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Sample records for acid degradation pathways

  1. Identification of an itaconic acid degrading pathway in itaconic acid producing Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei; Huang, Xuenian; Zhong, Chengwei; Li, Jianjun; Lu, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    Itaconic acid, one of the most promising and flexible bio-based chemicals, is mainly produced by Aspergillus terreus. Previous studies to improve itaconic acid production in A. terreus through metabolic engineering were mainly focused on its biosynthesis pathway, while the itaconic acid-degrading pathway has largely been ignored. In this study, we used transcriptomic, proteomic, bioinformatic, and in vitro enzymatic analyses to identify three key enzymes, itaconyl-CoA transferase (IctA), itaconyl-CoA hydratase (IchA), and citramalyl-CoA lyase (CclA), that are involved in the catabolic pathway of itaconic acid in A. terreus. In the itaconic acid catabolic pathway in A. terreus, itaconic acid is first converted by IctA into itaconyl-CoA with succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor, and then itaconyl-CoA is hydrated into citramalyl-CoA by IchA. Finally, citramalyl-CoA is cleaved into acetyl-CoA and pyruvate by CclA. Moreover, IctA can also catalyze the reaction between citramalyl-CoA and succinate to generate succinyl-CoA and citramalate. These results, for the first time, identify the three key enzymes, IctA, IchA, and CclA, involved in the itaconic acid degrading pathway in itaconic acid producing A. terreus. The results will facilitate the improvement of itaconic acid production by metabolically engineering the catabolic pathway of itaconic acid in A. terreus. PMID:27102125

  2. Enzymes involved in a novel anaerobic cyclohexane carboxylic acid degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Kung, Johannes W; Meier, Anne-Katrin; Mergelsberg, Mario; Boll, Matthias

    2014-10-01

    The anaerobic degradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHC) has so far been studied only in Rhodopseudomonas palustris, in which CHC is activated to cyclohexanoyl coenzyme A (cyclohexanoyl-CoA [CHCoA]) and then dehydrogenated to cyclohex-1-ene-1-carboxyl-CoA (CHeneCoA). This intermediate is further degraded by reactions of the R. palustris-specific benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway of aromatic compounds. However, CHeneCoA is not an intermediate in the degradation of aromatic compounds in all other known anaerobic bacteria; consequently, degradation of CHC was mostly unknown in anaerobic bacteria. We identified a previously unknown CHC degradation pathway in the Fe(III)-reducing Geobacter metallireducens by determining the following CHC-induced in vitro activities: (i) the activation of CHC to CHCoA by a succinyl-CoA:CHC CoA transferase, (ii) the 1,2-dehydrogenation of CHCoA to CHeneCoA by CHCoA dehydrogenase, and (iii) the unusual 1,4-dehydrogenation of CHeneCoA to cyclohex-1,5-diene-1-carboxyl-CoA. This last represents a previously unknown joint intermediate of the CHC and aromatic compound degradation pathway in bacteria other than R. palustris. The enzymes catalyzing the three reactions were purified and characterized as specific enzymes after heterologous expression of the encoding genes. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR revealed that expression of these genes was highly induced during growth with CHC but not with benzoate. The newly identified CHC degradation pathway is suggested to be present in nearly all CHC-degrading anaerobic bacteria, including denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, sulfate-reducing, and fermenting bacteria. Remarkably, all three CHC degradation pathways always link CHC catabolism to the catabolic pathways of aromatic compounds. We propose that the capacity to use CHC as a carbon source evolved from already-existing aromatic compound degradation pathways. PMID:25112478

  3. A second pathway to degrade pyrimidine nucleic acid precursors in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Gorm; Björnberg, Olof; Polakova, Silvia; Pynyaha, Yuriy; Rasmussen, Anna; Møller, Kasper; Hofer, Anders; Moritz, Thomas; Sandrini, Michael Paolo Bastner; Merico, Anna-Maria; Compagno, Concetta; Akerlund, Hans-Erik; Gojković, Zoran; Piskur, Jure

    2008-07-18

    Pyrimidine bases are the central precursors for RNA and DNA, and their intracellular pools are determined by de novo, salvage and catabolic pathways. In eukaryotes, degradation of uracil has been believed to proceed only via the reduction to dihydrouracil. Using a yeast model, Saccharomyces kluyveri, we show that during degradation, uracil is not reduced to dihydrouracil. Six loci, named URC1-6 (for uracil catabolism), are involved in the novel catabolic pathway. Four of them, URC3,5, URC6, and URC2 encode urea amidolyase, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, and a putative transcription factor, respectively. The gene products of URC1 and URC4 are highly conserved proteins with so far unknown functions and they are present in a variety of prokaryotes and fungi. In bacteria and in some fungi, URC1 and URC4 are linked on the genome together with the gene for uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (URC6). Urc1p and Urc4p are therefore likely the core components of this novel biochemical pathway. A combination of genetic and analytical chemistry methods demonstrates that uridine monophosphate and urea are intermediates, and 3-hydroxypropionic acid, ammonia and carbon dioxide the final products of degradation. The URC pathway does not require the presence of an active respiratory chain and is therefore different from the oxidative and rut pathways described in prokaryotes, although the latter also gives 3-hydroxypropionic acid as the end product. The genes of the URC pathway are not homologous to any of the eukaryotic or prokaryotic genes involved in pyrimidine degradation described to date. PMID:18550080

  4. An okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase negatively controls the cyclin degradation pathway in amphibian eggs.

    PubMed Central

    Lorca, T; Fesquet, D; Zindy, F; Le Bouffant, F; Cerruti, M; Brechot, C; Devauchelle, G; Dorée, M

    1991-01-01

    Inhibition of okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatases released the cyclin degradation pathway from its inhibited state in extracts prepared from unfertilized Xenopus eggs arrested at the second meiotic metaphase. It also switched on cyclin protease activity in a permanent fashion in interphase extracts prepared from activated eggs. Even after cdc2 kinase inactivation, microinjection of okadaic acid-treated interphase extracts pushed G2-arrested recipient oocytes into the M phase, suggesting that the phosphatase inhibitor stabilizes the activity of an unidentified factor which shares in common with cdc2 kinase the maturation-promoting factor activity. Images PMID:1846666

  5. From ether to acid: A plausible degradation pathway of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Lei; Birgel, Daniel; Elling, Felix J.; Sutton, Paul A.; Lipp, Julius S.; Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chuanlun; Könneke, Martin; Peckmann, Jörn; Rowland, Steven J.; Summons, Roger E.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are ubiquitous microbial lipids with extensive demonstrated and potential roles as paleoenvironmental proxies. Despite the great attention they receive, comparatively little is known regarding their diagenetic fate. Putative degradation products of GDGTs, identified as hydroxyl and carboxyl derivatives, were detected in lipid extracts of marine sediment, seep carbonate, hot spring sediment and cells of the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The distribution of GDGT degradation products in environmental samples suggests that both biotic and abiotic processes act as sinks for GDGTs. More than a hundred newly recognized degradation products afford a view of the stepwise degradation of GDGT via (1) ether bond hydrolysis yielding hydroxyl isoprenoids, namely, GDGTol (glycerol dialkyl glycerol triether alcohol), GMGD (glycerol monobiphytanyl glycerol diether), GDD (glycerol dibiphytanol diether), GMM (glycerol monobiphytanol monoether) and bpdiol (biphytanic diol); (2) oxidation of isoprenoidal alcohols into corresponding carboxyl derivatives and (3) chain shortening to yield C39 and smaller isoprenoids. This plausible GDGT degradation pathway from glycerol ethers to isoprenoidal fatty acids provides the link to commonly detected head-to-head linked long chain isoprenoidal hydrocarbons in petroleum and sediment samples. The problematic C80 to C82 tetraacids that cause naphthenate deposits in some oil production facilities can be generated from H-shaped glycerol monoalkyl glycerol tetraethers (GMGTs) following the same process, as indicated by the distribution of related derivatives in hydrothermally influenced sediments.

  6. Biochemical and structural characterization of Klebsiella pneumoniae oxamate amidohydrolase in the uric acid degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Katherine A; Ealick, Steven E

    2016-06-01

    HpxW from the ubiquitous pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae is involved in a novel uric acid degradation pathway downstream from the formation of oxalurate. Specifically, HpxW is an oxamate amidohydrolase which catalyzes the conversion of oxamate to oxalate and is a member of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily. HpxW is autoprocessed from an inactive precursor to form a heterodimer, resulting in a 35.5 kDa α subunit and a 20 kDa β subunit. Here, the structure of HpxW is presented and the substrate complex is modeled. In addition, the steady-state kinetics of this enzyme and two active-site variants were characterized. These structural and biochemical studies provide further insight into this class of enzymes and allow a mechanism for catalysis consistent with other members of the Ntn-hydrolase superfamily to be proposed. PMID:27303801

  7. Excretion pathways and ruminal disappearance of glyphosate and its degradation product aminomethylphosphonic acid in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    von Soosten, D; Meyer, U; Hüther, L; Dänicke, S; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, M; Schafft, H; Spolders, M; Breves, G

    2016-07-01

    From 6 balance experiments with total collection of feces and urine, samples were obtained to investigate the excretion pathways of glyphosate (GLY) in lactating dairy cows. Each experiment lasted for 26d. The first 21d served for adaptation to the diet, and during the remaining 5d collection of total feces and urine was conducted. Dry matter intake and milk yield were recorded daily and milk and feed samples were taken during the sampling periods. In 2 of the 6 experiments, at the sampling period for feces and urine, duodenal contents were collected for 5d. Cows were equipped with cannulas at the dorsal sac of the rumen and the proximal duodenum. Duodenal contents were collected every 2h over 5 consecutive days. The daily duodenal dry matter flow was measured by using chromium oxide as a volume marker. All samples (feed, feces, urine, milk and duodenal contents were analyzed for GLY and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA). Overall, across the 6 experiments (n=32) the range of GLY intake was 0.08 to 6.67mg/d. The main proportion (61±11%; ±SD) of consumed GLY was excreted with feces; whereas excretion by urine was 8±3% of GLY intake. Elimination via milk was negligible. The GLY concentrations above the limit of quantification were not detected in any of the milk samples. A potential ruminal degradation of GLY to AMPA was derived from daily duodenal GLY flow. The apparent ruminal disappearance of GLY intake was 36 and 6%. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicate that the gastrointestinal absorption of GLY is of minor importance and fecal excretion represents the major excretion pathway. A degradation of GLY to AMPA by rumen microbes or a possible retention in the body has to be taken into account. PMID:27108173

  8. Analysis of Hydroxycinnamic Acid Degradation in Agrobacterium fabrum Reveals a Coenzyme A-Dependent, Beta-Oxidative Deacetylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Campillo, Tony; Renoud, Sébastien; Kerzaon, Isabelle; Vial, Ludovic; Baude, Jessica; Gaillard, Vincent; Bellvert, Floriant; Chamignon, Cécile; Comte, Gilles; Lavire, Céline; Hommais, Florence

    2014-01-01

    The soil- and rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium Agrobacterium fabrum (genomospecies G8 of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens species complex) is known to have species-specific genes involved in ferulic acid degradation. Here, we characterized, by genetic and analytical means, intermediates of degradation as feruloyl coenzyme A (feruloyl-CoA), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-hydroxypropionyl–CoA, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionyl–CoA, vanillic acid, and protocatechuic acid. The genes atu1416, atu1417, and atu1420 have been experimentally shown to be necessary for the degradation of ferulic acid. Moreover, the genes atu1415 and atu1421 have been experimentally demonstrated to be essential for this degradation and are proposed to encode a phenylhydroxypropionyl-CoA dehydrogenase and a 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-ketopropionic acid (HMPKP)–CoA β-keto-thiolase, respectively. We thus demonstrated that the A. fabrum hydroxycinnamic degradation pathway is an original coenzyme A-dependent β-oxidative deacetylation that could also transform p-coumaric and caffeic acids. Finally, we showed that this pathway enables the metabolism of toxic compounds from plants and their use for growth, likely providing the species an ecological advantage in hydroxycinnamic-rich environments, such as plant roots or decaying plant materials. PMID:24657856

  9. Reaction pathway of the degradation of the p-hydroxybenzoic acid by sulfate radical generated by ionizing radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criquet, Justine; Leitner, Nathalie Karpel Vel

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) in aqueous solutions by ionizing radiation was studied. The phenolic pollutant was easily removed by the electron beam irradiation, as more than 80% of the initial 100 μM introduced was degraded for a dose of 600 Gy. It was shown that the addition of persulfate, producing the sulfate radical as additional reactive species, induced a change in the reaction pathway. LC-MS analyses were performed in order to identify the different by-products formed. In the absence of persulfate, the main by-product formed was 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, while in presence of persulfate, 1,4-benzoquinone was detected and the hydroxylated by-products were not present. A reaction pathway of HBA degradation by hydroxyl and sulfate radicals was proposed from the identification of the chemical structure of the different by-products detected. The influences of pH and dissolved oxygen were also studied. A high decline of HBA degradation was observed at pH 11 compared to pH 4.5, this decrease was minimized in the presence of persulfate. The dissolved oxygen concentration was found to be a limiting parameter of HBA degradation, however an excess of dissolved oxygen in solution did not improve the degradation to a large extent.

  10. Regulation of protein degradation pathways by amino acids and insulin in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rapid gain in lean mass in neonates requires greater rates of protein synthesis than degradation. We previously delineated the molecular mechanisms by which insulin and amino acids, especially leucine, modulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis and how this changes with development. In the curre...

  11. Novel Pathway for the Degradation of 2-Chloro-4-Nitrobenzoic Acid by Acinetobacter sp. Strain RKJ12▿†

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Dhan; Kumar, Ravi; Jain, R. K.; Tiwary, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    The organism Acinetobacter sp. RKJ12 is capable of utilizing 2-chloro-4-nitrobenzoic acid (2C4NBA) as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. In the degradation of 2C4NBA by strain RKJ12, various metabolites were isolated and identified by a combination of chromatographic, spectroscopic, and enzymatic activities, revealing a novel assimilation pathway involving both oxidative and reductive catabolic mechanisms. The metabolism of 2C4NBA was initiated by oxidative ortho dehalogenation, leading to the formation of 2-hydroxy-4-nitrobenzoic acid (2H4NBA), which subsequently was metabolized into 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,4-DHBA) by a mono-oxygenase with the concomitant release of chloride and nitrite ions. Stoichiometric analysis indicated the consumption of 1 mol O2 per conversion of 2C4NBA to 2,4-DHBA, ruling out the possibility of two oxidative reactions. Experiments with labeled H218O and 18O2 indicated the involvement of mono-oxygenase-catalyzed initial hydrolytic dechlorination and oxidative denitration mechanisms. The further degradation of 2,4-DHBA then proceeds via reductive dehydroxylation involving the formation of salicylic acid. In the lower pathway, the organism transformed salicylic acid into catechol, which was mineralized by the ortho ring cleavage catechol-1,2-dioxygenase to cis, cis-muconic acid, ultimately forming tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Furthermore, the studies carried out on a 2C4NBA− derivative and a 2C4NBA+ transconjugant demonstrated that the catabolic genes for the 2C4NBA degradation pathway possibly reside on the ∼55-kb transmissible plasmid present in RKJ12. PMID:21803909

  12. Regulation of protein degradation pathways by amino acids and insulin in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The rapid gain in lean mass in neonates requires greater rates of protein synthesis than degradation. We previously delineated the molecular mechanisms by which insulin and amino acids, especially leucine, modulate skeletal muscle protein synthesis and how this changes with development. In the current study, we identified mechanisms involved in protein degradation regulation. In experiment 1, 6- and 26-d-old pigs were studied during 1) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic, 2) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-hyperaminoacidemic, and 3) hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic clamps for 2 h. In experiment 2, 5-d-old pigs were studied during 1) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic-euleucinemic, 2) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-hypoaminoacidemic-hyperleucinemic, and 3) euinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic-hyperleucinemic clamps for 24 h. We determined in muscle indices of ubiquitin-proteasome, i.e., atrogin-1 (MAFbx) and muscle RING-finger protein-1 (MuRF1) and autophagy-lysosome systems, i.e., unc51-like kinase 1 (UKL1), microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3), and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (Lamp-2). For comparison, we measured ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) activation, components of translation initiation. Results Abundance of atrogin-1, but not MuRF1, was greater in 26- than 6-d-old pigs and was not affected by insulin, amino acids, or leucine. Abundance of ULK1 and LC3 was higher in younger pigs and not affected by treatment. The LC3-II/LC3-I ratio was reduced and ULK1 phosphorylation increased by insulin, amino acids, and leucine. These responses were more profound in younger pigs. Abundance of Lamp-2 was not affected by treatment or development. Abundance of eIF4E, but not rpS6, was higher in 6- than 26-d-old-pigs but unaffected by treatment. Phosphorylation of eIF4E was not affected by treatment, however, insulin, amino acids, and leucine stimulated rpS6 phosphorylation, and the

  13. Metabolic pathways for the degradation of phosphatidic acid in isolated nuclei from cerebellar cells.

    PubMed

    Gaveglio, Virginia L; Pasquaré, Susana J; Giusto, Norma M

    2011-03-15

    The aim of the present research was to analyse the pathways for phosphatidic acid metabolism in purified nuclei from cerebellar cells. Lipid phosphate phosphatase and diacylglyceride lipase activities were detected in nuclei from cerebellar cells. It was observed that DAGL activity makes up 50% of LPP activity and that PtdOH can also be metabolised to lysophosphatidic acid. With a nuclear protein content of approximately 40 μg, the production of diacylglycerol and monoacylglycerol was linear for 30 min and 5 min, respectively, whereas it increased with PtdOH concentrations of up to 250 μM. LysoPtdOH, sphingosine 1-phosphate and ceramide 1-phosphate, which are alternative substrates for LPP, significantly reduced DAG production from PA. DAG and MAG production increased in the presence of Triton X-100 (1 mM) whereas no modifications were observed in the presence of ionic detergent sodium deoxycholate. Ca²+ and Mg²+ stimulated MAG production without affecting DAG formation whereas fluoride and vanadate inhibited the generation of both products. Specific PtdOH-phospholipase A1 and PtdOH-phospholipase A2 were also detected in nuclei. Our findings constitute the first reported evidence of active PtdOH metabolism involving LPP, DAGL and PtdOH-selective PLA activities in purified nuclei prepared from cerebellar cells. PMID:21216221

  14. Elucidating the Pseudomonas aeruginosa fatty acid degradation pathway: identification of additional fatty acyl-CoA synthetase homologues.

    PubMed

    Zarzycki-Siek, Jan; Norris, Michael H; Kang, Yun; Sun, Zhenxin; Bluhm, Andrew P; McMillan, Ian A; Hoang, Tung T

    2013-01-01

    The fatty acid (FA) degradation pathway of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, was recently shown to be involved in nutrient acquisition during BALB/c mouse lung infection model. The source of FA in the lung is believed to be phosphatidylcholine, the major component of lung surfactant. Previous research indicated that P. aeruginosa has more than two fatty acyl-CoA synthetase genes (fadD; PA3299 and PA3300), which are responsible for activation of FAs using ATP and coenzyme A. Through a bioinformatics approach, 11 candidate genes were identified by their homology to the Escherichia coli FadD in the present study. Four new homologues of fadD (PA1617, PA2893, PA3860, and PA3924) were functionally confirmed by their ability to complement the E. coli fadD mutant on FA-containing media. Growth phenotypes of 17 combinatorial fadD mutants on different FAs, as sole carbon sources, indicated that the four new fadD homologues are involved in FA degradation, bringing the total number of P. aeruginosa fadD genes to six. Of the four new homologues, fadD4 (PA1617) contributed the most to the degradation of different chain length FAs. Growth patterns of various fadD mutants on plant-based perfumery substances, citronellic and geranic acids, as sole carbon and energy sources indicated that fadD4 is also involved in the degradation of these plant-derived compounds. A decrease in fitness of the sextuple fadD mutant, relative to the ΔfadD1D2 mutant, was only observed during BALB/c mouse lung infection at 24 h. PMID:23737986

  15. BenR, a XylS Homologue, Regulates Three Different Pathways of Aromatic Acid Degradation in Pseudomonas putida

    PubMed Central

    Cowles, Charles E.; Nichols, Nancy N.; Harwood, Caroline S.

    2000-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida converts benzoate to catechol using two enzymes that are encoded on the chromosome and whose expression is induced by benzoate. Benzoate also binds to the regulator XylS to induce expression of the TOL (toluene degradation) plasmid-encoded meta pathway operon for benzoate and methylbenzoate degradation. Finally, benzoate represses the ability of P. putida to transport 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) by preventing transcription of pcaK, the gene encoding the 4-HBA permease. Here we identified a gene, benR, as a regulator of benzoate, methylbenzoate, and 4-HBA degradation genes. A benR mutant isolated by random transposon mutagenesis was unable to grow on benzoate. The deduced amino acid sequence of BenR showed high similarity (62% identity) to the sequence of XylS, a member of the AraC family of regulators. An additional seven genes located adjacent to benR were inferred to be involved in benzoate degradation based on their deduced amino acid sequences. The benABC genes likely encode benzoate dioxygenase, and benD likely encodes 2-hydro-1,2-dihydroxybenzoate dehydrogenase. benK and benF were assigned functions as a benzoate permease and porin, respectively. The possible function of a final gene, benE, is not known. benR activated expression of a benA-lacZ reporter fusion in response to benzoate. It also activated expression of a meta cleavage operon promoter-lacZ fusion inserted in an E. coli chromosome. Third, benR was required for benzoate-mediated repression of pcaK-lacZ fusion expression. The benA promoter region contains a direct repeat sequence that matches the XylS binding site previously defined for the meta cleavage operon promoter. It is likely that BenR binds to the promoter region of chromosomal benzoate degradation genes and plasmid-encoded methylbenzoate degradation genes to activate gene expression in response to benzoate. The action of BenR in repressing 4-HBA uptake is probably indirect. PMID:11053377

  16. Improved production of fatty acid ethyl esters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through up-regulation of the ethanol degradation pathway and expression of the heterologous phosphoketolase pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to an increasing demand of transportation fuels, a lower availability of cheap crude oil and a lack of sustainability of fossil fuels, a gradual shift from petroleum based fuels towards alternative and renewable fuel resources will be required in the near future. Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) have properties similar to current crude diesel and could therefore form an important contribution to the development of sustainable transportation fuels in future. It is important to develop novel cell factories for efficient production of FAEEs and their precursors. Results Here, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell factory expressing a heterologous wax ester synthase (ws2) from Marinobacter hydrocarbonoclasticus was used to produce FAEEs from ethanol and acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA). The production of acyl-CoA requires large amounts of NADPH and acetyl-CoA. Therefore, two metabolic engineering strategies for improved provision of NADPH and acetyl-CoA were evaluated. First, the ethanol degradation pathway was employed to re-channel carbon flow towards the synthesis of acetyl-CoA. Therefore, ADH2 and ALD6 encoding, respectively, alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase were overexpressed together with the heterologous gene acsSEL641P encoding acetyl-CoA synthetase. The co-overexpression of ADH2, ALD6 and acsSEL641P with ws2 resulted in 408 ± 270 μg FAEE gCDW−1, a 3-fold improvement. Secondly, for the expression of the PHK pathway two genes, xpkA and ack, both descending from Aspergillus nidulans, were co-expressed together with ws2 to catalyze, respectively, the conversion of xylulose-5-phosphate to acetyl phosphate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and acetyl phosphate to acetate. Alternatively, ack was substituted with pta from Bacillus subtilis, encoding phosphotransacetylase for the conversion of acetyl phosphate to acetyl-CoA. Both PHK pathways were additionally expressed in a strain with multiple chromosomally integrated ws2 gene, which

  17. Degradation of ascorbic acid in ethanolic solutions.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Tsai, Yi-Chin; Fu, Chi-Chang; Wu, James Swi-Bea

    2012-10-24

    Ascorbic acid occurs naturally in many wine-making fruits. The industry also uses ascorbic acid as an antioxidant and color stabilizer in the making of alcoholic beverages including white wine, wine cooler, alcopop, and fruit liqueur. However, the degradation of ascorbic acid itself may cause browning and the deterioration of color quality. This study was aimed to monitor the degradation of ascorbic acid, the formation of degradation products, and the browning in storage of ascorbic acid containing 0-40% (v/v) ethanolic solutions buffered at pH 3.2 as models of alcoholic beverages. The results show that ascorbic acid degradation in the ethanolic solutions during storage follows first-order reaction, that the degradation and browning rates increase with the increase of ethanol concentration, that the activation energy for the degradation of ascorbic acid is in the range 10.35-23.10 (kcal/mol), that 3-hydroxy-2-pyrone is an indicator and a major product of ascorbic acid degradation, and that aerobic degradation pathway dominants over anaerobic pathway in ascorbic acid degradation in ethanolic solutions. PMID:22994409

  18. GABA shunt and polyamine degradation pathway on γ-aminobutyric acid accumulation in germinating fava bean (Vicia faba L.) under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Runqiang; Guo, Qianghui; Gu, Zhenxin

    2013-01-01

    GABA shunt and polyamine degradation pathway on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulation in germinating fava bean under hypoxia was investigated. GABA content, GAD and DAO activity were significantly increased under hypoxia treatment. Glu and polyamine contents enhanced largely and thus supplied as sufficient substrates for GABA formation. In contrast, GABA content decreased, mainly in the embryo, after removing the hypoxia stress. DAO activity, Glu and polyamines contents decreased, while an increment of GAD activity was observed. This indicated that GAD activity can be not only regulated by hypoxia, but by the rapid growth of embryo after the recovery from hypoxia stress. When treated with AG, DAO activity was almost inhibited completely, and the GABA content decreased by 32.96% and 32.07% after treated for 3 and 5 days, respectively. Hence, it can be inferred that about 30% of GABA formed in germinating fava bean under hypoxia was supplied by polyamine degradation pathway. PMID:23017406

  19. Pathways of Amino Acid Degradation in Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) with Special Reference to Lysine-Ketoglutarate Reductase/Saccharopine Dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH)

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Pin-Jun; Yuan, San-Yue; Tang, Yao-Hua; Li, Kai-Long; Yang, Lu; Fu, Qiang; Li, Guo-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Nilaparvata lugens harbors yeast-like symbionts (YLSs). In present paper, a genome-wide analysis found 115 genes from Ni. lugens and 90 genes from YLSs that were involved in the metabolic degradation of 20 proteinogenic amino acids. These 205 genes encoded for 77 enzymes. Accordingly, the degradation pathways for the 20 amino acids were manually constructed. It is postulated that Ni. lugens can independently degrade fourteen amino acids (threonine, alanine, glycine, serine, aspartate, asparagine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, glutamate, glutamine, proline, histidine, leucine and lysine). Ni. lugens and YLSs enzymes may work collaboratively to break down tryptophan, cysteine, arginine, isoleucine, methionine and valine. We cloned a lysine-ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase gene (Nllkr/sdh) that encoded a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the first two steps of lysine catabolism. Nllkr/sdh is widely expressed in the first through fifth instar nymphs and adults, and is highly expressed in the fat body, ovary and gut in adults. Ingestion of dsNllkr/sdh by nymphs successfully knocked down the target gene, and caused nymphal/adult mortality, shortened nymphal development stage and reduced adult fresh weight. Moreover, Nllkr/sdh knockdown resulted in three defects: wings were shortened and thickened; cuticles were stretched and thinned; and old nymphal cuticles remained on the tips of legs and abdomen and were not completely shed. These data indicate that impaired lysine degradation negatively affects the survival and development of Ni. lugens. PMID:26000452

  20. Alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment of softwood: hemicellulose degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Vasco, Carlos; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated softwood hemicelluloses degradation pathways during alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment of Douglas fir. It was found that glucomannan is much more susceptible to alkaline pretreatment than xylan. Organic acids, including lactic, succinic, glycolic and formic acid are the predominant products from glucomannan degradation. At low treatment temperature (90°C), a small amount of formic acid is produced from glucomannan, whereas glucomannan degradation to lactic acid and succinic acid becomes the main reactions at 140°C and 180°C. The addition of H2O2 during alkaline pretreatment of D. fir led to a significant removal of lignin, which subsequently facilitated glucomannan solubilization. However, H2O2 has little direct effect on the glucomannan degradation reaction. The main degradation pathways involved in glucomannan conversion to organics acids are elucidated. The results from this study demonstrate the potential to optimize pretreatment conditions to maximize the value of biomass hemicellulose. PMID:24185034

  1. PHENOXYACETIC ACID DEGRADATION BY THE 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXYACETIC ACID (TFD) PATHWAY OF PLASMID PJP4: MAPPING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE TFD REGULATORY GENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid pJP4 enables Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 to degrade 3-chlorobenzoate and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (TFD), Plasmid pROl0 is a derivative of pJP4 obtained by insertion of TN1721 into a nonessential region of pJP4. lasmid pROl0l was transferred by conjugation to severa...

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the transcriptional repressor PaaX, the main regulator of the phenylacetic acid degradation pathway in Escherichia coli W

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Altuve, Alzoray; Carrasco-López, César; Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M.; Sanz, Jesús M.; Hermoso, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    PaaX is the main regulator of the phenylacetic acid aerobic degradation pathway in bacteria and acts as a transcriptional repressor in the absence of its inducer phenylacetyl-coenzyme A. The natural presence and the recent accumulation of a variety of highly toxic aromatic compounds owing to human pollution has created considerable interest in the study of degradation pathways in bacteria, the most important microorganisms capable of recycling these compounds, in order to design and apply novel bioremediation strategies. PaaX from Escherichia coli W was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method at 291 K. Crystals grew from a mixture of 0.9 M Li2SO4 and 0.5 M sodium citrate pH 5.8. These crystals, which belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with unit-cell parameters a = 167.88, b = 106.23, c = 85.87 Å, β = 108.33°, allowed the collection of an X-ray data set to 2.3 Å resolution. PMID:22102047

  3. Vitamin C Degradation Products and Pathways in the Human Lens*

    PubMed Central

    Nemet, Ina; Monnier, Vincent M.

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin C and its degradation products participate in chemical modifications of proteins in vivo through non-enzymatic glycation (Maillard reaction) and formation of different products called advanced glycation end products. Vitamin C levels are particularly high in selected tissues, such as lens, brain and adrenal gland, and its degradation products can inflict substantial protein damage via formation of advanced glycation end products. However, the pathways of in vivo vitamin C degradation are poorly understood. Here we have determined the levels of vitamin C oxidation and degradation products dehydroascorbic acid, 2,3-diketogulonic acid, 3-deoxythreosone, xylosone, and threosone in the human lens using o-phenylenediamine to trap both free and protein-bound adducts. In the protein-free fraction and water-soluble proteins (WSP), all five listed degradation products were identified. Dehydroascorbic acid, 2,3-diketogulonic acid, and 3-deoxythreosone were the major products in the protein-free fraction, whereas in the WSP, 3-deoxythreosone was the most abundant measured dicarbonyl. In addition, 3-deoxythreosone in WSP showed positive linear correlation with age (p < 0.05). In water-insoluble proteins, only 3-deoxythreosone and threosone were detected, whereby the level of 3-deoxythreosone was ∼20 times higher than the level of threosone. The identification of 3-deoxythreosone as the major degradation product bound to human lens proteins provides in vivo evidence for the non-oxidative pathway of dehydroascorbate degradation into erythrulose as a major pathway for vitamin C degradation in vivo. PMID:21885436

  4. [Microbial degradation of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid--A review].

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiqin; Liu, Shuliang; Yao, Kai

    2015-09-01

    3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) with estrogen toxicity is one of the intermediate products of most pyrethroid pesticides. 3-PBA is difficult to degrade in the natural environment, and threatens food safety and human health. Microbial degradation of pyrethroids and their intermediate product (3-PBA) has become a hot topic in recent years. Here, we reviewed microbial species, degrading enzymes and degradation genes, degradation pathways of 3-PBA degrading and the application of 3-PBA degradation strains. This article provides references for the study of 3-PBA degradation by microorganisms. PMID:26762020

  5. Acid rain degradation of nylon

    SciTech Connect

    Kyllo, K.E.

    1984-01-01

    Acid rain, precipitation with a pH less than 5.6, is known to damage lakes, vegetation and buildings. Degradation of outdoor textiles by acid rain is strongly suspected but not well documented. This study reports the effects of sunlight, aqueous acid, heat and humidity (acid rain conditions) on spun delustered nylon 6,6 fabric. Untreated nylon and nylon treated with sulfuric acid of pH 2.0, 3.0, and 4.4 were exposed to light in an Atlas Xenon-arc fadeometer at 63/sup 0/C and 65% R.H. for up to 640 AATCC Fading Units. The untreated and acid treated nylon fabrics were also exposed to similar temperature and humidity condition without light. Nylon degradation was determined by changes in breaking strength, elongation, molecular weight, color, amino end group concentration (NH/sub 2/) and /sup 13/C NMR spectra. Physical damage was assessed using SEM.

  6. Diphenylarsinic acid contaminated soil remediation by titanium dioxide (P25) photocatalysis: Degradation pathway, optimization of operating parameters and effects of soil properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, A-nan; Teng, Ying; Hu, Xue-feng; Wu, Long-hua; Huang, Yu-juan; Luo, Yong-ming; Christie, Peter

    2016-01-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) is formed during the leakage of arsenic chemical weapons in sites and poses a high risk to biota. However, remediation methods for DPAA contaminated soils are rare. Here, the photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) process by nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) was applied to degrade DPAA in soil. The degradation pathway was firstly studied, and arsenate was identified as the final product. Then, an orthogonal array experimental design of L9(3)(4), only 9 experiments were needed, instead of 81 experiments in a conventional one-factor-at-a-time, was used to optimize the operational parameters soil:water ratio, TiO2 dosage, irradiation time and light intensity to increase DPAA removal efficiency. Soil:water ratio was found to have a more significant effect on DPAA removal efficiency than other properties. The optimum conditions to treat 4 g soil with a DPAA concentration of 20 mg kg(-1) were found to be a 1:10 soil: water ratio, 40 mW cm(-2) light intensity, 5% TiO2 in soil, and a 3-hour irradiation time, with a removal efficiency of up to 82.7%. Furthermore, this method (except for a change in irradiation time from 3 to 1.5h) was validated in nine different soils and the removal efficiencies ranged from 57.0 to 78.6%. Removal efficiencies were found to be negatively correlated with soil electrical conductivity, organic matter content, pH and total phosphorus content. Finally, coupled with electron spin resonance (ESR) measurement, these soil properties affected the generation of OH• by TiO2 in soil slurry. This study suggests that TiO2 photocatalytic oxidation is a promising treatment for removing DPAA from soil. PMID:26410709

  7. Multiple degradation pathways of phenanthrene by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia C6

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shumei; Seo, Jong-Su; Wang, Jun; Keum, Young-Soo; Li, Jianqiang; Li, Qing X.

    2013-01-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strain C6, capable of utilizing phenanthrene as a sole source of carbon and energy, was isolated from creosote-contaminated sites at Hilo, Hawaii. Twenty-two metabolites of phenanthrene, covering from dihydrodiol to protocatechuic acid, were isolated and characterized. Phenanthrene was degraded via an initial dioxygenation on 1,2-, 3,4-, and 9,10-C, where the 3,4-dioxygenation and subsequent metabolisms were most dominant. The metabolic pathways were further branched by ortho- and meta-cleavage of phenanthrenediols to produce 1-hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid, 2-hydroxy-1-naphthoic acid, and naphthalene-1,2-dicarboxylic acid. These intermediates were then transformed to naphthalene-1,2-diol. 1-Hydroxy-2-naphthoic acid was also degraded via a direct ring cleavage. Naphthalene-1,2-diol underwent primarily ortho-cleavage to produce trans-2-carboxycinnamic acid and then to form phthalic acid, 4,5-dihydroxyphthalic acid and protocatechuic acid. Accumulation of salicylic acid in prolonged incubation indicated that a limited extent of meta-cleavage of naphthalene-1, 2-diol also occurred. This is the first study of detailed phenanthrene metabolic pathways by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. PMID:23539472

  8. A d-Amino Acid at the N-Terminus of a Protein Abrogates Its Degradation by the N-End Rule Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved the ubiquitin (Ub)/proteasome system to degrade polypeptides. The Ub/proteasome system is one way that cells regulate cytosolic protein and amino acids levels through the recognition and ubiquitination of a protein’s N-terminus via E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. The process by which the N-terminus stimulates intracellular protein degradation is referred to as the N-end rule. Characterization of the N-end rule has been limited to only the natural l-amino acids. Using a cytosolic delivery platform derived from anthrax lethal toxin, we probed the stability of mixed chirality proteins, containing one d-amino acid on the N-terminus of otherwise all l-proteins. In all cases, we observed that one N-terminal d-amino acid stabilized the cargo protein to proteasomal degradation with respect to the N-end rule. We found that since the mixed chirality proteins were not polyubiquitinated, they evaded N-end-mediated proteasomal degradation. Evidently, a subtle change on the N-terminus of a natural protein can enhance its intracellular lifetime. PMID:26807441

  9. PHENOXYACETIC ACID DEGRADATION BY THE 2,4-DICHLOROPHENOXYACETIC ACID (TFD) PATHWAY TO PLASMID PJP4: MAPPING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE TFD REGULATORY GENE, TFDR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasmid pJP4 enables Alcaligenes eutrophys JMP134 to dedegrade 3-chlorobenzoate and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (TFD). lasmid pR0101 is a derivative of pJP4 obtained by insertion of Tn1721 into a nonessential region of pJP4. lasmid pR0101 was transferred by conjugation to seve...

  10. The trans-anethole degradation pathway in an Arthrobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, Eyal; Baasov, Timor; Ravid, Uzi; Shoham, Yuval

    2002-04-01

    A bacterial strain (TA13) capable of utilizing t-anethole as the sole carbon source was isolated from soil. The strain was identified as Arthrobacter aurescens based on its 16 S rRNA gene sequence. Key steps of the degradation pathway of t-anethole were identified by the use of t-anethole-blocked mutants and specific inducible enzymatic activities. In addition to t-anethole, strain TA13 is capable of utilizing anisic acid, anisaldehyde, and anisic alcohol as the sole carbon source. t-Anethole-blocked mutants were obtained following mutagenesis and penicillin enrichment. Some of these blocked mutants, accumulated in the presence of t-anethole quantitative amounts of t-anethole-diol, anisic acid, and 4,6-dicarboxy-2-pyrone and traces of anisic alcohol and anisaldehyde. Enzymatic activities induced by t-anethole included: 4-methoxybenzoate O-demethylase, p-hydroxybenzoate 3-hydroxylase, and protocatechuate-4,5-dioxygenase. These findings indicate that t-anethole is metabolized to protocatechuic acid through t-anethole-diol, anisaldehyde, anisic acid, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid. The protocatechuic acid is then cleaved by protocatechuate-4,5-dioxygenase to yield 2-hydroxy-4-carboxy muconate-semialdehyde. Results from inducible uptake ability and enzymatic assays indicate that at least three regulatory units are involved in the t-anethole degradation pathway. These findings provide new routes for environmental friendly production processes of valuable aromatic chemicals via bioconversion of phenylpropenoids. PMID:11805095

  11. Aerobic degradation of dinitrotoluenes and pathway for bacterial degradation of 2,6-dinitrotoluene

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, S.F.; Paoli, G.C.; Spain, J.C.

    2000-05-01

    An oxidative pathway for the mineralization of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) by Burkholderia sp. strain DNT has been reported previously. The authors report here the isolation of additional strains with the ability to mineralize 2,4-DNT by the same pathway and the isolation and characterization of bacterial strains that mineralize 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT) by a different pathway. Burkholderia cepacia strain JS850 and Hydrogenophaga palleronii strain JS863 grew on 2,6-DNT as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. The initial steps in the pathway for degradation of 2,6-DNT were determined by simultaneous induction, enzyme assays, and identification of metabolites through mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. 2,6-DNT was converted to 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol by a dioxygenation reaction accompanied by the release of nitrite. 3-Methyl-4-nitrocatechol was the substrate for extradiol ring cleavage yielding 2-hydroxy-5-nitro-6-oxohepta-2,4-dienoic acid. 2,4-DNT-degrading strains also converted 2,6-DNT to 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol but did not metabolize the 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol. Although 2,6-DNT prevented the degradation of 2,4-DNT by 2,4-DNT-degrading strains, the effect was not the result of inhibition of 2,4-DNT dioxygenase by 2,6-DNT or of 4-methyl-5-nitrocatechol monooxygenase by 3-methyl-4-nitrocatechol.

  12. Proteogenomic Characterization of Monocyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Aniline-Degrading Bacterium Burkholderia sp. K24

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Yi, Yoon-Sun; Kim, Jonghyun; Chung, Young-Ho; Park, Edmond Changkyun; Kim, Seung Il

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. K24, formerly known as Acinetobacter lwoffii K24, is a soil bacterium capable of utilizing aniline as its sole carbon and nitrogen source. Genomic sequence analysis revealed that this bacterium possesses putative gene clusters for biodegradation of various monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs), including benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX), as well as aniline. We verified the proposed MAH biodegradation pathways by dioxygenase activity assays, RT-PCR, and LC/MS-based quantitative proteomic analyses. This proteogenomic approach revealed four independent degradation pathways, all converging into the citric acid cycle. Aniline and p-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathways converged into the β-ketoadipate pathway. Benzoate and toluene were degraded through the benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. The xylene isomers, i.e., o-, m-, and p-xylene, were degraded via the extradiol cleavage pathways. Salicylate was degraded through the gentisate degradation pathway. Our results show that Burkholderia sp. K24 possesses versatile biodegradation pathways, which may be employed for efficient bioremediation of aniline and BTX. PMID:27124467

  13. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues.

    PubMed

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl-N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27324649

  14. Fatty Acid Structure and Degradation Analysis in Fingerprint Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleik, Stefanie; Spengler, Bernhard; Schäfer, Thomas; Urbach, Dieter; Luhn, Steven; Kirsch, Dieter

    2016-09-01

    GC-MS investigations were carried out to elucidate the aging behavior of unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues and to identify their degradation products in aged samples. For this purpose, a new sample preparation technique for fingerprint residues was developed that allows producing N-methyl- N-trimethylsilyl-trifluoroacetamide (MSTFA) derivatives of the analyzed unsaturated fatty acids and their degradation products. MSTFA derivatization catalyzed by iodotrimethylsilane enables the reliable identification of aldehydes and oxoacids as characteristic MSTFA derivatives in GCMS. The obtained results elucidate the degradation pathway of unsaturated fatty acids. Our study of aged fingerprint residues reveals that decanal is the main degradation product of the observed unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, oxoacids with different chain lengths are detected as specific degradation products of the unsaturated fatty acids. The detection of the degradation products and their chain length is a simple and effective method to determine the double bond position in unsaturated compounds. We can show that the hexadecenoic and octadecenoic acids found in fingerprint residues are not the pervasive fatty acids Δ9-hexadecenoic (palmitoleic acid) and Δ9-octadecenoic (oleic acid) acid but Δ6-hexadecenoic acid (sapienic acid) and Δ8-octadecenoic acid. The present study focuses on the structure identification of human sebum-specific unsaturated fatty acids in fingerprint residues based on the identification of their degradation products. These results are discussed for further investigations and method developments for age determination of fingerprints, which is still a tremendous challenge because of several factors affecting the aging behavior of individual compounds in fingerprints.

  15. Degradation of ciprofloxacin in water by advanced oxidation process: kinetics study, influencing parameters and degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Sayed, Murtaza; Ismail, M; Khan, Sanaullah; Tabassum, Safia; Khan, Hasan M

    2016-03-01

    Gamma-radiation-induced degradation of ciprofloxacin (CIP) in aqueous solution and the factors affecting the degradation process have been investigated. The results showed that CIP (4.6 mg/L) was almost completely degraded at an absorbed dose of 870 Gy. The kinetic studies of aqueous solutions containing 4.6, 10, 15 and 17.9 mg/L indicated that the decomposition of CIP by gamma irradiation followed pseudo-first-order kinetics and the decay constant (k) decreased from 5.9  ×  10(-3) to 1.6  ×  10(-3) Gy(-1) with an increase in CIP initial concentration from 4.6 to 17.9 mg/L. The effect of saturation of CIP solution with N2, N2O or air on radiation-induced degradation of CIP was also investigated. The effects of radical scavengers, such as t-BuOH and i-PrOH, showed the role of reactive radicals towards degradation of CIP in the order of [Formula: see text]. The apparent second-order rate constant of [Formula: see text] with CIP was calculated to be 2.64 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The effects of solution pH as well as natural water contaminants, such as [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], on CIP degradation by gamma-irradiation were also investigated. Major degradation products, including organic acids, were identified using UPLC-MS/MS and IC, and degradation pathways have been proposed. PMID:26208491

  16. Rho iso-alpha acids from hops inhibit the GSK-3/NF-κB pathway and reduce inflammatory markers associated with bone and cartilage degradation

    PubMed Central

    Konda, Veera Reddy; Desai, Anuradha; Darland, Gary; Bland, Jeffrey S; Tripp, Matthew L

    2009-01-01

    Background Rho iso-alpha acids (RIAA) from hops have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties. To understand the mechanisms, we evaluated the effect of RIAA in cell signaling pathways and inflammatory markers using various in vitro models. We also investigated their therapeutic effect in mice with collagen-induced arthritis. Methods The LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages were used to evaluate the effect of RIAA on the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways; phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK was assessed by western blotting and NF-κB binding by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Effect on the NF-κB activity was evaluated by the luciferase reporter assays in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. GSK-3α/β kinase activity was measured in cell-free assays. The inhibitory effect of RIAA on inflammatory markers was assessed by measuring nitric oxide in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, RANKL-mediated TRAP activity in transformed osteoclasts, and TNF-α/IL-1β-mediated MMP-13 expression in SW1353 cells. Mice with collagen-induced arthritis were fed with RIAA for 2 weeks. Symptoms of joint swelling, arthritic index and joint damage were assessed. Results RIAA selectively inhibited the NF-κB pathway while having no effect on ERK1/2, p38 and JNK phosphorylation in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. RIAA also inhibited GSK-3α/β kinase activity and GSK-3β dependent phosphorylation of β-catenin in RAW 264.7 cells. In addition, RIAA inhibited NF-κB-mediated inflammatory markers in various cell models, including nitric oxide in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, RANKL-mediated TRAP activity in transformed osteoclasts, and TNF-α/IL-1β-mediated MMP-13 expression in SW1353 human chondrosarcoma cells. Finally, in a mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis, RIAA ameliorated joint damage as evidenced by significant reduction of the arthritis index and histology score; at 250 mg/kg-body weight, RIAA had efficacy similar to that of 20 mg/kg-body weight of celecoxib

  17. NP1EC Degradation Pathways Under Oxic and Microxic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery-Brown, John; Li, Yongmei; Ding, Wang-Hsien; Mong, Gary M.; Campbell, James A.; Reinhard, Martin

    2008-03-22

    The degradation pathway of nonylphenol ethoxyacetic acid (NP1EC) and the conditions favoring CAP1EC formation were studied in aerobic microcosms constructed with soil from the Mesa soil aquifer treatment (SAT) facility (Arizona, USA) and pristine sediments from Coyote Creek (California, USA). In the Mesa microcosms, para-NP1EC was transformed to para-NP, before being rapidly transformed to nonyl alcohols via ipso-hydroxylation. While the formation of NP from APEMs has been observed by several researchers under anaerobic conditions, this is the first time the transient formation of NP from APEMs has been observed under aerobic conditions. Unlike the Mesa microcosms, large quantities of CAP1ECs were observed in the Coyote Creek microcosms. Initially, CA8P1ECs were the dominant metabolites, but as biodegradation continued, CA6P1ECs became the dominant metabolites. Compared to the CA8P1ECs, the number of CA6P1ECs peaks observed was small (<6) even though their concentrations were high. This suggests that several CA8P1ECs are degraded to only a few CA6P1EC isomers (i.e., the degradation pathway converges) or that some CA6P1EC metabolites are significantly more recalcitrant than others. The different biodegradation pathways observed in the Mesa and Coyote Creek microcosms result from the limited availability of dissolved oxygen in the Coyote Creek microcosms. In both sets of microcosms, the ortho isomers were transformed more slowly than the para isomers and in the Coyote Creek microcosms several ortho-CAP1ECs were observed. In addition, several unknown metabolites were observed in the Coyote Creek microcosms that were not seen in the abiotic or Mesa microcosms; these metabolites appear to be CAP1EC metabolites, have a -CH2-C6H4- fragment, and contain one carboxylic acid. Nitro-nonylphenol was observed in the Mesa microcosms, however, further experimentation illustrated that it was the product of an abiotic reaction between nitrite and nonylphenol under acidic conditions.

  18. Pathway of degradation of nitrilotriacetate by a Pseudomonas species.

    PubMed Central

    Firestone, M K; Tiedje, J M

    1978-01-01

    The pathway of degradation of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) was determined by using cell-free extracts and a 35-fold purification of NTA monooxygenase. The first step in the breakdown was an oxidative cleavage of the tertiary amine by the monooxygenase to form the aldo acid, glyoxylate, and the secondary amine, iminodiacetate (IDA). NTA N-oxide acted as a substrate analog for induction of the monooxygenase and was slowly metabolized by the enzyme, but was not an intermediate in the pathway. No intermediate before IDA was found, but an unstable alpha-hydroxy-NTA intermediate was postulated. IDA did undergo cleavage in the presence of the purified monooxygenase to give glyoxylate and glycine, but was not metabolized in cell-free extracts. Glyoxylate was further metabolized by cell-free extracts to yield CO2 and glycerate or glycine, products also found from NTA metabolism. Of the three bacterial isolates in which the NTA pathway has been studied, two strains, one isolated from a British soil and ours from a Michigan soil, appear to be almost identical. Images PMID:655711

  19. TEMPERATURE-SENSITIVE, POST-TRANSLATIONAL REGULATION OF PLANT OMEGA-3 FATTY ACID DESATURASES IS MEDIATED BY THE ER-ASSOCIATED DEGRADATION PATHWAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In plants, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized omega-3 fatty acid desaturases (Fad3s) increase the production of polyunsaturated fatty acids at cooler temperatures, but the FAD3 genes themselves are typically not upregulated during this adaptive response. Here, we expressed two closely related ...

  20. Understanding Degradation Pathways in Organic Photovoltaics (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, M. T.; Olson, D. C.; Garcia, A.; Kauvar, I.; Kopidakis, N.; Reese, M. O.; Berry, J. J.; Ginley, D. S.

    2011-02-01

    Organic Photovoltaics (OPVs) recently attained power conversion efficiencies that are of interest for commercial production. Consequently, one of the most important unsolved issues facing a new industry is understanding what governs lifetime in organic devices and discovering solutions to mitigate degradation mechanisms. Historically, the active organic components are considered vulnerable to photo-oxidation and represent the primary degradation channel. However, we present several (shelf life and light soaking) studies pointing the relative stability of the active layers and instabilities in commonly used electrode materials. We show that engineering of the hole/electron layer at the electrode can lead to environmentally stable devices even without encapsulation.

  1. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1990-06-26

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylane glycols (PVB 6/22/90), propylene and and polypropylene (PVB 6/22/90) glycols, P-dioxanone, 1, 5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  2. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1994-11-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer were selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide where the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  3. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.

    1996-10-08

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer is described made from monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  4. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, Patrick V.; Coleman, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4-oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2 by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  5. Water and UV degradable lactic acid polymers

    DOEpatents

    Bonsignore, Patrick V.; Coleman, Robert D.

    1994-01-01

    A water and UV light degradable copolymer of monomers of lactic acid and a modifying monomer selected from the class consisting of ethylene and polyethylene glycols, propylene and polypropylene glycols, P-dioxanone, 1,5 dioxepan-2-one, 1,4 -oxathialan-2-one, 1,4-dioxide and mixtures thereof. These copolymers are useful for waste disposal and agricultural purposes. Also disclosed is a water degradable blend of polylactic acid or modified polylactic acid and high molecular weight polyethylene oxide wherein the high molecular weight polyethylene oxide is present in the range of from about 2% by weight to about 50% by weight, suitable for films. A method of applying an active material selected from the class of seeds, seedlings, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers and mixtures thereof to an agricultural site is also disclosed.

  6. Degradation of a model pollutant ferulic acid by the endophytic fungus Phomopsis liquidambari.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xing-Guang; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2015-03-01

    Biodegradation of ferulic acid, by an endophytic fungus called Phomopsis liquidambari was investigated in this study. This strain can use ferulic acid as the sole carbon for growth. Both in mineral salt medium and in soil, more than 97% of added ferulic acid was degraded within 48 h. The metabolites were identified and quantified using GC-MS and HPLC-MS. Ferulic acid was first decarboxylated to 4-vinyl guaiacol and then oxidized to vanillin and vanillic acid, followed by demethylation to protocatechuic acid, which was further degraded through the β-ketoadipate pathway. During degradation, ferulic acid decarboxylase, laccase and protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activities and their gene transcription levels were significantly affected by the variation of substrate and product concentrations. Moreover, ferulic acid degradation was determined to some extent by P. liquidambari laccase. This study is the first report of an endophytic fungus that has a great potential for practical application in ferulic acid-contaminated environments. PMID:25514400

  7. Anaerobic degradation of linoleic oleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Lalman, J.A.; Bagley, D.M.

    1999-07-01

    The anaerobic degradation of linoleic (C18:2) and oleic (C18:1) acids was examined in batch experiments. By-product distribution depended on both the type of long chain fatty acid added and initial substrate concentration. Major by-products were palmitic (C16), myristic (C14) and acetic acids. Trace quantities of palmitoleic (C16:1) and lauric (C12) acids were observed together with larger amounts of palmitic (C16), myristic (C14) and hexanoic (C6) acids in cultures incubated with 100 mg/L linoleic (C18:2) acid. Bio-hydrogenation of C18 fatty acids was not necessary for the {beta}-oxidation mechanism to proceed. Aceticlastic methanogenic inhibition was observed in cultures inoculated with greater than 50 mg/L linoleic (C18:2) acid. In cultures incubated with greater than 50 mg/L oleic (C18:1) acid, aceticlastic methanogenic inhibition was observed for a short time period.

  8. Cathodic degradation of antibiotics: characterization and pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deyong; Liang, Bin; Yun, Hui; Cheng, Haoyi; Ma, Jincai; Cui, Minhua; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Nanqi

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics in wastewaters must be degraded to eliminate their antibacterial activity before discharging into the environment. A cathode can provide continuous electrons for the degradation of refractory pollutants, however the cathodic degradation feasibility, efficiency and pathway for different kinds of antibiotics is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the degradation of four antibiotics, namely nitrofurazone (NFZ), metronidazole (MNZ), chloramphenicol (CAP), and florfenicol (FLO) by a poised cathode in a dual chamber electrochemical reactor. The cyclic voltammetry preliminarily proved the feasibility of the cathodic degradation of these antibiotics. The cathodic reducibility of these antibiotics followed the order of NFZ > MNZ > CAP > FLO. A decreased phosphate buffered solution (PBS) concentration as low as 2 mM or utilization of NaCl buffer solution as catholyte had significant influence on antibiotics degradation rate and efficiency for CAP and FLO but not for NFZ and MNZ. PBS could be replaced by Na2CO3-NaHCO3 buffer solution as catholyte for the degradation of these antibiotics. Reductive dechlorination of CAP proceeded only after the reduction of the nitro group to aromatic amine. The composition of the degradation products depended on the cathode potential except for MNZ. The cathodic degradation process could eliminate the antibacterial activity of these antibiotics. The current study suggests that the electrochemical reduction could serve as a potential pretreatment or advanced treatment unit for the treatment of antibiotics containing wastewaters. PMID:25660806

  9. Nanobiocatalytic Degradation of Acid Orange 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastings, Jason

    The catalytic properties of various metal nanoparticles have led to their use in environmental remediation applications. However, these remediation strategies are limited by their ability to deliver catalytic nanoparticles and a suitable electron donor to large treatment zones. Clostridium pasteurianum BC1 cells, loaded with bio-Pd nanoparticles, were used to effectively catalyze the reductive degradation and removal of Acid Orange 7 (AO7), a model azo compound. Hydrogen produced fermentatively by the C. pasteurianum BC1 acted as the electron donor for the process. Pd-free bacterial cultures or control experiments conducted with heat-killed cells showed limited reduction of AO7. Experiments also showed that the in situ biological production of H2 by C. pasteurianum BC1 was essential for the degradation of AO7, which suggests a novel process where the in situ microbial production of hydrogen is directly coupled to the catalytic bio-Pd mediated reduction of AO7. The differences in initial degradation rate for experiments conducted using catalyst concentrations of 1ppm Pd and 5ppm Pd and an azo dye concentration of 100ppm AO7 was 0.39 /hr and 1.94 /hr respectively, demonstrating the importance of higher concentrations of active Pd(0). The degradation of AO7 was quick as demonstrated by complete reductive degradation of 50ppm AO7 in 2 hours in experiments conducted using a catalyst concentration of 5ppm Pd. Dye degradation products were analyzed via Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer (GCMS), High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), UltraViolet-Visible spectrophotometer (UV-Vis) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) spectrometry. The presence of 1-amino 2-naphthol, one of the hypothesized degradation products, was confirmed using mass spectrometry.

  10. Pathways for degradation of plastic polymers floating in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Gewert, Berit; Plassmann, Merle M; MacLeod, Matthew

    2015-09-01

    Each year vast amounts of plastic are produced worldwide. When released to the environment, plastics accumulate, and plastic debris in the world's oceans is of particular environmental concern. More than 60% of all floating debris in the oceans is plastic and amounts are increasing each year. Plastic polymers in the marine environment are exposed to sunlight, oxidants and physical stress, and over time they weather and degrade. The degradation processes and products must be understood to detect and evaluate potential environmental hazards. Some attention has been drawn to additives and persistent organic pollutants that sorb to the plastic surface, but so far the chemicals generated by degradation of the plastic polymers themselves have not been well studied from an environmental perspective. In this paper we review available information about the degradation pathways and chemicals that are formed by degradation of the six plastic types that are most widely used in Europe. We extrapolate that information to likely pathways and possible degradation products under environmental conditions found on the oceans' surface. The potential degradation pathways and products depend on the polymer type. UV-radiation and oxygen are the most important factors that initiate degradation of polymers with a carbon-carbon backbone, leading to chain scission. Smaller polymer fragments formed by chain scission are more susceptible to biodegradation and therefore abiotic degradation is expected to precede biodegradation. When heteroatoms are present in the main chain of a polymer, degradation proceeds by photo-oxidation, hydrolysis, and biodegradation. Degradation of plastic polymers can lead to low molecular weight polymer fragments, like monomers and oligomers, and formation of new end groups, especially carboxylic acids. PMID:26216708

  11. ORGANOPHOSPHATE PESTICIDE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS DURING DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Free chlorine has been found to react with organophosphate (OP) pesticides resulting in the more toxic oxon products. We will discuss OP pesticide degradation pathways and modeling in the presence of chlorine and chloramines, as well as present a relationship between structure a...

  12. Degradation of oxcarbazepine by UV-activated persulfate oxidation: kinetics, mechanisms, and pathways.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lingjun; Zhou, Shiqing; Shi, Zhou; Deng, Lin; Li, Guangchao; Yi, Qihang; Gao, Naiyun

    2016-02-01

    The degradation kinetics and mechanism of the antiepileptic drug oxcarbazepine (OXC) by UV-activated persulfate oxidation were investigated in this study. Results showed that UV/persulfate (UV/PS) process appeared to be more effective in degrading OXC than UV or PS alone. The OXC degradation exhibited a pseudo-first order kinetics pattern and the degradation rate constants (k obs) were affected by initial OXC concentration, PS dosage, initial pH, and humic acid concentration to different degrees. It was found that low initial OXC concentration, high persulfate dosage, and initial pH enhanced the OXC degradation. Additionally, the presence of humic acid in the solution could greatly inhibit the degradation of OXC. Moreover, hydroxyl radical (OH•) and sulfate radical (SO4 (-)••) were identified to be responsible for OXC degradation and SO4 (-)• made the predominant contribution in this study. Finally, major intermediate products were identified and a preliminary degradation pathway was proposed. Results demonstrated that UV/PS system is a potential technology to control the water pollution caused by emerging contaminants such as OXC. PMID:26452660

  13. Aerobic Microbial Degradation of Glucoisosaccharinic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Strand, S. E.; Dykes, J.; Chiang, V.

    1984-01-01

    α-Glucoisosaccharinic acid (GISA), a major by-product of kraft paper manufacture, was synthesized from lactose and used as the carbon source for microbial media. Ten strains of aerobic bacteria capable of growth on GISA were isolated from kraft pulp mill environments. The highest growth yields were obtained with Ancylobacter spp. at pH 7.2 to 9.5. GISA was completely degraded by cultures of an Ancylobacter isolate. Ancylobacter cell suspensions consumed oxygen and produced carbon dioxide in response to GISA addition. A total of 22 laboratory strains of bacteria were tested, and none was capable of growth on GISA. GISA-degrading isolates were not found in forest soils. Images PMID:16346467

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Thermophilic Bacilli Degrading Cinnamic, 4-Coumaric, and Ferulic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xue; Misawa, Norihiko; Harayama, Shigeaki

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-four thermophilic Bacillus sp. strains were isolated from decayed wood bark and a hot spring water sample based on their ability to degrade vanillic acid under thermophilic conditions. It was found that these bacteria were able to degrade a wide range of aromatic acids such as cinnamic, 4-coumaric, 3-phenylpropionic, 3-(p-hydroxyphenyl)propionic, ferulic, benzoic, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids. The metabolic pathways for the degradation of these aromatic acids at 60°C were examined by using one of the isolates, strain B1. Benzoic and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids were detected as breakdown products from cinnamic and 4-coumaric acids, respectively. The β-oxidative mechanism was proposed to be responsible for these conversions. The degradation of benzoic and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids was determined to proceed through catechol and gentisic acid, respectively, for their ring fission. It is likely that a non-β-oxidative mechanism is the case in the ferulic acid catabolism, which involved 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-β-hydroxypropionic acid, vanillin, and vanillic acid as the intermediates. Other strains examined, which are V0, D1, E1, G2, ZI3, and H4, were found to have the same pathways as those of strain B1, except that strains V0, D1, and H4 had the ability to transform 3-hydroxybenzoic acid to gentisic acid, which strain B1 could not do. PMID:12620824

  15. Identification of the major degradation pathways of ticagrelor.

    PubMed

    Sadou Yaye, Hassane; Secrétan, Philippe-Henri; Henriet, Théo; Bernard, Mélisande; Amrani, Fatma; Akrout, Wiem; Tilleul, Patrick; Yagoubi, Najet; Do, Bernard

    2015-02-01

    Ticagrelor is a direct-acting and reversible P2Y12-adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor blocker used as antiplatelet drug. Forced degradation under various stress conditions was carried out. The degradation products have been detected and identified by high-pressure liquid chromatography multistage mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n)) along with high-resolution mass spectrometry. C18 XTerra MS column combined with a linear gradient mobile phase composed of a mixture of 10 mM acetate ammonium/acetonitrile was shown suitable for drug and impurity determinations and validated as a stability indicating method. Structural elucidation of the degradation products relied on MS(n) studies and accurate mass measurements giving access to elemental compositions. Up to nine degradation products resulting from oxidation/auto-oxidation, S-dealkylation and N-dealkylation have been identified, covering a range of possible degradation pathways for derivatives with such functional groups. Kinetics was also studied in order to assess the molecule's shelf-life and to identify the most important degradation factors. PMID:25543285

  16. Targeting the Autophagy/Lysosomal Degradation Pathway in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Ríos, Pilar; Madero-Pérez, Jesús; Fernández, Belén; Hilfiker, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular quality control mechanism crucial for neuronal homeostasis. Defects in autophagy are critically associated with mechanisms underlying Parkinson's disease (PD), a common and debilitating neurodegenerative disorder. Autophagic dysfunction in PD can occur at several stages of the autophagy/lysosomal degradative machinery, contributing to the formation of intracellular protein aggregates and eventual neuronal cell death. Therefore, autophagy inducers may comprise a promising new therapeutic approach to combat neurodegeneration in PD. Several currently available FDA-approved drugs have been shown to enhance autophagy, which may allow for their repurposing for use in novel clinical conditions including PD. This review summarizes our current knowledge of deficits in the autophagy/lysosomal degradation pathways associated with PD, and highlight current approaches which target this pathway as possible means towards novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26517050

  17. Hydroxide Degradation Pathways for Substituted Trimethylammonium Cations: A DFT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Long, H.; Kim, K.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2012-05-03

    Substituted trimethylammonium cations serve as small molecule analogues for tetherable cations in anion exchange membranes. In turn, these membranes serve as the basis for alkaline membrane fuel cells by allowing facile conduction of hydroxide. As these cations are susceptible to hydroxide attack, they degrade over time and greatly limit the lifetime of the fuel cell. In this research, we performed density functional theory calculations to investigate the degradation pathways of substituted trimethylammonium cations to probe the relative durability of cation tethering strategies in alkyl and aromatic tethers. Our results show that significant changes in calculated energy barriers occur when substitution groups change. Specifically, we have found that, when available, the Hofmann elimination pathway is the most vulnerable pathway for degradation; however, this barrier is also found to depend on the carbon chain length and number of hydrogens susceptible to Hofmann elimination. S{sub N}2 barriers were also investigated for both methyl groups and substitution groups. The reported findings give important insight into potential tethering strategies for trimethylammonium cations in anion exchange membranes.

  18. Efficient sonochemical degradation of perfluorooctanoic acid using periodate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Chi; Chen, Meng-Jia; Huang, Chin-Pao; Kuo, Jeff; Lo, Shang-Lien

    2016-07-01

    A rapid and efficient treatment method, using periodate (PI) for sonochemical oxidation of persistent and bioaccumulative perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) was developed. With an addition of 45 mM PI, 96.5% of PFOA was decomposed with a defluorination efficiency of 95.7% after 120 min of ultrasound (US). The removals of PFOA were augmented with an increase in PI doses. In all the PI+US experimental runs, decomposition efficiencies were essentially similar to those of defluorination, indicating that PFOA was decomposed and mineralized into fluoride ions. Lower solution pHs resulted in an increase in decomposition and defluorination efficiencies of PFOA due to acid-catalyzation. Dissolved oxygen increased the amount of IO4 radicals produced, which consumed the more effective IO3 radicals. Consequently, presence of oxygen inhibited the destruction of PFOA. The PFOA degradation rates with different gases sparging are in the following order: nitrogen>air>oxygen. Effects of anions follow the Hofmeister effects on PFOA degradation (i.e., Br(-)>none ⩾ Cl(-)>SO4(2)(-)). Br(-) could react with OH to yield radical anion Br2(-) that enhances the PFOA degradation. A reaction pathway was also proposed to describe the PI oxidation of PFOA under US irradiation. PMID:26964977

  19. TiO2 Photocatalytic Degradation of Phenylarsonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shan; Cai, Yong; O’Shea, Kevin E.

    2010-01-01

    Phenyl substituted arsenic compounds are widely used as feed additives in the poultry industry and have become a serious environmental concern. We have demonstrated that phenylarsonic acid (PA) is readily degraded by TiO2 photocatalysis. Application of the Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetic model for the initial stages of the TiO2 photocatalysis of PA yields an apparent rate constant (kr) of 2.8 µmol/L·min and the pseudo-equilibrium constant (K) for PA is 34 L/mmol. The pH of the solution influences the adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of PA due to the surface charge of TiO2 photocatalyst and speciation of PA. Phenol, catechol and hydroquinone are observed as the predominant products during the degradation. The roles of reactive oxygen species, •OH, 1O2, O2−• and hVB+ were probed by adding appropriate scavengers to the reaction medium and the results suggest that •OH plays a major role in the degradation of PA. By-products studies indicate the surface of the catalyst plays a key role in the formation of the primary products and the subsequent oxidation pathways leading to the mineralization to inorganic arsenic. TiO2 photocatalysis results in the rapid destruction of PA and may be attractive for the remediation of a variety of organoarsenic compounds. PMID:20473340

  20. Reaction pathways of the diketonitrile degradate of isoxaflutole with hypochlorite in water.

    PubMed

    Lerch, R N; Lin, C H; Leigh, N D

    2007-03-01

    Isoxaflutole (IXF; Balance) belongs to a new class of isoxazole herbicides. Isoxaflutole has a very short half-life in soil and rapidly degrades to a stable and phytotoxic degradate, diketonitrile (DKN). DKN was previously discovered to rapidly react with hypochlorite (OCl-) in tap water, yielding the benzoic acid (BA) degradate as a major product, but the complete reaction pathway and mechanism have not been elucidated. Thus, the objectives of this work were to (1) determine the stoichiometry of the reaction between DKN and OCl-; (2) identify products in addition to BA; and (3) propose a complete pathway and reaction mechanism for oxidation of DKN by OCl-. Stoichiometry of the reaction showed a molar ratio of OCl-/DKN of 2. In addition, two previously uncharacterized chlorinated intermediates were identified under conditions in which OCl- was the limiting reactant. The proposed chemical structure of a chlorinated benzoyl intermediate was inferred from a series of HPLC/MS and HPLC/MS/MS experiments and the use of mass spectral simulation software. A chlorinated ketone intermediate was also identified using ion trap GC/MS. Two additional end products were also identified: cyclopropanecarboxylic acid (CPCA) and dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN). On the basis of the reaction stoichiometry, the structure of the chlorinated intermediates, and the identification of the products, two reaction pathways are proposed. Both pathways involve a two-step nucleophilic attack and oxidation of the diketone structure of DKN, leading to formation of BA, DCAN, and CPCA. PMID:17284050

  1. Effectiveness and pathways of electrochemical degradation of pretilachlor herbicides.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinzhi; Feng, Yujie; Sun, Xiaojun; Liu, Junfeng; Zhu, Limin

    2011-05-15

    Pretilachlor used as one kind of acetanilide herbicides is potentially dangerous and biorefractory. In this work, electrochemical degradation of lab-synthetic pretilachlor wastewater was carried out with Sb doped Ti/SnO(2) electrode as anode and stainless steel as cathode. The effect of current density on pretilachlor degradation was investigated, and the degradation pathway of pretilachlor was inferred by analyzing its main degradation intermediates. The results showed that the removal of pretilachlor and TOC in treatment time of 60 min were 98.8% and 43.1% under the conditions of current density of 20 mA cm(-2), initial concentration of pretilachlor of 60 mg L(-1), Na(2)SO(4) dosage of 0.1 mol L(-1), pH of 7.2, respectively, while the energy consumption was 15.8 kWhm(-3). The main reactions for electrochemical degradation of pretilachlor included hydroxylation, oxidation, dechlorination, C-O bond and C-N bond cleavage, resulting in the formation of nine main intermediates. PMID:21382661

  2. Degradation of toluene-2,4-diamine by persulphate: kinetics, intermediates and degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yong-hai; Zhang, Jin-bao; Xi, Bei-dou; An, Da; Yang, Yu; Li, Ming-xiao

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the degradation of toluene-2,4-diamine (TDA) by persulphate (PS) in an aqueous solution at near-neutral pH was examined. The result showed that the degradation rate of TDA increased with increasing PS concentrations. The optimal dosage of PS in the reaction system was determined by efficiency indicator (I) coupling in the consumption of PS and decay half-life of TDA. Calculation showed that 0.74 mM of PS was the most effective dosage for TDA degradation, at that level the maximum I of 24.51 was obtained. PS can oxidize TDA for an extended reaction time period. Under neutral condition without activation, four degradation intermediates, 2,4-diamino-3-hydroxy-5-sulfonicacidtoluene, 2,4-diaminobenzaldehyde, 2,4-bis(vinylamino)benzaldehyde and 3,5-diamino-4-hydroxy-2-pentene, were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The tentative degradation pathway of TDA was proposed as well. It was found that hydroxyl radical played an important role in degradation of TDA with the activation of Fe2+, whereas PS anion and sulphate radicals were responsible for the degradation without activation of Fe2+. PMID:25442404

  3. Kinetic models and pathways of ronidazole degradation by chlorination, UV irradiation and UV/chlorine processes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Lang; Lin, Yi-Li; Xu, Bin; Hu, Chen-Yan; Tian, Fu-Xiang; Zhang, Tian-Yang; Zhu, Wen-Qian; Huang, He; Gao, Nai-Yun

    2014-11-15

    Degradation kinetics and pathways of ronidazole (RNZ) by chlorination (Cl2), UV irradiation and combined UV/chlorine processes were investigated in this paper. The degradation kinetics of RNZ chlorination followed a second-order behavior with the rate constants calculated as (2.13 ± 0.15) × 10(2) M(-2) s(-1), (0.82 ± 0.52) × 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1) and (2.06 ± 0.09) × 10(-1) M(-1) s(-1) for the acid-catalyzed reaction, as well as the reactions of RNZ with HOCl and OCl(-), respectively. Although UV irradiation degraded RNZ more effectively than chlorination did, very low quantum yield of RNZ at 254 nm was obtained as 1.02 × 10(-3) mol E(-1). RNZ could be efficiently degraded and mineralized in the UV/chlorine process due to the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The second-order rate constant between RNZ and hydroxyl radical was determined as (2.92 ± 0.05) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The degradation intermediates of RNZ during the three processes were identified with Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography - Electrospray Ionization - mass spectrometry and the degradation pathways were then proposed. Moreover, the variation of chloropicrin (TCNM) and chloroform (CF) formation after the three processes were further evaluated. Enhanced formation of CF and TCNM precursors during UV/chlorine process deserves extensive attention in drinking water treatment. PMID:25141357

  4. Degradation of fluorescent and radiolabelled sphingomyelins in intact cells by a non-lysosomal pathway.

    PubMed

    Levade, T; Vidal, F; Vermeersch, S; Andrieu, N; Gatt, S; Salvayre, R

    1995-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the entitled neutral, sphingomyelinase in the non-lysosomal pathway of sphingomyelin degradation by intact cells (Spence et al. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 8595-8600; Levade et al. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 13519-13529). The uptake and degradation of sphingomyelin by intact living cells was studied using cell lines exhibiting a wide range of activity levels of acid, lysosomal and neutral sphingomyelinases as determined in vitro on cell homogenates by their respective standard assays. For this purpose, neuroblastoma, skin fibroblasts, lymphoid and leukemic cell lines, some of them derived from patients with Niemann-Pick disease (deficient in the acid, lysosomal sphingomyelinase) were incubated with radioactive, [oleoyl-3H]sphingomyelin or fluorescent, pyrene-sulfonylaminoundecanoyl-sphingomyelin. Either compound was taken up by a pathway which was not receptor-mediated and hydrolyzed by all intact cells, including those derived from Niemann-Pick disease patients. Moreover, their degradation by the intact cells was not inhibited by treatment with chloroquine, indicating hydrolysis by a non-lysosomal sphingomyelinase. The intracellular sphingomyelin degradation rates showed no correlation with the activity of the 'classical' neutral sphingomyelinase as determined in vitro. In particular, fibroblasts derived from Niemann-Pick patients lacking the lysosomal sphingomyelinase, and having no detectable in vitro activity of the 'classical' neutral sphingomyelinase, were able to degrade the exogenously supplied sphingomyelins. Indeed, in vitro these cells were shown to exhibit neutral, magnesium- and dithiothreitol-dependent sphingomyelinase activities, that might contribute to the non-lysosomal pathway for sphingomyelin degradation to ceramide in intact cells. PMID:7548198

  5. Cooperative catabolic pathways within an atrazine-degrading enrichment culture isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel; Alvey, Sam; Crowley, David E

    2005-07-01

    Atrazine degradation previously has been shown to be carried out by individual bacterial species or by relatively simple consortia that have been isolated using enrichment cultures. Here, the degradative pathway for atrazine was examined for a complex 8-membered enrichment culture. The species composition of the culture was determined by PCR-DGGE. The bacterial species included Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Caulobacter crescentus, Pseudomonas putida, Sphingomonas yaniokuyae, Nocardia sp., Rhizobium sp., Flavobacterium oryzihabitans, and Variovorax paradoxus. All of the isolates were screened for the presence of known genes that function for atrazine degradation including atzA,-B,-C,-D,-E,-F and trzD,-N. Dechlorination of atrazine, which was obligatory for complete mineralization, was carried out exclusively by Nocardia sp., which contained the trzN gene. Following dechlorination, the resulting product, hydroxyatrazine was further degraded via two separate pathways. In one pathway Nocardia converted hydroxyatrazine to N-ethylammelide via an unidentified gene product. In the second pathway, hydroxyatrazine generated by Nocardia sp. was hydrolyzed to N-isopropylammelide by Rhizobium sp., which contained the atzB gene. Each member of the enrichment culture contained atzC, which is responsible for ring cleavage, but none of the isolates carried the atzD,-E, or -F genes. Each member further contained either trzD or exhibited urease activity. The enrichment culture was destabilized by loss of Nocardia sp. when grown on ethylamine, ethylammelide, and cyanuric acid, after which the consortium was no longer able to degrade atrazine. The analysis of this enrichment culture highlights the broad level bacterial community interactions that may be involved in atrazine degradation in nature. PMID:16329946

  6. The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan; Schöler, H. F.

    2010-05-01

    degradation of catechol to oxalic acid delivers a maximum yield of approximately 60 %, whereas the presence of chloride reduces the formation of oxalic acid to 30 %. Chloride possibly induces further competing reactions of catechol leading to a lower concentration of oxalic acid. Freeze-dried soil samples have been tested for production of oxalic acid, where the rate of organic matter seems to play an important role for the formation. By adding iron (III) and/or hydrogen peroxide oxalic acid yields increase, which demonstrates the reaction of soil organic matter with iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide as expected. Thus the natural abiotic formation of oxalic acid is confirmed. The results of the soil measurements are similar to those obtained with catechol. Therefore, the newly gained insights with model compounds appear to be applicable to soil conditions and these findings increase our understanding of the degradation pathways of soil organic matter. Furthermore an overview of the rates of oxalic acid formation of a variety of soil samples is shown and discussed in the light of different soil parameter.

