Science.gov

Sample records for acid deposition effects

  1. Effects of acid deposition on agricultural production

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Oden, N.L.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Coveney, E.A.; Jacobson, J.S.; Rosenthal, R.E.; Evans, L.S.; Lewin, K.F.; Allen, F.L.

    1985-09-01

    A preliminary assessment, both qualitative and quantitative, was carried out on the effects of acid deposition on agriculture. An inventory was made of US crops exposed to different acid deposition levels in 1982. Most crops (valued at more than $50 billion) were exposed to annual average acid deposition levels greater than pH 4.6, but crops worth more than $220 billion were exposed to even lower pH levels. Published results of experiments on crop response to acid deposition have not identified any single crop as being consistently sensitive, and suggest that present levels of acidic precipitation in the US are not significantly affecting growth and yield of crops. Because relatively few experiments appropriate to a quantitative acid deposition assessment have been conducted, the quantitative section is necessarily based on a restricted data set. Corn, potatoes, and soybeans have been studied in experimental environments which simulate agronomic conditions and which have adequate statistical power for yield estimates; only some varieties of soybeans have demonstrated statistically significant sensitivity to acid deposition.

  2. Acidic Depositions: Effects on Wildlife and Habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1993-01-01

    The phenomenon of 'acid rain' is not new; it was recognized in the mid-1800s in industrialized Europe. In the 1960s a synthesis of information about acidification began in Europe, along with predictions of ecological effects. In the U.S. studies of acidification began in the 1920s. By the late 1970s research efforts in the U.S. and Canada were better coordinated and in 1980 a 10-year research program was undertaken through the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Plan (NAPAP) to determine the causes and consequences of acidic depositions. Much of the bedrock in the northeastern U.S. and Canada contains total alkalinity of 20 kg/ha/yr of wet sulphate depositions and are vulnerable to acidifying processes. Acidic depositions contribute directly to acidifying processes of soil and soil water. Soils must have sufficient acid-neutralizing capacity or acidity of soil will increase. Natural soil-forming processes that lead to acidification can be accelerated by acidic depositions. Long-term effects of acidification are predicted, which will reduce soil productivity mainly through reduced availability of nutrients and mobilization of toxic metals. Severe effects may lead to major alteration of soil chemistry, soil biota, and even loss of vegetation. Several species of earthworms and several other taxa of soil-inhabiting invertebrates, which are important food of many vertebrate wildlife species, are affected by low pH in soil. Loss of canopy in declining sugar maples results in loss of insects fed on by certain neotropical migrant bird species. No definitive studies categorically link atmospheric acidic depositions with direct or indirect effects on wild mammals. Researchers have concentrated on vegetative and aquatic effects. Circumstantial evidence suggests that effects are probable for certain species of aquatic-dependent mammals (water shrew, mink, and otter) and that these species are at risk from the loss of foods or contamination of these foods by metals

  3. Ancillary effects of selected acid deposition control policies

    SciTech Connect

    Moe, R.J.; Lyke, A.J.; Nesse, R.J.

    1986-08-01

    NAPAP is examining a number of potential ways to reduce the precursors (sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) to acid deposition. However, the policies to reduce acid deposition will have other physical, biological and economic effects unrelated to acid deposition. For example, control policies that reduce sulfur dioxide emissions may also increase visibility. The effects of an acid deposition policy that are unrelated to acid deposition are referred to as ''ancillary'' effects. This reserch identifies and characterizes the principle physical and economic ancillary effects associated with acid deposition control and mitigation policies. In this study the ancillary benefits associated with four specific acid deposition policy options were investigated. The four policy options investigated are: (1) flue gas desulfurization, (2) coal blending or switching, (3) reductions in automobile emissions of NO/sub x/, and (4) lake liming. Potential ancillary benefits of each option were identified and characterized. Particular attention was paid to the literature on economic valuation of potential ancillary effects.

  4. Current research on the effects of acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, J.A.

    1984-03-01

    Preliminary research aimed at quantifying relationships between emission and acid deposition and on-the-ground effects indicates that small water supplies fed by surface waters or shallow wells and cistern supplies may be adversely affected by acid deposition. In addition, acid deposition makes water more corrosive, which may result in dangerous quantities of heavy metals in distribution systems. This will not be a problem with relatively hard water or with relatively large supplies, and corrosivity should be treatable at reasonable cost.

  5. Risk assessment and management of agricultural effects of acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Medeiros, W.H.; Oden, N.L.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Conveney, E.A.

    1986-06-01

    Risk assessment models provide logical and consistent frameworks for evaluating effects of acid deposition on agricultural production. Although many crops are grown in areas having high deposition, available experimental evidence does not suggest that yields of studied corps are being affected significantly. Sensitivity of soybeans to simulated acid deposition has been studied by many investigators; experimental data suggests that some varieties respond in a statistically significant way. Application of these dose-response data in regional- and national-level assessments suggests that predicted changes in yield from changing natural acid deposition levels are not of practical significance. Because of limited data, the estimates should be viewed with caution since they are based on many simplifying assumptions.

  6. Effects of acid deposition on portland cement concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, R.P.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1985-05-01

    Presented are the results of a program, sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency, conducted to determine the state-of-the-art knowledge pertaining to the effects of acid deposition on the properties of portland cement concrete structures (PCC). Information was collected from a computerized literature survey, interviews, and replies to mail and telephone inquiries addressed to cement and concrete researchers and to governmental agencies and private firms active in the maintenance and restoration of concrete structures. In general, the study revealed very little qualitative or quantitative information on the effects of acid deposition on PCC structures. The rate of deterioration of reinforced PCC structures in polluted areas, however, appears to be increasing, and available information makes it readily apparent that acids and acid waters significantly affect the durability of concrete, and that SO/sub 2/, NO/sub x/, and HCl accelerate the corrosion of reinforcing steel. On the basis of this evidence, it was recommended that an experimental test program, consisting of both laboratory and field tests, be developed and implemented to quantitatively measure the effects of acid deposition on PCC structures. 51 refs.

  7. Effects of acid deposition on painted wood substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Balik, C.M.; Fornes, R.E.; Gilbert, R.D.; Williams, R.S.

    1989-07-01

    This research program identifies early failure processes associated with acidic deposition on painted-wood-substrate systems. Effects observed during short-term accelerated exposure studies are as follows: FTIR, NMR, and Sol-gel analysis indicate that SO{sub 2} attacks the base terpolymer of latex polymeric coating in the presence of UV radiation. The polymer is stable upon exposure to SO{sub 2} alone, either gaseous or aqueous as sulfurous acid. Sulfurous acid diffuses through both oil-alkyd and latex coatings and can degrade lignin of the wood substrate. Field and laboratory studies indicate that CaCO{sub 3} and ZnO are removed from latex paints during exposures. The removal rate decreases with increasing pH. Discoloration or yellowing of CaCO{sub 3} containing paints on wood substrates was observed after three months field exposure. Based on the findings, it is recommended that research be continued to develop dose-response relationships for the effects of acid deposition on coated-wood-substrate systems.

  8. Distribution and effects of acidic deposition on wildlife and ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stromborg, K.L.; Longcore, J.R.; Kaemar, Peter; Legath, J.

    1987-01-01

    Acidic deposition occurs over most of the United States and the deposition patterns and theoretical vulnerabilities of aquatic ecosystems to chemical changes can be delineated, but few data exist on concomitant biological effects. Hypothetical direct effects are limited primarily to toxicity of various heavy metals mobilized at reduced pH. Results of studies in Scandinavia suggest that aluminum interferes with avian reproduction near acidified lakes. Some amphibian populations located on acid-vulnerable substrates may be adversely affected by reduced pH in the vernal pools used for egg laying and larval growth. Indirect effects on populations are difficult to detect because few historical data exist for wildlife populations and trophic relationships in vulnerable areas. Current research in the U.S.A. focuses on measuring habitat characteristics, food availability, and avian use of vulnerable wetland habitats. Results of Scandinavian studies suggest that some species of waterfowl may prefer acidified, I fish-free habitats because invertebrates essential for meeting nutritional requirements are more easily obtained in the absence of competition from fish. However, avian species dependent on fish would be absent from these habitats. Alteration of either the vegetative structure or primary productivity of wetlands might indirectly affect avian populations by causing decreased invertebrate productivity and consequent food limitations for birds.

  9. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) Interim Assessment: the causes and effects of acidic deposition. Volume 4. Effects of acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume on Effects of Acidic Deposition is the last in a four-volume set which comprises the NAPAP Interim Assessment. It contains five individual chapters covering (6) Agricultural Crops, (7) Forests, (8) Aquatic Systems, (9) Materials, and (10) Human Health and Visibility. Volume III, Atmospheric Processes and Deposition, has two chapters on (4) Atmospheric Processes, and (5) Acidic Deposition and Air Quality. Volume II, Emissions and Controls, contains three chapters on (1) Historical Emissions, (2) Emission Control Technologies, and (3) Future Emissions. Each of these chapters describes the National Program's research orientation and major conclusions within each of the ten primary areas of substantive concern. In order to learn how these first-order conclusions relate to the issue of acidic deposition in an overall, or synoptic, sense, the reader is directed to Volume I, Executive Summary, where the conclusions from each of the ten subject chapters are distilled in a manner that will allow interested parties to quickly reference the status of a variety of factors that pertain to the scientific understanding of acidic deposition.

  10. Acidic deposition: Effects on agricultural crops: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, D.S.; Johnston, J.W. Jr.; Taylor, G.E. Jr.; Luxmoore, R.J.; McConathy, R.K.; McLaughlin, S.B.; Norby, R.J.; Abner, C.H.; Heagle, A.S.; Dubay, D.T.

    1987-04-01

    During the late 1970's there developed an increasing recognition that attempts to understand the impact of acidic precipitation on vegetation would be difficult to interpret without also being able to understand the relationship between acid precipitation and other, potentially interacting stresses. Important among these other stress factors are the mixture of gaseous pollutants to which vegetation is also exposed during the growing season. The research project described in this report was conceived and developed to address the role and importance of the contribution of wet deposition (acid rain) to crop vegetation growth and yield in the context of the ambient gaseous pollutant environment existing in an agricultural field situation.

  11. Effects of Acid Deposition on Materials. Draft of a Research Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Novakov, T.; Dod, R.L.; Kukacka, L.E.; Lipfert, F.W.

    1985-11-01

    This draft of a Research Plan on the Effects of Acid Deposition on Materials identifies and defines research needs and approaches that should result in a more accurate assessment of materials damage due to various forms of deposition of acidic, acidifying, and other atmospheric species.

  12. Acid rain and dry deposition of atmospheric pollutants: ORNL studies the effects

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, D.

    1984-01-01

    Acidic precipitation and atmospheric deposition may be involved in the decline of some forests and in the elevation of aluminum levels in streams. The research programs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory which are focussed on acid rain are described. Some of the areas currently under scrutiny are: soil buffering capacity, the quantitative relationships between wet and dry deposition, the effects of acid rain on forest growth, forest canopy interactions with acid precipitation, the effects of acid rain on aquatic ecosystems, and innovations in pollution control technology.

  13. Effects of acid deposition on terrestrial ecosystems and their rehabilitation strategies in China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zong-wei; Miao, Hong; Zhang, Fu-zhu; Huang, Yi-zong

    2002-04-01

    South China has become the third largest region associated with acid deposition following Europe and North America, the area subject to damage by acid deposition increased from 1.75 million km2 in 1985 to 2.8 million km2 in 1993. Acid deposition has caused serious damage to ecosystem. Combined pollution of acid rain and SO2 showed the obvious multiple effects on crops. Vegetable was more sensitive to acid deposition than foodstuff crops. Annual economic loss of crops due to acid deposition damage in eleven provinces of south China was 4.26 billion RMB Yuan. Acid deposition caused serious damage to forest. Annual economic loss of wood volume was about 1.8 billion RMB Yuan and forest ecological benefit loss 16.2 billion in eleven provinces of south China. Acid deposition in south China was typical "sulfuric acid type". According to the thoughts of sustainable development, some strategies were brought forward as follows: (1) enhancing environmental management, specifying acid-controlling region, controlling and abating the total emission amount of SO2; (2) selecting practical energy technologies of clean coal, for example, cleansing and selecting coal, sulfur-fixed-type industrial briqutting, abating sulfur from waste gas and so on; (3) developing other energy sources to replace coal, including water electricity, atomic energy and the new energy such as solar energy, wind energy and so on; (4) in acid deposition region of south China, selecting acid-resistant type of crop and tree to decrease agricultural losses, planting more green fertilizer crops, using organic fertilizers and liming, in order to improve buffer capacities of soil.

  14. A new look at liming as an approach to accelerate recovery from acidic deposition effects.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gregory B; Burns, Douglas A; Riva-Murray, Karen

    2016-08-15

    Acidic deposition caused by fossil fuel combustion has degraded aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in North America for over four decades. The only management option other than emissions reductions for combating the effects of acidic deposition has been the application of lime to neutralize acidity after it has been deposited on the landscape. For this reason, liming has been a part of acid rain science from the beginning. However, continued declines in acidic deposition have led to partial recovery of surface water chemistry, and the start of soil recovery. Liming is therefore no longer needed to prevent further damage, so the question becomes whether liming would be useful for accelerating recovery of systems where improvement has lagged. As more is learned about recovering ecosystems, it has become clear that recovery rates vary with watershed characteristics and among ecosystem components. Lakes appear to show the strongest recovery, but recovery in streams is sluggish and recovery of soils appears to be in the early stages. The method in which lime is applied is therefore critical in achieving the goal of accelerated recovery. Application of lime to a watershed provides the advantage of increasing Ca availability and reducing or preventing mobilization of toxic Al, an outcome that is beneficial to both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the goal should not be complete neutralization of soil acidity, which is naturally produced. Liming of naturally acidic areas such as wetlands should also be avoided to prevent damage to indigenous species that rely on an acidic environment. PMID:27092419

  15. A new look at liming as an approach to accelerate recovery from acidic deposition effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Burns, Douglas A.; Murray, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Acidic deposition caused by fossil fuel combustion has degraded aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in North America for over four decades. The only management option other than emissions reductions for combating the effects of acidic deposition has been the application of lime to neutralize acidity after it has been deposited on the landscape. For this reason, liming has been a part of acid rain science from the beginning. However, continued declines in acidic deposition have led to partial recovery of surface water chemistry, and the start of soil recovery. Liming is therefore no longer needed to prevent further damage, so the question becomes whether liming would be useful for accelerating recovery of systems where improvement has lagged. As more is learned about recovering ecosystems, it has become clear that recovery rates vary with watershed characteristics and among ecosystem components. Lakes appear to show the strongest recovery, but recovery in streams is sluggish and recovery of soils appears to be in the early stages. The method in which lime is applied is therefore critical in achieving the goal of accelerated recovery. Application of lime to a watershed provides the advantage of increasing Ca availability and reducing or preventing mobilization of toxic Al, an outcome that is beneficial to both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the goal should not be complete neutralization of soil acidity, which is naturally produced. Liming of naturally acidic areas such as wetlands should also be avoided to prevent damage to indigenous species that rely on an acidic environment.

  16. A new look at liming as an approach to accelerate recovery from acidic deposition effects.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gregory B; Burns, Douglas A; Riva-Murray, Karen

    2016-08-15

    Acidic deposition caused by fossil fuel combustion has degraded aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in North America for over four decades. The only management option other than emissions reductions for combating the effects of acidic deposition has been the application of lime to neutralize acidity after it has been deposited on the landscape. For this reason, liming has been a part of acid rain science from the beginning. However, continued declines in acidic deposition have led to partial recovery of surface water chemistry, and the start of soil recovery. Liming is therefore no longer needed to prevent further damage, so the question becomes whether liming would be useful for accelerating recovery of systems where improvement has lagged. As more is learned about recovering ecosystems, it has become clear that recovery rates vary with watershed characteristics and among ecosystem components. Lakes appear to show the strongest recovery, but recovery in streams is sluggish and recovery of soils appears to be in the early stages. The method in which lime is applied is therefore critical in achieving the goal of accelerated recovery. Application of lime to a watershed provides the advantage of increasing Ca availability and reducing or preventing mobilization of toxic Al, an outcome that is beneficial to both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the goal should not be complete neutralization of soil acidity, which is naturally produced. Liming of naturally acidic areas such as wetlands should also be avoided to prevent damage to indigenous species that rely on an acidic environment.

  17. Climate dependency of tree growth suppressed by acid deposition effects on soils in northwest Russia.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gregory B; Lapenis, Andrei G; Berggren, Dan; Aparin, Boris F; Smith, Kevin T; Shortle, Walter C; Bailey, Scott W; Varlyguin, Dmitry L; Babikov, Boris

    2005-04-01

    Increased tree growth in temperate and boreal forests has been proposed as a direct consequence of a warming climate. Acid deposition effects on nutrient availability may influence the climate dependency of tree growth, however. This study presents an analysis of archived soil samples that has enabled changes in soil chemistry to be tracked with patterns of tree growth through the 20th century. Soil samples collected in 1926, 1964, and 2001, near St. Petersburg, Russia, showed that acid deposition was likely to have decreased root-available concentrations of Ca (an essential element) and increased root-available concentrations of Al (an inhibitor of Ca uptake). These soil changes coincided with decreased diameter growth and a suppression of climate-tree growth relationships in Norway spruce. Expected increases in tree growth from climate warming may be limited by decreased soil fertility in regions of northern and eastern Europe, and eastern North America, where Ca availability has been reduced by acidic deposition.

  18. Acidic deposition in the northeastern United States: Sources and inputs, ecosystem effects, and management strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driscoll, C.T.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bulger, A.J.; Butler, T.J.; Cronan, C.S.; Eagar, C.; Lambert, K.F.; Likens, G.E.; Stoddard, J.L.; Weathers, K.C.

    2001-01-01

    North America and Europe are in the midst of a large-scale experiment. Sulfuric and nitric acids have acidified soils, lakes, and streams, thereby stressing or killing terrestrial and aquatic biota. It is therefore critical to measure and to understand the recovery of complex ecosystems in response to decreases in acidic deposition. Fortunately, the NADP, CASTNet, and AIRMoN-dry networks are in place to measure anticipated improvements in air quality and in atmospheric deposition. Unfortunately, networks to measure changes in water quality are sparse, and networks to monitor soil, vegetation, and fish responses are even more limited. There is an acute need to assess the response of these resources to decreases in acid loading. It would be particularly valuable to assess the recovery of aquatic biota - which respond directly to acid stress - to changes in surface water chemistry (Gunn and Mills 1998). We used long-term research from the HBEF and other sites across the northeastern United States to synthesize data on the effects of acidic deposition and to assess ecosystem responses to reductions in emissions. On the basis of existing data, it is clear that in the northeastern United States ??? reductions of SO2 emissions since 1970 have resulted in statistically significant decreases in SO42- in wet and bulk deposition and in surface waters ??? emissions of NOX and concentrations of NO3- in wet and bulk deposition and in surface waters have shown no increase or decrease since the 1980s ??? estimates of NH3 emissions are uncertain, although atmospheric deposition of NH4+ remains important for forest management and stream NO3- loss ??? acidic deposition has accelerated the leaching of base cations from soils, thus delaying the recovery of ANC in lakes and streams from decreased emissions of SO2 (at the HBEF the available soil Ca pool appears to have declined 50% over the past 50 years) ???sulfur and N from atmospheric deposition have accumulated in forest soils across

  19. Effects of acidic deposition and other energy emissions on wildlife: a compendium

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, J.R.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1985-10-01

    Energy emissions, including acidic depositions, pose potential problems for wildlife populations. Historical and recent events show both direct, acute effects and indirect, chronic effects from a variety of airborne pollutants. Information on effects of selected gaseous and particulate energy emissions on domestic animals and livestock and on wildlife is compared. Our understanding of wildlife effects can be improved by the evaluation of veterinary toxicological information and research on the ecological equivalents of domestic and laboratory animals. 42 references.

  20. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) Interim Assessment: the causes and effects of acidic deposition. Volume 2. Emissions and control

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume on Emissions and Controls is the second in a four-volume set which comprises the NAPAP Interim Assessment. It contains three chapters, (1) Historical Emissions, (2) Emission Control Technologies, and (3) Future Emissions. Volume III, Atmospheric Processes and Deposition, contains chapters on (4) Atmospheric Processes, and (5) Acidic Deposition and Air Quality. The last volume, entitled, Effects of Acidic Deposition, covers (6) Agricultural Crops, (7) Forests, (8) Aquatics Systems, (9) 'Materials, and (10) Human Health and Visibility. Each of these chapters describes the National Program's research orientation and major conclusions within each of the ten primary areas of substantive concern. In order to learn how these first-order conclusions relate to the issue of acidic deposition in an overall, or synoptic, sense, the reader is directed to Volume I, Executive Summary, where the conclusions from each of the ten chapters are distilled in a manner that will allow interested parties to quickly reference the status of a variety of factors that pertain to the scientific understanding of acidic deposition.

  1. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) Interim Assessment: the causes and effects of acidic deposition. Volume 3. Atmospheric processes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume on Atmospheric Processes and Deposition is the third in a four volume set which comprises the NAPAP Interim Assessment. It contains two chapters dealing with (4) Atmospheric Processes, and (5) Acidic Deposition and Air Quality. Volume II, Emissions and Controls, contains chapters on (1) Historical Emissions, (2) Emission Control Technologies, and (3) Future Emissions. Volume IV, Effects of Acidic Deposition, contains chapters on (6) Agricultural Crops, (7) Forests, (8) Aquatic Systems, (9) Materials, and (10) Human Health and Visibility. Each of these chapters describes the National Program's research orientation and major conclusions within each of the ten primary areas of substantive concern. In order to learn how these first-order conclusions relate to the issue of acidic deposition in an overall, or synoptic, sense the reader is directed to Volume I, Executive Summary and Major Conclusions, where the conclusions from each of the ten chapters are distilled in a manner that will allow interested parties to quickly reference the status of a variety of factors that pertain to the scientific understanding of acidic deposition.

  2. Descriptive risk assessment of the effects of acidic deposition on Rocky Mountain amphibians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corn, Paul Stephen; Vertucci, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    We evaluated the risk of habitat acidification to the six species of amphibians that occur in the mountains of Colorado and Wyoming. Our evaluation included extrinsic environmental factors (habitat sensitivity and amount of acidic atmospheric deposition) and species-specific intrinsic factors (sensitivity to acid conditions, habitat preferences, and timing of breeding). Only one of 57 surveyed localities had both acid neutralizing capacity μeq/L and sulfate deposition >10 kg/ha/yr, extrinsic conditions with a possible risk of acidification. Amphibian breeding habitats in the Rocky Mountains do not appear to be sufficiently acidic to kill amphibian embryos. Some species breed in high-elevation vernal pools during snowmelt, and an acidic pulse during snowmelt may pose a risk to embryos of these species. However, the acidic pulse, if present, probably occurs before open water appears and before breeding begins. Although inherent variability of amphibian population size may make detection of declines from anthropogenic effects difficult, acidic deposition is unlikely to have caused the observed declines of Bufo boreas and Rana pipiens in Colorado and Wyoming. Amphibians in the Rocky Mountains are not likely to be at risk with acidification inputs at present levels.

  3. SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE METHOD TO MEASURE ACID DEPOSITION EFFECTS ON BUILDING STONE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kingston, Marguerite J.; Ager, Cathy M.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), the U. S. Geological Survey is cooperating with other agencies to test the effects of acid deposition on building stone. A 10-year test-site study has been organized for the purpose of correlating possible stone deterioration with environmental factors. In Summer 1984, slabs of building stone, 3 by 2 by 2 inches, were exposed to the atmosphere at four test sites where the pH of precipitation and other meteorological variables are continuously monitored. This paper examines the development of one experimental technique used in this study - the application of diffuse spectral reflectance methods for laboratory and in situ measurement of those properties of stone which may be affected by acid deposition.

  4. Effects of Folic Acid on Secretases Involved in Aβ Deposition in APP/PS1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Bai, Dong; Li, Wen; Huang, Guo-Wei; Liu, Huan

    2016-09-09

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia. Amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is identified as the core protein of neuritic plaques. Aβ is generated by the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via the APP cleaving enzyme (α-secretase, or β-secretase) and γ-secretase. Previous studies indicated that folate deficiency elevated Aβ deposition in APP/PS1 mice, and this rise was prevented by folic acid. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether folic acid could influence the generation of Aβ by regulating α-, β-, and γ-secretase. Herein, we demonstrated that folic acid reduced the deposition of Aβ42 in APP/PS1 mice brain by decreasing the mRNA and protein expressions of β-secretase [beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1)] and γ-secretase complex catalytic component-presenilin 1 (PS1)-in APP/PS1 mice brain. Meanwhile, folic acid increased the levels of ADAM9 and ADAM10, which are important α-secretases in ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. However, folic acid has no impact on the protein expression of nicastrin (Nct), another component of γ-secretase complex. Moreover, folic acid regulated the expression of miR-126-3p and miR-339-5p, which target ADAM9 and BACE1, respectively. Taken together, the effect of folic acid on Aβ deposition may relate to making APP metabolism through non-amyloidogenic pathway by decreasing β-secretase and increasing α-secretase. MicroRNA (miRNA) may involve in the regulation mechanism of folic acid on secretase expression.

  5. Effects of Folic Acid on Secretases Involved in Aβ Deposition in APP/PS1 Mice.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Bai, Dong; Li, Wen; Huang, Guo-Wei; Liu, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia. Amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is identified as the core protein of neuritic plaques. Aβ is generated by the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via the APP cleaving enzyme (α-secretase, or β-secretase) and γ-secretase. Previous studies indicated that folate deficiency elevated Aβ deposition in APP/PS1 mice, and this rise was prevented by folic acid. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether folic acid could influence the generation of Aβ by regulating α-, β-, and γ-secretase. Herein, we demonstrated that folic acid reduced the deposition of Aβ42 in APP/PS1 mice brain by decreasing the mRNA and protein expressions of β-secretase [beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1)] and γ-secretase complex catalytic component-presenilin 1 (PS1)-in APP/PS1 mice brain. Meanwhile, folic acid increased the levels of ADAM9 and ADAM10, which are important α-secretases in ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. However, folic acid has no impact on the protein expression of nicastrin (Nct), another component of γ-secretase complex. Moreover, folic acid regulated the expression of miR-126-3p and miR-339-5p, which target ADAM9 and BACE1, respectively. Taken together, the effect of folic acid on Aβ deposition may relate to making APP metabolism through non-amyloidogenic pathway by decreasing β-secretase and increasing α-secretase. MicroRNA (miRNA) may involve in the regulation mechanism of folic acid on secretase expression. PMID:27618097

  6. Effects of Folic Acid on Secretases Involved in Aβ Deposition in APP/PS1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Tian; Bai, Dong; Li, Wen; Huang, Guo-Wei; Liu, Huan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia. Amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is identified as the core protein of neuritic plaques. Aβ is generated by the sequential cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via the APP cleaving enzyme (α-secretase, or β-secretase) and γ-secretase. Previous studies indicated that folate deficiency elevated Aβ deposition in APP/PS1 mice, and this rise was prevented by folic acid. In the present study, we aimed to investigate whether folic acid could influence the generation of Aβ by regulating α-, β-, and γ-secretase. Herein, we demonstrated that folic acid reduced the deposition of Aβ42 in APP/PS1 mice brain by decreasing the mRNA and protein expressions of β-secretase [beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1)] and γ-secretase complex catalytic component—presenilin 1 (PS1)—in APP/PS1 mice brain. Meanwhile, folic acid increased the levels of ADAM9 and ADAM10, which are important α-secretases in ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family. However, folic acid has no impact on the protein expression of nicastrin (Nct), another component of γ-secretase complex. Moreover, folic acid regulated the expression of miR-126-3p and miR-339-5p, which target ADAM9 and BACE1, respectively. Taken together, the effect of folic acid on Aβ deposition may relate to making APP metabolism through non-amyloidogenic pathway by decreasing β-secretase and increasing α-secretase. MicroRNA (miRNA) may involve in the regulation mechanism of folic acid on secretase expression. PMID:27618097

  7. Effects of acid deposition on the properties of portland cement concrete: state of knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, R.P.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1985-02-01

    Presented are the results of a program conducted to determine the state-of-the-art knowledge pertaining to the effects of acid deposition on the properties of portland cement concrete structures. Information was collected from a computerized literature survey, interviews, and replies to mail and telephone inquiries addressed to cement and concrete researchers and to governmental agencies and private firms active in the maintenance and restoration of concrete structures.

  8. A Study of Effects of Acid Deposition on Pine Forest Ecosystem in Southwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Li, F.; Lv, Z.; Song, W.; Yang, S.

    2013-12-01

    We used a long-term soil acidification model (LTSAM) and a terrestrial biogeochemical model (CENTURY) coupled to simulate the effects of acid deposition on pine forest ecosystem in southwestern China, based on indoor experiment results of aluminum toxicity to individual plant growth. The results of indoor aluminum experiments show that high aluminum concentration may restrict the plant growth and the acidic condition may aggravate it. The behavior of restriction of plant growth includes decreases of pine seedling biomass, root elongation and the sorption of soil cations (e.g. Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+ and K+). The model simulation results about soil chemistry show that, as acid deposition increases more, the pH value decreases faster, the soil aluminum ion concentration increase more rapidly, and the nutrition ions in soil solution decrease more quickly. The increased acid deposition also has negative impacts on the forest ecosystem according to the biogeochemical model simulation, for example, decreases of vegetation biomass, net primary productivity (NPP) and net CO2 uptake. Furthermore, the decrease of plant biomass will result in the decrease of the soil organic carbon content for the limited decomposition material supply.

  9. The effects of climate change on the nitrogen cycle and acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.; Walton, J.J. ); Graboske, B.C. )

    1990-09-01

    Increases in greenhouse gases are expected to lead to a number of changes to the atmosphere which may impact regional and global chemical cycles. With the increasing awareness of climate change and the possibility of global chemical changes to the atmosphere, it becomes important to ask whether these changes to global climate and chemical cycles might benefit or hinder control programs aimed at reducing acid deposition. In the following, we review several possible changes to climate that may be expected to impact the global cycle of reactive nitrogen. We then use our global model of the reactive nitrogen cycle to estimate the effects of several of the more important changes on the continental-scale deposition of nitric acid. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Studies of acid deposition and its effects in two small catchments in Hunan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Nandong; Seip, Hans Martin; Liao, Bohan; Vogt, Rolf D.

    Acid deposition and its effects were studied by analysing the chemistry in precipitation, stream water, soil water and soils in two catchments in Hunan. One site, Linkesuo (denoted LKS), is on the outskirts of Changsha, the provincial capital of Hunan, the other (Bailutang, denoted BLT) on the outskirts of Chenzhou in southern Hunan. Volume-weighted average pH values and sulphate concentrations in wet deposition were 4.58 (BLT) and 4.90 (LKS) and 174 μmolc L-1 and 152 μmolc L-1, respectively. Wet deposition of sulphate has been estimated as 4.3 gS m-2yr-1 and 3.4 gS m-2yr-1 at BLT and LKS, respectively. Estimates of the corresponding total depositions (dry + wet) are 6.1 gS m-2yr-1 and 5.3 gS m-2yr-1. In precipitation and throughfall, sulphate was the major anion and calcium the major cation. In stream and soil water, nitrate was slightly higher than sulphate on an equivalent basis and magnesium (Mg) not much lower than calcium (Ca). Important soil properties, such as soil pH, soil organic matter (SOM) content, exchangeable acidic cations, exchangeable base cations, effective cation exchange capacity (CECe), base saturation (BS), and aluminium (Al) and iron (Fe) pools, were determined for five forest soil profiles (consisting of four horizons) in each of the two catchments. The soils in BLT are generally more acid, have lower BS and higher Al and Fe pools than the LKS soils. The Al- and Fe-pools were generally higher in the topsoils (i.e. the O and A horizons) than in deeper soils (i.e. E and B horizons) especially at the most acidic site (BLT). There are significant correlations between Fe-pools and the corresponding Al-pools in both catchments except between the amorphous Feox and Alox. Considering the long-term high deposition of sulphate, there is a risk of future ecological damage due to acidification, especially in the BLT catchment, although vegetation damage has yet to be observed in the catchments. This condition appears to be representative of a large

  11. (International conference on acidic deposition)

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B. Jr.

    1990-10-05

    The traveler took the opportunity to participate in a mini-sabbatical at the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (ITE) in Edinburgh, Scotland, as a part of planned travel to Glasgow, Scotland, to attend the International Conference on Acidic Precipitation. The purpose of the sabbatical was to provide quality time for study and interchange of ideas with scientists at ITE working on physiological effects of acidic deposition and to allocate significant time for writing and synthesizing of results of physiological studies from the National Forest Response Program's Spruce/Fir Research Cooperative. The study focused on the very significant cytological and physiological effects of calcium deficiency in trees, a response that appears to be amplified in spruce by acidic deposition.

  12. Climate dependency of tree growth suppressed by acid deposition effects on soils in Northwest Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Lapenis, A.G.; Berggren, D.; Aparin, B.F.; Smith, K.T.; Shortle, W.C.; Bailey, S.W.; Varlyguin, D.L.; Babikov, B.

    2005-01-01

    Increased tree growth in temperate and boreal forests has been proposed as a direct consequence of a warming climate. Acid deposition effects on nutrient availability may influence the climate dependency of tree growth, however. This study presents an analysis of archived soil samples that has enabled changes in soil chemistry to be tracked with patterns of tree growth through the 20th century. Soil samples collected in 1926, 1964, and 2001, near St. Petersburg, Russia, showed that acid deposition was likely to have decreased root-available concentrations of Ca (an essential element) and increased root-available concentrations of Al (an inhibitor of Ca uptake). These soil changes coincided with decreased diameter growth and a suppression of climate-tree growth relationships in Norway spruce. Expected increases in tree growth from climate warming may be limited by decreased soil fertility in regions of northern and eastern Europe, and eastern North America, where Ca availability has been reduced by acidic deposition. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  13. Acidity, nutrients, and minerals in atmospheric precipitation over Florida: deposition patterns, mechanisms and ecological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Brezonik, P.L.; Hendry, C.D. Jr.; Edgerton, E.S.; Schulze, R.L.; Crisman, T.L.

    1983-06-01

    A monitoring network of 21 bulk and 4 wet/dry collectors located throughout Florida measured spatial and temporal trends during a one-year period from May 1978 to April 1979. The project summary notes that statewide deposition rates of nitrogen and phosphorus were below the loading rates associated with eutrophication, although nutrient concentrations were higher during the summer. Overall, pH appears to have relatively small effects (in the range 4.7-6.8) on community structure in soft-water Florida lakes. More dramatic effects could occur under more acidic conditions in the future. 4 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  14. Effect of a Specialized Amino Acid Mixture on Human Collagen Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jeremy Z.; Abumrad, Naji; Barbul, Adrian

    2002-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of arginine, β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (HMB), and glutamine supplementation on wound collagen accumulation in a double-blind, randomized study. Summary Background Data Control of wound collagen synthesis has been an elusive goal for clinicians and scientists alike. In many clinical instances, it is desired to increase collagen deposition as a means of enhancing wound strength and integrity. Arginine, a semiessential amino acid, has been shown to increase wound collagen accumulation in rodents and humans. HMB, a metabolite of leucine, regulates muscle proteolysis in animals and humans and increases collagen deposition in rodents. Methods Thirty-five healthy, nonsmoking human volunteers 70 years or older were enrolled and underwent subcutaneous implantation of two small, sterile polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes into the deltoid region under strict aseptic techniques. The tubes were 1 mm in diameter and 6 cm in length with pore size of 90 to 120 μm to allow optimal ingrowth of fibroblasts and the deposition of matrix. Eighteen volunteers (mean age 75.4 years; 2 men, 16 women) were randomized to receive daily supplementation of 14 g arginine, 3 g HMB, and 14 g glutamine (total nitrogen 3.59 g) in two divided doses. The control group (n = 17; mean age 75.3 years; 6 men, 11 women) received an isonitrogenous, isocaloric supplementation of nonessential amino acids. Catheters were removed at 7 and 14 days postimplantation and analyzed for hydroxyproline (OHP, nmol/cm catheter, an index of collagen accumulation) and α-amino nitrogen (α-AN, mmol/cm, an index of total protein deposition). Results Supplements were well tolerated, without any reported side effects. Supplementation with the specialized amino acid mixture led to a significant rise in plasma arginine and ornithine levels. The specialized amino acid supplement led to a significant increase in collagen deposition (as reflected by OHP content) in the PTFE tubes without an

  15. Effects of temporal variations in the acidity of rain on crop response to acidic deposition (Task Force Project)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.E.; Irving, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    The variation of rainfall pH from one event to another may have important biological consequences in several respects. A few rainfall events, or even only one, at low pH values may be more damaging than the same total hydrogen ion deposition spread out over a larger number of events with higher pH values. The variation of rainfall pH within events may also affect biological response. For example, during the early stages of an event, acid precipitation may be less effective in damaging vegetation since the water falling on the plant surfaces is continually being washed off by the subsequent rain. On the other hand, that rainwater which falls during the very last stages of an event remains on the vegetation until it evaporates. Since the concentration of contaminants remaining in solution on the leaves in these circumstances steadily increasing during evaporation, this particular rain may have a significantly greater effect. Of course, there is also a third hypothesis to the effect that it is primarily the total hydrogen ion deposition received by plant surfaces over a long period of time (conceivably, over an entire growing season) which is the most important parameter due to the cumulative stress imposed on the plant tissue over the entire period of exposure. The proposed experiments will determine which of these hypotheses best represents the response of a particular, economically-important crop species to the impact of more realistically programmed, acid rain simulant treatments. Design of the experiments is discussed.

  16. Effects of acidic deposition on forest and aquatic ecosystems in New York State.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Charles T; Driscoll, Kimberley M; Mitchell, Myron J; Raynal, Dudley J

    2003-01-01

    Acidic deposition is comprised of sulfuric and nitric acids and ammonium derived from atmospheric emissions of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and ammonia, respectively. Acidic deposition has altered soil through depletion of labile pools of nutrient cations (i.e. calcium, magnesium), accumulation of sulfur and nitrogen, and the mobilization of elevated concentrations of inorganic monomeric aluminum to soil solutions in acid-sensitive areas. Acidic deposition leaches essential calcium from needles of red spruce, making this species more susceptible to freezing injury. Mortality among sugar maples appears to result from deficiencies of nutrient cations, coupled with other stresses such as insect defoliation or drought. Acidic deposition has impaired surface water quality in the Adirondack and Catskill regions of New York by lowering pH levels, decreasing acid-neutralizing capacity, and increasing aluminum concentrations. Acidification has reduced the diversity and abundance of aquatic species in lakes and streams. There are also linkages between acidic deposition and fish mercury contamination and eutrophication of estuaries.

  17. Effects of acid deposition on paints and metals: Results of a controlled field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edney, E. O.; Cheek, S. F.; Stiles, D. C.; Corse, E. W.; Wheeler, M. L.; Spence, J. W.; Haynie, F. H.; Wilson, W. E.

    A controlled field study was conducted in Research Triangle Park, NC to determine the impact of acid deposition on paints and metals. A computer-controlled system was designed so that test panels of galvanized steel, five exterior paints and Teflon could be exposed under the following conditions: (1) dry deposition only; (2) dry plus ambient wet deposition; and (3) dry deposition plus deionized water. A 78-day, 11-rain-event exposure experiment was conducted in which ambient and DI run-off samples were collected from each material on a rain-event basis and chemically analyzed. The run-off results show that the dry and wet deposition of acidic species accelerates the dissolution rates of galvanized-steel corrosion products and alkaline compounds in exterior paints. CaCO 3 and ZnO in latex paints and Al in aluminum flake paint react with acids either directly deposited or produced in thin films of moisture covering the surfaces. The results indicate that the uptake of SO 2 into moisture is strongly influenced by the reactivity of the material towards H +. Galvanized steel was found to have the highest SO 2 deposition velocity, whereas an oil-based paint, containing no known alkaline compounds, had the smallest value. Run-off results also suggest that Zn corrosion products were dissolved in ambient precipitation by acids produced by dissolved CO 2.

  18. Acidic Deposition along the Appalachian Trail Corridor and its Effects on Acid-Sensitive Terrestrial and Aquatic Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, G. B.; Sullivan, T. J.; Burns, D. A.; Bailey, S. W.; Cosby, B. J., Jr.; Dovciak, M.; Ewing, H. A.; McDonnell, T. C.; Riemann, R.; Quant, J.; Rice, K. C.; Siemion, J.; Weathers, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Appalachian National Scenic Trail (AT) spans 3,500 km from Georgia to Maine. Over its length, the trail passes through a corridor with wide variations in climate, bedrock type, soils, and stream water quality. These factors create a diverse range of ecosystems. The health of these ecosystems is a cause for concern because the AT passes through the heavily populated eastern U.S. with its many sources of sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) emissions that produce acidic deposition. To address concerns about the health of the AT, a study was designed to evaluate the condition and sensitivity of the AT corridor with respect to acidic deposition. Collections of stream water (265 sites), soil (60 sites), tree cores (15 sites) and atmospheric deposition samples (4 sites) were made along with understory and overstory vegetation measurements (30 sites) over the full trail length within a 40 km-wide corridor. Existing data on atmospheric deposition, geology, vegetation, stream chemistry, and soil chemistry were also used in the analysis. Mean acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) was lowest in the streams in the North section, intermediate in the Central section and highest the South section, despite the South having the highest acid rain levels. At least 40% of the study streams exhibited pH and/or Ali measurements that indicated potential harm to biota. Approximately 70% of the soil sites had values of base saturation under 20%, the threshold below which acidic deposition can mobilize inorganic aluminum (Ali), the form harmful to terrestrial and aquatic life. Compositional similarity of understory and canopy species was positively correlated with acidic deposition, suggesting that during past decades, species poorly adapted to acidic deposition were replaced with tolerant species. Target loads modeling indicated that exceedance of sulfur target loads to achieve stream ANC = 50 μeq/L by the year 2100occurred throughout the trail corridor.

  19. Acid deposition: a national problem

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrey, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    The deposition of excessive quantities of sulfur and nitrogen from the atmosphere constitutes a problem encompassing all of the United States east of the Mississippi River. It also occurs in some areas of the western US. Calculations based on emission inventories and simplifying assumptions indicate electric utilities account for 66% of SO/sub 2/ emissions, 29% of NO/sub x/ emissions and about half of precipitation acidity. Acidification of clearwater lakes and streams is a widespread problem only in areas receiving rain with an average acidity less than or equal to 4.7. The dominant anion in such waters is SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and concentrations of aluminum derived from watershed acidification may exceed 200 ..mu..g 1/sup -1/. Changes in assemblages of aquatic biota become increasingly apparent as pH decreases below 6.0, and elimination of fish from some waters has been documented. The sensitivity of surface waters is controlled by and represents an integration of biogeochemical processes in their edaphic settings. Changes in surface water chemistry imply changes in the terrestrial environment. Direct evidence of changes in terrestrial environments is sparse. Nevertheless, observations of forest dieback in the US and abroad suggest that acid deposition may contribute to the problem. Very few credible studies are available which allow an evaluation of acid precipitation effects on crops.

  20. Acid deposition in east Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Phadnis, M.J.; Carmichael, G.R.; Ichikawa, Y.

    1996-12-31

    A comparison between transport models was done to study the acid deposition in east Asia. The two models in question were different in the way the treated the pollutant species and the way simulation was carried out. A single-layer, trajectory model with simple (developed by the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Japan) was compared with a multi-layered, eulerian type model (Sulfur Transport Eulerian Model - II [STEM-II]) treating the chemical processes in detail. The acidic species used in the simulation were sulfur dioxide and sulfate. The comparison was done for two episodes: each a month long in winter (February) and summer (August) of 1989. The predicted results from STEM-II were compared with the predicted results from the CRIEPI model as well as the observed data at twenty-one stations in Japan. The predicted values from STEM-II were similar to the ones from the CRIEPI results and the observed values in regards to the transport features. The average monthly values of SO{sub 2} in air, sulfate in air and sulfate in precipitation were in good agreement. Sensitivity studies were carried out under different scenarios of emissions, dry depositions velocities and mixing heights. The predicted values in these sensitivity studies showed a strong dependence on the mixing heights. The predicted wet deposition of sulfur for the two months is 0.7 gS/m2.mon, while the observed deposition is around 1.1 gS/m2.mon. It was also observed that the wet deposition on the Japan sea side of the islands is more than those on the Pacific side and the Okhotsk sea, mainly because of the continental outflow of pollutant air masses from mainland China and Korea. The effects of emissions from Russia and volcanoes were also evaluated.

  1. Acid deposition in Maryland: Implications of the results of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuro, J.; Bowmann, M.; Ross, J.; Blundell, C.; Price, R.

    1991-07-01

    Acid deposition, commonly referred to as 'acid rain,' is a major global environmental concern. Acid deposition has reportedly resulted in damage to aquatic, terrestrial, and physical resources and has potentially adverse effects on human health. A component of the Maryland acid deposition program is the preparation of an annual report that summarizes yearly activities and costs of ongoing acid deposition research and monitoring programs.

  2. Florida acid deposition study - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, C.D.; Hendrickson, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    Comprehensive literature searches were performed in the areas of source attribution and long-range transport and ecological and material effects. The literature searches were designed to determine the impacts of acid deposition that are specific to Florida. In January 1982 the results of Phase I programs were issued. These reports were: (1) Monitoring Program Phase I Summary Report; (2) Source Attribution Phase I Summary Report; and (3) A Literature Review of the Ecological and Materials Effects of Acid Deposition.

  3. Biomimetic formation of titania thin films: effect of amino acids on the deposition process.

    PubMed

    Durupthy, Olivier; Jeurgens, Lars P H; Bill, Joachim

    2011-05-01

    Different types of amino acids have been used as additives to control the aqueous deposition of titanium dioxide thin films on single-crystal Si wafers. Thin titania films can be obtained through a chemical bath deposition (CBD) process using TiCl₄ as a precursor in an aqueous solution at temperatures below 100 °C. The addition of amino acids to the deposition solution was shown to reduce the thickness and roughness of the films and to increase their density. These protein building blocks were employed to modify the deposition rate as well as the size of aggregates that form the film. The thickness, crystallinity, morphology and composition of the grown films were characterized by a variety of techniques, including XRD, XPS, AFM and SEM. The consequences of the type of the amino acid additive (and its concentration in the solution) on the microstructural evolutions of the deposed films are thus revealed and discussed on the basis of the organic-inorganic interactions in solution and at the film surface. PMID:21480641

  4. Use of stream chemistry for monitoring acidic deposition effects in the Adirondack region of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Momen, B.; Roy, K.M.

    2004-01-01

    Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) and pH were measured weekly from October 1991 through September 2001 in three streams in the western Adirondack Mountain region of New York to identify trends in stream chemistry that might be related to changes in acidic deposition. A decreasing trend in atmospheric deposition of SO42- was observed within the region over the 10-yr period, although most of the decrease occurred between 1991 and 1995. Both ANC and pH were inversely related to flow in all streams; therefore, a trend analysis was conducted on (i) the measured values of ANC and pH and (ii) the residuals of the concentration-discharge relations. In Buck Creek, ANC increased significantly (p 0.10). In Bald Mountain Brook, ANC and residuals of ANC increased significantly (p < 0.01), although the trend was diatonic-a distinct decrease from 1991 to 1996 was followed by a distinct increase from 1996 to 2001. In Fly Pond outlet, ANC and residuals of ANC increased over the study period (p < 0.01), although the trend of the residuals resulted largely from an abrupt increase in 1997. In general, the trends observed in the three streams are similar to results presented for Adirondack lakes in a previous study, and are consistent with the declining trend in atmospheric deposition for this region, although the observed trends in ANC and pH in streams could not be directly attributed to the trends in acidic deposition.

  5. (Acidic deposition and the environment)

    SciTech Connect

    Garten, C.T.; Lindberg, S.E.; Van Miegroet, H.

    1990-10-24

    The travelers presented several papers at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition. These covered the following topics: atmospheric chemistry and deposition of airborne nitrogen compounds, soil solution chemistry in high-elevation spruce forests, and forest throughfall measurements for estimating total sulfur deposition to ecosystems. In addition, S. E. Lindberg was invited to organize and chair a conference session on Throughfall and Stemflow Experiments, and to present an invited lecture on Atmospheric Deposition and Canopy Interactions of Metals and Nitrogen in Forest Ecosystems: The Influence of Global Change'' at the 110th Anniversary Celebration of the Free University of Amsterdam.

  6. Effects of acid deposition on calcium nutrition and health of Southern Appalachian spruce fir forests

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Wullschleger, S.; Stone, A.; Wimmer, R.; Joslin, J.D.

    1995-02-01

    The role of acid deposition in the health of spruce fir forests in the Southern Appalachian Mountains has been investigated by a wide variety of experimental approaches during the past 10 years. These studies have proceeded from initial dendroecological documentation of altered growth patterns of mature trees to increasingly more focused ecophysiological research on the causes and characteristics of changes in system function associated with increased acidic deposition. Field studies across gradients in deposition and soil chemistry have been located on four mountains spanning 85 km of latitude within the Southern Appalachians. The conclusion that calcium nutrition is an important component regulating health of red spruce in the Southern Appalachians and that acid deposition significantly reduces calcium availability in several ways has emerged as a consistent result from multiple lines or research. These have included analysis of trends in wood chemistry, soil solution chemistry, foliar nutrition, gas exchange physiology, root histochemistry, and controlled laboratory and field studies in which acid deposition and/or calcium nutrition has been manipulated and growth and nutritional status of saplings or mature red spruce trees measured. This earlier research has led us to investigate the broader implications and consequences of calcium deficiency for changing resistance of spruce-fir forests to natural stresses. Current research is exploring possible relationships between altered calcium nutrition and shifts in response of Fraser fir to insect attack by the balsam wooly adelgid. In addition, changes in wood ultrastructural properties in relation to altered wood chemistry is being examined to evaluate its possible role in canopy deterioration, under wind and ice stresses typical of high elevation forests.

  7. Effect of acid deposition on quantity and quality of dissolved organic matter in soil-water.

    PubMed

    Ekström, Sara M; Kritzberg, Emma S; Kleja, Dan B; Larsson, Niklas; Nilsson, P Anders; Graneli, Wilhelm; Bergkvist, Bo

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how acid deposition may affect the concentration and quality of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in soil-water. This was done by a small-scale acidification experiment during two years where 0.5 × 0.5 m(2) plots were artificially irrigated with water with different sulfuric acid content, and soil-water was sampled using zero-tension lysimeters under the O-horizon. The DOM was characterized using absorbance, fluorescence, and size exclusion chromatography analyses. Our results showed lower mobility of DOM in the high acid treatment. At the same time, there was a significant change in the DOM quality. Soil-water in the high acid treatment exhibited DOM that was less colored, less hydrophobic, less aromatic, and of lower molecular weight, compared to the low acid treatment. This supports the hypothesis that reduction in sulfur deposition is an important driver behind the ongoing brownification of surface waters in many regions.

  8. The effects of acid deposition on sulfate reduction and methane production in peatlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Georgia L.; Hines, Mark E.; Bayley, Suzanne E.

    1992-01-01

    Peatlands, as fens and bods, make up a large percentage of northern latitude terrestrial environments. They are organic rich and support an active community of anaerobic bacteria, such as methanogenic and sulfate-reducing bacteria. The end products of these microbial activities, methane and hydrogen sulfide, are important components in the global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and sulfur. Since these two bacterial groups compete for nutritional substrates, increases in sulfate deposition due to acid rain potentially can disrupt the balance between these processes leading to a decrease in methane production and emission. This is significant because methane is a potent greenhouse gas that effects the global heat balance. A section of Mire 239 in the Experimental Lakes Area, in Northwestern Ontario, was artificially acidified and rates of sulfate reduction and methane production were measured with depth. Preliminary results suggested that methane production was not affected immediately after acidification. However, concentrations of dissolved methane decreased and dissolved sulfide increased greatly after acidification and both took several days to recover. The exact mechanism for the decrease in methane was not determined. Analyses are under way which will be used to determine rates of sulfate reduction. These results will be available by Spring and will be discussed.

  9. Effects of acidic deposition and soil acidification on sugar maple trees in the Adirondack Mountains, New York.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T J; Lawrence, G B; Bailey, S W; McDonnell, T C; Beier, C M; Weathers, K C; McPherson, G T; Bishop, D A

    2013-11-19

    We documented the effects of acidic atmospheric deposition and soil acidification on the canopy health, basal area increment, and regeneration of sugar maple (SM) trees across the Adirondack region of New York State, in the northeastern United States, where SM are plentiful but not well studied and where widespread depletion of soil calcium (Ca) has been documented. Sugar maple is a dominant canopy species in the Adirondack Mountain ecoregion, and it has a high demand for Ca. Trees in this region growing on soils with poor acid-base chemistry (low exchangeable Ca and % base saturation [BS]) that receive relatively high levels of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition exhibited a near absence of SM seedling regeneration and lower crown vigor compared with study plots with relatively high exchangeable Ca and BS and lower levels of acidic deposition. Basal area increment averaged over the 20th century was correlated (p < 0.1) with acid-base chemistry of the Oa, A, and upper B soil horizons. A lack of Adirondack SM regeneration, reduced canopy condition, and possibly decreased basal area growth over recent decades are associated with low concentrations of nutrient base cations in this region that has undergone soil Ca depletion from acidic deposition.

  10. Effects of acidic deposition and soil acidification on sugar maple trees in the Adirondack Mountains, New York.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T J; Lawrence, G B; Bailey, S W; McDonnell, T C; Beier, C M; Weathers, K C; McPherson, G T; Bishop, D A

    2013-11-19

    We documented the effects of acidic atmospheric deposition and soil acidification on the canopy health, basal area increment, and regeneration of sugar maple (SM) trees across the Adirondack region of New York State, in the northeastern United States, where SM are plentiful but not well studied and where widespread depletion of soil calcium (Ca) has been documented. Sugar maple is a dominant canopy species in the Adirondack Mountain ecoregion, and it has a high demand for Ca. Trees in this region growing on soils with poor acid-base chemistry (low exchangeable Ca and % base saturation [BS]) that receive relatively high levels of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition exhibited a near absence of SM seedling regeneration and lower crown vigor compared with study plots with relatively high exchangeable Ca and BS and lower levels of acidic deposition. Basal area increment averaged over the 20th century was correlated (p < 0.1) with acid-base chemistry of the Oa, A, and upper B soil horizons. A lack of Adirondack SM regeneration, reduced canopy condition, and possibly decreased basal area growth over recent decades are associated with low concentrations of nutrient base cations in this region that has undergone soil Ca depletion from acidic deposition. PMID:24102084

  11. Use of stream chemistry for monitoring acidic deposition effects in the Adirondack region of New York.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gregory B; Momen, Bahram; Roy, Karen M

    2004-01-01

    Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) and pH were measured weekly from October 1991 through September 2001 in three streams in the western Adirondack Mountain region of New York to identify trends in stream chemistry that might be related to changes in acidic deposition. A decreasing trend in atmospheric deposition of SO4/2- was observed within the region over the 10-yr period, although most of the decrease occurred between 1991 and 1995. Both ANC and pH were inversely related to flow in all streams; therefore, a trend analysis was conducted on (i) the measured values of ANC and pH and (ii) the residuals of the concentration-discharge relations. In Buck Creek, ANC increased significantly (p < 0.05) over the 10 yr, but the residuals of ANC showed no trend (p > 0.10). In Bald Mountain Brook, ANC and residuals of ANC increased significantly (p < 0.01), although the trend was diatonic-a distinct decrease from 1991 to 1996 was followed by a distinct increase from 1996 to 2001. In Fly Pond outlet, ANC and residuals of ANC increased over the study period (p < 0.01), although the trend of the residuals resulted largely from an abrupt increase in 1997. In general, the trends observed in the three streams are similar to results presented for Adirondack lakes in a previous study, and are consistent with the declining trend in atmospheric deposition for this region, although the observed trends in ANC and pH in streams could not be directly attributed to the trends in acidic deposition.

  12. Use of stream chemistry for monitoring acidic deposition effects in the Adirondack region of New York.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gregory B; Momen, Bahram; Roy, Karen M

    2004-01-01

    Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) and pH were measured weekly from October 1991 through September 2001 in three streams in the western Adirondack Mountain region of New York to identify trends in stream chemistry that might be related to changes in acidic deposition. A decreasing trend in atmospheric deposition of SO4/2- was observed within the region over the 10-yr period, although most of the decrease occurred between 1991 and 1995. Both ANC and pH were inversely related to flow in all streams; therefore, a trend analysis was conducted on (i) the measured values of ANC and pH and (ii) the residuals of the concentration-discharge relations. In Buck Creek, ANC increased significantly (p < 0.05) over the 10 yr, but the residuals of ANC showed no trend (p > 0.10). In Bald Mountain Brook, ANC and residuals of ANC increased significantly (p < 0.01), although the trend was diatonic-a distinct decrease from 1991 to 1996 was followed by a distinct increase from 1996 to 2001. In Fly Pond outlet, ANC and residuals of ANC increased over the study period (p < 0.01), although the trend of the residuals resulted largely from an abrupt increase in 1997. In general, the trends observed in the three streams are similar to results presented for Adirondack lakes in a previous study, and are consistent with the declining trend in atmospheric deposition for this region, although the observed trends in ANC and pH in streams could not be directly attributed to the trends in acidic deposition. PMID:15224937

  13. The allelopathic effects of invasive plant Solidago canadensis on seed germination and growth of Lactuca sativa enhanced by different types of acid deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congyan; Xiao, Hongguang; Zhao, Lulu; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Fei; Shi, Yanchun; Du, Daolin

    2016-04-01

    Invasive species can exhibit allelopathic effects on native species. Meanwhile, the types of acid deposition are gradually changing. Thus, the allelopathic effects of invasive species on seed germination and growth of native species may be altered or even enhanced under conditions with diversified acid deposition. This study aims to assess the allelopathic effects (using leaves extracts) of invasive plant Solidago canadensis on seed germination and growth of native species Lactuca sativa treated with five types of acid deposition with different SO4(2-) to NO3(-) ratios (1:0, sulfuric acid; 5:1, sulfuric-rich acid; 1:1, mixed acid; 1:5, nitric-rich acid; 0:1, nitric acid). Solidago canadensis leaf extracts exhibited significantly allelopathic effects on germination index, vigor index, and germination rate index of L. sativa. High concentration of S. canadensis leaf extracts also similarly exhibited significantly allelopathic effects on root length of L. sativa. This may be due to that S. canadensis could release allelochemicals and then trigger allelopathic effects on seed germination and growth of L. sativa. Acid deposition exhibited significantly negative effects on seedling biomass, root length, seedling height, germination index, vigor index, and germination rate index of L. sativa. This may be ascribed to the decreased soil pH values mediated by acid deposition which could produce toxic effects on seedling growth. Sulfuric acid deposition triggered more toxic effects on seedling biomass and vigor index of L. sativa than nitric acid deposition. This may be attributing to the difference in exchange capacity with hydroxyl groups (OH(-)) between SO4(2-) and NO3(-) as well as the fertilizing effects mediated by nitric deposition. All types of acid deposition significantly enhanced the allelopathic effects of S. canadensis on root length, germination index, vigor index, and germination rate index of L. sativa. This may be due to the negatively synergistic effects of

  14. The allelopathic effects of invasive plant Solidago canadensis on seed germination and growth of Lactuca sativa enhanced by different types of acid deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Congyan; Xiao, Hongguang; Zhao, Lulu; Liu, Jun; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Fei; Shi, Yanchun; Du, Daolin

    2016-04-01

    Invasive species can exhibit allelopathic effects on native species. Meanwhile, the types of acid deposition are gradually changing. Thus, the allelopathic effects of invasive species on seed germination and growth of native species may be altered or even enhanced under conditions with diversified acid deposition. This study aims to assess the allelopathic effects (using leaves extracts) of invasive plant Solidago canadensis on seed germination and growth of native species Lactuca sativa treated with five types of acid deposition with different SO4(2-) to NO3(-) ratios (1:0, sulfuric acid; 5:1, sulfuric-rich acid; 1:1, mixed acid; 1:5, nitric-rich acid; 0:1, nitric acid). Solidago canadensis leaf extracts exhibited significantly allelopathic effects on germination index, vigor index, and germination rate index of L. sativa. High concentration of S. canadensis leaf extracts also similarly exhibited significantly allelopathic effects on root length of L. sativa. This may be due to that S. canadensis could release allelochemicals and then trigger allelopathic effects on seed germination and growth of L. sativa. Acid deposition exhibited significantly negative effects on seedling biomass, root length, seedling height, germination index, vigor index, and germination rate index of L. sativa. This may be ascribed to the decreased soil pH values mediated by acid deposition which could produce toxic effects on seedling growth. Sulfuric acid deposition triggered more toxic effects on seedling biomass and vigor index of L. sativa than nitric acid deposition. This may be attributing to the difference in exchange capacity with hydroxyl groups (OH(-)) between SO4(2-) and NO3(-) as well as the fertilizing effects mediated by nitric deposition. All types of acid deposition significantly enhanced the allelopathic effects of S. canadensis on root length, germination index, vigor index, and germination rate index of L. sativa. This may be due to the negatively synergistic effects of

  15. Effects of acidic deposition and soil acidification on sugar maple trees in the Adirondack Mountains, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Timothy J.; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Bailey, Scott W.; McDonnell, Todd C.; Beier, Colin M.; Weathers, K.C.; McPherson, G.T.; Bishop, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    We documented the effects of acidic atmospheric deposition and soil acidification on the canopy health, basal area increment, and regeneration of sugar maple (SM) trees across the Adirondack region of New York State, in the northeastern United States, where SM are plentiful but not well studied and where widespread depletion of soil calcium (Ca) has been documented. Sugar maple is a dominant canopy species in the Adirondack Mountain ecoregion, and it has a high demand for Ca. Trees in this region growing on soils with poor acid–base chemistry (low exchangeable Ca and % base saturation [BS]) that receive relatively high levels of atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition exhibited a near absence of SM seedling regeneration and lower crown vigor compared with study plots with relatively high exchangeable Ca and BS and lower levels of acidic deposition. Basal area increment averaged over the 20th century was correlated (p < 0.1) with acid–base chemistry of the Oa, A, and upper B soil horizons. A lack of Adirondack SM regeneration, reduced canopy condition, and possibly decreased basal area growth over recent decades are associated with low concentrations of nutrient base cations in this region that has undergone soil Ca depletion from acidic deposition.

  16. Use of Soil-Streamwater Relationships to Assess Regional Patterns of Recovery from Acidic Deposition Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemion, J.; Lawrence, G. B.; Murdoch, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Declines of acidic deposition levels by as much as 50% since 1990 have led to partial recovery of surface waters in the Northeastern United States, but continued depletion of soil calcium through this same period suggests a disconnection between soil and surface water chemistry. To investigate the role of soil-surface water interactions in recovery from acidification, the first regional survey to directly relate soil chemistry to stream chemistry during high flow was implemented in the Catskill region of New York, where acidic deposition levels are among the highest in the East. More than 40% of streams sampled in the southwestern Catskill Mountains were determined to be acidified with inorganic monomeric aluminum concentrations that exceeded a threshold that is toxic to aquatic biota and more than 80% likely to exceed this threshold during the highest flows, but less than 10% were acidified in the northwestern portion of the region. Median Oa horizon soil base saturation ranged from 50-80% across the region, but median base saturation in the upper 10cm of the B horizon was less than 20% across the region and was only 2% in the southwestern area. Therefore, aluminum is likely to be interfering with calcium uptake in the mineral horizon by trees in half the watersheds where soils were collected. These results indicate stream chemistry over the Catskill region does not reflect the calcuim depletion of the B horizon that our sampling suggests is ubiquitous throughout the region.

  17. Effects of acidic deposition on the erosion of carbonate stone - experimental results from the U.S. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, P.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Reimann, K.J.; Sciammarella, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    One of the goals of NAPAP-sponsored research on the effects of acidic deposition on carbonate stone has been to quantify the incremental effects of wet and dry deposition of hydrogen ion, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides on stone erosion. Test briquettes and slabs of freshly quarried Indiana limestone and Vermont marble have been exposed to ambient environmental conditions in a long-term exposure program. Physical measurements of the recession of test stones exposed to ambient conditions at an angle of 30?? to horizontal at the five NAPAP materials exposure sites range from ~15 to ~30?? ??m yr-1 for marble, and from ~25 to ~45 ??m yr -1 for limestone, and are approximately double the recession estimates based on the observed calcium content of run-off solutions from test slabs. The difference between the physical and chemical recession measurements is attributed to the loss of mineral grains from the stone surfaces that are not measured in the run-off experiments. The erosion due to grain loss does not appear to be influenced by rainfall acidity, however, preliminary evidence suggests that grain loss may be influenced by dry deposition of sulfur dioxide between rainfall events. Chemical analyses of the run-off solutions and associated rainfall blanks suggest that ~30% of erosion by dissolution can be attributed to the wet deposition of hydrogen ion and the dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid between rain events. The remaining ~70% of erosion by dissolution is accounted for by the solubility of carbonate stone in rain that is in equilibrium with atmospheric carbon dioxide ('clean rain'). These results are for marble and limestone slabs exposed at an angle of 30?? from horizontal. The relative contribution of sulfur dioxide to chemical erosion is significantly enhanced for stone slabs having an inclination of 60?? or 85??. The dry deposition of alkaline particulate material has a mitigating effect at the two urban field exposure sites at Washington, DC

  18. Genetic parameters and crossbreeding effects of fat deposition and fatty acid profiles in Iberian pig lines.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Escriche, N; Magallón, E; Gonzalez, E; Tejeda, J F; Noguera, J L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the genetic and environmental parameters and crossbreeding effects on fatty acid and fat traits in the Iberian pig. Our final goal is to explore target selection traits and define crossbreeding strategies. The phenotypes were obtained under intensive management from 470 animals in a diallelic experiment involving Retinto, Torbiscal, and Entrepelado lines. The data set was composed of backfat thickness at the fourth rib (BFT), intramuscular fat (IMF) in the longissimus thoracis (LT), and the fatty acid profile for IMF and subcutaneous fat (SCF) traits. Data were analyzed through a Bayesian bivariate animal model by using a reparameterization of Dickerson's model. The results obtained showed an important genetic determinism for all traits analyzed with heritability ranging from 0.09 to 0.67. The common environment litter effect also had an important effect on IMF (0.34) and its fatty acid composition (0.06-0.53) at slaughter. The additive genetic correlation between BFT and IMF (additive genetic correlation [] = 0.31) suggested that it would be possible to improve lean growth independent of the IMF with an appropriate selection index. Furthermore, the high additive genetic correlation ( = 0.68) found between MUFA tissues would seem to indicate that either the LT or SCF could be used as the reference tissue for MUFA selection. The relevance of the crossbreeding parameters varied according to the traits analyzed. Backfat thickness at the fourth rib and the fatty acid profile of the IMF showed relevant differences between crosses, mostly due to line additive genetic effects associated with the Retinto line. On the contrary, those for IMF crosses were probably mainly attributable to heterosis effects. Particularly, heterosis effects were relevant for the Retinto and Entrepelado crosses (approximately 16% of the trait), which could be valuable for a crossbreeding system involving these lines.

  19. (Acidic deposition: Its nature and impacts)

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R.B.; Turner, R.S. ); Ryan, P.F. )

    1990-10-18

    The travelers presented papers on various aspects of modeling performed as part of the US National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) at the Fourth International Conference on Acidic Deposition: Its Nature and Impacts. The meeting was sponsored by the Royal Society of Edinburgh and was attended by over 800 scientists, primarily from Europe and North America. The conference focused on nine aspects of the nature and impacts of atmospheric pollutants, including ozone: chemistry of atmospheric pollutants; processes controlling the deposition of pollutants; effects of pollutants on soils; physiology of plant responses to pollutants; effects of pollutants in agricultural and natural or seminatural ecosystems; atmospheric pollutants and forests; effects of pollutants on the chemistry of freshwater streams and lakes; effects of pollutants on freshwater plants and animals; and effects of pollutants, indoors and outdoors, on materials and buildings.

  20. Effects of dietary combination of n-3 and n-9 fatty acids on the deposition of linoleic and arachidonic acid in broiler chicken meats.

