. Decomposition of hydroxy amino acids in foraminiferal tests; kinetics, mechanism and geochronological implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bada, J.L.; Shou, M.-Y.; Man, E.H.; Schroeder, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    The diagenesis of the hydroxy amino acids serine and threonine in foraminiferal tests has been investigated. The decomposition pathways of these amino acids are complex; the principal reactions appear to be dehydration, aldol cleavage and decarboxylation. Stereochemical studies indicate that the ??-amino-n-butyric acid (ABA) detected in foraminiferal tests is the end product of threonine dehydration pathway. Decomposition of serine and threonine in foraminiferal tests from two well-dated Caribbean deep-sea cores, P6304-8 and -9, has been found to follow irreversible first-order kinetics. Three empirical equations were derived for the disappearance of serine and threonine and the appearance of ABA. These equations can be used as a new geochronological method for dating foraminiferal tests from other deep-sea sediments. Preliminary results suggest that ages deduced from the ABA kinetics equation are most reliable because "species effect" and contamination problems are not important for this nonbiological amino acid. Because of the variable serine and threonine contents of modern foraminiferal species, it is likely that the accurate age estimates can be obtained from the serine and threonine decomposition equations only if a homogeneous species assemblage or single species sample isolated from mixed natural assemblages is used. ?? 1978.

  20. Investigation of the thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid containing inorganic impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Kogtev, S.E.; Nikandrov, I.S.; Borisenko, A.S.; Peretrutov, A.A.

    1986-09-20

    Oleum is recovered by thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid wastes to sulfur dioxide with conversion of the sulfur dioxide to oleum. The organic substances in sulfuric acid wastes can affect the thermal-decomposition indexes of sulfuric acid wastes. They studied the effect of toluene, nitrotoluene, benzoic acid, and carbon on the yield of sulfur dioxide and also the possibility of reduction of acid vapors by products of pyrolysis and incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons. It is shown that the yield of sulfur dioxide in thermal decomposition of hydrocarbon-containing sulfuric acid wastes can be increased if the process assumes the nature of reductive decomposition.

  1. Decomposition products of glycidyl esters of fatty acids by heating.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Wataru; Endo, Yasushi

    2017-03-01

    In this study, decomposition products of glycidyl palmitate (GP) of fatty acids heated at high temperature such as deep frying were investigated. When GP and tripalmitin (TP) were heated at 180 and 200 °C, they were decreased with heating time. The weight of GP was less than that of TP, although both GP and TP were converted to polar compounds after heating. The decomposition rate of GP was higher than TP. Both GP and TP produced considerable amounts of hydrocarbons and aldehydes during heating. Aldehydes produced from GP and TP included saturated aldehydes with carbon chain length of 3-10, while hydrocarbons consisted of carbon chain length of 8-15. It was observed that major hydrocarbons produced from GP during heating were pentadecane. Moreover, the level of carbon dioxide (CO2) released from GP was higher than that of TP. It was suggested that fatty acids in GE might be susceptible to decarboxylation. From these results, GP might be quickly decomposed to hydrocarbons, aldehydes and CO2 besides polar compounds by heating, in comparison with TP.

  2. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid mediated by iron in strongly acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Masaki; Ito, Masataka; Ohkura, Ryouichi; Mino A, Esteban R; Kose, Tomohiro; Okuda, Tetsuji; Nakai, Satoshi; Kawata, Kuniaki; Nishijima, Wataru

    2014-03-15

    The performance of a ferric ion mediated photochemical process for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) decomposition in strongly acidic conditions of pH 2.0 was evaluated in comparison with those in weakly acidic conditions, pH 3.7 or pH 5.0, based on iron species composition and ferric ion regeneration. Complete decomposition of PFOA under UV irradiation was confirmed at pH 2.0, whereas perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA) and other intermediates were accumulated in weakly acidic conditions. Iron states at each pH were evaluated using a chemical equilibrium model, Visual MINTEQ. The main iron species at pH 2.0 is Fe(3+) ion. Although Fe(3+) ion is consumed and is transformed to Fe(2+) ion by photochemical decomposition of PFOA and its intermediates, the produced Fe(2+) ion will change to Fe(3+) ion to restore chemical equilibrium. Continuous decomposition will occur at pH 2.0. However, half of the iron cannot be dissolved at pH 3.7. The main species of dissolved iron is Fe(OH)(2+). At pH 3.7 or higher pH, Fe(3+) ion will only be produced from the oxidation of Fe(2+) ion by hydroxyl radical produced by Fe(OH)(2+) under UV irradiation. These different mechanisms of Fe(3+) regeneration that prevail in strongly and weakly acidic conditions will engender different performances of the ferric ion.

  3. The criteria of critical runaway and stable temperatures of catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kai-Tai; Yang, Ching-Chyuan; Lin, Peng-Chu

    2006-07-31

    The hydrogen peroxide and hydrochloric acid are used in close proximity in the computer chip manufacture. The hydrochloric acid catalyzes an exothermic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. The accumulation of heat and non-condensable gas increases temperature and pressure in this reaction process always lead to runaway reaction and accident owing to inadvertent mixing. Thus, the chemical reaction hazard has to be clearly identified. Its critical runaway temperatures and unstable reaction criteria in this reaction process have to be determined urgently. In this investigation, we estimated its kinetic parameters at various volumetric ratios of the hydrogen peroxide to hydrochloric acid. Then, used these kinetic parameters to evaluate their critical temperatures and stable criteria in each reaction processes. The analytic results are important and useful for the design of safety system in the computer chip manufacture.

  4. Decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    A cornerstone of ecosystem ecology, decomposition was recognized as a fundamental process driving the exchange of energy in ecosystems by early ecologists such as Lindeman 1942 and Odum 1960). In the history of ecology, studies of decomposition were incorporated into the International Biological Program in the 1960s to compare the nature of organic matter breakdown in various ecosystem types. Such studies still have an important role in ecological studies of today. More recent refinements have brought debates on the relative role microbes, invertebrates and environment in the breakdown and release of carbon into the atmosphere, as well as how nutrient cycling, production and other ecosystem processes regulated by decomposition may shift with climate change. Therefore, this bibliography examines the primary literature related to organic matter breakdown, but it also explores topics in which decomposition plays a key supporting role including vegetation composition, latitudinal gradients, altered ecosystems, anthropogenic impacts, carbon storage, and climate change models. Knowledge of these topics is relevant to both the study of ecosystem ecology as well projections of future conditions for human societies.

  5. Decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid by ultraviolet light irradiation with Pb-modified titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng-Jia; Lo, Shang-Lien; Lee, Yu-Chi; Kuo, Jeff; Wu, Chung-Hsin

    2016-02-13

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, C7H15COOH) is widely used in industrial and commercial applications. It has become a global concern due to its widespread occurrence in water bodies and adverse environmental impact. PFOA could not be effectively removed by the conventional UV/TiO2 system. This study synthesized Pb-modified TiO2 catalyst and used it as a catalyst with light irradiation for PFOA decomposition. It was found that the Pb-TiO2 catalyst could produce traps to capture photo-induced electrons or holes that lead to better photocatalytic efficiencies. Rate constant values for PFOA decomposition by the UV/TiO2 and UV/Pb-TiO2 systems were determined to be 0.0158 and 0.5136 h(-1), respectively. The PFOA decomposition in the UV/Pb-TiO2 system is 32.5 times faster than that in the UV/TiO2 system. The UV/Pb-TiO2 system yielded a better performance than those of the UV/Fe-TiO2 and UV/Cu-TiO2 systems. During the reaction, PFOA decomposed stepwisely into shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids and F(-).

  6. Investigation of the decomposition reaction and dust explosion characteristics of crystalline benzoyl peroxides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kai-Tai; Chen, Ting-Chi; Hu, Kwan-Hua

    2009-01-15

    The benzoyl peroxide (BPO) is widely used in the chemical industry. Many catastrophes have been caused by its thermal instability or reactive incompatibility in storage or thermal decomposition reaction. Thus, its hazard characteristics have to be clearly identified. First of all, the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) is used to measure the heat of decomposition reaction, which can contribute to understanding the reaction characteristics of benzoyl peroxide. The accelerating rate calorimeter (ARC) is used to measure the rates of temperature and pressure rises of decomposition reaction, and then the kinetics parameters are estimated. Furthermore, the MIKE 3 apparatus and the 20-l-Apparatus are used to measure and analyze the dust explosion characteristics of benzoyl peroxide under room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Finally, Semenov's thermal explosion theory is applied to investigate the critical runaway condition and the stability criterion of decomposition reaction, and to build the relationship of critical temperature, convective heat transfer coefficient, heat transfer surface area and ambient temperature. These results contribute to improving the safety in the reaction, transportation and storage processes of benzoyl peroxide.

  7. Influence of sodium carbonate on decomposition of formic acid by pulsed discharge plasma inside bubble in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya

    2016-07-01

    The influence of sodium carbonate on the decomposition of formic acid by discharge inside bubbles in water was investigated experimentally. Oxygen or argon gases were injected into the water through a vertically positioned glass tube, in which the high-voltage wire electrode was placed to generate plasmas at low applied voltage. The concentration of formic acid was determined by ion chromatography. In the case of sodium carbonate additive, the pH increased owing to the decomposition of the formic acid. In the case of oxygen injection, the percentage of conversion of formic acid increased with increasing pH because the reaction rate of ozone with formic acid increased with increasing pH. In the case of argon injection, the percentage of conversion was not affected by the pH owing to the high rate loss of hydroxyl radicals.

  8. Decomposition mechanism of formic acid on Cu (111) surface: A theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhao; Qin, Pei; Fang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    The study of formic acid decomposition on transition metal surfaces is important to obtain useful information for vapor phase catalysis involving HCOOH and for the development of direct formic acid fuel cells. In this study, periodic density functional theory calculations have been employed to investigate the dissociation pathways of HCOOH on Cu (111) surface. About adsorption, it is found that the adsorption of HCOO, COOH, HCO, CO, OH and H on Cu (111) are considered chemisorption, whereas HCOOH, CO2, H2O and H2 have the weak interaction with Cu (111) surface. Furthermore, the minimum energy pathways are analyzed for the decomposition of HCOOH to CO2 and CO through the scission of Hsbnd O, Csbnd H and Csbnd O bonds. It is found that HCOOH, HCOO and COOH prefer to dissociate in the related reactions rather than desorb. For the decomposition, it is indicated that HCO and COOH are the main dissociated intermediates of trans-HCOOH, CO2 is the main dissociated intermediates of bidentate-HCOO, and CO is the main dissociated product of cis-COOH. The co-adsorbed H atom is beneficial for the formation of CO2 from cis-COOH. Besides, it is found that the most favorable path for HCOOH decomposition on Cu (111) surface is HCOOH-HCO-CO (Path 5), where the step of CO formation from HCO dehydrogenation is considered to be the rate-determining step. The results also show that CO is preferentially formed as the dominant product of HCOOH on Cu (111) surface.

  9. S-matrix decomposition, natural reaction channels, and the quantum transition state approach to reactive scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manthe, Uwe; Ellerbrock, Roman

    2016-05-01

    A new approach for the quantum-state resolved analysis of polyatomic reactions is introduced. Based on the singular value decomposition of the S-matrix, energy-dependent natural reaction channels and natural reaction probabilities are defined. It is shown that the natural reaction probabilities are equal to the eigenvalues of the reaction probability operator [U. Manthe and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 3411 (1993)]. Consequently, the natural reaction channels can be interpreted as uniquely defined pathways through the transition state of the reaction. The analysis can efficiently be combined with reactive scattering calculations based on the propagation of thermal flux eigenstates. In contrast to a decomposition based straightforwardly on thermal flux eigenstates, it does not depend on the choice of the dividing surface separating reactants from products. The new approach is illustrated studying a prototypical example, the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction. The natural reaction probabilities and the contributions of the different vibrational states of the methyl product to the natural reaction channels are calculated and discussed. The relation between the thermal flux eigenstates and the natural reaction channels is studied in detail.

  10. S-matrix decomposition, natural reaction channels, and the quantum transition state approach to reactive scattering.

    PubMed

    Manthe, Uwe; Ellerbrock, Roman

    2016-05-28

    A new approach for the quantum-state resolved analysis of polyatomic reactions is introduced. Based on the singular value decomposition of the S-matrix, energy-dependent natural reaction channels and natural reaction probabilities are defined. It is shown that the natural reaction probabilities are equal to the eigenvalues of the reaction probability operator [U. Manthe and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 3411 (1993)]. Consequently, the natural reaction channels can be interpreted as uniquely defined pathways through the transition state of the reaction. The analysis can efficiently be combined with reactive scattering calculations based on the propagation of thermal flux eigenstates. In contrast to a decomposition based straightforwardly on thermal flux eigenstates, it does not depend on the choice of the dividing surface separating reactants from products. The new approach is illustrated studying a prototypical example, the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction. The natural reaction probabilities and the contributions of the different vibrational states of the methyl product to the natural reaction channels are calculated and discussed. The relation between the thermal flux eigenstates and the natural reaction channels is studied in detail.

  11. The thermochemistry and reaction mechanisms in the decomposition of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C.F.

    1994-05-01

    The chemical processes involved in the decomposition of energetic materials have been investigated theoretically using quantum chemical methods to determine the thermochemistry and reaction pathways. The Bond-Additivity-Corrected Moller-Plesset 4th order perturbation theory method (BAC-MP4) has been used to determine heats of formation and free energies of reaction intermediates of decomposition. In addition, the BAC-MP4 method has been used to determine action pathways involving these intermediates. A theoretical method for calculating solvation energies has been developed to treat the non-idealities of high pressure and the condensed phase. The resulting chemical processes involving decomposition and ignition are presented for nitrate compounds, nitramines, and nitromethane.

  12. Pt/TiO2 (Rutile) Catalysts for Sulfuric Acid Decomposition in Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. Petkovic; D. M. Ginosar; H. W. Rollins; K. C. Burch; P. J. Pinhero; H. H. Farrell

    2008-04-01

    Thermochemical cycles consist of a series of chemical reactions to produce hydrogen from water at lower temperatures than by direct thermal decomposition. All the sulfur-based cycles for water splitting employ the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. This work reports the studies performed on platinum supported on titania (rutile) catalysts to investigate the causes of catalyst deactivation under sulfuric acid decomposition reaction conditions. Samples of 1 wt% Pt/TiO2 (rutile) catalysts were submitted to flowing concentrated sulfuric acid at 1123 K and atmospheric pressure for different times on stream (TOS) between 0 and 548 h. Post-operation analyses of the spent catalyst samples showed that Pt oxidation and sintering occurred under reaction conditions and some Pt was lost by volatilization. Pt loss rate was higher at initial times but total loss appeared to be independent of the gaseous environment. Catalyst activity showed an initial decrease that lasted for about 66 h, followed by a slight recovery of activity between 66 and 102 h TOS, and a period of slower deactivation after 102 h TOS. Catalyst sulfation did not seem to be detrimental to catalyst activity and the activity profile suggested that a complex dynamical situation involving platinum sintering, volatilization, and oxidation, along with TiO2 morphological changes affected catalyst activity in a non-monotonic way.

  13. A Review of Study on Thermal Energy Transport System by Synthesis and Decomposition Reactions of Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiusheng; Yabe, Akira; Kajiyama, Shiro; Fukuda, Katsuya

    The study on thermal energy transport system by synthesis and decomposition reactions of methanol was reviewed. To promote energy conservation and global environment protection, a two-step liquid-phase methanol synthesis process, which starts with carbonylation of methanol to methyl formate, then followed by the hydrogenolysis of the formate, was studied to recover wasted or unused discharged heat from industrial sources for the thermal energy demands of residential and commercial areas by chemical reactions. The research and development of the system were focused on the following three points. (1) Development of low-temperature decomposition and synthetic catalysts, (2) Development of liquid phase reactor (heat exchanger accompanying chemical reaction), (3) Simulation of the energy transport efficiency of entire system which contains heat recovery and supply sections. As the result of the development of catalyst, promising catalysts which agree with the development purposes for the methyl formate decomposition reaction and the synthetic reaction are being developed though some studies remain for the methanol decomposition and synthetic reactions. In the fundamental development of liquid phase reactor, the solubilities of CO and H2 gases in methanol and methyl formate were measured by the method of total pressure decrease due to absorption under pressures up to 1500kPa and temperatures up to 140°C. The diffusivity of CO gas in methanol was determined by measuring the diameter and solution time of single CO bubbles in methanol. The chemical reaction rate of methanol synthesis by hydrogenolysis of methyl formate was measured using a plate-type of Raney copper catalyst in a reactor with rectangular channel and in an autoclave reactor. The reaction characteristics were investigated by carrying out the experiments at various temperatures, flow rates and at various catalyst development conditions. We focused on the effect of Raney copper catalyst thickness on the liquid

  14. Decomposition of phenylarsonic acid by AOP processes: degradation rate constants and by-products.

    PubMed

    Jaworek, K; Czaplicka, M; Bratek, Ł

    2014-10-01

    The paper presents results of the studies photodegradation, photooxidation, and oxidation of phenylarsonic acid (PAA) in aquatic solution. The water solutions, which consist of 2.7 g dm(-3) phenylarsonic acid, were subjected to advance oxidation process (AOP) in UV, UV/H2O2, UV/O3, H2O2, and O3 systems under two pH conditions. Kinetic rate constants and half-life of phenylarsonic acid decomposition reaction are presented. The results from the study indicate that at pH 2 and 7, PAA degradation processes takes place in accordance with the pseudo first order kinetic reaction. The highest rate constants (10.45 × 10(-3) and 20.12 × 10(-3)) and degradation efficiencies at pH 2 and 7 were obtained at UV/O3 processes. In solution, after processes, benzene, phenol, acetophenone, o-hydroxybiphenyl, p-hydroxybiphenyl, benzoic acid, benzaldehyde, and biphenyl were identified.

  15. Comparative analysis of decomposition reactions in gaseous and crystalline β-HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharia, Onise; Kuklja, Maija

    2011-06-01

    Most quantum chemical studies focus on determining reaction paths and reaction barriers. We will illustrate that knowing only those parameters is insufficient for finding the dominant mechanism. One needs to calculate both the activation barriers and the reaction rates. We present a density functional theory based modeling of several possible detonation initiation reactions in HMX, including its gas phase, a perfect crystal, and a crystal containing vacancies, voids or internal surfaces. We show that the N-NO2 homolysis is the most favorable decomposition reaction in the gas phase. In the crystalline phase, this reaction has a higher activation barrier and becomes much slower due to the densely packed structure of HMX. As a result, two other reactions, the HONO elimination and NONO rearrangement, would compete with the N-NO2 homolysis in an ideal crystal. Practical samples however contain a lot of imperfections hence we also studied an effect of voids on the chemical decomposition. We established that a large space in the vicinity of voids facilitates the N-NO2 break, and, similarly to the gas phase, the N-NO2 reaction proceeds with the highest rate. The conclusions and revealed trends help to provide a consistent interpretation to experimental data.

  16. Conversion of waste cellulose to ethanol. Phase II. Reaction kinetics with phosphoric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, M.B.; Isbell, R.E.

    1982-05-01

    Waste cellulosic material can be hydrolyzed in dilute acid solution to produce fermentable sugars which can then be converted into ethanol. A laboratory investigation was made of the feasibility of using phosphoric acid as the hydrolysis catalyst. The hydrolysis reaction with phosphoric acid solutions was compared with the reaction employing the more conventional dilute sulfuric acid catalyst. The purpose of this research was to examine the hydrolysis step in a proposed process for the conversion of cellulose (from wood, newspapers, municipal solid waste, or other sources) into ethanol - by which a potentially valuable co-product, DICAL (dicalcium phosphate), might be made and sold with or without the lignin content as a fertilizer. The pertinent reaction kinetics for the acid catalyzed production of glucose from cellulose consists of consecutive, pseudo-first order reactions. The first reaction forms glucose by hydrolyzing the cellulose polymer and a subsequent reaction decomposes the glucose. The maximum theoretical yield depends on the ratio of the rate constants for these two reactions. The rate constants of both reactions were measured in a series of experiments studying temperature and concentration effects. The results suggest that the glucose decomposition reaction is similar with the two acids but that the cellulose hydrolysis reaction mechanism with phosphoric acid may be different than with sulfuric acid. The studies show phosphoric acid is unpromising and much inferior to sulfuric acid as the catalytic agent. Under the conditions studied, 0.8 wt % sulfuric acid gives a greater yield of glucose than 8.0 wt % phosphoric acid.

  17. Initial Reaction Steps in the Condensed-Phase Decomposition of Propellants

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C F; Piqueras, M C

    2001-12-11

    Understanding the reaction mechanisms for the decomposition of energetic materials in the condensed phase is critical to our development of detailed kinetic models of propellant combustion. To date, the reaction mechanisms in the condensed phase have been represented by global, reactions. The detailed elementary reactions subsequent to the initial NO{sub 2} bond scissioning are not known. Using quantum chemical calculations, we have investigated the possible early steps in the decomposition of energetic materials that can occur in the condensed phase. We have used methylnitrate, methylnitramine, and nitroethane as prototypes for O-NO{sub 2}, N-NO{sub 2} and C-NO{sub 2} nitro compounds. We find the energetic radicals formed from the initial NO{sub 2} bond scissioning can be converted to unsaturated non-radical intermediates as an alternative to the unzipping of the energetic radical. We propose a new, prompt oxidation mechanism in which the trapped HONO can add back onto the energetic molecule. This produces oxidation products in the condensed phase that normally would not be produced until much later in the flame. We have shown that this prompt oxidation mechanism is a general feature of both nitramines and nitrate esters. The resulting HONO formed by the H-atom abstraction will be strongly influenced by the cage effect of the condensed phase. The applicability of this mechanism is demonstrated for decomposition of ethylnitrate, illustrating the importance of the cage effect in enabling this mechanism to occur at low temperatures.

  18. GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

    1999-05-26

    Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N15H3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia.

  19. Scanning electrochemical microscopy #54. Application to the study of heterogeneous catalytic reactions-hydrogen peroxide decomposition.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José L; Hurth, Cedric; Bard, Allen J

    2005-05-19

    A scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) approach for the analysis of heterogeneous catalytic reactions at solid-liquid interfaces is described and applied. In this scheme, reactant, generated at a tip, undergoes a reaction (e.g., disproportionation) at the substrate. The theoretical background for this study, performed by digital simulations using a finite difference method, considers a chemical reaction at the substrate with general stoichiometry. In this case, the fraction of regenerated mediator (nu(S)) may differ with respect to a substrate reaction that is the reverse of the tip reaction, resulting in an asymmetric mediator loop. Simulated tip current transients and approach curves at different values of the kinetic rate constant for reactions where nu(S) < 1 were used to analyze this new SECM situation. This approach was used to study the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (HO2- --> 1/2O2 + OH-), where nu(S) = 0.5, on supported catalysts. A gold-mercury amalgam tip was used to quantitatively reduce dissolved O2 (mediator) to HO2-, which was decomposed back to oxygen at the catalyst substrate. Rate constants for the decomposition reaction on immobilized catalase and Pt particles were measured at different pH values by the correlation of experimental approach curves with the theoretical dependencies.

  20. Catalytic effect of magnetic nanoparticles over the H2O2 decomposition reaction.

    PubMed

    Andrade, A L; Souza, D M; Pereira, M C; Fabris, J D; Domingues, R Z

    2009-06-01

    This paper compares the rate of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide when controlled nano-sized magnetite powders are used as catalysts. Two different nano-sized powders and a Fe0/Fe3O4 composite have been used. The nanoparticle samples were synthesized by: (i) a chemical reduction-precipitation method and, (ii) by reduction under H2 atmosphere at 250 degrees C, of a hematite sample previously prepared. The composite, Fe0/Fe3O4, was prepared by thermal controlled reduction of nanoparticles of Fe2O3 obtained from hematite under H2 at 300 degrees C. The samples were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, and Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature, and surface area. The catalytic effect was studied in the decomposition reaction of H2O2 by measuring the formation of gaseous O2. The results showed the presence of pure Fe3O4 for nano magnetite samples and Fe0 and Fe3O4 for the composite sample. The average particle sizes of the magnetite, calculated from reflection 311 by using Scherrer equation were about 33 and 10 nm for the samples obtained by hematite reduction and reduction-precipitation, respectively. Kinetic studies of the decomposition of peroxide showed a higher decomposition rate for the hydrogen peroxide reaction when nanoparticles prepared by reduction-precipitation method were used as catalysts. The high catalytic activity associated to nanoparticles is discussed in terms of the high surface area of these samples.

  1. Sulfurized limonite as material for fast decomposition of organic compounds by heterogeneous Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kei; Tanaka, Toshinori; Tsuda, Yutaka; Ban, Masahiro; Koveke, Edwin P; Koinuma, Michio; Ohira, Shin-Ichi

    2014-08-15

    Rapid decomposition of wastewater contaminants using sulfurized limonite (S-limonite) was investigated. Limonite is used for desulfurization of biogases, and S-limonite is obtained from desulfurization plants as solid waste. In this work, the profitable use of S-limonite in water treatment was examined. The divalent Fe in S-limonite was expected to produce OH radicals, as Fe(2+) ions and limonite thermally treated with H2 do. Methylene blue was used for batch-wise monitoring of the decomposition performance. The decomposition rate was fast and the methylene blue solution color disappeared in only 10s when a small amount of H2O2 was added (1mM in the sample solution) in the presence of S-limonite. The OH radicals were formed by a heterogeneous reaction on the S-limonite surface and Fenton reaction with dissolved Fe(2+). The decomposition of pentachlorophenol was also examined; it was successfully decomposed in batch-wise tests. The surfaces of limonite before sulfurization, S-limonite, and S-limonite after use for water treatment were performed using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that S-limonite reverted to limonite after being used for water treatment.

  2. Hydrothermal decomposition of yeast cells for production of proteins and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Lamoolphak, Wiwat; Goto, Motonobu; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Suphantharika, Manop; Muangnapoh, Chirakarn; Prommuag, Chattip; Shotipruk, Artiwan

    2006-10-11

    This study examines hydrothermal decomposition of Baker's yeast cells, used as a model for spent Brewer's yeast waste, into protein and amino acids. The reaction was carried out in a closed batch reactor at various temperatures between 100 and 250 degrees C. The reaction products were separated into water-soluble and solid residue. The results demonstrated that the amount of yeast residue decreased with increasing hydrolysis temperature. After 20 min reaction in water at 250 degrees C, 78% of yeast was decomposed. The highest amount of protein produced was also obtained at this condition and was found to be 0.16 mg/mg dry yeast. The highest amount of amino acids (0.063 mg/mg dry yeast) was found at the lowest temperature tested after 15 min. The hydrolysis product obtained at 200 degrees C was tested as a nutrient source for yeast growth. The growth of yeast cells in the culture medium containing 2 w/v% of this product was comparable to that of the cells grown in the medium containing commercial yeast extract at the same concentration. These results demonstrated the feasibility of using subcritical water to potentially decompose proteinaceous waste such as spent Brewer's yeast while recovering more useful products.

  3. Reaction mechanism for the highly efficient catalytic decomposition of peroxynitrite by the amphipolar iron(III) corrole 1-Fe.

    PubMed

    Avidan-Shlomovich, Shlomit; Gross, Zeev

    2015-07-21

    The amphipolar iron(III) corrole 1-Fe is one of the most efficient catalysts for the decomposition of peroxynitrite, the toxin involved in numerous diseases. This research focused on the mechanism of that reaction at physiological pH, where peroxynitrite is in equilibrium with its much more reactive conjugated acid, by focusing on the elementary steps involved in the catalytic cycle. Kinetic investigations uncovered the formation of a reaction intermediate in a process that is complete within a few milliseconds (k1 ∼ 3 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1) at 5 °C, about 7 orders of magnitude larger than the first order rate constant for the non-catalyzed process). Multiple evidence points towards iron-catalyzed homolytic O-O bond cleavage to form nitrogen dioxide and hydroxo- or oxo-iron(iv) corrole. The iron(iv) intermediate was found to decay via multiple pathways that proceed at similar rates (k2 about 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)): reaction with nitrogen dioxide to form nitrate, nitration of the corrole macrocyclic, and dimerization to binuclear iron(iv) corrole. Catalysis in the presence of substrates affects the decay of the iron intermediate by either oxidative nitration (phenolic substrates) or reduction (ascorbate). A large enough excess of ascorbate accelerates the catalytic decomposition of PN by 1-Fe by orders of magnitude, prevents other decay routes of the iron intermediate, and eliminates nitration products as well. This suggests that the beneficial effect of the iron corrole under the reducing conditions present in most biological media might be even larger than in the purely chemical system. The acquired mechanistic insight is of prime importance for the design of optimally acting catalysts for the fast and safe decomposition of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

  4. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Thermal Decomposition of the Cobalt(II) Complex with 2-Picolinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Li, Di

    2014-01-01

    The cobalt(II) complex of 2-picolinic acid (Hpic), namely, [Co(pic)2(H2O)2] · 2H2O, was synthesized with the reaction of cobalt acetate and 2-picolinic acid as the reactants by solid-solid reaction at room temperature. The composition and structure of the complex were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetry-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC). The crystal structure of the complex belongs to monoclinic system and space group P2(1)/n, with cell parameters of a = 9.8468(7) Å, b = 5.2013(4) Å, c = 14.6041(15) Å, β = 111.745(6)°, V = 747.96(11) Å3, Z = 2, Dc = 1.666 g cm−3, R1 = 0.0297, and wR2 = 0.0831. In the title complex, the Co(II) ion is six-coordinated by two pyridine N atoms and two carboxyl O atoms from two 2-picolinic acid anions, and two O atoms from two H2O molecules, and forming a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. The thermal decomposition processes of the complex under nitrogen include dehydration and pyrolysis of the ligand, and the final residue is cobalt oxalate at about 450°C. PMID:24578654

  5. Substrate decomposition in galvanic displacement reaction: Contrast between gold and silver nanoparticle formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Tapas; Satpati, Biswarup

    2015-06-24

    We have investigated substrate decomposition during formation of silver and gold nanoparticles in galvanic displacement reaction on germanium surfaces. Silver and gold nanoparticles were synthesized by electroless deposition on sputter coated germanium thin film (∼ 200 nm) grown initially on silicon substrate. The nanoparticles formation and the substrate corrosion were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy.

  6. Red-Light Initiated Decomposition of α-Hydroxy Methylperoxy Radical in the Presence of Organic and Inorganic Acids: Implications for the HOx Formation in the Lower Stratosphere.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Francisco, Joseph S

    2016-05-05

    Theoretical calculations have been carried out to investigate the gas-phase decomposition of α-hydroxy methylperoxy (HOCH2(OO)) radical in the absence and presence of formic acid, acetic acid, nitric acid, and sulfuric acid. The HOCH2(OO) radical decomposition represents a new source of the HOx radical in troposphere. The results suggest that sulfuric acid will be more effective than other acids in catalyzing the peroxy radical decomposition. However, the significant stability of prereaction and postreaction complexes in all the bimolecular reactions implies a new photomechanism for the acid-mediated decomposition of the HOCH2(OO) radical that involves the visible or near IR overtone excitation of the OH stretching modes or electronic excitation of the O-O peroxy moiety in the acid-bound radical. This new overtone or electronic excitation-based photomechanism for the peroxy radical decomposition may provide useful insight into the missing photolytic source of the HOx at high solar zenith angles corresponding to the dawn or dusk photochemistry.

  7. A higher order accurate solution decomposition scheme for a singularly perturbed parabolic reaction-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, G. I.; Shishkina, L. P.

    2015-03-01

    An initial-boundary value problem is considered for a singularly perturbed parabolic reaction-diffusion equation. For this problem, a technique is developed for constructing higher order accurate difference schemes that converge ɛ-uniformly in the maximum norm (where ɛ is the perturbation parameter multiplying the highest order derivative, ɛ ∈ (0, 1]). A solution decomposition scheme is described in which the grid subproblems for the regular and singular solution components are considered on uniform meshes. The Richardson technique is used to construct a higher order accurate solution decomposition scheme whose solution converges ɛ-uniformly in the maximum norm at a rate of [InlineMediaObject not available: see fulltext.], where N + 1 and N 0 + 1 are the numbers of nodes in uniform meshes in x and t, respectively. Also, a new numerical-analytical Richardson scheme for the solution decomposition method is developed. Relying on the approach proposed, improved difference schemes can be constructed by applying the solution decomposition method and the Richardson extrapolation method when the number of embedded grids is more than two. These schemes converge ɛ-uniformly with an order close to the sixth in x and equal to the third in t.

  8. [H2O2 oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines over Mg2+ ion exchanged clinoptilolite and solventless solid state acid decomposition of ester to 3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid].

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, Takashi; Sato, Kanji; Nomura, Masayuki; Nakata, Shinichi

    2009-10-01

    The acid property of alkali and alkali earth cation exchanged clinoptiolites were observed by micro-calorimetry of NH(3) adsorption at 200 degrees C. The reaction rates on decomposition of tert-butyl acetate (TBA) over clinoptilolites was proportional to the acid strength. 1,4-Dihydropyridines were oxidized to corresponding Pyridines in high yields at room temperature by H(2)O(2) aqueous solution over Mg(2+) ion exchanged clinoptilolte (CZ-Mg) in acetone. Solventless acid ester decomposition of Di-tert-butyl 3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate to 3,5-Pyridinedicarboxylic acid was effected using CZ-Mg at 170 degrees C.

  9. The hydrothermal reaction kinetics of aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Jenny S.; Seward, Terry M.

    2007-02-01

    Experimental data on the hydrothermal reaction kinetics of aspartic acid were acquired using a custom-built spectrophotometric reaction cell which permits in situ observation under hydrothermal conditions. The results of this study indicate that the reaction kinetics of dilute aspartic acid solutions are significantly different depending on the presence or absence of catalytic surfaces such as standard metal alloys. The spectroscopic data presented here represent the first direct observations, in situ and in real time, of an amino acid reacting in a hydrothermal solution. Quantitative kinetic information, including rate constants, concentration versus time profiles, and calculations of the individual component spectra, was obtained from the data using a chemometric approach based on factor analysis/principle component analysis which treats the rate expressions simultaneously as a system of differential algebraic equations (DAE) of index 1. Identification of the products was confirmed where possible by high pressure anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). The reaction kinetics of aspartic acid under hydrothermal conditions was observed to be highly complex, in contrast to previous studies which indicated almost exclusively deamination. At lower temperatures (120-170 °C), several different reaction pathways were observed, including decarboxylation and polymerization, and the catalytic effects of reactor surfaces on the aspartic acid system were clearly demonstrated. At higher temperatures (above 170 °C), aspartic acid exhibited highly complex behaviour, with evidence indicating that it can simultaneously dimerize and cyclize, deaminate (by up to two pathways), and decarboxylate (by up to two pathways). These higher temperature kinetics were not fully resolvable in a quantitative manner due to the complexity of the system and the constraints of UV spectroscopy. The results of this study provide strong evidence that the reaction

  10. Studies of Hydrogen Getter Material Self-decomposition and Reaction Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Saab, A P; Dinh, L N

    2007-03-19

    Diacetylene based hydrogen getters are examined in order to gauge their self decomposition products, as well as to determine possible origins for observed losses in origins getter capacity. Simple long term (several months) thermal aging tests were conducted, with periodic solid solid-phase micro micro-extraction (SPME) sampling followed by GC/MS analysis. The results suggest that bis(diphenylethynyl) benzene tends to decompose to give phenyl contaminants more readily than diphenylbutadiyne. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction studies of the palladium catalyst following varying extents of reaction with hydrogen show that there is no change to the catalyst particles, indicating that any change in capacity originates from other causes. These causes are suggested by Sievert's-type experiments on the reaction of the getter with a low pressure (about 10 Torr) hydrogen atmosphere. The reaction data indicate that the getter capacity depends on the pressure of hydrogen to which the material is exposed, and also its thermal history.

  11. Thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates of BTATz-CMDB propellant.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jian-Hua; Zhao, Feng-Qi; Wang, Bo-Zhou; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Cheng; Hu, Rong-Zu; Ren, Ying-Hui; Xu, Si-Yu; Xu, Kang-Zhen; Ren, Xiao-Ning

    2010-09-15

    The composite modified double base (CMDB) propellants (nos. RB0601 and RB0602) containing 3,6-bis (1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-yl-amino)-1,2,4,5-tetrazine (BTATz) without and with the ballistic modifier were prepared and their thermal behaviors, nonisothermal decomposition reaction kinetics, thermal safety and burning rates were investigated. The results show that there are three mass-loss stages in TG curve and two exothermic peaks in DSC curve for the BTATz-CMDB propellant. The first two mass-loss stages occur in succession and the temperature ranges are near apart, and the decomposition peaks of the two stages overlap each other, inducing only one visible exothermic peak appear in DSC curve during 350-550 K. The reaction mechanisms of the main exothermal decomposition processes of RB0601 and RB0602 are all classified as chemical reaction, the mechanism functions are f(alpha)=(1-alpha)(2), and the kinetic equations are dalpha/dt = 10(19.24)(1-alpha)(2)e(-2.32x10(4)/T) and dalpha/dt = 10(20.32)(1-alpha)(2)e(-2.32x10(4)/T). The thermal safety evaluation on the BTATz-CMDB propellants was obtained. With the substitution of 26% RDX by BTATz and with the help of the ballistic modifier in the CMDB propellant formulation, the burning rate can be improved by 89.0% at 8 MPa and 47.1% at 22 MPa, the pressure exponent can be reduced to 0.353 at 14-20 MPa.

  12. 40 CFR 721.10679 - Carboxylic acid, substituted alkylstannylene ester, reaction products with inorganic acid tetra...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... alkylstannylene ester, reaction products with inorganic acid tetra alkyl ester (generic). 721.10679 Section 721... Carboxylic acid, substituted alkylstannylene ester, reaction products with inorganic acid tetra alkyl ester... identified generically as carboxylic acid, substituted alkylstannylene ester, reaction products...

  13. Determination of the Thermal Decomposition Products of Terephthalic Acid by Using Curie-Point Pyrolyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begüm Elmas Kimyonok, A.; Ulutürk, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    The thermal decomposition behavior of terephthalic acid (TA) was investigated by thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) and Curie-point pyrolysis. TG/DTA analysis showed that TA is sublimed at 276°C prior to decomposition. Pyrolysis studies were carried out at various temperatures ranging from 160 to 764°C. Decomposition products were analyzed and their structures were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 11 degradation products were identified at 764°C, whereas no peak was observed below 445°C. Benzene, benzoic acid, and 1,1‧-biphenyl were identified as the major decomposition products, and other degradation products such as toluene, benzophenone, diphenylmethane, styrene, benzaldehyde, phenol, 9H-fluorene, and 9-phenyl 9H-fluorene were also detected. A pyrolysis mechanism was proposed based on the findings.

  14. Formose reaction controlled by boronic acid compounds

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Toru; Michitaka, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Formose reactions were carried out in the presence of low molecular weight and macromolecular boronic acid compounds, i.e., sodium phenylboronate (SPB) and a copolymer of sodium 4-vinylphenylboronate with sodium 4-styrenesulfonate (pVPB/NaSS), respectively. The boronic acid compounds provided different selectivities; sugars of a small carbon number were formed favorably in the presence of SPB, whereas sugar alcohols of a larger carbon number were formed preferably in the presence of pVPB/NaSS. PMID:28144337

  15. Single Photon Initiated Decomposition Rearrangement Reactions (spidrr) of Organic Molecules Mediated by the Ni+ Cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellert, Darrin; Mansell, Adam; Theis, Zachary; Gutierrez, Michael

    2016-06-01

    The Bellert group at Baylor University has developed a novel method for performing single photon initiated decomposition rearrangement reactions (SPIDRR) of organic molecules mediated by a transition metal cation. The advantage that SPIDRR affords is the direct measurement of first order microcanonical rate constants, k(E), determined at resolved internal energies. Furthermore, the SPIDRR technique measures kinetic details of exothermic reactions where product production is limited only by submerged activation barriers (kinetic barriers that are at energies below the separated reactant limit). Thus, such reactions approach unit efficiency, are thermodynamically driven, and are of greater relevance to catalytic research. Direct measurements of k(E) values extend to isotopically labelled species that provide direct measurement of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE), furnishing unique insight into the mechanistic details of a reaction. This talk presents results from the visible photon initiated, Ni+ induced decarbonylation reaction of propionaldehyde. Here a rather unique energy dependent behavior of the measured rate constants was observed and attributed to a dynamic competition between parallel reaction coordinates available to the photo-excited precursor. RRKM calculations in concert with high level DFT is used to support and further experimental results.

  16. Effect of the interaction between dye and acetic acid on the decomposition of Basic Green 4 with additive by ozone.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Arizbeth A; Poznyak, Tatiana I; Chairez, Jorge I

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated the ozonation of Basic Green 4 (BG4) under the presence of acetic acid (AA). This acid is used as a textile additive for many industrial dyes derived from triphenylmethane. Determining the effect of this additive on discoloration, degradation dynamics, and final by-product distribution is the main objective of this study. The reaction system was the ozonation of a dye solution in co-solvents. This solution (dye and AA) was considered a simplified version of real BG4 dyeing wastewaters supplied with additives. The dye concentration was set to 50, 150, and 250 mg/L without pH adjustment (pH = 3). This low value was forced by the AA. Ozonation reaction with dye was mainly done by a direct molecular mechanism. The discoloration dynamics of BG4 without and with the additive were determined by ultraviolet and visible wavelength spectroscopy. The dye decomposition and the intermediate and final product formation-decomposition dynamics were followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The effects of AA in the ozonation results were significant in the following ways: 1) a possible complex, formed between AA and the dye, changed ozone consumption; 2) the presence of additive decelerated the dye discoloration and decomposition; and 3) the number of by-products was dissimilar in both systems, with and without the additive the ozonation. The accumulation of organic acids with low molecular weight was determined in both systems, with and without the additive. Only one by-product was obtained in ozonation when AA participated in the reactor. A possible reaction mechanism is proposed for the system dye-AA-ozone.

  17. Photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid by iron and niobium co-doped titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Estrellan, Carl Renan; Salim, Chris; Hinode, Hirofumi

    2010-07-15

    The photocatalytic decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in aqueous solution using Fe and Nb co-doped TiO(2) (Fe:Nb-TiO(2)) prepared by sol-gel method was investigated. The photocatalytic activity of Fe:Nb-TiO(2) towards PFOA degradation was compared to that of pure TiO(2) synthesized using the same method, and that of the commercially available TiO(2) photocatalyst, Aeroxide TiO(2) P25 (AO-TiO(2) P25). The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, DRS, BET-N(2) adsorption isotherm, and SEM-EDX techniques and the data were correlated to the photocatalytic activity. Fe:Nb-TiO(2) showed the highest activity compared to the undoped TiO(2) and the commercially available TiO(2). Such activity was attributable to the effects of co-doping both on the physico-chemical properties and surface interfacial charge transfer mechanisms. Perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) with shorter carbon chain length and fluoride ions were identified as photocatalytic reaction intermediates and products.

  18. Thermal decomposition of HO2NO2 (peroxynitric acid, PNA): rate coefficient and determination of the enthalpy of formation.

    PubMed

    Gierczak, Tomasz; Jiménez, Elena; Riffault, Veronique; Burkholder, James B; Ravishankara, A R

    2005-02-03

    Rate coefficients for the gas-phase thermal decomposition of HO(2)NO(2) (peroxynitric acid, PNA) are reported at temperatures between 331 and 350 K at total pressures of 25 and 50 Torr of N(2). Rate coefficients were determined by measuring the steady-state OH concentration in a mixture of known concentrations of HO(2)NO(2) and NO. The measured thermal decomposition rate coefficients k(-)(1)(T,P) are used in combination with previously published rate coefficient data for the HO(2)NO(2) formation reaction to yield a standard enthalpy for reaction 1 of Delta(r)H degrees (298K) = -24.0 +/- 0.5 kcal mol(-1) (uncertainties are 2sigma values and include estimated systematic errors). A HO(2)NO(2) standard heat of formation, Delta(f)H degrees (298K)(HO(2)NO(2)), of -12.6 +/- 1.0 kcal mol(-1) was calculated from this value. Some of the previously reported data on the thermal decomposition of HO(2)NO(2) have been reanalyzed and shown to be in good agreement with our reported value.

  19. [Effects of simulated acid rain on decomposition of soil organic carbon and crop straw].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xue-Zhu; Huang, Yao; Yang, Xin-Zhong

    2009-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of acid rain on the organic carbon decomposition in different acidity soils, a 40-day incubation test was conducted with the paddy soils of pH 5.48, 6.70 and 8.18. The soils were amended with 0 and 15 g x kg(-1) of rice straw, adjusted to the moisture content of 400 g x kg(-1) air-dried soil by using simulated rain of pH 6.0, 4.5, and 3.0, and incubated at 20 degrees C. The results showed that straw, acid rain, and soil co-affected the CO2 emission from soil system. The amendment of straw increased the soil CO2 emission rate significantly. Acid rain had no significant effects on soil organic carbon decomposition, but significantly affected the straw decomposition in soil. When treated with pH 3.0 acid rain, the amount of decomposed straw over 40-day incubation in acid (pH 5.48) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils was 8% higher, while that in neutral soil (pH 6.70) was 15% lower, compared to the treatment of pH 6.0 rain. In the treatment of pH 3.0 acid rain, the decomposition rate of soil organic C in acid (pH 5.48) soil was 43% and 50% (P < 0.05) higher than that in neutral (pH 6.70) and alkaline (pH 8.18) soils, while the decomposition rate of straw in neutral soil was 17% and 16% (P < 0.05) lower than that in acid and alkaline soils, respectively.

  20. Gallic Acid, Ellagic Acid and Pyrogallol Reaction with Metallic Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, J. A.; González, L.; Vargas, A.; Olave, G.

    2003-06-01

    The reaction between gallic acid, ellagic acid and pyrogallol with metallic iron was studied using infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Most hydrolysable tannins with interesting anticorrosive or inhibition properties are structurally related to these compounds, thus they may be used as models for the study of hydrolysable tannins and related polyphenols. The interaction was followed up to 3 months. Results indicated two different behaviors. At polyphenol concentrations higher than 1% iron converts to sparingly soluble and amorphous ferric (and ferrous) polyphenolate complexes. At lower concentrations (0.1%), the hydrolysis reactions are dominant, resulting in the formation of oxyhydroxides, which can be further reduced to compounds like magnetite by the polyphenols.

  1. CHLORINATION OF AMINO ACIDS: REACTION PATHWAYS AND REACTION RATES.

    PubMed

    How, Zuo Tong; Linge, Kathryn; Busetti, Francesco; Joll, Cynthia A

    2017-03-15

    Chlorination of amino acids can result in the formation of organic monochloramines or organic dichloramines, depending on the chlorine to amino acid ratio (Cl:AA). After formation, organic chloramines degrade into aldehydes, nitriles and N-chloraldimines. In this paper, the formation of organic chloramines from chlorination of lysine, tyrosine and valine were investigated. Chlorination of tyrosine and lysine demonstrated that the presence of a reactive secondary group can increase the Cl:AA ratio required for the formation of N,N-dichloramines, and potentially alter the reaction pathways between chlorine and amino acids, resulting in the formation of unexpected by-products. In a detailed investigation, we report rate constants for all reactions in the chlorination of valine, for the first time, using experimental results and modelling. At Cl:AA = 2.8, the chlorine was found to first react quickly with valine (5.4x104 M-1 s-1) to form N-monochlorovaline, with a slower subsequent reaction with N-monochlorovaline to form N,N-dichlorovaline (4.9x102 M-1 s-1), although some N-monochlorovaline degraded into isobutyraldehyde (1.0x10-4 s-1). The N,N-dichlorovaline then competitively degraded into isobutyronitrile (1.3x10-4 s-1) and N-chloroisobutyraldimine (1.2x10-4 s-1). In conventional drinking water disinfection, N-chloroisobutyraldimine can potentially be formed in concentrations higher than its odour threshold concentration, resulting in aesthetic challenges and an unknown health risk.

  2. Visible light-induced decomposition of a fluorotelomer unsaturated carboxylic acid in water with a combination of tungsten trioxide and persulfate.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hisao; Ishiguro, Atsushi; Nakajima, Kohei; Sano, Taizo; Kutsuna, Shuzo; Koike, Kazuhide

    2013-11-01

    Photochemical decomposition of a fluorotelomer unsaturated carboxylic acid, C3F7CFCHCOOH (1), in the presence of WO3 and an electron acceptor (S2O8(2-) or H2O2) in water under visible-light irradiation was investigated. Under an O2 atmosphere, 1 was not decomposed either by TiO2 (P25) or WO3 alone. A combination of WO3 and H2O2 also resulted in almost no decomposition of 1. In contrast, irradiation in the presence of a combination of WO3 and S2O8(2-) (potassium salt) efficiently decomposed 1 to F(-), CO2, C3F7COOH, and C2F5COOH. The decomposition of 1 was affected by the counter cation of S2O8(2-): the decomposition extent was higher with K2S2O8 than with (NH4)2S2O8. The decomposition of 1 was further enhanced when the reaction in the presence of WO3 and K2S2O8 was carried out under an argon atmosphere. Under O2, the amount of H2O2 formed in the reaction solution was an order of magnitude higher than the amount formed under argon. This fact suggests that the decrease in the decomposition of 1 under O2 can be ascribed to the formation of H2O2, which consumed S2O8(2-) and SO4(-).

  3. Direct numerical simulation of shear localization and decomposition reactions in shock-loaded HMX crystal

    DOE PAGES

    Austin, Ryan A.; Barton, Nathan R.; Reaugh, John E.; ...