  7. Further characterization of o-nitrobenzaldehyde degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ONBA-17 and deduction on its metabolic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fang-Bo; Li, Xiao-Dan; Ali, Shinawar Waseem; Shan, Sheng-Dao; Luo, Lin-Ping; Guan, Li-Bo

    2014-01-01

    A previously reported o-nitrobenzaldehyde (ONBA) degrading bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ONBA-17 was further identified and characterized. Based on results of DNA base composition and DNA-DNA hybridization, the strain was identified as P. putida. Its degradation effect enhanced with increase of inoculum amount and no lag phase was observed. Higher removal rate was achieved under shaking conditions. All tested ONBA with different initial concentrations could be completely degraded within 5 d. In addition, degradative enzyme(s) involved was confirmed as intra-cellular distributed and constitutively expressed. Effects of different compounds on relative activity of degradative enzyme(s) within cell-free extract were also evaluated. Finally, 2-nitrobenzoic acid and 2, 3-dihydroxybenzoic acid were detected as metabolites of ONBA degradation by P. putida ONBA-17, and relevant metabolic pathway was preliminary proposed. This study might help with future research in better understanding of nitroaromatics biodegradation. PMID:25763034

  8. Autophagy as a Regulated Pathway of Cellular Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Klionsky, Daniel J.; Emr, Scott D.

    2009-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a dynamic process involving the rearrangement of subcellular membranes to sequester cytoplasm and organelles for delivery to the lysosome or vacuole where the sequestered cargo is degraded and recycled. This process takes place in all eukaryotic cells. It is highly regulated through the action of various kinases, phosphatases, and guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases). The core protein machinery that is necessary to drive formation and consumption of intermediates in the macroautophagy pathway includes a ubiquitin-like protein conjugation system and a protein complex that directs membrane docking and fusion at the lysosome or vacuole. Macroautophagy plays an important role in developmental processes, human disease, and cellular response to nutrient deprivation. PMID:11099404

  9. Degradation of Ionic Pathway in PEM Fuel Cell Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh Kyu; Shao, Yuyan; Wan, Haiying; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Rieke, Peter C.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong

    2011-11-12

    The degradation of the ionic pathway throughout the catalyst layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells was studied under an accelerated stress test of catalyst support (potential hold at 1.2 V). Electrochemical behaviors of the cathode based on graphitic mesoporous carbon supported Pt catalyst were examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Impedance data were plotted and expressed in the complex capacitance form to determine useful parameters in the transmission line model: the double-layer capacitance, peak frequency, and ionic resistance. Electrochemical surface area and hydrogen crossover current through the membrane were estimated from cyclic voltammogram, while cathode Faradaic resistance was compared with ionic resistance as a function of test time. It was observed that during an accelerated stress test of catalyst support, graphitic mesoporous carbon becomes hydrophilic which increases interfacial area between the ionomer and the catalyst up to 100 h. However, the ionic resistance in the catalyst layer drastically increases after 100 h with further carbon support oxidation. The underlying mechanism has been studied and it was found that significant degradation of ionic pathway throughout the catalyst layer due to catalyst support corrosion induces uneven hydration and mechanical stress in the ionomer.

  10. [Degradation of oxytetracycline with ozonation in acetic acid solvent].

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Yin; Li, Xiao-Rong; Zhu, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Jiang-Peng; Wang, Guo-Xiang

    2012-12-01

    Use acetic acid as the media of ozone degradation of oxytetracycline (OTC), and effects of the initial dosing ratio of ozone/OTC, ozone flow, free radical scavenger, metal ions on the removal rate of OTC were investigated respectively. The results showed that acetic acid had a high ozone stability and solubility. OTC had a high removal rate and degradation rate in acetic acid solution. With the increase of OTC dosage, the removal rate of OTC decreased in acetic acid. Removal rate of OTC was increased distinctly when ozone flow increased properly. It was also observed that free radical scavenger had a significantly negative effect on OTC ozonation degradation in acetic acid. Furthermore the main reactions of OTC ozone oxidation were direct oxidation and indirect oxidation in acetic acid. When Fe3+ and Co2+ were existent in acetic acid, the degradation of OTC was inhibited significantly. PMID:23379161

  11. Characterization of a novel β-cypermethrin-degrading Aspergillus niger YAT strain and the biochemical degradation pathway of β-cypermethrin.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weiqin; Lin, Derong; Yao, Kai; Yuan, Huaiyu; Wang, Zhilong; Li, Jianlong; Zou, Likou; Han, Xinfeng; Zhou, Kang; He, Li; Hu, Xinjie; Liu, Shuliang

    2015-10-01

    Aspergillus niger YAT strain was obtained from Chinese brick tea (Collection number: CGMCC 10,568) and identified on the basis of morphological characteristics and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence. The strain could degrade 54.83 % of β-cypermethrin (β-CY; 50 mg L(-1)) in 7 days and 100 % of 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA; 100 mg L(-1)) in 22 h. The half-lives of β-CY and 3-PBA range from 3.573 to 11.748 days and from 5.635 to 12.160 h, respectively. The degradation of β-CY and 3-PBA was further described using first-order kinetic models. The pathway and mechanism of β-CY degraded by YAT were investigated by analyzing the degraded metabolites through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Relevant enzymatic activities and substrate utilization were also investigated. β-CY degradation products were analyzed. Results indicated that YAT strain transformed β-CY into 3-PBA. 3-PBA was then gradually transformed into permethric acid, protocatechuic acid, 3-hydroxy-5-phenoxy benzoic acid, gallic acid, and phenol gradually. The YAT strain can also effectively degrade these metabolites. The results indicated that YAT strain has potential applications in bioremediation of pyrethroid insecticide (PI)-contaminated environments and fermented food. PMID:26022858

  12. New metabolic pathway for degradation of 2-nitrobenzoate by Arthrobacter sp. SPG

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pankaj K.; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. SPG utilized 2-nitrobenzoate as its sole source of carbon and energy and degraded it with accumulation of stoichiometric amounts of nitrite ions. Salicylate and catechol were detected as metabolites of the 2-nitrobenzoate degradation using high performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Enzyme activities for 2-nitrobenzoate-2-monooxygenase, salicylate hydroxylase, and catechol-1,2-dioxygenase were detected in the crude extracts of the 2-nitrobenzoate-induced cells of strain SPG. The 2-nitrobenzoate-monooxygenase activity resulted in formation of salicylate and nitrite from 2-nitrobenzoate, whereas salicylate hydroxylase catalyzed the conversion of salicylate to catechol. The ring-cleaving enzyme, catechol-1,2-dioxygenase cleaved catechol to cis,cis-muconic acid. Cells of strain SPG were able to degrade 2-nitrobenzoate in sterile as well as non-sterile soil microcosms. The results of microcosm studies showed that strain SPG degraded more than 90% of 2-nitrobenzoate within 10–12 days. This study clearly shows that Arthrobacter sp. SPG degraded 2-nitrobenzoate via a new pathway with formation of salicylate and catechol as metabolites. Arthrobacter sp. SPG may be used for bioremediation of 2-nitrobenzoate-contaminated sites due to its ability to degrade 2-nitrobenzoate in soil. PMID:26082768

  13. Hydrolytic and oxidative degradation of electrospun supramolecular biomaterials: In vitro degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Brugmans, M C P; Sӧntjens, S H M; Cox, M A J; Nandakumar, A; Bosman, A W; Mes, T; Janssen, H M; Bouten, C V C; Baaijens, F P T; Driessen-Mol, A

    2015-11-01

    The emerging field of in situ tissue engineering (TE) of load bearing tissues places high demands on the implanted scaffolds, as these scaffolds should provide mechanical stability immediately upon implantation. The new class of synthetic supramolecular biomaterial polymers, which contain non-covalent interactions between the polymer chains, thereby forming complex 3D structures by self assembly. Here, we have aimed to map the degradation characteristics of promising (supramolecular) materials, by using a combination of in vitro tests. The selected biomaterials were all polycaprolactones (PCLs), either conventional and unmodified PCL, or PCL with supramolecular hydrogen bonding moieties (either 2-ureido-[1H]-pyrimidin-4-one or bis-urea units) incorporated into the backbone. As these materials are elastomeric, they are suitable candidates for cardiovascular TE applications. Electrospun scaffold strips of these materials were incubated with solutions containing enzymes that catalyze hydrolysis, or solutions containing oxidative species. At several time points, chemical, morphological, and mechanical properties were investigated. It was demonstrated that conventional and supramolecular PCL-based polymers respond differently to enzyme-accelerated hydrolytic or oxidative degradation, depending on the morphological and chemical composition of the material. Conventional PCL is more prone to hydrolytic enzymatic degradation as compared to the investigated supramolecular materials, while, in contrast, the latter materials are more susceptible to oxidative degradation. Given the observed degradation pathways of the examined materials, we are able to tailor degradation characteristics by combining selected PCL backbones with additional supramolecular moieties. The presented combination of in vitro test methods can be employed to screen, limit, and select biomaterials for pre-clinical in vivo studies targeted to different clinical applications. PMID:26316031

  14. Iodinated contrast media electro-degradation: process performance and degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Del Moro, Guido; Pastore, Carlo; Di Iaconi, Claudio; Mascolo, Giuseppe

    2015-02-15

    The electrochemical degradation of six of the most widely used iodinated contrast media was investigated. Batch experiments were performed under constant current conditions using two DSA® electrodes (titanium coated with a proprietary and patented mixed metal oxide solution of precious metals such as iridium, ruthenium, platinum, rhodium and tantalum). The degradation removal never fell below 85% (at a current density of 64 mA/cm(2) with a reaction time of 150 min) when perchlorate was used as the supporting electrolyte; however, when sulphate was used, the degradation performance was above 80% (at a current density of 64 mA/cm(2) with a reaction time of 150 min) for all of the compounds studied. Three main degradation pathways were identified, namely, the reductive de-iodination of the aromatic ring, the reduction of alkyl aromatic amides to simple amides and the de-acylation of N-aromatic amides to produce aromatic amines. However, as amidotrizoate is an aromatic carboxylate, this is added via the decarboxylation reaction. The investigation did not reveal toxicity except for the lower current density used, which has shown a modest toxicity, most likely for some reaction intermediates that are not further degraded. In order to obtain total removal of the contrast media, it was necessary to employ a current intensity between 118 and 182 mA/cm(2) with energy consumption higher than 370 kWh/m(3). Overall, the electrochemical degradation was revealed to be a reliable process for the treatment of iodinated contrast media that can be found in contaminated waters such as hospital wastewater or pharmaceutical waste-contaminated streams. PMID:25433384

  15. Characterization of a novel oxyfluorfen-degrading bacterial strain Chryseobacterium aquifrigidense and its biochemical degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huanhuan; Xu, Jun; Dong, Fengshou; Liu, Xingang; Wu, Yanbing; Wu, Xiaohu; Zheng, Yongquan

    2016-08-01

    Persistent use of the diphenyl ether herbicides oxyfluorfen may seriously increase the health risks and ecological safety problems. A newly bacterium R-21 isolated from active soil was able to degrade and utilize oxyfluorfen as the sole carbon source. R-21 was identified as Chryseobacterium aquifrigidense by morphology, physiobiochemical characteristics, and genetic analysis. Under the optimum cultural conditions (pH 6.9, temperature 33.4 °C, and inoculum size 0.2 g L(-1)), R-21 could degrade 92.1 % of oxyfluorfen at 50 mg L(-1) within 5 days. During oxyfluorfen degradation, six metabolites were detected and identified by atmospheric pressure gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry, and a plausible degradation pathway was deduced. Strain R-21 is a promising potential in bioremediation of oxyfluorfen-contaminated environments. PMID:27079576

  16. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Chen, Meili; Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  17. Genome Sequence Analysis of the Naphthenic Acid Degrading and Metal Resistant Bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii CR3

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jingfa; Hao, Lirui; Crowley, David E.; Zhang, Zhewen; Yu, Jun; Huang, Ning; Huo, Mingxin; Wu, Jiayan

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. are generally heavy metal tolerant bacteria with the ability to degrade a variety of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, although the degradation pathways and substrate versatilities remain largely unknown. Here we studied the bacterium Cupriavidus gilardii strain CR3, which was isolated from a natural asphalt deposit, and which was shown to utilize naphthenic acids as a sole carbon source. Genome sequencing of C. gilardii CR3 was carried out to elucidate possible mechanisms for the naphthenic acid biodegradation. The genome of C. gilardii CR3 was composed of two circular chromosomes chr1 and chr2 of respectively 3,539,530 bp and 2,039,213 bp in size. The genome for strain CR3 encoded 4,502 putative protein-coding genes, 59 tRNA genes, and many other non-coding genes. Many genes were associated with xenobiotic biodegradation and metal resistance functions. Pathway prediction for degradation of cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, a representative naphthenic acid, suggested that naphthenic acid undergoes initial ring-cleavage, after which the ring fission products can be degraded via several plausible degradation pathways including a mechanism similar to that used for fatty acid oxidation. The final metabolic products of these pathways are unstable or volatile compounds that were not toxic to CR3. Strain CR3 was also shown to have tolerance to at least 10 heavy metals, which was mainly achieved by self-detoxification through ion efflux, metal-complexation and metal-reduction, and a powerful DNA self-repair mechanism. Our genomic analysis suggests that CR3 is well adapted to survive the harsh environment in natural asphalts containing naphthenic acids and high concentrations of heavy metals. PMID:26301592

  18. Anoxic Androgen Degradation by the Denitrifying Bacterium Sterolibacterium denitrificans via the 2,3-seco Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Po-Hsiang; Yu, Chang-Ping; Lee, Tzong-Huei; Lin, Ching-Wen; Ismail, Wael; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Kuo, An-Ti

    2014-01-01

    The biodegradation of steroids is a crucial biochemical process mediated exclusively by bacteria. So far, information concerning the anoxic catabolic pathways of androgens is largely unknown, which has prevented many environmental investigations. In this work, we show that Sterolibacterium denitrificans DSMZ 13999 can anaerobically mineralize testosterone and some C19 androgens. By using a 13C-metabolomics approach and monitoring the sequential appearance of the intermediates, we demonstrated that S. denitrificans uses the 2,3-seco pathway to degrade testosterone under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, based on the identification of a C17 intermediate, we propose that the A-ring cleavage may be followed by the removal of a C2 side chain at C-5 of 17-hydroxy-1-oxo-2,3-seco-androstan-3-oic acid (the A-ring cleavage product) via retro-aldol reaction. The androgenic activities of the bacterial culture and the identified intermediates were assessed using the lacZ-based yeast androgen assay. The androgenic activity in the testosterone-grown S. denitrificans culture decreased significantly over time, indicating its ability to eliminate androgens. The A-ring cleavage intermediate (≤500 μM) did not exhibit androgenic activity, whereas the sterane-containing intermediates did. So far, only two androgen-degrading anaerobes (Sterolibacterium denitrificans DSMZ 13999 [a betaproteobacterium] and Steroidobacter denitrificans DSMZ 18526 [a gammaproteobacterium]) have been isolated and characterized, and both of them use the 2,3-seco pathway to anaerobically degrade androgens. The key intermediate 2,3-seco-androstan-3-oic acid can be used as a signature intermediate for culture-independent environmental investigations of anaerobic degradation of C19 androgens. PMID:24657867

  19. Photolytic and photocatalytic degradation of tetracycline: Effect of humic acid on degradation kinetics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Si; Hu, Jiangyong

    2016-11-15

    The widespread occurrence of tetracycline (TC) in the aquatic environment poses a potential risk to aquatic ecosystem and human health. In this study, elimination of TC by photolysis and TiO2 photocatalysis were investigated by using mercury-free UVA-LED as an alternative light source. Particular emphasis was given to the effect of humic acid (HA) on the reaction kinetics and mechanisms of TC removal. Photolytic degradation of TC was slightly enhanced by HA due to its photosensitization effect, as evidenced by the increased steady-state concentrations of OH. The most abundant transformation product of TC, which was formed by the attack of OH radical, was enhanced during photolytic degradation. During photocatalytic experiments, HA dramatically inhibited TC loss due to the surface deactivation of TiO2 and OH quenching. The steady-state concentration of OH was dramatically decreased in the presence of HA. Identification of transformation products showed that HA could inhibit the oxidation pathways initiated by OH during photocatalysis of TC. These findings provide further insights into the assessment of photolysis and photocatalysis for antibiotics elimination in natural waters where HA exists ubiquitously. PMID:27420385

  20. Biotransformation of nitrobenzene by bacteria containing toluene degradative pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Haigler, B.E.; Spain, J.C. )

    1991-11-01

    Nonpolar nitroaromatic compounds have been considered resistant to attack by oxygenases because of the electron withdrawing properties of the nitro group. The authors have investigate the ability of seven bacterial strains containing toluene degradative pathways to oxidize nitrobenzene. Cultures were induced with toluene vapor prior to incubation with nitrobenzene, and products were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pseudomonas cepacia G4 and a strain of Pseudomonas harboring the TOL plasmid (pTN2) did not transform nitrobenzene. Cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain JS150 converted nitrobenzene to 3-nitrocatechol. Transformation of nitrobenzene in the presence of {sup 18}O{sub 2} indicated that the reaction in JS150 involved the incorporation of both atoms of oxygen in the 3-nitrocatechol, which suggests a dioxygenase mechanism. P. putida 39/D, a mutant strain of P. putida F1, converted nitrobenzene to a compound tentatively identified as cis-1, 2-dihydroxy-3-nitrocyclohexa-3, 5-diene. This compound was rapidly converted to 3-nitrocatechol by cells of strain JS150. Cultures of Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 converted nitrobenzene to a mixture of 3- and 4-nitrophenol (10 and 63%, respectively). Pseudomonas pickettii PKO1 converted nitrobenzene to 3- and 4-nitrocatechol via 3- and 4-nitrophenol. The nitrocatechols were slowly degraded to unidentified metabolites. Nitrobenzene did not serve as an inducer for the enzymes that catalyzed its oxidation.

  1. Degradation of 2,4 dichlorobiphenyl via meta-cleavage pathway by Pseudomonas spp. consortium.

    PubMed

    Jayanna, Shobha K; Gayathri, Devaraja

    2015-06-01

    Two bacterial isolates (Pseudomonas sp. GSa and Pseudomonas sp. GSb) were in close association able to assimilate 2,4 dichlorobiphenyl (2,4 CB), a PCB congener. GC-MS analysis of spent culture medium of the consortium with 2,4 CB as substrate showed 90 % degradation (according to Electron capture detection values) with catechol as one of the important intermediate compounds through meta-cleavage pathway. Further, ability of the consortium to utilise PCB congeners, Methoxychlor, Aroclor 1016, Chlorobenzoic acids and Monoaromatic compounds indicated that the consortium of GSa and GSb would be an ideal candidate for in situ bioremediation of PCB. PMID:25800378

  2. Degradation of sulphonated azo dye Red HE7B by Bacillus sp. and elucidation of degradative pathways.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Jyoti Kumar; Paul, Sangeeta; Dureja, Prem; Annapurna, K; Padaria, Jasdeep C; Gopal, Madhuban

    2014-08-01

    Bacteria capable of degrading the sulfonated azo dye Red HE7B were isolated from textile mill effluent contaminated soil. The most efficient isolate was identified as Bacillus sp. Azo1 and the isolate could successfully decolorize up to 89% of the dye. The decolorized cultural extract analyzed by HPLC confirmed degradation. Enzymatic analysis showed twofold and fourfold increase in the activity of azoreductase and laccase enzymes, respectively, indicating involvement of both reductive and oxidative enzymes in biodegradation of Red HE7B. Degraded products which were identified by GC/MS analysis included various metabolites like 8-nitroso 1-naphthol, 2-diazonium naphthalene. Mono azo dye intermediate was initially generated from the parent molecule. This mono azo dye was further degraded by the organism, into additional products, depending on the site of cleavage of R-N=N-R molecule. Based on the degradation products identified, three different pathways have been proposed. The mechanism of degradation in two of these pathways is different from that of the previously reported pathway for azo dye degradation. This is the first report of a microbial isolate following multiple pathways for azo dye degradation. Azo dye Red HE7B was observed to be phytotoxic, leading to decrease in root development, shoot length and seedling fresh weight. However, after biotreatment the resulting degradation products were non-phytotoxic. PMID:24682261

  3. Aqueous photodegradation of antibiotic florfenicol: kinetics and degradation pathway studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya; Li, Jianhua; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Guoqing; Feng, Yanhong; Wang, Zunyao; Yang, Xi

    2016-04-01

    The occurrence of antibacterial agents in natural environment was of scientific concern in recent years. As endocrine disrupting chemicals, they had potential risk on ecology system and human beings. In the present study, the photodegradation kinetics and pathways of florfenicol were investigated under solar and xenon lamp irradiation in aquatic systems. Direct photolysis half-lives of florfenicol were determined as 187.29 h under solar irradiation and 22.43 h under xenon lamp irradiation, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as hydroxyl radical (·OH) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2) were found to play an important role in indirect photolysis process. The presence of nitrate and dissolved organic matters (DOMs) could affect photolysis of florfenicol in solutions through light screening effect, quenching effect, and photoinduced oxidization process. Photoproducts of florfenicol in DOMs solutions were identified by solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS) analysis techniques, and degradation pathways were proposed, including photoinduced hydrolysis, oxidation by (1)O2 and ·OH, dechlorination, and cleavage of the side chain. PMID:26705756

  4. Influence of Fenton's reagent doses on the degradation and mineralization of H-acid.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huanhuan; Chen, Quanyuan; Yu, Yang; Liu, Zhenhong; Xue, Gang

    2013-12-15

    The recalcitrant H-acid (1-amino-8-naphthol-3,6-disulfonic acid) in aqueous solution was oxidized by Fenton process, focusing on the relation of Fenton's reagent doses and degradation products. The experimental results showed that COD and TOC removals and biodegradability (BOD/COD ratio) of the solution increased with increasing Fenton's reagent doses. Over 80% COD can be removed and the biodegradability was improved significantly. It was found that major SO3H and NH2 groups in H-acid molecules were mineralized to SO4(2-) and NH4(+) ions during Fenton oxidation processes. H-acid degradation intermediates with benzene structures substituted by hydroxyl and/or carboxyl groups were identified by GC-MS. It was also found that short-chain fatty acids primarily oxalic acid were degradation products of H-acid by Fenton oxidation. Oxalic acid accumulated could account for approximately 60% of the residual TOC. The degradation pathway of H-acid was proposed based on above analyses in this work. PMID:24231329

  5. Connecting lignin-degradation pathway with pre-treatment inhibitor sensitivity of Cupriavidus necator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Shihui; Hunsinger, Glendon B; Pienkos, Philip T; Johnson, David K

    2014-01-01

    To produce lignocellulosic biofuels economically, the complete release of monomers from the plant cell wall components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, through pre-treatment and hydrolysis (both enzymatic and chemical), and the efficient utilization of these monomers as carbon sources, is crucial. In addition, the identification and development of robust microbial biofuel production strains that can tolerate the toxic compounds generated during pre-treatment and hydrolysis is also essential. In this work, Cupriavidus necator was selected due to its capabilities for utilizing lignin monomers and producing polyhydroxylbutyrate (PHB), a bioplastic as well as an advanced biofuel intermediate. We characterized the growth kinetics of C. necator in pre-treated corn stover slurry as well as individually in the pre-sence of 11 potentially toxic compounds in the saccharified slurry. We found that C. necator was sensitive to the saccharified slurry produced from dilute acid pre-treated corn stover. Five out of 11 compounds within the slurry were characterized as toxic to C. necator, namely ammonium acetate, furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid. Aldehydes (e.g., furfural and HMF) were more toxic than the acetate and the lignin degradation products benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid; furfural was identified as the most toxic compound. Although toxic to C. necator at high concentration, ammonium acetate, benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid could be utilized by C. necator with a stimulating effect on C. necator growth. Consequently, the lignin degradation pathway of C. necator was reconstructed based on genomic information and literature. The efficient conversion of intermediate catechol to downstream products of cis,cis-muconate or 2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde may help improve the robustness of C. necator to benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid as well as improve PHB productivity. PMID:24904560

  6. Connecting Lignin-Degradation Pathway with Pre-Treatment Inhibitor Sensitivity of Cupriavidus necator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Yang, S.; Hunsinger, G. B.; Pienkos, P. T.; Johnson, D. K.

    2014-05-27

    In order to produce lignocellulosic biofuels economically, the complete release of monomers from the plant cell wall components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, through pre-treatment and hydrolysis (both enzymatic and chemical), and the efficient utilization of these monomers as carbon sources, is crucial. In addition, the identification and development of robust microbial biofuel production strains that can tolerate the toxic compounds generated during pre-treatment and hydrolysis is also essential. In this work, Cupriavidus necator was selected due to its capabilities for utilizing lignin monomers and producing polyhydroxylbutyrate (PHB), a bioplastic as well as an advanced biofuel intermediate. We characterized the growth kinetics of C. necator in pre-treated corn stover slurry as well as individually in the pre-sence of 11 potentially toxic compounds in the saccharified slurry. We found that C. necator was sensitive to the saccharified slurry produced from dilute acid pre-treated corn stover. Five out of 11 compounds within the slurry were characterized as toxic to C. necator, namely ammonium acetate, furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid. Aldehydes (e.g., furfural and HMF) were more toxic than the acetate and the lignin degradation products benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid; furfural was identified as the most toxic compound. Although toxic to C. necator at high concentration, ammonium acetate, benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid could be utilized by C. necator with a stimulating effect on C. necator growth. Consequently, the lignin degradation pathway of C. necator was reconstructed based on genomic information and literature. The efficient conversion of intermediate catechol to downstream products of cis,cis-muconate or 2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde may help improve the robustness of C. necator to benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid as well as improve PHB productivity.

  7. Connecting lignin-degradation pathway with pre-treatment inhibitor sensitivity of Cupriavidus necator

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Shihui; Hunsinger, Glendon B.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Johnson, David K.

    2014-01-01

    To produce lignocellulosic biofuels economically, the complete release of monomers from the plant cell wall components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, through pre-treatment and hydrolysis (both enzymatic and chemical), and the efficient utilization of these monomers as carbon sources, is crucial. In addition, the identification and development of robust microbial biofuel production strains that can tolerate the toxic compounds generated during pre-treatment and hydrolysis is also essential. In this work, Cupriavidus necator was selected due to its capabilities for utilizing lignin monomers and producing polyhydroxylbutyrate (PHB), a bioplastic as well as an advanced biofuel intermediate. We characterized the growth kinetics of C. necator in pre-treated corn stover slurry as well as individually in the pre-sence of 11 potentially toxic compounds in the saccharified slurry. We found that C. necator was sensitive to the saccharified slurry produced from dilute acid pre-treated corn stover. Five out of 11 compounds within the slurry were characterized as toxic to C. necator, namely ammonium acetate, furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid. Aldehydes (e.g., furfural and HMF) were more toxic than the acetate and the lignin degradation products benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid; furfural was identified as the most toxic compound. Although toxic to C. necator at high concentration, ammonium acetate, benzoic acid, and p-coumaric acid could be utilized by C. necator with a stimulating effect on C. necator growth. Consequently, the lignin degradation pathway of C. necator was reconstructed based on genomic information and literature. The efficient conversion of intermediate catechol to downstream products of cis,cis-muconate or 2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde may help improve the robustness of C. necator to benzoic acid and p-coumaric acid as well as improve PHB productivity. PMID:24904560

  8. Degradation of hop bitter acids by fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Huszcza, Ewa Bartmanska, Agnieszka; Aniol, Miroslaw; Maczka, Wanda; Zolnierczyk, Anna; Wawrzenczyk, Czeslaw

    2008-07-01

    Nine fungal strains related to: Trametes versicolor, Nigrospora oryzae, Inonotus radiatus, Crumenulopsis sororia, Coryneum betulinum, Cryptosporiopsis radicicola, Fusarium equiseti, Rhodotorula glutinis and Candida parapsilosis were tested for their ability to degrade humulones and lupulones. The best results were obtained for T. versicolor culture, in which humulones and lupulones were fully degraded after 4 days of incubation in the dark or after 36 h in the light. The experiments were performed on a commercial hop extract and on sterilized spent hops.

  9. Effects of ultrasonic processing on degradation of salvianolic acid B in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Guo, Y X; Zhang, L; Lu, L; Liu, E H; Shi, C Z

    2016-09-10

    To evaluate the stability of salvianolic acid B (Sal B) under ultrasound-assisted extraction in the pharmaceutical industry, degradation of Sal B under ultrasonic irradiation was investigated as the function of buffer concentration, pH, and temperature. With regard to Sal-B concentration, a first-order degradation process was determined, with 10% change in assay from its initial concentration as t90=4.81h, under maximum stability acidic conditions (pH 2.0) and at 25°C. The logkpH-pH profile described by specific acid-base catalysis and water molecules supported the experimental results. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses revealed 7 major degradation products whose structures were characterized by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. A primary degradation pathway involved cleavage of the ester bond and ring-opening of benzofuran in Sal B was proposed. The complete degradation pathway of Sal B was also proposed. Results showed that ultrasonic irradiation leads to degradation of Sal B in aqueous solution. PMID:27442887

  10. [Degradation of Acid Orange 7 with Persulfate Activated by Silver Loaded Granular Activated Carbon].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong-ming; Huang, Tian-yin; Chen, Jia-bin; Li, Wen-wei; Zhang, Li-ming

    2015-11-01

    Granular activated carbon with silver loaded as activator (Ag/GAC) was prepared using impregnation method. N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were adopted to characterize the Ag/GAC, showing that silver was successfully loaded on granular activated carbon. The oxidation degradation of acid orange 7 (AO7) by the Ag/GAC activated by persulfate (PS) was investigated at ambient temperature. The influences of factors such as Ag loading, PS or Ag/GAC dosages and initial pH on the degradation of AO7 were evaluated. The results demonstrated that the degradation rate of AO7 could reach more than 95.0% after 180 min when the Ag loading content, PS/AO7 molar ratio, the Ag/GAC dosage were 12.7 mg x g(-1), 120: 1, 1.0 g x L(-1), respectively. The initial pH had significant effect on the AO7 degradation, with pH 5.0 as the optimal pH for the degradation of AO7. The possible degradation pathway was proposed for the AO7 degradation by using UV-visible spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GG/MS). The azo bond and naphthalene ring in the AO7 were destroyed during the degradation, with phthalic acid and acetophenone as the main degradation products. PMID:26910999

  11. Degradation of diclofenac by ultrasonic irradiation: kinetic studies and degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Nie, Er; Yang, Mo; Wang, Dong; Yang, Xiaoying; Luo, Xingzhang; Zheng, Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Diclofenac (DCF) is a widely used anti-inflammatory drug found in various water bodies, posing threats to human health. In this research, the effects of ultrasonic irradiation at 585kHz on the degradation of DCF were studied under the air, oxygen, argon, and nitrogen saturated conditions. First, the dechlorination efficiencies under the air, oxygen, argon, and nitrogen saturated conditions were calculated to be 67%, 60%, 53% and 59%. Second, there was full mineralization of nitrogen during DCF degradation under the air, oxygen, and argon saturated conditions, but no mineralization of nitrogen under the nitrogen-saturated condition. Different from nitrogen, only partial mineralization of carbon occurred under the four gas-saturated conditions. Third, OH scavengers were added to derive the rate constants in the three reaction zones: cavitation bubble, supercritical interface, and bulk solution. Comparison of the constants indicated that DCF degradation was not limited to the bulk solution as conventionally assumed. Oxidation in the supercritical interface played a dominant role under the air and oxygen saturated conditions, while OH reactions in the cavitation bubble and/or bulk solution were dominant under the nitrogen and argon saturated conditions. After the addition of H2O2, reactions in the cavitation bubble and bulk solution kept their dominant roles under the nitrogen and argon saturated conditions, while reaction in the supercritical interface decreased under the air and oxygen saturated conditions. Finally, LC-MS analysis was used to derive the by-products and propose the main pathways of DCF degradation by ultrasonic irradiation. PMID:25065805

  12. Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 Contains a Novel Degradation Pathway for Limonene

    PubMed Central

    van der Werf, Mariët J.; Swarts, Henk J.; de Bont, Jan A. M.

    1999-01-01

    the presence of coenzyme A and ATP this acid is converted further, and this finding, together with the high levels of isocitrate lyase activity in extracts of limonene-grown cells, suggests that further degradation takes place via the β-oxidation pathway. PMID:10224006

  13. Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 contains a novel degradation pathway for limonene.

    PubMed

    van der Werf, M J; Swarts, H J; de Bont, J A

    1999-05-01

    . In the presence of coenzyme A and ATP this acid is converted further, and this finding, together with the high levels of isocitrate lyase activity in extracts of limonene-grown cells, suggests that further degradation takes place via the beta-oxidation pathway. PMID:10224006

  14. Evidence for a new pathway in the bacterial degradation of 4-fluorobenzoate.

    PubMed Central

    Oltmanns, R H; Müller, R; Otto, M K; Lingens, F

    1989-01-01

    Six bacterial strains able to use 4-fluorobenzoic acid as their sole source of carbon and energy were isolated by selective enrichment from various water and soil samples from the Stuttgart area. According to their responses in biochemical and morphological tests, the organisms were assigned to the genera Alcaligenes, Pseudomonas, and Aureobacterium. To elucidate the degradation pathway of 4-fluorobenzoate, metabolic intermediates were identified. Five gram-negative isolates degraded this substrate via 4-fluorocatechol, as described in previous studies. In growth experiments, these strains excreted 50 to 90% of the fluoride from fluorobenzoate. Alcaligenes sp. strains RHO21 and RHO22 used all three isomers of monofluorobenzoate. Alcaligenes sp. strain RHO22 also grew on 4-chlorobenzoate. Aureobacterium sp. strain RHO25 transiently excreted 4-hydroxybenzoate into the culture medium during growth on 4-fluorobenzoate, and stoichiometric amounts of fluoride were released. In cell extracts from this strain, the enzymes for the conversion of 4-fluorobenzoate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate could be detected. All these enzymes were inducible by 4-fluorobenzoate. These data suggest a new pathway for the degradation of 4-fluorobenzoate by Aureobacterium sp. strain RHO25 via 4-hydroxybenzoate and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate. PMID:2604392

  15. Critical factors in sonochemical degradation of fumaric acid.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhilin; Cravotto, Giancarlo; Adrians, Marcus; Ondruschka, Bernd; Li, Weixin

    2015-11-01

    The effects of critical factors such as Henry's Law constant, atmospheric OH rate constant, initial concentration, H2O2, FeSO4 and tert-butanol on the sonochemical degradation of fumaric acid have been investigated. The pseudo first-order rate constant for the sonochemical degradation of 1mM fumaric acid is much lower than those for chloroform and phenol degradation, and is related to solute concentration at the bubble/water interface and reactivity towards hydroxyl radicals. Furthermore, fumaric acid is preferentially oxidized at the lower initial concentration. It is unreactive to H2O2 under agitation at room temperature. However, the degradation rate of fumaric acid increases with the addition of H2O2 under sonication. 0.1 mM of fumaric acid suppresses H2O2 formation thanks to water sonolysis, while degradation behavior is also dramatically affected by the addition of an oxidative catalyst (FeSO4) or radical scavenger (tert-butanol), indicating that the degradation of fumaric acid is caused by hydroxyl radicals generated during the collapse of high-energy cavities. PMID:26186831

  16. Biotransformation of nitrobenzene by bacteria containing toluene degradative pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Haigler, B E; Spain, J C

    1991-01-01

    Nonpolar nitroaromatic compounds have been considered resistant to attack by oxygenases because of the electron withdrawing properties of the nitro group. We have investigated the ability of seven bacterial strains containing toluene degradative pathways to oxidize nitrobenzene. Cultures were induced with toluene vapor prior to incubation with nitrobenzene, and products were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Pseudomonas cepacia G4 and a strain of Pseudomonas harboring the TOL plasmid (pTN2) did not transform nitrobenzene. Cells of Pseudomonas putida F1 and Pseudomonas sp. strain JS150 converted nitrobenzene to 3-nitrocatechol. Transformation of nitrobenzene in the presence of 18O2 indicated that the reaction in JS150 involved the incorporation of both atoms of oxygen in the 3-nitrocatechol, which suggests a dioxygenase mechanism. P. putida 39/D, a mutant strain of P. putida F1, converted nitrobenzene to a compound tentatively identified as cis-1,2-dihydroxy-3-nitrocyclohexa-3,5-diene. This compound was rapidly converted to 3-nitrocatechol by cells of strain JS150. Cultures of Pseudomonas mendocina KR-1 converted nitrobenzene to a mixture of 3- and 4-nitrophenol (10 and 63%, respectively). Pseudomonas pickettii PKO1 converted nitrobenzene to 3- and 4-nitrocatechol via 3- and 4-nitrophenol. The nitrocatechols were slowly degraded to unidentified metabolites. Nitrobenzene did not serve as an inducer for the enzymes that catalyzed its oxidation. These results indicate that the nitrobenzene ring is subject to initial attack by both mono- and dioxygenase enzymes. PMID:1781679

  17. Degradation of trichloroethylene by hydrodechlorination using formic acid as hydrogen source over supported Pd catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Wu, Ting; Yang, Xue-Jing; Xu, Jing; Auzam, Jordan; Semiat, Raphael; Han, Yi-Fan

    2016-03-15

    An advanced method for the degradation of trichloroethylene (TCE) over Pd/MCM-41 catalysts through a hydrogen-transfer was investigated. Formic acid (FA) was used instead of gaseous H2 as the hydrogen resource. As a model H-carrier compound, FA has proven to yield less by-products and second-hand pollution during the reaction. Several factors have been studied, including: the property of catalyst supports, Pd loading and size, temperature, initial concentrations of FA and TCE (potential impact on the reaction rates of TCE degradation), and FA decomposition. The intrinsic kinetics for TCE degradation were measured, while the apparent activation energies and the reaction orders with respect to TCE and FA were calculated through power law models. On the basis of kinetics, we assumed a plausible reaction pathway for TCE degradation in which the catalytic degradation of TCE is most likely the rate-determining step for this reaction. PMID:26685065

  18. Synthesis and characterization of anaerobic degradation biomarkers of n-alkanes via hydroxylation/carboxylation pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Bian, Xin-Yu; Zhou, Lei; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Metabolite profiling is a powerful method in research on anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Hydroxylation and carboxylation are proposed pathways in anaerobic degradation but very little direct evidence is available about metabolites and signature biomarkers. 2-Acetylalkanoic acid is a potential signature metabolite because of its unique and specific structure among possible intermediates. A procedure for the synthesis of four homologues with various carbon chain lengths was proposed and the characteristics of 2-acetyl- alkanoic acid esters were investigated using four derivatization processes, namely methyl, ethyl, n-butyl and trimethylsilyl esterification. Four intermediate fragments observed were at m/z 73 + 14n, 87 + 14n, 102 + 14n (n = 1, 2 and 4 for methyl, ethyl and n-butyl ester, respectively) and [M - 42]+ for three of the derivatization methods. For silylation, characteristic ions were observed at m/z 73, 117, [M - 42](+) and [M - 55](+). These are basic and significant data for the future identification of potential intermediates of the hydroxylation and carboxylation pathways in hydrocarbon degradation. PMID:26863073

  19. Hepatic alpha-oxidation of phytanic acid. A revised pathway.

    PubMed

    Van Veldhoven, P P; Mannaerts, G P; Casteels, M; Croes, K

    1999-01-01

    Synthetic 3-methyl-branched chain fatty acids were used to decipher the breakdown of phytanic acid. Based on results obtained in intact or permeabilized rat hepatocytes, rat liver homogenates or subcellular fractions, a revised alpha-oxidation pathway is proposed which appears to be functioning in man as well. In a first step, the 3-methyl-branched chain fatty acid is activated by an acyl-CoA synthetase. This reaction requires CoA, ATP and Mg2+. Subsequently, the acyl-CoA ester is hydroxylated at position 2 by a peroxisomal dioxygenase. This step is dependent on alpha-oxoglutarate, ascorbate (or glutathione), Fe2+ and O2. The 2-hydroxy-3-methylacyl-CoA intermediate is cleaved by a peroxisomal lyase to formyl-CoA and a 2-methyl-branched fatty aldehyde. Formyl-CoA is (partly enzymically) hydrolyzed to formate, which is then converted, most likely in the cytosol, to CO2. In the presence of NAD+, the aldehyde is dehydrogenated to a 2-methyl-branched fatty acid, presumably by a peroxisomal aldehyde dehydrogenase. This acid can--after activation--be degraded via a D-specific peroxisomal beta-oxidation system. PMID:10709654

  20. Microbiological degradation of bile acids. Nitrogenous hexahydroindane derivatives formed from cholic acid by Streptomyces rubescens.

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, S; Hashimoto, S; Onaka, T

    1976-01-01

    The metabolism of cholic acid (I) by Streptomyces rubescens was investigated. This organism effected ring A cleavage, side-chain shortening and amide bond formation and gave the following metabolites: (4R)-4-[4alpha-(2-carboxyethyl)-3aalpha-hexahydro-7abeta-methyl-5-oxoindan-1 beta-yl]valeric acid (IIa) and its mono-amide (valeramide) (IIb); and 2,3,4,6, 6abeta,7,8,9,9aalpha,9bbeta-decahydro-6abeta-methyl-1H-cyclopenta[f]quinoline-3,7-dione(IIIe)and its homologues with the beta-oriented side chains, valeric acid, valeramide, butanone and propionic acid, in the place of the oxo group at C-7, i.e.compounds (IIIa), (IIIb), (IIIc) and (IIId) respectively. All the nitrogenous metabolites were new compounds, and their structures were established by partial synthesis except for the metabolite (IIIc). The mechanism of formation of these metabolites is considered. A degradative pathway of cholic acid (I) into the metabolites is also tentatively proposed. PMID:1016253

  1. Evidence for a novel pathway in the degradation of fluorene by Pseudomonas sp. strain F274.

    PubMed Central

    Grifoll, M; Selifonov, S A; Chapman, P J

    1994-01-01

    A fluorene-utilizing microorganism, identified as a species of Pseudomonas, was isolated from soil severely contaminated from creosote use and was shown to accumulate six major metabolites from fluorene in washed-cell incubations. Five of these products were identified as 9-fluorenol, 9-fluorenone, (+)-1,1a-dihydroxy-1-hydro-9-fluorenone, 8-hydroxy-3,4-benzocoumarin, and phthalic acid. This last compound was also identified in growing cultures supported by fluorene. Fluorene assimilation into cell biomass was estimated to be approximately 50%. The structures of accumulated products indicate that a previously undescribed pathway of fluorene catabolism is employed by Pseudomonas sp. strain F274. This pathway involves oxygenation of fluorene at C-9 to give 9-fluorenol, which is then dehydrogenated to the corresponding ketone, 9-fluorenone. Dioxygenase attack on 9-fluorenone adjacent to the carbonyl group gives an angular diol, 1,1a-dihydroxy-1-hydro-9-fluorenone. Identification of 8-hydroxy-3,4-benzocoumarin and phthalic acid suggests that the five-membered ring of the angular diol is opened first and that the resulting 2'-carboxy derivative of 2,3-dihydroxy-biphenyl is catabolized by reactions analogous to those of biphenyl degradation, leading to the formation of phthalic acid. Cell extracts of fluorene-grown cells possessed high levels of an enzyme characteristic of phthalate catabolism, 4,5-dihydroxyphthalate decarboxylase, together with protocatechuate 4,5-dioxygenase. On the basis of these findings, a pathway of fluorene degradation is proposed to account for its conversion to intermediary metabolites. A range of compounds with structures similar to that of fluorene was acted on by fluorene-grown cells to give products consistent with the initial reactions proposed. PMID:8074523

  2. Structure of aldobiouronic acid and glucuronic acid from Agathis australis degraded gum polysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Singh, R B

    2007-04-01

    Agathis australis gum on acid hydrolysis with sulphuric acid yielded L-arabinose and D-galactose in 1:4 molar ratio with traces of L-fucose. The components of aldobiouronic acid and glucuronic acid were obtained by graded hydrolysis of degraded gum polysaccharide. The derivatives of aldobiouronic acid was obtained as methyl ester methyl glycoside. PMID:17915743

  3. Degradation of caffeic acid in subcritical water and online HPLC-DPPH assay of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Khuwijitjaru, Pramote; Suaylam, Boonyanuch; Adachi, Shuji

    2014-02-26

    Caffeic acid was subjected to degradation under subcritical water conditions within 160-240 °C and at a constant pressure of 5 MPa in a continuous tubular reactor. Caffeic acid degraded quickly at these temperatures; the main products identified by liquid chromatography-diode array detection/mass spectrometry were hydroxytyrosol, protocatechuic aldehyde, and 4-vinylcatechol. The reaction rates for the degradation of caffeic acid and the formation of products were evaluated. Online high-performance liquid chromatography/2,2-diphenyl-1-picryhydrazyl assay was used to determine the antioxidant activity of each product in the solution. It was found that the overall antioxidant activity of the treated solution did not change during the degradation process. This study showed a potential of formation of antioxidants from natural phenolic compounds under these subcritical water conditions, and this may lead to a discovering of novel antioxidants compounds during the extraction by this technique. PMID:24483598

  4. The purine degradation pathway: possible role in paralytic shellfish toxin metabolism in the cyanobacterium Planktothrix sp. FP1.

    PubMed

    Pomati, F; Manarolla, G; Rossi, O; Vigetti, D; Rossetti, C

    2001-12-01

    The paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) are potent neurotoxic alkaloids and their major biological effect is due to the blockage of voltage-gated sodium channels in excitable cells. They have been recognised as an important health risk for humans, animals, and ecosystems worldwide. The metabolic pathways that lead to the production and the degradation of these toxic metabolites are still unknown. In this study, we investigated the possible link between PST accumulation and the activation of the metabolism that leads to purine degradation in the filamentous freshwater cyanobacterium Planktothrix sp. FP1. The purine catabolic pathway is related to the nitrogen microcycle in water environments, in which cyanobacteria use traces of purines and ureides as a nitrogen source for growth. Thus, the activity of allantoicase, a key inducible enzyme of this metabolism, was used as tool for assaying the activation of the purine degradation pathway. The enzyme and the pathway were induced by allantoic acid, the direct substrate of allantoicase, as well as by adenine and, to a lower degree, by urea, one of the main products of purine catabolism. Crude cell extract of Escherichia coli was also employed and showed the best induction of allantoicase activity. In culture, Planktothrix sp. FP1 showed a differential accumulation of PST in consequence of the induction with different substrates. The cyanobacterial culture induced with allantoic acid accumulated 61.7% more toxins in comparison with the control. On the other hand, the cultures induced with adenine, urea, and the E. coli extract showed low PST accumulation, respectively, 1%, 38%, and 5% of the total toxins content detected in the noninduced culture. A degradation pathway for the PSTs can be hypothesised: as suggested for purine alkaloids in higher plants, saxitoxin (STX) and derivatives may also be converted into xanthine, urea, and further to CO2 and NH4+ or recycled in the primary metabolism through the purine degradation

  5. Amino Acid Degradation after Meteoritic Impact Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertrand, M.; Westall, F.; vanderGaast, S.; Vilas, F.; Hoerz, F.; Barnes, G.; Chabin, A.; Brack, A.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most important prebiotic molecules as it is from these precursors that the building blocks of life were formed [1]. Although organic molecules were among the components of the planetesimals making up the terrestrial planets, large amounts of primitive organic precursor molecules are believed to be exogenous in origin and to have been imported to the Earth via micrometeorites, carbonaceous meteorites and comets, especially during the early stages of the formation of the Solar System [1,2]. Our study concerns the hypothesis that prebiotic organic matter, present on Earth, was synthesized in the interstellar environment, and then imported to Earth by meteorites or micrometeorites. We are particularly concerned with the formation and fate of amino acids. We have already shown that amino acid synthesis is possible inside cometary grains under interstellar environment conditions [3]. We are now interested in the effects of space conditions and meteoritic impact on these amino acids [4-6]. Most of the extraterrestrial organic molecules known today have been identified in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites [7]. One of the components of these meteorites is a clay with a composition close to that of saponite, used in our experiments. Two American teams have studied the effects of impact on various amino acids [8,9]. [8] investigated amino acids in saturated solution in water with pressure ranges between 5.1 and 21 GPa and temperature ranges between 412 and 870 K. [9] studied amino acids in solid form associated with and without minerals (Murchison and Allende meteorite extracts) and pressure ranges between 3 and 30 GPa. In these two experiments, the amino acids survived up to 15 GPa. At higher pressure, the quantity of preserved amino acids decreases quickly. Some secondary products such as dipeptides and diketopiperazins were identified in the [8] experiment.

  6. Comparative Proteomics Analysis Reveals L-Arginine Activates Ethanol Degradation Pathways in HepG2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Guokai; Lestari, Retno; Long, Baisheng; Fan, Qiwen; Wang, Zhichang; Guo, Xiaozhen; Yu, Jie; Hu, Jun; Yang, Xingya; Chen, Changqing; Liu, Lu; Li, Xiuzhi; Purnomoadi, Agung; Achmadi, Joelal; Yan, Xianghua

    2016-01-01

    L-Arginine (Arg) is a versatile amino acid that plays crucial roles in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. In this study, to investigate the alteration induced by Arg supplementation in proteome scale, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) based proteomic approach was employed to comparatively characterize the differentially expressed proteins between Arg deprivation (Ctrl) and Arg supplementation (+Arg) treated human liver hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. A total of 21 proteins were identified as differentially expressed proteins and these 21 proteins were all up-regulated by Arg supplementation. Six amino acid metabolism-related proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, showed differential expressions. Intriguingly, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) based pathway analysis suggested that the three ethanol degradation pathways were significantly altered between Ctrl and +Arg. Western blotting and enzymatic activity assays validated that the key enzymes ADH1C, ALDH1A1, and ALDH2, which are mainly involved in ethanol degradation pathways, were highly differentially expressed, and activated between Ctrl and +Arg in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, 10 mM Arg significantly attenuated the cytotoxicity induced by 100 mM ethanol treatment (P < 0.0001). This study is the first time to reveal that Arg activates ethanol degradation pathways in HepG2 cells. PMID:26983598

  7. Comparative Genomics of Syntrophic Branched-Chain Fatty Acid Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Narihiro, Takashi; Nobu, Masaru K.; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Kamagata, Yoichi; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2016-01-01

    The syntrophic degradation of branched-chain fatty acids (BCFAs) such as 2-methylbutyrate and isobutyrate is an essential step in the production of methane from proteins/amino acids in anaerobic ecosystems. While a few syntrophic BCFA-degrading bacteria have been isolated, their metabolic pathways in BCFA and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) degradation as well as energy conservation systems remain unclear. In an attempt to identify these pathways, we herein performed comparative genomics of three syntrophic bacteria: 2-methylbutyrate-degrading “Syntrophomonas wolfei subsp. methylbutyratica” strain JCM 14075T (=4J5T), isobutyrate-degrading Syntrophothermus lipocalidus strain TGB-C1T, and non-BCFA-metabolizing S. wolfei subsp. wolfei strain GöttingenT. We demonstrated that 4J5 and TGB-C1 both encode multiple genes/gene clusters involved in β-oxidation, as observed in the Göttingen genome, which has multiple copies of genes associated with butyrate degradation. The 4J5 genome possesses phylogenetically distinct β-oxidation genes, which may be involved in 2-methylbutyrate degradation. In addition, these Syntrophomonadaceae strains harbor various hydrogen/formate generation systems (i.e., electron-bifurcating hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase, and membrane-bound hydrogenase) and energy-conserving electron transport systems, including electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF)-linked acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, ETF-linked iron-sulfur binding reductase, ETF dehydrogenase (FixABCX), and flavin oxidoreductase-heterodisulfide reductase (Flox-Hdr). Unexpectedly, the TGB-C1 genome encodes a nitrogenase complex, which may function as an alternative H2 generation mechanism. These results suggest that the BCFA-degrading syntrophic strains 4J5 and TGB-C1 possess specific β-oxidation-related enzymes for BCFA oxidation as well as appropriate energy conservation systems to perform thermodynamically unfavorable syntrophic metabolism. PMID:27431485

  8. Engineered Production of Short Chain Fatty Acid in Escherichia coli Using Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jawed, Kamran; Mattam, Anu Jose; Fatma, Zia; Wajid, Saima; Abdin, Malik Z.; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyric acid, have a broad range of applications in chemical and fuel industries. Worldwide demand of sustainable fuels and chemicals has encouraged researchers for microbial synthesis of SCFAs. In this study we compared three thioesterases, i.e., TesAT from Anaerococcus tetradius, TesBF from Bryantella formatexigens and TesBT from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, for production of SCFAs in Escherichia coli utilizing native fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway and modulated the genetic and bioprocess parameters to improve its yield and productivity. E. coli strain expressing tesBT gene yielded maximum butyric acid titer at 1.46 g L-1, followed by tesBF at 0.85 g L-1 and tesAT at 0.12 g L-1. The titer of butyric acid varied significantly depending upon the plasmid copy number and strain genotype. The modulation of genetic factors that are known to influence long chain fatty acid production, such as deletion of the fadD and fadE that initiates the fatty acid degradation cycle and overexpression of fadR that is a global transcriptional activator of fatty acid biosynthesis and repressor of degradation cycle, did not improve the butyric acid titer significantly. Use of chemical inhibitor cerulenin, which restricts the fatty acid elongation cycle, increased the butyric acid titer by 1.7-fold in case of TesBF, while it had adverse impact in case of TesBT. In vitro enzyme assay indicated that cerulenin also inhibited short chain specific thioesterase, though inhibitory concentration varied according to the type of thioesterase used. Further process optimization followed by fed-batch cultivation under phosphorous limited condition led to production of 14.3 g L-1 butyric acid and 17.5 g L-1 total free fatty acid at 28% of theoretical yield. This study expands our understanding of SCFAs production in E. coli through FASII pathway and highlights role of genetic and process optimization to enhance the desired product. PMID:27466817

  9. Engineered Production of Short Chain Fatty Acid in Escherichia coli Using Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Kamran; Mattam, Anu Jose; Fatma, Zia; Wajid, Saima; Abdin, Malik Z; Yazdani, Syed Shams

    2016-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as butyric acid, have a broad range of applications in chemical and fuel industries. Worldwide demand of sustainable fuels and chemicals has encouraged researchers for microbial synthesis of SCFAs. In this study we compared three thioesterases, i.e., TesAT from Anaerococcus tetradius, TesBF from Bryantella formatexigens and TesBT from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, for production of SCFAs in Escherichia coli utilizing native fatty acid synthesis (FASII) pathway and modulated the genetic and bioprocess parameters to improve its yield and productivity. E. coli strain expressing tesBT gene yielded maximum butyric acid titer at 1.46 g L-1, followed by tesBF at 0.85 g L-1 and tesAT at 0.12 g L-1. The titer of butyric acid varied significantly depending upon the plasmid copy number and strain genotype. The modulation of genetic factors that are known to influence long chain fatty acid production, such as deletion of the fadD and fadE that initiates the fatty acid degradation cycle and overexpression of fadR that is a global transcriptional activator of fatty acid biosynthesis and repressor of degradation cycle, did not improve the butyric acid titer significantly. Use of chemical inhibitor cerulenin, which restricts the fatty acid elongation cycle, increased the butyric acid titer by 1.7-fold in case of TesBF, while it had adverse impact in case of TesBT. In vitro enzyme assay indicated that cerulenin also inhibited short chain specific thioesterase, though inhibitory concentration varied according to the type of thioesterase used. Further process optimization followed by fed-batch cultivation under phosphorous limited condition led to production of 14.3 g L-1 butyric acid and 17.5 g L-1 total free fatty acid at 28% of theoretical yield. This study expands our understanding of SCFAs production in E. coli through FASII pathway and highlights role of genetic and process optimization to enhance the desired product. PMID:27466817

  10. Reaction pathways and mechanisms of the electrochemical degradation of phenol on different electrodes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Yan; Cui, Yu-Hong; Feng, Yu-Jie; Xie, Zhao-Ming; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2005-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out on the kinetics and pathways of the electrochemical (EC) degradation of phenol at three different types of anodes, Ti/SnO2-Sb, Ti/RuO2, and Pt. Although phenol was oxidised by all of the anodes at a current density of 20 mA/cm2 or a cell voltage of 4.6 V, there was a considerable difference between the three anode types in the effectiveness and performance of EC organic degradation. Phenol was readily mineralized at the Ti/SnO2-Sb anode, but its degradation was much slower at the Ti/RuO2 and Pt anodes. The analytical results of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC/MS) indicated that the intermediate products of EC phenol degradation, including benzoquinone and organic acids, were subsequently oxidised rapidly by the Ti/SnO2-Sb anode, but accumulated in the cells of Ti/RuO2 and Pt. There was also a formation of dark-coloured polymeric compounds and precipitates in the solutions electrolyzed by the Ti/RuO2 and Pt anodes, which was not observed for the Ti/SnO2-Sb cells. It is argued that anodic property not only affects the reaction kinetics of various steps of EC organic oxidation, but also alters the pathway of phenol electrolysis. Favourable surface treatment, such as the SnO2-Sb coating, provides the anode with an apparent catalytic function for rapid organic oxidation that is probably brought about by hydroxyl radicals generated from anodic water electrolysis. PMID:15882890

  11. Synthesis and degradation test of hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Sei Kwang; Park, Jung Kyu; Tomimatsu, Takashi; Shimoboji, Tsuyoshi

    2007-03-10

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels prepared with three different crosslinking reagents were assessed by in vitro and in vivo degradation tests for various tissue engineering applications. Adipic acid dihydrazide grafted HA (HA-ADH) was synthesized and used for the preparation of methacrylated HA (HA-MA) with methacrylic anhydride and thiolated HA (HA-SH) with Traut's reagent (imminothiolane). (1)H NMR analysis showed that the degrees of HA-ADH, HA-MA, and HA-SH modification were 69, 29, and 56 mol%, respectively. HA-ADH hydrogel was prepared by the crosslinking with bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS(3)), HA-MA hydrogel with dithiothreitol (DTT) by Michael addition, and HA-SH hydrogel with sodium tetrathionate by disulfide bond formation. According to in vitro degradation tests, HA-SH hydrogel was degraded very fast, compared to HA-ADH and HA-MA hydrogels. HA-ADH hydrogel was degraded slightly faster than HA-MA hydrogel. Based on these results, HA-MA hydrogels and HA-SH hydrogels were implanted in the back of SD rats and their degradation was assessed according to the pre-determined time schedule. As expected from the in vitro degradation test results, HA-SH hydrogel was in vivo degraded completely only in 2 weeks, whereas HA-MA hydrogels were degraded only partially even in 29 days. The degradation rate of HA hydrogels were thought to be controlled by changing the crosslinking reagents and the functional group of HA derivatives. In addition, the state of HA hydrogel was another factor in controlling the degradation rate. Dried HA hydrogel at 37 degrees C for a day resulted in relatively slow degradation compared to the bulk HA hydrogel. There was no adverse effect during the in vivo tests. PMID:17101173

  12. Benzoic acid degradation of polyacrylonitrile fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, D. S.; Needles, H. L.; Cagliostro, D. E.

    1981-01-01

    The reactions of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers in the presence of benzoic acid have been studied. Polyacrylonitrile fibers oxidize more readily in the presence of benzoic acid than in air at temperatures in the range of 170 C. The product decreased in solubility with extent of reaction. Gel permeation chromatography of the soluble fraction showed change in polydispersity. The insoluble product exhibited differences in weight loss as a function of decomposition temperature compared to PAN fibers. Infrared analyses of the fiber product showed absorption peaks similar to air-oxidized PAN. High-energy photoelectron spectral analysis showed a carbon-rich surface which contained oxygen and nitrogen. An air oxidized sample of fiber contained more oxygen at the surface than a fiber treated first with benzoic acid and then air oxidized.

  13. Proteolytic Pathways Induced by Herbicides That Inhibit Amino Acid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zulet, Amaia; Gil-Monreal, Miriam; Villamor, Joji Grace; Zabalza, Ana; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Royuela, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Background The herbicides glyphosate (Gly) and imazamox (Imx) inhibit the biosynthesis of aromatic and branched-chain amino acids, respectively. Although these herbicides inhibit different pathways, they have been reported to show several common physiological effects in their modes of action, such as increasing free amino acid contents and decreasing soluble protein contents. To investigate proteolytic activities upon treatment with Gly and Imx, pea plants grown in hydroponic culture were treated with Imx or Gly, and the proteolytic profile of the roots was evaluated through fluorogenic kinetic assays and activity-based protein profiling. Results Several common changes in proteolytic activity were detected following Gly and Imx treatment. Both herbicides induced the ubiquitin-26 S proteasome system and papain-like cysteine proteases. In contrast, the activities of vacuolar processing enzymes, cysteine proteases and metacaspase 9 were reduced following treatment with both herbicides. Moreover, the activities of several putative serine protease were similarly increased or decreased following treatment with both herbicides. In contrast, an increase in YVADase activity was observed under Imx treatment versus a decrease under Gly treatment. Conclusion These results suggest that several proteolytic pathways are responsible for protein degradation upon herbicide treatment, although the specific role of each proteolytic activity remains to be determined. PMID:24040092

  14. The influences of elastomer toward degradability of poly (lactic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaavessina, Mujtahid; Distantina, Sperisa; Chafidz, Achmad; Fadilah, Al-Zahrani, Saeed M.

    2016-02-01

    Poly (lactic acid)/elastomer blends were prepared via direct injection molding with the different weight fractions of elastomer, namely: 0, 10, 20 and 30 wt%. Degradation test of poly (lactic acid) (PLA) was performed by burial in the soil. The physical appearance and thermal properties of the tested specimens were monitored periodically. The presence of elastomer tended to significantly increase the degradability of PLA after buried for 27 weeks. With 30 wt% elastomer, the color and the surface of specimens become more white and rougher due to the degradation. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to evaluate thermal properties and crystallinity of all samples. It was found that the melting temperature decreased as the amount of elastomer increased. The crystallinity showed that the degradation of PLA is occurred firstly in amorphous phase.

  15. Three degradation pathways of 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium cation by activated sludge from wastewater treatment process.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chul-Woong; Pham, Thi Phuong Thuy; Kim, Sok; Song, Myung-Hee; Chung, Yun-Jo; Yun, Yeoung-Sang

    2016-03-01

    The biodegradability and degradation pathways of 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium cation [OMIM](+) by microbial community of wastewater treatment plant in Jeonju city, Korea were investigated. It was found that [OMIM](+) could be easily degraded by the microbial community. New degradation products and pathways of [OMIM](+) were identified, which are partially different from previous results (Green Chem. 2008, 10, 214-224). For the analysis of the degradation pathways and intermediates, the mass peaks observed in the range m/z of 50-300 were screened by using a tandem mass spectrometer (MS), and their fragmentation patterns were investigated by MS/MS. Surprisingly, we found three different degradation pathways of [OMIM](+), which were separated according to the initially oxidized position i.e. middle of the long alkyl chain, end of the long alkyl chain, and end of the short alkyl chain. The degradation pathways showed that the long and short alkyl chains of [OMIM](+) gradually degraded by repeating oxidation and carbon release. The results presented here shows that [OMIM](+) can be easily biodegraded through three different degradation pathways in wastewater treatment plants. PMID:26748207

  16. Chemical Degradation Studies on a Series of Dithiophosphinic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Freiderich, Melissa E; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Peterman, D. R.; Marc, Philippe L; Klaehn, John D.

    2014-01-01

    In this study a significant increase in the stability of a series of dithiophosphinic acids (DPAHs) under oxidizing acidic conditions was achieved. The degradation behavior of a series of DPAHs, designed for lanthanide/actinide separation, was examined. The stability of the DPAHs, when contacted with varying nitric acid concentrations, was tested and monitored using 31P {1H} NMR. Changes in the functional groups of the DPAHs resulted in substantial increases in the stability. However, all the DPAHs eventually showed signs of degradation when placed in contact with 2 M HNO3. The addition of a radical scavenger, hydrazine, inhibited the degradation of the DPAHs. With small amounts of hydrazine, five of the DPAHs remained stable for over a month in direct contact with 2 M HNO3.

  17. Chemical Degradation Studies on a Series of Dithiophosphinic Acids

    SciTech Connect

    Melissa E. Freiderich; Dean R. Peterman; John R. Klaehn; Philippe Marc; Laetitia H. Delmau

    2014-04-01

    A significant increase in the stability of a series of dithiophosphinic acids (DPAHs) under oxidizing acidic conditions was achieved. The degradation behavior of a series of DPAHs, designed for lanthanide/actinide separation, was examined. The stability of the DPAHs, when contacted with varying nitric acid concentrations, was tested and monitored using 31P {1H} NMR. Changes in the functional groups of the DPAHs resulted in substantial increases in the stability. However, when placed in contact with 2 M HNO3 all the DPAHs eventually showed signs of degradation. The addition of a radical scavenger, hydrazine, inhibited the degradation of the DPAHs. In the presence of a small concentration of hydrazine, five of the DPAHs remained stable for over a month in direct contact with 2 M HNO3.