    PubMed

    Shin, D; Choi, S H; Go, G; Park, J H; Narciso-Gaytán, C; Morgan, C A; Smith, S B; Sánchez-Plata, M X; Ruiz-Feria, C A

    2012-04-01

    To minimize the amount of n-6 fatty acids in broiler chicken meat, 120 Cobb × Ross male broilers were divided into 6 different groups and fed a basal corn-soybean meal diet containing 5% fat from 5 different lipid sources: 1) a commercial mix of animal and vegetable oil, 2) soybean oil and olive oil (2.5% each), 3) flaxseed oil and olive oil (2.5% each), 4) flaxseed oil, eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5; EPA; n-3), and olive oil (2.45, 0.05, and 2.5% respectively; FEO), 5) flaxseed oil, docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6; DHA; n-3), and olive oil (2.45, 0.05, and 2.5% respectively; FDO), and 6) fish oil and olive oil (2.5% each; FHO). At 6 and 9 wk, one bird per pen (4 pens per treatment) was processed, and liver, breast, and thigh samples were collected and used for fatty acid profiles or Δ6- and Δ9-desaturase mRNA gene expression levels. The deposition of linoleic acid (C18:2; n-6) or arachidonic acid (C20:4; n-6) was decreased in breast and thigh muscles of chickens fed n-3 fatty acids for 9 wk compared with chickens fed animal and vegetable oil and soybean oil and olive oil diets (P < 0.05). The addition of EPA to the diet (FEO; P > 0.05) did not reduce the deposition of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid as much as DHA (FDO; P < 0.05), and it suppressed the expression of Δ6- and Δ9-desaturase. When EPA and DHA were blended (FHO) and supplied to broiler chickens for 9 wk, EPA and DHA combination effects were observed on the deposition of LA and arachidonic acid in breast and thigh muscles. Thereby, the addition of a mixed EPA and DHA to a broiler chicken diet may be recommendable to reduce arachidonic acid accumulation in both broiler chicken breast and thigh meats, providing a functional broiler chicken meat to consumers.

  1. Preliminary exposure study to determine the effects of acid deposition on coated steel substrates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, P.J.; Simpson, T.C.; Hampel, H.; David, G.D.; Shaw, B.A.

    1990-04-01

    The project involves the evaluation of the effects of acidic pollutants on painted metal substrates. The project examined a commercially available alkyd paint/primer system applied to a low carbon steel substrate exposed under a variety of simulated acidic conditions to determine the micro/macro effects of such exposure. The techniques that were identified as those most sensitive and applicable during the study include tensile adhesion testing, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A novel electrochemical monitor was developed during this program that allowed the continual monitoring of coating degradation during chamber exposure. It was further found that a good correlation existed between tensile adhesion strength measurements and electrochemical impedance parameters. The program determined that the rate of degradation of the alkyd painted steel coupons was accelerated in the presence of SO2. This effect was most pronounced on samples that contained defects (scribes), that were allowed to form condensed (dew) during the exposure period and that had a horizontal orientation during exposure.

  2. CASTNet mountain acid deposition monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Bowser, J.J.; Anderson, J.B.; Edgerton, E.S.; Mohnen, V.; Baumgardener, R.

    1994-12-31

    Concern over the influence of air pollution on forest decline has led the USEPA to establish the Mountain Acid Deposition Monitoring Program (MADMP) to quantify total deposition at high altitudes, i.e., above cloud base. Clouds can be a major source of atmospheric deposition to sensitive, mountain ecosystems. This program is a part of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), a national assessment of the effects of the 1990 Clean Air Act. The objectives of MADMP are to estimate total deposition, measure cloud chemistry, and characterize spacial and temporal trends at four selected high altitude sites in the Eastern US. Four MADMP sites have been established for the 1994 field season: Clingman`s Dome, Great Smoky Mountain Nat. Park, TN; Slide Mountain, Catskill State Park, NY; Whiteface Mountain, Adirondack State Park, NY; and Whitetop Mountain, Mt. Rogers Nat`l Recreational Area, VA. An automated cloud collection system will be utilized in combination with continuous measurements of cloud liquid water content in order to estimate cloudwater deposition. Other relevant data will include continuous meteorological measurements, ozone and sulfur dioxide concentrations, wet deposition from rainfall analysis, and dry deposition from filter pack analysis. Quality assurance and quality control measures will be employed to maximize accuracy and precision.

  3. Acidic deposition and surface water chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, M. R.

    A pair of back-to-back (morning and afternoon) hydrology sessions, held December 10, 1987, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., covered “Predicting the Effects of Acidic Deposition on Surface Water Chemistry.” The combined sessions included four invited papers, 12 contributed papers, and a panel discussion at its conclusion. The gathering dealt with questions on a variety of aspects of modeling the effects of acidic deposition on surface water chemistry.Contributed papers included discussions on the representation of processes in models as well as limiting assumptions in model application (V. S. Tripathi et al., Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tenn., and E. C. Krug, Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign), along with problems in estimating depositional inputs to catchments and thus inputs to be used in the simulation of catchment response (M. M. Reddy et al., U.S. Geological Survey, Lakewood, Colo.; and E. A. McBean, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada). L. A. Baker et al. (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) dealt with the problem of modeling seepage lake systems, an exceedingly important portion of the aquatic resources in Florida and parts of the upper U.S. Midwest. J. A. Hau and Y. Eckstein (Kent State University, Kent, Ohio) considered equilibrium modeling of two northern Ohio watersheds that receive very different loads of acidic deposition but are highly similar in other respects.

  4. The Effect of Slaughter Season on the Fatty Acid Profile in Four Types of Fat Deposits in Crossbred Beef Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Sobczuk-Szul, Monika; Wroński, Marek; Wielgosz-Groth, Zofia; Mochol, Magdalena; Rzemieniewski, Arkadiusz; Nogalski, Zenon; Pogorzelska-Przybyłek, Paulina; Purwin, Cezary

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of slaughter season on the fatty acid profile in four types of fat deposits in crossbred (Polish Holstein Friesian Black-and-White×Limousine) beef bulls. The percentage share of fatty acids was determined by gas chromatography and were divided into the following categories of fatty acids: saturated (SFAs), unsaturated (UFAs), monounsaturated (MUFAs), polyunsaturated (PUFAs), desirable hypocholesterolemic (DFAs) and undesirable hypercholesterolemic (OFAs), n-3 and n-6. Perinephric fat was characterized by the highest SFA concentrations (59.89%), and subcutaneous fat had the highest MUFA content (50.63%). Intramuscular fat was marked by a high percentage share of PUFAs and the highest PUFA/SFA ratio. The slaughter season had a significant effect on the levels of C18:3, C20:4 (p≤0.01) and conjugated linoleic acid (p≤0.05). There was an interaction between the slaughter season and fat type for the content of C20:4 (p≤0.01) and C20:5 (p≤0.05). The results of this study show that beef from cattle slaughtered in the summer season has a higher nutritional value and more health-promoting properties. PMID:25049787

  5. Acidic deposition: effects on agricultural crops. Final report, April 1980-31 December 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Shriner, D.S.; Johnston, J.W. Jr.; Taylor, G.E. Jr.; Luxmoore, R.J.; McConathy, R.K.; McLaughlin, S.B.; Heagle, A.S.; Norby, R.J.; Takemoto, B.K.; Dubay, D.T.

    1985-05-01

    The report presents the results of research on soybean response to simulated wet and dry deposition, and field studies of growth, yield, and physiological response to a characterized air quality. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  6. Hatching success in salamanders and chorus frogs at two sites in Colorado, USA: Effects of acidic deposition and climate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muths, E.; Campbell, D.H.; Corn, P.S.

    2003-01-01

    The snowpack in the vicinity of the Mount Zirkel Wilderness Area is among the most acidic in the western United States. We analyzed water chemistry and examined hatching success in tiger salamanders and chorus frogs at ponds there and at nearby Rabbit Ears Pass (Dumont) to determine whether acid deposition affects amphibians or their breeding habitats at these potentially sensitive locations. We found a wide range of acid neutralizing capacity among ponds within sites; the minimum pH recorded during the experiment was 5.4 at one of 12 ponds with all others at pH ??? 5.7. At Dumont, hatching success for chorus frogs was greater in ponds with low acid neutralizing capacity; however, lowest pHs were >5.8. At current levels of acid deposition, weather and pond characteristics are likely more important than acidity in influencing hatching success in amphibian larvae at these sites.

  7. Acidic deposition effects on vegetation: a review and analysis of methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    Acid rain has recently been implicated as an agent which may potentially impact (both positively and negatively) vegetative growth. Although numerous hypotheses have been published regarding long-term acid rain damage to forests and croplands, there are few research results to directly support conclusive estimations of impact. A description and analysis of the approach and techniques used by researchers examining the vegetative impacts of acid rain is presented. 26 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  8. Acid deposition and the acidification of soils and waters

    SciTech Connect

    Reuss, J.O.; Johnson, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    A conceptual model of acid deposition is presented consistent with established physicochemical principles and the bulk of available information. The authors seek to provide insight into probable long-term effects of acid deposition; a testable hypotheses; plus design and interpretation of the research. (PSB)

  9. Chemical and biological status of lakes and streams in the upper midwest: assessment of acidic deposition effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiener, J.G.; Eilers, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Many lakes in three areas in the Upper Midwest - northeastern Minnesota, northern Wisconsin, and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan - have low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) and may be susceptible to change by acidic deposition. Northcentral Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan together contain about 150-300 acidic lakes (ANC ≤ 0), whereas none have been found in Minnesota. These acidic lakes are precipitation-dominated, Clearwater seepage lakes having small surface area, shallow depth, and low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon. The spatial distribution of these acidic lakes parallels a west to east gradient of increasing sulfate and hydrogen ion deposition. Several of these acidic lakes exhibit chemical characteristics and biological changes consistent with those observed elsewhere in waters reported to be acidified by acidic deposition. However, an hypothesis of recent lake acidification is not supported by analyses of either historical chemical data or diatom remains in lake sediments, and natural sources of acidity and alternative ecological processes have not been conclusively eliminated as causative factors. Streams in this three-state region have high ANC and appear to be insensitive to acidic deposition. The species richness and composition of lacustrine fish communities in the region are partly related to pH and associated chemical factors. Sport fishes considered acid-sensitive and of primary concern with regard to acidification include walleye, smallmouth bass, and black crappie. The fishery in at least one lake, Morgan Lake in Wisconsin (pH 4.6), may have declined because of acidification. Given the general lack of quantitative fishery data for acidic Wisconsin and Michigan lakes, however, more general conclusions concerning impacts or the absence of impacts of acidification on the region's fishery resources are not possible.

  10. Effects of acidic deposition on nutrient uptake, nutrient cycling and growth processes of vegetation in the spruce-fir ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, S.B.; Garten, C.T.; Wullschleger, S.D.

    1996-10-16

    This report summarizes progress in three years of field research designed to evaluate biological and chemical indicators of the current and future health of the Southern Appalachian spruce-fir ecosystem. The emphasis of this research has been on the identification and understanding of mechanisms through which current levels of acidic deposition are impacting ecosystem processes. The identification of these principal mechanisms and key biological indicators of change was designed to improve our capabilities to detect, monitor, and assess the effects of air quality regulations and attendant future air quality changes on ecosystem response. Individual research tasks focused on the following research areas: (1) the significance of foliar uptake of atmospheric sources of nitrogen in relationship to plant utilization of N from available soil reserves; (2) linkages between atmospheric inputs to the soil surface, solution chemistry, and decomposition in the upper organic soil horizons; (3) effects of soil solution chemistry on uptake of cations and aluminum by fine roots; and (4) the effects of varying rates of calcium supply on carbon metabolism of Fraser fir and red spruce, and the relationship between calcium levels in wood cells and integrity of wood formed in bole and branches. Each of the individual tasks was designed to focus upon a mechanism or process that we consider critical to understanding chemical and biological linkages. These linkages will be important determinants in understanding the basis of past and potential future responses of the high elevation Southern Appalachian Forest to acidic deposition and other co-occurring environmental stresses. This report contains (1) background and rationale for the research undertaken in 1992-94; (2) a summary of principal research findings; (3) publications from this research; and (4) characterization of data sets produced by this research which will be the basis of future research, analyses and/or publications.

  11. Emerging acid deposition research and monitoring issues

    SciTech Connect

    Birnbaum, R.

    1997-12-31

    The research baselines established for acid rain in the 1980s position scientists and policy makers to evaluate the environmental effectiveness of the acid rain control program and to test the variety of scientific hypotheses made regarding the chemical, transport and biological processes involved in acidic deposition. Several new research questions have evolved. How effective are the emissions reductions? What is the residual risk? How have ecological recovery rates been affected and what other environmental factors influence recovery? What are the critical requirements to measure ecological change including the extent and rate while also capturing the extent and severity of emerging ecological stressors (such as watershed nitrogen saturation)? These and other questions are currently being synthesized within and outside of EPA to develop a long-term strategy to provide guidance to emerging research and monitoring issues.

  12. Mesoscale acid deposition modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Michael L.; Proctor, F. H.; Zack, John W.; Karyampudi, V. Mohan; Price, P. E.; Bousquet, M. D.; Coats, G. D.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed in support of the EPA/DOE MADS (Mesoscale Acid Deposition) Project included the development of meteorological data bases for the initialization of chemistry models, the testing and implementation of new planetary boundary layer parameterization schemes in the MASS model, the simulation of transport and precipitation for MADS case studies employing the MASS model, and the use of the TASS model in the simulation of cloud statistics and the complex transport of conservative tracers within simulated cumuloform clouds. The work performed in support of the NASA/FAA Wind Shear Program included the use of the TASS model in the simulation of the dynamical processes within convective cloud systems, the analyses of the sensitivity of microburst intensity and general characteristics as a function of the atmospheric environment within which they are formed, comparisons of TASS model microburst simulation results to observed data sets, and the generation of simulated wind shear data bases for use by the aviation meteorological community in the evaluation of flight hazards caused by microbursts.

  13. Effects of acid deposition on watershed ecosystems of national parks in the great lakes basin.

    PubMed

    Stottlemyer, R; Rutkowski, D; Toczydlowski, D

    1989-04-01

    nutrients generally precedes maximum spring stream runoff. Water chemistry in both sensitive and non-sensitive lakes appears to be primarily reflecting how the conterminous terrestrial system is retaining atmospheric inputs more than the quality of direct lake atmospheric input. This is especially evident for H(+), NO 3 (sup-) and SO 4 (sup2-) .The second component is the assessment of watershed acidification, SO 4 (sup2-) output and soil retention across an input gradient. An anthropic deposition gradient provides the opportunity for intersite time-trend analyses as to the effects of inputs. Our study objective was to see if the decreasing west to east input/output values for SO 4 (sup2-) , noted in small first-order watersheds in national parks from Minnesota to Ohio, might be related to present atmospheric inputs, potential and total soil SO 4 (sup2-) adsorption, or soil SO 4 (sup2-) desorption from earlier higher inputs. Precipitation pH ranged from 5.05 at Fernberg, Minnesota to 4.24 at Wooster, Ohio. Minimum and maximum concentrations of NH 4 (+) , NO 3 (sup-) , SO 4 (sup2-) and Cl(-) were also found at these stations. Stream water concentrations of NO 3 (sup-) and SO 4 (sup2-) increase in a similar but sharper gradient. Streams are well buffered. Cation, HCO 3 (sup-) , NO 3 (sup-) and especially SO 4 (sup2-) output increase west to east, but H(+) output decreases. At the eastern site stream SO 4 (sup2-) concentration and output exceed HCO 3 (sup-) . Potential soil SO 4 (sup2-) adsorption capacity increases eastward, but this capacity is filled. Crystalline Fe hydrous oxides appear more effective than amorphous Fe hydrous oxides at adsorbing SO 4 (sup2-) . High anthropic anion inputs, inability of forest soil to adsorb additional inputs and perhaps SO 4 (sup2-) desorption appear responsible for the replacement of HCO 3 (sup-) by SO 4 (sup2-) in stream water. The major cation accompanying SO 4 (sup2-) is Ca(2+).

  14. Acid deposition effects on materials: Evaluation of nickel after four years of exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tidblad, J.; Leygraf, C. . Dept. of Applied Electrochemistry and Corrosion Science); Kucera, V. )

    1993-07-01

    The atmospheric corrosion of nickel after 4 years of exposure inside a sheltered box has been investigated. Quantitative evaluation of corrosion attack resulted in a linear relation between the weight increase of nickel and the sulfur dioxide concentration. Analysis of corrosion products by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction agreed with previous conclusions and suggested the initial formation of an amorphous basic nickel sulfate with less protective ability and subsequent formation of a crystalline basic nickel sulfate with higher protective ability. A carbonate was also detected, more abundant at lower weight increases. Conductivity of precipitation correlated with the weight increase of nickel but not so much as SO[sub 2]. High levels of this parameter are related to high concentrations of the different ions in precipitation. A complementary exposure program was performed to compare actual exposure conditions inside and outside the sample box. It was concluded that the SO[sub 2] deposition outside and inside the sample box differ approximately by a factor of 10. This difference could be separated into air flow conditions (a factor of 2) and concentrations (a factor of 5).

  15. Assessing the recovery of lakes in southeastern Canada from the effects of acidic deposition.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Dean S; Clair, Thomas A; Couture, Suzanne; Dillon, Peter J; Dupont, Jacques; Keller, Wendel; McNicol, Donald K; Turner, Michael A; Vet, Robert; Weeber, Russell

    2003-04-01

    Reductions in North American sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions promoted expectations that aquatic ecosystems in southeastern Canada would soon recover from acidification. Only lakes located near smelters that have dramatically reduced emissions approach this expectation. Lakes in the Atlantic provinces, Quebec and Ontario affected only by long-range sources show a general decline in sulfate (SO4(2-)) concentrations, but with a relatively smaller compensating increase in pH or alkalinity. Several factors may contribute to the constrained (or most likely delayed) acidity response: declining base cation concentrations, drought-induced mobilization of SO4(2-), damaged internal alkalinity generation mechanisms, and perhaps increasing nitrate or organic anion levels. Monitoring to detect biological recovery in southeastern Canada is extremely limited, but where it occurs, there is little evidence of recovery outside of the Sudbury/Killarney area. Both the occurrence of Atlantic salmon in Nova Scotia rivers and the breeding success of Common Loons in Ontario lakes are in fact declining although factors beyond acidification also play a role. Chemical and biological models predict that much greater SO2 emission reductions than those presently required by legislation will be needed to promote widespread chemical and latterly, biological recovery. It may be unrealistic to expect that pre-industrial chemical and biological conditions can ever be reestablished in many lakes of southeastern Canada.

  16. Assessing the recovery of lakes in southeastern Canada from the effects of acidic deposition.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Dean S; Clair, Thomas A; Couture, Suzanne; Dillon, Peter J; Dupont, Jacques; Keller, Wendel; McNicol, Donald K; Turner, Michael A; Vet, Robert; Weeber, Russell

    2003-04-01

    Reductions in North American sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions promoted expectations that aquatic ecosystems in southeastern Canada would soon recover from acidification. Only lakes located near smelters that have dramatically reduced emissions approach this expectation. Lakes in the Atlantic provinces, Quebec and Ontario affected only by long-range sources show a general decline in sulfate (SO4(2-)) concentrations, but with a relatively smaller compensating increase in pH or alkalinity. Several factors may contribute to the constrained (or most likely delayed) acidity response: declining base cation concentrations, drought-induced mobilization of SO4(2-), damaged internal alkalinity generation mechanisms, and perhaps increasing nitrate or organic anion levels. Monitoring to detect biological recovery in southeastern Canada is extremely limited, but where it occurs, there is little evidence of recovery outside of the Sudbury/Killarney area. Both the occurrence of Atlantic salmon in Nova Scotia rivers and the breeding success of Common Loons in Ontario lakes are in fact declining although factors beyond acidification also play a role. Chemical and biological models predict that much greater SO2 emission reductions than those presently required by legislation will be needed to promote widespread chemical and latterly, biological recovery. It may be unrealistic to expect that pre-industrial chemical and biological conditions can ever be reestablished in many lakes of southeastern Canada. PMID:12839192

  17. Interactive effects of cations on multi-decade trends in sulfate and acid deposition in North America and Europe: a new look at an old problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajtha, K.; Jones, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    Urbanization and industrial activities have profoundly altered both local and regional precipitation chemistry, with strong implications for soil and receiving water biogeochemistry. For example, increased N and S in precipitation have altered soil and water nutrient status and acidity, with mitigating effects from altered cation deposition. In 1995, Hedin et al. reported steep declines in atmospheric deposition of base cations in Europe and North America that offset the success of the 40-year history of regulation of acid precipitation, especially through sulfate control from urbanization and industrial activities. Using records from various sources including the North American LTER program, NADP, and the European EMAP data set, we extended the temporal extent of the analysis by 15 years to 2009 and expanded the analysis spatially by examining three contrasting site types with: (i) continuously high pollution and acidic deposition loads, (ii) historically high loads that experienced abrupt declines in atmospheric loading due to economic and industrial collapse (e.g. much of Eastern Europe), and (iii) relatively low and constant pollutant loading (e.g. western North America). Our goals were to (1) determine the spatial extent of the steep decline in cation deposition, (2) examine correlates, such as fossil fuel energy use and land management practices, to trends in cation deposition, and (3) determine more recent temporal trends in cation deposition in urbanized and rural sites. Our analysis suggests that for many sites that showed steep declines in base cation deposition in the earlier analysis, such as Sweden and New England, base cation deposition has stabilized at a lower rate, and sulfate and acidity in precipitation continue to decline. Other sites, particularly in Eastern Europe, are still experiencing steep declines in cation deposition with strong implications for the relationship between sulfate deposition and precipitation acidity. Other regions without

  18. Nitrogen cycling in s subarctic Alaskan watershed: the role of lichens and the potential effects of acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gunther, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that the loss of nitrogen-fixing lichens due to stress from air pollution could have adverse effects upon nitrogen availability, and thus primary productivity, in some ecosystems. There is general agreement, however, that the ecological role of these lichens has not been sufficiently well defined to determine whether they are keystone species. The objectives of this study were: (1) to examine the importance of nitrogen-fixing lichens to the nitrogen cycle in the drainage of Brooks Lake, Alaska, a nitrogen-limited nursery lake for the commercially important sockeye salmon (Oncorhychus nerka); and (2) to investigate the sensitivity of nitrogen fixation by lichens in this ecosystem to acid deposition. Biological nitrogen fixation was found to be the major source of new nitrogen to the Brooks Lake drainage. The rate of fixation is approximately 3 kg N/ha-yr, which compares to 0.3 kg N/ha-yr in precipitation and only 0.02 kg N/ha-yr in returning adult salmon. Cyanophillic lichens contribute about 0.21 kg N/ha-yr. The low levels of nitrogen in precipitation, combined with a lack of nitrogen-fixation activity in open lake waters, indicates that nitrogen in tributary streams is the major source of new nitrogen for Brooks Lake. The measurements of nitrogen inputs, along with estimates of other stocks and flows of nitrogen, were used to construct a steady-state box model of the nitrogen cycle in the drainage.

  19. Aquatic amphibians in the Sierra Nevada: Current status and potential effects of acidic deposition on populations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, D.F.; Gordon, M.S.

    1992-05-01

    Toxicity testing indicated that amphibians are at little risk from low pH in water acidified to a pH of 5.0 and aluminum concentrations from 39 to 80 micrograms/l. However, sublethal effects (reduced growth rate and earlier hatching) were observed for pH as high as 5.25 and the aluminum concentrations tested. The authors tested the hypothesis that acidification of habitats in the field has resulted in elimination of populationss from waters most vulnerable to acidification, i.e., low in pH or ANC, or from waters low in ionic strength a condition that increases the sensitivity of amphibians to low pH. The authors surveyed potential breeding sites for two declining and one non-declining species at high elevation within 30 randomly selected survey areas, and compared chemical parameters between sites containing a species and sites lacking the species. No significant differences were found that were consistent with the hypothesis, and water chemistry did not differ among sites inhabited by the three species. These findings imply that acidic deposition is unlikely to have been a cause of recent amphibian population declines in the Sierra Nevada.

  20. Acid deposition: No such thing as a free launch

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.

    1990-07-01

    This paper reviews the acid deposition process and outlines the issues of atmospheric science that have made it such a difficult issue on which to achieve consensus. The geographical focus of this review is eastern North America, but the considerations presented here are applicable also to other regions. Acid deposition consists of delivery of acidic substances from the atmosphere to the earth's surface, principally sulfur and nitrogen oxides, acids, and salts. These compounds (mainly the oxides) are introduced into the atmosphere principally as by-products of fossil fuel combustion. Research on atmospheric processes examines the relations between the rates and spatial distributions of emissions of acidifying substances, the atmospheric concentrations and spatial distributions of these substances and of their atmospheric transformation products, and the rates and spatial distributions of deposition of these materials. The goal of this research is to determine how atmospheric concentrations and deposition fluxes would change in response to specified changes in emissions. Effects research is the study of the consequences of atmospheric concentrations and deposition rates of acidic and related substances on human health, on artificial structural and ornamental materials, on cultivated crops, and on natural terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The goal of this research is to determine standards for concentrations and deposition that are suitable for protecting human health and the general welfare from adverse effects of acid deposition. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Evaluating risks to agricultural production from acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Oden, N.L.; Medeiros, W.H.; Coveney, E.A.

    1986-10-01

    Although it has been established that agricultural yields can be affected adversely by ozone and other air pollutants, the effects of existing levels of acid deposition on crops are less well understood. Evaluations of potential effects from growth chamber, greenhouse and field experiments have not identified any single crop as being consistently sensitive to acid deposition. Quantitative analysis of one crop (soybeans), which has demonstrated some sensitivity to acid deposition treatments in field settings, suggest that if current acid deposition levels are reduced by 50%, then US soybean production would increase by approximately 1%. These estimates are based on the fundamental assumption that estimated dose-response functions are homogeneous across biologic, geographic and temporal space; an assumption not supported by recently developed experimental data. As a result, confidence in this conclusion is weak.

  2. Deposition of salicylic acid into hamster sebaceous.

    PubMed

    Motwani, M R; Rhein, L D; Zatz, J L

    2004-01-01

    In an earlier paper, we identified vehicles that are miscible with sebum, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In this paper, the potential of these vehicles to deliver salicylic acid (SA) into the sebum-filled follicles of hamster ears is examined. The main objective of this study is to correlate the melting transitions of a model sebum with the follicular delivery of SA, using two different types of vehicles (fatty and polar). Generally, the fatty vehicles show higher deposition than the polar vehicles. Follicular delivery of salicylic acid correlates well with its solubility in the respective vehicles. This extent of deposition also shows a relationship with the effect of the vehicle on thermal behavior of the model sebum. The nature of the relationship depends on the vehicle (polar or fatty) tested. We conclude that DSC could be used to identify appropriate vehicles for drugs whose follicular delivery depends on solubility. The results also suggest that delivery into the sebaceous glands occurs by two different mechanisms, depending upon the polarity of the vehicle and the physicochemical properties of the drug. The results of these experiments are further extended to investigate follicular delivery of SA from two different types of oil-in-water emulsion formulations. From these studies we conclude that either increasing the volume of the oil phase or changing the emulsion to a water-in-oil emulsion would increase follicular deposition. Our research highlights the role of sebum, its compatibility with drug molecules, and vehicle selection in the transport of drugs into the follicles. The overall results of these experiments provide a reasonable understanding of the mechanisms underlying the transport of drugs to, and subsequently through, the sebaceous follicle.

  3. Acid deposition: effects on geochemical cycling and biological availability of trace elements. Report for September 1982-January 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, P.G.C.; Galloway, J.N.; Stokes, P.

    1985-01-01

    Acid deposition is caused by emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from such high temperature processes as fossil-fuel combustion and ore smelting. The emissions also contain elements present in the environment in trace amounts, for example, silver (Ag), arsenic (As), beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), tin (Sn), tellurium (Te), thallium (Th), Vanadium (V), and zinc (Zn). With the exception of mercury, these elements are not naturally present in the atmosphere owing to their characteristically low volatilities. The shift from natural to human control of deposition of trace elements significantly perturbs the biogeochemical cycles of these potentially toxic substances. This report addresses the following: Do elevated rates of their deposition cause changes in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. What are the interactions between their deposition and the concurrent acidification of ecosystems. The report focuses on elements generally classified as very toxic and relatively accessible in the environment, i.e. the 17 listed above plus aluminum (Al). A significant bibliography accompanies the report.

  4. The Effects of Gaseous Ozone and Nitric Acid Deposition on two Crustose Lichen Species From Joshua Tree National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessom, Elizabeth Curie

    Lichens are dependent on atmospheric deposition for much of their water and nutrients, and due to their sensitivity to pollutants, are commonly used as bioindicators for air quality. While studies have focused on epiphytic (tree dwelling) lichens as bioindicators, virtually nothing is known about crustose (rock dwelling) lichens. The atmospheric pollutants ozone (O 3) and nitric acid (HNO3) are two major pollutants found within the Los Angeles Basin. While recent O3 research suggests it does not significantly affect lichen growth, HNO3 appears to be phytotoxic to some lichens. As both of these pollutants are deposited downwind from the L.A. basin into Joshua Tree National Park (JOTR), lichen species located in the park may provide a sensitive indicator of pollution effects. This research studied two lichen species of particular interest from Joshua Tree National Park, Lobothallia praeradiosa (Nyl.) Hafellner, and Acarospora socialis H. Magn., both of which are crustose species with unknown sensitivities to O3, as well as hypothesized and unknown sensitivities to nitrogen compounds, respectively. Little research exists for either species, possibly because of the difficulty in working with crustose lichens. This research attempted to expand the background knowledge of these species by exposing them to varying levels of O3 and HNO3, to ascertain their physiological responses. Physiological measures of chlorophyll fluorescence, dark respiration, microscopic imaging, and lichen washes (as a proxy for membrane leakage), were measured throughout the exposure period. Results indicated that both species had similar sensitivities to O3 and HNO3. Both species registered physical damage during the O3 fumigation, as well as a decrease in respiration. Neither species showed major physical damage to HNO3, but both manifested a decrease in chlorophyll fluorescence, suggesting damage to the photosynthetic systems of the algae symbiont. These results suggest that both of these

  5. Effect of acid deposition on potentially sensitive soil-plant systems at Vandenberg AFB, California. Final report, 1 September 1984-1 September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Zedler, P.H.; Marion, G.

    1988-04-30

    The objectives of this study were to assess the impact of the acid deposition expected from rocket launches on natural coastal vegetation and soils. Interest was directed primarily toward the longer-term and more-subtle effects of acidity, and the degree of sensitivity of different soil-plant systems. A study area was established along a topographic chronosequence that ranged from stabilized dunes to residual soils over bedrock. Soils and plants were collected from this region and used in three main studies. A leaching study measured the changes in chemical properties of four soils subjected to repeated acid additions. A second study treated seeds of wide variety of native or spontaneous species with HC1 on the four soils to establish the sensitivity of the vegetation to deposition events during the fall to winter germination pulse characteristic of California coastal ecosystems. A third study examined the effect of acid treatments on the growth of and competition between two common woody plants -- Artemisia californica and Pinus muricata. A fourth study partially supported by this grant studied the invasion of an exotic species in a recently burned site on one of the four study soils. The studies collectively show that, although the soil-plant systems are well buffered against moderate and low inputs of acidity, the effect of acid additions differed among soil types and from species to species. Overall the hypothesis that acidic deposition could affect plant-plant and soil-plant interactions was supported, but some of these effects are subtle and not all appear to be deleterious.

  6. Study of the acidic deposition phenomenon over Alexandria city.

    PubMed

    Noweir, Kamal H; El-Marakby, Fadia A; Zaki, Gihan R; Ibrahim, Alaa K

    2008-01-01

    Acid deposition commonly occurs due to conversion of primary acidic pollutants (SO2 & NO2) into secondary pollutants (H2SO4 & HNO3 and their salts). The main natural sources of acid deposition in Alexandria include lightening and microbial processes. Anthropogenic sources include traffic, industrial, fuel burning, and incineration activities. Acid deposition has ecological and economic effects in addition to health effects. The objective of this study is to assess acidity of dry and wet depositions in the atmosphere of Alexandria. Dry samples were collected as settled dust using plastic jar. Wet samples were collected as rain water using polyethylene bottle. All samples were analyzed for pH, sulfates, and nitrates. The relatively high pH values observed in depositions of Alexandria city (6.95+/-0.22) and (7.14+/-0.49) for settled dust and rain water respectively indicating the conversion of the formed acids (H2SO4 & HNO3) into their salts. This explanation was confirmed by the relatively high concentrations of sulfates and nitrates. The average values were (14.3+/-4.21 g/km2/month and 20.5+/-9.5mg/L for sulfates), and (22.6+/-10.6 g/km2/month and 0.5+/-0.32 mg/L for nitrates) for settled dust and rainwater samples respectively. It can be concluded that Alexandria is a lucky city regarding acidity of the atmosphere due to its geographic, topographic, and meteorological features. Building up acid deposition monitoring network that covers all Egyptian cities to be a nucleus for African network, using new technologies that reduce emission of acid deposition precursors and alternative sources of energy, implementing and enforcing regulations and standards for major pollutants, and increasing public awareness are recommended.

  7. The effects of acidic deposition on streams in the Appalachian Mountain and Piedmont region of the mid-Atlantic United States

    SciTech Connect

    Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufman, P.R. ); Church, M.R.; Wigington, P.J. Jr. ); Webb, J.R. ); Sale, M.J. )

    1993-08-01

    Streams in the Appalachian Mountain area of the mid-Atlantic receive some of the largest acidic deposition loadings of any region of the US. A synthesis of the survey data from the mid-Appalachians yields a consistent picture of the acid base status of streams. Acidic streams, and streams with very low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), are almost all located in small (<20 km[sup 2]), upland, forested catchments in areas of base-poor bedrock. In the subpopulation in the mid-Appalachian area, data from various local surveys show that 6-27% of the streams are acidic, and about 25-50% have ANC less than 50 [mu]eq L[sup [minus]1]. After excluding streams with acid mine drainage, National Stream Survey estimates for the whole region show that there are 2330 km of acidic streams and 7500 km of streams with ANC less than 50 [mu]eq L[sup [minus]1]. Many of the streams with base flow ANC less than 50 [mu]eq L[sup [minus]1] become acidic during storm or snowmelt episodes. Sulfate from atmospheric deposition is the dominant source of strong acid anions in acid mid-Appalachian streams. Their low pH (median, 4.9) and high levels of inorganic monomeric aluminum (median, 129 [mu]g L[sup [minus]1]) leached through soils by acidic deposition are causing damage to aquatic biota. Quantification of the extent of biological effects, however, is not possible with available data. Localized studies have shown that stream water ANC is closely related to bedrock mineralogy. Attempts to quantify this relationship across the mid-Appalachians, however, were frustrated by the lack of adequate scale geologic mapping throughout the region. Sulfate mass balance analyses indicate that soils and surface waters of the region have not yet realized the full effects of elevated sulfur deposition due to watershed sulfate retention. Sulfur retention is likely to decrease in the future, resulting in further losses of stream ANC. 70 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. The effects of acidic deposition on streams in the Appalachian Mountain and Piedmont Region of the Mid-Atlantic United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlihy, A. T.; Kaufmann, P. R.; Church, M. R.; Wigington, P. J.; Webb, J. R.; Sale, M. J.

    1993-08-01

    Streams in the Appalachian Mountain area of the mid-Atlantic receive some of the largest acidic deposition loadings of any region of the United States. A synthesis of the survey data from the mid-Appalachians yields a consistent picture of the acid base status of streams. Acidic streams, and streams with very low acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), are almost all located in small (<20 km2), upland, forested catchments in areas of base-poor bedrock. In the subpopulation of upland forested systems, which comprises about half the total stream population in the mid-Appalachian area, data from various local surveys show that 6-27% of the streams are acidic, and about 25-50% have ANC less than 50 μeq L-1. After excluding streams with acid mine drainage, National Stream Survey estimates for the whole region show that there are 2330 km of acidic streams and 7500 km of streams with ANC less than 50 μeq L-1. Many of the streams with base flow ANC less than 50 μeq L-1 become acidic during storm or snowmelt episodes. Sulfate from atmospheric deposition is the dominant source of strong acid anions in acidic mid-Appalachian streams. Their low pH (median, 4.9) and high levels of inorganic monomeric aluminum (median, 129 μg L-1) leached through soils by acidic deposition are causing damage to aquatic biota. Quantification of the extent of biological effects, however, is not possible with available data. Localized studies have shown that stream water ANC is closely related to bedrock mineralogy. Attempts to quantify this relationship across the mid-Appalachians, however, were frustrated by the lack of adequate scale geologic mapping throughout the region. Sulfate mass balance analyses indicate that soils and surface waters of the region have not yet realized the full effects of elevated sulfur deposition due to watershed sulfate retention. Sulfur retention is likely to decrease in the future, resulting in further losses of stream ANC.

  9. Acidic deposition: decline in mobilization of toxic aluminium.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Sheila M; Driscoll, Charles T

    2002-05-16

    The mobilization of aluminium from acidic forest soils is arguably the most ecologically important consequence of acid deposition in the environment because of its adverse effects on soils, forest vegetation and surface water. Here we show that there has been a significant decline in the concentrations of aluminium species in soil solutions at medium-to-high elevations in a northern hardwood forest in the United States in response to decreasing acidic deposition. Streamwater aluminium concentrations have also fallen and, if this rate of recovery persists, will within 10 years no longer pose a threat to fish.

  10. RESULTS FROM THE MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro) was initiated in 1993 as part of the research necessary to support the objectives of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), which was created to address the. requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The main ob...

  11. Assessment of acidic deposition and ozone effects on conifer forests in the San Bernardino Mountains. Standard operating procedure manual. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.R.; Chow, J.; Watson, J.G.

    1994-11-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the separate and combined effects of ozone and acidic deposition on mixed conifer forests in the San Bernardino mountains of southern California. The primary objectives were to acquire a long-term data base of specified accuracy, precision and validity for atmospheric pollution concentration, local and stand meteorology, wet and dry deposition fluxes to forest canopies, and biological responses of forest vegetation and soils. Some data were used to parameterize and run simulations with the Big Leaf model. Futhermore, to document the procedures used in the project, complete descriptions of measurement techniques, research protocols and quality assurace objectives were compiled in a companion document to the final report. This multi-disciplinary study provides a data base describing many attributes of a California mixed conifer forest ecosystem exposed to a moderate level of gas and particle deposition compared to the highest possible levels in the western portions of the San Bernardino mountains.

  12. Assessment of acidic deposition and ozone effects on conifer forests in the San Bernardino Mountains. Standard operating procedure manual. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.R.; Chow, J.; Watson, J.G.

    1994-11-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the separate and combined effects of ozone and acidic deposition on mixed conifer forests in the San Bernardino mountains of southern California. The primary objectives were to acquire a long-term data base of specified accuracy, precision and validity for atmospheric pollution concentration, local and stand meteorology, wet and dry deposition fluxes to forest canopies, and biological responses of forest vegetation and soils. Some data were used to parameterize and run simulations with the Big Leaf model. Futhermore, to document the procedures used in the project, complete descriptions of measurement techniques, research protocols and quality assurace objectives were compiled in a companion document to the final report. This multi-disciplinary study provides a data base describing many attributes of a California mixed conifer forest ecosystem exposed to a moderate level of gas and particle deposition compared to the highest possible levels in the western portions of the San Bernardino mountains.

  13. Modelling effects of acid deposition and climate change on soil and run-off chemistry at Risdalsheia, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mol-Dijkstra, J. P.; Kros, H.

    Elevated carbon dioxide levels, caused by anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, and higher temperature may lead to increased plant growth and uptake of nitrogen, but increased temperature may lead to increased nitrogen mineralisation causing enhanced nitrogen leaching. The overall result of both counteracting effects is largely unknown. To gain insight into the long-term effects, the geochemical model SMART2 was applied using data from the catchment-scale experiments of the RAIN and CLIMEX projects, conducted on boreal forest ecosystems at Risdalsheia, southern Norway. These unique experiments at the ecosystem scale provide information on the short-term effects and interactions of nitrogen deposition and increased temperature and carbon dioxide on carbon and nitrogen cycling and especially the run-off chemistry. To predict changes in soil processes in response to climate change, the model was extended by including the temperature effect on mineralisation, nitrification, denitrification, aluminium dissolution and mineral weathering. The extended model was tested on the two manipulated catchments at Risdalsheia and long-term effects were evaluated by performing long-time runs. The effects of climate change treatment, which resulted in increased nitrogen fluxes at both catchments, were slightly overestimated by SMART2. The temperature dependency of mineralisation was simulated adequately but the temperature effect on nitrification was slightly overestimated. Monitored changes in base cation concentrations and pH were quite well simulated with SMART2. The long-term simulations indicate that the increase in nitrogen run-off is only a temporary effect; in the long-term, no effect on total nitrogen leaching is predicted. At higher deposition levels the temporary increase in nitrogen leaching lasts longer than at low deposition. Contrary to nitrogen leaching, temperature increase leads to a permanent decrease in aluminium concentrations and pH.

  14. Acid deposition: Processes of Lake Acidification

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    The Panel on Processes of Lake Acidification was assembled by the National Research Council at the request of the Environmental Protection Agency. The panel was charged with discussing the processes that control the rate of acidification of streams and lakes and to suggest how EPA's research program might approach addressing current deficiencies in knowledge. The panel defined the acidification of lakes and streams as a decrease in alkalinity over time. Soil acidification is the decrease in the percent base saturation over time. The panel concurred that in forested watersheds that are underlain by granitic or other highly siliceous bedrock with acidic forest soils not receiving appreciable acid deposition, most lakes and streams have bicarbonate as the dominant anion and pH levels above 5.5. Generally, lakes and streams in similar habitats but in areas receiving appreciable acid deposition have sulfate as the dominant anion.

  15. Use of soil-streamwater relationships to assess regional patterns of acidic deposition effects in the northeastern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Siemion, Jason; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Murdoch, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Declines of acidic deposition levels by as much as 50% since 1990 have led to partial recovery of surface waters in the northeastern USA but continued depletion of soil calcium through this same period suggests a disconnection between soil and surface water chemistry. To investigate the role of soil-surface water interactions in recovery from acidification, the first regional survey to directly relate soil chemistry to stream chemistry during high flow was implemented in a 4144-km2 area of the Catskill region of New York, where acidic deposition levels are among the highest in the East. More than 40% of 95 streams sampled in the southern Catskill Mountains were determined to be acidified and had inorganic monomeric aluminum concentrations that exceeded a threshold that is toxic to aquatic biota. More than 80% likely exceeded this threshold during the highest flows, but less than 10% of more than 100 streams sampled were acidified in the northwestern portion of the region. Median Oa horizon soil base saturation ranged from 50% to 80% at 200 sites across the region, but median base saturation in the upper 10 cm of the B horizon was less than 20% across the region and was only 2% in the southern area. Aluminum is likely to be interfering with root uptake of calcium in the mineral horizon in approximately half the sampled watersheds. Stream chemistry was highly variable over the Catskill region and, therefore, did not always reflect the calcium depletion of the B horizon that our sampling suggested was nearly ubiquitous throughout the region.

  16. Photosynthetic and growth responses of Schima superba seedlings to sulfuric and nitric acid depositions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fang-Fang; Ding, Hui-Ming; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Jing-Jing; Yang, Song-Yu; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A continuing rise in acid deposition can cause forest degradation. In China, acid deposition has converted gradually from sulfuric acid deposition (SAD) to nitric acid deposition (NAD). However, the differing responses of photosynthesis and growth to depositions of sulfuric vs. nitric acid have not been well studied. In this study, 1-year-old seedlings of Schima superba, a dominant species in subtropical forests, were treated with two types of acid deposition SO4 (2-)/NO3 (-) ratios (8:1 and 0.7:1) with two applications (foliar spraying and soil drenching) at two pH levels (pH 3.5 and pH 2.5) over a period of 18 months. The results showed that the intensity, acid deposition type, and spraying method had significant effects on the physiological characteristics and growth performance of seedlings. Acid deposition at pH 2.5 via foliar application reduced photosynthesis and growth of S. superba, especially in the first year. Unlike SAD, NAD with high acidity potentially alleviated the negative effects of acidity on physiological properties and growth, probably due to a fertilization effect that improved foliar nitrogen and chlorophyll contents. Our results suggest that trees were damaged mainly by direct acid stress in the short term, whereas in the long term, soil acidification was also likely to be a major risk to forest ecosystems. Our data suggest that the shift in acid deposition type may complicate the ongoing challenge of anthropogenic acid deposition to ecosystem stability.

  17. Investigation of the effects of acid deposition upon California crops. Final report, 8 January 1986-7 July 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Olszyk, D.M.; Musselman, R.C.; Bytnerowicz, A.; Takemoto, B.K.

    1987-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of acidic fog on winter crops of the San Joaquin Valley (alfalfa, broccoli, carrot, onion, potato, and wheat), and spring crops of the South Coast Air Basin (alfalfa, celery, green pepper, strawberry, and tomato). The study also evaluated the interaction between acidic fog and ambient oxidants on the crops of the South Coast. For the spring study, fog at pH 1.68, 2.69, or 7.24 was applied twice weekly to potted plants grown in open top field chambers or air exclusion plots for seven weeks. Fog at pH 1.68 caused necrosis on leaves and fruit of all species. Season long exposure to pH 1.68 fog reduced yield in strawberry, tomato, green pepper, and alfalfa. Species differed widely in their sensitivity to acidic fog.

  18. Effects of simulated deposition of acid mist and iron ore particulate matter on photosynthesis and the generation of oxidative stress in Schinus terebinthifolius Radii and Sophora tomentosa L.

    PubMed

    Kuki, Kacilda Naomi; Oliva, Marco Antônio; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão; Costa, Alan Carlos; Cambraia, José

    2008-09-15

    Particulate matter is a natural occurrence in the environment, but some industries, such as the iron ore sector, can raise the total amount of particles in the atmosphere. This industry is primarily a source of iron and sulfur dioxide particulates. The effects of the pollutants from the iron ore industries on representatives of restinga vegetation in a Brazilian coastal ecosystem were investigated using physiological and biochemical measures. Two species, Schinus terebinthifolius and Sophora tomentosa, were exposed to simulated deposition of acid mist and iron ore particulate matter in acrylic chambers in a greenhouse. Parameters such as gas exchange, fluorescence emission, chlorophyll content, total iron content, antioxidant enzyme activity and malondialdehyde content were assessed in order to evaluate the responses of the two species. Neither treatment was capable of inducing oxidative stress in S. terebinthifolius. Nevertheless, the deposition of iron ore particulates on this species increased chlorophyll content, the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II and the electron transport rate, while iron content was unaltered. On the other hand, S. tomentosa showed a greater sensitivity to the treatments. Plants of S. tomentosa that were exposed to acid mist had a decrease in photosynthesis, while the deposition of iron particulate matter led to an increase in iron content and membrane permeability of the leaves. The activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalases and superoxide dismutase, were enhanced by both treatments. The results suggested that the two restinga species use different strategies to overcome the stressful conditions created by the deposition of particulate matter, either solid or wet. It seems that while S. terebinthifolius avoided stress, S. tomentosa used antioxidant enzyme systems to partially neutralize oxidative stress. The findings also point to the potential use of S. tomentosa as a biomarker species under field conditions.

  19. Acid deposition and integrated zoning control in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Gao, Jixi

    2002-08-01

    China's rapidly growing economy is coupled with the consumption of large amounts of coal. An energy mix dominated by coal and inefficient energy utilization processes have led to increasingly serious problems of acid rain and sulfur dioxide pollution. Moreover, trends in the emissions of acidifying air pollutants lead to predictions of a very serious acid deposition problem in the future. In the absence of mitigating actions, these trends foretell a future of increasingly detrimental impacts to ecosystems in China and, potentially, to ecosystems in neighboring countries. China has implemented a two control zone (TCZ) policy, resulting in the establishment of acid rain and sulfur dioxide control zones, in an attempt to implement a cost-effective approach to mitigating acid deposition problems. While some short-term successes have resulted from management actions associated with the TCZ policy, it is clear additional measures and new policy directions are needed to reverse worsening acid deposition problems in the long term. To this end the following recommendations are presented: adjusting the primary energy mix, placing a greater emphasis on abating the effects of acid deposition, concentrating pollution control on large point sources, implementing an emission permit system for coal-fired power plants, utilizing an integrated approach in designing and evaluating control measures, and developing a greater research capacity. Research strategies must be developed that will lead to: (1) an improved scientific understanding of the sources of acidifying pollutants, their associated migration patterns, and their impacts; and (2) an identification of cost-effective mitigating strategies for the entire country.

  20. Galvanostatic and potentiostatic deposition of bismuth telluride films from nitric acid solution: effect of chemical and electrochemical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, S.; Diliberto, S.; Boulanger, C.; Stein, N.; Lecuire, J. M.

    2005-04-01

    Composition modulated Bi 2Te 3 thin films have been deposited onto stainless-steel substrates using a potentiostatic or a galvanostatic process. The deposition potentials and current densities for different bath compositions and concentrations have been estimated from voltamperometric curves. Solutions with two Bi/Te ratios were studied. Only Bi 3+ and HTeO 2+ solutions in the volumetric proportion of 1:1 with equimolar solution concentrations of 0.01, 0.015 or 0.02 M allow one to obtain films with an excess or a deficiency of Bi in relation to stoichiometric Bi 2Te 3 (Bi=40 at%, Te=60 at%) by changing the deposition potential or the current density. The structure and the morphology of films have been studied as a function of the electrolyte concentration and the deposition conditions.

  1. Effects of acidic deposition on in-lake phosphorus availability: a lesson from lakes recovering from acidification.

    PubMed

    Kopáček, Jiří; Hejzlar, Josef; Kaňa, Jiří; Norton, Stephen A; Stuchlík, Evžen

    2015-03-01

    Lake water concentrations of phosphorus (P) recently increased in some mountain areas due to elevated atmospheric input of P rich dust. We show that increasing P concentrations also occur during stable atmospheric P inputs in central European alpine lakes recovering from atmospheric acidification. The elevated P availability in the lakes results from (1) increasing terrestrial export of P accompanying elevated leaching of dissolved organic carbon and decreasing phosphate-adsorption ability of soils due to their increasing pH, and (2) decreasing in-lake P immobilization by aluminum (Al) hydroxide due to decreasing leaching of ionic Al from the recovering soils. The P availability in the recovering lakes is modified by the extent of soil acidification, soil composition, and proportion of till and meadow soils in the catchment. These mechanisms explain several conflicting observations of the acid rain effects on surface water P concentrations.

  2. Effects of acidic deposition on in-lake phosphorus availability: a lesson from lakes recovering from acidification.

    PubMed

    Kopáček, Jiří; Hejzlar, Josef; Kaňa, Jiří; Norton, Stephen A; Stuchlík, Evžen

    2015-03-01

    Lake water concentrations of phosphorus (P) recently increased in some mountain areas due to elevated atmospheric input of P rich dust. We show that increasing P concentrations also occur during stable atmospheric P inputs in central European alpine lakes recovering from atmospheric acidification. The elevated P availability in the lakes results from (1) increasing terrestrial export of P accompanying elevated leaching of dissolved organic carbon and decreasing phosphate-adsorption ability of soils due to their increasing pH, and (2) decreasing in-lake P immobilization by aluminum (Al) hydroxide due to decreasing leaching of ionic Al from the recovering soils. The P availability in the recovering lakes is modified by the extent of soil acidification, soil composition, and proportion of till and meadow soils in the catchment. These mechanisms explain several conflicting observations of the acid rain effects on surface water P concentrations. PMID:25660534

  3. Acid rain and acidification in China: the importance of base cation deposition.

    PubMed

    Larssen, T; Carmichael, G R

    2000-10-01

    Acid deposition has been recognized as a serious environmental problem in China. Most acid deposition studies have focused on sulfur deposition and the pH of precipitation. However, as high concentration of alkaline dust is an important feature of the atmosphere in large parts of China, base cation deposition must be taken into account when discussing possible effects on soils and vegetation from acid deposition. We estimate the deposition of sulfur as well as calcium, i.e. the dominating anion and cation, on a regional scale in China using data both from measurements and modeling. The ratio of sulfur/calcium in deposition is then used as an indicator for identifying areas where deposition acidity exceeds alkalinity, and where soils may be at risk to acidification. The dynamic soil acidification model MAGIC is applied with data from two sites receiving high deposition loads in southwest China. The model predictions indicate that considerable soil acidification has been going on for the last decades due to acid deposition inputs. Effects on the spatial distribution of acidic deposition in China, using different future deposition scenarios, are illustrated. As the size of the anthropogenic fraction of the base cation deposition is unknown, different possible future trends in calcium deposition were used. Soil response, according to the model, using different combinations of sulfur and calcium deposition scenarios is shown. Applying the most strict measures to reduce sulfur emission will almost eliminate the acid deposition problem; however, such a scenario is not economically feasible in the short term. A strict, but possibly realistic, future scenario for sulfur may be enough to keep the situation at the present level, assuming only moderate reductions in calcium deposition. With large decreases in base cation deposition, increased soil acidification can be expected even with considerable sulfur emission reductions.

  4. Emissions involved in acidic deposition processes: Methodology and results

    SciTech Connect

    Placet, M.

    1990-01-01

    Data on the emissions involved in atmospheric acid-base chemistry are crucial to the assessment of acidic deposition and its effects. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the primary chemical compounds involved in acidic deposition processes. In addition, other emission species -- e.g., ammonia, alkaline dust particles, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen fluoride -- are involved in atmospheric acid-base chemistry, either by contributing acidic constituents or by neutralizing acidic species. Several emissions data bases have been developed under the auspices of the National Acid Precipitation Program (NAPAP). In addition to those developed by NAPAP, emissions data bases and emissions trends estimates also have been developed by organizations such as the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper briefly describes and compares the methods used in developing these emissions data bases and presents an overview of their emissions estimates. A more detailed discussion of these topics can be found in the State-of-Science Report on emissions recently released by NAPAP and in the references cited in that report. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Estimates of cloud water deposition at Mountain Acid Deposition Program sites in the Appalachian Mountains.

    PubMed

    Baumgardner, Ralph E; Isil, Selma S; Lavery, Thomas F; Rogers, Christopher M; Mohnen, Volker A

    2003-03-01

    Cloud water deposition was estimated at three high-elevation sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States (Whiteface Mountain, NY; Whitetop Mountain, VA; and Clingman's Dome, TN) from 1994 through 1999 as part of the Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro). This paper provides a summary of cloud water chemistry, cloud liquid water content, cloud frequency, estimates of cloud water deposition of sulfur and nitrogen species, and estimates of total deposition of sulfur and nitrogen at these sites. Other cloud studies in the Appalachians and their comparison to MADPro are also summarized. Whiteface Mountain exhibited the lowest mean and median concentrations of sulfur and nitrogen ions in cloud water, while Clingman's Dome exhibited the highest mean and median concentrations. This geographic gradient is partly an effect of the different meteorological conditions experienced at northern versus southern sites in addition to the difference in pollution content of air masses reaching the sites. All sites measured seasonal cloud water deposition rates of SO4(2-) greater than 50 kg/ha and NO3(-) rates of greater than 25 kg/ha. These high-elevation sites experienced additional deposition loading of SO4(2-) and NO3(-) on the order of 6-20 times greater compared with lower elevation Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) sites. Approximately 80-90% of this extra loading is from cloud deposition.

  6. Effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid, lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quails induced by purine-rich diets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhijian; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Xiaoqing; Jin, Rui; Zhu, Wenjing

    2014-11-01

    Inulin, a group of dietary fibers, is reported to improve the metabolic disorders. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chicory inulin on serum metabolites of uric acid (UA), lipids, glucose, and abdominal fat deposition in quail model induced by a purine-rich diet. In this study, 60 male French quails were randomly allocated to five groups: CON (control group), MOD (model group), BEN (benzbromarone-treated group), CHI-H (high-dosage chicory inulin-treated group), and CHI-L (low-dosage chicory inulin-treated group). The serum UA level was significantly increased in the model group from days 7 to 28, as well as triglyceride (TG) and free fatty acid (FFA) increased later in the experimental period. The abdominal fat ratio was increased on day 28. Benzbromarone can decrease UA levels on days 14 and 28. The high and low dosage of chicory inulin also decreased serum UA levels on days 7, 14, and 28. The abdominal fat ratio, activity, and protein of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) were decreased in chicory inulin-treated groups. The activities of xanthine oxidase (XOD) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were increased in the model group and decreased in the benzbromarone and chicory inulin groups. This study evaluated a quail model of induced hyperuricemia with other metabolic disorders caused by a high-purine diet. The results indicated that a purine-rich diet might contribute to the development of hyperuricemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and abdominal obesity. Chicory inulin decreased serum UA, TG, and abdominal fat deposition in a quail model of hyperuricemia by altering the ACC protein expression and FAS and XOD activities.

  7. Materials damage due to acid deposition - A field study in southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, R.; Hillestad, R.; Jeanjaquet, S.L.; Mansfeld, F.

    1987-01-01

    The Kapiloff Acid Deposition Act of 1982 requires the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to assess the economic impact of acid deposition upon materials as part of a comprehensive research program to determine the nature, extent and potential effects of acid deposition in California. Prior to assessing the economic impact, major uncertainties must be resolved concerning the specific roles of acid deposition constituents in materials damage. Field exposure and laboratory chamber experiments to quantify these specific roles are being conducted in a joint project between Environmental Monitoring and Services, Inc. (EMSI), Rockwell International Science Center (RISC), and University of Southern California (USC).

  8. Selective deposition of dietary α-Lipoic acid in mitochondrial fraction and its synergistic effect with α-Tocoperhol acetate on broiler meat oxidative stability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The use of bioactive antioxidants in feed of broiler to mitigate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems is one of promising nutritional strategies. The aim of present study was to alleviate ROS production in mitochondrial fraction (MF) of meat by supplemented dietary antioxidant in feed of broiler. For this purpose, mitochondria specific antioxidant: α-lipoic acid (25 mg, 75 mg and 150 mg) with or without combination of α-tocopherol acetate (200 mg) used in normal and palm olein oxidized oil (4%) supplemented feed. One hundred and eighty one day old broiler birds were randomly divided into six treatments and provided the mentioned feed from third week. Feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR) remained statistically same in all groups while body weight decreased in supplemented groups accordingly at the end of study. The broiler meat MF antioxidant potential was significantly improved by feeding supplemented feed estimated as 1,1-di phenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity, 2,2-azinobis-(3- ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS+) and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). The maximum antioxidant activity was depicted in group fed on 150 mg/kg α-lipoic acid (ALA) and 200 mg/kg α-tocopherol acetate (ATA) (T4) in both breast and leg MF. Moreover, TBARS were higher in leg as compared to breast MF. Although, oxidized oil containing feed reduced the growth, lipid stability and antioxidant potential of MF whilst these traits were improved by receiving feed containing ALA and ATA. ALA and ATA showed higher deposition in T4 group while least in group received oxidized oil containing feed (T5). Positive correlation exists between DPPH free radical scavenging activity and the ABTS + reducing activity. In conclusion, ALA and ATA supplementation in feed had positive effect on antioxidant status of MF that consequently diminished the oxidative stress in polyunsaturated fatty acid enriched meat. PMID:23617815

  9. Modeling soil response to acidic deposition in nonsulfate adsorbing soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, P.R.; Grigal, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    A simple semiempirical model for the prediction of changes in soil pH and base saturation with acidic deposition was developed. In steady-state ecosystems acidic deposition results in losses of basic cations from exchange sites. In the model, depletion of exchangeable bases is calculated from the difference between input acidity and output of H/sup +/ and Al/sup 3 +/ in water percolating through the solum. A correction for the decrease in bicarbonate weathering is made but sulfate adsorption is not considered. Estimates including the effect of increased mineral weathering with decreased pH can be made if the natural weathering rate is known and if the order with respect to H/sup +/ is known for the rate expression for soil weathering. The model predicted laboratory data for the acidification of samples for three soil horizons. For a fourth horizon, that was formed in contact with bedrock and high in weatherable minerals, the model overestimated the effect of the acid. Model predictions using soil data showed a slow decrease in soil pH and base saturation until the pH region of Al buffering was attained and then a new steady-state was achieved. The pH and base saturation in the Al buffering region was similar to that found in very acid soils under forest vegetation.

  10. Uncertainties in the estimation of materials damage due to acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lipfert, F.W. )

    1987-01-01

    Damage to materials in the built environment is one of the effects of acid deposition leading to economic costs to society. Such effects are not new, having been recognized for over a century with respect to deterioration of stone work and probably 50 years with respect to accelerated corrosion of metals. As is the usual practice, acid deposition includes both dry deposition of gases and particles as well as wet deposition of acidic precipitation. This paper discusses the current status of knowledge and further information needs. In part, some of these needs are identified from critical reviews of the preliminary assessment efforts.

  11. Photosynthetic and growth responses of Schima superba seedlings to sulfuric and nitric acid depositions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Fang-Fang; Ding, Hui-Ming; Feng, Li-Li; Chen, Jing-Jing; Yang, Song-Yu; Wang, Xi-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A continuing rise in acid deposition can cause forest degradation. In China, acid deposition has converted gradually from sulfuric acid deposition (SAD) to nitric acid deposition (NAD). However, the differing responses of photosynthesis and growth to depositions of sulfuric vs. nitric acid have not been well studied. In this study, 1-year-old seedlings of Schima superba, a dominant species in subtropical forests, were treated with two types of acid deposition SO4 (2-)/NO3 (-) ratios (8:1 and 0.7:1) with two applications (foliar spraying and soil drenching) at two pH levels (pH 3.5 and pH 2.5) over a period of 18 months. The results showed that the intensity, acid deposition type, and spraying method had significant effects on the physiological characteristics and growth performance of seedlings. Acid deposition at pH 2.5 via foliar application reduced photosynthesis and growth of S. superba, especially in the first year. Unlike SAD, NAD with high acidity potentially alleviated the negative effects of acidity on physiological properties and growth, probably due to a fertilization effect that improved foliar nitrogen and chlorophyll contents. Our results suggest that trees were damaged mainly by direct acid stress in the short term, whereas in the long term, soil acidification was also likely to be a major risk to forest ecosystems. Our data suggest that the shift in acid deposition type may complicate the ongoing challenge of anthropogenic acid deposition to ecosystem stability. PMID:26797956

  12. Interactive effects of elevated CO2 and nitrogen deposition on fatty acid molecular and isotope composition of above- and belowground tree biomass and forest soil fractions.

    PubMed

    Griepentrog, Marco; Eglinton, Timothy I; Hagedorn, Frank; Schmidt, Michael W I; Wiesenberg, Guido L B

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and reactive nitrogen (N) concentrations have been increasing due to human activities and impact the global carbon (C) cycle by affecting plant photosynthesis and decomposition processes in soil. Large amounts of C are stored in plants and soils, but the mechanisms behind the stabilization of plant- and microbial-derived organic matter (OM) in soils are still under debate and it is not clear how N deposition affects soil OM dynamics. Here, we studied the effects of 4 years of elevated (13C-depleted) CO2 and N deposition in forest ecosystems established in open-top chambers on composition and turnover of fatty acids (FAs) in plants and soils. FAs served as biomarkers for plant- and microbial-derived OM in soil density fractions. We analyzed above- and belowground plant biomass of beech and spruce trees as well as soil density fractions for the total organic C and FA molecular and isotope (δ13C) composition. FAs did not accumulate relative to total organic C in fine mineral fractions, showing that FAs are not effectively stabilized by association with soil minerals. The δ13C values of FAs in plant biomass increased under high N deposition. However, the N effect was only apparent under elevated CO2 suggesting a N limitation of the system. In soil fractions, only isotope compositions of short-chain FAs (C16+18) were affected. Fractions of 'new' (experimental-derived) FAs were calculated using isotope depletion in elevated CO2 plots and decreased from free light to fine mineral fractions. 'New' FAs were higher in short-chain compared to long-chain FAs (C20-30), indicating a faster turnover of short-chain compared to long-chain FAs. Increased N deposition did not significantly affect the quantity of 'new' FAs in soil fractions, but showed a tendency of increased amounts of 'old' (pre-experimental) C suggesting that decomposition of 'old' C is retarded by high N inputs.

  13. California's program to assist economic impact of acidic deposition on materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, M.; Amar, P. )

    1988-01-01

    The effects of acidic deposition in California are potentially wide-ranging. Potential problems include adverse effects on human health, acidification of poorly buffered lakes and streams, direct or indirect damage to crops, and to forest, grassland and chaparral ecosystems, and damage to man-made materials and structures. In recognition of the potential problems posed by acidic deposition, the California legislature in 1982 adopted the Kapiloff Acid Deposition Act. The Kapiloff Act recognized that acidic deposition in several forms is occurring in California and established a five-year research and monitoring program. The goal of California's program, under the Kapiloff Act, was to investigate the causes and effects of, and possible strategies to reduce, acidic deposition in California.

  14. Effect of inulin supplementation and dietary fat source on performance, blood serum metabolites, liver lipids, abdominal fat deposition, and tissue fatty acid composition in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Velasco, S; Ortiz, L T; Alzueta, C; Rebolé, A; Treviño, J; Rodríguez, M L

    2010-08-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of adding inulin to diets containing 2 different types of fat as energy sources on performance, blood serum metabolites, liver lipids, and fatty acids of abdominal adipose tissue and breast and thigh meat. A total of 240 one-day-old female broiler chicks were randomly allocated into 1 of 6 treatments with 8 replicates per treatment and 5 chicks per pen. The experiment consisted of a 3 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments including 3 concentrations of inulin (0, 5, and 10 g/kg of diet) and 2 types of fat [palm oil (PO) and sunflower oil (SO)] at an inclusion rate of 90 g/kg of diet. The experimental period lasted from 1 to 34 d. Dietary fat type did not affect BW gain but impaired feed conversion (P < 0.001) in birds fed the PO diets compared with birds fed the SO diets. The diets containing PO increased abdominal fat deposition and serum lipid and glucose concentrations. Triacylglycerol contents in liver were higher in the birds fed PO diets. Dietary fat type also modified fatty acids of abdominal and i.m. fat, resulting in a higher concentration of C16:0 and C18:1n-9 and a lower concentration of C18:2n-6 in the birds fed PO diets. The addition of inulin to diets modified (P = 0.017) BW gain quadratically without affecting feed conversion. Dietary inulin decreased the total lipid concentration in liver (P = 0.003) and that of triacylglycerols and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol (up to 31%) in blood serum compared with the control groups. The polyunsaturated fatty acid:saturated fatty acid ratio increased in abdominal and i.m. fat when inulin was included in the SO-containing diets. The results from the current study suggest that the addition of inulin to broiler diets has a beneficial effect on blood serum lipids by decreasing triacylglyceride concentrations The results also support the use of inulin to increase the capacity of SO for enhancing polyunsaturated fatty acid:saturated fatty acid ratio of i.m. fat

  15. Acid deposition: Atmospheric processes in Eastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This report examines scientific evidence on the relationship between emissions of acid-forming pollutants and damage to sensitive ecosystems from acid rain and other forms of acid deposition. The report's conclusions represent the most authoritative statement yet that reductions in emissions of these pollutants will result in proportional reductions in acid rain.

  16. Acid depositions and concrete attack: Main influences

    SciTech Connect

    Sersale, R.; Frigione, G.; Bonavita, L.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an experimental research on the factors responsible to a greater extent for the action of simulated acid precipitations on cement concrete works, both in static and in dynamic conditions, are discussed. The influence of the cement type, the role of calcium hydroxide, the influence of water-cement ratio, and the retard effect on assault, owing to a surface treatment with a water repellent agent, are emphasized.

  17. Sulfuric acid deposition from stratospheric geoengineering with sulfate aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, Ben; Robock, Alan; Oman, Luke; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Marquardt, Allison B.

    2009-07-01

    We used a general circulation model of Earth's climate to conduct geoengineering experiments involving stratospheric injection of sulfur dioxide and analyzed the resulting deposition of sulfate. When sulfur dioxide is injected into the tropical or Arctic stratosphere, the main additional surface deposition of sulfate occurs in midlatitude bands, because of strong cross-tropopause flux in the jet stream regions. We used critical load studies to determine the effects of this increase in sulfate deposition on terrestrial ecosystems by assuming the upper limit of hydration of all sulfate aerosols into sulfuric acid. For annual injection of 5 Tg of SO2 into the tropical stratosphere or 3 Tg of SO2 into the Arctic stratosphere, neither the maximum point value of sulfate deposition of approximately 1.5 mEq m-2 a-1 nor the largest additional deposition that would result from geoengineering of approximately 0.05 mEq m-2 a-1 is enough to negatively impact most ecosystems.