    2015-05-14

    A numerical model is developed to study the shock wave ignition of HMX crystal. The model accounts for the coupling between crystal thermal/mechanical responses and chemical reactions that are driven by the temperature field. This allows for the direct numerical simulation of decomposition reactions in the hot spots formed by shock/impact loading. The model is used to simulate intragranular pore collapse under shock wave loading. In a reference case: (i) shear-enabled micro-jetting is responsible for a modest extent of reaction in the pore collapse region, and (ii) shear banding is found to be an important mode of localization. The shearmore » bands, which are filled with molten HMX, grow out of the pore collapse region and serve as potential ignition sites. The model predictions of shear banding and reactivity are found to be quite sensitive to the respective flow strengths of the solid and liquid phases. In this regard, it is shown that reasonable assumptions of liquid-HMX viscosity can lead to chemical reactions within the shear bands on a nanosecond time scale.« less

  4. Direct numerical simulation of shear localization and decomposition reactions in shock-loaded HMX crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Austin, Ryan A.; Barton, Nathan R.; Reaugh, John E.; Fried, Laurence E.

    2015-05-14

    A numerical model is developed to study the shock wave ignition of HMX crystal. The model accounts for the coupling between crystal thermal/mechanical responses and chemical reactions that are driven by the temperature field. This allows for the direct numerical simulation of decomposition reactions in the hot spots formed by shock/impact loading. The model is used to simulate intragranular pore collapse under shock wave loading. In a reference case: (i) shear-enabled micro-jetting is responsible for a modest extent of reaction in the pore collapse region, and (ii) shear banding is found to be an important mode of localization. The shear bands, which are filled with molten HMX, grow out of the pore collapse region and serve as potential ignition sites. The model predictions of shear banding and reactivity are found to be quite sensitive to the respective flow strengths of the solid and liquid phases. In this regard, it is shown that reasonable assumptions of liquid-HMX viscosity can lead to chemical reactions within the shear bands on a nanosecond time scale.

  5. Investigating Students' Reasoning about Acid-Base Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Melanie M.; Kouyoumdjian, Hovig; Underwood, Sonia M.

    2016-01-01

    Acid-base chemistry is central to a wide range of reactions. If students are able to understand how and why acid-base reactions occur, it should provide a basis for reasoning about a host of other reactions. Here, we report the development of a method to characterize student reasoning about acid-base reactions based on their description of…

  6. Analytic study of the chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides - atomic iodine donors - in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser: 2. Limiting parameters of the branching chain dark decomposition reaction of iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Andreeva, Tamara L; Kuznetsova, S V; Maslov, Aleksandr I; Sorokin, Vadim N

    2009-08-31

    The final stages in the development of a branching chain decomposition reaction of iodide in the active medium of a pulsed chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) are analysed. Approximate expressions are derived to calculate the limiting parameters of the chain reaction: the final degree of iodide decomposition, the maximum concentration of excited iodine atoms, the time of its achievement, and concentrations of singlet oxygen and iodide at that moment. The limiting parameters, calculated by using these expressions for a typical composition of the active medium of a pulsed COIL, well coincide with the results of numerical calculations. (active media)

  7. Niflumic acid and cutaneous reactions in children

    PubMed Central

    Menniti-Ippolito, F; Sagliocca, L; Da Cas, R; Saggiomo, G; Di, N; Traversa, G; the, S

    2001-01-01

    In a case control study of adverse drug reactions in children, the odds ratio of developing a serious mucocutaneous event among users of niflumic acid, adjusted for concomitant use of all other drugs, was 4.9 (95% CI 1.9 to 12.8). Given the availability of safer analgesics and antipyretics, there is no indication, in our opinion, that requires the prescription of substances which bear an increased risk.

 PMID:11316692

  8. Niflumic acid and cutaneous reactions in children.

    PubMed

    Menniti-Ippolito, F; Sagliocca, L; Da Cas, R; Saggiomo, G; Di Nardo, R; Traversa, G

    2001-05-01

    In a case control study of adverse drug reactions in children, the odds ratio of developing a serious mucocutaneous event among users of niflumic acid, adjusted for concomitant use of all other drugs, was 4.9 (95% CI 1.9 to 12.8). Given the availability of safer analgesics and antipyretics, there is no indication, in our opinion, that requires the prescription of substances which bear an increased risk.

  9. A Richardson scheme of the decomposition method for solving singularly perturbed parabolic reaction-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, G. I.; Shishkina, L. P.

    2010-12-01

    For the one-dimensional singularly perturbed parabolic reaction-diffusion equation with a perturbation parameter ɛ, where ɛ ∈ (0, 1], the grid approximation of the Dirichlet problem on a rectangular domain in the ( x, t)-plane is examined. For small ɛ, a parabolic boundary layer emerges in a neighborhood of the lateral part of the boundary of this domain. A new approach to the construction of ɛ-uniformly converging difference schemes of higher accuracy is developed for initial boundary value problems. The asymptotic construction technique is used to design the base decomposition scheme within which the regular and singular components of the grid solution are solutions to grid subproblems defined on uniform grids. The base scheme converges ɛ-uniformly in the maximum norm at the rate of O( N -2ln2 N + N {0/-1}), where N + 1 and N 0 + 1 are the numbers of nodes in the space and time meshes, respectively. An application of the Richardson extrapolation technique to the base scheme yields a higher order scheme called the Richardson decomposition scheme. This higher order scheme convergesɛ-uniformly at the rate of O( N -4ln4 N + N {0/-2}). For fixed values of the parameter, the convergence rate is O( N -4 + N {0/-2}).

  10. PROPERTIES OF CP: COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS, AND REACTION TO SPARK, FRICTION AND IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K

    2005-09-28

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear and isothermal heating, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, was used to monitor CP decomposition at linear heating rates of 1-7 C min{sup -1} in perforated pans and of 0.1-1.0 C min{sup -1} in sealed pans. The kinetic triplet was calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05, and predictions for 210 and 240 C are compared to isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  11. CP: AN INVESTIGATION OF COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS, AND REACTION TO VARIOUS STIMULI

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K; Fontes, A T

    2005-03-23

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear heating rates, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Using differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, CP was decomposed at linear heating rates of 1, 3, and 7 C/min and the kinetic triplet calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  12. Decomposition of Pyruvic Acid on the Ground-State Potential Energy Surface.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Gabriel

    2016-01-21

    A potential energy surface is reported for isomerization and decomposition of gas-phase pyruvic acid (CH3C(O)C(O)OH) in its ground electronic state. Consistent with previous works, the lowest energy pathway for pyruvic acid decomposition is identified as decarboxylation to produce hydroxymethylcarbene (CH3COH), with overall barrier of 43 kcal mol(-1). This study discovers that pyruvic acid can also isomerize to the α-lactone form with a barrier of only 36 kcal mol(-1), from which CO elimination can occur at 49 kcal mol(-1) above pyruvic acid. An additional novel channel is identified for the tautomerisation of pyruvic acid to the enol form, via a double H-shift mechanism. The barrier for this process is 51 kcal mol(-1), which is around 20 kcal mol(-1) lower than the barrier for conventional keto-enol tautomerization via a 1,3-H shift transition state. Rate coefficients are calculated for pyruvic acid decomposition through RRKM theory/master equation simulations at 800-2000 K and 1 atm, showing good agreement with the available experimental data. The dissociation of vibrationally excited pyruvic acid produced through photoexcitation and subsequent internal conversion to the ground state is also modeled under tropospheric conditions and is seen to produce appreciable quantities of CO (∼1-4%) in addition to CH3COH via the dominant CO2 loss channel.

  13. A review of plutonium oxalate decomposition reactions and effects of decomposition temperature on the surface area of the plutonium dioxide product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orr, R. M.; Sims, H. E.; Taylor, R. J.

    2015-10-01

    Plutonium (IV) and (III) ions in nitric acid solution readily form insoluble precipitates with oxalic acid. The plutonium oxalates are then easily thermally decomposed to form plutonium dioxide powder. This simple process forms the basis of current industrial conversion or 'finishing' processes that are used in commercial scale reprocessing plants. It is also widely used in analytical or laboratory scale operations and for waste residues treatment. However, the mechanisms of the thermal decompositions in both air and inert atmospheres have been the subject of various studies over several decades. The nature of intermediate phases is of fundamental interest whilst understanding the evolution of gases at different temperatures is relevant to process control. The thermal decomposition is also used to control a number of powder properties of the PuO2 product that are important to either long term storage or mixed oxide fuel manufacturing. These properties are the surface area, residual carbon impurities and adsorbed volatile species whereas the morphology and particle size distribution are functions of the precipitation process. Available data and experience regarding the thermal and radiation-induced decompositions of plutonium oxalate to oxide are reviewed. The mechanisms of the thermal decompositions are considered with a particular focus on the likely redox chemistry involved. Also, whilst it is well known that the surface area is dependent on calcination temperature, there is a wide variation in the published data and so new correlations have been derived. Better understanding of plutonium (III) and (IV) oxalate decompositions will assist the development of more proliferation resistant actinide co-conversion processes that are needed for advanced reprocessing in future closed nuclear fuel cycles.

  14. Kinetic studies on enzyme-catalyzed reactions: oxidation of glucose, decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and their combination.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhimin; Raffel, Ryan A; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Goodisman, Jerry

    2009-04-08

    The kinetics of the glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction of glucose with O2, which produces gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the catalase-assisted breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen, have been measured via the rate of O2 depletion or production. The O2 concentrations in air-saturated phosphate-buffered salt solutions were monitored by measuring the decay of phosphorescence from a Pd phosphor in solution; the decay rate was obtained by fitting the tail of the phosphorescence intensity profile to an exponential. For glucose oxidation in the presence of glucose oxidase, the rate constant determined for the rate-limiting step was k = (3.0 +/- 0.7) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at 37 degrees C. For catalase-catalyzed H2O2 breakdown, the reaction order in [H2O2] was somewhat greater than unity at 37 degrees C and well above unity at 25 degrees C, suggesting different temperature dependences of the rate constants for various steps in the reaction. The two reactions were combined in a single experiment: addition of glucose oxidase to glucose-rich cell-free media caused a rapid drop in [O2], and subsequent addition of catalase caused [O2] to rise and then decrease to zero. The best fit of [O2] to a kinetic model is obtained with the rate constants for glucose oxidation and peroxide decomposition equal to 0.116 s(-1) and 0.090 s(-1) respectively. Cellular respiration in the presence of glucose was found to be three times as rapid as that in glucose-deprived cells. Added NaCN inhibited O2 consumption completely, confirming that oxidation occurred in the cellular mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  15. Evaluation and characterization of the methane-carbon dioxide decomposition reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, R. J.; Schubert, F. H.; Shumar, J. W.; Steenson, T. S.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate and characterize the carbon dioxide-methane (CO2-CH4) decomposition reaction, i.e., CO2 + CH4 = 2C + 2H2O. The primary objective was to determine the feasibility of applying this reaction at low temperatures as a technique for recovering the oxygen (O2) remaining in the CO2 which exits mixed with CH4 from a Sabatier CO2 reduction subsystem (as part of an air revitalization system of a manned spacecraft). A test unit was designed, fabricated, and assembled for characterizing the performance of various catalysts for the reaction and ultraviolet activation of the CH4 and CO2. The reactor included in the test unit was designed to have sufficient capacity to evaluate catalyst charges of up to 76 g (0.17 lb). The test stand contained the necessary instrumentation and controls to obtain the data required to characterize the performance of the catalysts and sensitizers tested: flow control and measurement, temperature control and measurement, product and inlet gas analysis, and pressure measurement. A product assurance program was performed implementing the concepts of quality control and safety into the program effort.

  16. Conversion of KCl into KBH4 by Mechano-Chemical Reaction and its Catalytic Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilen, Murat; Gürü, Metin; Çakanyildirim, Çetin

    2017-02-01

    Production of KBH4, in the presence of KCl, B2O3 and MgH2 by means of a mechanical reaction and a dehydrogenation kinetic, constitute the main parts of this study. Operating time and reactant ratio are considered as two parameters for the mechanical reaction to obtain the maximum yield. The production process was carried out in a ball milling reactor, and the product residue was purified with ethylene diamine (EDA) and subsequently characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and x-ray Diffraction (XRD) analyses. Optimum time for mechano-chemical treatment and reactant ratio (MgH2/KCl) were obtained as 1000 min and 1.0, respectively. Synthesized and commercial KBH4 were compared by hydrolysis tests in the presence of Co1-xNix/Al2O3 heterogeneous catalyst. Hydrogen generation rates, activation energy and order of the KBH4 decomposition reaction were obtained as 1578 {mL}_{{{{H}}2 }} min^{ - 1} {g}_{{catalyst}}^{ - 1} , 39.2 kJ mol-1 and zero order, respectively.

  17. Fast Reactions of Aluminum and Explosive Decomposition Products in a Post-Detonation Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappan, Bryce; Manner, Virginia; Lloyd, Joseph; Pemberton, Steven; Explosives Applications; Special Projects Team

    2011-06-01

    In order to determine the reaction behavior of Al in HMX/cast-cured binder formulations shortly after the passage of the detonation, a series of cylinder tests was performed on formulations with varying amounts of 2 μm spherical Al as well as LiF (an inert surrogate for Al). In these studies, both detonation velocity and cylinder expansion velocity are measured in order to determine exactly how and when Al contributes to the explosive event, particularly in the presence of oxidizing/energetic binders. The U.S. Army ARDEC at Picatinny has recently coined the term ``combined effects explosives'' for these materials as they demonstrate both high metal pushing capability and high blast ability. This study is aimed at developing a fundamental understanding of the reaction of Al with explosives decomposition products, where both the detonation and post-detonation environment are analyzed. Reaction rates of Al metal are determined via comparison of predicted performance based on thermoequilibrium calculations. The JWL equation of state, detonation velocities, wall velocities, and parameters at the C-J plane are some of the parameters that will be discussed.

  18. Fast reactions of aluminum and explosive decomposition products in a post-detonation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappan, Bryce C.; Manner, Virginia W.; Lloyd, Joseph M.; Pemberton, Steven J.

    2012-03-01

    In order to determine the reaction behavior of Al in RDX or HMX/cast-cured binder formulations shortly after the passage of the detonation, a series of cylinder tests was performed on formulations comprising of varying binder systems and either 3.5 μm spherical Al or LiF (an inert salt with a similar molecular weight and density to Al). In these studies, both detonation velocity and cylinder expansion velocity are measured in order to determine exactly how and when Al contributes to the explosive event, particularly in the presence of oxidizing/energetic binders. The U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Laboratory at Picatinny have recently coined the term "combined effects" explosives for materials such as these; as they demonstrate both high metal pushing capability and high blast ability. This study is aimed at developing a fundamental understanding of the reaction of Al with explosives decomposition products, where both the detonation and early post-detonation environment are analyzed. Reaction rates of Al metal are investigated via comparison of predicted performance based on thermoequilibrium calculations. The detonation velocities, wall velocities, and parameters at the CJ plane are some of the parameters that will be discussed.

  19. The FB-Line and F-Canyon HAN/Nitric Acid Decomposition Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hang, T.

    1998-08-19

    Separations requested SRTC study the autocatalytic decomposition of the hydroxylamine nitrate which may occur in the presence of concentrated nitric acid with respect to making-up cold feed solutions. The data obtained from this study will provide Separations an envelope within which safe operations can be conducted.

  20. Water dissociation in a radio-frequency electromagnetic field with ex situ electrodes—decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid and tetrahydrofuran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Jens; Holzer, Frank; Kraus, Markus; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Roland, Ulf

    2016-10-01

    The application of radio waves with a frequency of 13.56 MHz on electrolyte solutions in a capillary reactor led to the formation of reactive hydrogen and oxygen species and finally to molecular oxygen and hydrogen. This process of water splitting can be principally used for the elimination of hazardous chemicals in water. Two compounds, namely perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and tetrahydrofuran, were converted using this process. Their main decomposition products were highly volatile and therefore transferred to a gas phase, where they could be identified by GC-MS analyses. It is remarkable that the chemical reactions could benefit from both the oxidizing and reducing species formed in the plasma process, which takes place in gas bubbles saturated with water vapor. The breaking of C-C and C-F bonds was proven in the case of PFOA, probably initiated by electron impacts and radical reactions.

  1. Integrated boiler, superheater, and decomposer for sulfuric acid decomposition

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Jr., Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Gelbard, Fred; Lenard, Roger X.

    2010-01-12

    A method and apparatus, constructed of ceramics and other corrosion resistant materials, for decomposing sulfuric acid into sulfur dioxide, oxygen and water using an integrated boiler, superheater, and decomposer unit comprising a bayonet-type, dual-tube, counter-flow heat exchanger with a catalytic insert and a central baffle to increase recuperation efficiency.

  2. Formation of Aldehydic Phosphatidylcholines during the Anaerobic Decomposition of a Phosphatidylcholine Bearing the 9-Hydroperoxide of Linoleic Acid.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Arnold N

    2016-01-01

    Lipid oxidation-derived carbonyl compounds are associated with the development of various physiological disorders. Formation of most of these products has recently been suggested to require further reactions of oxygen with lipid hydroperoxides. However, in rat and human tissues, the formation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal is greatly elevated during hypoxic/ischemic conditions. Furthermore, a previous study found an unexpected result that the decomposition of a phosphatidylcholine (PC) bearing the 13-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid under a nitrogen atmosphere afforded 9-oxononanoyl-PC rather than 13-oxo-9,11-tridecadienoyl-PC as the main aldehydic PC. In the present study, products of the anaerobic decomposition of a PC bearing the 9-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid were analysed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. 9-Oxononanoyl-PC (ONA-PC) and several well-known bioactive aldehydes including 12-oxo-9-hydroperoxy-(or oxo or hydroxy)-10-dodecenoyl-PCs were detected. Hydrolysis of the oxidized PC products, methylation of the acids obtained thereby, and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy with electron impact ionization further confirmed structures of some of the key aldehydic PCs. Novel, hydroxyl radical-dependent mechanisms of formation of ONA-PC and peroxyl-radical dependent mechanisms of formation of the rest of the aldehydes are proposed. The latter mechanisms will mainly be relevant to tissue injury under hypoxic/anoxic conditions, while the former are relevant under both normoxia and hypoxia/anoxia.

  3. Formation of Aldehydic Phosphatidylcholines during the Anaerobic Decomposition of a Phosphatidylcholine Bearing the 9-Hydroperoxide of Linoleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Lipid oxidation-derived carbonyl compounds are associated with the development of various physiological disorders. Formation of most of these products has recently been suggested to require further reactions of oxygen with lipid hydroperoxides. However, in rat and human tissues, the formation of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal is greatly elevated during hypoxic/ischemic conditions. Furthermore, a previous study found an unexpected result that the decomposition of a phosphatidylcholine (PC) bearing the 13-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid under a nitrogen atmosphere afforded 9-oxononanoyl-PC rather than 13-oxo-9,11-tridecadienoyl-PC as the main aldehydic PC. In the present study, products of the anaerobic decomposition of a PC bearing the 9-hydroperoxide of linoleic acid were analysed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. 9-Oxononanoyl-PC (ONA-PC) and several well-known bioactive aldehydes including 12-oxo-9-hydroperoxy-(or oxo or hydroxy)-10-dodecenoyl-PCs were detected. Hydrolysis of the oxidized PC products, methylation of the acids obtained thereby, and subsequent gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy with electron impact ionization further confirmed structures of some of the key aldehydic PCs. Novel, hydroxyl radical-dependent mechanisms of formation of ONA-PC and peroxyl-radical dependent mechanisms of formation of the rest of the aldehydes are proposed. The latter mechanisms will mainly be relevant to tissue injury under hypoxic/anoxic conditions, while the former are relevant under both normoxia and hypoxia/anoxia. PMID:27366754

  4. The chlorate-iodine-nitrous acid clock reaction.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T P; Faria, Roberto B

    2014-01-01

    A new clock reaction based on chlorate, iodine and nitrous acid is presented. The induction period of this new clock reaction decreases when the initial concentrations of chlorate, nitrous acid and perchloric acid increase, but it is independent on the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism is based on the LLKE autocatalytic mechanism for the chlorite-iodide reaction and the initial reaction between chlorate and nitrous acid to produce nitrate and chlorite. This new clock reaction opens the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions containing chlorate or nitrous acid, which in both cases has not been observed until now.

  5. The Chlorate-Iodine-Nitrous Acid Clock Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Sant'Anna, Rafaela T. P.; Faria, Roberto B.

    2014-01-01

    A new clock reaction based on chlorate, iodine and nitrous acid is presented. The induction period of this new clock reaction decreases when the initial concentrations of chlorate, nitrous acid and perchloric acid increase, but it is independent on the initial iodine concentration. The proposed mechanism is based on the LLKE autocatalytic mechanism for the chlorite-iodide reaction and the initial reaction between chlorate and nitrous acid to produce nitrate and chlorite. This new clock reaction opens the possibility for a new family of oscillating reactions containing chlorate or nitrous acid, which in both cases has not been observed until now. PMID:25313803

  6. Reduction reaction analysis of nanoparticle copper oxide for copper direct bonding using formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujino, Masahisa; Akaike, Masatake; Matsuoka, Naoya; Suga, Tadatomo

    2017-04-01

    Copper direct bonding is required for electronics devices, especially power devices, and copper direct bonding using formic acid is expected to lower the bonding temperature. In this research, we analyzed the reduction reaction of copper oxide using formic acid with a Pt catalyst by electron spin resonance analysis and thermal gravimetry analysis. It was found that formic acid was decomposed and radicals were generated under 200 °C. The amount of radicals generated was increased by adding the Pt catalyst. Because of these radicals, both copper(I) oxide and copper(II) oxide start to be decomposed below 200 °C, and the reduction of copper oxide is accelerated by reactants such as H2 and CO from the decomposition of formic acid above 200 °C. The Pt catalyst also accelerates the reaction of copper oxide reduction. Herewith, it is considered that the copper surface can be controlled more precisely by using formic acid to induce direct bonding.

  7. Reaction mechanism of ethylene glycol decomposition on Pt model catalysts: A density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Cun-Qin; Yang, Bo; Pang, Xian-Yong; Wang, Gui-Chang

    2016-12-01

    Understanding and controlling bond beak sequence is important in catalytic processes. The DFT-GGA method combined with slab model was performed to study the ethylene glycol decomposition on various Pt model catalysts such as close-packed Pt(111), stepped Pt(211) and a more open one, Pt(100). Calculation results show that the adsorption energies of ethylene glycol and other decomposition species depend on the coordination number of surface atom, that is, low coordination number correspond to high adsorption energy. Moreover, it was found that final products of ethylene glycol decomposition are CO and H2 on all model catalysts, but the reaction mechanism varies: On Pt(111), the first step is Osbnd H bond scission, followed by Csbnd H bond cleavage, namely C2H6O2 → HOCH2CH2O + H → HOCH2CHO + 2H→ HOCH2CO +3H → OCH2CO + 4H → OCHCO + 5H → CO + HCO + 5H → 2CO + 6H→ 2CO + 3H2; On Pt(211) and Pt(100), however, it is a second Osbnd H bond cleavage that follows the initial Osbnd H bond scission, that is, C2H6O2 → HOCH2CH2O + H → OCH2CH2O + 2H → OCHCH2O + 3H → OCHCHO + 4H → 2HCO + 4H → 2CO + 6H → 2CO + 3H2 on Pt(211), and C2H6O2 →HOCH2CH2O+ H → OCH2CH2O + 2H→OCHCH2O+3H→OCCH2O+4H→CO+H2CO+4H→CO+HCO+5H→2CO+6H→2CO+3H2 on Pt(100) For the catalytic order of ethylene glycol to form H2, it may be determined based on the rate-controlling step, and it is Pt(111) > Pt(211) > Pt(100).

  8. A simple method for decomposition of peracetic acid in a microalgal cultivation system.

    PubMed

    Sung, Min-Gyu; Lee, Hansol; Nam, Kibok; Rexroth, Sascha; Rögner, Matthias; Kwon, Jong-Hee; Yang, Ji-Won

    2015-03-01

    A cost-efficient process devoid of several washing steps was developed, which is related to direct cultivation following the decomposition of the sterilizer. Peracetic acid (PAA) is known to be an efficient antimicrobial agent due to its high oxidizing potential. Sterilization by 2 mM PAA demands at least 1 h incubation time for an effective disinfection. Direct degradation of PAA was demonstrated by utilizing components in conventional algal medium. Consequently, ferric ion and pH buffer (HEPES) showed a synergetic effect for the decomposition of PAA within 6 h. On the contrary, NaNO3, one of the main components in algal media, inhibits the decomposition of PAA. The improved growth of Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis PCC6803 was observed in the prepared BG11 by decomposition of PAA. This process involving sterilization and decomposition of PAA should help cost-efficient management of photobioreactors in a large scale for the production of value-added products and biofuels from microalgal biomass.

  9. High pressure sulfuric acid decomposition experiments for the sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle.

    SciTech Connect

    Velasquez, Carlos E; Reay, Andrew R.; Andazola, James C.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Gelbard, Fred

    2005-09-01

    A series of three pressurized sulfuric acid decomposition tests were performed to (1) obtain data on the fraction of sulfuric acid catalytically converted to sulfur dioxide, oxygen, and water as a function of temperature and pressure, (2) demonstrate real-time measurements of acid conversion for use as process control, (3) obtain multiple measurements of conversion as a function of temperature within a single experiment, and (4) assess rapid quenching to minimize corrosion of metallic components by undecomposed acid. All four of these objectives were successfully accomplished. This report documents the completion of the NHI milestone on high pressure H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition tests for the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle project. All heated sections of the apparatus, (i.e. the boiler, decomposer, and condenser) were fabricated from Hastelloy C276. A ceramic acid injection tube and a ceramic-sheathed thermocouple were used to minimize corrosion of hot liquid acid on the boiler surfaces. Negligible fracturing of the platinum on zirconia catalyst was observed in the high temperature decomposer. Temperature measurements at the exit of the decomposer and at the entry of the condenser indicated that the hot acid vapors were rapidly quenched from about 400 C to less than 20 C within a 14 cm length of the flow path. Real-time gas flow rate measurements of the decomposition products provided a direct measurement of acid conversion. Pressure in the apparatus was preset by a pressure-relief valve that worked well at controlling the system pressure. However, these valves sometimes underwent abrupt transitions that resulted in rapidly varying gas flow rates with concomitant variations in the acid conversion fraction.

  10. Formation of titanium phosphate composites during phosphoric acid decomposition of natural sphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslova, Marina V.; Rusanova, Daniela; Naydenov, Valeri; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Gerasimova, Lidia G.

    2008-12-01

    Decomposition of mineral sphene, CaTiOSiO 4, by H 3PO 4 is investigated in detail. During the dissolution process, simultaneous calcium leaching and formation of titanium phosphate (TiP) take place. The main product of decomposition is a solid titanium phosphate-silica composite. The XRD, solid-sate NMR, IR, TGA, SEM and BET data were used to identify and characterize the composite as a mixture of crystalline Ti(HPO 4) 2·H 2O and silica. When 80% phosphoric acid is used the decomposition degree is higher than 98% and calcium is completely transferred into the liquid phase. Formation of Ti(HPO 4) 2·H 2O proceeds via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases, Ti(H 2PO 4)(PO 4)·2H 2O and Ti(H 2PO 4)(PO 4). The sorption affinities of TiP composites were examined in relation to caesium and strontium ions. A decrease of H 3PO 4 concentration leads to formation of composites with greater sorption properties. The maximum sorption capacity of TiP is observed when 60% H 3PO 4 is used in sphene decomposition. The work demonstrates a valuable option within the Ti(HPO 4) 2·H 2O-SiO 2 composite synthesis scheme, to use phosphoric acid flows for isolation of CaHPO 4·2H 2O fertilizer.

  11. Kinetic Studies of the Thermal Decomposition of Methylperoxynitrate and of Ozone-Olefin Reactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahta, Abraha

    This research concerns the thermal decomposition kinetics of CH(,3)O(,2)NO(,2) and laboratory kinetic measurements of ozone-olefin reactions. In the first system, the thermal decomposition rate of CH(,3)O(,2)NO(,2) was studied in the temperature range of 256-268 K at (TURN)350 torr total pressure and in the pressure range of 50-720 torr at 263 K by the perturbation of the equilibrium: (UNFORMATTED TABLE FOLLOWS). CH(,3)O(,2) + NO(,2) (+M) (DBLARR) CH(,3)O(,2)NO(,2) (+M) (3,-3). with NO. CH(,3)O(,2) + NO (--->) CH(,3)O + NO(,2) (4). (TABLE ENDS). The CH(,3)O(,2)NO(,2) was generated in situ by the photolysis of Cl(,2) in the presence of O(,2), CH(,4) and NO(,2). The decomposition kinetics were monitored in the presence of NO by the change in ultraviolet absorption at 250 nm. The Arrhenius expression obtained for the thermal decomposition is k(,-3) = 6 x 10('15) exp{-(21,000 (+OR-) 1500)/RT} sec('-1) at (TURNEQ)350 torr total pressure (mostly CH(,4)) where R = 1.987 cal/mole('-) K. The uncertainty in the Arrhenius parameters can be greatly reduced by combining this expression with data for k(,3) and thermodynamics data to give k(,-3) = (6 (+OR-) 3) x 10('15) exp{-(21,300 (+OR-) 300)/RT} sec('-1) at (TURNEQ)350 torr total pressure. Computations based on the pressure dependence of the forward reaction give k(,-3)('(INFIN)) = 2.1 x 10('16) exp{-(21,700 (+OR -) 300)/RT} sec('-1) k(,-3)('(DEGREES)) = 3.3 x 10(' -4) exp{-(20,150 x 300)/RT} cm('3) sec('-1). At 263 K the equilibrium constant K(,3,-3){263 K} is determined to be (2.68 (+OR-) 0.26) x 10('-10) cm('3). In the stratosphere the CH(,3)O(,2)NO(,2) lifetime will be controlled by play a role in the NO(,x) budget of the lower stratosphere. In the second part, the kinetics of the reactions of O(,3) with C(,2)H(,4), C(,3)H(,4), 1,3-C(,4)H(,6), and trans-1,3-C(,5)H(,8) were studied with initial olefin-to -ozone ratios (GREATERTHEQ) 4.9, in the presence of excess O(,2), and over the temperature range 232 to 300 K. The

  12. Oxidation of Co(II) by ozone and reactions of Co(III) in solutions of sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanov, A. V.; Isaikina, O. Ya.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    Reactions of the oxidation of bivalent cobalt ions by ozone, of the spontaneous decomposition of trivalent cobalt, and of interactions between Co(III) and chloride ions in solutions of sulfuric acid are studied. The order and rate constant of the process of decomposition of Co(III) are determined. Information on the kinetics of the interaction between Co(III) and Cl- is obtained. Kinetic patterns of the accumulation of Co(III) during the ozonation of solutions of CoSO4 in sulfuric acid are explained. Molar absorption coefficients of Co(III) and Co2+ ions in the visible range of wavelengths are determined.

  13. Trends in Formic Acid Decomposition on Model Transition Metal Surfaces: A Density Functional Theory Study

    SciTech Connect

    Herron, Jeffrey A.; Scaranto, Jessica; Ferrin, Peter A.; Li, Sha; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-12-05

    We present a first-principles, self-consistent periodic density functional theory (PW91-GGA) study of formic acid (HCOOH) decomposition on model (111) and (100) facets of eight fcc metals (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, Pd, Ni, Ir, and Rh) and (0001) facets of four hcp (Co, Os, Ru, and Re) metals. The calculated binding energies of key formic acid decomposition intermediates including formate (HCOO), carboxyl (COOH), carbon monoxide (CO), water (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), hydroxyl (OH), carbon (C), oxygen (O), and hydrogen (H; H2) are presented. Using these energetics, we develop thermochemical potential energy diagrams for both the carboxyl-mediated and the formate-mediated dehydrogenation mechanisms on each surface. We evaluate the relative stability of COOH, HCOO, and other isomeric intermediates (i.e., CO + OH, CO2 + H, CO + O + H) on these surfaces. These results provide insights into formic acid decomposition selectivity (dehydrogenation versus dehydration), and in conjunction with calculated vibrational frequency modes, the results can assist with the experimental search for the elusive carboxyl (COOH) surface intermediate. Results are compared against experimental reports in the literature.

  14. Solid Molecular Phosphine Catalysts for Formic Acid Decomposition in the Biorefinery.

    PubMed

    Hausoul, Peter J C; Broicher, Cornelia; Vegliante, Roberta; Göb, Christian; Palkovits, Regina

    2016-04-25

    The co-production of formic acid during the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid offers the possibility for on-site hydrogen production and reductive transformations. Phosphorus-based porous polymers loaded with Ru complexes exhibit high activity and selectivity in the base-free decomposition of formic acid to CO2 and H2 . A polymeric analogue of 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (DPPE) gave the best results in terms of performance and stability. Recycling tests revealed low levels of leaching and only a gradual decrease in the activity over seven runs. An applicability study revealed that these catalysts even facilitate selective removal of formic acid from crude product mixtures arising from the synthesis of levulinic acid.

  15. Long-term amelioration of acidity accelerates decomposition in headwater streams.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Gareth B; Woodward, Guy; Hildrew, Alan G

    2013-04-01

    The secondary production of culturally acidified streams is low, with a few species of generalist detritivores dominating invertebrate assemblages, while decomposition processes are impaired. In a series of lowland headwater streams in southern England, we measured the rate of cellulolytic decomposition and compared it with values measured three decades ago, when anthropogenic acidification was at its peak. We hypothesized that, if acidity has indeed ameliorated, the rate of decomposition will have accelerated, thus potentially supporting greater secondary production and the longer food chains that have been observed in some well-studied recovering freshwater systems. We used cellulose Shirley test cloth as a standardized bioassay to measure the rate of cellulolytic decomposition, via loss in tensile strength, for 31 streams in the Ashdown Forest over 7 days in summer 2011 and 49 days in winter 2012. We compared this with data from an otherwise identical study conducted in 1978 and 1979. In a secondary study, we determined whether decomposition followed a linear or logarithmic decay and, as Shirley cloth is no longer available, we tested an alternative in the form of readily available calico. Overall mean pH had increased markedly over the 32 years between the studies (from 6.0 to 6.7). In both the previous and contemporary studies, the relationship between decomposition and pH was strongest in winter, when pH reaches a seasonal minimum. As in the late 1970s, there was no relationship in 2011/2012 between pH and decay rate in summer. As postulated, decomposition in winter was significantly faster in 2011/2012 than in 1978/1979, with an average increase in decay rate of 18.1%. Recovery from acidification, due to decreased acidifying emissions and deposition, has led to an increase in the rate of cellulolytic decomposition. This response in a critical ecosystem process offers a potential explanation of one aspect of the limited biological recovery that has been

  16. Modeling the contribution of soil fauna to litter decomposition influenced by acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, B.; Loucks, O.L; Kuperman, R. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1993-06-01

    The effect of acidic deposition on soil pH and therefore on soil invertebrates and litter decomposition is being investigated in oak-hickory forests across a three-state, midwest, pollution gradient. The role of soil invertebrates has been assessed previously through the use of feeding, assimilation and respiratory rates. These energetic parameters depend strongly on the form of the allometric equations which have been improved here by incorporating uncertainties in body and population size. Results show that changes in reproduction and turnover dynamics of soil invertebrates (particularly of earthworms) due to acid-induced changes in soil pH explains observed patterns in litter depth.

  17. The Kinetics and Mechanism of the Decomposition of Murexide in Acid Solution: An Experiment for Teaching Principles of Chemical Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoche, Wilhelm; Rees, Norman H.

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results are provided for an experiment on the decomposition of murexide in acid solution. The experiment, suitable for advanced courses, can be easily performed in a 6-hour laboratory period. (JN)

  18. Multicomponent cascade reactions of unprotected carbohydrates and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Benjamin; Linke, Michael; Mahrwald, Rainer

    2015-06-05

    Herein an operationally simple multicomponent reaction of unprotected carbohydrates with amino acids and isonitriles is presented. By the extension of this Ugi-type reaction to an unprotected disaccharide a novel glycopeptide structure was accessible.

  19. Theoretical Study of the Thermal Decomposition of Carboxylic Acids at Pyrolysis Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, J. M.; Robichaud, D. J.; Nimlos, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Carboxylic acids are important in the processing of biomass into renewable fuels and chemicals. They are formed from the pretreatment and pyrolysis of hemicellulose biopolymers and are released from the decomposition of sugars. They result from the deconstruction of polyhydroxyalkanoates (bacterial carbon storage polymers) from fatty acids derived from algae, bacteria, and oil crops. The thermal deoxygenation of carboxylic acids is an important step in the conversion of biomass into aliphatic hydrocarbons suitable for use in renewable biofuels and as petrochemical replacements. Decarboxylation, a primary decomposition pathway under pyrolysis conditions, represents an ideal conversion process, because it eliminates two atoms of oxygen for every carbon atom removed. Problematically, additional deoxygenation processes exist (e.g. dehydration) that are in direct competition with decarboxylation and result in the formation of reactive and more fragmented end products. To better understand the competition between decarboxylation and other deoxygenation processes and to gain insight into possible catalysts that would favor decarboxylation, we have investigated the mechanisms and thermochemistry of the various unimolecular and bimolecular deoxygenation pathways for a family of C1-C4 organic acids using electronic structure calculations at the M06-2X/6-311++G(2df,p) level of theory.

  20. Formation of titanium phosphate composites during phosphoric acid decomposition of natural sphene

    SciTech Connect

    Maslova, Marina V.; Rusanova, Daniela Naydenov, Valeri; Antzutkin, Oleg N.; Gerasimova, Lidia G.

    2008-12-15

    Decomposition of mineral sphene, CaTiOSiO{sub 4}, by H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is investigated in detail. During the dissolution process, simultaneous calcium leaching and formation of titanium phosphate (TiP) take place. The main product of decomposition is a solid titanium phosphate-silica composite. The XRD, solid-sate NMR, IR, TGA, SEM and BET data were used to identify and characterize the composite as a mixture of crystalline Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O and silica. When 80% phosphoric acid is used the decomposition degree is higher than 98% and calcium is completely transferred into the liquid phase. Formation of Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O proceeds via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases, Ti(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}).2H{sub 2}O and Ti(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4})(PO{sub 4}). The sorption affinities of TiP composites were examined in relation to caesium and strontium ions. A decrease of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} concentration leads to formation of composites with greater sorption properties. The maximum sorption capacity of TiP is observed when 60% H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is used in sphene decomposition. The work demonstrates a valuable option within the Ti(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O-SiO{sub 2} composite synthesis scheme, to use phosphoric acid flows for isolation of CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O fertilizer. - Graphical abstract: A new synthesis scheme for preparation of composite titanium phosphate (TiP) ion-exchangers upon one-stage decomposition process of natural sphene with phosphoric acid is presented. Syntheses of {alpha}-TiP-silica composites proceed via formation of meta-stable titanium phosphate phases. The concentration of H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} determines the porosity of final products and their sorption affinities.

  1. Acid-base bifunctional catalytic surfaces for nucleophilic addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-09-01

    This article illustrates the modification of oxide surfaces with organic amine functional groups to create acid-base bifunctional catalysts, summarizing our previous reports and also presenting new data. Immobilization of organic amines as bases on inorganic solid-acid surfaces afforded highly active acid-base bifunctional catalysts, which enabled various organic transformations including C--C coupling reactions, though these reactions did not proceed with either the homogeneous amine precursors or the acidic supports alone. Spectroscopic characterization, such as by solid-state MAS NMR and FTIR, revealed not only the interactions between acidic and basic sites but also bifunctional catalytic reaction mechanisms.

  2. Magnetite-supported sulfonic acid: a retrievable nanocatalyst for the Ritter reaction and multicomponent reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetite-sulfonic acid (NanocatFe-OSO3H), prepared by wet-impregnation method, serves as a magnetically retrievable sustainable catalyst for the Ritter reaction which can be used in several reaction cycles without any loss of activity.

  3. Kinetics of haloacetic acid reactions with Fe(0).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Arnold, William A; Hozalski, Raymond M

    2004-12-15

    Detailed kinetic studies of the reactions of haloacetic acids (HAAs) with Fe(0) were performed in longitudinally mixed batch reactors. The reactions of tribromoacetic acid (TBAA), bromodichloroacetic acid, and chlorodibromoacetic acid were mass transfer limited, with corrected mass transfer coefficients of 3.7-3.9 x 10(-4) m/s. The reactions of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), chloroacetic acid (CAA), and bromoacetic acid (BAA) were reaction limited. Bromochloroacetic acid (BCAA) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were partially reaction limited. For the reaction limited species and partially reaction limited species, intra- and interspecies competition effects were observed. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson kinetic model incorporating a mass transfer term was adopted to account for these effects. The lumped kinetic parameters for the HAAs ranged from 0.04 to 248 microM min(-1) for an iron loading of 0.3 g of Fe/125 mL and followed the trend DBAA > BCAA > TCAA > BAA > DCAA. The adsorption parameters ranged from 0.0007 to 0.0065 microM(-1). The effect of dissolved oxygen (DO) on the reaction of TBAA or BAA with Fe(0) was also investigated. No significant effect of DO on the reaction rate of TBAA, which is a mass transfer limited species, was observed. A lag phase, however, was observed for the reaction of BAA, which is a reaction limited species, until the DO was depleted. Simulations were performed to investigate the potential significance of the reactions of HAAs with Fe(0) in water distribution systems.

  4. Supercritical hydrogenation and acid-catalysed reactions "without gases".

    PubMed

    Hyde, Jason R; Poliakoff, Martyn

    2004-07-07

    The high temperature catalytic decomposition of HCO2H and HCO2Et are used to generate the high pressure H2 and the supercritical fluids needed for micro-scale hydrogenation of organic compounds; our approach overcomes the problems and limitations of handling high pressure gases on a small-scale and opens the way to the widespread use of continuous supercritical reactions in the laboratory.

  5. Reduction of carbadox mediated by reaction of Mn(III) with oxalic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Ru; Liu, Cun; Boyd, Stephen A; Teppen, Brian J; Li, Hui

    2013-02-05

    Manganese(III) geocomponents are commonly found in the soil environment, yet their roles in many biogeochemical processes remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that Mn(III) generated from the reaction of MnO(2) and oxalic acid caused rapid and extensive decompositions of a quinoxaline-di-N-oxide antibiotics, viz carbadox. The reaction occurred primarily at the quinoxaline-di-N-oxide moiety resulting in the removal of one -O from N1-oxide and formation of desoxycarbadox. The reaction rate was accelerated by increasing amounts of Mn(III), carbadox and oxalate. The critical step in the overall reaction was the formation of a quinoxaline-di-N-oxide/Mn(III)/oxalate ternary complex in which Mn(III) functioned as the central complexing cation and electron conduit in which the arrangement of ligands facilitated electron transfer from oxalate to carbadox. In the complex, the C-C bond in oxalate was cleaved to create CO(2)(-•) radicals, followed by electron transfer to carbadox through the Mn(III) center. This proposed reaction mechanism is supported by the reaction products formed, reaction kinetics, and quantum mechanical calculations. The results obtained from this study suggest that naturally occurring Mn(III)-oxalic acid complexes could reductively decompose certain organic compounds in the environment such as the antibiotic quinoxaline-di-N-oxide.

  6. Chemically activated formation of organic acids in reactions of the Criegee intermediate with aldehydes and ketones.

    PubMed

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W; Green, William H

    2013-10-21

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, ˙CH2OO˙) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between ˙CH2OO˙ and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48-51 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy, formed via 1,3-cycloaddition of ˙CH2OO˙ across the C=O bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O-O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO < CH3CHO < CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10(-4) times lower than the initial ˙CH2OO˙ concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  7. Chemically Activated Formation of Organic Acids in Reactions of the Criegee Intermediate with Aldehydes and Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W.; Green, William H.

    2013-08-08

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, .CH2OO.) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between .CH2OO. and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48–51 kcal mol-1 lower in energy, formed via 1,3- cycloaddition of .CH2OO. across the CQO bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O–O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO o CH3CHO o CH3COCH3 (the highest yield being 10-4 times lower than the initial .CH2OO. concentration). At low pressures, chemically activated formation of organic acids (formic acid in the case of HCHO and CH3COCH3, formic and acetic acid in the case of CH3CHO) was found to be the major product channel in agreement with recent direct measurements. Collisional energy transfer parameters and the barrier heights for SOZ reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  8. Effect of inclusion complex on nitrous acid reaction with flavonoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalafi, Lida; Rafiee, Mohammad; Sedaghat, Sajjad

    2011-10-01

    The kinetic of the nitrous acid reactions with quercetin and catechin has been studied using spectrophotometric method in aqueous solution. The results show that these antioxidants participate in oxidation reactions with nitrous acid which is derived from protonation of nitrite ion in mild acidic conditions. Corresponding o-quinones as relatively stable products were detected by spectrophotometric techniques. pH dependence of the reactions has been examined and the rate constants of reactions were obtained by non-linear fitting of kinetic profiles. The effect of β-cyclodextrin on the oxidation pathway was another object of this study. It is shown that β-cyclodextrin has an inhibitory effect on the oxidation reaction. The rate constants of oxidation reactions for complexed forms and their stability constants were obtained based on changes in the reaction rates as a function of β-cyclodextrin concentration.

  9. Reexamination of CO formation during formic acid decomposition on the Pt(1 1 1) surface in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yingying; Zhang, Dongju; Liu, Peng; Liu, Chengbu

    2016-08-01

    Existing theoretical results for formic acid (HCOOH) decomposition on Pt(1 1 1) cannot rationalize the easy CO poisoning of the catalysts in the gas phase. The present work reexamined HCOOH decomposition on Pt(1 1 1) by considering the effect of the initial adsorption structure of the reactant on the reactivity. Our calculations present a new adsorption configuration of HCOOH on Pt(1 1 1), from which the formation of CO is found to be competing with the formation of CO2. The newly proposed mechanism improves our understanding for the mechanism of HCOOH decomposition catalyzed by Pt-based catalysts.

  10. [The relatioship between decomposition of amino acid chloramines and their structures].

    PubMed

    Roshchupkin, D I; Murina, M A; Petrova, A O; Sergienko, V I

    2009-01-01

    Rate constants of the decomposition of monoamine alpha-amino acid chloramine derivatives were determined by a spectrophotometeric method. Several amino acid chloramines with elevated stability have been found. These included n-chloroglycine, n-chlorovaline, n-chlorothreonine, and n-chloroisoleucine. Their molecular structures are characterized by some characteristic feature at the beta-position. In the case of glycine chloramine, carbon atom at this position is absent, and the chloramine derivatives of three other amino acids possess branched chains. Partial atomic charges of the electrostatic potential (Wang-Ford) for chloramines of alpha-amino acids were computed using the semiempirical quantum-mechanical method AM1. The chloramines with elevated stability have high positive sums of charges of three carbon atoms that are atoms at alpha- and beta-positions and a carboxyl group atom. High partial charge also was obtained for one carbon atom at the beta-position. These computational values may be employed for prediction of the stability of designed amino acid chloramines. One of the important predictions is that the highest atomic charges and stabilities are characteristics of the amino acid chloramines, in which all hydrogen atoms at the beta-position are replaced by carbon-hydrogen chains or hydroxyl groups.

  11. Decomposition Studies of Triphenylboron, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboric Acid in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions Containing Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.L.; Peterson, R. A.

    1997-02-11

    This report documents the copper-catalyzed chemical kinetics of triphenylboron, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboric acid (3PB, 2PB and PBA) in aqueous alkaline solution contained in carbon-steel vessels between 40 and 70 degrees C.

  12. Thermal decomposition reactions of cotton fabric treated with piperazine-phosphonates derivatives as a flame retardant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a great scientific interest in exploring the great potential of the piperazine-phosphonates in flame retardant (FR) application on cotton fabric by investigating the thermal decomposition of cotton fabric treated with them. This research tries to understand the mode of action of the t...

  13. Model Experiment of Thermal Runaway Reactions Using the Aluminum-Hydrochloric Acid Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitabayashi, Suguru; Nakano, Masayoshi; Nishikawa, Kazuyuki; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for the education of students about thermal runaway reactions based on the reaction between aluminum and hydrochloric acid as a model reaction is proposed. In the introductory part of the exercise, the induction period and subsequent thermal runaway behavior are evaluated via a simple observation of hydrogen gas evolution and…

  14. Multi-level quantum Monte Carlo wave functions for complex reactions: the decomposition of α-hydroxy-dimethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Fracchia, Francesco; Filippi, Claudia; Amovilli, Claudio

    2014-01-05

    We present here several novel features of our recently proposed Jastrow linear generalized valence bond (J-LGVB) wave functions, which allow a consistently accurate description of complex potential energy surfaces (PES) of medium-large systems within quantum Monte Carlo (QMC). In particular, we develop a multilevel scheme to treat different regions of the molecule at different levels of the theory. As prototypical study case, we investigate the decomposition of α-hydroxy-dimethylnitrosamine, a carcinogenic metabolite of dimethylnitrosamine (NDMA), through a two-step mechanism of isomerization followed by a retro-ene reaction. We compute a reliable reaction path with the quadratic configuration interaction method and employ QMC for the calculation of the electronic energies. We show that the use of multideterminantal wave functions is very important to correctly describe the critical points of this PES within QMC, and that our multilevel J-LGVB approach is an effective tool to significantly reduce the cost of QMC calculations without loss of accuracy. As regards the complex PES of α-hydroxy-dimethylnitrosamine, the accurate energies computed with our approach allows us to confirm the validity of the two-step reaction mechanism of decomposition originally proposed within density functional theory, but with some important differences in the barrier heights of the individual steps.