  18. Activated sludge degradation of adipic acid esters.

    PubMed Central

    Saeger, V W; Kalley, R G; Hicks, O; Tucker, E S; Mieure, J P

    1976-01-01

    The biodegradability of three aliphatic adipic acid diesters and a 1,3-butylene glycol adipic acid polyester was determined in acclimated, activated sludge systems. Rapid primary biodegradation from 67 to 99+% was observed at 3- and 13-mg/liter feed levels for di-n-hexyl adipate, di(2-ethylhexyl) adipate, and di(heptyl, nonyl) adipate in 24 h. When acclimated, activated sludge microorganisms were employed as the seed for two carbon dioxide evolution procedures, greater than 75% of the theoretical carbon dioxide was evolved for the three diesters and the polyester in a 35-day test period. The essentially complete biodegradation observed in these studies suggests that these esters would not persist when exposed to similar mixed microbial populations in the environment. PMID:1275494

  19. A degradation study of PLLA containing lauric acid.

    PubMed

    Renouf-Glauser, Annette C; Rose, John; Farrar, David; Cameron, Ruth E

    2005-05-01

    Addition of lauric acid to poly (L-lactide) (PLLA) has resulted in a new family of enhanced degradation biomaterials. Presented is PLLA4.5 (PLLA containing 4.5 wt% lauric acid), the fastest degrading of the family. Degradation was studied via mass changes, gel-permeation chromatography, wide- and small-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS and SAXS), simultaneous SAXS and tensile testing, and visual observation. The undegraded PLLA4.5 deformed by crazing, recognisable from the characteristic shape of the SAXS pattern. As water up-take and degradation proceeded, samples crystallised, decreasing the SAXS long period, until by 4 days the deformation mechanism had become that of crystal-mediated deformation. This resulted in a 'peanut-lemon'-shaped SAXS pattern, interpreted in terms of cavitation and fibrillated shear. Further degradation up to 12 days resulted in the same deformation mechanism at different sample displacements, with samples failing earlier during tensile testing until a ductile-brittle transition occurred. At 30-40 days water up-take and mass-loss increased significantly and global whitening of samples occurred, while the crystallinity and long period stabilised. Complete degradation had not occurred by the end of the study at 73 days. Through an understanding of how the changes in morphology during degradation affect the micromechanisms of deformation, it may be possible to design microstructures to give a tailored evolution of mechanical response in the body. PMID:15585245

  20. Chemical intervention in bacterial lignin degradation pathways: Development of selective inhibitors for intradiol and extradiol catechol dioxygenases.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Paul D; Mineyeva, Yelena; Mycroft, Zoe; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2015-06-01

    Bacterial lignin degradation could be used to generate aromatic chemicals from the renewable resource lignin, provided that the breakdown pathways can be manipulated. In this study, selective inhibitors of enzymatic steps in bacterial degradation pathways were developed and tested for their effects upon lignin degradation. Screening of a collection of hydroxamic acid metallo-oxygenase inhibitors against two catechol dioxygenase enzymes, protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase (3,4-PCD) and 2,3-dihydroxyphenylpropionate 1,2-dioxygenase (MhpB), resulted in the identification of selective inhibitors D13 for 3,4-PCD (IC50 15μM) and D3 for MhpB (IC50 110μM). Application of D13 to Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 in minimal media containing ferulic acid led to the appearance of metabolic precursor protocatechuic acid at low concentration. Application of 1mM disulfiram, an inhibitor of mammalian aldehyde dehydrogenase, to R. jostii RHA1, gave rise to 4-carboxymuconolactone on the β-ketoadipate pathway, whereas in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 disulfiram treatment gave rise to a metabolite found to be glycine betaine aldehyde. PMID:25984987

  1. Microbial Degradation of Chlorogenic Acid by a Sphingomonas sp. Strain.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuping; Wang, Xiaoyu; Nie, Xueling; Zhang, Zhan; Yang, Zongcan; Nie, Cong; Tang, Hongzhi

    2016-08-01

    In order to elucidate the metabolism of chlorogenic acid by environmental microbes, a strain of Sphingomonas sp. isolated from tobacco leaves was cultured under various conditions, and chlorogenic acid degradation and its metabolites were investigated. The strain converting chlorogenic acid was newly isolated and identified as a Sphingomonas sp. strain by 16S rRNA sequencing. The optimal conditions for growth and chlorogenic acid degradation were 37 °C and pH 7.0 with supplementation of 1.5 g/l (NH4)2SO4 as the nitrogen source and 2 g/l chlorogenic acid as the sole carbon source. The maximum chlorogenic acid tolerating capability for the strain was 5 g/l. The main metabolites were identified as caffeic acid, shikimic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The analysis reveals the biotransformation mechanism of chlorogenic acid in microbial cells isolated from the environment. PMID:27068831

  2. Methyl-mercury degradation pathways: A comparison among three mercury impacted ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Agee, J.; Mcgowan, C.; Oremland, R.S.; Thomas, M.; Krabbenhoft, D.; Gilmour, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    We examined microbial methylmercury (MeHg) degradation in sediment of the Florida Everglades, Carson River (NV), and San Carlos Creek (CA), three freshwater environments that differ in the extent and type of mercury contamination and sediment biogeochemistry. Degradation rate constant (k(deg)) values increased with total mercury (Hg(t)) contamination both among and within ecosystems. The highest k(deg)'s (2.8-5.8 d-1) were observed in San Carlos Creek, at acid mine drainage impacted sites immediately downstream of the former New Idria mercury mine, where Hg(t) ranged from 4.5 to 21.3 ppm (dry wt). A reductive degradation pathway (presumably mer-detoxification) dominated degradation at these sites, as indicated by the nearly exclusive production of 14CH4 from 14C-MeHg, under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. At the upstream control site, and in the less contaminated ecosystems (e.g. the Everglades), k(deg)'s were low (???0.2 d-1) and oxidative demethylation (OD) dominated degradation, as evident from 14CO2 production. k(deg) increased with microbial CH4 production, organic content, and reduced sulfur in the Carson River system and increased with decreasing pH in San Carlos Creek. OD associated CO2 production increased with pore-water SO42- in Everglades samples but was not attributable to anaerobic methane oxidation, as has been previously proposed. This ecosystem comparison indicates that severely contaminated sediments tend to have microbial populations that actively degrade MeHg via mer-detoxification, whereas OD occurs in heavily contaminated sediments as well but dominates in those less contaminated.We examined microbial methylmercury (MeHg) degradation in sediment of the Florida Everglades, Carson River (NV), and San Carlos Creek (CA), three freshwater environments that differ in the extent and type of mercury contamination and sediment biogeochemistry. Degradation rate constant (kdeg) values increased with total mercury (Hgt) contamination both among and

  3. Piperazic acid derivatives inhibit Gli1 in Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Khatra, Harleen; Kundu, Jayanta; Khan, Pragya Paramita; Duttagupta, Indranil; Pattanayak, Sankha; Sinha, Surajit

    2016-09-15

    Piperazic acid, a non-proteinogenic amino acid, found in complex secondary metabolites and peptide natural substances, has shown down regulation of Gli1 expression in Hedgehog signaling pathway in cell based assays. Further structure activity relationship study indicated that amide derivatives of piperazic acid are more potent than piperazic acid itself, with little to no toxicity. However, other cellular components involved in the pathway were not affected. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the inhibitory property of piperazic acid in this pathway. Hence, this molecule could serve as a useful tool for studying Hedgehog signaling. PMID:27528433

  4. Extending shikimate pathway for the production of muconic acid and its precursor salicylic acid in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuheng; Sun, Xinxiao; Yuan, Qipeng; Yan, Yajun

    2014-05-01

    cis,cis-Muconic acid (MA) and salicylic acid (SA) are naturally-occurring organic acids having great commercial value. MA is a potential platform chemical for the manufacture of several widely-used consumer plastics; while SA is mainly used for producing pharmaceuticals (for example, aspirin and lamivudine) and skincare and haircare products. At present, MA and SA are commercially produced by organic chemical synthesis using petro-derived aromatic chemicals, such as benzene, as starting materials, which is not environmentally friendly. Here, we report a novel approach for efficient microbial production of MA via extending shikimate pathway by introducing the hybrid of an SA biosynthetic pathway with its partial degradation pathway. First, we engineered a well-developed phenylalanine producing Escherichia coli strain into an SA overproducer by introducing isochorismate synthase and isochorismate pyruvate lyase. The engineered strain is able to produce 1.2g/L of SA from simple carbon sources, which is the highest titer reported so far. Further, the partial SA degradation pathway involving salicylate 1-monoxygenase and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase is established to achieve the conversion of SA to MA. Finally, a de novo MA biosynthetic pathway is assembled by integrating the established SA biosynthesis and degradation modules. Modular optimization enables the production of up to 1.5g/L MA within 48h in shake flasks. This study not only establishes an efficient microbial platform for the production of SA and MA, but also demonstrates a generalizable pathway design strategy for the de novo biosynthesis of valuable degradation metabolites. PMID:24583236

  5. Degradation of 4-Chlorophenol via the meta Cleavage Pathway by Comamonas testosteroni JH5

    PubMed Central

    Hollender, J.; Hopp, J.; Dott, W.

    1997-01-01

    Comamonas testosteroni JH5 used 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) as its sole source of energy and carbon up to a concentration of 1.8 mM, accompanied by the stoichiometric release of chloride. The degradation of 4-CP mixed with the isomeric 2-CP by resting cells led to the accumulation of 3-chlorocatechol (3-CC), which inactivated the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase. As a result, further 4-CP breakdown was inhibited and 4-CC accumulated as a metabolite. In the crude extract of 4-CP-grown cells, catechol 1,2-dioxygenase and muconate cycloisomerase activities were not detected, whereas the activities of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde hydrolase, and 2-oxopent-4-enoate hydratase were detected. These enzymes of the meta cleavage pathway showed activity with 4-CC and with 5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde. The activities of the dioxygenase and semialdehyde dehydrogenase were constitutive. Two key metabolites of the meta cleavage pathway, the meta cleavage product (5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde) and 5-chloro-2-hydroxymuconic acid, were detected. Thus, our previous postulation that C. testosteroni JH5 uses the meta cleavage pathway for the complete mineralization of 4-CP was confirmed. PMID:16535738

  6. Microbial degradation of usnic acid in the reindeer rumen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundset, Monica A.; Barboza, Perry S.; Green, Thomas K.; Folkow, Lars P.; Blix, Arnoldus Schytte; Mathiesen, Svein D.

    2010-03-01

    Reindeer ( Rangifer tarandus) eat and utilize lichens as an important source of energy and nutrients in winter. Lichens synthesize and accumulate a wide variety of phenolic secondary compounds, such as usnic acid, as a defense against herbivores and to protect against damage by UV-light in solar radiation. We have examined where and to what extent these phenolic compounds are degraded in the digestive tract of the reindeer, with particular focus on usnic acid. Three male reindeer were given ad libitum access to a control diet containing no usnic acid for three weeks and then fed lichens ad libitum (primarily Cladonia stellaris) containing 9.1 mg/g DM usnic acid for 4 weeks. Usnic acid intake in reindeer on the lichen diet was 91-117 mg/kg BM/day. In spite of this, no trace of usnic acid or conjugates of usnic acid was found either in fresh rumen fluid, urine, or feces. This suggests that usnic acid is rapidly degraded by rumen microbes, and that it consequently is not absorbed by the animal. This apparent ability to detoxify lichen phenolic compounds may gain increased importance with future enhanced UV-B radiation expected to cause increased protective usnic acid/phenol production in lichens.

  7. Hydroxide Degradation Pathways for Substituted Benzyltrimethyl Ammonium: A DFT Study

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Hai; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2014-11-01

    The stability of cations used in the alkaline exchange membranes has been a major challenge. In this paper, degradation energy barriers were investigated by density functional theory for substituted benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA+) cations. Findings show that electron-donating substituent groups at meta-position(s) of the benzyl ring could result in increased degradation barriers. However, after investigating more than thirty substituted BTMA+ cations, the largest improvement in degradation barrier found was only 6.7 kJ/mol. This suggests a modest (8×) improvement in stability for this type of approach may be possible, but for anything greater other approaches will need to be pursued.

  8. Toxicity removal assessments related to degradation pathways of azo dyes: Toward an optimization of Electro-Fenton treatment.

    PubMed

    Le, Thi Xuan Huong; Nguyen, Thi Van; Yacouba, Zoulkifli Amadou; Zoungrana, Laetitia; Avril, Florent; Petit, Eddy; Mendret, Julie; Bonniol, Valerie; Bechelany, Mikhael; Lacour, Stella; Lesage, Geoffroy; Cretin, Marc

    2016-10-01

    The degradation pathway of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) by Electro-Fenton process using carbon felt cathode was investigated via HPLC-UV and LC-MS, IC, TOC analysis and bioassays (Vibrio Fischeri 81.9% Microtox(®) screening tests). The TOC removal of AO7 reached 96.2% after 8 h treatment with the optimal applied current density at -8.3 mA cm(-2) and 0.2 mM catalyst concentration. The toxicity of treated solution increased rapidly to its highest value at the early stage of electrolysis (several minutes), corresponding to the formation of intermediate poisonous aromatic compounds such as 1,2-naphthaquinone (NAPQ) and 1,4-benzoquinone (BZQ). Then, the subsequent formation of aliphatic short-chain carboxylic acids like acetic acid, formic acid, before the complete mineralization, leaded to a non-toxic solution after 270 min for 500 mL of AO7 (1 mM). Moreover, a quantitative analysis of inorganic ions (i.e. ammonium, nitrate, sulfate) produced during the course of degradation could help to verify molar balance with regard to original nitrogen and sulfur elements. To conclude, a clear degradation pathway of AO7 was proposed, and could further be applied to other persistent pharmaceuticals in aquatic environment. PMID:27441990

  9. Tannic acid degradation by Klebsiella strains isolated from goat feces

    PubMed Central

    Tahmourespour, Arezoo; Tabatabaee, Nooroldin; Khalkhali, Hossein; Amini, Imane

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Tannins are toxic polyphenols that either bind and precipitate or condense proteins. The high tannin content of some plants is the preliminary limitation of using them as a ruminant feed. So, the aim of this study was the isolation and characterization of tannic acid degrading bacterial strains from goat feces before and after feeding on Pistachio-Soft Hulls as tannin rich diet (TRD). Materials and Methods: Bacterial strains capable of utilizing tannic acid as sole carbon and energy source were isolated and characterized from goat feces before and after feeding on TRD. Tannase activity, maximum tolerable concentration and biodegradation potential were assessed. Results: Four tannase positive isolates were identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae. Isolated strains showed the maximum tolerable concentration of 64g/L of tannin. The tannic acid degradation percentage at a concentration of 15.0 g/L reached a maximum of 68% after 24 h incubation, and more than 98% after 72 h incubation. The pH of the medium also decreased along with tannic acid utilization. Conclusions: It is obvious that TRD induced adaptive responses. Thus, while the bacteria were able to degrade and detoxify the tannic acids, they had to adapt in the presence of high concentrations of tannic acid. So, these isolates have an amazing potential for application in bioremediation, waste water treatment, also reduction of tannins antinutritional effects in animal feeds. PMID:27092220

  10. Kinetics and reaction pathways of formaldehyde degradation using the UV-fenton method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangxuan; Liang, Jiantao; Wang, Xuanjun

    2011-05-01

    This study was based on the purpose of investigating the reaction rules of formaldehyde (HCHO) as an intermediate product in the degradation of many other organic wastewaters. The process conditions of UV-Fenton method for the degradation of the low concentrations of HCHO were studied in a batch photochemical reactor. The results showed that, when the original HCHO concentration was 30 mg/L, at an operating temperature of 23 degrees C, pH = 3, an H202 dosage of 68 mg/L, and an H2O2-to-Fe2+ mole ratio (H2O2:Fe2+) of 5, 91.89% of the HCHO was removed after 30 minutes. The degradation of HCHO in the UV-Fenton system was basically in accordance with the exponential decay. The kinetic study results showed that the reaction orders of HCHO, Fe2+, and H2O2 in the system were 1.054, 0.510, and 0.728, respectively, and the activation energy (Ea) was 9.85 kJ/mol. The comparison of UV/H2O2, Fenton, and UV-Fenton systems for the degradation of HCHO, and the results of iron catalyst tests showed that the mechanism of UV-Fenton on the degradation of HCHO was through a synergistic effect of Fe2+ and UV light to catalyze the decomposition of H2O2. The introduction of UV irradiation to the Fenton system largely increased the degradation rate of HCHO, mainly as a result of the accelerating effect on the formation of the Fe2+/Fe3+ cycle. The reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and a chemical oxygen demand (COD) analyzer. The effluent gases also were analyzed by gas chromatography. Based on those results, the reaction pathways of HCHO in the UV-Fenton system were proposed. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of the reaction products and the COD showed that the main intermediate product of the reaction was formic acid, and the further oxidation of it was the rate-limiting step for the degradation of HCHO. PMID:21657193

  11. Heterogeneous electro-Fenton using modified iron-carbon as catalyst for 2,4-dichlorophenol degradation: influence factors, mechanism and degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Minghua; Ren, Gengbo; Yu, Xinmin; Ma, Liang; Yang, Jie; Yu, Fangke

    2015-03-01

    Modified iron-carbon with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) was firstly investigated as heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) catalyst for 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) degradation in near neutral pH condition. The catalyst was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the effects of some important operating parameters such as current intensity and pH on the 2,4-DCP degradation were investigated. After the catalyst modification with 20% PTFE, the degradation performance maintained well with much lower iron leaching, and at current intensity 100 mA, initial pH 6.7, catalyst loading 6 g/L, the degradation efficiency of 2,4-DCP could exceed 95% within 120 min treatment. Two-stage pseudo first-order kinetics of 2,4-DCP degradation was observed, including a slow anodic oxidation stage (first-stage) and much faster heterogeneous EF oxidation (second-stage), in which the automatic drop of pH in the first-stage initiated the Fe(2+) release from micro-electrolysis and thus benefited to the subsequent EF reaction. Aromatic intermediates such as 3,5-dichlorocatechol, 4,6-dichlororesorcinol and 2-chlorohydroquinone were detected by GC-MS. Oxalic acid, acetic acid, formic acid and Cl(-) were quantified by ion chromatograph. Based on these analysis as well as the detection of H₂O₂ and OH, a possible mechanism and degradation pathway for 2,4-DCP were proposed. This work demonstrated that such a heterogeneous EF using cheap modified Fe-C catalyst was promising for organic wastewater treatment in initial neutral pH condition. PMID:25559487

  12. Degradation rates of glycerol polyesters at acidic and basic conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyesters prepared from glycerol with mixtures of adipic and citric acids were evaluated in the laboratory to estimate degradation rates over a range of pH conditions. These renewable polymers provide a market for glycerol that is generated during biodiesel production. The polyesters were prepared...

  13. FURTHER STUDY OF ADIPIC ACID DEGRADATION IN FGD SCRUBBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of investigations of adipic acid degradation to account for losses observed during earlier studies where it was used as an additive to improve SO2 scrubber performance. Bench-scale experiments identified the major species resulting from the oxidative degr...

  14. Rate Motifs Tune Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid Degradation Dynamics1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Britney L.; Mao, Haibin; Guseman, Jessica M.; Hinds, Thomas R.; Hellmuth, Antje; Kovenock, Marlies; Noorassa, Anisa; Lanctot, Amy; Villalobos, Luz Irina A. Calderón; Zheng, Ning; Nemhauser, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is a common feature in diverse plant cell signaling pathways; however, the factors that control the dynamics of regulated protein turnover are largely unknown. One of the best-characterized families of E3 ubiquitin ligases facilitates ubiquitination of auxin (aux)/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) repressor proteins in the presence of auxin. Rates of auxin-induced degradation vary widely within the Aux/IAA family, and sequences outside of the characterized degron (the minimum region required for auxin-induced degradation) can accelerate or decelerate degradation. We have used synthetic auxin degradation assays in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in plants to characterize motifs flanking the degron that contribute to tuning the dynamics of Aux/IAA degradation. The presence of these rate motifs is conserved in phylogenetically distant members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Aux/IAA family, as well as in their putative Brassica rapa orthologs. We found that rate motifs can act by enhancing interaction between repressors and the E3, but that this is not the only mechanism of action. Phenotypes of transgenic plants expressing a deletion in a rate motif in IAA28 resembled plants expressing degron mutations, underscoring the functional relevance of Aux/IAA degradation dynamics in regulating auxin responses. PMID:26149575

  15. Rate Motifs Tune Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid Degradation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Moss, Britney L; Mao, Haibin; Guseman, Jessica M; Hinds, Thomas R; Hellmuth, Antje; Kovenock, Marlies; Noorassa, Anisa; Lanctot, Amy; Villalobos, Luz Irina A Calderón; Zheng, Ning; Nemhauser, Jennifer L

    2015-09-01

    Ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is a common feature in diverse plant cell signaling pathways; however, the factors that control the dynamics of regulated protein turnover are largely unknown. One of the best-characterized families of E3 ubiquitin ligases facilitates ubiquitination of auxin (aux)/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) repressor proteins in the presence of auxin. Rates of auxin-induced degradation vary widely within the Aux/IAA family, and sequences outside of the characterized degron (the minimum region required for auxin-induced degradation) can accelerate or decelerate degradation. We have used synthetic auxin degradation assays in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in plants to characterize motifs flanking the degron that contribute to tuning the dynamics of Aux/IAA degradation. The presence of these rate motifs is conserved in phylogenetically distant members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Aux/IAA family, as well as in their putative Brassica rapa orthologs. We found that rate motifs can act by enhancing interaction between repressors and the E3, but that this is not the only mechanism of action. Phenotypes of transgenic plants expressing a deletion in a rate motif in IAA28 resembled plants expressing degron mutations, underscoring the functional relevance of Aux/IAA degradation dynamics in regulating auxin responses. PMID:26149575

  16. ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS DURING DRINKING WATER TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this work was to investigate organophosphorus (OP) pesticide transformation pathways as a class in the presence of aqueous chlorine. Seven priority OP pesticides were examined for their reactivity with aqueous chlorine: chlorpyrifos (CP), parathion (PA), diazino...

  17. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Terreic Acid Pathway in Aspergillus terreus

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Sun, Wei-wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2014-09-29

    Terreic acid is a natural product derived from 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA). A compact gene cluster for its biosynthesis was characterized. Isolation of the intermediates and shunt products from the mutant strains, in combined with bioinformatic analyses, allowed us to propose a biosynthetic pathway for terreic acid. Defining the pathway and the genes involved will facilitate the engineering of this molecule with interesting antimicrobial and antitumor bioactivities.

  18. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Terreic Acid Pathway in Aspergillus terreus

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Sun, Wei-wen; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2014-09-29

    Terreic acid is a natural product derived from 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA). A compact gene cluster for its biosynthesis was characterized. Isolation of the intermediates and shunt products from the mutant strains, in combined with bioinformatic analyses, allowed us to propose a biosynthetic pathway for terreic acid. Lastly, defining the pathway and the genes involved will facilitate the engineering of this molecule with interesting antimicrobial and antitumor bioactivities.

  19. Degradation of CYANEX 301 in Contact with Nitric Acid Media

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe Marc; Radu Custelcean; Gary S. Groenewold; John R. Klaehn; Dean R. Peterman; Laetitia H. Delmau

    2012-10-01

    The nature of the degradation product obtained upon contacting CYANEX 301 (bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid) with nitric acid has been elucidated and found to be a disulfide derivative. The first step to the degradation of CYANEX 301 in toluene has been studied using 31P{1H} NMR after being contacted with nitric acid media. The spectrum of the degradation product exhibits a complex multiplet around dP = 80 ppm. A succession of purifications of CYANEX 301 has resulted in single crystals of the acidic form and the corresponding ammonium salt. Unlike the original CYANEX 301, which consists of a complex diastereomeric mixture displaying all possible combinations of chiral orientations at the 2-methyl positions, the purified crystals were shown by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to be racemates, containing 50:50 mixtures of the [R;R] and [S;S] diastereomers. The comparison between the 31P {1H} NMR spectra of the degradation products resulting from the diastereomerically pure CYANEX 301 and the original diastereomeric mixture has elucidated the influence of the isomeric composition on the multiplicity of the 31P {1H} NMR peak. These NMR data indicate the initial degradation leads to a disulfide-bridged condensation product displaying multiple resonances due to phosphorus–phosphorus coupling, which is caused by the inequivalence of the two P atoms as a result of their different chirality. A total of nine different NMR resonances, six of which display phosphorus–phosphorus coupling, could be assigned, and the identity of the peaks corresponding to phosphorus atoms coupled to each other was confirmed by 31P {1H} homodecoupled NMR analysis.

  20. Investigation of the photocatalytic degradation pathway of the urine metabolite, creatinine: the effect of pH.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, Maria G; Nambiar, Usha; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2009-09-01

    This study investigated the degradation pathway of creatinine (a urine metabolite) with immobilized titanium dioxide photocatalysts. The degradation of creatinine was studied at three different pH values (acidic, neutral and basic) in the absence of buffering solutions. The intermediates formed were identified by using electrospray ionization mass spectrometer (ESI-MS) in both negative and positive ion mode. Two distinct mechanistic pathways which govern the photocatalytic degradation of creatinine irrespective of the pH of the initial solution were identified. The initial solution pH affected only the selectivity between the two mechanisms. The primary oxidation steps of creatinine with hydroxyl radicals included demethylation, hydrogen abstraction, hydroxylation, oxidation, and ring opening. At acidic pH, additional transformation steps of the two mechanisms were identified. The intermediates detected in the positive ion mode, contained at least one atom of nitrogen in their structure, explaining the observed low nitrogen mineralization of creatinine with TiO(2) photocatalysis. The intermediates in the negative ion mode were low molecular weight organic acids that contained only carbon and hydrogen atoms. PMID:19595423

  1. Influence of Root Exudates on the Bacterial Degradation of Chlorobenzoic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Lovecká, Petra; Dražková, Milena; Macková, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of chlorobenzoic acids (e.g., products of microbial degradation of PCB) by strains of microorganisms isolated from PCB contaminated soils was assessed. From seven bulk-soil isolates two strains unique in ability to degrade a wider range of chlorobenzoic acids than others were selected, individually and even in a complex mixture of 11 different chlorobenzoic acids. Such a feature is lacking in most tested degraders. To investigate the influence of vegetation on chlorobenzoic acids degraders, root exudates of two plant species known for supporting PCB degradation in soil were tested. While with individual chlorobenzoic acids the presence of plant exudates leads to a decrease of degradation yield, in case of a mixture of chlorobenzoic acids either a change in bacterial degradation specificity, associated with 3- and 4-chlorobenzoic acid, or an extension of the spectrum of degraded chlorobenzoic acids was observed. PMID:24222753

  2. Arachidonic acid downregulates acyl-CoA synthetase 4 expression by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation[S

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Stafforini, Diana M.; Azhar, Salman; Liu, Jingwen

    2014-01-01

    ACSL4 is a member of the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase (ACSL) family with a marked preference for arachidonic acid (AA) as its substrate. Although an association between elevated levels of ACSL4 and hepatosteatosis has been reported, the function of ACSL4 in hepatic FA metabolism and the regulation of its functional expression in the liver remain poorly defined. Here we provide evidence that AA selectively downregulates ACSL4 protein expression in hepatic cells. AA treatment decreased the half-life of ACSL4 protein in HepG2 cells by approximately 4-fold (from 17.3 ± 1.8 h to 4.2 ± 0.4 h) without causing apoptosis. The inhibitory action of AA on ACSL4 protein stability could not be prevented by rosiglitazone or inhibitors that interfere with the cellular pathways involved in AA metabolism to biologically active compounds. In contrast, treatment of cells with inhibitors specific for the proteasomal degradation pathway largely prevented the AA-induced ACSL4 degradation. We further show that ACSL4 is intrinsically ubiquitinated and that AA treatment can enhance its ubiquitination. Collectively, our studies have identified a novel substrate-induced posttranslational regulatory mechanism by which AA downregulates ACSL4 protein expression in hepatic cells. PMID:24879802

  3. Poly(lactic acid) degradable plastics, coatings, and binders

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.; Mudde, J.P.

    1992-05-01

    Biochemical processes to derive value from the management of high carbohydrate food wastes, such as potato starch, corn starch, and cheese whey permeate, have typically been limited to the production of either ethanol or methane. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) believes that lactic acid presents an attractive option for an alternate fermentation end product, especially in light of lactic acids` being a viable candidate for conversion to environmentally safe poly(lactic acid) (PLA) degradable plastics, coatings, and binders. Technology is being developed at ANL to permit a more cost effective route to modified high molecular weight PLA. Preliminary data on the degradation behavior of these modified PLAs shows the retention to the inherent hydrolytic degradability of the PLA modified, however, by introduced compositional variables. A limited study was done on the hydrolytic stability of soluble oligomers of poly(L-lactic acid). Over a 34 day hold period, water-methanol solutions of Pl-LA oligomers in the 2-10 DP range retained some 75% of their original molecular weight.

  4. Poly(lactic acid) degradable plastics, coatings, and binders

    SciTech Connect

    Bonsignore, P.V.; Coleman, R.D.; Mudde, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Biochemical processes to derive value from the management of high carbohydrate food wastes, such as potato starch, corn starch, and cheese whey permeate, have typically been limited to the production of either ethanol or methane. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) believes that lactic acid presents an attractive option for an alternate fermentation end product, especially in light of lactic acids' being a viable candidate for conversion to environmentally safe poly(lactic acid) (PLA) degradable plastics, coatings, and binders. Technology is being developed at ANL to permit a more cost effective route to modified high molecular weight PLA. Preliminary data on the degradation behavior of these modified PLAs shows the retention to the inherent hydrolytic degradability of the PLA modified, however, by introduced compositional variables. A limited study was done on the hydrolytic stability of soluble oligomers of poly(L-lactic acid). Over a 34 day hold period, water-methanol solutions of Pl-LA oligomers in the 2-10 DP range retained some 75% of their original molecular weight.

  5. Physiology of deletion mutants in the anaerobic β-myrcene degradation pathway in Castellaniella defragrans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Monoterpenes present a large and versatile group of unsaturated hydrocarbons of plant origin with widespread use in the fragrance as well as food industry. The anaerobic β-myrcene degradation pathway in Castellaniella defragrans strain 65Phen differs from well known aerobic, monooxygenase-containing pathways. The initial enzyme linalool dehydratase-isomerase ldi/LDI catalyzes the hydration of β-myrcene to (S)-(+)-linalool and its isomerization to geraniol. A high-affinity geraniol dehydrogenase geoA/GeDH and a geranial dehydrogenase geoB/GaDH contribute to the formation of geranic acid. A genetic system was for the first time applied for the betaproteobacterium to prove in vivo the relevance of the linalool dehydratase-isomerase and the geraniol dehydrogenase. In-frame deletion cassettes were introduced by conjugation and two homologous recombination events. Results Polar effects were absent in the in-frame deletion mutants C. defragrans Δldi and C. defragrans ΔgeoA. The physiological characterization of the strains demonstrated a requirement of the linalool dehydratase-isomerase for growth on acyclic monoterpenes, but not on cyclic monoterpenes. The deletion of geoA resulted in a phenotype with hampered growth rate on monoterpenes as sole carbon and energy source as well as reduced biomass yields. Enzyme assays revealed the presence of a second geraniol dehydrogenase. The deletion mutants were in trans complemented with the broad-host range expression vector pBBR1MCS-4ldi and pBBR1MCS-2geoA, restoring in both cases the wild type phenotype. Conclusions In-frame deletion mutants of genes in the anaerobic β-myrcene degradation revealed novel insights in the in vivo function. The deletion of a high-affinity geraniol dehydrogenase hampered, but did not preclude growth on monoterpenes. A second geraniol dehydrogenase activity was present that contributes to the β-myrcene degradation pathway. Growth on cyclic monoterpenes independent of the initial

  6. Occurrence of Arginine Deiminase Pathway Enzymes in Arginine Catabolism by Wine Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S.; Pritchard, G. G.; Hardman, M. J.; Pilone, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    l-Arginine, an amino acid found in significant quantities in grape juice and wine, is known to be catabolized by some wine lactic acid bacteria. The correlation between the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and the ability to catabolize arginine was examined in this study. The activities of the three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes, arginine deiminase, ornithine transcarbamylase, and carbamate kinase, were measured in cell extracts of 35 strains of wine lactic acid bacteria. These enzymes were present in all heterofermentative lactobacilli and most leuconostocs but were absent in all the homofermentative lactobacilli and pediococci examined. There was a good correlation among arginine degradation, formation of ammonia and citrulline, and the occurrence of arginine deiminase pathway enzymes. Urea was not detected during arginine degradation, suggesting that the catabolism of arginine did not proceed via the arginase-catalyzed reaction, as has been suggested in some earlier studies. Detection of ammonia with Nessler's reagent was shown to be a simple, rapid test to assess the ability of wine lactic acid bacteria to degrade arginine, although in media containing relatively high concentrations (>0.5%) of fructose, ammonia formation is inhibited. PMID:16534912

  7. The N-end rule pathway catalyzes a major fraction of the protein degradation in skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, V.; Lecker, S. H.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, overall protein degradation involves the ubiquitin-proteasome system. One property of a protein that leads to rapid ubiquitin-dependent degradation is the presence of a basic, acidic, or bulky hydrophobic residue at its N terminus. However, in normal cells, substrates for this N-end rule pathway, which involves ubiquitin carrier protein (E2) E214k and ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3) E3alpha, have remained unclear. Surprisingly, in soluble extracts of rabbit muscle, we found that competitive inhibitors of E3alpha markedly inhibited the 125I-ubiquitin conjugation and ATP-dependent degradation of endogenous proteins. These inhibitors appear to selectively inhibit E3alpha, since they blocked degradation of 125I-lysozyme, a model N-end rule substrate, but did not affect the degradation of proteins whose ubiquitination involved other E3s. The addition of several E2s or E3alpha to the muscle extracts stimulated overall proteolysis and ubiquitination, but only the stimulation by E3alpha or E214k was sensitive to these inhibitors. A similar general inhibition of ubiquitin conjugation to endogenous proteins was observed with a dominant negative inhibitor of E214k. Certain substrates of the N-end rule pathway are degraded after their tRNA-dependent arginylation. We found that adding RNase A to muscle extracts reduced the ATP-dependent proteolysis of endogenous proteins, and supplying tRNA partially restored this process. Finally, although in muscle extracts the N-end rule pathway catalyzes most ubiquitin conjugation, it makes only a minor contribution to overall protein ubiquitination in HeLa cell extracts.

  8. Biodegradation of chlorimuron-ethyl and the associated degradation pathway by Rhodococcus sp. D310-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Zang, Hailian; Yu, Qi; Lv, Tongyang; Cheng, Yi; Cheng, Xiaosong; Liu, Keran; Liu, Wanjun; Xu, Pianpian; Lan, Chuanzeng

    2016-05-01

    Chlorimuron-ethyl is a typical long-term residual sulfonylurea herbicide, and strategies for its removal have attracted increasing attention. Microbial degradation is considered the most acceptable dissipation method. In this study, we optimized the cultivation conditions (substrate concentration, pH, inoculum concentration, and temperature) of the chlorimuron-ethyl-degrading bacterium Rhodococcus sp. D310-1 using response surface methodology (RSM) to improve the biodegradation efficiency. A maximum biodegradation rate of 88.95 % was obtained. The Andrews model was used to describe the changes in the specific degradation rate as the substrate concentration increased. Chlorimuron-ethyl could be transformed with a maximum specific degradation rate (q max), half-saturation constant (K S), and inhibition constant (K i) of 0.4327 day(-1), 63.50045 mg L(-1), and 156.76666 mg L(-1), respectively. Eight biodegradation products (2-amino-4-chloro-6-methoxypyrimidine, ethyl 2-sulfamoyl benzoate, 2-sulfamoyl benzoic acid, o-benzoic sulfimide, 2-[[(4-chloro-6-methoxy-2-pyrimidinyl) carbamoyl] sulfamoyl] benzoic acid, ethyl 2-carbonyl sulfamoyl benzoate, ethyl 2-benzenesulfonyl isocyanate benzoate, and N,N-2(ethyl formate)benzene sulfonylurea) were identified, and three possible degradation pathways were proposed based on the results of high performance liquid chromatography HPLC, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses and the relevant literature. This systematic study is the first to examine the chlorimuron-ethyl degradation pathways of the genus Rhodococcus. PMID:26810662

  9. Degradation Kinetics and Mechanism of a β-Lactam Antibiotic Intermediate, 6-Aminopenicillanic Acid, in a New Integrated Production Process.

    PubMed

    Su, Min; Sun, Hua; Zhao, Yingying; Lu, Aidang; Cao, Xiaohui; Wang, Jingkang

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to promote sustainability and to reduce manufacturing costs, the traditional production process for 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) has been modified to include less processing units. The objectives of this study are to investigate the degradation kinetics of 6-APA, to propose a reasonable degradation mechanism, and to optimize the manufacturing conditions within this new process. A series of degradation kinetic studies were conducted in the presence of impurities, as well as at various chemical and physical conditions. The concentrations of 6-APA were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. An Arrhenius-type kinetic model was established to give a more accurate prediction on the degradation rates of 6-APA. A hydrolysis degradation mechanism is shown to be the major pathway for 6-APA. The degradation mechanisms and the kinetic models for 6-APA in the new system enable the design of a good manufacturing process with optimized parameters. PMID:26852849

  10. Exploring the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Protein Degradation Pathway in Yeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, Tamara J.; McWatters, Melissa K.; McQuade, Kristi L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory investigating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in yeast. In this exercise, the enzyme beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) is expressed in yeast under the control of a stress response promoter. Following exposure to heat stress to induce beta-gal expression, cycloheximide is added to halt…

  11. PHOSPHOLIPIDS OF FIVE PSEUDOMONAD ARCHETYPES FOR DIFFERENT TOLUENE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS) was used to determine phospholipid profiles for five reference pseudomonad strains harboring distinct toluene catabolic pathways: Pseudomonas putida mt-2, Pseudomonas putida F1, Burkholderia cepacia G4, B...

  12. Amino Acid Degradations Produced by Lipid Oxidation Products.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-06-10

    Differently to amino acid degradations produced by carbohydrate-derived reactive carbonyls, amino acid degradations produced by lipid oxidation products are lesser known in spite of being lipid oxidation a major source of reactive carbonyls in food. This article analyzes the conversion of amino acids into Strecker aldehydes, α-keto acids, and amines produced by lipid-derived free radicals and carbonyl compounds, as well as the role of lipid oxidation products on the reactions suffered by these compounds: the formation of Strecker aldehydes and other aldehydes from α-keto acids; the formation of Strecker aldehydes and olefins from amines; the formation of shorter aldehydes from Strecker aldehydes; and the addition reactions suffered by the olefins produced from the amines. The relationships among all these reactions and the effect of reaction conditions on them are discussed. This knowledge should contribute to better control food processing in order to favor the formation of desirable beneficial compounds and to inhibit the production of compounds with deleterious properties. PMID:25748518

  13. Exploring De Novo metabolic pathways from pyruvate to propionic acid.

    PubMed

    Stine, Andrew; Zhang, Miaomin; Ro, Soo; Clendennen, Stephanie; Shelton, Michael C; Tyo, Keith E J; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Industrial biotechnology provides an efficient, sustainable solution for chemical production. However, designing biochemical pathways based solely on known reactions does not exploit its full potential. Enzymes are known to accept non-native substrates, which may allow novel, advantageous reactions. We have previously developed a computational program named Biological Network Integrated Computational Explorer (BNICE) to predict promiscuous enzyme activities and design synthetic pathways, using generalized reaction rules curated from biochemical reaction databases. Here, we use BNICE to design pathways synthesizing propionic acid from pyruvate. The currently known natural pathways produce undesirable by-products lactic acid and succinic acid, reducing their economic viability. BNICE predicted seven pathways containing four reaction steps or less, five of which avoid these by-products. Among the 16 biochemical reactions comprising these pathways, 44% were validated by literature references. More than 28% of these known reactions were not in the BNICE training dataset, showing that BNICE was able to predict novel enzyme substrates. Most of the pathways included the intermediate acrylic acid. As acrylic acid bioproduction has been well advanced, we focused on the critical step of reducing acrylic acid to propionic acid. We experimentally validated that Oye2p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae can catalyze this reaction at a slow turnover rate (10(-3) s(-1) ), which was unknown to occur with this enzyme, and is an important finding for further propionic acid metabolic engineering. These results validate BNICE as a pathway-searching tool that can predict previously unknown promiscuous enzyme activities and show that computational methods can elucidate novel biochemical pathways for industrial applications. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:303-311, 2016. PMID:26821575

  14. AEROBIC DEGRADATION OF DINITROTOLUENES AND PATHWAY FOR BACTERIAL DEGRADATION OF 2,6-DINITROTOLUENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An oxidative pathway for the mineralization of 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) by Burkhoderia sp. strain DNT has been reported previously. We report here the isolation of additional strains with the ability to mineralize dinitrotoluene (2,6-DNT) by a different pathway. Burkhoderia ...

  15. The molecular components of the extracellular protein-degradation pathways of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Firoz; Rineau, Francois; Canbäck, Björn; Johansson, Tomas; Tunlid, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Proteins contribute to a major part of the organic nitrogen (N) in forest soils. This N is mobilized and becomes available to trees as a result of the depolymerizing activities of symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi. The mechanisms by which these fungi depolymerize proteins and assimilate the released N are poorly characterized. Biochemical analysis and transcriptome profiling were performed to examine the proteolytic machinery and the uptake system of the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Paxillus involutus during the assimilation of organic N from various protein sources and extracts of organic matter. All substrates induced secretion of peptidase activity with an acidic pH optimum, mostly contributed by aspartic peptidases. The peptidase activity was transiently repressed by ammonium. Transcriptional analysis revealed a large number of extracellular endo- and exopeptidases. The expression levels of these peptidases were regulated in parallel with transporters and enzymes involved in the assimilation and metabolism of the released peptides and amino acids. For the first time the molecular components of the protein degradation pathways of an ectomycorrhizal fungus are described. The data suggest that the transcripts encoding these components are regulated in response to the chemical properties and the availability of the protein substrates. PMID:23902518

  16. Cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Arthur A.; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are oxidized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases to PUFA epoxides which function as potent lipid mediators. The major metabolic pathways of PUFA epoxides are incorporation into phospholipids and hydrolysis to the corresponding PUFA diols by soluble epoxide hydrolase. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase stabilize PUFA epoxides and potentiate their functional effects. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) synthesized from arachidonic acid produce vasodilation, stimulate angiogenesis, have anti-inflammatory actions, and protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury. EETs produce these functional effects by activating receptor-mediated signaling pathways and ion channels. The epoxyeicosatetraenoic acids synthesized from eicosapentaenoic acid and epoxydocosapentaenoic acids synthesized from docosahexaenoic acid are potent inhibitors of cardiac arrhythmias. Epoxydocosapentaenoic acids also inhibit angiogenesis, decrease inflammatory and neuropathic pain, and reduce tumor metastasis. These findings indicate that a number of the beneficial functions of PUFA may be due to their conversion to PUFA epoxides. PMID:25093613

  17. EIMS Fragmentation Pathways and MRM Quantification of 7α/β-Hydroxy-Dehydroabietic Acid TMS Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Rontani, Jean-François; Aubert, Claude; Belt, Simon T

    2015-09-01

    EI mass fragmentation pathways of TMS derivatives οf 7α/β-hydroxy-dehydroabietic acids resulting from NaBH(4)-reduction of oxidation products of dehydroabietic acid (a component of conifers) were investigated and deduced by a combination of (1) low energy CID-GC-MS/MS, (2) deuterium labeling, (3) different derivatization methods, and (4) GC-QTOF accurate mass measurements. Having identified the main fragmentation pathways, the TMS-derivatized 7α/β-hydroxy-dehydroabietic acids could be quantified in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode in sea ice and sediment samples collected from the Arctic. These newly characterized transformation products of dehydroabietic acid constitute potential tracers of biotic and abiotic degradation of terrestrial higher plants in the environment. PMID:26138887

  18. EIMS Fragmentation Pathways and MRM Quantification of 7α/β-Hydroxy-Dehydroabietic Acid TMS Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontani, Jean-François; Aubert, Claude; Belt, Simon T.

    2015-09-01

    EI mass fragmentation pathways of TMS derivatives οf 7α/β-hydroxy-dehydroabietic acids resulting from NaBH4-reduction of oxidation products of dehydroabietic acid (a component of conifers) were investigated and deduced by a combination of (1) low energy CID-GC-MS/MS, (2) deuterium labeling, (3) different derivatization methods, and (4) GC-QTOF accurate mass measurements. Having identified the main fragmentation pathways, the TMS-derivatized 7α/β-hydroxy-dehydroabietic acids could be quantified in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode in sea ice and sediment samples collected from the Arctic. These newly characterized transformation products of dehydroabietic acid constitute potential tracers of biotic and abiotic degradation of terrestrial higher plants in the environment.

  19. Study of Biochemical Pathways and Enzymes Involved in Pyrene Degradation by Mycobacterium sp. Strain KMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyrene degradation is known in bacteria. In this study, Mycobacterium sp. Strain KMS was used to study the metabolites produced during, and enzymes involved in, pyrene degradation. Several key metabolites, including pyrene-4,5-dione, cis-4,5-pyrene-dihydrodiol, phenanthrene-4,5-dicarboxylic acid, ...

  20. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway mediates the regulated degradation of mammalian 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase.

    PubMed

    Ravid, T; Doolman, R; Avner, R; Harats, D; Roitelman, J

    2000-11-17

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), the key regulatory enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, is rapidly degraded in mammalian cells supplemented with sterols or MVA. This accelerated turnover was blocked by N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-norleucinal (ALLN), MG-132, and lactacystin, and to a lesser extent by N-acetyl-leucyl-leucyl-methional (ALLM), indicating the involvement of the 26 S proteasome. Proteasome inhibition led to enhanced accumulation of high molecular weight polyubiquitin conjugates of HMGR and of HMGal, a chimera between the membrane domain of HMGR and beta-galactosidase. Importantly, increased amounts of polyubiquitinated HMGR and HMGal were observed upon treating cells with sterols or MVA. Cycloheximide inhibited the sterol-stimulated degradation of HMGR concomitantly with a marked reduction in polyubiquitination of the enzyme. Inhibition of squalene synthase with zaragozic acid blocked the MVA- but not sterol-stimulated ubiquitination and degradation of HMGR. Thus, similar to yeast, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in the metabolically regulated turnover of mammalian HMGR. Yet, the data indicate divergence between yeast and mammals and suggest distinct roles for sterol and nonsterol metabolic signals in the regulated ubiquitination and degradation of mammalian HMGR. PMID:10964918

  1. Nitrogen incorporation into lignite humic acids during microbial degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, L.H.; Yuan, H.L.

    2009-07-01

    Previous study showed that nitrogen content in lignite humic acids (HA) increased significantly during lignite biodegradation. In this paper we evaluated the factors responsible for the increased level of N in HA and the formation of new nitrogen compound following microbial degradation. When the ammonium sulfate concentration in lignite medium was 0.5%, the N-content in HA was higher than that in the crude lignite humic acid (cHA); when the ammonium sulfate concentration was epsilon 0.5%, both the biodegraded humic acid (bHA) N-content and the content of bHA in lignite increased significantly, but at 2.0% no increase was observed. This indicated that HA incorporated N existing in the lignite medium, and more HA can incorporate more N with the increase of bHA amount in lignite during microbial degradation. CP/MAS {sup 15}N NMR analysis showed that the N incorporated into HA during biotransformation was in the form of free or ionized NH{sub 2}-groups in amino acids and sugars, as well as NH{sub 4}{sup +}. We propose nitrogen can be incorporated into HA biotically and abiotically. The high N content bHA has a potential application in agriculture since N is essential for plant growth.

  2. Degradation and Isotope Source Tracking of Glyphosate and Aminomethylphosphonic Acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Joshi, Sunendra R; Jaisi, Deb P

    2016-01-27

    Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine], an active ingredient of the herbicide Roundup, and its main metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), have been frequently reported to be present in soils and other environments and thus have heightened public concerns on their potential adverse effects. Understanding the fate of these compounds and differentiating them from other naturally occurring compounds require a toolbox of methods that can go beyond conventional methods. Here, we applied individual isotope labeling technique whereby each compound or mineral involved in the glyphosate and AMPA degradation reaction was either synthesized or chosen to have distinct (18)O/(16)O ratios so that the source of incorporated oxygen in the orthophosphate generated and corresponding isotope effect during C-P bond cleavage could be identified. Furthermore, we measured original isotope signatures of a few commercial glyphosate sources to identify their source-specific isotope signatures. Our degradation kinetics results showed that the rate of glyphosate degradation was higher than that of AMPA in all experimental conditions, and both the rate and extent of degradation were lowest under anoxic conditions. Oxygen isotope ratios (δ(18)OP) of orthophosphate generated from glyphosate and AMPA degradation suggested that one external oxygen atom from ambient water, not from dissolved oxygen or mineral, was incorporated into orthophosphate with the other three oxygen atoms inherited from the parent molecule. Interestingly, δ(18)OP values of all commercial glyphosate products studied were found to be the lightest among all orthophosphates known so far. Furthermore, isotope composition was found to be unaffected due to variable degradation kinetics, light/dark, and oxic/anoxic conditions. These results highlight the importance of phosphate oxygen isotope ratios as a nonconventional tool to potentially distinguish glyphosate sources and products from other organophosphorus compounds

  3. Degradation of sulfonamide antibiotics by Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 - elucidating the downstream pathway.

    PubMed

    Ricken, Benjamin; Fellmann, Oliver; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Schäffer, Andreas; Corvini, Philippe François-Xavier; Kolvenbach, Boris Alexander

    2015-12-25

    Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 is among the first bacterial isolates which were proven to degrade sulfonamide antibiotics. The degradation is initiated by an ipso-substitution, initiating the decay of the molecule into sulfur dioxide, the substrate specific heterocyclic moiety as a stable metabolite and benzoquinone imine. The latter appears to be instantaneously reduced to p-aminophenol, as that in turn was detected as the first stable intermediate. This study investigated the downstream pathway of sulfonamide antibiotics by testing the strain's ability to degrade suspected intermediates of this pathway. While p-aminophenol was degraded, degradation products could not be identified. Benzoquinone was shown to be degraded to hydroquinone and hydroquinone in turn was shown to be degraded to 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene. The latter is assumed to be the potential substrate for aromatic ring cleavage. However, no products from the degradation of 1,2,4-trihydroxybenzene could be identified. There are no signs of accumulation of intermediates causing oxidative stress, which makes Microbacterium sp. strain BR1 an interesting candidate for industrial waste water treatment. PMID:25796473

  4. Degradation of the antiviral component ARGONAUTE1 by the autophagy pathway

    PubMed Central

    Derrien, Benoît; Baumberger, Nicolas; Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Viotti, Corrado; De Cillia, Julia; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Isono, Erika; Schumacher, Karin; Genschik, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) mediated by siRNAs is an evolutionarily conserved antiviral defense mechanism in higher plants and invertebrates. In this mechanism, viral-derived siRNAs are incorporated into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) to guide degradation of the corresponding viral RNAs. In Arabidopsis, a key component of RISC is ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1), which not only binds to siRNAs but also carries the RNA slicer activity. At present little is known about posttranslational mechanisms regulating AGO1 turnover. Here we report that the viral suppressor of RNA silencing protein P0 triggers AGO1 degradation by the autophagy pathway. Using a P0-inducible transgenic line, we observed that AGO1 degradation is blocked by inhibition of autophagy. The engineering of a functional AGO1 fluorescent reporter protein further indicated that AGO1 colocalizes with autophagy-related (ATG) protein 8a (ATG8a) positive bodies when degradation is impaired. Moreover, this pathway also degrades AGO1 in a nonviral context, especially when the production of miRNAs is impaired. Our results demonstrate that a selective process such as ubiquitylation can lead to the degradation of a key regulatory protein such as AGO1 by a degradation process generally believed to be unspecific. We anticipate that this mechanism will not only lead to degradation of AGO1 but also of its associated proteins and eventually small RNAs. PMID:23019378

  5. Phenol degradation by Sulfobacillus acidophilus TPY via the meta-pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wengen; Guo, Wenbin; Zhou, Hongbo; Chen, Xinhua

    2016-09-01

    Due to its toxicity and volatility, phenol must be cleared from the environment. Sulfobacillus acidophilus TPY, which was isolated from a hydrothermal vent in the Pacific Ocean as a moderately thermoacidophilic Gram-positive bacterium, was capable of aerobically degrading phenol. This bacterium could tolerate up to 1300mg/L phenol and degrade 100mg/L phenol in 40h completely at 45°C and pH 1.8 with a maximal degradation rate of 2.32mg/L/h at 38h. Genome-wide search revealed that one gene (TPY_3176) and 14 genes clustered together in two regions with locus tags of TPY_0628-0634 and TPY_0640-0646 was proposed to be involved in phenol degradation via the meta-pathway with both the 4-oxalocrotonate branch and the hydrolytic branch. Real-time PCR analysis of S. acidophilus TPY under phenol cultivation condition confirmed the transcription of proposed genes involved in the phenol degradation meta-pathway. Degradation of 3-methylphenol and 2-methylphenol confirmed that the hydrolytic branch was utilised by S. acidophilus TPY. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that S. acidophilus TPY was closely related to sulphate-reducing bacteria and some Gram-positive phenol-degrading bacteria. This was the first report demonstrating the ability of S. acidophilus to degrade phenol and characterising the putative genes involved in phenol metabolism in S. acidophilus TPY. PMID:27393997

  6. Degradation pathways of PCBs upon UV irradiation in hexane.

    PubMed

    Miao, X S; Chu, S G; Xu, X B

    1999-10-01

    The photodegradations of eight individual PCB congeners (5, 31, 52, 77, 87, 126, 138, 169) in hexane have been investigated employing a mercury lamp. All degradation reactions of the above mentioned PCB congeners are of the pseudo first order. The principal products of PCB decomposition are the less chlorinated biphenyls, and no PCB-solvent adducts are found. Symmetrical and coplanar PCB congeners show lower photoreactivities. The reactivities of the chlorine atoms at various positions of PCB rings are generally in the order: ortho > meta > para. Photodechlorinations occur mainly on the more substituted rings, when the numbers of chlorine atoms on the two phenyl rings are unequal. During photodegradation, some coplanar PCB congeners are formed, which make the TEQ of solutions to decrease slowly or even to increase. PMID:10520484

  7. Degradation of the Plant Defense Signal Salicylic Acid Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Toxicity and Enhances Virulence on Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Lowe-Power, Tiffany M.; Jacobs, Jonathan M.; Ailloud, Florent; Fochs, Brianna; Prior, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plants use the signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) to trigger defenses against diverse pathogens, including the bacterial wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. SA can also inhibit microbial growth. Most sequenced strains of the heterogeneous R. solanacearum species complex can degrade SA via gentisic acid to pyruvate and fumarate. R. solanacearum strain GMI1000 expresses this SA degradation pathway during tomato pathogenesis. Transcriptional analysis revealed that subinhibitory SA levels induced expression of the SA degradation pathway, toxin efflux pumps, and some general stress responses. Interestingly, SA treatment repressed expression of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system, suggesting that this pathogen may suppress virulence functions when stressed. A GMI1000 mutant lacking SA degradation activity was much more susceptible to SA toxicity but retained the wild-type colonization ability and virulence on tomato. This may be because SA is less important than gentisic acid in tomato defense signaling. However, another host, tobacco, responds strongly to SA. To test the hypothesis that SA degradation contributes to virulence on tobacco, we measured the effect of adding this pathway to the tobacco-pathogenic R. solanacearum strain K60, which lacks SA degradation genes. Ectopic addition of the GMI1000 SA degradation locus, including adjacent genes encoding two porins and a LysR-type transcriptional regulator, significantly increased the virulence of strain K60 on tobacco. Together, these results suggest that R. solanacearum degrades plant SA to protect itself from inhibitory levels of this compound and also to enhance its virulence on plant hosts like tobacco that use SA as a defense signal molecule. PMID:27329752

  8. Characterization of the novel dimethyl sulfide-degrading bacterium Alcaligenes sp. SY1 and its biochemical degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yiming; Qiu, Jiguo; Chen, Dongzhi; Ye, Jiexu; Chen, Jianmeng

    2016-03-01

    Recently, the biodegradation of volatile organic sulfur compounds (VOSCs) has become a burgeoning field, with a growing focus on the reduction of VOSCs. The reduction of VOSCs encompasses both organic emission control and odor control. Herein, Alcaligenes sp. SY1 was isolated from active sludge and found to utilize dimethyl sulfide (DMS) as a growth substrate in a mineral salt medium. Response surface methodology (RSM) analysis was applied to optimize the incubation conditions. The following conditions for optimal degradation were identified: temperature 27.03°C; pH 7.80; inoculum salinity 0.84%; and initial DMS concentration 1585.39 μM. Under these conditions, approximately 99% of the DMS was degraded within 30 h of incubation. Two metabolic compounds were detected and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS): dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) and dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS). The DMS degradation kinetics for different concentrations were evaluated using the Haldane-Andrews model and the pseudo first-order model. The maximum specific growth rate and degradation rate of Alcaligenes sp. SY1 were 0.17 h(-1) and 0.63 gs gx(-1)h(-1). A possible degradation pathway is proposed, and the results suggest that Alcaligenes sp. SY1 has the potential to control odor emissions under aerobic conditions. PMID:26623933

  9. Unveiling New Degradation Intermediates/Pathways from the Photocatalytic Degradation of Microcystin-LR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study focuses on the identification of reaction intermediates formed during the photocatalytic degradation of the cyanotoxin microcystin-LR with immobilized TiO2 Tphotocatalysts at neutral pH. To differentiate between impurities already existing in the MC-LR stand...

  10. Transcriptome analysis of bitter acid biosynthesis and precursor pathways in hop (Humulus lupulus)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bitter acids (e.g. humulone) are prenylated polyketides synthesized in lupulin glands of the hop plant (Humulus lupulus) which are important contributors to the bitter flavour and stability of beer. Bitter acids are formed from acyl-CoA precursors derived from branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) degradation and C5 prenyl diphosphates from the methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. We used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to obtain the transcriptomes of isolated lupulin glands, cones with glands removed and leaves from high α-acid hop cultivars, and analyzed these datasets for genes involved in bitter acid biosynthesis including the supply of major precursors. We also measured the levels of BCAAs, acyl-CoA intermediates, and bitter acids in glands, cones and leaves. Results Transcripts encoding all the enzymes of BCAA metabolism were significantly more abundant in lupulin glands, indicating that BCAA biosynthesis and subsequent degradation occurs in these specialized cells. Branched-chain acyl-CoAs and bitter acids were present at higher levels in glands compared with leaves and cones. RNA-seq analysis showed the gland-specific expression of the MEP pathway, enzymes of sucrose degradation and several transcription factors that may regulate bitter acid biosynthesis in glands. Two branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT) enzymes, HlBCAT1 and HlBCAT2, were abundant, with gene expression quantification by RNA-seq and qRT-PCR indicating that HlBCAT1 was specific to glands while HlBCAT2 was present in glands, cones and leaves. Recombinant HlBCAT1 and HlBCAT2 catalyzed forward (biosynthetic) and reverse (catabolic) reactions with similar kinetic parameters. HlBCAT1 is targeted to mitochondria where it likely plays a role in BCAA catabolism. HlBCAT2 is a plastidial enzyme likely involved in BCAA biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis of the hop BCATs and those from other plants showed that they group into distinct biosynthetic (plastidial) and catabolic (mitochondrial

  11. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Degradation Using UV-Persulfate Process: Modeling of the Degradation and Chlorate Formation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yajie; Guo, Xin; Zhang, Yalei; Peng, Yue; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua; Niu, Junfeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Crittenden, John C

    2016-01-19

    In this study, we investigated the destruction and by-product formation of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) using ultraviolet light and persulfate (UV-PS). Additionally, we developed a first-principles kinetic model to simulate both PFOA destruction and by-product and chlorate (ClO3(-)) formation in ultrapure water (UW), surface water (SW), and wastewater (WW). PFOA degradation was significantly suppressed in the presence of chloride and carbonate species and did not occur until all the chloride was converted to ClO3(-) in UW and for low DOC concentrations in SW. The model was able to simulate the PS decay, pH changes, radical concentrations, and ClO3(-) formation for UW and SW. However, our model was unable to simulate PFOA degradation well in WW, possibly from PS activation by NOM, which in turn produced sulfate radicals. PMID:26686982

  12. Photolytic and photocatalytic degradation of 6-chloronicotinic acid.

    PubMed

    Zabar, Romina; Dolenc, Darko; Jerman, Tina; Franko, Mladen; Trebše, Polonca

    2011-10-01

    This work describes for the first time the photolytic and photocatalytic degradation of 6-chloronicotinic acid (6CNA) in double deionised water, which is a degradation product of neonicotinoid insecticides imidacloprid and acetamiprid, and it is known to appear in different environmental matrices. Photolytic experiments were performed with three UVA (ultraviolet A) polychromatic fluorescent lamps with broad maximum at 355 nm, while photocatalytic experiments were performed using immobilised titanium dioxide (TiO₂) on six glass slides in the spinning basket inside a photocatalytic quartz cell under similar irradiation conditions. Photolytic degradation revealed no change in concentration of 6CNA within 120 min of irradiation, while the photocatalytic degradation within 120 min, obeyed first-order kinetics. The observed disappearance rate constant was k=0.011 ± 0.001 min⁻¹ and t½ was 63.1 ± 5.5 min. Mineralisation rate was estimated through total organic carbon (TOC) and measurements revealed no carbon removal in case of photolysis after 120 min of exposure. However in photocatalytic experiments 46 ± 7% mineralisation was achieved within 120 min of irradiation. Nevertheless, the removal of total nitrogen (TN) was not observed across all experiments. Ion chromatographic analyses indicated transformation of chlorine atoms to chloride and increase of nitrate(V) ions only via photocatalytic experiments. Efficiency of selected advanced oxidation process (AOP) was investigated through toxicity assessment with Vibrio fischeri luminescent bacteria and revealed higher adverse effects of treated samples on bacteria following photocatalytic degradation in spite of the fact that higher mineralisation was achieved. New hydroxylated product generated in photocatalytic experiments with TiO₂, was confirmed with liquid chromatography-electro spray ionisation mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) analyses, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic

  13. Elucidation of pathways of ribosomal RNA degradation: an essential role for RNase E.

    PubMed

    Sulthana, Shaheen; Basturea, Georgeta N; Deutscher, Murray P

    2016-08-01

    Although normally stable in growing cells, ribosomal RNAs are degraded under conditions of stress, such as starvation, and in response to misassembled or otherwise defective ribosomes in a process termed RNA quality control. Previously, our laboratory found that large fragments of 16S and 23S rRNA accumulate in strains lacking the processive exoribonucleases RNase II, RNase R, and PNPase, implicating these enzymes in the later steps of rRNA breakdown. Here, we define the pathways of rRNA degradation in the quality control process and during starvation, and show that the essential endoribonuclease, RNase E, is required to make the initial cleavages in both degradative processes. We also present evidence that explains why the exoribonuclease, RNase PH, is required to initiate the degradation of rRNA during starvation. The data presented here provide the first detailed description of rRNA degradation in bacterial cells. PMID:27298395

  14. Photolysis of chlorantraniliprole and cyantraniliprole in water and soil: verification of degradation pathways via kinetics modeling.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashok K; Zimmerman, William T; Singles, Suzanne K; Malekani, Kalumbu; Swain, Scott; Ryan, David; Mcquorcodale, Gordon; Wardrope, Laura

    2014-07-16

    Photodegradation of [(14)C]-chlorantraniliprole (CLAP) and [(14)C]-cyantraniliprole (CNAP) was investigated in sterile buffer solutions, in natural water, and on soil surfaces. Both compounds displayed rapid degradation in aqueous buffers when exposed to light at concentrations which could result from direct overspray to a shallow water body. While the main products observed had analogous structures, a substantial difference was noted in the rate of degradation of the two compounds despite minimal differences in their structures. Transformations observed were primarily intramolecular rearrangements and degradations resulting from addition of hydroxyl radicals leading to molecular cleavage. Some of the degradation products were transient, and several degradates had isomeric molecular compositions. The sequence of transformations was established definitively with the help of kinetics modeling. Utility of kinetics analysis in verification of the proposed pathways is illustrated. PMID:24971760

  15. Aerobic Degradation of Sulfadiazine by Arthrobacter spp.: Kinetics, Pathways, and Genomic Characterization.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Mao, Yanping; Li, Bing; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Tong

    2016-09-01

    Two aerobic sulfadiazine (SDZ) degrading bacterial strains, D2 and D4, affiliated with the genus Arthrobacter, were isolated from SDZ-enriched activated sludge. The degradation of SDZ by the two isolates followed first-order decay kinetics. The half-life time of complete SDZ degradation was 11.3 h for strain D2 and 46.4 h for strain D4. Degradation kinetic changed from nongrowth to growth-linked when glucose was introduced as the cosubstrate, and accelerated biodegradation rate was observed after the adaption period. Both isolates could degrade SDZ into 12 biodegradation products via 3 parallel pathways, of which 2-amino-4-hydroxypyrimidine was detected as the principal intermediate product toward the pyrimidine ring cleavage. Compared with five Arthrobacter strains reported previously, D2 and D4 were the only Arthrobacter strains which could degrade SDZ as the sole carbon source. The draft genomes of D2 and D4, with the same completeness of 99.7%, were compared to other genomes of related species. Overall, these two isolates shared high genomic similarities with the s-triazine-degrading Arthrobacter sp. AK-YN10 and the sulfonamide-degrading bacteria Microbacterium sp. C448. In addition, the two genomes contained a few significant regions of difference which may carry the functional genes involved in sulfonamide degradation. PMID:27477918

  16. Protein/Protein Interactions in the Mammalian Heme Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Andrea L. M.; Bagai, Ireena; Becker, Donald F.; Zuiderweg, Erik R. P.; Ragsdale, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the O2-dependent degradation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and iron with electrons delivered from NADPH via cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Biliverdin reductase (BVR) then catalyzes conversion of biliverdin to bilirubin. We describe mutagenesis combined with kinetic, spectroscopic (fluorescence and NMR), surface plasmon resonance, cross-linking, gel filtration, and analytical ultracentrifugation studies aimed at evaluating interactions of HO-2 with CPR and BVR. Based on these results, we propose a model in which HO-2 and CPR form a dynamic ensemble of complex(es) that precede formation of the productive electron transfer complex. The 1H-15N TROSY NMR spectrum of HO-2 reveals specific residues, including Leu-201, near the heme face of HO-2 that are affected by the addition of CPR, implicating these residues at the HO/CPR interface. Alanine substitutions at HO-2 residues Leu-201 and Lys-169 cause a respective 3- and 22-fold increase in Km values for CPR, consistent with a role for these residues in CPR binding. Sedimentation velocity experiments confirm the transient nature of the HO-2·CPR complex (Kd = 15.1 μm). Our results also indicate that HO-2 and BVR form a very weak complex that is only captured by cross-linking. For example, under conditions where CPR affects the 1H-15N TROSY NMR spectrum of HO-2, BVR has no effect. Fluorescence quenching experiments also suggest that BVR binds HO-2 weakly, if at all, and that the previously reported high affinity of BVR for HO is artifactual, resulting from the effects of free heme (dissociated from HO) on BVR fluorescence. PMID:25196843

  17. Mechanochemical degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A: performance, products and pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kunlun; Huang, Jun; Zhang, Wang; Yu, Yunfei; Deng, Shubo; Yu, Gang

    2012-12-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is the most widely used brominated flame retardant (BFR), which has received more and more concerns due to its high lipophilicity, persistency and endocrine disrupting property in the environment. Considering the possible need for the safe disposal of TBBPA containing wastes in the future, the potential of mechanochemical (MC) destruction as a promising non-combustion technology was investigated in this study. TBBPA was co-ground with calcium oxide (CaO) or the mixture of iron powder and quartz sand (Fe+SiO(2)) in a planetary ball mill at room temperature. The method of Fe+SiO(2) destructed over 98% of initial TBBPA after 3h and acquired 95% debromination rate after 5h, which showed a better performance than the CaO method. Raman spectra and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrated the generation of inorganic carbon with the disappearance of benzene ring and CBr bond, indicating the carbonization and debromination process during mechanochemical reaction. LC-MS-MS screening showed that the intermediates of the treatment with Fe+SiO(2) were tri-, bi-, mono-brominated BPA, BPA and other fragments. Finally all the intermediates were also destroyed after 5h grinding. The bromine balance was calculated and a possible reaction pathway was proposed. PMID:23158692

  18. Terrestrial and marine perspectives on modeling organic matter degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Burd, Adrian B; Frey, Serita; Cabre, Anna; Ito, Takamitsu; Levine, Naomi M; Lønborg, Christian; Long, Matthew; Mauritz, Marguerite; Thomas, R Quinn; Stephens, Brandon M; Vanwalleghem, Tom; Zeng, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Organic matter (OM) plays a major role in both terrestrial and oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The amount of carbon stored in these systems is far greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in the atmosphere, and annual fluxes of CO2 from these pools to the atmosphere exceed those from fossil fuel combustion. Understanding the processes that determine the fate of detrital material is important for predicting the effects that climate change will have on feedbacks to the global carbon cycle. However, Earth System Models (ESMs) typically utilize very simple formulations of processes affecting the mineralization and storage of detrital OM. Recent changes in our view of the nature of this material and the factors controlling its transformation have yet to find their way into models. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the role and cycling of detrital OM in terrestrial and marine systems and examine how this pool of material is represented in ESMs. We include a discussion of the different mineralization pathways available as organic matter moves from soils, through inland waters to coastal systems and ultimately into open ocean environments. We argue that there is strong commonality between aspects of OM transformation in both terrestrial and marine systems and that our respective scientific communities would benefit from closer collaboration. PMID:26015089

  19. Complete and Integrated Pyrene Degradation Pathway in Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 Based on Systems Biology▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Jae; Kweon, Ohgew; Jones, Richard C.; Freeman, James P.; Edmondson, Ricky D.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 was the first bacterium isolated by virtue of its ability to metabolize the high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pyrene. We used metabolic, genomic, and proteomic approaches in this investigation to construct a complete and integrated pyrene degradation pathway for M. vanbaalenii PYR-1. Genome sequence analyses identified genes involved in the pyrene degradation pathway that we have proposed for this bacterium. To identify proteins involved in the degradation, we conducted a proteome analysis of cells exposed to pyrene using one-dimensional gel electrophoresis in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Database searching performed with the M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 genome resulted in identification of 1,028 proteins with a protein false discovery rate of <1%. Based on both genomic and proteomic data, we identified 27 enzymes necessary for constructing a complete pathway for pyrene degradation. Our analyses indicate that this bacterium degrades pyrene to central intermediates through o-phthalate and the β-ketoadipate pathway. Proteomic analysis also revealed that 18 enzymes in the pathway were upregulated more than twofold, as indicated by peptide counting when the organism was grown with pyrene; three copies of the terminal subunits of ring-hydroxylating oxygenase (NidAB2, MvanDraft_0817/0818, and PhtAaAb), dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (MvanDraft_0815), and ring cleavage dioxygenase (MvanDraft_3242) were detected only in pyrene-grown cells. The results presented here provide a comprehensive picture of pyrene metabolism in M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 and a useful framework for understanding cellular processes involved in PAH degradation. PMID:17085566

  20. Complete and integrated pyrene degradation pathway in Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 based on systems biology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Jae; Kweon, Ohgew; Jones, Richard C; Freeman, James P; Edmondson, Ricky D; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 was the first bacterium isolated by virtue of its ability to metabolize the high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pyrene. We used metabolic, genomic, and proteomic approaches in this investigation to construct a complete and integrated pyrene degradation pathway for M. vanbaalenii PYR-1. Genome sequence analyses identified genes involved in the pyrene degradation pathway that we have proposed for this bacterium. To identify proteins involved in the degradation, we conducted a proteome analysis of cells exposed to pyrene using one-dimensional gel electrophoresis in combination with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Database searching performed with the M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 genome resulted in identification of 1,028 proteins with a protein false discovery rate of <1%. Based on both genomic and proteomic data, we identified 27 enzymes necessary for constructing a complete pathway for pyrene degradation. Our analyses indicate that this bacterium degrades pyrene to central intermediates through o-phthalate and the beta-ketoadipate pathway. Proteomic analysis also revealed that 18 enzymes in the pathway were upregulated more than twofold, as indicated by peptide counting when the organism was grown with pyrene; three copies of the terminal subunits of ring-hydroxylating oxygenase (NidAB2, MvanDraft_0817/0818, and PhtAaAb), dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (MvanDraft_0815), and ring cleavage dioxygenase (MvanDraft_3242) were detected only in pyrene-grown cells. The results presented here provide a comprehensive picture of pyrene metabolism in M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 and a useful framework for understanding cellular processes involved in PAH degradation. PMID:17085566

  1. Different pathways of degradation of SP-A and saturated phosphatidylcholine by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Baritussio, A; Alberti, A; Armanini, D; Meloni, F; Bruttomesso, D

    2000-07-01

    Alveolar macrophages degrade surfactant protein (SP) A and saturated phosphatidycholine [dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC)]. To clarify this process, using rabbit alveolar macrophages, we analyzed the effect of drugs known to affect phagocytosis, pinocytosis, clathrin-mediated uptake, caveolae, the cytoskeleton, lysosomal pH, protein kinase C, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) on the degradation of SP-A and DPPC. We found the following: 1) SP-A binds to the plasma membrane, is rapidly internalized, and then moves toward degradative compartments. Uptake could be clathrin mediated, whereas phagocytosis, pinocytosis, or the use of caveolae are less likely. An intact cytoskeleton and an acidic milieu are necessary for the degradation of SP-A. 2) Stimulation of protein kinase C increases the degradation of SP-A. 3) PI3K influences the degradation of SP-A by regulating both the speed of internalization and subsequent intracellular steps, but its inhibition does not prevent SP-A from reaching the lysosomal compartment. 4) The degradation of DPPC is unaffected by most of the treatments able to influence the degradation of SP-A. Thus it appears that DPPC is degraded by alveolar macrophages through mechanisms very different from those utilized for the degradation of SP-A. PMID:10893207

  2. Mevalonic acid-dependent degradation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Correll, C C; Edwards, P A

    1994-01-01

    The microsomal enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is subject to rapid degradation when cells are incubated with sterols or mevalonic acid (MVA). It has been shown that this rapid degradation is dependent upon both a sterol and another MVA-derived metabolite (Nakanishi, M., Goldstein, J. L., and Brown, M. S. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 8929-8937). In the current study, inhibitors of the isoprene biosynthetic pathway were used to define further this mevalonic acid derivative involved in the accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase. The accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase in met-18b-2 cells, which is induced by the addition of MVA, was inhibited by the presence of the squalene synthase inhibitor, zaragozic acid/squalestatin, or the squalene epoxidase inhibitor, NB-598. Accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase was observed when NB-598-treated cells were incubated with both MVA and sterols. In contrast, the addition of MVA and sterols to zaragozic acid/squalestatin-treated cells did not result in rapid enzyme degradation. This MVA- and sterol-dependent degradation of HMG-CoA reductase persisted in cells permeabilized with reduced streptolysin O. Finally, the selective degradation of HMG-CoA reductase was also observed in rat hepatic microsomes incubated in vitro in the absence of ATP and cytosol. We conclude that the MVA-derived component that is required for the accelerated degradation of HMG-CoA reductase is derived from farnesyl disphosphate and/or squalene in the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway. We propose that this component has a permissive effect and does not, by itself, induce the degradation of HMG-CoA reductase. We also conclude that the degradation of HMG-CoA occurs in the endoplasmic reticulum, and, once the degradation of HMG-CoA reductase has been initiated by MVA and sterols, all necessary components for the continued degradation of HMG-CoA reductase reside in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:8276863

  3. Cellulose degradation in alkaline media upon acidic pretreatment and stabilisation.

    PubMed

    Testova, Lidia; Nieminen, Kaarlo; Penttilä, Paavo A; Serimaa, Ritva; Potthast, Antje; Sixta, Herbert

    2014-01-16

    The present study reports on a revised kinetic model for alkaline degradation of cellulose accounting for primary peeling/stopping reactions as well as for alkaline hydrolysis followed by secondary peeling. Oxalic acid pretreated cotton linters was utilised as the model substrate for the prehydrolysis-soda anthraquinone process. The main emphasis was investigating the effect of end-group stabilising additives such as sodium borohydride (BH), anthraquinone (AQ), and anthraquinone-2-sulphonic acid sodium salt (AQS) on the rates of the yield loss reactions. BH and AQS ensured a cellulose yield gain of 13% and 11%, respectively, compared to the reference. Both stabilisation agents decreased the content of the reducing end groups in the samples, while in the case of AQS stabilisation a 25% increase in carboxyl group content compared to the reference was also observed. As expected, the addition of end group stabilisers resulted in a significant decrease in the peeling-to-stopping rate constants ratio. PMID:24188853

  4. Degradation Network Reconstruction in Uric Acid and Ammonium Amendments in Oil-Degrading Marine Microcosms Guided by Metagenomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Bargiela, Rafael; Gertler, Christoph; Magagnini, Mirko; Mapelli, Francesca; Chen, Jianwei; Daffonchio, Daniele; Golyshin, Peter N.; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Biostimulation with different nitrogen sources is often regarded as a strategy of choice in combating oil spills in marine environments. Such environments are typically depleted in nitrogen, therefore limiting the balanced microbial utilization of carbon-rich petroleum constituents. It is fundamental, yet only scarcely accounted for, to analyze the catabolic consequences of application of biostimulants. Here, we examined such alterations in enrichment microcosms using sediments from chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediment at Ancona harbor (Italy) amended with natural fertilizer, uric acid (UA), or ammonium (AMM). We applied the web-based AromaDeg resource using as query Illumina HiSeq meta-sequences (UA: 27,893 open reading frames; AMM: 32,180) to identify potential catabolic differences. A total of 45 (for UA) and 65 (AMM) gene sequences encoding key catabolic enzymes matched AromaDeg, and their participation in aromatic degradation reactions could be unambiguously suggested. Genomic signatures for the degradation of aromatics such as 2-chlorobenzoate, indole-3-acetate, biphenyl, gentisate, quinoline and phenanthrene were common for both microcosms. However, those for the degradation of orcinol, ibuprofen, phenylpropionate, homoprotocatechuate and benzene (in UA) and 4-aminobenzene-sulfonate, p-cumate, dibenzofuran and phthalate (in AMM), were selectively enriched. Experimental validation was conducted and good agreement with predictions was observed. This suggests certain discrepancies in action of these biostimulants on the genomic content of the initial microbial community for the catabolism of petroleum constituents or aromatics pollutants. In both cases, the emerging microbial communities were phylogenetically highly similar and were composed by very same proteobacterial families. However, examination of taxonomic assignments further revealed different catabolic pathway organization at the organismal level, which should be considered for designing

  5. Degradation Network Reconstruction in Uric Acid and Ammonium Amendments in Oil-Degrading Marine Microcosms Guided by Metagenomic Data.