  18. Discovering the causes, consequences, and implications of acid rain and atmospheric deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Cowling, E.B.

    1983-09-01

    Most forest industry personnel concerned with environmental issues are located at mill sites, where the major focus of their concern is with emissions and regulations rather than with deposition and its effects. The forest products industry needs to think of itself as a net receiver rather than a primary emitter of air pollution, acid rain, and atmospheric deposition. A shift in focus to include research on the chemistry of atmospheric deposition and both beneficial and detrimental effects on forest productivity and water quality is recommended. An attempt is made to summarize some important principles concerning air pollution, acid deposition, and atmospheric deposition and their effects on terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The effects on water quality, agricultural crops, forests, and soils are examined. Recent federal coordinated research programs that have been developed on the biological and atmospheric aspects of the acid deposition problem are presented.

  19. Methodology for estimating crop loss from acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    Crop losses affect the production, availability and cost of food, and therefore have important economic, social, and political implications especially during this period of rapid world population growth. The fact that air-borne pollutants affect vegetative growth has been known for more than a century. Recently, the acidic deposition phenomenon has gained increasing attention, especially when implicated as a factor potentially responsible for crop yield losses. Experimental approaches utilized in traditional pollution effects research include: field surveys, sensitivity classification, dose-response studies, and regional-impact evaluation. Acid rain is a unique pollutant having special problems associated with researching its effects. For example, the description of dose for this pollutant should include rain chemistry (not just pH), rainfall rate, duration of event, total deposition, droplet size, etc. These parameters must also be considered when simulating rain in controlled studies. Due to the potential for interactions with biotic and abiotic entities, factorial research designs and multivariate analyses may be necessary for investigations of acid-rain impacts on crops. Results from well-planned mechanistic studies and dose-response experiments may be used to predict effects (both positive and negative), assess economic impacts, and establish tolerance thresholds for this form of pollution.

  20. [Effects of simulated nitrogen deposition on soil acid phosphomonoesterase activity and soil available phosphorus content in subtropical forests in Dinghushan Mountain].

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Zeng, Shu-cai; Huang, Wen-juan

    2011-03-01

    An in situ field experiment was conducted to study the effects of simulated nitrogen (N) deposition on soil acid phosphomonoesterase activity (APA) and soil available phosphorous (AP) content in Pinus massoniana forest (PF), coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest (MF), and monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest (MEBF) in Dinghushan Mountain. In PF and MF, three treatments were installed, i.e., CK (0 kg N x hm(-2) x a(-1)), low N (50 kg N x hm(-2) x a(-1)), and medium N (100 kg N x hm(-2) x a(-1)); in MEBF, four treatments were installed, i.e., CK, low N, medium N, and high N (150 kg N x hm(-2) x a(-1)). The soil APA and soil AP content decreased with soil depth. The soil APA was the highest in MEBF, while the AP content had no significant difference in the three forests. The effects of N addition on soil APA differed with forest types. In MEBF, the APA was the highest (19.52 micromol x g(-1) x h(-1)) in low N treatment; while in PF and MF, the APA was the highest (12.74 and 11.02 micromol x g(-1) x h(-1), respectively) in medium N treatment. In the three forests, soil AP content was the highest in low N treatment, but had no significant differences among the N treatments. There was a significant positive correlation between soil APA and soil AP content.

  1. [Effects of simulated nitrogen deposition on soil acid phosphomonoesterase activity and soil available phosphorus content in subtropical forests in Dinghushan Mountain].

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Zeng, Shu-cai; Huang, Wen-juan

    2011-03-01

    An in situ field experiment was conducted to study the effects of simulated nitrogen (N) deposition on soil acid phosphomonoesterase activity (APA) and soil available phosphorous (AP) content in Pinus massoniana forest (PF), coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest (MF), and monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest (MEBF) in Dinghushan Mountain. In PF and MF, three treatments were installed, i.e., CK (0 kg N x hm(-2) x a(-1)), low N (50 kg N x hm(-2) x a(-1)), and medium N (100 kg N x hm(-2) x a(-1)); in MEBF, four treatments were installed, i.e., CK, low N, medium N, and high N (150 kg N x hm(-2) x a(-1)). The soil APA and soil AP content decreased with soil depth. The soil APA was the highest in MEBF, while the AP content had no significant difference in the three forests. The effects of N addition on soil APA differed with forest types. In MEBF, the APA was the highest (19.52 micromol x g(-1) x h(-1)) in low N treatment; while in PF and MF, the APA was the highest (12.74 and 11.02 micromol x g(-1) x h(-1), respectively) in medium N treatment. In the three forests, soil AP content was the highest in low N treatment, but had no significant differences among the N treatments. There was a significant positive correlation between soil APA and soil AP content. PMID:21657017

  2. Mitigation of acid deposition: Liming of surface waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoshesky, J.; Price, R.; DeMuro, J.

    1989-05-01

    In recent years acid deposition has become a serious concern internationally. Scientific literature has documented the acidification of numerous lakes and streams in North America and Scandinavia resulting in the depletion or total loss of fisheries and other aquatic biota. Liming represents the only common corrective practice aimed specifically at remediating an affected acid receptor. This report reviews a range of liming technologies and liming materials, as well as the effect of surface-water liming on water quality and aquatic biota. As background to the liming discussion, the hydrologic cycle and the factors that make surface waters sensitive to acid deposition are also discussed. Finally, a brief review of some of the liming projects that have been conducted, or are currently in operation is presented, giving special emphasis to mitigation efforts in Maryland. Liming has been effectively used to counteract surface-water acidification in parts of Scandinavia, Canada, and the U.S. To date, liming has generally been shown to improve physical and chemical conditions and enhance the biological recovery of aquatic ecosystems affected by acidification.

  3. The influence of a small amount of maleic acid on crystal deposition phenomena of methacrylic acid in melt crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Tomomichi; Kato, Shinpei; Takiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Crystal deposition phenomena were investigated in the suspension melt crystallization of an organic acid. Methacrylic acid was used as the target substance, a certain amount of methanol was used as the solvent, and the effect of a small amount of maleic acid by-produced in methacrylic acid synthesis was focused on. Batch crystallizations were carried out on a laboratory scale using various concentrations of maleic acid. In the presence of maleic acid, a certain deviation from equilibrium of the pure binary system was observed in the final composition of mother liquor. Moreover, nevertheless the final temperature in the crystallizer was same, the amount of crystal deposition in the presence of maleic acid was smaller than in the absence of maleic acid. It was suggested that the final amount of crystal deposition decreased in the presence of maleic acid. Additionally, it was observed that the obtained crystal size was smaller in the presence of maleic acid. Hence, a simplified kinetic analysis of crystal deposition rates was carried out to make the effect of maleic acid clear. Consequently, it was suggested that the cause of the above-mentioned phenomena was the existence of the maleic acid concentration dependent pseudo-liquidus line.

  4. Effects of acid deposition on dissolution of carbonate stone during summer storms in the Adirondack Mountains, New York, 1987-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Paul F.; Reddy, Michael M.; Sherwood, S.I.

    1994-01-01

    This study is part of a long-term research program designed to identify and quantify acid rain damage to carbonate stone. Acidic deposition accelerates the dissolution of carbonate-stone monuments and building materials. Sequential sampling of runoff from carbonate-stone (marble) and glass (reference) microcatchments in the Adirondack Mountains in New York State provided a detailed record of the episodic fluctuations in rain rate and runoff chemistry during individual summer storms. Rain rate and chemical concentrations from carbonate-stone and glass runoff fluctuated three to tenfold during storms. Net calcium-ion concentrations from the carbonatestone runoff, a measure of stone dissolution, typically fluctuated twofold during these storms. High net sulfate and net calcium concentrations in the first effective runoff at the start of a storm indicated that atmospheric pollutants deposited on the stone surface during dry periods formed calcium sulfate minerals, an important process in carbonate stone dissolution. Dissolution of the carbonate stone generally increased up to twofold during coincident episodes of low rain rate (less than 5 millimeters per hour) and decreased rainfall (glass runoff) pH (less than 4.0); episodes of high rain rate (cloudbursts) were coincident with a rapid increase in rainfall pH and also a rapid decrease in the dissolution of carbonate-stone. During a storm, it seems the most important factors causing increased dissolution of carbonate stone are coincident periods of low rain rate and decreased rainfall pH. Dissolution of the carbonate stone decreased slightly as the rain rate exceeded about 5 millimeters per hour, probably in response to rapidly increasing rainfall pH during episodes of high rain rate and shorter contact time between the runoff and the stone surface. High runoff rates resulting from cloudbursts remove calcium sulfate minerals formed during dry periods prior to storms and also remove dissolution products formed in large

  5. Effects of ozone and acidic deposition on carbon allocation and mycorrhizal colonization of Pinus taeda L. seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.B.; O'Neal, E.G.

    1991-03-01

    Patterns of carbon allocation and mycorrhizal colonization were examined in loblolly pine seedlings from two half-sib families exposed to three ozone treatments (charcoal-filtered air, ambient air + 80 ppb O{sub 3}, and ambient air + 160 ppb O{sub 3}) and three rain pH levels (5.2, 4.5, and 3.3) for 12 weeks in open-topped chambers in a field setting. No statistically significant effects of ozone or rain pH were detected on biomass, root:shoot ratios, or carbon allocation; some consistent patterns were observed, however. Coarse root starch concentrations and mycorrhizal infection varied significantly with ozone levels. No significant interactions of ozone, rain pH, or genotype were detected.

  6. Atmospheric acid deposition damage to paints. Environmental research brief

    SciTech Connect

    Haynie, F.H.

    1986-01-01

    Available data from laboratory and field studies of damage to paints by erosion were analyzed to develop an atmospheric acid-deposition damage function for exterior house paints containing calcium carbonate or silicate extenders. Regression-analysis coefficients associated with sulfur dioxide levels are consistent with the reaction between the SO/sub 2/ and calcium carbonate to form soluble calcium sulfate. The effect of sulfuric acid in rain on paint is expected to behave similarly. Observed actual household painting frequencies prior to 1970 are consistent with the damage functions calculated from the experimental erosion data obtained in the 1950's, 1960's and early 1970's. Changes in both environmental conditions and types of paints marketed make it necessary to make assumptions when using the damage functions to estimate costs associated with repainting.

  7. Acidic lakes and streams in the United States: The role of acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L.A.; Herlihy, A.T.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Eilers, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    A statistically designed survey of lakes and streams in acid-sensitive areas of the United States, the National Surface Water Survey (NSWS), was used to identify the role of acidic deposition, relative to other factors, in causing acidic conditions in 1,181 lakes and 4,668 streams. Atmospheric deposition is the dominant source of acid anions in 75% of the acidic lakes and 47% of the acidic streams. Organic anions are dominant in one-fourth of the acidic lakes and streams; acidic mine drainage is the dominant acid source in 25% of the acidic streams. Other causes of acidic conditions are relatively unimportant on a regional scale. Nearly all the deposition-dominated acidic systems were found in six well-delineated subpopulations that represent about one-fourth of the NSWS lake population and one-third of the NSWS stream population.

  8. Low-Vacuum Deposition of Glutamic Acid and Pyroglutamic Acid: A Facile Methodology for Depositing Organic Materials beyond Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Iwao; Maeda, Shunsaku; Suda, Yoriko; Makihara, Kenji; Takahashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Thin layers of pyroglutamic acid (Pygl) have been deposited by thermal evaporation of the molten L-glutamic acid (L-Glu) through intramolecular lactamization. This deposition was carried out with the versatile handmade low-vacuum coater, which was simply composed of a soldering iron placed in a vacuum degassing resin chamber evacuated by an oil-free diaphragm pump. Molecular structural analyses have revealed that thin solid film evaporated from the molten L-Glu is mainly composed of L-Pygl due to intramolecular lactamization. The major component of the L-Pygl was in β-phase and the minor component was in γ-phase, which would have been generated from partial racemization to DL-Pygl. Electron microscopy revealed that the L-Glu-evaporated film generally consisted of the 20 nm particulates of Pygl, which contained a periodic pattern spacing of 0.2 nm intervals indicating the formation of the single-molecular interval of the crystallized molecular networks. The DL-Pygl-evaporated film was composed of the original DL-Pygl preserving its crystal structures. This methodology is promising for depositing a wide range of the evaporable organic materials beyond amino acids. The quartz crystal resonator coated with the L-Glu-evaporated film exhibited the pressure-sensing capability based on the adsorption-desorption of the surrounding gas at the film surface. PMID:25254114

  9. Low-Vacuum Deposition of Glutamic Acid and Pyroglutamic Acid: A Facile Methodology for Depositing Organic Materials beyond Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Iwao; Maeda, Shunsaku; Suda, Yoriko; Makihara, Kenji; Takahashi, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Thin layers of pyroglutamic acid (Pygl) have been deposited by thermal evaporation of the molten L-glutamic acid (L-Glu) through intramolecular lactamization. This deposition was carried out with the versatile handmade low-vacuum coater, which was simply composed of a soldering iron placed in a vacuum degassing resin chamber evacuated by an oil-free diaphragm pump. Molecular structural analyses have revealed that thin solid film evaporated from the molten L-Glu is mainly composed of L-Pygl due to intramolecular lactamization. The major component of the L-Pygl was in β-phase and the minor component was in γ-phase, which would have been generated from partial racemization to DL-Pygl. Electron microscopy revealed that the L-Glu-evaporated film generally consisted of the 20 nm particulates of Pygl, which contained a periodic pattern spacing of 0.2 nm intervals indicating the formation of the single-molecular interval of the crystallized molecular networks. The DL-Pygl-evaporated film was composed of the original DL-Pygl preserving its crystal structures. This methodology is promising for depositing a wide range of the evaporable organic materials beyond amino acids. The quartz crystal resonator coated with the L-Glu-evaporated film exhibited the pressure-sensing capability based on the adsorption-desorption of the surrounding gas at the film surface.

  10. ESTIMATES OF CLOUD WATER DEPOSITION AT MOUNTAIN DEPOSITION AT MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM SITES IN THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cloud water deposition was estimated at three high elevation sites in the Appalachian Mountains of the eastern United States (Whiteface Mountain, NY, Whitetop Mountain, VA, and Clingrnan's Dome, TN) from 1994 through 1999 as part of the Mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro). ...

  11. Stable plasma-deposited acrylic acid surfaces for cell culture applications.

    PubMed

    Detomaso, Loredana; Gristina, Roberto; Senesi, Giorgio S; d'Agostino, Riccardo; Favia, Pietro

    2005-06-01

    Continuous and modulated glow discharges were used to deposit thin films from acrylic acid vapors. Different deposition regimes were investigated, and their effect on chemical composition, morphology and homogeneity of the coatings, as well as on their stability in water and resistance to sterilization. Stable films were utilized in cell adhesion experiments with human fibroblasts. PMID:15626431

  12. Temporal perspective on acid deposition research

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrey, G R

    1980-02-20

    This statement presented to the Subcommittee on Natural Resources of the US House of Representatives gives a definition of acid rain, presents new data on the regional and temporal nature of the problem, and discusses research needs. (ACR)

  13. Geochemical investigations of selected Eastern United States watersheds affected by acid deposition.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bricker, O.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of acid deposition on surface waters in eastern USA watersheds of similar size, physiography, climate and land-use are related to the composition of the underlying bedrock. Watersheds developed on greenstone, calcareous shale, sandstone, granite and schist differ in their ability to neutralize acid rain; consequently, stream acidity is similar to that of precipitation. Watersheds developed on granite and schist are intermediate in their capacity to neutralize acid deposition. Bedrock composition appears to be the major property controlling surface-water chemistry in these systems; hydrological flowpaths and the nature of surficial materials and vegetation also influence chemical responses to acid deposition in watersheds. 453This and the following 10 abstracts are for papers forming a thematic set on geochemical aspects of acid rain. -P.Br.

  14. The emerging role of NO{sub x} in acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.A.; Birnbaum, R.E.

    1997-12-31

    The oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) have long been recognized as a principal precursor to acid deposition. Until recently, however, scientific knowledge about the nature and extent of NO{sub x}`s contribution to acidity in the atmosphere and to acid deposition damages on earth has been nascent; the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) and related research during the 1980s focused primarily on the linkage between sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions with acid deposition. This paper summarizes an integrative assessment on the science of NO{sub x} and acid deposition and the multiple environmental benefits associated with decreases in NO{sub x} emissions from coal-fired power plants. The Acid Rain Program performed this staff assessment to support the Phase II Acid Rain NO{sub x} Emission Reduction Rule, proposed on January 19, 1996 (61 FR 1442), and the Office of Air and Radiation (OAR) Integrated NO{sub x} Strategy. Model projections from EPA`s Acid Deposition Standard Feasibility Study (October 1995) provided the initial indication of the important role of NO{sub x} in the future chronic acidification of certain sensitive watershed ecosystems. Corroborative findings from the Bear Brook Watershed Manipulation Experiment and other recent field studies are discussed. This paper also presents an overview discussion of the current state-of-knowledge with respect to NO{sub x}`s role in the acidification of forests, soils, and vegetation as well as acidic-related damage to materials and structures. Basic terms and processes such as {open_quotes}atmospheric nitrogen deposition,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}nitrogen saturation,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}chronic vs. episodic acidification,{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}direct vs. soil-mediated acidification effects{close_quotes} are defined in context so as to facilitate understanding of the emerging role of NO{sub x} in acid deposition.

  15. Materials damage due to acid deposition - A laboratory study

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, F.; Jeanjaquet, S.L.; Vijayakumar, R.

    1987-01-01

    A series of laboratory tests is being carried out which supports a field study of materials damage due to acid deposition which is being carried out at present in California. Galvanized steel, nickel, two types of house paint and concrete are exposed in 28-day tests to humid air containing 1 ppm of SO/sub 2/, NO/sub 2/ or O/sub 3/, a mixture of these three pollutants or aerosols such as H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ or HNO/sub 3/. Also exposed in the test chamber are nickel and zinc atmospheric corrosion rate monitors (ACRMs) which supply a continuous record of the instantaneous corrosion rate and the time-of-wetness, t/sub w/. The results obtained so far show that the pollutants affect corrosion rates and t/sub w/ by varying degrees, with SO/sub 2/ having by far the largest effect.

  16. Examples of regional environmental assessment using acid deposition data

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.J.; Turner, R.S.; Allison, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    Integrated assessments of acid deposition impacts require data on pollutant emissions, pollutant deposition, air quality, aquatic resources, crops, forests, and manmade materials. These data must have common spatial and temporal attributes that can be readily accessed for statistical analysis, modeling, and display purposes. The Acid Deposition Assessment Staff of Task Group I established the Acid Deposition Data Network (ADDNET) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide accurate and reliable data to conduct assessment and policy analysis for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Although specific projects and task groups within NAPAP collect and analyze individual data files, ADDNET assembles selected files, verifies their contents, conducts quality assurance, maintains documentation, and makes data available to the NAPAP community. The ADDNET data base contains over 65 'certified' data sets that have been screened to ensure consistency across all areas of the assessment. Two applications of the ADDNET Data Base to assessment activities are described: estimation of the extent of sensitive lakes at risk to high atmospheric deposition and the mapping of regional soil properties according to hypothesized sensitivity criteria. Both examples cover New York and the New England states and show the integration of data from diverse sources for analyses. The data resources and the regional environmental assessment approach described here can be applied directly to other hazardous materials discussed at this symposium. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 11. Historical changes in surface-water acid-base chemistry in response to acidic deposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T.J.; Small, M.J.; Kingston, J.C.; Bernert, J.A.; Thomas, D.R.

    1990-09-01

    The objectives of the analyses reported in the State of Science report are to: identify the lake and stream populations in the United States that have experienced chronic changes in biologically significant constituents of surface water chemistry (e.g. pH, Al) in response to acidic deposition; quantify biologically meaningful historical changes in chronic surface water chemistry associated with acidic deposition, with emphasis on ANC, pH, and Al; estimate the proportion of lakes nor acidic that were not acidic in pre-industrial times; estimate the proportional response of each of the major chemical constituents that have changed in response to acidic deposition using a subset of statistically selected Adirondack lakes for which paleolimnological reconstructions of pre-industrial surface water chemistry have been performed; evaluate and improve, where appropriate and feasible, empirical models of predicting changes in ANC; and evaluate the response of seepage lakes to acidic deposition.

  18. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation.

    PubMed

    Djurdjević, L; Mitrović, M; Pavlović, P; Gajić, G; Kostić, O

    2006-05-01

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges (ranging from 1-80%). Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids (38.07-185.16 microg/g of total phenolics and 4.12-27.28 microg/g of phenolic acids) in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. Ash samples contained high amounts of ferulic, vanillic, and p-coumaric acid, while the content of both p-hydroxybenzoic and syringic acid was relatively low. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

  19. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation.

    PubMed

    Djurdjević, L; Mitrović, M; Pavlović, P; Gajić, G; Kostić, O

    2006-05-01

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the "Nikola Tesla-A" thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges (ranging from 1-80%). Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids (38.07-185.16 microg/g of total phenolics and 4.12-27.28 microg/g of phenolic acids) in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. Ash samples contained high amounts of ferulic, vanillic, and p-coumaric acid, while the content of both p-hydroxybenzoic and syringic acid was relatively low. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits. PMID:16418890

  20. Phenolic acids as bioindicators of fly ash deposit revegetation

    SciTech Connect

    L. Djurdjevic; M. Mitrovic; P. Pavlovic; G. Gajic; O. Kostic

    2006-05-15

    The floristic composition, the abundance, and the cover of pioneer plant species of spontaneously formed plant communities and the content of total phenolics and phenolic acids, as humus constituents, of an ash deposit after 7 years of recultivation were studied. The restoration of both the soil and the vegetation on the ash deposits of the 'Nikola Tesla-A' thermoelectric power plant in Obrenovac (Serbia) is an extremely slow process. Unfavorable physical and chemical characteristics, the toxicity of fly ash, and extreme microclimatic conditions prevented the development of compact plant cover. The abundance and cover of plants increased from the central part of the deposit towards its edges. Festuca rubra L., Crepis setosa Hall., Erigeron canadensis L., Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop., Calamagrostis epigeios (L.) Roth., and Tamarix gallica L. were the most abundant species, thus giving the highest cover. Humus generated during the decomposition process of plant remains represents a completely new product absent in the ash as the starting material. The amount of total phenolics and phenolic acids in fly ash increased from the center of the deposit towards its edges in correlation with the increase in plant abundance and cover. The presence of phenolic acids indicates the ongoing process of humus formation in the ash, in which the most abundant pioneer plants of spontaneously formed plant communities play the main role. Phenolic compounds can serve as reliable bioindicators in an assessment of the success of the recultivation process of thermoelectric power plants' ash deposits.

  1. Projection of response of trees and forests to acidic deposition and associated pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Kiester, A.R.; Ford, E.D.; Avery, A.; Gay, C.; Droessler, T.

    1990-09-01

    In 1986 the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) established the Forest Response Program (FRP) to assess the effects of acidic deposition and associated pollutants on forests. Modeling studies were developed in parallel with both field studies on the pattern and trends of forest condition and physiological studies of seedlings, saplings, and branches of mature trees. The goals of the modeling effort were to simulate the dynamics of the processes by which acidic deposition and ozone affect tree physiological processes and therefore lead to changes in growth. Results from models of the physiological function of leaves, branches, roots, xylem, and canopies are presented here. These models illustrate three aspects of the dynamics of these processes. First, growth and the effects of pollutants are stochastic processes; that is, they vary randomly over time. The models help to account for the large amount of variability seen in normal field conditions. Second, some physiological processes can compensate for the effects of acidic deposition or ozone. Third, pollutants may have more than one effect on tree growth, and these effects may be synergistic. The potential nonlinearities and the variabilities demonstrated by these models lead to the conclusions that forest health effects may be developing that are not yet apparent; and for regulation of acidic deposition and associated pollutants to have a detectable effect, regulatory changes will probably have to be of substantial magnitude.

  2. Electrophoretic deposition of tannic acid-polypyrrolidone films and composites.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Zhang, Tianshi; Zhitomirsky, Igor

    2016-05-01

    Thin films of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-tannic acid (TA) complexes were prepared by a conceptually new strategy, based on electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Proof of concept investigations involved the analysis of the deposition yield, FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy of the deposited material, and electron microscopy studies. The analysis of the deposition mechanism indicated that the limitations of the EPD in the deposition of small phenolic molecules, such as TA, and electrically neutral polymers, similar to PVP, containing hydrogen-accepting carbonyl groups, can be avoided. The remarkable adsorption properties of TA and film forming properties of the PVP-TA complexes allowed for the EPD of materials of different types, such as huntite mineral platelets and hydrotalcite clay particles, TiO2 and MnO2 oxide nanoparticles, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, TiN and Pd nanoparticles. Moreover, PVP-TA complexes were used for the co-deposition of different materials and formation of composite films. In another approach, TA was used as a capping agent for the hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanorods, which were then deposited by EPD using PVP-TA complexes. The fundamental adsorption and interaction mechanisms of TA involved chelation of metal atoms on particle surfaces with galloyl groups, π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding. The films prepared by EPD can be used for various applications, utilizing functional properties of TA, PVP, inorganic and organic materials of different types and their composites.

  3. Electrophoretic deposition of tannic acid-polypyrrolidone films and composites.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dan; Zhang, Tianshi; Zhitomirsky, Igor

    2016-05-01

    Thin films of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-tannic acid (TA) complexes were prepared by a conceptually new strategy, based on electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Proof of concept investigations involved the analysis of the deposition yield, FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy of the deposited material, and electron microscopy studies. The analysis of the deposition mechanism indicated that the limitations of the EPD in the deposition of small phenolic molecules, such as TA, and electrically neutral polymers, similar to PVP, containing hydrogen-accepting carbonyl groups, can be avoided. The remarkable adsorption properties of TA and film forming properties of the PVP-TA complexes allowed for the EPD of materials of different types, such as huntite mineral platelets and hydrotalcite clay particles, TiO2 and MnO2 oxide nanoparticles, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, TiN and Pd nanoparticles. Moreover, PVP-TA complexes were used for the co-deposition of different materials and formation of composite films. In another approach, TA was used as a capping agent for the hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanorods, which were then deposited by EPD using PVP-TA complexes. The fundamental adsorption and interaction mechanisms of TA involved chelation of metal atoms on particle surfaces with galloyl groups, π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding. The films prepared by EPD can be used for various applications, utilizing functional properties of TA, PVP, inorganic and organic materials of different types and their composites. PMID:26878711

  4. MOUNTAIN ACID DEPOSITION PROGRAM (MADPRO): CLOUD DEPOSITION TO THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS, 1994 THROUGH 1999

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mountain Acid Deposition Program (MADPro) was initiated in 1993 as part of the research necessary to support the objectives of the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet), which was created to address the requirements of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The two ma...

  5. [Trend in acid deposition at Tieshanping, Chonging during 2001-2010].

    PubMed

    Yu, De-Xiang; Xiao-Xiao, Ma; Tan, Bing-Quan; Zhao, Da-Wei; Zhang, Dong-Bao; Duan, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Although the total emission of sulphure dioxide (SO2) was reduced by more than 10% in the Eleventh Five-Year-Plan (2006-2010) in China, the total emission of nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the same period kept increasing. In order to evaluate the effects of the emission changes on acid depostion, a ten-year monitoring on forest throughfall was carried out from 2001 to 2010 at Tieshanping, Chongqing in Southwestern China. The results indicated there was a significantly decreasing trend of sulphur deposition and an increasing trend of nitrogen deposition, which coincided well with the dicreasing trend of SO2 emission and increasing tread of NOx emission in Chongqing, respectively. As the net effect, acid deposition was reduced by the emission contol. However, the total deposition of sulphur and nitrogen in 2010 was estimated to be 9.9 keq x (hm2 x a)(-1) and 4.5 keq x (hm2 x a)(-1), respectively according to the throughfall data, with the former probably overestimated by 28% and the latter underestimated by 50%. Since both the sulphur deposition and nitrogen deposition are higher than the highest levels in the history in Europe and North America, acid deposition is still a serious issue in Chongqing.

  6. Growth of and mineral deposition in young rats fed saturated and unsaturated fatty acids

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, A.; D'Souza, D. John Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD )

    1991-03-15

    Male weanling rats were used in 4 week experiments to study effects of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids on growth and mineral deposition in several organs (bone, kidneys, liver, spleen, testes). Minerals evaluated were calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and zinc, and levels of these minerals in tests diets were appropriate for growing rats. Two levels of dietary fat were used, and fatty acids included in the study were butyric/capronic, palmitic/stearic, oleic, and linoleic/linolenic acids. Decreased weight gains were observed in rats fed saturated fatty acids or 10% fat, while increases in weight gains were associated with increases in polyunsaturated/saturated (P/S) ratios. Copper, iron, or zinc levels tended to be higher in organs of rats fed saturated fatty acids. P/S ratios had no effect on copper or zinc deposition, but decreases in liver iron and increases in spleen iron were observed in rats fed the higher P/S ratios. Manganese levels were generally unaffected by fatty acid types, fat level, or P/S ratio, although liver manganese levels were higher in rats fed unsaturated fatty acids. Dietary fatty acids, fat level, or P/S ratios had no apparent effects on calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, or zinc deposition in femurs and tibias of rats.

  7. Effect of Polyelectrolyte and Fatty Acid Soap on the Formation of CaCO3 in the Bulk and the Deposit on Hard Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Alfredsson, Viveka; Tropsch, Juergen; Ettl, Roland; Nylander, Tommy

    2015-09-30

    The effects of sodium polyacrylate (NaPAA) as well as potassium oleate on the nucleation and calcium carbonate crystal growth on hard surfaces, i.e., stainless steel and silica, have been investigated at different temperatures. The relation between the surface deposition and the corresponding bulk processes has been revealed by combining dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and ellipsometry. The aim was to further our understanding of the crystal deposition/growth mechanism and how it can be controlled by the presence of polyelectrolytes (NaPAA) or soap (potassium oleate). The addition of polyelectrolytes (NaPAA) or soap (potassium oleate) decreases the size of CaCO3 particles in bulk solution and affects both crystal structure and morphology in the bulk as well as on hard surfaces. The amount of particles on hard surfaces decreases significantly in the presence of both potassium oleate and NaPAA. This was found to be a consequence of potassium oleate or NaPAA adsorption on the hard surface as well as on the CaCO3 crystal surfaces. Here, the polymer NaPAA exhibited a stronger inhibition effect on the formation and growth of CaCO3 particles than potassium oleate. PMID:26353982

  8. Simulated seasonal variations in wet acid depositions over East Asia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Cui; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Lingyun; Han, Xiao; Wang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    The air quality modeling system Regional Atmospheric Modeling System-Community Multi-scale Air Quality (RAMS-CMAQ) was applied to analyze temporospatial variations in wet acid deposition over East Asia in 2005, and model results obtained on a monthly basis were evaluated against extensive observations, including precipitation amounts at 704 stations and SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ concentrations in the atmosphere and rainwater at 18 EANET (the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia) stations. The comparison shows that the modeling system can reasonably reproduce seasonal precipitation patterns, especially the extensive area of dry conditions in northeast China and north China and the major precipitation zones. For ambient concentrations and wet depositions, the simulated results are in reasonable agreement (within a factor of 2) with observations in most cases, and the major observed features are mostly well reproduced. The analysis of modeled wet deposition distributions indicates that East Asia experiences noticeable variations in its wet deposition patterns throughout the year. In winter, southern China and the coastal areas of the Japan Sea report higher S04(2-) and NO3- wet depositions. In spring, elevated SO4(2-) and NO3-wet depositions are found in northeastern China, southern China, and around the Yangtze River. In summer, a remarkable rise in precipitation in northeastern China, the valleys of the Huaihe and Yangtze rivers, Korea, and Japan leads to a noticeable increase in SO4(2-) and NO3- wet depositions, whereas in autumn, higher SO4(2-) and NO3-wet depositions are found around Sichuan Province. Meanwhile, due to the high emission of SO2, high wet depositions of SO4(2-) are found throughout the entire year in the area surrounding Sichuan Province. There is a tendency toward decreasing NO3- concentrations in rainwater from China through Korea to Japan in both observed and simulated results, which is a consequence of the influence of the continental

  9. Simulated seasonal variations in wet acid depositions over East Asia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Cui; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Lingyun; Han, Xiao; Wang, Jun

    2011-11-01

    The air quality modeling system Regional Atmospheric Modeling System-Community Multi-scale Air Quality (RAMS-CMAQ) was applied to analyze temporospatial variations in wet acid deposition over East Asia in 2005, and model results obtained on a monthly basis were evaluated against extensive observations, including precipitation amounts at 704 stations and SO4(2-), NO3-, and NH4+ concentrations in the atmosphere and rainwater at 18 EANET (the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia) stations. The comparison shows that the modeling system can reasonably reproduce seasonal precipitation patterns, especially the extensive area of dry conditions in northeast China and north China and the major precipitation zones. For ambient concentrations and wet depositions, the simulated results are in reasonable agreement (within a factor of 2) with observations in most cases, and the major observed features are mostly well reproduced. The analysis of modeled wet deposition distributions indicates that East Asia experiences noticeable variations in its wet deposition patterns throughout the year. In winter, southern China and the coastal areas of the Japan Sea report higher S04(2-) and NO3- wet depositions. In spring, elevated SO4(2-) and NO3-wet depositions are found in northeastern China, southern China, and around the Yangtze River. In summer, a remarkable rise in precipitation in northeastern China, the valleys of the Huaihe and Yangtze rivers, Korea, and Japan leads to a noticeable increase in SO4(2-) and NO3- wet depositions, whereas in autumn, higher SO4(2-) and NO3-wet depositions are found around Sichuan Province. Meanwhile, due to the high emission of SO2, high wet depositions of SO4(2-) are found throughout the entire year in the area surrounding Sichuan Province. There is a tendency toward decreasing NO3- concentrations in rainwater from China through Korea to Japan in both observed and simulated results, which is a consequence of the influence of the continental

  10. Mathematical Modeling and Sensitivity Analysis of Acid Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Seog-Yeon

    Atmospheric processes influencing acid deposition are investigated by using mathematical model and sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity analysis techniques including Green's function analysis, constraint sensitivities, and lumped sensitivities are applied to temporal problems describing gas and liquid phase chemistry and to space-time problems describing pollutant transport and deposition. The sensitivity analysis techniques are used to; (1) investigate the chemical and physical processes related to acid depositions and (2) evaluate the linearity hypothesis, and source and receptor relationships. Results from analysis of the chemistry processes show that the relationship between SO(,2) concentration and the amount of sulfate produced is linear in gas phase but it may be nonlinear in liquid phase when there exists an excess amount of SO(,2) compared to H(,2)O(,2). Under the simulated conditions, the deviation of linearity between ambient sulfur present and the amount of sulfur deposited after 2 hours, is less than 10% in a convective storm situation when the liquid phase chemistry, gas phases chemistry, and cloud processes are considered simultaneously. Efficient ways of sensitivity analysis of time-space problems are also developed and used to evaluate the source and receptor relationships in an Eulerian transport, chemistry, removal model.

  11. Spatial variation in acidic deposition in an appalachian forest

    SciTech Connect

    Tajchman, S.J.; Kosuri, S.R.; Zeleznik, J.D. . Division of Forestry)

    1993-03-01

    Precipitation is the main source of water for the forest. Gross precipitation reaching the forest canopy is partitioned among interception, stem flow, and through fall. While the intercepted fraction of precipitation evaporates into the atmosphere, stem flow and through fall reach the forest floor, but their chemistry is as a rule different from that of gross precipitation. This modification is due to the enrichment of stem flow and through fall with substances of dry deposition washed off from the vegetation surface. In addition, there is a mass exchange effect between the solutions of chemicals on the surface of vegetation and plant tissue; the balance of this exchange can be positive or negative. There is spatial variability in the amount and chemistry of through fall. This variability is mainly related to the distribution of leaf area and to the species composition. In the West Virginia University Forest, the coefficient of variation of the growing-season through fall means ranged from 0.09 to 0.14. The major components in acid rain are sulfates and nitrates, which affect plant growth and forest declines. The objective of this study was to obtain characteristic properties of through fall and stem flow of selected trees in the West Virginia University Forest.

  12. Dry deposition of sulfur dioxide and nitric acid to oak, elm and pine leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Dash, J.M. )

    1988-01-01

    In this study, the deposition of SO{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3} was measured to three tree species, elm, oak and pine. Earlier work has shown that these three species cover of physical types (smooth oak leaves, rough elm leaves, and needles) and chemical types (acid and alkaline leaves) The total deposition is compared to the deposition measured through the stomata. After deposition, removal by revolatilization or extraction was determined. The data is used to estimate dry deposition fluxes of SO{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3} to forests that can then be combined with wet fluxes to determine total atmospheric inputs. Based on these results, a preliminary estimate is made of the possible detrimental effects to forests from atomspheric inputs.

  13. Changes in soil pH across England and Wales in response to decreased acid deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, G. J. D.; Bellamy, P. H.

    2009-04-01

    In our recent analysis of data from the National Soil Inventory of England and Wales, we found widespread changes in soil pH across both countries between the two samplings of the Inventory. In general, soil pH increased - i.e. soils became less acid - under all land uses. The Inventory was first sampled in 1978-83 on a 5-km grid over the whole area. This yielded about 6,000 sites of which 5,662 could be sampled for soil. Roughly 40% of the sites were re-sampled at intervals from 12 to 25 years after the original sampling - in 1994/96 for agricultural land and in 2002/03 for non-agricultural. Exactly the same sampling and analytical protocols were used in the two samplings. In arable soils, the increase in pH was right across the range, whereas in grassland soils the main increase was at the acid end of the scale (pH < 5.5) with a small increase above pH 7. Some part of the change is likely to have been due to changes in land management. This includes better targeting of agricultural lime on acid soils; changes in nitrogen fertilizer use; deeper ploughing bringing up more calcareous subsoil on soils on calcareous materials; and so forth. However a major driver appears to have been decreased acid deposition to land. The total amounts of nitrogen compounds deposited were relatively unchanged over the survey period, but the amounts of acidifying sulphur compounds decreased by approximately 50%. We constructed a linear regression model to assess the relation between the rate of change in pH (normalised to an annual basis) and the rate of change in acid deposition, as modified by soil properties (pH, clay content, organic matter content), rainfall and past acid deposition. We used data on rainfall and acid deposition over the survey period on the same 5-km grid as the NSI data. We fitted the model separately for each land use category. The results for arable land showed a significant effect of the change in rate of acid deposition, though a significant part of the

  14. Impact of acid rain and deposition on aquatic biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference which examined the biological effects of acid rain on aquatic ecosystems. Topics considered at the conference included acidic lakes, the effects of acidification on biomass, hydrology, the sensitivity of stream invertebrates to pH depression, automated biomonitoring, remote computer platforms with satellite data retrieval in acidified streams, toxicity test, and a simple method of measuring pH accurately in acid rain.

  15. Dietary conjugated linoleic acids increase intramuscular fat deposition and decrease subcutaneous fat deposition in Yellow Breed × Simmental cattle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haibo; Dong, Xianwen; Wang, Zhisheng; Zhou, Aiming; Peng, Quanhui; Zou, Huawei; Xue, Bai; Wang, Lizhi

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to estimate the effect of dietary conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) on intramuscular and subcutaneous fat deposition in Yellow Breed × Simmental cattle. The experiment was conducted for 60 days. The results showed that the average backfat thickness, (testicles + kidney + pelvic) fat percentage and subcutaneous fat percentage in dietary CLA were significantly lower than in the control group, while intramuscular the fat percentage was significantly higher. Compared to the control group, the Longissimus muscle enzyme activities of lipoprotein lipase (LPL), fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) in dietary CLA and the subcutaneous fat enzyme activities of LPL, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1) were significantly increased. Similarly, compared to the control group, the Longissimus muscle sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1), FAS, stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase (SCD), ACC, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), heart fatty-acid binding protein (H-FABP) and LPL gene expression in dietary CLA were significant increased, as were the subcutaneous fat of PPARγ, H-FABP, LPL, CPT-1 and HSL in dietary CLA. These results indicated that dietary CLA increases IMF deposition mainly by the up-regulation of lipogenic gene expression, while decreasing subcutaneous fat deposition mainly by the up-regulation of lipolytic gene expression.

  16. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 14. Methods for projecting future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, K.W.; Marmorek, D.; Ryan, P.F.; Heltcher, K.; Robinson, D.

    1990-09-01

    The objectives of the report are to: critically evaluate methods for projecting future effects of acidic deposition on surface water acid-base chemistry; review and evaluate techniques and procedures for analyzing projection uncertainty; review procedures for estimating regional lake and stream population attributes; review the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Direct/Delayed Response Project (DDRP) methodology for projecting the effects of acidic deposition on future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry; and present the models, uncertainty estimators, population estimators, and proposed approach selected to project the effects of acidic deposition on future changes in surface water acid-base chemistry in the NAPAP 1990 Integrated Assessment and discuss the selection rationale.

  17. Field-exposure study for determining the effects of acid deposition on the corrosion and deterioration of materials: description of program and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Flinn, D.R.; Cramer, S.D.; Carter, J.P.; Spence, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Materials-exposure sites, fully instrumented to characterize environmental parameters related to air quality, meteorology, and rain chemistry, were established at four locations in the eastern and northeastern United States to study the effects of acid precipitation on atmospheric damage to metals, exterior paints, and building stone. A fifth, midwestern site has recently been added to the program. Utilizing short-term, seasonal, and long-term exposures, the corrosion behavior of five metal alloys (1010 carbon steel, Cor-Ten A, 3003-H14 aluminum, 110 copper, and 191 zinc) and two coated-steel products (galvanized steel and Galvalume) commonly used outdoors have been characterized using gravimetric, surface analytical, and corrosion film chemistry measurements. Monthly exposures indicate that the environments at the sites are significantly different in their effects on the metals.

  18. Stream ecosystem response to chronic deposition of N and acid at the Bear Brook Watershed, Maine.

    PubMed

    Simon, Kevin S; Chadwick, Michael A; Huryn, Alexander D; Valett, H Maurice

    2010-12-01

    The Bear Brook Watershed in Maine (BBWM) is a long-term, paired watershed experiment that addresses the effects of acid and nitrogen (N) deposition on whole watersheds. To examine stream response at BBWM, we synthesized data on organic matter dynamics, including leaf breakdown rates, organic matter inputs and standing stocks, macroinvertebrate secondary production, and nutrient uptake in treated and reference streams at the BBWM. While N concentrations in stream water and leaves have increased, the input, standing stocks, and breakdown rates of leaves, as well as macroinvertebrate production, were not responsive to acid and N deposition. Both chronic and acute increases of N availability have saturated uptake of nitrate in the streams. Recent experimental increases in phosphorus (P) availability enhanced stream capacity to take up nitrate and altered the character of N saturation. These results show how the interactive effects of multiple factors, including environmental flow regime, acidification, and P availability, may constrain stream response to chronic N deposition.

  19. Mathematical modeling of acid deposition due to radiation fog

    SciTech Connect

    Pandis, S.N.; Seinfeld, J.H. )

    1989-09-20

    A Lagrangian model has been developed to study acidic deposition due to radiation fog. The model couples submodels describing the development and dissipation of radiation fog, the gas-phase chemistry and transfer, and the aqueous-phase chemistry. The model is applied to a radiation fog episode in Bakersfield in the San Joaquin Valley of California over the period January 4--5 1985. Model predictions for temperature profile, fog development, liquid water content, gas-phase concentrations of SO{sub 2}, HNO{sub 3}, and NH{sub 3}, {ital p}H, aqueous-phase concentrations of OS{sup 2{minus}}{sub 4}, NH{sup +}{sub 4}, and NO{sup {minus}}{sub 3}, and finally deposition rates of the above ions are compared with the observed values. The deposition rates of the major ions are predicted to increase significantly during the fog episode, the most notable being the increase of sulfate deposition. Pathways for sulfate production that are of secondary importance in a cloud environment may become signficant in a fog. Expressing the mean droplet settling velocity as a function of liquid water content is found to be quite influential in the model's predictions. {copyright} American Geophysical Union 1989

  20. Integrated assessment of acid deposition impacts using reduced-form modeling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, R.; Small, M.J.

    1996-05-01

    Emissions of sulfates and other acidic pollutants from anthropogenic sources result in the deposition of these acidic pollutants on the earth`s surface, downwind of the source. These pollutants reach surface waters, including streams and lakes, and acidify them, resulting in a change in the chemical composition of the surface water. Sometimes the water chemistry is sufficiently altered so that the lake can no longer support aquatic life. This document traces the efforts by many researchers to understand and quantify the effect of acid deposition on the water chemistry of populations of lakes, in particular the improvements to the MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) modeling effort, and describes its reduced-form representation in a decision and uncertainty analysis tool. Previous reduced-form approximations to the MAGIC model are discussed in detail, and their drawbacks are highlighted. An improved reduced-form model for acid neutralizing capacity is presented, which incorporates long-term depletion of the watershed acid neutralization fraction. In addition, improved fish biota models are incorporated in the integrated assessment model, which includes reduced-form models for other physical and chemical processes of acid deposition, as well as the resulting socio-economic and health related effects. The new reduced-form lake chemistry and fish biota models are applied to the Adirondacks region of New York.

  1. Acidic deposition, plant pests, and the fate of forest ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Gragnani, A; Gatto, M; Rinaldi, S

    1998-12-01

    We present and analyze a nonlinear dynamical system modelling forest-pests interactions and the way they are affected by acidic deposition. The model includes mechanisms of carbon and nitrogen exchange between soil and vegetation, biomass decomposition and microbial mineralization, and defoliation by pest grazers, which are partially controlled by avian or mammalian predators. Acidic deposition is assumed to directly damage vegetation, to decrease soil pH, which in turn damages roots and inhibits microbial activity, and to predispose trees to increased pest attack. All the model parameters are set to realistic values except the inflow of protons to soil and the predation mortality inflicted to the pest which are allowed to vary inside reasonable ranges. A numerical bifurcation analysis with respect to these two parameters is carried out. Five functioning modes are uncovered: (i) pest-free equilibrium; (ii) pest persisting at endemic equilibrium; (iii) forest-pest permanent oscillations; (iv) bistable behavior with the system converging either to pest-free equilibrium or endemic pest presence in accordance with initial conditions; (v) bistable behavior with convergence to endemic pest presence or permanent oscillations depending on initial conditions. Catastrophic bifurcations between the different behavior modes are possible, provided the abundance of predators is not too small. Numerical simulation shows that increasing acidic load can lead the forest to collapse in a short time period without important warning signals.

  2. Polyglycolic acid microneedles modified with inkjet-deposited antifungal coatings.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Ryan D; Daniels, Justin; Stafslien, Shane; Nasir, Adnan; Lefebvre, Joe; Narayan, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined use of piezoelectric inkjet printing to apply an antifungal agent, voriconazole, to the surfaces of biodegradable polyglycolic acid microneedles. Polyglycolic acid microneedles with sharp tips (average tip radius = 25 ± 3 μm) were prepared using a combination of injection molding and drawing lithography. The elastic modulus (9.9 ± 0.3 GPa) and hardness (588.2 ± 33.8 MPa) values of the polyglycolic acid material were determined using nanoindentation and were found to be suitable for use in transdermal drug delivery devices. Voriconazole was deposited onto the polyglycolic acid microneedles by means of piezoelectric inkjet printing. It should be noted that voriconazole has poor solubility in water; however, it is readily soluble in many organic solvents. Optical imaging, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to examine the microneedle geometries and inkjet-deposited surface coatings. Furthermore, an in vitro agar plating study was performed on the unmodified, vehicle-modified, and voriconazole-modified microneedles. Unlike the unmodified and vehicle-modified microneedles, the voriconazole-modified microneedles showed antifungal activity against Candida albicans. The unmodified, vehicle-modified, and voriconazole-modified microneedles did not show activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Staphylococcus aureus. The results indicate that piezoelectric inkjet printing may be useful for loading transdermal drug delivery devices such as polyglycolic acid microneedles with antifungal pharmacologic agents and other pharmacologic agents with poor solubility in aqueous solutions.

  3. Polyglycolic acid microneedles modified with inkjet-deposited antifungal coatings.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Ryan D; Daniels, Justin; Stafslien, Shane; Nasir, Adnan; Lefebvre, Joe; Narayan, Roger J

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined use of piezoelectric inkjet printing to apply an antifungal agent, voriconazole, to the surfaces of biodegradable polyglycolic acid microneedles. Polyglycolic acid microneedles with sharp tips (average tip radius = 25 ± 3 μm) were prepared using a combination of injection molding and drawing lithography. The elastic modulus (9.9 ± 0.3 GPa) and hardness (588.2 ± 33.8 MPa) values of the polyglycolic acid material were determined using nanoindentation and were found to be suitable for use in transdermal drug delivery devices. Voriconazole was deposited onto the polyglycolic acid microneedles by means of piezoelectric inkjet printing. It should be noted that voriconazole has poor solubility in water; however, it is readily soluble in many organic solvents. Optical imaging, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were utilized to examine the microneedle geometries and inkjet-deposited surface coatings. Furthermore, an in vitro agar plating study was performed on the unmodified, vehicle-modified, and voriconazole-modified microneedles. Unlike the unmodified and vehicle-modified microneedles, the voriconazole-modified microneedles showed antifungal activity against Candida albicans. The unmodified, vehicle-modified, and voriconazole-modified microneedles did not show activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Staphylococcus aureus. The results indicate that piezoelectric inkjet printing may be useful for loading transdermal drug delivery devices such as polyglycolic acid microneedles with antifungal pharmacologic agents and other pharmacologic agents with poor solubility in aqueous solutions. PMID:25732934

  4. Electrophoretic deposition and electrochemical behavior of novel graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Qian; Jia, Zhaojun; Xu, Xuchen; Shi, Yuying; Cheng, Yan; Zheng, Yufeng; Xi, Tingfei; Wei, Shicheng

    2013-11-01

    Novel ternary graphene oxide-hyaluronic acid-hydroxyapatite (GO-HY-HA) nanocomposite coatings were prepared on Ti substrate using anodic electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Hyaluronic acid was employed as charging additive and dispersion agent during EPD. The kinetics and mechanism of the deposition, and the microstructure of the coated samples were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and microscopic Fourier transform infrared analysis. The results showed that the addition of GO sheets into the HY-HA suspensions could increase the deposition rate and inhibit cracks creation and propagation in the coatings. The corrosion resistant of the resulting samples were evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization method in simulated body fluid, and the GO-HY-HA coatings could effectively improve the anti-corrosion property of the Ti substrate.

  5. The effects of uncertainty on the analysis of atmospheric deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bloyd, C.N. ); Small, M.J.; Henrion, M.; Rubin, E.S. )

    1988-01-01

    Research efforts on the problem of acid ran are directed at improving current scientific understanding in critical areas, including sources of precursor emissions, the transport and transformation of pollutants in the atmosphere, the deposition of acidic species, and the chemical and biological effects of acid deposition on aquatic systems, materials, forests, crops and human health. The general goal of these research efforts is to characterize the current situation and to develop analytical models which can be used to predict the response of various systems to changes in critical parameters. This paper describes a framework which enables one to characterize uncertainty at each major stage of the modeling process. Following a general presentation of the modeling framework, a description is given of the methods chosen to characterize uncertainty for each major step. Analysis is then performed to illustrate the effects of uncertainty on future lake acidification in the Adirondacks Park area of upstate New York.

  6. Conjugated linoleic acid alters growth performance, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli).

    PubMed

    Dong, Gui-Fang; Liu, Wen-Zuo; Wu, Lin-Zhou; Yu, Deng-Hang; Huang, Feng; Li, Peng-Cheng; Yang, Yan-Ou

    2015-02-01

    Fatty liver syndrome is a prevalent problem of farmed fish. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) has received increased attention recently as a fat-reducing fatty acid to control fat deposition in mammals. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether dietary CLA can reduce tissue lipid content of darkbarbel catfish (Pelteobagrus vachelli) and whether decreased lipid content is partially due to alterations in lipid metabolism enzyme activities and fatty acid profiles. A 76-day feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effect of dietary CLA on the growth, tissue lipid deposition, and fatty acid composition of darkbarbel catfish. Five diets containing 0 % (control), 0.5 % (CLA0.5), 1 % (CLA1), 2 % (CLA2), and 3 % (CLA3) CLA levels were evaluated. Results showed that fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed a significantly lower specific growth rate and feed conversion efficiency than those fed with the control diet. Dietary CLA decreased the lipid contents in the liver and intraperitoneal fat with the CLA levels from 1 to 3 %. Fish fed with 2-3 % CLA diets showed significantly higher lipoprotein lipase and hepatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control, and fish fed with 1-3 % CLA diets had significantly higher pancreatic triacylglycerol lipase activities in liver than those of fish fed with the control. Dietary CLA was incorporated into liver, intraperitoneal fat, and muscle lipids, with higher percentages observed in liver compared with other tissues. Liver CLA deposition was at the expense of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). In contrast, CLA deposition appeared to be primarily at the expense of MUFA and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in the intraperitoneal fat, whereas in muscle it was at the expense of n-3 PUFA. Our results suggested that CLA at a 1 % dose can reduce liver lipid content without eliciting any negative effect on growth rate in darkbarbel catfish. This lipid-lowering effect could

  7. Fundamental Study on Temperature Dependence of Deposition Rate of Silicic Acid - 13270

    SciTech Connect

    Shinmura, Hayata; Niibori, Yuichi; Mimura, Hitoshi

    2013-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of the silicic acid is one of the key factors to estimate the condition of the repository system after the backfill. This study experimentally examined the temperature dependence of dynamic behavior of supersaturated silicic acid in the co-presence of solid phase, considering Na ions around the repository, and evaluated the deposition rate constant, k, of silicic acid by using the first-order reaction equation considering the specific surface area. The values of k were in the range of 1.0x10{sup -11} to 1.0x10{sup -9} m/s in the temperature range of 288 K to 323 K. The deposition rate became larger with increments of temperature under the Na ion free condition. Besides, in the case of Na ions 0.6 M, colloidal silicic acid decreased dramatically at a certain time. This means that the diameter of the colloidal silicic acid became larger than the pore size of filter (0.45 μm) due to bridging of colloidal silicic acid. Furthermore, this study estimated the range of altering area and the aperture of flow-path in various value of k corresponding to temperature by using advection-dispersion model. The concentration in the flow-path became lower with increments of temperature, and when the value of k is larger than 1.0x10{sup -11} m/s, the deposition range of supersaturated silicic acid was estimated to be less than 20 m around the repository. In addition, the deposition of supersaturated silicic acid led the decrement of flow-path aperture, which was remarkable under the condition of relatively high temperature. Such a clogging in flow paths is expected as a retardation effect of radionuclides. (authors)

  8. An overview of a 5-year research program on acid deposition in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; He, K.; Xu, X.; Zhang, P.; Bai, Y.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, X.; Duan, L.; Li, W.; Chai, F.

    2011-12-01

    Despite concerted research and regulative control of sulfur dioxide in China, acid rain remained a serious environmental issue, due to a sharp increase in the combustion of fossil fuel in the 2000s. In 2005, the Ministry of Science and Technology of China funded a five-year comprehensive research program on acid deposition. This talk will give an overview of the activities and the key findings from this study, covering emission, atmospheric processes, and deposition, effects on soil and stream waters, and impact on typical trees/plants in China. The main results include (1) China still experiences acidic rainfalls in southern and eastern regions, although the situation has stabilized after 2006 due to stringent control of SO2 by the Chinese Government; (2) Sulfate is the dominant acidic compound, but the contribution of nitrate has increased; (3) cloud-water composition in eastern China is strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions; (4) the persistent fall of acid rain in the 30 years has lead to acidification of some streams/rivers and soils in southern China; (5) the studied plants have shown varying response to acid rain; (6) some new insights have been obtained on atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric transport, soil chemistry, and ecological impacts, some of which will be discussed in this talk. Compared to the situation in North America and Europe, China's acid deposition is still serious, and continued control of sulfur and nitrogen emission is required. There is an urgent need to establish a long-term observation network/program to monitor the impact of acid deposition on soil, streams/rivers/lakes, and forests.

  9. Enhanced acid rain and atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, sulfur and heavy metals in Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Wang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition is known to be important mechanism reducing air pollution. In response to the growing concern on the potential effects of the deposited material entering terrestrial and aquatic environments as well as their subsequent health effects, since 2007 we have established a 10-site monitoring network in Northern China, where particularly susceptible to severe air pollution. Wet and dry deposition was collected using an automatic wet-dry sampler. The presentation will focus on the new results of atmospheric deposition flux for a number of chemical species, such as nutrients (e.g. nitrogen and phosphorus), acidic matters (e.g. sulfur and proton), heavy metals and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, etc. This is to our knowledge the first detailed element budget study in the atmosphere across Northern China. We find that: (1) Over the 3 year period, 26% of precipitation events in the target area were more acid than pH 5.60 and these acidic events occurred in summer and autumn. The annual volume-weighted mean (VWM) pH value of precipitation was lower than 5.60 at most sites, which indicated the acidification of precipitation was not optimistic. The primary ions in precipitation were NH4+, Ca2+, SO42- and NO3-, with 10-sites-average concentrations of 221, 216, 216 and 80 μeq L-1, respectively. The ratio of SO42- to NO3- was 2.7; suggesting SO42- was the dominant acid component. (2) The deposited particles were neutral in general and the pH value increased from rural area to industrial and coastal sites. It is not surprising to note that the annual VWM pH value of precipitation was higher than 5.60 at three urban sites (Beijing and Tianjin mega cities) and one coastal site near the Bohai Bay, considering the fact that high buffer capacity of alkaline component, gas NH3 and mineral aerosols, at these sites compared to other places. (3) The 10-sites annual total deposition amounts for sulfur and nitrogen compounds were 60 and 65 kg N/S ha-1 yr-1

  10. Using the regional acid deposition model to determine the nitrogen deposition airshed of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, R.L.

    1995-08-25

    The Regional Acid Deposition Model, RADM, an advanced Eulerian model, is used to develop an estimate of the primary airshed of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions that is contributing nitrogen deposition to the Chesapeake Bay watershed. A brief description of RADM together with a summary of the aggregation method used to develop annual average deposition is given. The evaluation background of RADM is summarized. The transport range of the nitrogen affecting deposition, principally the termination product nitric acid, is first established in the model. This range is compared to that determined for sulfur.

  11. Economic evaluation of materials damage associated with acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, R.L. Jr.; Lareau, T.J.; Lipfert, F.W.

    1987-06-01

    The assessment approach is based on the maintained hypothesis that a reduction of acid deposition from current levels to natural background would increase the interval of time before specific materials would be repaired or replaced. The lengthening of the maintenance interval implies that annualized maintenance expenditures would be reduced and that cost savings would be realized. These cost savings represent an approximation of the willingness of individuals to pay for a reduction in acid deposition. The strength of this assessment relative to previous studies of materials damage is the disaggregate nature of the data. Estimates of damage are computed for 5-km grid squares within selected urban areas in terms of material/use combinations and building types. Four materials (paint, zinc (galvanized steel), mortar and stone), seven uses (walls, roofs, chimneys, gutters, downspouts, fencing, window trim) and four building types (single and multiple family residences, commercial/industrial buildings, and tax exempt buildings) are examined. Detailed inventory data are available for sampled areas in four case study cities: Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, new Haven, and Portland. Statistical methods based on building counts are used to extrapolate to unsampled areas in the case study cities and to other urban areas in 17 northeastern states.

  12. On the potential high acid deposition in northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Junji; Tie, Xuexi; Dabberdt, Walter F.; Jie, Tang; Zhao, Zhuzi; An, Zhisheng; Shen, Zhenxing; Feng, Yinchang

    2013-05-01

    is an acid deposition conundrum in China: contrary to conventional wisdom, extremely high ambient sulfate concentrations in northeastern China are not always accompanied by correspondingly high acidities. To investigate this discrepancy, data from two independent sets of in situ field measurements were analyzed along with Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) satellite observations and Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers (MOZART) chemical transport model calculations. The field measurements included soluble aerosol ion concentrations and pH and particulate data from 11 cities, as well as pH measurement data from 74 sites in China. This study explores the basis for and the impacts of the large discrepancy in northeastern China between the major acidity precursors (SO2 and NOx) and measured acidity levels as indicated by pH values. There are extremely high SO2 emissions and ambient concentrations in northeastern China, while the corresponding acidity is unusually low (high pH) in this region. This is inconsistent with the usual situation where high-acidity precursor pollutants result in low pH (high acidity) values and acid rain conditions. In other regions, such as southern China and the United States, high SO2 concentrations are typically well correlated with high acidities. Using measured soluble particle measurements (including both positively and negatively charged ions), it is seen that there are high values of alkaline ions in northeastern China that play an important role in neutralizing acidity in this region. This result strongly suggests that the high alkaline concentrations, especially Ca2+, increase warm season pH values by about 0.5 in northern China, partially explaining the inconsistency between sulfate concentrations and acidity. This has a very important implication for acid rain mitigation—especially in northeastern China. However, there are additional issues pertaining to the precursor-acidity

  13. DNA methylation landscape of fat deposits and fatty acid composition in obese and lean pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shunhua; Shen, Linyuan; Xia, Yudong; Yang, Qiong; Li, Xuewei; Tang, Guoqing; Jiang, Yanzhi; Wang, Jinyong; Li, Mingzhou; Zhu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Obese and lean type pig breeds exhibit differences in their fat deposits and fatty acid composition. Here, we compared the effect of genome-wide DNA methylation on fatty acid metabolism between Landrace pigs (LP, leaner) and Rongchang pigs (RP, fatty). We found that LP backfat (LBF) had a higher polyunsaturated fatty acid content but a lower adipocyte volume than RP backfat (RBF). LBF exhibited higher global DNA methylation levels at the genome level than RBF. A total of 483 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were located in promoter regions, mainly affecting olfactory and sensory activity and lipid metabolism. In LBF, the promoters of genes related to ATPase activity had significantly stronger methylation. This fact may suggest lower energy metabolism levels, which may result in less efficient lipid synthesis in LBF. Furthermore, we identified a DMR in the miR-4335 and miR-378 promoters and validated their methylation status by bisulfite sequencing PCR. The hypermethylation of the promoters of miR-4335 and miR-378 in LBF and the resulting silencing of the target genes may result in LBF’s low content in saturated fatty acids and fat deposition capacity. This study provides a solid basis for exploring the epigenetic mechanisms affecting fat deposition and fatty acid composition. PMID:27721392

  14. The stem-II regional scale acid deposition and photochemical oxidant model—IV. The impact of emission reductions on mesoscale acid deposition in the lower ohio river valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, Rohit; Saylor, Rick D.; Peters, Leonard K.

    Assessment of the effect of reduction in emissions of primary sources on eventual levels of pollutants, pH of precipitation and total wet deposition is crucial in designing acid-rain control strategies. The STEM-II/ASM model is used to investigate the effect of reduction in emissions on the ultimate deposition patterns and amounts of major acidic pollutants in a mesoscale region. This work also investigates the effect of background levels of primary pollutant species on the eventual levels and deposition amounts of SO 4= and NO 3-. A series of mesoscale simulations were conducted in which emissions of primary sources of NO x and SO 2 were reduced and/or background concentrations of certain key species were changed. The results indicate that the dominant effect on the eventual deposition amounts of SO 4= and NO 3- is due to background concentrations of key precursor species such as SO x and NO x. With relatively high background concentrations, reducing SO 2 emissions by 50% and NO x emissions by 40% resulted in reductions of 2-3% for SO 4= wet deposition aand about 15% for NO 3- wet deposition. However, reducing the background concentrations of SO 2 and SO 4= by 50% and NO, NO 2 and HNO 3 by 40% resulted in substantial reductions in wet deposition; SO 4= deposition was reduced by 40-50% and NO 3- deposition was reduced by approximately 35%.

  15. Declining acidic deposition begins reversal of forest-soil acidification in the northeastern U.S. and eastern Canada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Hazlett, Paul W.; Fernandez, Ivan J.; Ouimet, Rock; Bailey, Scott W.; Shortle, Walter C.; Smith, Kevin T.; Antidormi, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Decreasing trends in acidic deposition levels over the past several decades have led to partial chemical recovery of surface waters. However, depletion of soil Ca from acidic deposition has slowed surface water recovery and led to the impairment of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Nevertheless, documentation of acidic deposition effects on soils has been limited, and little is known regarding soil responses to ongoing acidic deposition decreases. In this study, resampling of soils in eastern Canada and the northeastern U.S. was done at 27 sites exposed to reductions in wet SO42– deposition of 5.7–76%, over intervals of 8–24 y. Decreases of exchangeable Al in the O horizon and increases in pH in the O and B horizons were seen at most sites. Among all sites, reductions in SO42– deposition were positively correlated with ratios (final sampling/initial sampling) of base saturation (P < 0.01) and negatively correlated with exchangeable Al ratios (P < 0.05) in the O horizon. However, base saturation in the B horizon decreased at one-third of the sites, with no increases. These results are unique in showing that the effects of acidic deposition on North American soils have begun to reverse.

  16. Declining Acidic Deposition Begins Reversal of Forest-Soil Acidification in the Northeastern U.S. and Eastern Canada.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gregory B; Hazlett, Paul W; Fernandez, Ivan J; Ouimet, Rock; Bailey, Scott W; Shortle, Walter C; Smith, Kevin T; Antidormi, Michael R

    2015-11-17

    Decreasing trends in acidic deposition levels over the past several decades have led to partial chemical recovery of surface waters. However, depletion of soil Ca from acidic deposition has slowed surface water recovery and led to the impairment of both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Nevertheless, documentation of acidic deposition effects on soils has been limited, and little is known regarding soil responses to ongoing acidic deposition decreases. In this study, resampling of soils in eastern Canada and the northeastern U.S. was done at 27 sites exposed to reductions in wet SO4(2-) deposition of 5.7-76%, over intervals of 8-24 y. Decreases of exchangeable Al in the O horizon and increases in pH in the O and B horizons were seen at most sites. Among all sites, reductions in SO4(2-) deposition were positively correlated with ratios (final sampling/initial sampling) of base saturation (P < 0.01) and negatively correlated with exchangeable Al ratios (P < 0.05) in the O horizon. However, base saturation in the B horizon decreased at one-third of the sites, with no increases. These results are unique in showing that the effects of acidic deposition on North American soils have begun to reverse.

  17. Spatial gradient in nitrogen deposition affects plant species frequency in acidic grasslands.

    PubMed

    Pannek, A; Duprè, C; Gowing, D J G; Stevens, C J; Diekmann, M

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic eutrophication impacts ecosystems worldwide. Here, we use a vegetation dataset from semi-natural grasslands on acidic soils sampled along a gradient in north-western Europe to examine the response of species frequency to nitrogen (N) deposition, controlling for the effects of other environmental variables. A second dataset of acidic grasslands from Germany and the Netherlands containing plots from different time periods was analysed to examine whether the results of the spatial gradient approach coincided with temporal changes in the abundance of species. Out of 44 studied species, 16 were affected by N deposition, 12 of them negatively. Soil pH and phosphorus (P) influenced 24 and 14 species, respectively, predominantly positively. Fewer species were related to the soil contents of NO3(-) or NH4(+), with no significant differences between the number of positive and negative effects. Whereas the temporal change of species was unrelated to their responses to pH, species responding negatively to N deposition, soil P and NO3(-) showed a significant decline over time in both countries. Species that were negatively affected by high N deposition and/or high soil P also showed a negative temporal trend and could be characterised by short stature and slow growth. The results confirm the negative role of N deposition for many plant species in semi-natural acidic grasslands. The negative temporal trends of species sensitive to high N deposition and soil P values clearly show a need for maintaining low soil nutrient status and for restoring the formerly infertile conditions in nutrient-enriched grasslands. PMID:25407619

  18. Spatial gradient in nitrogen deposition affects plant species frequency in acidic grasslands.

    PubMed

    Pannek, A; Duprè, C; Gowing, D J G; Stevens, C J; Diekmann, M

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic eutrophication impacts ecosystems worldwide. Here, we use a vegetation dataset from semi-natural grasslands on acidic soils sampled along a gradient in north-western Europe to examine the response of species frequency to nitrogen (N) deposition, controlling for the effects of other environmental variables. A second dataset of acidic grasslands from Germany and the Netherlands containing plots from different time periods was analysed to examine whether the results of the spatial gradient approach coincided with temporal changes in the abundance of species. Out of 44 studied species, 16 were affected by N deposition, 12 of them negatively. Soil pH and phosphorus (P) influenced 24 and 14 species, respectively, predominantly positively. Fewer species were related to the soil contents of NO3(-) or NH4(+), with no significant differences between the number of positive and negative effects. Whereas the temporal change of species was unrelated to their responses to pH, species responding negatively to N deposition, soil P and NO3(-) showed a significant decline over time in both countries. Species that were negatively affected by high N deposition and/or high soil P also showed a negative temporal trend and could be characterised by short stature and slow growth. The results confirm the negative role of N deposition for many plant species in semi-natural acidic grasslands. The negative temporal trends of species sensitive to high N deposition and soil P values clearly show a need for maintaining low soil nutrient status and for restoring the formerly infertile conditions in nutrient-enriched grasslands.