  15. Effects of acid stress on aerobic decomposition of algal and aquatic macrophyte detritus: Direct comparison in a radiocarbon assay

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, S.A.; Benner, R.; Armstrong, A.; Sobecky, P.; Hodson, R.E. )

    1990-01-01

    Radiolabeled phytoplankton and macrophyte lignocelluloses were incubated at pHs 4 and 7 in water from a naturally acidic freshwater wetland (Okefenokee Swamp; ambient pH, 3.8 to 4.2), a freshwater reservoir (L-Lake; pH 6.7 to 7.2), and a marine marsh (Sapelo Island; pH {approximately}7.8). The data suggest that acidity is an important factor in explaining the lower decomposition rates of algae in Okefenokee Swamp water relative to L-Lake or Sapelo Island water. The decomposition of algal substrate was less sensitive to low pH ({approximately}5 to 35% inhibition) than was the decomposition of lignocellulose ({approximately}30 to 70% inhibition). These substrate-dependent differences were greater and more consistent in salt marsh than in L-lake incubations. In both freshwater sites, the extent to which decomposition was suppressed by acidity was greater for green algal substrate than for mixed diatom or blue-green algal (cyanobacteria) substrates. The use of different bases to adjust pH or incubation in a defined saltwater medium had no significant effect on substrate-dependent differences. Although pH differences with lignocellulose were larger in marine incubations, amendment of lake water with marine bacteria or with calcium, known to stabilize exoenzymes in soils, did not magnify the sensitivity of decomposition to acid stress.

  16. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... Substances § 721.10125 Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... Substances § 721.10125 Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... Substances § 721.10125 Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... Substances § 721.10125 Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10125 - Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle and alkenoic acid alkyl ester (generic). 721.10125 Section... Substances § 721.10125 Alkenedioic acid, dialkyl ester, reaction products with polyaminocarbomonocycle...

  1. MELCOR-H2 Benchmarking of the SNL Transient Sulfuric Acid Decomposition Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Sal B.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Gelbard, Fred; Pickard, Paul; Cole, Randy; McFadden, Katherine; Drennen, Tom; Martin, Billy; Louie, David; Archuleta, Louis; Revankar, Shripad T.; Vierow, Karen; El-Genk, Mohamed; Tournier, Jean Michel

    2007-07-01

    MELCOR is a world-renowned nuclear reactor safety analysis code that is used to simulate both light water and gas-cooled reactors. MELCOR-H2 is an extension of MELCOR that can model detailed nuclear reactors that are fully coupled with modular secondary-system components and the sulfur iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle for the generation of hydrogen and electricity. The models are applicable to both steady state and transient calculations. Previous work has shown that the hydrogen generation rate calculated by MELCOR-H2 for the SI cycle was within the expected theoretical yield, thus providing a macroscopic confirmation that MELCOR-H2's computational approach is reasonable. However, in order to better quantify its adequacy, benchmarking of the code with experimental data is required. Sulfuric acid decomposition experiments were conducted during late 2006 at Sandia National Laboratories, and MELCOR-H2 was used to simulate them. We developed an input deck based on the experiment's geometry, as well as the initial and boundary conditions, and then proceeded to compare the experimental acid conversion efficiency and SO{sub 2} production data with the code output. The comparison showed that the simulation output was typically within less than 10% of experimental data, and that key experimental data trends such as acid conversion efficiency, molar acid flow rate, and solution mole % were computed adequately by the MELCOR-H2. (authors)

  2. Fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Alex G.; Young, Alex B.

    2006-09-01

    The fragmentation reactions of deprotonated peptides containing aspartic acid have been elucidated using MS2 and MS3 experiments and accurate mass measurements where necessary. The disposition of labile (N and O bonded) hydrogens in the fragmentation products has been studied by exchanging the labile hydrogens for deuterium whereby the [MD]- ion is formed on electrospray ionization. [alpha]-Aspartyl and [beta]-aspartyl dipeptides give very similar fragment ion spectra on collisional activation, involving for both species primarily formation of the y1 ion and loss of H2O from [MH]- followed by further fragmentation, thus precluding the distinction of the isomeric species by negative ion tandem mass spectrometry. Dipeptides of sequence HXxxAspOH give characteristic spectra different from the [alpha]- and [beta]-isomers. For larger peptides containing aspartic acid a common fragmentation reaction involves nominal cleavage of the NC bond N-terminal to the aspartic acid residue to form a c ion (deprotonated amino acid amide (c1) or peptide amide (cn)) and the complimentary product involving elimination of a neutral amino acid amide or peptide amide. When aspartic acid is in the C-terminal position this fragmentation reaction occurs from the [MH]- ion while when the aspartic acid is not in the C-terminal position the fragmentation reaction occurs mainly from the [MHH2O]- ion. The products of this NC bond cleavage reaction serve to identify the position of the aspartic acid residue in the peptide.

  3. Iminodicarboxylic acids in the Murchison meteorite: Evidence of Strecker reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, Narcinda R.; Cooper, George W.

    2005-06-01

    α-Amino acids and α-hydroxy acids are well known constituents of several carbonaceous meteorites. One proposed mechanism of their formation is the reactions of CN -, NH 3, aldehydes and ketones in aqueous solution, a Strecker-like synthesis. Iminodicarboxylic acids, relatively unusual in molecular structure, are significant by-products of laboratory Strecker syntheses of α-amino acids. It is therefore notable that an analogous suite of imino acids has not been reported in CM2 chondrites where amino and hydroxy acids are abundant. In this work, aqueous extracts of the Murchison meteorite were examined for the presence of imino acids; GC-MS and HPLC molecular analyses revealed a complex suite of such acids. With the exception of one of the seven-carbon members, all of the C4 through C7 imino acids were observed in Murchison. These observations suggest that the Strecker synthesis made, at least, some contribution to the formation of extraterrestrial amino acids.

  4. Acid-functionalized polyolefin materials and their use in acid-promoted chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Tian, Chengcheng; Bauer, John Christopher; Dai, Sheng

    2016-06-07

    An acid-functionalized polyolefin material that can be used as an acid catalyst in a wide range of acid-promoted chemical reactions, wherein the acid-functionalized polyolefin material includes a polyolefin backbone on which acid groups are appended. Also described is a method for the preparation of the acid catalyst in which a precursor polyolefin is subjected to ionizing radiation (e.g., electron beam irradiation) of sufficient power and the irradiated precursor polyolefin reacted with at least one vinyl monomer having an acid group thereon. Further described is a method for conducting an acid-promoted chemical reaction, wherein an acid-reactive organic precursor is contacted in liquid form with a solid heterogeneous acid catalyst comprising a polyolefin backbone of at least 1 micron in one dimension and having carboxylic acid groups and either sulfonic acid or phosphoric acid groups appended thereto.

  5. Reactivity and regioselectivity in reactions of methyl and ethyl azides with cyclooctynes: activation strain model and energy decomposition analysis.

    PubMed

    de S Vilhena, Felipe; de M Carneiro, José Walkimar

    2017-01-01

    The structures and energies for the Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions of methyl and ethyl azides with some cyclooctynes and dibenzocyclooctynes were computed at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. The activation strain model (ASM) and quantitative molecular orbital (MO) theory were used to investigate the reactivity and regiochemistry in these reactions. The energy decomposition analysis (EDA) was used to identify the intrinsic electronic factor that lead to the preferential formation of 1,7-regiochemistry products. The reactivity order agrees with formation of more synchronous transition states and lower distortion energies. For the reaction of N3Met with azacyclooctyne, the 1,7-regiochemistry preference is attributed to a lower FMO gap and a higher contribution of the polarization term of the interaction energy than for the 1,8-transition state. For the reaction with aza-dibenzocyclooctyne, the 1,7-preference is due to a lower strain energy and a more pronounced contribution of the exchange term of the interaction energy. Graphical Abstract In the reactions between methyl and ethyl azides with azacyclooctynes the regiochemistry is governed by the intrinsic electronic factors.

  6. Decomposition of organochlorine compounds in flue gas from municipal solid waste incinerators using natural and activated acid clays.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Hee; Takahashi, Shigetoshi; Matsuo, Takayuki; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2014-09-01

    High-temperature particle control (HTPC) using a ceramic filter is a dust collection method without inefficient cooling and reheating of flue gas treatment; thus, its use is expected to improve the energy recovery efficiency of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs). However there are concerns regarding de novo synthesis and a decrease in the adsorptive removal efficiency of dioxins (DXNs) at approximately 300 degrees C. In this study, the effect of natural and activated acid clays on the decomposition of monochlorobenzene (MCB), one of the organochlorine compounds in MSW flue gas, was investigated. From the results of MCB removal tests at 30-300 degrees C, the clays were classified as adsorption, decomposition, and low removal types. More than half of the clays (four kinds of natural acid clays and two kinds of activated acid clays) were of the decomposition type. In addition, the presence of Cl atoms detached from MCB was confirmed by washing the clay used in the MCB removal test at 300 degrees C. Activated acid clay was expected to have high dechlorination performance because of its proton-rich-composition, but only two clays were classed as decomposition type. Conversely, all the natural acid clays used in this work were of the decomposition type, which contained relatively higher di- and trivalent metal oxides such as Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, and CaO. These metal oxides might contribute to the catalytic dechlorination of MCB at 300 degrees C. Therefore, natural and activated acid clays can be used as alternatives for activated carbon at 300 degrees C to remove organochloride compounds such as DXNs. Their utilization is expected to mitigate the latent risks related to the adoption of HTPC, and also to contribute to the improvement of energy recovery efficiency of MSWI. Implications: The effect of natural and activated acid clays on MCB decomposition was investigated to evaluate their suitability as materials for the removal of organochlorine compounds, such as

  7. Kinetics and Mechanism of the CIO + CIO Reaction: Pressure and Temperature Dependences of the Bimolecular and Termolecular Channels andThermal Decomposition of Chlorine Peroxide, CIOOCI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Friedl, Randall R.; Sander, Stanley P.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the CIO + CIO reaction and the thermal decomposition of CIOOCI were studied using the flash photolysis/long path ultraviolet absorption technique. Pressure and temperature dependences were determined for the rate coefficients for the bimolecular and termolecular reaction channels, and for the thermal decompositon of CIOOCI.

  8. Imino Acids in the Murchison Meteorite: Evidence of Strecker Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Cooper, G. W.

    2003-01-01

    Both alpha-amino acids and alpha-hydroxy acids occur in aqueous extracts of the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite. The Strecker-cyanohydrin reaction, the reaction of carbonyl compounds, cyanide, and ammonia to produce amino and hydroxy acids, has been proposed as a source of such organic acids in meteorites. Such syntheses are consistent with the suggestion that interstellar precursors of meteoritic organic compounds accreted on the meteorite parent body together with other ices. Subsequent internal heating of the parent body melted these ices and led to the formation of larger compounds in synthetic reactions during aqueous alteration, which probably occurred at temperatures between 273K and 298K. In the laboratory, imino acids are observed as important by-products of the Strecker synthesis.

  9. Kinetics of liquid-solid reactions in naphthenic acid conversion and Kraft pulping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ling

    Two liquid-solid reactions, in which the morphology of the solid changes as the reactions proceeds, were examined. One is the NA conversion in oil by decarboxylation on metal oxides and carbonates, and the other is the Kraft pulping in which lignin removal by delignification reaction. In the study of the NA conversion, CaO was chosen as the catalyst for the kinetic study from the tested catalysts based on NA conversion. Two reaction mixtures, carrier oil plus commercial naphthenic acids and heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO) from Athabasca bitumen, were applied in the kinetic study. The influence of TAN, temperature, and catalyst loading on the NA conversion and decarboxylation were studied systematically. The results showed that the removal rate of TAN and the decarboxylation of NA were both independent of the concentration of NA over the range studied, and significantly dependent on reaction temperature. The data from analyzing the spent catalyst demonstrated that calcium naphthenate was an intermediate of the decarboxylation reaction of NA, and the decomposition of calcium naphthenate was a rate-determining step. In the study on the delignification of the Kraft pulping, a new mechanism was proposed for the heterogeneous delignification reaction during the Kraft pulping process. In particular, the chemical reaction mechanism took into account the heterogeneous nature of Kraft pulping. Lignin reacted in parallel with sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfide. The mechanism consists of three key kinetic steps: (1) adsorption of hydroxide and hydrosulfide ions on lignin; (2) surface reaction on the solid surface to produce degraded lignin products; and (3) desorption of degradation products from the solid surface. The most important step for the delignification process is the surface reaction, rather than the reactions occurring in the liquid phase. A kinetic model has, thus, been developed based on the proposed mechanism. The derived kinetic model showed that the mechanism

  10. Recombination Reactions in the Thermal Decomposition of Anisole: An Investigation of Benzene and Naphthalene Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Adam; Ellison, Barney; Mukarakate, Calvin; Robichaud, David; Nimlos, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Thermal decompositions of anisole (C6H5OCH3) and methyl-deuterated anisole (C6H5OCD3) are studied using a hyperthermal tubular reactor and photoionization reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Gas exiting the reactor is subject to a supersonic expansion after a residence time of 65 μs, allowing detection of highly chemically reactive radical species. Anisole decomposes through loss of a methyl group (CH3) to form phenoxy radical (C6H5O), followed by ejection of a CO to form cyclopentadienyl radical (c-C5H5; CPDR). Benzene is generated primarily by thermal decomposition of methylcyclopentadiene (C5H5CH3; MCPD). The MCPD results from methyl radical recombination with CPDR. The MCPD then undergoes two hydrogen atom losses and a ring expansion resulting in benzene. At Twall = 1200 C -- 1300 C a large amount of propargyl radical (CH2CCH) is observed. Propargyl radical recombination accounts for a small fraction of the observed benzene. Naphthalene and its precursor intermediates (C10H10, C10H9), resulting from CPDR recombination, are also observed. The presence of benzene and naphthalene is confirmed with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI).

  11. Marangoni instability in the iodate–arsenous acid reaction front

    SciTech Connect

    Pópity-Tóth, Éva; Pótári, Gábor; Erdős, István; Tóth, Ágota; Horváth, Dezső

    2014-07-28

    Horizontally propagating chemical fronts leading to the formation of a single stable convection roll are investigated in the iodate–arsenous acid reaction with arsenous acid stoichiometrically limiting, leaving the surface active iodine present in the product mixture. In sufficiently thin solution layers with open upper surface, the contribution of Marangoni instability is significantly enhanced. Acting in the same direction as buoyancy driven instability, it distorts the entire tilted reaction front that becomes 50% more elongated. The corresponding three-dimensional calculations based on the empirical rate-law of the reaction corroborate the experimental findings.

  12. Solution of rocks and refractory minerals by acids at high temperatures and pressures. Determination of silica after decomposition with hydrofluoric acid

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, I.; Rowe, J.J.

    1965-01-01

    A modified Morey bomb was designed which contains a removable nichromecased 3.5-ml platinium crucible. This bomb is particularly useful for decompositions of refractory samples for micro- and semimicro-analysis. Temperatures of 400-450?? and pressures estimated as great as 6000 p.s.i. were maintained in the bomb for periods as long as 24 h. Complete decompositions of rocks, garnet, beryl, chrysoberyl, phenacite, sapphirine, and kyanite were obtained with hydrofluoric acid or a mixture of hydrofluoric and sulfuric acids; the decomposition of chrome refractory was made with hydrochloric acid. Aluminum-rich samples formed difficultly soluble aluminum fluoride precipitates. Because no volatilization losses occur, silica can be determined on sample solutions by a molybdenum-blue procedure using aluminum(III) to complex interfering fluoride. ?? 1965.

  13. Exothermic Surface Reactions in Alumina-Aluminum Shell-Core Nanoparticles with Iodine Oxide Decomposition Fragments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-22

    AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Exothennic smface reactions in alumina-aluminum shell-core W911NF-11-1-0439 nanoprui icles with iodine oxide...is observed for aluminum and an iodine -containing oxidizer. This PIR is exothermic and precedes the main exothennic reaction conesponding to aluminum...combustion. For the aluminum and iodine oxide system, exothennic smface chemistiy was recently predicted for I-0 fragments fonning bridge bonds with

  14. Decomposition Reaction of Metastable M2C Carbide in a Multi-Component Semi-High-Speed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Pei, Jianming; Li, Fei; Zhang, Yingjie; Wang, Mingjia; Ma, Xiaocong

    2016-12-01

    The metastable M2C carbide in a multi-component semi-high-speed steel shows an in situ decomposition during heat treatment. M2C carbides transform themselves into an aggregate of three secondary carbides (M6C, MC, M7C3) at the M2C carbide/ γ-Fe matrix interface through the diffusion of various alloying elements. The content of the decomposition products decreases in the order of M6C, MC, and M7C3. The Fe-rich M6C is considered to be the η 2-type carbides of (Cr, V, Fe)4(Mo, W)2C, the MC consists primarily of V as the crystallized carbide does, and the M7C3 with 70 at. pct of Cr and Fe in total is formed only during heat treatment but not during solidification. At the heat treatment temperature of 1273 K (1000 °C), a new approximate reaction equation of M2C + 0.052 γ-Fe → 0.687M6C + 0.044M7C3 + 0.320MC is proposed based on the measurement of the composition of carbides; moreover, a modified prediction model of transformation ratio of M2C carbide is obtained according to the DSC experiments.

  15. Compact Ag@Fe3O4 Core-shell Nanoparticles by Means of Single-step Thermal Decomposition Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brollo, Maria Eugênia F.; López-Ruiz, Román; Muraca, Diego; Figueroa, Santiago J. A.; Pirota, Kleber R.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2014-10-01

    A temperature pause introduced in a simple single-step thermal decomposition of iron, with the presence of silver seeds formed in the same reaction mixture, gives rise to novel compact heterostructures: brick-like Ag@Fe3O4 core-shell nanoparticles. This novel method is relatively easy to implement, and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining a multifunctional heteroparticle in which a noble metal is surrounded by magnetite. Structural analyses of the samples show 4 nm silver nanoparticles wrapped within compact cubic external structures of Fe oxide, with curious rectangular shape. The magnetic properties indicate a near superparamagnetic like behavior with a weak hysteresis at room temperature. The value of the anisotropy involved makes these particles candidates to potential applications in nanomedicine.

  16. Compact Ag@Fe3O4 core-shell nanoparticles by means of single-step thermal decomposition reaction.

    PubMed

    Brollo, Maria Eugênia F; López-Ruiz, Román; Muraca, Diego; Figueroa, Santiago J A; Pirota, Kleber R; Knobel, Marcelo

    2014-10-30

    A temperature pause introduced in a simple single-step thermal decomposition of iron, with the presence of silver seeds formed in the same reaction mixture, gives rise to novel compact heterostructures: brick-like Ag@Fe3O4 core-shell nanoparticles. This novel method is relatively easy to implement, and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining a multifunctional heteroparticle in which a noble metal is surrounded by magnetite. Structural analyses of the samples show 4 nm silver nanoparticles wrapped within compact cubic external structures of Fe oxide, with curious rectangular shape. The magnetic properties indicate a near superparamagnetic like behavior with a weak hysteresis at room temperature. The value of the anisotropy involved makes these particles candidates to potential applications in nanomedicine.

  17. Compact Ag@Fe3O4 Core-shell Nanoparticles by Means of Single-step Thermal Decomposition Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Brollo, Maria Eugênia F.; López-Ruiz, Román; Muraca, Diego; Figueroa, Santiago J. A.; Pirota, Kleber R.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    A temperature pause introduced in a simple single-step thermal decomposition of iron, with the presence of silver seeds formed in the same reaction mixture, gives rise to novel compact heterostructures: brick-like Ag@Fe3O4 core-shell nanoparticles. This novel method is relatively easy to implement, and could contribute to overcome the challenge of obtaining a multifunctional heteroparticle in which a noble metal is surrounded by magnetite. Structural analyses of the samples show 4 nm silver nanoparticles wrapped within compact cubic external structures of Fe oxide, with curious rectangular shape. The magnetic properties indicate a near superparamagnetic like behavior with a weak hysteresis at room temperature. The value of the anisotropy involved makes these particles candidates to potential applications in nanomedicine. PMID:25354532

  18. A STUDY OF THE PROPERTIES OF CP: COEFFICIENT OF THERMAL EXPANSION, DECOMPOSITION KINETICS AND REACTION TO SPARK, FRICTION AND IMPACT

    SciTech Connect

    Weese, R K; Burnham, A K; Fontes, A T

    2005-03-30

    The properties of pentaamine (5-cyano-2H-tetrazolato-N2) cobalt (III) perchlorate (CP), which was first synthesized in 1968, continues to be of interest for predicting behavior in handling, shipping, aging, and thermal cook-off situations. We report coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) values over four specific temperature ranges, decomposition kinetics using linear heating rates, and the reaction to three different types of stimuli: impact, spark, and friction. The CTE was measured using a Thermal Mechanical Analyzer (TMA) for samples that were uniaxially compressed at 10,000 psi and analyzed over a dynamic temperature range of -20 C to 70 C. Using differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, CP was decomposed at linear heating rates of 1, 3, and 7 C/min and the kinetic triplet calculated using the LLNL code Kinetics05. Values are also reported for spark, friction, and impact sensitivity.

  19. A Method for Decomposition of the Basic Reaction of Biological Macromolecules into Exponential Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, Yu. M.; Lyamets, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    The structural and dynamical properties of biological macromolecules under non-equilibrium conditions determine the kinetics of their basic reaction to external stimuli. This kinetics is multiexponential in nature. This is due to the operation of various subsystems in the structure of macromolecules, as well as the effect of the basic reaction on the structure of macromolecules. The situation can be interpreted as a manifestation of the stationary states of macromolecules, which are represented by monoexponential components of the basic reaction (Monod-Wyman-Changeux model) Monod et al. (J Mol Cell Biol 12:88-118, 1965). The representation of multiexponential kinetics of the basic reaction in the form of a sum of exponential functions (A(t)={sum}_{i=1}^n{a}_i{e}^{-{k}_it}) is a multidimensional optimization problem. To solve this problem, a gradient method of optimization with software determination of the amount of exponents and reasonable calculation time is developed. This method is used to analyze the kinetics of photoinduced electron transport in the reaction centers (RC) of purple bacteria and the fluorescence induction in the granum thylakoid membranes which share a common function of converting light energy.

  20. 40 CFR 721.10629 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (PMN...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10629 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with modified fatty acids and polyalkanolamines (PMN...

  2. Effect of reaction atmosphere on particle morphology of TiO2 produced by thermal decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jae Gil; Park, Kyun Young

    2006-04-01

    Thermal decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was carried out in varying reaction atmospheres: nitrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen plus water vapor. The effect of reaction atmosphere on the morphology, size, and crystalline structure of produced TiO2 particles was studied. The reactor used was similar to the microreactor proposed earlier by Park et al. (2001, J. Nanopart. Res., 3, 309-319), but for a modification in the precursor evaporator. The reactor temperature was varied from 300 to 700°C and the TTIP concentration in the evaporator from 1.0 to 7.0 mol%, holding the reactor residence time at 0.7 s. The primary-particle size was in the range 25-250 nm, varying with operating condition. The crystalline structure was amorphous in nitrogen, a mixture of rutile and anatase in nitrogen plus water vapor, and anatase in oxygen atmospheres. In nitrogen, agglomerates composed of very small particles whose individual boundaries are not clearly distinguished were produced. In oxygen, the particles composing an agglomerate became larger and were clearly spherical. As the atmosphere was varied to the nitrogen plus water vapor, the particle size increased further. The variation of primary particle size with reaction atmosphere was discussed in comparison with previous experimental data.

  3. Enhancement of selective decomposition. Adsorption and reaction of methanethiol on carbon-covered W(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, D.R.; Lyman, P.F.

    1995-04-13

    Selective decomposition of methanethiol (CH{sub 3}SH) on carbon-covered W(001) to produce methane is enhanced by 75% compared to the clean surface. The maximum enhancement requires only 0.25 monolayers (ML) of preadsorbed C. On a surface percovered with 0.8 ML of C, the methane desorbs in peaks at 460 and 550 K compared to 360 K on the clean surface, suggesting a greater stability in the C-S and C-H bonds. Increased intramolecular bond stability is confirmed by the temperature dependence of the S 2p and C 1s soft X-ray photoemission. Methyl thiolate, CH{sub 3}S, forms upon adsorption at 100 K. Chemisorbed methanethiol, which is not stable on the clean surface, is also observed between 100 and 300 K. The chemisorbed thiol decomposes to form additional thiolate. The thiolate reacts along three competing pathways. It undergoes rehydrogenation and desorbs as methanethiol, it selectively decomposes to form desorbed methane and adsorbed S, or it totally decomposes to form S, C, and desorbed H{sub 2}. 23 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Mesoporous Silica Supported Pd-MnOx Catalysts with Excellent Catalytic Activity in Room-Temperature Formic Acid Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Min-Ho; Oh, Duckkyu; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Lee, Sung-Wook; Park, Jong-Soo; Lee, Kwan-Young; Lee, Dong-Wook

    2016-09-01

    For the application of formic acid as a liquid organic hydrogen carrier, development of efficient catalysts for dehydrogenation of formic acid is a challenging topic, and most studies have so far focused on the composition of metals and supports, the size effect of metal nanoparticles, and surface chemistry of supports. Another influential factor is highly desired to overcome the current limitation of heterogeneous catalysis for formic acid decomposition. Here, we first investigated the effect of support pore structure on formic acid decomposition performance at room temperature by using mesoporous silica materials with different pore structures such as KIE-6, MCM-41, and SBA-15, and achieved the excellent catalytic activity (TOF: 593 h‑1) by only controlling the pore structure of mesoporous silica supports. In addition, we demonstrated that 3D interconnected pore structure of mesoporous silica supports is more favorable to the mass transfer than 2D cylindrical mesopore structure, and the better mass transfer provides higher catalytic activity in formic acid decomposition. If the pore morphology of catalytic supports such as 3D wormhole or 2D cylinder is identical, large pore size combined with high pore volume is a crucial factor to achieve high catalytic performance.

  5. Mesoporous Silica Supported Pd-MnOx Catalysts with Excellent Catalytic Activity in Room-Temperature Formic Acid Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Min-Ho; Oh, Duckkyu; Park, Ju-Hyoung; Lee, Chun-Boo; Lee, Sung-Wook; Park, Jong-Soo; Lee, Kwan-Young; Lee, Dong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    For the application of formic acid as a liquid organic hydrogen carrier, development of efficient catalysts for dehydrogenation of formic acid is a challenging topic, and most studies have so far focused on the composition of metals and supports, the size effect of metal nanoparticles, and surface chemistry of supports. Another influential factor is highly desired to overcome the current limitation of heterogeneous catalysis for formic acid decomposition. Here, we first investigated the effect of support pore structure on formic acid decomposition performance at room temperature by using mesoporous silica materials with different pore structures such as KIE-6, MCM-41, and SBA-15, and achieved the excellent catalytic activity (TOF: 593 h−1) by only controlling the pore structure of mesoporous silica supports. In addition, we demonstrated that 3D interconnected pore structure of mesoporous silica supports is more favorable to the mass transfer than 2D cylindrical mesopore structure, and the better mass transfer provides higher catalytic activity in formic acid decomposition. If the pore morphology of catalytic supports such as 3D wormhole or 2D cylinder is identical, large pore size combined with high pore volume is a crucial factor to achieve high catalytic performance. PMID:27666280

  6. The Unimolecular Decomposition and H Abstraction Reactions by HO and HO2 from n-Butanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moc, Jerzy; Black, Gráinne; Simmie, John M.; Curran, Henry J.

    2009-08-01

    By using correlated ab initio (MP2, CCSD(T)) and multi-level (G3, CBS-QB3) methods we have studied unimolecular and bimolecular reactions of n-butanol in the gas phase. The specific processes investigated include H2O elimination and hydrogen abstraction by the hydroxy (HO) and hydroperoxy (HO2) radicals from this alcohol.

  7. Kinetic study of free fatty acid esterification reaction catalyzed by recoverable and reusable hydrochloric acid.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Hung

    2013-02-01

    The catalytic performance and recoverability of several homogeneous acid catalysts (hydrochloric, sulfuric, and nitric acids) for the esterification of enzyme-hydrolyzed free fatty acid (FFA) and methanol were studied. Although all tested catalysts drove the reaction to a high yield, hydrochloric acid was the only catalyst that could be considerably recovered and reused. The kinetics of the esterification reaction catalyzed by hydrochloric acid was investigated under varying catalyst loading (0.1-1M), reaction temperature (303-343K), and methanol/FFA molar ratio (1:1-20:1). In addition, a pseudo-homogeneous kinetic model incorporating the above factors was developed. A good agreement (r(2)=0.98) between the experimental and calculated data was obtained, thus proving the reliability of the model. Furthermore, the reusability of hydrochloric acid in FFA esterification can be predicted by the developed model. The recoverable hydrochloric acid achieved high yields of FFA esterification within five times of reuse.

  8. Dissolution, speciation, and reaction of acetaldehyde in cold sulfuric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Ashbourn, Samantha F. M.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-12-01

    The uptake of gas-phase acetaldehyde [CH3CHO, ethanal] by aqueous sulfuric acid solutions was studied under upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric (UT/LS) conditions. The solubility of acetaldehyde was found to be low, between 2 × 102 M atm-1 and 1.5 × 105 M atm-1 under the ranges of temperature (211-241 K) and acid composition (39-76 weight percent, wt%, H2SO4) studied. Under most conditions, acetaldehyde showed simple solubility behavior when exposed to sulfuric acid. Under moderately acidic conditions (usually 47 wt% H2SO4), evidence of reaction was observed. Enhancement of uptake at long times was occasionally detected in conjunction with reaction. The source of these behaviors and the effect of acetaldehyde speciation on solubility are discussed. Implications for the uptake of oxygenated organic compounds by tropospheric aerosols are considered.

  9. Wang-Landau Reaction Ensemble Method: Simulation of Weak Polyelectrolytes and General Acid-Base Reactions.

    PubMed

    Landsgesell, Jonas; Holm, Christian; Smiatek, Jens

    2017-02-14

    We present a novel method for the study of weak polyelectrolytes and general acid-base reactions in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The approach combines the advantages of the reaction ensemble and the Wang-Landau sampling method. Deprotonation and protonation reactions are simulated explicitly with the help of the reaction ensemble method, while the accurate sampling of the corresponding phase space is achieved by the Wang-Landau approach. The combination of both techniques provides a sufficient statistical accuracy such that meaningful estimates for the density of states and the partition sum can be obtained. With regard to these estimates, several thermodynamic observables like the heat capacity or reaction free energies can be calculated. We demonstrate that the computation times for the calculation of titration curves with a high statistical accuracy can be significantly decreased when compared to the original reaction ensemble method. The applicability of our approach is validated by the study of weak polyelectrolytes and their thermodynamic properties.

  10. Ozone decomposition.

    PubMed

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho; Zaikov, Gennadi E

    2014-06-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates.

  11. Ozone decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Batakliev, Todor; Georgiev, Vladimir; Anachkov, Metody; Rakovsky, Slavcho

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic ozone decomposition is of great significance because ozone is a toxic substance commonly found or generated in human environments (aircraft cabins, offices with photocopiers, laser printers, sterilizers). Considerable work has been done on ozone decomposition reported in the literature. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the literature, concentrating on analysis of the physico-chemical properties, synthesis and catalytic decomposition of ozone. This is supplemented by a review on kinetics and catalyst characterization which ties together the previously reported results. Noble metals and oxides of transition metals have been found to be the most active substances for ozone decomposition. The high price of precious metals stimulated the use of metal oxide catalysts and particularly the catalysts based on manganese oxide. It has been determined that the kinetics of ozone decomposition is of first order importance. A mechanism of the reaction of catalytic ozone decomposition is discussed, based on detailed spectroscopic investigations of the catalytic surface, showing the existence of peroxide and superoxide surface intermediates. PMID:26109880

  12. High-Temperature Decomposition of Brønsted Acid Sites in Gallium-Substituted Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    K Al-majnouni; N Hould; W Lonergan; D Vlachos; R Lobo

    2011-12-31

    The dehydroxylation of Broensted acid sites (BAS) in Ga-substituted zeolites was investigated at temperatures up to 850 C using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and mass spectrometry-temperature programmed desorption (MS-TPD). X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) revealed that the majority of gallium has tetrahedral coordination even after complete dehydroxylation. The interatomic gallium-oxygen distance and gallium coordination number determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) are consistent with gallium in tetrahedral coordination at low T (< 550 C). Upon heating Ga-Beta and Ga-ZSM5 to 850 C, analysis of the EXAFS showed that 70 and 80% of the gallium was still in tetrahedral coordination. The remainder of the gallium was found to be in octahedral coordination. No trigonal Ga atoms were observed. FTIR measurements carried out at similar temperatures show that the intensity of the OH vibration due to BAS has been eliminated. MS-TPD revealed that hydrogen in addition to water evolved from the samples during dehydroxylation. This shows that dehydrogenation in addition to dehydration is a mechanism that contributes to BAS decomposition. Dehydrogenation was further confirmed by exposing the sample to hydrogen to regenerate some of the BAS as monitored by FTIR and MS-TPD.

  13. Kinetic-spectrophotometric determination of ascorbic acid by inhibition of the hydrochloric acid-bromate reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Rezaei, B.; Movahedinia, H.

    2002-10-01

    A new analytical method was developed for the determination of ascorbic acid in fruit juice and pharmaceuticals. The method is based on its inhibition effect on the reaction between hydrochloric acid and bromate. The decolourisation of Methyl Orange by the reaction products was used to monitor the reaction spectrophotometrically at 510 nm. The linearity range of the calibration graph depends on bromate concentration. The variable affecting the rate of the reaction was investigated. The method is simple, rapid, relatively sensitive and precise. The limit of detection is 7.6×10 -6 M and calibration rang is 8×10 -6-1.2×10 -3 M ascorbic acid. The relative standard deviation of seven replication determinations of 8×10 -6 and 2×10 -5 M ascorbic acid was 2.8 and 1.7%, respectively. The influence of potential interfering substance was studied. The method was successfully applied for the determination of ascorbic acid in pharmaceuticals.

  14. Deoxyribonucleic Acid Polymerase of Rous Sarcoma Virus: Reaction Conditions and Analysis of the Reaction Product Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, D. H. L.; Ruprecht, Ruth; Simpson, R. W.; Spiegelman, S.

    1971-01-01

    Reaction conditions for Rous sarcoma virus ribonucleic acid (RNA)-instructed deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) polymerase activity are described whereby the viral RNA is relatively protected from endogenous or added nuclease activity. Three analyses of reaction product nucleic acids (3H-RNA, 32P-DNA) were compared, namely, gel electrophoresis, Cs2SO4 gradient centrifugation, and hydroxyapatite column chromatography. It was found that hydroxyapatite analysis could be misleading unless the state of the template RNA was monitored concomitantly with the DNA analysis. Gel electrophoresis and Cs2SO4 gradient centrifugation gave comparable results. It was concluded that analyses of the product of reverse transcriptase reactions should not only refer to the template RNA and product DNA species, but also be performed with virus or viral RNA which do not have or obtain nicks in the 60S RNA. Otherwise, interpretation of the results would have the ambiguity of potential artifacts caused by those degraded RNA molecules. PMID:4332143

  15. Dissociative attachment reactions of electrons with strong acid molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, N.G.; Smith, D.; Viggiano, A.A.; Paulson, J.F.; Henchman, M.J.

    1986-06-15

    Using the flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe (FALP) technique, we have determined (at variously 300 and 570 K) the dissociative attachment coefficients ..beta.. for the reactions of electrons with the common acids HNO/sub 3/ (producing NO/sup -//sub 2/) and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ (HSO/sup -//sub 4/), the superacids FSO/sub 3/H (FSO/sup -//sub 3/), CF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/H (CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/), ClSO/sub 3/H (ClSO/sup -//sub 3/,Cl/sup -/), the acid anhydride (CF/sub 3/SO/sub 2/)/sub 2/O (CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/), and the halogen halides HBr (Br/sup -/) and HI (I/sup -/). The anions formed in the reactions are those given in the parentheses. The reactions with HF and HCl were investigated, but did not occur at a measurable rate since they are very endothermic. Dissociative attachment is rapid for the common acids, the superacids, and the anhydride, the measured ..beta.. being appreciable fractions of the theoretical maximum ..beta.. for such reactions, ..beta../sub max/. The HI reaction is very fast ( ..beta..approx...beta../sub max/) but the HBr reaction occurs much more slowly because it is significantly endothermic. The data indicate that the extreme acidity of the (Bronsted-type) superacids has its equivalence in the very efficient gas-phase dissociative attachment which these species undergo when reacting with free electrons. The anions of the superacids generated in these reactions, notably FSO/sup -//sub 3/ and CF/sub 3/SO/sup -//sub 3/, are very stable (unreactive) implying exceptionally large electron affinities for the FSO/sub 3/ and CF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/ radicals.

  16. Reactions of Thiocyanate Ions with Acid: A Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glidewell, Christopher; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background information, procedures, and typical results are provided for a three-part experiment involving reactions of potassium thiocynate (KNCS) with sulfuric acid. The experiment represents the final stage of structured work prior to students' research projects during their final year. (JM)

  17. 40 CFR 721.10448 - Acetic acid, hydroxy- methoxy-, methyl ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine (generic). 721.10448 Section 721.10448 Protection... Acetic acid, hydroxy- methoxy-, methyl ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine (generic). (a... generically as acetic acid, hydroxymethoxy-, methyl ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10448 - Acetic acid, hydroxy- methoxy-, methylester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-, methylester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine (generic). 721.10448 Section 721.10448 Protection... Acetic acid, hydroxy- methoxy-, methylester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine (generic). (a... generically as acetic acid, hydroxymethoxy-, methyl ester, reaction products with substituted alkylamine...

  19. Wash Bottle Laboratory Exercises: Iodide-Catalyzed H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] Decomposition Reaction Kinetics Using the Initial Rate Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2010-01-01

    A wash bottle water displacement scheme is used to determine the kinetics of the iodide-catalyzed H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] decomposition reaction. The reagents (total volume 5.00 mL) are added to a test tube that is placed in a wash bottle containing water. The mass of the water displaced in [approximately]60 s is measured. The reaction is…

  20. Decomposition techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Sample decomposition is a fundamental and integral step in the procedure of geochemical analysis. It is often the limiting factor to sample throughput, especially with the recent application of the fast and modern multi-element measurement instrumentation. The complexity of geological materials makes it necessary to choose the sample decomposition technique that is compatible with the specific objective of the analysis. When selecting a decomposition technique, consideration should be given to the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of the sample, elements to be determined, precision and accuracy requirements, sample throughput, technical capability of personnel, and time constraints. This paper addresses these concerns and discusses the attributes and limitations of many techniques of sample decomposition along with examples of their application to geochemical analysis. The chemical properties of reagents as to their function as decomposition agents are also reviewed. The section on acid dissolution techniques addresses the various inorganic acids that are used individually or in combination in both open and closed systems. Fluxes used in sample fusion are discussed. The promising microwave-oven technology and the emerging field of automation are also examined. A section on applications highlights the use of decomposition techniques for the determination of Au, platinum group elements (PGEs), Hg, U, hydride-forming elements, rare earth elements (REEs), and multi-elements in geological materials. Partial dissolution techniques used for geochemical exploration which have been treated in detail elsewhere are not discussed here; nor are fire-assaying for noble metals and decomposition techniques for X-ray fluorescence or nuclear methods be discussed. ?? 1992.

  1. Template directed reactions of 2-aminoadenylic acid derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, T. R.; Orgel, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    The template-directed oligomerization of activated derivatives of 2-aminoadenylic acid (paA) on polyuridylic acid (poly(U)) in aqueous buffers was studied. The reaction differs from that of adenylic acid (pA) under identical conditions, in that only di- and tri-nucleotides are observed as substantial products rather than a longer sequence of oligomers. The reaction of paA also differs from that of pA in that it does not require Mg (2+), and is less susceptible to increased temperature. The relevance of these observations to the chemical evolution of polynucleotide replication is discussed. Improved syntheses of paA and its diphosphate are reported.

  2. Decomposition of superimposed ground reaction forces into left and right force profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, B. L.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    The process of collecting ground reaction force data by mounting a forceplate beneath a treadmill belt has the advantage that numerous walking trials can be analyzed without the problem of subjects 'targeting' their footsteps. However, a potential problem is that the measured forces represent a summation of bilateral force profiles during the double support phase of walking. To address this issue, an algorithm is described for decomposing superimposed ground reaction force data into individual left and right profiles. It is based on an examination of the side-to-side oscillations of the measured center of pressure (CoP). Whenever the measured CoP exceeds a certain threshold, it is assumed that the person is being supported by a single limb, and the measured GRF data reflect the forces under that limb. Conversely, when the measured CoP indicates that both feet are on the treadmill, it is assumed that the location of the individual CoP under each foot is given by wL2 and wR2. These quantities reflect the greatest excursion of the measured CoP towards the left and right sides of the forceplate, respectively. With this assumption, individual GRF profiles can be calculated by means of solving two simultaneous equations--one describing the equilibrium of forces in the vertical direction, and one describing the equilibrium of moments about an antero-posterior axis of the forceplate. The algorithm describing this procedure is simple enough to be implemented on a spreadsheet and yields estimates for average force, impulse, peak force and stance time that are typically within 3% of the true values.

  3. Adsorption and decomposition mechanism of formic acid on the Ga2O3 surface by first principle studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Li, Zhen Hua

    2017-02-01

    The adsorption and decomposition of formic acid (FA) on the Ga2O3(100) surface was studied with density functional theory. On the perfect Ga2O3(100) surface, the preferred adsorption state of FA is a monodentate configuration while the most stable adsorption state is a bridging configuration. Heating the surface would convert FA from monodentate to bridging configuration and further heating would decompose FA into CO2 and two surface hydroxyl groups. On the other hand, on the O(2)-defect Ga2O3(100) surface the preferred adsorption state of FA is a bridging formate with one O atom of formate filling the O(2) vacancy. Heating the surface would generate CO and two surface hydroxyl groups. If the Ga2O3(100) surface is used as decomposition catalyst, then at low temperature the formation of a small amount of CO2 can be observed. On the other hand, at high temperature continuous formation of CO and H2O can be observed. The active sites for FA decomposition are the O(2) defects on the surface formed in situ from the removal of water from surface hydroxyl groups. The strong dependence of mechanism on experimental conditions explains why no consensus has been reached in the previous experimental studies regarding the adsorption and decomposition mechanism of FA.

  4. Tuning Lipase Reaction for Production of Fatty Acids from Oil.

    PubMed

    Odaneth, Annamma A; Vadgama, Rajeshkumar N; Bhat, Anuradha D; Lali, Arvind M

    2016-10-01

    Fats or oils are split partially or completely to obtain fatty acids that find wide applications in oleo-chemical industries. Lipase-mediated complete splitting (hydrolysis) of oils is a green process having great potential to replace the traditional methods of oil splitting. However, cost of lipases, mechanistic kinetic equilibrium and associated operational limitations prove to be deterrents for scale up of the enzymatic oil splitting process. In the present study, we demonstrate the use of immobilised 1,3-regioselective lipase (HyLIP) for complete hydrolysis of oil in monophasic reaction medium. Incorporation of a polar organic solvent (tert-butanol, 1:5, v/v) homogenises the oil-water mixture and contributes positively towards complete hydrolysis. The monophasic oil hydrolysis reaction with optimised water concentration (0.05 %, v/v) gave Free Fatty Acid (FFA) yield of 88 % (HyLIP and Novozym-435) and 66 % (TLIM and RMIM). Smart reaction engineering and modification of the reaction intermediates to favourable substrate lead to ∼99 % degree of hydrolysis of triglycerides with ∼90 % FFA yield using 1,3-regioselective lipase. The present work becomes basic platform for developing technologies for synthesis of fatty acids, monoglycerides, diglycerides and glycerol.

  5. Thermochemistry for silicic acid formation reaction: Prediction of new reaction pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Bhaskar; Ghosh, Deepanwita; Das, Abhijit K.

    2009-08-01

    Reaction between SiO 2 and water has been studied extensively using ab initio methods. The mechanism for formation of metasilicic acid SiO(OH) 2 and orthosilicic acid Si(OH) 4 has been explored and a new pathway for formation of Si(OH) 4 is predicted. Heats of reaction ( ΔrH298∘) and heats of formation ( ΔfH298∘) at 298 K for the related reactions and species calculated at two different theoretical levels G3B3 and G3MP2B3 agree well with the literature values. It is found that when SiO 2 reacts simultaneously with two water molecules, the thermodynamic as well as kinetic feasibility of the process is much greater than that when SiO 2 reacts with one molecule of water.

  6. Phosphoric Acid-Mediated Synthesis of Vinyl Sulfones through Decarboxylative Coupling Reactions of Sodium Sulfinates with Phenylpropiolic Acids.

    PubMed

    Rong, Guangwei; Mao, Jincheng; Yan, Hong; Zheng, Yang; Zhang, Guoqi

    2015-08-07

    A novel phosphoric acid -mediated synthesis of vinyl sulfones through decarboxylative coupling reactions of sodium sulfinates with phenylpropiolic acids is described. This transformation is efficient and environmentally friendly.

  7. Heterogeneous atmospheric reactions - Sulfuric acid aerosols as tropospheric sinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, A. C.; Golden, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The reaction probabilities of various atmospheric species incident on a bulk sulfuric acid surface are measured in order to determine the role of sulfuric acid aerosols as pollutant sinks. Reaction products and unreacted starting materials leaving a Knudsen cell flow reactor after collision at 300 K with a H2SO4 surface or a soot surface were detected by mass spectrometry. Significant collision reaction probabilities are observed on a H2SO4 surface for H2O2, HNO3, HO2NO2, ClONO2, N2O5, H2O and NH3, and on soot for NH3. Estimates of the contribution of heterogeneous reactions to pollutant removal under atmospheric conditions indicate that while aerosol removal in the stratosphere is insignificant (loss rate constants approximately 10 to the -10th/sec), heterogeneous reactions may be the dominant loss process for several tropospheric species (loss rate constant approximately 10 to the -5th/sec, comparable to photolysis rate constants).

  8. Reaction of acetaldehyde with 5-aminolevulinic acid via dihydropyrazine derivative.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshinori; Yasuhara, Naoki; Ueda, Takashi; Inukai, Michiyo; Mio, Mitsunobu

    2015-01-01

    When a solution of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) was incubated with acetaldehyde at neutral pH, a product was generated. This product was identified as 3-ethylpyrazine-2,5-dipropanoic acid (ETPY). ETPY was stable at neutral pH. It has been reported that ALA dimerizes at neutral pH generating 3,6-dihydropyrazine-2,5-dipropanoic acid (DHPY), and subsequently resulting in pyrazine-2,5-dipropanoic acid (PY) by autoxidation. In the present reaction, DHPY generated from ALA reacted with acetaldehyde, resulting in ETPY. Preadministration of ALA 3 min prior to acetaldehyde injection supressed the toxicity of acetaldehyde in male mice. These results suggest that ALA may be useful as a scavenger for acetaldehyde.

  9. Manganese(II) Complexes with Schiff Bases Immobilized on Nanosilica as Catalysts of the Reaction of Ozone Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakytska, Tetyana; Truba, Alla; Radchenko, Evgen; Golub, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we submit the description of synthesis and identification of manganese(II) complexes with pyrogenic nanosilica-immobilized ( d av = 10 nm; S sp = 290 m2/g) hydroxyaldimine ligands (Mn{(L)}_2/overline{Si}) : salicilaldiminopropyl (L1); 5-bromosalicilaldiminopropyl (L2); 2-hydroxynaphtaldiminopropyl (L3); 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldiminopropyl (L4); 2-hydroxy-3,5-dichloroacetophenoniminopropyl (L5); and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldiminopropyl (L6). The ligands and complexes were characterized by UV-VIS and IR spectrometry. Nanocomposites consisting of complexes Mn{(L)}_2/overline{Si} showed a high catalytic activity in low-temperature ozone decomposition in the range of concentrations between 2.1 × 10-6 and 8.4 × 10-6 mol/l. The number of catalytic cycles increased for isostructural pseudotetrahedral complexes Mn{(L)}_2/overline{Si} (L1-L5) in the following order: Mn(L3)2 >> Mn(L4)2 > Mn(L1)2 > Mn(L2)2 > Mn(L5)2. In the case of pseudooctahedral complexes with L6, the change of coordination polyhedral does not influence the kinetics and stoichiometric parameters of the reaction.

  10. Manganese(II) Complexes with Schiff Bases Immobilized on Nanosilica as Catalysts of the Reaction of Ozone Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Rakytska, Tetyana; Truba, Alla; Radchenko, Evgen; Golub, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we submit the description of synthesis and identification of manganese(II) complexes with pyrogenic nanosilica-immobilized (d av = 10 nm; S sp = 290 m(2)/g) hydroxyaldimine ligands [Formula: see text]: salicilaldiminopropyl (L1); 5-bromosalicilaldiminopropyl (L2); 2-hydroxynaphtaldiminopropyl (L3); 2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldiminopropyl (L4); 2-hydroxy-3,5-dichloroacetophenoniminopropyl (L5); and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldiminopropyl (L6). The ligands and complexes were characterized by UV-VIS and IR spectrometry. Nanocomposites consisting of complexes [Formula: see text] showed a high catalytic activity in low-temperature ozone decomposition in the range of concentrations between 2.1 × 10(-6) and 8.4 × 10(-6) mol/l. The number of catalytic cycles increased for isostructural pseudotetrahedral complexes [Formula: see text] (L1-L5) in the following order: Mn(L3)2 > Mn(L4)2 > Mn(L1)2 > Mn(L2)2 > Mn(L5)2. In the case of pseudooctahedral complexes with L6, the change of coordination polyhedral does not influence the kinetics and stoichiometric parameters of the reaction.