    PubMed

    Bargiela, Rafael; Gertler, Christoph; Magagnini, Mirko; Mapelli, Francesca; Chen, Jianwei; Daffonchio, Daniele; Golyshin, Peter N; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Biostimulation with different nitrogen sources is often regarded as a strategy of choice in combating oil spills in marine environments. Such environments are typically depleted in nitrogen, therefore limiting the balanced microbial utilization of carbon-rich petroleum constituents. It is fundamental, yet only scarcely accounted for, to analyze the catabolic consequences of application of biostimulants. Here, we examined such alterations in enrichment microcosms using sediments from chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediment at Ancona harbor (Italy) amended with natural fertilizer, uric acid (UA), or ammonium (AMM). We applied the web-based AromaDeg resource using as query Illumina HiSeq meta-sequences (UA: 27,893 open reading frames; AMM: 32,180) to identify potential catabolic differences. A total of 45 (for UA) and 65 (AMM) gene sequences encoding key catabolic enzymes matched AromaDeg, and their participation in aromatic degradation reactions could be unambiguously suggested. Genomic signatures for the degradation of aromatics such as 2-chlorobenzoate, indole-3-acetate, biphenyl, gentisate, quinoline and phenanthrene were common for both microcosms. However, those for the degradation of orcinol, ibuprofen, phenylpropionate, homoprotocatechuate and benzene (in UA) and 4-aminobenzene-sulfonate, p-cumate, dibenzofuran and phthalate (in AMM), were selectively enriched. Experimental validation was conducted and good agreement with predictions was observed. This suggests certain discrepancies in action of these biostimulants on the genomic content of the initial microbial community for the catabolism of petroleum constituents or aromatics pollutants. In both cases, the emerging microbial communities were phylogenetically highly similar and were composed by very same proteobacterial families. However, examination of taxonomic assignments further revealed different catabolic pathway organization at the organismal level, which should be considered for designing

  6. Microbial degradation of isosaccharinic acid at high pH

    PubMed Central

    Bassil, Naji M; Bryan, Nicholas; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate-level radioactive waste (ILW), which dominates the radioactive waste inventory in the United Kingdom on a volumetric basis, is proposed to be disposed of via a multibarrier deep geological disposal facility (GDF). ILW is a heterogeneous wasteform that contains substantial amounts of cellulosic material encased in concrete. Upon resaturation of the facility with groundwater, alkali conditions will dominate and will lead to the chemical degradation of cellulose, producing a substantial amount of organic co-contaminants, particularly isosaccharinic acid (ISA). ISA can form soluble complexes with radionuclides, thereby mobilising them and posing a potential threat to the surrounding environment or ‘far field'. Alkaliphilic microorganisms sampled from a legacy lime working site, which is an analogue for an ILW-GDF, were able to degrade ISA and couple this degradation to the reduction of electron acceptors that will dominate as the GDF progresses from an aerobic ‘open phase' through nitrate- and Fe(III)-reducing conditions post closure. Furthermore, pyrosequencing analyses showed that bacterial diversity declined as the reduction potential of the electron acceptor decreased and that more specialised organisms dominated under anaerobic conditions. These results imply that the microbial attenuation of ISA and comparable organic complexants, initially present or formed in situ, may play a role in reducing the mobility of radionuclides from an ILW-GDF, facilitating the reduction of undue pessimism in the long-term performance assessment of such facilities. PMID:25062127

  7. Degradation of endocytosed gap junctions by autophagosomal and endo-/lysosomal pathways: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Matthias M.; Fong, John T.; Kells, Rachael M.; O’Laughlin, Michael C.; Kowal, Tia J.; Thévenin, Anastasia F.

    2012-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) are composed of tens to many thousands of double-membrane spanning GJ channels that cluster together to form densely packed channel arrays (termed GJ plaques) in apposing plasma membranes of neighboring cells. In addition to providing direct intercellular communication (GJIC, their hallmark function), GJs, based on their characteristic double-membrane-spanning configuration, likely also significantly contribute to physical cell-to-cell adhesion. Clearly, modulation (up-/down-regulation) of GJIC and of physical cell-to-cell adhesion is as vitally important as the basic ability of GJ formation itself. Others and we have previously described that GJs can be removed from the plasma membrane via the internalization of entire GJ plaques (or portions thereof) in a cellular process that resembles clathrin-mediated endocytosis. GJ endocytosis results in the formation of double-membrane vesicles (termed annular gap junctions [AGJs] or connexosomes) in the cytoplasm of one of the coupled cells. Four recent independent studies, consistent with earlier ultrastructural analyses, demonstrate the degradation of endocytosed AGJ vesicles via autophagy. However, in TPA-treated cells others report degradation of AGJs via the endo-/lysosomal degradation pathway. Here we summarize evidence that supports the concept that autophagy serves as the cellular default pathway for the degradation of internalized GJs. Furthermore, we highlight and discuss structural criteria that seem required for an alternate degradation via the endo-/lysosomal pathway. PMID:22825714

  8. Opposing effects of bile acids deoxycholic acid and ursodeoxycholic acid on signal transduction pathways in oesophageal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M; Inoue, Hiroyasu; Reynolds, John V

    2016-09-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) was reported to reduce bile acid toxicity, but the mechanisms underlying its cytoprotective effects are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of UDCA on the modulation of deoxycholic acid (DCA)-induced signal transduction in oesophageal cancer cells. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) activity was assessed using a gel shift assay. NF-κB activation and translocation was performed using an ELISA-based assay and immunofluorescence analysis. COX-2 expression was analysed by western blotting and COX-2 promoter activity was assessed by luciferase assay. DCA induced NF-κB and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in SKGT-4 and OE33 cells. UDCA pretreatment inhibited DCA-induced NF-κB and AP-1 activation and NF-κB translocation. This inhibitory effect was coupled with a blockade of IκB-α degradation and inhibition of phosphorylation of IKK-α/β and ERK1/2. Moreover, UDCA pretreatment inhibited COX-2 upregulation. Using transient transfection of the COX-2 promoter, UDCA pretreatment abrogated DCA-induced COX-2 promoter activation. In addition, UDCA protected oesophageal cells from the apoptotic effects of deoxycholate. Our findings indicate that UDCA inhibits DCA-induced signalling pathways in oesophageal cancer cells. These data indicate a possible mechanistic role for the chemopreventive actions of UDCA in oesophageal carcinogenesis. PMID:26378497

  9. Reconstructing metabolic pathways of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Nina; Donaho, John A; Gutierrez, Tony; Seitz, Kiley W; Teske, Andreas P; Baker, Brett J

    2016-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, one of the largest marine oil spills(1), changed bacterial communities in the water column and sediment as they responded to complex hydrocarbon mixtures(2-4). Shifts in community composition have been correlated to the microbial degradation and use of hydrocarbons(2,5,6), but the full genetic potential and taxon-specific metabolisms of bacterial hydrocarbon degraders remain unresolved. Here, we have reconstructed draft genomes of marine bacteria enriched from sea surface and deep plume waters of the spill that assimilate alkane and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons during stable-isotope probing experiments, and we identify genes of hydrocarbon degradation pathways. Alkane degradation genes were ubiquitous in the assembled genomes. Marinobacter was enriched with n-hexadecane, and uncultured Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria populations were enriched in the polycyclic-aromatic-hydrocarbon-degrading communities and contained a broad gene set for degrading phenanthrene and naphthalene. The repertoire of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon use varied among different bacterial taxa and the combined capabilities of the microbial community exceeded those of its individual components, indicating that the degradation of complex hydrocarbon mixtures requires the non-redundant capabilities of a complex oil-degrading community. PMID:27572965

  10. Degradation of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid by photoassisted Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Acero, L L; Benítez, F J; Real, F J; Leal, A I

    2001-01-01

    The chemical decomposition of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, a phenolic pollutant present in agro-industrial plant effluents, has been investigated by means of the Fenton's reaction and the photoassisted Fenton's reaction, the so-called photo-Fenton system. The degradation levels achieved have been compared to those obtained by applying other Advanced Oxidation Processes, such as the combination UV/H2O2. The optimum pH to carry out the decomposition of this organic compound by either Fenton or photo-Fenton systems was found to be pH = 3. The presence of buffers such as phosphate impedes these processes due to the formation of ferric complexes. A reaction mechanism, which allows calculating the contribution of the radical reaction to the global process, has been proposed. According to this mechanism, the dominant way of degradation of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid is through its reaction with the OH radicals originated in the photolysis of H2O2 and, especially, in the Fenton's reaction. PMID:11695475

  11. OXIDATIVE DEGRADATION OF ORGANIC ACIDS CONJUGATED WITH SULFITE OXIDATION IN FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation under flue gas desulfurization (FGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k12, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate times th...

  12. New hydrocarbon degradation pathways in the microbial metagenome from Brazilian petroleum reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Sierra-García, Isabel Natalia; Correa Alvarez, Javier; de Vasconcellos, Suzan Pantaroto; Pereira de Souza, Anete; dos Santos Neto, Eugenio Vaz; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic pathways involved in hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum reservoirs is still limited, mostly due to the difficulty in recovering the complex community from such an extreme environment. Metagenomics is a valuable tool to investigate the genetic and functional diversity of previously uncultured microorganisms in natural environments. Using a function-driven metagenomic approach, we investigated the metabolic abilities of microbial communities in oil reservoirs. Here, we describe novel functional metabolic pathways involved in the biodegradation of aromatic compounds in a metagenomic library obtained from an oil reservoir. Although many of the deduced proteins shared homology with known enzymes of different well-described aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways, the metagenomic fragments did not contain the complete clusters known to be involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Instead, the metagenomic fragments comprised genes belonging to different pathways, showing novel gene arrangements. These results reinforce the potential of the metagenomic approach for the identification and elucidation of new genes and pathways in poorly studied environments and contribute to a broader perspective on the hydrocarbon degradation processes in petroleum reservoirs. PMID:24587220

  13. New Hydrocarbon Degradation Pathways in the Microbial Metagenome from Brazilian Petroleum Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-García, Isabel Natalia; Correa Alvarez, Javier; Pantaroto de Vasconcellos, Suzan; Pereira de Souza, Anete; dos Santos Neto, Eugenio Vaz; de Oliveira, Valéria Maia

    2014-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial diversity and metabolic pathways involved in hydrocarbon degradation in petroleum reservoirs is still limited, mostly due to the difficulty in recovering the complex community from such an extreme environment. Metagenomics is a valuable tool to investigate the genetic and functional diversity of previously uncultured microorganisms in natural environments. Using a function-driven metagenomic approach, we investigated the metabolic abilities of microbial communities in oil reservoirs. Here, we describe novel functional metabolic pathways involved in the biodegradation of aromatic compounds in a metagenomic library obtained from an oil reservoir. Although many of the deduced proteins shared homology with known enzymes of different well-described aerobic and anaerobic catabolic pathways, the metagenomic fragments did not contain the complete clusters known to be involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Instead, the metagenomic fragments comprised genes belonging to different pathways, showing novel gene arrangements. These results reinforce the potential of the metagenomic approach for the identification and elucidation of new genes and pathways in poorly studied environments and contribute to a broader perspective on the hydrocarbon degradation processes in petroleum reservoirs. PMID:24587220

  14. Impact of degrading permafrost on subsurface solute transport pathways and travel times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Andrew; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-09-01

    Subsurface solute transport under surface warming and degrading permafrost conditions is studied using a physically based model of coupled cryotic and hydrogeological flow processes combined with a particle tracking method. Changes in the subsurface water and inert solute pathways and travel times are analyzed for different modeled geological configurations. For all simulated cases, the minimum and mean travel times increase nonlinearly with warming irrespective of geological configuration and heterogeneity structure. The timing of the start of increase in travel time depends on heterogeneity structure, combined with the rate of permafrost degradation that also depends on material thermal and hydrogeological properties. The travel time changes depend on combined warming effects of: i) increase in pathway length due to deepening of the active layer, ii) reduced transport velocities due to a shift from horizontal saturated groundwater flow near the surface to vertical water percolation deeper into the subsurface, and iii) pathway length increase and temporary immobilization caused by cryosuction-induced seasonal freeze cycles.

  15. Degradation of Serotonin N-Acetyltransferase, a Circadian Regulator, by the N-end Rule Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wadas, Brandon; Borjigin, Jimo; Huang, Zheping; Oh, Jang-Hyun; Hwang, Cheol-Sang; Varshavsky, Alexander

    2016-08-12

    Serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) converts serotonin to N-acetylserotonin (NAS), a distinct biological regulator and the immediate precursor of melatonin, a circulating hormone that influences circadian processes, including sleep. N-terminal sequences of AANAT enzymes vary among vertebrates. Mechanisms that regulate the levels of AANAT are incompletely understood. Previous findings were consistent with the possibility that AANAT may be controlled through its degradation by the N-end rule pathway. By expressing the rat and human AANATs and their mutants not only in mammalian cells but also in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and by taking advantage of yeast genetics, we show here that two "complementary" forms of rat AANAT are targeted for degradation by two "complementary" branches of the N-end rule pathway. Specifically, the N(α)-terminally acetylated (Nt-acetylated) Ac-AANAT is destroyed through the recognition of its Nt-acetylated N-terminal Met residue by the Ac/N-end rule pathway, whereas the non-Nt-acetylated AANAT is targeted by the Arg/N-end rule pathway, which recognizes the unacetylated N-terminal Met-Leu sequence of rat AANAT. We also show, by constructing lysine-to-arginine mutants of rat AANAT, that its degradation is mediated by polyubiquitylation of its Lys residue(s). Human AANAT, whose N-terminal sequence differs from that of rodent AANATs, is longer-lived than its rat counterpart and appears to be refractory to degradation by the N-end rule pathway. Together, these and related results indicate both a major involvement of the N-end rule pathway in the control of rodent AANATs and substantial differences in the regulation of rodent and human AANATs that stem from differences in their N-terminal sequences. PMID:27339900

  16. A Non-canonical RNA Silencing Pathway Promotes mRNA Degradation in Basal Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Nicolás, Francisco E.; Vila, Ana; Moxon, Simon; Dalmay, Tamas; Torres-Martínez, Santiago; Garre, Victoriano; Ruiz-Vázquez, Rosa M.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing knowledge on the functional relevance of endogenous small RNAs (esRNAs) as riboregulators has stimulated the identification and characterization of these molecules in numerous eukaryotes. In the basal fungus Mucor circinelloides, an emerging opportunistic human pathogen, esRNAs that regulate the expression of many protein coding genes have been described. These esRNAs share common machinery for their biogenesis consisting of an RNase III endonuclease Dicer, a single Argonaute protein and two RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. We show in this study that, besides participating in this canonical dicer-dependent RNA interference (RNAi) pathway, the rdrp genes are involved in a novel dicer-independent degradation process of endogenous mRNAs. The analysis of esRNAs accumulated in wild type and silencing mutants demonstrates that this new rdrp-dependent dicer-independent regulatory pathway, which does not produce sRNA molecules of discrete sizes, controls the expression of target genes promoting the specific degradation of mRNAs by a previously unknown RNase. This pathway mainly regulates conserved genes involved in metabolism and cellular processes and signaling, such as those required for heme biosynthesis, and controls responses to specific environmental signals. Searching the Mucor genome for candidate RNases to participate in this pathway, and functional analysis of the corresponding knockout mutants, identified a new protein, R3B2. This RNase III-like protein presents unique domain architecture, it is specifically found in basal fungi and, besides its relevant role in the rdrp-dependent dicer-independent pathway, it is also involved in the canonical dicer-dependent RNAi pathway, highlighting its crucial role in the biogenesis and function of regulatory esRNAs. The involvement of RdRPs in RNA degradation could represent the first evolutionary step towards the development of an RNAi mechanism and constitutes a genetic link between mRNA degradation and post

  17. Increase of betulinic acid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by balancing fatty acids and betulinic acid forming pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Yansheng

    2014-04-01

    Betulinic acid is a plant-based triterpenoid that has been recognized for its antitumor and anti-HIV activities. The level of betulinic acid in its natural hosts is extremely low. In the present study, we constructed betulinic acid biosynthetic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by metabolic engineering. Given the betulinic acid forming pathways sharing the common substrate acetyl-CoA with fatty acid synthesis, the metabolic fluxes between the two pathways were varied by changing gene expressions, and their effects on betulinic acid production were investigated. We constructed nine S. cerevisiae strains representing nine combinations of the flux distributions between betulinic acid and fatty acid pathways. Our results demonstrated that it was possible to improve the betulinic acid production in S. cerevisiae while keeping a desirable growth phenotype by optimally balancing the carbon fluxes of the two pathways. Through modulating the expressions of the key genes on betulinic acid and fatty acid pathways, the difference in betulinic acid yield varied largely in the range of 0.01-1.92 mg L(-1) OD(-1). The metabolic engineering approach used in this study could be extended for synthesizing other triterpenoids in S. cerevisiae. PMID:24389702

  18. D-Galacturonic Acid: A Highly Reactive Compound in Nonenzymatic Browning. 2. Formation of Amino-Specific Degradation Products.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Steffen; Bornik, Maria-Anna; Kroh, Lothar W

    2015-07-22

    Thermal treatment of aqueous solutions of D-galacturonic acid and L-alanine at pH 3, 5, and 8 led to rapid and more intensive nonenzymatic browning reactions compared to similar solutions of other uronic acids and to Maillard reactions of reducing sugars. The hemiacetal ring structures of uronic acids had a high impact on browning behavior and reaction pathways. Besides reductic acid (1,2-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one), 4,5-dihydroxy-2-cyclopenten-1-one (DHCP), furan-2-carboxaldehyde, and norfuraneol (4-hydroxy-5-methyl-3-(2H)-furanone) could be detected as typical products of nonenzymatic uronic acid browning reactions. 2-(2-Formyl-1H-pyrrole-1-yl)propanoic acid (FPA) and 1-(1-carboxyethyl)-3-hydroxypyridin-1-ium (HPA) were identified as specific reaction products of uronic acids with amine participation like l-alanine. In contrast, the structurally related D-galacturonic acid methyl ester showed less browning activity and degradation under equal reaction conditions. Pectin-specific degradation products such as 5-formyl-2-furanoic acid and 2-furanoic acid were found but could not be verified for d-galacturonic acid monomers alone. PMID:26111613

  19. Degradation kinetics and pathway of phenol by Pseudomonas and Bacillus species

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Syed Adnan; Jabeen, Suraiya

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates that strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa (IES-Ps-1) is a versatile toxic organic compound degrader. With the degradation of malathion and cypermethrin (studied by other researchers previously), this strain was able to degrade phenol. Two other indigenous soil flora (i.e., Pseudomonas sp. (IES-S) and Bacillus subtilis (IES-B)) were also found to be potential phenol degraders. Phenol was degraded with Monod kinetics during growth in nutrient broth and mineral salts medium. Before entering into the growth inhibition phase, strains IES-Ps-1, IES-S and IES-B could tolerate up to 400, 700 and 500 mg/L phenol, respectively, when contained in nutrient broth. However, according to the Luong–Levenspiel model, the growth of strains IES-Ps-1, IES-S and IES-B would cease at 2000, 2174 and 2190 mg/L phenol, respectively. Strain IES-Ps-1 degraded 700, 900 and 1050 mg/L phenol contained in mineral salts medium with the specific rates of 0.034, 0.075 and 0.021 h−1, respectively. All these strains grew by making clusters when exposed to phenol in order to prevent damages due to high substrate concentration. These strains transformed phenol into catechol, which was then degraded via ortho-cleavage pathway. PMID:26740787

  20. Characterization of Two Novel Propachlor Degradation Pathways in Two Species of Soil Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Margarita; Mengs, Gerardo; Allende, Jose Luis; Fernandez, Javier; Alonso, Ramon; Ferrer, Estrella

    1999-01-01

    Propachlor (2-chloro-N-isopropylacetanilide) is an acetamide herbicide used in preemergence. In this study, we isolated and characterized a soil bacterium, Acinetobacter strain BEM2, that was able to utilize this herbicide as the sole and limiting carbon source. Identification of the intermediates of propachlor degradation by this strain and characterization of new metabolites in the degradation of propachlor by a previously reported strain of Pseudomonas (PEM1) support two different propachlor degradation pathways. Washed-cell suspensions of strain PEM1 with propachlor accumulated N-isopropylacetanilide, acetanilide, acetamide, and catechol. Pseudomonas strain PEM1 grew on propachlor with a generation time of 3.4 h and a Ks of 0.17 ± 0.04 mM. Acinetobacter strain BEM2 grew on propachlor with a generation time of 3.1 h and a Ks of 0.3 ± 0.07 mM. Incubations with strain BEM2 resulted in accumulation of N-isopropylacetanilide, N-isopropylaniline, isopropylamine, and catechol. Both degradative pathways were inducible, and the principal product of the carbon atoms in the propachlor ring was carbon dioxide. These results and biodegradation experiments with the identified metabolites indicate that metabolism of propachlor by Pseudomonas sp. strain PEM1 proceeds through a different pathway from metabolism by Acinetobacter sp. strain BEM2. PMID:9925619

  1. Phenolic acid degradation potential and growth behavior of lactic acid bacteria in sunflower substrates.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Caroline; Heinrich, Veronika; Vogel, Rudi F; Toelstede, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Sunflower flour provides a high content of protein with a well-balanced amino acid composition and is therefore regarded as an attractive source for protein. The use for human nutrition is hindered by phenolic compounds, mainly chlorogenic acid, which can lead under specific circumstances to undesirable discolorations. In this study, growth behavior and degradation ability of chlorogenic acid of four lactic acid bacteria were explored. Data suggested that significant higher fermentation performances on sunflower flour as compared to sunflower protein concentrate were reached by Lactobacillus plantarum, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus gasseri and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. In fermentation with the latter two strains reduced amounts of chlorogenic acid were observed in sunflower flour (-11.4% and -19.8%, respectively), which were more pronounced in the protein concentrate (-50.7% and -95.6%, respectively). High tolerances against chlorogenic acid and the cleavage product quinic acid with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥20.48 mg/ml after 48 h were recorded for all strains except Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, which was more sensitive. The second cleavage compound, caffeic acid revealed a higher antimicrobial potential with MIC values of 0.64-5.12 mg/ml. In this proof of concept study, degradation versus inhibitory effect suggest the existence of basic mechanisms of interaction between phenolic acids in sunflower and lactic acid bacteria and a feasible way to reduce the chlorogenic acid content, which may help to avoid undesired color changes. PMID:27052717

  2. Combination of degradation pathways for naphthalene utilization in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Gallardo, Laura; Gómez-Álvarez, Helena; Santero, Eduardo; Floriano, Belén

    2014-03-01

    Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB is a metabolic versatile bacterium able to grow on naphthalene as the only carbon and energy source. Applying proteomic, genetic and biochemical approaches, we propose in this paper that, at least, three coordinated but independently regulated set of genes are combined to degrade naphthalene in TFB. First, proteins involved in tetralin degradation are also induced by naphthalene and may carry out its conversion to salicylaldehyde. This is the only part of the naphthalene degradation pathway showing glucose catabolite repression. Second, a salicylaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that converts salicylaldehyde to salicylate is detected in naphthalene-grown cells but not in tetralin- or salicylate-grown cells. Finally, we describe the chromosomally located nag genes, encoding the gentisate pathway for salicylate conversion into fumarate and pyruvate, which are only induced by salicylate and not by naphthalene. This work shows how biodegradation pathways in Rhodococcus sp. strain TFB could be assembled using elements from different pathways mainly because of the laxity of the regulatory systems and the broad specificity of the catabolic enzymes. PMID:24325207

  3. Characterization of a new degradation product of nifedipine formed on catalysis by atenolol: A typical case of alteration of degradation pathway of one drug by another.

    PubMed

    Handa, Tarun; Singh, Saranjit; Singh, Inder Pal

    2014-02-01

    An increasing interest is being shown throughout the world on the use of fixed-dose combinations of drugs in the therapy of select diseases, like cardiovascular diseases, due to their multiple advantages. Though the main criterion for combining drugs in a single dosage form is the rationale, but consideration like stability of formulation is equally important, due to an added aspect of drug-drug interaction. The objective of this study was to evaluate interaction among the drugs in an antihypertensive combination of nifedipine and atenolol. Nifedipine is a known light sensitive drug, which degrades via intra-molecular mechanisms to nitro- and nitroso-pyridine analogs, along with a few minor secondary products that are formed through inter-molecular interactions amongst primary degradation products and their intermediates. Atenolol is reasonably stable weakly basic drug that is mainly hydrolyzed at acetamide terminal amide moiety to its corresponding carboxylic acid. To the best of our knowledge, there is no known information on chemical compatibility among the two drugs. The present study involved subjecting of nifedipine, atenolol and their combination to a variety of accelerated and stress conditions. HPLC studies revealed formation of a new product in the mixture of two drugs (∼2%), which was also generated from nifedipine alone, but at trace levels (<0.1%). The product was isolated by preparative chromatography and subjected to indepth studies for its characterization. Ultra-violet, FT-IR, mass spectrometric and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies highlighted that the principal photo-degradation pathway of nifedipine was modified and diverted in the presence of atenolol. To verify the same, a study was conducted employing two other β-blockers with similar structures to atenolol, and the same product was formed in relatively higher quantity therein also. The new product is postulated to be produced as a result of rearrangement of hydroxylamine

  4. Docosahexaenoic acid ester degradation measured by FTIR-ATR with correlation spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Highly unsaturated fatty acids such as docosahexaenoic acid and linolenic acid are prone to oxidation with a resulting loss of bioactivity and generation of malodorous degradation compounds. Degradation proceeds by formation of the corresponding hydroperoxyl free radical with subsequent oxidative cl...

  5. Metagenomic identification of bacterioplankton taxa and pathways involved in microcystin degradation in lake erie.

    PubMed

    Mou, Xiaozhen; Lu, Xinxin; Jacob, Jisha; Sun, Shulei; Heath, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs) that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments. However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera) and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax) of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr) were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation. Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems. PMID:23637924

  6. A functional 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathway in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris is required for full pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jia-Yuan; Zhou, Lian; Chen, Bo; Sun, Shuang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ming; Tang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Plants contain significant levels of natural phenolic compounds essential for reproduction and growth, as well as defense mechanisms against pathogens. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of crucifers black rot. Here we showed that genes required for the synthesis, utilization, transportation, and degradation of 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) are present in Xcc. Xcc rapidly degrades 4-HBA, but has no effect on 2-hydroxybenzoate and 3-hydroxybenzoate when grown in XOLN medium. The genes for 4-HBA degradation are organized in a superoperonic cluster. Bioinformatics, biochemical, and genetic data showed that 4-HBA is hydroxylated by 4-HBA 3-hydroxylase (PobA), which is encoded by Xcc0356, to yield PCA. The resulting PCA is further metabolized via the PCA branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway, including Xcc0364, Xcc0365, and PcaFHGBDCR. Xcc0364 and Xcc0365 encode a new form of β-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase that is required for 4-HBA degradation. pobA expression was induced by 4-HBA via the transcriptional activator, PobR. Radish and cabbage hydrolysates contain 2-HBA, 3-HBA, 4-HBA, and other phenolic compounds. Addition of radish and cabbage hydrolysates to Xcc culture significantly induced the expression of pobA via PobR. The 4-HBA degradation pathway is required for full pathogenicity of Xcc in radish. PMID:26672484

  7. Catalytic thermolysis in treating Cibacron Blue in aqueous solution: Kinetics and degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Claire Xin-Hui; Teng, Tjoon-Tow; Wong, Yee-Shian; Morad, Norhashimah; Rafatullah, Mohd

    2016-03-01

    A thermal degradation pathway of the decolourisation of Reactive Cibacron Blue F3GA (RCB) in aqueous solution through catalytic thermolysis is established. Catalytic thermolysis is suitable for the removal of dyes from wastewater as it breaks down the complex dye molecules instead of only transferring them into another phase. RCB is a reactive dye that consists of three main groups, namely anthraquinone, benzene and triazine groups. Through catalytic thermolysis, the bonds that hold the three groups together were effectively broken and at the same time, the complex molecules degraded to form simple molecules of lower molecular weight. The degradation pathway and products were characterized and determined through UV-Vis, FT-IR and GCMS analysis. RCB dye molecule was successfully broken down into simpler molecules, namely, benzene derivatives, amines and triazine. The addition of copper sulphate, CuSO4, as a catalyst, hastens the thermal degradation of RCB by aiding in the breakdown of large, complex molecules. At pH 2 and catalyst mass loading of 5 g/L, an optimum colour removal of 66.14% was observed. The degradation rate of RCB is well explained by first order kinetics model. PMID:26741557

  8. Degradation kinetics and pathways of three calcium channel blockers under UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Zonja, Bozo; Gonzalez, Oscar; Sans, Carme; Pérez, Sandra; Barceló, Damia; Esplugas, Santiago; Xu, Ke; Qiang, Zhimin

    2015-12-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are a group of pharmaceuticals widely prescribed to lower blood pressure and treat heart diseases. They have been frequently detected in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents and downstream river waters, thus inducing a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems. However, little is known about the behavior and fate of CCBs under UV irradiation, which has been adopted as a primary disinfection method for WWTP effluents. This study investigated the degradation kinetics and pathways of three commonly-used CCBs, including amlodipine (AML), diltiazem (DIL), and verapamil (VER), under UV (254 nm) irradiation. The chemical structures of transformation byproducts (TBPs) were first identified to assess the potential ecological hazards. On that basis, a generic solid-phase extraction method, which simultaneously used four different cartridges, was adopted to extract and enrich the TBPs. Thereafter, the photo-degradation of target CCBs was performed under UV fluences typical for WWTP effluent disinfection. The degradation of all three CCBs conformed to the pseudo-first-order kinetics, with rate constants of 0.031, 0.044 and 0.011 min(-1) for AML, DIL and VER, respectively. By comparing the MS(2) fragments and the evolution (i.e., formation or decay) trends of identified TBPs, the degradation pathways were proposed. In the WWTP effluent, although the target CCBs could be degraded, several TBPs still contained the functional pharmacophores and reached peak concentrations under UV fluences of 40-100 mJ cm(-2). PMID:26003333

  9. Metagenomic Identification of Bacterioplankton Taxa and Pathways Involved in Microcystin Degradation in Lake Erie

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Xiaozhen; Lu, Xinxin; Jacob, Jisha; Sun, Shulei; Heath, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful blooms (CyanoHABs) that produce microcystins are appearing in an increasing number of freshwater ecosystems worldwide, damaging quality of water for use by human and aquatic life. Heterotrophic bacteria assemblages are thought to be important in transforming and detoxifying microcystins in natural environments. However, little is known about their taxonomic composition or pathways involved in the process. To address this knowledge gap, we compared the metagenomes of Lake Erie free-living bacterioplankton assemblages in laboratory microcosms amended with microcystins relative to unamended controls. A diverse array of bacterial phyla were responsive to elevated supply of microcystins, including Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria of the alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon subdivisions and Verrucomicrobia. At more detailed taxonomic levels, Methylophilales (mainly in genus Methylotenera) and Burkholderiales (mainly in genera Bordetella, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus, Polaromonas, Ralstonia, Polynucleobacter and Variovorax) of Betaproteobacteria were suggested to be more important in microcystin degradation than Sphingomonadales of Alphaproteobacteria. The latter taxa were previously thought to be major microcystin degraders. Homologs to known microcystin-degrading genes (mlr) were not overrepresented in microcystin-amended metagenomes, indicating that Lake Erie bacterioplankton might employ alternative genes and/or pathways in microcystin degradation. Genes for xenobiotic metabolism were overrepresented in microcystin-amended microcosms, suggesting they are important in bacterial degradation of microcystin, a phenomenon that has been identified previously only in eukaryotic systems. PMID:23637924

  10. Degradation of ibuprofen by hydrodynamic cavitation: Reaction pathways and effect of operational parameters.

    PubMed

    Musmarra, Dino; Prisciandaro, Marina; Capocelli, Mauro; Karatza, Despina; Iovino, Pasquale; Canzano, Silvana; Lancia, Amedeo

    2016-03-01

    Ibuprofen (IBP) is an anti-inflammatory drug whose residues can be found worldwide in natural water bodies resulting in harmful effects to aquatic species even at low concentrations. This paper deals with the degradation of IBP in water by hydrodynamic cavitation in a convergent-divergent nozzle. Over 60% of ibuprofen was degraded in 60 min with an electrical energy per order (EEO) of 10.77 kWh m(-3) at an initial concentration of 200 μg L(-1) and a relative inlet pressure pin=0.35 MPa. Five intermediates generated from different hydroxylation reactions were identified; the potential mechanisms of degradation were sketched and discussed. The reaction pathways recognized are in line with the relevant literature, both experimental and theoretical. By varying the pressure upstream the constriction, different degradation rates were observed. This effect was discussed according to a numerical simulation of the hydroxyl radical production identifying a clear correspondence between the maximum kinetic constant kOH and the maximum calculated OH production. Furthermore, in the investigated experimental conditions, the pH parameter was found not to affect the extent of degradation; this peculiar feature agrees with a recently published kinetic insight and has been explained in the light of the intermediates of the different reaction pathways. PMID:26584987

  11. A functional 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation pathway in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris is required for full pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Yuan; Zhou, Lian; Chen, Bo; Sun, Shuang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ming; Tang, Hongzhi; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Ji-Liang; He, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Plants contain significant levels of natural phenolic compounds essential for reproduction and growth, as well as defense mechanisms against pathogens. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc) is the causal agent of crucifers black rot. Here we showed that genes required for the synthesis, utilization, transportation, and degradation of 4-hydroxybenzoate (4-HBA) are present in Xcc. Xcc rapidly degrades 4-HBA, but has no effect on 2-hydroxybenzoate and 3-hydroxybenzoate when grown in XOLN medium. The genes for 4-HBA degradation are organized in a superoperonic cluster. Bioinformatics, biochemical, and genetic data showed that 4-HBA is hydroxylated by 4-HBA 3-hydroxylase (PobA), which is encoded by Xcc0356, to yield PCA. The resulting PCA is further metabolized via the PCA branches of the β-ketoadipate pathway, including Xcc0364, Xcc0365, and PcaFHGBDCR. Xcc0364 and Xcc0365 encode a new form of β-ketoadipate succinyl-coenzyme A transferase that is required for 4-HBA degradation. pobA expression was induced by 4-HBA via the transcriptional activator, PobR. Radish and cabbage hydrolysates contain 2-HBA, 3-HBA, 4-HBA, and other phenolic compounds. Addition of radish and cabbage hydrolysates to Xcc culture significantly induced the expression of pobA via PobR. The 4-HBA degradation pathway is required for full pathogenicity of Xcc in radish. PMID:26672484

  12. Synergetic stress of acids and ammonium on the shift in the methanogenic pathways during thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organics.

    PubMed

    Lü, Fan; Hao, Liping; Guan, Dongxing; Qi, Yujiao; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2013-05-01

    Combined effects of acids and ammonium on functional pathway and microbial structure during organics methanization were investigated by stable isotopic method and quantitative PCR. The results showed that the stress from acids and ammonium was synergetic, resulted in different inhibition for acetoclastic and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and syntrophic acetate oxidation, leading to pathway shift. Methane production from acetate was affected more by acetate than by ammonium until the ammonium concentration reached 6-7 g-N/L. When the ammonium concentration exceeded 6 g-N/L, ammonium inhibition was strengthened by the increased concentration of acetate. At a low acetate concentration (50 mmol/L), acetoclastic methanogenesis dominated, regardless of ammonium concentration. At higher acetate concentrations (150 and 250 mmol/L) and at low-medium ammonium levels (1-4 g-N/L), acetate was mainly degraded by acetoclastic methanogenesis, while residual acetate was degraded by a combination of acetoclastic methanogenesis and the syntrophic reaction of syntrophic acetate oxidization and hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis with the latter dominating at 250 mmol/L acetate. At high ammonium levels (6-7 g-N/L), the degradation of acetate in the 150 mmol/L treatment was firstly through a combination of acetoclastic methanogenesis and the syntrophic pathway and then gradually shifted to the syntrophic pathway, while the degradation of acetate in the 250 mmol/L treatment was completely by the syntrophic pathway. PMID:23434042

  13. Candida albicans Utilizes a Modified β-Oxidation Pathway for the Degradation of Toxic Propionyl-CoA*

    PubMed Central

    Otzen, Christian; Bardl, Bettina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Nett, Markus; Brock, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Propionyl-CoA arises as a metabolic intermediate from the degradation of propionate, odd-chain fatty acids, and some amino acids. Thus, pathways for catabolism of this intermediate have evolved in all kingdoms of life, preventing the accumulation of toxic propionyl-CoA concentrations. Previous studies have shown that fungi generally use the methyl citrate cycle for propionyl-CoA degradation. Here, we show that this is not the case for the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans despite its ability to use propionate and valerate as carbon sources. Comparative proteome analyses suggested the presence of a modified β-oxidation pathway with the key intermediate 3-hydroxypropionate. Gene deletion analyses confirmed that the enoyl-CoA hydratase/dehydrogenase Fox2p, the putative 3-hydroxypropionyl-CoA hydrolase Ehd3p, the 3-hydroxypropionate dehydrogenase Hpd1p, and the putative malonate semialdehyde dehydrogenase Ald6p essentially contribute to propionyl-CoA degradation and its conversion to acetyl-CoA. The function of Hpd1p was further supported by the detection of accumulating 3-hydroxypropionate in the hpd1 mutant on propionyl-CoA-generating nutrients. Substrate specificity of Hpd1p was determined from recombinant purified enzyme, which revealed a preference for 3-hydroxypropionate, although serine and 3-hydroxyisobutyrate could also serve as substrates. Finally, virulence studies in a murine sepsis model revealed attenuated virulence of the hpd1 mutant, which indicates generation of propionyl-CoA from host-provided nutrients during infection. PMID:24497638

  14. Role of the fatty acid breakdown pathway in the leaf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Components of the lipid breakdown pathway including beta-oxidation enzymes and fatty acid transport mechanisms are essential for mobilizing storage lipid in germinating seeds of many plants. Comparatively little is known about their role during the rest of the plant’s life-time, however. We are cur...

  15. Clostridium sticklandii, a specialist in amino acid degradation:revisiting its metabolism through its genome sequence

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Clostridium sticklandii belongs to a cluster of non-pathogenic proteolytic clostridia which utilize amino acids as carbon and energy sources. Isolated by T.C. Stadtman in 1954, it has been generally regarded as a "gold mine" for novel biochemical reactions and is used as a model organism for studying metabolic aspects such as the Stickland reaction, coenzyme-B12- and selenium-dependent reactions of amino acids. With the goal of revisiting its carbon, nitrogen, and energy metabolism, and comparing studies with other clostridia, its genome has been sequenced and analyzed. Results C. sticklandii is one of the best biochemically studied proteolytic clostridial species. Useful additional information has been obtained from the sequencing and annotation of its genome, which is presented in this paper. Besides, experimental procedures reveal that C. sticklandii degrades amino acids in a preferential and sequential way. The organism prefers threonine, arginine, serine, cysteine, proline, and glycine, whereas glutamate, aspartate and alanine are excreted. Energy conservation is primarily obtained by substrate-level phosphorylation in fermentative pathways. The reactions catalyzed by different ferredoxin oxidoreductases and the exergonic NADH-dependent reduction of crotonyl-CoA point to a possible chemiosmotic energy conservation via the Rnf complex. C. sticklandii possesses both the F-type and V-type ATPases. The discovery of an as yet unrecognized selenoprotein in the D-proline reductase operon suggests a more detailed mechanism for NADH-dependent D-proline reduction. A rather unusual metabolic feature is the presence of genes for all the enzymes involved in two different CO2-fixation pathways: C. sticklandii harbours both the glycine synthase/glycine reductase and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathways. This unusual pathway combination has retrospectively been observed in only four other sequenced microorganisms. Conclusions Analysis of the C. sticklandii genome and

  16. A novel denitrifying bacterial isolate that degrades trimethylamine both aerobically and anaerobically via two different pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, S G; Bae, H S; Lee, S T

    2001-10-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic degradation of trimethylamine by a newly isolated denitrifying bacterium from an enrichment culture with trimethylamine inoculated with activated sludge was studied. Based on 16S rDNA analysis, this strain was identified as a Paracoccus sp. The isolate, strain T231, aerobically degraded trimethylamine, dimethylamine and methylamine and released a stoichiometric amount of ammonium ion into the culture fluid as a metabolic product, indicating that these methylated amines were completely degraded to formaldehyde and ammonia. The strain degraded trimethylamine also under denitrifying conditions and consumed a stoichiometric amount of nitrate, demonstrating that complete degradation of trimethylamine was coupled with nitrate reduction. Cell-free extract prepared from cells grown aerobically on trimethylamine exhibited activities of trimethylamine mono-oxygenase, trimethylamine N-oxide demethylase, dimethylamine mono-oxygenase, and methylamine mono-oxygenase. Cell-free extract from cells grown anaerobically on trimethylamine and nitrate exhibited activities of trimethylamine dehydrogenase and dimethylamine dehydrogenase. These results indicate that strain T231 had two different pathways for aerobic and anaerobic degradation of trimethylamine. This is a new feature for trimethylamine metabolism in denitrifying bacteria. PMID:11685371

  17. Sodium persulfate-assisted mechanochemical degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A: Efficacy, products and pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xitao; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Kunlun; Qi, Chengdu

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, activated persulfate (PS) oxidation has been developed as a new advanced oxidation process for the degradation of organic pollutants. On the other hand, the mechanochemical method has exhibited a unique advantage in dealing with chemical wastes. The degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a widely used brominated flame retardant (BFR), in wastes has attracted considerable attention. In this study, the efficacy of a CaO-mechanochemical (CaO-MC) treatment system assisted by the addition of PS for the degradation of TBBPA was investigated. Under the optimum reaction conditions with a mole ratio of PS:CaO = 1:4 and less than 12.5% of TBBPA by mass, the degradation and debromination of TBBPA were completed within 2 h, while the mineralization was completed within 4 h. Characterization of the milled sample by XRD revealed that CaSO4 crystallization occurred. The TG results illustrate that there was little organic matter left after 4 h of milling. Raman and FT-IR spectra exhibited the TBBPA destruction process and disappearance of the organic groups. Through analysis by LC/MS/MS, seventeen intermediates were identified. The mechanism of TBBPA degradation by the PS-assisted CaO-MC treatment system was explained from two aspects, the course of crystallization and the degradation of TBBPA by activated PS, and two parallel initiation pathways were proposed. PMID:26359264

  18. Putative pathway of sex pheromone biosynthesis and degradation by expression patterns of genes identified from female pheromone gland and adult antenna of Sesamia inferens (Walker).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Xia, Yi-Han; Zhu, Jia-Yao; Li, Sheng-Yun; Dong, Shuang-Lin

    2014-05-01

    The general pathway of biosynthesis and degradation for Type-I sex pheromones in moths is well established, but some genes involved in this pathway remain to be characterized. The purple stem borer, Sesamia inferens, employs a pheromone blend containing components with three different terminal functional groups (Z11-16:OAc, Z11-16:OH, and Z11-16:Ald) of Type-I sex pheromones. Thus, it provides a good model to study the diversity of genes involved in pheromone biosynthesis and degradation pathways. By analyzing previously obtained transcriptomic data of the sex pheromone glands and antennae, we identified 73 novel genes that are possibly related to pheromone biosynthesis (46 genes) or degradation (27 genes). Gene expression patterns and phylogenetic analysis revealed that one desaturase (SinfDes4), one fatty acid reductase (SinfFAR2), and one fatty acid xtransport protein (SinfFATP1) genes were predominantly expressed in pheromone glands, and clustered with genes involved in pheromone synthesis in other moth species. Ten genes including five carboxylesterases (SinfCXE10, 13, 14, 18, and 20), three aldehyde oxidases (SinfAOX1, 2 and 3), and two alcohol dehydrogenases (SinfAD1 and 3) were expressed specifically or predominantly in antennae, and could be candidate genes involved in pheromone degradation. SinfAD1 and 3 are the first reported alcohol dehydrogenase genes with antennae-biased expression. Based on these results we propose a pathway involving these potential enzyme-encoding gene candidates in sex pheromone biosynthesis and degradation in S. inferens. This study provides robust background information for further elucidation of the genetic basis of sex pheromone biosynthesis and degradation, and ultimately provides potential targets to disrupt sexual communication in S. inferens for control purposes. PMID:24817326

  19. PATHWAY FOR THE DISSIMILATION OF ITACONIC AND MESACONIC ACIDS.

    PubMed

    Brightman, V; Martin, W R

    1961-09-01

    Brightman, Vernon (The University of Chicago, Chicago), and William R. Martin. Pathway for the dissimilation of itaconic and mesaconic acids. J. Bacteriol. 82:376-382. 1961.-Studies on the oxidation of itaconic and mesaconic acids by a Pseudomonas sp., adapted to utilize either of these acids as a sole carbon source, have provided evidence for a pathway converting both itaconate and mesaconate to succinate. A metabolic interconversion of itaconate, mesaconate, and citramalate has also been demonstrated by whole cell and cell-free enzyme studies. Succinate derived from methylene-labeled itaconate was found to be labeled in the inside carbon atoms, a fact which indicates that the branched chain compound was converted into a straight chain molecule by a shift of the methylene carbon (C-5) from the side chain of itaconate to a position between C-2 and C-3 in an, as yet, unknown straight chain intermediate prior to its conversion to succinate. PMID:16561921

  20. Gradual surface degradation of restorative materials by acidic agents.

    PubMed

    Hengtrakool, Chanothai; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acidic agents on surface roughness and characteristics of four restorative materials. Fifty-two discs were created from each restorative material: metal-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Ketac-S), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC), resin composite (Filtek Z250), and amalgam (Valiant-PhD); each disc was 12 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm thick. The specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=13) and immersed for 168 hours in four storage media: deionized water (control); citrate buffer solution; green mango juice; and pineapple juice. Surface roughness measurements were performed with a profilometer, both before and after storage media immersion. Surface characteristics were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Statistical significance among each group was analyzed using two-way repeated ANOVA and Tukey's tests. Ketac-S demonstrated the highest roughness changes after immersion in acidic agents (p<0.05), followed by Fuji II LC. Valiant-PhD and Filtek Z250 illustrated some minor changes over 168 hours. The mango juice produced the greatest degradation effect of all materials tested (p<0.05). SEM photographs demonstrated gradual surface changes of all materials tested after immersions. Of the materials evaluated, amalgam and resin composite may be the most suitable for restorations for patients with tooth surface loss. PMID:21903509

  1. Degradation kinetics and pathways of spirotetramat in different parts of spinach plant and in the soil.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojun; Meng, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yanyan; Gu, Haotian; Ren, Yajun; Lu, Chunliang

    2016-08-01

    Spirotetramat is a new pesticide against a broad spectrum of sucking insects and exhibits a unique property with a two-way systemicity. In order to formulate a scientific rationale for a reasonable spray dose and the safe interval period of 22.4 % spirotetramat suspension concentrate on controlling vegetable pests, we analyzed degradation dynamics and pathways of spirotetramat in different parts of spinach plant (leaf, stalk, and root) and in the soil. We conducted experimental trials under field conditions and adopted a simple and reliable method (dispersive solid phase extraction) combined with liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry to evaluate the dissipation rates of spirotetramat residue and its metabolites. The results showed that the spirotetramat was degraded into different metabolite residues in different parts of spinach plant (leaf, stalk, and root) and in the soil. Specifically, spirotetramat was degraded into B-keto, B-glu, and B-enol in the leaf; B-glu and B-enol in the stalk; and only B-enol in the root. In the soil where the plants grew, spirotetramat followed a completely different pathway compared to the plant and degraded into B-keto and B-mono. Regardless of different degradation pathways, the dissipation dynamic equations of spirotetramat in different parts of spinach plant and in the soil were all based on the first-order reaction dynamic equations. This work provides guidelines for the safe use of spirotetramat in spinach fields, which would help prevent potential health threats to consumers. PMID:27083908

  2. Metabolic pathway of 3,6-anhydro-D-galactose in carrageenan-degrading microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Bok; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lim, Hyun Seung

    2016-05-01

    Complete hydrolysis of κ-carrageenan produces two sugars, D-galactose and 3,6-anhydro-D-galactose (D-AnG). At present, however, we do not know how carrageenan-degrading microorganisms metabolize D-AnG. In this study, we investigated the metabolic pathway of D-AnG degradation by comparative genomic analysis of Cellulophaga lytica LIM-21, Pseudoalteromonas atlantica T6c, and Epulopiscium sp. N.t. morphotype B, which represent the classes Flavobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Clostridia, respectively. In this bioinformatic analysis, we found candidate common genes that were believed to be involved in D-AnG metabolism. We then experimentally confirmed the enzymatic function of each gene product in the D-AnG cluster. In all three microorganisms, D-AnG metabolizing genes were clustered and organized in operon-like arrangements, which we named as the dan operon (3,6-d-anhydro-galactose). Combining bioinformatic analysis and experimental data, we showed that D-AnG is metabolized to pyruvate and D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate via four enzyme-catalyzed reactions in the following route: 3,6-anhydro-D-galactose → 3,6-anhydro-D-galactonate → 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-galactonate (D-KDGal) → 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phospho-D-galactonate → pyruvate + D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. The pathway of D-AnG degradation is composed of two parts: transformation of D-AnG to D-KDGal using two D-AnG specific enzymes and breakdown of D-KDGal to two glycolysis intermediates using two DeLey-Doudoroff pathway enzymes. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the metabolic pathway of D-AnG degradation. PMID:26875872

  3. Entner-Doudoroff pathway for sulfoquinovose degradation in Pseudomonas putida SQ1.

    PubMed

    Felux, Ann-Katrin; Spiteller, Dieter; Klebensberger, Janosch; Schleheck, David

    2015-08-01

    Sulfoquinovose (SQ; 6-deoxy-6-sulfoglucose) is the polar head group of the plant sulfolipid SQ-diacylglycerol, and SQ comprises a major proportion of the organosulfur in nature, where it is degraded by bacteria. A first degradation pathway for SQ has been demonstrated recently, a "sulfoglycolytic" pathway, in addition to the classical glycolytic (Embden-Meyerhof) pathway in Escherichia coli K-12; half of the carbon of SQ is abstracted as dihydroxyacetonephosphate (DHAP) and used for growth, whereas a C3-organosulfonate, 2,3-dihydroxypropane sulfonate (DHPS), is excreted. The environmental isolate Pseudomonas putida SQ1 is also able to use SQ for growth, and excretes a different C3-organosulfonate, 3-sulfolactate (SL). In this study, we revealed the catabolic pathway for SQ in P. putida SQ1 through differential proteomics and transcriptional analyses, by in vitro reconstitution of the complete pathway by five heterologously produced enzymes, and by identification of all four organosulfonate intermediates. The pathway follows a reaction sequence analogous to the Entner-Doudoroff pathway for glucose-6-phosphate: It involves an NAD(+)-dependent SQ dehydrogenase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconolactone (SGL) lactonase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconate (SG) dehydratase, and 2-keto-3,6-dideoxy-6-sulfogluconate (KDSG) aldolase. The aldolase reaction yields pyruvate, which supports growth of P. putida, and 3-sulfolactaldehyde (SLA), which is oxidized to SL by an NAD(P)(+)-dependent SLA dehydrogenase. All five enzymes are encoded in a single gene cluster that includes, for example, genes for transport and regulation. Homologous gene clusters were found in genomes of other P. putida strains, in other gamma-Proteobacteria, and in beta- and alpha-Proteobacteria, for example, in genomes of Enterobacteria, Vibrio, and Halomonas species, and in typical soil bacteria, such as Burkholderia, Herbaspirillum, and Rhizobium. PMID:26195800

  4. Entner–Doudoroff pathway for sulfoquinovose degradation in Pseudomonas putida SQ1

    PubMed Central

    Felux, Ann-Katrin; Spiteller, Dieter; Klebensberger, Janosch; Schleheck, David

    2015-01-01

    Sulfoquinovose (SQ; 6-deoxy-6-sulfoglucose) is the polar head group of the plant sulfolipid SQ-diacylglycerol, and SQ comprises a major proportion of the organosulfur in nature, where it is degraded by bacteria. A first degradation pathway for SQ has been demonstrated recently, a “sulfoglycolytic” pathway, in addition to the classical glycolytic (Embden–Meyerhof) pathway in Escherichia coli K-12; half of the carbon of SQ is abstracted as dihydroxyacetonephosphate (DHAP) and used for growth, whereas a C3-organosulfonate, 2,3-dihydroxypropane sulfonate (DHPS), is excreted. The environmental isolate Pseudomonas putida SQ1 is also able to use SQ for growth, and excretes a different C3-organosulfonate, 3-sulfolactate (SL). In this study, we revealed the catabolic pathway for SQ in P. putida SQ1 through differential proteomics and transcriptional analyses, by in vitro reconstitution of the complete pathway by five heterologously produced enzymes, and by identification of all four organosulfonate intermediates. The pathway follows a reaction sequence analogous to the Entner–Doudoroff pathway for glucose-6-phosphate: It involves an NAD+-dependent SQ dehydrogenase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconolactone (SGL) lactonase, 6-deoxy-6-sulfogluconate (SG) dehydratase, and 2-keto-3,6-dideoxy-6-sulfogluconate (KDSG) aldolase. The aldolase reaction yields pyruvate, which supports growth of P. putida, and 3-sulfolactaldehyde (SLA), which is oxidized to SL by an NAD(P)+-dependent SLA dehydrogenase. All five enzymes are encoded in a single gene cluster that includes, for example, genes for transport and regulation. Homologous gene clusters were found in genomes of other P. putida strains, in other gamma-Proteobacteria, and in beta- and alpha-Proteobacteria, for example, in genomes of Enterobacteria, Vibrio, and Halomonas species, and in typical soil bacteria, such as Burkholderia, Herbaspirillum, and Rhizobium. PMID:26195800

  5. Novel degradation pathway and kinetic analysis for buprofezin removal by newly isolated Bacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangli; Xu, Dayong; Xiong, Minghua; Zhang, Hui; Li, Feng; Liu, Yuan

    2016-09-15

    Given the intensive and widespread application of the pesticide, buprofezin, its environmental residues potentially pose a problem; yet little is known about buprofezin's kinetic and metabolic behaviors. In this study, a novel gram-positive strain, designated BF-5, isolated from aerobic activated sludge, was found to be capable of metabolizing buprofezin as its sole energy, carbon, and nitrogen source. Based on its physiological and biochemical characteristics, other aspects of its phenotype, and a phylogenetic analysis, strain BF-5 was identified as Bacillus sp. This study investigated the effect of culture conditions on bacterial growth and substrate degradation, such as pH, temperature, initial concentration, different nitrogen source, and additional nitrogen sources as co-substrates. The degradation rate parameters, qmax, Ks, Ki and Sm were determined to be 0.6918 h(-1), 105.4 mg L(-1), 210.5 mg L(-1), and 148.95 mg L(-1) respectively. The capture of unpublished potential metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis has led to the proposal of a novel degradation pathway. Taken together, our results clarify buprofezin's biodegradation pathway(s) and highlight the promising potential of strain BF-5 in bioremediation of buprofezin-contaminated environments. PMID:27208995

  6. Microbial degradation and metabolic pathway of pyridine by a Paracoccus sp. strain BW001.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yaohui; Sun, Qinghua; Zhao, Cui; Wen, Donghui; Tang, Xiaoyan

    2008-11-01

    A bacterial strain using pyridine as sole carbon, nitrogen and energy source was isolated from the activated sludge of a coking wastewater treatment plant. By means of morphologic observation, physiological characteristics study and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the strain was identified as the species of Paracoccus. The strain could degrade 2,614 mg l(-1) of pyridine completely within 49.5 h. Experiment designed to track the metabolic pathway showed that pyridine ring was cleaved between the C2 and N, then the mineralization of the carbonous intermediate products may comply with the early proposed pathway and the transformation of the nitrogen may proceed on a new pathway of simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification. During the degradation, NH3-N occurred and increased along with the decrease of pyridine in the solution; but the total nitrogen decreased steadily and equaled to the quantity of NH3-N when pyridine was degraded completely. Adding glucose into the medium as the extra carbon source would expedite the biodegradation of pyridine and the transformation of the nitrogen. The fragments of nirS gene and nosZ gene were amplified which implied that the BW001 had the potential abilities to reduce NO2- to NO and/or N2O, and then to N2. PMID:18437507

  7. A Polyomic Approach To Elucidate the Fluoranthene-Degradative Pathway in Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Ohgew; Kim, Seong-Jae; Jones, Richard C.; Freeman, James P.; Adjei, Michael D.; Edmondson, Ricky D.; Cerniglia, Carl E.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1 is capable of degrading a wide range of high-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including fluoranthene. We used a combination of metabolomic, genomic, and proteomic technologies to investigate fluoranthene degradation in this strain. Thirty-seven fluoranthene metabolites including potential isomers were isolated from the culture medium and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and UV-visible absorption. Total proteins were separated by one-dimensional gel and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in conjunction with the M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 genome sequence (http://jgi.doe.gov), which resulted in the identification of 1,122 proteins. Among them, 53 enzymes were determined to be likely involved in fluoranthene degradation. We integrated the metabolic information with the genomic and proteomic results and proposed pathways for the degradation of fluoranthene. According to our hypothesis, the oxidation of fluoranthene is initiated by dioxygenation at the C-1,2, C-2,3, and C-7,8 positions. The C-1,2 and C-2,3 dioxygenation routes degrade fluoranthene via fluorene-type metabolites, whereas the C-7,8 routes oxidize fluoranthene via acenaphthylene-type metabolites. The major site of dioxygenation is the C-2,3 dioxygenation route, which consists of 18 enzymatic steps via 9-fluorenone-1-carboxylic acid and phthalate with the initial ring-hydroxylating oxygenase, NidA3B3, oxidizing fluoranthene to fluoranthene cis-2,3-dihydrodiol. Nonspecific monooxygenation of fluoranthene with subsequent O methylation of dihydroxyfluoranthene also occurs as a detoxification reaction. PMID:17449607

  8. Acid attack on hydrated cement — Effect of mineral acids on the degradation process

    SciTech Connect

    Gutberlet, T.; Hilbig, H.; Beddoe, R.E.

    2015-08-15

    During acid attack on concrete structural components, a degraded layer develops whose properties as a protective barrier are decisive for durability. {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy and {sup 27}Al NMR spectroscopy were used with XRD to investigate the degraded layer on hardened cement paste exposed to HCl and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The layer comprises an amorphous silica gel with framework silicates, geminate and single silanol groups in which Si is substituted by Al. Amorphous Al(OH){sub 3} and Fe(OH){sub 3} are present. The gel forms by polycondensation and cross-linking of C-A-S-H chains at AlO{sub 4} bridging tetrahedra. In the transition zone between the degraded layer and the undamaged material, portlandite dissolves and Ca is removed from the C-A-S-H phases maintaining their polymer structure at first. With HCl, monosulphate in the transition zone is converted into Friedel's salt and ettringite. With H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, gypsum precipitates near the degradation front reducing the thickness of the transition zone and the rate of degradation.

  9. Enhanced degradation in soil of the herbicide EPTC and determination of its degradative pathway by an isolated soil microorganism

    SciTech Connect

    Ankumah, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to examine the ability of Ohio soils to develop enhanced degradation of the herbicide EPTC (s-ethyl N,N-dipropyl carbamothiaote) and to determine its metabolism by an isolated soil microorganism. Three soils selected to obtain an range in pH, texture, and organic carbon were treated with EPTC for 4 consecutive applications (6 weeks between applications). EPTC concentrations as measured by gas chromatography, decreased 80% or more one week after the second application in all three soils. Metabolism of unlabelled and labelled EPTC by an isolated soil microbe was followed by GC/MS and TLC/LSC analysis, respectively. Rapid decrease in 14-C activity in the organic fraction corresponded with rapid {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolution and transient increase in 14-C activity in the aqueous fraction. Four metabolites were observed in the TLC analysis. Two were identified as EPTC-sulfoxide and N-depropyl EPTC with N-depropyl EPTC being confirmed by GC/MS analysis. The availability of different pathways for EPTC metabolism by soil microbes after repeated applications to the soil results in its very rapid degradation and loss of efficacy.

  10. Elucidation of the upper pathway of alicyclic musk Romandolide degradation in OECD screening tests with activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, M; Boschung, A; Miffon, F; Ohleyer, E; Chaintreau, A

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of Romandolide ([1-(3',3'-dimethyl-1'-cyclohexyl)ethoxycarbonyl] methyl propanoate), a synthetic alicyclic musk, by activated sludge inocula was investigated using both the manometric respirometry test OECD 301F and the CO₂ evolution test. In addition to measuring its biodegradability, key steps of the upper part of the metabolic pathway responsible for Romandolide degradation were identified using extracts at different time points of incubation. Early metabolism of Romandolide yielded ester hydrolysis products, including Cyclademol (1-(3,3-dimethylcyclohexyl)ethanol). The principal metabolites after 31 days were identified as 3,3-dimethyl cyclohexanone and 3,3-dimethyl cyclohexyl acetate. Formation of 3,3-dimethyl cyclohexanone from Cyclademol by sludge was confirmed in subsequent experiments using Cyclademol as a substrate, indicating the involvement of an oxygen insertion reminiscent of a Baeyer-Villiger oxidation. Further mineralization of 3,3-dimethyl cyclohexanone was also confirmed in subsequent studies. Three steps were thus required for complete biodegradation of the alicyclic musk: (1) successive ester hydrolyses leading to the formation of Cyclademol with concomitant degradation of the resulting acids, (2) conversion of Cyclademol into 3,3-dimethyl cyclohexanone, and (3) further mineralization via ring cleavage. PMID:24277432

  11. Enhancement of carboxylic acid degradation with sulfate radical generated by persulfate activation.

    PubMed

    Criquet, J; Nebout, P; Karpel Vel Leitner, N

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the generation of sulfate radical for the removal of two carboxylic acids in aqueous solution: acetic and citric acids. From photochemical and radiolytic processes, kinetics of the degradation of these two carboxylic acids was studied as a function of the pH of the solution. It was shown that the maximum of acetic acid degradation occurred at pH 5. Above this pH, competitive reactions with the carbon mineralized inhibit the reaction of with the solute. In the case of citric acid, pH has only a little effect on the kinetic of citric acid degradation. The determination of mineralization yields shows several differences depending on carboxylic acids and pH. The degradation of both carboxylic acids was also studied in the radiolysis process whether with or without persulfate addition. A comparison of the processes of sulfate radical production is presented. PMID:20220244

  12. Solar photocatalytic degradation of naphthenic acids in oil sands process-affected water.

    PubMed

    Leshuk, Tim; Wong, Timothy; Linley, Stuart; Peru, Kerry M; Headley, John V; Gu, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Bitumen mining in the Canadian oil sands creates large volumes of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), the toxicity of which is due in part to naphthenic acids (NAs) and other acid extractable organics (AEO). The objective of this work was to evaluate the potential of solar photocatalysis over TiO2 to remove AEO from OSPW. One day of photocatalytic treatment under natural sunlight (25 MJ/m(2) over ∼14 h daylight) eradicated AEO from raw OSPW, and acute toxicity of the OSPW toward Vibrio fischeri was eliminated. Nearly complete mineralization of organic carbon was achieved within 1-7 day equivalents of sunlight exposure, and degradation was shown to proceed through a superoxide-mediated oxidation pathway. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) analysis of oxidized intermediate compounds indicated preferential degradation of the heavier and more cyclic NAs (higher number of double bond equivalents), which are the most environmentally persistent fractions. The photocatalyst was shown to be recyclable for multiple uses, and thus solar photocatalysis may be a promising "green" advanced oxidation process (AOP) for OSPW treatment. PMID:26539710

  13. Starch degradation in chloroplasts isolated from C3 or CAM (crassulacean acid metabolism)-induced Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.