  19. Impact of acid rain and deposition on aquatic biological systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isom, B.; Dennis, S.; Bates, J.

    1986-01-01

    Since little information on acid rain effects on fish and other aquatic life exists, and what is available is often inconclusive, STP 928 presents quantitative and practical information. This volume is a collection of nine diverse, peer-reviewed papers. This book discusses lake/stream acidification processes and aquatic biological effects, such as stream and lake productivity, diversity, and measurement techniques.

  20. [Correlation between acidic materials and acid deposition in Beijing during 1997-2011].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-yuan; Tian, He-zhong; Yang, Dong-yan; Zou, Ben-dong; Lu, Hai-feng; Lin, An-guo

    2013-05-01

    Based on the environment monitoring data and the ambient air quality data during the period of 1997-2011 from Beijing municipal environmental monitoring center, the correlations between primary pre-cursors of acid deposition, acidic materials and precipitation in Beijing area were analyzed in detail by taking economic development and energy mix into account. These results will be helpful for assessing the performance of environment quality improvement, as well as supplying scientific supporting information to make policies for national and local environment protection authorities. The main findings included as follows: there are significant correlations between the concentrations of NO2, NOx, and SO2 in the atmosphere, which indicated that both N and S in ambient air of Beijing came from fossil fuels combustion; acidic pollutants in the air are mainly discharged from local emission sources in Beijing, while there is no obvious correlation between S and N in wet deposition and concentrations of SO2, NO2 and NOx in the atmosphere, which demonstrated that concentrations of different ions in the acid deposition were influenced by both local sources as well as the inputs from other surrounding districts. Besides, the concentration of NO3- appeared to be correlative with the amount of motor vehicles, implying that the NOx from motor vehicles have contributed the increase of NO3- concentration of substantially.

  1. Regional trends in soil acidification and exchangeable metal concentrations in relation to acid deposition rates.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Carly J; Dise, Nancy B; Gowing, David J

    2009-01-01

    The deposition of high levels of reactive nitrogen (N) and sulphur (S), or the legacy of that deposition, remain among the world's most important environmental problems. Although regional impacts of acid deposition in aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, quantitative evidence of wide-scale impacts on terrestrial ecosystems is not common. In this study we analysed surface and subsoil chemistry of 68 acid grassland sites across the UK along a gradient of acid deposition, and statistically related the concentrations of exchangeable soil metals (1 M KCl extraction) to a range of potential drivers. The deposition of N, S or acid deposition was the primary correlate for 8 of 13 exchangeable metals measured in the topsoil and 5 of 14 exchangeable metals in the subsoil. In particular, exchangeable aluminium and lead both show increased levels above a soil pH threshold of about 4.5, strongly related to the deposition flux of acid compounds.

  2. A Mathematical Model for the Analysis of Acid Deposition.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mei-Kao; Stewart, Douglas A.; Henderson, Donald

    1982-06-01

    This paper describes the use of a regional-scale air quality model as a diagnostic tool for analyzing problems associated with acid rain. The model, which is hybrid in nature, consists of a puff module and a grid module. The puff module computes the evolution of individual puffs, such as the horizontal and vertical standard deviations of the puff spreads and the location of the center of mass, emitted continuously from each major point source. It also determines the location at which the puff will be released to the grid module and the amount of oxidation and deposition along the trajectory. The grid module then follows the transport, diffusion, and chemical reactions of these aged puffs, as well as emissions from a variety of diffuse sources. Elaborate schemes for both dry and wet deposition have also been incorporated into the model. This model has been exercised for two real-time meteorological scenarios-a dry case and a two-day rainstorm episode in the Northern Great Plains. On the basis of model calculations, atmospheric budgets for SO2 and sulfate over the modeling region have been estimated.

  3. Modeling the contribution of soil fauna to litter decomposition influenced by acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, B.; Loucks, O.L; Kuperman, R. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1993-06-01

    The effect of acidic deposition on soil pH and therefore on soil invertebrates and litter decomposition is being investigated in oak-hickory forests across a three-state, midwest, pollution gradient. The role of soil invertebrates has been assessed previously through the use of feeding, assimilation and respiratory rates. These energetic parameters depend strongly on the form of the allometric equations which have been improved here by incorporating uncertainties in body and population size. Results show that changes in reproduction and turnover dynamics of soil invertebrates (particularly of earthworms) due to acid-induced changes in soil pH explains observed patterns in litter depth.

  4. Potential human health effects of acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    Adverse human health effects, namely acute and chronic respiratory effects, can occur from the pre-deposition phase of the acid rain phenomenon due to inhalation of acidic particles and gases. State-of-the-art methodology to evaluate these effects is just now being applied to this question. The major post-deposition effect of the acid rain phenomenon is to acidify water, increasing solubility and subsequent human exposure to mercury, lead, cadmium, and aluminum. Acidification increases bioconversion of mercury to methylmercury, a highly toxic compound, which accumulates in fish, increasing the risk to toxicity in people who eat fish. Increase in water and soil content of lead and cadmium increases human exposure to these metals which become additive to other sources presently under regulatory control. The potential adverse health effects of increased human exposure to aluminum is not known at the present time. Deficiencies in the identification of the contribution of pre-deposition of air pollutants and post-deposition mobilization of toxic metals to the recognized potential health effects of the involved toxic substances is due to the fact that scientists have not addressed these specific questions. 113 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Soil calcium status and the response of stream chemistry to changing acidic deposition rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.; Lovett, Gary M.; Murdoch, Peter S.; Burns, Douglas A.; Stoddard, J.L.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Porter, J.H.; Thompson, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    Despite a decreasing trend in acidic deposition rates over the past two to three decades, acidified surface waters in the northeastern United States have shown minimal changes. Depletion of soil Ca pools has been suggested as a cause, although changes in soil Ca pools have not been directly related to long-term records of stream chemistry. To investigate this problem, a comprehensive watershed study was conducted in the Neversink River Basin, in the Catskill Mountains of New York, during 1991-1996. Spatial variations of atmospheric deposition, soil chemistry, and stream chemistry were evaluated over an elevation range of 817-1234 m to determine whether these factors exhibited elevational patterns. An increase in atmospheric deposition of SO4 with increasing elevation corresponded with upslope decreases of exchangeable soil base concentrations and acid-neutralizing capacity of stream water. Exchangeable base concentrations in homogeneous soil incubated within the soil profile for one year also decreased with increasing elevation. An elevational gradient in precipitation was not observed, and effects of a temperature gradient on soil properties were not detected. Laboratory leaching experiments with soils from this watershed showed that (1) concentrations of Ca in leachate increased as the concentrations of acid anions in added solution increased, and (2) the slope of this relationship was positively correlated with base saturation. Field and laboratory soil analyses are consistent with the interpretation that decreasing trends in acid-neutralizing capacity in stream water in the Neversink Basin, dating back to 1984, are the result of decreases in soil base saturation caused by acidic deposition.

  6. Do the paleolimnological reconstructions reflect the influence of acid deposition?

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, D.Y.

    1996-12-31

    The using possibility of paleolimnological analyses was considered with the documentation aim of acid-forming substances distant transfer on territory of Northern Fennoscandia. The Holocene and ancient interglacial lakes pH-and alkalinity trends, reconstructed by means of bottom sediments diatomic analyses, were studied. It has been made evident that the tendency to sharp changes of these data is revealed on final stages of interglacial periods. At that time the high amplitude of climatic changes with low periodicity is resulting in catastrophic changes of landscapes in the frames of water-catchments bodies. During the last millennium the climatic situation in the Northern Fennoscandia was changing repeatedly (Medieval Warm Epoch, Little Ice Age, the rise in temperature in 20-40`s of XXth century). In the Little Ice Age (XVI-XIX centuries) the decrease of average annual temperature and intensification of winds velocity have caused a rapid retreat of latitudinal and high-altitude forest boundaries, accompanied by sharp reconstruction of tundra-,forest-tundra-and northern taiga landscapes. These processes have accelerated due to the enforcement of economic activity which caused the destruction of vegetation cover (salt-working, and ship-building since the XIXth century, pasture of reindeer herds since the end of XIXth century). Acidifying of ground and surface waters in the current century could be caused by the increased entry of organic acids, as a result of plant residues decomposition. The decomposition process was activated in the end of XIXth - beginning of XXth century in connection with the rise of temperature and increase of precipitation. Thus, the trends in pH and alkalinity changes in this region can not be used as indicators of acid-forming substances atmospheric deposition increase.

  7. A 120-year record of the spatial and temporal distribution of gravestone decay and acid deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooers, Howard D.; Cota-Guertin, Avery R.; Regal, Ronald R.; Sames, Anthony R.; Dekan, Amanda J.; Henkels, Linnea M.

    2016-02-01

    This investigation examines the spatial and temporal variability of marble gravestone decay throughout West Midlands County and adjacent portions of Warwickshire, Staffordshire, and Worcestershire. Gravestone decay has been used effectively as a quantitative measure of acid deposition. Numerous techniques have been used to assess gravestone decay and each is subject to different sources of error. To minimize error we focus only on marble gravestones that use the flush lead lettering technique. Decay of the marble leaves the lead lettering raised above the surface, and the distance can be measured with the use of a digital micrometer. Gravestone decay can be used to quantify the spatial and temporal distribution of acid deposition. Our gravestone decay database consists of 1417 individual measurements on 591 tombstones in 33 cemeteries and covers the period from 1860 to 2010. Sites range from industrial and residential areas to rural settings. These data allow us to establish the natural background rates of decay, the effects of urban/residential expansion, and the efficacy of environmental regulations. Decay rates vary from a minimum of 0.2 mm/century in remote rural areas to nearly 3.0 mm/century in the Birmingham City Center. The data are corrected for environmental variables, converted to acid deposition rates, and plotted at 10-year intervals from 1890 to 2010.

  8. Acid deposition in Maryland: a report to the Governor and General Assembly (1986). Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Power Plant Research Program coordinates Maryland's acid-deposition research and reports research results annually. The report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition, its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy-conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  9. Acid deposition in Maryland: Summary of results through 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeMuro, J.; Bowman, M.; Maxwell, C.; Asante-Duah, D.; Meyers, S.

    1990-06-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Program coordinates Maryland's acid deposition research and reports research results annually. The report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition, its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  10. Acid deposition in Maryland: the status of knowledge in 1987. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Power Plant Research Program coordinates Maryland's acid deposition research and reports research results annually. The report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy-conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  11. Acid deposition in Maryland: summary of results through 1988. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Program coordinates Maryland's acid-deposition research and reports research results annually. This report evaluates several major topic areas including transport and chemistry of acid deposition its potential impacts on the State's streams and fish, possible impacts on terrestrial resources such as crops and forests and on materials, the ability of energy conservation programs to reduce emissions of acid-forming pollutants, and mitigation techniques for neutralizing acid waters.

  12. Evidence of sulphur and nitrogen deposition signals at the United Kingdom Acid Waters Monitoring Network sites.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D M

    2005-09-01

    Some recent studies of trends in sulphate in surface waters have alluded to possible lag effects imposed by catchment soils, resulting in discrepancies between trends in deposition and run-off. To assess the extent of these possible effects in the UK, sulphate concentration data from the United Kingdom Acid Waters Monitoring Network (AWMN) sites are compared with estimates of sulphur deposition at each site. From these data, input-output budgets are computed at an annual time scale. The estimated budgets suggest a close association between catchment sulphur inputs and outputs at an annual scale, with well-balanced annual budgets at most sites, indicative of only minor lag effects. A similar analysis of the AWMN site nitrogen budget shows little evidence of an association between nitrogen inputs and outputs at this time scale.

  13. RAINS-ASIA: An assessment model for acid deposition in Asia

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R.J.; Ramankutty, R.; Shah, J.J.

    1997-08-31

    Asia`s rapid economic growth has fueled a growing appetite for commercial energy, which is satisfied by fossil fuels that emit pollutants. These pollutants are oxidized and transported into the atmosphere, creating acidic depositions known as acid rain that can damage foliage, soils, and surface waters. At current energy consumption growth rates, by the year 2000 sulfur dioxide emissions from Asia will surpass the emissions of North America and Europe combined. RAINS-ASIA is an assessment tool developed by the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and donors to study the implications of alternative energy development strategies for air pollution and acid rain and to help identify cost-effective abatement methods. This report provides an overview of the model and some results of analyses that have been conducted as part of the RAINS-ASIA program.

  14. Interactions of aluminum with forest soils and vegetation: Implications for acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Maynard, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that an important ecological consequence of acidic deposition is increased aluminum mobilization. There is concern that increased aluminum activity may produce toxic effects in forested ecosystems. My studies were concerned with the behavior of pedogenic and added aluminum in soils derived from chemically different parent material. Soil aluminum was related to the aluminum content of the vegetation found growing in the soils. In addition, aluminum levels of forest litter was compared to levels determined 40 years ago. Field, greenhouse, and laboratory investigations were conducted in which the effects of aluminum concentration on germination and early growth was determined. Soils were then used in greenhouse and laboratory studies to establish patterns of soil and plant aluminum behavior with implications to acid deposition. Results show that the amount of aluminum extracted was related to the pH value of the extracting solution and to the chemical characteristics of the soil. Some acid rain solutions extracted measurable amounts of aluminum from selected primary minerals. Germination and early growth of Pinus radiata was controlled by levels of aluminum in the soil or in solution. Field studies indicated that most forest species were sensitive to rising levels of aluminum in the soil. In general, ferns and fern allies were less sensitive to very high levels of aluminum in the soil, continuing to grow when more advanced dicots have disappeared. Aluminum tissue levels of all species were related to the concentration of aluminum in the soil as was the reappearance of species. Aluminum levels in leaf litter have risen at least 50% in the last 40 years. These values were consistent over 3 years. The implications to acid deposition were discussed.

  15. Atmospheric transport and deposition of acidic air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Although general principles which govern atmospheric chemistry of sulfur are understood, a purely theoretical estimation of the magnitude of the processes is not likely to be useful. Furthermore, the data base necessary to make empirical estimates does not yet exist. The sulfur budget of the atmosphere appears to be dominated by man-associated sulfur. The important processes in deposition of man-associated sulfur are wet deposition of sulfate and dry deposition of SO/sub 2/. The relative importance of sulfate and SO/sub 2/ to sulfur deposition (input to watersheds) depends on the air concentrations, and either compound may be the greater contributor depending on conditions. (PSB)

  16. The influence of organic acids in relation to acid deposition in controlling the acidity of soil and stream waters on a seasonal basis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Pippa J; Clark, Joanna M; Reynolds, Brian; Adamson, John K

    2008-01-01

    Much uncertainty still exists regarding the relative importance of organic acids in relation to acid deposition in controlling the acidity of soil and surface waters. This paper contributes to this debate by presenting analysis of seasonal variations in atmospheric deposition, soil solution and stream water chemistry for two UK headwater catchments with contrasting soils. Acid neutralising capacity (ANC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and the Na:Cl ratio of soil and stream waters displayed strong seasonal patterns with little seasonal variation observed in soil water pH. These patterns, plus the strong relationships between ANC, Cl and DOC, suggest that cation exchange and seasonal changes in the production of DOC and seasalt deposition are driving a shift in the proportion of acidity attributable to strong acid anions, from atmospheric deposition, during winter to predominantly organic acids in summer.

  17. The influence of organic acids in relation to acid deposition in controlling the acidity of soil and stream waters on a seasonal basis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Pippa J; Clark, Joanna M; Reynolds, Brian; Adamson, John K

    2008-01-01

    Much uncertainty still exists regarding the relative importance of organic acids in relation to acid deposition in controlling the acidity of soil and surface waters. This paper contributes to this debate by presenting analysis of seasonal variations in atmospheric deposition, soil solution and stream water chemistry for two UK headwater catchments with contrasting soils. Acid neutralising capacity (ANC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and the Na:Cl ratio of soil and stream waters displayed strong seasonal patterns with little seasonal variation observed in soil water pH. These patterns, plus the strong relationships between ANC, Cl and DOC, suggest that cation exchange and seasonal changes in the production of DOC and seasalt deposition are driving a shift in the proportion of acidity attributable to strong acid anions, from atmospheric deposition, during winter to predominantly organic acids in summer. PMID:17478019

  18. Effect of soil moisture on chlorine deposition.

    PubMed

    Hearn, John; Eichler, Jeffery; Hare, Christopher; Henley, Michael

    2014-02-28

    The effect of soil moisture on chlorine (Cl(2)) deposition was examined in laboratory chamber experiments at high Cl(2) exposures by measuring the concentration of chloride (Cl(-)) in soil columns. Soil mixtures with varying amounts of clay, sand, and organic matter and with moisture contents up to 20% (w/w) were exposed to ≈3×10(4)ppm Cl(2) vapor. For low water content soils, additional water increased the reaction rate as evidenced by higher Cl(-) concentration at higher soil moisture content. Results also showed that the presence of water restricted transport of Cl(2) into the soil columns and caused lower overall deposition of Cl(2) in the top 0.48-cm layer of soil when water filled ≈60% or more of the void space in the column. Numerical solutions to partial differential equations of Fick's law of diffusion and a simple rate law for Cl(2) reaction corroborated conclusions derived from the data. For the soil mixtures and conditions of these experiments, moisture content that filled 30-50% of the available void space yielded the maximum amount of Cl(2) deposition in the top 0.48cm of soil.

  19. Sensitivity of stream basins in Shenandoah National Park to acid deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynch, D.D.; Dise, N.B.

    1985-01-01

    Six synoptic surveys of 56 streams that drain the Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, were conducted in cooperation with the University of Virginia to evaluate sensitivity of dilute headwater streams to acid deposition and to determine the degree of acidification of drainage basins. Flow-weighted alkalinity concentration of most streams is below 200 microequivalents per liter, which is considered the threshold of sensitivity. Streams draining resistant siliceous bedrocks have an extreme sensitivity (alkalinity below 20 microequivalents/L); those draining granite and granodiorite have a high degree of sensitivity (20 to 100 microequivalents/L); and streams draining metamorphosed volcanics have moderate to marginal sensitivity (100 to 200 microequivalents/L). A comparison of current stream water chemistry to that predicted by a model based on carbonic acid weathering reactions suggests that all basins in the Park shows signs of acidification by atmospheric deposition. Acidification is defined as a neutralization of stream water alkalinity and/or an increase in the base cation weathering rate. Acidification averages 50 microequivalents/L, which is fairly evenly distributed in the Park. However, the effects of acidification are most strongly felt in extremely sensitive basins, such as those underlain by the Antietam Formation, which have stream water pH values averaging 4.99 and a mineral acidity of 7 microequivalents/L. (USGS)

  20. A Calculation of Spatial Range of Colloidal Silicic Acid Deposited Downstream from the Alkali Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niibori, Yuichi; Iijima, Kazuki; Tamura, Naoyuki; Mimura, Hitoshi

    A high alkali domain spreads out due to the use of cement materials for the construction of the repository of radioactive wastes. Sudden change of pH at this alkali front produces colloidal silicic acid (polymeric silicic acid) in addition to the deposition of supersaturated monomeric silicic acid onto the fracture surface of flow-pathway. The colloidal silicic acid also deposits with relatively small rate-constant in the co-presence of solid phase. Once the flow-path surface is covered with the amorphous silica, the surface seriously degrades the sorption behavior of radionuclides (RNs). Therefore, so far, the authors have examined the deposition rates of supersaturated silicic acid. This study summarized the deposition rate-constants defined by the first-order reaction equation under various conditions of co-presence of amorphous silica powder. Then, using the smallest rate-constant (1.0×10-12 m/s in the co-presence of calcium ions of 1 mM) and a simulation code, COLFRAC-MRL, the spatial range of colloidal silicic acid deposited downstream from the alkali front was estimated. The results suggested the clogging caused by the deposition of colloidal silicic acid in flow-path. The altered spatial range in the flow-path was limited to around 30 m in fracture and to several centimeters in rock matrix.

  1. Image analysis of epicuticular damage to foliage caused by dry deposition of the air pollutant nitric acid.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Pamela E; Parry, Sally D; Bytnerowicz, Andrzej; Heath, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    Nitric acid vapor is produced by the same photochemical processes that produce ozone. In the laboratory, concentrated nitric acid is a strong acid and a powerful oxidant. In the environment, where the concentrations are much lower, it is an innocuous source of plant nitrogen. As an air pollutant, which mode of action does dry deposition of nitric acid follow? We investigated the effects of dry deposition of nitric acid on the foliage of four tree species native to the western United States. A novel controlled environment, fumigation system enabled a four-week exposure at concentrations consistent with ambient diurnal patterns. Scanning electron microscopy and automated image analysis revealed changes in the epicuticular wax layer during fumigation. Exposure to nitric acid resulted in a reproducible suite of damage symptoms that increased with increasing dose. Each tree species tested exhibited a unique set of damage features, including cracks, lesions, and conformation changes to epicuticular crystallite structures. Dry deposition of atmospheric nitric acid caused substantial perturbation to the epicuticular surface of all four tree species investigated, consistent with the chemical oxidation of epicuticular waxes. Automated image analysis eliminated many biases that can trouble microscopy studies. Trade names and commercial enterprises or products are mentioned solely for information. No endorsements by the U.S. Department of Agriculture are implied.

  2. Student Knowledge of Scientific and Natural Resource Concepts Concerning Acidic Deposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Assessed is the level of scientific and natural resource knowledge possessed by fourth-, eighth- and eleventh-grade students. Misconceptions are noted. Discussed are implications for teaching about acidic deposition. (CW)

  3. MEAD Marine Effects of Atmospheric Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jickells, T.; Spokes, L.

    2003-04-01

    The coastal seas are one of the most valuable resources on the planet but they are threatened by human activity. We rely on the coastal area for mineral resources, waste disposal, fisheries and recreation. In Europe, high population densities and high levels of industrial activity mean that the pressures arising from these activities are particularly acute. One of the main problems concerning coastal seas is the rapid increase in the amounts of nitrogen-based pollutants entering the water. They come from many sources, the most important ones being traffic, industry and agriculture. These pollutants can be used by algae as nutrients. The increasing concentrations of these nutrients have led to excessive growth of algae, some of which are harmful. When algae die and decay, oxygen in the water is used up and the resulting lower levels of oxygen may lead to fish kills. Human activity has probably doubled the amount of chemically and biologically reactive nitrogen present globally. In Europe the increases have been greater than this, leading to real concern over the health of coastal waters. Rivers have, until recently, been thought to be the most important source of reactive nitrogen to the coastal seas but we now know that inputs from the atmosphere are large and can equal, or exceed, those from the rivers. Our initial hypothesis was that atmospheric inputs are important and potentially different in their effect on coastal ecosystems to riverine inputs and hence require different management strategies. However, we had almost no information on the direct effects of atmospheric deposition on marine ecosystems, though clearly such a large external nitrogen input should lead to enhanced phytoplankton growth The aim of this European Union funded MEAD project has been to determine how inputs of nitrogen from the atmosphere affect the chemistry and biology of coastal waters. To try to answer this, we have conducted field experiments in the Kattegat, an area where we know

  4. Leaching of cell wall components caused by acid deposition on fir needles and trees.

    PubMed

    Shigihara, Ado; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Sakurai, Naoki; Igawa, Manabu

    2008-07-15

    Virgin fir forests have been declining since the 1960s at Mt. Oyama, which is located at the eastern edge of the Tanzawa Mountains and adjacent to the Kanto plain in Japan. An acid fog frequently occurs in the mountains. We collected throughfall and stemflow under fir trees and rainfall every week during January-December 2004 at Mt. Oyama to clarify the influence of acid fog on the decline of fir (Abies firma) needles. In relation to throughfall and stemflow, D-mannose, D-galactose, and D-glucose are the major neutral sugar components; only D-glucose is a major component of rainfall. The correlation coefficient between the total neutral sugars and uronic acid (as D-galacturonic acid), which is a key component of the cross-linking between pectic polysaccharides, was high except for rainfall. The leached amount of calcium ion, neutral sugars, uronic acid, and boron is related to the nitrate ion concentration in throughfall. Results of a laboratory exposure experiment using artificial fog water simulating the average composition of fog water observed at Mt. Oyama (simulated acid fog: SAF) on the fir seedling needles also shows a large leaching of these components from the cell walls of fir needles. The leaching amount increased concomitantly with decreasing pH of the SAF solution. We also observed that a dimeric rhamnogalacturonan II-borate complex (dRG-II-B) that exists in the cell wall as pectic polysaccharide was converted to monomeric RG-II (mRG-II) by the leaching of calcium ion and boron. Results not only of field observations but also those of laboratory experiments indicate a large effect of acid depositions on fir needles.

  5. Evidence for differential effects of reduced and oxidised nitrogen deposition on vegetation independent of nitrogen load.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Leon J L; Jones, Laurence; Sheppard, Lucy J; Smart, Simon M; Bobbink, Roland; Dise, Nancy B; Ashmore, Mike R

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition impacts natural and semi-natural ecosystems globally. The responses of vegetation to N deposition may, however, differ strongly between habitats and may be mediated by the form of N. Although much attention has been focused on the impact of total N deposition, the effects of reduced and oxidised N, independent of the total N deposition, have received less attention. In this paper, we present new analyses of national monitoring data in the UK to provide an extensive evaluation of whether there are differences in the effects of reduced and oxidised N deposition across eight habitat types (acid, calcareous and mesotrophic grasslands, upland and lowland heaths, bogs and mires, base-rich mires, woodlands). We analysed data from 6860 plots in the British Countryside Survey 2007 for effects of total N deposition and N form on species richness, Ellenberg N values and grass:forb ratio. Our results provide clear evidence that N deposition affects species richness in all habitats except base-rich mires, after factoring out correlated explanatory variables (climate and sulphur deposition). In addition, the form of N in deposition appears important for the biodiversity of grasslands and woodlands but not mires and heaths. Ellenberg N increased more in relation to NHx deposition than NOy deposition in all but one habitat type. Relationships between species richness and N form were habitat-specific: acid and mesotrophic grasslands appear more sensitive to NHx deposition while calcareous grasslands and woodlands appeared more responsive to NOy deposition. These relationships are likely driven by the preferences of the component plant species for oxidised or reduced forms of N, rather than by soil acidification.

  6. Atmospheric dry plus wet deposition and wet-only deposition of dicarboxylic acids and inorganic compounds in a coastal suburban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ying I.; Kuo, Su-Ching; Young, Li-Hao; Hsieh, Li-Ying; Chen, Pei-Ti

    2014-06-01

    This study investigated the chemical properties and composition sources of dicarboxylic organic acids and inorganic salts in dry plus wet deposition (DWD) and wet-only deposition at a coastal suburban area in southern Taiwan in 2008. DWD is the accumulation of dry deposition and wet deposition from the beginning of each new rain event, while wet-only deposition is the wet deposition from the beginning of each new rain event only. A total of 60 samples were collected during the period of study. The wet-only deposition samples were slightly more acidic (pH 5.01-5.50) than the DWD samples (pH 5.51-6.00). The total volume-weighted mean (VWM) equivalent ionic concentration of 784.3 ± 431.1 μeq L-1 in DWD was higher than that of 682.2 ± 392.4 μeq L-1 in wet-only deposition. In both types of deposition the major cation species were Ca2+, Na+ and NH4+, and the major anion species were HCO3-, Cl- and non-sea salt (nss) nss-SO42-. Total dicarboxylic acids contributed only 0.60% and 0.45% of the total ionic equivalent concentration in DWD and wet-only deposition, respectively, and oxalic and malonic acids were the major dicarboxylic acid species. DWD to wet-only deposition species concentration ratios (DWD/W ratios) were always higher than 1.0. DWD contained more water-soluble inorganic salts and dicarboxylic acids than wet-only deposition, with DWD/W ratios of the dust-bound species K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ as large as 1.6-1.8 and those from photochemical species nss-SO42- and NH4+ of 1.36 and 1.29, respectively. These ratios show that the dry deposition flux of dust is greater than that of photochemical particles. In addition, the 1.81 ratio for oxalic acid shows that oxalic acid is easier to remove from the atmosphere via dry deposition than malonic and succinic acids. Probable deposition composition sources for both DWD and wet-only deposition, investigated using principal component analysis, were marine spray, photochemical inorganic products, and terrestrial origin and

  7. Sensitivity of high-elevation streams in the Southern Blue Ridge Province to acidic deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Hudy, M.; Fowler, D.; Van Den Avyle, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Southern Blue Ridge Province, which encompasses parts of northern Georgia, eastern Tennessee, and western North Carolina, has been predicted to be sensitive to impacts from acidic deposition, owing to the chemical composition of the bedrock geology and soils. This study confirms the predicted potential sensitivity, quantifies the level of total alkalinity and describes the chemical characteristics of 30 headwater streams of this area. Water chemistry was measured five times between April 1983 and June 1984 at first and third order reaches of each stream during baseflow conditions. Sensitivity based on total alkalinity and the Calcite Saturation Index indicates that the headwater streams of the Province are vulnerable to acidification. Total alkalinity and p11 were generally higher in third order reaches (mean, 72 ?eq/? and 6.7) than in first order reaches (64 ?eq/? and 6.4). Ionic concentrations were low, averaging 310 and 340 ?eq/? in first and third order reaches, respectively. A single sampling appears adequate for evaluating sensitivity based on total alkalinity, but large temporal variability requires multiple sampling for the detection of changes in pH and alkalinity over time. Monitoring of stream water should continue in order to detect any subtle effects of acidic deposition on these unique resource systems.

  8. Wetlands serve as natural sources for improvement of stream ecosystem health in regions affected by acid deposition.

    PubMed

    Pound, Katrina L; Lawrence, Gregory B; Passy, Sophia I

    2013-09-01

    For over 40 years, acid deposition has been recognized as a serious international environmental problem, but efforts to restore acidified streams and biota have had limited success. The need to better understand the effects of different sources of acidity on streams has become more pressing with the recent increases in surface water organic acids, or 'brownification,' associated with climate change and decreased inorganic acid deposition. Here, we carried out a large scale multi-seasonal investigation in the Adirondacks, one of the most acid-impacted regions in the United States, to assess how acid stream producers respond to local and watershed influences and whether these influences can be used in acidification remediation. We explored the pathways of wetland control on aluminum chemistry and diatom taxonomic and functional composition. We demonstrate that streams with larger watershed wetlands have higher organic content, lower concentrations of acidic anions, and lower ratios of inorganic to organic monomeric aluminum, all beneficial for diatom biodiversity and guilds producing high biomass. Although brownification has been viewed as a form of pollution, our results indicate that it may be a stimulating force for biofilm producers with potentially positive consequences for higher trophic levels. Our research also reveals that the mechanism of watershed control of local stream diatom biodiversity through wetland export of organic matter is universal in running waters, operating not only in hard streams, as previously reported, but also in acid streams. Our findings that the negative impacts of acid deposition on Adirondack stream chemistry and biota can be mitigated by wetlands have important implications for biodiversity conservation and stream ecosystem management. Future acidification research should focus on the potential for wetlands to improve stream ecosystem health in acid-impacted regions and their direct use in stream restoration, for example, through

  9. Wetlands serve as natural sources for improvement of stream ecosystem health in regions affected by acid deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pound, Katrina L; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Passy, Sophia I.

    2013-01-01

    For over 40 years, acid deposition has been recognized as a serious international environmental problem, but efforts to restore acidified streams and biota have had limited success. The need to better understand the effects of different sources of acidity on streams has become more pressing with the recent increases in surface water organic acids, or 'brownification' associated with climate change and decreased inorganic acid deposition. Here, we carried out a large scale multi-seasonal investigation in the Adirondacks, one of the most acid-impacted regions in the United States, to assess how acid stream producers respond to local and watershed influences and whether these influences can be used in acidification remediation. We explored the pathways of wetland control on aluminum chemistry and diatom taxonomic and functional composition. We demonstrate that streams with larger watershed wetlands have higher organic content, lower concentrations of acidic anions, and lower ratios of inorganic to organic monomeric aluminum, all beneficial for diatom biodiversity and guilds producing high biomass. Although brownification has been viewed as a form of pollution, our results indicate that it may be a stimulating force for biofilm producers with potentially positive consequences for higher trophic levels. Our research also reveals that the mechanism of watershed control of local stream diatom biodiversity through wetland export of organic matter is universal in running waters, operating not only in hard streams, as previously reported, but also in acid streams. Our findings that the negative impacts of acid deposition on Adirondack stream chemistry and biota can be mitigated by wetlands have important implications for biodiversity conservation and stream ecosystem management. Future acidification research should focus on the potential for wetlands to improve stream ecosystem health in acid-impacted regions and their direct use in stream restoration, for example, through

  10. Wetlands serve as natural sources for improvement of stream ecosystem health in regions affected by acid deposition.

    PubMed

    Pound, Katrina L; Lawrence, Gregory B; Passy, Sophia I

    2013-09-01

    For over 40 years, acid deposition has been recognized as a serious international environmental problem, but efforts to restore acidified streams and biota have had limited success. The need to better understand the effects of different sources of acidity on streams has become more pressing with the recent increases in surface water organic acids, or 'brownification,' associated with climate change and decreased inorganic acid deposition. Here, we carried out a large scale multi-seasonal investigation in the Adirondacks, one of the most acid-impacted regions in the United States, to assess how acid stream producers respond to local and watershed influences and whether these influences can be used in acidification remediation. We explored the pathways of wetland control on aluminum chemistry and diatom taxonomic and functional composition. We demonstrate that streams with larger watershed wetlands have higher organic content, lower concentrations of acidic anions, and lower ratios of inorganic to organic monomeric aluminum, all beneficial for diatom biodiversity and guilds producing high biomass. Although brownification has been viewed as a form of pollution, our results indicate that it may be a stimulating force for biofilm producers with potentially positive consequences for higher trophic levels. Our research also reveals that the mechanism of watershed control of local stream diatom biodiversity through wetland export of organic matter is universal in running waters, operating not only in hard streams, as previously reported, but also in acid streams. Our findings that the negative impacts of acid deposition on Adirondack stream chemistry and biota can be mitigated by wetlands have important implications for biodiversity conservation and stream ecosystem management. Future acidification research should focus on the potential for wetlands to improve stream ecosystem health in acid-impacted regions and their direct use in stream restoration, for example, through

  11. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 15. Liming acidic surface waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Olem, H.; Thornelof, E.; Sandoy, S.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1990-09-01

    The document describes the science and technology of aquatic liming--a method for improving the water quality of acidic surface waters to restore or enhance fisheries. The report is a comprehensive compilation of years of research in North America and Europe by dozens of scientists. Several mitigation technologies--including those that have only been proposed--are critically evaluated along with the effects of liming on water chemistry and aquatic biota. Through these evaluations, the state of the science and technology of aquatic liming is identified for the reader. Whole-lake liming is now recognized as a valuable management tool for acidic surface waters and their fisheries. However, some liming technologies are considered experimental and will need further evaluation. Distinctions between technologies are included--as is the distinction between liming acidic surface waters and reducing acidifying emissions.

  12. High frequency and large deposition of acid fog on high elevation forest.

    PubMed

    Igawa, Manabu; Matsumura, Ko; Okochi, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    We have collected and analyzed fogwater on the mountainside of Mt. Oyama (1252 m) in the Tanzawa Mountains of Japan and observed the fog event frequency from the base of the mountain with a video camera. The fog event frequency increased with elevation and was observed to be present 46% of the year at the summit. The water deposition via throughfall increased with elevation because of the increase in fogwater interception and was about twice that via rain at the summit, where the air pollutant deposition via throughfall was several times that via rainwater. The dry deposition and the deposition via fogwater were dominant factors in the total ion deposition at high elevation sites. In a fog event, nitric acid, the major acid component on the mountain, is formed during the transport of the air mass from the base of the mountain along the mountainside, where gases including nitric acid deposit and are scavenged by fogwater. Therefore, high acidity caused by nitric acid and relatively low ion strength are observed in the fogwater at high elevation sites.

  13. [Calculating critical loads of acid deposition with different percentiles in China].

    PubMed

    Duan, Lei; Hao, Jiming; Zhou, Zhongping; Xie, Shaodong

    2002-09-01

    While mapping critical loads of acid deposition in China, the 1 degree (latitude) x 1 degree (longitude) resolution was always adopted in critical load calculation. However, the results of mapping can not show the difference of sensitivity of ecosystems to acid deposition within a 1 degree x 1 degree grid. For the convenience of policy-makers to formulate acid deposition control strategies based on critical loads, and to improve the representation and practicability of 1 degree x 1 degree results, a series of critical load maps with different percentiles were compiled, which may be accordance with a given economic or technological level, and allows some degree of damage. Based on the cumulative distribution function, the critical load exceedance maps with different percentiles and the maximum allowable deposition of each province was also derived.

  14. Atmospheric deposition and canopy exchange of anions and cations in two plantation forests under acid rain influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Weijun; Ren, Huili; Darrel Jenerette, G.; Hui, Dafeng; Ren, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition as a widely concerned environmental problem in China has been less studied in plantation forests compared to urban and secondary forests, albeit they constitute 1/3 of the total forested areas of the country. We measured the rainwater amount and chemistry outside and beneath the canopies of two widely distributed plantations (Acacia mangium and Dimocarpus longan) in the severe acid rain influenced Pearl River Delta region of southeastern China for two years. Our results showed that the frequency of acid rain was 96% on the basis of pH value <5.6. The volume-weighted mean (vwm) pH was 4.62 and higher in the dry (Oct.-Mar.) than in the wet (Apr.-Sep.) seasons. The major acidic anion was sulfate with vwm concentration of 140 μeq l-1 and annual deposition flux of 110.3 kg ha-1 yr-1. The major neutralizing cations were calcium (94.8 μeq l-1 and 28 kg ha-1 yr-1) and ammonium (41.2 μeq l-1 and 11.7 kg ha-1 yr-1). Over 95% of these major acidic anions and neutralizing cations were derived from anthropogenic and terrestrial sources as a result of industrial, agricultural and forestry activities. Plantation canopy had marked impacts on rainwater chemistry, with the measured anion and cation concentrations being significantly enriched in throughfall (TF) and stemflow (SF) rainwater by 1.4 (for NO) to 20-fold (for K+) compared to those in bulk precipitation (BP). Dry deposition generally contributed about 13-22% of the total deposition while canopy leaching mainly occurred for K+ (>88%) and NH (10-38%). The two tree species showed distinct impacts on rainfall redistribution and rainwater chemistry due to their differences in canopy architecture and leaf/bark texture, suggesting that species-specific effects should not be overlooked while assessing the acid deposition in forested areas.

  15. Acid fog deposition and the declining forest in Tanzawa mountains, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igawa, M.; Shigihara, A.; Goto, S.; Nanzai, B.

    2010-07-01

    Since 1988, we have investigated fog chemistry in Mt. Oyama, Tanzawa mountains, Japan, and acid fog has been frequently observed there. We have observed fog on Mt. Oyama by using a night view video camera placed at the base of the mountain, by using a visibility meter at the top of the mountain, and by an active fog sampler at the mountainside. We have reported the fog frequency at the top of Mt. Oyama to be 46% measured by the video camera, but it was overestimated. The visibility measured at the top of the mountain is the most reliable index, and the top of the mountain is covered with fog for about 30%. The frequency of about 15% was added for the case of the visibility of a few km when it was measured by a night view video camera placed at the base of the mountain (8.5 km far from the top). Fog-water deposition increases with the increasing altitude to be much larger than the rain-water deposition. The factors affecting on the occult precipitation intensity were investigated by the simultaneous measurement of the rainfall intensity under a canopy, the wind speed and direction, and the visibility at the top of the mountain. Air pollution has been improved recently in Japan, but acid fog is not improved and has been affecting the leaves of the trees. In Tanzawa mountains, many fir trees and beech trees are declining, while cedar trees show no decline symptoms. We have investigated the effect of acid fog on the trees of these species by exposing simulated acid fog on the seedlings of the species. Seedlings of fir and beech are much damaged by the long term exposure of pH 3 fog, while cedar seedlings are not affected by the acid fog. By the exposure of simulated acid fog, the epicuticle wax is eroded at first, then the cross linking polycation between sugar chains of cell wall is ion-exchanged with proton and the cell wall is swollen, and the membrane calcium is desorbed from the membrane, which lowers the tolerance of the trees to the climate change. Fir and beech

  16. Acidification sensitivity and critical loads of acid deposition for surface waters in China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xuemei; Hao, Jiming; Duan, Lei; Zhou, Zhongping

    2002-04-22

    Although decades of severe acid deposition have not resulted in serious surface water acidification in China, at present, the risk of some freshwaters becoming acidified cannot be neglected. To know more clearly about the possible impact acid deposition would have on Chinese surface waters, it is necessary to study the sensitivity of those surface waters to acidification and their critical loads of acid deposition on a national scale. Here we assess the acidification sensitivity of Chinese surface waters using an approach based on geology, soils, land use and hydrological conditions. Critical loads of S, N and acidity were also evaluated by a first-order acidity balance (FAB) model. Results show that most surface waters in China have very high critical loads of S and acidity and are not susceptible to acidification. Surface waters can be divided into three groups according to both sensitivity classes and critical loads. The few most sensitive surface waters are located in the northern part of Daxinganling region, with critical loads of S deposition and acidity lower than 2 keq ha(-1) year(-1). Surface waters in the northeastern region draining dark brown forest soils and in southern China belong to the second class of acidification sensitivity and their critical loads of S and acidity are generally between 2 and 15 keq ha(-1) year(-1), indicating they are not likely to be acidified under any flow conditions. Surface waters in other parts of China will not be acidified to any degree, with critical loads much higher than 15 keq ha(-1) year(-1). The magnitude and spatial distribution pattern of acidification sensitivity have significant similarity to the critical loads of S and acidity for Chinese surface waters. Although most surface waters are not likely to be acidified, attention should still be paid to the possible adverse impact acid deposition would have, especially in northeastern China, where the surface waters are the most sensitive, and the southern region

  17. Cytokinin producing bacteria stimulate amino acid deposition by wheat roots.

    PubMed

    Kudoyarova, Guzel R; Melentiev, Alexander I; Martynenko, Elena V; Timergalina, Leila N; Arkhipova, Tatiana N; Shendel, Galina V; Kuz'mina, Ludmila Yu; Dodd, Ian C; Veselov, Stanislav Yu

    2014-10-01

    Phytohormone production is one mechanism by which rhizobacteria can stimulate plant growth, but it is not clear whether the bacteria gain from this mechanism. The hypothesis that microbial-derived cytokinin phytohormones stimulate root exudation of amino acids was tested. The rhizosphere of wheat plants was drenched with the synthetic cytokinin trans-zeatin or inoculated with Bacillus subtilis IB-22 (which produces zeatin type cytokinins) or B. subtilis IB-21 (which failed to accumulate cytokinins). Growing plants in a split root system allowed spatial separation of zeatin application or rhizobacterial inoculation to one compartment and analyses of amino acid release from roots (rhizodeposition) into the other compartment (without either microbial inoculation or treatment with exogenous hormone). Supplying B. subtilis IB-22 or zeatin to either the whole root system or half of the roots increased concentrations of amino acids in the soil solution although the magnitude of the increase was greater when whole roots were treated. There was some similarity in amino acid concentrations induced by either bacterial or zeatin treatment. Thus B. subtilis IB-22 increased amino acid rhizodeposition, likely due to its ability to produce cytokinins. Furthermore, B. subtilis strain IB-21, which failed to accumulate cytokinins in culture media, did not significantly affect amino acid concentrations in the wheat rhizosphere. The ability of rhizobacteria to produce cytokinins and thereby stimulate rhizodeposition may be important in enhancing rhizobacterial colonization of the rhizoplane.

  18. [Current situation and impact factors of acid deposition in main cites of Shandong Province].

    PubMed

    Jia, Hong-yu; Zhang, Qiao-xian; Deng, Hong-bing; Zhao, Jing-zhu; Mu, Jin-bo; Zhang, De-zhi

    2006-12-01

    Based on the monitoring data for years in Shandong Province, current situation of acid rain in every city was assessed, and the temporal distribution of the dry, wet and total sulfur deposition in Jinan and Qingdao were studied. The results showed that Qingdao which had the largest precipitation acidity was the single city whose annul average precipitation pH was below 5. 60. The precipitation acidities in the main cities of Shandong Province were in a descent tendency. The total sulfur desposition in Jinan and Qingdao was basically stable or in a descent tendency, but also reached 10 t/(km(2)x a) or so. Among the total sulfur deposition flux, the dry deposition of sulfur had the greater contribution, and the contribution of SO2 dry deposition was higher than that of SO42- dry deposition. By analyzing the relation between the precipitation acidity and the SO2 discharge intensity, soil acidity and meteorological condition, the impact factors of acid precipitation in the cities of Shandong Province were revealed.

  19. Basal area growth of sugar maple in relation to acid deposition, stand health, and soil nutrients.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Louis; Ouimet, Rock; Houle, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies have shown in noncalcareous soils that acid deposition may have increased soil leaching of basic cations above the input rate from soil weathering and atmospheric depositions. This phenomenon may have increased soil acidity levels, and, as a consequence, may have reduced the availability of these essential nutrients for forest growth. Fourteen plots of the Forest Ecosystem Research and Monitoring Network in Québec were used to examine the relation between post-industrial growth trends of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) and acid deposition (N and S), stand decline rate, and soil exchangeable nutrient concentrations. Atmospheric N and S deposition and soil exchangeable acidity were positively associated with stand decline rate, and negatively with the average tree basal area increment trend. The growth rate reduction reached on average 17% in declining stands compared with healthy ones. The results showed a significant sugar maple growth rate reduction since 1960 on acid soils. The appearance of the forest decline phenomenon in Québec can be attributed, at least partially, to soil acidification and acid deposition levels.

  20. Growth characteristics of Ti-based fumaric acid hybrid thin films by molecular layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan-Qiang; Zhu, Lin; Li, Xin; Cao, Zheng-Yi; Wu, Di; Li, Ai-Dong

    2015-09-01

    Ti-based fumaric acid hybrid thin films were successfully prepared using inorganic TiCl4 and organic fumaric acid as precursors by molecular layer deposition (MLD). The effect of deposition temperature from 180 °C to 350 °C on the growth rate, composition, chemical state, and topology of hybrid films has been investigated systematically by means of a series of analytical tools such as spectroscopic ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The MLD process of the Ti-fumaric acid shows self-limiting surface reaction with a reasonable growth rate of ∼0.93 Å per cycle and small surface roughness of ∼0.59 nm in root-mean-square value at 200 °C. A temperature-dependent growth characteristic has been observed in the hybrid films. On increasing the temperature from 180 °C to 300 °C, the growth rate decreases from 1.10 to 0.49 Å per cycle and the XPS composition of the film's C : O : Ti ratio changes from 8.35 : 7.49 : 1.00 to 4.66 : 4.80 : 1.00. FTIR spectra indicate that the hybrid films show bridging bonding mode at a low deposition temperature of 200 °C and bridging/bidentate mixed bonding mode at elevated deposition temperatures of 250 and 300 °C. The higher C and O amounts deviating from the ideal composition may be ascribed to increased organic incorporation into the hybrid films at lower deposition temperature and temperature-dependent density of reactive sites (-OH). The composition of hybrid films grown at 350 °C shows a dramatic decrease in C and O elemental composition (C : O : Ti = 1.97 : 2.76 : 1.00) due to the thermal decomposition of the fumaric acid precursor. The produced by-product H2O changes the structure of the hybrid films, resulting in the formation of more Ti-O bonds at high temperatures. The stability of the hybrid films against chemical and thermal treatment, and long-term storage by

  1. Effect of acid rain on the soil environment: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Rechcigl, J.E.; Sparks, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on acid rain, with emphasis on soils and leaching of soil elements. Several questions still exist concerning the effects of atmospheric acid deposition on soils: (1) does acid rain enhance mobilization of harmful heavy metals in soils which could leach into the groundwater; (2) does acid rain accelerate the kinetics of weathering of primary minerals and of secondary clay minerals in soils which would release large quantities of Al, Fe, and Si into the groundwater making it unfit for human consumption; and (3) do the beneficial effects of acid deposition outweigh the negative effects or vice versa. Literature pertaining to these questions is addressed in this review. 63 references.

  2. Subsurface hydrologic effects on sediment deposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantification of soil erosion processes has been traditionally focused on soil detachment and sediment transport while efforts in quantifying sediment deposition process are relatively minor. Nevertheless, most sediment generated on the hill slopes are deposited within the field and only a small am...

  3. A model of annual orographic precipitation and acid deposition and its application to Snowdonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, A. J.; Mousavi-Baygi, M.; Smith, R. I.; Hall, J.; Fowler, D.; Choularton, T. W.

    A model of orographic rainfall has been used to estimate annual precipitation and acid wet deposition at a 1 km resolution for the Snowdonia mountains in North Wales. Comparison with measurements and existing rainfall maps of the UK showed that this approach was successful in reproducing the high annual precipitation peaks of up to 4000 mm annually that occur in this area. At 13 out of the 17 measurement sites, the modelled annual precipitation differed from long-term annual average measurements by no more than 25%. The process model was compared with a procedure used to map wet deposition of pollutants across the United Kingdom at a 5 km resolution. Significant differences between the two deposition data sets were apparent. With the mapping procedure, maximum wet deposition was correlated to areas of high precipitation in the northeast of the domain. With the process model, however, maximum deposition was observed over the smaller hills in the southwest of the domain, the first orographic barrier reached by the air mass in south-westerly flow. High exceedances of critical loads for acidic deposition to soils were calculated using the mapping procedure and found to be due to the high annual precipitation in Snowdonia. The seeder-feeder model represents a useful tool, which could be used for estimating annual wet deposition of pollutants and exceedance of critical loads in hill areas at a much finer resolution than the national transport models and deposition mapping routines that are commonly employed in the United Kingdom.

  4. A biogeochemical comparison of two well-buffered catchments with contrasting histories of acid deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.; Kram, P.; Hruska, J.; Bullen, T.D.

    2004-01-01

    Much of the biogeochemical cycling research in catchments in the past 25 years has been driven by acid deposition research funding. This research has focused on vulnerable base-poor systems; catchments on alkaline lithologies have received little attention. In regions of high acid loadings, however, even well-buffered catchments are susceptible to forest decline and episodes of low alkalinity in streamwater. As part of a collaboration between the Czech and U.S. Geological Surveys, we compared biogeochemical patterns in two well-studied, well-buffered catchments: Pluhuv Bor in the western Czech Republic, which has received high loading of atmospheric acidity, and Sleepers River Research Watershed in Vermont, U.S.A., where acid loading has been considerably less. Despite differences in lithology, wetness, forest type, and glacial history, the catchments displayed similar patterns of solute concentrations and flow. At both catchments, base cation and alkalinity diluted with increasing flow, whereas nitrate and dissolved organic carbon increased with increasing flow. Sulfate diluted with increasing flow at Sleepers River, while at Pluhuv Bor the sulfate-flow relation shifted from positive to negative as atmospheric sulfur (S) loadings decreased and soil S pools were depleted during the 1990s. At high flow, alkalinity decreased to near 100 ??eq L-1 at Pluhuv Bor compared to 400 ??eq L-1 at Sleepers River. Despite the large amounts of S flushed from Pluhuv Bor soils, these alkalinity declines were caused solely by dilution, which was greater at Pluhuv Bor relative to Sleepers River due to greater contributions from shallow flow paths at high flow. Although the historical high S loading at Pluhuv Bor has caused soil acidification and possible forest damage, it has had little effect on the acid/base status of streamwater in this well-buffered catchment. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  5. Granite weathering and the sensitivity of alpine lakes to acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, R.E.

    1990-07-01

    Lake chemical data from the National Surface Water Survey (NSWS) were corrected for the effects of regional atmospheric deposition and then used to evaluate the role of weathering in supplying base cations, silica, sulfate, and alkalinity to surface waters in alpine vs. subalpine, and in glaciated vs. unglaciated granitic terrane of the western and southeastern US. Thermodynamic models, idealized reaction stoichiometry, and multivariate regression involving solutes and geographic variables indicate that irreversible weathering can largely account for lake chemistry. By contrast, relatively minor roles are played by reversible ion exchange in soils and sediments, terrestrial bioaccumulation, and transformation in lakes. The regional patterns in lake acidity components (NO{sub 3}, SO{sub 4}, DOC, CO{sub 2}), and statistical relationships between acidity and base cations demonstrate that rock weathering is limited by acid inputs in many alpine catchments prior to fall overturn. The empirical success of the Henriksen alkalinity model depends on a high Ca: Na weathering ration. The latter increase with increasing physical disturbance of the catchment (juvenility), hence under natural circumstances attains a maximum as a result of on-going or recent glaciation. The Henriksen model fails in geochemically old terrane, where cation losses accompanying silicate weathering attain steady state proportions.

  6. Amino acid geochemistry of fossil bones from the Rancho La Brea asphalt deposit, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMenamin, M.A.S.; Blunt, D.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Miller, S.E.; Marcus, L.F.; Pardi, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    Low aspartic acid d:l ratios and modern collagenlike concentration values indicate that amino acids in bones from the Rancho La Brea asphalt deposit, Los Angeles, California are better preserved than amino acids in bones of equivalent age that have not been preserved in asphalt. Amino acids were recovered from 10 Rancho La Brea bone samples which range in age from less than 200 to greater than 36,000 yr. The calibrated rates of aspartic acid racemization range from 2.1 to 5.0 ?? 10-6yr-1. Although this wide range of rate constants decreases the level of confidence for age estimates, use of the larger rate constant of 5.0 ?? 10-6yr-1 provides minimum age estimates which fit the known stratigraphic and chronologic records of the Rancho La Brea deposits. ?? 1982.

  7. Human health effects of exposure to airborne acid.

    PubMed

    Folinsbee, L J

    1989-02-01

    This paper summarizes and critiques a series of reports on the health effects of acid aerosol exposure, presented at the Symposium on the Health Effects of Acid Aerosols and compares these data to selected previous studies. The role of the two major defenses against acid aerosols, the conversion of acid to the ammonium salts by respiratory ammonia and buffering of acid by airway surface liquid are discussed in relation to airway acid burdens expected from typical inhalation exposures. The roles of particle size and hygroscopicity on airway deposition of aerosol are also included. The major health effects studied were the effects of acid aerosol on mucociliary clearance in healthy individuals and changes in lung function in asthmatics, an important sensitive subpopulation. The broad range of response in asthmatics suggests the need for further study.

  8. The contribution from shipping emissions to air quality and acid deposition in Europe.

    PubMed

    Derwent, Richard G; Stevenson, David S; Doherty, Ruth M; Collins, William J; Sanderson, Michael G; Johnson, Colin E; Cofala, Janusz; Mechler, Reinhard; Amann, Markus; Dentener, Frank J

    2005-02-01

    A global three-dimensional Lagrangian chemistry-transport model STOCHEM is used to describe the European regional acid deposition and ozone air quality impacts along the Atlantic Ocean seaboard of Europe, from the SO2, NOx, VOCs and CO emissions from international shipping under conditions appropriate to the year 2000. Model-derived total sulfur deposition from international shipping reaches over 200 mg S m(-2) yr(-1) over the southwestern approaches to the British Isles and Brittany. The contribution from international shipping to surface ozone concentrations during the summertime, peaks at about 6 ppb over Ireland, Brittany and Portugal. Shipping emissions act as an external influence on acid deposition and ozone air quality within Europe and may require control actions in the future if strict deposition and air quality targets are to be met.

  9. Post-depositional migration and preservation of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) in polar ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, M.; Marchal, O.; Guo, W.; Das, S. B.; Evans, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Methanesulfonic acid (MSA; CH3SO3-) in ice cores is a unique, high-resolution proxy of regional sea ice behavior, marine primary productivity, and synoptic climatology. Significant uncertainties remain, however, in both our understanding of the production and transfer of MSA to the ice sheet, as well as its preservation over time, compromising the paleoclimatological utility of the proxy. Here we apply a numerical modeling approach to quantitatively investigate the post-depositional processes affecting MSA migration and preservation within the firn and ice column, building on recent observational and theoretical studies. Our model allows us to evaluate the timing and magnitude of the vertical movement of MSA in response to varying influences, including the competing effects of 1) concentration gradients of sea-salts typically deposited asynchronously to MSA, 2) snow accumulation and densification rates, and 3) in situ temperature gradients. We first test the model against a recently collected ice core from a high accumulation site in coastal West Antarctica, where monthly-resolved MSA records show an abrupt shift from a summer-to-winter maximum in MSA at ~23m depth (ρ ≈ 650 kg/m3), near the firn-ice transition. We find our model to be a robust predictor of the observed migrational features in this record, capturing both (i) the abrupt shift in summer-to-winter maximal concentrations of MSA (steady state ≈ 3.2 yrs), and (ii) the depression of the seasonal amplitude at depth. Further, our modeling results suggest post-depositional effects can lead to substantial interannual alteration of the MSA signal, contrary to previous assumptions that MSA migration is confined within annual layers at high accumulation sites. Using a broad range of polar MSA records and their associated, site-specific environmental conditions, we will evaluate the fidelity of subannual to interannual variability of MSA records and systematically determine the factors conducive to its

  10. Comparison among model estimates of critical loads of acidic deposition using different sources and scales of input data.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, T C; Cosby, B J; Sullivan, T J; McNulty, S G; Cohen, E C

    2010-09-01

    The critical load (CL) of acidic atmospheric deposition represents the load of acidity deposited from the atmosphere to the earth's surface at which harmful acidification effects on sensitive biological receptors are thought to occur. In this study, the CL for forest soils was estimated for 27 watersheds throughout the United States using a steady-state mass balance approach based on both national and site-specific data and using different approaches for estimating base cation weathering. Results suggested that the scale and source of input data can have large effects on the calculated CL and that the most important parameter in the steady-state model used to estimate CL is base cation weathering. These results suggest that the data and approach used to estimate weathering must be robust if the calculated CL is to be useful for its intended purpose.

  11. Comparison among model estimates of critical loads of acidic deposition using different sources and scales of input data.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, T C; Cosby, B J; Sullivan, T J; McNulty, S G; Cohen, E C

    2010-09-01

    The critical load (CL) of acidic atmospheric deposition represents the load of acidity deposited from the atmosphere to the earth's surface at which harmful acidification effects on sensitive biological receptors are thought to occur. In this study, the CL for forest soils was estimated for 27 watersheds throughout the United States using a steady-state mass balance approach based on both national and site-specific data and using different approaches for estimating base cation weathering. Results suggested that the scale and source of input data can have large effects on the calculated CL and that the most important parameter in the steady-state model used to estimate CL is base cation weathering. These results suggest that the data and approach used to estimate weathering must be robust if the calculated CL is to be useful for its intended purpose. PMID:20609503

  12. Matrix-assisted pulsed laser deposition of croconic acid, a diprotic organic ferroelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, S. M.; Yi, Sun Yong; Jimenez, Richard; Corgan, Jeffrey; Borchert, James; Kuchmek, John; Papantonakis, M. R.; McGill, R. A.; Bubb, D. M.

    2011-11-01

    MAPLE has long been demonstrated as a successful tool for the deposition of relatively large polymerics and biomaterials. Less work has been done with small-mass organic compounds. In this work, MAPLE has been demonstrated as a viable materials processing technique for 4,5-dihydroxycyclopentenetrione, a diprotic hydroxylic acid, more commonly known as croconic acid ((C=O)3(COH)2). Croconic acid readily dissociates in solution, and, as prepared in the solvent matrices used in this study, was deposited in large part as the solvated croconate conjugate base. Various substrates were utilized and the deposited films were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, atomic and piezo-force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and second harmonic generation measurements. This material has potential application in nonlinear optics and green computing as memory elements.

  13. Comment on comment on ''acid precipitation in historical perspective and effects of acid precipitation''

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksen, A.; Richter, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    The author criticizes the fact that some soil scientists have difficulties in accepting that lakes and stream waters have become acid due to acid rain, because the natural production of acidity in ecosystems is large compared to the contribution from acid rain. He points out that Richter concludes that many of the reported changes, where real, may well result from natural processes with relatively minor contributions from acid precipitation. The author also disagrees with Krug and Frink who recently suggested that SO/sub 4/ from acid rain is exchanged with organic anions originally present in the water, leaving pH essentially unchanged. The author rebuts Henriksen who he says appears to have misunderstood the intent of the original correspondence, which was not to document evidence but rather to assert two generalities; (1) adverse effects of acid deposition on ecosystems are commonly overstated, and (2) the biogeochemistry of ecosystems is easily oversimplified, and natural sources of acidity are often ignored.

  14. Influence of Perfluorooctanoic Acid on the Transport and Deposition Behaviors of Bacteria in Quartz Sand.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dan; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2016-03-01

    The significance of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) on the transport and deposition behaviors of bacteria (Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis) in quartz sand is examined in both NaCl and CaCl2 solutions at pH 5.6 by comparing both breakthrough curves and retained profiles with PFOA in solutions versus those without PFOA. All test conditions are found to be highly unfavorable for cell deposition regardless of the presence of PFOA; however, 7%-46% cell deposition is observed depending on the conditions. The cell deposition may be attributed to micro- or nanoscale roughness and/or to chemical heterogeneity of the sand surface. The results show that, under all examined conditions, PFOA in suspensions increases cell transport and decreases cell deposition in porous media regardless of cell type, presence or absence of extracellular polymeric substances, ionic strength, and ion valence. We find that the additional repulsion between bacteria and quartz sand caused by both acid-base interaction and steric repulsion as well as the competition for deposition sites on quartz sand surfaces by PFOA are responsible for the enhanced transport and decreased deposition of bacteria with PFOA in solutions.

  15. A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity and pH, and phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vet, Robert; Artz, Richard S.; Carou, Silvina

    2014-08-01

    Investigating and assessing the chemical composition of precipitation and atmospheric deposition is essential to understanding how atmospheric pollutants contribute to contemporary environmental concerns including ecosystem acidification and eutrophication, loss of biodiversity, air pollution and global climate change. Evidence of the link between atmospheric deposition and these environmental issues is well established. The state of scientific understanding of this link is that present levels of atmospheric deposition of sulfur and nitrogen adversely affect terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, putting forest sustainability and aquatic biodiversity at risk. Nitrogen and phosphorus loadings are linked to impacts on the diversity of terrestrial and aquatic vegetation through biological cycling, and atmospheric deposition plays a major role in the emission-transport-conversion-loss cycle of chemicals in the atmosphere as well as the formation of particulate matter and ozone in the troposphere. Evidence also shows that atmospheric constituents are changing the earth's climate through direct and indirect atmospheric processes. This Special Issue, comprising a single article titled "A global assessment of precipitation chemistry and deposition of sulfur, nitrogen, sea salt, base cations, organic acids, acidity and pH, and phosphorus", presents a recent comprehensive review of precipitation chemistry and atmospheric deposition at global and regional scales. The information in the Special Issue, including all supporting data sets and maps, is anticipated to be of great value not only to the atmospheric deposition community but also to other science communities including those that study ecosystem impacts, human health effects, nutrient processing, climate change, global and hemispheric modeling and biogeochemical cycling. Understanding and quantifying pollutant loss from the atmosphere is, and will remain, an important component of each of these scientific fields as they

  16. Environmental factors affecting the low temperature isomerization of homohopanes in acidic peat deposits, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianyu; Meyers, Philip A.; Xue, Jiantao; Gong, Linfeng; Wang, Xinxin; Xie, Shucheng

    2015-04-01

    Progressively more evidence reveals the abundant occurrence of the C31 homohopane with a 17α, 21β-configuration (C31 αβ) in immature peats. This compound is commonly considered to be an indicator of thermal maturity in petroleum source rocks, but in peats it has also been interpreted to reflect the oxidation and subsequent decarboxylation reactions of bacteriohopanepolyols with microbially mediated epimerization at C-17 that is catalyzed by the acidic peat conditions. To learn more about the environmental factors that affect the low-temperature isomerization of homohopanes, we investigated the distribution patterns of homohopanes in a well-studied peat core from the Dajiuhu peatland, central China, together with data from modern surface peat samples from Dajiuhu and three other locations. From comparison with paleotemperature and paleohydrologic records in the peat core, we hypothesize that the ratio of C31 αβ hopane relative to the ββ isomer (C31 αβ/ββ) is mainly influenced on a centennial to millennial timescale by ambient temperature with a secondary effect from redox conditions that are defined by peatland water levels. The surface peat samples revealed that relatively high C31 αβ/ββ values occurred under pH < 6. These results suggest that pH is indeed an important factor in the low-temperature isomerization of C31 homohopanes, although the magnitude of the pH effect may be less than those of ambient temperature and redox conditions. In both surface peat and peat horizons from the Dajiuhu peatland, the amount of the C31 αβ compound with R configuration relative to that with S configuration (C31 R/S) varied closely with C31 αβ/ββ, suggesting that the epimerization at both C-17 and C-22 may happen synchronously and at similar rates. This study reveals that the isomerization of homohopanes has the potential to reflect paleoenvironmental changes in acidic peat deposits. In addition, acidic peat samples investigated in this and previous studies

  17. [Effects of low molecular weight organic acids on speciation of exogenous Cu in an acid soil].

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Yong; Fu, Qing-Ling; Zhu, Jun; Wan, Tian-Ying; Hu, Hong-Qing

    2014-08-01

    In order to ascertain the effect of LMWOA (citric acid, tartaric acid, oxalic acid) on Cu-contaminated soils and to investigate the change of Cu species, a red soil derived from quartz sandstone deposit was added by Cu (copper) in the form of CuSO4 x 5H2O so as to simulate soil Cu pollution, keeping the additional Cu concentrations were 0, 100, 200, 400 mg x kg(-1) respectively. After 9 months, different LMWOA was also added into the simulated soil, keeping the additional LMWOAs in soil were 0, 5, 10, 20 mmol x kg(-1) respectively. After 2 weeks incubation, the modified sequential extraction method on BCR (European Communities Bureau of Reference) was used to evaluate the effects of these LMWOAs on the changes of copper forms in soil. The result showed that the percentage of weak acid dissolved Cu, the most effective form in the soil increased with three organic acids increase in quantity in the simulated polluted soil. And there was a good activation effect on Cu in the soil when organic acid added. Activation effects on Cu increased with concentration of citric acid increasing, but it showed a rise trend before they are basically remained unchanged in the case of tartaric acid and oxalic acid added in the soil. On the contrary, the state of the reduction of copper which was regarded as a complement for effective state decreased with the increased concentration of organic acid in the soil, especially with citric acid. When 20 mmol x kg(-1) oxalic acid and citric acid were added into the soil, the activation effect was the best; whereas for tartaric, the concentration was 10 mmol x kg(-1). In general, the effect on the changes of Cu forms in the soil is citric acid > tartaric acid > oxalic acid.

  18. 3D-nanoarchitectured Pd/Ni catalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition for the electrooxidation of formic acid.

    PubMed

    Assaud, Loïc; Monyoncho, Evans; Pitzschel, Kristina; Allagui, Anis; Petit, Matthieu; Hanbücken, Margrit; Baranova, Elena A; Santinacci, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensionally (3D) nanoarchitectured palladium/nickel (Pd/Ni) catalysts, which were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on high-aspect-ratio nanoporous alumina templates are investigated with regard to the electrooxidation of formic acid in an acidic medium (0.5 M H2SO4). Both deposition processes, Ni and Pd, with various mass content ratios have been continuously monitored by using a quartz crystal microbalance. The morphology of the Pd/Ni systems has been studied by electron microscopy and shows a homogeneous deposition of granularly structured Pd onto the Ni substrate. X-ray diffraction analysis performed on Ni and NiO substrates revealed an amorphous structure, while the Pd coating crystallized into a fcc lattice with a preferential orientation along the [220]-direction. Surface chemistry analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed both metallic and oxide contributions for the Ni and Pd deposits. Cyclic voltammetry of the Pd/Ni nanocatalysts revealed that the electrooxidation of HCOOH proceeds through the direct dehydrogenation mechanism with the formation of active intermediates. High catalytic activities are measured for low masses of Pd coatings that were generated by a low number of ALD cycles, probably because of the cluster size effect, electronic interactions between Pd and Ni, or diffusion effects.