  11. Acid-Base Pairs in Lewis Acidic Zeolites Promote Direct Aldol Reactions by Soft Enolization.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Van de Vyver, Stijn; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-08-17

    Hf-, Sn-, and Zr-Beta zeolites catalyze the cross-aldol condensation of aromatic aldehydes with acetone under mild reaction conditions with near quantitative yields. NMR studies with isotopically labeled molecules confirm that acid-base pairs in the Si-O-M framework ensemble promote soft enolization through α-proton abstraction. The Lewis acidic zeolites maintain activity in the presence of water and, unlike traditional base catalysts, in acidic solutions.

  12. Thermal decomposition of HMX: Low temperature reaction kinetics and their use for assessing response in abnormal thermal environments and implications for long-term aging

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, R.; Bulusu, S.

    1995-12-01

    The thermal decomposition of HMX between 175 and 200{degree}C has been studied using the simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometer (STMBMS) apparatus with a focus on the initial stages of the decomposition. The identity of thermal decomposition products is the same as that measured in previous higher temperature experiments. The initial stages of the decomposition are characterized by an induction period followed by two acceleratory periods. The Arrhenius parameters for the induction and two acceleratory periods are (Log(A) = 18.2 {plus_minus} 0.8, Ea = 48.2 {plus_minus} 1.8 kcal/mole), (Log(A) = 17.15 {plus_minus} 1.5 and Ea = 48.9 {plus_minus} 3.2 kcal/mole), (Log A) = 19.1 {plus_minus} 3.0 and Ea = 52.1 {plus_minus} 6.3 kcal/mole), respectively. This data can be used to calculate the time and temperature required to decompose a desired fraction of a sample that is being prepared to test the effect of thermal degradation on its sensitivity or burn rates. It can also be used to estimate the extent of decomposition that may be expected under normal storage conditions for munitions containing HMX. This data, along with previous mechanistic studies conducted at higher temperatures, suggest that the process that controls the early stages of decomposition of HMX in the solid phase is scission of the N-NO{sub 2} bond, reaction of the N0{sub 2} within a ``lattice cage`` to form the mononitroso analogue of HMX and decomposition of the mononitroso HMX within the HMX lattice to form gaseous products that are retained in bubbles or diffuse into the surrounding lattice.

  13. Photocatalytic decomposition of crotamiton over aqueous TiO(2) suspensions: determination of intermediates and the reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Fukahori, Shuji; Fujiwara, Taku; Ito, Ryusei; Funamizu, Naoyuki

    2012-09-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of crotamiton in aqueous solution using TiO(2) was investigated. To investigate the effect of initial pH, the photodegradation behaviors of three types of pharmaceuticals were compared (crotamiton, clofibric acid, sulfamethoxazole). The degradation rates of crotamiton in the pH range 3-9 were nearly equal, but those of clofibric acid and sulfamethoxazole were affected by pH. At pH>6.5, TiO(2) particles, clofibric acid and sulfamethoxazole had negative charge, therefore, the repulsive force between TiO(2) particles and anionic pharmaceuticals occurred and a low reaction rate at high pH was observed. The effect of UV intensity and TiO(2) concentration on photodegradation efficiency was also investigated. Linear and logarithmical relationships between UV intensity, TiO(2) concentration and the reaction rate constant were confirmed. Furthermore, the structures of photodegradation intermediates formed concomitantly with the disappearance of crotamiton were estimated. Seven intermediates were characterized by LC/MS/MS analyses, and it was assumed that the photocatalytic degradation of crotamiton was initiated by the attack of electrophilic hydroxyl radicals on aromatic rings and alkyl chains.

  14. High-Temperature Shock Tube Measurements of Dimethyl Ether Decomposition and the Reaction of Dimethyl Ether with OH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Robert D.; Davidson, David F.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2009-08-01

    We measured the first high-temperature rate measurements of two dimethyl ether (DME) reactions, (1) DME + Ar → CH3O + CH3 + Ar and (2) DME + OH → CH3OCH2 + H2O, in a shock tube by monitoring OH radicals. OH was measured with a narrow-line width laser absorption diagnostic using the well-known R1(5) line of the A-X(0,0) transition at 306.7 nm. The rate k1 is in the falloff regime at high temperatures, so it was measured at several pressures from 0.6 to 11.5 atm and temperatures from 1349 to 1790 K. OH radicals were formed by shock-heating mixtures of DME and O2 in Ar. These mixtures take advantage of the rapid decomposition of the product CH3O, forming H-atoms, which react with O2 to form OH. In carefully chosen mixtures, OH concentration is primarily sensitive to k1 and the well-known rate of H + O2 → OH + O. Uncertainty in the k1 measurements was estimated to be ±35%. The rate measurements were then modeled using RRKM theory, which describes the data quite well. Both the rate measurements and the RRKM model were fit from 1000 to 1800 K using the Troe falloff form: k1,∞(T) = (4.38 × 1021)T-1.57 exp(-42 220 K/T) s-1, k1,o = 7.52 × 1015 exp(-21 537 K/T) cm3 mol-1 s-1, and Fcent = 0.454 exp(-T/2510). The rate of k2 was measured at pressures near 1.6 atm and temperatures from 923 to 1423 K. OH radicals were generated by the thermal decomposition of the OH precursor tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP), and k2 was inferred from the observed decay of OH with an estimated uncertainty of ±40%. The high-temperature measurements were compared with several rate evaluations and previous low-temperature measurements. The rate evaluation by Curran et al. of k2 = (6.32 × 106)T2 exp(328 K/T) (cm3 mol-1 s-1) was found to be an excellent fit to both the previous low-temperature measurements and this work.

  15. Mechanism of arylboronic acid-catalyzed amidation reaction between carboxylic acids and amines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Yu, Hai-Zhu; Fu, Yao; Guo, Qing-Xiang

    2013-04-07

    Arylboronic acids were found to be efficient catalysts for the amidation reactions between carboxylic acids and amines. Theoretical calculations have been carried out to investigate the mechanism of this catalytic process. It is found that the formation of the acyloxyboronic acid intermediates from the carboxylic acid and the arylboronic acid is kinetically facile but thermodynamically unfavorable. Removal of water (as experimentally accomplished by using molecular sieves) is therefore essential for overall transformation. Subsequently C-N bond formation between the acyloxyboronic acid intermediates and the amine occurs readily to generate the desired amide product. The cleavage of the C-O bond of the tetracoordinate acyl boronate intermediates is the rate-determining step in this process. Our analysis indicates that the mono(acyloxy)boronic acid is the key intermediate. The high catalytic activity of ortho-iodophenylboronic acid is attributed to the steric effect as well as the orbital interaction between the iodine atom and the boron atom.

  16. Serum uric acid levels during leprosy reaction episodes

    PubMed Central

    Alves-Junior, Eduardo R.; Arruda, Talita A.; Lopes, Jose C.; Fontes, Cor J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur mainly in the multibacillary forms of the disease. The reactions are classified as type 1 (reverse reaction) or type 2 (erythema nodosum leprosum). Leprosy-associated oxidative stress has been widely demonstrated. Several recent studies have shown uric acid (UA) to have antioxidative effects under pathologic conditions. The objective of this study was to assess serum levels of UA in patients with leprosy reactions, with the aim of monitoring their levels before and after treatment, compared with levels in leprosy patients without reactions. Methods. The study included patients aged 18–69 years assisted at a leprosy treatment reference center in the Central Region of Brazil. Patients who were pregnant; were using immunosuppressant drugs or immunobiologicals; or had an autoimmune disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, or tuberculosis were excluded. Upon recruitment, all individuals were clinically assessed for skin lesions and neural or systemic impairment. Some patients had already completed treatment for leprosy, while others were still undergoing treatment or had initiated treatment after being admitted. The treatment of the reactional episode was started only after the initial evaluation. Laboratory assessments were performed upon admission (baseline) and at approximately 30 and 60 days (time points 1 and 2, respectively). Results. A total of 123 leprosy patients were recruited between June 2012 and June 2015; among them, 56, 42, and 25 presented with type 1, type 2, and no reactions, respectively. Serum UA levels were significantly reduced in patients with type 2 leprosy reactions compared with patients in the control group and remained lower in the two subsequent assessments, after initiation of anti-reaction treatments, with similar values to those recorded before the treatment. Discussion. The decreased serum UA levels in patients with

  17. Heterogeneous Reaction of HO2 Radical with Dicarboxylic Acid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.

    2010-12-01

    HOx(OH+ HO2) radical plays a central role in the tropospheric chemistry. Recently, the heterogeneous loss of HO2 by aerosol particles is a potentially important HOx sink in the troposphere suggested from observation study. However, there have been few studies for loss of HO2 by aerosols. In this study, we measured the HO2 uptake coefficients for four dicarboxylic acids (succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and pimelic acid) aerosol particles under ambient conditions (760Torr and 296K) using an aerosol flow tube(AFT) coupled with a chemical conversion /laser-induced fluorescence(CC/LIF) technique. The CC/LIF technique enabled experiments to be performed at almost the same HO2 radical concentration as that in the atmosphere(-10^8 molecules/cm^3). In this system, the effect of the self-reaction of HO2 in the gas phase can be neglected. HO2 radicals were injected into the AFT through a vertically movable Pyrex tube. Injector position dependent profiles of LIF intensity were measured as a function of aerosol concentration at 30% and 70% of relative humilities (RH). Determined HO2 uptake coefficients by succinic acid, glutaric acid, adipic acid, and pimelic acid aerosol particles at 30% RH were 0.05 +/- 0.02, 0.07 +/- 0.03, 0.02 +/- 0.01, and 0.06 +/- 0.03, respectively, while the uptake coefficients by those particles at 70% RH were 0.13 +/- 0.05, 0.13 +/- 0.03, 0.06 +/- 0.01, and 0.11 +/- 0.03, respectively. These results suggest that compositions and relative humidity are significant to the HO2 uptake. We will discuss the potential HO2 loss processes.

  18. Polymerase chain reaction system using magnetic beads for analyzing a sample that includes nucleic acid

    DOEpatents

    Nasarabadi, Shanavaz [Livermore, CA

    2011-01-11

    A polymerase chain reaction system for analyzing a sample containing nucleic acid includes providing magnetic beads; providing a flow channel having a polymerase chain reaction chamber, a pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber, and a post pre polymerase magnet position adjacent the polymerase chain reaction chamber. The nucleic acid is bound to the magnetic beads. The magnetic beads with the nucleic acid flow to the pre polymerase chain reaction magnet position in the flow channel. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are washed with ethanol. The nucleic acid in the polymerase chain reaction chamber is amplified. The magnetic beads and the nucleic acid are separated into a waste stream containing the magnetic beads and a post polymerase chain reaction mix containing the nucleic acid. The reaction mix containing the nucleic acid flows to an analysis unit in the channel for analysis.

  19. REACTION OF AMINO-ACIDS AND PEPTIDE BONDS WITH FORMALDEHYDE AS MEASURED BY CHANGES IN THE ULTRA-VIOLET SPECTRA,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AMINO ACIDS , CHEMICAL REACTIONS), (*PEPTIDES, CHEMICAL REACTIONS), (*FORMALDEHYDE, CHEMICAL REACTIONS), (*ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPY, PROTEINS), ABSORPTION SPECTRA, CHEMICAL BONDS, AMIDES, CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM, REACTION KINETICS

  20. 40 CFR 721.10664 - Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic). 721.10664 Section 721.10664... Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic)....

  1. 40 CFR 721.10664 - Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic). 721.10664 Section 721.10664... Alkenedioic acid dialkyl ester, reaction products with alkenoic acid alkyl esters and diamine (generic)....

  2. ENERGY EFFICIENCY LIMITS FOR A RECUPERATIVE BAYONET SULFURIC ACID DECOMPOSITION REACTOR FOR SULFUR CYCLE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.; Edwards, T.

    2009-06-11

    A recuperative bayonet reactor design for the high-temperature sulfuric acid decomposition step in sulfur-based thermochemical hydrogen cycles was evaluated using pinch analysis in conjunction with statistical methods. The objective was to establish the minimum energy requirement. Taking hydrogen production via alkaline electrolysis with nuclear power as the benchmark, the acid decomposition step can consume no more than 450 kJ/mol SO{sub 2} for sulfur cycles to be competitive. The lowest value of the minimum heating target, 320.9 kJ/mol SO{sub 2}, was found at the highest pressure (90 bar) and peak process temperature (900 C) considered, and at a feed concentration of 42.5 mol% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. This should be low enough for a practical water-splitting process, even including the additional energy required to concentrate the acid feed. Lower temperatures consistently gave higher minimum heating targets. The lowest peak process temperature that could meet the 450-kJ/mol SO{sub 2} benchmark was 750 C. If the decomposition reactor were to be heated indirectly by an advanced gas-cooled reactor heat source (50 C temperature difference between primary and secondary coolants, 25 C minimum temperature difference between the secondary coolant and the process), then sulfur cycles using this concept could be competitive with alkaline electrolysis provided the primary heat source temperature is at least 825 C. The bayonet design will not be practical if the (primary heat source) reactor outlet temperature is below 825 C.

  3. Laboratory measurements of heterogeneous reactions on sulfuric acid surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Leah R.; Manion, Jeffrey A.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Increasing evidence from field, modeling, and laboratory studies suggests that heterogeneous reactions on stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles may contribute to global ozone depletion. Using a Knudsen cell reactor technique, the authors have studied the uptake, reactivity, and solubility of several trace atmospheric species on cold sulfuric acid surfaces representative of stratospheric aerosol particles. The results suggest that the heterogeneous conversion of N2O5 to HNO3 is fast enough to significantly affect the partitioning of nitrogen species in the global stratosphere and thus contribute to global ozone depletion. The hydrolysis of ClONO2 is slower and unlikely to be important under normal conditions at midlatitudes. The solubilities of HCl and HNO3 in sulfuric acid down to 200 K were found to be quite low. For HCl, this means that little HCl is available for reaction on the surfaces of stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles. The low solubility of HNO3 means that this product of heterogeneous reactions will enter the gas phase, and the denitrification observed in polar regions is unlikely to occur in the global stratosphere.

  4. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10126 - Alkyl amino substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... substituted triazine amino substituted benezenesulfonic acid reaction product with naphthalenesulfonato azo... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkyl amino substituted triazine...

  9. The electrochemical reactions of pure In with Li and Na: anomalous electrolyte decomposition, benefits of FEC additive, phase transitions and electrode performance

    SciTech Connect

    Hawks, Samantha A; Baggetto, Loic; Bridges, Craig A; Veith, Gabriel M

    2014-01-01

    Indium thin films are evaluated as an anode material for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries (theoretical capacities of 1012 mAh g-1 for Li and 467 mAh g-1 for Na). The native surface oxides are responsible for the anomalous electrolyte decomposition during the first cycle while oxidized In species are found to be responsible for the electrolyte decomposition during the subsequent cycles. The presence of 5wt% FEC electrolyte additive suppresses the occurrence of the anomalous electrolyte decomposition during the first cycle but is not sufficient to prevent the decomposition upon further cycling from 0 to 2 V. Prevention of the anomalous decomposition can be achieved by restricting the charge cut-off, for instance at 1.1 V, or by using larger amounts of FEC. The In films show moderately good capacity retention with storage capacities when cycled with Li (950 mAh g-1) but significantly less when cycled with Na (125 mAh g-1). XRD data reveal that several known Li-In phases (i.e LiIn, Li3In2, LiIn2 and Li13In3) form during the electrochemical reaction. In contrast, the reaction with Na is severely limited. The largest amount of inserted Na is evidenced for cells short-circuited 40 hrs at 65C, for which the XRD data show the coexistence of NaIn, In, and an unknown phase. During cycling, mechanical degradation due to repeated expansion/shrinkage, evidenced by SEM, coupled with SEI formation is the primary source of the capacity fade. Finally, we show that the In thin films exhibit very high rate capability for both Li (100 C) and Na (30 C).

  10. In situ monitoring of the acetylene decomposition and gas temperature at reaction conditions for the deposition of carbon nanotubes using linear Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Reinhold-López, Karla; Braeuer, Andreas; Popovska, Nadejda; Leipertz, Alfred

    2010-08-16

    To understand the reaction mechanisms taking place by growing carbon nanotubes via the catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, a strategy to monitor in situ the gas phase at reaction conditions was developed applying linear Raman spectroscopy. The simultaneous determination of the gas temperature and composition was possible by a new strategy of the evaluation of the Raman spectra. In agreement to the well-known exothermic decomposition of acetylene, a gas temperature increase was quantified when acetylene was added to the incident flow. Information about exhaust gas recirculation and location of the maximal acetylene conversion was derived from the composition measurements.

  11. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... identified generically as a hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (PMN P-99-0052) is subject...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane (PMN P-98-1036; CAS No. 207409-71-0) is subject to...

  14. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10251 - Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10251 Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-09-366) is subject to reporting...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... identified generically as a hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (PMN P-99-0052) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10211 - Octadecanoic acid, reaction products with diethylenetriamine and urea, acetates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Octadecanoic acid, reaction products... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10211 Octadecanoic acid, reaction... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octadecanoic acid, reaction products...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10464 - Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10464 Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-03-461) is subject to reporting...

  1. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... identified generically as a hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (PMN P-99-0052) is subject...

  2. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10251 - Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acids, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10251 Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-09-366) is subject to reporting...

  4. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane (PMN P-98-1036; CAS No. 207409-71-0) is subject to...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9484 - Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9484 Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic). (a... generically as Dimer acid/rosin amidoamine reaction product (PMN P-99-0143) is subject to reporting under...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10211 - Octadecanoic acid, reaction products with diethylenetriamine and urea, acetates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Octadecanoic acid, reaction products... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10211 Octadecanoic acid, reaction... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octadecanoic acid, reaction products...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10211 - Octadecanoic acid, reaction products with diethylenetriamine and urea, acetates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Octadecanoic acid, reaction products... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10211 Octadecanoic acid, reaction... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octadecanoic acid, reaction products...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10251 - Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10251 Fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-09-366) is subject to reporting...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9460 - Tall oil fatty acids, reaction products with polyamines, alkyl substituted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9460 Tall oil fatty acids, reaction... reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as tall oil fatty acids, reaction products...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane (PMN P-98-1036; CAS No. 207409-71-0) is subject to...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10464 - Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction products with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10464 Fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acid, reaction products with alkanolamine (PMN P-03-461) is subject to reporting...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... identified generically as a hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (PMN P-99-0052) is subject...

  16. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane (PMN P-98-1036; CAS No. 207409-71-0) is subject to...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4461 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4461 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane... identified generically as a hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with octane (PMN P-99-0052) is subject...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10211 - Octadecanoic acid, reaction products with diethylenetriamine and urea, acetates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Octadecanoic acid, reaction products... SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10211 Octadecanoic acid, reaction... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as octadecanoic acid, reaction products...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4385 - Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4385 Hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane. (a) Chemical... hydrofluoric acid, reaction products with heptane (PMN P-98-1036; CAS No. 207409-71-0) is subject to...

  20. Kinetics of the reactions of hypochlorous acid and amino acid chloramines with thiols, methionine, and ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Peskin, A V; Winterbourn, C C

    2001-03-01

    Thiol oxidation by hypochlorous acid and chloramines is a favorable reaction and may be responsible for alterations in regulatory or signaling pathways in cells exposed to neutrophil oxidants. In order to establish the mechanism for such changes, it is necessary to appreciate whether these oxidants are selective for different thiols as compared with other scavengers. We have measured rate constants for reactions of amino acid chloramines with a range of thiols, methionine, and ascorbate, using a combination of stopped-flow and competitive kinetics. For HOCl, rate constants are too fast to measure directly by our system and values relative to reduced glutathione were determined by competition with methionine. For taurine chloramine, the rate constants for reaction with 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid, GSH, methionine, and ascorbate at pH 7.4 were 970, 115, 39, and 13 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Values for 10 thiols varied by a factor of 20 and showed an inverse relationship to the pK(a) of the thiol group. Rate constants for chloramines of glycine and N-alpha-acetyl-lysine also showed these relationships. Rates increased with decreasing pH, suggesting a mechanism involving acid catalysis. For hypochlorous acid, rates of reaction with 5-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid, GSH, cysteine, and most of the other thiols were very similar. Relative reactivities varied by less than 5 and there was no dependence on thiol pK(a). Chloramines have the potential to be selective for different cellular thiols depending on their pK(a). For HOCl to be selective, other factors must be important, or its reactions could be secondary to chloramine formation.

  1. Contribution to the chemistry of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. Products of the Ferriin-Bromomalonic acid and the Ferriin-Malonic acid reactions.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Laszló; Försterling, Horst-Dieter; Onel, Lavinia; Wittmann, Maria; Noszticzius, Zoltan

    2006-11-30

    In the present mechanistic schemes of the ferroin-catalyzed oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction the oxidation of the organic substrates (bromomalonic or malonic acid) by ferriin (the oxidized form of the catalyst) plays an important role. As the organic products of these reactions were not yet identified experimentally, they were studied here by an HPLC technique. It was found that the main organic oxidation product of bromomalonic acid is bromo-ethene-tricarboxylic acid (BrEETRA), the same compound that is formed when bromomalonic acid is oxidized by Ce4+ (another catalyst of the BZ reaction). Formation of BrEETRA is explained here by a new mechanism that is more realistic than the one suggested earlier. To find any oxidation product of malonic acid in the ferriin-malonic acid reaction was not successful, however. Neither ethane-tetracarboxylic acid (ETA) nor malonyl malonate (MAMA), the usual products of the Ce4+- malonic acid reaction, nor any other organic acid, not even CO2, was found as a product of the reaction. We propose that malonic acid is not oxidized in the ferriin-malonic acid reaction, and it plays only the role of a complex forming catalyst in a process where Fe3+ oxidizes mostly its phenantroline ligand.

  2. Nucleic acid amplification: Alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Fakruddin, Md; Mannan, Khanjada Shahnewaj Bin; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Mazumdar, Reaz Mohammad; Hossain, Md. Nur; Islam, Sumaiya; Chowdhury, Md. Alimuddin

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid amplification is a valuable molecular tool not only in basic research but also in application oriented fields, such as clinical medicine development, infectious diseases diagnosis, gene cloning and industrial quality control. A comperehensive review of the literature on the principles, applications, challenges and prospects of different alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed. PCR was the first nucleic acid amplification method. With the advancement of research, a no of alternative nucleic acid amplification methods has been developed such as loop mediated isothermal amplification, nucleic acid sequence based amplification, strand displacement amplification, multiple displacement amplification. Most of the alternative methods are isothermal obviating the need for thermal cyclers. Though principles of most of the alternate methods are relatively complex than that of PCR, they offer better applicability and sensitivity in cases where PCR has limitations. Most of the alternate methods still have to prove themselves through extensive validation studies and are not available in commercial form; they pose the potentiality to be used as replacements of PCR. Continuous research is going on in different parts of the world to make these methods viable technically and economically. PMID:24302831

  3. Nucleic acid amplification: Alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Fakruddin, Md; Mannan, Khanjada Shahnewaj Bin; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Mazumdar, Reaz Mohammad; Hossain, Md Nur; Islam, Sumaiya; Chowdhury, Md Alimuddin

    2013-10-01

    Nucleic acid amplification is a valuable molecular tool not only in basic research but also in application oriented fields, such as clinical medicine development, infectious diseases diagnosis, gene cloning and industrial quality control. A comperehensive review of the literature on the principles, applications, challenges and prospects of different alternative methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed. PCR was the first nucleic acid amplification method. With the advancement of research, a no of alternative nucleic acid amplification methods has been developed such as loop mediated isothermal amplification, nucleic acid sequence based amplification, strand displacement amplification, multiple displacement amplification. Most of the alternative methods are isothermal obviating the need for thermal cyclers. Though principles of most of the alternate methods are relatively complex than that of PCR, they offer better applicability and sensitivity in cases where PCR has limitations. Most of the alternate methods still have to prove themselves through extensive validation studies and are not available in commercial form; they pose the potentiality to be used as replacements of PCR. Continuous research is going on in different parts of the world to make these methods viable technically and economically.

  4. Effect of simulated acid rain on the litter decomposition of Quercus acutissima and Pinus massoniana in forest soil microcosms and the relationship with soil enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congyan; Guo, Peng; Han, Guomin; Feng, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Peng; Tian, Xingjun

    2010-06-01

    With the continuing increase in human activities, ecologists are increasingly interested in understanding the effects of acid rain on litter decomposition. Two dominant litters were chosen from Zijin Mountain in China: Quercus acutissima from a broad-leaved forest and Pinus massoniana from a coniferous forest. The litters were incubated in microcosms and treated with simulated acid rain (gradient pH levels). During a six-month incubation, changes in chemical composition (i.e., lignin, total carbohydrate, and nitrogen), litter mass losses, soil pH values, and activities of degradative enzymes were determined. Results showed that litter mass losses were depressed after exposure to acid rain and the effects of acid rain on the litter decomposition rates of needles were higher than on those of leaves. Results also revealed that simulated acid rain restrained the activities of cellulase, invertase, nitrate reductase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase, and urease, while it enhanced the activities of catalase in most cases during the six-month decomposition process. Catalase and polyphenol oxidase were primarily responsible for litter decomposition in the broad-leaved forest, while invertase, nitrate reductase, and urease were primarily responsible for litter decomposition in the coniferous forest. The results suggest acid rain-restrained litter decomposition may be due to the depressed enzymatic activities. According to the results of this study, soil carbon in subtropical forests would accumulate as a long-term consequence of continued acid rain. This may presumably alter the balance of ecosystem carbon flux, nutrient cycling, and humus formation, which may, in turn, have multiple effects on forest ecosystems.

  5. The Effect of Hetrogeneous Reactions on Model Performance for Nitrous Acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent studies suggest that emissions, heterogeneous reactions, and surface photolysis of adsorbed nitric acid may produce additional nitrous acid in the atmosphere. The effects of these sources on nitrous acid formation are evaluated using the Community Multiscale Air Quality m...

  6. Acid activated montmorillonite as catalysts in methyl esterification reactions of lauric acid.

    PubMed

    Zatta, Leandro; Ramos, Luiz Pereira; Wypych, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activity of acid activated montmorillonite in the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) is reported. Standard Montmorillonite (MMT) type STx-1 provided by the Clay Mineral Society repository was activated using phosphoric, nitric and sulphuric acids under different conditions and the resulting materials were characterized and evaluated as catalysts in the methyl esterification of lauric acid. Blank reactions carried out in the absence of any added catalyst presented conversions of 32.64, 69.79 and 79.23%, for alcohol:lauric acid molar ratios of 60:1, 12:1 and 6:1, respectively. In the presence of the untreated clay and using molar ratios of 12:1 and 6:1 with 12% of catalyst, conversions of 70.92 and 82.30% were obtained, respectively. For the acid activated clays, conversions up to 93.08% of lauric acid to methyl laurate were obtained, much higher than those observed for the thermal conversion or using untreated montmorillonite. Relative good correlations were observed between the catalytic activity and the development of acid sites and textural properties of the resulting materials. Therefore, a simple acid activation was able to improve the catalytic activity and produce clay catalysts that are environmental friendly, cost effective, noncorrosive and reusable.

  7. Synergistic effect of the combination of immobilized TiO2, UVA and ozone on the decomposition of dichloroacetic acid.

    PubMed

    Mehrjouei, Mohammad; Müller, Siegfried; Möller, Detlev

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a heterogeneous photocatalytic ozonation system (TiO(2)/UVA/O(3)) was evaluated on the degradation and mineralization of dichloroacetic acid as a contaminant in aqueous solutions by means of a planar reactor. The commercial product "Pilkington Active™ glass" was used as the immobilized TiO(2) photocatalyst and it was irradiated by near UV light in this study. The synergistic interaction between ozone and the photoactivated TiO(2) surface was discussed and highlighted. Furthermore, the influences of initial concentration and temperature on the degradation rate of dichloroacetic acid and the ozone consumption level during the oxidation process were investigated. The concentrations of dichloroacetic acid and chloride anions produced during degradation were measured using ion chromatography. The mineralization of dichloroacetic acid was evaluated by Total Organic Carbon (TOC) measurements. The degradation of dichloroacetic acid by photocatalytic ozonation showed good agreement with the kinetics of first-order reactions with respect to dichloroacetic acid.

  8. Effect of catalyst concentration and reaction time on the extraction of glucomannan from porang (Amorphophallus oncophyllus) flour via acid hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumoro, A. C.; Yuganta, T. H. A.; Ratnawati, R.; Retnowati, D. S.

    2016-11-01

    High demand of glucomannan for various applications has attracted the attention of researchers to look for efficient extraction method from its botanical sources. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of catalyst concentration and reaction time on the yield and purity of glucomannan, and profile of reducing sugar during glucomannan extraction from crude porang flour via acid hydrolysis. The effect of catalyst concentration was found to be more pronounced over the effect of reaction time. When catalyst concentration was varied from 0.03125 to 1 M, extraction of glucomannan from porang flour for 1 hour at 60°C yielded 40.5 to 70% glucomannan with purity of 47.35 to 90.18% (w/w). The yield and purity of glucomannan obtained from extraction using catalyst concentration of 1 M for 0.25 to 3 hour ranged between 49 to 66.67% and 58.32 to 90.18% (w/w), respectively. Reduction in glucomannan yield and purity observed at high catalyst concentration and prolong reaction time was likely to be due to over-decomposition. Glucomannan with highest purity (90.18% w/w) was obtained at 66.67% yield from acid hydrolysis of porang flour using 0.5 M hydrochloric acid solution with flour:water ratio of 1:50 at 60°C for 1 hour.

  9. Surface reactions of iron - enriched smectites: adsorption and transformation of hydroxy fatty acids and phenolic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polubesova, Tamara; Olshansky, Yaniv; Eldad, Shay; Chefetz, Benny

    2014-05-01

    Iron-enriched smectites play an important role in adsorption and transformation of soil organic components. Soil organo-clay complexes, and in particular humin contain hydroxy fatty acids, which are derived from plant biopolymer cutin. Phenolic acids belong to another major group of organic acids detected in soil. They participate in various soil processes, and are of concern due to their allelopathic activity. We studied the reactivity of iron-enriched smectites (Fe(III)-montmorillonite and nontronite) toward both groups of acids. We used fatty acids- 9(10),16-dihydroxypalmitic acid (diHPA), isolated from curtin, and 9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic acid (triHPA); the following phenolic acids were used: ferulic, p-coumaric, syringic, and vanillic. Adsorption of both groups of acids was measured. The FTIR spectra of fatty acid-mineral complexes indicated inner-sphere complexation of fatty acids with iron-enriched smectites (versus outer-sphere complexation with Ca(II)-montmorillonite). The LC-MS results demonstrated enhanced esterification of fatty acids on the iron-enriched smectite surfaces (as compared to Ca(II)-montmorillonite). This study suggests that fatty acids can be esterified on the iron-enriched smectite surfaces, which results in the formation of stable organo-mineral complexes. These complexes may serve as a model for the study of natural soil organo-clay complexes and humin. The reaction of phenolic acids with Fe(III)-montmorillonite demonstrated their oxidative transformation by the mineral surfaces, which was affected by molecular structure of acids. The following order of their transformation was obtained: ferulic >syringic >p-coumaric >vanillic. The LC-MS analysis demonstrated the presence of dimers, trimers, and tetramers of ferulic acid on the surface of Fe(III)-montmorillonite. Oxidation and transformation of ferulic acid were more intense on the surface of Fe(III)-montmorillonite as compared to Fe(III) in solution due to stronger complexation on

  10. Reaction of Thymidine with Hypobromous Acid in Phosphate Buffer.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshinori; Kitabatake, Akihiko; Koide, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    When thymidine was treated with hypobromous acid (HOBr) in 100 mM phosphate buffer at pH 7.2, two major product peaks appeared in the HPLC chromatogram. The products in each peak were identified by NMR and MS as two isomers of 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymidine-6-phosphate (a novel compound) and two isomers of 5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymidine (thymidine glycol) with comparable yields. 5-Hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymidine-6-phosphate was relatively stable, and decomposed with a half-life of 32 h at pH 7.2 and 37°C generating thymidine glycol. The results suggest that 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymidine-6-phosphate in addition to thymidine glycol may have importance for mutagenesis by the reaction of HOBr with thymine residues in nucleotides and DNA.

  11. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes via Electrophilic Substitution Reaction in Polyphosphoric Acid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-26

    1 Title of proposed research: Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes via Electrophilic Substitution Reaction in Polyphosphoric Acid Proposer: Jong...Choi, J.-Y.; Tan, L.-S.; Baek, J.-B. “Functionalization of carbon nanotubes via electrophilic substitution reaction in polyphosphoric acid” AFOSR...2006 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Functionalization of carbon nanotubes via electrophilic substitution reaction in polyphosphoric acid 5a. CONTRACT

  12. Decomposition of energetic chemicals contaminated with iron or stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Chervin, Sima; Bodman, Glenn T; Barnhart, Richard W

    2006-03-17

    Contamination of chemicals or reaction mixtures with iron or stainless steel is likely to take place during chemical processing. If energetic and thermally unstable chemicals are involved in a manufacturing process, contamination with iron or stainless steel can impact the decomposition characteristics of these chemicals and, subsequently, the safety of the processes, and should be investigated. The goal of this project was to undertake a systematic approach to study the impact of iron or stainless steel contamination on the decomposition characteristics of different chemical classes. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the decomposition reaction by testing each chemical pure, and in mixtures with iron and stainless steel. The following classes of energetic chemicals were investigated: nitrobenzenes, tetrazoles, hydrazines, hydroxylamines and oximes, sulfonic acid derivatives and monomers. The following non-energetic groups were investigated for contributing effects: halogens, hydroxyls, amines, amides, nitriles, sulfonic acid esters, carbonyl halides and salts of hydrochloric acid. Based on the results obtained, conclusions were drawn regarding the sensitivity of the decomposition reaction to contamination with iron and stainless steel for the chemical classes listed above. It was demonstrated that the most sensitive classes are hydrazines and hydroxylamines/oximes. Contamination of these chemicals with iron or stainless steel not only destabilizes them, leading to decomposition at significantly lower temperatures, but also sometimes causes increased severity of the decomposition. The sensitivity of nitrobenzenes to contamination with iron or stainless steel depended upon the presence of other contributing groups: the presence of such groups as acid chlorides or chlorine/fluorine significantly increased the effect of contamination on decomposition characteristics of nitrobenzenes. The decomposition of sulfonic acid derivatives and tetrazoles

  13. Nitro-fatty acid reaction with glutathione and cysteine. Kinetic analysis of thiol alkylation by a Michael addition reaction.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laura M S; Baker, Paul R S; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Schopfer, Francisco J; Fink, Mitchell; Woodcock, Steven R; Branchaud, Bruce P; Radi, Rafael; Freeman, Bruce A

    2007-10-19

    Fatty acid nitration by nitric oxide-derived species yields electrophilic products that adduct protein thiols, inducing changes in protein function and distribution. Nitro-fatty acid adducts of protein and reduced glutathione (GSH) are detected in healthy human blood. Kinetic and mass spectrometric analyses reveal that nitroalkene derivatives of oleic acid (OA-NO2) and linoleic acid (LNO2) rapidly react with GSH and Cys via Michael addition reaction. Rates of OA-NO2 and LNO2 reaction with GSH, determined via stopped flow spectrophotometry, displayed second-order rate constants of 183 M(-1)S(-1) and 355 M(-1)S(-1), respectively, at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C. These reaction rates are significantly greater than those for GSH reaction with hydrogen peroxide and non-nitrated electrophilic fatty acids including 8-iso-prostaglandin A2 and 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J2. Increasing reaction pH from 7.4 to 8.9 enhanced apparent second-order rate constants for the thiol reaction with OA-NO2 and LNO2, showing dependence on the thiolate anion of GSH for reactivity. Rates of nitroalkene reaction with thiols decreased as the pKa of target thiols increased. Increasing concentrations of the detergent octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside decreased rates of nitroalkene reaction with GSH, indicating that the organization of nitro-fatty acids into micellar or membrane structures can limit Michael reactivity with more polar nucleophilic targets. In aggregate, these results reveal that the reversible adduction of thiols by nitro-fatty acids is a mechanism for reversible post-translational regulation of protein function by nitro-fatty acids.

  14. The electrochemical reactions of pure indium with Li and Na: Anomalous electrolyte decomposition, benefits of FEC additive, phase transitions and electrode performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Samantha A.; Baggetto, Loïc; Bridges, Craig A.; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2014-02-01

    Indium thin films were evaluated as an anode material for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries (theoretical capacities of 1012 mAh g-1 for Li and 467 mAh g-1 for Na). XRD data reveal that several known Li-In phases (LiIn, Li3In2, LiIn2 and Li13In3) form providing 950 mAh g-1 reversible capacity. In contrast, the reaction with Na is severely limited (75-125 mAh g-1). XRD data of short-circuited cells (40 h at 65 °C) show the coexistence of NaIn, In, and an unknown NaxIn phase. In electrodes exhibit anomalous electrolyte decomposition characterized by large discharge plateaus at 1.4 V vs Li/Li+ and 0.9 V vs Na/Na+. The presence of 5 wt% fluoroethylene carbonate additive suppresses the occurrence of the electrolyte decomposition during the first cycle but does not necessarily prevent it upon further cycling. Prevention of the anomalous decomposition can be achieved by restricting the (dis)charge voltages, increasing the current or by using larger amounts of FEC. The native surface oxides (In2O3) are responsible for the pronounced electrolyte decomposition during the first cycle while other In3+ species are responsible during the subsequent cycles. We also show that indium electrodes can exhibit very high rate capability for both Li (100 C-rate) and Na (30 C-rate).

  15. Layered materials with coexisting acidic and basic sites for catalytic one-pot reaction sequences.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-06-17

    Acidic montmorillonite-immobilized primary amines (H-mont-NH(2)) were found to be excellent acid-base bifunctional catalysts for one-pot reaction sequences, which are the first materials with coexisting acid and base sites active for acid-base tamdem reactions. For example, tandem deacetalization-Knoevenagel condensation proceeded successfully with the H-mont-NH(2), affording the corresponding condensation product in a quantitative yield. The acidity of the H-mont-NH(2) was strongly influenced by the preparation solvent, and the base-catalyzed reactions were enhanced by interlayer acid sites.

  16. Calculated rate constants of the chemical reactions involving the main byproducts SO2F, SOF2, SO2F2 of SF6 decomposition in power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuwei; Rong, Mingzhe; Yang, Kang; Yang, Aijun; Wang, Xiaohua; Gao, Qingqing; Liu, Dingxin; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2016-04-01

    SF6 is widely used in electrical equipment as an insulating gas. In the presence of an electric arc, partial discharge (PD) or spark, SF6 dissociation products (such as SF2, SF3 and SF4) react with the unavoidable gas impurities (such as water vapor and oxygen), electrodes and surrounding solid insulation materials, forming several toxic and corrosive byproducts. The main stable decomposition products are SO2F, SO2F2 and SOF2, which have been confirmed experimentally to have a direct relationship with discharge faults, and are thus expected to be useful in the fault diagnosis of power equipment. Various studies have been performed of the main SF6 decomposition species and their concentrations under different types of faults. However, most of the experiments focused on the qualitative analysis of the relationship between the stable products and discharge faults. Although some theoretical research on the formation of main SF6 derivatives have been carried out using chemical kinetics models, the basic data (chemical reactions and their rate constants) adopted in the model are inaccurate and incomplete. The complex chemical reactions of SF6 with the impurities are ignored in most cases. The rate constants of some reactions obtained at ambient temperature or in a narrow temperature range are adopted in the models over a far greater range, for example up to 12 000 K, due to the difficulty in the experimental measurement and theoretical estimation of rate coefficients, particularly at high temperatures. Therefore, improved theoretical models require not only the consideration of additional SF6 decomposition reactions in the presence of impurities but also on improved values of rate constants. This paper is devoted to determining the rate constants of the chemical reactions relating to the main byproducts of SF6 decomposition in SF6 gas-insulated power equipment: SO2F, SOF2 and SO2F2. Quantum chemistry calculations with density functional theory, conventional

  17. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. I. The model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Rivard, Ugo; Iftimie, Radu

    2010-07-01

    Ultrafast, time-resolved investigations of acid-base neutralization reactions have recently been performed using systems containing the photoacid 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) and various Brønsted bases. Two conflicting neutralization mechanisms have been formulated by Mohammed et al. [Science 310, 83 (2005)] and Siwick et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 13412 (2007)] for the same acid-base system. Herein an ab initio molecular dynamics based computational model is formulated, which is able to investigate the validity of the proposed mechanisms in the general context of ground-state acid-base neutralization reactions. Our approach consists of using 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (exp. pKa≅1) as a model for excited-state HPTS∗ (pKa≅1.4) and carboxylate ions for the accepting base. We employ our recently proposed dipole-field/quantum mechanics (QM) treatment [P. Maurer and R. Iftimie, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074112 (2010)] of the proton donor and acceptor molecules. This approach allows one to tune the free energy of neutralization to any desired value as well as model initial nonequilibrium hydration effects caused by a sudden increase in acidity, making it possible to achieve a more realistic comparison with experimental data than could be obtained via a full-QM treatment of the entire system. It is demonstrated that the dipole-field/QM model reproduces correctly key properties of the 2,4,6-tricyanophenol acid molecule including gas-phase proton dissociation energies and dipole moments, and condensed-phase hydration structure and pKa values.

  18. High School Forum: "Invitations to Enquiry": The Calcite/Acid Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herron, J. Dudley, Ed.; Driscoll, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a high school chemistry experiment which involves the reaction between calcite and hydrochloric and sulfuric acids. This reaction can be carried out as a projected demonstration and on an individual basis. (HM)

  19. Understanding Nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) reactions with ferric hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Rodrigo Javier; Farrell, James

    2017-05-01

    Phosphonate compounds are used in a wide variety of industrial and agricultural applications, and are commonly found in surface and ground waters. Adsorption to ferric hydroxide can have a significant effect on the transport and fate of phosphonate compounds in the environment. This research used density functional theory modeling to investigate the adsorption mechanisms of nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) on ferric hydroxide. Standard Gibbs free energies of reaction (ΔGr(o)) and reaction activation barriers (Ea) were calculated for different possible adsorption mechanisms. Physical adsorption of NTMP to ferric hydroxide was promoted by negative charge assisted hydrogen bonding, and had ΔGr(o) ranging from -2.7 to -7.4 kcal/mol. NTMP was found to form three different types of inner sphere complexes, monodentate, bidentate mononuclear and bidentate binuclear. For the monodentate complexes, ΔGr(o) ranged from -8.0 to -13.7 kcal/mol, for the bidentate complexes ΔGr(o) ranged from -15.3 to -28.9 kcal/mol. Complexation with Ca(2+) decreased the energy for physical adsorption but increased the binding energies for mono- and bidentate complexes. Complexation with Ca(2+) also allowed formation of a tridentate ternary surface complex, whereby the Ca(2+) ion formed a bridge between three FeO(-) and three PO(-) groups. Physical adsorption had Ea = 0, but mono- and bidentate complex formation had Ea values ranging from 36 to 53 kcal/mol. Formation of tridentate ternary surface complexes involving Ca(2+) had the lowest activation barriers of 8 and 10 kcal/mol. The different activation barriers for different modes of adsorption may explain previous experimental observations of unusual kinetic behavior for adsorption and desorption of NTMP.

  20. Ab Initio Chemical Kinetics for the CH3 + O((3)P) Reaction and Related Isomerization-Decomposition of CH3O and CH2OH Radicals.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z F; Raghunath, P; Lin, M C

    2015-07-16

    The kinetics and mechanism of the CH3 + O reaction and related isomerization-decomposition of CH3O and CH2OH radicals have been studied by ab initio molecular orbital theory based on the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//CCSD/aug-cc-pVTZ, CCSD/aug-cc-pVDZ, and G2M//B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2p) levels of theory. The predicted potential energy surface of the CH3 + O reaction shows that the CHO + H2 products can be directly generated from CH3O by the TS3 → LM1 → TS7 → LM2 → TS4 path, in which both LM1 and LM2 are very loose and TS7 is roaming-like. The result for the CH2O + H reaction shows that there are three low-energy barrier processes including CH2O + H → CHO + H2 via H-abstraction and CH2O + H → CH2OH and CH2O + H → CH3O by addition reactions. The predicted enthalpies of formation of the CH2OH and CH3O radicals at 0 K are in good agreement with available experimental data. Furthermore, the rate constants for the forward and some key reverse reactions have been predicted at 200-3000 K under various pressures. Based on the new reaction pathway for CH3 + O, the rate constants for the CH2O + H and CHO + H2 reactions were predicted with the microcanonical variational transition-state/Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (VTST/RRKM) theory. The predicted total and individual product branching ratios (i.e., CO versus CH2O) are in good agreement with experimental data. The rate constant for the hydrogen abstraction reaction of CH2O + H has been calculated by the canonical variational transition-state theory with quantum tunneling and small-curvature corrections to be k(CH2O + H → CHO + H2) = 2.28 × 10(-19) T(2.65) exp(-766.5/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the 200-3000 K temperature range. The rate constants for the addition giving CH3O and CH2OH and the decomposition of the two radicals have been calculated by the microcanonical RRKM theory with the time-dependent master equation solution of the multiple quantum well system in the 200-3000 K temperature range at 1 Torr to

  1. Effects of Acid Digestion on the Peak Decomposition and Impact Sensitivity of Nitrocellulose

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    180-grit sandpaper stored over desiccant. H50 values are defined as a height at which 50% of samples will undergo a reaction, and was determined... sandpaper , smoke emission, or major distortion of the sandpaper . Standard NC had a measured H50 value of 17.78 in with a standard deviation of 1.508 in

  2. Silylium ion-catalyzed challenging Diels-Alder reactions: the danger of hidden proton catalysis with strong Lewis acids.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Ruth K; Müther, Kristine; Mück-Lichtenfeld, Christian; Grimme, Stefan; Oestreich, Martin

    2012-03-07

    The pronounced Lewis acidity of tricoordinate silicon cations brings about unusual reactivity in Lewis acid catalysis. The downside of catalysis with strong Lewis acids is, though, that these do have the potential to mediate the formation of protons by various mechanisms, and the thus released Brønsted acid might even outcompete the Lewis acid as the true catalyst. That is an often ignored point. One way of eliminating a hidden proton-catalyzed pathway is to add a proton scavenger. The low-temperature Diels-Alder reactions catalyzed by our ferrocene-stabilized silicon cation are such a case where the possibility of proton catalysis must be meticulously examined. Addition of the common hindered base 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine resulted, however, in slow decomposition along with formation of the corresponding pyridinium ion. Quantitative deprotonation of the silicon cation was observed with more basic (Mes)(3)P to yield the phosphonium ion. A deuterium-labeling experiment verified that the proton is abstracted from the ferrocene backbone. A reasonable mechanism of the proton formation is proposed on the basis of quantum-chemical calculations. This is, admittedly, a particular case but suggests that the use of proton scavengers must be carefully scrutinized, as proton formation might be provoked rather than prevented. Proton-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions are not well-documented in the literature, and a representative survey employing TfOH is included here. The outcome of these catalyses is compared with our silylium ion-catalyzed Diels-Alder reactions, thereby clearly corroborating that hidden Brønsted acid catalysis is not operating with our Lewis acid. Several simple-looking but challenging Diels-Alder reactions with exceptionally rare dienophile/enophile combinations are reported. Another indication is obtained from the chemoselectivity of the catalyses. The silylium ion-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction is general with regard to the oxidation level of the

  3. Kinetic Studies on the Reaction between Dicyanocobinamide and Hypochlorous Acid

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Dhiman; Ali, Iyad; Abdulridha, Rasha M.; Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N.; Saed, Ghassan M.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M.

    2014-01-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a potent oxidant generated by myeloperoxidase (MPO), which is an abundant enzyme used for defense against microbes. We examined the potential role of HOCl in corrin ring destruction and subsequent formation of cyanogen chloride (CNCl) from dicyanocobinamide ((CN)2-Cbi). Stopped-flow analysis revealed that the reaction consists of at least three observable steps, including at least two sequential transient intermediates prior to corrin ring destruction. The first two steps were attributed to sequential replacement of the two cyanide ligands with hypochlorite, while the third step was the destruction of the corrin ring. The formation of (OCl)(CN)-Cbi and its conversion to (OCl)2-Cbi was fitted to a first order rate equation with second order rate constants of 0.002 and 0.0002 µM−1s−1, respectively. The significantly lower rate of the second step compared to the first suggests that the replacement of the first cyanide molecule by hypochlorite causes an alteration in the ligand trans effects changing the affinity and/or accessibility of Co toward hypochlorite. Plots of the apparent rate constants as a function of HOCl concentration for all the three steps were linear with Y-intercepts close to zero, indicating that HOCl binds in an irreversible one-step mechanism. Collectively, these results illustrate functional differences in the corrin ring environments toward binding of diatomic ligands. PMID:25375773

  4. [Influencing factors and reaction mechanism of chloroacetic acid reduction by cast iron].

    PubMed

    Tang, Shun; Yang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Mao; Xie, Yue-Feng

    2014-03-01

    The chloroacetic acids are ubiquitous present as a class of trace chlorinated organic pollutants in surface and drinking water. Most of chloroacetic acids are known or suspected carcinogens and, when at high concentrations, are of great concern to human health. In order to economically remove chloroacetic acids, the degradation of chloroacetic acids by cast iron was investigated. Moreover, the effect of iron style, pretreatment process, shocking mode and dissolved oxygen on chloroacetic acids reduced by cast iron was discussed. Compared to iron source and acid pretreatment, mass transfer was more important to chloroacetic acid removal. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and monochloroacetic acid (MCAA) were the main products of anoxic and oxic degradation of trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) by cast iron during the researched reaction time, respectively. With longtitudinal shock, the reaction kinetics of chloroaectic acid removal by cast iron conformed well to the pseudo first order reaction. The anoxic reaction constants of TCAA, DCAA and MCAA were 0.46 h(-1), 0.03 h(-1) and 0, and their oxic constants were 1.24 h(-1), 0.79 h(-1) and 0.28 h(-1), respectively. The removal mechanisms of chloroacetic acids were different under various oxygen concentrations, including sequential hydrogenolysis for anoxic reaction and sequential hydrogenolysis and direct transformation possible for oxic reaction, respectively.