    PubMed Central

    Neuhaus, H E; Schulte, N

    1996-01-01

    C3 or crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM)-induced Mesembryanthemum crystallinum plants perform nocturnal starch degradation which is linear with time. To analyse the composition of metabolites released by isolated leaf chloroplasts during starch degradation we developed a protocol for the purification of starch-containing plastids. Isolated chloroplasts from C3 or CAM-induced M. crystallinum plants are also able to degrade starch. With respect to the endogenous starch content of isolated plastids the rate of starch degradation in intact leaves. The combined presence of Pi, ATP, and oxaloacetate is identified to be the most positive effector combination to induce starch mobilization. The metabolic flux through the oxidative pentose-phosphate pathway in chloroplasts isolated from CAM-induced M. crystallinum is less than 3.5% compared with other metabolic routes of starch degradation. Here we report that starch-degrading chloroplasts isolated from CAM-induced M. crystallinum plants use exogenously supplied oxaloacetate for the synthesis of malate. The main products of starch degradation exported into the incubation medium by these chloroplasts are glucose 6-phosphate, 3-phosphoglyceric acid, dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glucose. The identification of glucose 6-phosphate as an important metabolite released during starch degradation is in contrast to the observations made on all other types of plastids analysed so far, including chloroplasts isolated from M. crystallinum in the C3 state. Therefore, we analysed the transport properties of isolated chloroplasts from M. crystallinum. Surprisingly, both types of chloroplasts, isolated from either C3 or CAM-induced plants, are able to transport glucose 6-phosphate in counter exchange with endogenous Pi, indicating the presence of a glucose 6-phosphate translocator as recently demonstrated to occur in other types of plastids. The composition of metabolites released and the stimulatory effect of oxaloacetate on the rate of

  14. Phytic acid degrading lactic acid bacteria in tef-injera fermentation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Maren M; Egli, Ines M; Aeberli, Isabelle; Hurrell, Richard F; Meile, Leo

    2014-11-01

    Ethiopian injera, a soft pancake, baked from fermented batter, is preferentially prepared from tef (Eragrostis tef) flour. The phytic acid (PA) content of tef is high and is only partly degraded during the fermentation step. PA chelates with iron and zinc in the human digestive tract and strongly inhibits their absorption. With the aim to formulate a starter culture that would substantially degrade PA during injera preparation, we assessed the potential of microorganisms isolated from Ethiopian household-tef fermentations to degrade PA. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were found to be among the dominating microorganisms. Seventy-six isolates from thirteen different tef fermentations were analyzed for phytase activity and thirteen different isolates of seven different species were detected to be positive in a phytase screening assay. In 20-mL model tef fermentations, out of these thirteen isolates, the use of Lactobacillus (L.) buchneri strain MF58 and Pediococcus pentosaceus strain MF35 resulted in lowest PA contents in the fermented tef of 41% and 42%, respectively of its initial content. In comparison 59% of PA remained when spontaneously fermented. Full scale tef fermentation (0.6L) and injera production using L. buchneri MF58 as culture additive decreased PA in cooked injera from 1.05 to 0.34±0.02 g/100 g, representing a degradation of 68% compared to 42% in injera from non-inoculated traditional fermentation. The visual appearance of the pancakes was similar. The final molar ratios of PA to iron of 4 and to zinc of 12 achieved with L. buchneri MF58 were decreased by ca. 50% compared to the traditional fermentation. In conclusion, selected LAB strains in tef fermentations can degrade PA, with L. buchneri MF58 displaying the highest PA degrading potential. The 68% PA degradation achieved by the application of L. buchneri MF58 would be expected to improve human zinc absorption from tef-injera, but further PA degradation is probably necessary if iron absorption has to

  15. Rates and mechanisms of fatty acid degradation in oxic and anoxic coastal marine sediments of Long Island Sound, New York, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ming-Yi; Wakeham, Stuart G.; Lee, Cindy

    1997-01-01

    The rates and pathways of labile organic matter degradation significantly affect the cycling of organic carbon and nutrients in coastal sediments. In this study, we measured degradation rate constants of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids by incubating radiolabeled 1- 14C-palmitic (16:0) and 1- 14C-oleic (18:1) acids and an unlabeled plankton mixture in oxic and anoxic sediments from Long Island Sound (LIS) under laboratory-controlled conditions. Rate constants for degradation of 16:0 and 18:1 fatty acids were higher in oxic sediments than in anoxic sediments. Degradation of the unsaturated 18:1 acid in anoxic sediments was two times faster than for 16:0, while there was little difference between the two fatty acids in oxic sediments. The incubation results clearly showed that fatty acids degrade through multiple pathways in both oxic and anoxic sediments. About 80-90% of the label was lost from the incubated sediments (presumably as 14CO 2 or other volatile products), and 5-10% was incorporated into the sediment matrix. Both degradation and incorporation into the sediment matrix were slightly greater under oxic conditions. A small part (5-10%) of the label was incorporated into what are presumed to be metabolic products. A higher percentage of this incorporation occurred under anoxic conditions, implying that anaerobic bacteria are less efficient at degrading the labeled fatty acid to volatile products such as CO 2. In the oxic sediments, more oleic than palmitic acid was converted into intermediate metabolites, indicating that the unsaturated fatty acid was degraded less efficiently. There was little difference in formation of metabolites between oleic and palmitic acids under anoxic conditions. The seasonal distributions of palmitic and oleic acids at two coastal LIS sites with distinctive oxygen content were modeled to yield degradation rate constants for these two fatty acids. The comparison between fatty acid degradation rate constants derived from

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of nine Sphingobium strains: Insights into their evolution and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) degradation pathways

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Verma, Helianthous; Kumar, Roshan; Oldach, Phoebe; Sangwan, Naseer; Khurana, Jitendra P.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Lal, Rup

    2014-11-23

    Background: Sphingobium spp. are efficient degraders of a wide range of chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons. In particular, strains which harbour the lin pathway genes mediating the degradation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers are of interest due to the widespread persistence of this contaminant. Here, we examined the evolution and diversification of the lin pathway under the selective pressure of HCH, by comparing the draft genomes of six newly-sequenced Sphingobium spp. (strains LL03, DS20, IP26, HDIPO4, P25 and RL3) isolated from HCH dumpsites, with three existing genomes (S. indicum B90A, S. japonicum UT26S and Sphingobium sp. SYK6). Results: Efficient HCH degraders phylogeneticallymore » clustered in a closely related group comprising of UT26S, B90A, HDIPO4 and IP26, where HDIPO4 and IP26 were classified as subspecies with ANI value >98%. Less than 10% of the total gene content was shared among all nine strains, but among the eight HCH-associated strains, that is all except SYK6, the shared gene content jumped to nearly 25%. Genes associated with nitrogen stress response and two-component systems were found to be enriched. The strains also housed many xenobiotic degradation pathways other than HCH, despite the absence of these xenobiotics from isolation sources. In addition, these strains, although non-motile, but posses flagellar assembly genes. While strains HDIPO4 and IP26 contained the complete set of lin genes, DS20 was entirely devoid of lin genes (except linKLMN) whereas, LL03, P25 and RL3 were identified as lin deficient strains, as they housed incomplete lin pathways. Further, in HDIPO4, linA was found as a hybrid of two natural variants i.e., linA1 and linA2 known for their different enantioselectivity. In conclusion, the bacteria isolated from HCH dumpsites provide a natural testing ground to study variations in the lin system and their effects on degradation efficacy. Further, the diversity in the lin gene sequences and copy number, their

  17. Crystal Structure and Substrate Recognition of Cellobionic Acid Phosphorylase, Which Plays a Key Role in Oxidative Cellulose Degradation by Microbes*

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Young-Woo; Nihira, Takanori; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Saito, Yuka; Kitaoka, Motomitsu; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Fushinobu, Shinya

    2015-01-01

    The microbial oxidative cellulose degradation system is attracting significant research attention after the recent discovery of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases. A primary product of the oxidative and hydrolytic cellulose degradation system is cellobionic acid (CbA), the aldonic acid form of cellobiose. We previously demonstrated that the intracellular enzyme belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 94 from cellulolytic fungus and bacterium is cellobionic acid phosphorylase (CBAP), which catalyzes reversible phosphorolysis of CbA into glucose 1-phosphate and gluconic acid (GlcA). In this report, we describe the biochemical characterization and the three-dimensional structure of CBAP from the marine cellulolytic bacterium Saccharophagus degradans. Structures of ligand-free and complex forms with CbA, GlcA, and a synthetic disaccharide product from glucuronic acid were determined at resolutions of up to 1.6 Å. The active site is located near the dimer interface. At subsite +1, the carboxylate group of GlcA and CbA is recognized by Arg-609 and Lys-613. Additionally, one residue from the neighboring protomer (Gln-190) is involved in the carboxylate recognition of GlcA. A mutational analysis indicated that these residues are critical for the binding and catalysis of the aldonic and uronic acid acceptors GlcA and glucuronic acid. Structural and sequence comparisons with other glycoside hydrolase family 94 phosphorylases revealed that CBAPs have a unique subsite +1 with a distinct amino acid residue conservation pattern at this site. This study provides molecular insight into the energetically efficient metabolic pathway of oxidized sugars that links the oxidative cellulolytic pathway to the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways in cellulolytic microbes. PMID:26041776

  18. Carbon Nanotube Degradation in Macrophages: Live Nanoscale Monitoring and Understanding of Biological Pathway.

    PubMed

    Elgrabli, Dan; Dachraoui, Walid; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Liu, Xiao Jie; Bégin, Dominique; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence; Alloyeau, Damien

    2015-10-27

    Despite numerous applications, the cellular-clearance mechanism of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has not been clearly established yet. Previous in vitro studies showed the ability of oxidative enzymes to induce nanotube degradation. Interestingly, these enzymes have the common capacity to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we combined material and life science approaches for revealing an intracellular way taken by macrophages to degrade carbon nanotubes. We report the in situ monitoring of ROS-mediated MWCNT degradation by liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy. Two degradation mechanisms induced by hydroxyl radicals were extracted from these unseen dynamic nanoscale investigations: a non-site-specific thinning process of the walls and a site-specific transversal drilling process on pre-existing defects of nanotubes. Remarkably, similar ROS-induced structural injuries were observed on MWCNTs after aging into macrophages from 1 to 7 days. Beside unraveling oxidative transformations of MWCNT structure, we elucidated an important, albeit not exclusive, biological pathway for MWCNT degradation in macrophages, involving NOX2 complex activation, superoxide production, and hydroxyl radical attack, which highlights the critical role of oxidative stress in cellular processing of MWCNTs. PMID:26331631

  19. Oxidative degradation of N-Nitrosopyrrolidine by the ozone/UV process: Kinetics and pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Fang, Jingyun; Fan, Chihhao; Shang, Chii

    2016-05-01

    N-Nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) is an emerging contaminant in drinking water and wastewater. The degradation kinetics and mechanisms of NPYR degradation by the O3/UV process were investigated and compared with those of UV direct photolysis and ozonation. A synergistic effect of ozone and UV was observed in the degradation of NPYR due to the accelerated production of OH• by ozone photolysis. This effect was more pronounced at higher ozone dosages. The second-order rate constants of NPYR reacting with OH• and ozone was determined to be 1.38 (± 0.05) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) and 0.31 (± 0.02) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The quantum yield by direct UV photolysis was 0.3 (± 0.01). An empirical model using Rct (the ratio of the exposure of OH• to that of ozone) was established for NPYR degradation in treated drinking water and showed that the contributions of direct UV photolysis and OH• oxidation on NPYR degradation were both significant. As the reaction proceeded, the contribution by OH• became less important due to the exhausting of ozone. Nitrate was the major product in the O3/UV process by two possible pathways. One is through the cleavage of nitroso group to form NO• followed by hydrolysis, and the other is the oxidation of the intermediates of amines by ozonation. PMID:26733013

  20. Metabolic pathway for degradation of 2-chloro-4-aminophenol by Arthrobacter sp. SPG.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar; Mohanta, Tapan Kumar; Srivastava, Alok; Bae, Hanhong; Singh, Vijay Pal

    2014-01-01

    A degradation pathway of 2-chloro-4-aminophenol (2C4AP) was studied in an Arthrobacter sp. SPG that utilized 2C4AP as its sole source of carbon and energy. The 2C4AP degradation was initiated by a 2C4AP-deaminase that catalyzed the conversion of 2C4AP into chlorohydroquinone (CHQ) with removal of ammonium ion. In the next step, a CHQ-dehalogenase dehalogenated CHQ to hydroquinone (HQ) that cleaved into γ-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde by a HQ-dioxygenase. The 2C4AP degradation was also investigated in sterile and non-sterile soil microcosms using strain SPG. The results show that the SPG cells degraded 2C4AP more rapidly in sterile soil than non-sterile soil. Our studies showed that strain SPG may be used for bioremediation of 2C4AP-contaminated sites. This is the first report of the 2C4AP degradation by any bacteria. PMID:25427856

  1. Effects of reforesting degraded grassland on hydrological flow pathways on Leyte, the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Meerveld, Ilja; Zhang, Jun; Bruijnzeel, Sampurno

    2014-05-01

    Reforestation of degraded land in the tropics is promoted for a wide range of expected benefits, including carbon sequestration and streamflow regulation. However, how reforestation of degraded land affects runoff generation mechanisms and catchment water yield is still poorly understood as most experimental work pertains to non-degraded terrain. We set out to study the differences in hydrological functioning of a small degraded grassland catchment and a similar catchment that was reforested 15 years ago. Both catchments are located near Tacloban, Leyte, the Philippines. Stream stage, EC and temperature are measured continuously since June 2013. Precipitation, soil moisture content, and groundwater levels are monitored as well. Samples are taken from streamflow, precipitation, groundwater, and soil water prior to and during rainfall events for geochemical and stable isotope analysis to elucidate source contributions to storm runoff. Streamflow and event water contributions increase rapidly during almost every rainfall event in the grassland. In the reforested catchment, event water contributions to streamflow are much smaller and only increase during large events. These tracer results suggest that overland flow occurs much less frequently and is much less widespread in the reforested catchment compared to the grassland catchment. Our results thus indicate that the dominant flow pathways have changed as a result of reforestation and suggest that reforestation can largely restore the hydrological functioning of degraded sites if the forest is allowed to develop over a sufficiently long period without subsequent disturbance.

  2. Metabolic Engineering of a Novel Muconic Acid Biosynthesis Pathway via 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Sudeshna; Goonewardena, Lakshani; Juturu, Veeresh

    2015-01-01

    cis,cis-Muconic acid (MA) is a commercially important raw material used in pharmaceuticals, functional resins, and agrochemicals. MA is also a potential platform chemical for the production of adipic acid (AA), terephthalic acid, caprolactam, and 1,6-hexanediol. A strain of Escherichia coli K-12, BW25113, was genetically modified, and a novel nonnative metabolic pathway was introduced for the synthesis of MA from glucose. The proposed pathway converted chorismate from the aromatic amino acid pathway to MA via 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHB). Three nonnative genes, pobA, aroY, and catA, coding for 4-hydroxybenzoate hydrolyase, protocatechuate decarboxylase, and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, respectively, were functionally expressed in E. coli to establish the MA biosynthetic pathway. E. coli native genes ubiC, aroFFBR, aroE, and aroL were overexpressed and the genes ptsH, ptsI, crr, and pykF were deleted from the E. coli genome in order to increase the precursors of the proposed MA pathway. The final engineered E. coli strain produced nearly 170 mg/liter of MA from simple carbon sources in shake flask experiments. The proposed pathway was proved to be functionally active, and the strategy can be used for future metabolic engineering efforts for production of MA from renewable sugars. PMID:26362984

  3. Metabolic engineering of a novel muconic acid biosynthesis pathway via 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Sudeshna; Jonnalagadda, Sudhakar; Goonewardena, Lakshani; Juturu, Veeresh

    2015-12-01

    cis,cis-Muconic acid (MA) is a commercially important raw material used in pharmaceuticals, functional resins, and agrochemicals. MA is also a potential platform chemical for the production of adipic acid (AA), terephthalic acid, caprolactam, and 1,6-hexanediol. A strain of Escherichia coli K-12, BW25113, was genetically modified, and a novel nonnative metabolic pathway was introduced for the synthesis of MA from glucose. The proposed pathway converted chorismate from the aromatic amino acid pathway to MA via 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHB). Three nonnative genes, pobA, aroY, and catA, coding for 4-hydroxybenzoate hydrolyase, protocatechuate decarboxylase, and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, respectively, were functionally expressed in E. coli to establish the MA biosynthetic pathway. E. coli native genes ubiC, aroF(FBR), aroE, and aroL were overexpressed and the genes ptsH, ptsI, crr, and pykF were deleted from the E. coli genome in order to increase the precursors of the proposed MA pathway. The final engineered E. coli strain produced nearly 170 mg/liter of MA from simple carbon sources in shake flask experiments. The proposed pathway was proved to be functionally active, and the strategy can be used for future metabolic engineering efforts for production of MA from renewable sugars. PMID:26362984

  4. Effects of organic acids, amino acids and ethanol on the radio-degradation of patulin in an aqueous model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Hyejeong; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Cheorun; Chung, Jinwoo; Kim, Soohyun; Kwon, Joong-Ho; Kim, Dongho

    2008-06-01

    The effects of organic acids, amino acids, and ethanol on the radio-degradation of patulin by gamma irradiation in an aqueous model system were investigated. The patulin, dissolved in distilled water at a concentration of 50 ppm, was practically degraded by the gamma irradiation at the dose of 1.0 kGy, while 33% of the patulin remained in apple juice. In the aqueous model system, the radio-degradation of patulin was partially inhibited by the addition of organic acids, amino acids, and ethanol. The proportions of remaining patulin after irradiation with the dose of 1.0 kGy in the 1% solution of malic acid, citric acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, ascorbic acid, and ethanol were 31.4%, 2.3%, 31.2%, 6.1%, 50.8%, and 12.5%, respectively. During 30 days of storage, the remaining patulin was reduced gradually in the solution of ascorbic acid and malic acid compared to being stable in other samples. The amino acids, serine, threonine, and histidine, inhibited the radio-degradation of patulin. In conclusion, it was suggested that 1 kGy of gamma irradiation (recommended radiation doses for radicidation and/or quarantine in fruits) is effective for the reduction of patulin, but the nutritional elements should be considered because the radio-degradation effects are environment dependent.

  5. Characterization of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid-degrading fungi in Vietnamese soils.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kazuhito; Kinoshita, Masahiro; Morishita, Shigeyuki; Chida, Masateru; Suyama, Kousuke

    2013-04-01

    Sixty-nine fungal strains were isolated countrywide from 10 Vietnamese soils, in areas both with and without a history of exposure to Agent Orange, and their degrading activities on the phenoxy acid herbicides 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), as well as related compounds, were examined. Among taxonomically various fungi, 45, 12 and 4% of the isolates degraded phenoxyacetic acid (PA), 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T, respectively. While the PA-degrading fungi were distributed to all sites and among many genera, the 2,4-D-degraders were found only in order Eurotiales in class Eurotiomycetes. All of the 2,4,5-T-degrading fungal strains were phylogenetically close to Eupenicillium spp. and were isolated from southern Vietnam. As a degradation intermediate, the corresponding phenol compounds were detected in some strains. The degradation substrate spectrum for 26 compounds of Eupenicillium spp. strains including 2,4,5-T-degraders and -non-degraders seemed to be related to phylogenetic similarity and soil sampling location of the isolates. These results suggest that the heavily contaminated environments enhanced the adaptation of the phylogenetic group of Eupenicillium spp. toward to obtain the ability to degrade 2,4,5-T. PMID:23167922

  6. Radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions by gamma ray irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wenbao; He, Yanquan; Ling, Yongsheng; Hei, Daqian; Shan, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jiatong

    2015-04-01

    The radiation-induced degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid under gamma ray irradiation was investigated. Degradation experiments were performed with 100 mL sealed Pyrex glass vessels loaded with 80 mL of cyclohexanebutyric acid solutions at various initial concentrations of 10, 20, and 40 mg L-1. The absorbed doses were controlled at 0, 0.65, 1.95, 3.25, 6.5, 9.75, and 13 kGy. The results showed that gamma ray irradiation could effectively degrade cyclohexanebutyric acid in aqueous solutions. The removal rate of cyclohexanebutyric acid increased significantly with the increase of absorbed dose and the decrease of its initial concentration. At the same time, the removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was as effective as that of cyclohexanebutyric acid. The kinetic studies showed that the degradation of cyclohexanebutyric acid followed pseudo first-order reaction. Above all, the proposed mechanism obtained when NaNO2, NaNO3 and tert-butanol were added showed that the •OH radical played a major role in the gamma degradation process of cyclohexanebutyric acid, while •H and eaq- played a minor role in the gamma degradation process. The degradation products were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) during cyclohexanebutyric acid degradation.

  7. EFFECT OF TRACE METALS AND SULFITE OXIDATION OF ADIPIC ACID DEGRADATION IN FGD SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of the measurement of the adipic acid degradation rate in a bench-scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, designed to simulate many of the important aspects of full-scale FGD systems. Results show that the adipic acid degradation rate depends on the ...

  8. Characterization of the KstR2 regulator responsible of the lower cholesterol degradative pathway in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Julia; Galán, Beatriz; Medrano, Francisco J; García, José L

    2015-02-01

    The interaction of KstR2-dependent promoters of the divergon constituted by the MSMEG_6000-5999 and MSMEG_6001-6004 operons of Mycobacterium smegmatis which encode the genes involved in the lower cholesterol degradative pathway has been characterized. Footprint analyses have demonstrated experimentally for the first time that KstR2 specifically binds to an operator region of 29 nucleotides containing the palindromic sequence AAGCAAGNNCTTGCTT. This region overlaps with the -10 and -35 boxes of the putative P(6000) and P(6001) divergent promoters, suggesting that KstR2 represses their transcription by preventing the binding of the ribonucleic acid polymerase. A three-dimensional model of the KstR2 protein revealed a typical TetR-type regulator folding with two domains, a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-binding N-terminal domain and a regulator-binding C-terminal domain composed by three and six helices respectively. KstR2 is an all alpha protein as confirmed by circular dichroism. We have determined that M. smegmatis is able to grow using sitolactone (HIL) as the only carbon source and that this compound induces the kstR2 regulon in vivo. HIL or its open form 5OH-HIP were unable to release in vitro the KstR2-DNA operator interaction, suggesting that 5OH-HIP-CoA or a further derivative would induce the lower cholesterol catabolic pathway. PMID:25511435

  9. New pathway for degradation of sulfonated azo dyes by microbial peroxidases of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Streptomyces chromofuscus.

    PubMed Central

    Goszczynski, S; Paszczynski, A; Pasti-Grigsby, M B; Crawford, R L; Crawford, D L

    1994-01-01

    Pathways for the degradation of 3,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-azobenzene-4'-sulfonic acid (I) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyazobenzene-4'-sulfonamide (II) by the manganese peroxidase and ligninase of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and by the peroxidase of Streptomyces chromofuscus have been proposed. Twelve metabolic products were found, and their mechanisms of formation were explained. Preliminary oxidative activation of the dyes resulted in the formation of cationic species, making the molecules vulnerable to the nucleophilic attack of water. Two types of hydrolytic cleavage were observed. Asymmetric splitting gave rise to quinone and diazene derivatives, while symmetric splitting resulted in the formation of quinone monoimine and nitroso derivatives. These unstable intermediates underwent further redox, oxidation, and hydrolytic transformation, eventually furnishing 11 organic products and ammonia. PMID:8113173

  10. Enzymes of the benzoyl-coenzyme A degradation pathway in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Ferroglobus placidus.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Georg; René, Sandra Bosch; Boll, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    The Fe(III)-respiring Ferroglobus placidus is the only known archaeon and hyperthermophile for which a complete degradation of aromatic substrates to CO2 has been reported. Recent genome and transcriptome analyses proposed a benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) degradation pathway similar to that found in the phototrophic Rhodopseudomonas palustris, which involves a cyclohex-1-ene-1-carboxyl-CoA (1-enoyl-CoA) forming, ATP-dependent key enzyme benzoyl-CoA reductase (BCR). In this work, we demonstrate, by first in vitro studies, that benzoyl-CoA is ATP-dependently reduced by two electrons to cyclohexa-1,5-dienoyl-CoA (1,5-dienoyl-CoA), which is further degraded by hydration to 6-hydroxycyclohex-1-ene-1-carboxyl-CoA (6-OH-1-enoyl-CoA); upon addition of NAD(+) , the latter was subsequently converted to β-oxidation intermediates. The four candidate genes of BCR were heterologously expressed, and the enriched, oxygen-sensitive enzyme catalysed the two-electron reduction of benzoyl-CoA to 1,5-dienoyl-CoA. A gene previously assigned to a 2,3-didehydropimeloyl-CoA hydratase was heterologously expressed and shown to act as a typical 1,5-dienoyl-CoA hydratase that does not accept 1-enoyl-CoA. A gene previously assigned to a 1-enoyl-CoA hydratase was heterologously expressed and identified to code for a bifunctional crotonase/3-OH-butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase. In summary, the results consistently provide biochemical evidence that F. placidus and probably other archaea predominantly degrade aromatics via the Thauera/Azoarcus type and not or only to a minor extent via the predicted R. palustris-type benzoyl-CoA degradation pathway. PMID:25630364

  11. Auxin Biosynthesis: Are the Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Phenylacetic Acid Biosynthesis Pathways Mirror Images?

    PubMed

    Cook, Sam D; Nichols, David S; Smith, Jason; Chourey, Prem S; McAdam, Erin L; Quittenden, Laura; Ross, John J

    2016-06-01

    The biosynthesis of the main auxin in plants (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) has been elucidated recently and is thought to involve the sequential conversion of Trp to indole-3-pyruvic acid to IAA However, the pathway leading to a less well studied auxin, phenylacetic acid (PAA), remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from metabolism experiments that PAA is synthesized from the amino acid Phe, via phenylpyruvate. In pea (Pisum sativum), the reverse reaction, phenylpyruvate to Phe, is also demonstrated. However, despite similarities between the pathways leading to IAA and PAA, evidence from mutants in pea and maize (Zea mays) indicate that IAA biosynthetic enzymes are not the main enzymes for PAA biosynthesis. Instead, we identified a putative aromatic aminotransferase (PsArAT) from pea that may function in the PAA synthesis pathway. PMID:27208245

  12. Oleic acid-enhanced transdermal delivery pathways of fluorescent nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen; Ghazaryan, Ara; Tso, Chien-Hsin; Hu, Po-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Liang; Kuo, Tsung-Rong; Lin, Sung-Jan; Chen, Shean-Jen; Chen, Chia-Chun; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2012-05-01

    Transdermal delivery of nanocarriers provides an alternative pathway to transport therapeutic agents, alleviating pain, improving compliance of patients, and increasing overall effectiveness of delivery. In this work, enhancement of transdermal delivery of fluorescent nanoparticles and sulforhodamine B with assistance of oleic acid was visualized utilizing multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and analyzed quantitatively using multi-photon excitation-induced fluorescent signals. Results of MPM imaging and MPM intensity-based spatial depth-dependent analysis showed that oleic acid is effective in facilitating transdermal delivery of nanoparticles.

  13. Degradation study of carnosic acid, carnosol, rosmarinic acid, and rosemary extract (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) assessed using HPLC.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Smuts, Jonathan P; Dodbiba, Edra; Rangarajan, Rekha; Lang, John C; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2012-09-12

    Rosemary, whose major caffeoyl-derived and diterpenoid ingredients are rosmarinic acid, carnosol, and carnosic acid, is an important source of natural antioxidants and is being recognized increasingly as a useful preservative, protectant, and even as a potential medicinal agent. Understanding the stability of these components and their mode of interaction in mixtures is important if they are to be utilized to greatest effect. A study of the degradation of rosmarinic acid, carnosol, carnosic acid, and a mixture of the three was conducted in ethanolic solutions at different temperatures and light exposure. As expected, degradation increased with temperature. Some unique degradation products were formed with exposure to light. Several degradation products were reported for the first time. The degradation products were identified by HPLC/MS/MS, UV, and NMR. The degradation of rosemary extract in fish oil also was investigated, and much slower rates of degradation were observed for carnosic acid. In the mixture of the three antioxidants, carnosic acid serves to maintain levels of carnosol, though it does so at least in part at the cost of its own degradation. PMID:22881034

  14. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations of ..beta..-D-Glucose and ..beta..-D-Xylose Degradation Mechanisms in Acidic Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, X.; Nimlos, M. R.; Davis, M.; Johnson, D. K.; Himmel, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations were employed to investigate, with explicit solvent water molecules, {beta}-d-glucose and {beta}-d-xylose degradation mechanisms in acidic media. The rate-limiting step in sugar degradation was found to be protonation of the hydroxyl groups on the sugar ring. We found that the structure of water molecules plays a significant role in the acidic sugar degradation pathways. Firstly, a water molecule competes with the hydroxyl group on the sugar ring for protons. Secondly, water forms hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl groups on the sugar rings, thus weakening the C-C and C-O bonds (each to a different degree). Note that the reaction pathways could be altered due to the change of relative stability of the C-C and C-O bonds. Thirdly, water molecules that are hydrogen-bonded to sugar hydroxyls could easily extract a proton from the reaction intermediate, terminating the reaction. Indeed, the sugar degradation pathway is complex due to multiple protonation probabilities and the surrounding water structure. Our experimental data support multiple sugar acidic degradation pathways.

  15. Involvement of Two Latex-Clearing Proteins during Rubber Degradation and Insights into the Subsequent Degradation Pathway Revealed by the Genome Sequence of Gordonia polyisoprenivorans Strain VH2

    PubMed Central

    Hiessl, Sebastian; Schuldes, Jörg; Thürmer, Andrea; Halbsguth, Tobias; Bröker, Daniel; Angelov, Angel; Liebl, Wolfgang; Daniel, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The increasing production of synthetic and natural poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) rubber leads to huge challenges in waste management. Only a few bacteria are known to degrade rubber, and little is known about the mechanism of microbial rubber degradation. The genome of Gordonia polyisoprenivorans strain VH2, which is one of the most effective rubber-degrading bacteria, was sequenced and annotated to elucidate the degradation pathway and other features of this actinomycete. The genome consists of a circular chromosome of 5,669,805 bp and a circular plasmid of 174,494 bp with average GC contents of 67.0% and 65.7%, respectively. It contains 5,110 putative protein-coding sequences, including many candidate genes responsible for rubber degradation and other biotechnically relevant pathways. Furthermore, we detected two homologues of a latex-clearing protein, which is supposed to be a key enzyme in rubber degradation. The deletion of these two genes for the first time revealed clear evidence that latex-clearing protein is essential for the microbial utilization of rubber. Based on the genome sequence, we predict a pathway for the microbial degradation of rubber which is supported by previous and current data on transposon mutagenesis, deletion mutants, applied comparative genomics, and literature search. PMID:22327575

  16. Use of an acidic Fe/O{sub 2} cell for wastewater treatment: Degradation of aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Brillas, E.; Sauleda, R.; Casado, J.

    1999-12-01

    Solutions containing 0.50 mol dm{sup {minus}3} Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and aniline concentrations between 129 and 1,000 ppm have been decontaminated using an acidic Fe/O{sub 2} cell with an Fe anode and a carbon-poly(tetrafluoroethylene) O{sub 2}-fed cathode. This system produces spontaneously strong oxidizing radicals, such as OH{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}} and HO{sub 2}{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}}, which react with pollutants. Decontamination is more efficient for solutions with pH > 3 where intermediates coagulate with the Fe(OH){sub 3} precipitate formed. A 95% degradation is reached after 1 h of treatment of 129 ppm of aniline at initial pH 4 and at 35 C. For higher substrate levels, pollutants are quickly destroyed if the pH is regulated between 4 and 5. After 2 h, solutions up to 500 ppm of aniline are almost completely degraded, whereas 81% of the degradation is reached for 1,000 ppm of substrate. Benzoquinone and nitrobenzene are detected as intermediates. An insignificant accumulation of these products is found in the treatment of 1,000 ppm of substrate, suggesting the formation of polymers that coagulate with the Fe(OH){sub 3} precipitate. Low concentrations of ammonium and nitrate ions have been determined in treated solutions. The major part of the initial carbon and nitrogen is retained in the precipitate, indicating that coagulation of intermediates predominates over their mineralization. A reaction pathway for the degradation of aniline involving all intermediates detected is proposed.

  17. Blue Light Induces a Distinct Starch Degradation Pathway in Guard Cells for Stomatal Opening.

    PubMed

    Horrer, Daniel; Flütsch, Sabrina; Pazmino, Diana; Matthews, Jack S A; Thalmann, Matthias; Nigro, Arianna; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Lawson, Tracy; Santelia, Diana

    2016-02-01

    Stomatal pores form a crucial interface between the leaf mesophyll and the atmosphere, controlling water and carbon balance in plants [1]. Major advances have been made in understanding the regulatory networks and ion fluxes in the guard cells surrounding the stomatal pore [2]. However, our knowledge on the role of carbon metabolism in these cells is still fragmentary [3-5]. In particular, the contribution of starch in stomatal opening remains elusive [6]. Here, we used Arabidopsis thaliana as a model plant to provide the first quantitative analysis of starch turnover in guard cells of intact leaves during the diurnal cycle. Starch is present in guard cells at the end of night, unlike in the rest of the leaf, but is rapidly degraded within 30 min of light. This process is critical for the rapidity of stomatal opening and biomass production. We exploited Arabidopsis molecular genetics to define the mechanism and regulation of guard cell starch metabolism, showing it to be mediated by a previously uncharacterized pathway. This involves the synergistic action of β-amylase 1 (BAM1) and α-amylase 3 (AMY3)-enzymes that are normally not required for nighttime starch degradation in other leaf tissues. This pathway is under the control of the phototropin-dependent blue-light signaling cascade and correlated with the activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. Our results show that guard cell starch degradation has an important role in plant growth by driving stomatal responses to light. PMID:26774787

  18. It's all about talking: two-way communication between proteasomal and lysosomal degradation pathways via ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Liebl, Martina P; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Selective degradation of proteins requires a fine-tuned coordination of the two major proteolytic pathways, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. Substrate selection and proteolytic activity are defined by a plethora of regulatory cofactors influencing each other. Both proteolytic pathways are initiated by ubiquitylation to mark substrate proteins for degradation, although the size and/or topology of the modification are different. In this context E3 ubiquitin ligases, ensuring the covalent attachment of activated ubiquitin to the substrate, are of special importance. The regulation of E3 ligase activity, competition between different E3 ligases for binding E2 conjugation enzymes and substrates, as well as their interplay with deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) represent key events in the cross talk between the UPS and autophagy. The coordination between both degradation routes is further influenced by heat shock factors and ubiquitin-binding proteins (UBPs) such as p97, p62, or optineurin. Mutations in enzymes and ubiquitin-binding proteins or a general decline of both proteolytic systems during aging result in accumulation of damaged and aggregated proteins. Thus further mechanistic understanding of how UPS and autophagy communicate might allow therapeutic intervention especially against age-related diseases. PMID:27225656

  19. Unraveling the specific regulation of the central pathway for anaerobic degradation of 3-methylbenzoate.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Javier F; Liu, Huixiang; Zamarro, María T; McMahon, Stephen; Liu, Huanting; Naismith, James H; Eberlein, Christian; Boll, Matthias; Carmona, Manuel; Díaz, Eduardo

    2015-05-01

    The mbd cluster encodes the anaerobic degradation of 3-methylbenzoate in the β-proteobacterium Azoarcus sp. CIB. The specific transcriptional regulation circuit that controls the expression of the mbd genes was investigated. The PO, PB 1, and P3 R promoters responsible for the expression of the mbd genes, their cognate MbdR transcriptional repressor, as well as the MbdR operator regions (ATACN10GTAT) have been characterized. The three-dimensional structure of MbdR has been solved revealing a conformation similar to that of other TetR family transcriptional regulators. The first intermediate of the catabolic pathway, i.e. 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA, was shown to act as the inducer molecule. An additional MbdR-dependent promoter, PA, which contributes to the expression of the CoA ligase that activates 3-methylbenzoate to 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA, was shown to be necessary for an efficient induction of the mbd genes. Our results suggest that the mbd cluster recruited a regulatory system based on the MbdR regulator and its target promoters to evolve a distinct central catabolic pathway that is only expressed for the anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds that generate 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA as the central metabolite. All these results highlight the importance of the regulatory systems in the evolution and adaptation of bacteria to the anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. PMID:25795774

  20. Unraveling the Specific Regulation of the Central Pathway for Anaerobic Degradation of 3-Methylbenzoate*

    PubMed Central

    Juárez, Javier F.; Liu, Huixiang; Zamarro, María T.; McMahon, Stephen; Liu, Huanting; Naismith, James H.; Eberlein, Christian; Boll, Matthias; Carmona, Manuel; Díaz, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The mbd cluster encodes the anaerobic degradation of 3-methylbenzoate in the β-proteobacterium Azoarcus sp. CIB. The specific transcriptional regulation circuit that controls the expression of the mbd genes was investigated. The PO, PB1, and P3R promoters responsible for the expression of the mbd genes, their cognate MbdR transcriptional repressor, as well as the MbdR operator regions (ATACN10GTAT) have been characterized. The three-dimensional structure of MbdR has been solved revealing a conformation similar to that of other TetR family transcriptional regulators. The first intermediate of the catabolic pathway, i.e. 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA, was shown to act as the inducer molecule. An additional MbdR-dependent promoter, PA, which contributes to the expression of the CoA ligase that activates 3-methylbenzoate to 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA, was shown to be necessary for an efficient induction of the mbd genes. Our results suggest that the mbd cluster recruited a regulatory system based on the MbdR regulator and its target promoters to evolve a distinct central catabolic pathway that is only expressed for the anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds that generate 3-methylbenzoyl-CoA as the central metabolite. All these results highlight the importance of the regulatory systems in the evolution and adaptation of bacteria to the anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. PMID:25795774

  1. Polysorbate 20 Degradation in Biopharmaceutical Formulations: Quantification of Free Fatty Acids, Characterization of Particulates, and Insights into the Degradation Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Anthony; Demeule, Barthélemy; Lin, Baiwei; Yadav, Sandeep

    2015-11-01

    Polysorbate 20 (PS20), a commonly used surfactant in biopharmaceuticals, showed degradation upon long-term (∼18-36 months) storage of two monoclonal antibody (mAb, mAb-A, and mAb-B) drug products at 2-8 °C. The PS20 degradation resulted in the accumulation of free fatty acids (FFA), which ultimately precipitated to form particles upon long-term storage. This study documents the development, qualification, and application of a method for FFA quantification in soluble and insoluble fraction of protein formulation. The method was applied to the quantification of capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, palmitic/oleic acid, and stearic acid in placebo as well as active protein formulations on stability. Quantification of FFA in both the soluble and insoluble fraction of mAb-A and mAb-B provided a better mechanistic understanding of PS20 degradation and the dynamics of subsequent fatty acid particle formation. Additionally, the use of this method for monitoring and quantitation of the FFA on real time storage stability appears to aid in identifying batches with higher probability for particulate formation upon extended storage at 5 °C. PMID:26419339

  2. Degradation of Amino Acids and Structure in Model Proteins and Bacteriophage MS2 by Chlorine, Bromine, and Ozone.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jong Kwon; Richards, David H; Wilson, Corey J; Mitch, William A

    2015-11-17

    Proteins are important targets of chemical disinfectants. To improve the understanding of disinfectant-protein reactions, this study characterized the disinfectant:protein molar ratios at which 50% degradation of oxidizable amino acids (i.e., Met, Tyr, Trp, His, Lys) and structure were observed during HOCl, HOBr, and O3 treatment of three well-characterized model proteins and bacteriophage MS2. A critical question is the extent to which the targeting of amino acids is driven by their disinfectant rate constants rather than their geometrical arrangement. Across the model proteins and bacteriophage MS2 (coat protein), differing widely in structure, methionine was preferentially targeted, forming predominantly methionine sulfoxide. This targeting concurs with its high disinfectant rate constants and supports its hypothesized role as a sacrificial antioxidant. Despite higher HOCl and HOBr rate constants with histidine and lysine than for tyrosine, tyrosine generally was degraded in preference to histidine, and to a lesser extent, lysine. These results concur with the prevalence of geometrical motifs featuring histidines or lysines near tyrosines, facilitating histidine and lysine regeneration upon Cl[+1] transfer from their chloramines to tyrosines. Lysine nitrile formation occurred at or above oxidant doses where 3,5-dihalotyrosine products began to degrade. For O3, which lacks a similar oxidant transfer pathway, histidine, tyrosine, and lysine degradation followed their relative O3 rate constants. Except for its low reactivity with lysine, the O3 doses required to degrade amino acids were as low as or lower than for HOCl or HOBr, indicating its oxidative efficiency. Loss of structure did not correlate with loss of particular amino acids, suggesting the need to characterize the oxidation of specific geometric motifs to understand structural degradation. PMID:26488608

  3. The radiation-induced degradation of hyaluronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeble, D. J.; Phillips, G. O.; Bothe, E.; Schuchmann, H.-P.; von Sonntag, C.

    Free-radical-induced chain scission in hyaluronic acid in aqueous solution has been studied using pulse radiolysis. In the absence of oxygen (nitrous oxide-saturated solutions) the process of chain breakage was monitored by measuring changes in conductivity resulting from the release of condensed counter-ions (K +), originally located in the vicinity of the break. The rate of formation of breaks was found to be first order and was catalysed by acid and base (overall half-lives at pH values of 4.8, 7 and 10.2 were 0.6, 1 and 0.1 ms). It would seem that more than two independent reaction pathways are involved in the cleavage processes. In the presence of oxygen (N 2O/O 2), chain scission has been measured by pulse radiolysis monitoring changes in scattered light intensity as well as following conductivity changes. In oxygenated solutions, the kinetics of OH-radical-induced chain scission were found to contain a second-order component; the rate of breakage was base catalysed. Yield-dose plots for chain breaks (N 2O/O 2, pulse-irradiated), showed a marked dependence on pH, with G-values (molecules/100 eV) of 0.7, 2.5 and 4.7 at pH values of 7, 9.7 and 10.4, respectively. Steady-state radiolysis (N 2O/O 2) was used to determine G-values for oxygen consumption [ G(-O 2) ≈ 6], carbon dioxide formation [ G(CO 2) = 0.8 in the absence of O 2 and 1.3 in its presence] and peroxide formation [ G(H 2O 2) ≈ 2; G(organic hydroperoxide) < 0.15].

  4. Degradation of 3-phenylbutyric acid by Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    Sariaslani, F S; Sudmeier, J L; Focht, D D

    1982-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. isolated by selective culture with 3-phenylbutyrate (3-PB) as the sole carbon source metabolized the compound through two different pathways by initial oxidation of the benzene ring and by initial oxidation of the side chain. During early exponential growth, a catechol substance identified as 3-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)butyrate (2,3-DHPB) and its meta-cleavage product 2-hydroxy-7-methyl-6-oxononadioic-2,4-dienoic acid were produced. These products disappeared during late exponential growth, and considerable amounts of 2,3-DHPB reacted to form brownish polymeric substances. The catechol intermediate 2,3-DHPB could not be isolated, but cell-free extracts were able only to oxidize 3-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)propionate of all dihydroxy aromatic acids tested. Moreover, a reaction product caused by dehydration of 2,3-DHPB on silica gel was isolated and identified by spectral analysis as (--)-8-hydroxy-4-methyl-3,4-dihydrocoumarin. 3-Phenylpropionate and a hydroxycinnamate were found in supernatants of cultures grown on 3-PB; phenylacetate and benzoate were found in supernatants of cultures grown on 3-phenylpropionate; and phenylacetate was found in cultures grown on cinnamate. Cells grown on 3-PB rapidly oxidized 3-phenylpropionate, cinnamate, catechol, and 3-(2,3-dihydroxyphenyl)propionate, whereas 2-phenylpropionate, 2,3-dihydroxycinnamate, benzoate, phenylacetate, and salicylate were oxidized at much slower rates. Phenylsuccinate was not utilized for growth nor was it oxidized by washed cell suspensions grown on 3-PB. However, dual axenic cultures of Pseudomonas acidovorans and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which could not grow on phenylsuccinate alone, could grow syntrophically and produced the same metabolites found during catabolism of 3-PB by Pseudomonas sp. Washed cell suspensions of dual axenic cultures also immediately oxidized phenylsuccinate, 3-phenylpropionate, cinnamate, phenylacetate, and benzoate. PMID:7118830

  5. Dissecting Abscisic Acid Signaling Pathways Involved in Cuticle Formation.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fuqiang; Brosché, Mikael; Lehtonen, Mikko T; Amiryousefi, Ali; Xu, Enjun; Punkkinen, Matleena; Valkonen, Jari P T; Fujii, Hiroaki; Overmyer, Kirk

    2016-06-01

    The cuticle is the outer physical barrier of aerial plant surfaces and an important interaction point between plants and the environment. Many environmental stresses affect cuticle formation, yet the regulatory pathways involved remain undefined. We used a genetics and gene expression analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana to define an abscisic acid (ABA) signaling loop that positively regulates cuticle formation via the core ABA signaling pathway, including the PYR/PYL receptors, PP2C phosphatase, and SNF1-Related Protein Kinase (SnRK) 2.2/SnRK2.3/SnRK2.6. Downstream of the SnRK2 kinases, cuticle formation was not regulated by the ABA-responsive element-binding transcription factors but rather by DEWAX, MYB16, MYB94, and MYB96. Additionally, low air humidity increased cuticle formation independent of the core ABA pathway and cell death/reactive oxygen species signaling attenuated expression of cuticle-biosynthesis genes. In Physcomitrella patens, exogenous ABA suppressed expression of cuticle-related genes, whose Arabidopsis orthologs were ABA-induced. Hence, the mechanisms regulating cuticle formation are conserved but sophisticated in land plants. Signaling specifically related to cuticle deficiency was identified to play a major role in the adaptation of ABA signaling pathway mutants to increased humidity and in modulating their immunity to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis. These results define a cuticle-specific downstream branch in the ABA signaling pathway that regulates responses to the external environment. PMID:27060495

  6. Formation and Operation of the Histidine-degrading Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lessie, Thomas G.; Neidhardt, Frederick C.

    1967-01-01

    Histidine ammonia lyase (histidase), urocanase, and the capacity to degrade formiminoglutamate, which are respectively involved in steps I, II, and IV in the catabolism of histidine, were induced during growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on histidine or urocanate, and were formed gratuitously in the presence of dihydro-urocanate. Urocanase-deficient bacteria formed enzymes I and IV constitutively; presumably they accumulate enough urocanate from the breakdown of endogenous histidine to induce formation of the pathway. Urocanate did not satisfy the histidine requirement of a histidine auxotroph, indicating that it probably acted as an inducer without being converted to histidine. The results imply that urocanate is the physiological inducer of the histidine-degrading enzymes in P. aeruginosa. Enzymes of the pathway were extremely sensitive to catabolite repression; enzymes I and II, but not IV, were coordinately repressed. Our results suggest a specific involvement of nitrogenous metabolites in the repression. Mutant bacteria with altered sensitivity to repression were obtained. The molecular weight of partially purified histidase was estimated at 210,000 by sucrose gradient centrifugation. Its Km for histidine was 2 × 10−3 m in tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane chloride buffer. Sigmoid saturation curves were obtained in pyrophosphate buffer, indicating that the enzyme might have multiple binding sites for histidine. Under certain conditions, histidase appeared to be partially inactive in vivo. These findings suggest that some sort of allosteric interaction involving histidase may play a role in governing the operation of the pathway of histidine catabolism. PMID:4290562

  7. Genetic immunization based on the ubiquitin-fusion degradation pathway against Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Bin; Hiromatsu, Kenji; Hisaeda, Hajime; Duan, Xuefeng; Imai, Takashi; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2010-02-12

    Cytotoxic CD8{sup +} T cells are particularly important to the development of protective immunity against the intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. We have developed a new effective strategy of genetic immunization by activating CD8{sup +} T cells through the ubiquitin-fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. We constructed expression plasmids encoding the amastigote surface protein-2 (ASP-2) of T. cruzi. To induce the UFD pathway, a chimeric gene encoding ubiquitin fused to ASP-2 (pUB-ASP-2) was constructed. Mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 presented lower parasitemia and longer survival period, compared with mice immunized with pASP-2 alone. Depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells abolished protection against T. cruzi in mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 while depletion of CD4{sup +} T cells did not influence the effective immunity. Mice deficient in LMP2 or LMP7, subunits of immunoproteasomes, were not able to develop protective immunity induced. These results suggest that ubiquitin-fused antigens expressed in antigen-presenting cells were effectively degraded via the UFD pathway, and subsequently activated CD8{sup +} T cells. Consequently, immunization with pUB-ASP-2 was able to induce potent protective immunity against infection of T. cruzi.

  8. Organelle interactions and possible degradation pathways visualized in high-pressure frozen algal cells.

    PubMed

    Aichinger, N; Lütz-Meindl, U

    2005-08-01

    Summary Organelle interactions, although essential for both anabolic and catabolic pathways in plant cells have not been examined in detail so far. In the present study the structure of different organelle-organelle, organelle-vesicle and organelle-membrane interactions were investigated in growing and nongrowing cells of the green alga Micrasterias denticulata by use of high pressure freeze fixation and energy filtering transmission electron microscopy. It became clear that contacts between mitochondria always occur by formation of a cone-shaped protuberance of one of the mitochondria which penetrates into its fusion partner. In the same way, structural interactions between mitochondria and mucilage vesicles and between microbodies and mucilage vesicles are achieved. Lytic compartments contact mitochondria or mucilage vesicles again by forming protuberances and by extending their contents into the respective compartment. Detached portions of mitochondria are found inside lytic compartments as a consequence of such interactions. Mitochondria found in contact with the plasma membrane reveal structural disintegration. Our study shows that interactions of organelles and vesicles are frequent events in Micrasterias cells of different ages. The interactive contacts between lytic compartments and organelles or vesicles suggest a degradation pathway different from autophagy processes described in the literature. Both the interactions between vesicles and organelles and the degradation pathways occur independently from cytoskeleton function as demonstrated by use of cytochalasin D and the microtubule inhibitor amiprophos-methyl. PMID:16159344

  9. Metabolic pathways utilized by Phanerochaete chrysosporium for degradation of the cyclodiene pesticide endosulfan.

    PubMed Central

    Kullman, S W; Matsumura, F

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cultures of white rot fungi not favoring the production of lignin and manganese peroxidases are effective in degrading certain xenobiotics. In this study we have used endosulfan as a model xenobiotic to assess the enzymatic mechanisms of pesticide metabolism under ligninolytic (nutrient-deficient) and nonligninolytic (nutrient-rich) culture conditions. Rapid metabolism of this chlorinated pesticide occurred under each nutrient condition tested. However, the extent of degradation and the nature of the metabolic products differed for nutrient-deficient and nutrient-rich media. The pathways for endosulfan metabolism were characterized by analysis of the fungal metabolites produced. The major endosulfan metabolites were identified by gas chromatography-electron capture detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as endosulfan sulfate, endosulfan diol, endosulfan hydroxyether, and a unknown metabolite tentatively identified as endosulfan dialdehyde. The nature of the metabolites formed indicates that this organism utilizes both oxidative and hydrolytic pathways for metabolism of this pesticide. Piperonyl butoxide, a known cytochrome P-450 inhibitor, significantly inhibited the oxidation of endosulfan to endosulfan sulfate and enhanced hydrolysis of endosulfan to endosulfan diol. We suggest that the metabolism of endosulfan is mediated by two divergent pathways, one hydrolytic and the other oxidative. Judging by the inactivity of extracellular fluid and partially purified lignin peroxidase in metabolizing endosulfan, we conclude that metabolism of this compound does not involve the action of extracellular peroxidases. PMID:8593059

  10. Sequestration of a highly reactive intermediate in an evolving pathway for degradation of pentachlorophenol

    PubMed Central

    Yadid, Itamar; Rudolph, Johannes; Hlouchova, Klara; Copley, Shelley D.

    2013-01-01

    Microbes in contaminated environments often evolve new metabolic pathways for detoxification or degradation of pollutants. In some cases, intermediates in newly evolved pathways are more toxic than the initial compound. The initial step in the degradation of pentachlorophenol by Sphingobium chlorophenolicum generates a particularly reactive intermediate; tetrachlorobenzoquinone (TCBQ) is a potent alkylating agent that reacts with cellular thiols at a diffusion-controlled rate. TCBQ reductase (PcpD), an FMN- and NADH-dependent reductase, catalyzes the reduction of TCBQ to tetrachlorohydroquinone. In the presence of PcpD, TCBQ formed by pentachlorophenol hydroxylase (PcpB) is sequestered until it is reduced to the less toxic tetrachlorohydroquinone, protecting the bacterium from the toxic effects of TCBQ and maintaining flux through the pathway. The toxicity of TCBQ may have exerted selective pressure to maintain slow turnover of PcpB (0.02 s−1) so that a transient interaction between PcpB and PcpD can occur before TCBQ is released from the active site of PcpB. PMID:23676275

  11. The Role of the Ubiquitin Proteasome Pathway in Keratin Intermediate Filament Protein Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rogel, Micah R.; Jaitovich, Ariel; Ridge, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    Lung injury, whether caused by hypoxic or mechanical stresses, elicits a variety of responses at the cellular level. Alveolar epithelial cells respond and adapt to such injurious stimuli by reorganizing the cellular cytoskeleton, mainly accomplished through modification of the intermediate filament (IF) network. The structural and mechanical integrity in epithelial cells is maintained through this adaptive reorganization response. Keratin, the predominant IF expressed in epithelial cells, displays highly dynamic properties in response to injury, sometimes in the form of degradation of the keratin IF network. Post-translational modification, such as phosphorylation, targets keratin proteins for degradation in these circumstances. As with other structural and regulatory proteins, turnover of keratin is regulated by the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway. The degradation process begins with activation of Ub by the Ub-activating enzyme (E1), followed by the exchange of Ub to the Ub-conjugating enzyme (E2). E2 shuttles the Ub molecule to the substrate-specific Ub ligase (E3), which then delivers the Ub to the substrate protein, thereby targeting it for degradation. In some cases of injury and IF-related disease, aggresomes form in epithelial cells. The mechanisms that regulate aggresome formation are currently unknown, although proteasome overload may play a role. Therefore, a more complete understanding of keratin degradation—causes, mechanisms, and consequences—will allow for a greater understanding of epithelial cell biology and lung pathology alike. PMID:20160151

  12. Ozonation of chlortetracycline in the aqueous phase: Degradation intermediates and pathway confirmed by NMR.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Hammad; Jung, Jin-Young

    2016-06-01

    Chlortetracycline (CTC) degradation mechanism in aqueous phase ozonation was evaluated for degradation mechanism and its correlation with the biodegradability and mineralization. CTC was removed within 8 and 4 min of ozonation at pH 2.2 and 7.0, respectively. At pH 2.2, HPLC-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS) detected 30 products. The structures for some of these products were proposed on the basis of ozonation chemistry, CTC structure and MS data; these structures were then confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. Double bond cleavages, dimethyl amino group oxidation, opening and removal of the aromatic ring and dechlorination, mostly direct ozonation reactions, gave products with molecular weights (m.w.) 494, 510, 524, 495 and 413, respectively. Subsequent degradations gave products with m.w. 449, 465, 463 and 415. These products were arranged into a degradation pathway. At pH 7.0, the rate of reaction was increased, though the detected products were similar. Direct ozonation at pH 2.2 increased the biodegradability by altering the structures of CTC and its products. Nevertheless, direct ozonation alone remained insufficient for the mineralization, which was efficient at pH 7.0 due to the production of free radicals. PMID:26963235

  13. Optimization of polyphosphate degradation and phosphate secretion using hybrid metabolic pathways and engineered host strains

    SciTech Connect

    Dien, S.J. van; Keasling, J.D.

    1998-09-20

    Polyphosphate degradation and phosphate secretion were optimized in Escherichia coli strains over-expressing the E. coli polyphosphate kinase gene (ppk) and either the E. coli polyphosphatase gene (ppx) or the Saccharomyces cerevisiae polyphosphatase gene (scPPX1) from different inducible promoters on medium- and high-copy plasmids. The use of a host strain without functional ppk or ppx genes on the chromosome yielded the highest levels of polyphosphate, as well as the fastest degradation of polyphosphate when the gene for polyphosphatase was induced. The introduction of a hybrid metabolic pathway consisting of the E. coli ppk gene and the S cerevisiae polyphosphatase gene resulted in lower polyphosphate concentrations than when using both the ppk and ppx genes from E. coli, and did not significantly improve the degradation rate. It was also found that the rate of polyphosphate degradation was highest when ppx was induced late in growth, most likely due to the high intracellular polyphosphate concentration. The phosphate released from polyphosphate allowed the growth of phosphate-starved cells; excess phosphate was secreted into the medium, leading to a down-regulation of the phosphate-starvation (Pho) response. The production of alkaline phosphatase, an indicator of the Pho response, can be precisely controlled by manipulating the degree of ppx induction.

  14. The exoribonuclease Dis3L2 defines a novel eukaryotic RNA degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Malecki, Michal; Viegas, Sandra C; Carneiro, Tiago; Golik, Pawel; Dressaire, Clémentine; Ferreira, Miguel G; Arraiano, Cecília M

    2013-07-01

    The final step of cytoplasmic mRNA degradation proceeds in either a 5'-3' direction catalysed by Xrn1 or in a 3'-5' direction catalysed by the exosome. Dis3/Rrp44, an RNase II family protein, is the catalytic subunit of the exosome. In humans, there are three paralogues of this enzyme: DIS3, DIS3L, and DIS3L2. In this work, we identified a novel Schizosaccharomyces pombe exonuclease belonging to the conserved family of human DIS3L2 and plant SOV. Dis3L2 does not interact with the exosome components and localizes in the cytoplasm and in cytoplasmic foci, which are docked to P-bodies. Deletion of dis3l2(+) is synthetically lethal with xrn1Δ, while deletion of dis3l2(+) in an lsm1Δ background results in the accumulation of transcripts and slower mRNA degradation rates. Accumulated transcripts show enhanced uridylation and in vitro Dis3L2 displays a preference for uridylated substrates. Altogether, our results suggest that in S. pombe, and possibly in most other eukaryotes, Dis3L2 is an important factor in mRNA degradation. Therefore, this novel 3'-5' RNA decay pathway represents an alternative to degradation by Xrn1 and the exosome. PMID:23503588

  15. Jasmonate-inducible plant enzymes degrade essential amino acids in the herbivore midgut

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Kuchar, Jason A.; Phinney, Brett S.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2005-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) activates host defense responses against a broad spectrum of herbivores. Although it is well established that JA controls the expression of a large set of target genes in response to tissue damage, very few gene products have been shown to play a direct role in reducing herbivore performance. To test the hypothesis that JA-inducible proteins (JIPs) thwart attack by disrupting digestive processes in the insect gut, we used a MS-based approach to identify host proteins that accumulate in the midgut of Manduca sexta larvae reared on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. We show that two JIPs, arginase and threonine deaminase (TD), act in the M. sexta midgut to catabolize the essential amino acids Arg and Thr, respectively. Transgenic plants that overexpress arginase were more resistant to M. sexta larvae, and this effect was correlated with reduced levels of midgut Arg. We present evidence indicating that the ability of TD to degrade Thr in the midgut is enhanced by herbivore-induced proteolytic removal of the enzyme's C-terminal regulatory domain, which confers negative feedback regulation by isoleucine in planta. Our results demonstrate that the JA signaling pathway strongly influences the midgut protein content of phytophagous insects and support the hypothesis that catabolism of amino acids in the insect digestive tract by host enzymes plays a role in plant protection against herbivores. PMID:16357201

  16. Induction of DREB2A pathway with repression of E2F, jasmonic acid biosynthetic and photosynthesis pathways in cold acclimation-specific freeze-resistant wheat crown.

    PubMed

    Karki, Amrit; Horvath, David P; Sutton, Fedora

    2013-03-01

    Winter wheat lines can achieve cold acclimation (development of tolerance to freezing temperatures) and vernalization (delay in transition from vegetative to reproductive phase) in response to low non-freezing temperatures. To describe cold-acclimation-specific processes and pathways, we utilized cold acclimation transcriptomic data from two lines varying in freeze survival but not vernalization. These lines, designated freeze-resistant (FR) and freeze-susceptible (FS), were the source of crown tissue RNA. Well-annotated differentially expressed genes (p ≤ 0.005 and fold change ≥ 2 in response to 4 weeks cold acclimation) were used for gene ontology and pathway analysis. "Abiotic stimuli" was identified as the most enriched and unique for FR. Unique to FS was "cytoplasmic components." Pathway analysis revealed the "triacylglycerol degradation" pathway as significantly downregulated and common to both FR and FS. The most enriched of FR pathways was "neighbors of DREB2A," with the highest positive median fold change. The "13-LOX and 13-HPL" and the "E2F" pathways were enriched in FR only with a negative median fold change. The "jasmonic acid biosynthesis" pathway and four "photosynthetic-associated" pathways were enriched in both FR and FS but with a more negative median fold change in FR than in FS. A pathway unique to FS was "binding partners of LHCA1," which was enriched only in FS with a significant negative median fold change. We propose that the DREB2A, E2F, jasmonic acid biosynthesis, and photosynthetic pathways are critical for discrimination between cold-acclimated lines varying in freeze survival. PMID:23262780

  17. Degradation of Acid Orange 7 Dye in Two Hybrid Plasma Discharge Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yongjun; Lei, Lecheng; Zhang, Xingwang; Ding, Jiandong

    2014-11-01

    To get an optimized pulsed electrical plasma discharge reactor and to increase the energy utilization efficiency in the removal of pollutants, two hybrid plasma discharge reactors were designed and optimized. The reactors were compared via the discharge characteristics, energy transfer efficiency, the yields of the active species and the energy utilization in dye wastewater degradation. The results showed that under the same AC input power, the characteristics of the discharge waveform of the point-to-plate reactor were better. Under the same AC input power, the two reactors both had almost the same peak voltage of 22 kV. The peak current of the point-to-plate reactor was 146 A, while that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor was only 48.8 A. The peak powers of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.38 MW and 1.01 MW, respectively. The energy per pulse of the point-to-plate reactor was 0.2221 J, which was about 29.4% higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (0.1716 J). To remove 50% Acid Orange 7 (AO7), the energy utilizations of the point-to-plate reactor and the wire-to-cylinder reactor were 1.02 × 10-9 mol/L and 0.61 × 10-9 mol/L, respectively. In the point-to-plate reactor, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in pure water was 3.6 mmol/L after 40 min of discharge, which was higher than that of the wire-to-cylinder reactor (2.5 mmol/L). The concentration of liquid phase ozone in the point-to-plate reactor (5.7 × 10-2 mmol/L) was about 26.7% higher than that in the wire-to-cylinder reactor (4.5 × 10-2 mmol/L). The analysis results of the variance showed that the type of reactor and reaction time had significant impacts on the yields of the hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The main degradation intermediates of AO7 identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GCMS) were acetic acid, maleic anhydride, p-benzoquinone, phenol, benzoic acid, phthalic anhydride, coumarin and 2-naphthol. Proposed degradation pathways were

  18. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator degradation: cross-talk between the ubiquitylation and SUMOylation pathways.

    PubMed

    Ahner, Annette; Gong, Xiaoyan; Frizzell, Raymond A

    2013-09-01

    Defining the significant checkpoints in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) biogenesis should identify targets for therapeutic intervention with CFTR folding mutants such as F508del. Although the role of ubiquitylation and the ubiquitin proteasome system is well established in the degradation of this common CFTR mutant, the part played by SUMOylation is a novel aspect of CFTR biogenesis/quality control. We identified this post-translational modification of CFTR as resulting from its interaction with small heat shock proteins (Hsps), which were found to selectively facilitate the degradation of F508del through a physical interaction with the SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) E2 enzyme, Ubc9. Hsp27 promoted the SUMOylation of mutant CFTR by the SUMO-2 paralogue, which can form poly-chains. Poly-SUMO chains are then recognized by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase, RNF4, which elicited F508del degradation in a Hsp27-dependent manner. This work identifies a sequential connection between the SUMO and ubiquitin modifications of the CFTR mutant: Hsp27-mediated SUMO-2 modification, followed by ubiquitylation via RNF4 and degradation of the mutant via the proteasome. Other examples of the intricate cross-talk between the SUMO and ubiquitin pathways are discussed with reference to other substrates; many of these are competitive and lead to different outcomes. It is reasonable to anticipate that further research on SUMO-ubiquitin pathway interactions will identify additional layers of complexity in the process of CFTR biogenesis and quality control. PMID:23809253

  19. Orthogonal Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Pathway Improves Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Dawn T; HamediRad, Mohammad; Yuan, Yongbo; Zhao, Huimin

    2015-07-17

    Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) are a form of biodiesel that can be microbially produced via a transesterification reaction of fatty acids with ethanol. The titer of microbially produced FAEEs can be greatly reduced by unbalanced metabolism and an insufficient supply of fatty acids, resulting in a commercially inviable process. Here, we report on a pathway engineering strategy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhancing the titer of microbially produced FAEEs by providing the cells with an orthogonal route for fatty acid synthesis. The fatty acids generated from this heterologous pathway would supply the FAEE production, safeguarding endogenous fatty acids for cellular metabolism and growth. We investigated the heterologous expression of a Type-I fatty acid synthase (FAS) from Brevibacterium ammoniagenes coupled with WS/DGAT, the wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme that catalyzes the transesterification reaction with ethanol. Strains harboring the orthologous fatty acid synthesis yielded a 6.3-fold increase in FAEE titer compared to strains without the heterologous FAS. Variations in fatty acid chain length and degree of saturation can affect the quality of the biodiesel; therefore, we also investigated the diversity of the fatty acid production profile of FAS enzymes from other Actinomyces organisms. PMID:25594225

  20. Degradation of extracellular matrix and its components by hypobromous acid

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Martin D.; McNiven, Tane N.; Davies, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    EPO (eosinophil peroxidase) and MPO (myeloperoxidase) are highly basic haem enzymes that can catalyse the production of HOBr (hypobromous acid). They are released extracellularly by activated leucocytes and their binding to the polyanionic glycosa-minoglycan components of extracellular matrix (proteoglycans and hyaluronan) may localize the production of HOBr to these materials. It is shown in the present paper that the reaction of HOBr with glycosaminoglycans (heparan sulfate, heparin, chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronan) generates polymer-derived N-bromo derivatives (bromamines, dibromamines, N-bromosulfon-amides and bromamides). Decomposition of these species, which can occur spontaneously and/or via one-electron reduction by low-valent transition metal ions (Cu+ and Fe2+), results in polymer fragmentation and modification. One-electron reduction of the N-bromo derivatives generates radicals that have been detected by EPR spin trapping. The species detected are consistent with metal ion-dependent polymer fragmentation and modification being initiated by the formation of nitrogen-centred (aminyl, N-bromoaminyl, sulfonamidyl and amidyl) radicals. Previous studies have shown that the reaction of HOBr with proteins generates N-bromo derivatives and results in fragmentation of the polypeptide backbone. The reaction of HOBr with extracellular matrix synthesized by smooth muscle cells in vitro induces the release of carbohydrate and protein components in a time-dependent manner, which is consistent with fragmentation of these materials via the formation of N-bromo derivatives. The degradation of extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans and proteins by HOBr may contribute to tissue damage associated with inflammatory diseases such as asthma. PMID:17014424

  1. Biodegradability of HCH in agricultural soils from Guadeloupe (French West Indies): identification of the lin genes involved in the HCH degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Laquitaine, L; Durimel, A; de Alencastro, L F; Jean-Marius, C; Gros, O; Gaspard, S

    2016-01-01

    Banana has been a main agricultural product in the French West Indies (Guadeloupe and Martinique) since the 1960s. This crop requires the intensive use of pesticides to prevent attacks by insect pests. Chlorinated pesticides, such as hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), chlordecone and dieldrin, were used until the beginning of the 1990s, resulting in a generalized diffuse contamination of the soil and water in the areas of banana production, hence the need to develop solutions for cleanup of the polluted sites. The aims of this work were (i) to assess lindane degradation in soil slurry microcosms treated with lindane at 10 mg/L and (ii) to detect the catabolic genes involved in the HCH degradation pathway. The soil slurry microcosm system showed a 40% lindane degradation efficiency at the end of a 30-day experiment. Lower lindane removal was also detected in the abiotic controls, probably caused by pesticide adsorption to soil particles. Indeed, the lindane concentration decreased from 6000 to 1330 ng/mL and from 800 to 340 ng/mL for the biotic and abiotic soils, respectively. Nevertheless, some of the genes involved in the HCH degradation pathway were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from crude deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from the Guadeloupe agricultural soil, suggesting that HCH degradation is probably mediated by bacteria closely related to the family Sphingomonadaceae. PMID:26686518

  2. Characterization of the metabolic pathway and catabolic gene expression in biphenyl degrading marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa JP-11.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Jaya; Das, Surajit

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic pathway of biphenyl assimilation and the catabolic gene expression in a marine bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa JP-11, isolated from the coastal sediments of Odisha, India have been studied. This strain utilized 98.86% ± 2.29% of biphenyl within 72 h when supplied as the sole source of carbon, however, preferential utilization of glucose was observed over catechol and biphenyl when grown in a complex medium. Combination of chromatographic and spectrophotometric techniques confirmed the catechol pathway and identified 2-Hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2, 4-dienoate as the intermediate metabolic product. Assimilation of biphenyl was initiated by its dioxygenation, forming cis-2, 3-dihydro-2, 3-dihydroxybiphenyl subsequently transformed to 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2, 4-dienoate. In the lower pathway, cis-1, 6-dihydroxy-2, 4-cyclohexadiene-1-carboxylic acid was detected which formed catechol before entering into the Krebs cycle. Detection of key enzyme catechol-1, 2-dioxygenase in the cell-free extract of P. aeruginosa JP-11 supported the proposed degradation pathway. The primary enzyme for biphenyl assimilation, biphenyl dioxygenase encoded by bphA gene was found in the genome of the isolate. On increasing biphenyl stress (50, 100, 150 and 200 mg L(-1)), bphA gene showed a significant (P < 0.01) up-regulation upto 43.5 folds. Production of biosurfactant was confirmed and the rhamnolipid synthesizing gene rhlAB was amplified. This gene also showed a significant (P < 0.01) up-regulation upto 258 folds on increasing biphenyl stress. PMID:26519802

  3. Molecular characterization of the Akt-TOR signaling pathway in rainbow trout: potential role in muscle growth/degradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Akt-TOR signaling pathway plays a key role in cellular metabolism and muscle growth. Hormone, nutrition and stress factors affect the Akt-TOR pathway by regulating gene transcription, protein synthesis and degradation. In addition, we previously showed that energetic demands elevate during vit...

  4. The Branched-Chain Dodecylbenzene Sulfonate Degradation Pathway of Pseudomonas aeruginosa W51D Involves a Novel Route for Degradation of the Surfactant Lateral Alkyl Chain

    PubMed Central

    Campos-García, Jesús; Esteve, Abraham; Vázquez-Duhalt, Rafael; Ramos, Juán Luis; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa W51D is able to grow by using branched-chain dodecylbenzene sulfonates (B-DBS) or the terpenic alcohol citronellol as a sole source of carbon. A mutant derived from this strain (W51M1) is unable to degrade citronellol but still grows on B-DBS, showing that the citronellol degradation route is not the main pathway involved in the degradation of the surfactant alkyl moiety. The structures of the main B-DBS isomers and of some intermediates were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis, and a possible catabolic route is proposed. PMID:10427075

  5. Main chain acid-degradable polymers for the delivery of bioactive materials

    DOEpatents

    Frechet, Jean M. J.; Standley, Stephany M.; Jain, Rachna; Lee, Cameron C.

    2012-03-20

    Novel main chain acid degradable polymer backbones and drug delivery systems comprised of materials capable of delivering bioactive materials to cells for use as vaccines or other therapeutic agents are described. The polymers are synthesized using monomers that contain acid-degradable linkages cleavable under mild acidic conditions. The main chain of the resulting polymers readily degrade into many small molecules at low pH, but remain relatively stable and intact at physiological pH. The new materials have the common characteristic of being able to degrade by acid hydrolysis under conditions commonly found within the endosomal or lysosomal compartments of cells thereby releasing their payload within the cell. The materials can also be used for the delivery of therapeutics to the acidic regions of tumors and other sites of inflammation.

  6. Life in hot acid: pathway analyses in extremely thermoacidophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Auernik, Kathryne S; Cooper, Charlotte R; Kelly, Robert M

    2008-10-01

    The extremely thermoacidophilic archaea are a particularly intriguing group of microorganisms that must simultaneously cope with biologically extreme pHs (< or = 4) and temperatures (Topt > or = 60 degrees C) in their natural environments. Their expanding biotechnological significance relates to their role in biomining of base and precious metals and their unique mechanisms of survival in hot acid, at both the cellular and biomolecular levels. Recent developments, such as advances in understanding of heavy metal tolerance mechanisms, implementation of a genetic system, and discovery of a new carbon fixation pathway, have been facilitated by the availability of genome sequence data and molecular genetic systems. As a result, new insights into the metabolic pathways and physiological features that define extreme thermoacidophily have been obtained, in some cases suggesting prospects for biotechnological opportunities. PMID:18760359

  7. Are Phragmites australis enzymes involved in the degradation of the textile azo dye acid orange 7?

    PubMed

    Carias, Cátia C; Novais, Júlio M; Martins-Dias, Susete

    2008-01-01

    The role of antioxidant and detoxification enzymes of Phragmites australis, in the degradation of an azo dye, acid orange 7 (AO7), was studied. Activities of several enzymes involved in plant protection against stress were assayed through the activity characterization of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidases (POD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APOX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), obtained from P. australis crude extracts of leaves, stems and roots. A sub-surface vertical flow constructed wetland, planted with P. australis was used to test the plants response to the AO7 exposure at two different concentrations (130 and 700 mg l(-1)). An activity increase was detected for an AO7 concentration of 130 mg l(-1) for most enzymes studied (SOD, CAT and APOX), especially in leaves, suggesting a response of the reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes to the chemical stress imposed. GST activity increase in this situation can also be interpreted as an activation of the detoxification pathway and subsequent AO7 conjugation. A totally different behaviour was observed for AO7 at 700 mg l(-1). An evident decrease in activity was observed for SOD, CAT, APOX and GST, probably due to enzymatic inhibition by AO7. Contrarily, DHAR activity augmented drastically in this situation. POD activity was not greatly affected during trial. Altogether these results suggest that P. australis effectively uses the ascorbate-glutathione pathway for the detoxification of AO7. PMID:17336060

  8. Oxidative degradation of organic acids conjugated with sulfite oxidation in flue gas desulfurization

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    Organic acid degradation conjugated with sulfite oxidation has been studied under flue gas desulfurization (EGD) conditions. The oxidative degradation constant, k/sub 12/, is defined as the ratio of organic acid degradation rate and sulfite oxidation rate after being normalized by the concentrations of organic acid and dissolved S(IV). K/sub 12/, not significantly affected by pH or dissolved oxygen, is around 10/sup -3/ in the absence of manganese or iron. However, k/sub 12/ is increased by certain transition metals such as Co, Ni, and Fe and is decreased by Mn and halides. Lower dissolved S(IV) magnified these effects. No k/sub 12/ greater than 4 x 10/sup -3/ or smaller than 0.1 x 10/sup -3/ has been observed. A free radical mechanism was proposed to describe the kinetics: (1) sulfate free radical is the major radical responsible to the degradation of organic acid; (2) ferrous generates sulfate radical by reacting with monoxypersulfate to enhance k/sub 12/; (3) manganous consumes sulfate radical to decrease k/sub 12/; (4) dissolved S(IV) competes with ferrous for monoxypersulfate and with manganous for sulfate radical to demonstrate the effects of dissolved S(IV) on k/sub 12/. Hydroxy and sulfonated carboxylic acids degrade approximately three times slower than saturated dicarboxylic acids; while maleic acid, an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid, degraded an order of magnitude faster. A wide spectrum of degradation products of adipic acid were found, including carbon dioxide - the major product, glutaric semialdehyde - the major retained product with low manganese, glutaric acid and valeric acids - the major retained product with high manganese, lower molecular weight mono- and dicarboxylic acids, other carbonyl compounds, and hydrocarbons.

  9. Inherently antioxidant and antimicrobial tannic acid release from poly(tannic acid) nanoparticles with controllable degradability.