  19. 3D-nanoarchitectured Pd/Ni catalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition for the electrooxidation of formic acid

    PubMed Central

    Assaud, Loïc; Monyoncho, Evans; Pitzschel, Kristina; Allagui, Anis; Petit, Matthieu; Hanbücken, Margrit

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three-dimensionally (3D) nanoarchitectured palladium/nickel (Pd/Ni) catalysts, which were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on high-aspect-ratio nanoporous alumina templates are investigated with regard to the electrooxidation of formic acid in an acidic medium (0.5 M H2SO4). Both deposition processes, Ni and Pd, with various mass content ratios have been continuously monitored by using a quartz crystal microbalance. The morphology of the Pd/Ni systems has been studied by electron microscopy and shows a homogeneous deposition of granularly structured Pd onto the Ni substrate. X-ray diffraction analysis performed on Ni and NiO substrates revealed an amorphous structure, while the Pd coating crystallized into a fcc lattice with a preferential orientation along the [220]-direction. Surface chemistry analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed both metallic and oxide contributions for the Ni and Pd deposits. Cyclic voltammetry of the Pd/Ni nanocatalysts revealed that the electrooxidation of HCOOH proceeds through the direct dehydrogenation mechanism with the formation of active intermediates. High catalytic activities are measured for low masses of Pd coatings that were generated by a low number of ALD cycles, probably because of the cluster size effect, electronic interactions between Pd and Ni, or diffusion effects. PMID:24605281

  20. 3D-nanoarchitectured Pd/Ni catalysts prepared by atomic layer deposition for the electrooxidation of formic acid.

    PubMed

    Assaud, Loïc; Monyoncho, Evans; Pitzschel, Kristina; Allagui, Anis; Petit, Matthieu; Hanbücken, Margrit; Baranova, Elena A; Santinacci, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensionally (3D) nanoarchitectured palladium/nickel (Pd/Ni) catalysts, which were prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on high-aspect-ratio nanoporous alumina templates are investigated with regard to the electrooxidation of formic acid in an acidic medium (0.5 M H2SO4). Both deposition processes, Ni and Pd, with various mass content ratios have been continuously monitored by using a quartz crystal microbalance. The morphology of the Pd/Ni systems has been studied by electron microscopy and shows a homogeneous deposition of granularly structured Pd onto the Ni substrate. X-ray diffraction analysis performed on Ni and NiO substrates revealed an amorphous structure, while the Pd coating crystallized into a fcc lattice with a preferential orientation along the [220]-direction. Surface chemistry analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed both metallic and oxide contributions for the Ni and Pd deposits. Cyclic voltammetry of the Pd/Ni nanocatalysts revealed that the electrooxidation of HCOOH proceeds through the direct dehydrogenation mechanism with the formation of active intermediates. High catalytic activities are measured for low masses of Pd coatings that were generated by a low number of ALD cycles, probably because of the cluster size effect, electronic interactions between Pd and Ni, or diffusion effects. PMID:24605281

  1. Identification of research relating to the critical loads concept and its potential application to the regulation of acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatti, N.

    1993-12-01

    The overwhelming majority of strategies currently implemented to regulate acidic deposition have focused on source-based or emission-control techniques. In the past few years, however, the fact that such source-based. strategies may not be sufficient to prevent adverse ecological effects and may therefore need to be supplemented with other control options, such as receptor-based strategies, has become apparent. Partly in response to this insufficiency of regulatory controls, the US Congress has required the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program to determine (1) what deposition levels are needed to prevent such ecological damage, (2) whether such safe deposition levels (i.e., critical loads) can realistically be identified, and (3) what the costs and benefits of attaining such deposition levels are. This report reviews and culls the existing research on these alternative control strategies, emphasizing the critical loads concept, to determine the advantages and limitations and the cost-benefit relationships associated with receptor-based control options. The results of this study indicate that in spite of the significant limitations associated with the critical loads concept, this strategy dominates all discussions of non-source-based control options and offers considerable advantages, including cost-effectiveness, over the more traditional source-based control methods. Summaries of 10 of the most relevant studies dealing with alternative control strategies and the costs and benefits associated with them are also presented in this report.

  2. Simulation of acid mine drainage generation around Küre VMS Deposits, Northern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Cansu; Kurt, Mehmet Ali; Çelik Balci, Nurgül

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated comparative leaching characteristics of acidophilic bacterial strains under shifting environmental conditions at proposed two stages as formation stage or post acidic mine drainage (AMD) generation. At the first stage, initial reactions associated with AMD generation was simulated in shaking flasks containing massive pyritic chalcopyrite ore by using a pure strain Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and a mixed culture of Acidithiobacillus sp. mostly dominated by A. ferrooxidans and A. thiooxidans at 26oC. At the second stage, long term bioleaching experiments were carried out with the same strains at 26oC and 40oC to investigate the leaching characteristics of pyritic chalcopyrite ore under elevated heavy metal and temperature conditions. During the experiments, physicochemical characteristics (e.i. Eh, pH, EC) metal (Fe, Co, Cu, Zn) and sulfate concentration of the experimental solution were monitored during 180 days. Significant acid generation and sulfate release were determined during bioleaching of the ore by mixed acidophilic cultures containing both iron and sulfur oxidizers. In the early stage of the experiments, heavy metal release from the ore was caused by generation of acid due to accelerated bacterial oxidation of the ore. Generally high concentrations of Co and Cu were released into the solution from the experiments conducted by pure cultures of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans whereas high Zn and Fe was released into the solution from the mixed culture experiments. In the later stage of AMD generation and post AMD, chemical oxidation is accelerated causing excessive amounts of contamination, even exceeding the amounts resulted from bacterial oxidation by mixed cultures. Acidithibacillus ferrooxidans was found to be more effective in leaching Cu, Fe and Co at higher temperatures in contrary to mixed acidophiles that are more prone to operate at optimal moderate conditions. Moreover, decreasing Fe values are noted in bioleaching

  3. Stress assessment and spectral characterization of suspected acid deposition damage in red spruce (Picea Rubens) from Vermont

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. N.; Vogelmann, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of acid deposition on Picea rubens are studied. The Picea rubens located at Camels Hump Mt., Mt. Ascutney, and Ripton, VT were analyzed using stress level evaluations, in situ spectral data, pressure bomb analysis, and aircraft sensors. Spruce stress per circular plot and percent spruce mortality are calculated. The relation between stress levels and elevation and exposure and weather patterns is examined. It is observed that variations in the reflectance curves of the foliage and branches are related to cellular health, the type of cellular arrangement, and the degree of leaf tissue hydration; the leaf and twig specimens from high stress sites are more reflective in the red portion of the visible and less reflective in the NIR portion of the spectrum. The pressure bomb data reveal that the xylem water tension is higher in specimens from high stress sites. It is noted that remote sensing permits discrimination and mapping of suspected acid deposition damage.

  4. Chemical response of lakes in the Adirondack Region of New York to declines in acidic deposition.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Charles T; Driscoll, Kimberley M; Roy, Karen M; Mitchell, Myron J

    2003-05-15

    Long-term changes in the chemistry of wet deposition and lake water were investigated in the Adirondack Region of New York. Marked decreases in concentrations of SO4(2-) and H+ in wet deposition have occurred at two sites since the late 1970s. These decreases are consistent with long-term declines in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the eastern United States. Changes in wet NO3- deposition and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions have been minor over the same interval. Virtually all Adirondack Lakes have shown marked decreases in concentrations of SO4(2-), which coincide with decreases in atmospheric S deposition. Concentrations of NO3- have also decreased in several Adirondack lakes. As atmospheric N deposition has not changed over this period, the mechanism contributing to this apparent increase in lake/watershed N retention is not evident. Decreases in concentrations of SO4(2-) + NO3- have resulted in increases in acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) and pH and resulted in a shift in the speciation of monomeric Al from toxic inorganic species toward less toxic organic forms in some lakes. Nevertheless, many lakes continue to exhibit pH values and concentrations of inorganic monomeric Al that are critical to aquatic biota. Extrapolation of rates of ANC increase suggests that the time frame of chemical recovery of Adirondack Lakes will be several decades if current decreases in acidic deposition are maintained.

  5. Influence of alkyl chain length on calcium phosphate deposition onto titanium surfaces modified with alkylphosphonic acid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Hirata, Isao; Zhao, Xianghui; Gao, Bo; Okazaki, Masayuki; Kato, Koichi

    2013-08-01

    Much attention has been paid to the modification of a titanium surface with an alkylphosphonic acid (PA)-based self-assembled monolayer (SAM) to accelerate hydroxyapatite (HA) deposition on the surface. In order to further accelerate the rate of HA deposition, we examined here the effect of alkyl chain length of SAMs on the formation of a HA layer. PAs with three different alkyl chain lengths (3, 6, and 16 methylene units) were used for the preparation of a SAM on titanium. The titanium specimens with monolayers were soaked in a simulated body fluid under physiological conditions for 4 weeks. The deposited substances were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. These analyses revealed that the formation of PA SAMs accelerate the deposition of poorly crystallized HA, in an alkyl chain length-dependent manner. Among PAs studied here, PA containing a 16-carbon alkyl chain gave rise to the titanium surface most effective for the deposition of HA.

  6. Responses of microbial populations in the rhizosphere to deposition of simulated acidic rain onto foliage and/or soil.

    PubMed

    Shafer, S R

    1992-01-01

    Air pollutants or some chemicals applied to plant foliage can alter the ecology of the rhizosphere. Experiments were conducted to distinguish among possible foliage-mediated versus soil- or root-mediated effects of acid deposition on microorganism in the rhizosphere. Seedlings of a sorghum x sudangrass hybrid in pots of non-sterile soil-sand mix in a greenhouse were exposed to simulated rain solution adjusted with H2SO4 + HNO3 to pH 4.9, 4.2, 3.5 or 2.8. Solutions were applied as simulated rain to foliage and soil, foliage only (soil covered by plastic, and deionized water applied directly to the soil), or soil only (solution applied directly to the soil). Solutions were applied on 16 days during a 6-week period (1.5 cm deposition in 1 h per application). Plant shoot and root dry weights and population densities of selected types of bacteria, filamentous actinomycetes and fungi in the rhizosphere were quantified after exposures were completed. Deposition of simulated acidic rain onto foliage alone had no effect on plant biomass or microbial population densities in the rhizosphere (colony-forming units per gram of rhizosphere soil). However, plant growth was stimulated and all microbial populations in the rhizosphere increased 3- to 8-fold with increased solution acidity (relative to pH 4.9 solution) when solution penetrated the soil. Statistical analyses indicated that the acid dose-population response relationships for soil-only and foliage-and-soil applications were not different. Thus, no foliage-mediated effect of simulated acidic rain on rhizosphere ecology was detected.

  7. Effect of forage energy intake and supplementation on marbling deposition in growing beef cattle.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucose is the primary carbon source for fatty acid synthesis in intramuscular fat, whereas, acetate is primarily utilized by subcutaneous fat. Our objective was to examine the effect of forage energy intake and type of fermentation on marbling deposition by stocker cattle grazing dormant native ra...

  8. Acid deposition in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region: a policy perspective.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Colin J; Watmough, Shaun A

    2015-12-01

    Industrial emissions of sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) to the atmosphere associated with the oil sands industry in north-eastern Alberta are of interest as they represent the largest localized source in Canada (with potential for future growth) and the region features acid-sensitive upland terrain. Existing emission management policy for the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, where the industry is located, is based on a time-to-effect approach that relies on dynamic model simulations of temporal changes in chemistry and features highly protective chemical criteria. In practice, the policy is difficult to implement and it is unlikely that a scientifically defensible estimate of acidification risk can be put forward due to the limitations primarily associated with issues of scale, chemical endpoint designation (selection of chemical limit for ecosystem protection from acidification) and data availability. A more implementable approach would use a steady-state critical load (CL) assessment approach to identify at-risk areas. The CL assessment would consider areas of elevated acid deposition associated with oil sands emissions rather than targeted political jurisdictions. Dynamic models should only be (strategically) used where acidification risk is identified via CL analysis, in order to characterize the potential for acidification-induced changes that can be detrimental to sensitive biota within the lifespan of the industry. PMID:26607154

  9. Acid deposition in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region: a policy perspective.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Colin J; Watmough, Shaun A

    2015-12-01

    Industrial emissions of sulphur (S) and nitrogen (N) to the atmosphere associated with the oil sands industry in north-eastern Alberta are of interest as they represent the largest localized source in Canada (with potential for future growth) and the region features acid-sensitive upland terrain. Existing emission management policy for the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, where the industry is located, is based on a time-to-effect approach that relies on dynamic model simulations of temporal changes in chemistry and features highly protective chemical criteria. In practice, the policy is difficult to implement and it is unlikely that a scientifically defensible estimate of acidification risk can be put forward due to the limitations primarily associated with issues of scale, chemical endpoint designation (selection of chemical limit for ecosystem protection from acidification) and data availability. A more implementable approach would use a steady-state critical load (CL) assessment approach to identify at-risk areas. The CL assessment would consider areas of elevated acid deposition associated with oil sands emissions rather than targeted political jurisdictions. Dynamic models should only be (strategically) used where acidification risk is identified via CL analysis, in order to characterize the potential for acidification-induced changes that can be detrimental to sensitive biota within the lifespan of the industry.

  10. Preparation of waxes and humic acids from brown coal from the Sergeevskoe deposit

    SciTech Connect

    L.P. Noskova; A.V. Rokhin; A.P. Sorokin

    2007-06-15

    The comparative extraction of coal with organic solvents was performed. Humic acids were separated from solid residues. The yields, particle-size distributions, and chemical compositions of the resulting products were analyzed. It was demonstrated that brown-coal wax and humic fertilizers can potentially be obtained using coal from the Sergeevskoe deposit.

  11. Response of DOC in acid-sensitive Maine lakes to decreasing sulfur deposition (1993 - 2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In response to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, sulfur deposition has decreased across the northeastern United States. As a result, sulfate concentrations in lakes and streams have also decreased and many surface waters have become less acidic. Over the same time period, th...

  12. Chemical effect on ozone deposition over seawater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface layer resistance plays an important role in determining ozone deposition velocity over seawater. Recent studies suggest that surface layer resistance over sea-water is influenced by wind-speed and chemical interaction at the air-water interface. Here, we investigate the e...

  13. Precipitation-chemistry measurements from the California Acid Deposition Monitoring Program, 1985-1990

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchard, Charles L.; Tonnessen, Kathy A.

    1993-01-01

    The configuration of the California Acid Deposition Monitoring Program (CADMP) precipitation network is described and quality assurance results summarized. Comparison of CADMP and the National Acid Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) data at four parallel sites indicated that mean depth-weighted differences were less than 3 μeq ℓ−1 for all ions, being statistically significant for ammonium, sulfate and hydrogen ion. These apparently small differences were 15–30% of the mean concentrations of ammonium, sulfate and hydrogen ion. Mean depth-weighted concentrations and mass deposition rates for the period 1985–1990 are summarized; the latter were highest either where concentrations or precipitation depths were relatively high.

  14. Geology and geochemistry of Summitville, Colorado: an epithermal acid sulfate deposit in a volcanic dome

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, J.E.; Coolbaugh, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    Geologic studies during recent open-pit mining at Summitville, Colorado, have provided new information on an epithermal acid sulfate Au-Ag-Cu deposit formed in a volcanic dome. Geologic mapping, geochemical studies of whole-rock samples from blast holes, and geologic and geochemical traverse studies refine the details of the evolution of the Summitville deposit. Six distinct events followed emplacement of the quartz latite volcanic dome and define the development of the Summitville deposit: 1) an early stage of acid sulfate alteration, 2) subsequent Cu sulfide and gold mineralization, 3) widespread hydrothermal brecciation, 4) volumetrically minor, base metal sulfide-bearing barite veining, 5) volumetrically minor, kaolinite matrix brecciation, and finally, 6) supergene oxidation. -from Authors

  15. Economic assessment of materials damage in the South Coast Air Basin: A case study of acid-deposition effects on painted wood surfaces using individual maintenance-behavior data

    SciTech Connect

    Horst, R.L.; Zankel, K.; Kamen, S.; Rosso, D.

    1990-05-01

    The case study examines the economic impact of acid deposition damage to painted wood surfaces in the South Coast Air Basin of Southern California. The output of the analysis is an estimate of the annual cost-savings that would be realized for a uniform 10 percent reduction in NO2 concentrations. The economic estimates are developed for individuals who reside in single family homes, make their own maintenance decisions, and perform one of six specific maintenance tasks. Individual maintenance behavior data are collected as part of the study and permit a more disaggregate analysis than earlier economic materials damage assessments. The economic estimates are derived in two ways. First, physical damage functions are used to predict rates of damage. The analysis indicates that the best estimates of annual cost-savings for the scenario examined are $0.7 million (1988) for the physical damage function approach and $3.6 million (1988) for the economic damage function approach. Consideration of some of the factors that contribute to uncertainty indicate that the cost-savings estimates could vary by at least a factor of two.

  16. The deposition of conjugated linoleic acids in eggs of laying hens fed diets varying in fat level and fatty acid profile.

    PubMed

    Raes, Katleen; Huyghebaert, Gerard; De Smet, Stefaan; Nollet, Lode; Arnouts, Sven; Demeyer, Daniel

    2002-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the incorporation of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) into eggs and its effect on the fatty acid metabolism when layers are fed diets with different fat sources and fat levels. Layers were fed either a low fat diet (LF) or one of three high fat diets based on soybean oil (SB), animal fat (AF) or flaxseed oil (FSO). CLA was added at a concentration of 1 g/100 g feed from two different CLA premixes with a different CLA profile. For the trial, 144 laying hens were allocated to 12 treatments (4 basal fat sources x 3 CLA treatments) with 3 replicates of 4 hens each. No significant differences were observed in feed intake, egg weight, feed conversion or laying rate between chickens fed control and CLA-supplemented diets. Differences in yolk fat, cholesterol or yolk color were not clearly related to the dietary CLA. However, the supplementation of CLA to the diets had clear effects on the fatty acid composition, i.e., a decrease in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) and an increase in saturated fatty acids (SFA) was observed, whereas the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) content were essentially unaffected. The results suggest that CLA may influence the activity of the desaturases to a different extent in the synthesis of (n-6) and (n-3) long-chain fatty acids. These effects of CLA depend on the level of (n-6) and (n-3) fatty acids available in the feed. The apparent deposition rate (%) is clearly higher for the c9, t11 isomer than for the t10, c12 isomer. Adding CLA to layers diets rich in (n-3) fatty acids produces eggs that could promote the health of the consumer in terms of a higher intake of (n-3) fatty acids and CLA. PMID:11823576

  17. Further improvement of flame retardancy of polyaniline-deposited paper composite through using phytic acid as dopant or co-dopant.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Ding, Chunyue; Qian, Xueren; An, Xianhui

    2015-01-22

    Polyaniline (PANI)-deposited electrically conductive and flame retardant paper composite was prepared using phytic acid (PA) as dopant or co-dopant. PA as doping acid greatly improved the flame retardancy of PANI-deposited paper composite whilst the conductivity was lower compared with using 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA) as doping acid. Lower temperature was favorable to obtain PANI-deposited paper composite with both higher conductivity and better flame retardancy. Conductivity of PANI-deposited paper composite increased with increase of doping acid concentration and the suitable PA concentration range was 0.15-0.3 mol/L depending on the requirement of conductivity and flame retardancy. The PANI-deposited paper composite was characterized by SEM, TGA and XPS. The outstanding flame retardancy of PA-doped paper composite was caused by the synergetic effect of PANI coating and H3PO4. Both higher flame retardancy and higher conductivity of PANI-deposited paper composite were obtained by co-doping of SSA with PA.

  18. Contemporaneous deposition of phyllosilicates and sulfates: Using Australian acidic saline lake deposits to describe geochemical variability on Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldridge, A.M.; Hook, S.J.; Crowley, J.K.; Marion, G.M.; Kargel, J.S.; Michalski, J.L.; Thomson, B.J.; de Souza, Filho C.R.; Bridges, N.T.; Brown, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Studies of the origin of the Martian sulfate and phyllosilicate deposits have led to the hypothesis that there was a marked, global-scale change in the Mars environment from circum-neutral pH aqueous alteration in the Noachian to an acidic evaporitic system in the late Noachian to Hesperian. However, terrestrial studies suggest that two different geochemical systems need not be invoked to explain such geochemical variation.Western Australian acidic playa lakes have large pH differences separated vertically and laterally by only a few tens of meters, demonstrating how highly variable chemistries can coexist over short distances in natural environments. We suggest diverse and variable Martian aqueous environments where the coetaneous formation of phyllosilicates and sulfates at the Australian sites are analogs for regions where phyllosilicates and sulfates coexist on Mars. In these systems, Fe and alkali earth phyllosilicates represent deep facies associated with upwelling neutral to alkaline groundwater, whereas aluminous phyllosilicates and sulfates represent near-surface evaporitic facies formed from more acidic brines. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Amino-acid racemizarion in Quaternary shell deposits at Willapa Bay, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Blunt, D.J.; Clifton, H.E.

    1979-01-01

    Extents of racemization ( d l ratios) of amino acids in fossil Saxidomus giganteus (Deshayes) and Ostrea lurida Carpenter were measured on shell deposits exposed at 21 sites on the east side of Willapa Bay, Washington. Amino acids from Saxidomus show less variability in d Spl ratios and, therefore, are of greater use in correlation and age estimation than are amino acids from Ostrea. Shells of two different ages, about 120,000 ?? 40,000 yr old and about 190,000 ?? 40,000 yr old, are present. These ages correspond to Stages 5 and 7 of the marine isotope record defined by Shackleton and Opdyke in 1973 and hence the shell deposits likely formed during two different high stands of sea level. The stratigraphic record at Willapa Bay is consistent with this interpretation. ?? 1979.

  20. Simultaneous assessment of deposition effects of base cations, sulfur, and nitrogen using an extended critical load function for acidification

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Zhao; Lei Duan; Thorjorn Larssen; Lanhua Hu; Jiming Hao

    2007-03-15

    Base cations (BC) play an important role to prevent soil acidification. In certain acid sensitive areas, such as China, BC deposition is high and a considerable fraction is of anthropogenic origin. BC deposition might decrease in the future with the implementation of air pollution control measures. The effect of changes in BC deposition, however, has seldom been considered in critical load calculations based on the steady-state mass balance (SSMB) method. In order to better quantify the importance of the BC deposition for acid deposition mitigation policy, an extension of the SSMB method for critical load calculation for soil acidification is presented. The BC deposition is taken into account as a variable along with sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) deposition, creating an S-N-BC critical load function. As a case study, critical loads of S and N for the Tie Shan Ping catchment in Chongqing in southwest China under variable BC deposition were calculated. Results indicate that abatement of BC deposition has significant impact on the critical loads of S and N. A 75% reduction in BC of assumed anthropogenic origin decreases the critical loads of acids by 58%. The current deposition does not exceed the critical loads, but if BC deposition from anthropogenic sources was controlled, then the exceedance would be considerable. Uncertainty analysis show that the size of the BC deposition of natural origin is the single parameter contributing the most to the steady-state S and N critical load. The extended critical load function can be used by policy makers to set more reasonable acidity control strategies in the future. The method also highlights for policymakers the 'competition' between emission control of particulate matter driven by human health targets and potential increase of net acid load from such measures. 38 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Deposition kinetics and characterization of stable ionomers from hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urstöger, Georg; Resel, Roland; Koller, Georg; Coclite, Anna Maria

    2016-04-01

    A novel ionomer of hexamethyldisiloxane and methacrylic acid was synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PECVD process, being solventless, allows mixing of monomers with very different solubilities, and for polymers formed at high deposition rates and with high structural stability (due to the high number of cross-links and covalent bonding to the substrate) to be obtained. A kinetic study over a large set of parameters was run with the aim of determining the optimal conditions for high stability and proton conductivity of the polymer layer. Copolymers with good stability over 6 months' time in air and water were obtained, as demonstrated by ellipsometry, X-Ray reflectivity, and FT-IR spectroscopy. Stable coatings showed also proton conductivity as high as 1.1 ± 0.1 mS cm-1. Chemical analysis showed that due to the high molecular weight of the chosen precursors, it was possible to keep the plasma energy-input-per-mass low. This allowed limited precursor fragmentation and the functional groups of both monomers to be retained during the plasma polymerization.

  2. Vacuum deposition of stoichiometric crystalline PbS films: The effect of sulfurizing environment during deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, A.; Tyagi, R. C.

    2015-10-01

    Thin film of lead sulfide (PbS) was deposited onto highly cleaned glass and quartz substrates using a vacuum thermal evaporation technique. The effect of the sulfurizing environment on the growth and properties of vacuum-deposited PbS thin film was studied. The ambient sulfurizing environment was created by thermal decomposition of thiourea inside the vacuum chamber during deposition to maintain the stoichiometry and quality of the PbS film. The sulfurizing gas H2S, produced in the thermal decomposition of the solid sulfur containing thiourea readily combines with the cations (Pb2+) without leaving any anions (S2-) at the substrates and also has not produced any excess of sulfur at the substrates. The deposited film was characterized by optical spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron micrographs with energy dispersive analysis of x-rays, and atomic force micrographs. The physical characterization of the deposited PbS film revealed that the surface of film grown in the sulfurizing environment improved and contained more stoichiometric sulfur in comparison to film deposited without the sulfurizing environment.

  3. Stearic acids at sn-1, 3 positions of TAG are more efficient at limiting fat deposition than palmitic and oleic acids in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Gouk, Shiou-Wah; Cheng, Sit-Foon; Ong, Augustine Soon-Hock; Chuah, Cheng-Hock

    2014-04-14

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of long-acyl chain SFA, namely palmitic acid (16:0) and stearic acid (18:0), at sn-1, 3 positions of TAG on obesity. Throughout the 15 weeks of the experimental period, C57BL/6 mice were fed diets fortified with cocoa butter, sal stearin (SAL), palm mid fraction (PMF) and high-oleic sunflower oil (HOS). The sn-1, 3 positions were varied by 16:0, 18:0 and 18:1, whilst the sn-2 position was preserved with 18:1. The HOS-enriched diet was found to lead to the highest fat deposition. This was in accordance with our previous postulation. Upon normalisation of total fat deposited with food intake to obtain the fat:feed ratio, interestingly, mice fed the SAL-enriched diet exhibited significantly lower visceral fat/feed and total fat/feed compared with those fed the PMF-enriched diet, despite their similarity in SFA-unsaturated fatty acid-SFA profile. That long-chain SFA at sn-1, 3 positions concomitantly with an unsaturated FA at the sn-2 position exert an obesity-reducing effect was further validated. The present study is the first of its kind to demonstrate that SFA of different chain lengths at sn-1, 3 positions exert profound effects on fat accretion.

  4. Acid deposition sensitivity map of the Southern Appalachian Assessment area; Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pepper, John D.; Grosz, Andrew E.; Kress, Thomas H.; Collins, Thomas K.; Kappesser, Gary B.; Huber, Cindy M.; Webb, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Project Summary: The following digital product represents the Acid Deposition Sensitivity of the Southern Appalachian Assessment Area. Areas having various susceptibilities to acid deposition from air pollution are designated on a three tier ranking in the region of the Southern Appalachian Assessment (SAA). The assessment is being conducted by Federal agencies that are members of the Southern Appalachian Man and Biosphere (SAMAB) Cooperative. Sensitivities to acid deposition, ranked high, medium, and low are assigned on the basis of bedrock compositions and their associated soils, and their capacities to neutralize acid precipitation.

  5. Changing trends in sulfur emissions in Asia: implications for acid deposition, air pollution, and climate.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Gregory R; Streets, David G; Calori, Giuseppe; Amann, Markus; Jacobson, Mark Z; Hansen, James; Ueda, Hiromasa

    2002-11-15

    In the early 1990s, it was projected that annual SO2 emissions in Asia might grow to 80-110 Tg yr(-1) by 2020. Based on new high-resolution estimates from 1975 to 2000, we calculate that SO2 emissions in Asia might grow only to 40-45 Tg yr(-1) by 2020. The main reason for this lower estimate is a decline of SO2 emissions from 1995 to 2000 in China, which emits about two-thirds of Asian SO2. The decline was due to a reduction in industrial coal use, a slowdown of the Chinese economy, and the closure of small and inefficient plants, among other reasons. One effect of the reduction in SO2 emissions in China has been a reduction in acid deposition not only in China but also in Japan. Reductions should also improve visibility and reduce health problems. SO2 emission reductions may increase global warming, but this warming effect could be partially offset by reductions in the emissions of black carbon. How SO2 emissions in the region change in the coming decades will depend on many competing factors (economic growth, pollution control laws, etc.). However a continuation of current trends would result in sulfur emissions lower than any IPCC forecasts.

  6. Seasonal and rainfall-type variations in inorganic ions and dicarboxylic acids and acidity of wet deposition samples collected from subtropical East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ying I.; Hsieh, Li-Ying; Kuo, Su-Ching; Chen, Chien-Lung; Wu, Pei-Ling

    2011-07-01

    Rainfall samples were collected over a period of 3 years and 8 months in subtropical East Asia. They are categorized into different rainfall types and analyzed to assess the ionic composition and its effect on the acidity of wet deposition in southern Taiwan. Only 4% of samples had a pH of <5.0, indicating that the study area is not impacted significantly by acid rain. The volume-weighted mean (VWM) pH by rainfall type was Spring Rain 5.74, Typhoon Rain 5.56, Summer Rain 5.46, Typhoon Outer Circulation (TOC) Rain 5.45, Plum Rain 5.32 and Autumn-Winter Rain 5.29. Dilution effects were important to the equivalent ionic concentration of different rainfall types. HCO 3-, SO 42- and Cl - were detected as major anions whereas NH 4+, Na + and Ca 2+ were major cations. CO 2-derived HCO 3- was the major ionic species in all but Typhoon Rain and Spring Rain, in which the major species were Na + and Cl - and Ca 2+, respectively. Excluding HCO 3-, the major species were NH 4+, Na + and Ca 2+ in Plum Rain, the secondary photochemical products SO 42-, NO 3- and NH 4+ in TOC Rain and Summer Rain, and Na + and Ca 2+ in Autumn-Winter Rain. Calculation of arithmetic means showed that dicarboxylic acids contributed between 0.25% and 0.53% of the total ionic concentration and of these, oxalic acid contributed the least (81.3% of the dicarboxylic acid) to TOC Rain and the most (96.1% of the dicarboxylic acid) to Spring Rain, suggestive of long-range transport in the latter. Differences in wet deposition composition were shown to be a result of differences in local emissions and long-range transport (hence of prevailing wind direction) during the period of rainfall and of the frequency and volume of rain that typifies each rainfall type. Principal component analysis (PCA) further revealed that traffic-related and industrial organic and inorganic pollutants, their secondary photochemical products, sea salts, and dust are important contributors to wet deposition. Moreover, the ratio of

  7. Nicotinic acid supplementation in diet favored intramuscular fat deposition and lipid metabolism in finishing steers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhu-Qing; Bao, Lin-Bin; Zhao, Xiang-Hui; Wang, Can-Yu; Zhou, Shan; Wen, Lu-Hua; Fu, Chuan-Bian; Gong, Jian-Ming; Qu, Ming-Ren

    2016-06-01

    Nicotinic acid (NA) acting as the precursor of NAD(+)/NADH and NADP(+)/NADPH, participates in many biochemical processes, e.g. lipid metabolism. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary NA on carcass traits, meat quality, blood metabolites, and fat deposition in Chinese crossbred finishing steers. Sixteen steers with the similar body weight and at the age of 24 months were randomly allocated into control group (feeding basal diet) and NA group (feeding basal diet + 1000 mg/kg NA). All experimental cattle were fed a 90% concentrate diet and 10% forage straw in a 120-day feeding experiment. The results showed that supplemental NA in diet increased longissimus area, intramuscular fat content (17.14% vs. 9.03%), marbling score (8.08 vs. 4.30), redness (a*), and chroma (C*) values of LD muscle, but reduced carcass fat content (not including imtramuscular fat), pH24 h and moisture content of LD muscle, along with no effect on backfat thickness. Besides, NA supplementation increased serum HDL-C concentration, but decreased the serum levels of LDL-C, triglyceride, non-esterified fatty acid, total cholesterol, and glycated serum protein. In addition, NA supplementation increased G6PDH and ICDH activities of LD muscle. These results suggested that NA supplementation in diet improves the carcass characteristics and beef quality, and regulates the compositions of serum metabolites. Based on the above results, NA should be used as the feed additive in cattle industry.

  8. Impact of sunlight and humic acid on the deposition kinetics of aqueous fullerene nanoparticles (nC60).

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaolei; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Li, Qilin

    2012-12-18

    Nanoparticle transport in natural settings is complex due to interactions with the surrounding environment. In this study, the impact of UVA irradiation and humic acid (HA) on deposition of aqueous fullerene nanoparticles (nC₆₀) on a silica surface as a surrogate for natural sediments was studied using packed column experiments and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring under various solution conditions. Surface oxidation of nC₆₀ induced by UVA irradiation greatly retarded its deposition due to the increased negative surface charge and hydrophilicity. Dissolved HA, once adsorbed onto the nC₆₀ surface, also hindered its deposition mainly through steric hindrance forces. The extent of this effect depended on the properties and the amount of HA adsorbed, which is a function of ionic strength and HA concentration. HA has limited adsorption on UVA-irradiated nC₆₀ and is expected to play a less important role in its stability. HA immobilized onto the silica surface had a variable effect on nC₆₀ deposition, depending on the complex interplay of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) and non-DLVO interactions such as electrostatic interaction, steric hindrance, and hydrogen bonding as well as HA molecular conformation. These results highlight the importance of environment-induced changes in nC₆₀ surface chemistry in its fate and transport in aquatic environments.

  9. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 2. Effects of sintering and deposit microstructure

    SciTech Connect

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    The authors report results from an experimental study that examines the influence of sintering and microstructure on ash deposit thermal conductivity. The measurements are made using a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. The technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. The initial stages of sintering and densification are accompanied by an increase in deposit thermal conductivity. Subsequent sintering continues to densify the deposit, but has little effect on deposit thermal conductivity. SEM analyses indicates that sintering creates a layered deposit structure with a relatively unsintered innermost layer. They hypothesize that this unsintered layer largely determines the overall deposit thermal conductivity. A theoretical model that treats a deposit as a two-layered material predicts the observed trends in thermal conductivity.

  10. Acid rain: effects on fish and wildlife

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, K.S.; Multer, E.P.; Schreiber, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The following questions concerning acid rain are discussed: what is acid rain; what causes acid rain; where do sulfur and nitrogen oxides originate; what areas in the U.S. are susceptible to acid rain; are there early warning signals of acidification to aquatic resources; how does acid rain affect fishery resources; does acid rain affect wildlife; and how can effects of acid rain be reduced.

  11. Inkjet deposition of itraconazole onto poly(glycolic acid) microneedle arrays.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Ryan D; Jaipan, Panupong; Skoog, Shelby A; Stafslien, Shane; VanderWal, Lyndsi; Narayan, Roger J

    2016-03-11

    Poly(glycolic acid) microneedle arrays were fabricated using a drawing lithography process; these arrays were modified with a drug release agent and an antifungal agent by piezoelectric inkjet printing. Coatings containing poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride), a water-soluble drug release layer, and itraconazole (an antifungal agent), were applied to the microneedles by piezoelectric inkjet printing. Microscopic evaluation of the microneedles indicated that the modified microneedles contained the piezoelectric inkjet printing-deposited agents and that the surface coatings were released in porcine skin. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry aided in confirmation that the piezoelectric inkjet printing-deposited agents were successfully applied to the desired target areas of the microneedle surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence of the component materials in the piezoelectric inkjet printing-deposited material. Itraconazole-modified microneedle arrays incubated with agar plates containing Candida albicans cultures showed zones of growth inhibition.

  12. Inkjet deposition of itraconazole onto poly(glycolic acid) microneedle arrays.

    PubMed

    Boehm, Ryan D; Jaipan, Panupong; Skoog, Shelby A; Stafslien, Shane; VanderWal, Lyndsi; Narayan, Roger J

    2016-03-01

    Poly(glycolic acid) microneedle arrays were fabricated using a drawing lithography process; these arrays were modified with a drug release agent and an antifungal agent by piezoelectric inkjet printing. Coatings containing poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic anhydride), a water-soluble drug release layer, and itraconazole (an antifungal agent), were applied to the microneedles by piezoelectric inkjet printing. Microscopic evaluation of the microneedles indicated that the modified microneedles contained the piezoelectric inkjet printing-deposited agents and that the surface coatings were released in porcine skin. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry aided in confirmation that the piezoelectric inkjet printing-deposited agents were successfully applied to the desired target areas of the microneedle surface. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to confirm the presence of the component materials in the piezoelectric inkjet printing-deposited material. Itraconazole-modified microneedle arrays incubated with agar plates containing Candida albicans cultures showed zones of growth inhibition. PMID:26869165

  13. Comparison of Buffer Effect of Different Acids During Sandstone Acidizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer Shafiq, Mian; Khaled Ben Mahmud, Hisham; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    The most important concern of sandstone matrix acidizing is to increase the formation permeability by removing the silica particles. To accomplish this, the mud acid (HF: HCl) has been utilized successfully for many years to stimulate the sandstone formations, but still it has many complexities. This paper presents the results of laboratory investigations of different acid combinations (HF: HCl, HF: H3PO4 and HF: HCOOH). Hydrofluoric acid and fluoboric acid are used to dissolve clays and feldspar. Phosphoric and formic acids are added as a buffer to maintain the pH of the solution; also it allows the maximum penetration of acid into the core sample. Different tests have been performed on the core samples before and after the acidizing to do the comparative study on the buffer effect of these acids. The analysis consists of permeability, porosity, color change and pH value tests. There is more increase in permeability and porosity while less change in pH when phosphoric and formic acids were used compared to mud acid. From these results it has been found that the buffer effect of phosphoric acid and formic acid is better than hydrochloric acid.

  14. DEPOSITION TANK CORROSION TESTING FOR ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING POST OXALIC ACID DESTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.

    2011-08-29

    An Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (ECC) process is being developed to aid in the high level waste tank closure at the Savannah River Site. The ECC process uses an advanced oxidation process (AOP) to destroy the oxalic acid that is used to remove residual sludge from a waste tank prior to closure. The AOP process treats the dissolved sludge with ozone to decompose the oxalic acid through reactions with hydroxyl radicals. The effluent from this oxalic acid decomposition is to be sent to a Type III waste tank and may be corrosive to these tanks. As part of the hazardous simulant testing that was conducted at the ECC vendor location, corrosion testing was conducted to determine the general corrosion rate for the deposition tank and to assess the susceptibility to localized corrosion, especially pitting. Both of these factors impact the calculation of hydrogen gas generation and the structural integrity of the tanks, which are considered safety class functions. The testing consisted of immersion and electrochemical testing of A537 carbon steel, the material of construction of Type III tanks, and 304L stainless steel, the material of construction for transfer piping. Tests were conducted in solutions removed from the destruction loop of the prototype ECC set up. Hazardous simulants, which were manufactured at SRNL, were used as representative sludges for F-area and H-area waste tanks. Oxalic acid concentrations of 1 and 2.5% were used to dissolve the sludge as a feed to the ECC process. Test solutions included the uninhibited effluent, as well as the effluent treated for corrosion control. The corrosion control options included mixing with an inhibited supernate and the addition of hydroxide. Evaporation of the uninhibited effluent was also tested since it may have a positive impact on reducing corrosion. All corrosion testing was conducted at 50 C. The uninhibited effluent was found to increase the corrosion rate by an order of magnitude from less than 1 mil per year (mpy

  15. Analysis of potential combustion source impacts on acid deposition using an independently derived inventory. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    This project had three major objectives. The first objective was to develop a fossil fuel combustion source inventory (NO/sub x/, SO/sub x/, and hydrocarbon emissions) that would be relatively easy to use and update for analyzing the impact of combustion emissions on acid deposition in the eastern United States. The second objective of the project was to use the inventory data as a basis for selection of a number of areas that, by virtue of their importance in the acid rain issue, could be further studied to assess the impact of local and intraregional combustion sources. The third objective was to conduct an analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in the areas under study, along with pertinent physical characteristics, meteorological conditions, and emission patterns of these areas, to investigate probable relationships between local and intraregional combustion sources and the deposition of acidic material. The combustion source emissions inventory has been developed for the eastern United States. It characterizes all important area sources and point sources on a county-by-county basis. Its design provides flexibility and simplicity and makes it uniquely useful in overall analysis of emission patterns in the eastern United States. Three regions with basically different emission patterns have been identified and characterized. The statistical analysis of wet deposition monitoring data in conjunction with emission patterns, wind direction, and topography has produced consistent results for each study area and has demonstrated that the wet deposition in each area reflects the characteristics of the localized area around the monitoring sites (typically 50 to 150 miles). 8 references, 28 figures, 39 tables.

  16. An evaluation of critical loads of soil acidity in areas of high sea salt deposition.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, B

    2000-05-15

    The empirical and mass balance approaches to setting critical loads of acidity for mineral soils have been evaluated using field data from forest sites in Wales. Using the Simple Mass Balance Equation (SMBE) with Sitka spruce as the biological target, critical loads ranged between 2.3 and 9.8 keq H+ ha(-1) year(-1) compared to mapped empirical critical loads which ranged between 0.2 and 0.5 keq H+ ha(-1) year(-1). At all sites the empirical critical load was exceeded with respect to deposited sulfur acidity. There were no exceeded sites for the SMBE critical loads. The big differences between the two methods arise from the large ANC leaching term in the SMBE model which is determined by the relatively low (Ca + Mg + K)/Al(crit) ratio for Sitka spruce, compared to other conifers, and the influence of the large deposition of sea salt base cations. The low value of the (Ca + Mg + K)/Al(crit) ratio for Sitka spruce implies that it is tolerant of very acidic soil conditions, however, the ratio is based on the results of only one solution culture study and may thus be uncertain under field conditions. Large sea salt base cation deposition directly influences SMBE critical loads because the predicted soil water base cation concentrations permit large concentrations of hydrogen ions and aluminium (low ANC values) before the critical chemical limit is transgressed. Where weathering rates are low, critical ANC leaching (ANC(lecrit)) becomes the dominant term in the SMBE, with the counter intuitive result that the critical load becomes a linear function of sea salt base cation deposition. Thus the current formulation of the SMBE may not be appropriate for low weathering rate areas receiving large amounts of sea salt base cation deposition.

  17. [Acidic components of precipitation: humid deposition of S, N and Cl compounds].

    PubMed

    Fernández Patier, R; Esteban Lefler, M

    1989-01-01

    Precipitation samples have been gathered using recipients that differentiate the dry deposition of the humidity in three stations in Spain: one urban (Madrid) and two at base levels (San Pablo de los Montes and Granada). The study is centred on the components of an acid character, for which significant special variations of the sulphate and nitrate concentrations have been obtained. The levels, highest in Madrid and lowest in San Pablo, show the influence of the emitting focal points. A study of the seasonal variations in San Pablo show that the concentrations in summer are more than double than those in winter, probably due to the intervention of the photochemical formation processes of these contaminants. Also studies of humidity deposition are carried out, from which one can observe greater monthly values that are greater in Madrid than in other stations, in spite of having less rainfall. Likewise, episodes of "acid rain" and "red rain" are commented on.

  18. Arachidonic acid diet attenuates brain Aβ deposition in Tg2576 mice.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Takashi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Jung, Cha-Gyun; Kontani, Masanori; Tokuda, Hisanori; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Kiso, Yoshinobu; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Michikawa, Makoto

    2015-07-10

    The amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is believed to play a causative role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because the amyloid precursor protein (APP), a substrate of Aβ, and β-secretase and γ-secretase complex proteins, which process APP to generate Aβ, are all membrane proteins, it is possible to assume that alterations in brain lipid metabolism modulate APP and/or Aβ metabolism. However, the role of polyunsaturated fatty acids in Aβ metabolism remains unknown. We report here that 9 months-treatment of Tg2576 mice with arachidonic acid (ARA)-containing (ARA+) diet prevented brain Aβ deposition in 17-month-old Tg2576 mice. APP processing to generate soluble APPα, CTF-β, and Aβ synthesis was attenuated in Tg2576 mice fed with the ARA+ diet. These findings suggest that ARA+ diet could prevent Aβ deposition through the alteration of APP processing in Tg2576 mice.

  19. Valuation of damages to recreational trout fishing in the Upper Northeast due to acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Englin, J.E.; Cameron, T.A.; Mendelsohn, R.E.; Parsons, G.A.; Shankle, S.A.

    1991-04-01

    This report documents methods used to estimate economic models of changes in recreational fishing due to the acidic deposition. The analysis was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and its subcontractors for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) in support of the National Acidic Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The primary data needed to estimate these models were collected in the 1989 Aquatic Based Recreation Survey (ABRS), which was jointly funded by the DOE and the EPA's Office of Policy Planning and Evaluation. 11 refs., 5 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. Dry deposition and heavy acid loading in the vicinity of Masaya Volcano, a major sulfur and chlorine source in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Delmelle, P; Stix, J; Bourque, C P; Baxter, P J; Garcia-Alvarez, J; Barquero, J

    2001-04-01

    Certain volcanoes constitute the world's largest sources of SO2, HCl, and HF emissions and contribute significantly to regional acid deposition. However, the impact of volcanic acid emissions to nearby ecosystems remain poorly documented. In this paper, the spatial pattern of acid dry depositions was monitored within 44 km of Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua, with a network of sulfation plates. Measured SO2 deposition rates were <2-791 mg m(-2) day(-1). The plates also collected the dry deposition of HCI at rates of <1-297 mg m(-2) day(-1). A similar deposition velocity Vd (gas transfer) of 1.6 +/- 0.8 cm/s was calculated for SO2 and HCl above the plate surfaces. Quantities of SO2 and HCI deposited daily within the area surveyed amounted to 1.5 x 10(8) g and 5.7 x 10(7) g, respectively, which correspond to about 10% of the total SO2 and HCl released by the volcano. These depositions may generate an equivalent hydrogen flux ranging from <1 to 30 mg m(-2) day(-1). Our results demonstrate that volcano emissions can dramatically affect acid deposition downwind and in turn cause extreme acid loading of the local ecosystems. This study opens exciting prospects for investigating the sensivity of volcanic ash soils to acid inputs.

  1. Dry deposition and heavy acid loading in the vicinity of Masaya Volcano, a major sulfur and chlorine source in Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Delmelle, P; Stix, J; Bourque, C P; Baxter, P J; Garcia-Alvarez, J; Barquero, J

    2001-04-01

    Certain volcanoes constitute the world's largest sources of SO2, HCl, and HF emissions and contribute significantly to regional acid deposition. However, the impact of volcanic acid emissions to nearby ecosystems remain poorly documented. In this paper, the spatial pattern of acid dry depositions was monitored within 44 km of Masaya Volcano, Nicaragua, with a network of sulfation plates. Measured SO2 deposition rates were <2-791 mg m(-2) day(-1). The plates also collected the dry deposition of HCI at rates of <1-297 mg m(-2) day(-1). A similar deposition velocity Vd (gas transfer) of 1.6 +/- 0.8 cm/s was calculated for SO2 and HCl above the plate surfaces. Quantities of SO2 and HCI deposited daily within the area surveyed amounted to 1.5 x 10(8) g and 5.7 x 10(7) g, respectively, which correspond to about 10% of the total SO2 and HCl released by the volcano. These depositions may generate an equivalent hydrogen flux ranging from <1 to 30 mg m(-2) day(-1). Our results demonstrate that volcano emissions can dramatically affect acid deposition downwind and in turn cause extreme acid loading of the local ecosystems. This study opens exciting prospects for investigating the sensivity of volcanic ash soils to acid inputs. PMID:11348058

  2. Modeling wet deposition of acid substances over the PRD region in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xingcheng; Fung, Jimmy Chi Hung; Wu, Dongwei

    2015-12-01

    The Pearl River Delta (PRD) region in southern China has suffered heavily from acid rain in the last 10 years due to the anthropogenic emission of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide. Several measurement-based studies about this issue have been conducted to analyze the chemical composition of precipitation in this area. However, no detailed, high resolution numerical simulation regarding this topic has ever been done in this region. In this study, the WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ system was applied to simulate the wet deposition of acid substances (SO42- and NO3-) in the PRD region from 2009 to 2011 with a resolution of 3 km. The simulation output agreed well with the observation data. Our results showed that Guangzhou was the city most affected by acid rain in this region. The ratio of non-sea-salt sulfate to nitrate indicated that the acid rain in this region belonged to the sulfate-nitrate mixed type. The source apportionment result suggests that point source and super regional source are the ones that contribute the pollutants most in the rain water over PRD Region. The sulfate and nitrate input to some reservoirs via wet deposition was also estimated based on the model simulation. Our results suggest that further cross-city cooperation and emission reduction are needed to further curb acid rain in this region.

  3. Decreased acid deposition and the chemical recovery of Killarney, Ontario, lakes.

    PubMed

    Keller, Wendel; Heneberry, Jocelyne H; Dixit, Sushil S

    2003-04-01

    Lakes in Killarney Park near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, have shown dramatic water quality changes including general increases in pH and alkalinity, and decreases in SO4(2-), base cations and metals. While some lakes have recovered to pH > 6.0, many are still highly acidic despite decades of improvement. Very high historical S deposition related to emissions from the Sudbury metal smelters dominated the acidification process in this region. However, since the implementation of substantial S emission controls (90%) at the smelters, the Sudbury emissions are no longer the major source of S deposition in the Sudbury area. Wet deposition of SO4(2-) and SO4(2-) concentrations in lakewaters at Killarney now approach values in the Dorset, Ontario, area, about 200 km from Sudbury. This suggests that the S deposition to the Killarney area is now primarily from long-range transport, not from local sources. Studies of Killarney lakes are revealing the complex nature of the chemical recovery process. As lake acidity decreases, other changes including decreased Ca2+ concentrations, increased transparency, and altered thermal regimes may potentially affect some of these ecosystems. It is clear that continuing assessments of the recovery of Killarney lakes, within a multiple-stressor framework, are needed.

  4. Trends in emissions and acid deposition over the northeastern US: Measurements and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehr, J. W.; Allen, D. J.; Dickerson, R. R.; Loughner, C.; Piety, C. A.

    2006-05-01

    In recent years, two large emissions reduction programs have taken place in and upwind of the Northeastern United States: the Acid Rain Program and the NOx SIP (State Implementation Plan) call. Other programs have been directed toward reducing emissions from mobile sources, and new programs such as the CAIR rule (Clean Air Interstate Rule) are coming on line, pushing emissions down even further. Trends in the emissions data to date suggest that the benefits of these programs should already be measurable using existing monitoring data. A brief analysis of acid deposition data from several sites around the region indicates that the trends in sulfate are all downward, while the trends in nitrate deposition are less dramatic, with a promising recent downward trend. The CMAQ (Community Multiscale Air Quality) model - a one-atmosphere urban/regional smog, aerosol, and deposition model - has been used to estimate future trends in deposition with the implementation of new programs expected to come on line in the next several years.

  5. Acid rain and nitrogen deposition in a sub-tropical watershed (Piracicaba): ecosystem consequences.

    PubMed

    Krusche, A V; de Camargo, P B; Cerri, C E; Ballester, M V; Lara, L B L S; Victoria, R L; Martinelli, L A

    2003-01-01

    High levels of wet N and acidic deposition were measured in southeast Brazil. In this study we addressed the sensitivity of water bodies and soils to acidification and N deposition in the Piracicaba River basin (12,400 km2). Average acid neutralization capacity (ANC) at 23 river sampling sites varied from 350 to 1800 microeq l(-1). Therefore, rivers and streams in the Piracicaba basin are well buffered, if the lower limit of 200 microeq l(-1) is assumed as an indication of poorly buffered waters. ANC is increased by untreated wastewaters discarded into rivers and streams of the region. Average NO3 concentrations varied from 20 to 70 microeq l(-1). At the most polluted river sites, NO3 concentration is not highest, however, probably due to NO3 reduction and denitrification. Most of the nitrogen in streams is also provided by wastewaters and not by wet deposition. The majority of the soils in the basin, however, are acidic with a low base cation content and high aluminum concentration. Therefore, soils in this basin are poorly buffered and, in areas of forest over sandy soils, acidification may be a problem.

  6. Facile plasma-enhanced deposition of ultrathin crosslinked amino acid films for conformal biometallization.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kyle D; Slocik, Joseph M; McConney, Michael E; Enlow, Jesse O; Jakubiak, Rachel; Bunning, Timothy J; Naik, Rajesh R; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2009-03-01

    A novel method for the facile fabrication of conformal, ultrathin, and uniform synthetic amino acid coatings on a variety of practical surfaces by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is introduced. Tyrosine, which is utilized as an agent to reduce gold nanoparticles from solution, is sublimed into the plasma field and directly deposited on a variety of substrates to form a homogeneous, conformal, and robust polyamino acid coating in a one-step, solvent-free process. This approach is applicable to many practical surfaces and allows surface-induced biometallization while avoiding multiple wet-chemistry treatments that can damage many soft materials. Moreover, by placing a mask over the substrate during deposition, the tyrosine coating can be micropatterned. Upon its exposure to a solution of gold chloride, a network of gold nanoparticles forms on the surface, replicating the initial micropattern. This method of templated biometallization is adaptable to a variety of practical inorganic and organic substrates, such as silicon, glass, nitrocellulose, polystyrene, polydimethylsiloxane, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyethylene, and woven silk fibers. No special pretreatment is necessary, and the technique results in a rapid, conformal amino acid coating that can be utilized for further biometallization.

  7. Effects of debris flow composition on runout, depositional mechanisms, and deposit morphology in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Tjalling; Braat, Lisanne; Leuven, Jasper R. F. W.; Lokhorst, Ivar R.; Kleinhans, Maarten G.

    2015-09-01

    Predicting debris flow runout is of major importance for hazard mitigation. Apart from topography and volume, runout distance and area depends on debris flow composition and rheology, but how is poorly understood. We experimentally investigated effects of composition on debris flow runout, depositional mechanisms, and deposit geometry. The small-scale experimental debris flows were largely similar to natural debris flows in terms of flow behavior, deposit morphology, grain size sorting, channel width-depth ratio, and runout. Deposit geometry (lobe thickness and width) in our experimental debris flows is largely determined by composition, while the effects of initial conditions of topography (i.e., outflow plain slope and channel slope and width) and volume are negligible. We find a clear optimum in the relations of runout with coarse-material fraction and clay fraction. Increasing coarse-material concentration leads to larger runout. However, excess coarse material results in a large accumulation of coarse debris at the flow front and enhances diffusivity, increasing frontal friction and decreasing runout. Increasing clay content initially enhances runout, but too much clay leads to very viscous flows, reducing runout. Runout increases with channel slope and width, outflow plain slope, debris flow volume, and water fraction. These results imply that debris flow runout depends at least as much on composition as on topography. This study improves understanding of the effects of debris flow composition on runout and may aid future debris flow hazard assessments.

  8. Long-term impact of acid resin waste deposits on soil quality of forest areas I. Contaminants and abiotic properties.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Madejón, Engracia; Cabrera, Francisco; Buegger, Franz; Fuss, Roland; Pritsch, Karin; Schloter, Michael

    2008-11-15

    Acid resins are residues characterised by elevated concentrations of hydrocarbons and trace elements, which were produced by mineral oil industries in Central Europe during the first half of the last century. Due to the lack of environmental legislation at that time, these wastes were dumped into excavated ponds in public areas without further protection. In this work, the long-term effects of such resin deposits on soil quality of two forest areas (Bayern, Germany) were assessed. We evaluated the distribution and accumulation of contaminants in the surroundings of the deposits, where the waste was disposed of about 60 years ago. General soil chemical properties such as pH, C, N and P content were also investigated. Chemical analysis of resin waste from the deposits revealed large amounts of potential contaminants such as hydrocarbons (93 g kg(-1)), As (63 mg kg(-1)), Cd (24 mg kg(-1)), Cu (1835 mg kg(-1)), Pb (8100 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (873 mg kg(-1)). Due to the location of the deposits on a hillside and the lack of adequate isolation, contaminants have been released downhill despite the solid nature of the waste. Five zones were investigated in each site: the deposit, three affected zones along the plume of contamination and a control zone. In affected zones, contaminants were 2 to 350 times higher than background levels depending on the site. In many cases, contaminants exceeded the German environmental guidelines for the soil-groundwater path and action levels based on extractable concentrations. Resin contamination yielded larger total C/total N ratios in affected zones, but no clear effect was observed on absolute C, N and P concentrations. In general, no major acidification effect was reported in affected zones.

  9. Assessment of lake sensitivity to acidic deposition in national parks of the Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    Nanus, L; Williams, M W; Campbell, D H; Tonnessen, K A; Blett, T; Clow, D W

    2009-06-01

    The sensitivity of high-elevation lakes to acidic deposition was evaluated in five national parks of the Rocky Mountains based on statistical relations between lake acid-neutralizing capacity concentrations and basin characteristics. Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of 151 lakes sampled during synoptic surveys and basin-characteristic information derived from geographic information system (GIS) data sets were used to calibrate the statistical models. The explanatory basin variables that were considered included topographic parameters, bedrock type, and vegetation type. A logistic regression model was developed, and modeling results were cross-validated through lake sampling during fall 2004 at 58 lakes. The model was applied to lake basins greater than 1 ha in area in Glacier National Park (n = 244 lakes), Grand Teton National Park (n = 106 lakes), Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (n = 11 lakes), Rocky Mountain National Park (n = 114 lakes), and Yellowstone National Park (n = 294 lakes). Lakes that had a high probability of having an ANC concentration <100 microeq/L, and therefore sensitive to acidic deposition, are located in basins with elevations >3000 m, with <30% of the catchment having northeast aspect and with >80% of the catchment bedrock having low buffering capacity. The modeling results indicate that the most sensitive lakes are located in Rocky Mountain National Park and Grand Teton National Park. This technique for evaluating the lake sensitivity to acidic deposition is useful for designing long-term monitoring plans and is potentially transferable to other remote mountain areas of the United States and the world. PMID:19544737

  10. Assessment of lake sensitivity to acidic deposition in national parks of the Rocky Mountains.

    PubMed

    Nanus, L; Williams, M W; Campbell, D H; Tonnessen, K A; Blett, T; Clow, D W

    2009-06-01

    The sensitivity of high-elevation lakes to acidic deposition was evaluated in five national parks of the Rocky Mountains based on statistical relations between lake acid-neutralizing capacity concentrations and basin characteristics. Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of 151 lakes sampled during synoptic surveys and basin-characteristic information derived from geographic information system (GIS) data sets were used to calibrate the statistical models. The explanatory basin variables that were considered included topographic parameters, bedrock type, and vegetation type. A logistic regression model was developed, and modeling results were cross-validated through lake sampling during fall 2004 at 58 lakes. The model was applied to lake basins greater than 1 ha in area in Glacier National Park (n = 244 lakes), Grand Teton National Park (n = 106 lakes), Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (n = 11 lakes), Rocky Mountain National Park (n = 114 lakes), and Yellowstone National Park (n = 294 lakes). Lakes that had a high probability of having an ANC concentration <100 microeq/L, and therefore sensitive to acidic deposition, are located in basins with elevations >3000 m, with <30% of the catchment having northeast aspect and with >80% of the catchment bedrock having low buffering capacity. The modeling results indicate that the most sensitive lakes are located in Rocky Mountain National Park and Grand Teton National Park. This technique for evaluating the lake sensitivity to acidic deposition is useful for designing long-term monitoring plans and is potentially transferable to other remote mountain areas of the United States and the world.

  11. Assessment of lake sensitivity to acidic deposition in national parks of the Rocky Mountains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nanus, L.; Williams, M.W.; Campbell, D.H.; Tonnessen, K.A.; Blett, T.; Clow, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    The sensitivity of high-elevation lakes to acidic deposition was evaluated in five national parks of the Rocky Mountains based on statistical relations between lake acid-neutralizing capacity concentrations and basin characteristics. Acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) of 151 lakes sampled during synoptic surveys and basin-characteristic information derived from geographic information system (GIS) data sets were used to calibrate the statistical models. The explanatory basin variables that were considered included topographic parameters, bedrock type, and vegetation type. A logistic regression model was developed, and modeling results were cross-validated through lake sampling during fall 2004 at 58 lakes. The model was applied to lake basins greater than 1 ha in area in Glacier National Park (n = 244 lakes), Grand Teton National Park (n = 106 lakes), Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (n = 11 lakes), Rocky Mountain National Park (n = 114 lakes), and Yellowstone National Park (n = 294 lakes). Lakes that had a high probability of having an ANC concentration 3000 m, with 80% of the catchment bedrock having low buffering capacity. The modeling results indicate that the most sensitive lakes are located in Rocky Mountain National Park and Grand Teton National Park. This technique for evaluating the lake sensitivity to acidic deposition is useful for designing long-term monitoring plans and is potentially transferable to other remote mountain areas of the United States and the world.

  12. Investigation of electroless tin deposition from acidic thiourea-type bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araźna, A.; Bieliński, J.

    2006-10-01

    The constant tendency of miniaturization in electronic products and developments in surface assembly techniques creates requirement to prepare new techniques and processes also in the range of metallic coatings. An additional factor which influences the evolution of preservatives coatings technology is the necessity to adapt Polish law to European directive. From 1 st July 2006 there will be an obligatory RoHS directive banning applying lead in electronics. Electroless tin deposition is one of an alternative for Sn/Pb lead free preservative films on copper surface in PCB technology. Electroless deposition of tin coatings on copper can be made in two ways: from an alkaline bath - the process disproportionation of Sn(II) compounds and from acidic bath contain complex compound such as thiourea - the displacement of copper by tin in Sn(II). Alkaline baths are not used in printed circuit board technology because it has destructive influence on resists. Besides acidic baths complex compounds contain additional stability solution composition which modify structure of obtained tin film. Quality and thickness tin layer are fundamental parameters which determine its protective character. The research test were done in thiourea-type electroless tin bath. The influence of different parameters on n rate of tin deposition and thickness of Sn coating were determined: temperature of the bath, Sn(II)-salt, thiourea and HCl concentration. Tin layers were depositioned on electrolytical copper foil. The thickness of Sn coating was determined by coulometry in 2M HCl. The rate deposition process depends mainly on the thiourea and HCl concentrations in solution. The temperature is also a very important parameter. The thickness of tin layer grows when the temperature increase. Although above 70°C appear undesirable thiourea decomposition. The results of the investigation show that further investigations are necessary for this solution.

  13. Acid deposition coverage in five North American newspapers, 1979-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffeld, J.A.; Fortner, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Daily newspapers in some areas receiving acid rain, in some areas reported to be producing acid rain, and in some areas apparently ''neutral'' in the issue were content analyzed for their coverage of acid rain between 1979 and 1982. Of the five papers, the greatest amount of coverage was in the Cleveland Plain Dealer and the Toronto Globe and Mail. Coverage of acid rain effects was greatest in the Washington Post, as was the number of items suggesting remedies for the problem. Articles from papers in areas receiving acid rain contained more indications of urgency than those from areas blamed for the problem.

  14. Chemical and biological recovery from acid deposition within the Honnedaga Lake watershed, New York, USA.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Daniel C; Robinson, Jason M; Chiotti, Justin; Jirka, Kurt J; Kraft, Clifford E

    2014-07-01

    Honnedaga Lake in the Adirondack region of New York has sustained a heritage brook trout population despite decades of atmospheric acid deposition. Detrimental impacts from acid deposition were observed from 1920 to 1960 with the sequential loss of acid-sensitive fishes, leaving only brook trout extant in the lake. Open-lake trap net catches of brook trout declined for two decades into the late 1970s, when brook trout were considered extirpated from the lake but persisted in tributary refuges. Amendments to the Clean Air Act in 1990 mandated reductions in sulfate and nitrogen oxide emissions. By 2000, brook trout had re-colonized the lake coincident with reductions in surface-water sulfate, nitrate, and inorganic monomeric aluminum. No changes have been observed in surface-water acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) or calcium concentration. Observed increases in chlorophyll a and decreases in water clarity reflect an increase in phytoplankton abundance. The zooplankton community exhibits low species richness, with a scarcity of acid-sensitive Daphnia and dominance by acid-tolerant copepods. Trap net surveys indicate that relative abundance of adult brook trout population has significantly increased since the 1970s. Brook trout are absent in 65 % of tributaries that are chronically acidified with ANC of <0 μeq/L and toxic aluminum levels (>2 μmol/L). Given the current conditions, a slow recovery of chemistry and biota is expected in Honnedaga Lake and its tributaries. We are exploring the potential to accelerate the recovery of brook trout abundance in Honnedaga Lake through lime applications to chronically and episodically acidified tributaries. PMID:24671614

  15. Tuning Acid-Base Properties Using Mg-Al Oxide Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Jackson, David H K; O'Neill, Brandon J; Lee, Jechan; Huber, George W; Dumesic, James A; Kuech, Thomas F

    2015-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to coat γ-Al2O3 particles with oxide films of varying Mg/Al atomic ratios, which resulted in systematic variation of the acid and base site areal densities. Variation of Mg/Al also affected morphological features such as crystalline phase, pore size distribution, and base site proximity. Areal base site density increased with increasing Mg content, while acid site density went through a maximum with a similar number of Mg and Al atoms in the coating. This behavior leads to nonlinearity in the relationship between Mg/Al and acid/base site ratio. The physical and chemical properties were elucidated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 physisorption, and CO2 and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Fluorescence emission spectroscopy of samples grafted with 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) was used for analysis of base site proximity. The degree of base site clustering was correlated to acid site density. Catalytic activity in the self-condensation of acetone was dependent on sample base site density and independent of acid site density. PMID:26168188

  16. Tuning Acid-Base Properties Using Mg-Al Oxide Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Jackson, David H K; O'Neill, Brandon J; Lee, Jechan; Huber, George W; Dumesic, James A; Kuech, Thomas F

    2015-08-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used to coat γ-Al2O3 particles with oxide films of varying Mg/Al atomic ratios, which resulted in systematic variation of the acid and base site areal densities. Variation of Mg/Al also affected morphological features such as crystalline phase, pore size distribution, and base site proximity. Areal base site density increased with increasing Mg content, while acid site density went through a maximum with a similar number of Mg and Al atoms in the coating. This behavior leads to nonlinearity in the relationship between Mg/Al and acid/base site ratio. The physical and chemical properties were elucidated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N2 physisorption, and CO2 and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Fluorescence emission spectroscopy of samples grafted with 1-pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) was used for analysis of base site proximity. The degree of base site clustering was correlated to acid site density. Catalytic activity in the self-condensation of acetone was dependent on sample base site density and independent of acid site density.

  17. Effects of complexing agents on electrochemical deposition of FeS x O y thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supee, Aizuddin; Ichimura, Masaya

    2016-08-01

    FeS x O y thin films were deposited on indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrates at 15 °C via galvanostatic electrochemical deposition from an aqueous solution containing 100 mM Na2S2O3 and 30 mM FeSO4. The effects of l(+)-tartaric acid (C4H4O6) and lactic acid [CH3CH(OH)COOH] at different concentrations were investigated. All the deposited films were amorphous. With the complexing agents, the thickness was increased, and the oxygen content was reduced significantly compared with the sample deposited without the complexing agents. In the photoelectrochemical measurement, p-type conductivity was confirmed. The photoresponsivity was not influenced significantly by the complexing agent, suggesting that the oxygen content does not drastically affect the properties of the deposited films probably because the local bonding configuration around Fe atoms in FeS x O y is similar to that in FeS2.