  5. Decomposition reactions for NaAl H4 , Na3 Al H6 , and NaH: First-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xuezhi; Tanaka, Isao

    2005-01-01

    The electronic properties and lattice dynamics of the sodium alanate phases have been studied by the density functional calculations. The phases include NaAlH4 (space group, I41/a ), Na3AlH6 (space group, P21/n ), and NaH (space group, Fm-3m ). The electronic properties are discussed on the basis of the electronic band structures, the atomic charges, the bond overlap population analysis, and the Born effective charges. The phonon dispersion relations and phonon density of states (DOS) of the phases are calculated by a direct force-constant method. Within the quasiharmonic approximation, the calculated thermodynamic functions including the heat capacity, the vibrational enthalpy, and the vibrational entropy are in good agreement with experimental values. Three decomposition reactions are studied based on the thermodynamic functions. The reactions are (1) NaAlH4→(1)/(3)Na3AlH6+(2)/(3)Al+H2 , (2) (1)/(3)Na3AlH6→NaH+(1)/(3)Al+(1)/(2)H2 , and (3) NaH→Na+(1)/(2)H2 . The reactions (1), (2), and (3) are predicted to take place at 285, 390, and 726K , respectively, which are in good agreement with the experiment (353, 423, and 698K , respectively). The individual contributions to the reactions including the enthalpy and entropy are investigated. We found that the enthalpy for the reaction is almost constant, and the net entropy contribution ( TΔS ) to the reaction is approximately equal to the entropy contribution of the H2 gas molecule (produced in that reaction).

  6. Malonic acid concentration as a control parameter in the kinetic analysis of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction under batch conditions.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Slavica M; Anić, Slobodan R; Cupić, Zeljko D; Pejić, Natasa D; Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana Z

    2008-11-28

    The influence of the initial malonic acid concentration [MA]0 (8.00 x 10(-3) < or = [MA]0 < or = 4.30 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)) in the presence of bromate (6.20 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)), bromide (1.50 x 10(-5) mol dm(-3)), sulfuric acid (1.00 mol dm(-3)) and cerium sulfate (2.50 x 10(-3) mol dm(-3)) on the dynamics and the kinetics of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactions was examined under batch conditions at 30.0 degrees C. The kinetics of the BZ reaction was analyzed by the earlier proposed method convenient for the examinations of the oscillatory reactions. In the defined region of parameters where oscillograms with only large-amplitude relaxation oscillations appeared, the pseudo-first order of the overall malonic acid decomposition with a corresponding rate constant of 2.14 x 10(-2) min(-1) was established. The numerical results on the dynamics and kinetics of the BZ reaction, carried out by the known skeleton model including the Br2O species, were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The already found saddle node infinite period (SNIPER) bifurcation point in transition from a stable quasi-steady state to periodic orbits and vice versa is confirmed by both experimental and numerical investigations of the system under consideration. Namely, the large-amplitude relaxation oscillations with increasing periods between oscillations in approaching the bifurcation points at the beginning and the end of the oscillatory domain, together with excitability of the stable quasi-steady states in their vicinity are obtained.

  7. Acid-free aza Diels-Alder reaction of Danishefsky's diene with imines.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu; Li, Xin; Ding, Kuiling

    2002-09-19

    [reaction: see text] A highly efficient aza Diels-Alder reaction of Danishefsky's diene with imines was found to occur in methanol in the absence of any acids at room temperature to give corresponding 2-substituted dihydro-4-pyridone derivatives in high yields. This reaction can be also carried out in a three-component one-pot reaction manner. The reaction was found to proceed through a Mannich-type condensation mechanism.

  8. Low-energy reaction rate constants for the Ni+-assisted decomposition of acetaldehyde: observation of C-H and C-C activation.

    PubMed

    Dee, S Jason; Castleberry, Vanessa A; Villarroel, Otsmar J; Laboren, Ivanna E; Bellert, Darrin J

    2010-02-04

    Rate constants for the low-energy Ni(+)-assisted dissociative reaction of acetaldehyde have been measured under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. The rate constants are acquired through monitoring the time dependence of fragment Ni(+)CO formation. The decomposition of the precursor Ni(+)-acetaldehyde cluster ion proceeds via consecutive, parallel reaction coordinates that originate with the Ni(+)-assisted cleavage of either a C-C or an aldehyde C-H bond. The energies used to initiate these reactions are well below that required to cleave sigma-bonds in the isolated acetaldehyde molecule. Direct measurement of the reaction kinetics over a range of energies indicates that the rate-limiting step in the dissociative mechanism changes at cluster ion internal energies = 17,200 +/- 400 cm(-1). Arguments are presented that this energy marks the closure of the dissociative coordinate that initiates with C-H sigma-bond activation and thus provides a measure of the activation energy of this dissociative pathway.

  9. Glucose and Fructose to Platform Chemicals: Understanding the Thermodynamic Landscapes of Acid-Catalysed Reactions Using High-Level ab Initio Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Kim, Taijin; Low, John; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2012-12-28

    Molecular level understanding of acid-catalysed conversion of sugar molecules to platform chemicals such as hydroxy-methyl furfural (HMF), furfuryl alcohol (FAL), and levulinic acid (LA) is essential for efficient biomass conversion. In this paper, the high-level G4MP2 method along with the SMD solvation model is employed to understand detailed reaction energetics of the acid-catalysed decomposition of glucose and fructose to HMF. Based on protonation free energies of various hydroxyl groups of the sugar molecule, the relative reactivity of gluco-pyranose, fructo-pyranose and fructo-furanose are predicted. Calculations suggest that, in addition to the protonated intermediates, a solvent assisted dehydration of one of the fructo-furanosyl intermediates is a competing mechanism, indicating the possibility of multiple reaction pathways for fructose to HMF conversion in aqueous acidic medium. Two reaction pathways were explored to understand the thermodynamics of glucose to HMF; the first one is initiated by the protonation of a C2–OH group and the second one through an enolate intermediate involving acyclic intermediates. Additionally, a pathway is proposed for the formation of furfuryl alcohol from glucose initiated by the protonation of a C2–OH position, which includes a C–C bond cleavage, and the formation of formic acid. The detailed free energy landscapes predicted in this study can be used as benchmarks for further exploring the sugar decomposition reactions, prediction of possible intermediates, and finally designing improved catalysts for biomass conversion chemistry in the future.

  10. Thermal decomposition of methanol in the sonolysis of methanol-water mixtures. Spin-trapping evidence for isotope exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, C.M.; Lion, Y.; Kondo, T.; Riesz, P.

    1987-11-05

    The spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzenesulfonate was used to monitor the yield of free radicals produced during sonolysis of water-methanol mixtures. Methyl radicals and CH/sub 2/OH radicals were observed as well as the isotopically mixed radicals CH/sub 2/D and CHD/sub 2/ when CH/sub 3/OD:D/sub 2/O mixtures were studied. The results clearly show that thermal decomposition of methanol to methyl radicals occurs in the gas phase. The methyl radical yield rises sharply at very low concentrations of methanol, reaches a maximum at 5 mol dm/sup -3/ in water and decreases to a smaller value in methanol. The yield of methyl radicals as a function of methanol concentration is discussed in terms of the different factors influencing the sonochemistry.

  11. Synthesis of cyclopropyl-substituted furans by brønsted Acid promoted cascade reactions.

    PubMed

    Clark, J Stephen; Romiti, Filippo; Hogg, Kirsten F; Hamid, Malai Haniti S A; Richter, Sven C; Boyer, Alistair; Redman, Joanna C; Farrugia, Louis J

    2015-05-04

    Chloroacetic acid promotes an efficient and diastereoselective intramolecular cascade reaction of electron-deficient ynenones to deliver products featuring a 2,3,5-trisubstituted furan bearing a fused cyclopropyl substituent at the 5-position. Synthetically relevant polycyclic building blocks featuring rings of various sizes and heteroatoms have been synthesized in high yield using this mild acid-catalyzed reaction.

  12. Improved approximations of the solution and derivatives to a singularly perturbed reaction-diffusion equation based on the solution decomposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, G. I.; Shishkina, L. P.

    2011-06-01

    In the case of the Dirichlet problem for a singularly perturbed ordinary differential reaction-diffusion equation, a new approach is used to the construction of finite difference schemes such that their solutions and their normalized first- and second-order derivatives converge in the maximum norm uniformly with respect to a perturbation parameter ɛ ∈(0, 1]; the normalized derivatives are ɛ-uniformly bounded. The key idea of this approach to the construction of ɛ-uniformly convergent finite difference schemes is the use of uniform grids for solving grid subproblems for the regular and singular components of the grid solution. Based on the asymptotic construction technique, a scheme of the solution decomposition method is constructed such that its solution and its normalized first- and second-order derivatives converge ɛ-uniformly at the rate of O( N -2ln2 N), where N + 1 is the number of points in the uniform grids. Using the Richardson technique, an improved scheme of the solution decomposition method is constructed such that its solution and its normalized first and second derivatives converge ɛ-uniformly in the maximum norm at the same rate of O( N -4ln4 N).

  13. Bulk Diffusion via a ``kick-out'' method for Lithium in the decomposition reaction LiAlH4/Li3AlH6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolih, Biljana; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Ozolins Team

    2013-03-01

    In the pursuit to find a practical system for hydrogen storage, complex metal hydrides have long been considered as viable candidates due to their high hydrogen content. However, some of the challenges faced with these types of systems are poor thermodynamics or kinetics. The underlying mechanisms, and their limiting processes, for the decomposition of these materials need to be understood. From experimental work on the decomposition of hydrogen storage materials, it has been suggested that bulk diffusion of metal species is the bottleneck for hydrogen release. In this work is the dehydrogenation we investigated the system LiAlH4  LiAlH6 with favorable hydrogen release (5.3 wt %), at moderate temperatures. Using first-principles density functional theory we found the defects facilitating mass transport by calculating individual formation energies, highest concentrations, and activation barriers for defect mobility. The mass transport of Lithium is found to be mediated by a ``kick-out'' mechanism. The results are used to further our understanding of the fundamental mechanism of mass transport and evaluate the possibility of kinetics as the limiting process in this reaction.

  14. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  15. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10428 - Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine. 721.10428 Section 721.10428 Protection of Environment..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10428 - Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine. 721.10428 Section 721.10428 Protection of Environment..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9485 - Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... amidoamine reaction product (generic). 721.9485 Section 721.9485 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... reaction product (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as Dimer acid/polymerized rosin amidoamine reaction product...

  2. Decomposition of Alternative Chirality Amino Acids by Alkaliphilic Anaerobe from Owens Lake, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Alisa; Pikuta, Elena V.; Guisler, Melissa; Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    The study of alkaliphilic microbial communities from anaerobic sediments of Owens and Mono Lakes in California led to the isolation of a bacterial strain capable of metabolizing amino acids with alternative chirality. According to the phylogenetic analysis, the anaerobic strain BK1 belongs to the genus Tindallia; however, despite the characteristics of other described species of this genus, the strain BK1 was able to grow on D-arginine and Dlysine. Cell morphology of this strain showed straight, motile, non-spore-forming rods with sizes 0.45 x 1.2-3 microns. Physiological characteristics of the strain showed that it is catalase negative, obligately anaerobic, mesophilic, and obligately alkaliphilic. This isolate is unable to grow at pH 7 and requires CO3 (2-) ions for growth. The strain has chemo-heterotrophic metabolism and is able to ferment various proteolysis products and some sugars. It plays the role of a primary anaerobe within the trophic chain of an anaerobic microbial community by the degradation of complex protein molecules to smaller and less energetic molecules. The new isolate requires NaCl for growth, and can grow within the range of 0.5-13 %, with the optimum at 1 % NaCl (w/v). The temperature range for the growth of the new isolate is 12-40 C with optimum at 35 C. The pH range for the growth of strain BK1 occurs between 7.8 and 11.0 with optimum at 9.5. This paper presents detailed physiological characteristics of the novel isolate from Owens Lake, a unique relic ecosystem of Astrobiological significance, and makes an accent on the ability of this strain to utilize L-amino acids.

  3. Proton exchange in acid-base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-06-01

    We extend previous work on nitric acid-ammonia and nitric acid-alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid-strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are <400 cm-1. This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm-1. Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  4. Reaction of folic acid with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Mark D.; Chorney, Matthew

    2016-10-01

    The oxygen-containing functional groups on oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are used to covalently bond folic acid molecules to the SWNTs. Infrared spectroscopy confirms intact molecular binding to the SWNTs through the formation of an amide bond between a carboxylic acid group on an SWNT and the primary amine group of folic acid. The folic acid-functionalized SWNTs are readily dispersible in water and phosphate-buffered saline, and the dispersions are stable for a period of two weeks or longer. These folic acid-functionalized SWNTs offer potential for use as biocompatible SWNTs.

  5. Organo-niobate Ionic Liquids: Synthesis, Characterization and Application as Acid Catalyst in Pechmann Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Valerio C. D.; Alves, Melquizedeque B.; Souza, Ernesto R.; Pinto, Ivana O.; Rubim, Joel C.; Andrade, Carlos Kleber Z.; Suarez, Paulo A. Z.

    2007-01-01

    The combinations of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride with NbCl5 yielded ionic mixtures with different melting point temperatures and acidity depending on the niobium molar fraction. The mixtures were characterized by thermal (DSC) and spectroscopic (FT-IR and 1H NMR) analysis. The Pechmann reactions of different phenols with ethylacetoacetate, producing coumarins, was used as model to evaluate the catalytic behavior of these mixtures as acid Lewis catalyst. These reactions were carried out using acidic mixtures of 60 mol%.

  6. 40 CFR 721.10429 - Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and tall-oil...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and tall-oil fatty acids. 721.10429 Section 721.10429... Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and tall-oil fatty acids... identified as fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10429 - Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and tall-oil...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and tall-oil fatty acids. 721.10429 Section 721.10429... Fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and tall-oil fatty acids... identified as fatty acids, C18-unsatd., dimers, reaction products with 1-piperazineethanamine and...

  8. Rate-limiting step in the low-energy unimolecular decomposition reaction of Ni+* acetone into Ni+CO + ethane.

    PubMed

    Dee, S Jason; Castleberry, Vanessa A; Villarroel, Otsmar J; Laboren, Ivanna E; Frey, Sarah E; Ashley, Daniel; Bellert, Darrin J

    2009-12-24

    Rate constants for the low-energy Ni(+)-assisted C-C bond cleavage reaction of deuterium-labeled acetone have been acquired under jet-cooled conditions in the gas phase. The energies used to initiate the dissociative reactions of the precursor complex ion Ni(+)(d(6)-Ac) are well below that required to cleave C-C sigma-bonds in isolated organic molecules. The rate constants are compared to those acquired previously for the lighter Ni(+)(h(6)-Ac) isotope and result in a substantial kinetic isotope effect (k(H)/k(D) approximately 5.5). Arguments are made that implicate isomerization leading to C-C bond coupling as the rate-limiting step (not C-C sigma-bond activation) in the dissociative reaction.

  9. Chiral BINOL-derived phosphoric acids: privileged Brønsted acid organocatalysts for C-C bond formation reactions.

    PubMed

    Zamfir, Alexandru; Schenker, Sebastian; Freund, Matthias; Tsogoeva, Svetlana B

    2010-12-07

    BINOL-derived phosphoric acids have emerged during the last five years as powerful chiral Brønsted acid catalysts in many enantioselective processes. The most successful transformations carried out with chiral BINOL phosphates include C-C bond formation reactions. The recent advances have been reviewed in this article with a focus being placed on hydrocyanations, aldol-type, Mannich, Friedel-Crafts, aza-ene-type, Diels-Alder, as well as cascade and multi-component reactions.

  10. Determination of acidity constants of curcumin in aqueous solution and apparent rate constant of its decomposition.

    PubMed

    Bernabé-Pineda, Margarita; Ramírez-Silva, María Teresa; Romero-Romo, Mario; González-Vergara, Enrique; Rojas-Hernández, Alberto

    2004-04-01

    The stability of curcumin (H3Cur) in aqueous media is improved when the systems in which it is present are at high pH values (higher than 11.7), fitting a model describable by a pseudo-zero order with a rate constant k' for the disappearance of the Cur3- species of 1.39 (10(-9)) Mmin(-1). There were three acidity constants measured for the curcumin as follows: pKA3 = 10.51 +/- 0.01 corresponding to the equilibrium HCur2- = Cur3- + H+, a pKA2 = 9.88 +/- 0.02 corresponding to the equilibrium H2Cur- = HCur-(2) + H+. These pKA values were attributed to the hydrogen of the phenol part of the curcumin, while the pKA1 = 8.38 +/- 0.04 corresponds to the equilibrium H3Cur = H2Cur- + H+ and is attributed the acetylacetone type group. Formation of quinoid structures play an important role in the tautomeric forms of the curcumin in aqueous media, which makes the experimental values differ from the theoretically calculated ones, depending on the conditions adopted in the study.

  11. Aqueous Phase Photo-Oxidation of Succinic Acid: Changes in Hygroscopic Properties and Reaction Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, P. K.; Ninokawa, A.; Hofstra, J.; de Lijser, P.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have been identified as important factors in understanding climate change. The extent to which aerosols affect climate is determined, in part, by hygroscopic properties which can change as a result of atmospheric processing. Dicarboxylic acids, components of atmospheric aerosol, have a wide range of hygroscopic properties and can undergo oxidation and photolysis reactions in the atmosphere. In this study, the hygroscopic properties of succinic acid aerosol, a non-hygroscopic four carbon dicarboxylic acid, were measured with a humidified tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) and compared to reaction products resulting from the aqueous phase photo-oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide and succinic acid. Reaction products were determined and quantified using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as a function of hydrogen peroxide:succinic acid concentration ratio and photolysis time. Although reaction products include larger non-hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. adipic acid) and smaller hygroscopic dicarboxylic acids (e.g. malonic and oxalic acids), comparison of hygroscopic growth curves to Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) predictions suggests that the hygroscopic properties of many of the product mixtures are largely independent of the hygroscopicity of the individual components. This study provides a framework for future investigations to fully understand and predict the role of chemical reactions in altering atmospheric conditions that affect climate.

  12. Field and Laboratory Studies of Reactions between Atmospheric Water Soluble Organic Acids and Inorganic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Sellon, Rachel E.; Shilling, John E.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2013-06-25

    Atmospheric inorganic particles undergo complex heterogeneous reactions that change their physicochemical properties. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids [1-2]. Recently, we showed that NaCl can react with water soluble organic acids (WSOA) and release gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) resulting in formation of organic salts [3]. A similar mechanism is also applicable to mixed WSOA/nitrate particles where multi-phase reactions are driven by the volatility of nitric acid. Furthermore, secondary organic material, which is a complex mixture of carboxylic acids, exhibits the same reactivity towards chlorides and nitrates. Here, we present a systematic study of reactions between atmospheric relevant WSOA, SOM, and inorganic salts including NaCl, NaNO3, and Ca(NO3)2 using complementary micro-spectroscopy analysis.

  13. [Experimental and kinetic modeling of acid/base and redox reactions over oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The research has involved the characterization of catalyst acidity, [sup 2]D NMR studies of Bronsted acid sites, and kinetic, calorimetric, and spectroscopic studies of methylamine synthesis and related reactions over acid catalysts. Approach of this work was to explore quantitative correlations between factors that control the generation, type, strength, and catalytic properties of acid sites on zeolite catalysts. Microcalorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, and NMR spectroscopy have provided information about the nature and strength of acid sites in zeolites. This was vital in understanding the catalytic cycles involved in methylamine synthesis and related reactions over zeolite catalysts.

  14. Process for chemical reaction of amino acids and amides yielding selective conversion products

    DOEpatents

    Holladay, Jonathan E.

    2006-05-23

    The invention relates to processes for converting amino acids and amides to desirable conversion products including pyrrolidines, pyrrolidinones, and other N-substituted products. L-glutamic acid and L-pyroglutamic acid provide general reaction pathways to numerous and valuable selective conversion products with varied potential industrial uses.

  15. Predicting protein decomposition: the case of aspartic-acid racemization kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, M J; Waite, E R; van Duin, A C

    1999-01-01

    The increase in proportion of the non-biological (D-) isomer of aspartic acid (Asp) relative to the L-isomer has been widely used in archaeology and geochemistry as a tool for dating. the method has proved controversial, particularly when used for bones. The non-linear kinetics of Asp racemization have prompted a number of suggestions as to the underlying mechanism(s) and have led to the use of mathematical transformations which linearize the increase in D-Asp with respect to time. Using one example, a suggestion that the initial rapid phase of Asp racemization is due to a contribution from asparagine (Asn), we demonstrate how a simple model of the degradation and racemization of Asn can be used to predict the observed kinetics. A more complex model of peptide bound Asx (Asn + Asp) racemization, which occurs via the formation of a cyclic succinimide (Asu), can be used to correctly predict Asx racemization kinetics in proteins at high temperatures (95-140 degrees C). The model fails to predict racemization kinetics in dentine collagen at 37 degrees C. The reason for this is that Asu formation is highly conformation dependent and is predicted to occur extremely slowly in triple helical collagen. As conformation strongly influences the rate of Asu formation and hence Asx racemization, the use of extrapolation from high temperatures to estimate racemization kinetics of Asx in proteins below their denaturation temperature is called into question. In the case of archaeological bone, we argue that the D:L ratio of Asx reflects the proportion of non-helical to helical collagen, overlain by the effects of leaching of more soluble (and conformationally unconstrained) peptides. Thus, racemization kinetics in bone are potentially unpredictable, and the proposed use of Asx racemization to estimate the extent of DNA depurination in archaeological bones is challenged. PMID:10091247

  16. Uptake of Hypobromous Acid (HOBr) by Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions: Low-Temperature Solubility and Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Ashbourn, Samatha F. M.; Rammer, Thomas A.; Golden, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species linking inorganic bromine to the chlorine and odd hydrogen chemical families. We have measured the solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosol composition. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, with an effective Henry's law coefficient, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol/L/atm. H* is inversely dependent on temperature, with Delta H = -46.2 kJ/mol and Delta S = -106.2 J/mol/K for 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4 solutions. Our study includes temperatures which overlap both previous measurements of HOBr solubility. For uptake into aqueous 45 wt% H2SO4, the solubility can be described by log H* = 3665/T - 10.63. For 55 - 70 wt% H2SO4, log H* = 2412/T - 5.55. At temperatures colder than approx. 213 K, the solubility of HOBr in 45 wt% H2SO4 is noticeably larger than in 70 wt% H2SO4. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols should contain equilibrium concentrations of HOBr which equal or exceed those of HBr. Our measurements indicate chemical reaction of HOBr upon uptake into aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases followed by evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2, particularly at 70 wt% H2SO4.

  17. The effects of phytic acid on the Maillard reaction and the formation of acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Zhou, Yamin; Ma, Jimei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Hong

    2013-11-01

    Phytic acid, myo-inositol hexaphosphoric acid, exists in substantial (1-5%) amounts in edible plant seeds. In this study the effects of phytic acid on the Maillard reaction and the formation of acrylamide were investigated. Both phytic acid and phosphate enhanced browning in glucose/β-alanine system, but phytic acid was less effective than phosphate. Higher pH favoured the catalytic activities for both of them. The influence of the types of sugar and amino acid on the reaction was also examined. Browning was suppressed by the addition of calcium and magnesium ions, but an additive effect was observed for ferrous ions and phytic acid in glucose/β-alanine solution at pH 8.0. Both phytic acid and phosphate promoted the polymerisation of the reaction intermediates. The kinetics of Maillard reaction was first-ordered reaction in the presence of phytic acid. Phytic acid was less effective than phosphate in the formation of acrylamide. When potato slices were treated with sodium phytate and calcium chloride successively, the formation of acrylamide was greatly suppressed.

  18. Investigating hydrogel dosimeter decomposition by chemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The chemical oxidative decomposition of leucocrystal violet micelle hydrogel dosimeters was investigated using the reaction of ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide or sodium bicarbonate with hydrogen peroxide. The second reaction is more effective at dye decomposition in gelatin hydrogels. Additional chemical analysis is required to determine the decomposition products.

  19. Spectrophotometric method for determination and kinetics of amino acids through their reaction with syringaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medien, H. A. A.

    1998-02-01

    A spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of amino acids. The method is based on the reaction between amino acids and syringaldehyde at pH 9.0, by which a color is developed with maximum absorption at 420 nm in aqueous methyl alcohol. The absorption of the product obeys Beer's law within the concentration range of 0.025-0.5 mM of original amino acid. The kinetics of the reaction follows overall second order kinetics, first order in each of the reactants. The rates of the reaction were investigated as a function of pH of the reaction medium and structure of the amino compounds. Logarithms of the second-order rate constants increased with amino acid anion concentration as the pH was increased. The mechanisms of the reaction have been discussed.

  20. Actual-Waste Tests of Enhanced Chemical Cleaning for Retrieval of SRS HLW Sludge Tank Heels and Decomposition of Oxalic Acid - 12256

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Christopher J.; King, William D.; Ketusky, Edward T.

    2012-07-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge. During ECC actual waste testing, the introduction of ozone was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels. This testing did not identify physical or chemical changes in the ECC product sludge that would impact downstream processing. The results from these tests confirm observations made by AREVA NP during larger scale testing with waste simulants. This testing, however, had a decreased utilization of ozone, requiring approximately 5 moles of ozone per mole of oxalate decomposed. Decomposition of oxalates in sludge dissolved in 2 wt% OA to levels near 100 ppm oxalate using ECC process conditions required 8 to 12.5 hours without the aid of UV light and 4.5 to 8 hours with the aid of UV light. The pH and ORP were tracked during decomposition testing. Sludge components were tracked during OA decomposition, showing that most components have the highest soluble levels in the initial dissolved sludge and early decomposition samples and exhibit lower soluble levels as OA decomposition progresses. The Deposition Tank storage conditions that included pH adjustment to approximately 1 M free hydroxide tended to bring the soluble concentrations in the ECC product to nearly the same level for each test regardless of storage time, storage temperature, and contact with other tank sludge material. (authors)

  1. Conversion of waste cellulose to ethanol. Phase 2: Reaction kinetics with phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, M. B.; Isbell, R. E.

    1982-05-01

    Waste cellulosic material can be hydrolyzed in dilute acid solution to produce fermentable sugars which can then be converted into ethanol. A laboratory investigation was made of the feasibility of using phosphoric acid as the hydrolysis catalyst. The hydrolysis reaction with phosphoric acid solutions was compared with the reaction employing the more conventional dilute sulfuric acid catalyst. The purpose of this research was to examine the hydrolysis step in a proposed process for the conversion of cellulose (from wood, newspapers, municipal solid waste, or other sources) into ethanol - by which a potentially valuable co-product, DICAL (dicalcium phosphate), might be made and sold with or without the lignin content as a fertilizer. The pertinent reaction kinetics for the acid catalyzed production of glucose from cellulose consists of consecutive, pseudo-first order reactions.

  2. Carbocations as Lewis acid catalysts in Diels-Alder and Michael addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Bah, Juho; Franzén, Johan

    2014-01-20

    In general, Lewis acid catalysts are metal-based compounds that owe their reactivity to a low-lying empty orbital. However, one potential Lewis acid that has received negligible attention as a catalyst is the carbocation. We have demonstrated the potential of the carbocation as a highly powerful Lewis acid catalyst for organic reactions. The stable and easily available triphenylmethyl (trityl) cation was found to be a highly efficient catalyst for the Diels-Alder reaction for a range of substrates. Catalyst loadings as low as 500 ppm, excellent yields, and good endo/exo selectivities were achieved. Furthermore, by changing the electronic properties of the substituents on the tritylium ion, the Lewis acidity of the catalyst could be tuned to control the outcome of the reaction. The ability of this carbocation as a Lewis acid catalyst was also further extended to the Michael reaction.

  3. Decomposition of hexamethyldisilane on a hot tungsten filament and gas-phase reactions in a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition reactor.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yujun; Li, Xinmao; Tong, Ling; Toukabri, Rim; Eustergerling, Brett

    2008-05-14

    To study the effect of an Si-Si bond on gas-phase reaction chemistry in the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) process with a single source alkylsilane molecule, soft ionization with a vacuum ultraviolet wavelength of 118 nm was used with time-of-flight mass spectrometry to examine the products from the primary decomposition of hexamethyldisilane (HMDS) on a heated tungsten (W) filament and from secondary gas-phase reactions in a HWCVD reactor. It is found that both Si-Si and Si-C bonds break when HMDS decomposes on the W filament. The dominance of the breakage of Si-Si over Si-C bond has been demonstrated. In the reactor, the abstraction of methyl and H atom, respectively, from the abundant HMDS molecules by the dominant primary trimethylsilyl radicals produces tetramethylsilane (TMS) and trimethylsilane (TriMS). Along with TMS and TriMS, various other alkyl-substituted silanes (m/z = 160, 204, 262) and silyl-substituted alkanes (m/z = 218, 276, 290) are also formed from radical combination reactions. With HMDS, an increasing number of Si-Si bonds are found in the gas-phase reaction products aside from the Si-C bond which has been shown to be the major bond connection in the products when TMS is used in the same reactor. Three methyl-substituted 1,3-disilacyclobutane species (m/z = 116, 130, 144) are present in the reactor with HMDS, suggesting a more active involvement from the reactive silene intermediates.

  4. Asymmetric Lewis acid organocatalysis of the Diels-Alder reaction by a silylated C-H acid.

    PubMed

    Gatzenmeier, Tim; van Gemmeren, Manuel; Xie, Youwei; Höfler, Denis; Leutzsch, Markus; List, Benjamin

    2016-02-26

    Silylium ion equivalents have shown promise as Lewis acid catalysts for a range of important C-C bond-forming reactions. Here we describe chiral C-H acids that upon in situ silylation, generate silylium-carbanion pairs, which are extremely active Lewis acid catalysts for enantioselective Diels-Alder reactions of cinnamates with cyclopentadiene. Enantiomeric ratios of up to 97:3 and diastereomeric ratios of more than 20:1 are observed across a diverse set of substitution patterns with 1 mole percent (mol %) of C-H acid catalyst and 10 mol % of a silylating reagent. The results show promise for broad applications of such C-H acid-derived silylium ion equivalents in asymmetric Lewis acid catalysis.

  5. The reaction of selenium (IV) with ascorbic acid: its relevance in aqueous and soil systems.

    PubMed

    Pettine, Maurizio; Gennari, Francesca; Campanella, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Abiotic processes able to reduce oxidized Se species may have a strong influence on the environmental behavior of selenium since Se toxicity, bioavailability and mobility follow the order Se(-II)acid, which is exudated from plant roots, aquatic macrophytes and phytoplankton and also derives from decomposition of organic matter (e.g. litter, dead roots, algal cells), is present either in soil solution or in the water phase and may interact with Se affecting its speciation and environmental behavior. The rates of the reduction of Se(IV) by ascorbic acid (C(6)H(8)O(6)=H(2)A) were measured in NaCl and NaClO(4) solutions with 1 μM Se(IV) and 100-1000 μM H(2)A as a function of pH, temperature and ionic strength and in the presence of possible interfering metals. The rates of the reaction decreased abruptly with increasing of pH in the range 2-5.5, while slowly at lower pH. The rates showed a small influence of temperature in the range 10-40°C and were independent of ionic strength from 0.01 M to 1M. The values of the second-order rate constant (k) calculated from the values of k(1)/[H(2)A](T) can be determined from the equation: log k = -0.92 × pH - 3368.4/T + 0.24 × I(0.5) + 16.94 for the pH range 2-5.5 (σ=±0.23), from 10 to 40 °C and from 0.01 to 1M ionic strength. The effect of pH and ionic strength on the reaction suggests that the second-order rate expression over the entire pH range investigated can be determined from (H(2)A=C(6)H(8)O(6); HA=C(6)H(7)O(6)(-); H(2)B=H(2)SeO(3); HB=HSeO(3)(-)) [formula, see text] where K(HA), K(A), K(HB), K(B) are the dissociation constants of selenous acid and ascorbic acid, k(H2A-H2B)=5577±78 and k(H2A-HB)=812±102 M(-1)h(-1). The presence of Cu(II), which is a strong catalyzer for the oxidation of H(2)A, decreases the rates of Se(IV) reduction by H(2)A in oxygenated waters. Mn(IV) causes an oxidation of Se(IV) to Se(VI) at high Mn(IV)/H(2)A molar ratios (>0.3), while does not affect

  6. In situ spectroscopic studies on vapor phase catalytic decomposition of dimethyl oxalate.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shweta; Tharpa, Kalsang; Akuri, Satyanarayana Reddy; K, Rakesh; Kumar, Ajay; Deshpande, Raj; Nair, Sreejit A

    2017-03-15

    Dimethyl Oxalate (DMO) has recently gained prominence as a valuable intermediate for the production of compounds of commercial importance. The stability of DMO is poor and hence this can result in the decomposition of DMO under reaction conditions. The mechanism of DMO decomposition is however not reported and more so on catalytic surfaces. Insights into the mechanism of decomposition would help in designing catalysts for its effective molecular transformation. It is well known that DMO is sensitive to moisture, which can also be a factor contributing to its decomposition. The present work reports the results of decomposition of DMO on various catalytic materials. The materials studied consist of acidic (γ-Al2O3), basic (MgO), weakly acidic (ZnAl2O4) and neutral surfaces such as α-Al2O3 and mesoporous precipitated SiO2. Infrared spectroscopy is used to identify the nature of adsorption of the molecule on the various surfaces. The spectroscopy study is done at a temperature of 200 °C, which is the onset of gas phase decomposition of DMO. The results indicate that the stability of DMO is lower than the corresponding acid, i.e. oxalic acid. It is also one of the products of decomposition. Spectroscopic data suggest that DMO decomposition is related to surface acidity and the extent of decomposition depends on the number of surface hydroxyl groups. Decomposition was also observed on α-Al2O3, which was attributed to the residual surface hydroxyl groups. DMO decomposition to oxalic acid was not observed on the basic surface (MgO).

  7. Resonance Regge poles and the state-to-state F + H2 reaction: QP decomposition, parametrized S matrix, and semiclassical complex angular momentum analysis of the angular scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. N. L.

    2013-03-01

    Three new contributions to the complex angular momentum (CAM) theory of differential cross sections (DCSs) for chemical reactions are reported. They exploit recent advances in the Padé reconstruction of a scattering (S) matrix in a region surrounding the {Renolimits} J axis, where J is the total angular momentum quantum variable, starting from the discrete values, J = 0, 1, 2, …. In particular, use is made of Padé continuations obtained by Sokolovski, Castillo, and Tully [Chem. Phys. Lett. 313, 225 (1999), 10.1016/S0009-2614(99)01016-7] for the S matrix of the benchmark F + H2(vi = 0, ji = 0, mi = 0) → FH(vf = 3, jf = 3, mf = 0) + H reaction. Here vi, ji, mi and vf, jf, mf are the initial and final vibrational, rotational, and helicity quantum numbers, respectively. The three contributions are: (1) A new exact decomposition of the partial wave (PW) S matrix is introduced, which is called the QP decomposition. The P part contains information on the Regge poles. The Q part is then constructed exactly by subtracting a rapidly oscillating phase and the PW P matrix from the input PW S matrix. After a simple modification, it is found that the corresponding scattering subamplitudes provide insight into the angular-scattering dynamics using simple partial wave series (PWS) computations. It is shown that the leading n = 0 Regge pole contributes to the small-angle scattering in the centre-of-mass frame. (2) The Q matrix part of the QP decomposition has simpler properties than the input S matrix. This fact is exploited to deduce a parametrized (analytic) formula for the PW S matrix in which all terms have a direct physical interpretation. This is a long sort-after goal in reaction dynamics, and in particular for the state-to-state F + H2 reaction. (3) The first definitive test is reported for the accuracy of a uniform semiclassical (asymptotic) CAM theory for a DCS based on the Watson transformation. The parametrized S matrix obtained in contribution (2) is used in both

  8. On the Hybrid of Fourier Transform and Adomian Decomposition Method for the Solution of Nonlinear Cauchy Problems of the Reaction-Diffusion Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nourazar, Salman; Nazari-Golshan, Akbar; Yıldırım, Ahmet; Nourazar, Maryam

    2012-07-01

    The physical science importance of the Cauchy problem of the reaction-diffusion equation appears in the modelling of a wide variety of nonlinear systems in physics, chemistry, ecology, biology, and engineering. A hybrid of Fourier transform and Adomian decomposition method (FTADM) is developed for solving the nonlinear non-homogeneous partial differential equations of the Cauchy problem of reaction-diffusion. The results of the FTADM and the ADM are compared with the exact solution. The comparison reveals that for the same components of the recursive sequences, the errors associated with the FTADM are much lesser than those of the ADM. We show that as time increases the results of the FTADM approaches 1 with only six recursive terms. This is in agreement with the physical property of the density-dependent nonlinear diffusion of the Cauchy problem which is also in agreement with the exact solution. The monotonic and very rapid convergence of the results of the FTADM towards the exact solution is shown to be much faster than that of the ADM

  9. 40 CFR 721.6477 - Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic anhydride. 721.6477 Section 721.6477... Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic... identified generically as alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols,...

  10. 40 CFR 721.6477 - Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic anhydride. 721.6477 Section 721.6477... Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic... identified generically as alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols,...

  11. 40 CFR 721.6477 - Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic anhydride. 721.6477 Section 721.6477... Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic... identified generically as alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols,...

  12. 40 CFR 721.6477 - Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic anhydride. 721.6477 Section 721.6477... Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic... identified generically as alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols,...

  13. 40 CFR 721.6477 - Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic anhydride. 721.6477 Section 721.6477... Alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols, reaction products with maleic... identified generically as alkyl polycarboxylic acids, esters with ethoxylated fatty alcohols,...

  14. Phosphoric acid impurities in phosphoric acid fuel cell electrolytes. 2: Effects on the oxygen reduction reaction at platinum electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Sugishima, Noboru; Hinatsu, J.T.; Foulkes, F.R. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry)

    1994-12-01

    The effects of phosphorus acid additions on the oxygen reduction reaction at platinum electrodes in concentrated phosphoric acid were studied. The oxygen reduction currents decreased, and the Tafel slopes became more negative upon the addition of small concentrations of phosphorus acid. In addition,the phosphorus acid oxidation current tended to complete with the oxygen reduction current. These effects became more pronounced at higher phosphorus acid concentrations and at higher temperatures. Upon the addition of phosphorus acid the number of electrons involved in the oxygen reduction reaction decreased from a value close to four to a value approaching two, suggesting promotion of a two-electron reduction to peroxide. Therefore, in studies of the electrochemical reduction of oxygen in hot concentrated phosphoric acid or in fuel cell systems using hot concentrated phosphoric acid as electrolyte, it is recommended that precautions be taken against the inadvertent formation of the phosphorus acid. The removal of phosphorus acid from concentrated phosphoric acid by repeated potential cycling at 100 mV/s between + 0.5 and +1.50 V (vs. dynamic hydrogen electrode) was demonstrated.

  15. Effective and site-specific phosphoramidation reaction for universally labeling nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Chih; Chen, Hsing-Yin; Ko, Ni Chien; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Wu, Min Hui; Wang, Li-Fang; Wang, Yun-Ming; Chang, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Eng-Chi; Wang, Tzu-Pin

    2014-03-15

    Here we report efficient and selective postsynthesis labeling strategies, based on an advanced phosphoramidation reaction, for nucleic acids of either synthetic or enzyme-catalyzed origin. The reactions provided phosphorimidazolide intermediates of DNA or RNA which, whether reacted in one pot (one-step) or purified (two-step), were directly or indirectly phosphoramidated with label molecules. The acquired fluorophore-labeled nucleic acids, prepared from the phosphoramidation reactions, demonstrated labeling efficacy by their F/N ratio values (number of fluorophores per molecule of nucleic acid) of 0.02-1.2 which are comparable or better than conventional postsynthesis fluorescent labeling methods for DNA and RNA. Yet, PCR and UV melting studies of the one-step phosphoramidation-prepared FITC-labeled DNA indicated that the reaction might facilitate nonspecific hybridization in nucleic acids. Intrinsic hybridization specificity of nucleic acids was, however, conserved in the two-step phosphoramidation reaction. The reaction of site-specific labeling nucleic acids at the 5'-end was supported by fluorescence quenching and UV melting studies of fluorophore-labeled DNA. The two-step phosphoramidation-based, effective, and site-specific labeling method has the potential to expedite critical research including visualization, quantification, structural determination, localization, and distribution of nucleic acids in vivo and in vitro.

  16. Microwave-assisted reaction of glycosylamine with aspartic acid.

    PubMed

    Real-Fernández, Feliciana; Nuti, Francesca; Bonache, M Angeles; Boccalini, Marco; Chimichi, Stefano; Chelli, Mario; Papini, Anna Maria

    2010-07-01

    The synthesis of N-protected glycosyl amino acids from amines has been investigated and it was found that, under microwave conditions, glycosylamines could be hydrolyzed leading to new products containing a glycosyl ester linkage. The efficiency of the microwave-induced glycosylation of aspartic acid was studied comparing the microwave activity between amide and ester bond formation. Different sugar moieties have been employed to demonstrate the simple and reproducible coupling methodology. New glycosyl ester compounds were further characterized by NMR spectroscopy.

  17. Development of a multichannel Fourier-transform spectrometer to measure weak chemiluminescence: Application to the emission of singlet-oxygen dimol in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide with gallic acid and K 3[Fe(CN) 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsukino, Kazuo; Satoh, Toshihiro; Ishii, Hiroshi; Nakata, Munetaka

    2008-05-01

    A Fourier-transform spectrometer equipped with a Savart-plate polarization interferometer was developed for observation of weak chemiluminescence and applied to a measurement of emission spectra in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide with gallic acid and K 3[Fe(CN) 6]. The band appearing at ˜580 nm in the chemiluminescence spectrum was assigned to the emission of singlet-oxygen dimol, the peak wavelength being shifted from that observed in the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with sodium hypochlorite, ˜633 nm. The band intensity was increased with the increasing concentration of K 3[Fe(CN) 6] up to ˜100 mM, and thereafter the peak wavelength was shifted from 580 to 700 nm with a decrease in the intensity.

  18. Potential Usage of Aqueous Alum for Decomposition of Chemical Warfare Agents. Part 2: Reactions with VX and QL

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    based precursor of VX, O-ethyl-O’-[(2-isopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonite (QL). Hydrolysis kinetics have been studied for a large number of CWAs...conducted on varying amounts of QL using only acid buffers. Experiments were conducted on QL at pH = 2, 3, and 4. Malathion and diazinon were treated with...soluble in base, and the resultant biphasic system can affect the kinetics . The alum treatment described above was so rapid that no evidence of QL was

  19. Cascade dearomatization of N-substituted tryptophols via Lewis acid-catalyzed Michael reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Wei; Dai, Li-Xin; You, Shu-Li

    2012-09-21

    Lewis acid-catalyzed cascade dearomatization of N-substituted tryptophols via Michael addition reaction was developed. The generality of the method has been demonstrated by the synthesis of versatile furoindoline derivatives with a quaternary carbon center in good yields.

  20. A Mini-Review on Solid Acid Catalysts for Esterification Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirsam, Rajkumar; Hansora, Dharmesh; Usmani, Ghayas A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents an overview of research pertaining to solid acid catalysts for esterification reactions. Prominence has been given to the literatures that have been appeared during the last two decades. A variety of reactions catalyzed by solid acid catalysts have been tabulated according to their broad classification; industrially important reactions have been outlined. Examples, where the use of various solid acid catalysts have led to an improvement in the selectivity of the desired products, have also been discussed. Various catalyzed esterification reactions using different approaches and previous kinetic studies have been reviewed. Types, preparation and synthesis of various solid acid catalysts have been reviewed and discussed. Suggestions have been summarized for their implementation in future work.

  1. Envisioning an enzymatic Diels-Alder reaction by in situ acid-base catalyzed diene generation.

    PubMed

    Linder, Mats; Johansson, Adam Johannes; Manta, Bianca; Olsson, Philip; Brinck, Tore

    2012-06-07

    We present and evaluate a new and potentially efficient route for enzyme-mediated Diels-Alder reactions, utilizing general acid-base catalysis. The viability of employing the active site of ketosteroid isomerase is demonstrated.

  2. Examination of Organic Reactions in UT/LS Aerosols: Temperature Dependence in Sulfuric Acid Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Michelsen, R. R.

    2004-12-01

    Sulfuric acid has been used for decades as an industrial catalyst for organic reactions, but its parallel role in atmospheric aerosols is relatively unexplored, despite identification of a wide array of organic compounds in particles. Several recent studies have demonstrated possible reactions in acidic particles, generally involving carbonyl groups (C=O) and leading to the formation of larger molecules. Reactions of oxygenated organic compounds in acidic solution are most often studied near room temperature, while the sulfate particles of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are significantly colder. Our studies of ethanal (acetaldehyde) suggest that reactivity in ~50 wt% H2SO4 solutions may be enhanced at lower temperatures, contrary to expectations. We will present temperature-dependent results of acid catalyzed condensation reactions, leading to formation of higher molecular weight products. Implications for aerosol composition and reactivity will be discussed.

  3. Kinetics of Acid Reactions: Making Sense of Associated Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kim Chwee Daniel; Treagust, David F.; Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Mocerino, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    In chemical kinetics, in addition to the concepts related to kinetics, stoichiometry, chemical equilibrium and the characteristics of the reactants are often involved when comparing the rates of different reactions, making such comparisons very challenging for students at all levels, as well as for pre-service science teachers. Consequently, four…

  4. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  6. 40 CFR 721.6181 - Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction product with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6181 Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde... as fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl...

  7. 40 CFR 721.6181 - Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction product with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6181 Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde... as fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10188 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine (generic). (a... generically as fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with 4-methyl-2-pentanone and aliphatic polyamine...

  11. 40 CFR 721.6181 - Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl ether...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acid, reaction product with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6181 Fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde... as fatty acid, reaction product with substituted oxirane, formaldehyde-phenol polymer glycidyl...

  12. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  13. Proton transfer reactions between nitric acid and acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde in the solid phase.

    PubMed

    Lasne, Jérôme; Laffon, Carine; Parent, Philippe

    2012-12-05

    The heterogeneous and homogeneous reactions of acetone, hydroxyacetone, acetaldehyde and benzaldehyde with solid nitric acid (HNO(3)) films have been studied with Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (RAIRS) under Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV) conditions in the 90-170 K temperature range. In the bulk or at the surface of the films, nitric acid transfers its proton to the carbonyl function of the organic molecules, producing protonated acetone-H(+), hydroxyacetone-H(+), acetaldehyde-H(+) and benzaldehyde-H(+), and nitrate anions NO(3)(-), a reaction not observed when nitric acid is previously hydrated [J. Lasne, C. Laffon and Ph. Parent, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 697]. This provides a molecular-scale description of the carbonyl protonation reaction in an acid medium, the first step of the acid-catalyzed condensation of carbonyl compounds, fuelling the growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) in the atmosphere.

  14. Multifunctional Co0.85Se/graphene hybrid nanosheets: controlled synthesis and enhanced performances for the oxygen reduction reaction and decomposition of hydrazine hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin-Fei; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Ultrathin nanosheets possess novel electronic structures and physical properties as compared with their corresponding bulk samples. However, the controlled synthesis of ultrathin monolayer nanosheets still remains a great challenge due to the lack of an intrinsic driving force for anisotropic growth of two-dimensional (2D) structures. Here we demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, the in situ synthesis of large-scale ultrathin single-crystalline Co0.85Se nanosheets on graphene oxide (GO) sheets, with a thickness of 3 nm. Owing to the synergetic chemical coupling effects between GO and Co0.85Se, the Co0.85Se/graphene hybrid nanosheets exhibit the highest catalytic performance among the available cobalt chalcogenide-based catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Moreover, Co0.85Se/graphene hybrid nanosheets can catalyze the decomposition of hydrazine hydrate rapidly, with 97% of hydrazine hydrate being degraded in 12 min and the degradation rate remaining constant over 10 consecutive cycles, thus having great potential as long-term catalysts in wastewater treatment.Ultrathin nanosheets possess novel electronic structures and physical properties as compared with their corresponding bulk samples. However, the controlled synthesis of ultrathin monolayer nanosheets still remains a great challenge due to the lack of an intrinsic driving force for anisotropic growth of two-dimensional (2D) structures. Here we demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, the in situ synthesis of large-scale ultrathin single-crystalline Co0.85Se nanosheets on graphene oxide (GO) sheets, with a thickness of 3 nm. Owing to the synergetic chemical coupling effects between GO and Co0.85Se, the Co0.85Se/graphene hybrid nanosheets exhibit the highest catalytic performance among the available cobalt chalcogenide-based catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Moreover, Co0.85Se/graphene hybrid nanosheets can catalyze the decomposition of hydrazine hydrate rapidly

  15. Direct studies of the thermal decomposition of N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} and of the reaction of CO with O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.W.; Patterson, P.M.; Klemm, R.B.