    PubMed

    Sahiner, Nurettin; Sagbas, Selin; Aktas, Nahit; Silan, Coskun

    2016-06-01

    From a natural polyphenol, Tannic acid (TA), poly(TA) nanoparticles were readily prepared using a single step approach with three different biocompatible crosslinkers; trimethylolpropane triglycidyl ether (TMPGDE), poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEGGE), and trisodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). P(TA) particles were obtained with controllable diameters between 400 to 800nm with -25mV surface charge. The effect of synthesis conditions, such as the emulsion medium, pH values of TA solution, and the type of crosslinker, on the shape, size, dispersity, yield, and degradability of poly(Tannic Acid) (p(TA)) nanoparticles was systematically investigated. The hydrolytic degradation amount in physiological pH conditions of 5.4, 7.4, and 9.0 at 37.5°C were found to be in the order TMPGDEdegradation amounts of TA from p(TA) nanoparticles can be controlled by the appropriate choice of crosslinker, and the pH of releasing media. The highest TA release, 600mg/g, was obtained for TMPGDE-crosslinked p(TA) particles in intestinal pH conditions (pH 9) over 3 days; whereas, a slow and linear TA release profile over almost 30 days was obtained by using PEGGE-crosslinked p(TA) in body fluid pH conditions (pH 7.4). The total phenol content of p(TA) particles was calculated as 70±1μgmL(-1) for 170μgmL(-1) p(TA), and the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity was found to be 2027±104mM trolox equivalent g(-1). Moreover, p(TA) nanoparticles demonstrated strong antimicrobial effects against common bacterial strains. More interestingly, with a higher concentration of p(TA) particles, higher blood clotting indices were obtained. PMID:26970821

  10. A heme-degradation pathway in a blood-sucking insect.

    PubMed

    Paiva-Silva, Gabriela O; Cruz-Oliveira, Christine; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Dunkov, Boris C; Masuda, Hatisaburo; Almeida, Igor C; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2006-05-23

    Hematophagous insects are vectors of diseases that affect hundreds of millions of people worldwide. A common physiological event in the life of these insects is the hydrolysis of host hemoglobin in the digestive tract, leading to a massive release of heme, a known prooxidant molecule. Diverse organisms, from bacteria to plants, express the enzyme heme oxygenase, which catalyzes the oxidative degradation of heme to biliverdin (BV) IX, CO, and iron. Here, we show that the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of Chagas' disease, has a unique heme-degradation pathway wherein heme is first modified by addition of two cysteinylglycine residues before cleavage of the porphyrin ring, followed by trimming of the dipeptides. Furthermore, in contrast to most known heme oxygenases, which generate BV IXalpha, in this insect, the end product of heme detoxification is a dicysteinyl-BV IXgamma. Based on these results, we propose a heme metabolizing pathway that includes the identified intermediates produced during modification and cleavage of the heme porphyrin ring. PMID:16698925

  11. A heme-degradation pathway in a blood-sucking insect

    PubMed Central

    Paiva-Silva, Gabriela O.; Cruz-Oliveira, Christine; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M.; Dunkov, Boris C.; Masuda, Hatisaburo; Almeida, Igor C.; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2006-01-01

    Hematophagous insects are vectors of diseases that affect hundreds of millions of people worldwide. A common physiological event in the life of these insects is the hydrolysis of host hemoglobin in the digestive tract, leading to a massive release of heme, a known prooxidant molecule. Diverse organisms, from bacteria to plants, express the enzyme heme oxygenase, which catalyzes the oxidative degradation of heme to biliverdin (BV) IX, CO, and iron. Here, we show that the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of Chagas' disease, has a unique heme-degradation pathway wherein heme is first modified by addition of two cysteinylglycine residues before cleavage of the porphyrin ring, followed by trimming of the dipeptides. Furthermore, in contrast to most known heme oxygenases, which generate BV IXα, in this insect, the end product of heme detoxification is a dicysteinyl-BV IXγ. Based on these results, we propose a heme metabolizing pathway that includes the identified intermediates produced during modification and cleavage of the heme porphyrin ring. PMID:16698925

  12. Genomic organisation, activity and distribution analysis of the microbial putrescine oxidase degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Foster, Alexander; Barnes, Nicole; Speight, Robert; Keane, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    The catalytic action of putrescine specific amine oxidases acting in tandem with 4-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase is explored as a degradative pathway in Rhodococcus opacus. By limiting the nitrogen source, increased catalytic activity was induced leading to a coordinated response in the oxidative deamination of putrescine to 4-aminobutyraldehyde and subsequent dehydrogenation to 4-aminobutyrate. Isolating the dehydrogenase by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration revealed that the enzyme acts principally on linear aliphatic aldehydes possessing an amino moiety. Michaelis-Menten kinetic analysis delivered a Michaelis constant (K(M)=0.014 mM) and maximum rate (Vmax=11.2 μmol/min/mg) for the conversion of 4-aminobutyraldehyde to 4-aminobutyrate. The dehydrogenase identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis (E value=0.031, 23% coverage) belongs to a functionally related genomic cluster that includes the amine oxidase, suggesting their association in a directed cell response. Key regulatory, stress and transport encoding genes have been identified, along with candidate dehydrogenases and transaminases for the further conversion of 4-aminobutyrate to succinate. Genomic analysis has revealed highly similar metabolic gene clustering among members of Actinobacteria, providing insight into putrescine degradation notably among Micrococcaceae, Rhodococci and Corynebacterium by a pathway that was previously uncharacterised in bacteria. PMID:23906496

  13. Light-induced degradation of perfluorocarboxylic acids in the presence of titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Dillert, Ralf; Bahnemann, Detlef; Hidaka, Hisao

    2007-03-01

    The UV-photon-induced degradation of heptafluorobutanoic acid was investigated in acidic aqueous solutions in the presence of titanium dioxide. Heptafluorobutanoic acid could be degraded with this photocatalyst in a light-induced reaction generating carbon dioxide and fluoride anions. Carbon dioxide evolution in a significant amount occurred only in the presence of molecular oxygen and the photocatalyst. The light-induced degradation of trifluoroacetic acid, pentafluoropropanoic acid, nonafluorobutanoic acid, pentadecafluorooctanoic acid, nonafluorobutanesulfonic acid, and heptadecafluorooctanesulfonic acid in the presence of titanium dioxide was also studied. The perfluorocarboxylic acids under investigation are degraded to generate CO(2) and fluoride anions while both perfluorinated sulfonic acids are persistent under the experimental conditions employed in this study. For all compounds photonic efficiencies of the mineralization reaction were estimated to be smaller than 1x10(-5). To increase the photocatalytic activity mixed systems containing homogeneous phosphotungstic acid and heterogeneous titanium dioxide catalysts were also investigated. In the mixtures of these two photocatalysts, the formation rate of CO(2) increased with illumination time. PMID:17126882

  14. Kinetics and pathways of ibuprofen degradation by the UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yingying; Fang, Jingyun; Shang, Chii

    2016-03-01

    The UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process (AOP), which forms reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals (HO) and reactive chlorine species (RCS) such as chlorine atoms (Cl) and Cl2(-), is being considered as an alternative to the UV/H2O2 AOP for the degradation of emerging contaminants. This study investigated the kinetics and pathways of the degradation of a recalcitrant pharmaceutical and personal care product (PPCP)-ibuprofen (IBP)-by the UV/chlorine AOP. The degradation of IBP followed the pseudo first-order kinetics. The first-order rate constant was 3.3 times higher in the UV/chlorine AOP than in the UV/H2O2 AOP for a given chemical molar dosage at pH 6. The first-order rate constant decreased from 3.1 × 10(-3) s(-1) to 5.5 × 10(-4) s(-1) with increasing pH from 6 to 9. Both HO and RCS contributed to the degradation, and the contribution of RCS increased from 22% to 30% with increasing pH from 6 to 9. The degradation was initiated by HO-induced hydroxylation and Cl-induced chlorine substitution, and sustained through decarboxylation, demethylation, chlorination and ring cleavage to form more stable products. Significant amounts of chlorinated intermediates/byproducts were formed from the UV/chlorine AOP, and four chlorinated products were newly identified. The yield of total organic chlorine (TOCl) was 31.6 μM after 90% degradation of 50 μM IBP under the experimental conditions. The known disinfection by-products (DBPs) comprised 17.4% of the TOCl. The effects of water matrix in filtered drinking water on the degradation were not significant, demonstrating the practicality of the UV/chlorine AOP for the control of some refractory PPCPs. However, the toxicity of the chlorinated products should be further assessed. PMID:26748208

  15. Amyloid-beta protein clearance and degradation (ABCD) pathways and their role in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Baranello, Robert J; Bharani, Krishna L; Padmaraju, Vasudevaraju; Chopra, Nipun; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Greig, Nigel H; Pappolla, Miguel A; Sambamurti, Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-β proteins (Aβ) of 42 (Aβ42) and 40 aa (Aβ40) accumulate as senile plaques (SP) and cerebrovascular amyloid protein deposits that are defining diagnostic features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A number of rare mutations linked to familial AD (FAD) on the Aβ precursor protein (APP), Presenilin-1 (PS1), Presenilin- 2 (PS2), Adamalysin10, and other genetic risk factors for sporadic AD such as the ε4 allele of Apolipoprotein E (ApoE-ε4) foster the accumulation of Aβ and also induce the entire spectrum of pathology associated with the disease. Aβ accumulation is therefore a key pathological event and a prime target for the prevention and treatment of AD. APP is sequentially processed by β-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) and γ-secretase, a multisubunit PS1/PS2-containing integral membrane protease, to generate Aβ. Although Aβ accumulates in all forms of AD, the only pathways known to be affected in FAD increase Aβ production by APP gene duplication or via base substitutions on APP and γ-secretase subunits PS1 and PS2 that either specifically increase the yield of the longer Aβ42 or both Aβ40 and Aβ42. However, the vast majority of AD patients accumulate Aβ without these known mutations. This led to proposals that impairment of Aβ degradation or clearance may play a key role in AD pathogenesis. Several candidate enzymes, including Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), Neprilysin (NEP), Endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), Plasmin, and Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been identified and some have even been successfully evaluated in animal models. Several studies also have demonstrated the capacity of γ-secretase inhibitors to paradoxically increase the yield of Aβ and we have recently established that the mechanism is by skirting Aβ degradation. This review outlines major cellular pathways of Aβ degradation to provide a basis for future efforts to fully characterize the panel of pathways responsible for A

  16. Degradation Pathways for Geogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Soil Gases from the Solfatara Crater (Campi Flegrei, Southern Italy).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassi, F.; Venturi, S.; Cabassi, J.; Capecchiacci, F.; Nisi, B., Sr.; Vaselli, O.

    2014-12-01

    The chemical composition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in soil gases from the Solfatara crater (Campi Flegrei, Southern Italy) was analyzed to investigate the effects of biogeochemical processes occurring within the crater soil on gases discharged from the hydrothermal reservoir and released into the atmosphere through diffuse degassing. In this system, two fumarolic vents (namely Bocca Grande and Bocca Nuova) are the preferential pathways for hydrothermal fluid uprising. For our goal, the chemistry of VOCs discharged from these sites were compared to that of soil gases. Our results highlighted that C4-C9 alkanes, alkenes, S-bearing compounds and alkylated aromatics produced at depth were the most prone to degradation processes, such as oxidation-reduction and hydration-dehydration reactions, as well as to microbial activity. Secondary products, which were enriched in sites characterized by low soil gas fluxes, mostly consisted of aldheydes, ketons, esters, ethers, organic acids and, subordinately, alcohols. Benzene, phenol and hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs) produced at depth were able to transit through the soil almost undisturbed, independently on the emission rate of diffuse degassing. The presence of cyclics was possibly related to an independent low-temperature VOC source, likely within sedimentary formations overlying the hydrothermal reservoir. Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were possibly due to air contamination. This study demonstrated the strict control of biogeochemical processes on the behaviour of hydrothermal VOCs that, at least at a local scale, may have a significant impact on air quality. Laboratory experiments conducted at specific chemical-physical conditions and in presence of different microbial populations may provide useful information for the reconstruction of the degradation pathways controlling fate and behaviour of VOCs in the soil.

  17. Degradable Cationic Shell Crosslinked Knedel-like Nanoparticles: Synthesis, degradation, nucleic acid binding and in vitro evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Sandani; Ibricevic, Aida; Gunsten, Sean P.; Shrestha, Ritu; Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Brody, Steven L.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, degradable cationic shell crosslinked knedel-like (deg-cSCK) nanoparticles were developed as an alternative platform to replace similar non-degradable cSCK nanoparticles that have been utilized for nucleic acids delivery. An amphiphilic diblock copolymer poly(acrylamidoethylamine)90-block-poly(DL-lactide)40 (PAEA90-b-PDLLA40) was synthesized, self-assembled in aqueous solution and shell crosslinked using a hydrolyzable crosslinker to afford deg-cSCKs with an average core diameter of 45 ± 7 nm. These nanoparticles were fluorescently labeled for in vitro tracking. The enzymatic- and hydrolytic-degradability, siRNA binding affinity, cell uptake and cytotoxicity of the deg-cSCKs were evaluated. Esterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of the nanoparticles resulted in the degradation of ca. 24% of the PDLLA core into lactic acid within 5 d, as opposed to only ca. 9% degradation from aqueous solutions of the deg-cSCK nanoparticles in the absence of enzyme. Cellular uptake of deg-cSCKs was efficient, while exhibiting low cytotoxicity with LD50 values of ca. 90 μg/mL and 30 μg/mL in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages and MLE 12 cell lines, respectively, ca. 5–6-fold lower than the cytotoxicity observed for non-degradable cSCK analogs. Additionally, deg-cSCKs were able to complex siRNA at an N/P ratio as low as 2, and were efficiently able to facilitate cellular uptake of the complexed nucleic acids. PMID:23510389

  18. Alteration of Dynein Function Affects α-Synuclein Degradation via the Autophagosome-Lysosome Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Da; Shi, Ji-Jun; Mao, Cheng-Jie; Liu, Sha; Wang, Jian-Da; Chen, Jing; Wang, Fen; Yang, Ya-Ping; Hu, Wei-Dong; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that dynein dysfunction may be implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration. It plays a central role in aggresome formation, the delivery of autophagosome to lysosome for fusion and degradation, which is a pro-survival mechanism essential for the bulk degradation of misfolded proteins and damaged organells. Previous studies reported that dynein dysfuntion was associated with aberrant aggregation of α-synuclein, which is a major component of inclusion bodies in Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, it remains unclear what roles dynein plays in α-synuclein degradation. Our study demonstrated a decrease of dynein expression in neurotoxin-induced PD models in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by an increase of α-synuclein protein level. Dynein down-regulation induced by siRNA resulted in a prolonged half-life of α-synuclein and its over-accumulation in A53T overexpressing PC12 cells. Dynein knockdown also prompted the increase of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3-II) and sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1, p62) expression, and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles. Moreover, dynein suppression impaired the autophagosome fusion with lysosome. In summary, our findings indicate that dynein is critical for the clearance of aberrant α-synuclein via autophagosome-lysosome pathway. PMID:24351814

  19. Degradation and Pathway of Tetracycline Hydrochloride in Aqueous Solution by Potassium Ferrate

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Gao, Naiyun; Li, Cong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In the context of water treatment, the ferrate ([FeO4]2−) ion has long been known for its strong oxidizing power and for producing a coagulant from its reduced form [i.e., Fe(III)]. However, it has not been widely applied in water treatment, because of preparation difficulties and high cost. This article describes a low-cost procedure for producing solid potassium ferrate. In this synthetic procedure, NaClO was used in place of chlorine generation; and 10 M KOH was used in place of saturated KOH in the previous procedures. In addition, this study investigated the reactions of potassium ferrate with tetracycline hydrochloride (TC) at different pH and molar ratios. Results showed that the optimal pH range for TC degradation was pH 9–10, and TC could be mostly removed by Fe(VI) in 60 s. However, results showed >70% of TC degraded and <15% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) reduction at molar ratio of 1:20. The main degradation pathway of TC is proposed based on the experimental data. PMID:22566741

  20. Degradation pathway of quinolines in a biofilm system under denitrifying conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Johansen, S.S.; Arvin, E.; Mosbaek, H.; Hansen, A.B.

    1997-09-01

    This article reports for the first time the degradation pathways of quinoline, isoquinoline, and methylquinolines by a mixed culture in a biofilm under nitrate-reducing conditions. A simple reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method using ultraviolet detection at 223 nm for determination of seven quinoline analogues and 15 metabolites was developed, and gas chromatography--mass spectrometry and thin-layer chromatography analyses were used for identification. The inhibition of nitrification by the parent compounds and their degradation products was assessed by a nitrification toxicity test called MINNTOX. Quinoline and 3-, 4-, 6-, and 8-methylquinoline were all transformed by hydroxylation into their 2-hydroxyquinoline analogues (2-quinolinones), and isoquinoline was transformed into 1-hydroxyisoquinoline. 2-Methylquinoline was not transformed by this microcosm, likely due to the blockage at position 2 by the methyl group. The hydroxylated metabolites of isoquinoline and quinolines methylated at the heterocyclic ring were not transformed further, whereas metabolites of quinoline and quinolines methylated at the homocyclic ring were hydrogenated at position 3 and 4, and the resulting 3,4-dihydro-2-quinolinone analogues accumulated. Of these metabolites, only 3,4-dihydro-2-quinolinone from the degradation of quinoline was further transformed into unidentified products. All quinolines and their metabolites had inhibiting effects on the nitrifying bacteria at the same level (ppm) in the applied bioassay, indicating that the inhibition of the compounds was not influenced by the initial transformation reactions.

  1. Aqueous photodegradation of 4-tert-butylphenol: By-products, degradation pathway and theoretical calculation assessment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanlin; Shi, Jin; Chen, Hongche; Zhao, Jianfu; Dong, Wenbo

    2016-10-01

    4-tert-butylphenol (4-t-BP), an endocrine disrupting chemical, is widely distributed in natural bodies of water but is difficult to biodegrade. In this study, we focused on the transformation of 4-t-BP in photo-initiated degradation processes. The steady-state photolysis and laser flash photolysis (LFP) experiments were conducted in order to elucidate its degradation mechanism. Identification of products was performed using the GC-MS, LC-MS and theoretical calculation techniques. The oxidation pathway of 4-t-BP by hydroxyl radical (HO) was also studied and H2O2 was added to produce HO. 4-tert-butylcatechol and 4-tert-butylphenol dimer were produced in 4-t-BP direct photolysis. 4-tert-butylcatechol and hydroquinone were produced by the oxidation of HO. But the formation mechanism of 4-tert-butylcatechol in the two processes was different. The benzene ring was fractured in 4-t-BP oxidation process and 29% of TOC was degraded after 16h irradiation. PMID:27213674

  2. Identification of Genes and Pathways Related to Phenol Degradation in Metagenomic Libraries from Petroleum Refinery Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Cynthia C.; Hayden, Helen; Sawbridge, Tim; Mele, Pauline; De Paula, Sérgio O.; Silva, Lívia C. F.; Vidigal, Pedro M. P.; Vicentini, Renato; Sousa, Maíra P.; Torres, Ana Paula R.; Santiago, Vânia M. J.; Oliveira, Valéria M.

    2013-01-01

    Two fosmid libraries, totaling 13,200 clones, were obtained from bioreactor sludge of petroleum refinery wastewater treatment system. The library screening based on PCR and biological activity assays revealed more than 400 positive clones for phenol degradation. From these, 100 clones were randomly selected for pyrosequencing in order to evaluate the genetic potential of the microorganisms present in wastewater treatment plant for biodegradation, focusing mainly on novel genes and pathways of phenol and aromatic compound degradation. The sequence analysis of selected clones yielded 129,635 reads at an estimated 17-fold coverage. The phylogenetic analysis showed Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the most abundant orders among the selected fosmid clones. The MG-RAST analysis revealed a broad metabolic profile with important functions for wastewater treatment, including metabolism of aromatic compounds, nitrogen, sulphur and phosphorus. The predicted 2,276 proteins included phenol hydroxylases and cathecol 2,3- dioxygenases, involved in the catabolism of aromatic compounds, such as phenol, byphenol, benzoate and phenylpropanoid. The sequencing of one fosmid insert of 33 kb unraveled the gene that permitted the host, Escherichia coli EPI300, to grow in the presence of aromatic compounds. Additionally, the comparison of the whole fosmid sequence against bacterial genomes deposited in GenBank showed that about 90% of sequence showed no identity to known sequences of Proteobacteria deposited in the NCBI database. This study surveyed the functional potential of fosmid clones for aromatic compound degradation and contributed to our knowledge of the biodegradative capacity and pathways of microbial assemblages present in refinery wastewater treatment system. PMID:23637911

  3. Unfolded Protein Response and Activated Degradative Pathways Regulation in GNE Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Honghao; Chen, Qi; Liu, Fuchen; Zhang, Xuemei; Li, Wei; Liu, Shuping; Zhao, Yuying; Gong, Yaoqin; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2013-01-01

    Although intracellular beta amyloid (Aβ) accumulation is known as an early upstream event in the degenerative course of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase (GNE) myopathy, the process by which Aβdeposits initiate various degradative pathways, and their relationship have not been fully clarified. We studied the possible secondary responses after amyloid beta precursor protein (AβPP) deposition including unfolded protein response (UPR), ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) activation and its correlation with autophagy system. Eight GNE myopathy patients and five individuals with normal muscle morphology were included in this study. We performed immunofluorescence and immunoblotting to investigate the expression of AβPP, phosphorylated tau (p-tau) and endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperones. Proteasome activities were measured by cleavage of fluorogenic substrates. The expression of proteasome subunits and linkers between proteasomal and autophagy systems were also evaluated by immunoblotting and relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Four molecular chaperones, glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94), glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), calreticulin and calnexin and valosin containing protein (VCP) were highly expressed in GNE myopathy. 20S proteasome subunits, three main proteasome proteolytic activities, and the factors linking UPS and autophagy system were also increased. Our study suggests that AβPP deposition results in endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and highly expressed VCP deliver unfolded proteins from endoplasmic reticulum to proteosomal system which is activated in endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD) in GNE myopathy. Excessive ubiquitinated unfolded proteins are exported by proteins that connect UPS and autophagy to autophagy system, which is activated as an alternative pathway for degradation. PMID:23472144

  4. Chlorophenol hydroxylases encoded by plasmid pJP4 differentially contribute to chlorophenoxyacetic acid degradation.

    PubMed

    Ledger, T; Pieper, D H; González, B

    2006-04-01

    Phenoxyalkanoic compounds are used worldwide as herbicides. Cupriavidus necator JMP134(pJP4) catabolizes 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetate (MCPA), using tfd functions carried on plasmid pJP4. TfdA cleaves the ether bonds of these herbicides to produce 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) and 4-chloro-2-methylphenol (MCP), respectively. These intermediates can be degraded by two chlorophenol hydroxylases encoded by the tfdB(I) and tfdB(II) genes to produce the respective chlorocatechols. We studied the specific contribution of each of the TfdB enzymes to the 2,4-D/MCPA degradation pathway. To accomplish this, the tfdB(I) and tfdB(II) genes were independently inactivated, and growth on each chlorophenoxyacetate and total chlorophenol hydroxylase activity were measured for the mutant strains. The phenotype of these mutants shows that both TfdB enzymes are used for growth on 2,4-D or MCPA but that TfdB(I) contributes to a significantly higher extent than TfdB(II). Both enzymes showed similar specificity profiles, with 2,4-DCP, MCP, and 4-chlorophenol being the best substrates. An accumulation of chlorophenol was found to inhibit chlorophenoxyacetate degradation, and inactivation of the tfdB genes enhanced the toxic effect of 2,4-DCP on C. necator cells. Furthermore, increased chlorophenol production by overexpression of TfdA also had a negative effect on 2,4-D degradation by C. necator JMP134 and by a different host, Burkholderia xenovorans LB400, harboring plasmid pJP4. The results of this work indicate that codification and expression of the two tfdB genes in pJP4 are important to avoid toxic accumulations of chlorophenols during phenoxyacetic acid degradation and that a balance between chlorophenol-producing and chlorophenol-consuming reactions is necessary for growth on these compounds. PMID:16597983

  5. Sequential RNA degradation pathways provide a fail-safe mechanism to limit the accumulation of unspliced transcripts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Sayani, Shakir; Chanfreau, Guillaume F.

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear exosome and the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathways have been implicated in the degradation of distinct unspliced transcripts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study we show that these two systems can act sequentially on specific unspliced pre-mRNAs to limit their accumulation. Using steady-state and decay analyses, we show that while specific unspliced transcripts rely mostly on NMD or on the nuclear exosome for their degradation, some unspliced RNAs are stabilized only when both the nuclear exosome and NMD are inactivated. We found that the mechanism of degradation of these unspliced pre-mRNAs is not influenced by promoter identity. However, the specificity in the pre-mRNAs degradation pathways can be manipulated by changing the rate of export or retention of these mRNAs. For instance, reducing the nuclear export of pre-mRNAs mostly degraded by NMD results in a higher fraction of unspliced transcripts degraded by the nuclear exosome. Reciprocally, inactivating the Mlp retention factors results in a higher fraction of unspliced transcripts degraded by NMD for precursors normally targeted by the nuclear exosome. Overall, these results demonstrate that a functional redundancy exists between nuclear and cytoplasmic degradation pathways for unspliced pre-mRNAs, and suggest that the degradation routes of these species are mainly determined by the efficiency of their nuclear export rates. The presence of these two sequential degradation pathways for unspliced pre-mRNAs underscores the importance of limiting their accumulation and might serve as a fail-safe mechanism to prevent the expression of these nonfunctional RNAs. PMID:22753783

  6. Hydrolytic degradation study of biodegradable polyesteramide copolymers based on epsilon-caprolactone and 11-aminoundecanoic acid.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhiyong; Li, Sai; He, Yi; Zhang, Hailian; Liu, Xiaobo

    2004-05-01

    In this paper, a new kind of aliphatic biodegradable polyesteramide copolymers P(CL/AU)x/y based on epsilon-caprolactone and 11-aminoundecanoic acid were synthesized by the melt polycondensation method. Hydrolytic degradation behavior of P(CL/AU) copolymers were studied by using FTIR, 1H-NMR and DSC. Chemical compositions, macromolecular weight, thickness of the test sample, and pH of the degradation medium have great effect on degradation rate. The degradation rate decreased with increase in aminoundecanoic acid content, macromolecular weight, and thickness of the test samples, but increased with incubation temperature and pH of the degradation medium. The degradation mechanism was studied according to the mathematical model developed by professor Göpferich. PMID:14741611

  7. Crystal structure of phenylacetic acid degradation protein PaaG from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Kichise, Tomoyasu; Hisano, Tamao; Takeda, Kazuki; Miki, Kunio

    2009-09-01

    Microbial degradation of phenylacetic acid proceeds via the hybrid pathway that includes formation of a coenzyme A thioester, ring hydroxylation, non-oxygenolytic ring opening, and beta-oxidation-like reactions. A phenylacetic acid degradation protein PaaG is a member of the crotonase superfamily, and is a candidate non-oxygenolytic ring-opening enzyme. The crystal structure of PaaG from Thermus thermophilus HB8 was determined at a resolution of 1.85 A. PaaG consists of three identical subunits related by local three-fold symmetry. The monomer is comprised of a spiral and a helical domain with a fold characteristic of the crotonase superfamily. A putative active site residue, Asp136, is situated in an active site cavity and surrounded by several hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues. The active site cavity is sufficiently large to accommodate a ring substrate. Two conformations are observed for helix H2 located adjacent to the active site. Helix H2 is kinked at Asn81 in two subunits, whereas it is kinked at Leu77 in the other subunit, and the side chain of Tyr80 is closer to Asp136. This indicates that catalytic reaction of PaaG may proceed with large conformational changes at the active site. Asp136 is the only conserved polar residue in the active site. It is located at the same position as those of 4-chlorobenzoyl-CoA dehalogenase and peroxisomal Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase, indicating that PaaG may undergo isomerization or a ring-opening reaction via a Delta(3),Delta(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase-like mechanism. PMID:19452559

  8. Bacterial Fatty Acid Synthesis and its Relationships with Polyketide Synthetic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cronan, John E.; Thomas, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    This review presents the most thoroughly studied bacterial fatty acid synthetic pathway, that of Escherichia coli and then discusses the exceptions to the E. coli pathway present in other bacteria. The known interrelationships between the fatty acid and polyketide synthetic pathways are also assessed, mainly in the Streptomyces group of bacteria. Finally, we present a compendium of methods for analysis of bacterial fatty acid synthetic pathways. PMID:19362649

  9. Organellar oligopeptidase (OOP) provides a complementary pathway for targeting peptide degradation in mitochondria and chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Kmiec, Beata; Teixeira, Pedro F.; Berntsson, Ronnie P.-A.; Murcha, Monika W.; Branca, Rui M. M.; Radomiljac, Jordan D.; Regberg, Jakob; Svensson, Linda M.; Bakali, Amin; Langel, Ülo; Lehtiö, Janne; Whelan, James; Stenmark, Pål; Glaser, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    Both mitochondria and chloroplasts contain distinct proteolytic systems for precursor protein processing catalyzed by the mitochondrial and stromal processing peptidases and for the degradation of targeting peptides catalyzed by presequence protease. Here, we have identified and characterized a component of the organellar proteolytic systems in Arabidopsis thaliana, the organellar oligopeptidase, OOP (At5g65620). OOP belongs to the M3A family of peptide-degrading metalloproteases. Using two independent in vivo methods, we show that the protease is dually localized to mitochondria and chloroplasts. Furthermore, we localized the OPP homolog At5g10540 to the cytosol. Analysis of peptide degradation by OOP revealed substrate size restriction from 8 to 23 aa residues. Short mitochondrial targeting peptides (presequence of the ribosomal protein L29 and presequence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase 1) and N- and C-terminal fragments derived from the presequence of the ATPase beta subunit ranging in size from 11 to 20 aa could be degraded. MS analysis showed that OOP does not exhibit a strict cleavage pattern but shows a weak preference for hydrophobic residues (F/L) at the P1 position. The crystal structures of OOP, at 1.8–1.9 Å, exhibit an ellipsoidal shape consisting of two major domains enclosing the catalytic cavity of 3,000 Å3. The structural and biochemical data suggest that the protein undergoes conformational changes to allow peptide binding and proteolysis. Our results demonstrate the complementary role of OOP in targeting-peptide degradation in mitochondria and chloroplasts. PMID:24043784

  10. Oxidation of microcystin-LR by ferrate(VI): kinetics, degradation pathways, and toxicity assessments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenjun; Chen, Long; Batchu, Sudha Rani; Gardinali, Piero R; Jasa, Libor; Marsalek, Blahoslav; Zboril, Radek; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; O'Shea, Kevin E; Sharma, Virender K

    2014-10-21

    The presence of the potent cyanotoxin, microcystin-LR (MC-LR), in drinking water sources poses a serious risk to public health. The kinetics of the reactivity of ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-), Fe(VI)) with MC-LR and model compounds (sorbic acid, sorbic alcohol, and glycine anhydride) are reported over a range of solution pH. The degradation of MC-LR followed second-order kinetics with the bimolecular rate constant (kMCLR+Fe(VI)) decreasing from 1.3 ± 0.1 × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.5 to 8.1 ± 0.08 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 10.0. The specific rate constants for the individual ferrate species were determined and compared with a number of common chemical oxidants employed for water treatment. Detailed product studies using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) indicated the oxidized products (OPs) were primarily the result of hydroxylation of the aromatic ring, double bond of the methyldehydroalanine (Mdha) amino acid residue, and diene functionality. Products studies also indicate fragmentation of the cyclic MC-LR structure occurs under the reaction conditions. The analysis of protein phosphatase (PP1) activity suggested that the degradation byproducts of MC-LR did not possess significant biological toxicity. Fe(VI) was effective for the degradation MC-LR in water containing carbonate ions and fulvic acid (FA) and in lake water samples, but higher Fe(VI) dosages would be needed to completely remove MC-LR in lake water compared to deionized water. PMID:25215438

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Perfluorooctane Acid-Degrading Bacterium Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chongjian; Peng, Qingjing; Peng, Qingzhong

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas parafulva YAB-1, isolated from perfluorinated compound-contaminated soil, has the ability to degrade perfluorooctane acid (PFOA) compound. Here, we report the draft genome sequence and annotation of the PFOA-degrading bacterium P. parafulva YAB-1. The data provide the basis to investigate the molecular mechanism of PFOA metabolism. PMID:26337877

  12. Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-07-18

    Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

  13. Degradation of h-acid by free and immobilized cells of Alcaligenes latus

    PubMed Central

    Usha, M.S.; Sanjay, M.K.; Gaddad, S.M.; Shivannavar, C.T.

    2010-01-01

    Alcaligenes latus, isolated from industrial effluent, was able to grow in mineral salts medium with 50 ppm (0.15 mM) of H-acid as a sole source of carbon. Immobilization of Alcaligenes latus in Ca-alginate and polyurethane foam resulted in cells embedded in the matrices. When free cells and immobilized cells were used for biodegradation studies at concentration ranging from 100 ppm (0.3 mM) to 500 ppm (1.15 mM) degradation rate was enhanced with immobilized cells. Cells immobilized in polyurethane foam showed 100% degradation up to 350 ppm (1.05 mM) and 57% degradation at 500 ppm (1.5 mM). Degradation rate of Ca-alginate immobilized cells was less as compared to that of polyurethane foam immobilized cells. With Ca-alginate immobilized cells 100% degradation was recorded up to 200 ppm (0.6 mM) of H-acid and only 33% degradation was recorded at 500 ppm (1.5 mM) of H-acid. Spectral analysis of the products after H-acid utilization showed that the spent medium did not contain any aromatic compounds indicating H-acid degradation by A. latus. PMID:24031573

  14. Comparative degradation of [14C]-2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in wheat and potato after Foliar application and in wheat, radish, lettuce, and apple after soil application.

    PubMed

    Hamburg, A; Puvanesarajah, V; Burnett, T J; Barnekow, D E; Premkumar, N D; Smith, G A

    2001-01-01

    The fate of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) applied foliarly as the 2-ethylhexyl ester (EHE) to wheat and potatoes, to the soil as the dimethylamine (DMA) salt under apple tree canopies, and preplant as the free acid for wheat, lettuce, and radish was studied to evaluate metabolic pathways. Crop fractions analyzed for (14)C residues included wheat forage, straw, and grain; potato vine and tubers; and apple fruit. The primary metabolic pathway for foliar application in wheat is ester hydrolysis followed by the formation of base-labile 2,4-D conjugates. A less significant pathway for 2,4-D in wheat was ring hydroxylation to give NIH-shift products 2,5-dichloro-4-hydroxyphenoxyacetic acid (4-OH-2,5-D), 4-OH-2,3-D, and 5-OH-2,4-D both free and as acid-labile conjugates. The primary metabolic pathway in potato was again ester hydrolysis. 2,4-D acid was further transformed to 4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and 4-OH-2,5-D. For the soil applications, (14)C residues in the crops were low, and characterization of the (14)C residues indicated association with or incorporation into the biochemical matrix of the tissue. The degradative pathways observed in wheat are similar to those characterized in other intact plant studies but differ from those in studies in wheat cell suspension culture in that no amino acid conjugates were observed. PMID:11170570

  15. Deoxyribonucleic Acid Degradation in Bacillus subtilis During Exposure to Actinomycin D1

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, James L.

    1968-01-01

    At high concentrations (10 μg/ml), actinomycin D inhibited deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis in Bacillus subtilis. Inhibition occurred quickly (in less than 1 min) and was complete. In strain 23 thy his, inhibition of DNA synthesis by actinomycin D was followed by partial degradation of one of the two daughter strands to acid-soluble products. Degradation began at the replication point and proceeded over a distance equal to about 12% of a chromosome in length. Actinomycin D played some essential part in degradation, since exposure of the cells to other treatments or agents which inhibit growth did not lead to the above result. PMID:4967199

  16. Isolation and structure elucidation of a novel product of the acidic degradation of cefaclor.

    PubMed

    Baertschi, S W; Dorman, D E; Occolowitz, J L; Spangle, L A; Collins, M W; Wildfeuer, M E; Lorenz, L J

    1993-06-01

    The acidic aqueous degradation of cefaclor, an orally administered cephalosporin antibiotic, has been investigated. The most prominent peak in the high-performance liquid chromatography profile of a degraded solution of cefaclor was isolated by preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. Mechanistically, the formation of this degradent from cefaclor involves a condensation of two cefaclor degradation products in which both products have undergone contraction from a six-membered cephem ring to a five-membered thiazole ring, presumably via a common episulfonium ion intermediate. PMID:8331538

  17. Novel Pathway of Toluene Catabolism in the Trichloroethylene-Degrading Bacterium G4

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Malcolm S.; Montgomery, Stacy O.; Chapman, Peter J.; Cuskey, Stephen M.; Pritchard, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    o-Cresol and 3-methylcatechol were identified as successive transitory intermediates of toluene catabolism by the trichloroethylene-degrading bacterium G4. The absence of a toluene dihydrodiol intermediate or toluene dioxygenase and toluene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase activities suggested that G4 catabolizes toluene by a unique pathway. Formation of a hybrid species of 18O- and 16O-labeled 3-methylcatechol from toluene in an atmosphere of 18O2 and 16O2 established that G4 catabolizes toluene by successive monooxygenations at the ortho and meta positions. Detection of trace amounts of 4-methylcatechol from toluene catabolism suggested that the initial hydroxylation of toluene was not exclusively at the ortho position. Further catabolism of 3-methylcatechol was found to proceed via catechol-2,3-dioxygenase and hydroxymuconic semialdehyde hydrolase activities. PMID:16347956

  18. Stress degradation studies and stability-indicating TLC-densitometric method of glycyrrhetic acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycyrrhetic acid, a pentacyclic triterpenoid, possesses a broad range of pharmacological activities and serves as template to synthesize many bioactive drugs. This paper describes a simple, accurate, and sensitive stability-indicating TLC densitometric method for the determination of glycyrrhetic acid and its degradation product as per the ICH guidelines. Results Separation was carried out on TLC aluminium sheet pre-coated with silica gel 60F254 using chloroform, methanol and formic acid (9:0.9:0.1, v/v). Compact spot for glycyrrhetic acid was found at Rf value of 0.42 ± 0.03. Densitometric analysis was carried out in the absorbance mode at λmax 254 nm. Glycyrrhetic acid was found to be stable to the exposure of base, neutral, oxidation, dry heating treatment and wet heating treatment, but showed degradation under acidic and photochemical conditions. Moreover, fragmentation pattern of glycyrrhetic acid was developed by using a positive ion electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-QqTOF-MS/MS) hybrid instrument. A photo-degraded product was characterized through comparison of mass spectrometric studies with glycyrrhetic acid. Conclusion The developed stability-indicating TLC-densitometric method can be applied for routine analysis of glycyrrhetic acid in the presence of its degradation products. PMID:23327365

  19. Degradation pathways of lamotrigine under advanced treatment by direct UV photolysis, hydroxyl radicals, and ozone.

    PubMed

    Keen, Olya S; Ferrer, Imma; Michael Thurman, E; Linden, Karl G

    2014-12-01

    Lamotrigine is recently recognized as a persistent pharmaceutical in the water environment and wastewater effluents. Its degradation was studied under UV and ozone advanced oxidation treatments with reaction kinetics of lamotrigine with ozone (≈4 M(-1)s(-1)), hydroxyl radical [(2.1 ± 0.3) × 10(9)M(-1)s(-1)] and by UV photolysis with low and medium pressure mercury vapor lamps [quantum yields ≈0 and (2.7 ± 0.4)× 10(-4) respectively] determined. All constants were measured at pH 6 and at temperature ≈20°C. The results indicate that lamotrigine is slow to respond to direct photolysis or oxidation by ozone and no attenuation of the contaminant is expected in UV or ozone disinfection applications. The compound reacts rapidly with hydroxyl radicals indicating that advanced oxidation processes would be effective for its treatment. Degradation products were identified under each treatment process using accurate mass time-of-flight spectrometry and pathways of decay were proposed. The main transformation pathways in each process were: dechlorination of the benzene ring during direct photolysis; hydroxyl group addition to the benzene ring during the reaction with hydroxyl radicals; and triazine ring opening after reaction with ozone. Different products that form in each process may be to a varying degree less environmentally stable than the parent lamotrigine. In addition, a novel method of ozone quenching without addition of salts is presented. The new quenching method would allow subsequent mass spectrometry analysis without a solid phase extraction clean-up step. The method involves raising the pH of the sample to approximately 10 for a few seconds and lowering it back and is therefore limited to applications for which temporary pH change is not expected to affect the outcome of the analysis. PMID:25150682

  20. Antioxidant activities of fucoidan degraded by gamma irradiation and acidic hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sangyong; Choi, Jong-il; Park, Hyun

    2015-04-01

    Low molecular weight fucoidan, prepared by radical degradation using gamma ray was investigated for its antioxidant activities with different assay methods. As the molecular weight of fucoidan decreased with a higher absorbed dose, ferric-reducing antioxidant power values increased, but β-carotene bleaching inhibition did not change significantly. The antioxidant activity of acid-degraded fucoidan was also examined to investigate the effect of different degradation methods. At the same molecular weight, fucoidan degraded by gamma irradiation showed higher 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging activity than that observed with the acidic method. This result reveals that in addition to molecular weight, the degradation method affects the antioxidant activity of fucoidan.

  1. M2-like macrophages are responsible for collagen degradation through a mannose receptor–mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Daniel H.; Leonard, Daniel; Masedunskas, Andrius; Moyer, Amanda; Jürgensen, Henrik Jessen; Peters, Diane E.; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Selvaraj, Arul; Yamada, Susan S.; Brenner, David A.; Burgdorf, Sven; Engelholm, Lars H.; Behrendt, Niels; Holmbeck, Kenn; Weigert, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Tissue remodeling processes critically depend on the timely removal and remodeling of preexisting collagen scaffolds. Nevertheless, many aspects related to the turnover of this abundant extracellular matrix component in vivo are still incompletely understood. We therefore took advantage of recent advances in optical imaging to develop an assay to visualize collagen turnover in situ and identify cell types and molecules involved in this process. Collagen introduced into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis in a partially matrix metalloproteinase–dependent manner and was subsequently routed to lysosomes for complete degradation. Collagen uptake was predominantly executed by a quantitatively minor population of M2-like macrophages, whereas more abundant Col1a1-expressing fibroblasts and Cx3cr1-expressing macrophages internalized collagen at lower levels. Genetic ablation of the collagen receptors mannose receptor (Mrc1) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor–associated protein (Endo180 and Mrc2) impaired this intracellular collagen degradation pathway. This study demonstrates the importance of receptor-mediated cellular uptake to collagen turnover in vivo and identifies a key role of M2-like macrophages in this process. PMID:24019537

  2. Structural basis of lentiviral subversion of a cellular protein degradation pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwefel, David; Groom, Harriet C. T.; Boucherit, Virginie C.; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Walker, Philip A.; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Bishop, Kate N.; Taylor, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Lentiviruses contain accessory genes that have evolved to counteract the effects of host cellular defence proteins that inhibit productive infection. One such restriction factor, SAMHD1, inhibits human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection of myeloid-lineage cells as well as resting CD4+ T cells by reducing the cellular deoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphate (dNTP) concentration to a level at which the viral reverse transcriptase cannot function. In other lentiviruses, including HIV-2 and related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs), SAMHD1 restriction is overcome by the action of viral accessory protein x (Vpx) or the related viral protein r (Vpr) that target and recruit SAMHD1 for proteasomal degradation. The molecular mechanism by which these viral proteins are able to usurp the host cell's ubiquitination machinery to destroy the cell's protection against these viruses has not been defined. Here we present the crystal structure of a ternary complex of Vpx with the human E3 ligase substrate adaptor DCAF1 and the carboxy-terminal region of human SAMHD1. Vpx is made up of a three-helical bundle stabilized by a zinc finger motif, and wraps tightly around the disc-shaped DCAF1 molecule to present a new molecular surface. This adapted surface is then able to recruit SAMHD1 via its C terminus, making it a competent substrate for the E3 ligase to mark for proteasomal degradation. The structure reported here provides a molecular description of how a lentiviral accessory protein is able to subvert the cell's normal protein degradation pathway to inactivate the cellular viral defence system.

  3. Structural basis of lentiviral subversion of a cellular protein degradation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schwefel, David; Groom, Harriet C. T.; Boucherit, Virginie C.; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Walker, Philip A.; Stoye, Jonathan P.; Bishop, Kate N.; Taylor, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    Lentiviruses contain accessory genes that have evolved to counteract the effects of host cellular defence proteins that inhibit productive infection. One such restriction factor, SAMHD1, inhibits HIV-1 infection of myeloid-lineage cells 1,2 as well as resting CD4+ T cells 3,4 by reducing the cellular dNTP concentration to a level where the viral reverse transcriptase cannot function 5,6. In other lentiviruses, including HIV-2 and related SIVs, SAMHD1 restriction is overcome by the action of viral accessory protein x (Vpx) or the related viral protein r (Vpr) that target and recruit SAMHD1 for proteasomal degradation 7,8. The molecular mechanism by which these viral proteins are able to usurp the host cell’s ubiquitination machinery to destroy the cell’s protection against these viruses has not been defined. We present here the crystal structure of a ternary complex of Vpx with the host cell’s E3 ligase substrate adaptor DCAF1 and the C-terminal region of SAMHD1. Vpx is made up of a three-helical bundle, stabilised by a zinc finger motif and wraps tightly around the disc-shaped DCAF1 molecule to present a new molecular surface. This adapted surface is then able to recruit SAMHD1 via its C-terminus making it a competent substrate for the E3 ligase to mark for proteasomal degradation. The structure provides the first description of how a lentiviral accessory protein is able to subvert the cell’s normal protein degradation pathway to inactivate the cellular viral defence system. PMID:24336198

  4. Protein Degradation Pathways Regulate the Functions of Helicases in the DNA Damage Response and Maintenance of Genomic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Joshua A.; Suhasini, Avvaru N.; Brosh, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Degradation of helicases or helicase-like proteins, often mediated by ubiquitin-proteasomal pathways, plays important regulatory roles in cellular mechanisms that respond to DNA damage or replication stress. The Bloom’s syndrome helicase (BLM) provides an example of how helicase degradation pathways, regulated by post-translational modifications and protein interactions with components of the Fanconi Anemia (FA) interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair pathway, influence cell cycle checkpoints, DNA repair, and replication restart. The FANCM DNA translocase can be targeted by checkpoint kinases that exert dramatic effects on FANCM stability and chromosomal integrity. Other work provides evidence that degradation of the F-box DNA helicase (FBH1) helps to balance translesion synthesis (TLS) and homologous recombination (HR) repair at blocked replication forks. Degradation of the helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), a DNA translocase and ubiquitylating enzyme, influences the choice of post replication repair (PRR) pathway. Stability of the Werner syndrome helicase-nuclease (WRN) involved in the replication stress response is regulated by its acetylation. Turning to transcription, stability of the Cockayne Syndrome Group B DNA translocase (CSB) implicated in transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is regulated by a CSA ubiquitin ligase complex enabling recovery of RNA synthesis. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that helicases can be targeted for degradation to maintain genome homeostasis. PMID:25906194

  5. Evaluation of non-thermal effects of electricity on ascorbic acid and carotenoid degradation in acerola pulp during ohmic heating.

    PubMed

    Jaeschke, Débora Pez; Marczak, Ligia Damasceno Ferreira; Mercali, Giovana Domeneghini

    2016-05-15

    The effect of electric field on ascorbic acid and carotenoid degradation in acerola pulp during ohmic heating was evaluated. Ascorbic acid kinetic degradation was evaluated at 80, 85, 90 and 95°C during 60 min of thermal treatment by ohmic and conventional heating. Carotenoid degradation was evaluated at 90 and 95°C after 50 min of treatment. The different temperatures evaluated showed the same effect on degradation rates. To investigate the influence of oxygen concentration on the degradation process, ohmic heating was also carried out under rich and poor oxygen modified atmospheres at 90°C. Ascorbic acid and carotenoid degradation was higher under a rich oxygen atmosphere, indicating that oxygen is the limiting reagent of the degradation reaction. Ascorbic acid and carotenoid degradation was similar for both heating technologies, demonstrating that the presence of the oscillating electric field did not influence the mechanisms and rates of reactions associated with the degradation process. PMID:26775953

  6. Morpholine Degradation Pathway of Mycobacterium aurum MO1: Direct Evidence of Intermediates by In Situ 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Combourieu, B.; Besse, P.; Sancelme, M.; Veschambre, H.; Delort, A. M.; Poupin, P.; Truffaut, N.

    1998-01-01

    Resting Mycobacterium aurum MO1 cells were incubated with morpholine, a waste from the chemical industry. The kinetics of biodegradation was monitored by using in situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The incubation medium was directly analyzed by 1H NMR. This technique allowed the unambiguous identification of two intermediates of the metabolic pathway involved in the biodegradation process, glycolate and 2-(2-aminoethoxy)acetate. The latter compound, which was not commercially available, was synthesized, in three steps, from 2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethanol. Quantitative analysis of the kinetics of degradation of morpholine was performed by integrating the signals of the different metabolites in 1H-NMR spectra. Morpholine was degraded within 10 h. The intermediates increased during the first 10 h and finally disappeared after 20 h incubation. Assays of degradation were also carried out with glycolate and ethanolamine, hypothetical intermediates of the morpholine degradation pathway. They were degraded within 4 and 8 h, respectively. Until now, no tool for direct detection of intermediates or even morpholine has been available, consequently, only hypothetical pathways have been proposed. The approach described here gives both qualitative and quantitative information about the metabolic routes used in morpholine degradation by M. aurum MO1. It could be used to investigate many biodegradative processes. PMID:9435073

  7. Hydrolytic degradation behaviour of sucrose palmitate reinforced poly(lactic acid) nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Valapa, Ravi Babu; G, Pugazhenthi; Katiyar, Vimal

    2016-08-01

    This work discusses the influence of novel biofiller, "sucrose palmitate" (SP) on the hydrolytic degradation behavior of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanocomposites. The influence of temperature and pH of the solution on the hydrolytic degradation behavior of PLA and PLA-SP nanocomposites was investigated. The variation in the crystallinity of PLA and PLA composites subjected to the hydrolytic degradation process is verified by XRD and DSC analysis. The morphological changes that occurred during the degradation process are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermo-gravimetric analysis confirms the loss of thermal stability of the neat PLA as well as composites after hydrolytic degradation process. Transparency measurements support the enhancement in opacity of both the PLA and PLA-SP nanocomposites with progress in hydrolytic degradation period. PMID:27095433

  8. Metagenomic analysis of an anaerobic alkane-degrading microbial culture: potential hydrocarbon-activating pathways and inferred roles of community members.

    PubMed

    Tan, Boonfei; Dong, Xiaoli; Sensen, Christoph W; Foght, Julia

    2013-10-01

    A microbial community (short-chain alkane-degrading culture, SCADC) enriched from an oil sands tailings pond was shown to degrade C6-C10 alkanes under methanogenic conditions. Total genomic DNA from SCADC was subjected to 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina paired-end sequencing, and 16S rRNA amplicon pyrotag sequencing; the latter revealed 320 operational taxonomic units at 5% distance. Metagenomic sequences were subjected to in-house quality control and co-assembly, yielding 984 086 contigs, and annotation using MG-Rast and IMG. Substantial nucleotide and protein recruitment to Methanosaeta concilii, Syntrophus aciditrophicus, and Desulfobulbus propionicus reference genomes suggested the presence of closely related strains in SCADC; other genomes were not well mapped, reflecting the paucity of suitable reference sequences for such communities. Nonetheless, we detected numerous homologues of putative hydrocarbon succinate synthase genes (e.g., assA, bssA, and nmsA) implicated in anaerobic hydrocarbon degradation, suggesting the ability of the SCADC microbial community to initiate methanogenic alkane degradation by addition to fumarate. Annotation of a large contig revealed analogues of the ass operon 1 in the alkane-degrading sulphate-reducing bacterium Desulfatibacillum alkenivorans AK-01. Despite being enriched under methanogenic-fermentative conditions, additional metabolic functions inferred by COG profiling indicated multiple CO(2) fixation pathways, organic acid utilization, hydrogenase activity, and sulphate reduction. PMID:24237341

  9. Production and Degradation of Oxalic Acid by Brown Rot Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Espejo, Eduardo; Agosin, Eduardo

    1991-01-01

    Our results show that all of the brown rot fungi tested produce oxalic acid in liquid as well as in semisolid cultures. Gloeophyllum trabeum, which accumulates the lowest amount of oxalic acid during decay of pine holocellulose, showed the highest polysaccharide-depolymerizing activity. Semisolid cultures inoculated with this fungus rapidly converted 14C-labeled oxalic acid to CO2 during cellulose depolymerization. The other brown rot fungi also oxidized 14C-labeled oxalic acid, although less rapidly. In contrast, semisolid cultures inoculated with the white rot fungus Coriolus versicolor did not significantly catabolize the acid and did not depolymerize the holocellulose during decay. Semisolid cultures of G. trabeum amended with desferrioxamine, a specific iron-chelating agent, were unable to lower the degree of polymerization of cellulose or to oxidize 14C-labeled oxalic acid to the extent or at the rate that control cultures did. These results suggest that both iron and oxalic acid are involved in cellulose depolymerization by brown rot fungi. PMID:16348522

  10. Degradable cationic shell cross-linked knedel-like nanoparticles: synthesis, degradation, nucleic acid binding, and in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Samarajeewa, Sandani; Ibricevic, Aida; Gunsten, Sean P; Shrestha, Ritu; Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Brody, Steven L; Wooley, Karen L

    2013-04-01

    In this work, degradable cationic shell cross-linked knedel-like (deg-cSCK) nanoparticles were developed as an alternative platform to replace similar nondegradable cSCK nanoparticles that have been utilized for nucleic acids delivery. An amphiphilic diblock copolymer poly(acrylamidoethylamine)(90)-block-poly(DL-lactide)(40) (PAEA(90)-b-PDLLA(40)) was synthesized, self-assembled in aqueous solution, and shell cross-linked using a hydrolyzable cross-linker to afford deg-cSCKs with an average core diameter of 45 ± 7 nm. These nanoparticles were fluorescently labeled for in vitro tracking. The enzymatic- and hydrolytic-degradability, siRNA binding affinity, cell uptake and cytotoxicity of the deg-cSCKs were evaluated. Esterase-catalyzed hydrolysis of the nanoparticles resulted in the degradation of ca. 24% of the PDLLA core into lactic acid within 5 d, as opposed to only ca. 9% degradation from aqueous solutions of the deg-cSCK nanoparticles in the absence of enzyme. Cellular uptake of deg-cSCKs was efficient, while exhibiting low cytotoxicity with LD50 values of ca. 90 and 30 μg/mL in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages and MLE 12 cell lines, respectively, ca. 5- to 6-fold lower than the cytotoxicity observed for nondegradable cSCK analogs. Additionally, deg-cSCKs were able to complex siRNA at an N/P ratio as low as 2, and were efficiently able to facilitate cellular uptake of the complexed nucleic acids. PMID:23510389

  11. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney, M.J.

    1992-11-16

    The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 [mu]M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 [mu]M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K[sub i] for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

  12. Novel Intermediates of Acenaphthylene Degradation by Rhizobium sp. Strain CU-A1: Evidence for Naphthalene-1,8-Dicarboxylic Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Poonthrigpun, Siriwat; Pattaragulwanit, Kobchai; Paengthai, Sarunya; Kriangkripipat, Thanyanuch; Juntongjin, Kanchana; Thaniyavarn, Suthep; Petsom, Amorn; Pinphanichakarn, Pairoh

    2006-01-01

    The acenaphthylene-degrading bacterium Rhizobium sp. strain CU-A1 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated soil in Thailand. This strain was able to degrade 600 mg/liter acenaphthylene completely within three days. To elucidate the pathway for degradation of acenaphthylene, strain CU-A1 was mutagenized by transposon Tn5 in order to obtain mutant strains deficient in acenaphthylene degradation. Metabolites produced from Tn5-induced mutant strains B1, B5, and A53 were purified by thin-layer chromatography and silica gel column chromatography and characterized by mass spectrometry. The results suggested that this strain cleaved the fused five-membered ring of acenaphthylene to form naphthalene-1,8-dicarboxylic acid via acenaphthenequinone. One carboxyl group of naphthalene-1,8-dicarboxylic acid was removed to form 1-naphthoic acid which was transformed into salicylic acid before metabolization to gentisic acid. This work is the first report of complete acenaphthylene degradation by a bacterial strain. PMID:16957226

  13. Selective microbial degradation of saturated methyl branched chain fatty acid isomers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three strains of Pseudomonas bacteria were screened for their capabilities of degrading chemically synthesized saturated branched-chain fatty acids (sbc-FAs). Mixtures of sbc-FAs with the methyl-branch located at various locales along the fatty acid were used as a carbon feedstock in shake-flask cu...

  14. ADIPIC ACID DEGRADATION MECHANISM IN AQUEOUS FGD (FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION) SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a field and laboratory study of the adipic acid degradation mechanism in aqueous flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. (Adding adipic acid to limestone-based, SO2 wet scrubbers increases SO2 removal and limestone utilization. However, as much as 80% ...

  15. A macromolecular delivery vehicle for protein-based vaccines: Acid-degradable protein-loaded microgels

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, Niren; Xu, Mingcheng; Schuck, Stephany; Kunisawa, Jun; Shastri, Nilabh; Fréchet, Jean M. J.

    2003-01-01

    The development of protein-based vaccines remains a major challenge in the fields of immunology and drug delivery. Although numerous protein antigens have been identified that can generate immunity to infectious pathogens, the development of vaccines based on protein antigens has had limited success because of delivery issues. In this article, an acid-sensitive microgel material is synthesized for the development of protein-based vaccines. The chemical design of these microgels is such that they degrade under the mildly acidic conditions found in the phagosomes of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). The rapid cleavage of the microgels leads to phagosomal disruption through a colloid osmotic mechanism, releasing protein antigens into the APC cytoplasm for class I antigen presentation. Ovalbumin was encapsulated in microgel particles, 200–500 nm in diameter, prepared by inverse emulsion polymerization with a synthesized acid-degradable crosslinker. Ovalbumin is released from the acid-degradable microgels in a pH-dependent manner; for example, microgels containing ovalbumin release 80% of their encapsulated proteins after 5 h at pH 5.0, but release only 10% at pH 7.4. APCs that phagocytosed the acid-degradable microgels containing ovalbumin were capable of activating ovalbumin-specific cytoxic T lymphocytes. The acid-degradable microgels developed in this article should therefore find applications as delivery vehicles for vaccines targeted against viruses and tumors, where the activation of cytoxic T lymphocytes is required for the development of immunity. PMID:12704236

  16. Electrochemical assisted photocatalytic degradation of salicylic acid with highly ordered TiO2 nanotube electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Zhu, Jinwei; Wang, Ying; Feng, Jiangtao; Yan, Wei; Xu, Hao

    2014-07-01

    To explore the kinetics of photoelectrocatalytic degradation of salicylic acid, one of the important PPCPs, highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTs) were prepared by the electrochemical anodization and characterized with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The effect of TiO2 NTs properties, bias potential, initial salicylic acid concentration and solution pH on the degradation efficiency was studied and carefully analyzed. The results revealed that the salicylic acid degradation follows quasi-first order kinetics in the photoelectrocatalytic process, and the fastest decay kinetics was achieved in acidic environment (pH 2). The result was further interpreted through the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is confirmed that the electrochemical assisted photocatalysis is a synergetic approach to combat stable organic substances with improved efficiency.

  17. Ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter protein levels are down-regulated through ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation induced by bile acids.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Yamakawa, Hiroki; Hayashi, Kenjiro; Kuribayashi, Hideaki; Yamazoe, Yasushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2013-08-15

    The ileal apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT or SLC10A2) has a crucial role in intestinal bile acid absorption. We previously reported that enterobacteria-mediated bile acid conversion was involved in the alteration of ileal ASBT expression levels. In the present study, to investigate the hypothesis that ileal ASBT protein levels are post-translationally regulated by enterobacteria-associated bile acids, alteration of ileal ASBT protein levels was analysed in mice 12 h and 24 h after anti-bacterial drug ampicillin (ABPC) treatment (100 mg/kg, single shot) that altered bile acid composition in the intestinal lumen. In ABPC-treated mice, enterobacteria-biotransformed bile acid, taurodeoxycholic acid (TDCA) and cholic acid (CA) levels were decreased, whereas taurocholic acid (TCA) and tauro-β-muricholic acid levels were increased in the intestinal lumen. Ileal ASBT protein levels in brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMVs), but not ileal Asbt mRNA levels, were significantly increased in the ABPC-treated mice, and the extent of ubiquitination of the ileal ASBT protein was reduced in the ABPC-treated mice. Treatment of ABPC-pretreated mice with CA or TDCA, but not TCA, significantly decreased ileal ASBT protein levels and increased the extent of ubiquitination of ileal ASBT protein. Treatment of mice with the lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine, or the proteasome inhibitor, MG132, increased ileal ASBT protein levels in BBMVs. CA-mediated reduction of ASBT protein levels in the ABPC-pretreated mice was attenuated by co-treatment with chloroquine or MG132. These results suggest that ileal ASBT protein is degraded by a ubiquitin-dependent pathway in response to enterobacteria-associated bile acids. PMID:23872411

  18. Reconstruction of cytosolic fumaric acid biosynthetic pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fumaric acid is a commercially important component of foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals and industrial materials, yet the current methods of production are unsustainable and ecologically destructive. Results In this study, the fumarate biosynthetic pathway involving reductive reactions of the tricarboxylic acid cycle was exogenously introduced in S. cerevisiae by a series of simple genetic modifications. First, the Rhizopus oryzae genes for malate dehydrogenase (RoMDH) and fumarase (RoFUM1) were heterologously expressed. Then, expression of the endogenous pyruvate carboxylase (PYC2) was up-regulated. The resultant yeast strain, FMME-001 ↑PYC2 + ↑RoMDH, was capable of producing significantly higher yields of fumarate in the glucose medium (3.18 ± 0.15 g liter-1) than the control strain FMME-001 empty vector. Conclusions The results presented here provide a novel strategy for fumarate biosynthesis, which represents an important advancement in producing high yields of fumarate in a sustainable and ecologically-friendly manner. PMID:22335940

  19. [Study on cooperating degradation of cypermethrin and 3-phenoxybenzoic acid by two bacteria strains].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yu-Xin; Sun, Ji-Quan; Li, Xiao-Hui; Li, Shun-Peng; Chen, Yi

    2007-10-01

    The microbial cooperated reaction is one of the most important forms of microbial degradation of organic pollutants. Although there were many research reports of cooperating degradation, less report on the microbial cooperated of pyrethroid degradation to be found. We have isolated one degrading-bacteria strain named CDT3 for degradation of cypermethrin, which can degraded the cypermethrin into 3-PBA and DCVA. At the same time, we also isolated another degrading-bacteria strain named as PBM11, which could get multiplication on 3-PBA as its C source and energy source. The cooperative degradation process of cypermethrin and 3-Phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) using the two degrading-bacteria strain CDT3 and PBM11 was investigated. An obvious inhibition to the cypermethrin degrading-bacterium strain CDT3 (Rhodococcus sp.) by its metabolic mediate 3-PBA was found; meanwhile there is no effect on the growth of 3-PBA degrading-bacterium strain PBM11 (Pesudomonas sp.) when the concentration of cypermethrin was lower than 200 mg/L. The degradation rate of cypermethrin by both strain CDT3 and PBM11 was higher than that by CDT3 alone. The biomass of PBM11 increased along with the degradation of cypermethrin and 3-PBA, but that of CDT3 not. There was no the accumulation of 3-PBA when the simultaneous addition of strain CDT3 and PBM11, however, an obvious one within 24h if inoculation of strain PBM11 was later 24h after inoculation of strain CDT3, Subsequently the 3-PBA was degraded rapidly by strain PBM11. The strains CDT3 and PBM11 showed some characteristics of co-metabolism, however it is not actual degradation form of co-metabolism. For examples, although the degrading sub product of cypermethrin by CDT3 could be utilized, the multiplication of PBM11 could not enhance the multiplication of CDT3, implied there is no obvious relationship between the two strains. Also, to add PBM11 could eliminate the inhibition of 3-PBA to CDT3. Thus, the cooperating degradation of strains CDT3

  20. Degradability of fluorapatite-leucite ceramics in naturally acidic agents.

    PubMed

    Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Hengtrakool, Chanothai; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2010-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the titratable acidity and effect of naturally acidic agents on the surface microhardness, elemental composition, and surface morphology of fluorapatite-leucite ceramics. One hundred and ten ceramic disks (IPS d.SIGN), 12.0 mm in diameter and 2.0 mm in thickness, were fabricated. Before immersion, the baseline data of Vickers microhardness and elemental composition were recorded. Four groups were immersed in acidic agents (citrate buffer solution, green mango juice, and pineapple juice) and deionized water (control) at 37ºC for 168 hours, whereas one group was immersed in 4% acetic acid at 80ºC for 168 hours. After immersion, specimens were evaluated and data were analyzed using one-way repeated ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Microhardness values significantly decreased after immersion (p<0.05). In terms of elemental composition, the weight percentages of silicon, potassium, aluminum, and sodium also decreased after immersion (p<0.05). Results of this study showed that fluorapatite-leucite ceramics were affected by long-term immersion in acidic agents. PMID:20827032

  1. Electrochemical degradation of sulfonamides at BDD electrode: kinetics, reaction pathway and eco-toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fabiańska, Aleksandra; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Stepnowski, Piotr; Stolte, Stefan; Siedlecka, Ewa Maria

    2014-09-15

    The investigation dealt with electrochemical oxidation of five sulfonamides (SNs): sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfathiazole (STZ), sulfamerazine (SMR), sulfamethazine (SMN) and sulfadimethoxine (SDM) in aqueous solution at boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. All studied sulfonamides were degraded according to a pseudo first order kinetics. The structure of SNs had no significant effect on the values of pseudo first order rate constants. Increased degradation efficiency was observed in higher temperature and in acidic pH. Due to the presence of chlorine and nitrate SNs were more effectively oxidized from municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents than from pure supporting electrolyte Na2SO4. The intermediates identified by LC-MS and GC-MS analysis suggested that the hydroxyl radicals attack mainly the SN bond, but also the aromatic ring systems (aniline, pyrimidine or triazole) of SNs. Finally, the toxicity of the SNs solutions and effluents after electrochemical treatment was assessed through the measurement of growth inhibition of green algae (Scenedesmus vacualatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor). Toxicity of SMR, STZ, SMN solutions before and after electrochemical oxidation and SDM solution after the process in L. minor test was observed. No significant toxicity of studied SNs was observed in algae test. PMID:25215656

  2. Characterization of bacterial diversity in an atrazine degrading enrichment culture and degradation of atrazine, cyanuric acid and biuret in industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Anirban; Vasudevan, Venugopal; Nain, Lata; Singh, Neera

    2016-01-01

    An enrichment culture was used to study atrazine degradation in mineral salt medium (MSM) (T1), MSM+soil extract (1:1, v/v) (T2) and soil extract (T3). Results suggested that enrichment culture required soil extract to degrade atrazine, as after second sequential transfer only partial atrazine degradation was observed in T1 treatment while atrazine was completely degraded in T2 and T3 treatments even after fourth transfer. Culture independent polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) technique confirmed selective enrichment of genus Bacillus along with Pseudomonas and Burkholderia. Degradation of atrazine/metabolites in the industrial wastewater was studied at different initial concentrations of the contaminants [wastewater-water (v/v) ratio: T1, 1:9; T2, 2:8; T3, 3:7; T4, 5:5 and T5, undiluted effluent]. The initial concentrations of atrazine, cyanuric acid and biuret ranged between 5.32 and 53.92 µg mL(-1), 265.6 and 1805.2 µg mL(-1) and 1.85 and 16.12 µg mL(-1), respectively. The enrichment culture was able to completely degrade atrazine, cyanuric acid and biuret up to T4 treatment, while no appreciable degradation of contaminants was observed in the undiluted effluent (T5). Inability of enrichment culture to degrade atrazine/metabolites might be due to high concentrations of cyanuric acid. Therefore, a separate study on cyanuric acid degradation suggested: (i) no appreciable cyanuric acid degradation with accumulation of an unidentified metabolite in the medium where cyanuric acid was supplemented as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen; (ii) partial cyanuric acid degradation with accumulation of unidentified metabolite in the medium containing additional nitrogen source; and (iii) complete cyanuric acid degradation in the medium supplemented with an additional carbon source. This unidentified metabolite observed during cyanuric acid degradation and also detected in the enrichment culture inoculated wastewater samples

  3. D-Amino acid metabolism in mammals: biosynthesis, degradation and analytical aspects of the metabolic study.

    PubMed

    Ohide, Hiroko; Miyoshi, Yurika; Maruyama, Rindo; Hamase, Kenji; Konno, Ryuichi

    2011-11-01

    It was believed for long time that d-amino acids are not present in mammals. However, current technological advances and improvements in analytical instruments have enabled studies that now indicate that significant amounts of D-amino acids are present in mammals. The most abundant D-amino acids are D-serine and D-aspartate. D-Serine, which is synthesized by serine racemase and is degraded by D-amino-acid oxidase, is present in the brain and modulates neurotransmission. D-Aspartate, which is synthesized by aspartate racemase and degraded by D-aspartate oxidase, is present in the neuroendocrine and endocrine tissues and testis. It regulates the synthesis and secretion of hormones and spermatogenesis. D-Serine and D-aspartate bind to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors and function as a coagonist and agonist, respectively. The enzymes that are involved in the synthesis and degradation of these D-amino acids are associated with neural diseases where the NMDA receptors are involved. Knockout mice for serine racemase and D-aspartate oxidase have been generated, and natural mutations in the d-amino-acid oxidase gene are present in mice and rats. These mutant animals display altered behaviors caused by enhanced or decreased NMDA receptor activity. In this article, we review currently available studies on D-amino acid metabolism in mammals and discuss analytical methods used to assay activity of amino acid racemases and D-amino-acid oxidases. PMID:21757409

  4. The contribution of mediated oxidation mechanisms in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid using diamond anodes.

    PubMed

    Bensalah, Nasr; Dbira, Sondos; Bedoui, Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    In this work, the contribution of mediated oxidation mechanisms in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid using boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes was investigated in different electrolytes. A complete mineralization of cyanuric acid was obtained in NaCl; however lower degrees of mineralization of 70% and 40% were obtained in Na2SO4 and NaClO4, respectively. This can be explained by the nature of the oxidants electrogenerated in each electrolyte. It is clear that the contribution of active chlorine (Cl2, HClO, ClO(-)) electrogenerated from oxidation of chlorides on BDD is much more important in the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid than the persulfate and hydroxyl radicals produced by electro-oxidation of sulfate and water on BDD anodes. This could be explained by the high affinity of active chlorine towards nitrogen compounds. No organic intermediates were detected during the electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid in any the electrolytes, which can be explained by their immediate depletion by hydroxyl radicals produced on the BDD surface. Nitrates and ammonium were the final products of electrolytic degradation of cyanuric acid on BDD anodes in all electrolytes. In addition, small amounts of chloramines were formed in the chloride medium. Low current density (≤10mA/cm(2)) and neutral medium (pH in the range 6-9) should be used for high efficiency electrolytic degradation and negligible formation of hazardous chlorate and perchlorate. PMID:27372125

  5. Abscisic-acid-induced cellular apoptosis and differentiation in glioma via the retinoid acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Yao, Yu; Ye, Hongxing; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying

    2016-04-15

    Retinoid acid (RA) plays critical roles in regulating differentiation and apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. Abscisic acid (ABA) and RA are direct derivatives of carotenoids and share structural similarities. Here we proposed that ABA may also play a role in cellular differentiation and apoptosis by sharing a similar signaling pathway with RA that may be involved in glioma pathogenesis. We reported for the first time that the ABA levels were twofold higher in low-grade gliomas compared with high-grade gliomas. In glioma tissues, there was a positive correlation between the ABA levels and the transcription of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 (CRABP2) and a negative correlation between the ABA levels and transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5). ABA treatment induced a significant increase in the expression of CRABP2 and a decrease in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) in glioblastoma cells. Remarkably, both cellular apoptosis and differentiation were increased in the glioblastoma cells after ABA treatment. ABA-induced cellular apoptosis and differentiation were significantly reduced by selectively silencing RAR-α, while RAR-α overexpression exaggerated the ABA-induced effects. These results suggest that ABA may play a role in the pathogenesis of glioma by promoting cellular apoptosis and differentiation through the RA signaling pathway. PMID:26594836

  6. Modeling the degradation of Portland cement pastes by biogenic organic acids

    SciTech Connect

    De Windt, Laurent; Devillers, Philippe

    2010-08-15

    Reactive transport models can be used to assess the long-term performance of cement-based materials subjected to biodegradation. A bioleaching test (with Aspergillus niger fungi) applied to ordinary Portland cement pastes during 15 months is modeled with HYTEC. Modeling indicates that the biogenic organic acids (acetic, butyric, lactic and oxalic) strongly accelerate hydrate dissolution by acidic hydrolysis whilst their complexation of aluminum has an effect on the secondary gel stability only. The deepest degradation front corresponds to portlandite dissolution and decalcification of calcium silicate hydrates. A complex pattern of sulfate phases dissolution and precipitation takes place in an intermediate zone. The outermost degraded zone consists of alumina and silica gels. The modeling accurateness of calcium leaching, pH evolution and degradation thickness is consistently enhanced whilst considering increase of diffusivity in the degraded zones. Precipitation of calcium oxalate is predicted by modeling but was hindered in the bioleaching reactor.

  7. Oxidative degradation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209) by potassium permanganate: reaction pathways, kinetics, and mechanisms assisted by density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiaqi; Qu, Ruijuan; Feng, Mingbao; Wang, Xinghao; Wang, Liansheng; Yang, Shaogui; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-04-01

    This study found that decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209) could be oxidized effectively by potassium permanganate (KMnO4) in sulfuric acid medium. A total of 15 intermediate oxidative products were detected. The reaction pathways were proposed, which primarily included cleavage of the ether bond to form pentabromophenol. Direct oxidation on the benzene ring also played an important role because hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were produced during the oxidation process. The degradation occurred dramatically in the first few minutes and fitted pseudo-first-order kinetics. Increasing the water content decelerated the reaction rate, whereas increasing the temperature facilitated the reaction. In addition, density functional theory (DFT) was employed to determine the frontier molecular orbital (FMO) and frontier electron density (FED) of BDE 209 and the oxidative products. The theoretical calculation results confirmed the proposed reaction pathways. PMID:25751737

  8. Decolorization of azo dye C.I. Reactive Black 5 by ozonation in aqueous solution: influencing factors, degradation products, reaction pathway and toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing; Dai, Yong; Han, Xiangyun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, ozonation treatment of C.I. Reactive Black 5 (RB5) was investigated at various operating parameters. The results showed that the aqueous solution initially containing 200 mg/L RB5 was quickly decolorized at pH 8.0 with an ozone dose of 3.2 g/h. Reaction intermediates with m/z 281, 546, 201, 350, 286 and 222 were elucidated using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, while sulfate ion, nitrate ion and three carboxylic acids (i.e., oxalic acid, formic acid, and acetic acid) were identified by ion exchange chromatography. Thus, the cleavage of the azo bond and the introduction of OH groups in the corresponding positions were proposed as the predominant reaction pathway. The detachment of sulfonic groups was also commonly observed during the ozonation treatment. The proposed degradation mechanism was confirmed by frontier electron density calculations, suggesting the feasibility of predicting the major events in the whole ozonation process with the computational method. Compared with RB5 degradation, the reduction of total organic carbon (TOC) proceeded much more slowly, and approximately 54% TOC was removed after 4 h of ozonation. Acute toxicity tests with Photobacterium phosphoreum showed that the toxicity of reaction solution was firstly increased and then decreased to a negligible level after 160 min. PMID:27054721

  9. The Whole Genome Sequence of Sphingobium chlorophenolicum L-1: Insights into the Evolution of the Pentachlorophenol Degradation Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Copley, Shelley D.; Rokicki, Joseph; Turner, Pernilla; Daligault, Hajnalka E.; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam L

    2012-01-01

    Sphingobium chlorophenolicum Strain L-1 can mineralize the toxic pesticide pentachlorophenol (PCP). We have sequenced the genome of S. chlorophenolicum Strain L-1. The genome consists of a primary chromosome that encodes most of the genes for core processes, a secondary chromosome that encodes primarily genes that appear to be involved in environmental adaptation, and a small plasmid. The genes responsible for degradation of PCP are found on chromosome 2. We have compared the genomes of S. chlorophenolicum Strain L-1 and Sphingobium japonicum, a closely related Sphingomonad that degrades lindane. Our analysis suggests that the genes encoding the first three enzymes in the PCP degradation pathway were acquired via two different horizontal gene transfer events, and the genes encoding the final two enzymes in the pathway were acquired from the most recent common ancestor of these two bacteria.