  18. Effects of complexing agents on electrochemical deposition of FeS x O y thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supee, Aizuddin; Ichimura, Masaya

    2016-08-01

    FeS x O y thin films were deposited on indium–tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrates at 15 °C via galvanostatic electrochemical deposition from an aqueous solution containing 100 mM Na2S2O3 and 30 mM FeSO4. The effects of l(+)-tartaric acid (C4H4O6) and lactic acid [CH3CH(OH)COOH] at different concentrations were investigated. All the deposited films were amorphous. With the complexing agents, the thickness was increased, and the oxygen content was reduced significantly compared with the sample deposited without the complexing agents. In the photoelectrochemical measurement, p-type conductivity was confirmed. The photoresponsivity was not influenced significantly by the complexing agent, suggesting that the oxygen content does not drastically affect the properties of the deposited films probably because the local bonding configuration around Fe atoms in FeS x O y is similar to that in FeS2.

  19. An Investigation of Solid-State Amidization and Imidization Reactions in Vapor Deposited Poly (amic acid)

    SciTech Connect

    Anthamatten, M; Letts, S A; Day, K; Cook, R C; Gies, A P; Hamilton, T P; Nonidez, W K

    2004-06-28

    The condensation polymerization reaction of 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA) with pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) to form poly(amic acid) and the subsequent imidization reaction to form polyimide were investigated for films prepared using vapor deposition polymerization techniques. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of films at different temperatures indicate that additional solid-state polymerization occurs prior to imidization reactions. Experiments reveal that, upon vapor deposition, poly(amic acid) oligomers form that have a number-average molecular weight of about 1500 Daltons. Between 100 - 130 C these chains undergo additional condensation reaction to form slightly higher molecular weight oligomers. Calorimetry measurements show that this reaction is exothermic ({Delta}H {approx} -30 J/g) with an activation energy of about 120 kJ/mol. Experimental reaction enthalpies are compared to results from ab initio molecular modeling calculations to estimate the number of amide groups formed. At higher temperatures (150 - 300 C) imidization of amide linkages occurs as an endothermic reaction ({Delta}H {approx} +120 J/g) with an activation energy of about 130 kJ/mol. Solid-state kinetics were found to depend on reaction conversion as well as the processing conditions used to deposit films.

  20. Acid rain effects on aluminum mobilization clarified by inclusion of strong organic acids.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, G B; Sutherland, J W; Boylen, C W; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S W; Momen, B; Baldigo, B P; Simonin, H A

    2007-01-01

    Assessments of acidic deposition effects on aquatic ecosystems have often been hindered by complications from naturally occurring organic acidity. Measurements of pH and ANCG, the most commonly used indicators of chemical effects, can be substantially influenced by the presence of organic acids. Relationships between pH and inorganic Al, which is toxic to many forms of aquatic biota, are also altered by organic acids. However, when inorganic Al concentrations are plotted against ANC (the sum of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, and K+, minus S042-, N03-, and Cl-), a distinct threshold for Al mobilization becomes apparent. If the concentration of strong organic anions is included as a negative component of ANC, the threshold occurs at an ANC value of approximately zero, the value expected from theoretical charge balance constraints. This adjusted ANC is termed the base-cation surplus. The threshold relationship between the base-cation surplus and Al was shown with data from approximately 200 streams in the Adirondack region of New York, during periods with low and high dissolved organic carbon concentrations, and for an additional stream from the Catskill region of New York. These results indicate that (1) strong organic anions can contribute to the mobilization of inorganic Al in combination with SO42- and N03-, and (2) the presence of inorganic Al in surface waters is an unambiguous indication of acidic deposition effects.

  1. Acid rain effects on aluminum mobilization clarified by inclusion of strong organic acids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, G.B.; Sutherland, J.W.; Boylen, C.W.; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S. W.; Momen, B.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Simonin, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    Assessments of acidic deposition effects on aquatic ecosystems have often been hindered by complications from naturally occurring organic acidity. Measurements of pH and ANCG, the most commonly used indicators of chemical effects, can be substantially influenced by the presence of organic acids. Relationships between pH and inorganic Al, which is toxic to many forms of aquatic biota, are also altered by organic acids. However, when inorganic Al concentrations are plotted against ANC (the sum of Ca2+, Mg 2+, Na+, and K+, minus SO42-, NO3-, and Cl-), a distinct threshold for Al mobilization becomes apparent. If the concentration of strong organic anions is included as a negative component of ANC, the threshold occurs at an ANC value of approximately zero, the value expected from theoretical charge balance constraints. This adjusted ANC is termed the base-cation surplus. The threshold relationship between the base-cation surplus and Al was shown with data from approximately 200 streams in the Adirondack region of New York, during periods with low and high dissolved organic carbon concentrations, and for an additional stream from the Catskill region of New York. These results indicate that (1) strong organic anions can contribute to the mobilization of inorganic Al in combination with SO42- and NO 3-, and (2) the presence of inorganic Al in surface waters is an unambiguous indication of acidic deposition effects. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  2. Acid rain effects on aluminum mobilization clarified by inclusion of strong organic acids.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, G B; Sutherland, J W; Boylen, C W; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S W; Momen, B; Baldigo, B P; Simonin, H A

    2007-01-01

    Assessments of acidic deposition effects on aquatic ecosystems have often been hindered by complications from naturally occurring organic acidity. Measurements of pH and ANCG, the most commonly used indicators of chemical effects, can be substantially influenced by the presence of organic acids. Relationships between pH and inorganic Al, which is toxic to many forms of aquatic biota, are also altered by organic acids. However, when inorganic Al concentrations are plotted against ANC (the sum of Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, and K+, minus S042-, N03-, and Cl-), a distinct threshold for Al mobilization becomes apparent. If the concentration of strong organic anions is included as a negative component of ANC, the threshold occurs at an ANC value of approximately zero, the value expected from theoretical charge balance constraints. This adjusted ANC is termed the base-cation surplus. The threshold relationship between the base-cation surplus and Al was shown with data from approximately 200 streams in the Adirondack region of New York, during periods with low and high dissolved organic carbon concentrations, and for an additional stream from the Catskill region of New York. These results indicate that (1) strong organic anions can contribute to the mobilization of inorganic Al in combination with SO42- and N03-, and (2) the presence of inorganic Al in surface waters is an unambiguous indication of acidic deposition effects. PMID:17265932

  3. Superhydrophobic surfaces on diverse metals based on ultrafast sequential deposition of silver and stearic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Junfei; Shi, Qingwen; Chen, Yiwei; Wang, Fajun; Xue, Mingshan; Li, Wen

    2015-01-01

    In the presence of NaF, silver (Ag) was galvanically deposited onto aluminum (Al) substrate quickly (typically 10 s) from dilute aqueous AgNO3 solution. Subsequent immersion into ethanolic solution of stearic acid (SA, for 30 s) rendered Al superhydrophobic. The deposition and morphological evolution of Ag were investigated in detail. It was found that NaF was indispensable to initiate the Ag galvanic deposition by dissolving the barrier oxide layer. Moreover, as reaction time prolonging, surface morphology and surface wettability varied synchronously. This strategy to fabricate superhydrophobic surface (coded as SHS) was also applicable to many other metals, such as Fe, Co and Mo with oxide passivation layer (NaF was needed) or Mg, Zn, Sn, Pb, and Cu with no apparent oxide passivation layer (NaF was not needed). In summary, the strategy to fabricate SHS based on Ag deposition and SA modification was quite impressive for its time-saving benefits and wide substrate applicability.

  4. Deposition and rainwater concentrations of trifluoroacetic acid in the United States from the use of HFO-1234yf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazil, J.; McKeen, S.; Kim, S.-W.; Ahmadov, R.; Grell, G. A.; Talukdar, R. K.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Currently, HFC-134a (1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane) is the most common refrigerant in automobile air conditioners. This high global warming potential substance (100 year GWP of 1370) will likely be phased out and replaced with HFO-1234yf (2,3,3,3-tetrafluoropropene) that has a 100 year GWP of 4. HFO-1234yf will be oxidized to produce trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in clouds. TFA, a mildly toxic substance with detrimental effects on some aquatic organisms at high concentrations (≥100μgL-1), would be transported by rain to the surface and enter bodies of water. We investigated the dry and wet deposition of TFA from HFO-1234yf over the contiguous USA using the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting model (ARW) with interactive chemical, aerosol, and cloud processes (WRF/Chem) model. Special focus was placed on emissions from three continental USA regions with different meteorological characteristics. WRF/Chem simulated meteorology, cloud processes, gas and aqueous phase chemistry, and dry and wet deposition between May and September 2006. The model reproduced well the multimonth total sulfate wet deposition (4% bias) and its spatial variability (r = 0.86) observed by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. HFO-1234yf emissions were obtained by assuming the number of automobile air conditioners to remain unchanged, and substituting HFO-1234yf, mole-per-mole for HFC-134a. Our estimates of current HFC-134a emissions were in agreement with field data. Average TFA rainwater concentration was 0.89μgL-1, with peak values of 7.8μgL-1, for the May-September 2006 period over the contiguous USA. TFA rainwater concentrations over the dry western USA were often significantly higher, but wet-deposited TFA amounts remained relatively low at such locations.

  5. Experimental study of acid-sulfate alteration of basalt and implications for sulfate deposits on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Robbins, Mark; Moskowitz, Bruce; Berquó, Thelma S.; Jöns, Niels; Hynek, Brian M.

    2013-04-01

    Acid-sulfate alteration of basalt by SO2-bearing volcanic vapors has been proposed as one possible origin for sulfate-rich deposits on Mars. To better define mineralogical signatures of acid-sulfate alteration, laboratory experiments were performed to investigate alteration pathways and geochemical processes during reaction of basalt with sulfuric acid. Pyroclastic cinders composed of phenocrysts including plagioclase, olivine, and augite embedded in glass were reacted with sulfuric acid at 145 °C for up to 137 days at a range of fluid : rock ratios. During the experiments, the phenocrysts reacted rapidly to form secondary products, while the glass was unreactive. Major products included amorphous silica, anhydrite, and Fe-rich natroalunite, along with minor iron oxides/oxyhydroxides (probably hematite) and trace levels of other sulfates. At the lowest fluid : rock ratio, hexahydrite and an unidentified Fe-silicate phase also occurred as major products. Reaction-path models indicated that formation of the products required both slow dissolution of glass and kinetic inhibitions to precipitation of a number of minerals including phyllosilicates and other aluminosilicates as well as Al- and Fe-oxides/oxyhydroxides. Similar models performed for Martian basalt compositions predict that the initial stages of acid-sulfate alteration of pyroclastic deposits on Mars should result in formation of amorphous silica, anhydrite, Fe-bearing natroalunite, and kieserite, along with relict basaltic glass. In addition, analysis of the experimental products indicates that Fe-bearing natroalunite produces a Mössbauer spectrum closely resembling that of jarosite, suggesting that it should be considered an alternative to the component in sulfate-rich bedrocks at Meridiani Planum that has previously been identified as jarosite.

  6. Application of a Depositional Facies Model to an Acid Mine Drainage Site▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Juliana F.; Jones, Daniel S.; Mills, Daniel B.; Macalady, Jennifer L.; Burgos, William D.

    2011-01-01

    Lower Red Eyes is an acid mine drainage site in Pennsylvania where low-pH Fe(II) oxidation has created a large, terraced iron mound downstream of an anoxic, acidic, metal-rich spring. Aqueous chemistry, mineral precipitates, microbial communities, and laboratory-based Fe(II) oxidation rates for this site were analyzed in the context of a depositional facies model. Depositional facies were defined as pools, terraces, or microterracettes based on cm-scale sediment morphology, irrespective of the distance downstream from the spring. The sediments were composed entirely of Fe precipitates and cemented organic matter. The Fe precipitates were identified as schwertmannite at all locations, regardless of facies. Microbial composition was studied with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transitioned from a microaerophilic, Euglena-dominated community at the spring, to a Betaproteobacteria (primarily Ferrovum spp.)-dominated community at the upstream end of the iron mound, to a Gammaproteobacteria (primarily Acidithiobacillus)-dominated community at the downstream end of the iron mound. Microbial community structure was more strongly correlated with pH and geochemical conditions than depositional facies. Intact pieces of terrace and pool sediments from upstream and downstream locations were used in flowthrough laboratory reactors to measure the rate and extent of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation. No change in Fe(II) concentration was observed with 60Co-irradiated sediments or with no-sediment controls, indicating that abiotic Fe(II) oxidation was negligible. Upstream sediments attained lower effluent Fe(II) concentrations compared to downstream sediments, regardless of depositional facies. PMID:21097582

  7. Application of a depositional facies model to an acid mine drainage site.

    PubMed

    Brown, Juliana F; Jones, Daniel S; Mills, Daniel B; Macalady, Jennifer L; Burgos, William D

    2011-01-01

    Lower Red Eyes is an acid mine drainage site in Pennsylvania where low-pH Fe(II) oxidation has created a large, terraced iron mound downstream of an anoxic, acidic, metal-rich spring. Aqueous chemistry, mineral precipitates, microbial communities, and laboratory-based Fe(II) oxidation rates for this site were analyzed in the context of a depositional facies model. Depositional facies were defined as pools, terraces, or microterracettes based on cm-scale sediment morphology, irrespective of the distance downstream from the spring. The sediments were composed entirely of Fe precipitates and cemented organic matter. The Fe precipitates were identified as schwertmannite at all locations, regardless of facies. Microbial composition was studied with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transitioned from a microaerophilic, Euglena-dominated community at the spring, to a Betaproteobacteria (primarily Ferrovum spp.)-dominated community at the upstream end of the iron mound, to a Gammaproteobacteria (primarily Acidithiobacillus)-dominated community at the downstream end of the iron mound. Microbial community structure was more strongly correlated with pH and geochemical conditions than depositional facies. Intact pieces of terrace and pool sediments from upstream and downstream locations were used in flowthrough laboratory reactors to measure the rate and extent of low-pH Fe(II) oxidation. No change in Fe(II) concentration was observed with (60)Co-irradiated sediments or with no-sediment controls, indicating that abiotic Fe(II) oxidation was negligible. Upstream sediments attained lower effluent Fe(II) concentrations compared to downstream sediments, regardless of depositional facies.

  8. Concentrations, deposition, and effects of nitrogenous pollutants in selected California ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bytnerowicz, A; Padgett, P E; Parry, S D; Fenn, M E; Arbaugh, M J

    2001-11-28

    Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) in California ecosystems is ecologically significant and highly variable, ranging from about 1 to 45 kg/ha/year. The lowest ambient concentrations and deposition values are found in the eastern and northern parts of the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the highest in parts of the San Bernardino and San Gabriel Mountains that are most exposed to the Los Angeles air pollution plume. In the Sierra Nevada Mountains, N is deposited mostly in precipitation, although dry deposition may also provide substantial amounts of N. On the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada, the majority of airborne N is in reduced forms as ammonia (NH3) and particulate ammonium (NH4+) from agricultural activities in the California Central Valley. In southern California, most of the N air pollution is in oxidized forms as nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitric acid (HNO3), and particulate nitrate (NO3-) resulting from fossil fuel combustion and subsequent complex photochemical reactions. In southern California, dry deposition of gases and particles provides most (up to 95%) of the atmospheric N to forests and other ecosystems. In the mixed-conifer forest zone, elevated deposition of N may initially benefit growth of vegetation, but chronic effects may be expressed as deterioration of forest health and sustainability. HNO3 vapor alone has a potential for toxic effects causing damage of foliar surfaces of pines and oaks. In addition, dry deposition of predominantly HNO3 has lead to changes in vegetation composition and contamination of ground- and stream water where terrestrial N loading is high. Long-term, complex interactions between N deposition and other environmental stresses such as elevated ozone (O3), drought, insect infestations, fire suppression, or intensive land management practices may affect water quality and sustainability of California forests and other ecosystems.

  9. Concentrations, deposition, and effects of nitrogenous pollutants in selected California ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bytnerowicz, A; Padgett, P E; Parry, S D; Fenn, M E; Arbaugh, M J

    2001-11-28

    Atmospheric deposition of nitrogen (N) in California ecosystems is ecologically significant and highly variable, ranging from about 1 to 45 kg/ha/year. The lowest ambient concentrations and deposition values are found in the eastern and northern parts of the Sierra Nevada Mountains and the highest in parts of the San Bernardino and San Gabriel Mountains that are most exposed to the Los Angeles air pollution plume. In the Sierra Nevada Mountains, N is deposited mostly in precipitation, although dry deposition may also provide substantial amounts of N. On the western slopes of the Sierra Nevada, the majority of airborne N is in reduced forms as ammonia (NH3) and particulate ammonium (NH4+) from agricultural activities in the California Central Valley. In southern California, most of the N air pollution is in oxidized forms as nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitric acid (HNO3), and particulate nitrate (NO3-) resulting from fossil fuel combustion and subsequent complex photochemical reactions. In southern California, dry deposition of gases and particles provides most (up to 95%) of the atmospheric N to forests and other ecosystems. In the mixed-conifer forest zone, elevated deposition of N may initially benefit growth of vegetation, but chronic effects may be expressed as deterioration of forest health and sustainability. HNO3 vapor alone has a potential for toxic effects causing damage of foliar surfaces of pines and oaks. In addition, dry deposition of predominantly HNO3 has lead to changes in vegetation composition and contamination of ground- and stream water where terrestrial N loading is high. Long-term, complex interactions between N deposition and other environmental stresses such as elevated ozone (O3), drought, insect infestations, fire suppression, or intensive land management practices may affect water quality and sustainability of California forests and other ecosystems. PMID:12805794

  10. Acidic deposition, cation mobilization, and biochemical indicators of stress in healthy red spruce

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shortle, W.C.; Smith, K.T.; Minocha, R.; Lawrence, G.B.; David, M.B.

    1997-01-01

    Dendrochemical and biochemical markers link stress in apparently healthy red spruce trees (Picea rubens) to acidic deposition. Acidic deposition to spruce forests of the northeastern USA increased sharply during the 1960s. Previous reports related visible damage of trees at high elevations to root and soil processes. In this report, dendrochemical and foliar biochemical markers indicate perturbations in biological processes in healthy red spruce trees across the northeastern USA. Previous research on the dendrochemistry of red spruce stemwood indicated that under uniform environmental conditions, stemwood concentrations of Ca and Mg decreased with increasing radial distance from the pith. For nine forest locations, frequency analysis shows that 28 and 52% of samples of red spruce stemwood formed in the 1960s are enriched in Ca and Mg, respectively, relative to wood formed prior to and after the 1960s. This enrichment in trees throughout the northeastern USA may be interpretable as a signal of increased availability of essential cations in forest soils. Such a temporary increase in the availability of Ca and Mg could be caused by cation mobilization, a consequence of increased acidic deposition. During cation mobilization, essential Ca and Mg as well as potentially harmful Al become more available for interaction with binding sites in the soil and absorbing roots. As conditions which favor cation mobilization continue, Ca and Mg can be leached or displaced from the soil. A measure of the interaction between Ca and Al is the Al/Ca binding ratio (molar charge ratio of exchangeable Al to exchangeable Ca). As the Al/Ca binding ratio in the root zone increased from 0.3 to 1.9, the foliar concentration of the biochemical stress marker putrescine also increased from 45 to 145 nm g-1. The correlation of the putrescine concentration to the Al/Ca binding ratio (adj. r2 = 0.68, P < 0.027) suggests that foliar stress may be linked to soil chemistry.

  11. Lysophosphatidic acid enhances collagen deposition and matrix thickening in engineered tissue.

    PubMed

    Chabaud, Stéphane; Marcoux, Thomas-Louis; Deschênes-Rompré, Marie-Pier; Rousseau, Alexandre; Morissette, Amélie; Bouhout, Sara; Bernard, Geneviève; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2015-11-01

    The time needed to produce engineered tissue is critical. A self-assembly approach provided excellent results regarding biological functions and cell differentiation because it closely respected the microenvironment of cells. Nevertheless, the technique was time consuming for producing tissue equivalents with enough extracellular matrix to allow manipulations. Unlike L-arginine supplementation that only increased accumulation of collagen in cell culture supernatant in our model, addition of lysophosphatidic acid, a natural bioactive lipid, did not modify the amount of accumulated collagen in the cell culture supernatant; however, it enhanced the matrix deposition rate without inducing fibroblast hyperproliferation and tissue fibrosis.

  12. NASA evaluation of Type 2 chemical depositions. [effects of deicer deposition on aircraft tire friction performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Stubbs, Sandy M.; Howell, W. Edward; Webb, Granville L.

    1993-01-01

    Recent findings from NASA Langley tests to define effects of aircraft Type 2 chemical deicer depositions on aircraft tire friction performance are summarized. The Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF) is described together with the scope of the tire cornering and braking friction tests conducted up to 160 knots ground speed. Some lower speed 32 - 96 km/hr (20 - 60 mph) test run data obtained using an Instrumented Tire Test Vehicle (ITTV) to determine effects of tire bearing pressure and transverse grooving on cornering friction performance are also discussed. Recommendations are made concerning which parameters should be evaluated in future testing.

  13. Acid rain and its environmental effects: Recent scientific advances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Douglas A.; Aherne, Julian; Gay, David A.; Lehmann, Christopher M.B.

    2016-01-01

    The term ‘acid rain’ refers to atmospheric deposition of acidic constituents that impact the earth as rain, snow, particulates, gases, and vapor. Acid rain was first recognized by Ducros (1845) and subsequently described by the English chemist Robert Angus Smith (Smith, 1852) whose pioneering studies linked the sources to industrial emissions and included early observations of deleterious environmental effects (Smith, 1872). Smith's work was largely forgotten until the mid-20th century when observations began to link air pollution to the deposition of atmospheric sulfate (SO42−) and other chemical constituents, first near the metal smelter at Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, and later at locations in Europe, North America, and Australia (Gorham, 1961). Our modern understanding of acid rain as an environmental problem caused largely by regional emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) stems from observations in the 1960s and early 1970s in Sweden by Svante Odén (Odén, 1976), and in North America by Gene Likens and colleagues (Likens and Bormann, 1974). These scientists and many who followed showed the link to emissions from coal-fired power plants and other industrial sources, and documented the environmental effects of acid rain such as the acidification of surface waters and toxic effects on vegetation, fish, and other biota.

  14. Thermal and trophic stability of deeper Maine lakes in granite waterhsheds implacted by acid deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, R.E.; Wittchen, B.D. )

    1990-09-01

    Acid deposition can lead to lake and watershed acidification, increases in lake transparency, and reduction in thermal stability and hypolimnetic oxygen deficits. On the basis of lake surveys during August-September 1985, we determined to what extent the deeper (maximum depth z{sub m}{gt}17 m) Maine lakes in acid-sensitive granitic watersheds have registered changes in temperature and oxygen stratification, as compared to 1938-1942, when G.P. Cooper performed the earliest scientific surveys of the state's lakes. After correcting for small but geographically consistent interannual differences in summer hypolimnetic temperatures related to spring turnover, and weather-dependent differences in mixed layer depth, there has been no significant change in thermal stratification in these Maine lakes over approximately 43 years. On the basis of specific historical contrasts in the late summer metalimnetic, hypolimnetic, and bathylimnetic oxygen concentrations there has been no significant change in lake trophic state or transparency.

  15. Assessing biogeographic patterns in the changes in soil invertebrate biodiversity due to acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sugg, P.M.; Kuperman, R.G.; Loucks, O.L. |

    1995-09-01

    We are studying the response of soil faunal communities to a gradient in acidic deposition across midwestern hardwood forests. We have documented a pattern of population decrease and species loss for soil invertebrates along the acidification gradient. We now ask the following question: When confronted with apparent diversity changes along a region-wide pollution gradient, how can one assess the possibility of natural biogeographic gradients accounting for the pattern? As a first approximation, we use published range maps from taxonomic monographs to determine the percent of the regional fauna with ranges encompassing each site. For staphylinid beetles, range data show no sign of a biogeographic gradient. Yet for soil staphylinids, a large decrease is seen in alpha diversity (as species richness) from low to high acid dose sites (from 20 species to 8). Staphylinid species turnover is greatest in the transition from low to intermediate dose sites.

  16. Partitioning the variation within the acid neutralizing capacity of surface waters in Scotland in relation to land cover, soil and atmospheric depositional factors.

    PubMed

    Kernan, M R; Helliwell, R C

    2001-01-29

    A method of decomposing the variation in the acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) of surface waters in Scotland is described. Using national datasets, a series of variables relating to 703 catchments across Scotland is divided into three components representing (i) land cover, (ii) soil and (iii) atmospheric deposition/altitude. Redundancy analysis (RDA) and (partial) redundancy analysis are used to quantify the amount of variation in ANC uniquely attributable to each of these components, independent of the effects of the others. The variation accounted for by covarying combinations of these components is also determined. Approximately 55% of the total variation in ANC across the 703 sites is explained by the variables representing catchment characteristics and atmospheric deposition. Of this, 8.5%, 2.4% and 6.9% are uniquely attributable to the land cover, soil and deposition/altitude components, respectively. A further 38% of ANC variation is associated with the covariation between components, with 18% accounted for by the combination of all three. Approximately 45% of the variation in ANC remains unexplained. The results reflect the integrated nature of catchment processes and demonstrate, for these data, that it is a combination of land cover, soil and deposition and altitude factors which most explain variation in freshwater ANC level. The approach offers a tool with which to assess the sensitivity of surface waters to acid deposition at a regional scale and provides a way of identifying regional differences in catchment response to acid loading.

  17. HCl in rocket exhaust clouds - Atmospheric dispersion, acid aerosol characteristics, and acid rain deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Sebacher, D. I.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Both measurements and model calculations of the temporal dispersion of peak HCl (g + aq) concentration in Titan III exhaust clouds are found to be well characterized by one-term power-law decay expressions. The respective coefficients and decay exponents, however, are found to vary widely with meteorology. The HCl (g), HCl (g + aq), dewpoint, and temperature-pressure-altitude data for Titan III exhaust clouds are consistent with accurately calculated HCl/H2O vapor-liquid compositions for a model quasi-equilibrated flat surface aqueous aerosol. Some cloud evolution characteristics are also defined. Rapid and extensive condensation of aqueous acid clearly occurs during the first three min of cloud rise. Condensation is found to be intensified by the initial entrainment of relatively moist ambient air from lower levels, that is, from levels below eventual cloud stabilization. It is pointed out that if subsequent dilution air at stabilization altitude is significantly drier, a state of maximum condensation soon occurs, followed by an aerosol evaporation phase.

  18. EFFECT OF SOOT AND COPPER COMBUSTOR DEPOSITS ON DIOXIN EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the effects of residual soot and copper combustor deposits on the formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) during the combustion of a chlorinated waste. In a bench-scale set...

  19. 1997 Canadian acid rain assessment. Volume 3: Aquatic effects

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, D.S.

    1997-12-31

    This report is an assessment of information on the aquatic effects of acid rain, produced to act as technical support for development of an acid rain strategy. It first reviews the previous aquatic effects assessment of 1990 and aquatic effects monitoring and research conducted post-1990. It then presents and discusses results of research that proceeds from the knowledge base and status presented in the 1990 assessment. First, the chemical and biological changes observed in aquatic ecosystems since the early 1980s are assessed, including an analysis of the factors (such as declining acidic deposition) that influence the changes. Regional differences and hysteresis between acidification and recovery responses are also discussed. Second, interactions between the acidity stressor and other atmospherically based stressors such as climate change and contaminant deposition are considered. Third, the effectiveness of existing critical and target loads in protecting aquatic ecosystems is re-evaluated. Finally, the likely effect of full implementation of the planned sulphur dioxide controls in Canada and the United States on aquatic chemistry and biology is predicted using up-to-date modelling tools. Knowledge gaps are identified along with recommended actions to be implemented.

  20. Insights from the Metagenome of an Acid Salt Lake: The Role of Biology in an Extreme Depositional Environment

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Chevrette, Marc Gerard; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Benison, Kathleen Counter

    2015-01-01

    The extremely acidic brine lakes of the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia are home to some of the most biologically challenging waters on Earth. In this study, we employed metagenomic shotgun sequencing to generate a microbial profile of the depositional environment associated with the sulfur-rich sediments of one such lake. Of the 1.5 M high-quality reads generated, 0.25 M were mapped to protein features, which in turn provide new insights into the metabolic function of this community. In particular, 45 diverse genes associated with sulfur metabolism were identified, the majority of which were linked to either the conversion of sulfate to adenylylsulfate and the subsequent production of sulfide from sulfite or the oxidation of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate via the sulfur oxidation (Sox) system. This is the first metagenomic study of an acidic, hypersaline depositional environment, and we present evidence for a surprisingly high level of microbial diversity. Our findings also illuminate the possibility that we may be meaningfully underestimating the effects of biology on the chemistry of these sulfur-rich sediments, thereby influencing our understanding of past geobiological conditions that may have been present on Earth as well as early Mars. PMID:25923206

  1. Insights from the metagenome of an acid salt lake: the role of biology in an extreme depositional environment.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah Stewart; Chevrette, Marc Gerard; Ehlmann, Bethany L; Benison, Kathleen Counter

    2015-01-01

    The extremely acidic brine lakes of the Yilgarn Craton of Western Australia are home to some of the most biologically challenging waters on Earth. In this study, we employed metagenomic shotgun sequencing to generate a microbial profile of the depositional environment associated with the sulfur-rich sediments of one such lake. Of the 1.5 M high-quality reads generated, 0.25 M were mapped to protein features, which in turn provide new insights into the metabolic function of this community. In particular, 45 diverse genes associated with sulfur metabolism were identified, the majority of which were linked to either the conversion of sulfate to adenylylsulfate and the subsequent production of sulfide from sulfite or the oxidation of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate via the sulfur oxidation (Sox) system. This is the first metagenomic study of an acidic, hypersaline depositional environment, and we present evidence for a surprisingly high level of microbial diversity. Our findings also illuminate the possibility that we may be meaningfully underestimating the effects of biology on the chemistry of these sulfur-rich sediments, thereby influencing our understanding of past geobiological conditions that may have been present on Earth as well as early Mars.

  2. Soil nutrient bioavailability and nutrient content of pine trees (Pinus thunbergii) in areas impacted by acid deposition in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae E; Lee, Wi-Young; Ok, Yong Sik; Skousen, Jeffrey

    2009-10-01

    Acid deposition has caused detrimental effects on tree growth near industrial areas of the world. Preliminary work has indicated that concentrations of NO(3-), SO(4)(2-), F( - ) and Al in soil solutions were 2 to 33 times higher in industrial areas compared to non-industrial areas in Korea. This study evaluated soil nutrient bioavailability and nutrient contents of red pine (Pinus thunbergii) needles in forest soils of industrial and non-industrial areas of Korea. Results confirm that forest soils of industrial areas have been acidified mainly by deposition of sulfate, resulting in increases of Al, Fe and Mn and decreases of Ca, Mg and K concentrations in soils and soil solutions. In soils of industrial areas, the molar ratios of Ca/Al and Mg/Al in forest soils were <2, which can lead to lower levels and availability of nutrients for tree growth. The Ca/Al molar ratio of Pinus thunbergii needles on non-industrial sites was 15, while that of industrial areas was 10. Magnesium concentrations in needles of Pinus thunbergii were lower in soils of industrial areas and the high levels of acid cations such as Al and Mn in these soils may have antagonized the uptake of base cations like Mg. Continued acidification can further reduce uptake of base cations by trees. Results show that Mg deficiency and high concentrations of Al and Mn in soil solution can be limiting factors for Pinus thunbergii growth in industrial areas of Korea.

  3. Soil nutrient bioavailability and nutrient content of pine trees (Pinus thunbergii) in areas impacted by acid deposition in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae E; Lee, Wi-Young; Ok, Yong Sik; Skousen, Jeffrey

    2009-10-01

    Acid deposition has caused detrimental effects on tree growth near industrial areas of the world. Preliminary work has indicated that concentrations of NO(3-), SO(4)(2-), F( - ) and Al in soil solutions were 2 to 33 times higher in industrial areas compared to non-industrial areas in Korea. This study evaluated soil nutrient bioavailability and nutrient contents of red pine (Pinus thunbergii) needles in forest soils of industrial and non-industrial areas of Korea. Results confirm that forest soils of industrial areas have been acidified mainly by deposition of sulfate, resulting in increases of Al, Fe and Mn and decreases of Ca, Mg and K concentrations in soils and soil solutions. In soils of industrial areas, the molar ratios of Ca/Al and Mg/Al in forest soils were <2, which can lead to lower levels and availability of nutrients for tree growth. The Ca/Al molar ratio of Pinus thunbergii needles on non-industrial sites was 15, while that of industrial areas was 10. Magnesium concentrations in needles of Pinus thunbergii were lower in soils of industrial areas and the high levels of acid cations such as Al and Mn in these soils may have antagonized the uptake of base cations like Mg. Continued acidification can further reduce uptake of base cations by trees. Results show that Mg deficiency and high concentrations of Al and Mn in soil solution can be limiting factors for Pinus thunbergii growth in industrial areas of Korea. PMID:18758977

  4. Controllable nitrogen doping in as deposited TiO{sub 2} film and its effect on post deposition annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Shaoren; Devloo-Casier, Kilian; Devulder, Wouter; Dendooven, Jolien; Deduytsche, Davy; Detavernier, Christophe; Lenaerts, Silvia; Martens, Johan A.; Van den Berghe, Sven

    2014-01-15

    In order to narrow the band gap of TiO{sub 2}, nitrogen doping by combining thermal atomic layer deposition (TALD) of TiO{sub 2} and plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of TiN has been implemented. By altering the ratio between TALD TiO{sub 2} and PEALD TiN, the as synthesized TiO{sub x}N{sub y} films showed different band gaps (from 1.91 eV to 3.14 eV). In situ x-ray diffraction characterization showed that the crystallization behavior of these films changed after nitrogen doping. After annealing in helium, nitrogen doped TiO{sub 2} films crystallized into rutile phase while for the samples annealed in air a preferential growth of the anatase TiO{sub 2} along (001) orientation was observed. Photocatalytic tests of the degradation of stearic acid were done to evaluate the effect of N doping on the photocatalytic activity.

  5. Acid Rain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  6. Modeling free convective gravitational effects in chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinespring, C. D.; Annen, K. D.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, a combined fluid-mechanics, mass-transport, and chemistry model describing CVD in an open-tube atmospheric-pressure flow reactor is developed. The model allows gas-phase reactions to proceed to equilibrium and accounts for finite reaction rates at the surface of the deposition substrate. This model is a useful intermediate step toward a model employing fully rate-limited chemistry. The model is used to predict the effects of free convection on flow patterns, temperature and species-concentration profiles, and local deposition rates for silicon deposited by silane pyrolysis. These results are discussed in terms of implications for CVD of silicon and other compounds, microgravity studies, and techniques for testing and validating the model.

  7. Effect of suture material on platelet deposition onto prosthetic material

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, R.; McEnroe, C.S.; Li, S.; Coleman, J.; Callow, A.D.

    1988-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the importance of employing prosthetic material with minimal thrombogenicity. However, the role of different suture materials in early thrombotic events on prosthetic materials has not been examined. Experiments were designed to analyze the effects of suture on platelet graft interaction using an in vivo baboon hemocompatability screen. Indium labeled, autologous platelet deposition was determined on expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) containing suture lines of polypropylene (Prolene), polybutester (Novafil), and ePTFE (Gore-Tex). A significant increase in platelet deposition was noted not only at the suture line, but proximal and distal to it as well. The results were different for each of the sutures employed and suggest that the suture line may influence early platelet deposition in the perianastomotic region, not only at the suture line, but proximally and distally as well.

  8. Effects of inhaled acids on lung biochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.

    1989-02-01

    Effects of respirable aerosols of sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate, sodium sulfite, and ammonium persulfate on lungs of rats are reviewed. The literature regarding interactions between ozone or nitrogen dioxide and acidic aerosols (ammonium sulfate, sulfuric acid) is discussed. An unexpected interaction between nitrogen dioxide and sodium chloride aerosol is also discussed. An attempt is made to identify bases for prediction of how and when acid aerosols might potentiate effects of inhaled gases.

  9. Effects of inhaled acids on lung biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Last, J A

    1989-02-01

    Effects of respirable aerosols of sulfuric acid, ammonium sulfate, sodium sulfite, and ammonium persulfate on lungs of rats are reviewed. The literature regarding interactions between ozone or nitrogen dioxide and acidic aerosols (ammonium sulfate, sulfuric acid) is discussed. An unexpected interaction between nitrogen dioxide and sodium chloride aerosol is also discussed. An attempt is made to identify bases for prediction of how and when acid aerosols might potentiate effects of inhaled gases.

  10. Field comparison of methods for the measurement of gaseous and particulate contributors to acidic dry deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sickles, J.E.; Hodson, L.L.; McClenny, W.A.; Paur, R.J.; Ellestad, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    A field study was conducted to compare methods for sampling and analysis of atmospheric constituents that are important contributors to acidic dry deposition. Three multicomponent samplers were used: the Canadian filter pack (FP), the annular denuder system (ADS), and the transition flow reactor (TFR). A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) provided continuous reference measurements of NO2 and HNO3. Nitrogen dioxide was also monitored with continuous luminol-based chemiluminescence monitors and with passive sampling devices (PSDs). The study was designed to provide a database for statistical comparison of the various methods with emphasis on the multicomponent samplers under consideration for use in a national dry deposition network. The study was conducted at the EPA dry deposition station in Research Triangle Park, NC between 29 September and 12 October, 1986. Daily averaging and/or sampling times were employed for the 13-day study; weekly samples were also collected, but results from these samples are not compared in the paper. Different measurements of ambient concentrations of the following constituents are compared: total particulate and gaseous NO3(-), HNO3, NO2, total particulate NH4(-), NH3, total particulate SO4(-), and SO2.

  11. Imbalance in fatty-acid-chain length of gangliosides triggers Alzheimer amyloid deposition in the precuneus.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Naoto; Matsubara, Teruhiko; Fukuda, Ryoto; Yasumori, Hanaki; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Shigeo; Sato, Toshinori; Suzuki, Akemi; Yanagisawa, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid deposition, a crucial event of Alzheimer's disease (AD), emerges in distinct brain regions. A key question is what triggers the assembly of the monomeric amyloid ß-protein (Aß) into fibrils in the regions. On the basis of our previous findings that gangliosides facilitate the initiation of Aß assembly at presynaptic neuritic terminals, we investigated how lipids, including gangliosides, cholesterol and sphingomyelin, extracted from synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) isolated from autopsy brains were involved in the Aß assembly. We focused on two regions of the cerebral cortex; precuneus and calcarine cortex, one of the most vulnerable and one of the most resistant regions to amyloid deposition, respectively. Here, we show that lipids extracted from SPMs isolated from the amyloid-bearing precuneus, but neither the amyloid-free precuneus nor the calcarine cortex, markedly accelerate the Aß assembly in vitro. Through liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of the lipids, we identified an increase in the ratio of the level of GD1b-ganglioside containing C20:0 fatty acid to that containing C18:0 as a cause of the enhanced Aß assembly in the precuneus. Our results suggest that the local glycolipid environment play a critical role in the initiation of Alzheimer amyloid deposition.

  12. Imbalance in Fatty-Acid-Chain Length of Gangliosides Triggers Alzheimer Amyloid Deposition in the Precuneus

    PubMed Central

    Oikawa, Naoto; Matsubara, Teruhiko; Fukuda, Ryoto; Yasumori, Hanaki; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Shigeo; Sato, Toshinori; Suzuki, Akemi; Yanagisawa, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid deposition, a crucial event of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), emerges in distinct brain regions. A key question is what triggers the assembly of the monomeric amyloid ß-protein (Aß) into fibrils in the regions. On the basis of our previous findings that gangliosides facilitate the initiation of Aß assembly at presynaptic neuritic terminals, we investigated how lipids, including gangliosides, cholesterol and sphingomyelin, extracted from synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) isolated from autopsy brains were involved in the Aß assembly. We focused on two regions of the cerebral cortex; precuneus and calcarine cortex, one of the most vulnerable and one of the most resistant regions to amyloid deposition, respectively. Here, we show that lipids extracted from SPMs isolated from the amyloid-bearing precuneus, but neither the amyloid-free precuneus nor the calcarine cortex, markedly accelerate the Aß assembly in vitro. Through liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of the lipids, we identified an increase in the ratio of the level of GD1b-ganglioside containing C20:0 fatty acid to that containing C18:0 as a cause of the enhanced Aß assembly in the precuneus. Our results suggest that the local glycolipid environment play a critical role in the initiation of Alzheimer amyloid deposition. PMID:25798597

  13. nC60 deposition kinetics: the complex contribution of humic acid, ion concentration, and valence.

    PubMed

    McNew, Coy P; LeBoeuf, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    The demonstrated toxicity coupled with inevitable environmental release of nC60 raise serious concerns about its environmental fate and transport, therefore it is crucial to understand how nC60 will interact with subsurface materials including attached phase soil and sediment organic matter (AP-SOM). This study investigated the attachment of nC60 onto a Harpeth humic acid (HHA) coated silica surface under various solution conditions using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The HHA coating greatly enhanced nC60 attachment at low ion concentrations while hindering attachment at high ion concentrations in the presence of both mono and divalent cations. At low ion concentrations, the HHA greatly reduced the surface potential of the silica, enhancing nC60 deposition through reduction in the electrostatic repulsion. At high ion concentrations however, the reduced surface potential became less important due to the near zero energy barrier to deposition and therefore non-DLVO forces dominated, induced by compaction of the HHA layer, and leading to hindered attachment. In this manner, observed contributions from the HHA layer were more complex than previously reported and by monitoring surface charge and calculated DLVO interaction energy alongside attachment experiments, this study advances the mechanistic understanding of the variable attachment contributions from the humic acid layer.

  14. Stretchability of Silver Films on Thin Acid-Etched Rough Polydimethylsiloxane Substrates Fabricated by Electrospray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, S. M.; Cho, K. H.; Kang, C. N.; Choi, K. H.

    2015-07-01

    This paper investigates the fabrication of Ag films through the electrospray deposition (ESD) technique on sub-millimeter-thick acid-etched rough polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates having both low and high modulus of elasticity. The main focus of the study is on the stretchable behavior of ESD-deposited Ag nanoparticles-based thin films on these substrates when subjected to axial strains. Experimental results suggest that the as-fabricated films on thin acid-etched rough low modulus PDMS has an average stretchability of 5.6% with an average increase in the resistance that is 23 times that of the initial resistance at electrical failure (complete rupture of the films). Comparatively, the stretchability of Ag films on the high modulus PDMS was found to be 3 times higher with 4.65 times increase in the resistance at electrical failure. Also, a high positive value of the piezoresistive coefficient for these films suggests that the resistivity changes during stretching, and thus deviation from the simplified models is inevitable. Based on these results, new models are presented that quantify the changes in resistance with strain.

  15. Characterization of thin-film deposition in a pulsed acrylic acid polymerizing discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Voronin, Sergey A.; Bradley, James W.; Fotea, Catalin; Zelzer, Mischa; Alexander, Morgan R.

    2007-07-15

    In this study, thin-film deposition in a pulsed rf polymerizing discharge (13.56 MHz) struck in acrylic acid has been investigated by mass spectrometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and quartz crystal microbalance techniques. The experiment was conducted at a fixed acrylic acid pressure of 1.3 Pa and 'on' pulse duration of 0.1 ms, whereas the 'off' time was varied between 0 and 20 ms. The rf input power in the 'on' time and gas flow rate were varied between 10 and 50 W and 1.5 and 4.8 sccm (sccm denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP), respectively. These changes of the discharge conditions resulted in large-scale progressive variations in film and gas-phase plasma composition. In particular, the -COOH functionality of the monomer was increasingly retained in the plasma-generated thin films as the duty cycle was lowered (i.e., with lowered time-averaged powers). The monomer retention reached its maximum value of 66% for 'off' times exceeding 5 ms, when the discharge was operating in the power-deficient regime. The results show that the film deposition rate is a strong function of the monomer flow rate, whereas -COOH retention is correlated to the amount of unfragmented monomer in the plasma, controlled by the applied power.

  16. nC60 deposition kinetics: the complex contribution of humic acid, ion concentration, and valence.

    PubMed

    McNew, Coy P; LeBoeuf, Eugene J

    2016-07-01

    The demonstrated toxicity coupled with inevitable environmental release of nC60 raise serious concerns about its environmental fate and transport, therefore it is crucial to understand how nC60 will interact with subsurface materials including attached phase soil and sediment organic matter (AP-SOM). This study investigated the attachment of nC60 onto a Harpeth humic acid (HHA) coated silica surface under various solution conditions using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The HHA coating greatly enhanced nC60 attachment at low ion concentrations while hindering attachment at high ion concentrations in the presence of both mono and divalent cations. At low ion concentrations, the HHA greatly reduced the surface potential of the silica, enhancing nC60 deposition through reduction in the electrostatic repulsion. At high ion concentrations however, the reduced surface potential became less important due to the near zero energy barrier to deposition and therefore non-DLVO forces dominated, induced by compaction of the HHA layer, and leading to hindered attachment. In this manner, observed contributions from the HHA layer were more complex than previously reported and by monitoring surface charge and calculated DLVO interaction energy alongside attachment experiments, this study advances the mechanistic understanding of the variable attachment contributions from the humic acid layer. PMID:27061365

  17. Accumulation of different sulfur fractions in Chinese forest soil under acid deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanyi; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Zhangwei; Mulder, Jan

    2011-09-01

    Atmogenic sulfur (S) deposition loading by acid rain is one of the biggest environmental problems in China. It is important to know the accumulated S stored in soil, because eventually the size (and also the "desorption" rate) determines how rapidly the soil water pH responds to decrease in S deposition. The S fractions and the ratio of total carbon/total sulfur (C/S) of forest soil in 9 catchments were investigated by comparing soils at the rural and urban sites in China. The S fractions included water-soluble sulfate-S (SO(4)-S), adsorbed SO(4)-S, insoluble SO(4)-S and organic S. The ratio of C/S in soil at the rural site was significantly (p < 0.05) greater than that at the urban site. C/S of soil in the A horizon was significantly (p < 0.05) and negatively correlated with the wet S-deposition rate. The ratio of C/S presents a better indicator for atmogenic S loading. Organic S was the dominant form in soils at rural sites; contributing more than 69% of the total S in the uppermost 30 cm soil. Organic S and adsorbed SO(4)-S were the main forms of S in soil at urban sites. High contents of water-soluble SO(4)-S and adsorbed SO(4)-S were found in uppermost 30 cm soils at urban sites but not at rural sites. Decades of acid rain have caused accumulation of inorganic SO(4)-S in Chinese forest soil especially at the urban sites. The soil at urban sites had been firstly acidified, and the impacts on the forest ecosystem in these areas should be noticed.

  18. Therapeutic effect of Xue Niao An on glyoxylate-induced calcium oxalate crystal deposition based on urinary metabonomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhongjiang; Chen, Wei; Gao, Songyan; Su, Li; Li, Na; Wang, Li; Lou, Ziyang; Dong, Xin; Guo, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    The anti-nephrolithiasis effect of Xue Niao An (XNA) capsules is explored by analyzing urine metabolic profiles in mouse models, with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS). An animal model of calcium oxalate crystal renal deposition was established in mice by intra-abdominal injection of glyoxylate. Then, treatment with XNA by intra-gastric administration was performed. At the end of the study, calcium deposition in kidney was measured by Von Kossa staining under light microscopy, and the Von Kossa staining changes showed that XNA significantly alleviated the calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Meanwhile, urine samples for fifteen metabolites, including amino acids and fatty acids, with significant differences were detected in the calcium oxalate group, while XNA treatment attenuated metabolic imbalances. Our study indicated that the metabonomic strategy provided comprehensive insight on the metabolic response to XNA treatment of rodent renal calcium oxalate deposition. PMID:25411524

  19. Simulated effects of reduced sulfur, nitrogen, and base cation deposition on soils and solutions in southern Appalachian forests

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Susfalk, R.B.; Brewer, P.F.; Swank, W.T.

    1999-08-01

    Effects of reduced deposition of N, S, and C{sub B} on nutrient pools, fluxes, soil, and soil solution chemistry were simulated for two Appalachian forest ecosystems using the nutrient cycling model. In the extremely acidic, N- and S-saturated red spruce [Picea rubens (Sarg.)] forest (Nolan Divide), reducing C{sub B} deposition by 50% reduced C{sub B} leaching by {approximately}40% during the 24-yr simulation period. This was due solely to the effects of C{sub B} deposition on the soil exchanger rather than effects on soil solution. Reducing S and N by 50% caused immediate reductions in total anion and cation leaching at Nolan Divide, but the effects on soil solution C{sub B} diminished and C{sub B} leaching was reduced by only 17% over the simulation period. Reducing S and N deposition had a greater effect on soil solution aluminum (Al) and molar Ca/Al ratio than reducing base cation deposition at Nolan Divide. In the moderately acidic, N- and S-accumulating mixed deciduous forest at Coweeta, reduced C{sub B} deposition by 50% caused a very slight reduction in C{sub B} leaching as a result of slightly reduced base saturation and increased soil sulfate adsorption. The effects on reducing S and N deposition by 50% on C{sub B} leaching were greater than those of reduced C{sub B} deposition. The system continued to accumulate both S and N even at reduced deposition at Coweeta, although growth and vegetation uptake were slightly reduced because of increased N deficiency. Base saturation remained well above the Al buffering range at all times at Coweeta and Al was an unimportant component of soil solutions in all scenarios.

  20. Evaluation of different approaches for modeling effects of acid rain on soils in China.

    PubMed

    Larssen, T; Schnoor, J L; Seip, H M; Dawei, Z

    2000-02-10

    Acid deposition is an environmental problem of increasing concern in China. Acidic soils are common in the southern part of the country and soil acidification caused by acid deposition is expected to occur. Here we test and apply two different approaches for modeling effects of acid deposition and compare results with observed data from sites throughout southern China. The dynamic model MAGIC indicates that, during the last few decades, soil acidification rates have increased considerably due to acid deposition. This acidification will continue if sulfur deposition is not reduced, and if reduced more rapidly than base cation deposition. With the Steady State Mass Balance model (SSMB), and assuming that a molar ratio of Ca2+/Al3+ < 1 in soil water is harmful to vegetation, we estimate a slight probability for exceedance of the critical load for present deposition rates. Results from both modeling approaches show a strong dependence with deposition of base cations as well as sulfur. Hence, according to the models, changes in emission control of alkaline particulate matter prior to sulfur dioxide will be detrimental to the environment. Model calculations are, however, uncertain, particularly because available data on base cation deposition fluxes are scarce, and that model formulation of aluminum chemistry does not fully reproduce observations. An effort should be made to improve our present knowledge regarding deposition fluxes. Improvements to the model are suggested. Our work indicates that the critical loads presented in the regional acid deposition assessment model RAINS-Asia are too stringent. We find weaknesses in the SSMB approach, developed for northern European conditions, when applying it to Chinese conditions. We suggest an improved effort to revise the risk parameters for use in critical load estimates in China.

  1. The effect of decreased atmospheric sulphur deposition on soil dissolved organic carbon concentration and quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Sara; Kritzberg, Emma; Berggren, Dan; Graneli, Wilhelm; Bergkvist, Bo

    2010-05-01

    Increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has been observed in aquatic systems throughout the Northern Hemisphere the last decades. The reduction in sulphur deposition has been identified as one of the major mechanisms behind this trend, where several reports show correlations between DOC and sulphur concentrations in surface waters. The reasoning is that as sulphur deposition decreases, pH in soil increase and ionic strength decrease thereby making DOC more soluble and mobile. With a more mobile DOC, the transport of DOC from the terrestrial to the aquatic system will increase. However, most of these conclusions are based solely on monitoring data that generally only include the period of decreasing sulphur deposition, and little experimental evidence exist. In this study we wanted to test the effect of sulphur deposition on the concentration and quality of the DOC in soil water. This was done in a field experiment with artificial precipitation of 12 50*50 cm plots in a boreal-nemoral forest. There was one low and one high sulphate treatment and the soil water was collected every second week using zero-tension lysimeters placed just below the O-horizon and analyzed for both quantitative and qualitative DOC variables. The experiment lasted 2 years. After about one year the low acid treatment had significantly higher absorbance at a wavelength of 420 nm, while DOC concentration did not differ between the low and the high acid treatment. Rather than the expected increase in DOC concentration in the low acid treatment, a change in DOC quality was observed as characterized by absorbance, fluorescence and high performance size exclusion chromatography. DOC in the low acid treatment tended to be more aromatic and of greater molecular weight. A change in DOC quality will affect the fate of the DOC as it moves through the terrestrial and into the aquatic system. The susceptibility of DOC to photooxidation, biodegradation and flocculation may be greatly

  2. Relationships between soil properties and community structure of soil macroinvertebrates in oak-history forests along an acidic deposition gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Kuperman, R.G.

    1996-02-01

    Soil macroinvertebrate communities were studied in ecologically analogous oak-hickory forests across a three-state atmospheric pollution gradient in Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. The goal was to investigate changes in the community structure of soil fauna in study sites receiving different amounts of acidic deposition for several decades and the possible relationships between these changes and physico-chemical properties of soil. The study revealed significant differences in the numbers of soil animals among the three study sites. The sharply differentiated pattern of soil macroinvertebrate fauna seems closely linked to soil chemistry. Significant correlations of the abundance of soil macroinvertebrates with soil parameters suggest that their populations could have been affected by acidic deposition in the region. Abundance of total soil macroinvertebrates decreased with the increased cumulative loading of acidic deposition. Among the groups most sensitive to deposition were: earthworms gastropods, dipteran larvae, termites, and predatory beetles. The results of the study support the hypothesis that chronic long-term acidic deposition could aversely affect the soil decomposer community which could cause lower organic matter turnover rates leading to an increase in soil organic matter content in high deposition sites.

  3. Responses of 20 lake-watersheds in the Adirondack region of New York to historical and potential future acidic deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingtao; Driscoll, Charles T; Sullivan, Timothy J

    2015-04-01

    Critical loads (CLs) and dynamic critical loads (DCLs) are important tools to guide the protection of ecosystems from air pollution. In order to quantify decreases in acidic deposition necessary to protect sensitive aquatic species, we calculated CLs and DCLs of sulfate (SO4(2-))+nitrate (NO3-) for 20 lake-watersheds from the Adirondack region of New York using the dynamic model, PnET-BGC. We evaluated lake water chemistry and fish and total zooplankton species richness in response to historical acidic deposition and under future deposition scenarios. The model performed well in simulating measured chemistry of Adirondack lakes. Current deposition of SO4(2-)+NO3-, calcium (Ca2+) weathering rate and lake acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in 1850 were related to the extent of historical acidification (1850-2008). Changes in lake Al3+ concentrations since the onset of acidic deposition were also related to Ca2+ weathering rate and ANC in 1850. Lake ANC and fish and total zooplankton species richness were projected to increase under hypothetical decreases in future deposition. However, model projections suggest that lake ecosystems will not achieve complete chemical and biological recovery in the future.

  4. Acidic precipitation, Vol. 2: Biological and ecological effects

    SciTech Connect

    Adriano, D.C.; Johnson, A.H.

    1989-01-01

    Acidic precipitation has its origin in emissions to the atmosphere of numerous compounds from both natural and man-made sources. The chapters in this volume cover a wide array of topics on the biological and ecological effects of acidic precipitation. A chapter on soil productivity emphasizes changes in biological and chemical characters of forest soils impacted by acidic deposition. Additional chapters discuss specific effects on soil microorganisms, trees, and crops. The importance of aluminum in this environmental issue is highlighted by a discussion on the mobility and phytotoxicity of this element in acidic soils. This chapter puts into perspective the biology of Al stressed plants. Two major chapters discuss the effect of acidic precipitation on forest ecosystems; one emphasizing North America, and the other Europe. Effects of soil acidification on key soil processes, including litter decomposition and depletion of essential plant nutrients in the soil profile are emphasized. Finally, three major chapters comprehensively cover limnological ecosystems and their response to acidic perturbation. These chapters discuss the response of stream and lake communities, both floral and faunal, to water acidification, including reduced biodiversity in these systems. Ten chapters have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  5. Effect of deposition temperature on boron-doped carbon coatings deposited from a BCl 3-C 3H 6-H 2 mixture using low pressure chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Litong; Cheng, Laifei; Yang, Wenbin; Xu, Yongdong

    2009-08-01

    A mixture of propylene, hydrogen and boron trichloride was used to fabricate boron-doped carbon coatings by using low pressure chemical vapor deposition ( LPCVD) technique. Effect of deposition temperature on deposition rate, morphologies, compositions and bonding states of boron-doped carbon coatings was investigated. Below 1273 K, the deposition rate is controlled by reaction dynamics. The deposition rate increases with increasing deposition temperature. The activation energy is 208.74 kJ/mol. Above 1273 K, the deposition rate decreases due to smaller critical radius rc and higher nuclei formation rate J with increasing temperature. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the structure changes from glass-like to nano-laminates with increasing deposition temperature. The boron concentration decreases with increasing deposition temperature, corresponding with increasing carbon concentration. The five types of bonding states are B-C, B-sub-C, BC 2O, BCO 2 and B-O. B-sub-C and BC 2O are the main bonding states. The reactions are dominant at all temperatures, in which the B-sub-C and PyC are formed.

  6. Analysis of southeastern Canada lake-water chemistry data in relation to acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.J.; Cook, R.B.; Ross-Todd, B.M.; Beauchamp, J.J.

    1990-05-01

    Lake-water chemistry data were obtained for lakes in southeastern Canada to study relationships between atmospheric deposition and acid-base chemistry as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program State of Science and Technology reports. Quality assurance checks were made to ensure that the data used were of sufficient quality and were comparable to data from the United States. Ninety-eight percent of the 8506 sampled lakes had pH, ANC, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2 {minus}} data and were used in our analyses. Of these, we created a subset of 4017 lakes having data for more variable (Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, DOC, and conductivity) to analyze potential sources of lake-water acidity. The objectives of this work were to determine the geographical extent and number of potentially affected systems and to infer causes of acidification based on ion ratios. 35 refs., 28 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. Acidification and recovery of a Spodosol BS horizon from acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlgren, R.A.; McAvoy, D.C.; Driscoll, C.T.

    1990-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine acidification and recovery of a Spodosol Bs horizon from acidic deposition in the Bear Brook Watershed (BBW) in central Maine. A mechanical vacuum extractor was used to draw solutions through a soil column at three treatments containing 40, 100, or 160 micromol/L SO4(2-). Following 44 d of leaching, all treatments were decreased to the 40 micromol/L SO4(2-) level to examine recovery from acidification. Acidic additions were initially neutralized by release of basic cations and sulfate adsorption. Following attainment of steady state conditions for basic cations and SO4(2-) with respect to the soil adsorption complex, Al dissolution was the primary neutralization mechanism. Aqueous Al activities appeared to be regulated by equilibrium with an Al(OH)3 mineral phase. Following decreases in acid loadings, recovery was rapid resulting in retention of basic cations, reversible release of SO4(2-) and a marked reduction in the concentrations of soluble Al.

  8. Acidification and recovery of a spodosol Bs horizon from acidic deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlgren, R.A.; McAvoy, D.C.; Driscoll, C.T. )

    1990-04-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to examine acidification and recovery of a Spodosol Bs horizon from acidic deposition in the Bear Brook Watershed (BBW) in central Maine. A mechanical vacuum extractor was used to draw solutions through a soil column at three treatments containing 40, 100, or 160 {mu}mol/L SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}. Following 44 days of leaching, all treatments were decreased to the 40 {mu}mol/L SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} level to examine recovery from acidification. Acid additions were initially neutralized by release of basic cations and sulfate adsorption. Following attainment of steady-state conditions for basic cations and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} with respect to the soil adsorption complex, Al dissolution was the primary neutralization mechanism. Aqueous Al activities appeared to be regulated by equilibrium with an Al(OH){sub 3} mineral phase. Following decreases in acid loadings, recovery was rapid resulting in retention of basic cations, reversible release of SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, and a marked reduction in the concentrations of soluble Al.

  9. Impact of acid and trace metals deposition on freshwater invertebrates in north-eastern Fennoscandia and Kola Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Yakovlev, V.

    1996-12-31

    Freshwater invertebrate communities in a total 400 lakes and streams in northeastern Norway, Finnish Lapland and the Kola Peninsula, subjected to the atmospheric deposition were studied. The severe influence of toxic heavy metals, dusts from smelters and mineral enrichment factories were found in the Kola Peninsula. The negative acidification effects on benthic communities were found in the Jarfjord (Norway), Enontekio, Ranua-Posio and Kittila-Kolari (Finnish Lapland) areas and in the Kola Peninsula (Russia). Taxa groups, known to be sensitive to acidification, such as gammarids, snails, mayflies, stone flies, were represented with few species and in a low abundance. Heavy metals accumulation in biota is recorded in areas surrounding nickel smelters in the Kola Peninsula. The metal concentration invertebrates in remote areas is rather wide and depend on an air deposition, characteristics of lake catchment areas, as well as water acidity. The environmental variables, such as lake hydrological type, altitude of lakes, dominant substratum type, abundance of macrophytes and mosses in sampling area, content of pollutants in water also show significant relationships with metal concentration in invertebrates. The most severe negative effects on biota were found in waters with low pH and simultaneously contaminated by heavy metals. The biological method for estimation of simultaneously water acidification and contamination is suggested.

  10. The effect of depositional history on contaminated bed sediment stability.

    PubMed

    Droppo, I G; Lau, Y L; Mitchell, C

    2001-02-01

    Experiments were conducted in an annular flume using a commercially available kaolinite clay as well as contaminated bed sediment from Hamilton Harbour (Ontario) to assess their stability against erosion. Critical shear stress for erosion was measured under different conditions of bed formation (quiescently deposited beds and shear deposited beds) as well as with and without the presence of a biostabilized bed. Results suggest that a biostabilized bed and a bed formed under a flowing condition, similar to a river scenario, will be more resistant against erosion than will a non-biostabilized bed and a bed formed under quiescent conditions. Up to three cycles of erosion and flocculation/deposition were observed to occur within one experiment. These results suggest that the depositional history and biostabilization of river bed sediments need to be seriously considered within sediment and contaminant transport models if meaningful estimates of sediment and contaminant source, fate and effect are to be generated and used for the management of our aquatic ecosystems.

  11. Chemical recovery of surface waters across the northeastern united states from reduced inputs of acidic deposition: 1984-2001.

    PubMed

    Warby, Richard A F; Johnson, Chris E; Driscoll, Charles T

    2005-09-01

    Changes in lake water chemistry between 1984 and 2001 at 130 stratified random sites across the northeastern United States were studied to evaluate the population-level effects of decreases in acidic deposition. Surface-water S04(2-) concentrations decreased across the region at a median rate of -1.53 microequiv L(-1) year(-1). Calcium concentrations also decreased, with a median rate of -1.73 microequiv L(-1) year(-1). This decrease in Ca2+ retarded the recovery of surface water acid neutralizing capacity (Gran ANC), which increased at a median rate of 0.66 microequiv L(-1) year(-1). There were small increases in pH in all subregions except central New England and Maine, where the changes were not statistically significant. Median NO3- trends were not significant except in the Adirondacks, where NO3- concentrations increased at a rate of 0.53 microequiv L(-1) year(-1). A regionwide decrease in the concentration of total Al, especially in ponds with low ANC values (ANC < 25 microequiv L(-1)), was observed in the Adirondack subregion. These changes in Al were consistent with the general pattern of increasing pH and ANC. Despite the general pattern of chemical recovery, many ponds remain chronically acidic or are susceptible to episodic acidification. The continued chemical and biological recovery at sites in the northeastern United States will depend on further controls on S and N emissions.

  12. Transient inhibition of connective tissue infiltration and collagen deposition into porous poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) discs.

    PubMed

    Love, Ryan J; Jones, Kim S

    2013-12-01

    Connective tissue rapidly proliferates on and around biomaterials implanted in vivo, which impairs the function of the engineered tissues, biosensors, and devices. Glucocorticoids can be utilized to suppress tissue ingrowth, but can only be used for a limited time because they nonselectively arrest cell proliferation in the local environment. The present study examined use of a prolyl-4-hydroxylase inhibitor, 1,4-dihydrophenonthrolin-4-one-3-carboxylic acid (1,4-DPCA), to suppress connective tissue ingrowth in porous PLGA discs implanted in the peritoneal cavity for 28 days. The prolyl-4-hydroxylase inhibitor was found to be effective at inhibiting collagen deposition within and on the outer surface of the disc, and also limited connective tissue ingrowth, but not to the extent of glucocorticoid inhibition. Finally, it was discovered that 1,4-DPCA suppressed Scavenger Receptor A expression on a macrophage-like cell culture, which may account for the drug's ability to limit connective tissue ingrowth in vivo.

  13. Forest ecosystems and the changing patterns of nitrogen input and acid deposition today and in the future based on a scenario.

    PubMed

    Busch, G; Lammel, G; Beese, F O; Feichter, J; Dentener, F J; Roelofs, G J

    2001-01-01

    A global assessment of the impact of the anthropogenic perturbation of the nitrogen and sulfur cycles on forest ecosystems is carried out for both the present-day [1980-1990] and for a projection into the future [2040-2050] under a scenario of economic development which represents a medium path of development according to expert guess [IPCC IS92a]. Results show that forest soils will receive considerably increasing loads of nitrogen and acid deposition and that deposition patterns are likely to change. The regions which are most prone to depletion of soils buffering capacity and supercritical nitrogen deposition are identified in the subtropical and tropical regions of South America and Southeast Asia apart from the well known 'hotspots' North-Eastern America and Central Europe. The forest areas likely to meet these two risks are still a minor fraction of the global forest ecosystems, though. But the bias between eutrophication and acidification will become greater and an enhanced growth triggered by the fertilizing effects of increasing nitrogen input cannot be balanced by the forest soils nutrient pools. Results show increasing loads into forest ecosystems which are likely to account for 46% higher acid loads and 36% higher nitrogen loads in relation to the 1980-1990 situation. Global background deposition of up to 5 kg N ha-1 a-1 will be exceeded at more than 25% of global forest ecosystems and at more than 50% of forest ecosystems on acid sensitive soils. More than 33% of forest ecosystems on acid sensitive soils will receive acid loads which exceeds their buffering capacity. About 25% of forest areas with exceeded acid loads will receive critical nitrogen loads.

  14. Sulfuric acid karst and its relationship to hydrocarbon reservoir porosity, native sulfur deposits, and the origin of Mississippi Valley-type ore deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, C.A. , Albuquerque, NM )

    1993-03-01

    The Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico and West Texas contains hydrocarbons and native sulfur in the basin and sulfuric acid-formed caves and Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) ore deposits around the margins of the basin. Hydrocarbons reacting with sulfate evaporite rock produced hydrogen sulfide gas, which gas oxidized to native sulfur in the basin and which gas also migrated from basin to reef and accumulated there in structural and stratigraphic traps. In the reduced zone of the carbonate reef margin the H[sub 2]S combined with metal-chloride complexes to form MVTs, and in the oxidized zone later in time the H[sub 2]S formed sulfuric acid which dissolved out the famous caves of the region (e.g., Carlsbad Cavern, Lechuguilla Cave). Sulfuric acid karst can be recognized by the discontinuity, large size, and spongework nature of its cave passages, and by the presence of native sulfur, endellite, and large gypsum deposits within these caves. Sulfuric acid oilfield karst refers to cavernous porosity filled with hydrocarbons and can be produced by the mixing of waters of different H[sub 2]S content or by the oxidation of H[sub 2]S to sulfuric acid. Sulfur and carbon-oxygen isotopes have been used to establish and trace the sequence of related hydrocarbon, sulfur, MVT, and karst events in the Delaware Basin.

  15. Economic assessment of acid deposition and ozone damage on the San Joaquin Valley agriculture. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Howitt, R.

    1993-02-01

    The California Agricultural Resources Model (CARM) was used to estimate the economic impact of acidic deposition and ozone on crops in the San Joaquin Valley. Data on ozone exposure-crop response and agricultural markets are used in the CARM to estimate the potential economic benefits of an improvement in air quality. The study focused on the economic impact of two ozone reduction scenarios in agricultural regions of California. The CARM projected that if growing season concentrations of ozone were reduced to 0.04 ppm, annual benefits to consumers (higher availability and lower prices) and producers (higher production and lower production costs) would be approximately $489 million. In comparison, the benefit projected if statewide levels of ozone were uniformly reduced to 0.025 ppm was approximately $1.5 billion. Although the 0.025 ppm scenario is unlikely, the economic benefits were estimated to be correspondingly large.