    1992-02-01

    The thermal decompositions of N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} was investigated by monitoring the kinetics of formation of O({sup 3}P) atoms in the reflected shock regime using atomic resonance absorption spectrophotometry (A.R.A.S.). The temperature range was 1805K to 2379K for N{sub 2}O and 2332K to 2869K for CO{sub 2}. Total densities were 3--4 {times} 10{sup 18} molecules cm{sup {minus}3} and hence the reported rate constants are at or near the low pressure limit for unimolecular decomposition. The results were expressed by the following Arrhenius equations: CO{sub 2} k(T) = (1.63 {plus_minus} 1.96) {times} 10{sup {minus}8} exp({minus}122565 {plus_minus} 5183/RT) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} N{sub 2}O k(T) = (6.02 {plus_minus} 2.81) {times} 10{sup 10} exp({minus}53397 {plus_minus} 1865/RT) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Uncertainties in the Arrhenius expressions are given at the one standard deviation level and the mean deviations of the experimental data from the respective expression are {plus_minus} 18.6% and {plus_minus} 30.7%. Corresponding values for the reverse reaction, k{sub rev}(CO{sub 2}) were computed from the expression k{sub for}/k{sub rev} = K{sub c}. The value obtained for k{sub rev}(CO{sub 2}) was (2.18 {plus_minus} 0.83) {times} 10{sup {minus}34} cm{sup 6} molecule{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}, independent of temperature from 2332K to 2869K. Preliminary results are also reported for the direct determination of the rate constant for the reaction, CO + O{sub 2} {yields} CO{sub 2} + O, from measurements of the initial rate of formation of O({sup 3}P) atoms. 35 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Direct studies of the thermal decomposition of N sub 2 O and CO sub 2 and of the reaction of CO with O sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.W.; Patterson, P.M.; Klemm, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal decompositions of N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} was investigated by monitoring the kinetics of formation of O({sup 3}P) atoms in the reflected shock regime using atomic resonance absorption spectrophotometry (A.R.A.S.). The temperature range was 1805K to 2379K for N{sub 2}O and 2332K to 2869K for CO{sub 2}. Total densities were 3--4 {times} 10{sup 18} molecules cm{sup {minus}3} and hence the reported rate constants are at or near the low pressure limit for unimolecular decomposition. The results were expressed by the following Arrhenius equations: CO{sub 2} k(T) = (1.63 {plus minus} 1.96) {times} 10{sup {minus}8} exp({minus}122565 {plus minus} 5183/RT) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} N{sub 2}O k(T) = (6.02 {plus minus} 2.81) {times} 10{sup 10} exp({minus}53397 {plus minus} 1865/RT) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}. Uncertainties in the Arrhenius expressions are given at the one standard deviation level and the mean deviations of the experimental data from the respective expression are {plus minus} 18.6% and {plus minus} 30.7%. Corresponding values for the reverse reaction, k{sub rev}(CO{sub 2}) were computed from the expression k{sub for}/k{sub rev} = K{sub c}. The value obtained for k{sub rev}(CO{sub 2}) was (2.18 {plus minus} 0.83) {times} 10{sup {minus}34} cm{sup 6} molecule{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}, independent of temperature from 2332K to 2869K. Preliminary results are also reported for the direct determination of the rate constant for the reaction, CO + O{sub 2} {yields} CO{sub 2} + O, from measurements of the initial rate of formation of O({sup 3}P) atoms. 35 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  17. Atmospheric chemistry of hydrazoic acid (HN3): UV absorption spectrum, HO reaction rate, and reactions of the N3 radical.

    PubMed

    Orlando, John J; Tyndall, Geoffrey S; Betterton, Eric A; Lowry, Joe; Stegall, Steve T

    2005-03-15

    Processes related to the tropospheric lifetime and fate of hydrazoic acid, HN3, have been studied. The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HN3 is shown to possess a maximum near 262 nm with a tail extending to at least 360 nm. The photolysis quantum yield for HN3 is shown to be approximately 1 at 351 nm. Using the measured spectrum and assuming unity quantum yield throughout the actinic region, a diurnally averaged photolysis lifetime near the earth's surface of 2-3 days is estimated. Using a relative rate method, the rate coefficient for reaction of HO with HN3 was found to be (3.9 +/-0.8) x 10(-12) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1), substantially larger than the only previous measurement. The atmospheric HN3 lifetime with respect to HO oxidation is thus about 2-3 days, assuming a diurnally averaged [HO] of 10(6) molecule cm(-3). Reactions of N3, the product of the reaction of HO with HN3, were studied in an environmental chamber using an FTIR spectrometer for end-product analysis. The N3 radical reacts efficiently with NO, producing N2O with 100% yield. Reaction of N3 with NO2 appears to generate both NO and N2O, although the rate coefficient for this reaction is slower than that for reaction with NO. No evidence for reaction of N3 with CO was observed, in contrast to previous literature data. Reaction of N3 with O2 was found to be extremely slow, k < 6 x 10(-20) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1), although this upper limit does not necessarily rule out its occurrence in the atmosphere. Finally, the rate coefficient for reaction of Cl with HN3 was measured using a relative rate method, k = (1.0+/-0.2) x 10(-12) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1).

  18. CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PRODUCTS FROM THE REACTION OF DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID WITH HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV) with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is of biological significance and may be implicated in the overall toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenic. The course of the reaction in aqueous phase was monitored and an initial product, dimethylthioarsin...

  19. Acid-Base Chemistry According to Robert Boyle: Chemical Reactions in Words as well as Symbols

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodney, David E.

    2006-01-01

    Examples of acid-base reactions from Robert Boyle's "The Sceptical Chemist" are used to illustrate the rich information content of chemical equations. Boyle required lengthy passages of florid language to describe the same reaction that can be done quite simply with a chemical equation. Reading or hearing the words, however, enriches the student's…

  20. The temperature dependence of the rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurylo, M. J.; Cornett, K. D.; Murphy, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with nitric acid in the 225-443 K temperature range has been measured by means of the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique. Above 300 K, the rate constant levels off in a way that can only be explained by the occurrence of two reaction channels, of which one, operative at low temperatures, proceeds through the formation of an adduct intermediate. The implications of these rate constant values for stratospheric reaction constants is discussed.

  1. Simultaneous determination of free amino acid content in tea infusions by using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection coupled with alternating penalty trilinear decomposition algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fuyuan; Tan, Chao; Zhao, Aiping; Li, Menglong

    2011-10-26

    In this paper, a novel application of alternating penalty trilinear decomposition (APTLD) for high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) has been developed to simultaneously determine the contents of free amino acids in tea. Although the spectra of amino acid derivatives were similar and a large number of water-soluble compounds are coextracted, APTLD could predict the accurate concentrations together with reasonable resolution of chromatographic and spectral profiles for the amino acids of interest owing to its "second-order advantage". An additional advantage of the proposed method is lower cost than traditional methods. The results indicate that it is an attractive alternative strategy for the routine resolution and quantification of amino acids in the presence of unknown interferences or when complete separation is not easily achieved.

  2. Lewis acid-Lewis acid heterobimetallic cooperative catalysis: mechanistic studies and application in enantioselective aza-Michael reaction.

    PubMed

    Yamagiwa, Noriyuki; Qin, Hongbo; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2005-09-28

    The full details of a catalytic asymmetric aza-Michael reaction of methoxylamine promoted by rare earth-alkali metal heterobimetallic complexes are described, demonstrating the effectiveness of Lewis acid-Lewis acid cooperative catalysis. First, enones were used as substrates, and the 1,4-adducts were obtained in good yield (57-98%) and high ee (81-96%). Catalyst loading was successfully reduced to 0.3-3 mol % with enones. To broaden the substrate scope of the reaction to carboxylic acid derivatives, alpha,beta-unsaturated N-acylpyrroles were used as monodentate, carboxylic acid derivatives. With beta-alkyl-substituted N-acylpyrroles, the reaction proceeded smoothly and the products were obtained in high yield and good ee. Transformation of the 1,4-adducts from enones and alpha,beta-unsaturated N-acylpyrroles afforded corresponding chiral aziridines and beta-amino acids. Detailed mechanistic studies, including kinetics, NMR analysis, nonlinear effects, and rare earth metal effects, are also described. The Lewis acid-Lewis acid cooperative mechanism, including the substrate coordination mode, is discussed in detail.

  3. Chemical Reaction between Boric Acid and Phosphine Indicates Boric Acid as an Antidote for Aluminium Phosphide Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Motahareh; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed F.; Shetab-Boushehri, Seyed V.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Aluminium phosphide (AlP) is a fumigant pesticide which protects stored grains from insects and rodents. When it comes into contact with moisture, AlP releases phosphine (PH3), a highly toxic gas. No efficient antidote has been found for AlP poisoning so far and most people who are poisoned do not survive. Boric acid is a Lewis acid with an empty p orbital which accepts electrons. This study aimed to investigate the neutralisation of PH3 gas with boric acid. Methods: This study was carried out at the Baharlou Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, between December 2013 and February 2014. The volume of released gas, rate of gas evolution and changes in pH were measured during reactions of AlP tablets with water, acidified water, saturated boric acid solution, acidified saturated boric acid solution, activated charcoal and acidified activated charcoal. Infrared spectroscopy was used to study the resulting probable adduct between PH3 and boric acid. Results: Activated charcoal significantly reduced the volume of released gas (P <0.01). Although boric acid did not significantly reduce the volume of released gas, it significantly reduced the rate of gas evolution (P <0.01). A gaseous adduct was formed in the reaction between pure AlP and boric acid. Conclusion: These findings indicate that boric acid may be an efficient and non-toxic antidote for PH3 poisoning. PMID:27606109

  4. Thermodynamics and Reaction Mechanisms of Decomposition of the Simplest Protonated Tripeptide, Triglycine: A Guided Ion Beam and Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mookherjee, Abhigya; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Armentrout, P. B.

    2017-02-01

    We present a thorough characterization of fragmentations observed in threshold collision-induced dissociation (TCID) experiments of protonated triglycine (H+GGG) with Xe using a guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometer (GIBMS). Kinetic energy-dependent cross-sections for 10 ionic products are observed and analyzed to provide 0 K barriers for six primary products: [b2]+, [y1 + 2H]+, [b3]+, CO loss, [y2 + 2H]+, and [a1]+; three secondary products: [a2]+, [a3]+, and [y2 + 2H - CO]+; and two tertiary products: high energy [y1 + 2H]+ and [a2 - CO]+ after accounting for multiple ion-molecule collisions, internal energy of reactant ions, unimolecular decay rates, competition between channels, and sequential dissociations. Relaxed potential energy surface scans performed at the B3LYP-D3/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory are used to identify transition states (TSs) and intermediates of the six primary and one secondary products. Geometry optimizations and single point energy calculations were performed at several levels of theory. These theoretical energies are compared with experimental energies and are found to give reasonably good agreement, in particular for the M06-2X level of theory. This good agreement between experiment and theory validates the reaction mechanisms explored computationally here and elsewhere and allows identification of the product structures formed at threshold energies. The present work presents the first measurement of absolute experimental threshold energies of important sequence ions and non-sequence ions: [y1 + 2H]+, [b3]+, CO loss, [a1]+, and [a3]+, and refines those for [b2]+ and [y2 + 2H]+ previously measured.

  5. Brønsted acid catalyzed asymmetric aldol reaction: a complementary approach to enamine catalysis.

    PubMed

    Pousse, Guillaume; Le Cavelier, Fabien; Humphreys, Luke; Rouden, Jacques; Blanchet, Jérôme

    2010-08-20

    A syn-enantioselective aldol reaction has been developed using Brønsted acid catalysis based on H(8)-BINOL-derived phosphoric acids. This method affords an efficient synthesis of various beta-hydroxy ketones, some of which could not be synthesized using enamine organocatalysis.

  6. Reactions in glass ionomer cements: V. Effect of incorporating tartaric acid in the cement liquid.

    PubMed

    Crisp, S; Wilson, A D

    1976-01-01

    A description is give of the effect on the ASPA cement reaction of tartaric acid incorporated in the cement liquid. Tartaric acid acts as an accelerator that aids in the extraction of ions from the aluminosilicate glass and facilitates their binding to the polyanion chains. Postgelation hardening is significantly increased. Working time is unaffected possibly because cations are initially present as complexes.

  7. A Comparative Study of French and Turkish Students' Ideas on Acid-Base Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cokelez, Aytekin

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this comparative study was to determine the knowledge that French and Turkish upper secondary-school students (grades 11 and 12) acquire on the concept of acid-base reactions. Following an examination of the relevant curricula and textbooks in the two countries, 528 students answered six written questions about the acid-base concept.…

  8. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under...

  9. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under...

  11. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9220 - Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (generic name). 721.9220 Section 721... Reaction products of secondary alkyl amines with a substituted benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid... benzenesulfonic acid and sulfuric acid (PMNs P-89-703, P-89-755, and P-89-756) are subject to reporting under...

  13. Enantioconvergent Nucleophilic Substitution Reaction of Racemic Alkyne-Dicobalt Complex (Nicholas Reaction) Catalyzed by Chiral Brønsted Acid.

    PubMed

    Terada, Masahiro; Ota, Yusuke; Li, Feng; Toda, Yasunori; Kondoh, Azusa

    2016-08-31

    Catalytic enantioselective syntheses enable a practical approach to enantioenriched molecules. While most of these syntheses have been accomplished by reaction at the prochiral sp(2)-hybridized carbon atom, little attention has been paid to enantioselective nucleophilic substitution at the sp(3)-hybridized carbon atom. In particular, substitution at the chiral sp(3)-hybridized carbon atom of racemic electrophiles has been rarely exploited. To establish an unprecedented enantioselective substitution reaction of racemic electrophiles, enantioconvergent Nicholas reaction of an alkyne-dicobalt complex derived from racemic propargylic alcohol was developed using a chiral phosphoric acid catalyst. In the present enantioconvergent process, both enantiomers of the racemic alcohol were transformed efficiently to a variety of thioethers with high enantioselectivity. The key to achieving success is dynamic kinetic asymmetric transformation (DYKAT) of enantiomeric cationic intermediates generated via dehydroxylation of the starting racemic alcohol under the influence of the chiral phosphoric acid catalyst. The present fascinating DYKAT involves the efficient racemization of these enantiomeric intermediates and effective resolution of these enantiomers through utilization of the chiral conjugate base of the phosphoric acid.

  14. Reaction mechanisms of riboflavin triplet state with nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Weizhen; Lu, Changyuan; Du, Fuqiang; Shao, Zhiyong; Han, Zhenhui; Tu, Tiecheng; Yao, Side; Lin, Nianyun

    2006-04-01

    ESR and laser flash photolysis studies have determined a reasonable order of reactivity of nucleotides with triplet riboflavin (3Rb*) for the first time. ESR detection of triplet state reactivity of Rb with nucleoside, polynucleotide and DNA has been obtained simultaneously. In addition, ESR spin elimination measurement of the reactivity of 3Rb* with nucleotides in good accord with laser flash photolysis determination of the corresponding rate constants offers a simple and reliable method to detect the reactivities of nucleic acids and its components with photoexcited flavins. Kinetic, ESR and thermodynamic studies have demonstrated that Rb should be a strong endogenous photosensitizer capable of oxidizing all nucleic acid bases, and preferentially two purine nucleotides with high rate constants.

  15. Heterogeneous kinetics, products, and mechanisms of ferulic acid particles in the reaction with NO3 radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changgeng; Zhang, Peng; Wen, Xiaoying; Wu, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Methoxyphenols, as an important component of wood burning, are produced by lignin pyrolysis and considered to be the potential tracers for wood smoke emissions. In this work, the heterogeneous reaction between ferulic acid particles and NO3 radicals was investigated. Six products including oxalic acid, 4-vinylguaiacol, vanillin, 5-nitrovanillin, 5-nitroferulic acid, and caffeic acid were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, the reaction mechanisms were proposed and the main pathways were NO3 electrophilic addition to olefin and the meta-position to the hydroxyl group. The uptake coefficient of NO3 radicals on ferulic acid particles was 0.17 ± 0.02 and the effective rate constant under experimental conditions was (1.71 ± 0.08) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The results indicate that ferulic acid degradation by NO3 can be an important sink at night.

  16. [Study of Reaction Dynamics between Bovine Serum Albumin and Folic Acid by Stopped-Flow/Fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Ye, San-xian; Luo, Yun-jing; Qiao, Shu-liang; Li, Li; Liu, Cai-hong; Shi, Jian-long; An, Xue-jing

    2016-01-01

    As a kind of coenzyme of one-carbon enzymes in vivo, folic acid belongs to B vitamins, which can interact with other vitamins and has great significance for converting among amino acids, dividing growth of cells and protein synthesis reactions. Half-life, concentration and reaction rate constant of drugs are important parameters in pharmacokinetic study. In this paper, by utilizing fluorescence spectrophotometer and stopped-flow spectrum analyzer, reaction kinetic parameters between bovine serum albumin(BSA) and folic acid in a bionic system have been investigated, which provide references for parameters of drug metabolism related to folic acid. By using Stern-Volmer equation dealing with fluorescence quenching experiments data, we concluded that under 25, 30, and 37 degrees C, the static quenching constants of folic acid to intrinsic fluorescence from bovine serum albumin were 2.455 x 10(10), 4.900 x 10(10) and 6.427 x 10(10) L x mol(-1) x s(-1) respectively; The results of kinetic reaction rate have shown that the reaction rate of BSA and folic acid are greater than 100 mol x L(-1) x s(-1) at different temperatures, pH and buffering media, illustrating that the quenching mechanism between BSA and folic acid is to form composite static quenching process. Reaction concentration of bovine serum albumin and its initial concentration were equal to the secondary reaction formula, and the correlation coefficient was 0.998 7, while the half-life (t1/2) was 0.059 s at physiological temperature. With the increase of folic acid concentration, the apparent rate constant of this reaction had a linear increasing trend, the BSA fluorescence quenching rate constant catalyzed by folic acid was 3.174 x 10(5) mol x L(-1) x s(-1). Furthermore, with different buffer, the apparent rate constant and reaction rate constant of BSA interacting with folic acid were detected to explore the influence on the reaction under physiological medium, which is of great significance to determine the

  17. On the reaction of iron oxides and oxyhydroxides with tannic and phosphoric acid and their mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán, J. J.; Novegil, F. J.; García, K. E.; Barrero, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    The actions of tannic acid, phosphoric acid and their mixture on lepidocrocite, goethite, superparamagnetic goethite, akaganeite, magnetite, hematite and maghemite for 1 day and 1 month were explored. It was found that these acids form iron tannates and phosphates. Lepidocrocite and magnetite were the iron phases more easily transformed with the mixture of the acids after 1 month of reaction, whereas hematite was the most resistant phase. In the case of goethite, our results suggest that in order to understand properly the action of these acids, we have to take into account its stoichiometry, surface area and degree of crystallinity.

  18. The Use of Gel Electrophoresis to Study the Reactions of Activated Amino Acids with Oligonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zieboll, Gerhard; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used gel electrophoresis to study the primary covalent addition of amino acids to oligonu-cleotides or their analogs and the subsequent addition of further molecules of the amino acids to generate peptides covalently linked to the oligonucleotides. We have surveyed the reactions of a variety of amino acids with the phosphoramidates derived from oligonucleotide 5 inches phosphates and ethylenediamine. We find that arginine and amino acids can interact with oligonucleotidesl through stacking interactions react most efficiently. D- and L-amino acids give indistinguishable families of products.

  19. Reaction kinetics of free fatty acids esterification in palm fatty acid distillate using coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Arif; Rochmadi, Wijaya, Karna; Budiman, Arief

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a new strategy of preparing novel carbon-based solid acids has been developed. In this research, the esterification reactions of Palm Fatty Acid Distillate (PFAD) with methanol, using coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst from biomass wastes as catalyst, were studied. In this study, the coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalysts were synthesized by sulfonating the coconut shell biochar using concentrated H2SO4. The kinetics of free fatty acid (FFA) esterification in PFAD using a coconut shell biochar sulfonated catalyst was also studied. The effects of the mass ratio of catalyst to oil (1-10%), the molar ratio of methanol to oil (6:1-12:1), and the reaction temperature (40-60°C) were studied for the conversion of PFAD to optimize the reaction conditions. The results showed that the optimal conditions were an methanol to PFAD molar ratio of 12:1, the amount of catalyst of 10%w, and reaction temperature of 60°C. The proposed kinetic model shows a reversible second order reaction and represents all the experimental data satisfactorily, providing deeper insight into the kinetics of the reaction.

  20. Syntheses of Papyracillic Acids: Application of the Tandem Chain Extension-Acylation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Mazzone, Jennifer R.; Zercher, Charles K.

    2012-01-01

    A synthetic approach to the papyracillic acid family of natural products has been developed. The spiroacetal core is rapidly assembled through an unprecedented zinc carbenoid-mediated tandem chain extension-acylation reaction. Subsequent functional group manipulation provided access to papyracillic acid B and 4-epi-papyracillic acid C. The successful preparation of these molecules resulted in the clarification of structural assignments of members of this family of natural products. PMID:23013246

  1. Kinetics of the reaction between ozone and phenolic acids present in agro-industrial wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Beltran-Heredia, J; Torregrosa, J; Dominguez, J R; Peres, J A

    2001-03-01

    The kinetics of the ozonation of three phenolic acids is investigated from ozone absorption experiments in a semi-continuous reactor. After the evaluation of stoichiometric ratios for the individual reactions between ozone and each phenolic acid, the oxidation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid by ozone is performed in a first stage. The influence of the operating variables on the degradation process is established, and the application of a mass transfer with chemical reaction model based on the film theory leads to the determination of the reaction orders and kinetic rate constants. The experimental absorption rates obtained agree well with those calculated theoretically. In the second stage, a mixture of ferulic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid), beta-resorcylic acid (2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid) and p-hydroxybenzoic acid is ozonated under different experimental conditions. The kinetic study is performed by means of a competitive method that takes p-hydroxybenzoic acid as reference compound. The application of this model allows to determine the kinetic rate constants for each compound, which are correlated as a function of pH and temperature. The results obtained support that the kinetic regime of absorption is fast and pseudo-first order with respect to ozone, a condition required by the competitive method used.

  2. Cross-coupling reactions of aryl pivalates with boronic acids.

    PubMed

    Quasdorf, Kyle W; Tian, Xia; Garg, Neil K

    2008-11-05

    The first cross-coupling of acylated phenol derivatives has been achieved. In the presence of an air-stable Ni(II) complex, readily accessible aryl pivalates participate in the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling with arylboronic acids. The process is tolerant of considerable variation in each of the cross-coupling components. In addition, a one-pot acylation/cross-coupling sequence has been developed. The potential to utilize an aryl pivalate as a directing group has also been demonstrated, along with the ability to sequentially cross-couple an aryl bromide followed by an aryl pivalate, using palladium and nickel catalysis, respectively.

  3. Catalyst for sodium chlorate decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Production of oxygen by rapid decomposition of cobalt oxide and sodium chlorate mixture is discussed. Cobalt oxide serves as catalyst to accelerate reaction. Temperature conditions and chemical processes involved are described.

  4. Reaction of methanol with chlorate ions in acid solution containing Hg{sup +2} by NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, W.R.; Indu, B.; Crump, B.; Gelbaum, L.T.

    1996-05-01

    The reaction rate of methanol was measured in solutions of sodium chlorate and sulfuric acid at several levels of temperature and concentration, in the presence of mercuric nitrate. The progress of the reaction was monitored by proton NMR signals corresponding to methanol and formic acid. Chlorine dioxide formation was suppressed by adding mercuric nitrate, which was shown earlier to catalyze the disproportionation of the intermediate species, chlorous acid, and sequester chloride ions. The reaction is first order in methanol and chlorate concentration and in the Hammett acidity function. The reaction of formic acid, sodium chlorate and sulfuric acid was also studied using the same technique. Formic acid was stable and did not react with chlorate at a measurable rate, even at concentrations and temperatures of a commercial process. This study related to commercial processes that produce chlorine dioxide by reducing chlorate ions with methanol. Chlorine dioxide is an oxidizing chemical that is used in water purification and is replacing chlorine in many chemical bleaching processes because of environmental concerns.

  5. Hydrodynamic instability in the open system of the iodate-arsenous acid reaction.

    PubMed

    Pópity-Tóth, Éva; Pimienta, Véronique; Horváth, Dezső; Tóth, Ágota

    2013-10-28

    Hydrodynamic instability arising in horizontally propagating vertical chemical fronts leading to the formation of a single stable convection roll is investigated experimentally in the iodate-arsenous acid reaction for various stoichiometry. In the presence of a free surface, the tilted reaction front becomes more elongated due to the evaporation of the surface active iodine and the decrease in the surface tension during the reaction. The experimental conditions are then identified where Marangoni instability represents the driving force for the distortion of the reaction front at the surface.

  6. Activation of stratospheric chlorine by reactions in liquid sulphuric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, R.A.; MacKenzie, A.R. ); Mueller, R.H.; Peter, Th.; Crutzen, P.J. )

    1994-06-22

    The authors discuss activation mechanisms for chlorine compounds in the stratosphere, based on laboratory measurements for the solubility and reaction rates of HOCl and HCl in H[sub 2]SO[sub 4] solutions, as found on aerosols in the stratosphere. Their interest is in the impact of the large increase in aerosol loading in the stratosphere in the winter on 1991-92 due to the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. While laboratory data is not available for the temperature range close to 190 K, they argue that should the solubility and hydrolysis rates be high enough, this excess aerosol density could have contributed a significant additional amount of reactive chlorine to the stratosphere.

  7. The suppression of the N-nitrosating reaction by chlorogenic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Y; Shibata, H; Kodama, Y; Sawa, Y

    1995-01-01

    N-Nitrosation of a model aromatic amine (2,3-diamino-naphthalene) by the N-nitrosating agent produced by nitrite in acidic solution was inhibited by a polyphenol, chlorogenic acid, which is an ester of caffeic acid quinic acid. Caffeic acid also inhibited the N-nitrosation, but quinic acid did not. 1,2-Benzenediols and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid had inhibitory activities. Chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, 1,2-benzenediols and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid were able to scavenge the stable free radical, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl. Chlorogenic acid was found to be nitrated by acidic nitrite. The kinetic studies and the nitration observed only by bubbling of nitric oxide plus nitrogen dioxide gases indicated that the nitrating agent was nitrogen sesquioxide. The observations showed that the mechanism by which chlorogenic acid inhibited N-nitrosation of 2,3-diamino-naphthalene is due to its ability to scavenge the nitrosating agent, nitrogen sesquioxide. Chlorogenic acid may be effective not only in protecting against oxidative damage but also in inhibiting potentially mutagenic and carcinogenic reactions in vivo. PMID:8554543

  8. Ultrasonic and densimetric titration applied for acid-base reactions.

    PubMed

    Burakowski, Andrzej; Gliński, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Classical acoustic acid-base titration was monitored using sound speed and density measurements. Plots of these parameters, as well as of the adiabatic compressibility coefficient calculated from them, exhibit changes with the volume of added titrant. Compressibility changes can be explained and quantitatively predicted theoretically in terms of Pasynski theory of non-compressible hydrates combined with that of the additivity of the hydration numbers with the amount and type of ions and molecules present in solution. It also seems that this development could be applied in chemical engineering for monitoring the course of chemical processes, since the applied experimental methods can be carried out almost independently on the medium under test (harmful, aggressive, etc.).

  9. Interactive effects of cadmium and acid rain on photosynthetic light reaction in soybean seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhaoguo; Wang, Lihong; Chen, Minmin; Wang, Lei; Liang, Chanjuan; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2012-05-01

    Interactive effects of cadmium (Cd(2+)) and acid rain on photosynthetic light reaction in soybean seedlings were investigated under hydroponic conditions. Single treatment with Cd(2+) or acid rain and the combined treatment decreased the content of chlorophyll, Hill reaction rate, the activity of Mg(2+)-ATPase, maximal photochemical efficiency and maximal quantum yield, increased initial fluorescence and damaged the chloroplast structure in soybean seedlings. In the combined treatment, the change in the photosynthetic parameters and the damage of chloroplast structure were stronger than those of any single pollution. Meanwhile, Cd(2+) and acid rain had the interactive effects on the test indices in soybean seedlings. The results indicated that the combined pollution of Cd(2+) and acid rain aggravated the toxic effect of the single pollution of Cd(2+) or acid rain on the photosynthetic parameters due to the serious damage to the chloroplast structure.

  10. High-pressure 13C-diamond-forming reaction of decomposition of Na213CO3 melt at 20 - 60 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solopova, N.; Spivak, A.; Kupenko, I.; Litvin, Yu.; Dubrovinsky, L.

    2012-04-01

    higher temperature 2400 K. In the sample heated at 33 GPa and 2600 K, we found a broad G-band at 1545 cm-1 (12C -graphite originated, probably, from diamond anvils) and a sharp band at 1315 cm-1 (newly formed 13C-diamond). The bands correspond to mixture of graphite and diamond with isotopic 13C:12C ratio about 1:1. The 13C -diamond was synthesized, evidently, due to the reaction of decomposition of sodium carbonate melt with formation of dense fluid phase CO2 decomposed with liberation of elemental carbon. Further studies of CaCO3 are in progress in order to determine a melting curve and decomposition boundary of sodium carbonate melt, as well as PT-parameters of its phase stability region. This work was funded by grants of President of RF MK-913.2011.5, FPP 2011-1.3.1-151-0066 and RFBR 10-05-00654, 11-05-00401.

  11. Switching the BZ reaction with a strong-acid-free gel.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Yoshinori; Mayama, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-16

    In the present study, a novel gel with a semi-interpenetrating polymer network (semi-IPN) that undergo the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction without the addition of a strong acid (HNO3 or H2SO4) was developed. The required concentrations of the BZ substrates, sodium bromate (NaBrO3) and malonic acid (MA), under these conditions were higher than under the normal BZ reaction conditions, involving the addition of a strong acid. The period of the BZ reaction with the novel gel (semi-IPN BZ gel) decreased with increasing concentrations of NaBrO3 and MA. Moreover, the connection of the semi-IPN BZ gel to a conventional BZ gel facilitated the reaction in the latter through the propagation of the intermediates from the former to the latter. The BZ reaction stopped when the conventional BZ gel was disconnected from the semi-IPN BZ gel. These results demonstrate that the BZ reaction in the conventional BZ gel underwent on-off switching, controlled by its attachment to the semi-IPN BZ gel. This on-off switching mechanism would be valuable in controlling actuators and robots without strong acids.

  12. ACTUAL-WASTE TESTS OF ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING FOR RETRIEVAL OF SRS HLW SLUDGE TANK HEELS AND DECOMPOSITION OF OXALIC ACID

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, C.; King, W.; Ketusky, E.

    2012-01-12

    Savannah River National Laboratory conducted a series of tests on the Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process using actual Savannah River Site waste material from Tanks 5F and 12H. Testing involved sludge dissolution with 2 wt% oxalic acid, the decomposition of the oxalates by ozonolysis (with and without the aid of ultraviolet light), the evaporation of water from the product, and tracking the concentrations of key components throughout the process. During ECC actual waste testing, the process was successful in decomposing oxalate to below the target levels without causing substantial physical or chemical changes in the product sludge.

  13. Explosive decomposition of a melamine-cyanuric acid supramolecular assembly for fabricating defect-rich nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes with significantly promoted catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhongkui; Dai, Yitao; Ge, Guifang; Wang, Guiru

    2015-05-26

    A facile and scalable approach for fabricating structural defect-rich nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (MCSA-CNTs) through explosive decomposition of melamine-cyanuric acid supramolecular assembly is presented. In comparison to pristine carbon nanotubes, MCSA-CNT exhibits significantly enhanced catalytic performance in oxidant- and steam-free direct dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene, demonstrating the potential for metal-free clean and energy-saving styrene production. This finding also opens a new horizon for preparing highly-efficient carbocatalysts rich in structural defect sites for diverse transformations.

  14. Abnormal Decomposition Potentials Reconsidered--A Corrected Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoski, Cynthia G.; Bard, Allen J.

    2000-04-01

    The concept of "abnormal decomposition potential" as described by Liang et al. (J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 444) is imprecise and of little relevance in modern electrochemistry. Complete current- potential curves can be calculated and they show why such decomposition potentials are smaller than standard potentials. Disproportionation reactions are not needed to explain this phenomenon, which is the natural consequence of current-vs-potential behavior, and are of little importance in understanding the redox chemistry of halogen acids at concentrations at or above 10-3 M levels.

  15. Thermochemical study of the reactions of acid-base interaction in an aqueous solution of α-aminobutyric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkin, A. I.; Chernikov, V. V.; Krutova, O. N.; Skvortsov, I. A.; Korchagina, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The heat effects of the interaction between a solution of α-aminobutyric acid and solutions of HNO3 and KOH are measured by means of calorimetry in different ranges of pH at 298.15 K and values of ionic strength of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 (KNO3). The heat effects of the stepwise dissociation of the amino acid are determined. Standard thermodynamic characteristics (Δr H 0, Δr G 0, and Δr S 0) of the reactions of acid-base interaction in aqueous solutions of α-aminobutyric acid are calculated. The connection between the thermodynamic characteristics of the dissociation of the amino acid and the structure of this compound is considered.

  16. Influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of acidic, neutral and basic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Chi; Zhao, Xia; Pu, Jiang-Hua; Luan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-06-05

    Monosaccharide composition analysis is important for structural characterization of polysaccharides. To investigate the influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides, we chose alginate, starch, chitosan and chondroitin sulfate as representative of acidic, neutral, basic and complex polysaccharides to compare the release degree of monosaccharides under different hydrolytic conditions. The hydrolysis stability of 10 monosaccharide standards was also explored. Results showed that the basic sugars were hard to release but stable, the acidic sugars (uronic acids) were easy to release but unstable, and the release and stability of neutral sugars were in between acidic and basic sugars. In addition, the hydrolysis process was applied to monosaccharide composition analysis of Hippocampus trimaculatus polysaccharide and the appropriate hydrolytic condition was accorded with that of the above four polysaccharides. Thus, different hydrolytic conditions should be used for the monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides based on their structural characteristics.

  17. Esterification Reaction of Glycerol and Palm Oil Oleic Acid Using Methyl Ester Sulfonate Acid Catalyst as Drilling Fluid Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, V. I.; Hambali, E.; Suryani, A.; Permadi, P.

    2017-02-01

    Esterification reaction between glycerol with palm oil oleic acid to produce glycerol ester and one of the utilization of glycerol esters is as ingredients of drilling fluids formula for oil drilling needs. The purpose of this research is to get the best conditions of the esterification process. The esterification reaction does with the reactants is glycerol with purity of 97.6%, palm oil oleic acid with the molar ratio is 1:1, Methyl Ester Sulfonate Acid (MESA) catalyst 0.5%, and stirring speed 400 rpm. The temperature range of 180°C to 240°C and the processing time between 120 to 180 minutes. The results showed that the best conditions of the esterification reaction at the temperature 240°C and time process are 180 minute. The increasing temperature resulted that the acid number decreases and causing the conversion increased. The maximum conversion is 99.24%, density 0.93 g/cm3, flash point 241°C, pour point -3°C, the boiling point of 244 °C, the acid value of 1.90 mg KOH/g sample, kinematic viscosity 31.51 cSt (40°C), surface tension 37.0526 dyne/cm and GCMS identification, glycerol ester at 22,256 retention time (minutes) and wide area 73.75 (%). From the research results obtained glycerol ester with characteristics suitable for drilling fluid formulations.

  18. Reactions Between Water Soluble Organic Acids and Nitrates in Atmospheric Aerosols: Recycling of Nitric Acid and Formation of Organic Salts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander

    2014-03-25

    Atmospheric particles often include a complex mixture of nitrate and secondary organic materials accumulated within the same individual particles. Nitrate as an important inorganic component can be chemically formed in the atmosphere. For instance, formation of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) and calcium nitrate Ca(NO3)2 when nitrogen oxide and nitric acid (HNO3) species react with sea salt and calcite, respectively. Organic acids contribute a significant fraction of photochemically formed secondary organics that can condense on the preexisting nitrate-containing particles. Here, we present a systematic microanalysis study on chemical composition of laboratory generated particles composed of water soluble organic acids and nitrates (i.e. NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2) investigated using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and Fourier transform infrared micro-spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). The results show that water-soluble organic acids can react with nitrates releasing gaseous HNO3 during dehydration process. These reactions are attributed to acid displacement of nitrate with weak organic acids driven by the evaporation of HNO3 into gas phase due to its relatively high volatility. The reactions result in significant nitrate depletion and formation of organic salts in mixed organic acids/nitrate particles that in turn may affect their physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric environment and climate. Airborne nitrate concentrations are estimated by thermodynamic calculations corresponding to various nitrate depletions in selected organic acids of atmospheric relevance. The results indicate a potential mechanism of HNO3 recycling, which may further affect concentrations of gas- and aerosol-phase species in the atmosphere and the heterogeneous reaction chemistry between them.

  19. Reaction of gamma-tocopherol with hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quyen; Southwell-Keely, Peter T

    2007-03-01

    In addition to being a very good antioxidant, gamma-tocopherol is also an excellent electrophile trap. This is a study of the reactivity of gamma-tocopherol with hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite, a potential biological foe that is both an oxidant and an electrophile. Aqueous sodium hypochlorite (1.72 mmol; pH 7.4) was stirred with gamma-tocopherol (0.12 mmol) in hexane for 2 min at room temperature. The following products were isolated: gamma-tocopheryl quinone (0.6%), tocored (10%), 3-chloro-gamma-tocopheryl quinone (14%), an ether dimer of 3-chloro-gamma-tocopheryl quinone (0.4%), two isomers of 5-(5-gamma-tocopheryl)-gamma-tocopherol (3 and 2% respectively), 5-chloro-gamma-tocopherol (14%) and two chlorinated dimers (14 and 24% respectively) which were identified as diastereomers of (3R,10R)-11a-chloro-2,3,9,10-tetrahydro-3,5,6,10,12,13-hexamethyl-3,10-bis[(4R,8R)-4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl]-1H-pyrano(3,2a)-8H-pyrano(3,2g)-dibenzofuran-14(7aH)(14aH)-one. The chlorinated dimers, 5-chloro-gamma-tocopherol, 3-chloro-gamma-tocopheryl quinone and its ether dimer are new compounds.

  20. Preparation of Pd-Co-based nanocatalysts and their superior applications in formic acid decomposition and methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yu-ling; Liu, Ya-cheng; Liang, Fei; Wang, Li-min

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid (FA) and methanol, as convenient hydrogen-containing materials, are most widely used for fuel cells. However, using suitable and low-cost catalysts to further improve their energy performance still is a matter of great significance. Herein, PdCo and PdCo@Pd nanocatalysts (NCs) are successfully prepared by the facile method. Pd 3d binding energy decreases due to the presence of Co. Consequently, PdCo@Pd NCs exhibit high catalytic activity and selectivity toward FA dehydrogenation at room temperature. The gas-generation rate at 30 min is 65.4 L h(-1)  g(-1) . PdCo/C has the worst catalytic performance in this reaction, despite the fact that it has a high gas-generation rate in the initial 30 min. Furthermore, both PdCo and PdCo@Pd NCs have enhanced electrocatalytic performance toward methanol oxidation. Their maximum currents are 966 and 1205 mA mg(-1) , respectively, which is much higher than monometallic Pd/C.

  1. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10136 - 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl)melamine (generic). 721.10136 Section 721.10136... 2-Propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction products with hexakis(alkoxyalkyl... substance identified generically as 2-propenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-hydroxyethyl ester, reaction...

  6. An Investigation of Solid-State Amidization and Imidization Reactions in Vapor Deposited Poly (amic acid)

    SciTech Connect

    Anthamatten, M; Letts, S A; Day, K; Cook, R C; Gies, A P; Hamilton, T P; Nonidez, W K

    2004-06-28

    The condensation polymerization reaction of 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA) with pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) to form poly(amic acid) and the subsequent imidization reaction to form polyimide were investigated for films prepared using vapor deposition polymerization techniques. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of films at different temperatures indicate that additional solid-state polymerization occurs prior to imidization reactions. Experiments reveal that, upon vapor deposition, poly(amic acid) oligomers form that have a number-average molecular weight of about 1500 Daltons. Between 100 - 130 C these chains undergo additional condensation reaction to form slightly higher molecular weight oligomers. Calorimetry measurements show that this reaction is exothermic ({Delta}H {approx} -30 J/g) with an activation energy of about 120 kJ/mol. Experimental reaction enthalpies are compared to results from ab initio molecular modeling calculations to estimate the number of amide groups formed. At higher temperatures (150 - 300 C) imidization of amide linkages occurs as an endothermic reaction ({Delta}H {approx} +120 J/g) with an activation energy of about 130 kJ/mol. Solid-state kinetics were found to depend on reaction conversion as well as the processing conditions used to deposit films.

  7. Investigation and application of multiple reactions between molybdoniobium heteropoly acid and di- or trimethylthionines

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoyam, F.B.; Karapetyan, A.A.

    1986-03-01

    This paper presents the results of the study and use of reactions of molybdoniobic acid (MNA) with di- and trimethylthiones (DMT and TMT, respectively). It was found that light absorption of acetone solutions of the products of outer-sphere interaction between MNA and DMT or TMT enabled the determination of optimum acidity for MNA formation. Reaction between TMT and MNA gives two different compounds containing two and five associated dye cations, different in molar extinction coefficient and optimum reaction acidity (pH 0.05-0.25 and 0.35-0.90). Formation of the 6th and 8th molybdenum series with an identical composition of the outer sphere is shown. A highly sensitive photometric method for determining niobium has been developed.

  8. Characterization of the esterification reaction in high free fatty acid oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altic, Lucas Eli Porter

    Energy and vegetable oil prices have caused many biodiesel producers to turn to waste cooking oils as feedstocks. These oils contain high levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) which make them difficult or impossible to convert to biodiesel by conventional production methods. Esterification is required for ultra-high FFA feedstocks such as Brown Grease. In addition, ultrasonic irradiation has the potential to improve the kinetics of the esterification reaction. 2-level, multi-factor DOE experiments were conducted to characterize the esterification reaction in ultra-high FFA oils as well as determine whether ultrasonic irradiation gives any benefit besides energy input. The study determined that sulfuric acid content had the greatest effect followed by temperature and water content (inhibited reaction). Methanol content had no effect in the range studied. A small interaction term existed between sulfuric acid and temperature. The study also concluded that sonication did not give any additional benefit over energy input.

  9. New method for spectrophotometric determination of quinones and barbituric acid through their reaction. A kinetic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medien, H. A. A.

    1996-11-01

    A new and sensitive spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of p-benzoquinone, p-chloranil and 1.4-naphthoquinone. The method is based on the reaction between quinones and barbituric acid, by which a color is developed with maximum absorption between 485 and 555 nm in 50% methyl alcohol-water mixture. The absorption of the product obeys Beer's law within the concentration range 0.025-05 mM of orginal quinone. The kinetics of the reaction between p-benzoquinone and barbituric acid was studied in a range of methyl alcohol-water mixtures. The reaction follows overall second order kinetics, first order in each of the reactants. The rate increases with increasing dielectric constant. The method was applied for determination of barbituric acid with p-benzoquinone in the concentration range of 0.025-0.345 mM. Other barbiturates do not interfere.

  10. Theoretical stusy of the reaction between 2,2',4' - trihydroxyazobenzene-5-sulfonic acid and zirconium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fletcher, Mary H.

    1960-01-01

    Zirconium reacts with 2,2',4'-trihydroxyazobenzene-5-sulfonic acid in acid solutions to Form two complexes in which the ratios of dye to zirconium are 1 to 1 and 2 to 1. Both complexes are true chelates, with zirconium acting as a bridge between the two orthohydroxy dye groups. Apparent equilibrium constants for the reactions to form each of the complexes are determined. The reactions are used as a basis for the determination of the active component in the dye and a graphical method for the determination of reagent purity is described. Four absorption spectra covering the wave length region from 350 to 750 mu are given, which completely define the color system associated with the reactions in solutions where the hydrochloric acid concentration ranges from 0.0064N to about 7N.

  11. Oxygen dependency of one-electron reactions generating ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide from ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the two separate one-electron reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid was investigated. The rate of ascorbate radical (Asc(-)) formation (and stability) was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. A product of ascorbic acid oxidation was measurable levels of hydrogen peroxide, as high as 32.5 μM from 100 μM ascorbic acid. Evidence for a feedback mechanism where hydrogen peroxide generated during the oxidation of ascorbic acid accelerates further oxidation of ascorbic acid is also presented. The second one-electron oxidation reaction of ascorbic acid leading to the disappearance of Asc(-) was also strongly inhibited in samples flushed with argon. In the range of 0.05-1.2 mM ascorbic acid, maximum levels of measurable hydrogen peroxide were achieved with an initial concentration of 0.2 mM ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide generation was greatly diminished at ascorbic acid levels of 0.8 mM or above.

  12. Molecular Design of a Chiral Brønsted Acid with Two Different Acidic Sites: Regio-, Diastereo-, and Enantioselective Hetero-Diels-Alder Reaction of Azopyridinecarboxylate with Amidodienes Catalyzed by Chiral Carboxylic Acid-Monophosphoric Acid.

    PubMed

    Momiyama, Norie; Tabuse, Hideaki; Noda, Hirofumi; Yamanaka, Masahiro; Fujinami, Takeshi; Yamanishi, Katsunori; Izumiseki, Atsuto; Funayama, Kosuke; Egawa, Fuyuki; Okada, Shino; Adachi, Hiroaki; Terada, Masahiro

    2016-09-07

    A chiral Brønsted acid containing two different acidic sites, chiral carboxylic acid-monophosphoric acid 1a, was designed to be a new and effective concept in catalytic asymmetric hetero-Diels-Alder reactions of azopyridinecarboxylate with amidodienes. The multipoint hydrogen-bonding interactions among the carboxylic acid, monophosphoric acid, azopyridinecarboxylate, and amidodiene achieved high catalytic and chiral efficiency, producing substituted 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridazines with excellent stereocontrol in a single step. This constitutes the first example of regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselective azo-hetero-Diels-Alder reactions by chiral Brønsted acid catalysis.

  13. 40 CFR 721.10189 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Substances § 721.10189 Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acids, tall-oil,...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10189 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Substances § 721.10189 Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acids, tall-oil,...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10189 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Substances § 721.10189 Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acids, tall-oil,...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10189 - Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde-phenol polymer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction... Substances § 721.10189 Fatty acids, tall-oil, reaction products with (butoxymethyl) oxirane formaldehyde... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as fatty acids, tall-oil,...

  17. Transition-metal-free cascade reaction of α-halo-N-tosylhydrazones, indoles and arylboronic acids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guojiao; Deng, Yifan; Luo, Haiqing; Zhou, Junliang; Li, Tianjiao; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jianbo

    2016-04-18

    α-Halo-N-tosylhydrazones are employed as reagents for the formation of multiple carbon-carbon bonds in the three-component reactions. In this transformation, a strategy has been designed to generate the diazo intermediate by using a nucleophile to react with the azoalkene intermediate generated in situ from the α-halo-N-tosylhydrazone. The diazo intermediate thus generated further undergoes transition-metal-free C-C bond forming reaction with arylboronic acids.

  18. Experimental Evidence of Localized Oscillations in the Photosensitive Chlorine Dioxide-Iodine-Malonic Acid Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Míguez, David G.; Alonso, Sergio; Muñuzuri, Alberto P.; Sagués, Francesc

    2006-10-01

    The interaction between Hopf and Turing modes has been the subject of active research in recent years. We present here experimental evidence of the existence of mixed Turing-Hopf modes in a two-dimensional system. Using the photosensitive chlorine dioxide-iodine-malonic acid reaction (CDIMA) and external constant background illumination as a control parameter, standing spots oscillating in amplitude and with hexagonal ordering were observed. Numerical simulations in the Lengyel-Epstein model for the CDIMA reaction confirmed the results.

  19. Enantioselective aldol reaction between isatins and cyclohexanone catalyzed by amino acid sulphonamides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Liu, Qi; Hao, Qing; Sun, Yanhua; Luo, Yiming; Yang, Hua

    2015-04-01

    Sulphonamides derived from primary α-amino acid were successfully applied to catalyze the aldol reaction between isatin and cyclohexanone under neat conditions. More interestingly, molecular sieves, as privileged additives, were found to play a vital role in achieving high enantioselectivity. Consequently, high yields (up to 99%) along with good enantioselectivities (up to 92% ee) and diastereoselectivities (up to 95:5 dr) were obtained. In addition, this reaction was also conveniently scaled up, demonstrating the applicability of this protocol.

  20. Intramolecular Diels–Alder Reactions of Cycloalkenones: Stereoselectivity, Lewis Acid Acceleration, and Halogen Substituent Effects

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The intramolecular Diels–Alder reactions of cycloalkenones and terminal dienes occur with high endo stereoselectivity, both thermally and under Lewis-acidic conditions. Through computations, we show that steric repulsion and tether conformation govern the selectivity of the reaction, and incorporation of either BF3 or α-halogenation increases the rate of cycloaddition. With a longer tether, isomerization from a terminal diene to the more stable internal diene results in a more facile cycloaddition. PMID:24410341

  1. Organocatalytic Enantioselective Aza-Friedel-Crafts Reaction of Cyclic Ketimines with Pyrroles using Imidazolinephosphoric Acid Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Matsuda, Nazumi; Ohara, Mutsuyo

    2016-07-04

    Organocatalytic enantioselective aza-Friedel-Crafts reactions of cyclic ketimines with pyrroles or indoles were catalyzed by imidazoline/phosphoric acid catalysts. The reaction was applied to various 3H-indol-3-ones to afford products in excellent yields and enantioselectivities. The chiral catalysts can be recovered by a single separation step using column chromatography and are reusable without further purification. Based on the experimental investigations, a possible transition state has been proposed to explain the origin of the asymmetric induction.