  10. The Whole Genome Sequence of Sphingobium chlorophenolicum L-1: Insights into the Evolution of the Pentachlorophenol Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Copley, Shelley D.; Rokicki, Joseph; Turner, Pernilla; Daligault, Hajnalka; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Sphingobium chlorophenolicum Strain L-1 can mineralize the toxic pesticide pentachlorophenol (PCP). We have sequenced the genome of S. chlorophenolicum Strain L-1. The genome consists of a primary chromosome that encodes most of the genes for core processes, a secondary chromosome that encodes primarily genes that appear to be involved in environmental adaptation, and a small plasmid. The genes responsible for degradation of PCP are found on chromosome 2. We have compared the genomes of S. chlorophenolicum Strain L-1 and Sphingobium japonicum, a closely related Sphingomonad that degrades lindane. Our analysis suggests that the genes encoding the first three enzymes in the PCP degradation pathway were acquired via two different horizontal gene transfer events, and the genes encoding the final two enzymes in the pathway were acquired from the most recent common ancestor of these two bacteria. PMID:22179583

  11. Insights from 14C into C loss pathways in degraded peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Martin; Evans, Chris; Allott, Tim; Stimson, Andrew; Goulsbra, Claire

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are important global stores of terrestrial carbon. Lowered water tables due to changing climate and direct or indirect human intervention produce a deeper aerobic zone and have the potential to enhance loss of stored carbon from the peat profile. The quasi continuous accumulation of organic matter in active peatlands means that the age of fluvial dissolved organic carbon exported from peatland systems is related to the source depth in the peat profile. Consequently 14C analysis of DOC in waters draining peatlands has the potential not only to tell us about the source of fluvial carbon and the stability of the peatland but also about the dominant hydrological pathways in the peatland system. This paper will present new radiocarbon determinations from peatland streams draining the heavily eroded peatlands of the southern Pennine uplands in the UK. These blanket peatland systems are highly degraded, with extensive bare peat and gully erosion resulting from air pollution during the industrial revolution, overgrazing, wildfire and climatic changes. Deep and extensive gullying has significantly modified the hydrology of these systems leading to local and more widespread drawdown of water table. 14C data from DOC in drainage waters are presented from two catchments; one with extensive gully erosion and the other with a combination of gully erosion and sheet erosion of the peat. At the gully eroded site DOC in drainage waters is as old as 160 BP but at the site with extensive sheet erosion dates of up to 1069 BP are amongst the oldest recorded from blanket peatland globally These data indicate significant degradation of stored carbon from the eroding peatlands. Initial comparisons of the 14C data with modelled water table for the catchments and depth-age curves for catchment peats suggests that erosion of the peat surface, allowing decomposition of exposed older organic material is a potential mechanism producing aged carbon from the eroded catchment. This

  12. Retinoic acid triggers meiosis initiation via stra8-dependent pathway in Southern catfish, Silurus meridionalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Feng, Ruijuan; Ma, He; Dong, Ranran; Liu, Zhilong; Jiang, Wentao; Tao, Wenjing; Wang, Deshou

    2016-06-01

    Existing studies demonstrated that retinoic acid (RA) regulates meiotic initiation via stra8-independent pathway in teleosts which lack stra8 in their genomes. However, stra8 was recently identified from several fish species including Southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis). To explore the existence of stra8-dependent pathway in RA mediated meiotic initiation in fishes, in the present study, the genes encoding RA synthase aldh1a2 and catabolic enzyme cyp26a1 and cyp26b1 were cloned from the Southern catfish. By immunohistochemistry, Aldh1a2 signal was observed in gonads of both sexes during the meiotic initiation period. By real-time PCR, differentially expressed gene was observed for cyp26a1, but not for cyp26b1, in gonads during the meiotic initiation. Administration of exogenous RA or inhibition of endogenous RA degradation by either KET (RA catabolic enzyme inhibitor) or cyp26a1 knockdown using CRISPR/Cas9 induced advanced meiotic initiation in the ovaries as demonstrated by increased Stra8/stra8 expression and appearance of oocytes. In contrast, treatment with RA synthase inhibitor DEAB resulted in delayed meiotic initiation and Stra8/stra8 expression in the ovaries, which was rescued by exogenous RA administration. These results indicated that (1) RA triggers the onset of meiosis via stra8-dependent pathway in stra8 existing teleosts, as it does in tetrapods; (2) exogenous RA can rescue the endogenous RA deficiency; (3) Cyp26a1, instead of Cyp26b1, is the key catabolic enzyme involved in meiosis initiation in teleosts. Taken together, RA might trigger meiotic initiation via stra8-dependent and -independent pathway in different teleosts. PMID:26764212

  13. Effect of trace metals and sulfite oxidation of adipic acid degradation in FGD systems. Final report Dec 81-May 82

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, J.B.; Terry, J.C.; Schubert, S.A.; Utley, B.L.

    1982-12-01

    The report gives results of the measurement of the adipic acid degradation rate in a bench-scale flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system, designed to simulate many of the important aspects of full-scale FGD systems. Results show that the adipic acid degradation rate depends on the sulfite oxidation rate, the adipic acid concentration, the presence of manganese in solution, and temperature. The degradation rate is also affected by pH, but only when manganese is present. Adipic acid degradation products identified in the liquid phase include valeric, butyric, propionic, succinic, and glutaric acids. When manganese was present, the predominant degradation products were succinic and glutaric acids. Analysis of solids from the bench scale tests shows large concentrations of coprecipitated adipic acid in low oxidation sulfite solids. By contrast, low quantities of coprecipitated adipic acid were found in high oxidation gypsum solids.

  14. The earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa stimulates abundance and activity of phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicide degraders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya-Jun; Zaprasis, Adrienne; Liu, Shuang-Jiang; Drake, Harold L; Horn, Marcus A

    2011-01-01

    2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) is a widely used phenoxyalkanoic acid (PAA) herbicide. Earthworms represent the dominant macrofauna and enhance microbial activities in many soils. Thus, the effect of the model earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa (Oligochaeta, Lumbricidae) on microbial MCPA degradation was assessed in soil columns with agricultural soil. MCPA degradation was quicker in soil with earthworms than without earthworms. Quantitative PCR was inhibition-corrected per nucleic acid extract and indicated that copy numbers of tfdA-like and cadA genes (both encoding oxygenases initiating aerobic PAA degradation) in soil with earthworms were up to three and four times higher than without earthworms, respectively. tfdA-like and 16S rRNA gene transcript copy numbers in soil with earthworms were two and six times higher than without earthworms, respectively. Most probable numbers (MPNs) of MCPA degraders approximated 4 × 105 gdw−1 in soil before incubation and in soil treated without earthworms, whereas MPNs of earthworm-treated soils were approximately 150 × higher. The aerobic capacity of soil to degrade MCPA was higher in earthworm-treated soils than in earthworm-untreated soils. Burrow walls and 0–5 cm depth bulk soil displayed higher capacities to degrade MCPA than did soil from 5–10 cm depth bulk soil, expression of tfdA-like genes in burrow walls was five times higher than in bulk soil and MCPA degraders were abundant in burrow walls (MPNs of 5 × 107 gdw−1). The collective data indicate that earthworms stimulate abundance and activity of MCPA degraders endogenous to soil by their burrowing activities and might thus be advantageous for enhancing PAA degradation in soil. PMID:20740027

  15. Improved Acid Stress Survival of Lactococcus lactis Expressing the Histidine Decarboxylation Pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524*

    PubMed Central

    Trip, Hein; Mulder, Niels L.; Lolkema, Juke S.

    2012-01-01

    Degradative amino acid decarboxylation pathways in bacteria generate secondary metabolic energy and provide resistance against acid stress. The histidine decarboxylation pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524 was functionally expressed in the heterologous host Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, and the benefits of the newly acquired pathway for the host were analyzed. During growth in M17 medium in the pH range of 5–6.5, a small positive effect was observed on the biomass yield in batch culture, whereas no growth rate enhancement was evident. In contrast, a strong benefit for the engineered L. lactis strain was observed in acid stress survival. In the presence of histidine, the pathway enabled cells to survive at pH values as low as 3 for at least 2 h, conditions under which the host cells were rapidly dying. The flux through the histidine decarboxylation pathway in cells grown at physiological pH was under strict control of the electrochemical proton gradient (pmf) across the membrane. Ionophores that dissipated the membrane potential (ΔΨ) and/or the pH gradient (ΔpH) strongly increased the flux, whereas the presence of glucose almost completely inhibited the flux. Control of the pmf over the flux was exerted by both ΔΨ and ΔpH and was distributed over the transporter HdcP and the decarboxylase HdcA. The control allowed for a synergistic effect between the histidine decarboxylation and glycolytic pathways in acid stress survival. In a narrow pH range around 2.5 the synergism resulted in a 10-fold higher survival rate. PMID:22351775

  16. Improved acid stress survival of Lactococcus lactis expressing the histidine decarboxylation pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524.

    PubMed

    Trip, Hein; Mulder, Niels L; Lolkema, Juke S

    2012-03-30

    Degradative amino acid decarboxylation pathways in bacteria generate secondary metabolic energy and provide resistance against acid stress. The histidine decarboxylation pathway of Streptococcus thermophilus CHCC1524 was functionally expressed in the heterologous host Lactococcus lactis NZ9000, and the benefits of the newly acquired pathway for the host were analyzed. During growth in M17 medium in the pH range of 5-6.5, a small positive effect was observed on the biomass yield in batch culture, whereas no growth rate enhancement was evident. In contrast, a strong benefit for the engineered L. lactis strain was observed in acid stress survival. In the presence of histidine, the pathway enabled cells to survive at pH values as low as 3 for at least 2 h, conditions under which the host cells were rapidly dying. The flux through the histidine decarboxylation pathway in cells grown at physiological pH was under strict control of the electrochemical proton gradient (pmf) across the membrane. Ionophores that dissipated the membrane potential (ΔΨ) and/or the pH gradient (ΔpH) strongly increased the flux, whereas the presence of glucose almost completely inhibited the flux. Control of the pmf over the flux was exerted by both ΔΨ and ΔpH and was distributed over the transporter HdcP and the decarboxylase HdcA. The control allowed for a synergistic effect between the histidine decarboxylation and glycolytic pathways in acid stress survival. In a narrow pH range around 2.5 the synergism resulted in a 10-fold higher survival rate. PMID:22351775

  17. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Degradation of Connexin43 in Rat Astrocytes via the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Proteolytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chih-Kai; Jeng, Chung-Jiuan; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Wang, Shu-Huei; Wu, Jiahn-Chun

    2013-01-01

    The astrocytic syncytium plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of the brain through the regulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Changes to GJIC in response to inflammatory stimuli in astrocytes may have serious effects on the brain. We have previously shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces connexin43 (Cx43) expression and GJIC in cultured rat astrocytes via a toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling pathway. In the present study, treatment of astrocytes with LPS resulted in a significant increase in levels of the phosphorylated forms of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) -1, -2, and -3 for up to 18 h. An increase in nuclear transcription factor NF-κB levels was also observed after 8 h of LPS treatment and was sustained for up to 18 h. The LPS-induced decrease in Cx43 protein levels and inhibition of GJIC were blocked by the SAPK/JNK inhibitor SP600125, but not by the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. Following blockade of de novo protein synthesis by cycloheximide, LPS accelerated Cx43 degradation. Moreover, the LPS-induced downregulation of Cx43 was blocked following inhibition of 26S proteasome activity using the reversible proteasome inhibitor MG132 or the irreversible proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. Immunoprecipitation analyses revealed an increased association of Cx43 with both ubiquitin and E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 in astrocytes after LPS stimulation for 6 h and this effect was prevented by SP600125. Taken together, these results suggest that LPS stimulation leads to downregulation of Cx43 expression and GJIC in rat astrocytes by activation of SAPK/JNK and the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. PMID:24236122

  18. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Ana T; Goos, Yvonne J; Pereboom, Tamara C; Hermkens, Dorien; Wlodarski, Marcin W; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene haploinsufficiency. While the mechanisms underlying the cytopenia phenotype of patients with these mutations are not completely understood, it is believed that stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor protein may induce apoptosis in the progenitor cells. In stark contrast, tumor cells from zebrafish with RP gene haploinsufficiency are unable to stabilize p53 even when exposed to acute DNA damage despite transcribing wild type p53 normally. In this work we demonstrate that p53 has a limited role in eliciting the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA. In fact, we find that RP-deficient embryos exhibit the same normal p53 transcription, absence of p53 protein, and impaired p53 response to DNA damage as RP haploinsufficient tumor cells. Recently we reported that RP mutations suppress activity of the AKT pathway, and we show here that this suppression results in proteasomal degradation of p53. By re-activating the AKT pathway or by inhibiting GSK-3, a downstream modifier that normally represses AKT signaling, we are able to restore the stabilization of p53. Our work indicates that the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA is dependent on factors other than p53, and may hold clinical significance for both DBA and the increasing number of cancers revealing spontaneous mutations in RP genes. PMID:26132763

  19. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hermkens, Dorien; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene haploinsufficiency. While the mechanisms underlying the cytopenia phenotype of patients with these mutations are not completely understood, it is believed that stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor protein may induce apoptosis in the progenitor cells. In stark contrast, tumor cells from zebrafish with RP gene haploinsufficiency are unable to stabilize p53 even when exposed to acute DNA damage despite transcribing wild type p53 normally. In this work we demonstrate that p53 has a limited role in eliciting the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA. In fact, we find that RP-deficient embryos exhibit the same normal p53 transcription, absence of p53 protein, and impaired p53 response to DNA damage as RP haploinsufficient tumor cells. Recently we reported that RP mutations suppress activity of the AKT pathway, and we show here that this suppression results in proteasomal degradation of p53. By re-activating the AKT pathway or by inhibiting GSK-3, a downstream modifier that normally represses AKT signaling, we are able to restore the stabilization of p53. Our work indicates that the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA is dependent on factors other than p53, and may hold clinical significance for both DBA and the increasing number of cancers revealing spontaneous mutations in RP genes. PMID:26132763

  20. GFP Reporter Screens for the Engineering of Amino Acid Degrading Enzymes from Libraries Expressed in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Paley, Olga; Agnello, Giulia; Cantor, Jason; Yoo, Tae Hyun; Georgiou, George; Stone, Everett

    2014-01-01

    There is significant interest in engineering human amino acid degrading enzymes as non-immunogenic chemotherapeutic agents. We describe a high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) assay for detecting the catalytic activity of amino acid degrading enzymes in bacteria, at the single cell level. This assay relies on coupling the synthesis of the GFP reporter to the catalytic activity of the desired amino acid degrading enzyme in an appropriate E. coli genetic background. The method described here allows facile screening of much larger libraries (106–107) than was previously possible. We demonstrate the application of this technique in the screening of libraries of bacterial and human asparaginases and also for the catalytic optimization of an engineered human methionine gamma lyase. PMID:23423887

  1. Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, March 1992--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McInerney M.J.

    1995-06-23

    Factors affecting the rate and extent of benzoate degradation by anaerobic syntrophic consortia were studied. Cocultures of a syntrophic benzoate degrader, strain SB, with a hydrogen/formate-using sulfate reducer degraded benzoate to a threshold that depended on the amount of substrate and acetate present. The benzoate threshold was not a function of the inhibition of benzoate degradation capacity by acetate or the toxicity of the undissociated form of acetate. Rather, a critical or minimal Gibb`s free energy value may exist where thermodynamic constraints preclude further benzoate degradation. A sensitive assay to detect low formate concentrations was developed to measure the formate levels when the benzoate threshold was reached. We showed that increased acetate concentrations, even when hydrogen and formate levels are low, affects the extent of benzoate degradation, implicating the importance of interspecies acetate transfer. In addition to benzoate, various saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, 2-methylbutyrate, and methyl esters of fatty acids supported growth in coculture with a hydrogen-using partner. SB is the only syntrophic bacterium known to use both benzoate and fatty acids. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SB clustered with sulfate reducers in the delta subclass of the Proteobacteria. SB grew well in coculture with Desulfoarculus baarsii, a sulfate reducer that uses formate but not hydrogen. This unequivocally shows that SB can grow by interspecies formate transfer.

  2. Degradation of hydroxycinnamic acid mixtures in aqueous sucrose solutions by the Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Danny M T; Zhang, Zhanying; Doherty, William O S

    2015-02-11

    The degradation efficiencies and behaviors of caffeic acid (CaA), p-coumaric acid (pCoA), and ferulic acid (FeA) in aqueous sucrose solutions containing the mixture of these hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) were studied by the Fenton oxidation process. Central composite design and multiresponse surface methodology were used to evaluate and optimize the interactive effects of process parameters. Four quadratic polynomial models were developed for the degradation of each individual acid in the mixture and the total HCAs degraded. Sucrose was the most influential parameter that significantly affected the total amount of HCA degraded. Under the conditions studied there was a <0.01% loss of sucrose in all reactions. The optimal values of the process parameters for a 200 mg/L HCA mixture in water (pH 4.73, 25.15 °C) and sucrose solution (13 mass %, pH 5.39, 35.98 °C) were 77% and 57%, respectively. Regression analysis showed goodness of fit between the experimental results and the predicted values. The degradation behavior of CaA differed from those of pCoA and FeA, where further CaA degradation is observed at increasing sucrose and decreasing solution pH. The differences (established using UV/vis and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy) were because, unlike the other acids, CaA formed a complex with Fe(III) or with Fe(III) hydrogen-bonded to sucrose and coprecipitated with lepidocrocite, an iron oxyhydroxide. PMID:25585639

  3. Maintenance of essential amino acid synthesis pathways in the Blattabacterium cuenoti symbiont of a wood-feeding cockroach

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Gaku; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Kinjo, Yukihiro; Saitoh, Seikoh; Sabree, Zakee; Hojo, Masaru; Yamada, Akinori; Hayashi, Yoshinobu; Shigenobu, Shuji; Bandi, Claudio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Lo, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    In addition to harbouring intestinal symbionts, some animal species also possess intracellular symbiotic microbes. The relative contributions of gut-resident and intracellular symbionts to host metabolism, and how they coevolve are not well understood. Cockroaches and the termite Mastotermes darwiniensis present a unique opportunity to examine the evolution of spatially separated symbionts, as they harbour gut symbionts and the intracellular symbiont Blattabacterium cuenoti. The genomes of B. cuenoti from M. darwiniensis and the social wood-feeding cockroach Cryptocercus punctulatus are each missing most of the pathways for the synthesis of essential amino acids found in the genomes of relatives from non-wood-feeding hosts. Hypotheses to explain this pathway degradation include: (i) feeding on microbes present in rotting wood by ancestral hosts; (ii) the evolution of high-fidelity transfer of gut microbes via social behaviour. To test these hypotheses, we sequenced the B. cuenoti genome of a third wood-feeding species, the phylogenetically distant and non-social Panesthia angustipennis. We show that host wood-feeding does not necessarily lead to degradation of essential amino acid synthesis pathways in B. cuenoti, and argue that ancestral high-fidelity transfer of gut microbes best explains their loss in strains from M. darwiniensis and C. punctulatus. PMID:23515978

  4. Maintenance of essential amino acid synthesis pathways in the Blattabacterium cuenoti symbiont of a wood-feeding cockroach.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Gaku; Elbourne, Liam D H; Kinjo, Yukihiro; Saitoh, Seikoh; Sabree, Zakee; Hojo, Masaru; Yamada, Akinori; Hayashi, Yoshinobu; Shigenobu, Shuji; Bandi, Claudio; Paulsen, Ian T; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Lo, Nathan

    2013-06-23

    In addition to harbouring intestinal symbionts, some animal species also possess intracellular symbiotic microbes. The relative contributions of gut-resident and intracellular symbionts to host metabolism, and how they coevolve are not well understood. Cockroaches and the termite Mastotermes darwiniensis present a unique opportunity to examine the evolution of spatially separated symbionts, as they harbour gut symbionts and the intracellular symbiont Blattabacterium cuenoti. The genomes of B. cuenoti from M. darwiniensis and the social wood-feeding cockroach Cryptocercus punctulatus are each missing most of the pathways for the synthesis of essential amino acids found in the genomes of relatives from non-wood-feeding hosts. Hypotheses to explain this pathway degradation include: (i) feeding on microbes present in rotting wood by ancestral hosts; (ii) the evolution of high-fidelity transfer of gut microbes via social behaviour. To test these hypotheses, we sequenced the B. cuenoti genome of a third wood-feeding species, the phylogenetically distant and non-social Panesthia angustipennis. We show that host wood-feeding does not necessarily lead to degradation of essential amino acid synthesis pathways in B. cuenoti, and argue that ancestral high-fidelity transfer of gut microbes best explains their loss in strains from M. darwiniensis and C. punctulatus. PMID:23515978

  5. The degradation of airway tight junction protein under acidic conditions is probably mediated by transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Li, Qi; Zhou, Jia; Zhou, Xiang-dong; Perelman, Juliy M.; Kolosov, Victor P.

    2013-01-01

    Acidic airway microenvironment is one of the representative pathophysiological features of chronic inflammatory respiratory diseases. Epithelial barrier function is maintained by TJs (tight junctions), which act as the first physical barrier against the inhaled substances and pathogens of airway. As previous studies described, acid stress caused impaired epithelial barriers and led the hyperpermeability of epithelium. However, the specific mechanism is still unclear. We have showed previously the existence of TRPV (transient receptor potential vanilloid) 1 channel in airway epithelium, as well as its activation by acidic stress in 16HBE cells. In this study, we explored the acidic stress on airway barrier function and TJ proteins in vitro with 16HBE cell lines. Airway epithelial barrier function was determined by measuring by TER (trans-epithelial electrical resistance). TJ-related protein [claudin-1, claudin-3, claudin-4, claudin-5, claudin-7 and ZO-1 (zonula occluden 1)] expression was examined by western blotting of insoluble fractions of cell extraction. The localization of TJ proteins were visualized by immunofluorescent staining. Interestingly, stimulation by pH 6.0 for 8 h slightly increased the epithelial resistance in 16HBE cells insignificantly. However, higher concentration of hydrochloric acid (lower than pH 5.0) did reduce the airway epithelial TER of 16HBE cells. The decline of epithelial barrier function induced by acidic stress exhibited a TRPV1-[Ca2+]i-dependent pathway. Of the TJ proteins, claudin-3 and claudin-4 seemed to be sensitive to acidic stress. The degradation of claudin-3 and claudin-4 induced by acidic stress could be attenuated by the specific TRPV1 blocker or intracellular Ca2+ chelator BAPTA/AM [1,2-bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid tetrakis(acetoxymethyl ester)]. PMID:24073800

  6. Thermal pretreatment of olive mill wastewater for efficient methane production: control of aromatic substances degradation by monitoring cyclohexane carboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Pontoni, Ludovico; d'Antonio, Giuseppe; Esposito, Giovanni; Fabbricino, Massimiliano; Frunzo, Luigi; Pirozzi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is investigated as a sustainable depurative strategy of olive oil mill wastewater (OOMW). The effect of thermal pretreatment on the anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic compounds present in (OMWW) was investigated. The anaerobic degradation of phenolic compounds, well known to be the main concern related to this kind of effluents, was monitored in batch anaerobic tests at a laboratory scale on samples pretreated at mild (80±1 °C), intermediate (90±1 °C) and high temperature (120±1 °C). The obtained results showed an increase of 34% in specific methane production (SMP) for OMWW treated at the lowest temperature and a decrease of 18% for treatment at the highest temperature. These results were related to the different decomposition pathways of the lignocellulosic compounds obtained in the tested conditions. The decomposition pathway was determined by measuring the concentrations of volatile organic acids, phenols, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) versus time. Cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHCA) production was identified in all the tests with a maximum concentration of around 200 µmol L(-1) in accordance with the phenols degradation, suggesting that anaerobic digestion of aromatic compounds follows the benzoyl-CoA pathway. Accurate monitoring of this compound was proposed as the key element to control the process evolution. The total phenols (TP) and total COD removals were, with SMP, the highest (TP 62.7%-COD 63.2%) at 80 °C and lowest (TP 44.9%-COD 32.2%) at 120 °C. In all cases, thermal pretreatment was able to enhance the TP removal ability (up to 42% increase). PMID:25624137

  7. Identification of insulin domains important for binding to and degradation by endosomal acidic insulinase.

    PubMed

    Authier, F; Danielsen, G M; Kouach, M; Briand, G; Chauvet, G

    2001-01-01

    The endosomal compartment of hepatic parenchymal cells contains an acidic endopeptidase, endosomal acidic insulinase (EAI), which hydrolyzes internalized insulin at a limited number of sites. Although the positions of these cleavages are partially known, the residues of insulin important in its binding to and proteolysis by EAI have not been defined. To this end, we have studied the degradation over time of native human insulin and three insulin-analog peptides using a soluble endosomal extract from rat liver parenchyma followed by purification of the products by HPLC and determination of their structure by mass spectrometry. We found variable rates of ligand processing, i.e. high ([Asp(B10)]- and [Glu(A13),Glu(B10)]-insulin), moderate (insulin) and low (the H2-analog). On the basis of IC(50) values, competition studies revealed that human and mutant insulins display nearly equivalent affinity for the EAI. Proteolysis of human and mutant insulins by EAI resulted in eight cleavages in the B-chain which occurred in the central region (Glu(B13)-Leu(B17)) and at the C-terminus (Arg(B22)-Thr(B27)), the latter region comprising the initial cleavages at Phe(B24)-Phe(B25) (major pathway) and Phe(B25)-Tyr(B26) (minor pathway) bonds. Except for the [Glu(A13),Glu(B10)]-insulin mutant, only one cleavage on the A-chain was observed at residues Gln(A15)-Leu(A16). Analysis of the nine cleavage sites showed a preference for hydrophobic and aromatic amino acid residues on both the carboxyl and amino sides of a cleaved peptide bond. Using the B-chain alone as a substrate resulted in a 30-fold increase in affinity for EAI and a 6-fold increase in the rate of hydrolysis compared with native insulin. A similar role for the C-terminal region of the B-chain of insulin in the high-affinity recognition of EAI was supported by the use of the corresponding B(22)-B(30) peptide, which displayed an increase in EAI affinity similar to the entire B-chain vs. wild-type insulin. Thus, we have

  8. Hydroxycinnamic Acid Degradation, a Broadly Conserved Trait, Protects Ralstonia solanacearum from Chemical Plant Defenses and Contributes to Root Colonization and Virulence.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Tiffany M; Ailloud, Florent; Allen, Caitilyn

    2015-03-01

    Plants produce hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA) defense compounds to combat pathogens, such as the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum. We showed that an HCA degradation pathway is genetically and functionally conserved across diverse R. solanacearum strains. Further, a feruloyl-CoA synthetase (Δfcs) mutant that cannot degrade HCA was less virulent on tomato plants. To understand the role of HCA degradation in bacterial wilt disease, we tested the following hypotheses: HCA degradation helps the pathogen i) grow, as a carbon source; ii) spread, by reducing HCA-derived physical barriers; and iii) survive plant antimicrobial compounds. Although HCA degradation enabled R. solanacearum growth on HCA in vitro, HCA degradation was dispensable for growth in xylem sap and root exudate, suggesting that HCA are not significant carbon sources in planta. Acetyl-bromide quantification of lignin demonstrated that R. solanacearum infections did not affect the gross quantity or distribution of stem lignin. However, the Δfcs mutant was significantly more susceptible to inhibition by two HCA, namely, caffeate and p-coumarate. Finally, plant colonization assays suggested that HCA degradation facilitates early stages of infection and root colonization. Together, these results indicated that ability to degrade HCA contributes to bacterial wilt virulence by facilitating root entry and by protecting the pathogen from HCA toxicity. PMID:25423265

  9. Hydroxycinnamic acid degradation, a broadly conserved trait, protects Ralstonia solanacearum from chemical plant defenses and contributes to root colonization and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Tiffany M.; Ailloud, Florent; Allen, Caitilyn

    2014-01-01

    Plants produce hydroxycinnamic acid defense compounds (HCAs) to combat pathogens, such as the bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum. We showed that an HCA degradation pathway is genetically and functionally conserved across diverse R. solanacearum strains. Further, a Δfcs (feruloyl-CoA synthetase) mutant that cannot degrade HCAs was less virulent on tomato plants. To understand the role of HCA degradation in bacterial wilt disease, we tested the following hypotheses: HCA degradation helps the pathogen (1) grow, as a carbon source; (2) spread, by reducing physical barriers HCA-derived; and (3) survive plant antimicrobial compounds. Although HCA degradation enabled R. solanacearum growth on HCAs in vitro, HCA degradation was dispensable for growth in xylem sap and root exudate, suggesting that HCAs are not significant carbon sources in planta. Acetyl-bromide quantification of lignin demonstrated that R. solanacearum infections did not affect the gross quantity or distribution of stem lignin. However, the Δfcs mutant was significantly more susceptible to inhibition by two HCAs: caffeate and p-coumarate. Finally, plant colonization assays suggested that HCA degradation facilitates early stages of infection and root colonization. Together, these results indicated that ability to degrade HCAs contributes to bacterial wilt virulence by facilitating root entry and by protecting the pathogen from HCA toxicity. PMID:25423265

  10. REGγ regulates ERα degradation via ubiquitin–proteasome pathway in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chai, Fan; Liang, Yan; Bi, Jiong; Chen, Li; Zhang, Fan; Cui, Youhong; Jiang, Jun

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • High expression of REGγ is correlated with ERα status and poor clinical features. • Cell growth, mobility and invasion are significantly impaired by REGγ knockdown. • REGγ indirectly regulates ERα protein expression. - Abstract: REGγ is a proteasome coactivator which regulates proteolytic activity in eukaryotic cells. Abundant lines of evidence have showed that REGγ is over expressed in a number of human carcinomas. However, its precise role in the pathogenesis of cancer is still unclear. In this study, by examining 200 human breast cancer specimens, we demonstrated that REGγ was highly expressed in breast cancers, and the expression of REGγ was positively correlated with breast cancer patient estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) status. Moreover, the expression of REGγ was found positively associated with poor clinical features and low survival rates in ERα positive breast cancer patients. Further cell culture studies using MCF7 and BT474 breast cancer cell lines showed that cell proliferation, motility, and invasion capacities were decreased significantly by REGγ knockdown. Lastly, we demonstrated that REGγ indirectly regulates the degradation of ERα protein via ubiquitin–proteasome pathway. In conclusion, our findings provide the evidence that REGγ expression was positively correlated with ERα status and poor clinical prognosis in ERα positive breast cancer patients. As well, we disclose a new connection between the two molecules that are both highly expressed in most breast cancer cases.

  11. The metabolism of aromatic acids by micro-organisms. Metabolic pathways in the fungi

    PubMed Central

    Cain, R. B.; Bilton, R. F.; Darrah, Josephine A.

    1968-01-01

    1. The metabolic pathways of aromatic-ring fission were examined in a range of fungal genera that utilize several compounds related to lignin. 2. Most of the genera, after growth on p-hydroxybenzoate, protocatechuate or compounds that are degraded to the latter (e.g. caffeate, ferulate or vanillate), rapidly oxidized these compounds, but not catechol. 3. Such genera possessed a protocatechuate 3,4-oxygenase and accumulated β-carboxymuconate as the product of protocatechuate oxidation. This enzyme had a high pH optimum in most organisms; the Rhodotorula enzyme was competitively inhibited by catechol. 4. β-Carboxymuconate was converted by all competent fungi into β-carboxymuconolactone, which was isolated and characterized. None of the fungi produced or utilized at significant rates the corresponding bacterial intermediate γ-carboxymuconolactone. 5. The lactonizing enzymes of Rhodotorula and Neurospora crassa had a pH optimum near 5·5 and approximate molecular weights of 19000 and 190000 respectively. 6. The fungi did not degrade the isomeric (+)-muconolactone, γ-carboxymethylenebutanolide or β-oxoadipate enol lactone at significant rates, and thus differ radically from bacteria, where β-oxoadipate enol lactone is the precursor of β-oxoadipate in all strains examined. 7. The end product of β-carboxymuconolactone metabolism by extracts was β-oxoadipate. 8. Evidence for a coenzyme A derivative of β-oxoadipate was found during further metabolism of this keto acid. 9. A few anomalous fungi, after growth on p-hydroxybenzoate, had no protocatechuate 3,4-oxygenase, but possessed all the enzymes of the catechol pathway. Catechol was detected in the growth medium in one instance. 10. A strain of Penicillium sp. formed pyruvate but no β-oxoadipate from protocatechuate, suggesting the existence also of a `meta' type of ring cleavage among fungi. PMID:5691754

  12. The Transmembrane Domain of Acid Trehalase Mediates Ubiquitin-independent Multivesicular Body Pathway Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ju; Reggiori, Fulvio

    2007-01-01

    Trehalose serves as a storage source of carbon and plays important roles under various stress conditions. For example, in many organisms trehalose has a critical function in preserving membrane structure and fluidity during dehydration/rehydration. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, trehalose accumulates in the cell when the nutrient supply is limited but is rapidly degraded when the supply of nutrients is renewed. Hydrolysis of trehalose in yeast depends on neutral trehalase and acid trehalase (Ath1). Ath1 resides and functions in the vacuole; however, it appears to catalyze the hydrolysis of extracellular trehalose. Little is known about the transport route of Ath1 to the vacuole or how it encounters its substrate. Here, through the use of various trafficking mutants we showed that this hydrolase reaches its final destination through the multivesicular body (MVB) pathway. In contrast to the vast majority of proteins sorted into this pathway, Ath1 does not require ubiquitination for proper localization. Mutagenesis analyses aimed at identifying the unknown targeting signal revealed that the transmembrane domain of Ath1 contains the information sufficient for its selective sequestration into MVB internal vesicles. PMID:17475771

  13. Adsorption and degradation of phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides in soils: A review.

    PubMed

    Paszko, Tadeusz; Muszyński, Paweł; Materska, Małgorzata; Bojanowska, Monika; Kostecka, Małgorzata; Jackowska, Izabella

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of the present review on phenoxyalkanoic acid herbicides-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) acetic acid (2,4-D), 2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) acetic acid (MCPA), (2R)-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) propanoic acid (dichlorprop-P), (2R)-2-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) propanoic acid (mecoprop-P), 4-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy) butanoic acid (2,4-DB), and 4-(4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy) butanoic acid (MCPB)-was to compare the extent of their adsorption in soils and degradation rates to assess their potential for groundwater contamination. The authors found that adsorption decreased in the sequence of 2,4-DB > 2,4-D > MCPA > dichlorprop-P > mecoprop-P. Herbicides are predominantly adsorbed as anions-on organic matter and through a water-bridging mechanism with adsorbed Fe cations-and their neutral forms are adsorbed mainly on organic matter. Adsorption of anions of 2,4-D, MCPA, dichlorprop-P, and mecoprop-P is inversely correlated with their lipophilicity values, and modeling of adsorption of the compounds based on this relationship is possible. The predominant dissipation mechanism of herbicides in soils is bacterial degradation. The contribution of other mechanisms, such as degradation by fungi, photodegradation, or volatilization from soils, is much smaller. The rate of bacterial degradation decreased in the following order: 2,4-D > MCPA > mecoprop-P > dichlorprop-P. It was found that 2,4-D and MCPA have the lowest potential for leaching into groundwater and that mecoprop-P and dichlorprop-P have slightly higher potential. Because of limited data on adsorption and degradation of 2,4-DB and MCPB, estimation of their leaching potential was not possible. PMID:26292078

  14. SURFACE DEGRADATION OF COMPOSITE RESINS BY ACIDIC MEDICINES AND pH-CYCLING

    PubMed Central

    Valinoti, Ana Carolina; Neves, Beatriz Gonçalves; da Silva, Eduardo Moreira; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of acidic medicines (Dimetapp® and Claritin®), under pH-cycling conditions, on the surface degradation of four composite resins (microhybrid: TPH, Concept, Opallis and Nanofilled: Supreme). Thirty disc-shaped specimens (Ø = 5.0 mm / thickness = 2.0 mm) of each composite were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n = 10): a control and two experimental groups, according to the acidic medicines evaluated. The specimens were finished and polished with aluminum oxide discs, and the surface roughness was measured by using a profilometer. After the specimens were submitted to a pH-cycling regimen and immersion in acidic medicines for 12 days, the surface roughness was measured again. Two specimens for each material and group were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) before and after pH-cycling. Data were analyzed by the Student's-t test, ANOVA, Duncan's multiple range test and paired t-test (α=0.05). Significant increase in roughness was found only for TPH in the control group and TPH and Supreme immersed in Claritin® (p<0.05). SEM analyses showed that the 4 composite resins underwent erosion and surface degradation after being subjected to the experimental conditions. In conclusion, although the roughness was slightly affected, the pH-cycling and acidic medicines caused surface degradation of the composite resins evaluated. Titratable acidity seemed to play a more crucial role on surface degradation of composite resins than pH. PMID:19089257

  15. Molybdenum-Containing Nicotine Hydroxylase Genes in a Nicotine Degradation Pathway That Is a Variant of the Pyridine and Pyrrolidine Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Li, Yangyang

    2015-01-01

    Ochrobactrum sp. strain SJY1 utilizes nicotine as a sole source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy via a variant of the pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways (the VPP pathway). Several strains and genes involved in the VPP pathway have recently been reported; however, the first catalyzing step for enzymatic turnover of nicotine is still unclear. In this study, a nicotine hydroxylase for the initial hydroxylation step of nicotine degradation was identified and characterized. The nicotine hydroxylase (VppA), which converts nicotine to 6-hydroxynicotine in the strain SJY1, is encoded by two open reading frames (vppAS and vppAL [subunits S and L, respectively]). The vppA genes were heterologously expressed in the non-nicotine-degrading strains Escherichia coli DH5α and Pseudomonas putida KT2440; only the Pseudomonas strain acquired the ability to degrade nicotine. The small subunit of VppA contained a [2Fe-2S] cluster-binding domain, and the large subunit of VppA contained a molybdenum cofactor-binding domain; however, an FAD-binding domain was not found in VppA. Resting cells cultivated in a molybdenum-deficient medium had low nicotine transformation activity, and excess molybdenum was detected in the purified VppA by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis. Thus, it is demonstrated that VppA is a two-component molybdenum-containing hydroxylase. PMID:26407884

  16. Quantum chemical prediction of redox reactivity and degradation pathways for aqueous phase contaminants: an example with HMPA.

    PubMed

    Blotevogel, Jens; Borch, Thomas; Desyaterik, Yury; Mayeno, Arthur N; Sale, Tom C

    2010-08-01

    Models used to predict the fate of aqueous phase contaminants are often limited by their inability to address the widely varying redox conditions in natural and engineered systems. Here, we present a novel approach based on quantum chemical calculations that identifies the thermodynamic conditions necessary for redox-promoted degradation and predicts potential degradation pathways. Hexamethylphosphoramide (HMPA), a widely used solvent and potential groundwater contaminant, is used as a test case. Its oxidation is estimated to require at least iron-reducing conditions at low to neutral pH and nitrate-reducing conditions at high pH. Furthermore, the transformation of HMPA by permanganate is predicted to proceed through sequential N-demethylation. Experimental validation based on LC/TOF-MS analysis confirms the predicted pathways of HMPA oxidation by permanganate to phosphoramide via the formation of less methylated as well as singly and multiply oxygenated reaction intermediates. Pathways predicted to be thermodynamically or kinetically unfavorable are similarly absent in the experimental studies. Our newly developed methodology will enable scientists and engineers to estimate the favorability of contaminant degradation at a specific field site, suitable approaches to enhance degradation, and the persistence of a contaminant and its reaction intermediates. PMID:20608732

  17. OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic- and hydroxycinnamic acids and formation of aromatic products—A gamma radiolysis study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimmel, Birgit; Swoboda, Friederike; Solar, Sonja; Reznicek, Gottfried

    2010-12-01

    The OH-radical induced degradation of hydroxybenzoic acids (HBA), hydroxycinnamic acids (HCiA) and methoxylated derivatives, as well as of chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid was studied by gamma radiolysis in aerated aqueous solutions. Primary aromatic products resulting from an OH-radical attachment to the ring (hydroxylation), to the position occupied by the methoxyl group (replacement -OCH 3 by -OH) as well as to the propenoic acid side chain of the cinnamic acids (benzaldehyde formations) were analysed by HPLC-UV and LC-ESI-MS. A comparison of the extent of these processes is given for 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, isovanillic acid, syringic acid, cinnamic acid, 4-hydroxycinnamic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid. For all cinnamic acids and derivatives benzaldehydes were significant oxidation products. With the release of caffeic acid from chlorogenic acid the cleavage of a phenolic glycoside could be demonstrated. Reaction mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Chemotaxis and degradation of organophosphate compound by a novel moderately thermo-halo tolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain BUR11: evidence for possible existence of two pathways for degradation

    PubMed Central

    Pailan, Santanu

    2015-01-01

    An organophosphate (OP) degrading chemotactic bacterial strain BUR11 isolated from an agricultural field was identified as a member of Pseudomonas genus on the basis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The strain could utilize parathion, chlorpyrifos and their major hydrolytic intermediates as sole source of carbon for its growth and exhibited positive chemotactic response towards most of them. Optimum concentration of parathion for its growth was recorded to be 200 ppm and 62% of which was degraded within 96 h at 37 °C. Growth studies indicated the strain to be moderately thermo-halo tolerant in nature. Investigation based on identification of intermediates of parathion degradation by thin layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) provided evidence for possible existence of two pathways. The first pathway proceeds via 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) while the second proceeds through formation of 4-aminoparathion (4-APar), 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and parabenzoquinone (PBQ). This is the first report of chemotaxis towards organophosphate compound by a thermo-halo tolerant bacterium. PMID:26587344

  19. Chemotaxis and degradation of organophosphate compound by a novel moderately thermo-halo tolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain BUR11: evidence for possible existence of two pathways for degradation.

    PubMed

    Pailan, Santanu; Saha, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    An organophosphate (OP) degrading chemotactic bacterial strain BUR11 isolated from an agricultural field was identified as a member of Pseudomonas genus on the basis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The strain could utilize parathion, chlorpyrifos and their major hydrolytic intermediates as sole source of carbon for its growth and exhibited positive chemotactic response towards most of them. Optimum concentration of parathion for its growth was recorded to be 200 ppm and 62% of which was degraded within 96 h at 37 °C. Growth studies indicated the strain to be moderately thermo-halo tolerant in nature. Investigation based on identification of intermediates of parathion degradation by thin layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) provided evidence for possible existence of two pathways. The first pathway proceeds via 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) while the second proceeds through formation of 4-aminoparathion (4-APar), 4-aminophenol (4-AP) and parabenzoquinone (PBQ). This is the first report of chemotaxis towards organophosphate compound by a thermo-halo tolerant bacterium. PMID:26587344

  20. Retrospective analysis for the identification of 4-aminocarminic acid photo-degradation products in beverages.

    PubMed

    Gosetti, Fabio; Chiuminatto, Ugo; Mastroianni, Rita; Mazzucco, Eleonora; Manfredi, Marcello; Marengo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    This article deals with the identification of the photo-degradation products of 4-aminocarminic acid potentially present in commercial beverages. Sixteen beverages of different composition but all containing the E120 dye were previously analysed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry to identify the common degradation products of the E120 dye. Since it is plausible to find unauthorised 4-aminocarminic acid in beverages which report generic E120 dye on the label, retrospective analysis was employed here not only to search for the possible presence of 4-aminocarminic acid but also to investigate the potential formation of photo-degradation products derived from this compound. For this purpose, a statistical approach based on Student's t-test was used to compare the degraded beverages containing 4-aminocarminic acid with all the others. Five degradation products were identified and their structures were elucidated on the basis of the high-accuracy and high-resolution of mass and mass/mass spectra. The toxicity of the degradation products was evaluated through the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay. No evidence of mutagenicity was obtained for the beverages subjected or not to irradiation, whereas a toxic effect of the 4-aminocarminic acid standard solution already at 100.0 µg l(-1) was found. This leads, once again, to the conclusion that the toxicity study must be carried out on the beverages in order to take into account of all the possible masking/protection interactions among the ingredients. PMID:25562586

  1. Use of 13C NMR and ftir for elucidation of degradation pathways during natural litter decomposition and composting I. early stage leaf degradation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Leenheer, J.A.; Kennedy, K.R.; Noyes, T.I.

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative degradation of plant tissue leads to the formation of natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and humus. Infrared (IR) and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry have been used to elucidate the chemical reactions of the early stages of degradation that give rise to DOC derived from litter and compost. The results of this study indicate that oxidation of the lignin components of plant tissue follows the sequence of O-demethylation, and hydroxylation followed by ring-fission, chain-shortening, and oxidative removal of substituents. Oxidative ring-fission leads to the formation of carboxylic acid groups on the cleaved ends of the rings and, in the process, transforms phenolic groups into aliphatic alcoholic groups. The carbohydrate components are broken down into aliphatic hydroxy acids and aliphatic alcohols.

  2. Testing the importance of p27 degradation by the SCFskp2 pathway in murine models of lung and colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Timmerbeul, Inke; Garrett-Engele, Carrie M; Kossatz, Uta; Chen, Xueyan; Firpo, Eduardo; Grünwald, Viktor; Kamino, Kenji; Wilkens, Ludwig; Lehmann, Ulrich; Buer, Jan; Geffers, Robert; Kubicka, Stefan; Manns, Michael P; Porter, Peggy L; Roberts, James M; Malek, Nisar P

    2006-09-19

    Decreased expression of the CDK inhibitor p27kip1 in human tumors directly correlates with increased resistance to chemotherapies, increased rates of metastasis, and an overall increased rate of patient mortality. It is thought that decreased p27 expression in tumors is caused by increased proteasomal turnover, in particular activation of the pathway governed by the SCFskp2 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase. We have directly tested the importance of the SCFskp-mediated degradation of p27 in tumorigenesis by analyzing the tumor susceptibility of mice that express a form of p27 that cannot be ubiquitinated and degraded by this pathway (p27T187A). In mouse models of both lung and colon cancer down-regulation of p27 promotes tumorigenesis. However, we found that preventing p27 degradation by the SCFskp2 pathway had no impact on tumor incidence or overall survival in either tumor model. Our study unveiled a previously unrecognized role for the control of p27 mRNA abundance in the development of non-small cell lung cancers. In the colon cancer model, the frequency of intestinal adenomas was similarly unaffected by the p27T187A mutation, but, unexpectedly, we found that it inhibited progression of intestinal adenomas to carcinomas. These studies may guide the choice of clinical settings in which pharmacologic inhibitors of the Skp2 pathway might be of therapeutic value. PMID:16966613

  3. Anaerobic Degradation Pathway of the Novel Chiral Insecticide Paichongding and Its Impact on Bacterial Communities in Soils.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jing; Ma, Jiangtao; Zhu, Xiaolin; Cai, Jinyan; Yang, Guanghua

    2015-08-19

    To comprehensively understand anaerobic degradation of the novel cis-nitromethylene neonicotinoid insecticide Paichongding (IPP) and its impacts on microbial communities in anaerobic soils, we investigated IPP degradation characteristics, kinetics, and pathway in four different soils. The bacterial community in response to the application of IPP using pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was also studied. The removal ratio of IPP stereoisomers (RR-IPP, SS-IPP, RS-IPP, and SR-IPP) reached >90% at 60 days after IPP treatment (DAT) in yellow loam soil (F) and paddy field on desalting muddy polder (C), whereas the degradation ratios of RR-IPP and SS-IPP were <30% at 60 DAT in Huangshi soil (J) and yellow paddy soil (H). The results showed that the anaerobic degradation rate of IPP and its stereoisomers was strongly affected by soil physical-chemical characteristics. Furthermore, on the basis of the six metabolites (M1-M6) identified by LC-MS/MS and their behavior, the anaerobic degradation pathway of IPP in soils was proposed. Biodegradation of IPP involved continuous biocatalytic reactions such as nitro reduction and elimination, hydrolysis, demethyl, and ether cleavage reactions. A higher richness of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was found in soils without IPP application than in soils with IPP application. Both the rarefaction curves and Shannon-Wiener diversity index in anaerobic soils had significant difference after IPP application, and the community composition also differed at both the phyla and genus levels. PMID:26216485

  4. Regulation of Leaf Starch Degradation by Abscisic Acid Is Important for Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Plants[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Thalmann, Matthias; Pazmino, Diana; Seung, David; Horrer, Daniel; Nigro, Arianna; Meier, Tiago; Zeeman, Samuel C.; Santelia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Starch serves functions that range over a timescale of minutes to years, according to the cell type from which it is derived. In guard cells, starch is rapidly mobilized by the synergistic action of β-AMYLASE1 (BAM1) and α-AMYLASE3 (AMY3) to promote stomatal opening. In the leaves, starch typically accumulates gradually during the day and is degraded at night by BAM3 to support heterotrophic metabolism. During osmotic stress, starch is degraded in the light by stress-activated BAM1 to release sugar and sugar-derived osmolytes. Here, we report that AMY3 is also involved in stress-induced starch degradation. Recently isolated Arabidopsis thaliana amy3 bam1 double mutants are hypersensitive to osmotic stress, showing impaired root growth. amy3 bam1 plants close their stomata under osmotic stress at similar rates as the wild type but fail to mobilize starch in the leaves. 14C labeling showed that amy3 bam1 plants have reduced carbon export to the root, affecting osmolyte accumulation and root growth during stress. Using genetic approaches, we further demonstrate that abscisic acid controls the activity of BAM1 and AMY3 in leaves under osmotic stress through the AREB/ABF-SnRK2 kinase-signaling pathway. We propose that differential regulation and isoform subfunctionalization define starch-adaptive plasticity, ensuring an optimal carbon supply for continued growth under an ever-changing environment. PMID:27436713

  5. Isolation and characterization of Bradyrhizobium sp. 224 capable of degrading sulfanilic acid.

    PubMed

    Hayase, Nobuki; Fujikawa, Yui; Nakagawa, Katsuhiko; Ushio, Kazutoshi

    2016-08-01

    A bacterial strain (strain 224), which has the ability to utilize sulfanilic acid as a sole source of carbon, was isolated from soil. 16S rRNA gene sequence obtained from strain 224 exhibited 100% identical to that of species in the genus Bradyrhizobium. Strain 224 degraded 4.7 mM of sulfanilic acid and released almost the same molar concentration of sulfate ion. PMID:27108596

  6. Biodegradation of dimethyl phthalate by Sphingomonas sp. isolated from phthalic-acid-degrading aerobic granules.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ping; Moy, Benjamin Yan-Pui; Song, Yong-Hui; Tay, Joo-Hwa

    2008-10-01

    Phthalic acid esters (PAEs) contamination in water, air, and soil is one of the major environmental concerns in many countries. Besides the PAE biodegradation process, the PAE degrading bacteria have become one of the focuses of study. This study reports the successful isolation of one kind of indigenous bacterium PA-02 from phthalic acid (PA)-degrading aerobic granules. Based on its 16S ribosomal DNA sequence, isolate PA-02 was identified as Sphingomonas genus with 100% similarity to Sphingomonas sp. strain D84532. Strain PA-02 was a Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium with strong auto-aggregation ability. In particular, the strain PA-02 possessed PAE-degrading ability without acclimation. Results of growth tests showed that strain PA-02 could degrade dimethyl phthalate (DMP), dibutyl phthalate, and diethylhexyl phthalate. The specific degradation rates of DMP and PA were concentration-dependent with maximum values of 0.4 g-DMP g(-1) biomass h(-1) and 1.3 g-PA g(-1) biomass h(-1), respectively. Kinetic studies also revealed that PA-02 was robust under high concentrations of DMP and PA. Even when the PA concentration was increased to 1,000.0 mg l(-1), the specific PA degradation rate was about 0.25 g-PA g(-1) biomass h(-1). The corresponding value for DMP was 0.067 g-DMP g(-1) biomass h(-1) at 1,000 mg l(-1). PMID:18751698

  7. Protocatechuic Acid Promoted Alachlor Degradation in Fe(III)/H2O2 Fenton System.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yaxin; Song, Fahui; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Pingping; Zhang, Lizhi

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that protocatechuic acid (PCA) can significantly promote the alachlor degradation in the Fe(III)/H2O2 Fenton oxidation system. It was found that the addition of protocatechuic acid could increase the alachlor degradation rate by 10 000 times in this Fenton oxidation system at pH = 3.6. This dramatic enhancement of alachlor degradation was attributed to the complexing and reduction abilities of protocatechuic ligand, which could form stable complexes with ferric ions to prevent their precipitation and also accelerate the Fe(III)/Fe(II) cycle to enhance the ·OH generation. Meanwhile, the Fe(III)/PCA/H2O2 system could also work well at near natural pH even in the case of PCA concentration as low as 0.1 mmol/L. More importantly, both alachlor and PCA could be effectively mineralized in this Fenton system, suggesting the environmental benignity of PCA/Fe(III)/H2O2 Fenton system. We employed gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify the degradation intermediates of alachlor and then proposed a possible alachlor degradation mechanism in this novel Fenton oxidation system. This study provides an efficient way to remove chloroacetanilide herbicides, and also shed new insight into the possible roles of widely existed phenolic acids in the conversion and the mineralization of organic contaminants in natural aquatic environment. PMID:26066010

  8. The E3 ubiquitin protein ligase MDM2 dictates all-trans retinoic acid-induced osteoblastic differentiation of osteosarcoma cells by modulating the degradation of RARα.

    PubMed

    Ying, M; Zhang, L; Zhou, Q; Shao, X; Cao, J; Zhang, N; Li, W; Zhu, H; Yang, B; He, Q

    2016-08-18

    Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) has a critical role in the differentiation process of osteosarcoma cells induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, degradation of RARα through ubiquitin proteasome pathway weakens the differentiation efficiency of osteosarcoma cells. In this study, we discover that murine double minute-2 (MDM2) acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase to target RARα for degradation. We observe that MDM2 is required for RARα polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation because downregulation of MDM2 by short hairpin RNA results in the accumulation of RARα, and MDM2 overexpression promotes the degradation of RARα. We also demonstrate that the N-terminal domain of MDM2 (amino acids 1-109) is the major RARα-binding site. Importantly, endogenous MDM2 levels are not only upregulated in human primary osteosarcoma blasts but are also inversely correlated with the level of osteopontin, which is a marker of bone differentiation. Moreover, MDM2 impairs the ATRA-induced osteoblastic differentiation of osteosarcoma cells, whereas an inhibitor of the MDM2 ubiquitin ligase synergizes with ATRA to enhance the differentiation of osteosarcoma cells and primary osteosarcoma blasts. Therefore, our study indicates that MDM2 serves as an E3 ubiquitin ligase to regulate the degradation of RARα and suggests that MDM2 is a novel therapeutic target for ATRA-based differentiation therapeutic approaches in osteosarcoma. PMID:26776160

  9. Degradation kinetic modelling of ascorbic acid and colour intensity in pasteurised blood orange juice during storage.

    PubMed

    Remini, Hocine; Mertz, Christian; Belbahi, Amine; Achir, Nawel; Dornier, Manuel; Madani, Khodir

    2015-04-15

    The stability of ascorbic acid and colour intensity in pasteurised blood orange juice (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck) during one month of storage was investigated at 4-37 °C. The effects of ascorbic acid fortification (at 100, 200 mg L(-1)) and deaeration, temperature/time storage on the kinetic behaviour were determined. Ascorbic acid was monitored by HPLC-DAD and colour intensity by spectrophotometric measurements. Degradation kinetics were best fitted by first-order reaction models for both ascorbic acid and colour intensity. Three models (Arrhenius, Eyring and Ball) were used to assess the temperature-dependent degradation. Following the Arrhenius model, activation energies were ranged from 51 to 135 kJ mol(-1) for ascorbic acid and from 49 to 99 kJ mol(-1) for colour intensity. The effect of storage temperature and deaeration are the most influent factors on kinetics degradation, while the fortification revealed no significant effect on ascorbic acid content and colour intensity. PMID:25466074

  10. First-order kinetics analysis of monomer composition dependent polyhydroxyalkanoic acid degradation in Pseudomonas spp.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mun Hwan; Rho, Jong Kook; Lee, Ho-Joo; Song, Jae Jun; Yoon, Sung Chul; Lee, Sang Yeol

    2003-01-01

    The intracellular degradation of polyhydroxyalkanoic acid (PHA) in pseudomonads was investigated by first-order kinetics analysis using the initial rate method. One type of PHA was accumulated in five Pseudomonas spp., P. oleovorans, P. aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, P. citronellolis, and P. putida, by growing them on octanoic acid. The monomer compositions of the five PHA were not significantly different from one another: 85-90 mol % 3-hydroxyoctanoic acid (3HO), 7-12 mol % 3-hydorxycaproic acid (3HC), and 3-6 mol % 3-hydroxydecanoic acid (3HD). The first-order degradation rate constants (k(1)) for the octanoate-derived PHA (designated P(3HO)) in the five species were in a similar range between 0.060 and 0.088 h(-1). This may indicate the similar specificities of the five intracellular depolymerases. In addition, the similar k(1) among the different species may correlate with the high degree of amino acid sequence identities (over 85%) among the intracellular PHA depolymerase phaZ genes. Six other chemically different types of PHA were accumulated in P. putida from n-nonanoic acid, n-decanoic acid, 5-phenyvaleric acid, or 11-phenoxyundecanoic acid as a single or a mixed carbon source. The calculated k(1) values were characteristic to each PHA, reflecting their chemical structures. In comparison with P(3HO), an increase in the levels of the two minor monomers 3HC and 3HD as in P(21 mol % 3HC-co-56 mol % 3HO-co-23 mol % 3HD) significantly slowed the rate of intracellular degradation. From the comparison of k(1) values, it is suggested that the P. putida intracellular depolymerase is most active against P(3HO). PMID:12625741

  11. Acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of BMS-582664: degradation product identification and mechanism elucidation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Derbin, George; Miller, Scott; Badawy, Sherif; Hussain, Munir

    2012-09-01

    BMS-582664 is an investigational drug intended for cancer treatment through oral administration. The preformulation studies revealed two unexpected degradation products under acidic conditions by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Additional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry results suggested that these were cleavage (hydrolysis) products of a diaryl ether. To further understand the degradation mechanism, the reaction was carried out in (18) O-labeled water. The (18) O was found to be incorporated in only one of the two hydrolysis products. The results suggest that the corresponding α carbon in the heterocycle was unusually eletrophilic in acidic conditions probably because of the protonation of the neighboring nitrogen. This led to the selective attack by water and the consequent hydrolysis products. The study provides a new example of hydrolytic degradation of pharmaceutical compounds, and the reaction center is an aromatic heterocyclic carbon with an aryloxy substitution. PMID:22189636

  12. Mechanistic Study of the Acid Degradation of Lignin Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Lignin is a major constituent of biomass, which remains underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in understanding the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Two model dimers with a b-O-4 aryl ether linkage (2-phenoxy-1-phenethanol and 2-phenoxy-1-phenyl-1,3 propanediol) and model dimmers with an a-O-4 aryl ether linkage were synthesized and deconstructed in H2SO4. The major products of the acidolysis of the b-O-4 compounds consisted of phenol and two aldehydes, phenylacetaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. To confirm proposed mechanisms several possible intermediates were studied under similar acidolysis conditions. Although the resonance time for cleavage was on the order several hours, we have shown that the cleavage of the aryl ether linkage affords phenol and aldehydes. We would next like to utilize our mechanism of aryl ether cleavage in actual lignin.

  13. Nitrite attenuated hypochlorous acid-mediated heme degradation in hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Lu, Naihao; Li, Jiayu; Ren, Xiaoming; Tian, Rong; Peng, Yi-Yuan

    2015-08-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is elevated in many inflammatory diseases and causes the accumulation of free iron. Through the Fenton reaction, free iron has the ability to generate free radicals and subsequently is toxic. Recent studies have demonstrated that HOCl participates in heme destruction of hemoglobin (Hb) and free iron release. In this study, it was showed that nitrite (NO2(-)) could prevent HOCl-mediated Hb heme destruction and free iron release. Also, NO2(-) prevented HOCl-mediated loss of Hb peroxidase activity. After the NO2(-)/HOCl treatment, Tyr 42 in α-chain was found to be nitrated in Hb, attenuating the electron transferring abilities of phenolic compounds. The protective effects of NO2(-) on HOCl-induced heme destruction were attributed to its reduction of ferryl Hb and/or direct scavenging of HOCl. Therefore, NO2(-) could show protective effects in some inflammatory diseases by preventing HOCl-mediated heme destruction of hemoproteins and free iron release. PMID:26051522

  14. Study on the enzymatic degradation of PBS and its alcohol acid modified copolymer.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingliang; Zhang, Min; Yang, Jinming; Qiu, Jian-hui

    2012-02-01

    Enzymatic hydrolytic degradation of polybutylene succinate (PBS), poly(polybutylenesuccinate-co-1,4-cyclohexane dimethanol) (PBS/CHDM) and poly(polybutylene succinate-co-diglycolic acid) (PBS/DGA) in mixed solvent of tetrahydrofuran (THF) and toluene was examined. Lipase was used as catalyst to degrade polymers with molecular weight of more than 100,000, and the molecular weight of products ranged from hundreds to thousands. Thermal decomposition temperatures of all products were below 250°C. The degradation products of both PBS/CHDM and PBS/DGA showed two melting points at about 85 and 99°C. Mass spectrometry (MS) was employed to obtain the molecular weight of oligomers extracted from the products, which proved to be low-polyesters with the molecular weight of less 1,000. The butanediol (BDO) monomer was found in PBS/CHDM degradation product for the first time. PMID:21732135

  15. Degradation of ferric chelate of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid by bacterium isolated from deep-sea stalked barnacle.

    PubMed

    Imada, Chiaki; Harada, Yohei; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Hamada-Sato, Naoko; Watanabe, Etsuo

    2005-01-01

    Twenty strains of marine bacteria that degrade ferric chelate of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (Fe-EDTA) were isolated from among 117 strains collected from a marine environment. Among them strain 02-N-2, which was isolated from stalked barnacle collected from the deep sea in the Indian Ocean, had the highest Fe-EDTA degradation ability and was selected for further study. The strain showed high Fe-EDTA degradation ability at different seawater concentrations. In addition, the intact cells of this strain had the ability to degrade such metal-EDTAs as Ca, Cu, and Mg. The strain was an aerobic, gram-variable, rod-shaped organism. The results of various taxonomic studies revealed that the strain had significant similarity to Bacillus jeotgali JCM 10885(T), which was isolated from a Korean traditional fermented seafood, Jeotgal. PMID:15747087

  16. Degradation of Poly(L-Lactic acid) and Biocomposites in various Alkaline and Temperature Treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ribbons of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and PLA containing 10 or 25 % Osage orange (OO) biocomposites of various sized heartwood particles were exposed to soil conditions either outdoors or in a greenhouse. No appreciable degradation was evident even after 200 days treatments. An artificial alkaline de...

  17. Abatement and degradation pathways of toluene in indoor air by positive corona discharge.

    PubMed

    Van Durme, J; Dewulf, J; Sysmans, W; Leys, C; Van Langenhove, H

    2007-08-01

    Indoor air concentrations of volatile organic compounds often exceed outdoor levels by a factor of 5. There is much interest in developing new technologies in order to improve indoor air quality. In this work non-thermal plasma (DC positive corona discharge) is explored as an innovative technology for indoor air purification. An inlet gas stream of 10 l min(-1) containing 0.50+/-0.02 ppm toluene was treated by the plasma reactor in atmospheric conditions. Toluene removal proved to be achievable with a characteristic energy density epsilon(0) of 50 J l(-1). Removal efficiencies were higher for 26% relative humidity (epsilon(0)=35 J l(-1)), compared with those at increased humidities (50% relative humidity, epsilon(0)=49 J l(-1)). Reaction products such as formic acid, benzaldehyde, benzyl alcohol, 3-methyl-4-nitrophenol, 4-methyl-2-nitrophenol, 4-methyl-2-propyl furan, 5-methyl-2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrophenol, 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol are identified by means of mass spectrometry. Based on these by-products a toluene degradation mechanism is proposed. PMID:17490711

  18. Degradation of chlorpyrifos in aqueous chlorine solutions: pathways, kinetics, and modeling.

    PubMed

    Duirk, Stephen E; Collette, Timothy W

    2006-01-15

    Chlorpyrifos (CP) was used as a model compound to develop experimental methods and prototype modeling tools to forecast the fate of organophosphate (OP) pesticides under drinking water treatment conditions. CP was found to rapidly oxidize to chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) in the presence of free chlorine. The primary oxidant is hypochlorous acid (HOCl), kr = 1.72 (+/-0.68) x 10(6) M(-1)h(-1). Thus, oxidation is more rapid at lower pH (i.e., below the pKa of HOCl at 7.5). At elevated pH, both CP and CPO are susceptible to alkaline hydrolysis and degrade to 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), a stable end product. Furthermore, hydrolysis of both CP and CPO to TCP was shown to be accelerated in the presence of free chlorine by OCl-, kOCl,CP = 990 (+/-200) M(-1)h(-1) and kOCl,CPO = 1340 (+/-110) M(-1)h(-1). These observations regarding oxidation and hydrolysis are relevant to common drinking water disinfection processes. In this work, intrinsic rate coefficients for these processes were determined, and a simple mechanistic model was developed that accurately predicts the temporal concentrations of CP, CPO, and TCP as a function of pH, chlorine dose, and CP concentration. PMID:16468401

  19. Study of kinetics of degradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid by acclimated activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhua; Shi, Shuian; Chen, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Activated sludge contains complex microorganisms, which are highly effective biodegrading agents. In this study, the kinetics of biodegradation of cyclohexane carboxylic acid (CHCA) by an acclimated aerobic activated sludge were investigated. The results showed that after 180 days of acclimation, the activated sludge could steadily degrade >90% of the CHCA in 120 h. The degradation of CHCA by the acclimated activated sludge could be modeled using a first-order kinetics equation. The equations for the degradation kinetics for different initial CHCA concentrations were also obtained. The kinetics constant, kd, decreased with an increase in the CHCA concentration, indicating that, at high concentrations, CHCA had an inhibiting effect on the microorganisms in the activated sludge. The effects of pH on the degradation kinetics of CHCA were also investigated. The results showed that a pH of 10 afforded the highest degradation rate, indicating that basic conditions significantly promoted the degradation of CHCA. Moreover, it was found that the degradation efficiency for CHCA increased with an increase in temperature and concentration of dissolved oxygen under the experimental conditions. PMID:27191578

  20. Cathepsin B-sensitive polymers for compartment-specific degradation and nucleic acid release

    PubMed Central

    Chu, David S.H.; Johnson, Russell N.; Pun, Suzie H.

    2011-01-01

    Degradable cationic polymers are desirable for in vivo nucleic acid delivery because they offer significantly decreased toxicity over non-degradable counterparts. Peptide linkers provide chemical stability and high specificity for particular endopeptidases but have not been extensively studied for nucleic acid delivery applications. In this work, enzymatically degradable peptide-HPMA copolymers were synthesized by RAFT polymerization of HPMA with methacrylated peptide macromonomers, resulting in polymers with low polydispersity and near quantitative incorporation of peptides. Three peptide-HPMA copolymers were evaluated: (i) pHCathK10, containing peptides composed of the linker phe-lys-phe-leu (FKFL), a substrate of the endosomal/lysosomal endopeptidase cathepsin B, connected to oligo-(l)-lysine for nucleic acid binding, (ii) pHCath(d)K10, containing the FKFL linker with oligo-(d)-lysine, and (iii) pH(d)Cath(d)K10, containing all (d) amino acids. Cathepsin B degraded copolymers pHCathK10 and pHCath(d)K10 within one hour while no degradation of pH(d)Cath(d)K10 was observed. Polyplexes formed with pHCathK10 copolymers show DNA release by 4 hrs of treatment with cathepsin B; comparatively, polyplexes formed with pHCath(d)K10 and pH(d)Cath(d)K10 show no DNA release within 8 hrs. Transfection efficiency in HeLa and NIH/3T3 cells were comparable between the copolymers but pHCathK10 was less toxic. This work demonstrates the successful application of peptide linkers for degradable cationic polymers and DNA release. PMID:22036879

  1. Porcine arterivirus activates the NF-{kappa}B pathway through I{kappa}B degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Myeong; Kleiboeker, Steven B. . E-mail: KleiboekerS@Missouri.edu

    2005-11-10

    Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-{kappa}B) is a critical regulator of innate and adaptive immune function as well as cell proliferation and survival. The present study demonstrated for the first time that a virus belonging to the Arteriviridae family activates NF-{kappa}B in MARC-145 cells and alveolar macrophages. In porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected cells, NF-{kappa}B activation was characterized by translocation of NF-{kappa}B from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, increased DNA binding activity, and NF-{kappa}B-regulated gene expression. NF-{kappa}B activation was increased as PRRSV infection progressed and in a viral dose-dependent manner. UV-inactivation of PRRSV significantly reduced the level of NF-{kappa}B activation. Degradation of I{kappa}B protein was detected late in PRRSV infection, and overexpression of the dominant negative form of I{kappa}B{alpha} (I{kappa}B{alpha}DN) significantly suppressed NF-{kappa}B activation induced by PRRSV. However, I{kappa}B{alpha}DN did not affect viral replication and viral cytopathic effect. PRRSV infection induced oxidative stress in cells by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidants inhibited NF-{kappa}B DNA binding activity in PRRSV-infected cells, suggesting ROS as a mechanism by which NF-{kappa}B was activated by PRRSV infection. Moreover, NF-{kappa}B-dependent expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 was observed in PRRSV-infected cells, an observation which implies that NF-{kappa}B activation is a biologically significant aspect of PRRSV pathogenesis. The results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular pathways of pathology and immune evasion associated with disease caused by PRRSV.

  2. Porcine arterivirus activates the NF-kappaB pathway through IkappaB degradation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Myeong; Kleiboeker, Steven B

    2005-11-10

    Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) is a critical regulator of innate and adaptive immune function as well as cell proliferation and survival. The present study demonstrated for the first time that a virus belonging to the Arteriviridae family activates NF-kappaB in MARC-145 cells and alveolar macrophages. In porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV)-infected cells, NF-kappaB activation was characterized by translocation of NF-kappaB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, increased DNA binding activity, and NF-kappaB-regulated gene expression. NF-kappaB activation was increased as PRRSV infection progressed and in a viral dose-dependent manner. UV-inactivation of PRRSV significantly reduced the level of NF-kappaB activation. Degradation of IkappaB protein was detected late in PRRSV infection, and overexpression of the dominant negative form of IkappaBalpha (IkappaBalphaDN) significantly suppressed NF-kappaB activation induced by PRRSV. However, IkappaBalphaDN did not affect viral replication and viral cytopathic effect. PRRSV infection induced oxidative stress in cells by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidants inhibited NF-kappaB DNA binding activity in PRRSV-infected cells, suggesting ROS as a mechanism by which NF-kappaB was activated by PRRSV infection. Moreover, NF-kappaB-dependent expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 was observed in PRRSV-infected cells, an observation which implies that NF-kappaB activation is a biologically significant aspect of PRRSV pathogenesis. The results presented here provide a basis for understanding molecular pathways of pathology and immune evasion associated with disease caused by PRRSV. PMID:16129468

  3. The Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acid Pathway Enhances Hepatic Insulin Signaling and is Repressed in Insulin-Resistant Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Alexander; Neschen, Susanne; Kahle, Melanie; Sarioglu, Hakan; Gaisbauer, Tobias; Imhof, Axel; Adamski, Jerzy; Hauck, Stefanie M; Ueffing, Marius

    2015-10-01

    Although it is widely accepted that ectopic lipid accumulation in the liver is associated with hepatic insulin resistance, the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been well characterized.Here we employed time resolved quantitative proteomic profiling of mice fed a high fat diet to determine which pathways were affected during the transition of the liver to an insulin-resistant state. We identified several metabolic pathways underlying altered protein expression. In order to test the functional impact of a critical subset of these alterations, we focused on the epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) eicosanoid pathway, whose deregulation coincided with the onset of hepatic insulin resistance. These results suggested that EETs may be positive modulators of hepatic insulin signaling. Analyzing EET activity in primary hepatocytes, we found that EETs enhance insulin signaling on the level of Akt. In contrast, EETs did not influence insulin receptor or insulin receptor substrate-1 phosphorylation. This effect was mediated through the eicosanoids, as overexpression of the deregulated enzymes in absence of arachidonic acid had no impact on insulin signaling. The stimulation of insulin signaling by EETs and depression of the pathway in insulin resistant liver suggest a likely role in hepatic insulin resistance. Our findings support therapeutic potential for inhibiting EET degradation. PMID:26070664

  4. A vacuolar carboxypeptidase mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is degraded by the ERAD pathway independently of its N-glycan

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaya; Kawanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Hayashi, Yoko; Endo, Toshiya; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi

    2010-03-12

    Misfolded proteins produced in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are degraded by a mechanism, the ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here we report establishment of the experimental system to analyze the ERAD in plant cells. Carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) is a vacuolar enzyme and its mutant CPY* is degraded by the ERAD in yeast. Since Arabidopsis thaliana has AtCPY, an ortholog of yeast CPY, we constructed and expressed fusion proteins consisting of AtCPY and GFP and of AtCPY*, which carries a mutation homologous to yeast CPY*, and GFP in A. thaliana cells. While AtCPY-GFP was efficiently transported to the vacuole, AtCPY*-GFP was retained in the ER to be degraded in proteasome- and Cdc48-dependent manners. We also found that AtCPY*-GFP was degraded by the ERAD in yeast cells, but that its single N-glycan did not function as a degradation signal in yeast or plant cells. Therefore, AtCPY*-GFP can be used as a marker protein to analyze the ERAD pathway, likely for nonglycosylated substrates, in plant cells.