  16. Early indications of soil recovery from acidic deposition in U.S. red spruce forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Shortle, Walter C.; David, Mark B.; Smith, Kevin T.; Warby, Richard A.F.; Lapenis, Andrei G.

    2012-01-01

    Forty to fifty percent decreases in acidic deposition through the 1980s and 1990s led to partial recovery of acidified surface waters in the northeastern United States; however, the limited number of studies that have assessed soil change found increased soil acidification during this period. From existing data, it's not clear whether soils continued to worsen in the 1990s or if recovery had begun. To evaluate possible changes in soils through the 1990s, soils in six red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) stands in New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine, first sampled in 1992 to 1993, were resampled in 2003 to 2004. The Oa-horizon pH increased (P 42−, which decreased the mobility of Al throughout the upper soil profile. Results indicate a nascent recovery driven largely by vegetation processes.

  17. Spectral Characterization of Suspected Acid Deposition Damage in Red Spruce (picea Rubens) Stands from Vermont

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogelmann, J. E.; Rock, B. N.

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to demonstrate the utility of remote sensing systems to monitor sites of suspected acid rain deposition damage, intensive field activities, coupled with aircraft overflights, were centered on red spruce stands in Vermont during August and September of 1984. Remote sensing data were acquired using the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer, Thematic Mapper Simulator, Barnes Model 12 to 1000 Modular Multiband Radiometer and Spectron Engineering Spectrometer (the former two flown on the NASA C-130; the latter two on A Bell UH-1B Iroquois Helicopter). Field spectral data were acquired during the week of the August overflights using a high spectral resolution spectrometer and two broad-band radiometers. Preliminary analyses of these data indicate a number of spectral differences in vegetation between high and low damage sites. Some of these differences are subtle, and are observable only with high spectral resolution sensors; others are less subtle and are observable using broad-band sensors.

  18. [Effect of Helium on Diamond Films Deposited Using Microwave PCVD].

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Ma, Zhi-bin; Tao, Li-ping; Gao, Pan; Li, Yi-cheng; Fu, Qiu-ming

    2015-03-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to in situ diagnose the CH4-H2-He plasma in order to know the effect of helium on the diamond growth by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The spatial distribution of radicals in the plasma as a function of helium addition was studied. The diamond films deposited in different helium volume fraction were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the spectra intensity of radicals of H(α), H(β), H(γ), CH and C2 increases with the increasing of helium volume fraction, especially, that of radical H(α) has the most improvement. The spectrum space diagnosis results show that the uniformity of C2, CH radicals in the plasma tends to poor due to the helium addition and resulted in a different thickness along the radial direction The measurement of deposition rate shows that the addition of helium is useful for the improvement of the growth rate of diamond films, due to relative concentration of carbon radicals was increased. The deposition rate increases by 24% when the volume fraction of He was increased from 0 vol. % to 4.7 vol.%. The micrographs of SEM reveal that with the increasing of helium volume fraction, the diamond films' crystallite orientation changes from (111) to disorder and a twins growth becomes obvious. The secondary nucleation density during growth increases because the high relatively concentration of C2 radicals under higher helium volume fraction (4.7 vol. %). In addition, the substrate was etched and sputtered by the plasma, which introduced metallic atoms into the plasma during the deposition of diamond films. Eventually, the existing of secondary nucleation and impurity atoms lead to the appearance of twins and results in the compressive dress.

  19. [Effect of Helium on Diamond Films Deposited Using Microwave PCVD].

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Ma, Zhi-bin; Tao, Li-ping; Gao, Pan; Li, Yi-cheng; Fu, Qiu-ming

    2015-03-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was used to in situ diagnose the CH4-H2-He plasma in order to know the effect of helium on the diamond growth by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The spatial distribution of radicals in the plasma as a function of helium addition was studied. The diamond films deposited in different helium volume fraction were investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results show that the spectra intensity of radicals of H(α), H(β), H(γ), CH and C2 increases with the increasing of helium volume fraction, especially, that of radical H(α) has the most improvement. The spectrum space diagnosis results show that the uniformity of C2, CH radicals in the plasma tends to poor due to the helium addition and resulted in a different thickness along the radial direction The measurement of deposition rate shows that the addition of helium is useful for the improvement of the growth rate of diamond films, due to relative concentration of carbon radicals was increased. The deposition rate increases by 24% when the volume fraction of He was increased from 0 vol. % to 4.7 vol.%. The micrographs of SEM reveal that with the increasing of helium volume fraction, the diamond films' crystallite orientation changes from (111) to disorder and a twins growth becomes obvious. The secondary nucleation density during growth increases because the high relatively concentration of C2 radicals under higher helium volume fraction (4.7 vol. %). In addition, the substrate was etched and sputtered by the plasma, which introduced metallic atoms into the plasma during the deposition of diamond films. Eventually, the existing of secondary nucleation and impurity atoms lead to the appearance of twins and results in the compressive dress. PMID:26117884

  20. Acidic deposition, cation mobilization, and biochemical indicators of stress in healthy red spruce

    SciTech Connect

    Shortle, W.C.; Smith, K.T.; Minocha, R.

    1997-05-01

    Dendrochemical and biochemical markers link stress in apparently healthy red spruce trees (Picea rubens) to acidic deposition. Previous reports related visible damage of trees at high elevations to root and soil processes. In this report, dendrochemical and foliar biochemical markers indicate perturbations in biological processes in healthy red spruce trees across the northeastern USA. Previous research on the dendrochemistry of red spruce stemwood indicated that under uniform environmental conditions, stemwood concentrations of Ca and Mg decreased with increasing radial distance from the pith. For nine forest locations, frequency analysis shows that 28 and 52% of samples of red spruce stemwood formed in the 1960s are enriched in Ca and Mg, respectively, relative to wood formed prior to and after the 1960s. This enrichment in trees throughout the northeastern USA may be interpretable as a signal of increased availability of essential cations in forest soils. Such a temporary increase in the availability of Ca and Mg could be caused by cation mobilization, a consequence of increased acidic deposition. During cation mobilization, essential and Ca and Mg as well as potentially harmful Al become more available for interaction with binding sites in the soil and absorbing roots. As conditions which favor cation mobilization continue, Ca and Mg can be leached or displaced from the soil. A measure of the interaction between Ca and Al is the Al/Ca binding ratio (molar charge ratio of exchangeable Al to exchangeable Ca). As the Al/Ca binding ratio in the root zone increased from 0.3 to 1.9, the foliar concentration of the biochemical stress marker putrescine also increased form 45 to 145 nm g{sup {minus}1}. The correlation of the putrescine concentration to the Al/Ca binding ratio (adj. r{sup 2} = 0.68, P <0.027) suggests that foliar stress may be linked to soil chemistry. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Heterogeneous response of central European streams to decreased acidic atmospheric deposition.

    PubMed

    Veseý, Josef; Majer, Vladimir; Norton, Stephen A

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the relations between mountain streamwater chemistry and atmospheric pollution in an arca of 1611 km2 of the Czech Republic by comparing concentrations of SO4. NO3, Cl, Ca and the pH at 432 localities at the time of high (1984-1986) and relatively low (1996-2000) acidic atmospheric deposition. Medians of Cl. SO4, and NO3 decreased by 17, 96 and 60 microeq l(-1), or by 23, 17 and 49%, respectively, during 12 +/- 2 years. The decreased Cl corresponds to decreased emission of industrial Cl (as HCl). The decreased stream SO4 was proportionally lower than the 71% decrease in S-emissions due to leaching of previously accumulated SO4 from soils and non-zero background concentrations. Decreases of NO3 up to 60% in streamwaters with pH < or = 6 was greater than the decrease of N emission in central Europe, about 35%. Extensive regional decrease of NO3 is surprising and is probably described for the first time. The difference in NO3 concentrations between the two periods was probably enhanced by (a) an increase of mineralisation of forest floor in the mid-1980s and (b) by higher uptake of N in the late-1990s. The median pH of the 432 streams did not change but the pH of the sub-population with pH < 6 in the mid-1980s recovered substantially. The pH of circum-neutral streams (pH > 6.5) decreased even as acidic atmospheric deposition decreased.

  2. Uric Acid and Antioxidant Effects of Wine

    PubMed Central

    Boban, Mladen; Modun, Darko

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to review the role of uric acid in the context of antioxidant effects of wine and its potential implication to human health. We described and discussed the mechanisms of increase in plasma antioxidant capacity after consumption of moderate amounts of wine. Because this effect is largely contributed by acute elevation in plasma uric acid, we paid special attention to wine constituents and metabolic processes that are likely to be involved in uric acid elevation. PMID:20162741

  3. Atmospheric concentrations and deposition of trichloroacetic acid in Scotland: results from a 2-year sampling campaign.

    PubMed

    Heal, M R; Reeves, N M; Cape, J N

    2003-06-15

    The first long-term concurrent measurements of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) in rainwater, in cloudwater, and in air (both gas and particle phase) are reported. Measurements were made weekly between June 1998 and April 2000 at a rural forested upland site in SE Scotland. Rainwater TCA concentration did not differ significantly between two elevations (602 and 275 m asl), with precipitation-weighted mean values of 0.77 and 0.70 microg L(-1), respectively (n > 75). The precipitation-weighted mean concentration of TCA in cloudwater at the highest elevation was 0.92 microg L(-1), yielding an average cloudwater enrichment factor of 1.2, considerably lower than for other inorganic ions measured. Rainwater and cloudwater TCA concentrations did not vary systematically with season. Since wet precipitation depth also did not vary systematically with season, the wet deposition fluxes of TCA were likewise invariant (annual fluxes at the highest elevation of 880 and 130 microg m(-2), respectively, for rain and cloud interception to spruce forest). Weekly integrated concentrations of TCA in air (gas and particle) were very low (median 25 pg m(-3), range < LOD-110 pg m(-3)). The estimated upper limit for annual dry deposition of TCA at this site was approximately 20 microg m(-2), assuming a deposition velocity of 2 cm s(-1). Concentrations of TCA in air correlated reasonably strongly with concentrations in rainwater, with a partition ratio approximately equal to the Henry's law coefficient. On average, only about 23% of TCA measured in Edinburgh air was associated with the particle phase. These measurements are consistent with the observed high scavenging ratio of TCA (ratio of concentration in air to concentration in rainwater). Overall, these data confirm that the atmosphere is an important source of TCA to the environment and that precipitation is the dominant transfer mechanism. In line with previous work, the atmospheric deposition flux is greater than expected from the current

  4. Patterns of acid deposition variability in the Eastern United States, 1981-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lins, H.F.; Lanfear, K.J.; Schertz, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    An increase in pH and a decrease in sulfate concentration of precipitation were recorded at National Atmospheric Deposition Program and National Trends Network (NADP/NTN) monitoring sites in the Eastern United States between 1981 and 1984. The decline in acidity, however, was not spatially or temporally uniform. The range in acidity and sulfate concentrations decreased during the four-yr period. Variations in the area of constant pH surfaces take the general form of area reductions in both the lower (pH 4.01-4.40) and upper (pH 4.91-5.40) range of values with concomitant area increases in the middle (pH 4.41-4.90) range. The pattern for sulfate is simpler, with area increases occurring in the lower (1.0-1.9 mg/L) range, decreases in the upper (2.5-4.4 mg/L) range, with approximate stability in the middle (2.0-2.4 mg/L) range of values. (Author 's abstract)

  5. Geochemical characterization of acidic mine waters in Darrehzar copper deposit, Kerman province, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarzi, B.; Shahabpour, J.; Naseh, R.

    2009-04-01

    Darrehzar porphyry copper deposit is located in the south of Sar Cheshmeh copper mine. There are varieties of geological factors which control the composition of mine drainage waters. Surface samples were collected from the Darrehzar locality for chemical measurements. The measured quantities are: Cl-, Ca, Mg, Na, K, SO42-, Al. Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn, As, Sb, Mo, HCO3-, EC, pH and Eh. Phyllic alteration has the highest influence on the production of acid mine drainage. Mineralogical studies and analysis of water samples indicate a good correlation between sulfide minerals and acid mine drainage. Analysis of water samples showed that samples with low pH values have high concentration of sulfate and heavy metals. Correlation coefficients between different quantities were calculated and binary diagram prepared. Heavy metals increase with a decrease in pH except for Mo. Sulfate and heavy metals are positively related in mine water. The high positive correlation between Fe and Mn with respect to heavy metals indicates their adsorption on Fe and Mn oxides and hydroxides.

  6. Antioxidant responses to simulated acid rain and heavy metal deposition in birch seedlings.

    PubMed

    Koricheva, J; Roy, S; Vranjic, J A; Haukioja, E; Hughes, P R; Hänninen, O

    1997-01-01

    This study measured the responses of different anti-oxidants in 2-year-old birch (Betula pendula Roth) seedlings subjected to simulated acid rain (pH 4.0) and heavy metals (Cu/Ni), applied alone or in combination for 2 months. The applied concentrations of pollutants did not significantly affect seedling biomass or total glutathione levels. Acid rain alone increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity both in leaves and roots, while heavy metals alone inhibited SOD activity in roots. Both acid rain and heavy metals applied singly increased ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) activities in leaves but decreased activities in roots. In contrast, acid rain and heavy metal treatments increased glutathione reductase (GR) activity in roots but not in leaves. Spraying birch seedlings with a mixture of acid rain and heavy metals increased SOD, APX and GPX activities in leaves and GR activity in roots. However, the effects of mixed pollutants on enzyme activities usually were less than the summed effects of individual pollutants. Enzyme responses also depended on where pollutants were applied: spraying pollutants onto the shoots initiated higher responses in SOD, APX and GPX than did application to the soil surface, while the opposite was true for GR.

  7. Laboratory study of SO2 dry deposition on limestone and marble: Effects of humidity and surface variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiker, E. C.; Hosker, R.P.; Weintraub, V.C.; Sherwood, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    The dry deposition of gaseous air pollutants on stone and other materials is influenced by atmospheric processes and the chemical characteristics of the deposited gas species and of the specific receptor material. Previous studies have shown that relative humidity, surface moisture, and acid buffering capability of the receptor surface are very important factors. To better quantify this behavior, a special recirculating wind tunnel/environmental chamber was constructed, in which wind speed, turbulence, air temperature, relative humidity, and concentrations of several pollutants (SO2, O3, nitrogen oxides) can be held constant. An airfoil sample holder holds up to eight stone samples (3.8 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick) in nearly identical exposure conditions. SO2 deposition on limestone was found to increase exponentially with increasing relative humidity (RH). Marble behaves similarly, but with a much lower deposition rate. Trends indicate there is little deposition below 20% RH on clean limestone and below 60% RH on clean marble. This large difference is due to the limestone's greater porosity, surface roughness, and effective surface area. These results indicate surface variables generally limit SO2 deposition below about 70% RH on limestone and below at least 95% RH on marble. Aerodynamic variables generally limit deposition at higher relative humidity or when the surface is wet.The dry deposition of gaseous air pollutants on stone and other materials is influenced by atmospheric processes and the chemical characteristics of the deposited gas species and of the specific receptor material. Previous studies have shown that relative humidity, surface moisture, and acid buffering capability of the receptor surface are very important factors. To better quantify this behavior, a special recirculating wind tunnel/environmental chamber was constructed, in which wind speed, turbulence, air temperature, relative humidity, and concentrations of several pollutants (SO2, O3

  8. Effects of atmospheric deposition of energy-related pollutants on water quality: a review and assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.J.

    1981-05-01

    The effects on surface-water quality of atmospheric pollutants that are generated during energy production are reviewed and evaluated. Atmospheric inputs from such sources to the aquatic environment may include trace elements, organic compounds, radionuclides, and acids. Combustion is the largest energy-related source of trace-element emissions to the atmosphere. This report reviews the nature of these emissions from coal-fired power plants and discusses their terrestrial and aquatic effects following deposition. Several simple models for lakes and streams are developed and are applied to assess the potential for adverse effects on surface-water quality of trace-element emissions from coal combustion. The probability of acute impacts on the aquatic environment appears to be low; however, more subtle, chronic effects are possible. The character of acid precipitation is reviewed, with emphasis on aquatic effects, and the nature of existing or potential effects on water quality, aquatic biota, and water supply is considered. The response of the aquatic environment to acid precipitation depends on the type of soils and bedrock in a watershed and the chemical characteristics of the water bodies in question. Methods for identifying regions sensitive to acid inputs are reviewed. The observed impact of acid precipitation ranges from no effects to elimination of fish populations. Coal-fired power plants and various stages of the nuclear fuel cycle release radionuclides to the atmosphere. Radioactive releases to the atmosphere from these sources and the possible aquatic effects of such releases are examined. For the nuclear fuel cycle, the major releases are from reactors and reprocessing. Although aquatic effects of atmospheric releases have not been fully quantified, there seems little reason for concern for man or aquatic biota.

  9. Fundamental Proximity Effects in Focused electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Plank, Harald; Smith, Daryl; Haber, Thomas; Rack, Philip D; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental proximity effects for electron beam induced deposition processes on nonflat surfaces were studied experimentally and via simulation. Two specific effects were elucidated and exploited to considerably increase the volumetric growth rate of this nanoscale direct write method: (1) increasing the scanning electron pitch to the scale of the lateral electron straggle increased the volumetric growth rate by 250% by enhancing the effective forward scattered, backscattered, and secondary electron coefficients as well as by strong recollection effects of adjacent features; and (2) strategic patterning sequences are introduced to reduce precursor depletion effects which increase volumetric growth rates by more than 90%, demonstrating the strong influence of patterning parameters on the final performance of this powerful direct write technique.

  10. Effect of Increasing Nitrogen Deposition on Soil Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Shengmu; Xue, Kai; He, Zhili; VanNostrand, Joy D.; Liu, Jianshe; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Increasing nitrogen deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and decreasing biodiversity are three main environmental changes occurring on a global scale. The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) ecological experiment site at the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve started in 1997, to better understand how these changes would affect soil systems. To understand how increasing nitrogen deposition affects the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure impact soil microbial communities, 12 samples were collected from the BioCON plots in which nitrogenous fertilizer was added to simulate the effect of increasing nitrogen deposition and 12 samples from without added fertilizer. DNA from the 24 samples was extracted using a freeze-grind protocol, amplified, labeled with a fluorescent dye, and then hybridized to GeoChip, a functional gene array containing probes for genes involved in N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all genes detected was performed to analyze microbial community patterns. The first two axes accounted for 23.5percent of the total variation. The samples fell into two major groups: fertilized and non-fertilized, suggesting that nitrogenous fertilizer had a significant impact on soil microbial community structure and diversity. The functional gene numbers detected in fertilized samples was less that detected in non-fertilizer samples. Functional genes involving in the N cycling were mainly discussed.

  11. Linkage effects between deposit discovery and postdiscovery exploratory drilling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, Lawrence J.

    1975-01-01

    For the 1950-71 period of petroleum exploration in the Powder River Basin, northeastern Wyoming and southeastern Montana, three specific topics were investigated. First, the wildcat wells drilled during the ambient phases of exploration are estimated to have discovered 2.80 times as much petroleum per well as the wildcat wells drilled during the cyclical phases of exploration, periods when exploration plays were active. Second, the hypothesis was tested and verified that during ambient phases of exploration the discovery of deposits could be anticipated by a small but statistically significant rise in the ambient drilling rate during the year prior to the year of discovery. Closer examination of the data suggests that this anticipation effect decreases through time. Third, a regression model utilizing the two independent variables of (1) the volume of petroleum contained in each deposit discovered in a cell and the directly adjacent cells and (2) the respective depths of these deposits was constructed to predict the expected yearly cyclical wildcat drilling rate in four 30 by 30 min (approximately 860 mi2) sized cells. In two of these cells relatively large volumes of petroleum were discovered, whereas in the other two cells smaller volumes were discovered. The predicted and actual rates of wildcat drilling which occurred in each cell agreed rather closely.

  12. Rainwater trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in Guangzhou, South China: levels, wet deposition fluxes and source implication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiaoyun; Wang, Xinming; Ding, Xiang

    2014-01-15

    The origin of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) occurring in hydrosphere has long been a controversial issue. Hydrochlorofluorocarbons and hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs/HFCs) as replacements of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are precursors of TFA in the atmosphere, their contribution to rainwater TFA is a concern as their ambient mixing ratios are continually growing. Here we present rainwater TFA monitored from April 2007 to March 2008 in urban Guangzhou, a central city in south China's highly industrialized and densely populated Pearl River Delta region. Rainwater TFA levels ranged 45.8-974 ng L(-1) with a median of 166 ng L(-1). TFA levels negatively correlated with rainfall amount, the yearly rainfall-weighted average for TFA was 152 ng L(-1). The annual TFA wet deposition flux was estimated to be 229 g km(-2) yr(-1), and the total wet deposition of TFA reached ~1.7 tyr(-1) in Guangzhou. The Two-Box model was applied to estimate attributions of HCFCs/HFCs and fluoropolymers to rainwater TFA assuming TFA generated was proportional to gross domestic product (GDP), gross industrial product (GIP) or number of private cars. The results revealed that the degradation of HCFCs/HFCs and fluoropolymers could explain 131.5-152.4 ng L(-1) rainwater TFA, quite near the observed rainfall-weighted annual mean of 152 ng L(-1), suggesting rainwater TFA in Guangzhou was predominantly originated from these anthropogenic precursors. HCFCs/HFCs accounted for 83.3-96.5% of rainwater TFA observed, while fluoropolymers' contributions were minor (~5%). HFC-134a alone could explain 55.9-90.0% of rainwater TFA, and its contribution would be greatly enhanced with its wide use in mobile air conditioning systems and rapid increase in ambient mixing ratios.

  13. Rainwater trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in Guangzhou, South China: levels, wet deposition fluxes and source implication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiaoyun; Wang, Xinming; Ding, Xiang

    2014-01-15

    The origin of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) occurring in hydrosphere has long been a controversial issue. Hydrochlorofluorocarbons and hydrofluorocarbons (HCFCs/HFCs) as replacements of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are precursors of TFA in the atmosphere, their contribution to rainwater TFA is a concern as their ambient mixing ratios are continually growing. Here we present rainwater TFA monitored from April 2007 to March 2008 in urban Guangzhou, a central city in south China's highly industrialized and densely populated Pearl River Delta region. Rainwater TFA levels ranged 45.8-974 ng L(-1) with a median of 166 ng L(-1). TFA levels negatively correlated with rainfall amount, the yearly rainfall-weighted average for TFA was 152 ng L(-1). The annual TFA wet deposition flux was estimated to be 229 g km(-2) yr(-1), and the total wet deposition of TFA reached ~1.7 tyr(-1) in Guangzhou. The Two-Box model was applied to estimate attributions of HCFCs/HFCs and fluoropolymers to rainwater TFA assuming TFA generated was proportional to gross domestic product (GDP), gross industrial product (GIP) or number of private cars. The results revealed that the degradation of HCFCs/HFCs and fluoropolymers could explain 131.5-152.4 ng L(-1) rainwater TFA, quite near the observed rainfall-weighted annual mean of 152 ng L(-1), suggesting rainwater TFA in Guangzhou was predominantly originated from these anthropogenic precursors. HCFCs/HFCs accounted for 83.3-96.5% of rainwater TFA observed, while fluoropolymers' contributions were minor (~5%). HFC-134a alone could explain 55.9-90.0% of rainwater TFA, and its contribution would be greatly enhanced with its wide use in mobile air conditioning systems and rapid increase in ambient mixing ratios. PMID:24035981

  14. Effects of acid treatment duration and sulfuric acid molarity on purification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Seyedeh Z.; Novinrooz, Abdul J.; Reyhani, Ali; Mirershadi, Soghra

    2010-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized using a Fe-Ni bimetallic catalyst supported by MgO using thermal chemical vapor deposition. Purification processes to remove unwanted carbon structures and other metallic impurities were carried out by boiling in sulfuric acid solution. Various analytical techniques such as TGA/DSC, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, HRTEM and EDAX were employed to investigate the morphology, graphitization and quality of the carbon nanotubes. The obtained results reveal the molarity of sulfuric acid and immersed time of the carbon nanotubes in the acid solution is very effective at purifying multi-walled carbon nanotubes. It was also found that 5 M concentration of boiling sulfuric acid for a 3 h treatment duration led to the highest removal of the impurities with the least destructive effect. Moreover, it was observed that acid treatment results in decreasing of CNTs’ diameter.

  15. Effects of acid treatment duration and sulfuric acid molarity on purification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, Seyedeh; Novinrooz, Abdul; Reyhani, Ali; Mirershadi, Soghra

    2010-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized using a Fe-Ni bimetallic catalyst supported by MgO using thermal chemical vapor deposition. Purification processes to remove unwanted carbon structures and other metallic impurities were carried out by boiling in sulfuric acid solution. Various analytical techniques such as TGA/DSC, Raman spectroscopy, SEM, HRTEM and EDAX were employed to investigate the morphology, graphitization and quality of the carbon nanotubes. The obtained results reveal the molarity of sulfuric acid and immersed time of the carbon nanotubes in the acid solution is very effective at purifying multi-walled carbon nanotubes. It was also found that 5 M concentration of boiling sulfuric acid for a 3 h treatment duration led to the highest removal of the impurities with the least destructive effect. Moreover, it was observed that acid treatment results in decreasing of CNTs' diameter.

  16. Background on health effects of acid aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, M

    1989-02-01

    This introduction to the 1987 NIEHS-EPA Symposium on the Health Effects of Acid Aerosols reviews the state of our knowledge on this topic as of the close of the 1984 NIEHS Conference on the Health Effects of Acid Precipitation (Environmental Health Perspectives, Volume 63) and the results of some key studies completed since that time. These studies, together with the results of the studies presented in the papers that follow, provide a substantial increment in our knowledge of the health effects of acid aerosols.

  17. Background on health effects of acid aerosols.

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, M

    1989-01-01

    This introduction to the 1987 NIEHS-EPA Symposium on the Health Effects of Acid Aerosols reviews the state of our knowledge on this topic as of the close of the 1984 NIEHS Conference on the Health Effects of Acid Precipitation (Environmental Health Perspectives, Volume 63) and the results of some key studies completed since that time. These studies, together with the results of the studies presented in the papers that follow, provide a substantial increment in our knowledge of the health effects of acid aerosols. PMID:2707208

  18. [Effects of Canalization on the Iron Deposition in Sanjiang Plain].

    PubMed

    Su, Wen-hui; Yu, Xiao-fei; Wang, Guo-ping; Luan, Jin-hua; Zou, Yuan-chun

    2015-04-01

    Canalization is the representative process and landscape of wetland reclamation. A typical ditch system of four levels near the Honghe National Nature Reserve in Sanjiang Plain was selected. Deposition plates were set on the sediments along the ditch level and the remained natural wetland nearby was quantitatively sampled for two years as the control. The deposition fluxes, total iron concentration, iron oxides and their components, as well as biogenic elements in the sediments collected by deposition plates were measured. The results showed that the litter, mud/sand and total deposition fluxes showed no significant differences between different ditch levels, with the means of (57.00 ± 16.90) g x (m2 x a)(-1), (3 997.57 ± 798.98) g x (m2 x a)(-1) and (4054.57 ± 792.91) g x (m2 x a)(-1), respectively. The litter flux decreased with the increase of ditch level, and the flux in the natural wetland [ (120.26 ± 19.42) g x (m2 x a)(-1) ] was significantly greater than that of the ditches. The mud/sand [ (35.41 ± 11.15 ) g x (m2 x a)(-1)] and total deposition fluxes [ (155.67 ± 20.75) g x ( m2 x a](-1) ] were significantly smaller than those of the ditches. There were no significant differences in the total iron between different ditches and natural wetland, while the free iron oxide content in the ditch sediments was significantly lower than that of natural wetland sediment. Except for the main ditch, the amorphous and complex iron oxides in the other ditch and natural wetland sediments showed no significant differences. The free degree of the iron oxide in ditch sediments was 60.2% of that in the natural wetland, while the differences in the complex degree and the activated degree were insignificant. The differences in the total organic carbon, total nitrogen and total phosphorus were insignificant, and all were smaller than those of the natural wetland, with the percentages of 14.6%, 31.6% and 41.0%, respectively. It could be concluded that the effects of

  19. Recycling of metal-organic chemical vapor deposition waste of GaN based power device and LED industry by acidic leaching: Process optimization and kinetics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Basudev; Mishra, Chinmayee; Kang, Leeseung; Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Chan Gi; Hong, Hyun Seon; Park, Jeung-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Recovery of metal values from GaN, a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) waste of GaN based power device and LED industry is investigated by acidic leaching. Leaching kinetics of gallium rich MOCVD waste is studied and the process is optimized. The gallium rich waste MOCVD dust is characterized by XRD and ICP-AES analysis followed by aqua regia digestion. Different mineral acids are used to find out the best lixiviant for selective leaching of the gallium and indium. Concentrated HCl is relatively better lixiviant having reasonably faster kinetic and better leaching efficiency. Various leaching process parameters like effect of acidity, pulp density, temperature and concentration of catalyst on the leaching efficiency of gallium and indium are investigated. Reasonably, 4 M HCl, a pulp density of 50 g/L, 100 °C and stirring rate of 400 rpm are the effective optimum condition for quantitative leaching of gallium and indium.

  20. Effects of acid precipitation on crops

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of acid rain on crop yield have been studied using field-grown and potted plants. Results have shown that the chemicals in acid rain can affect crop growth and yield at ambient concentrations. For many crops, the dose-response curve probably has at least one peak and crossover point from stimulatory to inhibitory response may depend on other environmental factors. Plant parts often are affected differently, suggesting that acid rain can change the allocation of energy within plants. Available experimental results are not transferable to agricultural situations. The characteristics of acid rain which have the greatest influence on crop yield have not been determined. Interactions between acid rain and other environmental factors have scarcely been studied. Before a believable assessment of the economic impact of acid rain on crops can be done, the mechanisms of response have to be studied and the predictive capability enhanced and validated.

  1. Nitric acid dry deposition to conifer forests: Niwot Ridge spruce-fir-pine study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sievering, H.; Kelly, T.; McConville, G.; Seibold, C.; Turnipseed, A.

    2001-01-01

    The dry deposition velocity of nitric acid, Vd(HNO3), over a 12-m (mean height) spruce-fir forest at Niwot Ridge, Colorado was estimated during 13 daytime periods using the flux-gradient approach. Turbulence intensity at this site is high (mean u* of 0.65ms-1 with u of 2.9ms-1) and contributed to the large observed Vd(HNO3). The overriding contributor is identified to be the small aerodynamic needle width of the conifer trees. Two cases had inflated Vd(HNO3) due to height-differentiated nitric acid loss to soil-derived particle surfaces. Not considering these cases, the mean Vd(HNO3) was 7.6cms-1. The mean laminar boundary layer resistance (Rb) was found to be 7.8sm-1 (of similar magnitude to that of the aerodynamic resistance, 8.5sm-1). The data-determined Rb is bracketed by two theoretical estimates of the mean Rb, 5.9 and 8.6sm-1, that include consideration of the small canopy length scale (aerodynamic needle width), 1mm or less, at this conifer forest. However, the poor correlation of data-determined Rb values with both sets of theoretical estimates indicates that measurement error needs to be reduced and/or improved formulations of theoretical Rb values are in order. The large observed Vd(HNO3) at this conifer forest site is attributed to high turbulence intensity, and, especially, to small aerodynamic needle width. Copyright ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. Chemical recovery of surface waters across the Northeastern United States from reduced inputs of acidic deposition: 1984-2001

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A.F. Warby; Chris E. Johnson; Charles T. Driscoll

    2005-09-01

    Changes in lake water chemistry between 1984 and 2001 at 130 stratified random sites across the northeastern United States were studied to evaluate the population-level effects of decreases in acidic deposition. Surface-water SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations decreased across the region at a median rate of -1.53 {mu}equiv L{sup -1} year{sup -1}. Calcium concentrations also decreased, with a median rate of -1.73 {mu}equiv L{sup -1} year{sup -1}. This decrease in Ca{sub 2+} retarded the recovery of surface water acid neutralizing capacity (Gran ANC), which increased at a median rate of 0.66 {mu}equiv L{sup -1} year{sup -1}. There were small increases in pH in all subregions except central New England and Maine, where the changes were not statistically significant. Median NO{sub 3}{sup -} trends were not significant except in the Adirondacks, where NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations increased at a rate of 0.53 equiv L{sup -1} year{sup -1}. A regionwide decrease in the concentration of total Al, especially in ponds with low ANC values (ANC {lt} 25 {mu}equiv L{sup -1}), was observed in the Adirondack subregion. These changes in Al were consistent with the general pattern of increasing pH and ANC. Despite the general pattern of chemical recovery, many ponds remain chronically acidic or are susceptible to episodic acidification. The continued chemical and biological recovery at sites in the northeastern United States will depend on further controls on S and N emissions. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. An Assessment of Student Knowledge in Fourth, Eighth and Eleventh Grades of Science and Natural Resource Concepts Related to Acidic Deposition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael; And Others

    This study assessed the level of scientific and natural resource knowledge that 4th, 8th, and 11th grade students in Maine possessed concerning acidic deposition. A representative sample of public school students (n=175) was interviewed on 12 concept principles considered critical to a full understanding of the acidic deposition problem. These…

  4. Acid deposition in Maryland. Summary of research and monitoring results compiled through 1991 and a discussion of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Report for 1991-1992

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.; Mountain, D.

    1992-10-01

    This is the sixth annual report submitted under Maryland legislative requirements. The report focuses on more than a decade of acid deposition research conducted in Maryland. In addition, the report discusses Title IV - Acid Deposition Control of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) and its potential impacts on Maryland.

  5. An evaluation of the regional acid deposition model surface module for ozone uptake at three sites in the San Joaquin Valley of California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massman, W. J.; Pederson, J.; Delany, A.; Grantz, D.; Hertog, G. Den; Neumann, H. H.; Oncley, S. P.; Pearson, R., Jr.; Shaw, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    Plants and soils act as major sinks for the destruction of tropospheric ozone, especially during daylight hours when plant stomata open and are thought to provide the dominant pathway for the uptake of ozone. The present study, part of the California Ozone Deposition Experiment, compares predictions of the regional acid deposition model ozone surface conductance module with surface conductance data derived from eddy covariance measurements of ozone flux taken at a grape, a cotton, and a grassland site in the San Joaquin Valley of California during the summer of 1991. Results indicate that the model (which was developed to provide long-term large-area estimates for the eastern United States) significantly overpredicts the surface conductance at all times of the day for at least two important types of plant cover of the San Joaquin Valley and that it incorrectly partitions the ozone flux between transpiring and nontranspiring components of the surface at the third site. Consequently, the model either overpredicts or inaccurately represents the observed deposition velocities. Other results indicate that the presence of dew does not reduce the rate of ozone deposition, contradicting to model assumptions, and that model assumptions involving the dependency of stomata upon environmental temperature are unnecessary. The effects of measurement errors and biases, arising from the presence of the roughness sublayer and possible photochemical reactions, are also discussed. A simpler model for ozone surface deposition (at least for the San Joaquin Valley) is proposed and evaluated.

  6. Buffer capacities of fresh water lakes sensitive to acid rain deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, S.D.; McIntosh, A.

    1983-01-01

    The Van Slyke definition of buffer capacity, the increment of a strong base or strong acid that causes an incremental change in the pH value of water, is better than total alkalinity for defining a water's resistance to acid rain. This Van Slyke value, designated by beta, shows a peak at pH 6.3 for the bicarbonate-carbonate pair, indicating that the effect of acid rain on the pH and alkalinity of natural waters is not deleterious until this peak is traversed. A beta value of zero indicates a dead water with no capacity to neutralize acid. The beta values, pH and total alkalinity of lakes, reservoirs, and streams in New Jersey are given. Data clearly show that pH and alkalinity alone cannot determine buffer capacity. For example: Fairview Lake (pH of 5.5 and alkalinity of 10.2 mg per liter) has a beta value 11 times that of Clyde Potts Reservoir (pH of 7.3, alkalinity of 8.1 mg per liter). 3 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  7. Effect of Deposition Temperature on the Properties of TIO2 Thin Films Deposited by Mocvd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Zaki S.

    2016-02-01

    Crystal structure, microstructure, and optical properties of TiO2 thin films deposited on quartz substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) in the temperature range from 250∘C to 450∘C have been studied. The crystal structure, thickness, microstructure, and optical properties have been carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), and UV-visible transmittance spectroscopy, respectively. XRD patterns show that the obtained films are pure anatase. Simultaneously, the crystal size calculated using XRD peaks, and the grain size measured by AFM decrease with the increase in deposition temperature. Moreover, the texture of the films change and roughness decrease with the increase in deposition temperature. The spectrophotometric transmittance spectra have been used to calculate the refractive index, extinction coefficient, dielectric constant, optical energy gap, and porosity of the deposited films. While the refractive index and dielectric constant decrease with the increase of deposition temperature, the porosity shows the opposite.

  8. A novel role of PR2 in abscisic acid (ABA) mediated, pathogen-induced callose deposition in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Oide, Shinichi; Bejai, Sarosh; Staal, Jens; Guan, Na; Kaliff, Maria; Dixelius, Christina

    2013-12-01

    Pathogenesis-related protein 2 (PR2) is known to play a major role in plant defense and general stress responses. Resistance against the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans in Arabidopsis requires abscisic acid (ABA), which promotes the deposition of callose, a β-1,3-glucan polymer. Here, we examined the role of PR2 in callose deposition in relation to ABA treatment and challenge with L. maculans and Pseudomonas syringae. Characterization of PR2-overexpressing plants and the knockout line indicated that PR2 negatively affects callose deposition. Recombinant PR2 purified from Pichia pastoris showed callose-degrading activity, and a considerable reduction in the callose-degrading activity was observed in the leaf extract of the PR2 knockout line compared with the wild-type. ABA pretreatment before challenge with L. maculans concomitantly repressed PR2 and enhanced callose accumulation. Likewise, overexpression of an ABA biosynthesis gene NCED3 resulted in reduced PR2 expression and increased callose deposition. We propose that ABA promotes callose deposition through the transcriptional repression of PR2 in Arabidopsis challenged by L. maculans and P. syringae. Callose by itself is likely to act antagonistically on salicylic acid (SA) defense signaling, suggesting that PR2 may function as a modulator of callose- and SA-dependent defense responses.

  9. A comparison of cleaning regimes for the effective removal of fingerprint deposits from brass.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Emma; Bond, John W; Hillman, A Robert

    2010-01-01

    Effective removal of fingerprint deposits is crucial for experimentation related to the corrosion of metals by fingerprint deposits. Such removal is also necessary prior to deposition of test fingerprints. The effectiveness of four regimes in removing fingerprint deposits from brass is considered. Sustained wiping of the deposit with a tissue at applied pressures of up to c. 1430 Pa or rubbing while the brass was immersed in acetone both failed to remove completely all traces of fingerprint deposits. Heating the brass to 600 degrees C was an effective remover; however, this also oxidized the surface of the metal except where inhibited by fingerprint deposits. The most effective regime, and the only one of the four that removed all traces of deposit without affecting the properties of the metal surface, was immersion in warm soapy water while rubbing with a tissue. We propose this as the preferred method for fingerprint removal.

  10. Acidic deposition: State of science and technology. Report 9. Current status of surface-water acid-base chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, L.A.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Brakke, D.F.; Herlihy, A.T.; Eilers, J.M.

    1990-09-01

    The report is based largely upon the National Surface Water Survey (NSWS), augmented by numerous smaller state and university surveys and many detailed watershed studies. In describing the current status of surface waters, the authors go far beyond the description of population statistics, although some of this is necessary, and direct their attention to the interpretation of these data. They address the question of the sources of acidity to surface waters in order to determine the relative importance of acidic deposition compared with other sources, such as naturally produced organic acids and acid mine drainage. They also examine in some detail what they call 'high interest' populations-the specific groups of lakes and streams most likely to be impacted by acidic deposition. The authors then turn to the general question of uncertainty, and finally examine low alkalinity surface waters in several other parts of the world to develop further inferences about the acid-base status of surface waters in the United States.

  11. 42 CFR 35.48 - Deposit of unclaimed money; sale of unclaimed effects and deposit of proceeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... effects and deposit of proceeds. 35.48 Section 35.48 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT Disposal of Money... of the trust-fund account entitled “Money and Effects of Deceased Patients, Public Health...

  12. 42 CFR 35.48 - Deposit of unclaimed money; sale of unclaimed effects and deposit of proceeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... effects and deposit of proceeds. 35.48 Section 35.48 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT Disposal of Money... of the trust-fund account entitled “Money and Effects of Deceased Patients, Public Health...

  13. 42 CFR 35.48 - Deposit of unclaimed money; sale of unclaimed effects and deposit of proceeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... effects and deposit of proceeds. 35.48 Section 35.48 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT Disposal of Money... of the trust-fund account entitled “Money and Effects of Deceased Patients, Public Health...

  14. 42 CFR 35.48 - Deposit of unclaimed money; sale of unclaimed effects and deposit of proceeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... effects and deposit of proceeds. 35.48 Section 35.48 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT Disposal of Money... of the trust-fund account entitled “Money and Effects of Deceased Patients, Public Health...

  15. 42 CFR 35.48 - Deposit of unclaimed money; sale of unclaimed effects and deposit of proceeds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... effects and deposit of proceeds. 35.48 Section 35.48 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICAL CARE AND EXAMINATIONS HOSPITAL AND STATION MANAGEMENT Disposal of Money... of the trust-fund account entitled “Money and Effects of Deceased Patients, Public Health...

  16. Acid fog Deposition of Crusts on Basaltic Tephra Deposits in the Sand Wash Region of Kilauea Volcano: A Possible Mechanism for Siliceous-Sulfatic Crusts on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffman, P.; Zierenberg, R.; Marks, N.; Bishop, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Although the presence of sulfate minerals in martian outcrops may imply the prior existence of standing bodies of surface water, in terrestrial volcanic settings, sulfatic alteration may also occur above the water table within the vadose zone. On the summit of Kilauea volcano, sulfur dioxide, which is continuously emitted from Halemaumau crater and rapidly sequestered into sulfuric acid-rich aerosol entrained in the prevailing trade winds, is subsequently precipitated as acid-fog immediately downwind from the caldera in the Kau Desert. The characteristic pH of surface tephra deposits is < 4.0 in Sand Wash, a region of continuous, acidic aerosol fall-out immediately SW of the caldera. The upper portion of the Keanakakoi Ash tephra in Sand Wash, deposited in the late 18th century, has a ubiquitous, 0.1-0.2 mm-thick coating of amorphous silica. Conversely, vertical walls of unconsolidated tephra, exposed within small, dry gullies eroded into the ca. 3-4 m-thick Keanakakoi section at Sand Wash, are coated with ca. 0.5-1.0 mm-thick, mixed amorphous silica and jarosite-bearing crusts. Since these crusts are denuded from their outcrops during ephemeral, but probably annual flooding events in Sand Wash, we believe that they must accumulate rapidly. These crusts are apparently formed via an evaporative mechanism whereby acidic pore fluids, circulating in the upper few m's within the highly porous tephra, are wicked towards the walls of the gullies. Geochemical modeling of the crust-forming process implies that the sulfate formation via evaporation occurs subsequent to minimal interaction of acidic pore fluids with the basaltic tephra. This also suggests that the cycle from acid-fog fall-out to precipitation of the siliceous-sulfatic crusts must occur quite rapidly. Production of siliceous-sulfatic crusts via acid-fog alteration may also be occurring on Mars. The occurrence of evaporitic sulfate and silica at Sand Wash in Kilauea may serve as an example of how the jarosite

  17. Interactions between lead-zirconate titanate, polyacrylic acid, and polyvinyl butyral in ethanol and their influence on electrophoretic deposition behavior.

    PubMed

    Kuscer, Danjela; Bakarič, Tina; Kozlevčar, Bojan; Kosec, Marija

    2013-02-14

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is an attractive method for the fabrication of a few tens of micrometer-thick piezoelectric layers on complex-shape substrates that are used for manufacturing high-frequency transducers. Niobium-doped lead-zirconate titanate (PZT Nb) particles were stabilized in ethanol using poly(acrylic acid) (PAA). With Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), we found that the deprotonated carboxylic group from the PAA is coordinated with the metal in the perovskite PZT Nb structure, resulting in a stable ethanol-based suspension. The hydroxyl group from the polyvinyl butyral added into the suspension to prevent the formation of cracks in the as-deposited layer did not interact with the PAA-covered PZT Nb particles. PVB acts as a free polymer in ethanol-based suspensions. The electrophoretic deposition of micro- and nanometer-sized PZT Nb particles from ethanol-based suspensions onto electroded alumina substrates was attempted in order to obtain uniform, crack-free deposits. The interactions between the PZT Nb particles, the PAA, and the PVB in ethanol will be discussed and related to the properties of the suspensions, the deposition yield and the morphology of the as-deposited PZT Nb thick film.

  18. Effects of Ar plasma treatment for deposition of ruthenium film by remote plasma atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Taeyong; Lee, Jaesang; Park, Jingyu; Jeon, Heeyoung; Jeon, Hyeongtag; Lee, Ki-Hoon; Cho, Byung-Chul; Kim, Moo-Sung; Ahn, Heui-Bok

    2012-01-15

    Ruthenium thin films were deposited on argon plasma-treated SiO{sub 2} and untreated SiO{sub 2} substrates by remote plasma atomic layer deposition using bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium [Ru(EtCp){sub 2}] as a Ru precursor and ammonia plasma as a reactant. The results of in situ Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analysis indicate that the initial transient region of Ru deposition was decreased by Ar plasma treatment at 400 deg. C, but did not change significantly at 300 deg. C The deposition rate exhibited linearity after continuous film formation and the deposition rates were about 1.7 A/cycle and 0.4 A/cycle at 400 deg. C and 300 deg. C, respectively. Changes of surface energy and polar and dispersive components were measured by the sessile drop test. The quantity of surface amine groups was measured from the surface nitrogen concentration with AES. Furthermore, the Ar plasma-treated SiO{sub 2} contained more amine groups and less hydroxyl groups on the surface than on untreated SiO{sub 2}. Auger spectra exhibited chemical shifts by Ru-O bonding, and larger shifts were observed on untreated substrates due to the strong adhesion of Ru films.

  19. Oxygen isotope fractionation in travertine-depositing pools at Baishuitai, Yunnan, SW China: Effects of deposition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hailong; Liu, Zaihua; Yan, Hao

    2014-05-01

    Travertine δ18O values can be used to reconstruct paleo-temperatures if the oxygen isotope fractionation factors between travertine and water are accurately understood. For this purpose, the δ18O values of pool travertine and its parent water, and the deposition rates of the calcite were investigated at Baishuitai (Yunnan, SW China) over the course of the full hydrological year, April 23 2006-April 25 2007. The results show that the travertine-water isotope fractionation factors are close to the commonly accepted equilibrium line of Kim and O'Neil (1997). This differs from the results obtained by Yan et al. (2012) who found that the oxygen isotope fractionation factors in the travertine-depositing pools were close to the line suggested as equilibrium relationship by Coplen (2007). The average calcite deposition rate (2.30 mg cm-2 d-1) in the present study is six times larger than that (0.38 mg cm-2 d-1) in Yan et al. (2012). If slower calcite precipitation leads to equilibrium oxygen isotopic fractionation, then the results of this study support the results of Coplen (2007) that indicate that the equilibrium fractionation factor may be greater than the commonly accepted one derived by Kim and O'Neil (1997). The relationship between oxygen isotope fractionation factor and calcite deposition rate in our study also agrees with the results of Dietzel et al. (2009) who found that the kinetic-isotope effect favors preferential incorporation of 16O in solid calcite as the calcite deposition rate increases. There was a threshold for calcite precipitation rate control on oxygen isotopic equilibrium. In our case of travertine-depositing pools, when the calcite deposition rate was lower than 0.38 mg cm-2 d-1, oxygen isotopic equilibrium between calcite and water was attained. Therefore, calcite deposition rate is a potentially important consideration when using δ18O in natural carbonates as a proxy for terrestrial and ocean temperature.

  20. Secondary economic impact of acid deposition control legislation in six coal producing states: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, M.J.; Guthrie, S.J.

    1988-12-01

    Among the difficult policy questions on the US environmental agenda is what to do about emissions to the earth's atmosphere of pollutants that may result in ''acid rain''. The Congress has considered several pieces of legislation spelling out potential approaches to the problem and setting goals for emission reduction, mostly emphasizing the control of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen. Significant policy concern is the dollar costs to the nation's economy of achieving the intended effects of the legislation and the potential impacts on economic activity---in particular, losses of both coal mining and secondary service sector employment in states and regions dependent on the mining of high sulfur coal. There are several direct economic effects of regulations such as the acid rain control legislation. One of the more obvious effects was the switching from high sulfur coal to low sulfur coal. This would result in increases in employment and coal business procurements in low sulfur coal mining regions, but also would result in lower employment and lower coal business procurements in high sulfur coal mining areas. The potential negative effects are the immediate policy concern and are the focus of this report. 15 refs., 1 fig., 17 tabs.

  1. The effects of a changing pollution climate on throughfall deposition and cycling in a forested area in southern England.

    PubMed

    Skeffington, R A; Hill, T J

    2012-09-15

    This study compares two sets of measurements of the composition of bulk precipitation and throughfall at a site in southern England with a 20-year gap between them. During this time, SO(2) emissions from the UK fell by 82%, NO(x) emissions by 35% and NH(3) emissions by 7%. These reductions were partly reflected in bulk precipitation, with deposition reductions of 56% in SO(4)(2-), 38% in NO(3)(-), 32% in NH(4)(+), and 73% in H(+). In throughfall under Scots pine, the effects were more dramatic, with an 89% reduction in SO(4)(2-) deposition and a 98% reduction in H(+) deposition. The mean pH under these trees increased from 2.85 to 4.30. Nitrate and ammonium deposition in throughfall increased slightly, however. In the earlier period, the Scots pines were unable to neutralise the high flux of acidity associated with sulphur deposition, even though this was not a highly polluted part of the UK, and deciduous trees (oak and birch) were only able to neutralise it in summer when the leaves were present. In the later period, the sulphur flux had reduced to the point where the acidity could be neutralised by all species - the neutralisation mechanism is thus likely to be largely leaching of base cations and buffering substances from the foliage. The high fluxes are partly due to the fact that these are 60-80 year old trees growing in an open forest structure. The increase in NO(3)(-) and NH(4)(+) in throughfall in spite of decreased deposition seems likely due to a decrease in foliar uptake, perhaps due to the increasing nitrogen saturation of the catchment soils. These changes may increase the rate of soil microbial activity as nitrogen increases and acidity declines, with consequent effects on water quality of the catchment drainage stream.

  2. Iron dissolution of dust source materials during simulated acidic processing: the effect of sulfuric, acetic, and oxalic acids.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-09-17

    Atmospheric organic acids potentially display different capacities in iron (Fe) mobilization from atmospheric dust compared with inorganic acids, but few measurements have been made on this comparison. We report here a laboratory investigation of Fe mobilization of coal fly ash, a representative Fe-containing anthropogenic aerosol, and Arizona test dust, a reference source material for mineral dust, in pH 2 sulfuric acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid, respectively. The effects of pH and solar radiation on Fe dissolution have also been explored. The relative capacities of these three acids in Fe dissolution are in the order of oxalic acid > sulfuric acid > acetic acid. Oxalate forms mononuclear bidentate ligand with surface Fe and promotes Fe dissolution to the greatest extent. Photolysis of Fe-oxalate complexes further enhances Fe dissolution with the concomitant degradation of oxalate. These results suggest that ligand-promoted dissolution of Fe may play a more significant role in mobilizing Fe from atmospheric dust compared with proton-assisted processing. The role of atmospheric organic acids should be taken into account in global-biogeochemical modeling to better access dissolved atmospheric Fe deposition flux at the ocean surface.

  3. Nitrogen deposition effects on carbon storage and fungal:bacterial ratios in coastal sage scrub soils of southern California.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kun; Crowley, David

    2009-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen (N) across a deposition gradient on bacterial and fungal degradation pathways were studied in southern California coastal sage scrub soils to determine whether elevated N levels alter microbial community structure and organic matter accumulation. Three sites across an N deposition gradient having low, intermediate, and high levels of atmospheric N deposition were studied for 20 mo. Fungi:bacteria (F:B) biomass ratios were determined by phospholipid fatty acid analysis. Plots at each location included control plots receiving ambient N deposition and treatment plots that were fertilized with an additional 50 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) of slow-release urea. Results showed that organic carbon (C) levels varied seasonally but that F:B ratios were relatively stable and similar across the three locations and over time. Total organic C decreased in response to N additions only at the low N deposition site. The results suggest that organic matter degradation pathways leading to C storage in soils that have been exposed to high levels of atmospheric N deposition are not responsive to additional increases in N and that N effects on organic C in semiarid soils may be significant only in areas with prior low exposure to N pollution.

  4. Sequential erosion/deposition experiments--demonstrating the effects of depositional history on sediment erosion.

    PubMed

    Lau, Y L; Droppo, I G; Krishnappan, B G

    2001-08-01

    Experiments on the erosion of a bed of kaolinite were carried out in a rotating circular flume. Each experiment was carried out using the stratified bed which resulted from the previous experiment. Changes in suspended sediment concentrations during the experiments were explained by the history of the deposition. The sequence of experiments showed how the rate of erosion and the amount eroded reflected the structure of the bed and that of the individual flocs which created it. Results suggest that modelling of sediment/contaminant transport needs to account for the manner in which deposition took place.

  5. Genotoxic effect of substituted phenoxyacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Venkov, P; Topashka-Ancheva, M; Georgieva, M; Alexieva, V; Karanov, E

    2000-11-01

    The potential toxic and mutagenic action of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid has been studied in different test systems, and the obtained results range from increased chromosomal damage to no effect at all. We reexamined the effect of this herbicide by simultaneous using three tests based on yeast, transformed hematopoietic, and mouse bone marrow cells. The results obtained demonstrated that 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid has cytotoxic and mutagenic effects. The positive response of yeast and transformed hematopoietic cells was verified in kinetics and dose-response experiments. The analysis of metaphase chromosomes indicated a statistically proved induction of breaks, deletions, and exchanges after the intraperitoneal administration of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in mice. The study of phenoxyacetic acid and its differently chlorinated derivatives showed that cytotoxicity and mutagenicity are induced by chlorine atoms at position 2 and/or 4 in the benzene ring. The mutagenic effect was abolished by introduction of a third chlorine atom at position 5. Thus 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid was found to have very weak, if any mutagenic effect; however, the herbicide preserved its toxic effect.

  6. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: potential use in environmental risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Neves, Natália Rust; Oliva, Marco Antonio; da Cruz Centeno, Danilo; Costa, Alan Carlos; Ribas, Rogério Ferreira; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão

    2009-06-01

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM(Fe)) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM(Fe) application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers.

  7. Photosynthesis and oxidative stress in the restinga plant species Eugenia uniflora L. exposed to simulated acid rain and iron ore dust deposition: potential use in environmental risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Neves, Natália Rust; Oliva, Marco Antonio; da Cruz Centeno, Danilo; Costa, Alan Carlos; Ribas, Rogério Ferreira; Pereira, Eduardo Gusmão

    2009-06-01

    The Brazilian sandy coastal plain named restinga is frequently subjected to particulate and gaseous emissions from iron ore factories. These gases may come into contact with atmospheric moisture and produce acid rain. The effects of the acid rain on vegetation, combined with iron excess in the soil, can lead to the disappearance of sensitive species and decrease restinga biodiversity. The effects of iron ore dust deposition and simulated acid rain on photosynthesis and on antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Eugenia uniflora, a representative shrub species of the restinga. This study aimed to determine the possible utility of this species in environmental risk assessment. After the application of iron ore dust as iron solid particulate matter (SPM(Fe)) and simulated acid rain (pH 3.1), the 18-month old plants displayed brown spots and necrosis, typical symptoms of iron toxicity and injuries caused by acid rain, respectively. The acidity of the rain intensified leaf iron accumulation, which reached phytotoxic levels, mainly in plants exposed to iron ore dust. These plants showed the lowest values for net photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, transpiration, chlorophyll a content and electron transport rate through photosystem II (PSII). Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were decreased by simulated acid rain. Peroxidase activity and membrane injury increased following exposure to acid rain and simultaneous SPM(Fe) application. Eugenia uniflora exhibited impaired photosynthetic and antioxidative metabolism in response to combined iron and acid rain stresses. This species could become a valuable tool in environmental risk assessment in restinga areas near iron ore pelletizing factories. Non-invasive evaluations of visual injuries, photosynthesis and chlorophyll a fluorescence, as well as invasive biochemical analysis could be used as markers. PMID:19321190

  8. Anti-Diabetic Effects of Madecassic Acid and Rotundic Acid.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yuan-Man; Hung, Yi-chih; Hu, Lihong; Lee, Yi-ju; Yin, Mei-chin

    2015-12-01

    Anti-diabetic effects of madecassic acid (MEA) and rotundic acid (RA) were examined. MEA or RA at 0.05% or 0.1% was supplied to diabetic mice for six weeks. The intake of MEA, not RA, dose-dependently lowered plasma glucose level and increased plasma insulin level. MEA, not RA, intake dose-dependently reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and fibrinogen level; as well as restored antithrombin-III and protein C activities in plasma of diabetic mice. MEA or RA intake decreased triglyceride and cholesterol levels in plasma and liver. Histological data agreed that MEA or RA intake lowered hepatic lipid droplets, determined by ORO stain. MEA intake dose-dependently declined reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidized glutathione levels, increased glutathione content and maintained the activity of glutathione reductase and catalase in the heart and kidneys of diabetic mice. MEA intake dose-dependently reduced interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels in the heart and kidneys of diabetic mice. RA intake at 0.1% declined cardiac and renal levels of these inflammatory factors. These data indicated that MEA improved glycemic control and hemostatic imbalance, lowered lipid accumulation, and attenuated oxidative and inflammatory stress in diabetic mice. Thus, madecassic acid could be considered as an anti-diabetic agent. PMID:26633490

  9. Anti-Diabetic Effects of Madecassic Acid and Rotundic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yuan-Man; Hung, Yi-chih; Hu, Lihong; Lee, Yi-ju; Yin, Mei-chin

    2015-01-01

    Anti-diabetic effects of madecassic acid (MEA) and rotundic acid (RA) were examined. MEA or RA at 0.05% or 0.1% was supplied to diabetic mice for six weeks. The intake of MEA, not RA, dose-dependently lowered plasma glucose level and increased plasma insulin level. MEA, not RA, intake dose-dependently reduced plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity and fibrinogen level; as well as restored antithrombin-III and protein C activities in plasma of diabetic mice. MEA or RA intake decreased triglyceride and cholesterol levels in plasma and liver. Histological data agreed that MEA or RA intake lowered hepatic lipid droplets, determined by ORO stain. MEA intake dose-dependently declined reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidized glutathione levels, increased glutathione content and maintained the activity of glutathione reductase and catalase in the heart and kidneys of diabetic mice. MEA intake dose-dependently reduced interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels in the heart and kidneys of diabetic mice. RA intake at 0.1% declined cardiac and renal levels of these inflammatory factors. These data indicated that MEA improved glycemic control and hemostatic imbalance, lowered lipid accumulation, and attenuated oxidative and inflammatory stress in diabetic mice. Thus, madecassic acid could be considered as an anti-diabetic agent. PMID:26633490

  10. NONLINEARITIES IN THE SULFATE SECONDARY FINE PARTICULATE RESPONSE TO NOX EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS AS MODELED BY THE REGIONAL ACID DEPOSITION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Attention is increasingly being devoted to the health effects of fine particulates. In regions that have a large production of sulfate, sulfuric acid and nitric acid compete for the available ammonia to form aerosols. In addition, the available nitric acid is the result of ur...

  11. Effects of collector types in sampling of atmospheric depositional fluxes.

    PubMed

    Dueñas, C; Fernández, M C; Cañete, S; Pérez Barea, J J; Pérez, M

    2009-02-01

    The bulk gross alpha, gross beta and (7)Be depositional fluxes were measured in Málaga (36.7 degrees N, 4.5 degrees W), a coastal Mediterranean station in the south of Spain for one whole year. In order to quantify the local variation of deposition rates, we have analysed the monthly results from two deposition collectors: a "pot "collector with a continuous water-covered surface and a "funnel" collector. In general, the alpha and beta depositional fluxes from the funnel collector were approximately two times lower than the pot collector. Whereas for the cosmogenic (7)Be, the depositional flux of (7)Be from funnel collector was also approximately two times lower than the pot collector. A good correlation of the depositional flux of (7)Be has been obtained from both collectors.

  12. An Investigation of the Solid-State Condensation Polymerization Reaction in Vapor-Deposited Poly(amic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthamatten, Mitchell; Letts, Stephan A.; Day, Katherine; Cook, Robert C.; Gies, Anthony P.; Nonidez, William K.

    2004-03-01

    The condensation polymerization reaction of 4,4'-oxydianiline (ODA) with pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) to form poly(amic acid) and the subsequent imidization reaction to form polyimide were investigated for films prepared using vapor deposition polymerization techniques. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermal analysis, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of films prepared at different temperatures indicate that additional solid-state polymerization occurs prior to imidization reactions. Experiments suggest that poly(amic acid) oligomers form upon vapor-deposition and have a number-average molecular weights of about 1500 Daltons. Between 100-130 °C these chains undergo additional condensation reactions to form slightly higher molecular weight oligomers. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  13. Trends in the composition of wet deposition: effects of the atmospheric rehabilitation in East-Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquardt, Wolfgang; Brüggemann, Erika; Ihle, Peter

    1996-07-01

    The chemical components in precipitation largely depend on type and quantity of emissions on the course of the air masses at the sampling site. Beginning in 1982, the concentrations of major ions in precipitation at initially 3 sites are described in total as well as arrival sectors. For regions with specific geographical or emission features, 5 to 7 sectors for every sampling site are established, e.g., Scandinavia, or the centres of brown coal combustion in the former GDR. Particulary from the sectors of the former GDR, the precipitation was over-averaged contaminated anthropogenically in the years before the political change. Some components were significantly raised in comparison to other sectors. However, acidity remained on the level of the other sectors in the 80s. In the early 90s, anthropogenic emissions were systematically reduced partly by substitution of brown coal of inferior quality, better flue gas cleaning and partly by closing down industries. The effect of such steps on the wet deposition is being studied in a national German SANA research project (SANA: scientific program of rehabilitation of the atmosphere). In this project, the sampling sites were extended to 7 while maintaining the sampling procedure and the recording of relevant meteorological input-data. As a result, there now exists a homogeneous long-term data base allowing us to study the effects of emissions on wet deposition by the rehabilitation of the atmosphere in the former GDR. The paper focusses on changes in sulphate, nitrate, calcium, acidity, chloride and potassium concentrations in precipitation at the 3 so-called long-term sites. There are conspicuous decreases of some ions on one hand, but there is also an increase of nitrate and acidity, especially in recent years.

  14. Graphene decorated microelectrodes for simultaneous detection of ascorbic, dopamine, and folic acids by means of chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namdar, N.; Hassanpour Amiri, M.; Dehghan Nayeri, F.; Gholizadeh, A.; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, high quality and large area graphene layers were synthesized using thermal chemical vapour deposition on copper foil substrates. We use graphene incorporated electrodes to measure simultaneously ascorbic acid, dopamine and folic acid. Cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry methods were used to evaluate electrochemical behaviour of the grown graphene layers. The graphene-modified electrode shows large electrochemical potential difference compared to bare gold electrodes with higher current responses. Also our fabricated electrodes configuration can be used easily for microfluidic analysis.

  15. Long-term recovery of lakes in the Adirondack region of New York to decreases in acidic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waller, Kristin; Driscoll, Charles; Lynch, Jason; Newcomb, Dani; Roy, Karen

    2012-01-01

    After years of adverse impacts to the acid-sensitive ecosystems of the eastern United States, the Acid Rain Program and Nitrogen Budget Program were developed to control sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and nitrogen oxide (NO x) emissions through market-based cap and trade systems. We used data from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program's National Trends Network (NTN) and the U.S. EPA Temporally Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) program to evaluate the response of lake-watersheds in the Adirondack region of New York to changes in emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides resulting from the Acid Rain Program and the Nitrogen Budget Program. TIME is a long-term monitoring program designed to sample statistically selected subpopulations of lakes and streams across the eastern U.S. to quantify regional trends in surface water chemistry due to changes in atmospheric deposition. Decreases in wet sulfate deposition for the TIME lake-watersheds from 1991 to 2007 (-1.04 meq m -2-yr) generally corresponded with decreases in estimated lake sulfate flux (-1.46 ± 0.72 meq m -2-yr), suggesting declines in lake sulfate were largely driven by decreases in atmospheric deposition. Decreases in lake sulfate and to a lesser extent nitrate have generally coincided with increases in acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) resulting in shifts in lakes among ANC sensitivity classes. The percentage of acidic Adirondack lakes (ANC <0 μeq L -1) decreased from 15.5% (284 lakes) to 8.3% (152 lakes) since the implementation of the Acid Rain Program and the Nitrogen Budget Program. Two measures of ANC were considered in our analysis: ANC determined directly by Gran plot analysis (ANC G) and ANC calculated by major ion chemistry (ANC calc = CB - CA). While these two metrics should theoretically show similar responses, ANC calc (+2.03 μeq L -1-yr) increased at more than twice the rate as ANC G (+0.76 μeq L -1-yr). This discrepancy has important implications for assessments of lake recovery

  16. Lower ω-6/ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Ratios Decrease Fat Deposition by Inhibiting Fat Synthesis in Gosling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lihuai; Wang, Shunan; Ding, Luoyang; Liang, Xianghuan; Wang, Mengzhi; Dong, Li; Wang, Hongrong

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of dietary ω-6/ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratios on lipid metabolism in goslings. One hundred and sixty 21-day-old Yangzhou geese of similar weight were randomly divided into 4 groups. They were fed different PUFA-supplemented diets (the 4 diets had ω-6/ω-3 PUFA ratios of 12:1, 9:1, 6:1, or 3:1). The geese were slaughtered and samples of liver and muscle were collected at day 70. The activities and the gene expression of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism were measured. The results show that the activities of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), malic enzyme (ME), and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were lower (p<0.05), but the activities of hepatic lipase (HL) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) were higher (p<0.05), in the liver and the muscle from the 3:1 and 6:1 groups compared with those in the 9:1 and 12:1 groups. Expression of the genes for FAS (p<0.01), ME (p<0.01) and ACC (p<0.05) were higher in the muscle of groups fed diets with higher ω-6/ω-3 PUFA ratios. Additionally, in situ hybridization tests showed that the expression intensities of the high density lipoprotein (HDL-R) gene in the 12:1 and 9:1 groups were significantly lower (p<0.01) than that of the 3:1 group in the muscle of goslings. In conclusion, diets containing lower ω-6/ω-3 PUFA ratios (3:1 or 6:1) could decrease fat deposition by inhibiting fat synthesis in goslings. PMID:27189638

  17. Lower ω-6/ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Ratios Decrease Fat Deposition by Inhibiting Fat Synthesis in Gosling.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lihuai; Wang, Shunan; Ding, Luoyang; Liang, Xianghuan; Wang, Mengzhi; Dong, Li; Wang, Hongrong

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of dietary ω-6/ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) ratios on lipid metabolism in goslings. One hundred and sixty 21-day-old Yangzhou geese of similar weight were randomly divided into 4 groups. They were fed different PUFA-supplemented diets (the 4 diets had ω-6/ω-3 PUFA ratios of 12:1, 9:1, 6:1, or 3:1). The geese were slaughtered and samples of liver and muscle were collected at day 70. The activities and the gene expression of enzymes involved in lipid metabolism were measured. The results show that the activities of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), malic enzyme (ME), and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were lower (p<0.05), but the activities of hepatic lipase (HL) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) were higher (p<0.05), in the liver and the muscle from the 3:1 and 6:1 groups compared with those in the 9:1 and 12:1 groups. Expression of the genes for FAS (p<0.01), ME (p<0.01) and ACC (p<0.05) were higher in the muscle of groups fed diets with higher ω-6/ω-3 PUFA ratios. Additionally, in situ hybridization tests showed that the expression intensities of the high density lipoprotein (HDL-R) gene in the 12:1 and 9:1 groups were significantly lower (p<0.01) than that of the 3:1 group in the muscle of goslings. In conclusion, diets containing lower ω-6/ω-3 PUFA ratios (3:1 or 6:1) could decrease fat deposition by inhibiting fat synthesis in goslings.