  2. Coupling of hydrologic transport and chemical reactions in a stream affected by acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, B.A.; Broshears, R.E.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream, examined the coupling of hydrologic transport to chemical reactions affecting metal concentrations. Injection of LiCl as a conservative tracer was used to determine discharge and residence time along a 1497-m reach. Transport of metals downstream from inflows of acidic, metal-rich water was evaluated based on synoptic samples of metal concentrations and the hydrologic characteristics of the stream. Transport of SO4 and Mn was generally conservative, but in the subreaches most affected by acidic inflows, transport was reactive. Both 0.1-??m filtered and particulate Fe were reactive over most of the stream reach. Filtered Al partitioned to the particulate phase in response to high instream concentrations. Simulations that accounted for the removal of SO4, Mn, Fe, and Al with first-order reactions reproduced the steady-state profiles. The calculated rate constants for net removal used in the simulations embody several processes that occur on a stream-reach scale. The comparison between rates of hydrologie transport and chemical reactions indicates that reactions are only important over short distances in the stream near the acidic inflows, where reactions occur on a comparable time scale with hydrologic transport and thus affect metal concentrations.

  3. Kinetics and Quantitative Structure—Activity Relationship Study on the Degradation Reaction from Perfluorooctanoic Acid to Trifluoroacetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chen; Sun, Xiaomin; Zhang, Chenxi; Zhang, Xue; Niu, Junfeng

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the degradation kinetics of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has been carried out to calculate rate constants of the main elementary reactions using the multichannel Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory and canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling correction over a temperature range of 200~500 K. The Arrhenius equations of rate constants of elementary reactions are fitted. The decarboxylation is role step in the degradation mechanism of PFOA. For the perfluorinated carboxylic acids from perfluorooctanoic acid to trifluoroacetic acid, the quantitative structure–activity relationship of the decarboxylation was analyzed with the genetic function approximation method and the structure–activity model was constructed. The main parameters governing rate constants of the decarboxylation reaction from the eight-carbon chain to the two-carbon chain were obtained. As the structure–activity model shows, the bond length and energy of C1–C2 (RC1–C2 and EC1–C2) are positively correlated to rate constants, while the volume (V), the energy difference between EHOMO and ELUMO (ΔE), and the net atomic charges on atom C2 (QC2) are negatively correlated. PMID:25196516

  4. ortho-Lithium/magnesium carboxylate-driven aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions on unprotected naphthoic acids.

    PubMed

    Aissaoui, Regadia; Nourry, Arnaud; Coquel, Ariane; Dao, Thi Thanh Hà; Derdour, Aicha; Helesbeux, Jean-Jacques; Duval, Olivier; Castanet, Anne-Sophie; Mortier, Jacques

    2012-01-06

    Substitution of an ortho-fluoro or methoxy group in 1- and 2-naphthoic acids furnishing substituted naphthoic acids occurs in good to excellent yields upon reaction with alkyl/vinyl/aryl organolithium and Grignard reagents, in the absence of a metal catalyst without the need to protect the carboxyl (CO(2)H) group. This novel nucleophilic aromatic substitution is presumed to proceed via a precoordination of the organometallic with the substrate, followed by an addition/elimination.

  5. Determination of free fatty acids and triglycerides by gas chromatography using selective esterification reactions.

    PubMed

    Kail, Brian W; Link, Dirk D; Morreale, Bryan D

    2012-01-01

    A method for selectively determining both free fatty acids (FFA) and triacylglycerides (TAGs) in biological oils was investigated and optimized using gas chromatography after esterification of the target species to their corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The method used acid catalyzed esterification in methanolic solutions under conditions of varying severity to achieve complete conversion of more reactive FFAs while preserving the concentration of TAGs. Complete conversion of both free acids and glycerides to corresponding FAMEs was found to require more rigorous reaction conditions involving heating to 120°C for up to 2 h. Method validation was provided using gas chromatography-flame ionization detection, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The method improves on existing methods because it allows the total esterified lipid to be broken down by FAMEs contributed by FFA compared to FAMEs from both FFA and TAGs. Single and mixed-component solutions of pure fatty acids and triglycerides, as well as a sesame oil sample to simulate a complex biological oil, were used to optimize the methodologies. Key parameters that were investigated included: HCl-to-oil ratio, temperature and reaction time. Pure free fatty acids were found to esterify under reasonably mild conditions (10 min at 50°C with a 2.1:1 HCl to fatty acid ratio) with 97.6 ± 2.3% recovery as FAMEs, while triglycerides were largely unaffected under these reaction conditions. The optimized protocol demonstrated that it is possible to use esterification reactions to selectively determine the free acid content, total lipid content, and hence, glyceride content in biological oils. This protocol also allows gas chromatography analysis of FAMEs as a more ideal analyte than glyceride species in their native state.

  6. Chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed enantioselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azlactones.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Sun, Wangsheng; Zhu, Gongming; Yang, Junxian; Zhang, Ming; Hong, Liang; Wang, Rui

    2016-01-25

    The first chiral phosphoric acid catalyzed highly diastereo- and enantioselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of azlactones and methyleneindolinones was disclosed. By using a BINOL-derived chiral phosphoric acid as the catalyst, azlactones were activated as chiral anti N-protonated 1,3-dipoles to react with methyleneindolinones to yield biologically important 3,3'-pyrrolidonyl spirooxindole scaffolds in high yields, with good-to-excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivity.

  7. Identification of hydroxycinnamic acid-maillard reaction products in low-moisture baking model systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Deshou; Chiaro, Christopher; Maddali, Pranav; Prabhu, K Sandeep; Peterson, Devin G

    2009-11-11

    The chemistry and fate of hydroxycinnamic acids (ferulic, p-coumeric, caffeic, sinapic, and cinnamic acid) in a glucose/glycine simulated baking model (10% moisture at 200 degrees C for 15 min) were investigated. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of glucose/glycine and glucose/glycine/hydroxycinnamic acid model systems confirmed the phenolics reacted with Maillard intermediates; two main reaction product adducts were reported. On the basis of isotopomeric analysis, LC-MS, and NMR spectroscopy, structures of two ferulic acid-Maillard reaction products were identified as 6-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-5-(hydroxymethyl)-8-oxabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one (adduct I) and 2-(6-(furan-2-yl)-7-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1-methyl-3-oxo-2,5-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-5-en-2-yl)acetic acid (adduct II). In addition, a pyrazinone-type Maillard product, 2-(5-(furan-2-yl)-6-methyl-2-oxopyrazin-1(2H)-yl) acetic acid (IIa), was identified as an intermediate for reaction product adduct II, whereas 3-deoxy-2-hexosulose was identified as an intermediate of adduct I. Both adducts I and II were suggested to be generated by pericyclic reaction mechanisms. Quantitative gas chromatography (GC) analysis and liquid chromatography (LC) also indicated that the addition of ferulic acid to a glucose/glycine model significantly reduced the generation of select Maillard-type aroma compounds, such as furfurals, methylpyrazines, 2-acetylfuran, 2-acetylpyridine, 2-acetylpyrrole, and cyclotene as well as inhibited color development in these Maillard models. In addition, adducts I and II suppressed the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated expression of two prototypical pro-inflammatory genes, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, in an in vitro murine macrophage model; ferulic acid reported negligible activity.

  8. Determination of Free Fatty Acids and Triglycerides by Gas Chromatography Using Selective Esterification Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kail, Brian W; Link, Dirk D; Morreale, Bryan D

    2012-11-01

    A method for selectively determining both free fatty acids (FFA) and triacylglycerides (TAGs) in biological oils was investigated and optimized using gas chromatography after esterification of the target species to their corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs). The method used acid catalyzed esterification in methanolic solutions under conditions of varying severity to achieve complete conversion of more reactive FFAs while preserving the concentration of TAGs. Complete conversion of both free acids and glycerides to corresponding FAMEs was found to require more rigorous reaction conditions involving heating to 120°C for up to 2 h. Method validation was provided using gas chromatography–flame ionization detection, gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. The method improves on existing methods because it allows the total esterified lipid to be broken down by FAMEs contributed by FFA compared to FAMEs from both FFA and TAGs. Single and mixed-component solutions of pure fatty acids and triglycerides, as well as a sesame oil sample to simulate a complex biological oil, were used to optimize the methodologies. Key parameters that were investigated included: HCl-to-oil ratio, temperature and reaction time. Pure free fatty acids were found to esterify under reasonably mild conditions (10 min at 50°C with a 2.1:1 HCl to fatty acid ratio) with 97.6 ± 2.3% recovery as FAMEs, while triglycerides were largely unaffected under these reaction conditions. The optimized protocol demonstrated that it is possible to use esterification reactions to selectively determine the free acid content, total lipid content, and hence, glyceride content in biological oils. This protocol also allows gas chromatography analysis of FAMEs as a more ideal analyte than glyceride species in their native state.

  9. Study of the ammonia (gas)-sulfuric acid (aerosol) reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.; Takano, H.; Anderson, G.R.

    1983-06-01

    An experimental study of the reaction rate between monodisperse sulfuric acid aerosols and ammonia gas is described. Reactions took place in a laminar flow reactor at 24/sup 0/C and 6% relative humidity, and reaction products were sampled from the core of the flow so that reaction times were well defined. For the data reported here, the reaction time was 5.0 +/- 0.5 s, ammonia concentrations ranged from 13 to 63 ppb, and particle sizes ranged from 0.03 to 0.2 ..mu..m. The extent of reaction was determined by comparing the hygroscopic and deliquescent properties of the product aerosols with known properties of aerosols consisting of internal mixtures of sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate. It was found that the average fraction of ammonia-aerosol collisions that resulted in chemical reaction during neutralization decreased from 0.40 +/- 0.10 for 0.058-..mu..m particles to 0.18 +/- 0.03 for 0.10-..mu..m particles. Differential mobility analyzers were used for generating the monodisperse aerosols and also for measuring the hygroscopic and deliquescent properties of the product aerosols.

  10. Kinetic resolution of acids in acylation reactions in the presence of chiral tertiary amines

    SciTech Connect

    Potapov, V.M.; Dem'yanovich, V.M.; Khlebnikov, V.A.

    1988-07-10

    Asymmetric synthesis has now become an important method for the production of optically active compounds, and its most attractive form is asymmetric catalysis. This work was devoted to an investigation into asymmetric catalysis with chiral tertiary amines in acylation reactions. During the acylation of alcohols and amines by the action of racemic 2-phenylpropionic and 2-methyl-3-phenylpropionic acids in the presence of S-nicotine the initial acids are resolved kinetically. The (R)-2-phenylpropionic acid obtained in this way had an optical purity of 0.5-1.5%.

  11. Bifunctional acid base catalyzed reactions in zeolites from the HSAB viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemelsoet, K.; Lesthaeghe, D.; Speybroeck, V. Van; Waroquier, M.

    2006-02-01

    The applicability of the hard and soft acids and bases principle is investigated for the interaction of 5T zeolite clusters with probe molecules such as chloromethane, methanol and olefins. The reactions are intermediately hard-hard and, therefore, mainly charge-controlled. This is confirmed by the success of the atomic charges and the electrostatic interaction energy at the acid site as correct descriptors of regio-selectivity and reactivity sequences. Both acid and basic reactive sites can be clearly indicated using frontier orbitals. Moreover, an excellent correlation is found between the activation hardnesses and the energy barriers at the absolute zero.

  12. Permanganate oxidation of α-amino acids: kinetic correlations for the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic reaction pathways.

    PubMed

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F

    2011-09-08

    The reactions of permanganate ion with seven α-amino acids in aqueous KH(2)PO(4)/K(2)HPO(4) buffers have been followed spectrophotometrically at two different wavelengths: 526 nm (decay of MnO(4)(-)) and 418 nm (formation of colloidal MnO(2)). All of the reactions studied were autocatalyzed by colloidal MnO(2), with the contribution of the autocatalytic reaction pathway decreasing in the order glycine > l-threonine > l-alanine > l-glutamic acid > l-leucine > l-isoleucine > l-valine. The rate constants corresponding to the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic pathways were obtained by means of either a differential rate law or an integrated one, the latter requiring the use of an iterative method for its implementation. The activation parameters for the two pathways were determined and analyzed to obtain statistically significant correlations for the series of reactions studied. The activation enthalpy of the nonautocatalytic pathway showed a strong, positive dependence on the standard Gibbs energy for the dissociation of the protonated amino group of the α-amino acid. Linear enthalpy-entropy correlations were found for both pathways, leading to isokinetic temperatures of 370 ± 21 K (nonautocatalytic) and 364 ± 28 K (autocatalytic). Mechanisms in agreement with the experimental data are proposed for the two reaction pathways.

  13. Is there a redox reaction between Cu(II) and gallic acid?

    PubMed

    Severino, Joyce Ferreira; Goodman, Bernard A; Reichenauer, Thomas G; Pirker, Katharina F

    2011-02-01

    Interactions between transition metal ions and polyphenols can result in complexation, redox or polymerization, but the relative importance of these reactions is unclear. The present paper reports results from the reaction of gallic acid (GA) with Cu(II) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and UV/visible spectroscopy for various relative concentrations and pH values. Reduction of Cu(II) by GA does not occur under strongly acidic or strongly alkaline conditions. Di- or polymerization reactions between Cu(II) and carboxylate groups of GA dominate the results at acidic pH, whereas mononuclear complexes increase in importance at higher pH and GA concentrations. There was no evidence for any redox reaction between Cu(II) and GA and free radical formation from GA at high pH was shown to be the consequence of auto-oxidation, which was inhibited by Cu(II). Serious questions are thus raised about the existence of the frequently assumed redox reactions between Cu(II) and polyphenols.

  14. Reactions on sulphuric acid aerosol and on polar stratospheric clouds in the Antarctic stratosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, E.W.; Mulvaney, R.

    1991-06-01

    Heterogeneous chemistry producing active chlorine has been identified as crucial to Antarctic ozone depletion. Most attention has focused on reactions on solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles, although there is still no satisfactory understanding of the microchemical incorporation of HCl in PSCs. The alternative mechanism involving sulphuric acid aerosol as the reaction surface has been considered at lower latitudes, but its role in the special conditions of the polar stratosphere has been largely ignored. Recent data from the Antarctic stratosphere have suggested the HCl is present in sulphuric acid aerosol that remains liquid even at the lowest stratospheric temperatures. The available laboratory data show that cold, relatively dilute, sulphuric acid is particularly able to take up HCl that is available for reaction provided the aerosol remains liquid. Fast heterogeneous reaction rates compared to those at mid-latitudes will produce active chlorine rapidly. Since the aerosol is present with significant surface area throughout the lower stratosphere, it should be very effective for heterogeneous reaction once temperatures drop. These surfaces, rather than PSCs, could host the initial conversion of Cl to its active form over the Antarctic.

  15. Determination of the Molar Volume of Hydrogen from the Metal-Acid Reaction: An Experimental Alternative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Berg, Kevin; Chapman, Ken

    1996-01-01

    Describes an alternative technique for determining the molar volume of hydrogen from the metal-acid reaction in which the metal sample is encased in a specially prepared cage and a pipette filler is used to fill an inverted burette with water. Eliminates some difficulties encountered with the conventional technique. (JRH)

  16. Total synthesis of (±)-epithuriferic acid methyl ester via Diels-Alder reaction.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, Marek; Bałczewski, Piotr; Owsianik, Krzysztof; Różycka-Sokołowska, Ewa; Marciniak, Bernard

    2016-02-07

    In this paper, we have described the first total synthesis of (±)-epithuriferic acid methyl ester from non-natural sources, in four steps (20% overall yield). The key step involves the Diels-Alder reaction of isobenzofuran with methyl 3-(dimethoxyphosphoryl)acrylate which is controlled by "ortho" regio- and endo stereoselectivities due to the COOMe group.

  17. Zeolite-directed cascade reactions: cycliacyarylation versus decarboxyarylation of alpha,beta-unsaturated carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Chassaing, Stefan; Kumarraja, Mayilvasagam; Pale, Patrick; Sommer, Jean

    2007-09-27

    The interaction of alpha,beta-unsaturated carboxylic acids with benzene derivatives was investigated in H-zeolites and led to two distinct but competing processes, cycliacyarylation and decarboxyarylation. Interestingly, H-USY selectively induced the cycliacyarylation cascade reaction, whereas H-ZSM5 selectively promoted the decarboxyarylation cascade.

  18. Gasoline compositions containing reaction products of fatty acid esters and amines as carburetor detergents

    SciTech Connect

    Schlicht, R.C.; Herbstman, S.; Levin, M.D.; Sung, R.L.

    1988-03-08

    A motor fuel composition is described comprising (a) a major portion of a fuel consisting essentially of a hydrocarbon boiling in the gasoline boiling range; and (b) a minor effective amount of, as detergent additive, a reaction product of C/sub 6/-C/sub 20/ fatty acid and a mono- or di-(hydroxy hydrocarbyl) amine.

  19. Simulated acid rain alters litter decomposition and enhances the allelopathic potential of the invasive plant Wedelia trilobata (Creeping Daisy)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive species and acid rain cause global environmental problems. Limited information exists, however, concerning the effects of acid rain on the invasiveness of these plants. For example, creeping daisy, an invasive exotic allelopathic weed, has caused great damage in southern China where acid ra...

  20. Elucidation of noble metal/formic acid chemistry during DWPF feed preparation. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, L.F.

    1991-12-31

    Eleven reports are included: evaluation of noble metal compounds as catalysts for aerobic decomposition of formic acid; reaction of NaNO{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 2} with formic acid under argon; effects of Ru, Rh, Pd chlorides on formic acid decomposition in presence of IDMS (pH=11.0) sludge; effects of additives on catalysts on decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen; Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid; the question of whether this decomposition can be heterogeneous catalysis; inhibition of this reaction by additives; nitrilotriacetic acid inhibitor; uses of gelatin and other water soluble polymers to control flocculation rate; comparison of catalytic activities of Rh, Ru, Pd in Purex and HM sludges; experiments on homogeneous vs heterogeneous nature of Rh catalyst. Figs, refs, tabs.

  1. Elucidation of noble metal/formic acid chemistry during DWPF feed preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    Eleven reports are included: evaluation of noble metal compounds as catalysts for aerobic decomposition of formic acid; reaction of NaNO[sub 3] and NaNO[sub 2] with formic acid under argon; effects of Ru, Rh, Pd chlorides on formic acid decomposition in presence of IDMS (pH=11.0) sludge; effects of additives on catalysts on decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen; Rh-catalyzed decomposition of formic acid; the question of whether this decomposition can be heterogeneous catalysis; inhibition of this reaction by additives; nitrilotriacetic acid inhibitor; uses of gelatin and other water soluble polymers to control flocculation rate; comparison of catalytic activities of Rh, Ru, Pd in Purex and HM sludges; experiments on homogeneous vs heterogeneous nature of Rh catalyst. Figs, refs, tabs.

  2. Geminal Brønsted Acid Ionic Liquids as Catalysts for the Mannich Reaction in Water

    PubMed Central

    He, Leqin; Qin, Shenjun; Chang, Tao; Sun, Yuzhuang; Zhao, Jiquan

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium geminal Brønsted acid ionic liquids (GBAILs) based on zwitterionic 1,2-bis[N-methyl-N-(3-sulfopropyl)-alkylammonium]ethane (where the carbon number of the alkyl chain is 4, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, or 18) and p-toluenesulfonic acid monohydrate were synthesized. The catalytic ionic liquids were applied in three-component Mannich reactions with an aldehyde, ketone, and amine at 25 °C in water. The effects of the type and amount of catalyst and reaction time as well as the scope of the reaction were investigated. Results showed that GBAIL-C14 has excellent catalytic activity and fair reusability. The catalytic procedure was simple, and the catalyst could be recycled seven times via a simple separation process without noticeable decreases in catalytic activity. PMID:24837832

  3. Study of the chemical mechanisms of the reaction of neutralization of calcium hydroxide by phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elgadi, M.; Mejdoubi, E.; Elansari, L. L.; Essaddek, A.; Abouricha, S.; Lamhamdi, A.

    2005-03-01

    Calcium phosphates reported in this study, are prepared following an acido-basic reaction between phosphoric acid and calcium hydroxide. These phosphates are the brushite, tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite and oxygenated apatite. The follow-up of the reaction by infra-red spectroscopy of absorption showed that the alkaline pH of calcium hydroxide solution, favours the formation of carbonated apatite, at the start of the reaction. Following the addition of phosphoric acid, the pH becomes increasingly favourable to the formation of the desired phase. The insertion of molecular oxygen in the apatitic tunnel is carried out by the use of hydrogen peroxide. The molecular oxygen rate in the apatite is then determined by volumetric analysis.

  4. Chemoselective Boron-Catalyzed Nucleophilic Activation of Carboxylic Acids for Mannich-Type Reactions.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yuya; Yamamoto, Tomohiro; Nagai, Hideoki; Shimizu, Yohei; Kanai, Motomu

    2015-06-10

    The carboxyl group (COOH) is an omnipresent functional group in organic molecules, and its direct catalytic activation represents an attractive synthetic method. Herein, we describe the first example of a direct catalytic nucleophilic activation of carboxylic acids with BH3·SMe2, after which the acids are able to act as carbon nucleophiles, i.e. enolates, in Mannich-type reactions. This reaction proceeds with a mild organic base (DBU) and exhibits high levels of functional group tolerance. The boron catalyst is highly chemoselective toward the COOH group, even in the presence of other carbonyl moieties, such as amides, esters, or ketones. Furthermore, this catalytic method can be extended to highly enantioselective Mannich-type reactions by using a (R)-3,3'-I2-BINOL-substituted boron catalyst.

  5. Chemical remodeling of cell-surface sialic acids through a palladium-triggered bioorthogonal elimination reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Cheng, Bo; Li, Jie; Zhang, Zhaoyue; Hong, Weiyao; Chen, Xing; Chen, Peng R

    2015-04-27

    We herein report a chemical decaging strategy for the in situ generation of neuramic acid (Neu), a unique type of sialic acid, on live cells by the use of a palladium-mediated bioorthogonal elimination reaction. Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) were found to be a highly efficient and biocompatible depropargylation catalyst for the direct conversion of metabolically incorporated N-(propargyloxycarbonyl)neuramic acid (Neu5Proc) into Neu on cell-surface glycans. This conversion chemically mimics the enzymatic de-N-acetylation of N-acetylneuramic acid (Neu5Ac), a proposed mechanism for the natural occurrence of Neu on cell-surface glycans. The bioorthogonal elimination was also exploited for the manipulation of cell-surface charge by unmasking the free amine at C5 to neutralize the negatively charged carboxyl group at C1 of sialic acids.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of polyacids from palm acid oil and sunflower oil via addition reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeimaran, Ehsan; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul; Nor, Hussin Mohd; Kamarul, Tunku; Djordjevic, Ivan

    2013-12-15

    In this study aliphatic polyacids were synthesized using palm acid oil (PAO) and sunflower oil (SFO) via addition reaction technique. The synthesized materials were characterized using Fourier-transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF-MS) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA). Mixing formic acid and hydrogen peroxide with PAO or SFO at the ratio 3:10:1 produced the lowest iodine value of 10.57 and 9.24 respectively, indicating the increase in epoxidization of both oils. Adding adipic acid to the epoxidized oils at a ratio of 1:10 increases the acid values of SFO and PAO to 11.22 and 6.73 respectively. The existence of multi-acid groups present in synthesized polyacid was confirmed by MALD-ToF-MS. This feature indicates a possible value to the biomaterials development.

  7. Reaction kinetics of waste sulfuric acid using H2O2 catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiade; Hong, Binxun; Tong, Xinyang; Qiu, Shufeng

    2016-12-01

    The process of recovering waste sulfuric acids using H2O2 catalytic oxidation is studied in this paper. Activated carbon was used as catalyst. Main operating parameters, such as temperature, feed rate of H2O2, and catalyst dosage, have effects on the removal of impurities from waste sulfuric acids. The reaction kinetics of H2O2 catalytic oxidation on impurities are discussed. At a temperature of 90°C, H2O2 feeding rate of 50 g (kg waste acid)(-1) per hour, and catalyst dosage of 0.2 wt% (waste acid weight), the removal efficiencies of COD and chrominance were both more than 99%, the recovery ratio of sulfuric acid was more than 95%, and the utilization ratio of H2O2 was 88.57%.

  8. The role of acid catalysis in the Baeyer-Villiger reaction. A theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Bach, Robert D

    2012-08-17

    Quantum mechanical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level have examined the overall mechanism of the Baeyer-Villiger (BV) reaction with peroxyacetic acid. A series of reactions that include both the addition step and the subsequent alkyl group migration step included ketones, acetone, t-butyl methyl ketone, acetophenone, cyclohexyl methyl ketone, and cyclohexyl phenyl ketone. The combined data suggested that the first step for addition of the peroxyacetic acid oxidation catalyst to the ketone carbonyl to produce the Criegee or tetrahedral intermediate is rate-limiting and has activation barriers that range from 38 to 41 kcal/mol without the aid of a catalyst. The rate of addition is markedly reduced by the catalytic action of a COOH functionality acting as a donor-acceptor group affecting both its proton transfer to the ketone C═O oxygen in concert with transfer of the OOH proton to the carboxylic acid carbonyl. The second or alkyl group migration step has a much reduced activation barrier, and its rate is not markedly influenced by acid catalysis. The rate of both steps in the BV reaction is greatly influenced by the catalytic action of very strong acids.

  9. Cirrus cloud mimic surfaces in the laboratory: organic acids, bases and NOx heterogeneous reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodeau, J.; Oriordan, B.

    2003-04-01

    CIRRUS CLOUD MIMIC SURFACES IN THE LABORATORY:ORGANIC ACIDS, BASES AND NOX HETEROGENEOUS REACTIONS. B. ORiordan, J. Sodeau Department of Chemistry and Environment Research Institute, University College Cork, Ireland j.sodeau@ucc.ie /Fax: +353-21-4902680 There are a variety of biogenic and anthropogenic sources for the simple carboxylic acids to be found in the troposphere giving rise to levels as high as 45 ppb in certain urban areas. In this regard it is of note that ants of genus Formica produce some 10Tg of formic acid each year; some ten times that produced by industry. The expected sinks are those generally associated with tropospheric chemistry: the major routes studied, to date, being wet and dry deposition. No studies have been carried out hitherto on the role of water-ice surfaces in the atmospheric chemistry of carboxylic acids and the purpose of this paper is to indicate their potential function in the heterogeneous release of atmospheric species such as HONO. The deposition of formic acid on a water-ice surface was studied using FT-RAIR spectroscopy over a range of temperatures between 100 and 165K. In all cases ionization to the formate (and oxonium) ions was observed. The results were confirmed by TPD (Temperature Programmed Desorption) measurements, which indicated that two distinct surface species adsorb to the ice. Potential reactions between the formic acid/formate ion surface and nitrogen dioxide were subsequently investigated by FT-RAIRS. Co-deposition experiments showed that N2O3 and the NO+ ion (associated with water) were formed as products. A mechanism is proposed to explain these results, which involves direct reaction between the organic acid and nitrogen dioxide. Similar experiments involving acetic acid also indicate ionization on a water-ice surface. The results are put into the context of atmospheric chemistry potentially occuring on cirrus cloud surfaces.

  10. A general method for preparing lanthanide oxide nanoparticles via thermal decomposition of lanthanide(III) complexes with 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid and hydrazine ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimalagandhi, Karuppannan; Premkumar, Thathan; Vairam, Sundararajan

    2016-09-01

    Six new lanthanide(III) complexes (i.e., [Ln(L)2(NA)1.5]·3H2O, where Ln=La(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), and Ce(III) and L and NA indicate N2H4 and C10H6(1-O)(2-COO), respectively) with 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid [C10H6(1-O)(2-COOH)] and hydrazine (N2H4) as co-ligands were characterized by elemental, FTIR, UV-visible, and XRD techniques. In the FT-IR spectra, the N-N stretching frequency in the range of 981-949 cm-1 demonstrates evidence of the presence of coordinated N2H4, indicating the bidentate bridging nature of hydrazine in the complexes. These complexes show symmetric and asymmetric COO- stretching from 1444 to 1441 cm-1 and 1582 to 1557 cm-1, respectively, indicating bidentate coordination. TG-DTA studies revealed that the compounds underwent endothermic dehydration from 98 to 110 °C. This was followed by the exothermic decomposition of oxalate intermediates to yield the respective metal oxides as the end products. From SEM images, the average size of the metal oxide particles prepared by thermal decomposition of the complexes was determined to be 39-42 nm. The powder X-ray and SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) studies revealed the presence of the respective nano-sized metal oxides. The kinetic parameters of the decomposition of the complexes were calculated using the Coats-Redfern equation.

  11. Enhanced visible-light photocatalytic decomposition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid over ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 photocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Pengxiang; Yao, Jinhua; Chen, Huan; Jiang, Fang; Xie, Xianchuan

    2016-11-05

    ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 heterojunction photocatalyst was successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal method and applied to visible-light photocatalytic decomposition of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) from aqueous phase. The flower-like ZnIn2S4 particles were dispersed on the surface of g-C3N4 nanosheets in the ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite. The composite showed higher separation rate of electron-hole pairs as compared to ZnIn2S4 and g-C3N4. Consequently, the ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite exhibited enhanced visible light photocatalytic decomposition efficiency of 2,4-D, within 20% ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite owning the highest photocatalytic efficiency and initial rate. The initial rates of 2,4-D degradation on g-C3N4, ZnIn2S4, and 20% ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 were 1.23, 0.57 and 3.69mmol/(gcath), respectively. The h(+) and O2(-) were found to be the dominant active species for 2,4-D decomposition. The photocatalytic degradation pathways of 2,4-D by ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 under visible light irradiation were explored. The ZnIn2S4/g-C3N4 composite displayed high photostability in recycling tests, reflecting its promising potential as an effective visible light photocatalyst for 2,4-D treatment.

  12. Reaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Disulfide and Sulfenic Acid to Form the Strongly Nucleophilic Persulfide.

    PubMed

    Cuevasanta, Ernesto; Lange, Mike; Bonanata, Jenner; Coitiño, E Laura; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Filipovic, Milos R; Alvarez, Beatriz

    2015-11-06

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is increasingly recognized to modulate physiological processes in mammals through mechanisms that are currently under scrutiny. H2S is not able to react with reduced thiols (RSH). However, H2S, more precisely HS(-), is able to react with oxidized thiol derivatives. We performed a systematic study of the reactivity of HS(-) toward symmetric low molecular weight disulfides (RSSR) and mixed albumin (HSA) disulfides. Correlations with thiol acidity and computational modeling showed that the reaction occurs through a concerted mechanism. Comparison with analogous reactions of thiolates indicated that the intrinsic reactivity of HS(-) is 1 order of magnitude lower than that of thiolates. In addition, H2S is able to react with sulfenic acids (RSOH). The rate constant of the reaction of H2S with the sulfenic acid formed in HSA was determined. Both reactions of H2S with disulfides and sulfenic acids yield persulfides (RSSH), recently identified post-translational modifications. The formation of this derivative in HSA was determined, and the rate constants of its reactions with a reporter disulfide and with peroxynitrite revealed that persulfides are better nucleophiles than thiols, which is consistent with the α effect. Experiments with cells in culture showed that treatment with hydrogen peroxide enhanced the formation of persulfides. Biological implications are discussed. Our results give light on the mechanisms of persulfide formation and provide quantitative evidence for the high nucleophilicity of these novel derivatives, setting the stage for understanding the contribution of the reactions of H2S with oxidized thiol derivatives to H2S effector processes.

  13. Woodland Decomposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, J.

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the role of the main organisms involved in woodland decomposition and discusses some of the variables affecting the rate of nutrient cycling. Suggests practical work that may be of value to high school students either as standard practice or long-term projects. (CW)

  14. Heterogeneous Reactions of Acetic Acid with Oxide Surfaces: Effects of Mineralogy and Relative Humidity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingjin; Larish, Whitney A; Fang, Yuan; Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2016-07-21

    We have investigated the heterogeneous uptake of gaseous acetic acid on different oxides including γ-Al2O3, SiO2, and CaO under a range of relative humidity conditions. Under dry conditions, the uptake of acetic acid leads to the formation of both acetate and molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on γ-Al2O3 and CaO and only molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on SiO2. More importantly, under the conditions of this study, dimers are the major form for molecularly adsorbed acetic acid on all three particle surfaces investigated, even at low acetic acid pressures under which monomers are the dominant species in the gas phase. We have also determined saturation surface coverages for acetic acid adsorption on these three oxides under dry conditions as well as Langmuir adsorption constants in some cases. Kinetic analysis shows that the reaction rate of acetic acid increases by a factor of 3-5 for γ-Al2O3 when relative humidity increases from 0% to 15%, whereas for SiO2 particles, acetic acid and water are found to compete for surface adsorption sites.

  15. Hypochlorous acid-mediated protein oxidation: how important are chloramine transfer reactions and protein tertiary structure?

    PubMed

    Pattison, David I; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J

    2007-08-28

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a powerful oxidant generated from H2O2 and Cl- by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase, which is released from activated leukocytes. HOCl possesses potent antibacterial properties, but excessive production can lead to host tissue damage that occurs in numerous human pathologies. As proteins and amino acids are highly abundant in vivo and react rapidly with HOCl, they are likely to be major targets for HOCl. In this study, two small globular proteins, lysozyme and insulin, have been oxidized with increasing excesses of HOCl to determine whether the pattern of HOCl-mediated amino acid consumption is consistent with reported kinetic data for isolated amino acids and model compounds. Identical experiments have been carried out with mixtures of N-acetyl amino acids (to prevent reaction at the alpha-amino groups) that mimic the protein composition to examine the role of protein structure on reactivity. The results indicate that tertiary structure facilitates secondary chlorine transfer reactions of chloramines formed on His and Lys side chains. In light of these data, second-order rate constants for reactions of Lys side chain and Gly chloramines with Trp side chains and disulfide bonds have been determined, together with those for further oxidation of Met sulfoxide by HOCl and His side chain chloramines. Computational kinetic models incorporating these additional rate constants closely predict the experimentally observed amino acid consumption. These studies provide insight into the roles of chloramine formation and three-dimensional structure on the reactions of HOCl with isolated proteins and demonstrate that kinetic models can predict the outcome of HOCl-mediated protein oxidation.

  16. Relative Reaction Rates of Sulfamic Acid and Hydroxylamine with Nitric Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-03-28

    This report describes a study of comparative reaction rates where the reductant is in excess, as in the 1B bank in the Purex process. The results of this work apply to planned plant tests to partially substitute HAN for the ferrous sulfamate reductant in the Purex 1B bank.

  17. Water-catalyzed gas-phase reaction of formic acid with hydroxyl radical: A computational investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yi; Maeda, Satoshi; Ohno, Koichi

    2009-02-01

    The reaction of formic acid with hydroxyl radical, which is considered to be relevant to atmospheric chemistry, has been extensively studied. A water-catalyzed process of this reaction is computationally studied here for the first time. The scaled hypersphere search method was used for global exploration of pre-reaction complexes. Calculations were performed at high level of theory, such as CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/6-311+G(2df, 2p) and CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ//MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ. It is found that the water-catalyzed process of this reaction is more kinetically favorable than its non-catalytic process. Such catalytic process may also be of interest for atmospheric chemistry, like the non-catalytic one.

  18. Enzymatic Kolbe-Schmitt reaction to form salicylic acid from phenol: enzymatic characterization and gene identification of a novel enzyme, Trichosporon moniliiforme salicylic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Gunji, Hiroaki; Wakayama, Rumiko; Hattori, Takasumi; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2010-04-02

    Salicylic acid decarboxylase (Sdc) can produce salicylic acid from phenol; it was found in the yeast Trichosporon moniliiforme WU-0401 and was for the first time enzymatically characterized, with the sdc gene heterologously expressed. Sdc catalyzed both reactions: decarboxylation of salicylic acid to phenol and the carboxylation of phenol to form salicylic acid without any byproducts. Both reactions were detected without the addition of any cofactors and occurred even in the presence of oxygen, suggesting that this Sdc is reversible, nonoxidative, and oxygen insensitive. Therefore, it is readily applicable in the selective production of salicylic acid from phenol, the enzymatic Kolbe-Schmitt reaction. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene, sdc, encoding Sdc comprises 350 amino acid residues corresponding to a 40-kDa protein. The recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) expressing sdc converted phenol to salicylic acid with a 27% (mol/mol) yield at 30 degrees C for 9h.

  19. Heterogeneous Reactions of ClONO2, HCl, and HOCl on Liquid Sulfuric Acid Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Renyi; Leu, Ming-Taun; Keyser, Leon F.

    1994-01-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of ClONO2 + H2O yields HNO3 + HOCl (1), ClONO2 + HCl yields C12 + HNO3 (2), and HOCl + HCl yields Cl2 + H2O (3) on liquid sulfuric acid surfaces have been studied using a fast flow reactor coupled to a quadrupole mass spectrometer. The main objectives of the study are to investigate: (a) the temperature dependence of these reactions at a fixed H2O partial pressure typical of the lower stratosphere (that is, by changing temperature at a constant water partial pressure, the H2SO4 content of the surfaces is also changed), (b) the relative importance or competition between reactions 1 and 2, and (c) the effect of HNO3 on the reaction probabilities due to the formation of a H2SO4/HNO3/H2O ternary system. The measurements show that all the reactions depend markedly on temperature at a fixed H2O partial pressure: they proceed efficiently at temperatures near 200 K and much slower at temperatures near 220 K. The reaction probability (gamma(sub 1)) for ClONO2 hydrolysis approaches 0.01 at temperatures below 200 K, whereas the values for gamma(sub 2) and gamma(sub 3) are on the order of a few tenths at 200 K. Although detailed mechanisms for these reactions are still unknown, the present data indicate that the competition between ClONO2 hydrolysis and ClONO2 reaction with HCl may depend on temperature (or H2SO4 Wt %): in the presence of gaseous HCl at stratospheric concentrations, reaction 2 is dominant at lower temperatures (less than 200 K), but reaction 1 becomes important at temperatures above 210 K. Furthermore, reaction probability measurements performed on the H2SO4/HNO3/ H2O ternary solutions do not exhibit noticeable deviation from those performed on the H2SO4/H2O binary system, suggesting little effect of HNO3 in sulfate aerosols on the ClONO2 and HOCl reactions with HCl. The results reveal that significant reductions in the chlorine-containing reservoir species (such as ClONO2 and HCl) can take place on stratospheric sulfate aerosols at

  20. Drug Reaction With Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms Induced by Valproic Acid: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Darban, Mahboubeh; Bagheri, Bahador

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome is a rare but life-threatening reaction to drugs such as carbamazepine and allopurinol. The condition is characterized by skin rashes, fever, hematological disturbances, lymphadenopathy, and organ failure, most probably hepatic dysfunction. To date, only a few cases of valproate-induced DRESS syndrome have been reported. Case Presentation We report on the case of a 60-year-old man who had been treated with valproic acid some time before being referred to Kowsar Hospital, Semnan, Iran in December 2015. He was given valproic acid 1000 mg PO, and after 20 days, he had developed widespread rashes, fever, esophagitis, cervical lymphadenopathy, and tender hepatomegaly. Laboratory results at Kowsar showed a drop in hemoglobin, in addition to lymphocytosis, thrombocytopenia, and elevated serum transaminases. DRESS was diagnosed, and corticosteroid therapy was initiated. Administration of the culprit drug to the patient was also stopped. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) improved the general condition of the patient. Conclusions Only a small number of case reports have described valproic acid-induced DRESS syndrome; therefore, the condition is difficult to prevent. Rechallenge with valproic acid should be avoided in patients with a history of reaction to the drug. PMID:28144463

  1. Light activates the reaction of bacteriorhodopsin aspartic acid-115 with dicyclohexylcarbodiimide

    SciTech Connect

    Renthal, R.; Cothran, M.; Espinoza, B.; Wall, K.A.; Bernard, M.

    1985-07-30

    Conditions for a light-induced reaction between the carboxyl-modifying reagent N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) and bacteriorhodopsin in Triton X-100 micelles were previously reported. The authors have now located the DCCD site in the bacteriorhodopsin amino acid sequence. ( UC)DCCD-bacteriorhodopsin was cleaved with CNBr. The resulting peptides were purified by gel filtration and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). One major UC peptide (50%) and two minor fractions were obtained. Amino acid analysis and sequence analysis showed that the major fraction contained residues 69-118. This region includes six carboxyl side chains. The major UC peptide was also subjected to pepsin hydrolysis. HPLC analysis of the product gave only a single major radioactive subfragment. Amino acid analysis of the peptic peptide showed that it contained residues 110-118. The only carboxyl side chain in this region is Asp-115. Thus, the authors conclude that Asp-115 is the major DCCD site. The light sensitivity of this reaction suggests that Asp-115 becomes more exposed or that its environment becomes more acidic during proton pumping. The DCCD reaction blue-shifts the retinal chromophore. Such a result would be expected if Asp-115 is the negative point charge predicted to be near the cyclohexene ring of retinal.

  2. Structure-acidity correlation of supported tungsten(VI)-oxo-species: FT-IR and TPD studies of adsorbed pyridine and catalytic decomposition of 2-propanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, M. I.; Mekhemer, G. A. H.; Fouad, N. E.; Rabee, A. I. M.

    2014-07-01

    The amount of 10 wt%-WO3 was supported on alumina, titania or silica by impregnation with aqueous solution of ammonium paratungstate and subsequent calcination at 500 °C for 10 h. Tungstate-related chemical and physical changes in the calcination products were resolved by ex-situ infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Nature of exposed surface acid sites were probed by in-situ IR spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine (Py) molecules at room temperature (RT). The relative strength of the acid sites thus probed was gauged by combining results of temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) measurements of the RT-adsorbed Py with those communicated by in-situ IR spectra of residual Py on the surface after a brief thermoevacuation at high temperatures (100-300 °C). Reactivity of the surface acid sites was tested toward 2-propanal catalytic decomposition, and observed by in-situ IR gas phase spectra. Results obtained were correlated with predominant structures assumed by the supported tungstate species. Accordingly, polymerization of the supported tungstate into 2-/3-dimensional structures, was found to be relatively most advanced on favorable locations of titania surfaces as compared to the case on alumina or silica surfaces. Consequently, the Lewis acidity was strengthened, and strong Bronsted acidity was evolved, leading to a 2-propanol dehydration catalyst (tungstate/titania) of optimal activity and selectivity. Strong tungstate/support interfacial interactions were found to hamper the formation of the strongly acidic and catalytically active polymeric structures of the supported tungstate (i.e., the case on alumina or silica).

  3. Methanol oxidation and hydrogen reactions on NiZr in acid solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hays, C. C.; Manoharan, R.; Goodenough, J. B.

    The electrochemical properties of a Ni 50Zr 50 (at.%) alloy have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry and steady-state polarization measurements. The alloy forms a passivating oxyhydroxide film that makes it electrochemically stable in an acid solution. The oxyhydroxide film is shown to be an electrocatalyst for the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The reaction proceeds at surface O 2- ions neighboring a Ni 3+ ion of a thicker passivating film; electron transfer from the surface to the electrode occurs diffusively by the nickel atoms of the film. A reaction pathway is presented that accounts for the observation of an optimum thickness for the passivating film. The NiZr alloy was also found to catalyze both hydrogen-oxidation and proton-reduction reactions (HOR and PRR) if it has a thinner surface oxyhydroxide film. The alloy appears to form mixed NiZrH and NiZrH 3- x hydrides on cycling negative of the normal hydrogen potential. The activity of the hydrogen-oxidation reaction on a hydride surface was found to increase in the presence of streaming hydrogen gas and also with increasing negative initial potential. Although the hydride is unstable in acid, it may be an attractive candidate for use as a rechargeable negative electrode in an alkaline metal/air or nickel-metal hydride secondary battery.

  4. Phytosphingosine degradation pathway includes fatty acid α-oxidation reactions in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takuya; Seki, Naoya; Kihara, Akio

    2017-03-28

    Although normal fatty acids (FAs) are degraded via β-oxidation, unusual FAs such as 2-hydroxy (2-OH) FAs and 3-methyl-branched FAs are degraded via α-oxidation. Phytosphingosine (PHS) is one of the long-chain bases (the sphingolipid components) and exists in specific tissues, including the epidermis and small intestine in mammals. In the degradation pathway, PHS is converted to 2-OH palmitic acid and then to pentadecanoic acid (C15:0-COOH) via FA α-oxidation. However, the detailed reactions and genes involved in the α-oxidation reactions of the PHS degradation pathway have yet to be determined. In the present study, we reveal the entire PHS degradation pathway: PHS is converted to C15:0-COOH via six reactions [phosphorylation, cleavage, oxidation, CoA addition, cleavage (C1 removal), and oxidation], in which the last three reactions correspond to the α-oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH3A2 catalyzes both the first and second oxidation reactions (fatty aldehydes to FAs). In Aldh3a2-deficient cells, the unmetabolized fatty aldehydes are reduced to fatty alcohols and are incorporated into ether-linked glycerolipids. We also identify HACL2 (2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase 2) [previous name, ILVBL; ilvB (bacterial acetolactate synthase)-like] as the major 2-OH acyl-CoA lyase involved in the cleavage (C1 removal) reaction in the FA α-oxidation of the PHS degradation pathway. HACL2 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, in addition to the already-known FA α-oxidation in the peroxisomes, we have revealed the existence of FA α-oxidation in the endoplasmic reticulum in mammals.

  5. Click with a boronic acid handle: a neighboring group-assisted click reaction that allows ready secondary functionalization.

    PubMed

    Draganov, Alexander B; Wang, Ke; Holmes, Jalisa; Damera, Krishna; Wang, Danzhu; Dai, Chaofeng; Wang, Binghe

    2015-10-21

    The feasibility of a neighboring boronic acid-facilitated facile condensation of an aldehyde is described. This reaction is bio-orthogonal, complete at room temperature within minutes, and suitable for bioconjugation chemistry. The boronic acid group serves the dual purpose of catalyzing the condensation reaction and being a handle for secondary functionalization.

  6. Atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiO(2) and TiO(2-x)-N(x) thin film photocatalysts in salicylic acid decomposition.

    PubMed

    Vilhunen, S H; Sillanpää, M E T

    2009-01-01

    Degradation of salicylic acid (SA) with thin film photocatalyst, titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) and nitrogen-doped TiO(2) (TiO(2-x)-N(x)) combined with ultraviolet (UV) radiation was studied. TiO(2) film with thickness of 15 and 65 nm was tested. The TiO(2-x)-N(x) film had thickness of 15 nm on top of TiO(2) (50 nm). Photocatalysts were prepared on glass substrate by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique. The effect of initial pH (3-10) was studied with SA concentration of 10 mg/l. Decomposition of SA was fastest at pH 6 with both films and the rate was equal at initial pH values 3 and 4.3. However, at higher pH values the non-doped film was more efficient.

  7. Pitchfork and winged-cusp singularities in iodate-arsenous acid reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ru-Sheng

    1994-09-01

    The iodate-arsenous acid reaction was reported to be able to exhibit hysteresis bistability, including mushrooms and isolas, in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor (CSTR) when an additional flow of solvent is introduced [N. Ganapathisubramanian and K. Showalter, J. Chem. Phys. 80, 4177 (1984)]. Based on their kinetic data and the empirical rate law, it is shown that the reaction may also exhibit pitchfork-type and winged cusp-type singularities if additional flows of the reactants are introduced to the CSTR.

  8. Library of Antifouling Surfaces Derived From Natural Amino Acids by Click Reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Hu, Xin; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Ye-Min; Liu, Xiao-Jiu; Xie, Bin-Bin; Yao, Chen; Li, Yi; Li, Xin-Song

    2015-08-12

    Biofouling is of great concern in numerous applications ranging from ophthalmological implants to catheters, and from bioseparation to biosensors. In this report, a general and facile strategy to combat surface fouling is developed by grafting of amino acids onto polymer substrates to form zwitterionic structure through amino groups induced epoxy ring opening click reaction. First of all, a library of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) hydrogels with zwitterionic surfaces were prepared, resulting in the formation of pairs of carboxyl anions and protonated secondary amino cations. The analysis of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the successful immobilization of amino acids on the hydrogel surfaces. After that, the contact angle and equilibrium water content of the modified hydrogels showed that the hydrogels exhibited improved hydrophilicity compared with the parent hydrogel. Furthermore, the protein deposition was evaluated by bicinchoninic acid assay using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme as models. The results indicated that the performance of the hydrogels was determined by the nature of incorporated amino acid: the hydrogels incorporated with neutral amino acids had nonspecific antiadsorption capability to both BSA and lysozyme; the hydrogels incorporated with charged amino acids showed antiadsorption behaviors against protein with same charge and enhanced adsorption to the protein with opposite charge; the optimal antiadsorption performance was observed on the hydrogels incorporated with polar amino acids with a hydroxyl residual. The improvement of antiprotein fouling of the neutral amino acids grafted hydrogels can be ascribed to the formation of zwitterionic surfaces. Finally, a couple of soft contact lenses grafted with amino acids were fabricated having improved antifouling property and hydrophilicity. The result demonstrated the success of

  9. Role of Lewis acid additives in a palladium catalyzed directed C-H functionalization reaction of benzohydroxamic acid to isoxazolone.

    PubMed

    Athira, C; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2016-12-20

    Metallic salts as well as protic additives are widely employed in transition metal catalyzed C-H bond functionalization reactions to improve the efficiency of catalytic protocols. In one such example, ZnCl2 and pivalic acid are used as additives in a palladium catalyzed synthesis of isoxazolone from a readily available benzohydroxamic acid under one pot conditions. In this article, we present some important mechanistic insights into the role of ZnCl2 and pivalic acid, gained by using density functional theory (M06) computations. Two interesting modes of action of ZnCl2 are identified in various catalytic steps involved in the formation of isoxazolone. The conventional Lewis acid coordination wherein zinc chloride (ZnCl2·(DMA)) binds to the carbonyl group is found to be more favored in the C-H activation step. However, the participation of a hetero-bimetallic Pd-Zn species is preferred in reductive elimination leading to Caryl-N bond formation. Pivalic acid helps in relay proton transfer in C-H bond activation through a cyclometallation deprotonation (CMD) process. The explicit inclusion of ZnCl2 and solvent N,N-dimethyl acetamide (DMA) stabilizes the transition state and also helps reduce the activation barrier for the C-H bond activation step. The electronic communication between the two metal species is playing a crucial role in stabilizing the Caryl-N bond formation transition state through a Pd-Zn hetero-bimetallic interaction.