  5. Amino acid biosynthesis in the spirochete Leptospira: evidence for a novel pathway of isoleucine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Charon, N W; Johnson, R C; Peterson, D

    1974-01-01

    Radioactive carbon dioxide was incubated with growing cells of Leptospira interrogans serotypes semaranga and tarassovi, and the specific activities and distribution of the label within the cellular amino acids were determined. The origins of the carbon skeletons of all the acid-stable amino acids except isoleucine were found to be consistent with known biosynthetic pathways for these amino acids. Experiments using radioactive carbon dioxide and other tracers indicated that most of the isoleucine was synthesized by a pathway not involving threonine. The origin of the carbon skeleton of isoleucine consisted of two residues of pyruvate (carbons 2 and 3) and acetate of acetyl-coenzyme A by this pathway. Isotope competition studies indicated that the pathway was regulated by isoleucine. The results are discussed in relation to two proposed pathways of isoleucine biosynthesis involving citramalate as an intermediate. PMID:4808901

  6. The poly(A)-dependent degradation pathway of rpsO mRNA is primarily mediated by RNase R

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, José M.; Hajnsdorf, Eliane; Régnier, Philippe; Arraiano, Cecília M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyadenylation is an important factor controlling RNA degradation and RNA quality control mechanisms. In this report we demonstrate for the first time that RNase R has in vivo affinity for polyadenylated RNA and can be a key enzyme involved in poly(A) metabolism. RNase II and PNPase, two major RNA exonucleases present in Escherichia coli, could not account for all the poly(A)-dependent degradation of the rpsO mRNA. RNase II can remove the poly(A) tails but fails to degrade the mRNA as it cannot overcome the RNA termination hairpin, while PNPase plays only a modest role in this degradation. We now demonstrate that in the absence of RNase E, RNase R is the relevant factor in the poly(A)-dependent degradation of the rpsO mRNA. Moreover, we have found that the RNase R inactivation counteracts the extended degradation of this transcript observed in RNase II-deficient cells. Elongated rpsO transcripts harboring increasing poly(A) tails are specifically recognized by RNase R and strongly accumulate in the absence of this exonuclease. The 3′ oligo(A) extension may stimulate the binding of RNase R, allowing the complete degradation of the mRNA, as RNase R is not susceptible to RNA secondary structures. Moreover, this regulation is shown to occur despite the presence of PNPase. Similar results were observed with the rpsT mRNA. This report shows that polyadenylation favors in vivo the RNase R-mediated pathways of RNA degradation. PMID:19103951

  7. Influence of cellulose powder structure on moisture-induced degradation of acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Mihranyan, A; Strømme, M; Ek, R

    2006-02-01

    The stability of crystalline acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) powder in binary mixtures with cellulose powders was investigated to reveal information about the influence of the cellulose structural properties on the moisture-induced ASA degradation. Different cellulose powder samples were manufactured and characterized by X-ray diffraction and N2 BET gas adsorption. The degradation patterns in ASA/cellulose mixtures were monitored as a function of salicylic acid increase versus time under various relative humidity conditions at 50 degrees C. The crystallinity index of cellulose samples varied between approximately 49 and 95%. The results indicated that cellulose powder with the lowest crystallinity index exhibited lower degradation rates than the samples with the higher crystallinity index. It should be noted that higher ASA degradation rates were observed in the samples with comparably lower moisture contents. This effect was most pronounced in the 1:3 (w/w), ASA/cellulose mixtures, whereas in 3:1 (w/w), ASA/cellulose mixtures the effect was less obvious. The findings emphasise the importance of cellulose structural organisation when governing the moisture's partition between cellulose and ASA during the hydrolytic degradation. PMID:16311024

  8. Control of the molecular degradation of hyaluronic acid hydrogels for tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun Ju; Kang, Sun-Woong; Kim, Byung-Soo; Jiang, Ge; Cho, Il Hwan; Hahn, Sei Kwang

    2008-09-01

    A novel protocol to control the molecular degradation of hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels was successfully developed for tissue augmentation applications. HA has a different conformational structure in water and organic solvent, and the carboxyl group of HA is known to be the recognition site of hyaluronidase and HA receptors. Based on these findings, HA was chemically modified by grafting adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) to the carboxyl group of HA in the water to prepare HA-ADH(WATER) and in the mixed solvent of water and ethanol to prepare degradation-controlled HA-ADH(WATER/ETHANOL). Three kinds of HA hydrogels were prepared by the crosslinking of HA-ADH(WATER) or HA-ADH(WATER/ETHANOL) with bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate, and by the crosslinking of HA-OH with divinyl sulfone (DVS). In vitro and in vivo degradation tests showed that HA-DVS hydrogels were degraded most rapidly, followed by HA-ADH(WATER) hydrogels and HA-ADH(WATER/ETHANOL) hydrogels. There was no adverse effect during and after in vivo degradation tests. All of the HA hydrogel samples appeared to be biocompatible, according to the histological analysis with hematoxylin-eosin and Alcian blue. PMID:18022803

  9. Influence of amino acids, buffers, and ph on the γ-irradiation-induced degradation of alginates.

    PubMed

    Ulset, Ann-Sissel T; Mori, Hideki; Dalheim, Marianne Ø; Hara, Masayuki; Christensen, Bjørn E

    2014-12-01

    Alginate-based biomaterials and medical devices are commonly subjected to γ-irradiation as a means of sterilization, either in the dry state or the gel (hydrated) state. In this process the alginate chains degrade randomly in a dose-dependent manner, altering alginates' material properties. The addition of free radical scavenging amino acids such as histidine and phenylalanine protects the alginate significantly against degradation, as shown by monitoring changes in the molecular weight distributions using SEC-MALLS and determining the pseudo first order rate constants of degradation. Tris buffer (0.5 M), but not acetate, citrate, or phosphate buffers had a similar effect on the degradation rate. Changes in pH itself had only marginal effects on the rate of alginate degradation and on the protective effect of amino acids. Contrary to previous reports, the chemical composition (M/G profile) of the alginates, including homopolymeric mannuronan, was unaltered following irradiation up to 10 kGy. PMID:25412478

  10. Degradation of 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid in biological treated effluent by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Libing; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-02-01

    Gamma irradiation-induced degradation of a chlorinated aromatic compound, 3-chloro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (CHBA) in biological treated effluent was studied and the results were compared with those obtained in deionized water. Gamma irradiation led to a complete decomposition of CHBA and a partial mineralization in the treated effluent. The removal of CHBA followed the pseudo first-order reaction kinetic model and the rate constant in the treated effluent was 1.7-3.5 times lower than that in deionized water. The CHBA degradation rate was higher at acidic condition than at neutral and alkaline conditions. The radiolytic yield, G-value for CHBA degradation was lower in the treated effluent, which decreased with increase in absorbed doses and increased with increase in initial concentrations of CHBA. The degradation mechanism of CHBA using gamma irradiation was proposed through the oxidation by -OH and reduction by eaq- and H- radicals. As exposed to gamma irradiation, dechlorination takes place rapidly and combines with the oxidation and cleavage of the aromatic ring, producing chloride ions, small carboxylic acids, acetaldehyde and other intermediates into the solution.

  11. Catalytic degradation of recalcitrant pollutants by Fenton-like process using polyacrylonitrile-supported iron (II) phthalocyanine nanofibers: Intermediates and pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhexin; Chen, Yi; Gu, Yan; Wu, Fei; Lu, Wangyang; Xu, Tiefeng; Chen, Wenxing

    2016-04-15

    Iron (II) phthalocyanine (FePc) molecules were isolated in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) nanofibers by electrospinning to prevent the formation of dimers and oligomers. Carbamazepine (CBZ) and Rhodamine B (RhB) degradation was investigated during a Fenton-like process with FePc/PAN nanofibers. Classical quenching tests with isopropanol and electron paramagnetic resonance tests with 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-oxide as spin-trapping agent were performed to determine the formation of active species during hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) decomposition by FePc/PAN nanofibers. After eight recycles for CBZ degradation over the FePc/PAN nanofibers/H2O2 system, the removal ratios of CBZ remained at 99%. Seven by-products of RhB and twelve intermediates of CBZ were identified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Pathways of CBZ and RhB degradation were proposed based on the identified intermediates. As the reaction proceeded, all CBZ and RhB aromatic nucleus intermediates decreased and were transformed to small acids, but also to potentially toxic epoxide-containing intermediates and acridine, because of the powerful oxidation ability of •OH in the catalytic system. PMID:26949842

  12. Efficient degradation of Acid Orange 7 in aqueous solution by iron ore tailing Fenton-like process.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianming; Gao, Zhanqi; He, Huan; Yang, Shaogui; Sun, Cheng

    2016-05-01

    An effective method based on iron ore tailing Fenton-like process was studied for removing an azo dye, Acid Orange 7 (AO7) in aqueous solution. Five tailings were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectroscope (XFS), Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET) measurement, and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The result of XFS showed that Fe, Si and Ca were the most abundant elements and some toxic heavy metals were also present in the studied tailings. The result of BET analysis indicated that the studied tailings had very low surface areas (0.64-5.68 m(2) g(-1)). The degradation efficiencies of AO7 were positively correlated with the content of iron oxide and cupric oxide, and not related with the BET surface area of the tailings. The co-existing metal elements, particularly Cu, might accelerate the heterogeneous Fenton-like reaction. The effects of other parameters on heterogeneous Fenton-like degradation of AO7 by a converter slag iron tailing (tailing E) which contains highest iron oxide were also investigated. The tailing could be reused 10 times without significant decrease of the catalytic capacity. Very low amount of iron species and almost undetectable toxic elements were leached in the catalytic degradation of AO7 by the tailing E. The reaction products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and a possible pathway of AO7 degradation was proposed. This study not only provides an effective method for removing azo dyes in polluted water by employing waste tailings as Fenton-like catalysts, but also uses waste tailings as the secondary resource. PMID:26891355

  13. Ammonium-oxidizing bacteria facilitate aerobic degradation of sulfanilic acid in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Ginige, Maneesha P; Kaksonen, Anna H; Cheng, Ka Yu

    2014-01-01

    Sulfanilic acid (SA) is a toxic sulfonated aromatic amine commonly found in anaerobically treated azo dye contaminated effluents. Aerobic acclimatization of SA-degrading mixed microbial culture could lead to co-enrichment of ammonium-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) because of the concomitant release of ammonium from SA oxidation. To what extent the co-enriched AOB would affect SA oxidation at various ammonium concentrations was unclear. Here, a series of batch kinetic experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of AOB on aerobic SA degradation in an acclimatized activated sludge culture capable of oxidizing SA and ammonium simultaneously. To account for the effect of AOB on SA degradation, allylthiourea was used to inhibit AOB activity in the culture. The results indicated that specific SA degradation rate of the mixed culture was negatively correlated with the initial ammonium concentration (0-93 mM, R²= 0.99). The presence of AOB accelerated SA degradation by reducing the inhibitory effect of ammonium (≥ 10 mM). The Haldane substrate inhibition model was used to correlate substrate concentration (SA and ammonium) and oxygen uptake rate. This study revealed, for the first time, that AOB could facilitate SA degradation at high concentration of ammonium (≥ 10 mM) in an enriched activated sludge culture. PMID:25259503

  14. Adsorption and degradation of the weak acid mesotrione in soil and environmental fate implications.

    PubMed

    Dyson, J S; Beulke, S; Brown, C D; Lane, M C G

    2002-01-01

    The ability of soils to adsorb and degrade pesticides strongly influences their environmental fate. This paper examines the adsorption and degradation of a weak acid, a new herbicide mesotrione 12-[4-(methylsulfonyl)-2-nitrobenzoyl]-1,3-cyclohexanedione], in 15 different soils from Europe and the USA. Experiments were conducted to understand the influence of soil properties, covering a wide range of soil textures, soil pH values (4.4 to 7.5), and organic carbon contents (0.6 to 3.35%). Mesotrione adsorption (Kd values ranged from 0.13 to 5.0 L/kg) was primarily related to soil pH, and to a lesser extent by percent organic carbon (%OC). As soil pH rose. mesotrione Kd values got smaller as mesotrione dissociated from the molecular to anionic form. Mesotrione degradation (half-lives ranged from 4.5 to 32 d) was also related to soil pH, getting shorter as soil pH rose. Simple regression of mesotrione adsorption against soil pH and %OC and against degradation provided a close fit to the data. The correlation between mesotrione adsorption and degradation means that Kd and half-life values are only relevant for use in environmental fate assessment if these values are "paired" for the same soil pH and %OC. The implications were as illustrated for leaching, raising important issues about combining pesticide adsorption and degradation behavior in environmental fate assessments. PMID:11931453

  15. Degradation of Fructans and Production of Propionic Acid by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are Enhanced by the Shortage of Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Adamberg, Signe; Tomson, Katrin; Vija, Heiki; Puurand, Marju; Kabanova, Natalja; Visnapuu, Triinu; Jõgi, Eerik; Alamäe, Tiina; Adamberg, Kaarel

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is commonly found in the human colon and stabilizes its ecosystem by catabolism of various polysaccharides. A model of cross-talk between the metabolism of amino acids and fructans in B. thetaiotaomicron was proposed. The growth of B. thetaiotaomicron DSM 2079 in two defined media containing mineral salts and vitamins, and supplemented with either 20 or 2 amino acids, was studied in an isothermal microcalorimeter. The polyfructans inulin (from chicory) and levan (synthesized using levansucrase from Pseudomonas syringae), two fructooligosaccharide preparations with different composition, sucrose and fructose were tested as substrates. The calorimetric power-time curves were substrate specific and typically multiauxic. A surplus of amino acids reduced the consumption of longer oligosaccharides (degree of polymerization > 3). Bacterial growth was not detected either in the carbohydrate free medium containing amino acids or in the medium with inulin as a sole carbohydrate. In amino acid-restricted medium, fermentation leading to acetic acid formation was dominant at the beginning of growth (up to 24 h), followed by increased lactic acid production, and mainly propionic and succinic acids were produced at the end of fermentation. In the medium supplemented with 20 amino acids, the highest production of d-lactate (82 ± 33 mmol/gDW) occurred in parallel with extensive consumption (up to 17 mmol/gDW) of amino acids, especially Ser, Thr, and Asp. The production of Ala and Glu was observed at growth on all substrates, and the production was enhanced under amino acid deficiency. The study revealed the influence of amino acids on fructan metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and showed that defined growth media are invaluable in elucidating quantitative metabolic profiles of the bacteria. Levan was shown to act as an easily degradable substrate for B. thetaiotaomicron. The effect of levan on balancing or modifying colon microbiota will

  16. Degradation of Fructans and Production of Propionic Acid by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron are Enhanced by the Shortage of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Adamberg, Signe; Tomson, Katrin; Vija, Heiki; Puurand, Marju; Kabanova, Natalja; Visnapuu, Triinu; Jõgi, Eerik; Alamäe, Tiina; Adamberg, Kaarel

    2014-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is commonly found in the human colon and stabilizes its ecosystem by catabolism of various polysaccharides. A model of cross-talk between the metabolism of amino acids and fructans in B. thetaiotaomicron was proposed. The growth of B. thetaiotaomicron DSM 2079 in two defined media containing mineral salts and vitamins, and supplemented with either 20 or 2 amino acids, was studied in an isothermal microcalorimeter. The polyfructans inulin (from chicory) and levan (synthesized using levansucrase from Pseudomonas syringae), two fructooligosaccharide preparations with different composition, sucrose and fructose were tested as substrates. The calorimetric power-time curves were substrate specific and typically multiauxic. A surplus of amino acids reduced the consumption of longer oligosaccharides (degree of polymerization > 3). Bacterial growth was not detected either in the carbohydrate free medium containing amino acids or in the medium with inulin as a sole carbohydrate. In amino acid-restricted medium, fermentation leading to acetic acid formation was dominant at the beginning of growth (up to 24 h), followed by increased lactic acid production, and mainly propionic and succinic acids were produced at the end of fermentation. In the medium supplemented with 20 amino acids, the highest production of d-lactate (82 ± 33 mmol/gDW) occurred in parallel with extensive consumption (up to 17 mmol/gDW) of amino acids, especially Ser, Thr, and Asp. The production of Ala and Glu was observed at growth on all substrates, and the production was enhanced under amino acid deficiency. The study revealed the influence of amino acids on fructan metabolism in B. thetaiotaomicron and showed that defined growth media are invaluable in elucidating quantitative metabolic profiles of the bacteria. Levan was shown to act as an easily degradable substrate for B. thetaiotaomicron. The effect of levan on balancing or modifying colon microbiota will

  17. Microwave-assisted rapid photocatalytic degradation of malachite green in TiO2 suspensions: mechanism and pathways.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yongming; Yang, Shaogui; Ding, Youchao; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Aiqian; Wang, Lianhong

    2008-11-01

    Microwave-assisted photocatalytic (MPC) degradation of malachite green (MG) in aqueous TiO2 suspensions was investigated. A 20 mg/L sample of MG was rapidly and completely decomposed in 3 min with the corresponding TOC removal efficiency of about 85%. To gain insight into the degradation mechanism, both GC-MS and LC-ESI-MS/MS techniques were employed to identify the major intermediates of MG degradation, including N-demethylation intermediates [(p-dimethylaminophenyl)(p-methylaminophenyl)phenylmethylium (DM-PM), (p-methylaminophenyl)(p-methylaminophenyl)phenylmethylium (MM-PM), (p-methylaminophenyl)(p-aminophenyl)phenylmethylium (M-PM)]; a decomposition compound of the conjugated structure (4-dimethylaminobenzophenone (DLBP)); products resulting from the adduct reaction of hydroxyl radical; products of benzene removal; and other open-ring intermediates such as phenol, terephthalic acid, adipic acid, benzoic acid, etc. The possible degradation mechanism of MG included five processes: the N-demethylation process, adduct products of the hydroxyl radical, the breakdown of chromophores such as destruction of the conjugated structure intermediate, removal of benzene, and an open-ring reaction. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time the whole MG photodegradation processes have been reported. PMID:18841945

  18. Degradation behavior of hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanocomposite in simulated body fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Liuyun, Jiang; Chengdong, Xiong; Lixin, Jiang; Lijuan, Xu

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: In this manuscript, we initiated a systematic study to investigate the effect of HA on thermal properties, inner structure, reduction of mechanical strength, surface morphology and the surface deposit of n-HA/PLGA composite with respect to the soaking time. The results showed that n-HA played an important role in improving the degradation behavior of n-HA/PLGA composite, which can accelerate the degradation of n-HA/PLGA composite and endow it with bioactivity, after n-HA was detached from PLGA during the degradation, so that n-HA/PLGA composite may have a more promising prospect of the clinical application than pure PLGA as bone fracture internal fixation materials, and the results would be of reference significance to predict the in vivo degradation and biological properties. - Highlights: • Effect of n-HA on degradation behavior of n-HA/PLGA composite was investigated. • Degradation behaviors of n-HA/PLGA and PLGA were carried out in SBF for 6 months. • Viscosity, thermal properties, inner structure and bending strength were tested. • n-HA can accelerate the degradation and endows it with bioactivity. - Abstract: To investigate the effect of hydroxyapatite(HA) on the degradation behavior of hydroxyapatite/poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (HA/PLGA) nanocomposite, the degradation experiment of n-HA/PLGA composite and pure PLGA were carried out by soaking in simulated body fluid(SBF) at 37 °C for 1, 2, 4 and 6 months. The change of intrinsic viscosity, thermal properties, inner structure, bending strength reduction, surface morphology and the surface deposit of n-HA/PLGA composite and pure PLGA with respect to the soaking time were investigated by means of UbbeloHde Viscometer, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), scanning electron microscope(SEM), electromechanical universal tester, a conventional camera and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that n-HA played an important role in improving the degradation behavior of n

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of nine Sphingobium strains: Insights into their evolution and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) degradation pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Helianthous; Kumar, Roshan; Oldach, Phoebe; Sangwan, Naseer; Khurana, Jitendra P.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Lal, Rup

    2014-11-23

    Background: Sphingobium spp. are efficient degraders of a wide range of chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons. In particular, strains which harbour the lin pathway genes mediating the degradation of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers are of interest due to the widespread persistence of this contaminant. Here, we examined the evolution and diversification of the lin pathway under the selective pressure of HCH, by comparing the draft genomes of six newly-sequenced Sphingobium spp. (strains LL03, DS20, IP26, HDIPO4, P25 and RL3) isolated from HCH dumpsites, with three existing genomes (S. indicum B90A, S. japonicum UT26S and Sphingobium sp. SYK6). Results: Efficient HCH degraders phylogenetically clustered in a closely related group comprising of UT26S, B90A, HDIPO4 and IP26, where HDIPO4 and IP26 were classified as subspecies with ANI value >98%. Less than 10% of the total gene content was shared among all nine strains, but among the eight HCH-associated strains, that is all except SYK6, the shared gene content jumped to nearly 25%. Genes associated with nitrogen stress response and two-component systems were found to be enriched. The strains also housed many xenobiotic degradation pathways other than HCH, despite the absence of these xenobiotics from isolation sources. In addition, these strains, although non-motile, but posses flagellar assembly genes. While strains HDIPO4 and IP26 contained the complete set of lin genes, DS20 was entirely devoid of lin genes (except linKLMN) whereas, LL03, P25 and RL3 were identified as lin deficient strains, as they housed incomplete lin pathways. Further, in HDIPO4, linA was found as a hybrid of two natural variants i.e., linA1 and linA2 known for their different enantioselectivity. In conclusion, the bacteria isolated from HCH dumpsites provide a natural testing ground to study variations in the lin system and their

  20. REACTION PATHWAY OF THE DIKETONITRILE DEGRADATE OF ISOXAFLUTOLE (BALANCE(TM)) WITH HYPOCHLORITE IN WATER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isoxaflutole (IXF; Balance(TM)) belongs to the new class of isoxazole herbicides. Isoxaflutole has a very short half-life in soil and rapidly degrades to a stable and phytotoxic degradate, diketonitrile (DKN). DKN was previously discovered to rapidly react with hypochlorite (OCl-) in tap water, yie...

  1. Activation of FGF-23 Mediated Vitamin D Degradative Pathways by Cholecalciferol

    PubMed Central

    Alshayeb, Hala; Showkat, Arif; Wall, Barry M.; Gyamlani, Geeta G.; David, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    Context: The optimal circulating concentration of 25(OH) vitamin D is controversial. Objective: The aim was to investigate if FGF-23 and 24,25(OH)2D can guide cholecalciferol replacement. Design: Oral cholecalciferol (10,000 IU weekly) administered to subjects with 25(OH)D levels < 20 ηg/mL and eGFR > 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 (n = 25), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (n = 27), or end stage renal disease (ESRD) (n = 14). Setting: The study was conducted at the Veterans Affairs clinics. Main Outcome Measure: Serum FGF-23, PTH, 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D, 24,25(OH)2D, calcium, and phosphorous concentrations, and urinary excretion of calcium and phosphorus at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment. Results: Cholecalciferol treatment increased concentrations of serum 25(OH)D by (19.3 ± 8 ηg/mL, P = .001; 12.2 ± 9 ηg/mL, P = .0001) and 24,25(OH)2D (1.14 ± 0.89 ηg/mL, P = .0024; 1.0 ± 0.72 ηg/mL P = .0002), and reduced serum PTH (−11 ± 21 pg/mL, P = .0292; −42 ± 68 pg/mL, P = .0494) in normal and CKD subjects, respectively. Cholecalciferol increased serum FGF-23 levels only in normal subjects (44 ± 57 ηg/mL, P = .01). Increments in serum 25(OH)D positively correlated with serum FGF-23 and 24,25(OH)2D and negatively correlated with PTH. In ESRD, cholecalciferol administration increased 25(OH)D by (16.6 ± 6.6 ηg/mL P ≤ .05) without changing 24,25(OH)2D, FGF-23 or PTH levels. Conclusion: Modest elevations of serum 25(OH)D levels after cholecalciferol treatment are sufficient to induce compensatory degradative pathways in patients with sufficient renal reserves, suggesting that optimal circulating 25(OH)D levels are approximately 20 ηg/mL. In addition, catabolism of 25(OH)D may also contribute to the low circulating vitamin D levels in CKD, since elevations of FGF-23 in CKD are associated with increased 24,25(OH)2D after cholecalciferol administration. PMID:24960544

  2. Mechanism of Calcium Lactate Facilitating Phytic Acid Degradation in Soybean during Germination.

    PubMed

    Hui, Qianru; Yang, Runqiang; Shen, Chang; Zhou, Yulin; Gu, Zhenxin

    2016-07-13

    Calcium lactate facilitates the growth and phytic acid degradation of soybean sprouts, but the mechanism is unclear. In this study, calcium lactate (Ca) and calcium lactate with lanthanum chloride (Ca+La) were used to treat soybean sprouts to reveal the relevant mechanism. Results showed that the phytic acid content decreased and the availability of phosphorus increased under Ca treatment. This must be due to the enhancement of enzyme activity related to phytic acid degradation. In addition, the energy metabolism was accelerated by Ca treatment. The energy status and energy metabolism-associated enzyme activity also increased. However, the transmembrane transport of calcium was inhibited by La(3+) and concentrated in intercellular space or between the cell wall and cell membrane; thus, Ca+La treatment showed reverse results compared with those of Ca treatment. Interestingly, gene expression did not vary in accordance with their enzyme activity. These results demonstrated that calcium lactate increased the rate of phytic acid degradation by enhancing growth, phosphorus metabolism, and energy metabolism. PMID:27324823

  3. Effects of environmental conditions on aerobic degradation of a commercial naphthenic acid.

    PubMed

    Kinley, Ciera M; Gaspari, Daniel P; McQueen, Andrew D; Rodgers, John H; Castle, James W; Friesen, Vanessa; Haakensen, Monique

    2016-10-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are problematic constituents in energy-derived waters, and aerobic degradation may provide a strategy for mitigating risks to aquatic organisms. The overall objective of this study was to determine the influence of concentrations of N (as ammonia) and P (as phosphate), and DO, as well as pH and temperatures on degradation of a commercial NA in bench-scale reactors. Commercial NAs provided replicable compounds necessary to compare influences of environmental conditions on degradation. NAs were quantified using high performance liquid chromatography. Microbial diversity and relative abundance were measured in treatments as explanatory parameters for potential effects of environmental conditions on microbial populations to support analytically measured NA degradation. Environmental conditions that positively influenced degradation rates of Fluka NAs included nutrients (C:N 10:1-500:1, C:P 100:1-5000:1), DO (4.76-8.43 mg L(-1)), pH (6-8), and temperature (5-25 °C). Approximately 50% removal of 61 ± 8 mg L(-1) was achieved in less than 2 d after NA introduction, achieving the method detection limit (5 mg L(-1)) by day 6 of the experiment in treatments with a C:N:P ratio of 100:10:1, DO > 8 mg L(-1), pH ∼8-9, and temperatures >23 °C. Microbial diversity was lowest in lower temperature treatments (6-16 °C), which may have resulted in observed slower NA degradation. Based on results from this study, when macro- and micronutrients were available, DO, pH, and temperature (within environmentally relevant ranges) influenced rates of aerobic degradation of Fluka NAs. This study could serve as a model for systematically evaluating environmental factors that influence NA degradation in field scenarios. PMID:27459161

  4. SCFβ-TRCP-mediated degradation of NEDD4 inhibits tumorigenesis through modulating the PTEN/Akt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Liu, Jiankang; Wang, Zhiwei; Wei, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    The HECT domain-containing ubiquitin E3 ligase NEDD4 is widely expressed in mammalian tissues and plays a crucial role in governing a wide spectrum of cellular processes including cell growth, tissue development and homeostasis. Recent reports have indicated that NEDD4 might facilitate tumorigenesis through targeted degradation of multiple tumor suppressor proteins including PTEN. However, the molecular mechanism by which NEDD4 stability is regulated has not been fully elucidated. Here we report that SCFβ-TRCP governs NEDD4 protein stability by targeting it for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation in a Casein Kinase-I (CKI) phosphorylation-dependent manner. Specifically, depletion of β-TRCP, or inactivation of CKI, stabilized NEDD4, leading to down-regulation of its ubiquitin target PTEN and subsequent activation of the mTOR/Akt oncogenic pathway. Furthermore, we found that CKIδ-mediated phosphorylation of Ser347 and Ser348 on NEDD4 promoted its interaction with SCFβ-TRCP for subsequent ubiquitination and degradation. As a result, compared to ectopic expression of wild-type NEDD4, introducing a non-degradable NEDD4 (S347A/S348A-NEDD4) promoted cancer cell growth and migration. Hence, our findings revealed the CKI/SCFβ-TRCP signaling axis as the upstream negative regulator of NEDD4, and further suggested that enhancing NEDD4 degradation, presumably with CKI or SCFβ-TRCP agonists, could be a promising strategy for treating human cancers. PMID:24657926

  5. Enhancement of arachidonic acid signaling pathway by nicotinic acid receptor HM74A

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Yuting . E-mail: ytang@prdus.jnj.com; Zhou, Lubing; Gunnet, Joseph W.; Wines, Pamela G.; Cryan, Ellen V.; Demarest, Keith T.

    2006-06-23

    HM74A is a G protein-coupled receptor for nicotinic acid (niacin), which has been used clinically to treat dyslipidemia for decades. The molecular mechanisms whereby niacin exerts its pleiotropic effects on lipid metabolism remain largely unknown. In addition, the most common side effect in niacin therapy is skin flushing that is caused by prostaglandin release, suggesting that the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2})/arachidonic acid (AA) pathway is involved. Various eicosanoids have been shown to activate peroxisome-proliferator activated receptors (PPAR) that play a diverse array of roles in lipid metabolism. To further elucidate the potential roles of HM74A in mediating the therapeutic effects and/or side effects of niacin, we sought to explore the signaling events upon HM74A activation. Here we demonstrated that HM74A synergistically enhanced UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner in A431 cells. Activation of HM74A also led to Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization and enhanced bradykinin-promoted Ca{sup 2+}-mobilization through Gi protein. While HM74A increased ERK1/2 activation by the bradykinin receptor, it had no effects on UTP-promoted ERK1/2 activation.Furthermore, UTP- and bradykinin-mediated AA release was significantly decreased in the presence of both MAPK kinase inhibitor PD 098059 and PKC inhibitor GF 109203X. However, the synergistic effects of HM74A were not dramatically affected by co-treatment with both inhibitors, indicating the cross-talk occurred at the receptor level. Finally, stimulation of A431 cells transiently transfected with PPRE-luciferase with AA significantly induced luciferase activity, mimicking the effects of PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that alteration of AA signaling pathway can regulate gene expression via endogenous PPARs.

  6. Auxin Biosynthesis: Are the Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Phenylacetic Acid Biosynthesis Pathways Mirror Images?1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, David S.; Smith, Jason; Chourey, Prem S.; McAdam, Erin L.; Quittenden, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the main auxin in plants (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) has been elucidated recently and is thought to involve the sequential conversion of Trp to indole-3-pyruvic acid to IAA. However, the pathway leading to a less well studied auxin, phenylacetic acid (PAA), remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from metabolism experiments that PAA is synthesized from the amino acid Phe, via phenylpyruvate. In pea (Pisum sativum), the reverse reaction, phenylpyruvate to Phe, is also demonstrated. However, despite similarities between the pathways leading to IAA and PAA, evidence from mutants in pea and maize (Zea mays) indicate that IAA biosynthetic enzymes are not the main enzymes for PAA biosynthesis. Instead, we identified a putative aromatic aminotransferase (PsArAT) from pea that may function in the PAA synthesis pathway. PMID:27208245

  7. Study on degradation kinetics of 2-(2-hydroxypropanamido) benzoic acid in aqueous solutions and identification of its major degradation product by UHPLC/TOF-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qili; Guan, Jiao; Rong, Rong; Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Zhiguo

    2015-08-10

    A RP-HPLC method was developed and validated for the degradation kinetic study of 2-(2-hydroxypropanamido) benzoic acid (HPABA), a promising anti-inflammatory drug, which would provide a basis for further studies on HPABA. The effects of pH, temperature, buffer concentration and ionic strength on the degradation kinetics of HPABA were discussed. Experimental parameters such as degradation rate constants (k), activation energy (Ea), acid and alkali catalytic constants (k(ac), k(al)), shelf life (t1/2) and temperature coefficient (Q10) were calculated. The results indicated that degradation kinetics of HPABA followed zero-order reaction kinetics; degradation rate constants (k) of HPABA at different pH values demonstrated that HPABA was more stable in neutral and near-neutral conditions; the function of temperature on k obeyed the Arrhenius equation (r = 0.9933) and HPABA was more stable at lower temperature; with the increase of ionic strength and buffer concentration, the stability of HPABA was decreased. The major unknown degradation product of HPABA was identified by UHPLC/TOF-MS/MS with positive electrospray ionization. Results demonstrated that the hydrolysis product was the primary degradation product of HPABA and it was deduced as anthranilic acid. PMID:25935790

  8. Degradation of p-toluenesulphonic acid via sidechain oxidation, desulphonation and meta ring cleavage in Pseudomonas (Comamonas) testosteroni T-2.

    PubMed

    Locher, H H; Leisinger, T; Cook, A M

    1989-07-01

    Pseudomonas (Comamonas) testosteroni T-2 completely converted p-toluenesulphonic acid (TS) or p-sulphobenzoic acid (PSB) to cell material, CO2 and sulphate, with growth yields of about 5 g protein (mol C)-1. PSB and sulphite were excreted as transient intermediates during growth in TS-salts medium. All reactions of a catabolic pathway involving sidechain oxidation and cleavage of the sulphonate moiety as sulphite were measurable in the soluble portion of cell extracts. Degradation of TS and PSB was inducible and apparently involved at least two regulons. TS was converted to p-sulphobenzyl alcohol in a reaction requiring NAD(P)H and 1 mol O2 (mol TS)-1. This alcohol was in an equilibrium (in the presence of NAD+) with p-sulphobenzaldehyde, which was converted to PSB in an NAD(P)+-dependent reaction. PSB was desulphonated to protocatechuic acid in a reaction requiring NAD(P)H and 1 mol O2 (mol PSB)-1. Experiments with 18 O2 confirmed involvement of a dioxygenase, because both atoms of this molecular oxygen were recovered in protocatechuate. Protocatechuate was converted to 2-hydroxy-4-carboxymuconate semialdehyde by a 4.5-dioxygenase. PMID:2614395

  9. Metabolism of 2-Chloro-4-Nitroaniline via Novel Aerobic Degradation Pathway by Rhodococcus sp. Strain MB-P1

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pal, Deepika; Vikram, Surendra; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    2-chloro-4-nitroaniline (2-C-4-NA) is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitor and also used in the synthesis of niclosamide, a molluscicide. It is marked as a black-listed substance due to its poor biodegradability. We report biodegradation of 2-C-4-NA and its pathway characterization by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1 under aerobic conditions. The strain MB-P1 utilizes 2-C-4-NA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In the growth medium, the degradation of 2-C-4-NA occurs with the release of nitrite ions, chloride ions, and ammonia. During the resting cell studies, the 2-C-4-NA-induced cells of strain MB-P1 transformed 2-C-4-NA stoichiometrically to 4-amino-3-chlorophenol (4-A-3-CP), which subsequently gets transformed to 6-chlorohydroxyquinol (6-CHQ) metabolite. Enzyme assays by cell-free lysates prepared from 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells, demonstrated that the first enzyme in the 2-C-4-NA degradation pathway is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the stoichiometric removal of nitro group and production of 4-A-3-CP. Oxygen uptake studies on 4-A-3-CP and related anilines by 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells demonstrated the involvement of aniline dioxygenase in the second step of 2-C-4-NA degradation. This is the first report showing 2-C-4-NA degradation and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway by an aerobic bacterium. PMID:23614030

  10. Metabolism of 2-chloro-4-nitroaniline via novel aerobic degradation pathway by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fazlurrahman; Pal, Deepika; Vikram, Surendra; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-01-01

    2-chloro-4-nitroaniline (2-C-4-NA) is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitor and also used in the synthesis of niclosamide, a molluscicide. It is marked as a black-listed substance due to its poor biodegradability. We report biodegradation of 2-C-4-NA and its pathway characterization by Rhodococcus sp. strain MB-P1 under aerobic conditions. The strain MB-P1 utilizes 2-C-4-NA as the sole carbon, nitrogen, and energy source. In the growth medium, the degradation of 2-C-4-NA occurs with the release of nitrite ions, chloride ions, and ammonia. During the resting cell studies, the 2-C-4-NA-induced cells of strain MB-P1 transformed 2-C-4-NA stoichiometrically to 4-amino-3-chlorophenol (4-A-3-CP), which subsequently gets transformed to 6-chlorohydroxyquinol (6-CHQ) metabolite. Enzyme assays by cell-free lysates prepared from 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells, demonstrated that the first enzyme in the 2-C-4-NA degradation pathway is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the stoichiometric removal of nitro group and production of 4-A-3-CP. Oxygen uptake studies on 4-A-3-CP and related anilines by 2-C-4-NA-induced MB-P1 cells demonstrated the involvement of aniline dioxygenase in the second step of 2-C-4-NA degradation. This is the first report showing 2-C-4-NA degradation and elucidation of corresponding metabolic pathway by an aerobic bacterium. PMID:23614030

  11. Macro kinetic studies for photocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid in immobilized systems.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Kanheya; Yablonsky, Gregory S; Ray, Ajay K

    2005-09-01

    Semiconductor photocatalytic process has been studied extensively in recent years due to its intriguing advantages in environmental remediation. In this study, a two-phase swirl-flow monolithic-type reactor is used to study the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid in immobilized systems. Transport contributions into the observed degradation rates were determined when catalyst is immobilized. Intrinsic kinetic rate constants and its dependence on light intensity and catalyst layer thickness, values of adsorption equilibrium constant, internal as well as external mass transfer parameters were determined. The simultaneous effect of catalyst loading and light intensity and optimum catalyst layer thickness were also determined experimentally. Reaction rate constants and overall observed degradation rates were compared with slurry systems. PMID:16054912

  12. Cullin 3 mediates SRC-3 ubiquitination and degradation to control the retinoic acid response

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, Christine; Gaouar, Samia; Fischer, Benoit; Boeglin, Marcel; Paul, Nicodeme; Samarut, Eric; Piskunov, Aleksandr; Pankotai-Bodo, Gabriella; Brino, Laurent; Rochette-Egly, Cecile

    2011-01-01

    SRC-3 is an important coactivator of nuclear receptors including the retinoic acid (RA) receptor α. Most of SRC-3 functions are facilitated by changes in the posttranslational code of the protein that involves mainly phosphorylation and ubiquitination. We recently reported that SRC-3 is degraded by the proteasome in response to RA. Here, by using an RNAi E3-ubiquitin ligase entry screen, we identified CUL-3 and RBX1 as components of the E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in the RA-induced ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of SRC-3. We also show that the RA-induced ubiquitination of SRC-3 depends on its prior phosphorylation at serine 860 that promotes binding of the CUL-3–based E3 ligase in the nucleus. Finally, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation of SRC-3 cooperate to control the dynamics of transcription. In all, this process participates to the antiproliferative effect of RA. PMID:22147914

  13. Benzoic acid fermentation from starch and cellulose via a plant-like β-oxidation pathway in Streptomyces maritimus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Benzoic acid is one of the most useful aromatic compounds. Despite its versatility and simple structure, benzoic acid production using microbes has not been reported previously. Streptomyces are aerobic, Gram-positive, mycelia-forming soil bacteria, and are known to produce various kinds of antibiotics composed of many aromatic residues. S. maritimus possess a complex amino acid modification pathway and can serve as a new platform microbe to produce aromatic building-block compounds. In this study, we carried out benzoate fermentation using S. maritimus. In order to enhance benzoate productivity using cellulose as the carbon source, we constructed endo-glucanase secreting S. maritimus. Results After 4 days of cultivation using glucose, cellobiose, or starch as a carbon source, the maximal level of benzoate reached 257, 337, and 460 mg/l, respectively. S. maritimus expressed β-glucosidase and high amylase-retaining activity compared to those of S. lividans and S. coelicolor. In addition, for effective benzoate production from cellulosic materials, we constructed endo-glucanase-secreting S. maritimus. This transformant efficiently degraded the phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC) and then produced 125 mg/l benzoate. Conclusions Wild-type S. maritimus produce benzoate via a plant-like β-oxidation pathway and can assimilate various carbon sources for benzoate production. In order to encourage cellulose degradation and improve benzoate productivity from cellulose, we constructed endo-glucanase-secreting S. maritimus. Using this transformant, we also demonstrated the direct fermentation of benzoate from cellulose. To achieve further benzoate productivity, the L-phenylalanine availability needs to be improved in future. PMID:22545774

  14. Photocatalytic degradation of commercially sourced naphthenic acids by TiO2-graphene composite nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juncheng; Wang, Lin; Tang, Jingchun; Ma, Jianli

    2016-04-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a major contributor to the toxicity in oil sands process-affected water (OSPW), which is produced by hot water extraction of bitumen. NAs are extremely difficult to be degraded due to its complex ring and side chain structure. Photocatalysis is recognized as a promising technology in the removal of refractory organic pollutants. In this work, TiO2-graphene (P25-GR) composites were synthesized by means of solvothermal method. The results showed that P25-GR composite exhibited better photocatalytic activity than pure P25. The removal efficiency of naphthenic acids in acid solution was higher than that in neutral and alkaline solutions. It was the first report ever known on the photodegradation of NAs based on graphene, and this process achieved a higher removal rate than other photocatalysis degradation of NAs in a shorter reaction time. LC/MS analysis showed that macromolecular NAs (carbon number 17-22, z value -2) were easy to be degraded than the micromolecular ones (carbon number 11-16, z value -2). Furthermore, the reactive oxygen species that play the main role in the photocatalysis system were studied. It was found that holes and ·OH were the main reactive species in the UV/P25-GR photocatalysis system. Given the high removal efficiency of refractory organic pollutants and the short degradation time, photodegradation based on composite catalysts has a broad and practical prospect. The study on the photodegradation of commercially sourced NAs may provide a guidance for the degradation of OSPW NAs by this method. PMID:26874061

  15. Culturing oil sands microbes as mixed species communities enhances ex situ model naphthenic acid degradation

    PubMed Central

    Demeter, Marc A.; Lemire, Joseph A.; Yue, Gordon; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Oil sands surface mining for bitumen results in the formation of oil sands process water (OSPW), containing acutely toxic naphthenic acids (NAs). Potential exists for OSPW toxicity to be mitigated by aerobic degradation of the NAs by microorganisms indigenous to the oil sands tailings ponds, the success of which is dependent on the methods used to exploit the metabolisms of the environmental microbial community. Having hypothesized that the xenobiotic tolerant biofilm mode-of-life may represent a feasible way to harness environmental microbes for ex situ treatment of OSPW NAs, we aerobically grew OSPW microbes as single and mixed species biofilm and planktonic cultures under various conditions for the purpose of assaying their ability to tolerate and degrade NAs. The NAs evaluated were a diverse mixture of eight commercially available model compounds. Confocal microscopy confirmed the ability of mixed and single species OSPW cultures to grow as biofilms in the presence of the NAs evaluated. qPCR enumeration demonstrated that the addition of supplemental nutrients at concentrations of 1 g L-1 resulted in a more numerous population than 0.001 g L-1 supplementation by approximately 1 order of magnitude. GC-FID analysis revealed that mixed species cultures (regardless of the mode of growth) are the most effective at degrading the NAs tested. All constituent NAs evaluated were degraded below detectable limits with the exception of 1-adamantane carboxylic acid (ACA); subsequent experimentation with ACA as the sole NA also failed to exhibit degradation of this compound. Single species cultures degraded select few NA compounds. The degradation trends highlighted many structure-persistence relationships among the eight NAs tested, demonstrating the effect of side chain configuration and alkyl branching on compound recalcitrance. Of all the isolates, the Rhodococcus spp. degraded the greatest number of NA compounds, although still less than the mixed species cultures

  16. Requirement for alanine in the amino acid control of deprivation-induced protein degradation in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Pösö, A R; Mortimore, G E

    1984-01-01

    Protein degradation in liver is actively controlled by a small group of inhibitory amino acids--leucine, tyrosine (or phenylalanine), glutamine, proline, histidine, tryptophan, and methionine. Other evidence, however, suggests that one or more of the remaining 12 noninhibitory amino acids is also required for suppression of proteolysis at normal concentrations. This question was investigated in livers of fed rats perfused in the single-pass mode. The deletion of alanine at normal (1x), but not at 4x or 10x normal, plasma amino acid concentrations evoked a near-maximal acceleration of protein degradation. No other noninhibitory amino acid was effective. Because alanine alone was not directly inhibitory and its omission was not associated with a decrease in inhibitory amino acid pools, alanine was presumed to act as a coregulator in the expression of inhibitory activity. When tested alone, the inhibitory group was as effective as the complete mixture at 0.5x and 4x levels, but it lost its suppressive ability within a narrow zone of concentration centered slightly above 1x. The addition of 1x (0.48 mM) alanine completely restored the inhibition. Pyruvate and lactate could be effectively substituted, but only at concentrations 10-20 times greater than that of alanine. These, together with earlier findings, indicate the existence of a regulatory complex that recognizes specific amino acids and transmits positive and negative signals to proteolytic sites. The results also suggest that alanine can provide an important regulatory link between energy demands and protein degradation. PMID:6589593

  17. Structure of the PLP Degradative Enzyme 2-Methyl-3-hydroxypyridine-5-carboxylic Acid Oxygenase from Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 and Its Mechanistic Implications

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, Kathryn M.; Mukherjee, Tathagata; Begley, Tadhg P.; Ealick, Steven E.; Cornell

    2009-06-12

    A vitamin B{sub 6} degradative pathway has recently been identified and characterized in Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099. One of the enzymes on this pathway, 2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine-5-carboxylic acid oxygenase (MHPCO), is a flavin-dependent enzyme and catalyzes the oxidative ring-opening of 2-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine-5-carboxylic acid to form E-2-(acetamino-methylene)succinate. The gene for this enzyme has been cloned, and the corresponding protein has been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The crystal structure of MHPCO has been solved to 2.1 {angstrom} using SAD phasing with and without the substrate MHPC bound. These crystal structures provide insight into the reaction mechanism and suggest roles for active site residues in the catalysis of a novel oxidative ring-opening reaction.

  18. Intersection of RNA Processing and the Type II Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway in Yeast Mitochondria▿

    PubMed Central

    Schonauer, Melissa S.; Kastaniotis, Alexander J.; Hiltunen, J. Kalervo; Dieckmann, Carol L.

    2008-01-01

    Distinct metabolic pathways can intersect in ways that allow hierarchical or reciprocal regulation. In a screen of respiration-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion strains for defects in mitochondrial RNA processing, we found that lack of any enzyme in the mitochondrial fatty acid type II biosynthetic pathway (FAS II) led to inefficient 5′ processing of mitochondrial precursor tRNAs by RNase P. In particular, the precursor containing both RNase P RNA (RPM1) and tRNAPro accumulated dramatically. Subsequent Pet127-driven 5′ processing of RPM1 was blocked. The FAS II pathway defects resulted in the loss of lipoic acid attachment to subunits of three key mitochondrial enzymes, which suggests that the octanoic acid produced by the pathway is the sole precursor for lipoic acid synthesis and attachment. The protein component of yeast mitochondrial RNase P, Rpm2, is not modified by lipoic acid in the wild-type strain, and it is imported in FAS II mutant strains. Thus, a product of the FAS II pathway is required for RNase P RNA maturation, which positively affects RNase P activity. In addition, a product is required for lipoic acid production, which is needed for the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which feeds acetyl-coenzyme A into the FAS II pathway. These two positive feedback cycles may provide switch-like control of mitochondrial gene expression in response to the metabolic state of the cell. PMID:18779316

  19. Biosynthetic Pathway Analysis for Improving the Cordycepin and Cordycepic Acid Production in Hirsutella sinensis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Xue, Ya-Ping; Baker, Peter James; Wu, Hui; Xu, Feng; Teng, Yi; Brathwaite, Mgavi Elombe; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-06-01

    Hirsutella sinensis is considered as the only correct anamorph of Ophiocordyceps sinensis. To improve cordycepin and cordycepic acid production in H. sinensis, the biosynthetic pathways of cordycepin and cordycepic acid were predicted, and verified by cloning and expressing genes involved in these pathways, respectively. Then, 5'-nucleotidase participating in biosynthetic pathway of cordycepin, hexokinase, and glucose phosphate isomerase involved in biosynthetic pathway of cordycepic acid, were demonstrated playing important roles in the corresponding biosynthetic pathway by real-time PCR, accompanying with significantly up-regulated 15.03-, 5.27-, and 3.94-fold, respectively. Moreover, the metabolic regulation of H. sinensis was performed. As expected, cordycepin production reached 1.09 mg/g when additional substrate of 5'-nucleotidase was 4 mg/mL, resulting in an increase of 201.1 % compared with the control. In the same way, cordycepic acid production reached 26.6 and 23.4 % by adding substrate of hexokinase or glucose phosphate isomerase, leading to a rise of 77.3 and 55.1 %, respectively. To date, this is the first time to improve cordycepin and cordycepic acid production through metabolic regulation based on biosynthetic pathway analysis, and metabolic regulation is proved as a simple and effective way to enhance the output of cordycepin and cordycepic acid in submerged cultivation of H. sinensis. PMID:26922724

  20. Arginine-dependent acid-resistance pathway in Shigella boydii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ability to survive the low pH of the human stomach is considered be an important virulent determinant. Acid tolerance of Shigella boydii 18 CDPH, the strain implicated in an outbreak may have played an important role in surviving the acidic food (bean salad). The strain was capable of inducing arg...

  1. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  2. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a halotolerant strain of Penicillium chrysogenum: antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Guedes, Sumaya; Mendes, Benilde; Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    The extensive use of pesticides in agriculture has prompted intensive research on chemical and biological methods in order to protect contamination of water and soil resources. In this paper the degradation of the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a Penicillium chrysogenum strain previously isolated from a salt mine was studied in batch cultures. Co-degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid with additives such as sugar and intermediates of pesticide metabolism was also investigated. Penicillium chrysogenum in solid medium was able to grow at concentrations up to 1000 mg/L of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with sucrose. Meanwhile, supplementation of the solid medium with glucose and lactose led to fungal growth at concentrations up to 500 mg/L of herbicide. Batch cultures of 2,4-D at 100 mg/L were developed under aerobic conditions with the addition of glucose, lactose and sucrose, showing sucrose as the best additional carbon source. The 2,4-D removal was quantified by liquid chromatography. The fungus was able to use 2,4-D as the sole carbon and energy source under 0%, 2% and 5.9% NaCl. The greatest 2,4-D degradation efficiency was found using alpha-ketoglutarate and ascorbic acid as co-substrates under 2% NaCl at pH 7. Penicillin production was evaluated in submerged cultures by bioassay, and higher amounts of beta-lactam antibiotic were produced when the herbicide was alone. Taking into account the ability of P. chrysogenum CLONA2 to degrade aromatic compounds, this strain could be an interesting tool for 2,4-D herbicide remediation in saline environments. PMID:22629643

  3. The Rtr1p CTD phosphatase autoregulates its mRNA through a degradation pathway involving the REX exonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Hodko, Domagoj; Ward, Taylor; Chanfreau, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Rtr1p is a phosphatase that impacts gene expression by modulating the phosphorylation status of the C-terminal domain of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II. Here, we show that Rtr1p is a component of a novel mRNA degradation pathway that promotes its autoregulation through turnover of its own mRNA. We show that the 3′UTR of the RTR1 mRNA contains a cis element that destabilizes this mRNA. RTR1 mRNA turnover is achieved through binding of Rtr1p to the RTR1 mRNP in a manner that is dependent on this cis element. Genetic evidence shows that Rtr1p-mediated decay of the RTR1 mRNA involves the 5′-3′ DExD/H-box RNA helicase Dhh1p and the 3′-5′ exonucleases Rex2p and Rex3p. Rtr1p and Rex3p are found associated with Dhh1p, suggesting a model for recruiting the REX exonucleases to the RTR1 mRNA for degradation. Rtr1p-mediated decay potentially impacts additional transcripts, including the unspliced BMH2 pre-mRNA. We propose that Rtr1p may imprint its RNA targets cotranscriptionally and determine their downstream degradation mechanism by directing these transcripts to a novel turnover pathway that involves Rtr1p, Dhh1p, and the REX family of exonucleases. PMID:26843527

  4. The regulatory role of reversible phosphorylation in the chlorophyll degradation pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Senescence represents the final stage of plant development and is characterized by several processes including the systematic degradation of the photosynthetic apparatus and chlorophyll molecules inside chloroplasts. Normally, chlorophyll is catabolized to colorless compounds through a series of enz...

  5. A biosynthetic pathway for a prominent class of microbiota-derived bile acids

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, A. Sloan; Fischbach, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    The gut bile acid pool is millimolar in concentration, varies widely in composition among individuals, and is linked to metabolic disease and cancer. Although these molecules derive almost exclusively from the microbiota, remarkably little is known about which bacterial species and genes are responsible for their biosynthesis. Here, we report a biosynthetic pathway for the second most abundant class in the gut, iso (3β-hydroxy) bile acids, whose levels exceed 300 µM in some humans and are absent in others. We show, for the first time, that iso bile acids are produced by Ruminococcus gnavus, a far more abundant commensal than previously known producers; and that the iso bile acid pathway detoxifies deoxycholic acid, favoring the growth of the keystone genus Bacteroides. By revealing the biosynthetic genes for an abundant class of bile acids, our work sets the stage for predicting and rationally altering the composition of the bile acid pool. PMID:26192599

  6. Impairment of cellulose- and cellobiose-degrading soil Bacteria by two acidic herbicides.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Stefanie; Drake, Harold L; Kolb, Steffen

    2012-02-01

    Herbicides have the potential to impair the metabolism of soil microorganisms. The current study addressed the toxic effect of bentazon and 4-chloro-2-methylphenoxyacetic acid on aerobic and anaerobic Bacteria that are involved in cellulose and cellobiose degradation in an agricultural soil. Aerobic saccharide degradation was reduced at concentrations of herbicides above environmental values. Microbial processes (e.g. fermentations, ferric iron reduction) that were linked to anaerobic cellulose and cellobiose degradation were reduced in the presence of both herbicides at concentrations above and at those that occur in crop field soil. 16S rRNA gene transcript numbers of total Bacteria, and selected bacterial taxa (Clostridia [Group I], Planctomycetaceae, and two uncultivated taxa of Bacteroidetes) decreased more in anoxic than in oxic cellulose-supplemented soil microcosms in the presence of both herbicides. Collectively, the results suggested that the metabolism of anaerobic cellulose-degrading Bacteria was impaired by typical in situ herbicide concentrations, whereas in situ concentrations did not impair metabolism of aerobic cellulose- and cellobiose-degrading soil Bacteria. PMID:22098368

  7. Degradation of bromamine acid by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) supported on sepiolite.

    PubMed

    Fei, Xuening; Cao, Lingyun; Zhou, Lifeng; Gu, Yingchun; Wang, Xiaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Sepiolite, a natural nano-material, was chosen as a carrier to prepare supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI). The effects of preparation conditions, including mass ratio of nZVI and activated sepiolite and preparation pH value, on properties of the supported nZVI were investigated. The results showed that the optimal mass ratio of nZVI and sepiolite was 1.12:1 and the optimal pH value was 7. The supported nZVI was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and furthermore an analogy model of the supported nZVI was set up. Compared with the nZVI itself, the supported nZVI was more stable in air and possessed better water dispersibility, which were beneficial for the degradation of bromamine acid aqueous solution. The degradation characteristics, such as effects of supported nZVI dosage, initial concentration and initial pH value of the solution on the decolorization efficiency were also investigated. The results showed that in an acidic environment the supported nZVI with a dosage of 2 g/L showed high activity in the degradation of bromamine acid with an initial concentration of 1,000 mg/L, and the degree of decolorization could reach up to 98%. PMID:23109568

  8. Effect of the Electric Field Frequency on Ascorbic Acid Degradation during Thermal Treatment by Ohmic Heating

    PubMed Central

    Mercali, Giovana Domeneghini; Schwartz, Steven; Marczak, Ligia Damasceno Ferreira; Tessaro, Isabel Cristina; Sastry, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the influence of the electric field frequency and solids content on the degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid during ohmic heating of acerola pulp and acerola serum was investigated. The degradation percentage of ascorbic acid in the pulp after 120 min of heating varied between 12 and 17%. For the serum, the degradation percentage was in the range of 13 and 18%. The results were fitted to the first-order model, and the kinetic rate constants ranged from 1.1 to 1.6 × 10−3 min−1 and from 1.1 to 1.5 × 10−3 min−1 for pulp and serum, respectively. D values ranged between 1480 and 2145 min for the pulp and between 1524 and 1951 min for the serum. A distinct behavior between the kinetic parameters of the pulp and serum in electric field frequencies ranging from 10 to 1000 Hz indicates that the presence of distinct amounts and types of solids might affect the rate of the electron transfer in electrochemical reactions. These variables may also affect the polarization process stimulated by the oscillating electric field. The non-achievement of the equilibrium of the polarization process may have an influence on oxidation reactions, affecting the predisposition to hydrogen donation from the ascorbic acid molecule. PMID:24892902

  9. Effect of the electric field frequency on ascorbic acid degradation during thermal treatment by ohmic heating.

    PubMed

    Mercali, Giovana Domeneghini; Schwartz, Steven; Marczak, Ligia Damasceno Ferreira; Tessaro, Isabel Cristina; Sastry, Sudhir

    2014-06-25

    In this work, the influence of the electric field frequency and solids content on the degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid during ohmic heating of acerola pulp and acerola serum was investigated. The degradation percentage of ascorbic acid in the pulp after 120 min of heating varied between 12 and 17%. For the serum, the degradation percentage was in the range of 13 and 18%. The results were fitted to the first-order model, and the kinetic rate constants ranged from 1.1 to 1.6×10(-3) min(-1) and from 1.1 to 1.5×10(-3) min(-1) for pulp and serum, respectively. D values ranged between 1480 and 2145 min for the pulp and between 1524 and 1951 min for the serum. A distinct behavior between the kinetic parameters of the pulp and serum in electric field frequencies ranging from 10 to 1000 Hz indicates that the presence of distinct amounts and types of solids might affect the rate of the electron transfer in electrochemical reactions. These variables may also affect the polarization process stimulated by the oscillating electric field. The non-achievement of the equilibrium of the polarization process may have an influence on oxidation reactions, affecting the predisposition to hydrogen donation from the ascorbic acid molecule. PMID:24892902

  10. Free fatty acids degradation in grease trap purification using ozone bubbling and sonication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotr Kwiatkowski, Michal; Satoh, Saburoh; Fukuda, Shogo; Yamabe, Chobei; Ihara, Satoshi; Nieda, Masanori

    2013-02-01

    The oil and fat were treated at first by only ozone bubbling and it was confirmed that the collection efficiency of them became 98.4% when the aeration was used. It showed that the aeration method in a grease trap cleared the standard value of 90% and there was no worry on the oil and fat outflow from a grease trap. The characteristics of sonication process were studied for free fatty acids degradation. The free saturated fatty acids are the most hard-degradable compounds of the fats, oils and greases (FOGs) in the grease trap. The influence of various parameters such as immersion level of an ultrasound probe in the liquid and bubbling of various gases (Ar, O2, air, O3) on the sonochemical and energy efficiency of the sonication process was investigated. The most effective degradation treatment method for saturated free fatty acids was the combination of sonication and low flow rate argon bubbling. Contribution to the Topical Issue "13th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (Hakone XIII)", Edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Henryca Danuta Stryczewska and Yvan Ségui.

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis spherical TiO2 and its photo-degradation property on salicylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wenlu; Liu, Xiaolin; Huo, Pengwei; Gao, Xun; Wu, Di; Lu, Ziyang; Yan, Yongsheng

    2012-07-01

    Anatase TiO2 spheres have been prepared using hydrothermal synthesis. The prepared spheres were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS). The TiO2 consisted of well-defined spheres with size of 3-5 μm. The photocatalytic activity of spherical TiO2 was determined by degradation of salicylic acid under visible light irradiation. It was revealed that the degradation rate of the spherical TiO2 which was processed at 150 °C for 48 h could reach 81.758%. And the kinetics of photocatalytic degradation obeyed first-order kinetic, which the rate constant value was 0.01716 S-1 of the salicylic acid onto TiO2 (temperature: 150, time: 48 h). The kinetics of adsorption followed the pseudo-second-order model and the rate constant was 1.2695 g mg-1 of the salicylic acid onto TiO2 (temperature: 150, time: 48 h).

  12. Optimized photocatalytic degradation of caffeic acid by sol-gel TiO₂.

    PubMed

    García-Montelongo, Xiomara L; Martínez-de la Cruz, Azael; Contreras, David; Mansilla, Héctor D

    2015-01-01

    TiO₂anatase powder was prepared by means of the sol-gel method with titanium(IV) butoxide as precursor. The formation of a tetragonal crystal structure of TiO₂anatase at 500 °C was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction. The characterization of the samples synthesized was complemented by scanning electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO₂anatase powder was evaluated in the degradation of caffeic acid in aqueous solution under ultraviolet radiation. A central composite circumscribed design was used to assess the weight of the experimental variables, pH and amount of catalyst in the percentage of caffeic acid degraded and the optimal conditions. The optimized conditions were found to be pH = 5.2 and a load of TiO₂of 1.1 g L⁻¹. Under these conditions more than 90% of caffeic acid degradation was achieved after 30 min of lamp irradiation. At this time the mineralization reached was almost 60%. PMID:25812097

  13. Indole-3-acetic acid biosynthetic pathways in the basidiomycetous yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum.

    PubMed

    Nutaratat, Pumin; Srisuk, Nantana; Arunrattiyakorn, Panarat; Limtong, Savitree

    2016-07-01

    Microorganisms produce plant growth regulators, such as auxins, cytokinins and gibberellins, to promote plant growth. Auxins are a group of compounds with an indole ring that have a positive effect on plant growth. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is a plant growth hormone classified as an indole derivative of the auxin family. IAA biosynthesis pathways have been reported and widely studied in several groups of bacteria. Only a few studies on IAA biosynthesis pathways have been conducted in yeast. This study aimed to investigate IAA biosynthesis pathways in a basidiomycetous yeast (Rhodosporidium paludigenum DMKU-RP301). Investigations were performed both with and without a tryptophan supplement. Indole compound intermediates were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Indole-3-lactic acid and indole-3-ethanol were found as a result of the enzymatic reduction of indole-3-pyruvic acid and indole-3-acetaldehyde, in IAA biosynthesis via an indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway. In addition, we also found indole-3-pyruvic acid in culture supernatants determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Identification of tryptophan aminotransferase activity supports indole-3-pyruvic acid-routed IAA biosynthesis in R. paludigenum DMKU-RP301. We hence concluded that R. paludigenum DMKU-RP301 produces IAA through an indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway. PMID:26899734

  14. Mechanism and Reaction Pathways for Microcystin-LR Degradation through UV/H2O2 Treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yafeng; Ren, Jing; Wang, Xiangrong; Fan, Zhengqiu

    2016-01-01

    Microcystin-LR (MCLR) is the most common cyanotoxin in contaminated aquatic systems. MCLR inhibits protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, leading to liver damage and tumor formation. MCLR is relatively stable owing to its cyclic structures. The combined UV/H2O2 technology can degrade MCLR efficiently. The second-order rate constant of the reaction between MCLR and hydroxyl radical (·OH) is 2.79(±0.23)×1010 M-1 s-1 based on the competition kinetics model using nitrobenzene as reference compound. The probable degradation pathway was analyzed through liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Results suggested that the major destruction pathways of MCLR were initiated by ·OH attack on the benzene ring and diene of the Adda side chain. The corresponding aldehyde or ketone peptide residues were formed through further oxidation. Another minor destruction pathway involved ·OH attack on the methoxy group of the Adda side chain, followed by complete removal of the methoxy group. The combined UV/H2O2 system is a promising technology for MCLR removal in contaminated aquatic systems. PMID:27281173

  15. Mechanism and Reaction Pathways for Microcystin-LR Degradation through UV/H2O2 Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yafeng; Ren, Jing; Wang, Xiangrong; Fan, Zhengqiu

    2016-01-01

    Microcystin-LR (MCLR) is the most common cyanotoxin in contaminated aquatic systems. MCLR inhibits protein phosphatases 1 and 2A, leading to liver damage and tumor formation. MCLR is relatively stable owing to its cyclic structures. The combined UV/H2O2 technology can degrade MCLR efficiently. The second-order rate constant of the reaction between MCLR and hydroxyl radical (·OH) is 2.79(±0.23)×1010 M−1 s−1 based on the competition kinetics model using nitrobenzene as reference compound. The probable degradation pathway was analyzed through liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Results suggested that the major destruction pathways of MCLR were initiated by ·OH attack on the benzene ring and diene of the Adda side chain. The corresponding aldehyde or ketone peptide residues were formed through further oxidation. Another minor destruction pathway involved ·OH attack on the methoxy group of the Adda side chain, followed by complete removal of the methoxy group. The combined UV/H2O2 system is a promising technology for MCLR removal in contaminated aquatic systems. PMID:27281173

  16. Decolorization of acid and basic dyes: understanding the metabolic degradation and cell-induced adsorption/precipitation by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cerboneschi, Matteo; Corsi, Massimo; Bianchini, Roberto; Bonanni, Marco; Tegli, Stefania

    2015-10-01

    Escherichia coli strain DH5α was successfully employed in the decolorization of commercial anthraquinone and azo dyes, belonging to the general classes of acid or basic dyes. The bacteria showed an aptitude to survive at different pH values on any dye solution tested, and a rapid decolorization was obtained under aerobic conditions for the whole collection of dyes. A deep investigation about the mode of action of E. coli was carried out to demonstrate that dye decolorization mainly occurred via three different pathways, specifically bacterial induced precipitation, cell wall adsorption, and metabolism, whose weight was correlated with the chemical nature of the dye. In the case of basic azo dyes, an unexpected fast decolorization was observed after just 2-h postinoculation under aerobic conditions, suggesting that metabolism was the main mechanism involved in basic azo dye degradation, as unequivocally demonstrated by mass spectrometric analysis. The reductive cleavage of the azo group by E. coli on basic azo dyes was also further demonstrated by the inhibition of decolorization occurring when glucose was added to the dye solution. Moreover, no residual toxicity was found in the E. coli-treated basic azo dye solutions by performing Daphnia magna acute toxicity assays. The results of the present study demonstrated that E. coli can be simply exploited for its natural metabolic pathways, without applying any recombinant technology. The high versatility and adaptability of this bacterium could encourage its involvement in industrial bioremediation of textile and leather dyeing wastewaters. PMID:26062529

  17. SIAH-1 interacts with alpha-tubulin and degrades the kinesin Kid by the proteasome pathway during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Germani, A; Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, H; Fellous, A; Gisselbrecht, S; Varin-Blank, N; Calvo, F

    2000-12-01

    SIAH-1, a human homologue of the Drosophila seven in absentia (Sina), has been implicated in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of different target proteins through its N-terminal RING finger domain. SIAH-1 is also induced during p53-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, SIAH-1-transfected breast cancer cell line MCF-7 exhibits an altered mitotic process resulting in multinucleated giant cells. Now, using the two-hybrid system, we identified two new SIAH interacting proteins: Kid (kinesin like DNA binding protein) and alpha-tubulin. We demonstrate that SIAH is involved in the degradation of Kid via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Our results suggest that SIAH-1 but not its N-terminal deletion mutant, affects the mitosis by an enhanced reduction of kinesin levels. Our results imply, for the first time, SIAH-1 in regulating the degradation of proteins directly implicated in the mitotic process. PMID:11146551

  18. Pinolenic Acid Downregulates Lipid Anabolic Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ah Ron; Han, Sung Nim

    2016-07-01

    Pine nut oil (PNO) was reported to reduce lipid accumulation in the liver. However, the specific effect of pinolenic acid (18:3, all-cis-Δ5,9,12), a unique component of PNO, on lipid metabolism has not been studied. We hypothesized that pinolenic acid downregulates the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells. HepG2 cells were incubated in serum-free medium supplemented with 50 μM bovine serum albumin (BSA), palmitic acid, oleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, pinolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), or α-linolenic acid for 24 h. Lipid accumulation was determined by Oil Red O (ORO) staining. The mRNA levels of genes related to fatty acid biosynthesis (SREBP1c, FAS, SCD1, and ACC1), fatty acid oxidation (ACC2, PPARα, CPT1A, and ACADL), cholesterol synthesis (SREBP2 and HMGCR), and lipoprotein uptake (LDLr) and of genes that may be involved in the downregulation of the lipogenic pathway (ACSL3, ACSL4, and ACSL5) were determined by qPCR. LDLR protein levels were measured by Western blot analysis. The mRNA levels of SREBP1c, FAS, and SCD1 were significantly downregulated by pinolenic acid treatment compared to BSA control (53, 54, and 38 % lower, respectively). In addition, the mRNA levels of HMGCR, ACSL3, and LDLr were significantly lower (30, 30, and 43 % lower, respectively), and ACSL4 tended to be lower in the pinolenic acid group (20 % lower, P = 0.082) relative to the control group. In conclusion, pinolenic acid downregulated the lipid anabolic pathway in HepG2 cells by reducing expression of genes related to lipid synthesis, lipoprotein uptake, and the regulation of the lipogenic pathway. PMID:27084371

  19. Dysfunction of the autophagy/lysosomal degradation pathway is a shared feature of the genetic synucleinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Manzoni, Claudia; Lewis, Patrick A.

    2014-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed huge advances in our understanding of the genetics underlying Parkinson’s disease. Identifying commonalities in the biological function of genes linked to Parkinson’s provides an opportunity to elucidate pathways that lead to neuronal degeneration and eventually to disease. We propose that the genetic forms of Parkinson’s disease largely associated with α-synuclein-positive neuropathology (SNCA, LRRK2, and GBA) are brought together by involvement in the autophagy/lysosomal pathway and that this represents a unifying pathway to disease in these cases. PMID:23682122

  20. Nicotine Dehydrogenase Complexed with 6-Hydroxypseudooxynicotine Oxidase Involved in the Hybrid Nicotine-Degrading Pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens S33

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huili; Xie, Kebo; Yu, Wenjun; Hu, Liejie; Huang, Haiyan; Xie, Huijun

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine, a major toxic alkaloid in tobacco wastes, is degraded by bacteria, mainly via pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways. Previously, we discovered a new hybrid of the pyridine and pyrrolidine pathways in Agrobacterium tumefaciens S33 and characterized its key enzyme 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine (HSP) hydroxylase. Here, we purified the nicotine dehydrogenase initializing the nicotine degradation from the strain and found that it forms a complex with a novel 6-hydroxypseudooxynicotine oxidase. The purified complex is composed of three different subunits encoded by ndhAB and pno, where ndhA and ndhB overlap by 4 bp and are ∼26 kb away from pno. As predicted from the gene sequences and from chemical analyses, NdhA (82.4 kDa) and NdhB (17.1 kDa) harbor a molybdopterin cofactor and two [2Fe-2S] clusters, respectively, whereas Pno (73.3 kDa) harbors an flavin mononucleotide and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Mutants with disrupted ndhA or ndhB genes did not grow on nicotine but grew well on 6-hydroxynicotine and HSP, whereas the pno mutant did not grow on nicotine or 6-hydroxynicotine but grew well on HSP, indicating that NdhA and NdhB are responsible for initialization of nicotine oxidation. We successfully expressed pno in Escherichia coli and found that the recombinant Pno presented 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol reduction activity when it was coupled with 6-hydroxynicotine oxidation. The determination of reaction products catalyzed by the purified enzymes or mutants indicated that NdhAB catalyzed nicotine oxidation to 6-hydroxynicotine, whereas Pno oxidized 6-hydroxypseudooxynicotine to 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylsemialdehyde pyridine. These results provide new insights into this novel hybrid pathway of nicotine degradation in A. tumefaciens S33. PMID:26729714

  1. Anaerobic degradation of p-ethylphenol by "Aromatoleum aromaticum" strain EbN1: pathway, regulation, and involved proteins.

    PubMed

    Wöhlbrand, Lars; Wilkes, Heinz; Halder, Thomas; Rabus, Ralf

    2008-08-01

    The denitrifying "Aromatoleum aromaticum" strain EbN1 was demonstrated to utilize p-ethylphenol under anoxic conditions and was suggested to employ a degradation pathway which is reminiscent of known anaerobic ethylbenzene degradation in the same bacterium: initial hydroxylation of p-ethylphenol to 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethanol followed by dehydrogenation to p-hydroxyacetophenone. Possibly, subsequent carboxylation and thiolytic cleavage yield p-hydroxybenzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA), which is channeled into the central benzoyl-Co