  18. Different responses of two Mosla species to potassium limitation in relation to acid rain deposition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Gu, Bao-jing; Ge, Ying; Liu, Zhen; Jiang, De-an; Chang, Scott X; Chang, Jie

    2009-08-01

    The increasingly serious problem of acid rain is leading to increased potassium (K) loss from soils, and in our field investigation, we found that even congenerically relative Mosla species show different tolerance to K-deficiency. A hydroponic study was conducted on the growth of two Mosla species and their morphological, physiological and stoichiometric traits in response to limited (0.35 mmol K/L), normal (3.25 mmol K/L) and excessive (6.50 mmol K/L) K concentrations. Mosla hangchowensis is an endangered plant, whereas Mosla dianthera a widespread weed. In the case of M. hangchowensis, in comparison with normal K concentration, K-limitation induced a significant reduction in net photosynthetic rate (P(n)), soluble protein content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration. However, leaf mass ratio (LMR) and root mass ratio (RMR) were changed little by K-limitation. In contrast, for M. dianthera, K-limitation had little effect on P(n), soluble protein content, SOD activity, and MDA concentration, but increased LMR and RMR. Critical values of N (nitrogen):K and K:P (phosphorus) ratios in the shoots indicated that limitation in acquiring K occurred under K-limited conditions for M. hangchowensis but not for M. dianthera. We found that low K content in natural habitats was a restrictive factor in the growth and distribution of M. hangchowensis, and soil K-deficiency caused by acid rain worsened the situation of M. hangchowensis, while M. dianthera could well acclimate to the increasing K-deficiency. We suggest that controlling the acid rain and applying K fertilizers may be an effective way to rescue the endangered M. hangchowensis.

  19. Relationships between acid deposition, watershed characteristics, and stream chemistry in Maryland's coastal plain. Final report. Volume 1. Text. Report for May 1984-June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.; Bartoshesky, J.; Heimbuch, D.; Janicki, J.; Petrimoulx, H.

    1987-06-01

    Precipitation and stream-water chemistry data were collected from three watersheds in the Coastal Plain region of Maryland during the period May 1984 through June 1985 in an attempt to determine the potential effects of acidic deposition on the chemistry of these streams. The study streams included Lyons Creek, Morgan Creek, and Granny Finley Branch; these streams were chosen based on their differential responses to storm events observed in a survey of Coastal Plain streams in the spring of 1983. Lyons Creek typically exhibited lower pH, acid-neutralizing capacity, and concentrations of base cations than observed in the other streams. Sulfate mass balances suggest that the soils in the Lyons Creek watershed also have less affinity for sulfur retention than do soils of the other watersheds. Acidic pulses were observed in all three streams during the spring months; however, the magnitude of these pulses was less than that observed in 1983. Modeling of the relationships between precipitation chemistry, watershed interactions, and stream chemistry suggests that precipitation acidity can influence stream-water acidity, depending upon hydrological conditions and availabiility of acid-neutralizing materials in the watersheds.

  20. Effect of folic acid on zinc absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, L.; Keating, S.; King, J.C.; Stokstad, E.L.R.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of folic acid on zinc uptake was studied in the human and in the rat. The serum zinc response to a 25 mg oral dose or zinc was measured with and without a 10 mg dose of folic acid. Serum zinc levels were measured prior to the oral dose of zinc and at hourly intervals up to 4 hours after the dose. When zinc was given along, the increases in serum zinc from baseline at hours 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 92, 118, 92 and 66 ..mu..g/dl, respectively. When both zinc and folic acid were given, the increases in serum zinc at hours 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 100, 140, 110 and 75 ..mu..g/dl, respectively. When the increases in serum zinc were plotted against time, there was no significant difference between the areas under the two curves. The everted jejunal sac from the rat was used to study the effect of folate on zinc transport using 100 ..mu..M zinc in the mucosal buffer. The addition of folic acid at levels up to 10/sup -3/M had no significant effect on zinc transport to the serosal side solution or on uptake by the intestinal mucosa. This in vivo study with humans and in vitro study with rat intestine does not support a direct adverse effect of folic acid on zinc absorption.

  1. Long term response of acid-sensitive Vermont Lakes to sulfate deposition

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric deposition of sulfur can negatively affect the health of lakes and streams, particularly in poorly buffered catchments. In response to the Clean Air Act Amendments, wet deposition of sulfate decreased more than 35% in Vermont between 1990 and 2008. However, most of ...

  2. Initial results from the Pawnee eddy correlation system for acid deposition research

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, K.; Massman, W.; Stocker, D.; Fox, D.G.; Stellman, D.; Hazlett, D.

    1989-01-01

    The Pawnee grassland eddy correlation dry deposition project is described. Instrumentation, methods of analysis, and initial data and research findings are presented. Data from this eddy correlation system show agreement with previous observations of deposition velocities for atmospheric ozone, NO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x}; micrometeorological theory; and micrometeorological site characteristics.

  3. Brooktrout Lake case study: biotic recovery from acid deposition 20 years after the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, James W; Acker, Frank W; Bloomfield, Jay A; Boylen, Charles W; Charles, Donald F; Daniels, Robert A; Eichler, Lawrence W; Farrell, Jeremy L; Feranec, Robert S; Hare, Matthew P; Kanfoush, Sharon L; Preall, Richard J; Quinn, Scott O; Rowell, H Chandler; Schoch, William F; Shaw, William H; Siegfried, Clifford A; Sullivan, Timothy J; Winkler, David A; Nierzwicki-Bauer, Sandra A

    2015-03-01

    The Adirondack Mountain region is an extensive geographic area (26,305 km(2)) in upstate New York where acid deposition has negatively affected water resources for decades and caused the extirpation of local fish populations. The water quality decline and loss of an established brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis [Mitchill]) population in Brooktrout Lake were reconstructed from historical information dating back to the late 1880s. Water quality and biotic recovery were documented in Brooktrout Lake in response to reductions of S deposition during the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s and provided a unique scientific opportunity to re-introduce fish in 2005 and examine their critical role in the recovery of food webs affected by acid deposition. Using C and N isotope analysis of fish collagen and state hatchery feed as well as Bayesian assignment tests of microsatellite genotypes, we document in situ brook trout reproduction, which is the initial phase in the restoration of a preacidification food web structure in Brooktrout Lake. Combined with sulfur dioxide emissions reductions promulgated by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, our results suggest that other acid-affected Adirondack waters could benefit from careful fish re-introduction protocols to initiate the ecosystem reconstruction of important components of food web dimensionality and functionality.

  4. Brooktrout Lake case study: biotic recovery from acid deposition 20 years after the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, James W; Acker, Frank W; Bloomfield, Jay A; Boylen, Charles W; Charles, Donald F; Daniels, Robert A; Eichler, Lawrence W; Farrell, Jeremy L; Feranec, Robert S; Hare, Matthew P; Kanfoush, Sharon L; Preall, Richard J; Quinn, Scott O; Rowell, H Chandler; Schoch, William F; Shaw, William H; Siegfried, Clifford A; Sullivan, Timothy J; Winkler, David A; Nierzwicki-Bauer, Sandra A

    2015-03-01

    The Adirondack Mountain region is an extensive geographic area (26,305 km(2)) in upstate New York where acid deposition has negatively affected water resources for decades and caused the extirpation of local fish populations. The water quality decline and loss of an established brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis [Mitchill]) population in Brooktrout Lake were reconstructed from historical information dating back to the late 1880s. Water quality and biotic recovery were documented in Brooktrout Lake in response to reductions of S deposition during the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s and provided a unique scientific opportunity to re-introduce fish in 2005 and examine their critical role in the recovery of food webs affected by acid deposition. Using C and N isotope analysis of fish collagen and state hatchery feed as well as Bayesian assignment tests of microsatellite genotypes, we document in situ brook trout reproduction, which is the initial phase in the restoration of a preacidification food web structure in Brooktrout Lake. Combined with sulfur dioxide emissions reductions promulgated by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, our results suggest that other acid-affected Adirondack waters could benefit from careful fish re-introduction protocols to initiate the ecosystem reconstruction of important components of food web dimensionality and functionality. PMID:25621941

  5. Effects of sulfur oxide pollutants on respiratory function, particle deposition and bronchial clearance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.

    1980-11-01

    The effects of sulfur oxide pollutants on respiratory function, particle deposition, and bronchial clearance were explored in a series of three studies, two on donkeys and one on humans. In the first study, the effects of one-hour inhalation exposures to 0.3 - 0.6 micrograms H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ aerosols in the donkey were studied in terms of alterations in pulmonary flow resistance and dynamic compliance, and changes in the regional deposition and tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance of an inert test aerosol. In the second study, the effect of chronic inhalation exposures to sulfuric acid mist upon mucociliary clearance from the lungs was studied, using the donkey as an analogue for man. Four animals were exposed one hour per day, five days per week, for six months; two to a concentration of 102 micrograms/cu m, the other to 106 micrograms/cu m. In the final study, the mucociliary particle clearance and respiratory mechanics of twelve healty nonsmokers exposed to 1/2 micrometer H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ at 0 (control), 100, 300, and 1,000 micrograms/cu m for one hour per day for four days were examined.

  6. Study of the adhesive properties versus stability/aging of hernia repair meshes after deposition of RF activated plasma polymerized acrylic acid coating.

    PubMed

    Rivolo, Paola; Nisticò, Roberto; Barone, Fabrizio; Faga, Maria Giulia; Duraccio, Donatella; Martorana, Selanna; Ricciardi, Serena; Magnacca, Giuliana

    2016-08-01

    In order to confer adhesive properties to commercial polypropylene (PP) meshes, a surface plasma-induced deposition of poly-(acrylic acid) (PPAA) is performed. Once biomaterials were functionalized, different post-deposition treatments (i.e. water washing and/or thermal treatments) were investigated with the aim of monitoring the coating degradation (and therefore the loss of adhesion) after 3months of aging in both humid/oxidant (air) and inert (nitrogen) atmospheres. A wide physicochemical characterization was carried out in order to evaluate the functionalization effectiveness and the adhesive coating homogeneity by means of static water drop shape analysis and several spectroscopies (namely, FTIR, UV-Visible and X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy). The modification of the adhesion properties after post-deposition treatments as well as aging under different storage atmospheres were investigated by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) used in Force/Distance (F/D) mode. This technique confirms itself as a powerful tool for unveiling the surface adhesion capacity as well as the homogeneity of the functional coatings along the fibers. Results obtained evidenced that post-deposition treatments are mandatory in order to remove all oligomers produced during the plasma-treatment, whereas aging tests evidenced that these devices can be simply stored in presence of air for at least three months without a meaningful degradation of the original properties. PMID:27157754

  7. Study of the adhesive properties versus stability/aging of hernia repair meshes after deposition of RF activated plasma polymerized acrylic acid coating.

    PubMed

    Rivolo, Paola; Nisticò, Roberto; Barone, Fabrizio; Faga, Maria Giulia; Duraccio, Donatella; Martorana, Selanna; Ricciardi, Serena; Magnacca, Giuliana

    2016-08-01

    In order to confer adhesive properties to commercial polypropylene (PP) meshes, a surface plasma-induced deposition of poly-(acrylic acid) (PPAA) is performed. Once biomaterials were functionalized, different post-deposition treatments (i.e. water washing and/or thermal treatments) were investigated with the aim of monitoring the coating degradation (and therefore the loss of adhesion) after 3months of aging in both humid/oxidant (air) and inert (nitrogen) atmospheres. A wide physicochemical characterization was carried out in order to evaluate the functionalization effectiveness and the adhesive coating homogeneity by means of static water drop shape analysis and several spectroscopies (namely, FTIR, UV-Visible and X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy). The modification of the adhesion properties after post-deposition treatments as well as aging under different storage atmospheres were investigated by means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) used in Force/Distance (F/D) mode. This technique confirms itself as a powerful tool for unveiling the surface adhesion capacity as well as the homogeneity of the functional coatings along the fibers. Results obtained evidenced that post-deposition treatments are mandatory in order to remove all oligomers produced during the plasma-treatment, whereas aging tests evidenced that these devices can be simply stored in presence of air for at least three months without a meaningful degradation of the original properties.

  8. Determination of effects of deposition and anneal properties for tetranitratotitanium deposited TiO2 dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeon-Seag; Campbell, S. A.; Gilmer, D. C.; Kaushik, V.; Conner, J.; Prabhu, L.; Anderson, A.

    1999-03-01

    Carbon and hydrogen free tetranitratotitanium was synthesized, which is believed to thermally decomposed primarily as: Ti(NO3)4→TiO2+4NO2+O2. The by-products of the thermal decomposition of tetranitratotitanium, which include NO2 and O2, may possibly provide a robust ultrathin tunnel interfacial layer. Due to the hydrogen free nature of thermolysis, N2O may form an oxynitride layer which has been shown to produce thermal oxynitrides with higher quality than NH3-based nitride oxides. Unlike titanium tetrakis isopropoxide (TTIP) deposited films, the interface state density more closely follows the "U" shape characteristic of conventional thermal SiO2/Si interfaces. The integrated interface state density is considerably less for the film annealed at higher temperature, which should produce considerably higher inversion layer mobilities. This improvement of the interface, compared to TTIP deposited films, is believed to be due to the elimination of water vapor from the deposition ambient.

  9. Depositional controls, distribution, and effectiveness of world's petroleum source rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Klemme, H.D.; Ulmishek, G.F.

    1989-03-01

    Six stratigraphic intervals representing one-third of Phanerozoic time contain source rocks that have provided more than 90% of the world's discovered oil and gas reserves (in barrels of oil equivalent). The six intervals include (1) Silurian (generated 9% of the world's reserves); (2) Upper Devonian-Tournaisian (8% of reserves); (3) Pennsylvanian-Lower Permian (8% of reserves); (4) Upper Jurassic (25% of reserves); (5) middle Cretaceous (29% of reserves); and (6) Oligocene-Miocene (12.5% of reserves). This uneven distribution of source rocks in time has no immediately obvious cyclicity, nor are the intervals exactly repeatable in the commonality of factors that controlled the formation of source rocks. In this study, source rocks of the six intervals have been mapped worldwide together with oil and gas reserves generated by these rocks. Analysis of the maps shows that the main factors affecting deposition of these source rocks and their spatial distribution and effectiveness in generating hydrocarbon reserves are geologic age, global and regional tectonics, paleogeography, climate, and biologic evolution. The effect of each of the factors on geologic setting and quality of source rocks has been analyzed. Compilation of data on maturation time for these source rocks demonstrated that the majority of discovered oil and gas is very young, more than 80% of the world's oil and gas reserves have been generated since Aptian time, and nearly half of the world's hydrocarbons have been generated and trapped since the Oligocene.

  10. Effect of Deposition Rate on the Stress Evolution of Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoda, Kentaro; Colmenares-Angulo, Jose; Valarezo, Alfredo; Sampath, Sanjay

    2012-12-01

    The deposition rate plays an important role in determining the thickness, stress state, and physical properties of plasma-sprayed coatings. In this article, the effect of the deposition rate on the stress evolution during the deposition (named evolving stress) of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings was systematically studied by varying the powder feed rate and the robot-scanning speed. The evolving stress during the deposition tends to increase with the increased deposition rate, and this tendency was less significant at a longer spray distance. In some cases, the powder feed rate had more significant influence on the evolving stress than the robot speed. This tendency can be associated with a deviation of a local deposition temperature at a place where sprayed particles are deposited from an average substrate temperature. At a further higher deposition rate, the evolving stress was relieved by introduction of macroscopic vertical cracks as well as horizontal branching cracks.

  11. Sulphur dioxide emissions in Europe 1880 1991 and their effect on sulphur concentrations and depositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylona, Sophia

    1996-11-01

    A historical emission inventory for sulphur dioxide has been compiled for Europe covering the period 1880 1991. The estimated emissions have been used as input to the sulphur module of the EMEP/MSC-W acid deposition model. The aim was to show the way and the extent to which the historical development of anthropogenic sulphur dioxide emissions alone has affected the concentration and deposition fields of oxidised sulphur in Europe. Although acknowledged, effects exerted by the meteorological variability and the changing oxidising capacity of the atmosphere over the years have not been taken into consideration. Long-term emission estimates reveal that combustion of coal was the dominant emission source before World War II in all countries and combustion of liquid fuels thereafter in most. Releases from industrial processes were relatively small. National sulphur dioxide emissions peaked mainly in the 1960s and 1970s, whilst emission control measures resulted in gradual reductions in most countries in the 1980s. In Europe as a whole, coal combustion remained the major emission source throughout the century. Total anthropogenic releases increased by a factor of 10 between the 1880 s and 1970s when they peaked at approximately 55 million tonnes of sulphur dioxide, followed by a 30% decline in the 1980s. Uncertainties in national emission estimates due to uncertain sulphur contents in fossil fuels are within ± 30% for 22 out of 28 countries and ± 45% for the rest. The location of emission sources in Europe has shown over the years a progressive detachment from the coalfields towards a widespread distribution, accompanied in the last decades by considerable emission reductions over north-western and parts of central Europe and substantial increases in the south and south-east. Modelled air concentrations and depositions reflect to a great extent the emission pattern, revealing two- to six-fold increases between the 1880 s and 1970s. Maximum sulphur loadings are confined

  12. Bibliography on air pollution and acid rain effects on fish, wildlife, and their habitats

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography results from the development of nine reports synthesizing information from scientific research related to the effects of air pollution and acid deposition on fish and wildlife. The reports cover deserts, steppes, forests, grasslands, lakes, tundra, alpine meadows, rivers, streams, urban ecosystems, and critical habitats of threatened and endangered species.

  13. Bibliography on air pollution and acid rain effects on fish, wildlife, and their habitats. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    This bibliography is the result of the development of a series of nine reports synthesizing information from scientific research related to the effects of air pollution and acid deposition on fish and wildlife resources. The reports include an Introduction, Deserts and Steppes, Forests, Grasslands, Lakes, Tundra and Alpine Meadows, Rivers and Streams, Urban Ecosystems, and Critical Habitats of Threatened and Endangered Species.

  14. Does overfeeding enhance genotype effects on energy metabolism and lipid deposition in breast muscle of ducks?

    PubMed

    Chartrin, Pascal; Bernadet, Marie-Dominique; Guy, Gérard; Mourot, Jacques; Hocquette, Jean-François; Rideau, Nicole; Duclos, Michel Jacques; Baéza, Elisabeth

    2006-12-01

    We evaluated the effects of genotype (Muscovy, Pekin and their crossbreed hinny and mule ducks) and feeding levels (overfeeding between 12 and 14 weeks of age vs ad libitum feeding) on energy metabolism and lipid deposition in breast muscle of ducks. Samples of breast muscle (Pectoralis major) were collected at 14 weeks of age from 8 birds per group. Overfeeding induced an accumulation of lipids in breast muscle (1.5- to 1.7-fold, depending on genotype) mainly induced by triglyceride deposition. It also induced a considerable increase in the amounts (expressed as g/100 g of tissue) of saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids (SFA, MUFA), while the amounts of poly-unsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) remained unchanged in hinny and Muscovy ducks or slightly increased in Pekin and mule ducks. In breast muscle, overfeeding decreased the activity of the main enzymes involved in lipogenesis from glucose (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, G6PDH, malic enzyme, ME, acetyl CoA carboxylase, ACX). Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in Pectoralis major muscle was also significantly decreased (-21%). The ability of muscle tissues to catabolize long-chain fatty acids, as assessed by beta-hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activity, was increased in Pectoralis major muscle, as was cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) activity. Hybrid and Pekin ducks exhibited higher levels of ACX and LPL activity in Pectoralis major muscle than Muscovy ducks, suggesting a greater ability to synthesise lipids in situ, and to take up circulating lipids. Total lipid content in breast muscle of hybrid and Pekin ducks was higher than in that of Muscovy ducks. In hybrid and Pekin ducks, lipid composition of breast muscle was characterized by higher amounts of triglycerides, SFA and MUFA than in Muscovy ducks. Finally, oxidative metabolism was greater in Pectoralis major muscles of hybrid and Pekin ducks than in Muscovy ducks, suggesting an adaptative strategy of muscle energy metabolism according to lipid level.

  15. In vivo endocrine effects of naphthenic acids in fish.

    PubMed

    Knag, Anne Christine; Sebire, Marion; Mayer, Ian; Meier, Sonnich; Renner, Patrick; Katsiadaki, Ioanna

    2013-11-01

    Oil pollution from various sources, including exploration, production and transportation, is a growing global concern. The highest toxicity of hydrocarbon pollutants is associated with the water-soluble phase compounds, including naphthenic acids, a known component found in all hydrocarbon deposits. Recently, naphthenic acids (NAs) have shown estrogenic and anti-androgenic effects in vitro. For this reason we investigated the potential effects of two commercial mixtures of naphthenic acids on fish in vivo, using the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) as a model species. Anti-androgenic and estrogenic properties of tested compounds were evaluated using the androgenized female stickleback screen (AFSS) and a variant of the 21-d fish screen (TG230) respectively. One-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed that the complex commercial NAs mixtures were dominated by acyclic carboxylic acids. In one experiment (freshwater) we found a clear effect of NA exposure on spiggin levels; this was contrary to our hypothesis since NAs enhanced the androgenic potency of DHT (when co-administered) without inducing spiggin when tested in the absence of DHT. Exposure to NAs did not have a statistically significant effect on vitellogenin (Vtg) production in male stickleback, although the Vtg responses were increasing with increasing exposure concentrations. This study shows that in contrast to previous in vitro data, NAs did not exhibit either estrogenic or anti-androgenic properties in vivo, at the concentrations tested. On the contrary, at least in freshwater, NAs appear to have an overall androgenic effect that is not mediated via the androgen receptor involved in spiggin synthesis. Possible reasons for this discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo results as well as between our studies are discussed.

  16. Effects of Docosahexaenoic Acid on Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Farooqui, Akhlaq A.; Siddiqi, Nikhat J.; Alhomida, Abdullah S.; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the major polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) in the brain and a structural component of neuronal membranes. Changes in DHA content of neuronal membranes lead to functional changes in the activity of receptors and other proteins which might be associated with synaptic function. Accumulating evidence suggests the beneficial effects of dietary DHA supplementation on neurotransmission. This article reviews the beneficial effects of DHA on the brain; uptake, incorporation and release of DHA at synapses, effects of DHA on synapses, effects of DHA on neurotransmitters, DHA metabolites, and changes in DHA with age. Further studies to better understand the metabolome of DHA could result in more effective use of this molecule for treatment of neurodegenerative or neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:24116288

  17. Patterns of wet deposition of acidic matter in Maryland: January-June 1984. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, C.; Bartoshesky, J.; Pfeffer, N.; Campbell, S.

    1987-03-03

    A data base containing precipitation-chemistry data collected by multiple monitoring programs in and around Maryland for the January through June 1984 time period was compiled. Isopleth maps were constructed showing the spatial variation in the precipitation concentrations and depositions of hydrogen ion, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, calcium, sodium, chloride, potassium, and magnesium. For each parameter, the concentration pattern was very similar to its deposition pattern. The patterns suggest the occurrence of a ridge of high sulfate, nitrate, and hydrogen ion concentrations and depositions extending from south-central Pennsylvania, south into Maryland along the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay.

  18. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.; Kender, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines (Vitis labrusca, Bailey) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to pH 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, eight additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH 2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Only the cultivars de Chaunac and Ives had reduced berry soluble solids with chronic weekly sprays at pH 2.75. Reduction in soluble solids was not associated with increased oxidant stipple (ozone injury) in Concord and de Chaunac cultivars, but this association was observed in Ives. There was no evidence that acid rain in combination with ozone increased oxidant stipple as occurs when ozone and SO/sub 2/ are combined. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.

  19. Effects of acid rain on grapevines

    SciTech Connect

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Dee, R.J.; Kender, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature vineyard-growing Concord grapevines were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions ranging from pH 2.5 to 5.5 both as acute treatments at anthesis and chronically throughout the season in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, 8 additional varieties were also treated with simulated acid rain solutions at pH 2.75 and 3.25. With Concord in 1981, few foliar lesions on leaves were visible at pH 2.75. In contrast, many leaf lesions with decreased fruit soluble solids were observed at pH 2.5 in 1980. The relationship between acid-rain and oxidant stipple, chlorosis, and soluble solids in the absence of acid rain leaf lesions at pH>2.5 remains unclear. Acute sprays (pH2.75) at anthesis reduced pollen germination in four grape cultivars. However, fruit set was reduced in only one of these. Grape yields were not influenced by acid rain treatments. There was no evidence that acid-rain at ambient pH levels had negative effects on grape production or fruit quality.

  20. Effects of acid precipitation on cation transport in New Hampshire forest soils. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Cronan, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    This report describes the results of our investigation of the effects of regional acid precipitation on forest soils and watershed biogeochemistry in New England. The report provides descriptions of the following research findings: (1) acid precipitation may cause increased aluminum mobilization and leaching from soils to sensitive aquatic systems; (2) acid deposition may shift the historic carbonic acid/organic acid leaching regime in forest soils to one dominated by atmospheric H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/; (3) acid precipitation may accelerate nutrient cation leaching from forest soils and may pose a particular threat to the potassium resources of northeastern forested ecosystems; (4) while acid rain may pass through some coniferous canopies without being neutralized, similar inputs of acid rainfall to hardwood canopies may be neutralized significantly by Bronsted base leaching and by leaf surface ion exchange mechanisms; and (5) progressive acid dissolution of soils in the laboratory may provide an important tool for predicting the patterns of aluminum leaching from soils exposed to acid deposition.

  1. A Demonstration of Acid Rain and Lake Acidification: Wet Deposition of Sulfur Dioxide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goss, Lisa M.

    2003-01-01

    Introduces a science demonstration on the dissolution of sulfuric oxide emphasizing the concept of acid rain which is an environmental problem. Demonstrates the acidification from acid rain on two lake environments, limestone and granite. Includes safety information. (YDS)

  2. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program: Acidic deposition: An inventory of non-Federal research, monitoring, and assessment information

    SciTech Connect

    Herrick, C.N.

    1990-01-01

    The Acid Precipitation Act of 1990 (Title VII of the Energy Security Act of 1980, P.L. 96-294) established the Interagency Task Force on Acid Precipitation to develop and implement the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). The information included in the document was provided to NAPAP's Task Group Leaders and State-of-Science and State-of-Technology authors in July 1989. The early release was intended to assure that the authors would be aware of the information at an early phase in the assessment production process.

  3. Polymer matrix effects on acid generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedynyshyn, Theodore H.; Goodman, Russell B.; Roberts, Jeanette

    2008-03-01

    We have measured the acid generation efficiency with EUV exposure of a PAG in different polymer matrixes representing the main classes of resist polymers as well as some previously described fluoropolymers for lithographic applications. The polymer matrix was found to have a significant effect on the acid generation efficiency of the PAG studied. A linear relationship exists between the absorbance of the resist and the acid generation efficiency. A second inverse relationship exists between Dill C and aromatic content of the resist polymer. It was shown that polymer sensitization is important for acid generation with EUV exposure and the Dill C parameter can be increased by up to five times with highly absorbing non-aromatic polymers, such as non-aromatic fluoropolymers, over an ESCAP polymer. The increase in the Dill C value will lead to an up to five fold increase in resist sensitivity. It is our expectation that these insights into the nature of polymer matrix effects on acid generation could lead to increased sensitivity for EUV resists.

  4. Effects of Buffer Salt Concentration on the Dominated Deposition Mechanism and Optical Characteristics of Chemically Deposited Cadmium Sulfide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakhaki, Z. Makhdoumi; Youzbashi, A.; Sangpour, P.; Kazemzadeh, A.; Naderi, N.; Bazargan, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Effects of buffer salt concentration on the rate of deposition, dominated deposition mechanism and subsequently the structural, morphological, and optical properties of cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) on glass substrate were investigated. The precursors were chosen to be cadmium chloride (CdCl2) as the cadmium source, thiourea (CS(NH2)2) as the sulfur source, ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) as the buffer salt and ammonia as the complexing agent and the pH controller. The influence of the NH4NO3 concentration on the structure, morphology, film uniformity, stoichiometry and optical properties of CdS thin films was also studied by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscope, uv-visible and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopes. The XRD studies revealed that all the deposited films exhibited a (002)h/(111)c preferred orientation. The crystallite size was increased from 20nm to 30nm by the increase of concentration of NH4NO3 from 0.5M to 2.5M. The morphology of CdS thin films were agglomerated spherical particles consisted of smaller particles. The surface of thin films deposited at the NH4NO3 concentration of 0.5M was compact and smooth. The increase of the concentration of NH4NO3 decreased the packing density of the films. The optical band gap was in the range of 2.25-2.4eV, which was decreased by the decrement of packing density. The PL spectra showed two peaks centered at 400nm and 500nm which are attributed to violet and band-to-band emissions, respectively.

  5. Thermoresponsive PDMAEMA Brushes: Effect of Gold Nanoparticle Deposition.

    PubMed

    Yenice, Zuleyha; Schön, Sebastian; Bildirir, Hakan; Genzer, Jan; von Klitzing, Regine

    2015-08-13

    The paper addresses the effect of gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) deposition on the thermoresponsive volume phase transition of the weak polyelectrolyte poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) brushes. PDMAEMA brushes were synthesized via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). The PDMAEMA/Au-NP composite brushes were fabricated by immersing the brush modified wafer in the Au-NP suspension. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), ellipsometry, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have been employed to characterize the neat PDMAEMA brushes and PDMAEMA/Au-NP composite brushes. All neat PDMAEMA brushes swelled below the volume phase transition temperature and collapsed with increasing temperature over a broad temperature range independent of the initial brush thickness. Water uptake of the brushes is also independent of initial brush thickness. The adsorption of the charged Au-NPs significantly affects the degree of swelling and the thermoresponsive properties of the brushes. PDMAEMA/Au-NP composite brushes do not exhibit any noticeable phase transition at the experimental temperature range irrespective of the initial brush thickness. The reason for this behavior is attributed to a combination of the following: the decreased conformational entropy of the Au-NP adsorbed polymer chains, the increased hydrophilicity of the system due to the charged Au-NPs, and the ≈13 nm diameter Au-NPs causing steric hindrance. We have also shown that the AFM full-indentation method can be successfully applied to determine the polymer brush thicknesses. PMID:26132296

  6. Quantification of hydrochloric acid and particulate deposition resulting from space shuttle launches at John F. Kennedy space center, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.; Hall, Carlton R.

    1990-07-01

    Observations of damage to vegetation, acute reductions in surface water pH, and kills of small fish prompted the Biomedical Operations and Research Office at the John F. Kennedy Space Center to initiate intensive environmental evaluations of possible acute and long-term chronic impacts that may be produced by repeated launches of the space shuttle. An important step in this evaluation was the identification of deposition patterns and the quantification of ecosystem loading rates of exhaust constituents from the solid rocket motors (SRMs) in the area of the launch pad. These constituents are primarily aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hydrochloric acid (HCl). During three launches of the space transportation system (STS-11, 13, and 14) up to 100 bulk deposition collectors, 83 mm in diameter containing 100 ml of deionized water, were deployed in a grid pattern covering 12.6 ha north of launch pad 39-A. Estimates of HCl and particulate deposition levels were made based on laboratory measurements of items entrained in the collectors. Captured particulates consisted of a variety of items including Al2O3, sand grains, sea shell fragments, paint chips, and other debris ablated from the launch pad surface by the initial thrust of the SRMs. Estimated ranges of HCl and particulate deposition in the study area were 0-127 g/m2 and 0-246 g/m2, respectively. Deposition patterns were highly influenced by wind speed and direction. These measurements indicate that, under certain meteorological conditions, up to 7.1 × 103 kg of particulates and 3.4 × 103 kg of HCl can be deposited to the near-field environment beyond the launch pad perimeter fence.

  7. Deposition behavior of residual aluminum in drinking water distribution system: Effect of aluminum speciation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Shi, Baoyou; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yan, Mingquan; Lytle, Darren A; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Finished drinking water usually contains some residual aluminum. The deposition of residual aluminum in distribution systems and potential release back to the drinking water could significantly influence the water quality at consumer taps. A preliminary analysis of aluminum content in cast iron pipe corrosion scales and loose deposits demonstrated that aluminum deposition on distribution pipe surfaces could be excessive for water treated by aluminum coagulants including polyaluminum chloride (PACl). In this work, the deposition features of different aluminum species in PACl were investigated by simulated coil-pipe test, batch reactor test and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The deposition amount of non-polymeric aluminum species was the least, and its deposition layer was soft and hydrated, which indicated the possible formation of amorphous Al(OH)3. Al13 had the highest deposition tendency, and the deposition layer was rigid and much less hydrated, which indicated that the deposited aluminum might possess regular structure and self-aggregation of Al13 could be the main deposition mechanism. While for Al30, its deposition was relatively slower and deposited aluminum amount was relatively less compared with Al13. However, the total deposited mass of Al30 was much higher than that of Al13, which was attributed to the deposition of particulate aluminum matters with much higher hydration state. Compared with stationary condition, stirring could significantly enhance the deposition process, while the effect of pH on deposition was relatively weak in the near neutral range of 6.7 to 8.7.

  8. Deposition behavior of residual aluminum in drinking water distribution system: Effect of aluminum speciation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Shi, Baoyou; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Yan, Mingquan; Lytle, Darren A; Wang, Dongsheng

    2016-04-01

    Finished drinking water usually contains some residual aluminum. The deposition of residual aluminum in distribution systems and potential release back to the drinking water could significantly influence the water quality at consumer taps. A preliminary analysis of aluminum content in cast iron pipe corrosion scales and loose deposits demonstrated that aluminum deposition on distribution pipe surfaces could be excessive for water treated by aluminum coagulants including polyaluminum chloride (PACl). In this work, the deposition features of different aluminum species in PACl were investigated by simulated coil-pipe test, batch reactor test and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The deposition amount of non-polymeric aluminum species was the least, and its deposition layer was soft and hydrated, which indicated the possible formation of amorphous Al(OH)3. Al13 had the highest deposition tendency, and the deposition layer was rigid and much less hydrated, which indicated that the deposited aluminum might possess regular structure and self-aggregation of Al13 could be the main deposition mechanism. While for Al30, its deposition was relatively slower and deposited aluminum amount was relatively less compared with Al13. However, the total deposited mass of Al30 was much higher than that of Al13, which was attributed to the deposition of particulate aluminum matters with much higher hydration state. Compared with stationary condition, stirring could significantly enhance the deposition process, while the effect of pH on deposition was relatively weak in the near neutral range of 6.7 to 8.7. PMID:27090705

  9. High Elevation Lakes of the Western US: Are we Studying Systems Recovering from Excess Atmospheric Deposition of Acids and Nutrients?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickman, J. O.

    2011-12-01

    Instrumental records and monitoring of high elevation lakes began in most areas of the western US in the early 1980s. Much effort has been devoted to detecting changes in these aquatic ecosystems resulting from increased atmospheric deposition of acids and nutrients. However, there is growing evidence that thresholds for atmospheric pollutants were crossed much earlier in the 20th Century and that some of the subsequent hydrochemical and ecological changes observed in these lakes may be the result of recovery from earlier atmospheric forcing. We examine responses of high elevation lakes to atmospheric deposition on annual to century timescales using data from a 29-year study of Emerald Lake (Sequoia National Park) and paleolimnological analyses of other high elevation lakes incorporating diatom species analyses and geochemical proxies for fossil-fuel burning. At Emerald Lake, we have observed multiple transitions between nitrogen and phosphorus limitation of phytoplankton, the earliest of which occurred in the beginning of the 1980s and may be the result of reduction in N deposition due to the Clean Air Act. Critical loads analyses incorporating diatom species in lake sediments suggest that thresholds for N deposition were crossed in the period of 1950-1980 in the Rocky Mountains and likely much earlier, 1900-1920, in the Sierra Nevada. Diatom species composition is strongly controlled by acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) in the Sierra Nevada and we have observed a pronounced decline and recovery of ANC over the period of 1920-1980 in some Sierra Nevada lakes that coincides with the abundance of spheroidal carbonaceous particles (i.e., a diagnostic tracer of fossil fuel combustion) preserved in lake sediments; these patterns appear to be driven by increased emissions of oxidized N and S in the mid-20th Century and reductions in acid precursor levels caused by the Clean Air Act in the 1970s. Thus, when interpreting observational records from western high elevation

  10. Lactic acid aided electrochemical deposition of c -axis preferred orientation of zinc oxide thin films: Structural and morphological features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whang, Thou-Jen; Hsieh, Mu-Tao; Tsai, Jia-Ming; Lee, Shyan-Jer

    2011-09-01

    Compact and homogeneous c-axis preferred orientation of zinc oxide (ZnO) films on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass have been prepared electrochemically at -1.2 V vs. Ag|AgCl in a weak acidic condition from 0.06 M Zn(NO 3) 2 with 3 mM lactic acid (LA) added. LA was found having strong influence on the electrodeposition of c-axis preferred orientation of zinc oxide films. Other experimental variables such as deposition temperature, potential, and precursor concentration were also conducted in this article. Among these variables, it was found that precursor concentration of zinc nitrate influenced significantly on growth direction and crystal diameter of zinc oxide. Cyclic voltammetry was used to observe the electrochemistry of the deposition. Crystallinities of the films were examined by X-ray diffractometer. The morphologies of zinc oxide films were observed with a field emitting scanning electron microscope. Optical characteristics of zinc oxide layers were measured with UV-vis spectrophotometer. The band gap of the deposited zinc oxide thin films was evaluated from the Tauc relationship of ( αhν) 2 vs. hν, which was found to be 3.31 eV.

  11. Effect of surface deposits on electromagnetic waves propagating in uniform ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element Galerkin formulation was used to study the effect of material surface deposits on the reflective characteristics of straight uniform ducts with PEC (perfectly electric conducting) walls. Over a wide frequency range, the effect of both single and multiple surface deposits on the duct reflection coefficient were examined. The power reflection coefficient was found to be significantly increased by the addition of deposits on the wall.

  12. Effects of gas atmospheres on poly(lactic acid) film in acrylic acid plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Fina, Alberto; Venturello, Alberto; Geobaldo, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    Plasma polymerized acrylic acid (AA) coatings were deposited on poly(lactic acid) (PLA) films in various gas atmospheres during the pre-treatment of PLA and the deposition of AA, respectively. Therefore, this work was twofold: the argon pretreated PLA films followed by a deposition in argon were investigated against the mixture of argon and oxygen pretreated ones under the same deposition conditions; the plasma deposition of AA operating in different atmospheres (argon, oxygen and nitrogen) was employed to modify the pretreated PLA in oxygen. Chemical and physical changes on the plasma-treated surfaces were examined using contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-FTIR) analysis. The results showed that the discharge gas can have a significant influence on the chemical composition of the PLA surfaces: oxygen plasmas introduced oxygen-containing groups in company with surface etching in pretreatment and deposition, while argon discharges was able to achieve much better hydrophilic behavior and high retention ratio of poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) coating before and after washing in water.

  13. Expression of genes controlling unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis and oil deposition in developing seeds of Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Aizhong

    2014-10-01

    Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L., Euphorbiaceae) seed oil is rich in α-linolenic acid, a kind of n-3 fatty acids with many health benefits. To discover the mechanism underlying α-linolenic acid accumulation in sacha inchi seeds, preliminary research on sacha inchi seed development was carried out from one week after fertilization until maturity, focusing on phenology, oil content, and lipid profiles. The results suggested that the development of sacha inchi seeds from pollination to mature seed could be divided into three periods. In addition, investigations on the effect of temperature on sacha inchi seeds showed that total oil content decreased in the cool season, while unsaturated fatty acid and linolenic acid concentrations increased. In parallel, expression profiles of 17 unsaturated fatty acid related genes were characterized during seed development and the relationships between gene expression and lipid/unsaturated fatty acid accumulation were discussed.

  14. Expression of genes controlling unsaturated fatty acids biosynthesis and oil deposition in developing seeds of Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Liu, Aizhong

    2014-10-01

    Sacha inchi (Plukenetia volubilis L., Euphorbiaceae) seed oil is rich in α-linolenic acid, a kind of n-3 fatty acids with many health benefits. To discover the mechanism underlying α-linolenic acid accumulation in sacha inchi seeds, preliminary research on sacha inchi seed development was carried out from one week after fertilization until maturity, focusing on phenology, oil content, and lipid profiles. The results suggested that the development of sacha inchi seeds from pollination to mature seed could be divided into three periods. In addition, investigations on the effect of temperature on sacha inchi seeds showed that total oil content decreased in the cool season, while unsaturated fatty acid and linolenic acid concentrations increased. In parallel, expression profiles of 17 unsaturated fatty acid related genes were characterized during seed development and the relationships between gene expression and lipid/unsaturated fatty acid accumulation were discussed. PMID:25119487

  15. Acid dew and the role of chemistry in the dry deposition of reactive gases to wetted surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chameides, William L.

    1987-01-01

    A formalism is developed to describe the dry deposition of soluble reactive gases to wetted surfaces in terms of the relevant meteorological conditions, the surface roughness, the total amount of liquid water present on the surface, the rate of accumulation of this water, and the species' solubility and reactivity in the surface water. This formulation is then incorporated into a model designed to simulate the generation of acidic dew from the deposition of HNO3, SO2, S(IV) oxidants, H2O2, and O3. Similar to the observations of dew in the continental U.S., the model generates a dewdrop pH of about 4 by the end of the night; the pH can rapidly fall to toxic levels due to rapid evaporation after sunrise. Relatively low deposition velocities are predicted for the SO2 and O3 because of their lower solubilities and hence larger surface resistances than those of the other oxidants. Because the chemical lifetime of the SO2 in the dew is influenced by the atmospheric levels of H2O2, O3, and SO2, the SO2 deposition velocity is a strong function of these species' atmospheric abundances.

  16. Acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This report has four parts: they discuss acid rain in relation to acid soils, agriculture, forests, and aquatic ecosystems. Among findings: modern sources of acid deposition from the atmosphere for all the acid soils in the world, nor even chiefly responsible for those of northern U.S. Agriculture has its problems, but acid precipitation is probably not one of them. More research is needed to determine to what extent acid precipitation is responsible for forest declines and for smaller detrimental effects on forest growth where no damage to the foliage is evident. Many lakes and streams are extremely sensitive to added acids.

  17. Modeling Atmospheric Deposition across the Northeastern U.S. and its Potential Effects on Forest Albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, D. M.; Ollinger, S. V.; Jenkins, J.; Martin, M.

    2009-12-01

    In 1993 Ollinger did a study to model Atmospheric Deposition across the Northeastern U.S. My project was to update the model to see if the atmospheric deposition concentration or trends have changed in the past 16 year. I also drew a connection to some of Ollinger’s more recent work where he studied the nitrogen content in leaves and its effects on carbon uptake and forest albedo. From his study in 2008 he found that an increase in the nitrogen content in the leaves leads to increased carbon uptake and an increase in short wave albedo. I was hypothesizing that nitrogen deposition acts as an input of nitrogen into the ecosystem, so if you increased the nitrogen deposition the nitrogen content in the leaves would increase as well. This should mean that with greater nitrogen deposition you have a higher short wave albedo. So the second goal of my study was to see if there is a relationship between nitrogen deposition and short wave albedo. I used data from NADP (National Atmospheric Deposition Sites), CASTNET (Clean Air Status and Trends Network sites), and NOAA weather stations to model wet deposition, dry deposition, and rainfall by the latitude, longitude, and elevation of the sites in the Northeastern US. I found a trend between wet deposition and longitude, as you head east in the region the wet deposition decreases. We believe this is because wet deposition reflects long distance pollution transport from major pollution sources to the west of the study region, like power plants in the Great Lakes Region. I then found a trend between dry deposition and latitude, as you head north in the region the dry deposition decreases. This we believe is because dry deposition reflects more local pollution sources, like the concentration of urban areas along the southern coast of the region. With precipitation I found a trend with latitude, longitude, and elevation. The most important fact is that rainfall is greater along the coast and at higher elevations. Then I compared

  18. Trajectory analysis of acid deposition data from the new jersey pine barrens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budd, William W.

    This research provides an example of the application of a simple method for evaluating regional interrelationships using air parcel trajectory analysis. An assessment of trajectories associated with storms affecting McDonald's Branch watershed (39°50'N, 74°30'W) is presented. A simple classification system is used to examine regional contributions of acid precursors. The results of the work suggest that major regional sources of acid precursor emissions dominated precipitation acidity for the Pine Barrens region from 1978 to 1981. An incremental approach to acid precipitation policy is suggested.

  19. Dopant gas effect on silicon chemical vapor depositions: A surface potential model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. A.

    1975-01-01

    A surface potential model is proposed to consistently explain the known dopant gas effects on silicon chemical vapor deposition. This model predicts that the effects of the same dopant gases on the diamond deposition rate using methane and carbon tetrachloride should be opposite and similar to those of silane, respectively. Available data are in agreement with this prediction.

  20. Distinct Effects of Sorbic Acid and Acetic Acid on the Electrophysiology and Metabolism of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    van Beilen, J. W. A.; Teixeira de Mattos, M. J.; Hellingwerf, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    Sorbic acid and acetic acid are among the weak organic acid preservatives most commonly used to improve the microbiological stability of foods. They have similar pKa values, but sorbic acid is a far more potent preservative. Weak organic acids are most effective at low pH. Under these circumstances, they are assumed to diffuse across the membrane as neutral undissociated acids. We show here that the level of initial intracellular acidification depends on the concentration of undissociated acid and less on the nature of the acid. Recovery of the internal pH depends on the presence of an energy source, but acidification of the cytosol causes a decrease in glucose flux. Furthermore, sorbic acid is a more potent uncoupler of the membrane potential than acetic acid. Together these effects may also slow the rate of ATP synthesis significantly and may thus (partially) explain sorbic acid's effectiveness. PMID:25038097

  1. Dry deposition of ammonia, nitric acid, ammonium, and nitrate to alpine tundra at Niwot Ridge, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattray, G.; Sievering, H.

    2001-01-01

    Micrometeorological measurements and ambient air samples, analyzed for concentrations of NH3, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3-, were collected at an alpine tundra site on Niwot Ridge, Colorado. The measured concentrations were extremely low and ranged between 5 and 70ngNm-3. Dry deposition fluxes of these atmospheric species were calculated using the micrometeorological gradient method. The calculated mean flux for NH3 indicates a net deposition to the surface and indicates that NH3 contributed significantly to the total N deposition to the tundra during the August-September measurement period. Our pre-measurement estimate of the compensation point for NH3 in air above the tundra was 100-200ngNm-3; thus, a net emission of NH3 was expected given the low ambient concentrations of NH3 observed. Based on our results, however, the NH3 compensation point at this alpine tundra site appears to have been at or below about 20ngNm-3. Large deposition velocities (>2cms-1) were determined for nitrate and ammonium and may result from reactions with surface-derived aerosols. Copyright (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.Micrometeorological measurements and ambient air samples, analyzed for concentrations of NH3, HNO3, NH4+, and NO3-, were collected at an alpine tundra site on Niwot Ridge, Colorado. The measured concentrations were extremely low and ranged between 5 and 70 ng N m-3. Dry deposition fluxes of these atmospheric species were calculated using the micrometeorological gradient method. The calculated mean flux for NH3 indicates a net deposition to the surface and indicates that NH3 contributed significantly to the total N deposition to the tundra during the August-September measurement period. Our pre-measurement estimate of the compensation point for NH3 in air above the tundra was 100-200 ng N m-3; thus, a net emission of NH3 was expected given the low ambient concentrations of NH3 observed. Based on our results, however, the NH3 compensation point at this alpine tundra site appears to

  2. Runoff of acidic substances that originated from atmospheric deposition on Yakushima Island, a world natural heritage site.

    PubMed

    Nagafuchi, O; Kakimoto, H; Ebise, S; Inoue, T; Koga, M

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present monitoring data of stream waters that may reflect acidic impacts on the island as well as the rainwater qualities. The pH ranges of the river water in the Kawara streams in the western part of the island and the Yodogo stream in the central part of the island were 5.71-6.35 and 5.85-6.12 during 1992-1999, respectively. The concentrations of SO4(2-) and NO3- in the river water were lower than those in the rainwater. Many differences were observed among the sampling sites. Higher concentrations of acid substances are found in the stream waters of the western area compared to the other areas. On the other hand, sulfuric acid is the major acid in the rainwater, snow and rime ice. No differences were observed in the ion constituents of the rainwater collected in the areas. These results suggested that the densely growing canopy may play a role in holding air pollutants, and acidic substances deposited on the canopy would be discharged as a through-fall and a stem flow. Furthermore, the water mass containing high ionic substances in the western area has been held in the groundwater layer, continuously supplying the stream waters during dry weather days. On the other hand, part of the basic runoff will be diluted with a surface runoff during the rainy days. As a result, the concentrations of the ionic substances in the stream waters during rainy days decreased.

  3. Groundtruthing and potential for predicting acid deposition impacts in headwater streams using bedrock geology, GIS, angling, and stream chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kirby, C S; McInerney, B; Turner, M D

    2008-04-15

    Atmospheric acid deposition is of environmental concern worldwide, and the determination of impacts in remote areas can be problematic. Rainwater in central Pennsylvania, USA, has a mean pH of approximately 4.4. Bedrock varies dramatically in its ability to neutralize acidity. A GIS database simplified reconnaissance of non-carbonate bedrock streams in the Valley and Ridge Province and identified potentially chronically impacted headwater streams, which were sampled for chemistry and brook trout. Stream sites (n=26) that originate in and flow through the Tuscarora had a median pH of 5.0 that was significantly different from other formations. Shawangunk streams (n=6) and non-Tuscarora streams (n=20) had a median pH of 6.0 and 6.3, respectively. Mean alkalinity for non-Tuscarora streams (2.6 mg/L CaCO(3)) was higher than the mean for Tuscarora streams (0.5 mg/L). Lower pH and alkalinity suggest that the buffering capability of the Tuscarora is inferior to that of adjacent sandstones. Dissolved aluminum concentrations were much higher for Tuscarora streams (0.2 mg/L; approximately the lethal limit for brook trout) than for non-Tuscarora streams (0.03 mg/L) or Shawangunk streams (0.02 mg/L). Hook-and-line methods determined the presence/absence of brook trout in 47 stream reaches with suitable habitat. Brook trout were observed in 21 of 22 non-Tuscarora streams, all 6 Shawangunk streams, and only 9 of 28 Tuscarora stream sites. Carefully-designed hook-and-line sampling can determine the presence or absence of brook trout and help confirm biological impacts of acid deposition. 15% of 334 km of Tuscarora stream lengths are listed as "impaired" due to atmospheric deposition by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. 65% of the 101 km of Tuscarora stream lengths examined in this study were impaired.

  4. Effect of vegetation type on throughfall deposition and seepage flux.

    PubMed

    De Schrijver, A; Staelens, J; Wuyts, K; Van Hoydonck, G; Janssen, N; Mertens, J; Gielis, L; Geudens, G; Augusto, L; Verheyen, K

    2008-05-01

    This paper compares different vegetation types (coniferous and deciduous forest, grassed and pure heathland) in terms of input (throughfall deposition) and output (seepage flux) in a region with intermediate nitrogen load (+/-20kg Nha(-1)y(-1) via bulk precipitation) in comparable conditions in north Belgium. Coniferous forest (two plots Pinus sylvestris and two plots Pinus nigra) received significantly higher nitrogen and sulphur throughfall deposition than deciduous forest and heathland. Grassed and pure heathland had significantly highest throughfall quantities of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), respectively. The observed differences in throughfall deposition between the different vegetation types were not univocally reflected in the ion seepage flux. Considerable seepage fluxes of NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), Ca(2+) and Al(III) were only found under the P. nigra plots. We discuss our hypothesis that the P. nigra forests already evolved to a situation of N saturation, while the other vegetation types did not.

  5. Trends in summer chemistry linked to productivity in lakes recovering from acid deposition in the Adirondack region of New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Momen, B.; Lawrence, G.B.; Nierzwicki-Bauer, S. A.; Sutherland, J.W.; Eichler, L.W.; Harrison, J.P.; Boylen, C.W.

    2006-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Adirondack Effects Assessment Program (AEAP) to evaluate and monitor the status of biological communities in lakes in the Adirondack region of New York that have been adversely affected by acid deposition. This program includes chemical analysis of 30 lakes, sampled two to three times each summer. Results of trends analysis for lake chemistry and chlorophyll a (chlor a) are presented for 1994 to 2003, and a general comparison is made with recent results of the Adirondack Long-Term Monitoring (ALTM) Program, which included chemical analysis of all but two of these lakes (plus an additional 24 lakes) monthly, year-round for 1992-2004. Increases in pH were found in 25 of the 30 AEAP lakes (P < 0.05) and increases in acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) were found in 12 of the 30 lakes (P < 0.05). Concentrations of both SO 42- and Mg 2+ decreased in 11 lakes (P < 0.05), whereas concentrations of NO 3- decreased in 20 lakes (P < 0.05). Concentrations of NH 4+ decreased in 10 lakes at a significance level of P < 0.05 and in three other lakes based on P < 0.1. Concentrations of inorganic and organic monomeric aluminum generally were below the reporting limit of 1.5 ??mol L-1, but decreases were detected in four and five lakes, respectively (P < 0.1). Concentrations of chlor a increased in seven lakes at a significance level of P < 0.05 and two lakes at a significance level of P < 0.1. A significant inverse correlation was also found between chlor a and NO 3- concentrations in nine lakes at a significance level of P < 0.05 and two lakes at a significance level of P < 0.1. Results of AEAP analysis of lake chemistry were similar to those of the ALTM Program, although decreases in SO 42- concentrations were more evident in the year-round ALTM record. Overall, the results suggest (a) a degree of chemical recovery from acidification during the summer, (b) an increase in phytoplankton productivity, and (c) a decreasing trend in

  6. Uric acid deposits and estivation in the invasive apple-snail, Pomacea canaliculata.

    PubMed

    Giraud-Billoud, Maximiliano; Abud, María A; Cueto, Juan A; Vega, Israel A; Castro-Vazquez, Alfredo

    2011-04-01

    The physiological ability to estivate is relevant for the maintenance of population size in the invasive Pomacea canaliculata. However, tissue reoxygenation during arousal from estivation poses the problem of acute oxidative stress. Uric acid is a potent antioxidant in several systems and it is stored in specialized tissues of P. canaliculata. Changes in tissue concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), uric acid and allantoin were measured during estivation and arousal in P. canaliculata. Both TBARS and uric acid increased two-fold during 45 days estivation, probably as a consequence of concomitant oxyradical production during uric acid synthesis by xanthine oxidase. However, after arousal was induced, uric acid and TBARS dropped to or near baseline levels within 20 min and remained low up to 24h after arousal induction, while the urate oxidation product allantoin continuously rose to a maximum at 24h after induction, indicating the participation of uric acid as an antioxidant during reoxygenation. Neither uric acid nor allantoin was detected in the excreta during this 24h period. Urate oxidase activity was also found in organs of active snails, but activity shut down during estivation and only a partial and sustained recovery was observed in the midgut gland.

  7. A Demonstration of Acid Rain and Lake Acidification: Wet Deposition of Sulfur Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Lisa M.

    2003-01-01

    A demonstration showing acid rain and lake acidification is described. In this demonstration, SO2 gas is generated in a large graduated cylinder and then dissolved in water droplets from a simple spray bottle. The droplets carry the acid into simulated lakes, one of which includes solid CaCO3 to mimic limestone's natural buffering capacity.

  8. Contributions of acid deposition and natural processes to cation leaching from forest soils: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.W.; Van Miegroet, H.; Cole, D.W.; Richter, D.D.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of quantifying the roles of atmospheric acid inputs and internal acid generation by carbonic, organic, and nitric acids are illustrated by reviewing data sets from several intensively studied sites in North America. Some of the sites (tropical, Costa Rica (La Selva); temperate deciduous, Tennessee (Walker Branch); and temperate coniferous, Washington (Thompson)) received acid precipitation whereas others (northern, southeast Alaska (Petersburg); and subalpine, Washington Cascades (Findley Lake)) did not. Natural leaching by carbonic acid dominated soil leaching in the tropical and temperate coniferous sites, nitric acid (caused by nitrification) dominated leaching in an N-fixing temperate deciduous site (red alder in Washington), and organic acids dominated surface soil leaching in the subalpine site and contributed to leaching of surface soils in several other sites. Only at the temperate deciduous sites in eastern Tennessee did atmospheric acid input play a major role in soil leaching. In no case, however, are the annual net losses of cations regarded as alarming as compared to soil exchangeable cation capital.

  9. Effects of acidic precipitation on field crops

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.S.; Hendrey, G.R.; Lewin, K.F.; Gmur, N.F.

    1982-02-01

    The effects of acid rain on yields of field-grown soybeans has been investigated. Plants exposed to simulated rainfalls of pH 4.1, 3,3 and 2.7 had decreased seed yields of 10.6, 16.8 and 23.9% below yields of plants exposed to simulated rainfalls of pH 5.6. (ACR)

  10. Effects of chelating agents on oral uptake and renal deposition and excretion of cadmium.

    PubMed Central

    Engström, B

    1984-01-01

    The gastrointestinal absorption, transport, tissue deposition and excretion of cadmium was studied in adult male mice given a single oral LD50 dose of 109Cd-labeled CdCl2 alone or in combination with nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Blood, intestinal mucosa, liver and kidneys were analyzed for 109Cd at different times after exposure and the influence of the chelating agents on Cd binding to metallothionein and other tissue ligands was also studied. Acute toxicity was noted. Complex formation between Cd and EDTA was studied in solutions containing Cd:EDTA at 1:04 and 1:4 molar ratios. Adult male mice were exposed orally or by direct infusion into the stomach to either of the two solutions (containing an LD50 dose of Cd). Body retention and tissue deposition of Cd was recorded after 4 (direct infusion) or 21 days (oral exposure), and the mortality in different exposure groups observed. Adult male were also exposed to a low oral dose of 109Cd-labeled cadmium (0.5 mg/kg), followed by 18 months continuous administration of NTA, (500 ppm) STPP (500 ppm) or EDTA (50 ppm) in the drinking water or the chelating agent in combination with Cd (50 ppm), Cd alone (50 ppm) or deionized water. Whole-body retention of 109Cd, tissue deposition of 109Cd and total Cd and development of proteinuria were observed. When cadmium was given with an excess of EDTA, all Cd ions were bound in a 1:1 Cd-EDTA complex. Decreased acute toxicity was observed which was related to increased body elimination of cadmium. The Cd passes though the body still bound to EDTA and is excreted via the kidneys in this form. Similar results were found in mice exposed to Cd + NTA, while gavage of CD + STPP led to an initially decreased systemic uptake of Cd and thereafter to a prolongation of the biological half-time and thus a comparatively higher body retention of the metal. Cd may form a 2:1 complex with EDTA in the presence of excess cadmium

  11. Evidence for Siliceous Deposits Formed by Acid-Sulfate Alteration at Home Plate in Gusev Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Yen, A. S.; Clark, B. C.; Ruff, S. W.; Graff, T. G.; Arvidson, R. E.; Squyres, S. W.; Science Teams, T.

    2007-12-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit measured three targets on or adjacent to Home Plate in Gusev Crater that have unusually high SiO2 concentrations (68 to 91%), unusually low FeO concentrations (1 to 7%, with total Fe as FeO), and unusually high TiO2/FeO ratios (0.2 to 1.2 by weight). Two targets are high albedo soil (Gertrude Weise) exposed by the rover wheels (Kenosha Comets and Lefty Ganote), and one target is a rock (Fuzzy Smith). Kenosha Comets has the highest SiO2 concentration, lowest FeO concentration, and highest TiO2/FeO ratio. Mineralogical evidence from the MER Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) suggests that high proportions of amorphous (non- crystalline) SiO2 account for the high SiO2 concentration of Gertrude Weise. Mini-TES data were not acquired for Fuzzy Smith. The spectral evidence for amorphous SiO2 includes deep emissivity minima near 9 and 21 microns. Amorphous SiO2 is typically characterized by a shoulder near 8 microns, but the Gertrude Weise spectra are instead characterized by a well-defined emissivity minimum. The difference is attributed to scattering and/or geometric effects. The chemistry of Gertrude Weise and Fuzzy Smith is very similar to that for a tholeiitic basaltic rock altered under acid-sulfate conditions in a fumarolic (hydrothermal) environment on Kilauea Volcano (Hawaii). The terrestrial acid sulfate alteration resulted in compositions having about 62 to 91% SiO2, 1 to 8% FeO, and 0.3 to 5 TiO2/FeO. The SiO2 and TiO2 are passively enriched while all other major elements are removed by leaching. XRD analysis shows that SiO2 and TiO2 are present as amorphous SiO2 (opal-A) and anatase, respectively. Alunite is also present. Thermal emission spectra of the Kilauea rock obtained from its exterior surface and from 500-1000 micron and <150 micron powders derived by grinding and sieving are all characterized by the emissivity features at 8, 9, and 21

  12. Effects of Al Doping on the Properties of ZnO Thin Films Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Chen-Hui; Zhang, Rong-Jun; Chen, Xin; Zheng, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Song-You; Liu, Juan; Dai, Ning; Chen, Liang-Yao

    2016-12-01

    The tuning of structural, optical, and electrical properties of Al-doped ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition technique is reported in this work. With the increasing Al doping level, the evolution from (002) to (100) diffraction peaks indicates the change in growth mode of ZnO films. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been applied to study the thickness, optical constants, and band gap of AZO films. Due to the increasing carrier concentration after Al doping, a blue shift of band gap and absorption edge can be observed, which can be interpreted by Burstein-Moss effect. The carrier concentration and resistivity are found to vary significantly among different doping concentration, and the optimum value is also discussed. The modulations and improvements of properties are important for Al-doped ZnO films to apply as transparent conductor in various applications.

  13. Effects of Al Doping on the Properties of ZnO Thin Films Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Chen-Hui; Zhang, Rong-Jun; Chen, Xin; Zheng, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Song-You; Liu, Juan; Dai, Ning; Chen, Liang-Yao

    2016-09-01

    The tuning of structural, optical, and electrical properties of Al-doped ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition technique is reported in this work. With the increasing Al doping level, the evolution from (002) to (100) diffraction peaks indicates the change in growth mode of ZnO films. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been applied to study the thickness, optical constants, and band gap of AZO films. Due to the increasing carrier concentration after Al doping, a blue shift of band gap and absorption edge can be observed, which can be interpreted by Burstein-Moss effect. The carrier concentration and resistivity are found to vary significantly among different doping concentration, and the optimum value is also discussed. The modulations and improvements of properties are important for Al-doped ZnO films to apply as transparent conductor in various applications.

  14. Effects of Al Doping on the Properties of ZnO Thin Films Deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Chen-Hui; Zhang, Rong-Jun; Chen, Xin; Zheng, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Song-You; Liu, Juan; Dai, Ning; Chen, Liang-Yao

    2016-12-01

    The tuning of structural, optical, and electrical properties of Al-doped ZnO films deposited by atomic layer deposition technique is reported in this work. With the increasing Al doping level, the evolution from (002) to (100) diffraction peaks indicates the change in growth mode of ZnO films. Spectroscopic ellipsometry has been applied to study the thickness, optical constants, and band gap of AZO films. Due to the increasing carrier concentration after Al doping, a blue shift of band gap and absorption edge can be observed, which can be interpreted by Burstein-Moss effect. The carrier concentration and resistivity are found to vary significantly among different doping concentration, and the optimum value is also discussed. The modulations and improvements of properties are important for Al-doped ZnO films to apply as transparent conductor in various applications. PMID:27639580

  15. Effects of acid rain on crops and trees

    SciTech Connect

    Cowling, E.B.; Dochinger, L.S.

    1984-01-01

    A general treatment of the subject of acid rain and its effets are discussed along with sources of acid rain and its near-term (the last couple of decades). The effects of acid rain on terrestrial ecosystems are treated in some detail. Some treatment is given of the ecosystem-level effects of acid precipitation.

  16. Map scale effects on estimating the number of undiscovered mineral deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.; Menzie, W.D.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of numbers of undiscovered mineral deposits, fundamental to assessing mineral resources, are affected by map scale. Where consistently defined deposits of a particular type are estimated, spatial and frequency distributions of deposits are linked in that some frequency distributions can be generated by processes randomly in space whereas others are generated by processes suggesting clustering in space. Possible spatial distributions of mineral deposits and their related frequency distributions are affected by map scale and associated inclusions of non-permissive or covered geological settings. More generalized map scales are more likely to cause inclusion of geologic settings that are not really permissive for the deposit type, or that include unreported cover over permissive areas, resulting in the appearance of deposit clustering. Thus, overly generalized map scales can cause deposits to appear clustered. We propose a model that captures the effects of map scale and the related inclusion of non-permissive geologic settings on numbers of deposits estimates, the zero-inflated Poisson distribution. Effects of map scale as represented by the zero-inflated Poisson distribution suggest that the appearance of deposit clustering should diminish as mapping becomes more detailed because the number of inflated zeros would decrease with more detailed maps. Based on observed worldwide relationships between map scale and areas permissive for deposit types, mapping at a scale with twice the detail should cut permissive area size of a porphyry copper tract to 29% and a volcanic-hosted massive sulfide tract to 50% of their original sizes. Thus some direct benefits of mapping an area at a more detailed scale are indicated by significant reductions in areas permissive for deposit types, increased deposit density and, as a consequence, reduced uncertainty in the estimate of number of undiscovered deposits. Exploration enterprises benefit from reduced areas requiring

  17. Response of drinking-water reservoir ecosystems to decreased acidic atmospheric deposition in SE Germany: trends of chemical reversal.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Kai-Uwe; Paul, Lothar; Meybohm, Andreas

    2006-05-01

    This study evaluates chemical trends of seven acidified reservoirs and 22 tributaries in the Erzgebirge from 1993 to 2003. About 85% of these waters showed significantly (p < 0.05) declining concentrations of protons (-69%), nitrate (-41%), sulfate (-27%), and reactive aluminum (-50% on average). This reversal is attributed to the intense reduction of industrial SO2 and NOx emissions from formerly high levels, which declined by 99% and 82% in the German-Czech border region between 1993 and 1999. The deposition rates of protons and sulfur decreased by 70-90%. Since 1993, the dry deposition of total inorganic nitrogen diminished to a minor degree, but the wet deposition remained unchanged. The surface waters reflect a substantial decrease in Al exchange processes, a release of sulfur previously stored in soils, and an uptake of nitrate by forest vegetation. The latter effect may be supported by soil protection liming which contributed to the chemical reversal in almost 20% of the study waters.

  18. Acid deposition: State of science and technology. Summary report of the U. S. National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program

    SciTech Connect

    Irving, P.M.; Smith, E.

    1991-09-01

    The twenty-seven State-of-Science and State-of-Technology (SOS/T) Reports, published in 1990 as the definitive scientific and technical synthesis of information obtained during the first decade of the U.S. national Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP), are summarized in the document. In most cases, these summaries were the final chapter of the complete SOS/T Report.

  19. Cost-Effective Systems for Atomic Layer Deposition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubitz, Michael; Medina, Phillip A., IV; Antic, Aleks; Rosin, Joseph T.; Fahlman, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we describe the design and testing of two different home-built atomic layer deposition (ALD) systems for the growth of thin films with sub-monolayer control over film thickness. The first reactor is a horizontally aligned hot-walled reactor with a vacuum purging system. The second reactor is a vertically aligned cold-walled reactor with a…

  20. Jet fuel deposition and oxidation: Dilution, materials, oxygen, and temperature effects

    SciTech Connect

    Zabarnick, S.; Zelesnik, P.; Grinstead, R.R.

    1996-04-01

    Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and pressure measurements are used for determination of jet fuel thermal stability in a batch reactor. The QCM is able to monitor extremely small amounts of deposition in situ, while the pressure measurements provide qualitative data on the oxidation process. The dependence of the deposition amount was monitored as a function of the oxygen availability for two fuels. Also, the effect of QCM electrode materials was investigated. Deposition and oxidation were compared for the following electrode materials: gold, aluminum, silver, and platinum. The authors also studied the effect of dilution on oxidation and deposition. Jet fuel was diluted with increasing amounts of hydrocarbon solvent. It was observed that this dilution procedure can help characterize a fuel`s effective antioxidant concentration. Fuel dilution is also shown to be a good technique for improving thermal stability characteristics of poor fuels. Additionally they have studied the temperature effect on deposition for two fuels over the range 140 to 180 C.