  10. An acidic layered clay is combined with a basic layered clay for one-pot sequential reactions.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Fujita, Noriaki; Mori, Kohsuke; Mizugaki, Tomoo; Ebitani, Kohki; Kaneda, Kiyotomi

    2005-07-13

    A Ti4+-exchanged montmorillonite (Ti4+-mont) and a hydrotalcite (HT) are strong solid Brønsted acid and base, and these two clay catalysts could be used in a single reactor without neutralization of active sites. Because the Ti4+-mont have active acid site in the narrow interlayers, the base sites of large HT particles show no interaction with the acid sites. A variety of acid and base reactions, such as esterification, acetalization, deacetalization, aldol reaction, Michael reaction, and epoxidation, proceeded using both the Ti4+-mont and the HT in a single reactor.

  11. 40 CFR 721.9400 - Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reaction product of phenolic... Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and glyceride... substances identified generically as Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9400 - Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reaction product of phenolic... Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and glyceride... substances identified generically as Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty...

  13. 40 CFR 721.9400 - Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reaction product of phenolic... Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and glyceride... substances identified generically as Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10363 - Alkenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4′ -methylenebis...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4â² -methylenebis (cyclohexanamine) (generic). 721.10363 Section... Substances § 721.10363 Alkenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4..., reaction products with 4,4′ -methylenebis (cyclohexanamine) (PMN P-10-47) is subject to reporting...

  15. 40 CFR 721.10363 - Alkenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4′ -methylenebis...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4â² -methylenebis (cyclohexanamine) (generic). 721.10363 Section... Substances § 721.10363 Alkenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4..., reaction products with 4,4′ -methylenebis (cyclohexanamine) (PMN P-10-47) is subject to reporting...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9400 - Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reaction product of phenolic... Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty acid esters and oils, and glyceride... substances identified generically as Reaction product of phenolic pentaerythritol tetraesters with fatty...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10363 - Alkenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4′ -methylenebis...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4â² -methylenebis (cyclohexanamine) (generic). 721.10363 Section... Substances § 721.10363 Alkenoic acid, 2-methyl-, 2-oxiranylmethyl ester, reaction products with 4,4..., reaction products with 4,4′ -methylenebis (cyclohexanamine) (PMN P-10-47) is subject to reporting...

  18. Organosulfate Formation through the Heterogeneous Reaction of Sulfur Dioxide with Unsaturated Fatty Acids and Long-Chain Alkenes.

    PubMed

    Passananti, Monica; Kong, Lingdong; Shang, Jing; Dupart, Yoan; Perrier, Sébastien; Chen, Jianmin; Donaldson, D James; George, Christian

    2016-08-22

    The heterogeneous reaction between SO2 and unsaturated compounds results in the efficient production of organosulfates for several fatty acids and long-chain alkenes. The presence of an acid group, the physical state of the reactants (solid or liquid), the nature of the double bond (cis, trans, terminal), and the use of light irradiation all have an impact on the reaction rate. The reaction was investigated using different set-ups (coated flow tube, aerosol flow tube, and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform cell). The reaction products were identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry and the impact of this reaction on organosulfate formation in the atmosphere is discussed.

  19. Determination of nitrite via reaction with pyridine-4-carboxylic acid hydrazide

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, K.K.; Tyagi, P.

    1985-06-01

    Nitrite is determined by its reaction with a measured but excessive amount of pyridine-4-carboxylic acid hydrazide in acid medium (when the two substances react in a 1:1 molar ratio) and evaluation of the surplus hydrazide by titration with chloramine-T in the presence of acidified potassium bromide, the end-point being shown by the decolorization of the methyl red indicator. Nitrate, copper(II), mercury(II), etc. are found not to interfere, and the determination of nitrite in the presence of diazotized aromatic amines is demonstrated. 11 references, 2 tables.

  20. Dynamic behavior of the bray-liebhafsky oscillatory reaction controlled by sulfuric acid and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejić, N.; Vujković, M.; Maksimović, J.; Ivanović, A.; Anić, S.; Čupić, Ž.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.

    2011-12-01

    The non-periodic, periodic and chaotic regimes in the Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) oscillatory reaction observed in a continuously fed well stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under isothermal conditions at various inflow concentrations of the sulfuric acid were experimentally studied. In each series (at any fixed temperature), termination of oscillatory behavior via saddle loop infinite period bifurcation (SNIPER) as well as some kind of the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation is presented. In addition, it was found that an increase of temperature, in different series of experiments resulted in the shift of bifurcation point towards higher values of sulfuric acid concentration.

  1. Reaction of isoprene on thin sulfuric acid films: kinetics, uptake, and product analysis.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Brandon M; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2010-06-15

    A high vacuum Knudsen flow reactor was used to determine the reactive uptake coefficient, gamma, of isoprene on sulfuric acid films as a function of sulfuric acid weight percent, temperature, and relative humidity. No discernible dependence was observed for gamma over the range of temperatures (220 - 265 K) and pressures (10(-7) Torr -10(-4) Torr) studied. However, the uptake coefficient increased with increased sulfuric acid concentration between the range of 78 wt % (gamma(i) approximately 10(-4)) and 93 wt % (gamma(i) approximately 10(-3)). In addition to the Knudsen Cell, a bulk study was conducted between 60 and 85 wt % H(2)SO(4) to quantify uptake at lower acid concentrations and to determine reaction products. After exposing sulfuric acid to gaseous isoprene the condensed phase products were extracted and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Isoprene was observed to polymerize in the sulfuric acid and form yellow/red colored monoterpenes and cyclic sesquiterpenes. Finally, addition of water to the 85 wt % sulfuric acid/isoprene product mixture released these terpenes from the condensed phase into the gas phase. Together these experiments imply that direct isoprene uptake will not produce significant SOA; however, terpene production from the small uptake may be relevant for ultrafine particles and could affect growth and nucleation.

  2. Life detection experiments of the Viking Mission on Mars can be best interpreted with a Fenton oxidation reaction composed of H2O2 and Fe2+ and iron-catalysed decomposition of H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apak, Resat

    2008-10-01

    The findings of the life detection experiments carried out during the Viking mission to Mars were reinterpreted with a chemical hypothesis. The labelled release (LR), pyrolytic release (PR) and gas exchange (GEx) experiments were interpreted with Fenton chemistry. Oxygen and carbon dioxide evolution from Martian soil upon wetting and nutrient addition could be attributed to competition reactions between the Fenton-type oxidation of organic nutrients with the aqueous (hydrogen peroxide+Fe(II)) combination and the iron-catalysed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. A substantial evolution of radioactive gas upon addition of labelled organic nutrient solution to soil, whereas the ceasing of this gas with a heat treated sample in the LR experiments, was attributed to Fenton oxidation and hydrogen peroxide thermal decomposition, respectively. The peculiar kinetics of LR and PR experiments that cannot be fully explained by other chemical or biochemical scenarios were easily explained with this new hypothesis, i.e. limitation of the Fenton reaction may arise from the depletion of reactants, the build-up of ferric hydroxide on soil and excessive scavenging by the organic nutrients of the generated hydroxyl radicals. Reabsorption or adsorption of evolved or introduced CO2 may involve the formation of carbonate compounds (e.g., magnesium carbonate and bicarbonate) on the surface of alkalinized soil as a result of the Fenton reaction. A critical evaluation of the recent biological hypothesis assuming the utilization of a hydrogen peroxide water intracellular fluid by putative organisms (Houtkooper & Schulze-Makuch 2007) is also made.

  3. Muonium reactions with chloroacetic acid in water: Contrasts with H atoms and hydrated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadlbauer, John M.; Venkateswaran, Krishnan; Walker, David C.

    1997-09-01

    Muonium atoms react with chloroacetic acid and chloroacetate ions in dilute aqueous solution with rate constants of 2.3 × 10 6 and 9.1 × 10 5 dm 3 mol -1 s -1 respectively. These are compared with the reactions of 1H atoms (and e aq-) and discussed in terms of a pair of competing kinetic isotope effects. Muonium reacts at least eight times faster than H overall, and probably 28 times faster in forming Cl -. It behaves as a nucleophile, thus resembling e aq- more than H, in reacting faster with the acid than the anion. Muonium's reactions must be governed to a considerable extent by quantum-mechanical effects arising from its very small mass.

  4. Revisiting the Kinetics and Mechanism of the Tetrathionate-Hypochlorous Acid Reaction in Nearly Neutral Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Dénes; Horváth, Attila K.

    2009-11-01

    The tetrathionate-hypochlorous acid reaction has been investigated in nearly neutral medium at I = 0.5 M ionic strength and T = 25.0 ± 0.1 °C in dihydrogen-phosphate-hydrogen-phosphate buffer by UV-vis spectrophotometry. In excess of hypochlorous acid, the stoichiometry was found to be S4O62- + 7HOCl + 3H2O → 4SO42- + 7Cl- + 13H+, but in excess of tetrathionate colloidal sulfur precipitates. On the basis of the simultaneous evaluation of the kinetic curves, a nine-step kinetic model with four fitted and five fixed rate coefficients is proposed. Analogous oxidation reactions of tetrathionate are also compared and discussed.

  5. Origin of fatty acid synthesis - Thermodynamics and kinetics of reaction pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1991-01-01

    The primitiveness of contemporary fatty acid biosynthesis was evaluated by using the thermodynamics and kinetics of its component reactions to estimate the extent of its dependence on powerful and selective catalysis by enzymes. Since this analysis indicated that the modern pathway is not primitive because it requires sophisticated enzymatic catalysis, an alternative pathway of primitive fatty acid synthesis is proposed that uses glycolaldehyde as a substrate. In contrast to the modern pathway, this primitive pathway is not dependent on an exogenous source of phosphoanhydride energy. Furthermore, the chemical spontaneity of its reactions suggests that it could have been readily catalyzed by the rudimentary biocatalysts available at an early stage in the origin of life.

  6. Rapid generation of molecular complexity in the Lewis or Brønsted acid-mediated reactions of methylenecyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Min; Lu, Jian-Mei; Wei, Yin; Shao, Li-Xiong

    2012-04-17

    Although they are highly strained, methylenecyclopropanes (MCPs) are readily accessible molecules that have served as useful building blocks in organic synthesis. MCPs can undergo a variety of ring-opening reactions because the release of cyclopropyl ring strain (40 kcal/mol) can provide a thermodynamic driving force for reactions and the π-character of the bonds within the cyclopropane can afford the kinetic opportunity to initiate the ring-opening. Since the 1970s, the chemistry of MCPs has been widely explored in the presence of transition metal catalysts, but less attention had been paid to the Lewis or Brønsted acid mediated chemistry of MCPs. During the past decade, significant developments have also been made in the Lewis or Brønsted acid mediated reactions of MCPs. This Account describes chemistry developed in our laboratory and by other researchers. Lewis and Brønsted acids can be used as catalysts or reagents in the reactions of MCPs with a variety of substrates, and substituents on the terminal methylene or on the cyclopropyl ring of MCPs significantly affect the reaction pathways. During the past decade, we and other researchers have found interesting transformations based on this chemistry. These new reactions include the ring expansion of MCPs, cycloaddition reactions of MCPs with aldehydes and imines, cycloaddition reactions of MCPs with nitriles in the presence of strong Brønsted acid, radical reactions of MCPs with 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds, intramolecular Friedel-Crafts reactions of MCPs with arenes, acylation reactions of MCPs, and the reaction of MCPs with 1,1,3-triarylprop-2-yn-1-ols or their methyl ethers. These Lewis or Brønsted acid mediated reactions of MCPs can produce a variety of new compounds such as cyclobutanones, indenes, tetrahydrofurans, and tetrahydroquinolines. Finally, we have also carried out computational studies to explain the mechanism of the Brønsted acid mediated reactions of MCPs with acetonitrile.

  7. An Investigation of the Complexity of Maillard Reaction Product Profiles from the Thermal Reaction of Amino Acids with Sucrose Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Golon, Agnieszka; Kropf, Christian; Vockenroth, Inga; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2014-01-01

    Thermal treatment of food changes its chemical composition drastically with the formation of “so-called” Maillard reaction products, being responsible for the sensory properties of food, along with detrimental and beneficial health effects. In this contribution, we will describe the reactivity of several amino acids, including arginine, lysine, aspartic acid, tyrosine, serine and cysteine, with carbohydrates. The analytical strategy employed involves high and ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry followed by chemometric-type data analysis. The different reactivity of amino acids towards carbohydrates has been observed with cysteine and serine, resulting in complex MS spectra with thousands of detectable reaction products. Several compounds have been tentatively identified, including caramelization reaction products, adducts of amino acids with carbohydrates, their dehydration and hydration products, disproportionation products and aromatic compounds based on molecular formula considerations. PMID:28234331

  8. Axially chiral imidodiphosphoric Acid catalyst for asymmetric sulfoxidation reaction: insights on asymmetric induction.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Garima; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2014-04-22

    Insights into chiral induction for an asymmetric sulfoxidation reaction involving a single oxygen atom transfer are gained through analyzing the stereocontrolling transition states. The fitting of the substrate into the chiral cavity of a new class of imidodiphosphoric Brønsted acids, as well as weak CH⋅⋅⋅π and CH⋅⋅⋅O noncovalent interactions, are identified as responsible for the observed chiral induction.

  9. Lewis acid catalyzed cascade reaction to carbazoles and naphthalenes via dehydrative [3 + 3]-annulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoyin; Chai, Zhuo; Wei, Yun; Zhu, Xiancui; Zhou, Shuangliu; Wang, Shaowu

    2014-07-03

    A novel Lewis acid catalyzed dehydrative [3 + 3]-annulation of readily available benzylic alcohols and propargylic alcohols was developed to give polysubstituted carbazoles and naphthalenes in moderate to good yields with water as the only byproduct. The reaction was presumed to proceed via a cascade process involving Friedel-Crafts-type allenylation, 1,5-hydride shift, 6π-eletrocyclization, and Wagner-Meerwein rearrangement.

  10. Reversion and dehydration reactions of glucose during the dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    The inaccessibility of all glycosidic bonds necessitates industrial conversion schemes which employ a dilute acid catalyst at high temperatures. Process conditions also promote further reactions of glucose via the reversion and dehydration pathways. Quantitative determination of the yields of the major reversion and dehydration products is important for understanding and predicting the amounts of these materials expected under envisioned industrial operating conditions. Microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) was hydrolyzed with sulfuric acid (0.0-1.25 wt.%), at high temperatures (160-250/sup 0/C), and at a 3:1 liquid-to-solid ratio. The hydrolysis was monitored by evaluating the amount of cellulose remaining and the yields of glucose, solid humin, levulinic acid, formic acid, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), and reversion products as a function of the aforementioned reaction conditions. Analysis of the reversion products required the development of a technique for the quantitation of trace carbohydrates in complex mixtures and led to the development of a reduction/permethylation gas chromatographic procedure. Cellulose hydrolysis followed pseudo-homogeneous first-order kinetics. Glucose yield was adequately described as consecutive first-order reactions. Anhydrosugars formed via reversion followed equilibrium reaction kinetics whereas the disaccharides did not. Total reversion product yields approached 10% at 250/sup 0/C. Quantitative determination of the major dehydration products provided important information concerning the destruction of glucose. HMF was produced in up to 12% yields based on the theoretical amount of glucose available, and furfural was detected in up to 5% yields. A carbon mass balance based on the determined product yields revealed that approximately 90% of all carbon was accounted for at maximum glucose yields.

  11. Impact of Lewis acids on Diels-Alder reaction reactivity: a conceptual density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yue; Yin, Dulin; Rong, Chunying; Xu, Qiong; Yin, Donghong; Liu, Shubin

    2008-10-09

    Density functional theory (DFT) and conceptual/chemical DFT studies are carried out in this work for the normal electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between isoprene and acrolein to compare chemical reactivity and regioselectivity of the reactants in the absence and presence of Lewis acid (LA) catalysts. A cyclic coplanar structure of acrolein-LA complex has been observed and the natural bond orbital analysis has been employed to interpret the interaction between acrolein and LAs. Reactivity indices from frontier molecular orbital energies are proved to be adequate and efficient to evaluate the catalytic property of LAs. Linear relationships have been discovered among the bond order, bond length, catalytic activation, and chemical reactivity for the systems concerned. The validity and applicability of maximum hardness principle, minimum polarizability principle, and minimum electrophilicity principle are examined and discussed in the prediction of the major regioselective isomer and the preferred reaction pathway for the reactions in the present study.

  12. Kinetic Reaction Mechanism of Sinapic Acid Scavenging NO2 and OH Radicals: A Theoretical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Wang, AiHua; Shi, Peng; Zhang, Hui; Li, ZeSheng

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism and kinetics underlying reactions between the naturally-occurring antioxidant sinapic acid (SA) and the very damaging ·NO2 and ·OH were investigated through the density functional theory (DFT). Two most possible reaction mechanisms were studied: hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) and radical adduct formation (RAF). Different reaction channels of neutral and anionic sinapic acid (SA-) scavenging radicals in both atmosphere and water medium were traced independently, and the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters were calculated. We find the most active site of SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 and ·OH is the –OH group in benzene ring by HAT mechanism, while the RAF mechanism for SA/SA- scavenging ·NO2 seems thermodynamically unfavorable. In water phase, at 298 K, the total rate constants of SA eliminating ·NO2 and ·OH are 1.30×108 and 9.20×109 M-1 S-1 respectively, indicating that sinapic acid is an efficient scavenger for both ·NO2 and ·OH. PMID:27622460

  13. A preliminary investigation of acid-catalyzed polymerization reactions of shale oil distillates

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.

    1991-04-01

    Sinor (1989) reported that a major specialty market may exist for shale oil as an asphalt blending material. Shale oil can be converted to an asphalt blending material by acid catalyzed condensation and polymerization reactions of the many molecular species comprising the composition of shale oil. To simplify the investigation, crude shale oil was separated by distillation into three distillates of different hydrocarbon and heteroaromatic compositions. These distillates were then treated with two different types of acids to determine the effect of acid type on the end products. Three western shale oil distillates, a naphtha, a middle distillate, and an atmospheric gas oil, were reacted with anhydrous AlCl{sub 3} and 85% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} under low-severity conditions. At relatively low temperatures, little change in the hydrocarbon composition was noted for the AlCl{sub 3} reactions. AlCl{sub 3}{center_dot} (a polymerized product and/or complex) was formed. However, it is assumed that the sludge was mainly the result of heteroaromatic-AlCl{sub 3} reactions.

  14. A preliminary investigation of acid-catalyzed polymerization reactions of shale oil distillates

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.

    1991-04-01

    Sinor (1989) reported that a major specialty market may exist for shale oil as an asphalt blending material. Shale oil can be converted to an asphalt blending material by acid catalyzed condensation and polymerization reactions of the many molecular species comprising the composition of shale oil. To simplify the investigation, crude shale oil was separated by distillation into three distillates of different hydrocarbon and heteroaromatic compositions. These distillates were then treated with two different types of acids to determine the effect of acid type on the end products. Three western shale oil distillates, a naphtha, a middle distillate, and an atmospheric gas oil, were reacted with anhydrous AlCl{sub 3} and 85% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} under low-severity conditions. At relatively low temperatures, little change in the hydrocarbon composition was noted for the AlCl{sub 3} reactions. AlCl{sub 3}{center dot} (a polymerized product and/or complex) was formed. However, it is assumed that the sludge was mainly the result of heteroaromatic-AlCl{sub 3} reactions.

  15. Effects of ascorbic acid on sperm motility, viability, acrosome reaction and DNA integrity in teratozoospermic samples

    PubMed Central

    Fanaei, Hamed; Khayat, Samira; Halvaei, Iman; Ramezani, Vahid; Azizi, Yaser; Kasaeian, Amir; Mardaneh, Jalal; Parvizi, Mohammad Reza; Akrami, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress in teratozoospermic semen samples caused poor assisted reproductive techniques (ART) outcomes. Among antioxidants, ascorbic acid is a naturally occurring free radical scavenger and as such its presence assists various other mechanisms in decreasing numerous disruptive free radical processes. Objective: The main goal of this study was to evaluate potential protective effects of ascorbic acid supplementation during in vitro culture of teratozoospermic specimens. Materials and Methods: Teratozoospermic semen samples that collected from 15 volunteers were processed, centrifuged and incubated at 37oC until sperm swimmed-up. Supernatant was divided into four groups and incubated at 37oC for one hour under different experimental conditions: Control, 10 µm A23187, 600µm ascorbic acid and 10 µm A23187+600 µm ascorbic acid. After incubation sperm motility, viability, acrosome reaction, DNA damage and malondialdehyde levels were evaluated. Results: Our results indicated that after one hour incubation, ascorbic acid significantly reduced malondialdehyde level in ascorbic acid group (1.4±0.11 nmol/ml) compared to control group (1.58±0.13 nmol/ml) (p<0.001). At the end of incubation, progressive motility and viability in ascorbic acid group (64.5±8.8% and 80.3±6.4%, respectively) were significantly (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively) higher than the control group (54.5±6.8% and 70.9±7.3%, respectively). A23187 significantly (p<0.0001) increased acrosome reaction in A23187 group (37.3±5.6%) compared to control group (8.5±3.2%) and this effect of A23187 attenuated by ascorbic acid in ascorbic acid+A23187 group (17.2±4.4%). DNA fragmentation in ascorbic acid group (20±4.1%) was significantly (p<0.001) lower than controls (28.9±4.6%). Conclusion: In vitro ascorbic acid supplementation during teratozoospermic semen processing for ART could protect teratozoospermic specimens against oxidative stress, and it could improve ART outcome. PMID

  16. Formation of flavor components by the reaction of amino acid and carbonyl compounds in mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Pripis-Nicolau, L; de Revel, G; Bertrand, A; Maujean, A

    2000-09-01

    This work describe products of reactions between four alpha-dicarbonyl compounds (diacetyl, pentan-2,3-dione, glyoxal, and methylglyoxal) or two alpha-hydroxy ketones, (acetoine and acetol) and amino acids present in wines. The results shows the formation of odorous products or strong-smelling additives resulting from the Maillard and Strecker reaction in a primarily aqueous medium, at low temperature and low pH ( approximately pH 3.5) of the wine. GC/FID, GC/FPD, GC/NPD and GC/MS techniques were used. The olfactive characteristics of the products are described. In the presence of sulfur amino acids and in particular cysteine, many products were formed with a heterocycle production such as pyrazines and methylpyrazines, methylthiazoles, acetylthiazoles, acetylthiazolines, acetylthiazolidines, trimethyloxazole, and dimethylethyloxazoles. These various compounds present odors of sulfur, cornlike, pungent, nut, popcorn, roasted hazelnut, toasted, roasted, and ripe fruits. The chemical conditions of the model reactions are specified. The influence of temperature and pH on the reactions in the presence of cysteine were also studied.

  17. Thermal decomposition products of butyraldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatten, Courtney D.; Kaskey, Kevin R.; Warner, Brian J.; Wright, Emily M.; McCunn, Laura R.

    2013-12-01

    The thermal decomposition of gas-phase butyraldehyde, CH3CH2CH2CHO, was studied in the 1300-1600 K range with a hyperthermal nozzle. Products were identified via matrix-isolation Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and photoionization mass spectrometry in separate experiments. There are at least six major initial reactions contributing to the decomposition of butyraldehyde: a radical decomposition channel leading to propyl radical + CO + H; molecular elimination to form H2 + ethylketene; a keto-enol tautomerism followed by elimination of H2O producing 1-butyne; an intramolecular hydrogen shift and elimination producing vinyl alcohol and ethylene, a β-C-C bond scission yielding ethyl and vinoxy radicals; and a γ-C-C bond scission yielding methyl and CH2CH2CHO radicals. The first three reactions are analogous to those observed in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde, but the latter three reactions are made possible by the longer alkyl chain structure of butyraldehyde. The products identified following thermal decomposition of butyraldehyde are CO, HCO, CH3CH2CH2, CH3CH2CH=C=O, H2O, CH3CH2C≡CH, CH2CH2, CH2=CHOH, CH2CHO, CH3, HC≡CH, CH2CCH, CH3C≡CH, CH3CH=CH2, H2C=C=O, CH3CH2CH3, CH2=CHCHO, C4H2, C4H4, and C4H8. The first ten products listed are direct products of the six reactions listed above. The remaining products can be attributed to further decomposition reactions or bimolecular reactions in the nozzle.

  18. Reaction of primary and secondary amines to form carbamic acid glucuronides.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, William H

    2006-12-01

    Glucuronidation is an important mechanism used by mammalian systems to clear and eliminate both endogenous and foreign chemicals. Many functional groups are susceptible to conjugation with glucuronic acid, including hydroxyls, phenols, carboxyls, activated carbons, thiols, amines, and selenium. Primary and secondary amines can also react with carbon dioxide (CO(2)) via a reversible reaction to form a carbamic acid. The carbamic acid is also a substrate for glucuronidation and results in a stable carbamate glucuronide metabolite. The detection and characterization of these products has been facilitated greatly by the advent of soft ionization mass spectrometry techniques and high field NMR instrumentation. The formation of carbamate glucuronide metabolites has been described for numerous pharmaceuticals and they have been identified in all of the species commonly used in drug metabolism studies (rat, dog, mouse, rabbit, guinea pig, and human). There has been no obvious species specificity for their formation and no preference for 1 degrees or 2 degrees amines. Many biological reactions have also been described in the literature that involve the reaction of CO(2) with amino groups of biomolecules. For example, CO(2) generated from cellular respiration is expired in part through the reversible formation of a carbamate between CO(2) and the alpha-amino groups of the alpha- and beta-chains of hemoglobin. Also, carbamic acid products of several amines, such as beta-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), ethylenediamine, and L-cysteine have been implicated in toxicity. Studies suggested that a significant portion of amino-compounds in biological samples (that naturally contain CO(2)/bicarbonate) can be present as a carbamic acid.

  19. [Experimental and kinetic modeling of acid/base and redox reactions over oxide catalysts]. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The research has involved the characterization of catalyst acidity, {sup 2}D NMR studies of Bronsted acid sites, and kinetic, calorimetric, and spectroscopic studies of methylamine synthesis and related reactions over acid catalysts. Approach of this work was to explore quantitative correlations between factors that control the generation, type, strength, and catalytic properties of acid sites on zeolite catalysts. Microcalorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, IR spectroscopy, and NMR spectroscopy have provided information about the nature and strength of acid sites in zeolites. This was vital in understanding the catalytic cycles involved in methylamine synthesis and related reactions over zeolite catalysts.

  20. REACTION MECHANISMS OF 15-HYDROPEROXYEICOSATETRAENOIC ACID CATALYZED BY HUMAN PROSTACYCLIN AND THROMBOXANE SYNTHASES

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Hui-Chun; Tsai, Ah-Lim; Wang, Lee-Ho

    2007-01-01

    Prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) and thromboxane synthase (TXAS) are atypical cytochrome P450s. They do not require NADPH or dioxygen for isomerization of prostaglandin H2 (PGH2) to produce prostacyclin (PGI2) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2). PGI2 and TXA2 have opposing actions on platelet aggregation and blood vessel tone. In this report, we use a lipid hydroperoxide, 15-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HPETE), to explore the active site characteristics of PGIS and TXAS. The two enzymes transformed 15-HPETE not only into 13-hydroxy-14,15-epoxy-5,8,11-eicosatrienoic acid (13-OH-14,15-EET), like many microsomal P450s, but also to 15-ketoeicosatetraenoic acid (15-KETE) and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE). 13-OH-14,15-EET and 15-KETE result from homolytic cleavage of the O–O bond, whereas 15-HETE results from heterolytic cleavage, a common peroxidase pathway. About 80% of 15-HPETE was homolytically cleaved by PGIS and 60% was homolytically cleaved by TXAS. The Vmax of homolytic cleavage is 3.5-fold faster than heterolytic cleavage for PGIS-catalyzed reactions (1100 min−1 vs. 320 min−1) and 1.4-fold faster for TXAS (170 min−1 vs. 120 min−1). Similar KM values for homolytic and heterolytic cleavages were found for PGIS (∼60 μM 15-HPETE) and TXAS (∼80 μM 15-HPETE), making PGIS a more efficient catalyst for the 15-HPETE reaction. PMID:17459323

  1. Nuclemeter: A Reaction-Diffusion Based Method for Quantifying Nucleic Acids Undergoing Enzymatic Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changchun; Sadik, Mohamed M.; Mauk, Michael G.; Edelstein, Paul H.; Bushman, Frederic D.; Gross, Robert; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time amplification and quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences plays a major role in medical and biotechnological applications. In the case of infectious diseases, such as HIV, quantification of the pathogen-load in patient specimens is critical to assess disease progression and effectiveness of drug therapy. Typically, nucleic acid quantification requires expensive instruments, such as real-time PCR machines, which are not appropriate for on-site use and for low-resource settings. This paper describes a simple, low-cost, reaction-diffusion based method for end-point quantification of target nucleic acids undergoing enzymatic amplification. The number of target molecules is inferred from the position of the reaction-diffusion front, analogous to reading temperature in a mercury thermometer. The method was tested for HIV viral load monitoring and performed on par with conventional benchtop methods. The proposed method is suitable for nucleic acid quantification at point of care, compatible with multiplexing and high-throughput processing, and can function instrument-free. PMID:25477046

  2. A dual arylboronic acid--aminothiourea catalytic system for the asymmetric intramolecular hetero-Michael reaction of α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Takumi; Murata, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Inokuma, Tsubasa; Takemoto, Yoshiji

    2014-08-15

    A bifunctional aminoboronic acid has been used to facilitate for the first time the intramolecular aza- and oxa-Michael reactions of α,β-unsaturated carboxylic acids. The combination of an arylboronic acid with a chiral aminothiourea allowed for these reactions to proceed successfully in an enantioselective manner to afford the desired heterocycles in high yields and ee's (up to 96% ee). The overall utility of this dual catalytic system was demonstrated by a one-pot enantioselective synthesis of (+)-erythrococcamide B, which proceeded via sequential Michael and amidation reactions.

  3. Aquatic photolysis: photolytic redox reactions between goethite and adsorbed organic acids in aqueous solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Cunningham, K.M.; Weiner, Eugene R.

    1993-01-01

    Photolysis of mono and di-carboxylic acids that are adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxyhydroxide (goethite) results in an oxidation of the organic material and a reduction from Fe(III) to Fe(II) in the iron complex. There is a subsequent release of Fe2+ ions into solution. At constant light flux and constant solution light absorption, the factors responsible for the degree of photolytic reaction include: the number of lattice sites that are bonded by the organic acid; the rate of acid readsorption to the surface during photolysis; the conformation and structure of the organic acid; the degree of oxidation of the organic acid; the presence or absence of an ??-hydroxy group on the acid, the number of carbons in the di-acid chain and the conformation of the di-acid. The ability to liberate Fe(III) at pH 6.5 from the geothite lattice is described by the lyotropic series: tartrate>citrate> oxalate > glycolate > maleate > succinate > formate > fumarate > malonate > glutarate > benzoate = butanoate = control. Although a larger amount of iron is liberated, the series is almost the same at pH 5.5 except that oxalate > citrate and succinate > maleate. A set of rate equations are given that describe the release of iron from the goethite lattice. It was observed that the pH of the solution increases during photolysis if the solutions are not buffered. There is evidence to suggest the primary mechanism for all these reactions is an electron transfer from the organic ligand to the Fe(III) in the complex. Of all the iron-oxyhydroxide materials, crystalline goethite is the least soluble in water; yet, this study indicates that in an aqueous suspension, iron can be liberated from the goethite lattice. Further, it has been shown that photolysis can occur in a multiphase system at the sediment- water interface which results in an oxidation of the organic species and release of Fe2+ to solution where it becomes available for further reaction. ?? 1993.

  4. Transfer of Asymmetry between Proteinogenic Amino Acids under Harsh Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Vives, Thomas; Snytnikov, Valeriy N.; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2017-03-01

    The heating above 400 °C of serine, cysteine, selenocysteine and threonine leads to a complete decomposition of the amino acids and to the formation in low yields of alanine for the three formers and of 2-aminobutyric acid for the latter. At higher temperature, this amino acid is observed only when sublimable α-alkyl-α-amino acids are present, and with an enantiomeric excess dependent on several parameters. Enantiopure or enantioenriched Ser, Cys, Sel or Thr is not able to transmit its enantiomeric excess to the amino acid formed during its decomposition. The presence during the sublimation-decomposition of enantioenriched valine or isoleucine leads to the enantioenrichment of all sublimable amino acids independently of the presence of many decomposition products coming from the unstable derivative. All these studies give information on a potentially prebiotic key-reaction of abiotic transformations between α-amino acids and their evolution to homochirality.

  5. Transfer of Asymmetry between Proteinogenic Amino Acids under Harsh Conditions.

    PubMed

    Tarasevych, Arkadii V; Vives, Thomas; Snytnikov, Valeriy N; Guillemin, Jean-Claude

    2017-03-31

    The heating above 400 °C of serine, cysteine, selenocysteine and threonine leads to a complete decomposition of the amino acids and to the formation in low yields of alanine for the three formers and of 2-aminobutyric acid for the latter. At higher temperature, this amino acid is observed only when sublimable α-alkyl-α-amino acids are present, and with an enantiomeric excess dependent on several parameters. Enantiopure or enantioenriched Ser, Cys, Sel or Thr is not able to transmit its enantiomeric excess to the amino acid formed during its decomposition. The presence during the sublimation-decomposition of enantioenriched valine or isoleucine leads to the enantioenrichment of all sublimable amino acids independently of the presence of many decomposition products coming from the unstable derivative. All these studies give information on a potentially prebiotic key-reaction of abiotic transformations between α-amino acids and their evolution to homochirality.

  6. Survivability and Abiotic Reactions of Selected Amino Acids in Different Hydrothermal System Simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandru, Kuhan; Imai, Eiichi; Kaneko, Takeo; Obayashi, Yumiko; Kobayashi, Kensei

    2013-04-01

    We tested the stability and reaction of several amino acids using hydrothermal system simulators: an autoclave and two kinds of flow reactors at 200-250 °C. This study generally showed that there is a variation in the individual amino acids survivability in the simulators. This is mainly attributed to the following factors; heat time, cold quenching exposure, metal ions and also silica. We observed that, in a rapid heating flow reactor, high aggregation and/or condensation of amino acids could occur even during a heat exposure of 2 min. We also monitored their stability in a reflow-type of simulator for 120 min at 20 min intervals. The non-hydrolyzed and hydrolyzed samples for this system showed a similar degradation only in the absence of metal ions.

  7. Uptake of Small Organic Compounds by Sulfuric Acid Aerosols: Dissolution and Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Michelsen, R. R.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.; Staton, S. J. R.

    2003-01-01

    To assess the role of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, the interactions of a series of small organic compounds with low-temperature aqueous sulfuric acid will be evaluated. The total amount of organic material which may be taken up from the gas phase by dissolution, surface layer formation, and reaction during the particle lifetime will be quantified. Our current results for acetaldehyde uptake on 40 - 80 wt% sulfuric acid solutions will be compared to those of methanol, formaldehyde, and acetone to investigate the relationships between chemical functionality and heterogeneous activity. Where possible, equilibrium uptake will be ascribed to component pathways (hydration, protonation, etc.) to facilitate evaluation of other species not yet studied in low temperature aqueous sulfuric acid.

  8. Nonenzymatic oligomerization reactions on templates containing inosinic acid or diaminopurine nucleotide residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The template-directed oligomerization of nucleoside-5'-phosphoro-2-methyl imidazolides on standard oligonucleotide templates has been studied extensively. Here, we describe experiments with templates in which inosinic acid (I) is substituted for guanylic acid, or 2,6-diaminopurine nucleotide (D) for adenylic acid. We find that the substitution of I for G in a template is strongly inhibitory and prevents any incorporation of C into internal positions in the oligomeric products of the reaction. The substitution of D for A, on the contrary, leads to increased incorporation of U into the products. We found no evidence for the template-directed facilitation of oligomerization of A or I through A-I base pairing. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  9. Graphene oxide for acid catalyzed-reactions: Effect of drying process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, H. P.; Hua, W. M.; Yue, Y. H.; Gao, Z.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene oxides (GOs) were prepared by Hummers method through various drying processes, and characterized by XRD, SEM, FTIR, XPS and N2 adsorption. Their acidities were measured using potentiometric titration and acid-base titration. The catalytic properties were investigated in the alkylation of anisole with benzyl alcohol and transesterification of triacetin with methanol. GOs are active catalysts for both reaction, whose activity is greatly affected by their drying processes. Vacuum drying GO exhibits the best performance in transesterification while freezing drying GO is most active for alkylation. The excellent catalytic behavior comes from abundant surface acid sites as well as proper surface functional groups, which can be obtained by selecting appropriate drying process.

  10. Improvement of an acid phosphatase/DHAP-dependent aldolase cascade reaction by using directed evolution.

    PubMed

    van Herk, Teunie; Hartog, Aloysius F; Babich, Lara; Schoemaker, Hans E; Wever, Ron

    2009-09-04

    To enhance the phosphorylating activity of the bacterial nonspecific acid phosphatase from Salmonella enterica ser. typhimurium LT2 towards dihydroxyacetone (DHA), a mutant library was generated from the native enzyme. Three different variants that showed enhanced activity were identified after one round of epPCR. The single mutant V78L was the most active and showed an increase in the maximal DHAP concentration to 25 % higher than that of the wild-type enzyme at pH 6.0. This variant is 17 times more active than the wild-type acid phosphatase from Salmonella enterica ser. typhimurium LT2 in the acid phosphatase/aldolase cascade reaction at pH 6.0 and is also six times more active than the phosphatase from Shigella flexneri that we previously used.

  11. Synthesis of phosphatidylcholine with defined fatty acid in the sn-1 position by lipase-catalyzed esterification and transesterification reaction.

    PubMed

    Adlercreutz, Dietlind; Budde, Heike; Wehtje, Ernst

    2002-05-20

    The incorporation of caproic acid in the sn-1 position of phosphatidylcholine (PC) catalyzed by lipase from Rhizopus oryzae was investigated in a water activity-controlled organic medium. The reaction was carried out either as esterification or transesterification. A comparison between these two reaction modes was made with regard to product yield, product purity, reaction time, and byproduct formation as a consequence of acyl migration. The yield in the esterification and transesterification reaction was the same under identical conditions. The highest yield (78%) was obtained at a water activity (a(w)) of 0.11 and a caproic acid concentration of 0.8 M. The reaction time was shorter in the esterification reaction than in the transesterification reaction. The difference in reaction time was especially pronounced at low water activities and high fatty acid concentrations. The loss in yield due to acyl migration and consequent enzymatic side reactions was around 16% under a wide range of conditions. The incorporation of a fatty acid in the sn-1 position of PC proved to be thermodynamically much more favorable than the incorporation of a fatty acid in the sn-2 position.

  12. Tissue reactions to engineered cartilage based on poly-L-lactic acid scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Fujihara, Yuko; Asawa, Yukiyo; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Hoshi, Kazuto

    2009-07-01

    Tissue reactions against poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) in engineered cartilage may influence the size or maturity of regenerative tissue. To understand the biological events in these reactions, we subcutaneously transplanted engineered constructs of PLLA scaffolds with or without human chondrocytes or atelocollagen in nude mice and evaluated neovascularization and macrophage activation, which can be assessed even in nude mice. Although not showing cartilage regeneration, PLLA alone demonstrated dense localization of macrophages and blood vessels, as well as a high level of interleukin-1 beta and tissue hemoglobin at 2 and 8 weeks. Otherwise, constructs with PLLA and chondrocytes with or without atelocollagen (PLLA/cell/gel or PLLA/cell) formed mature cartilage by 8 weeks, which was more prominent in PLLA/cell/gel. Although accumulation of macrophages and blood vessels in PLLA/cell/gel and PLLA/cell was comparable with that in PLLA at 2 weeks, that in PLLA/cell/gel markedly decreased by 8 weeks, with blood vessels and macrophages excluded into non-cartilage areas. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor could be involved in these suppressed tissue reactions, because it was expressed in chondrocytes of engineered cartilage. Intense tissue reactions inevitably occurred in biopolymers alone, but it is possible that maturation of engineered cartilage suppressed these reactions, which may contribute to circumventing deformity or malformation of engineered tissues.

  13. Influence of step faceting on the enantiospecific decomposition of aspartic acid on chiral Cu surfaces vicinal to Cu{111}.

    PubMed

    Reinicker, A D; Therrien, A J; Lawton, T J; Ali, R; Sykes, E C H; Gellman, A J

    2016-09-13

    On surfaces vicinal to Cu{111}, l-aspartic acid (l-Asp) adsorption causes steps to facet enantiospecifically into {310}(R) and {320}(S) steps. l-Asp has its highest heat of adsortion on surfaces that naturally expose the {310}(R) or {320}(S) steps but decomposes preferentially on the {310}(R) steps.

  14. Lewis acid promoted reactions of ethenetricarboxylates with allenes: synthesis of indenes and gamma-lactones via conjugate addition/cyclization reaction.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Shoko; Yamamoto, Yuko; Fukushima, Yugo; Takebayashi, Masachika; Ukai, Tetsuma; Mikata, Yuji

    2010-08-06

    Indenes are important core structures in organic chemistry. Few simple arylallenes have been used to construct indene skeletons by Friedel-Crafts reaction. Lewis acid catalyzed reaction of ethenetricarboxylates 1 and arylallenes has been examined in this study. The reaction of arylallenes and ethenetricarboxylate triesters with SnCl(4) gave indene derivatives efficiently, via a conjugate addition/Friedel-Crafts cyclization reaction. On the other hand, the reactions of 1,1-diethyl 2-hydrogen ethenetricarboxylate and arylallenes or alkylallenes with SnCl(4) at -78 degrees C or room temperature and subsequent treatment with Et(3)N gave gamma-lactones. The reactions of triethyl ethenetricarboxylate and 1,1-dialkylallenes with SnCl(4) at room temperature also gave gamma-lactones.

  15. Chromotropic acid-formaldehyde reaction in strongly acidic media. The role of dissolved oxygen and replacement of concentrated sulphuric acid.

    PubMed

    Fagnani, E; Melios, C B; Pezza, L; Pezza, H R

    2003-05-28

    The procedure for formaldehyde analysis recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is the Chromotropic acid spectrophotometric method, which is the one that uses concentrated sulphuric acid. In the present study the oxidation step associated with the aforementioned method for formaldehyde determination was investigated. Experimental evidence has been obtained indicating that when concentrated H(2)SO(4) (18 mol l(-1)) is used (as in the NIOSH procedure) that acid is the oxidizing agent. On the other hand, oxidation through dissolved oxygen takes place when concentrated H(2)SO(4) is replaced by concentrated hydrochloric (12 mol l(-1)) and phosphoric (14.7 mol l(-1)) acids as well as by diluted H(2)SO(4) (9.4 mol l(-1)). Based on investigations concerning the oxidation step, a modified procedure was devised, in which the use of the potentially hazardous and corrosive concentrated H(2)SO(4) was eliminated and advantageously replaced by a less harmful mixture of HCl and H(2)O(2).

  16. RNA internal standard synthesis by nucleic acid sequence-based amplification for competitive quantitative amplification reactions.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wan-Yu; Baeumner, Antje J

    2007-02-15

    Nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reactions have been demonstrated to successfully synthesize new sequences based on deletion and insertion reactions. Two RNA internal standards were synthesized for use in competitive amplification reactions in which quantitative analysis can be achieved by coamplifying the internal standard with the wild type sample. The sequences were created in two consecutive NASBA reactions using the E. coli clpB mRNA sequence as model analyte. The primer sequences of the wild type sequence were maintained, and a 20-nt-long segment inside the amplicon region was exchanged for a new segment of similar GC content and melting temperature. The new RNA sequence was thus amplifiable using the wild type primers and detectable via a new inserted sequence. In the first reaction, the forwarding primer and an additional 20-nt-long sequence was deleted and replaced by a new 20-nt-long sequence. In the second reaction, a forwarding primer containing as 5' overhang sequence the wild type primer sequence was used. The presence of pure internal standard was verified using electrochemiluminescence and RNA lateral-flow biosensor analysis. Additional sequence deletion in order to shorten the internal standard amplicons and thus generate higher detection signals was found not to be required. Finally, a competitive NASBA reaction between one internal standard and the wild type sequence was carried out proving its functionality. This new rapid construction method via NASBA provides advantages over the traditional techniques since it requires no traditional cloning procedures, no thermocyclers, and can be completed in less than 4 h.

  17. Fluorimetric determination of phytic acid in urine based on replacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yingyu; Chen, Jingwen; Ma, Kang; Cao, Shuhong; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2007-12-19

    A sensitive fluorimetric method for determination of phytic acid in human urine samples was described. The method was based on a fluorimetric replacement reaction, in which the added phytic acid replaced the Cu2+ ion from Cu2+-gelatin complex, liberating the fluorescent gelatin molecule. The fluorescence of the solution was accordingly recovered proportionally to the amount of the foreign phytic acid. The excitation wavelength was 273.5 nm and the characteristic emission wavelength was 305.0 nm, respectively. The calibration graph was obtained by plotting the recovered fluorescent intensity at maximum 305.0 nm against the added standard phytic acid, and was divided into two sections. One section was linear over the range of 0.40-2.40 mg L(-1) with a linear regression equation of I(f) = -0.895+15.146c (R2 > 0.9993), and the other over the range of 2.40-9.20 mg L(-1) with a linear regression equation of I(f) = -29.526+26.113c (R2 > 0.9996), respectively. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) at 95% confidence degree for a 2.0 mg L(-1) of standard phytic acid within 1 month was less than 1.26% (n = 5), indicating the procedure is reproducible. The detection and the quantification limits of phytic acid were estimated to be 0.23 and 0.40 mg L(-1), respectively. The proposed method was applied to the determination of phytic acid in urine samples and the found concentrations of phytic acid in urine were in the range of 0.49-0.75 mg L(-1) with recoveries of 96.2-108.8%. Comparison of the obtained results with the reported HPLC was performed, indicating the proposed method was reliable.

  18. Unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane: RRKM calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Melius, C.F.

    1993-06-01

    Based on reaction thermochemistry and estimates of Arrhenius A-factors, it is expected that Si-C bond cleavage, C-H bond cleavage, and HCl elimination will be the primary channels for the unimolecular decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane. Using RRKM theory, we calculated rate constants for these three reactions. The calculations support the conclusion that these three reactions are the major decomposition pathways. Rate constants for each reaction were calculated in the high-pressure limit (800--1500 K) and in the falloff regime (1300--1500 K) for bath gases of both helium and hydrogen. These calculations thus provide branching fractions as well as decomposition rates. We also calculated bimolecular rate constants for the overall decomposition in the low-pressure limit. Interesting and surprising kinetic behavior of this system and the individual reactions is discussed. The reactivity of this chlorinated organosilane is compared to that of other organosilanes.

  19. Acid-base bifunctional catalysis of silica-alumina-supported organic amines for carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tomita, Mitsuru; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2008-01-01

    Acid-base bifunctional heterogeneous catalysts were prepared by the reaction of an acidic silica-alumina (SA) surface with silane-coupling reagents possessing amino functional groups. The obtained SA-supported amines (SA-NR2) were characterized by solid-state 13C and 29Si NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The solid-state NMR spectra revealed that the amines were immobilized by acid-base interactions at the SA surface. The interactions between the surface acidic sites and the immobilized basic amines were weaker than the interactions between the SA and free amines. The catalytic performances of the SA-NR2 catalysts for various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as cyano-ethoxycarbonylation, the Michael reaction, and the nitro-aldol reaction, were investigated and compared with those of homogeneous and other heterogeneous catalysts. The SA-NR2 catalysts showed much higher catalytic activities for the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions than heterogeneous amine catalysts using other supports, such as SiO2 and Al2O3. On the other hand, homogeneous amines hardly promoted these reactions under similar reaction conditions, and the catalytic behavior of SA-NR2 was also different from that of MgO, which was employed as a typical heterogeneous base. An acid-base dual-activation mechanism for the carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions is proposed.

  20. Initiation Temperature for Runaway Tri-n-Butyl Phosphate/Nitric Acid Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    2000-11-28

    During a review of the H-Canyon authorization basis, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) staff members questioned the margin of safety associated with a postulated tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/nitric acid runaway reaction due to the inadvertent heating of a canyon tank containing greater than 3000 lbs (1362 kg) of TBP. The margin of safety was partially based on experiments and calculations performed by the Actinide Technology Section (ATS) to support deletion of indication of tank agitation as a Safety Class System. In the technical basis for deletion of this system, ATS personnel conservatively calculated the equilibrium temperature distribution of a canyon tank containing TBP and nitric acid layers which were inadvertently heated by a steam jet left on following a transfer. The maximum calculated temperature (128 degrees C) was compared to the minimum initiation temperature for a runaway reaction (greater than 130 degrees C) documented by experimental work in the mid 195 0s. In this work, the initiation temperature as a function of nitric acid concentration was measured for 0 and 20 wt percent dissolved solids. The DNFSB staff members were concerned that data for 0 wt percent dissolved solids were not conservative given the facts that data for 20 wt percent dissolved solids show initiation temperatures at or below 130 degrees C and H-Canyon solutions normally contained a small amount of dissolved solids.